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Sample records for alkali doped swnt

  1. Optical properties and electronic structure of alkali doped SWNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemes, Norbert M.; Fischer, John E.; Kamarás, Katalin; Borondics, Ferenc; Tanner, David B.; Rinzler, Andrew G.

    2003-03-01

    Alkali doped SWNT exhibit colors similar to alkali doped graphite (GIC). We study their electronic structure with IR reflectivity; the alkali dopants donate their valence electron to the SWNT host, so the free carrier concentration increases, shifting the Drude-edge into the visible spectral range. This is accompanied by a large shift of the Fermi-level, so the characteristic transitions between the 1D van Hove singularities of the undoped SWNT diminish. The presence of the alkali ions around the SWNT breaks the translational symmetry and increases coupling between parallel tubes within ropes. The momentum relaxation time shortens as the ropes become more three dimensional; alkali disorder contributes to the scattering. In p-type, HNO3 doped SWNT, the charge transfer is smaller; only the first subband of the semiconducting tubes gets depleted, shown by the disappearance of the first van Hove transition. This indicates a Fermi-level shift of ˜0.3 eV. The reflectivity has structure at low energy, which moves the Drude-peak to a sharp, intense peak at 0.1 eV in the optical conductivity, reminiscent of quasi-1D TTF-TCNQ.

  2. Structural and electronic properties of alkali-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemes, Norbert Marcel

    In this thesis, we study the properties of alkali doped single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). SWNT are crystallized into ropes, which display the one-dimensional electronic properties of the constituent nanotubes. Using x-ray diffraction, we show that the alkali atoms invade the channels in the triangular rope lattice and determine the structure of the doped ropes. We show that the diffraction profile of the doped SWNT is best described by a model where the alkali ions surround each tube in an ordered fashion by dilating the channels. Alkali doped SWNT exhibit colors similar to alkali doped graphite (GIC). We study their electronic structure with IR reflectivity; the alkali dopants donate their valence electron to the SWNT host, so the free carrier concentration increases, shifting the Drude-edge into the visible spectral range. This is accompanied by a large shift of the Fermi-level, so the characteristic transitions between the 1D van Hove singularities of the undoped SWNT diminish. The presence of the alkali ions around the SWNT breaks the translational symmetry and increases coupling between parallel tubes within ropes. We find that the momentum relaxation time shortens as the ropes become more three dimensional. We also find that alkali disorder contributes to the scattering. In p-type, HNO3 doped SWNT, the charge transfer is smaller; only the first subband of the semiconducting tubes gets depleted, shown by the disappearance of the first van Hove transition. This indicates a Fermi-level shift of ˜0.3 eV. The reflectivity has structure at low energy, which moves the Drude-peak to a sharp, intense peak at 0.1 eV in the optical conductivity, reminiscent of quasi-1D TTF-TCNQ. The DC conductivity also increases ˜80-fold during doping. The low temperature divergence of undoped SWNT disappears in alkali doped SWNT. However, we find that oxygen can modulate the low-T divergence. After outgassing, the divergence becomes ˜10 times stronger. We interpret the low

  3. Photoluminescence intensity enhancement in SWNT aqueous suspensions due to reducing agent doping: Influence of adsorbed biopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnosov, N. V.; Leontiev, V. S.; Linnik, A. S.; Lytvyn, O. S.; Karachevtsev, V. A.

    2014-06-01

    The influence of biopolymer wrapped around nanotube on the enhancement of the semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) photoluminescence (PL) in aqueous suspension which increases due to the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) doping effect was revealed. The greatest enhancement of PL was observed for SWNTs covered with double- or single stranded DNA (above 170%) and DTT weak influence was revealed for SWNTs:polyC suspension (∼45%). The magnitude of the PL enhancement depends also on nanotube chirality and sample aging. The behavior of PL from SWNTs covered with various polymers is explained by the different biopolymers ordering on the nanotube surface. The ordered polymer conformation on the nanotube weakens the reducing agent doping effect. The method of reducing agent doping of nanotube:biopolymer aqueous suspension can serve as a sensitive luminescent probe of the biopolymer ordering on the carbon nanotube and can be used to increase the sensitivity of luminescent biosensors.

  4. Superconductivity in alkali-doped C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Arthur P.

    2015-07-01

    Superconductivity in alkali-doped C60 (A3C60, A = an alkali atom) is well described by an s-wave state produced by phonon mediated pairing. Moderate coupling of electrons to high-frequency shape-changing intra-molecular vibrational modes produces transition temperatures (Tc) up to 33 K in single-phase material. The good understanding of pairing in A3C60 offers a paradigm for the development of new superconducting materials.

  5. Unconventional Superconductivity of Alkali-doped Fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potocnik, Anton; Krajnc, Andraz; Jeglic, Peter; Prassides, Kosmas; Rosseinsky, Matthew J.; Arcon, Denis

    2014-03-01

    The superconductivity of the alkali-doped fullerenes (A3C60, A = alkali metal) has been so far discussed within the standard theory of superconductivity developed by Bardeen, Cooper and Shrieffer (BCS), even thought, they exhibit relatively high critical temperatures (up to Tc = 32 K). However, after our recent high-pressure measurements on Cs3C60 such description became questionable. We have shown that the superconducting phase of A3C60, in fact, borders the antiferromagnetic insulating phase (AFI), commonly observed for high-temperature superconductors like cuprates or pnictides. In addition, we also increased the maximal Tc to 38 K. To investigate this peculiar superconductivity close to the border with AFI state we employed nuclear magnetic resonance technique on Cs3-xRbxC60 and on Cs3C60 at various high pressures. Our results could not be correctly explained either by the standard BCS or the extended BCS that includes electron-electron repulsion interaction - the Migdal-Eliashberg theory. Far better agreement is obtained by the Dynamical Mean Field Theory. Due to similarity with other unconventional superconductors these results could also be relevant to other unconventional high-temperature superconductors.

  6. Superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerene nanowhiskers.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Toshio; Hirata, Chika; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Miyazawa, Kun'ichi; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2016-09-01

    Superconductivity in alkali metal-doped fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs) was observed in K3.3C60NWs, Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs with transition temperatures at 17, 25 and 26 K, respectively. Almost full shielding volume fraction (~80%) was observed in K3.3C60NWs when subjected to thermal treatment at 200 °C for a duration of 24 h. In contrast, the shielding fraction of Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs were calculated to be 8% and 6%, respectively. Here we report on an extensive investigation of the superconducting properties of these AC60NWs (A  =  K3.3, Rb3.0 and Cs2.0Rb1.0). These properties are compared to the ones reported on the corresponding conventional (single-crystal or powder) K-doped fullerene. We also evaluated the critical current densities of these C60NWs using the Bean model under an applied magnetic field up to 50 kOe. PMID:27385220

  7. Superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerene nanowhiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Toshio; Hirata, Chika; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Miyazawa, Kun’ichi; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2016-09-01

    Superconductivity in alkali metal-doped fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs) was observed in K3.3C60NWs, Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs with transition temperatures at 17, 25 and 26 K, respectively. Almost full shielding volume fraction (~80%) was observed in K3.3C60NWs when subjected to thermal treatment at 200 °C for a duration of 24 h. In contrast, the shielding fraction of Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs were calculated to be 8% and 6%, respectively. Here we report on an extensive investigation of the superconducting properties of these AC60NWs (A  =  K3.3, Rb3.0 and Cs2.0Rb1.0). These properties are compared to the ones reported on the corresponding conventional (single-crystal or powder) K-doped fullerene. We also evaluated the critical current densities of these C60NWs using the Bean model under an applied magnetic field up to 50 kOe.

  8. Superconductivity above 30 K in alkali-metal-doped hydrocarbon

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mianqi; Cao, Tingbing; Wang, Duming; Wu, Yue; Yang, Huaixin; Dong, Xiaoli; He, Junbao; Li, Fengwang; Chen, G. F.

    2012-01-01

    The recent discovery of superconductivity with a transition temperature (Tc) at 18 K in Kxpicene has extended the possibility of high-Tc superconductors in organic materials. Previous experience based on similar hydrocarbons, like alkali-metal doped phenanthrene, suggested that even higher transition temperatures might be achieved in alkali-metals or alkali-earth-metals doped such polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbons (PAHs), a large family of molecules composed of fused benzene rings. Here we report the discovery of high-Tc superconductivity at 33 K in K-doped 1,2:8,9-dibenzopentacene (C30H18). To our best knowledge, it is higher than any Tc reported previously for an organic superconductor under ambient pressure. This finding provides an indication that superconductivity at much higher temperature may be possible in such PAHs system and is worthy of further exploration. PMID:22548129

  9. Acid and alkali doped PBI electrolyte in electrochemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Baozhong

    In this work the conductivity of blank PBI membrane, acid doped PBI and alkaline doped PBI was systematically studied. A new methodology for sorption kinetics study in electrolyte solution has been established by monitoring the conductivity change during the sorption process. The model of the doping process and mechanism of conductivity are proposed. The performance of PBI (doped under optimum conditions) in fuel cell as PEM was evaluated. The experimental results show that the blank PBI in acid solution is an ionic insulator. It clarified the long time confusion in this area. The acid doped PBI membrane is an ionic conductor. The conductivity increases with the concentration of the acid solution. In high concentration acid solution, the conductivity increases with the type of acid in the order: H2SO 4 > H3PO4 > HClO4 > HNO3 > HCl. The kinetics of the doping process was studied, by a continuous method. The ionic conductivity mechanism was established. The PBI membranes doped with H2SO4 and H3PO4 exhibit better performance than NafionRTM. The doped FBI has more resistance to CO poison. 3% CO in H2 has little effect on the H3PO 4 doped PBI membrane at 185°C. The conductivity of the alkali doped PBI membrane changes with the concentration of the alkaline solution and the type of the alkalis. The conductivity has a maximum in KOH and NaOH solution. The maximum conductivity in KOH is higher than in NaOH and LiOH. It is about 5 times of that of NafionRTM in alkaline solution. The two-step sorption process in alkaline solution was observed. The first step is the permeation process of the alkalis in the PBI membrane. The permeation is the results of diffusion and interaction. It is concluded that the permeation process is controlled by the rate of interaction between the alkali and PBI molecule. The second step is the relaxation process in the membrane. This step contributes more to the conductivity for the membrane than the first step. The ionic conductivity mechanism

  10. High capacity nickel battery material doped with alkali metal cations

    DOEpatents

    Jackovitz, John F.; Pantier, Earl A.

    1982-05-18

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  11. Alkali-Doped Lithium Orthosilicate Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinwei; Liu, Wenqiang; Sun, Jian; Hu, Yingchao; Wang, Wenyu; Chen, Hongqiang; Zhang, Yang; Li, Xian; Xu, Minghou

    2016-09-01

    New alkali-doped (Na2 CO3 and K2 CO3 ) Li4 SiO4 sorbents with excellent performance at low CO2 concentrations were synthesized. We speculate that alkali doping breaks the orderly arrangement of the Li4 SiO4 crystals, hence increasing its specific surface area and the number of pores. It was shown that 10 wt % Na2 CO3 and 5 wt % K2 CO3 are the optimal additive ratios for doped sorbents to attain the highest conversions. Moreover, under 15 vol % CO2 , the doped sorbents present clearly faster absorption rates and exhibit stable cyclic durability with impressive conversions of about 90 %, at least 20 % higher than that of non-doped Li4 SiO4 . The attained conversions are also 10 % higher than the reported highest conversion of 80 % on doped Li4 SiO4 . The performance of Li4 SiO4 is believed to be enhanced by the eutectic melt, and it is the first time that the existence of eutectic Li/Na or Li/K carbonate on doped sorbents when absorbing CO2 at high temperature is confirmed; this was done using systematical analysis combining differential scanning calorimetry with in situ powder X-ray diffraction. PMID:27531239

  12. Transport properties of alkali metal doped fullerides

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Daluram Yadav, Nishchhal

    2015-07-31

    We have studied the intercage interactions between the adjacent C{sub 60} cages and expansion of lattice due to the intercalation of alkali atoms based on the spring model to estimate phonon frequencies from the dynamical matrix for the intermolecular alkali-C{sub 60} phonons. We considered a two-peak model for the phonon density of states to investigate the nature of electron pairing mechanism for superconducting state in fullerides. Coulomb repulsive parameter and the electron phonon coupling strength are obtained within the random phase approximation. Transition temperature, T{sub c}, is obtained in a situation when the free electrons in lowest molecular orbital are coupled with alkali-C{sub 60} phonons as 5 K, which is much lower as compared to reported T{sub c} (20 K). The superconducting pairing is mainly driven by the high frequency intramolecular phonons and their effects enhance it to 22 K. The importance of the present study, the pressure effect and normal state transport properties are calculated within the same model leading superconductivity.

  13. Transport properties of alkali metal doped fullerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Daluram; Yadav, Nishchhal

    2015-07-01

    We have studied the intercage interactions between the adjacent C60 cages and expansion of lattice due to the intercalation of alkali atoms based on the spring model to estimate phonon frequencies from the dynamical matrix for the intermolecular alkali-C60 phonons. We considered a two-peak model for the phonon density of states to investigate the nature of electron pairing mechanism for superconducting state in fullerides. Coulomb repulsive parameter and the electron phonon coupling strength are obtained within the random phase approximation. Transition temperature, Tc, is obtained in a situation when the free electrons in lowest molecular orbital are coupled with alkali-C60 phonons as 5 K, which is much lower as compared to reported Tc (20 K). The superconducting pairing is mainly driven by the high frequency intramolecular phonons and their effects enhance it to 22 K. The importance of the present study, the pressure effect and normal state transport properties are calculated within the same model leading superconductivity.

  14. Exotic s-wave superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yusuke; Sakai, Shiro; Capone, Massimo; Arita, Ryotaro

    2016-04-01

    Alkali-doped fullerides ({{A}3}{{\\text{C}}60} with A  =  K, Rb, Cs) show a surprising phase diagram, in which a high transition-temperature ({{T}\\text{c}} ) s-wave superconducting state emerges next to a Mott insulating phase as a function of the lattice spacing. This is in contrast with the common belief that Mott physics and phonon-driven s-wave superconductivity are incompatible, raising a fundamental question on the mechanism of the high-{{T}\\text{c}} superconductivity. This article reviews recent ab initio calculations, which have succeeded in reproducing comprehensively the experimental phase diagram with high accuracy and elucidated an unusual cooperation between the electron-phonon coupling and the electron-electron interactions leading to Mott localization to realize an unconventional s-wave superconductivity in the alkali-doped fullerides. A driving force behind the exotic physics is unusual intramolecular interactions, characterized by the coexistence of a strongly repulsive Coulomb interaction and a small effectively negative exchange interaction. This is realized by a subtle energy balance between the coupling with the Jahn-Teller phonons and Hund’s coupling within the {{\\text{C}}60} molecule. The unusual form of the interaction leads to a formation of pairs of up- and down-spin electrons on the molecules, which enables the s-wave pairing. The emergent superconductivity crucially relies on the presence of the Jahn-Teller phonons, but surprisingly benefits from the strong correlations because the correlations suppress the kinetic energy of the electrons and help the formation of the electron pairs, in agreement with previous model calculations. This confirms that the alkali-doped fullerides are a new type of unconventional superconductors, where the unusual synergy between the phonons and Coulomb interactions drives the high-{{T}\\text{c}} superconductivity.

  15. Exotic s-wave superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerides.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yusuke; Sakai, Shiro; Capone, Massimo; Arita, Ryotaro

    2016-04-20

    Alkali-doped fullerides (A3C60 with A = K, Rb, Cs) show a surprising phase diagram, in which a high transition-temperature (Tc) s-wave superconducting state emerges next to a Mott insulating phase as a function of the lattice spacing. This is in contrast with the common belief that Mott physics and phonon-driven s-wave superconductivity are incompatible, raising a fundamental question on the mechanism of the high-Tc superconductivity. This article reviews recent ab initio calculations, which have succeeded in reproducing comprehensively the experimental phase diagram with high accuracy and elucidated an unusual cooperation between the electron-phonon coupling and the electron-electron interactions leading to Mott localization to realize an unconventional s-wave superconductivity in the alkali-doped fullerides. A driving force behind the exotic physics is unusual intramolecular interactions, characterized by the coexistence of a strongly repulsive Coulomb interaction and a small effectively negative exchange interaction. This is realized by a subtle energy balance between the coupling with the Jahn-Teller phonons and Hund's coupling within the C60 molecule. The unusual form of the interaction leads to a formation of pairs of up- and down-spin electrons on the molecules, which enables the s-wave pairing. The emergent superconductivity crucially relies on the presence of the Jahn-Teller phonons, but surprisingly benefits from the strong correlations because the correlations suppress the kinetic energy of the electrons and help the formation of the electron pairs, in agreement with previous model calculations. This confirms that the alkali-doped fullerides are a new type of unconventional superconductors, where the unusual synergy between the phonons and Coulomb interactions drives the high-Tc superconductivity. PMID:26974650

  16. Charge oscillations and structure for alkali-metal-doped polyacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baughman, R. H.; Murthy, N. S.; Eckhardt, H.; Kertesz, M.

    1992-11-01

    predictions for oligomers, and good agreement is obtained between calculated and observed x-ray photoelectron spectra for sodium-doped polyacetylene. Emphasis is placed on the results of crystallographic studies of alkali-metal-doped polyacetylene and on the relationship between the experimentally derived symmetry breaking in interchain packing and the molecular symmetry breaking predicted by theory. Since presently available experimental data are insufficient for complete determination of structure, the present theoretical results can be useful for refinements in the interpretation of these data, as well as for refined crystal-packing calculations.

  17. Spectroscopic investigations of Nd(3+)-doped alkali chloroborophosphate glasses.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, L R; Rao, T S; Jayasimhadri, M; Radhapathy, A; Murthy, D V R

    2004-09-01

    Optical absorption spectra were studied in wavelength region 400-900 nm for the Nd(3+)-doped alkali (R = Li, Na and K) chloroborophosphate glasses at room temperature. The energy level scheme of the 4f(3) electron configuration was deduced from the observed energy level data using a parametrized Hamiltonian (H(F1)) model which includes 20 free-ion interaction parameters. Reasonable correlation was obtained between the experimental and calculated energy levels. The Judd-Ofelt model for the intensity analysis of induced electric dipole transitions has been applied to the measured oscillator strengths of the absorption bands to determine the three phenomenological intensity parameters Omega(2), Omega(4) and Omega(6) for each glass. Using these parameters, the total radiative transition rates (A(T)), non-radiative relaxation rates (W(NR)), branching ratios (beta(R)), integrated cross-sections for the stimulated emission (Sigma), excited state emission intensities (f(ESE)) and excited state absorption intensities (f(ESA)) have been theoretically calculated for certain excited Nd(3+) fluorescent levels. From the results obtained, the conclusion is made about the possibility of using these glasses as laser media. PMID:15294227

  18. Polybenzimidazole membranes for direct methanol fuel cell: Acid-doped or alkali-doped?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long-Yun; Yu, Bor-Chern; Shih, Chao-Ming; Lue, Shingjiang Jessie

    2015-08-01

    Polybenzimidazole (PBI) films immersed in 2 M phosphoric acid (H3PO4) or 6 M potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution form electrolytes for conducting proton or hydroxide, respectively. A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) with the alkali-KOH doped PBI gives 117.9 mW cm-2 of power output which is more than 2 times greater than the power density of 46.5 mW cm-2 with the H3PO4-doped PBI (vs.) when both of the DMFCs use a micro porous layer (MPL) in a gas-fed cathode and a MPL-free anode and are operated at 90 °C. When the MPL-free anode and cathode are used and the fuel flow rate is tripled, the peak power density of alkaline DMFC reaches 158.9 mW cm-2.

  19. Theoretical study on the adsorption of carbon dioxide on individual and alkali-metal doped MOF-5s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Nguyen Thi Thu; Lefedova, O. V.; Ha, Nguyen Ngoc

    2016-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to investigate the adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) on metal-organic framework (MOF-5) and alkali-metal (Li, K, Na) doped MOF-5s. The adsorption energy calculation showed that metal atom adsorption is exothermic in MOF-5 system. Moreover, alkali-metal doping can significantly improve the adsorption ability of carbon dioxide on MOF-5. The best influence is observed for Li-doping.

  20. Well-ordered monolayers of alkali-doped coronene and picene: Molecular arrangements and electronic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, M.; Endo, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Okada, R.; Yamada, Y. Sasaki, M.

    2014-07-21

    Adsorptions of alkali metals (such as K and Li) on monolayers of coronene and picene realize the formation of ordered phases, which serve as well-defined model systems for metal-intercalated aromatic superconductors. Upon alkali-doping of the monolayers of coronene and picene, scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed the rearrangement of the entire molecular layer. The K-induced reconstruction of both monolayers resulted in the formation of a structure with a herringbone-like arrangement of molecules, suggesting the intercalation of alkali metals between molecular planes. Upon reconstruction, a shift in both the vacuum level and core levels of coronene was observed as a result of a charge transfer from alkali metals to coronene. In addition, a new density of states near the Fermi level was formed in both the doped coronene and the doped picene monolayers. This characteristic electronic feature of the ordered monolayer has been also reported in the multilayer picene films, ensuring that the present monolayer can model the properties of the metal-intercalated aromatic hydrocarbons. It is suggested that the electronic structure near the Fermi level is sensitive to the molecular arrangement, and that both the strict control and determinations of the molecular structure in the doped phase should be important for the determination of the electronic structure of these materials.

  1. A hexagonal structure for alkali-metal doped poly (p-phenylene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, N. S.; Baughman, R. H.; Shacklette, L. W.; Fark, H.; Fink, J.

    1991-05-01

    An hexagonal structure (space group p overline62m, a = 8.6 Å) is proposed for sodium-doped poly(p-phenylene), PPP. The diffraction pattern calculated using only one freely adjustable parameter (the distance between the alkali-metal column and the polymer backbone) is in good agreement with the observed electron diffraction patterns. A similar structure ( a = 9.2 Å) is also suggested by diffraction data for potassium-doped PPP. This hexagonal structure is analogous to that reported for sodium-doped poly(p-phenylene vinylene), lithium-doped polyacetylene, and sodium-doped polyacetylene. The three chain per column arrangement provides a fundamental structural motif which maximizes the coordination of the negatively charged carbon atoms with both the alkali metal ions and the hydrogens, and maximizes interchain, intercolumn, and hydrogen to alkali-metal separations. The size of the dopant-ion relative to the cross-sectional dimensions of the host polymer determines whether the dopant-ion columns are formed in triangular (three chain per column) or tetragonal (four chain per column) channels.

  2. Evaluation of the physi- and chemisorption of hydrogen in alkali (Na, Li) doped fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Patrick A.; Teprovich, Jr., Jospeph A.; Compton, Robert N.; Schwartz, Viviane; Veith, Gabriel M.; Zidan, Ragiay

    2015-01-11

    Here, alkali doped fullerenes synthesized by two different solvent assisted mixing techniques are compared for their hydrogen uptake activity. In this study we investigated the interaction of hydrogen with alkali doped fullerenes via physisorption. In addition, we present the first mass spectrometric evidence for the formation of C60H60 via chemisorption. Hydrogen physisorption isotherms up to 1 atm at temperatures ranging from 77-303 K were measured demonstrating an increase in hydrogen uptake versus pure C60 and increased isosteric heats of adsorption for the lithium doped fullerene Li12C60. However, despite these improvements the low amount of physisorbed hydrogen at 1 atm and 77 K in these materials suggests that fullerenes do not possess enough accessible surface area to effectively store hydrogen due to their close packed crystalline nature.

  3. Evaluation of the physi- and chemisorption of hydrogen in alkali (Na, Li) doped fullerenes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ward, Patrick A.; Teprovich, Jr., Jospeph A.; Compton, Robert N.; Schwartz, Viviane; Veith, Gabriel M.; Zidan, Ragiay

    2015-01-11

    Here, alkali doped fullerenes synthesized by two different solvent assisted mixing techniques are compared for their hydrogen uptake activity. In this study we investigated the interaction of hydrogen with alkali doped fullerenes via physisorption. In addition, we present the first mass spectrometric evidence for the formation of C60H60 via chemisorption. Hydrogen physisorption isotherms up to 1 atm at temperatures ranging from 77-303 K were measured demonstrating an increase in hydrogen uptake versus pure C60 and increased isosteric heats of adsorption for the lithium doped fullerene Li12C60. However, despite these improvements the low amount of physisorbed hydrogen at 1 atm andmore » 77 K in these materials suggests that fullerenes do not possess enough accessible surface area to effectively store hydrogen due to their close packed crystalline nature.« less

  4. Conducting films of C60 and C70 by alkali-metal doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddon, R. C.; Hebard, A. F.; Rosseinsky, M. J.; Murphy, D. W.; Duclos, S. J.

    1991-03-01

    The preparation is reported of alkali-metal-doped films of C60 and C70 which have electrical conductivities at room temperature comparable to those attained by n-type doped polyacetylene. The highest conductivities observed in the doped films are: 4 S/cm (Cs/C60), 100 (Rb/C60), 500 (K/C60), 20 (Na/C60), 10 (Li/C60), 2 (K/C70). The doping process is reversed on exposure of the films to the atmosphere. At high doping level, the films become more resistive. The conductivity induced in these films is attributed to the formation of energy bands from the pi orbitals of C60 or C70, which become partially filled with carriers on doping. The smaller alkali metal ions should be able to fit into the interstices in the lattice without disrupting the network of contacts between the carbon spheroids. In the case of C60, this would allow the development of an isotropic band structure, and it is proposed that these materials may constitute the first three-dimensional 'organic' conductors.

  5. First-principles study of d0 ferromagnetism in alkali-metal doped GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong

    2016-08-01

    The d0 ferromagnetism in GaN has been studied based on density functional theory. Our results show that GaN with sufficient hole become spin-polarized. Alkali-metal doping can introduce holes in GaN. Among them, both of Li- and Na-doping induce ferromagnetism in GaN and Na-doped GaN behaves as half-metallic ferromagnet. Moreover, at a growth temperature of 2000 K under N-rich condition, both concentrations can exceed 18%, which is sufficient to produce detectable macroscopic magnetism in GaN. The Curie temperature of Li- and Na-doped GaN is estimated to be 304 and 740 K, respectively, which are well above room temperature.

  6. Stability of alkali-metal hydrides: effects of n-type doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olea Amezcua, Monica Araceli; de La Peña Seaman, Omar; Rivas Silva, Juan Francisco; Heid, Rolf; Bohnen, Klaus-Peter

    Metal hydrides could be considered ideal solid-state hydrogen storage systems, they have light weight and high hydrogen volumetric densities, but the hydrogen desorption process requires excessively high temperatures due to their high stability. Efforts have been performed to improve their dehydrogenation properties, based on the introduction of defects, impurities and doping. We present a systematic study of the n-type (electronic) doping effects on the stability of two alkali-metal hydrides: Na1-xMgxH and Li1-xBexH. These systems have been studied within the framework of density functional perturbation theory, using a mixed-basis pseudopotential method and the self-consistent version of the virtual crystal approximation to model the doping. The full-phonon dispersions are analyzed for several doping content, paying special attention to the crystal stability. It is found a doping content threshold for each system, where they are close to dynamical instabilities, which are related to charge redistribution in interstitial zones. Applying the quasiharmonic approximation, the vibrational free energy, the linear thermal expansion and heat capacities are obtained for both hydrides systems and are analyzed as a function of the doping content. This work is partially supported by the VIEP-BUAP 2016 and CONACYT-México (No.221807) projects.

  7. Pressure studies of alkali, alkaline earth and rare earth doped C{sub 60} superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Schirber, J.E.; Bayless, W.R.; Kortan, A.R.; Ozdas, E.; Zhou, O.; Murphy, D.; Fischer, J.E.

    1994-06-01

    Pressure studies of the superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} of the alkali metal doped C{sub 60} compounds helped to establish a universal curve of T{sub c} versus lattice constant upon which nearly all of these materials lie. Various theoretical schemes incorporate this finding and suggest that only the lattice parameter and not the details of the dopant determine T{sub c}. Ca{sub 5}C{sub 60}, the highest T{sub c} member of the alkaline earth doped C{sub 60} superconductor has a T{sub c} which lies on this universal curve so this material, from these considerations, should have the same large negative pressure derivative as the alkali doped superconductors. We have measured dT{sub c}/dP for Ca{sub 5}C{sub 60} and for Yb{sub x}C{sub 60} (x near 3) and find small and positive values indicating that the theoretical models must be expanded to include band structure effects.

  8. Electrical Transport Properties of C60 Single Crystals Doped with Alkali Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Hironori; Maruyama, Yusei; Inabe, Tamotsu; Achiba, Yohji; Suzuki, Sinzo; Kikuchi, Koichi; Ikemoto, Isao

    Electronic structures of various kinds of alkali metal (Na, K, Rb or Cs)-doped C60 solids are studied by electrical resistivity and thermoelectric power measurements by using C60 single crystals prepared from a CS2 solution as a starting material. For K-or Rb-doped C60, metallic conducting behaviors in the normal conducting state and relatively sharp superconducting transitions are observed by the electrical resistivity measurements. Nearly linear-temperature dependences with the negative sign are observed in the thermoelectric power measurements at the normal conducting states for K-or Rb-doped C60. From electron diffusion term of the thermoelectric power, the values of Fermi energy and the density of states at the Fermi energy are estimated by assuming the three-dimensional free electron model, which are in substantial agreement with the results of other experiments and calculations. "Metal-semiconductor transition" is observed in both the electrical resistivity and the thermoelectric power measurements for Na-doped C60. Existence of metallic phase is confirmed by the thermoelectric power measurement in Cs-doped C60.

  9. Structural, dielectric and AC conductivity properties of Co2+ doped mixed alkali zinc borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhu, B. J.; Banu, Syed Asma; Harshitha, G. A.; Shilpa, T. M.; Shruthi, B.

    2013-02-01

    The Co2+ doped 19.9ZnO+5Li2CO3+25Na2CO3+50B2O3 (ZLNB) mixed alkali zinc borate glasses have been prepared by a conventional melt quenching method. The structural (XRD & FT-IR), dielectric and a.c. conductivity (σac) properties have been investigated. Amorphous nature of these glasses has been confirmed from their XRD pattern. The dielectric properties and electrical conductivity (σac) of these glasses have been studied from 100Hz to 5MHz at the room temperature. Based on the observed trends in the a.c. conductivities, the present glass samples are found to exhibit a non-Debye behavior.

  10. James C. McGroddy Prize Talk: Superconductivity in alkali-metal doped Carbon-60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebard, Arthur

    2008-03-01

    Carbon sixty (C60), which was first identified in 1985 in laser desorption experiments, is unquestionably an arrestingly beautiful molecule. The high symmetry of the 12 pentagonal and 20 hexagonal faces symmetrically arrayed in a soccer-ball like structure invites special attention and continues to stimulate animated speculation. The availability in 1990 of macroscopic amounts of purified C60 derived from carbon-arc produced soot allowed the growth and characterization of both bulk and thin-film samples. Crystalline C60 is a molecular solid held together by weak van der Waals forces. The fcc structure has a 74% packing fraction thus allowing ample opportunity (26% available volume) for the intercalation of foreign atoms into the interstitial spaces of the three dimensional host. This opportunity catalyzed much of the collaborative work amongst chemists, physicists and materials scientists at Bell Laboratories, and resulted in the discovery of superconductivity in alkali-metal doped C60 with transition temperatures (Tc) in the mid-30-kelvin range. In this talk I will review how the successes of this initial team effort stimulated a worldwide collaboration between experimentalists and theorists to understand the promise and potential of an entirely new class of superconductors containing only two elements, carbon and an intercalated alkali metal. Although the cuprates still hold the record for the highest Tc, there are still open scientific questions about the mechanism that gives rise to such unexpectedly high Tc's in the non-oxide carbon-based superconductors. The doped fullerenes have unusual attributes (e.g., narrow electronic bands, high disorder, anomalous energy scales, and a tantalizing proximity to a metal-insulator Mott transition), which challenge conventional thinking and at the same time provide useful insights into new directions for finding even higher Tc materials. The final chapter of the `soot to superconductivity' story has yet to be written.

  11. XPS studies and photocurrent applications of alkali-metals-doped ZnO nanoparticles under visible illumination conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saáedi, Abdolhossein; Yousefi, Ramin; Jamali-Sheini, Farid; Zak, Ali Khorsand; Cheraghizade, Mohsen; Mahmoudian, M. R.; Baghchesara, Mohammad Amin; Dezaki, Abbas Shirmardi

    2016-05-01

    The present work is a study about a relationship between X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) results and photocurrent intensity of alkali-metals-elements doped ZnO nanoparticles, which is carried out under visible illumination conditions. The nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple sol-gel method. Structure and morphology studies of the NPs were carried out by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of doping on the optical band-gap was investigated by using UV-visible spectrometer. The absorption peak of the doped ZnO NPs was red-shifted with respect to that of the undoped ZnO NPs. After that, the photocurrent application of the products was examined under a white light source at 2 V bias. The photocurrent results showed that, the current intensity of the ZnO NPs was increased by doping materials. However, K-doped ZnO NPs showed the highest photocurrent intensity. Finally, a discussion was carried out about the obtained photocurrent results by the O-1s spectra of the XPS of the samples. Our results suggest that the alkali-metals-doped ZnO NPs exhibit considerable promise for highly sensitive visible-light photodetectors.

  12. From T2,2@Bmmim to Alkali@T2,2@Bmmim Ivory Ball-like Clusters: Ionothermal Syntheses, Precise Doping, and Photocatalytic Properties.

    PubMed

    Du, Cheng-Feng; Li, Jian-Rong; Zhang, Bo; Shen, Nan-Nan; Huang, Xiao-Ying

    2015-06-15

    Presented here are the syntheses, structures, and properties of an In-Sn-Se compound based on a ternary super-supertetrahedral T2,2 cluster nested by Bmmim cations and two of its alkali-doped quaternary analogues. By means of a one-pot ionothermal method, an alkali metal ion (Cs(+) or Rb(+)) could be precisely doped into the central cavity of the cluster, forming an alkali@T2,2@Bmmim quaternary cluster. Remarkably, the undoped compound exhibited excellent stability and visible light photodegradation ability over a wide range of pH, especially in acidic conditions. PMID:26034842

  13. Unified understanding of superconductivity and Mott transition in alkali-doped fullerides from first principles.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yusuke; Sakai, Shiro; Capone, Massimo; Arita, Ryotaro

    2015-08-01

    Alkali-doped fullerides A 3C60 (A = K, Rb, Cs) are surprising materials where conventional phonon-mediated superconductivity and unconventional Mott physics meet, leading to a remarkable phase diagram as a function of volume per C60 molecule. We address these materials with a state-of-the-art calculation, where we construct a realistic low-energy model from first principles without using a priori information other than the crystal structure and solve it with an accurate many-body theory. Remarkably, our scheme comprehensively reproduces the experimental phase diagram including the low-spin Mott-insulating phase next to the superconducting phase. More remarkably, the critical temperatures T c's calculated from first principles quantitatively reproduce the experimental values. The driving force behind the surprising phase diagram of A 3C60 is a subtle competition between Hund's coupling and Jahn-Teller phonons, which leads to an effectively inverted Hund's coupling. Our results establish that the fullerides are the first members of a novel class of molecular superconductors in which the multiorbital electronic correlations and phonons cooperate to reach high T c s-wave superconductivity. PMID:26601242

  14. Physical, structural and spectroscopic investigations of Sm3+ doped ZnO mixed alkali borate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sailaja, B.; Joyce Stella, R.; Thirumala Rao, G.; Jaya Raja, B.; Pushpa Manjari, V.; Ravikumar, R. V. S. S. N.

    2015-09-01

    Glass of 20ZnO-15 Li2O-15 Na2O-49.9 B2O3 doped with 0.1 mol% of Sm3+ (ZLNB) was prepared by the melt quenching technique. Physical properties were studied and analysed. The XRD studies confirm the amorphous nature of sample. The FT-IR spectral investigation discloses the BO3, BO4 groups, H and OH bonds. Optical absorption and emission spectra were recorded and characterized. Judd-Ofelt theory was applied to f ↔ f transitions to evaluate Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters (Ωλ). The oscillator strengths and bonding parameters were determined from absorption spectra. The trend observed was Ω4 > Ω6 > Ω2. High value of Ω4 reveals higher rigidity and covalency around the Sm3+ ion. Low value of Ω2 implies ionic nature of ligands and site symmetry around Sm3+ ion. luminescence data and Judd-Ofelt parameters Ωλ (λ = 2, 4, and 6) were used to evaluate various radiative probabilities like spontaneous radiative emission probabilities (AR), radiative lifetime (τR) and branching ratios (βR) stimulated emission cross section (σe) and CIE colour coordinates were measured, CCT temperature evaluated and the values were used to ascertain potential laser transitions at the optimum mixed alkali effect observed for the glass sample prepared. The preparedness of the material as the efficient laser active material is examined.

  15. SWNT Imaging Using Multispectral Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blades, Michael; Pirbhai, Massooma; Rotkin, Slava V.

    2012-02-01

    A flexible optical system was developed to image carbon single-wall nanotube (SWNT) photoluminescence using the multispectral capabilities of a typical CCD camcorder. The built in Bayer filter of the CCD camera was utilized, using OpenCV C++ libraries for image processing, to decompose the image generated in a high magnification epifluorescence microscope setup into three pseudo-color channels. By carefully calibrating the filter beforehand, it was possible to extract spectral data from these channels, and effectively isolate the SWNT signals from the background.

  16. Homogeneity of bismuth-distribution in bismuth-doped alkali germanate laser glasses towards superbroad fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanqi; Wondraczek, Lothar; Mermet, Alain; Peng, Mingying; Zhang, Qinyuan; Qiu, Jianrong

    2015-05-01

    Compared to rare-earth doped glasses, bismuth-doped glasses hold promise for super-broadband near-infrared (NIR) photoemission and potential applications in optical amplification. However, optically active bismuth centers are extremely sensitive to the properties of the surrounding matrix, and also to processing conditions. This is strongly complicating the exploitation of this class of materials, because functional devices require a very delicate adjustment of the redox state of the bismuth species, and its distribution throughout the bulk of the material. It also largely limits some of the conventional processing routes for glass fiber, which start from gas phase deposition and may require very high processing temperature. Here, we investigate the influence of melting time and alkali addition on bismuth-related NIR photoluminescence from melt-derived germanate glasses. We show that the effect of melting time on bismuth-related absorption and NIR photoemission is primarily through bismuth volatilization. Adding alkali oxides as fluxing agents, the melt viscosity can be lowered to reduce either the glass melting temperature, or the melting time, or both. At the same time, however, alkali addition also leads to increasing mean-field basicity, what may reduce the intensity of bismuth-related NIR emission. Preferentially using Li2O over Na2O or K2O presents the best trade-off between those above factors, because its local effect may be adverse to the generally assumed trend of the negative influence of more basic matrix composition. This observation provides an important guideline for the design of melt-derived Bi-doped glasses with efficient NIR photoemission and high optical homogeneity. PMID:25969328

  17. Distinct Impact of Alkali-Ion Doping on Electrical Transport Properties of Thermoelectric p-Type Polycrystalline SnSe.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tian-Ran; Tan, Gangjian; Zhang, Xiaomi; Wu, Chao-Feng; Li, Jing-Feng; Dravid, Vinayak P; Snyder, G Jeffrey; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2016-07-20

    Recent findings about ultrahigh thermoelectric performance in SnSe single crystals have stimulated related research on this simple binary compound, which is focused mostly on its polycrystalline counterparts, and particularly on electrical property enhancement by effective doping. This work systematically investigated the thermoelectric properties of polycrystalline SnSe doped with three alkali metals (Li, Na, and K). It is found that Na has the best doping efficiency, leading to an increase in hole concentration from 3.2 × 10(17) to 4.4 × 10(19) cm(-3) at room temperature, accompanied by a drop in Seebeck coefficient from 480 to 142 μV/K. An equivalent single parabolic band model was found adequate to capture the variation tendency of Seebeck coefficient with doping levels within a wide range. A mixed scattering of carriers by acoustic phonons and grain boundaries is suitable for numerically understanding the temperature-dependence of carrier mobility. A maximum ZT of ∼0.8 was achieved in 1% Na- or K-doped SnSe at 800 K. Possible strategies to improve the mobility and ZT of polycrystals were also proposed. PMID:27348333

  18. One-dimensional nature in transport property of SWNT thin film electrochemical transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimotani, Hidekazu; Tsuda, Satoshi; Yuan, Hongtao; Yomogida, Yohei; Moriya, Rieko; Takenobu, Taishi; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2012-02-01

    Recent success in isolating single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) of narrow chirality distribution enabled making pure metallic (m-) and semiconducting (s-) SWNT films. Such films are expected to reflect the nature of individual SWNTs, that is their one dimensional subband structure. Therefore, it is interesting to investigate electronic transport in m- and s-SWNT films by controlling their Fermi level (EF). Chemical doping or FET is unsuitable for the purpose because of the lack of precise and reversible EF controllability, and the narrow controllable EF range, respectively. The problems are solved by our electric double layer transistor technique,^1 where the gate voltage (VG) is applied through an electrolyte. The conductance and optical absorption spectra of the resistance of s- and m-SWNT films were measured at various VG. The conductance of the s-SWNT film showed stepwise change against VG. The absorbance spectra indicate the steps correspond to reaching of the EF to a vHs. Furthermore, even m-SWNT films showed steep increases of conductance, demonstrating that the conductance strongly depend on the subband filling. ^1 H. Shimotani et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 073104 (2006).

  19. Structural and electronic engineering of 3DOM WO3 by alkali metal doping for improved NO2 sensing performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihua; Fan, Xiaoxiao; Han, Dongmei; Gu, Fubo

    2016-05-19

    Novel alkali metal doped 3DOM WO3 materials were prepared using a simple colloidal crystal template method. Raman, XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS, PL, Hall and UV-Vis techniques were used to characterize the structural and electronic properties of all the products, while the corresponding sensing performances targeting ppb level NO2 were determined at different working temperatures. For the overall goal of structural and electronic engineering, the co-effect of structural and electronic properties on the improved NO2 sensing performance of alkali metal doped 3DOM WO3 was studied. The test results showed that the gas sensing properties of 3DOM WO3/Li improved the most, with the fast response-recovery time and excellent selectivity. More importantly, the response of 3DOM WO3/Li to 500 ppb NO2 was up to 55 at room temperature (25 °C). The especially high response to ppb level NO2 at room temperature (25 °C) in this work has a very important practical significance. The best sensing performance of 3DOM WO3/Li could be ascribed to the most structure defects and the highest carrier mobility. And the possible gas sensing mechanism based on the model of the depletion layer was proposed to demonstrate that both structural and electronic properties are responsible for the NO2 sensing behavior. PMID:27109698

  20. Effect of Li 2O content on physical and structural properties of vanadyl doped alkali zinc borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavendra Rao, T.; Rama Krishna, Ch.; Udayachandran Thampy, U. S.; Venkata Reddy, Ch.; Reddy, Y. P.; Sambasiva Rao, P.; Ravikumar, R. V. S. S. N.

    2011-05-01

    The effect of Li 2O content in vanadyl doped 20ZnO+ xLi 2O+(30- x)Na 2O+50B 2O 3 (5≤ x≥25) glasses has been studied with respect to their physical and structural properties. The absence of sharp peaks in XRD spectra of these glass samples confirms the amorphous nature. The physical parameters like density, refractive index, ionic concentration and electronic polarizability vary non-linearly with x mol% depending on the diffusivities of alkali ions. EPR and optical absorption spectra reveal that the resonance signals are characteristics of VO 2+ ions in tetragonally compressed octahedral site. Spin-Hamiltonian, crystal field, tetragonal field and bonding parameters are found to be in good agreement with the other reported glass systems. The tetragonal distortion ( g⊥- g∥) and Dt reveals that their values vary non-linearly with Li 2O content and reaches a minimum at x=10 mol%. An anomaly of character has been observed in all the properties of vanadyl doped glass systems, which gives a clear indication of mixed alkali effect.

  1. Direct imaging of the alkali metal site in K-doped fullerene peapods.

    PubMed

    Guan, Lunhui; Suenaga, Kazu; Shi, Zujin; Gu, Zhennan; Iijima, Sumio

    2005-02-01

    The structure of K-doped fullerene peapods has been investigated by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). It is proven that the potassium atoms can be doped at the intermolecular sites within C60 peapods. The EELS spectrum of potassium (K) L edge clearly exhibits the feature of K+ in the doped peapod and consequently suggests n-type doping. These results encourage the realization of a one-dimensional superconducting wire based on the nanotube peapods. PMID:15783568

  2. Structural and electronic engineering of 3DOM WO3 by alkali metal doping for improved NO2 sensing performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihua; Fan, Xiaoxiao; Han, Dongmei; Gu, Fubo

    2016-05-01

    Novel alkali metal doped 3DOM WO3 materials were prepared using a simple colloidal crystal template method. Raman, XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS, PL, Hall and UV-Vis techniques were used to characterize the structural and electronic properties of all the products, while the corresponding sensing performances targeting ppb level NO2 were determined at different working temperatures. For the overall goal of structural and electronic engineering, the co-effect of structural and electronic properties on the improved NO2 sensing performance of alkali metal doped 3DOM WO3 was studied. The test results showed that the gas sensing properties of 3DOM WO3/Li improved the most, with the fast response-recovery time and excellent selectivity. More importantly, the response of 3DOM WO3/Li to 500 ppb NO2 was up to 55 at room temperature (25 °C). The especially high response to ppb level NO2 at room temperature (25 °C) in this work has a very important practical significance. The best sensing performance of 3DOM WO3/Li could be ascribed to the most structure defects and the highest carrier mobility. And the possible gas sensing mechanism based on the model of the depletion layer was proposed to demonstrate that both structural and electronic properties are responsible for the NO2 sensing behavior.Novel alkali metal doped 3DOM WO3 materials were prepared using a simple colloidal crystal template method. Raman, XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS, PL, Hall and UV-Vis techniques were used to characterize the structural and electronic properties of all the products, while the corresponding sensing performances targeting ppb level NO2 were determined at different working temperatures. For the overall goal of structural and electronic engineering, the co-effect of structural and electronic properties on the improved NO2 sensing performance of alkali metal doped 3DOM WO3 was studied. The test results showed that the gas sensing properties of 3DOM WO3/Li improved the most, with the fast response-recovery time and

  3. MEA for alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell with alkali doped PBI membrane and non-platinum electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modestov, A. D.; Tarasevich, M. R.; Leykin, A. Yu.; Filimonov, V. Ya.

    This paper reports on the fabrication of MEA for alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (ADEFC). The MEA was fabricated using non-platinum electrocatalysts and a membrane of alkali doped polybenzimidazole (PBI). The employed oxygen reduction catalyst was prepared by pyrolysis of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-methoxyphenyl)-21H,23H-porphine cobalt(II) supported on XC72 carbon. This catalyst is tolerant to ethanol. Electrocatalyst at the anode was RuV alloy supported on XC72 carbon. It was synthesized by reduction of respective salts at elevated temperature. Single cell power density of 100 mW cm -2 at U = 0.4 V was achieved at 80 °C using air at ambient pressure and 3 M KOH + 2 M EtOH anode feed. The developed MEA is considered viable for use in emergency power supply units and in power sources for portable electronic equipment.

  4. Thermal and optical properties of Nd3+ doped lead zinc borate glasses—Influence of alkali metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasi Kumar, M. V.; Rajesh, D.; Balakrishna, A.; Ratnakaram, Y. C.

    2013-04-01

    In the present investigation a new series of six different Nd3+ doped alkali and mixed alkali (Li, Na, K, Li-Na, Li-K and Na-K) heavy metal (PbO and ZnO) borate glasses were prepared using the melt quenching technique. The amorphous nature of the glass systems has been identified based on the X-ray diffraction analysis. The glass transition studies were carried out using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Optical properties were studied by measuring the optical absorption and near infrared luminescence spectra. The Judd-Ofelt (J-O) theory has been applied to calculate J-O intensity parameters, Ωλ (λ=2, 4 and 6) and in turn used to estimate radiative properties of certain transitions. Spectroscopic parameters such as transition probabilities (AT), branching ratios (β), radiative lifetimes (τR) and integrated absorption cross-sections (Σ) were calculated using J-O intensity parameters for all transitions. Using emission spectra, experimental branching ratios and stimulated emission cross-sections (σP) are obtained for all the observed emission transitions.

  5. Design of low work function materials using alkali metal-doped transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sol; Lee, Man Young; Lee, Seong; Jhi, Seung-Hoon

    Engineering the work function is a key issue in surface science. Particularly, discovering the materials that have work functions less than 1eV is essential for efficient thermionic energy conversion. The lowest work function of materials, reported so far, is in a range of about 1eV. To design low work function materials, we chose MX2 (M =Mo and W; X =S, Se and Te) as substrates and alkali metals (Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs) as dopants, and studied their electronic structures, charge transfer, induced surface dipole moment, and work function using first-principles calculations. We found that the charge transfer from alkali metals to MX2 substrates decreases as the atomic radius of alkali metals increases. Regardless of the amount of the charge transfer, K on WTe2 exhibits the biggest surface dipole moment, which consequently makes the surface work function the lowest. Also, we found a correlation between the binding distance and the work function.

  6. Molecular Design of Strong SWNT/Polyelectrolyte Multilayers Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Nicholas

    2003-03-01

    The mechanical failure of hybrid materials made from polymers and single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is primarily attributed to poor matrix-SWNT connectivity and severe phase segregation. Both problems can be successfully mitigated when the SWNTcomposite is made following the protocol of layer-by-layer assembly. This deposition technique prevents phase segregation of the polymer/SWNT binary system, and after subsequent cross-linking, the nm-scale-uniform composite with SWNT loading as high as 50 wtmembranes delaminated from the substrate were found to be exceptionally strong with tensile strength approaches that of hard ceramics. Considering the light-weight nature of SWNT composites the prepared free-standing membranes can serve as unique components for a variety of long-life-time devices. The assembly process also affords preparation of aligned SWNT composites. Laminar flow adsorption shows gradual untangling of the nanotube agglomerates and the formation of parallel ribbons.

  7. Alkali-metal intercalation in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béguin, F.; Duclaux, L.; Méténier, K.; Frackowiak, E.; Salvetat, J. P.; Conard, J.; Bonnamy, S.; Lauginie, P.

    1999-09-01

    We report on successful intercalation of multiwall (MWNT) and single wall (SWNT) carbon nanotubes with alkali metals by electrochemical and vapor phase reactions. A LiC10 compound was produced by full electrochemical reduction of MWNT. KC8 and CsC8-MWNT first stage derivatives were synthesized in conditions of alkali vapor saturation. Their identity periods and the 2×2 R 0° alkali superlattice are comparable to their parent graphite compounds. The dysonian shape of KC8 EPR line and the temperature-independent Pauli susceptibility are both characteristic of a metallic behavior, which was confirmed by 13C NMR anisotropic shifts. Exposure of SWNT bundles to alkali vapor led to an increase of the pristine triangular lattice from 1.67 nm to 1.85 nm and 1.87 nm for potassium and rubidium, respectively.

  8. Characterization of Cr3+ doped mixed alkali ions effect in zinc borate glasses - Physical and spectroscopic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama Sundari, G.; Pushpa Manjari, V.; Raghavendra Rao, T.; Satish, D. V.; Rama Krishna, Ch.; Venkata Reddy, Ch.; Ravikumar, R. V. S. S. N.

    2014-06-01

    The physical and structural properties of Cr3+ doped 19.9 ZnO + xLi2O + (30 - x) Na2O + 50B2O3 (5 ⩽ x ⩽ 25) (ZLNB) glasses have been studied. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns indicated the amorphous nature of the glass samples. The physical parameters of all the glasses were also evaluated with respect to the composition. They exhibit the non-linearity providing the evidence for mixed alkali ions effect. The infrared spectra of the glasses in the range 400-4000 cm-1 showed the presence of BO3 and BO4 local structures in all the glass systems. No boroxol ring formation was observed in the structure of these glasses. Optical absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance studies were carried out at room temperature. From the optical absorption data various optical parameters such as optical band gap, Urbach energy were evaluated. Crystal field and Racah parameters are evaluated from optical absorption spectra. The EPR spectra of Cr3+ doped ZLNB glasses exhibited resonance signals at g = 4.066 and g = 1.9779 characteristic of Cr3+ ions. The evaluated bonding parameters suggest the covalent nature.

  9. Alkali doped poly (2,5-benzimidazole) membrane for alkaline water electrolysis: Characterization and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Liliana A.; Hnát, Jaromír; Heredia, Nayra; Bruno, Mariano M.; Viva, Federico A.; Paidar, Martin; Corti, Horacio R.; Bouzek, Karel; Abuin, Graciela C.

    2016-04-01

    The properties and performance of linear and cross-linked KOH doped ABPBI membranes as electrolyte/separator for zero gap alkaline water electrolysis cells are evaluated and compared with a commercial Zirfon® diaphragm. Stability in alkaline environment, swelling, thermal properties, water sorption, KOH uptake and conductivity of linear (L-ABPBI) and cross-linked (C-ABPBI) membranes doped with different concentrations of KOH are analyzed. Linear membranes show stability up to 3.0 mol·dm-3 KOH doping, while cross-linked membranes are stable up to 4.2 mol·dm-3 KOH doping. Both kinds of membranes exhibit good thermal stability and reasonable specific ionic conductivity at 22 °C in the range between 7 and 25 mS·cm-1, being slightly higher the conductivity of C-ABPBI membranes than that of L-ABPBI ones. In short-term electrolysis tests both L-ABPBI and C-ABPBI membranes show better performance than Zirfon diaphragm in the range from 50 to 70 °C. A current density of 335 mA·cm-2 at a cell voltage of 2.0 V is attained with C-ABPBI membranes doped in 3 mol·dm-3 KOH at 70 °C, a performance comparable with that of commercial units operating at temperatures ca. 80 °C and 30 wt% KOH (6.7 mol·dm-3) as electrolyte.

  10. Color of pure and alkali-doped cerium sulfide: A local-density-functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, M.-A.; Wimmer, E.

    1996-07-01

    The electronic structure and mechanisms for the optical excitations of pure and Na-doped γ-Ce2S3 have been investigated using first-principles local-density-functional theory. The energy-band structures from augmented-spherical-wave calculations indicate that the S 3p-->Ce 5d interband transitions give rise to absorptions in the ultraviolet, whereas the observed red color of γ-Ce2S3 is associated with localized Ce 4f-->5d excitations. The cationic vacancies in γ-Ce2S3 (which is derived from the cubic Th3P4 structure) lead to the formation of vacancy bands, which are split off from the top of the S 3p valence band. Na doping removes these vacancy bands and homogenizes the band edges of the valence and conduction bands. As a consequence, the onset of the f-->d transitions is shifted slightly to larger energies and becomes sharper, which is consistent with an observed change in the color of γ-Ce2S3 from maroon to red-orange upon doping with Na.

  11. Structural investigation and electron paramagnetic resonance of vanadyl doped alkali niobium borate glasses.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A; Sheoran, A; Sanghi, S; Bhatnagar, V; Gupta, S K; Arora, M

    2010-03-01

    Glasses with compositions xNb(2)O(5).(30-x)M(2)O.69B(2)O(3) (where M=Li, Na, K; x=0, 4, 8 mol%) doped with 1 mol% V(2)O(5) have been prepared using normal melt quench technique. The IR transmission spectra of the glasses have been studied over the range 400-4000 cm(-1). The changes caused by the addition of Nb(2)O(5) on the structure of these glasses have been reported. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of VO(2+) ions in these glasses have been recorded in X-band (9.14 GHz) at room temperature (300 K). The spin Hamiltonian parameters, dipolar hyperfine coupling parameter and Fermi contact interaction parameter have been calculated. It is observed that the resultant resonance spectra contain hyperfine structures (hfs) due to V(4+) ions which exist as VO(2+) ions in octahedral coordination with a tetragonal compression in the present glasses. The tetragonality of V(4+)O(6) complex decreases with increasing concentration of Nb(2)O(5). The 3d(xy) orbit contracts with increase in Nb(2)O(5):M(2)O ratio. Values of the theoretical optical basicity, Lambda(th), have also been reported. PMID:20060775

  12. The Production of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Anions in Inert Gas Matrices Doped with Alkali Metals. Electronic Absorption Spectra of the Pentacene Anion (C22H14(-))

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halasinski, Thomas M.; Hudgins, Douglas M.; Salama, Farid; Allamandola, Louis J.; Mead, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The absorption spectra of pentacene (C22H14) and its radical cation (C22H14(+)) and anion (C22H14(-)) isolated in inert-gas matrices of Ne, Ar, and Kr are reported from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared. The associated vibronic band systems and their spectroscopic assignments are discussed together with the physical and chemical conditions governing ion (and counterion) production in the solid matrix. In particular, the formation of isolated pentacene anions is found to be optimized in matrices doped with alkali metal (Na and K).

  13. Robust s± superconductivity in a two-band Hubbard-Fröhlich model of alkali-doped organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Tao; Fabrizio, Michele; Naghavi, S. Shahab; Tosatti, Erio

    2014-08-01

    The damaging effect of strong electron-electron repulsion on regular, electron-phonon superconductivity is a standard tenet. In spite of that, an increasing number of compounds such as fullerides and more recently alkali-doped aromatics exhibit superconductivity despite very narrow bands and very strong electron repulsion. Here, we explore superconducting solutions of a model Hamiltonian inspired by the electronic structure of alkali-doped aromatics. The model is a two-site, two-narrow-band metal with a single intersite phonon, leading to attraction-mediated, two-order parameter superconductivity. On top of that, the model includes a repulsive onsite Hubbard U, whose effect on the superconductivity we study. Starting within mean field, we find that s± superconductivity is the best solution surviving the presence of U, whose effect is canceled out by the opposite signs of the two order parameters. The correlated Gutzwiller study that follows is necessary because without electron correlations, the superconducting state would in this model be superseded by an antiferromagnetic insulating state with lower energy. The Gutzwiller correlations lower the energy of the metallic state, with the consequence that the s± superconducting state is stabilized and even strengthened for small Hubbard U.

  14. Spectroscopy Study of SWNT in Aqueous Solution With Different Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtsev, V. A.; Glamazda, A. Yu.; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Leontiev, V. S.; Plokhotnichenko, A. M.; Roth, S.

    2003-10-01

    Aqueous solutions of HiPCO SWNT with different surfactants (anionic (SDS), cationic (CTAB) and non-ionic (Triton X-100)) have been studied by Raman and Near-infra-red (NIR) absorption spectroscopy. The nanotube interaction with surfactant leads to the spectral shift of lines and its intensity redistribution, compared with the spectrum of SWNT in KBr pellet. The most essential spectral changes are observed for nanotube aqueous solution with the surfactant containing a charge group. Two possible models of micelle formation around the nanotube are discussed.

  15. Ionic conductivity studies in crystalline PVA/NaAlg polymer blend electrolyte doped with alkali salt KCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheela, T.; Bhajantri, R. F.; Ravindrachary, V.; Pujari, P. K.; Rathod, Sunil G.; Naik, Jagadish

    2014-04-01

    Potassium Chloride (KCl) doped poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/sodium alginate (NaAlg) in 60:40 wt% polymer blend electrolytes were prepared by solution casting method. The complexation of KCl with host PVA/NaAlg blend is confirmed by FTIR and UV-Vis spectra. The XRD studies show that the crystallinity of the prepared blends increases with increase in doping. The dc conductivity increases with increase in dopant concentration. Temperature dependent dc conductivity shows an Arrhenius behavior. The dielectric properties show that both the dielectric constant and dielectric loss increases with increase in KCl doping concentration and decreases with frequency. The cole-cole plots show a decrease in bulk resistance, indicates the increase in ac conductivity, due to increase in charge carrier mobility. The doping of KCl enhances the mechanical properties of PVA/NaAlg, such as Young's modulus, tensile strength, stiffness.

  16. Substantial enhancement in intrinsic coercivity on M-type strontium hexaferrite through the increase in magneto-crystalline anisotropy by co-doping of group-V and alkali elements

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Kyunghan Ryu, Byungki; Korolev, Dmitry; Jae Kang, Young

    2013-12-09

    The effect of d{sup 1} impurity doping in Sr-hexaferrite (SrM) on the magnetic anisotropy is investigated. First-principles calculations revealed that group-V elements (V, Nb) are stabilized with co-doping of alkali elements. Na{sup 1+}/K{sup 1+} doping at Sr{sup 2+}-site is found to be critical to form the d{sup 1} impurities at Fe-site. Experimentally, Na–V doped SrM shows the intrinsic coercivity of ∼5.4 kOe, which is ∼300% enhancement compared to undoped SrM and comparable value to La–Co co-doped SrM. Finally, the spin-orbit coupling from non-vanishing angular momentum of d{sup 1} impurity in SrM should be a main factor for such a substantial improvement of intrinsic coercivity.

  17. Role of glass structure in defining the chemical dissolution behavior, bioactivity and antioxidant properties of zinc and strontium co-doped alkali-free phosphosilicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Saurabh; Goel, Ashutosh; Tilocca, Antonio; Dhuna, Vikram; Bhatia, Gaurav; Dhuna, Kshitija; Ferreira, José M F

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the structure-property relationships in a series of alkali-free phosphosilicate glass compositions co-doped with Zn(2+) and Sr(2+). The emphasis was laid on understanding the structural role of Sr(2+) and Zn(2+) co-doping on the chemical dissolution behavior of glasses and its impact on their in vitro bioactivity. The structure of glasses was studied using molecular dynamics simulations in combination with solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The relevant structural properties are then linked to the observed degradation behavior, in vitro bioactivity, osteoblast proliferation and oxidative stress levels. The apatite-forming ability of glasses has been investigated by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy after immersion of glass powders/bulk in simulated body fluid (SBF) for time durations varying between 1h and 14 days, while their chemical degradation has been studied in Tris-HCl in accordance with ISO 10993-14. All the glasses exhibit hydroxyapatite formation on their surface within 1-3h of their immersion in SBF. The cellular responses were observed in vitro on bulk glass samples using human osteosarcoma MG63 cell line. The dose-dependent cytoprotective effect of glasses with respect to the concentration of zinc and strontium released from the glasses is also discussed. PMID:24709542

  18. High Temperature Alkali Corrosion of Dense SN4 Coated with CMZP and Mg-Doped A21TiO5 in Coal Gas

    SciTech Connect

    J. J. Brown; Nguyen Thierry

    1997-10-01

    Si3N4 heat exchangers used in industrial systems are usually operating in harsh environments. Not only is this structural material experiencing high temperatures, but it is also subjected to corrosive gases and condensed phases. Past studies have demonstrated that condensed phases severely attack Si3N4 and as a consequence, dramatically reduce its lifetime in industrial operating systems.1,2 Previous research conducted at Virginia Tech on low thermal expansion coefficient oxide ceramics,3,4,5 (Ca1-X,MgX)Zr4(PO4)6 (CMZP), and Mg-doped Al2TiO5, for structural application have shown that these two materials exhibited better resistance to alkaline corrosion than Si3N4. Thus, they were envisioned as good candidates for a protective coating on Si3N4 heat exchangers. As a result, the goal of the present work is to develop CMZP and Mg-doped Al2TiO5 protective thin films using the sol-gel process and the dip coating technique and to test their effectiveness in an alkali-containing atmosphere.

  19. Antimicrobial PVK:SWNT nanocomposite coated membrane for water purification: performance and toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Farid; Santos, Catherine M; Mangadlao, Joey; Advincula, Rigoberto; Rodrigues, Debora F

    2013-08-01

    This study demonstrated that coated nitrocellulose membranes with a nanocomposite containing 97% (wt%) of polyvinyl-N-carbazole (PVK) and 3% (wt%) of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) (97:3 wt% ratio PVK:SWNT) achieve similar or improved removal of bacteria when compared with 100% SWNTs coated membranes. Membranes coated with the nanocomposite exhibited significant antimicrobial activity toward Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (≈ 80-90%); and presented a virus removal efficiency of ≈ 2.5 logs. Bacterial cell membrane damage was considered a possible mechanism of cellular inactivation since higher efflux of intracellular material (Deoxyribonucleic acid, DNA) was quantified in the filtrate of PVK-SWNT and SWNT membranes than in the filtrate of control membranes. To evaluate possible application of these membrane filters for drinking water treatment, toxicity of PVK-SWNT was tested against fibroblast cells. The results demonstrated that PVK-SWNT was non toxic to fibroblast cells as opposed to pure SWNT (100%). These results suggest that it is possible to synthesize antimicrobial nitrocellulose membranes coated with SWNT based nanocomposites for drinking water treatment. Furthermore, membrane filters coated with the nanocomposite PVK-SWNT (97:3 wt% ratio PVK:SWNT) will produce more suitable coated membranes for drinking water than pure SWNTs coated membranes (100%), since the reduced load of SWNT in the nanocomposite will reduce the use of costly and toxic SWNT nanomaterial on the membranes. PMID:23545165

  20. Optical properties and radiation damages of cerium fluoride crystals doped with alkali-earth and rare-earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gusev, Y.I.; Melchakov, E.N.; Mironov, I.A.; Panteleev, L.A.; Reiterov, V.M.; Rodnyi, P.A.; Seliverstov, D.M.; Shchetkowsky, A.I.; Yazikov, D.M.; Zakharov, N.G.

    1994-12-31

    The most essential contribution in the investigation of CeF{sub 3} crystals having the goal to construct high precision electromagnetic calorimeters has been done by Crystal Clear Collaboration. Study of optical properties and radiation damages of Cerium Fluoride crystals doped with Ca, Ba, Sr, La, Nd, Zr and Hf in the wide range of concentrations has been performed with the goal to obtain high optical transparency of crystals at different cumulative doses under {gamma}-irradiation. Time decay curves and relative light yields of scintillators as a function of doping level were measured using X-ray excitation of samples and single photon counting method.

  1. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  2. Tug of war between AO-hybridization and aromaticity in dictating structures of Li-doped alkali clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrova, Anastassia N.

    2012-04-01

    Hybridization of atomic orbitals is a widely appreciated phenomenon in organic chemistry. Here, we demonstrate that hybridization also can dramatically impact the shapes of small all-alkali metal clusters, and oppose σ-aromaticity in defining cluster shapes. The valence-iso-electronic LiNa4- and LiK4- clusters adopt different global minimum structures: LiNa4- is a planar C2v (1A1) species distorted from the perfect pentagon, and LiK4- is a planar square D4h (1A1g) species with Li being in the centre. This effect is rooted in the different degrees of the 2s-2p hybridization in Li in response to binding to Na versus K.

  3. Unified picture of the doping dependence of superconducting transition temperatures in alkali metal/ammonia intercalated FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Hirschfeld, P. J.; Valentí, Roser

    2015-01-01

    In the recently synthesized Lix(NH2)y(NH3)zFe2Se2 family of iron chalcogenides, a molecular spacer consisting of lithium ions, lithium amide, and ammonia separates the layers of FeSe. It has been shown that upon variation of the chemical composition of the spacer layer, superconducting transition temperatures can reach Tc˜44 K , but the relative importance of the layer separation and effective doping to the Tc enhancement is currently unclear. Using state of the art band structure unfolding techniques, we construct eight-orbital models from ab initio density functional theory calculations for these materials. Within an RPA spin-fluctuation approach, we show that the electron doping enhances the superconducting pairing, which is of s± symmetry and explain the experimentally observed limit to Tc in the molecular spacer intercalated FeSe class of materials.

  4. Phase behavior of SWNT-superacid solutions and fabrication of aligned macrostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Budhadipta; Pasquali, Matteo

    2010-03-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are carbon based molecules which possess very high aspect ratio, high persistence length and behave as rigid rods when dispersed in a liquid phase. Superacids (oleum, chlorosulfonic acid etc) have been shown as one of the most effective solvents for dispersing and dissolving SWNTs. The SWNT-superacid systems exhibit a very rich phase behavior with well defined isotropic, bi-phasic and liquid crystalline phases, and controlled by factors like the SWNT concentration, SWNT length and strength of the acid (solvent). We report the fabrication of SWNT macrostructures with high degree of alignment by self assembly and exploiting the phase behavior of SWNT-superacid solutions. Phase transitions were induced in SWNT-superacid solutions in a controlled manner by gradually changing the strength of the acid solvent. This resulted in the precipitation of SWNT flakes and fibrils which exhibit a high degree of alignment. Detailed characterization of these macrostructures was performed using Raman spectroscopy and polarized optical microscopy. The above method presents a self-assembly based route for fabrication of aligned SWNT based structures from SWNT-superacid systems.

  5. Special antitumor immune effects of laser immunotherapy with SWNT-GC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feifan; Song, Sheng; Chen, Wei R.

    2014-02-01

    In our previous work, we constructed a multifunction nano system SWNT-GC, which can synergize photothermal and immunological effects. To further improve the application of this system, we study the cytotoxicity of SWNT-GC and investigate the effects on malignant tumor therapy. Here, we selected the optimal concentration of GC and SWNTs for the stable SWNT-GC construction. No cytotoxicity was observed under the dose used in the experiments. Using mouse melanoma tumor model, Laser+SWNT-GC treatment resulted in a significant mice survival rate, there were no long-term survivors under other treatment. It is providing a promising treatment modality for the malignancy.

  6. Recovery Act - Large Scale SWNT Purification and Solubilization

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Gemano; Dr. Linda B. McGown

    2010-10-07

    The goal of this Phase I project was to establish a quantitative foundation for development of binary G-gels for large-scale, commercial processing of SWNTs and to develop scientific insight into the underlying mechanisms of solubilization, selectivity and alignment. In order to accomplish this, we performed systematic studies to determine the effects of G-gel composition and experimental conditions that will enable us to achieve our goals that include (1) preparation of ultra-high purity SWNTs from low-quality, commercial SWNT starting materials, (2) separation of MWNTs from SWNTs, (3) bulk, non-destructive solubilization of individual SWNTs in aqueous solution at high concentrations (10-100 mg/mL) without sonication or centrifugation, (4) tunable enrichment of subpopulations of the SWNTs based on metallic vs. semiconductor properties, diameter, or chirality and (5) alignment of individual SWNTs.

  7. Electroconductive PET/SWNT Films by Solution Casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinert, Brian W.; Dean, Derrick R.

    2008-01-01

    The market for electrically conductive polymers is rapidly growing, and an emerging pathway for attaining these materials is via polymer-carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposites, because of the superior properties of CNTs. Due to their excellent electrical properties and anisotropic magnetic susceptibility, we expect CNTs could be easily aligned to maximize their effectiveness in imparting electrical conductivity to the polymer matrix. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) were dispersed in a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) matrix by solution blending then cast onto a glass substrate to create thin, flexible films. Various SWNT loading concentrations were implemented (0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 wt.%) to study the effect of additive density. The processing method was repeated to produce films in the presence of magnetic fields (3 and 9.4 Tesla). The SWNTs showed a high susceptibility to the magnetic field and were effectively aligned in the PET matrix. The alignment was characterized with Raman spectroscopy. Impedance spectroscopy was utilized to study the electrical behavior of the films. Concentration and dispersion seemed to play very important roles in improving electrical conductivity, while alignment played a secondary and less significant role. The most interesting result proved to be the effect of a magnetic field during processing. It appears that a magnetic field may improve dispersion of unmodified SWNTs, which seems to be more important than alignment. It was concluded that SWNTs offer a good option as conductive, nucleating filler for electroconductive polymer applications, and the utilization of a magnetic field may prove to be a novel method for CNT dispersion that could lead to improved nanocomposite materials.

  8. DNA aptamer release from the DNA-SWNT hybrid by protein recognition.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Chang-Hyuk; Jung, Seungwon; Bae, Jaehyun; Kim, Gunn; Ihm, Jisoon; Lee, Junghoon

    2016-02-14

    Here we show the formation of the complex between a DNA aptamer and a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and its reaction with its target protein. The aptamer, which is specifically bound with thrombin, the target protein in this study, easily wraps and disperses the SWNT by noncovalent π-π stacking. PMID:26763942

  9. Substituent Effects in π-Stacking of Histidine on Functionalized-SWNT and Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ge; Li, Huifang; Ma, Wanyong; Wang, Yixuan

    2015-01-01

    Adsorptions of histidine on the functionalized (10,0) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and graphene were investigated using density function theory methods, M05-2x and DFT-D. The results show that the binding of the histidine ring to the functionalized SWNT is weaker than that to the pristine SWNT for both singlet and triplet complexes, regardless of the electron-donating (-OH, -NH2) or electron-withdrawing (-COOH) character and their attached sites. The present decreased binding is opposite to the well-known enhanced binding in the substituted benzene dimers. Since the atoms of the histidine are distant from the substituent atoms by over 6Å, there would be no direct interaction between histidine and the substituent as in the case of the substituted benzene systems. The decreased binding can be mainly driven by the aromaticity of the functionalized SWNT. The nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) index analysis for the functionalized SWNTs in deed shows that local aromaticity of SWNT is decreased because of the electron redistribution induced by functional groups, and the π-π stacking between the histidine ring and functionalized-SWNT is therefore decreased as compared to the pristine SWNT. However, the above trend does not remain for the binding between the histidine and graphene. The binding of the histidine to the functionalized graphene with -OH and -NH2 is just slightly weaker than that to the pristine graphene, while its binding to COOH-SWNT becomes a little bit stronger. PMID:25914869

  10. Alkali Bee

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alkali bee, Nomia melanderi, is native to deserts and semi-arid desert basins of the western United States. It is a very effective and manageable pollinator for the production of seed in alfalfa (=lucerne) and some other crops, such as onion. It is the world’s only intensively managed ground-n...

  11. Effect of MoO3 on electron paramagnetic resonance spectra, optical spectra and dc conductivity of vanadyl ion doped alkali molybdo-borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, A.; Khasa, S.; Seth, V. P.; Sanghi, S.; Arora, M.

    2014-02-01

    Alkali molybdo-borate glasses having composition xMoO3·(30 - x)M2O·70B2O3 and xMoO3·(70 - x)B2O3·30M2O (M = Li, Na, K) with 0 ⩽ x ⩽ 15 (mol%) doped with 2.0 mol% of V2O5 have been prepared in order to study the influence of MoO3 on electrical conductivity, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical spectra. From EPR studies it is observed that V4+ ions in these samples exist as VO2+ ions in octahedral coordination with a tetragonal compression and belong to C4V symmetry. The tetragonal nature and octahedral symmetry of V4+O6 complex increase as well as decrease depending upon the composition of glasses with increase in MoO3 but 3dxy orbit of unpaired electron in the VO2+ ion expands in all the glasses. The decrease in optical band gap suggests that there is an increase in the concentration of non-bridging oxygen's. From the study of optical transmission spectra it is observed that for all the glasses the degree of covalency of the σ-bonding decreases with increase in MoO3 content and the degree of covalency of the π-bonding also varies. These results based on optical spectroscopy are in agreement with EPR findings. It is found that dc conductivity decreases and activation energy increases with increase in MoO3:M2O (M = Li, Na, K) ratio in MoO3·M2O·B2O3 glasses, whereas the conductivity increases and activation energy decreases with increase in MoO3:B2O3 ratio in xMoO3·B2O3·M2O glasses, which is governed by the increase in nonbridging oxygen's. The variation in theoretical optical basicity, Λth is also studied.

  12. Fractionation of SWNT/nucleic acid complexes by agarose gel electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetcher, Alexandre A.; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Vetcher, Ivan A.; Abramov, Semen M.; Kozlov, Mikhail; Baughman, Ray H.; Levene, Stephen D.

    2006-08-01

    We show that aqueous dispersions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), prepared with the aid of nucleic acids (NAs) such as RNA or DNA, can be separated into fractions using agarose gel electrophoresis. In a DC electric field, SWNT/NA complexes migrate in the gel in the direction of positive potential to form well-defined bands. Raman spectroscopy as a function of band position shows that nanotubes having different spectroscopic properties possess different electrophoretic mobilities. The migration patterns for SWNT/RNA and SWNT/DNA complexes differ. Parallel elution of the SWNT/NA complexes from the gel during electrophoresis and subsequent characterization by AFM reveals differences in nanotube diameter, length and curvature. The results suggest that fractionation of nanotubes can be achieved by this procedure. We discuss factors affecting the mobility of the nanotube complexes and propose analytical applications of this technique.

  13. Evidence for substitutional boron in doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, P.; Pichler, T.; Reppert, J.; Rao, A. M.; Grobosch, M.; Knupfer, M.

    2010-05-03

    Precise determination of acceptors in the laser ablation grown B doped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been elusive. Photoemission spectroscopy finds evidence for subpercent substitutional B in this material, which leads to superconductivity in thin film SWNT samples.

  14. A Biosynthetic Nerve Guide Conduit Based on Silk/SWNT/Fibronectin Nanocomposite for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh; Farokhi, Mehdi; Zaminy, Arash; Kokabi, Mehrdad; Soleimani, Masoud; Mirahmadi, Fereshteh

    2013-01-01

    As a contribution to the functionality of nerve guide conduits (NGCs) in nerve tissue engineering, here we report a conduit processing technique through introduction and evaluation of topographical, physical and chemical cues. Porous structure of NGCs based on freeze-dried silk/single walled carbon nanotubes (SF/SWNTs) has shown a uniform chemical and physical structure with suitable electrical conductivity. Moreover, fibronectin (FN) containing nanofibers within the structure of SF/SWNT conduits produced through electrospinning process have shown aligned fashion with appropriate porosity and diameter. Moreover, fibronectin remained its bioactivity and influenced the adhesion and growth of U373 cell lines. The conduits were then implanted to 10 mm left sciatic nerve defects in rats. The histological assessment has shown that nerve regeneration has taken places in proximal region of implanted nerve after 5 weeks following surgery. Furthermore, nerve conduction velocities (NCV) and more myelinated axons were observed in SF/SWNT and SF/SWNT/FN groups after 5 weeks post implantation, indicating a functional recovery for the injured nerves. With immunohistochemistry, the higher S-100 expression of Schwann cells in SF/SWNT/FN conduits in comparison to other groups was confirmed. In conclusion, an oriented conduit of biocompatible SF/SWNT/FN has been fabricated with acceptable structure that is particularly applicable in nerve grafts. PMID:24098649

  15. Tuning the mechanical properties of SWNT/nylon 6,10 composites with flexible spacers at the interface.

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman, Mohammad; Chattopadhyay, Jayanta; Billups, W Edward; Winey, Karen I

    2007-05-01

    We have prepared nylon 6,10 nanocomposites using functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes and our interfacial in situ polycondensation method. The specific functional groups -(CH2)nCOCl [n = 4 and 9] on the sidewalls of SWNT were designed to covalently link nanotubes to the nylon matrix via alkyl segments. The composites with functionalized SWNT show significant improvements in tensile modulus, strength, and toughness relative to nylon and nylon modified with non-functionalized SWNT. The alkyl linkages at the SWNT/nylon 6,10 interface contribute significantly to improving the toughness of the composites. PMID:17397230

  16. Broken Optical Symmetry in DNA-SWNT Hybrids: Spectroscopic Signaling of the Helical Wrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotkin, Slava V.

    2009-03-01

    Functionalizing single-stranded DNA on a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) has allowed isolating individual tubes, making them soluble, and separating SWNTs according to their chirality. Such strong technological impact motivated our study of the optical properties of the DNA-SWNT hybrids, commonly used now for the solution-based fabrication and experiments. The helicity of the DNA wrap may interfere with the intrinsic Hamiltonian of the SWNT and result in bandstructure modulation. Our modeling predicts a symmetry lowering in the hybrid due to the Coulomb potential of the regular helical wrap of the ionized backbone of the ssDNA, followed by the qualitative changes in the cross- or circularly polarized SWNT absorption spectrum (with no or little change in the parallel polarization). In particular, we predict the appearance of a new peak in the cross-polarized absorption of the ssDNA-SWNT at a frequency lower than that of all allowed transitions in the bare tube. Such effect can be used for optical identification of the wrap at sufficient ssDNA coverage. Wrap signaling happens also via another optical effect, a strong circular dichroism even in the complex with an achiral SWNT, and even at the frequencies where ss-DNA has no absorption features at all. Symmetry of the wrap is central to determine such a circular dichroism of the hybrid. Having in mind that the exact geometry of a DNA wrap for an arbitrary tube is not precisely known yet, we put forward a general model capable of tracking optical effects, varying the parameters of the wrap and/or tube diameter. For various ssDNA backbone helical angles and for various tubes we predict different absorption spectra, though a general qualitative feature of the helical symmetry breaking, the appearance of new van Hove singularities and circular dichroism, must be present.

  17. Controlled doping of carbon nanotubes with metallocenes for application in hybrid carbon nanotube/Si solar cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaokai; Guard, Louise M; Jiang, Jie; Sakimoto, Kelsey; Huang, Jing-Shun; Wu, Jianguo; Li, Jinyang; Yu, Lianqing; Pokhrel, Ravi; Brudvig, Gary W; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Hazari, Nilay; Taylor, André D

    2014-06-11

    There is considerable interest in the controlled p-type and n-type doping of carbon nanotubes (CNT) for use in a range of important electronics applications, including the development of hybrid CNT/silicon (Si) photovoltaic devices. Here, we demonstrate that easy to handle metallocenes and related complexes can be used to both p-type and n-type dope single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin films, using a simple spin coating process. We report n-SWNT/p-Si photovoltaic devices that are >450 times more efficient than the best solar cells of this type currently reported and show that the performance of both our n-SWNT/p-Si and p-SWNT/n-Si devices is related to the doping level of the SWNT. Furthermore, we establish that the electronic structure of the metallocene or related molecule can be correlated to the doping level of the SWNT, which may provide the foundation for controlled doping of SWNT thin films in the future. PMID:24779408

  18. Formation of Na2SO4 and K2SO4 in flames doped with sulfur and alkali chlorides and carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Miller, R. A.; Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    High pressure, free-jet expansion, mass spectrometric sampling was used to identify directly and to measure reaction products formed in doped methane-oxygen flames. Flames were doped with SO2 or CH3SH and sodium or potassium chlorides or carbonates. Gaseous NA2SO4 or K2S04 molecules were formed in residence times on the order of msec for each combination of dopants used. Composition profiles of combustion products were measured and compared with equilibrium thermodynamic calculations of product composition.

  19. Formation of Na2SO4 and K2SO4 in flames doped with sulfur and alkali chlorides and carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Miller, R. A.; Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    High pressure, free-jet expansion, mass spectrometric sampling was used to identify directly and to measure reaction products formed in doped methane-oxygen flames. Flames were doped with SO2 or CH3SH and sodium or potassium chlorides or carbonates. Gaseous Na2SO4 or K2SO4 molecules were formed in residence times on the order of 1 msec for each combination of dopants used. Composition profiles of combustion products were measured and compared with equilibrium thermodynamic calculations of product composition.

  20. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  1. Milk-alkali syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000332.htm Milk-alkali syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Milk-alkali syndrome is a condition in which there ...

  2. First-principles computational studies of alkali-doped C60 fullerides. Final technical report, 1 Jan 91-1 Jan 92

    SciTech Connect

    Erwin, S.C.

    1992-04-06

    Researchers at AT and T Bell Laboratories reported the discovery of superconductivity at 18 K in a potassium-doped fullerene solid, KxC60. This marked a major turning point in the young history of the C60 molecule 'buckminsterfullerene': from a hypothetical molecular (1985), to small-scale (mg) production of crystalline powders (1988), to large-scale synthesis (1990), to a material with the highest transition temperature of any molecular superconductor. This history represents only one of many research lines. Concurrently with the work at AT and T on partial doping, researchers at the Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter at the University of Pennsylvania were doping solid C60 to saturation with potassium. The resulting pure phase, K6C60, was characterized by x-ray diffraction in April 1991: the lattice was body-centered cubic, with the C60 molecules essentially undistorted, orientationally ordered, and each surrounded by a cage of 24 K atoms. Nothing was known about the electronic structure at this early stage.

  3. Enhancing Dispersion and Properties of SWNT-polymer Nanocomposites by Controlled Non-covalent Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linton, Dias

    2008-03-01

    The enhancement of the dispersion and properties of singlewalled carbon nanotubes in a polymer nanocomposite via non-covalent interaction is studied. 1% w/w SWNT are dispersed in random copolymers of methyl methacrylate and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), where the composition of the copolymer varies from 0% to 50% DMAEMA. The resulting nanocomposites indicate the existence of interactions between the carbon nanotube and polymer matrix by a shift of the D* peak position (˜2600-2700 cm-1) of the polymer nanocomposite. The copolymer with 30% DMAEMA shows the smallest shift, suggesting that the nanotubes are debundled, where it is expected that this non-covalent interaction originate from the tertiary amino group in DMAEMA by formation of an electron-donor interaction with the SWNT.

  4. Fabrication of conductive polymer nanofibers through SWNT supramolecular functionalization and aqueous solution processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Fahim; Prestayko, Rachel; Saem, Sokunthearath; Nowicki, Lauren; Imit, Mokhtar; Adronov, Alex; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M.

    2015-10-01

    Polymeric thin films and nanostructured composites with excellent electrical properties are required for the development of advanced optoelectronic devices, flexible electronics, wearable sensors, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Because most polymers available for fabrication are insulating, one of the biggest challenges remains the preparation of inexpensive polymer composites with good electrical conductivity. Among the nanomaterials used to enhance composite performance, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are ideal due to their unique physical and electrical properties. Yet, a barrier to their widespread application is that they do not readily disperse in solvents traditionally used for polymer processing. In this study, we employed supramolecular functionalization of SWNTs with a conjugated polyelectrolyte as a simple approach to produce stable aqueous nanotube suspensions, that could be effortlessly blended with the polymer poly(ethyleneoxide) (PEO). The homogeneous SWNT:PEO mixtures were used to fabricate conductive thin films and nanofibers with improved conductivities through drop casting and electrospinning. The physical characterization of electrospun nanofibers through Raman spectroscopy and SEM revealed that the SWNTs were uniformly incorporated throughout the composites. The electrical characterization of SWNT:PEO thin films allowed us to assess their conductivity and establish a percolation threshold of 0.1 wt% SWNT. Similarly, measurement of the nanofiber conductivity showed that the electrospinning process improved the contact between nanotube complexes, resulting in conductivities in the S m-1 range with much lower weight loading of SWNTs than their thin film counterparts. The methods reported for the fabrication of conductive nanofibers are simple, inexpensive, and enable SWNT processing in aqueous solutions, and offer great potential for nanofiber use in applications involving flexible electronics, sensing devices, and tissue engineering

  5. Fabrication of conductive polymer nanofibers through SWNT supramolecular functionalization and aqueous solution processing.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Fahim; Prestayko, Rachel; Saem, Sokunthearath; Nowicki, Lauren; Imit, Mokhtar; Adronov, Alex; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M

    2015-10-01

    Polymeric thin films and nanostructured composites with excellent electrical properties are required for the development of advanced optoelectronic devices, flexible electronics, wearable sensors, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Because most polymers available for fabrication are insulating, one of the biggest challenges remains the preparation of inexpensive polymer composites with good electrical conductivity. Among the nanomaterials used to enhance composite performance, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are ideal due to their unique physical and electrical properties. Yet, a barrier to their widespread application is that they do not readily disperse in solvents traditionally used for polymer processing. In this study, we employed supramolecular functionalization of SWNTs with a conjugated polyelectrolyte as a simple approach to produce stable aqueous nanotube suspensions, that could be effortlessly blended with the polymer poly(ethyleneoxide) (PEO). The homogeneous SWNT:PEO mixtures were used to fabricate conductive thin films and nanofibers with improved conductivities through drop casting and electrospinning. The physical characterization of electrospun nanofibers through Raman spectroscopy and SEM revealed that the SWNTs were uniformly incorporated throughout the composites. The electrical characterization of SWNT:PEO thin films allowed us to assess their conductivity and establish a percolation threshold of 0.1 wt% SWNT. Similarly, measurement of the nanofiber conductivity showed that the electrospinning process improved the contact between nanotube complexes, resulting in conductivities in the S m(-1) range with much lower weight loading of SWNTs than their thin film counterparts. The methods reported for the fabrication of conductive nanofibers are simple, inexpensive, and enable SWNT processing in aqueous solutions, and offer great potential for nanofiber use in applications involving flexible electronics, sensing devices, and tissue engineering

  6. A composite SWNT-collagen matrix: characterization and preliminary assessment as a conductive peripheral nerve regeneration matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosun, Z.; McFetridge, P. S.

    2010-12-01

    Unique in their structure and function, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have received significant attention due to their potential to create unique conductive materials. For neural applications, these conductive materials hold promise as they may enhance regenerative processes. However, like other nano-scaled biomaterials it is important to have a comprehensive understanding how these materials interact with cell systems and how the biological system responds to their presence. These investigations aim to further our understanding of SWNT-cell interactions by assessing the effect SWNT/collagen hydrogels have on PC12 neuronal-like cells seeded within and (independently) on top of the composite material. Two types of collagen hydrogels were prepared: (1) SWNTs dispersed directly within the collagen (SWNT/COL) and (2) albumin-coated SWNTs prepared using the surfactant 'sodium cholate' to improve dispersion (AL-SWNT/COL) and collagen alone serving as a control (COL). SWNT dispersion was significantly improved when using surfactant-assisted dispersion. The enhanced dispersion resulted in a stiffer, more conductive material with an increased collagen fiber diameter. Short-term cell interactions with PC12 cells and SWNT composites have shown a stimulatory effect on cell proliferation relative to plain collagen controls. In parallel to these results, p53 gene displayed normal expression levels, which indicates the absence of nanoparticle-induced DNA damage. In summary, these mechanically tunable SWNT-collagen scaffolds show the potential for enhanced electrical activity and have shown positive in vitro biocompatibility results offering further evidence that SWNT-based materials have an important role in promoting neuronal regeneration.

  7. Structural models for alkali-metal complexes of polyacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, N. S.; Shacklette, L. W.; Baughman, R. H.

    1990-02-01

    Structural models for a stage-2 complex are proposed for polyacetylene doped with less than about 0.1 potassium or rubidium atoms per carbon. These structures utilize as a basic motif an alkali-metal column surrounded by four planar-zig-zag polyacetylene chains, a structure found at the highest dopant levels. In the new stage-2 structures, each polyacetylene chain neighbors only one alkali-metal column, so the phase contains four polymer chains per alkali-metal column. Basic structural aspects for stage-1 and stage-2 structures are now established for both potassium- and rubidium-doped polyacetylene. X-ray-diffraction and electrochemical data show that undoped and doped phases coexist at low dopant concentrations (<0.06 K atom per C). X-ray-diffraction data, down to a Bragg spacing of 1.3 Å, for polyacetylene heavily doped with potassium (0.125-0.167 K atom per C) is fully consistent with our previously proposed stage-1 tetragonal unit cell containing two polyacetylene chains per alkali-metal column. There is no evidence for our samples requiring a distortion to a monoclinic unit cell as reported by others for heavily doped samples. The nature of structural transformations and the relationship between structure and electronic properties are discussed for potassium-doped polyacetylene.

  8. Electron thermalization and trapping rates in pure and doped alkali and alkaline-earth iodide crystals studied by picosecond optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucer, K. B.; Bizarri, G.; Burger, A.; Gektin, A.; Trefilova, L.; Williams, R. T.

    2014-04-01

    Although light continues to be emitted from insulating crystals used as scintillators over a period of nanoseconds to microseconds after stopping of an energetic particle, much of what determines the nonlinearity of response goes on in the first picoseconds. On this time scale, free carriers and excitons are at high density near the track core and thus are subject to nonlinear quenching. The hot (free) electrons eventually cool to low enough energy that trapping on holes, dopants, or defects can commence. In the track environment, spatial distributions of trapped carriers determined on the picosecond time scale can influence the proportionality between light yield and the initial particle energy throughout the whole light pulse. Picosecond spectroscopy of optical absorption induced by a short pulse of above-gap excitation provides a useful window on what occurs during the crucial early evolution of excited populations. The laser excitation can be tuned to excite carriers that are initially very hot (˜3 eV) relative to the band edges, or that are almost thermalized (˜0.1 eV excess energy) at the outset. Undoped and doped samples of NaI:Tl(0%, 0.1%), CsI:Tl(0%, 0.01%, 0.04%, 0.3%), and SrI2:Eu(0%, 0.2%, 0.5%, 3%) are studied in this work.

  9. Pyrene-based fluorescent ambidextrous gelators: scaffolds for mechanically robust SWNT-gel nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Deep; Kar, Tanmoy; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2014-01-27

    With the rapid progress in the development of supramolecular soft materials, examples of low-molecular-weight gelators (LMWGs) with the ability to immobilise both water and organic solvents by the same structural scaffold are very limited. In this paper, we report the development of pyrene-containing peptide-based ambidextrous gelators (AGs) with the ability to efficiently gelate both organic and aqueous solvents. The organo- and hydrogelation efficiencies of these gelators are in the range 0.7-1.1% w/v in various organic solvents and 0.5-5% w/v in water at certain acidic pH values (pH 2.0-4.0). Moreover, for the first time, AGs have been utilised to prepare single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWNT)-included soft nanocomposites in both hydro- and organogel matrices. The influence of different non-covalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic, π-π and van der Waals interactions in self-assembled gelation has been studied in detail by circular dichroism, FTIR, variable-temperature NMR, 2D NOESY and luminescence spectroscopy. Interestingly, the presence of the pyrene moiety in the structure rendered these AGs intrinsically fluorescent, which was quenched upon successful integration of the SWNTs within the gel. The prepared hydro- and organogels along with their SWNT-integrated nanocomposites are thermoreversible in nature. The supramolecular morphologies of the dried gels and SWNT-gel nanocomposites have been studied by transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and polarising optical microscopy, which confirmed the presence of three-dimensional self-assembled fibrillar networks (SAFINs) as well as the integrated SWNTs. Importantly, rheological studies revealed that the inclusion of SWNTs within the ambidextrous gels improved the mechanical rigidity of the resulting soft nanocomposites up to 3.8-fold relative to the native gels. PMID:24339266

  10. Doxorubicin loaded 17β-estradiol based SWNT dispersions for target specific killing of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Moumita; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The present work reports the synthesis of a 17β-estradiol based amphiphiles comprising of polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety linked through succinic acid that non-covalently dispersed (76%) the single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water. The superior exfoliation of carbon nanotubes was characterized by microscopic and spectroscopic studies. Significant stability of these SWNT dispersions was observed in the presence of protein in cell culture media and the nanohybrids were highly biocompatible toward mammalian cells. Anticancer drug doxorubicin loaded on these nanohybrids was selectively delivered within estrogen receptor rich cancer cells, MCF7 (breast cancer cell) and A549 (lung cancer cell). Microscopic studies showed the localization of doxorubicin within the cancer cell nucleus whereas no such localization was observed in ER negative cells. Both these ER positive cancer cells were killed by ∼3 fold higher efficiency than that of ER negative MDA-MB-231 (advanced breast cancer cell) and HeLa cells that are deprived of estrogen receptors. Thus, judiciously designed estradiol based nanohybrids proved to be excellent tool for SWNT dispersion and also for selectively killing of ER positive cancer cells. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time non-covalently modified SWNTs by estradiol based amphiphilic dispersing agent have been used for selective killing of ER positive cancer cells by doxorubicin loaded on dispersed SWNTs. It holds immense promise to be exploited as a cancer therapeutic agent. PMID:26970825

  11. An electronic nose for amine detection based on polymer/SWNT-COOH nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Lorwongtragooll, Panida; Wisitsoraat, Anurat; Kerdcharoen, Teerakiat

    2011-12-01

    An electronic nose (e-nose) system based on polymer/carboxylic-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT-COOH) was developed for sensing various volatile amines. The SWNT-COOH dispersed in the matrix of different polymers; namely, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), cumene terminated polystyrene-co-maleic anhydride (cumene-PSMA), poly(styrenecomaleic acid) partial isobutyl/methyl mixed ester (PSE), and polyvinylpyrrolidon (PVP), were deposited on interdigitated gold electrodes to make the gas sensors. The response of these sensors to volatile amines was studied by both static and dynamic flow measurements. It was found that all sensors exhibited behaviors corresponding to Plateau-Bretano-Stevens law (R2 = 0.81 to 0.99) as the response to volatile amines. Real-world application was demonstrated by applying this e-nose to monitor the odor of sun-dried snakeskin gourami that was pre-processed by salting-preservation. This electronic nose can discriminate sun-dried fish odors with different stored days using a simple pattern recognition based on the principal component analysis (PCA). PMID:22408925

  12. Visualization of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks in conductive polystyrene nanocomposites by charge contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Loos, Joachim; Alexeev, Alexander; Grossiord, Nadia; Koning, Cor E; Regev, Oren

    2005-09-01

    The morphology of conductive nanocomposites consisting of low concentration of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and polystyrene (PS) has been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and, in particular, scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Application of charge contrast imaging in SEM allows visualization of the overall SWNT dispersion within the polymer matrix as well as the identification of individual or bundled SWNTs at high resolution. The contrast mechanism involved will be discussed. In conductive nanocomposites the SWNTs are homogeneously dispersed within the polymer matrix and form a network. Beside fairly straight SWNTs, strongly bended SWNTs have been observed. However, for samples with SWNT concentrations below the percolation threshold, the common overall charging behavior of an insulating material is observed preventing the detailed morphological investigation of the sample. PMID:15885910

  13. Optical Properties of Tm(3+) Ions in Alkali Germanate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.; Barnes, Norman P.; Reichle, Donald J.; Jiang, Shibin

    2006-01-01

    Tm-doped alkali germanate glass is investigated for use as a laser material. Spectroscopic investigations of bulk Tm-doped germanate glass are reported for the absorption, emission and luminescence decay. Tm:germanate shows promise as a fiber laser when pumped with 0.792 m diodes because of low phonon energies. Spectroscopic analysis indicates low nonradiative quenching and pulsed laser performance studies confirm this prediction by showing a quantum efficiency of 1.69.

  14. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  15. Growth of Horizontal Semiconducting SWNT Arrays with Density Higher than 100 tubes/μm using Ethanol/Methane Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lixing; Zhang, Shuchen; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Horizontally aligned semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (s-SWNT) arrays with a certain density are highly desirable for future electronic devices. However, obtaining s-SWNT arrays with simultaneously high purity and high density is extremely challenging. We report herein a rational approach, using ethanol/methane chemical vapor deposition, to grow SWNT arrays with a s-SWNT ratio over 91% and a density higher than 100 tubes/μm. In this approach, at a certain temperature, ethanol was fully thermally decomposed to feed carbon atoms for Trojan-Mo catalysts growing high density SWNT arrays, while the incomplete pyrolysis of methane provided appropriate active H radicals with the help of catalytic sapphire surface to inhibit metallic SWNT (m-SWNT) growth. The synergistic effect of ethanol/methane mixtures resulted in enriched semiconducting SWNTs and no obvious decrease in nanotube density due to their milder reactivity and higher controllability at suitable growth conditions. This work represents a step forward in large-area synthesis of high density s-SWNT arrays on substrates and demonstrates potential applications in scalable carbon nanotube electronics. PMID:27177360

  16. Relation between the electroforming voltage in alkali halide-polymer diodes and the bandgap of the alkali halide

    SciTech Connect

    Bory, Benjamin F.; Wang, Jingxin; Janssen, René A. J.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Gomes, Henrique L.; De Leeuw, Dago M.

    2014-12-08

    Electroforming of indium-tin-oxide/alkali halide/poly(spirofluorene)/Ba/Al diodes has been investigated by bias dependent reflectivity measurements. The threshold voltages for electrocoloration and electroforming are independent of layer thickness and correlate with the bandgap of the alkali halide. We argue that the origin is voltage induced defect formation. Frenkel defect pairs are formed by electron–hole recombination in the alkali halide. This self-accelerating process mitigates injection barriers. The dynamic junction formation is compared to that of a light emitting electrochemical cell. A critical defect density for electroforming is 10{sup 25}/m{sup 3}. The electroformed alkali halide layer can be considered as a highly doped semiconductor with metallic transport characteristics.

  17. Apparatus enables accurate determination of alkali oxides in alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupraw, W. A.; Gahn, R. F.; Graab, J. W.; Maple, W. E.; Rosenblum, L.

    1966-01-01

    Evacuated apparatus determines the alkali oxide content of an alkali metal by separating the metal from the oxide by amalgamation with mercury. The apparatus prevents oxygen and moisture from inadvertently entering the system during the sampling and analytical procedure.

  18. Alkalis and Skin.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, John E; Tan, Jin Lin; Ming, Justin Choong Tzen; Abell, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this editorial is to provide an overview of the chemical interactions occurring in the skin of our patients on contact with alkaline agents. Strongly basic alkali is highly aggressive and will readily hydrolyze (or cleave) key biological molecules such as lipids and proteins. This phenomenon is known as saponification in the case of lipids and liquefactive denaturation for peptides and proteins. A short section on current first-aid concepts is included. A better understanding of the basic science behind alkali burns will make us better teachers and provide an insight into the urgency needed in treating these common and dangerous chemical injuries. PMID:26182072

  19. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  20. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  1. Chlor-Alkali Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkatesh, S.; Tilak, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    Chlor-alkali technology is one of the largest electrochemical industries in the world, the main products being chlorine and caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) generated simultaneously by the electrolysis of sodium chloride. This technology is reviewed in terms of electrochemical principles and manufacturing processes involved. (Author/JN)

  2. Lysozyme coated DNA and DNA/SWNT fibers by solution spinning.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Dhriti; Minus, Marilyn L; Kumar, Satish

    2011-07-01

    DNA fibers were prepared by solution spinning of DNA in a lysozyme (LSZ) coagulation/gelation bath. Strong positive charges carried by LSZ protein condensed the DNA (strong negative charged) molecules resulting in self-assembly and the formation of fibrillar structures in a gel-like network. DNA/LSZ fibril formation was found to be dependent on the ratio of DNA to LSZ. A minimum 0.1 wt.-% of LSZ was necessary to condense 0.1 wt.-% of DNA into micro-fibrils. Macroscopic fiber spinning was possible by introducing a 0.1 wt.-% DNA aqueous solution into a 0.2 wt.-% LSZ coagulation bath which resulted in fibers with ≈20 µm diameter. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) were also incorporated into these fibers to explore the possibility for creating hybrid materials. All DNA-based fibers exhibit strong birefringence confirming molecular orientation along the fiber axis. Due to the presence of LSZ, the fibers exhibit antimicrobial activity against bacteria like Micrococcus lysodeikticus. PMID:21472979

  3. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Wolfs, Denise Y.; Clavenna, Le Roy R.; Eakman, James M.; Kalina, Theodore

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  4. Origin of the Linear Relationship between CH2/NH/O-SWNT Reaction Energies and Sidewall Curvature: Armchair Nanotubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Guishan; Wang, Zhi; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2006-11-08

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The origin of the linear relationship between the reaction energy of the CH2/NH/O exo and endo additions to armchair (n, n) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and the inverse tube diameter (1/d) measuring sidewall curvature was elucidated using density functional theory and density functional tight binding methods for finite-size SWNT models with n ) 3, 4, ..., 13. A nearly perfect linear relationship between ¢E and 1/d all through exohedral (positive curvature) and endohedral (negative curvature) additions is due to cancellation between the quadratic contributions of the SWNT deformation energy and the interaction energy (INT) between the deformed SWNT and CH2/NH/O adducts. Energy decomposition analysis shows that the quadratic contributions in electrostatic, exchange, and orbital terms mostly cancel each other, making INT weakly quadratic, and that the linear 1/d dependence of INT, and therefore of ¢E, is a reflection of the 1/d dependence of the back-donative orbital interaction of b1 symmetry from the occupied CH2/NH/O pð orbital to the vacant CdC ð* LUMO of the SWNT. We also discuss the origin of the two isomers (open and three-membered ring) of the exohedral addition product and explain the behavior of their associated minima on the C-C potential energy surfaces with changing d.

  5. Hole doping and surface functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotube chemiresistive sensors for ultrasensitive and highly selective organophosphor vapor detection.

    PubMed

    Wei, Liangming; Shi, Diwen; Ye, Peiyi; Dai, Zhenqing; Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Changxin; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Liying; Xu, Dong; Wang, Zi; Zhang, Yafei

    2011-10-21

    We developed a chemiresistive sensor based on doped and functionalized semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) (simulant of nerve agent sarin) vapor. The semiconducting SWNT network was deposited between interdigitated electrodes and modified by solid organic acid tetrafluorohydroquinone (TFQ). The TFQ molecules could not only selectively bind DMMP onto the sidewalls of SWNTs via the strong hydrogen bonding interaction, but also tailor the electronic properties of SWNTs via heavy hole doping. This synergetic effect significantly improved the sensitivity of the devices, and enabled the sensors to easily detect DMMP at 20 parts-per-trillion (ppt) concentration with a response time of less than 2 min, without the need for pre-concentration of the analytes. This sensitivity is about five orders of magnitude higher than that of the unmodified SWNT chemiresistor, and also significantly higher than that of the functionalized SWNT chemiresistors previously reported. Moreover, the SWNT-TFQ sensors could be recovered when DMMP is replaced with referencing gas. The SWNT-TFQ sensors also show excellent selectivity toward DMMP over some interfering organic vapors. The response mechanism, i.e. charge transfer and dedoping was investigated. PMID:21934197

  6. Hole doping and surface functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotube chemiresistive sensors for ultrasensitive and highly selective organophosphor vapor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Liangming; Shi, Diwen; Ye, Peiyi; Dai, Zhenqing; Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Changxin; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Liying; Xu, Dong; Wang, Zi; Zhang, Yafei

    2011-10-01

    We developed a chemiresistive sensor based on doped and functionalized semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) (simulant of nerve agent sarin) vapor. The semiconducting SWNT network was deposited between interdigitated electrodes and modified by solid organic acid tetrafluorohydroquinone (TFQ). The TFQ molecules could not only selectively bind DMMP onto the sidewalls of SWNTs via the strong hydrogen bonding interaction, but also tailor the electronic properties of SWNTs via heavy hole doping. This synergetic effect significantly improved the sensitivity of the devices, and enabled the sensors to easily detect DMMP at 20 parts-per-trillion (ppt) concentration with a response time of less than 2 min, without the need for pre-concentration of the analytes. This sensitivity is about five orders of magnitude higher than that of the unmodified SWNT chemiresistor, and also significantly higher than that of the functionalized SWNT chemiresistors previously reported. Moreover, the SWNT-TFQ sensors could be recovered when DMMP is replaced with referencing gas. The SWNT-TFQ sensors also show excellent selectivity toward DMMP over some interfering organic vapors. The response mechanism, i.e. charge transfer and dedoping was investigated.

  7. Simple model potential and model wave functions for (H-alkali)+ and (alkali-alkali)+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, S. H.; Tang, K. T.

    2000-07-01

    A simple model potential is proposed to describe the interaction of a valence electron with the alkali core, which incorporates the correct asymptotic behavior in terms of dipolar polarizabilities, and the short-range exchange effects in terms of a hard core adjusted to give the correct energy for the valence electron. Based on this potential, simple wave functions are developed to describe the (H-alkali)+ and (alkali-alkali)+ ions. These wave functions exhibit some important structures of the ions, and provide a universal description of the properties of all (H-alkali)+ and (alkali-alkali)+ ions, in particular, the equilibrium separations of the nuclei and the corresponding dissociation energies. They also allow us to calculate the dipolar polarizabilities of Li2+, Na2+, K2+, Rb2+, and Cs2+.

  8. Alkali-vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.; Krupke, W. F.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the results from several of our alkali laser systems. We show highly efficient performance from an alexandrite-pumped rubidium laser. Using a laser diode stack as a pump source, we demonstrate up to 145 W of average power from a CW system. We present a design for a transversely pumped demonstration system that will show all of the required laser physics for a high power system.

  9. Effect of Reaction Temperature in the Selective Synthesis of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) on a Bimetallic CoCr-MCM-41 Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Zoican Loebick, C.; Abanulo, D; Majewska, M; Haller, G; Pfefferle, L

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) on a CoCr-MCM-41 bimetallic catalyst by CO disproportionation has been carried out at five different temperatures between 500 and 900 C. A series of methods have been employed for a comprehensive assessment effect of temperature on the size-controllability of the catalyst particles and the morphology of the resultant SWNT. By extended fine structure X-ray absorption, thermogravimetric analysis, resonance Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence excitation (PLE) mapping and transmission electron microscopy we found an optimal synthesis temperature window between 600 and 800 C. In this window, modifying the reaction temperature leads to significant changes in the SWNT yield, diameter and chirality distribution. Decrease in reaction temperature favored the selective synthesis of very small diameter carbon nanotubes (as low as 0.6 nm). Chirality dependence of SWNT on temperature has been measured by PLE. A progressive suppression of larger diameter SWNT identities in the measured SWNT population was noted when reaction temperature decreased. In the measured PL maps, two near armchair structures (6,5) and (7,3) were dominant at 600 and 700 C.

  10. Modification of alkali metals on silicon-based nanoclusters: An enhanced nonlinear optical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojun; Han, Quan; Yang, Xiaohui; Song, Ruijuan; Song, Limei

    2016-08-01

    Structures, chemical stabilities and nonlinear optical properties of alkali metals-adsorbed niobium-doped silicon (M@SinNb+) clusters are investigated using the DFT methods. The alkali metals prefer energetically to be attached as bridged bond rather than M-Si single bond in most of optimized structures. Adsorption of alkali metals on doped silicon clusters gradually enhances their chemical stabilities with increasing cluster size. Noteworthily, the first hyperpolarizabilities (βtot) of the M@SinNb+ clusters, obtained by using the long-range corrected CAM-B3LYP functional, are large enough to establish their strong nonlinear optical behavior, especially for M@Si9Nb+ (M = Li, Na, and K), and the enhanced βtot ordering by alkali metals is Na > K > Li.

  11. Adsorption on Alkali Halides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urzua Duran, Gilberto Antonio

    1995-01-01

    Using a variety of interionic potentials, I have computed the configurations of adsorbed alkali halides monomers on the (001) surface of selected alkali halides crystals. In the majority of cases studied it is found that the monomer adsorbs perpendicular to the surface with the cation sitting nearly on top of the surface anion. In about ten percent of the cases though the monomer adsorbs tilted from the vertical. In these cases the ion that is closer to the surface can be the cation or the anion. The effect of polarization forces is found to be important. In order to discuss the effects of surface retaxation with adsorbates, I have evaluated the surface relaxation of the alkali halide crystals, using a shell model for the interionic forces. It is found that surface relaxation and rumpling are generally small, especially when the van der Waals forces are included. A theory of the effect of substrate vibrations on the binding of an adsorbed atom is developed. At T = 0 the binding energy is D_0-E, where D_0 is the surface well depth (classical binding energy) and E is the quantum correction. For several simple models, it is found that E is surprisingly model-independent. We compare D _0-E with the binding energies to a rigid substrate, D_0-E_{rs}, and to a vibrationally averaged substrate, D _0-E_{va}. We prove that E_{va}>=q E>=q E_ {rs} and that similar relations hold at finite temperature for the free energy of binding. In most cases E_{rs} is better than E_{va} as an approximation to E.

  12. PROCESS OF RECOVERING ALKALI METALS

    DOEpatents

    Wolkoff, J.

    1961-08-15

    A process is described of recovering alkali metal vapor by sorption on activated alumina, activated carbon, dehydrated zeolite, activated magnesia, or Fuller's earth preheated above the vaporization temperature of the alkali metal and subsequent desorption by heating the solvent under vacuum. (AEC)

  13. Preparation of alkali metal dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Landel, R. F. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for producing alkali metal dispersions of high purity. The dispersions are prepared by varying the equilibrium solubility of the alkali metal in a suitable organic solvent in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The equilibrium variation is produced by temperature change. The size of the particles is controlled by controlling the rate of temperature change.

  14. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  15. Encapsulation of S/SWNT with PANI Web for Enhanced Rate and Cycle Performance in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joo Hyun; Fu, Kun; Choi, Junghyun; Kil, Kichun; Kim, Jeonghyun; Han, Xiaogang; Hu, Liangbing; Paik, Ungyu

    2015-03-01

    Lithium-sulfur batteries show great potential to compete with lithium-ion batteries due to the fact that sulfur can deliver a high theoretical capacity of 1672 mAh/g and a high theoretical energy density of 2500 Wh/kg. But it has several problems to be solved in order to achieve high sulfur utilization with high Coulombic efficiency and long cycle life of Li-S batteries. These problems are mainly caused by the dissoluble polysulfide species, which are a series of complex reduced sulfur products, associating with shuttle effect between electrodes as well as side reactions on lithium metal anode. To alleviate these challenges, we developed a sulfur-carbon nanotube (S/SWNT) composite coated with polyaniline (PANI) polymer as polysulfide block to achieve high sulfur utilization, high Coulombic efficiency, and long cycle life. The PANI coated S/SWNT composite showed a superior specific capacity of 1011 mAh/g over 100 cycles and a good rate retention, demonstrating the synergic contribution of porous carbon and conducting polymer protection to address challenges underlying sulfur cathode.

  16. Encapsulation of S/SWNT with PANI web for enhanced rate and cycle performance in lithium sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Hyun; Fu, Kun; Choi, Junghyun; Kil, Kichun; Kim, Jeonghyun; Han, Xiaogang; Hu, Liangbing; Paik, Ungyu

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-sulfur batteries show great potential to compete with lithium-ion batteries due to the fact that sulfur can deliver a high theoretical capacity of 1672 mAh/g and a high theoretical energy density of 2500 Wh/kg. But it has several problems to be solved in order to achieve high sulfur utilization with high Coulombic efficiency and long cycle life of Li-S batteries. These problems are mainly caused by the dissoluble polysulfide species, which are a series of complex reduced sulfur products, associating with shuttle effect between electrodes as well as side reactions on lithium metal anode. To alleviate these challenges, we developed a sulfur-carbon nanotube (S/SWNT) composite coated with polyaniline (PANI) polymer as polysulfide block to achieve high sulfur utilization, high Coulombic efficiency, and long cycle life. The PANI coated S/SWNT composite showed a superior specific capacity of 1011 mAh/g over 100 cycles and a good rate retention, demonstrating the synergic contribution of porous carbon and conducting polymer protection to address challenges underlying sulfur cathode. PMID:25752298

  17. Encapsulation of S/SWNT with PANI Web for Enhanced Rate and Cycle Performance in Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Hyun; Fu, Kun; Choi, Junghyun; Kil, Kichun; Kim, Jeonghyun; Han, Xiaogang; Hu, Liangbing; Paik, Ungyu

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-sulfur batteries show great potential to compete with lithium-ion batteries due to the fact that sulfur can deliver a high theoretical capacity of 1672 mAh/g and a high theoretical energy density of 2500 Wh/kg. But it has several problems to be solved in order to achieve high sulfur utilization with high Coulombic efficiency and long cycle life of Li-S batteries. These problems are mainly caused by the dissoluble polysulfide species, which are a series of complex reduced sulfur products, associating with shuttle effect between electrodes as well as side reactions on lithium metal anode. To alleviate these challenges, we developed a sulfur-carbon nanotube (S/SWNT) composite coated with polyaniline (PANI) polymer as polysulfide block to achieve high sulfur utilization, high Coulombic efficiency, and long cycle life. The PANI coated S/SWNT composite showed a superior specific capacity of 1011 mAh/g over 100 cycles and a good rate retention, demonstrating the synergic contribution of porous carbon and conducting polymer protection to address challenges underlying sulfur cathode. PMID:25752298

  18. Rapid sonosynthesis of N-doped nano TiO2 on wool fabric at low temperature: introducing self-cleaning, hydrophilicity, antibacterial/antifungal properties with low alkali solubility, yellowness and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Behzadnia, Amir; Montazer, Majid; Rashidi, Abousaeid; Mahmoudi Rad, Mahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Nano nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide was rapidly prepared by hydrolysis of titanium isopropoxide at 75-80°C using in situ sonochemical synthesis by introducing ammonia. Various concentrations of titanium isopropoxide were examined to deposit nano nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide through impregnation of the wool fabric in ultrasound bath followed by curing. The antibacterial/antifungal activities of wool samples were assessed against two common pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and the diploid fungus Candida albicans. The sonotreated wool fabrics indicated no adverse effects on human dermal fibroblasts. The presence of nanoparticles on the sonotreated wool fabrics were confirmed by FE-SEM images and EDS patterns and X-ray mapping and the crystalline size of nanoparticles were estimated through XRD results. The role of both pH and precursor concentration on the various properties of the fabric was investigated and the optimized conditions introduced using response surface methodology. PMID:25065604

  19. Two-color spectroscopy of UV excited ssDNA complex with a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) probe: Fast nucleobase autoionization mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotkin, Slava V.; Ignatova, Tetyana; Balaeff, Alexander; Zheng, Ming; Blades, Michael; Stoeckl, Peter

    DNA autoionization is a fundamental process wherein UV-photoexcited nucleobases dissipate energy to the environment without undergoing chemical damage. SWNT is shown to serve as a photoluminescent reporter for studying the mechanism and rates of DNA autoionization. Two-color photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy revealed a strong SWNT PL quenching when the UV pump is resonant with the DNA absorption [Nano Research, 2015]. Semiempirical calculations of the DNA-SWNT electronic structure, combined with a Green's function theory for charge transfer, show a 20 fs autoionization rate, dominated by the hole transfer. Rate-equation analysis of the spectroscopy data confirms that the quenching rate is limited by the thermalization of the free charge carriers transferred to the nanotube reservoir. The developed approach has a great potential for monitoring DNA excitation, autoionization, and chemical damage both in vivo and in vitro. NSF ECCS-1509786 (S.V.R.,T.I.) and PHY-1359195 (P.S.), NIST and UCF facilities.

  20. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  1. The structure of metallic complexes of polyacetylene with alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baughman, R. H.; Murthy, N. S.; Miller, G. G.

    1983-07-01

    The crystal structures of sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium doped polyacetylene have been determined using crystal packing and x-ray diffraction analyses. Each of these metallic complexes is tetragonal, with the polyacetylene chains forming a host lattice in which the alkali metal ions are present in channels. Lithium appears to be too small to stabilize the channel structure and an amorphous structure is observed. Predicted unit cell parameters and x-ray diffraction intensities are in agreement with observed values. Similarities with the alkali metal doped graphite suggest that hybridization between carbon pz orbitals and metal s orbitals occurs. Such hybridization is expected to result in a high conductivity component normal to the chain direction. On the other hand, direct overlap between polymer chains appears small, since alkali metal columns separate polymer chains. Compositions calculated for the channel structures (from meridional diffraction spacings, the intensity of equatorial diffraction lines, measured volume expansion, and distances in model complexes) all range from y=0.12 to 0.18 for (CHMy)x, where M is sodium, potassium, rubidium, or cesium.

  2. Diffusion of alkali species in porous tungsten substrates used in contact ionization sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon-Golcher, E.; Kwan, J.; Morse, E. C.

    2002-01-01

    Contact ionization (doped) sources used in current Heavy Ion Fusion experiments consist of a porous tungsten substrate doped with an alkali carbonate. In the early stages of the heating cycle (T - 600 C), the carbonate breaks down and releases the alkali atoms that then diffuse through the substrate. At the emitter surface there is a balance between the fast desorption rate of the alkali atoms (mostly as neutrals) and the slower replenishment rate from the substrate by diffusion. Time-resolved measurements of neutral particle evaporation rates at the emitter surface have been used to estimate the effective diffusion coefficient (D) that characterizes the migration of alkali species in the substrate. These estimates are consistent with the observed source lifetimes (tens of hrs.) and establish the alkali migration in the bulk as a diffusion-limited process. The measurements suggest that the faster migration rates (D {approx} 10{sup -5} - 10{sup -6} cm2/s) occur early during the heating cycle when the dominant species are the neutral alkali atoms. At operating temperatures there is a slower migration rate (D x 10-7cm2/sd) ue to the dominance of ions, which difise by a slower surface diffusion process.

  3. Transparent conductors from layer-by-layer assembled SWNT films: importance of mechanical properties and a new figure of merit.

    PubMed

    Shim, Bong Sup; Zhu, Jian; Jan, Edward; Critchley, Kevin; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2010-07-27

    New transparent conductors (TCs) capable of replacing traditional indium tin oxide (ITO) are much needed for displays, sensors, solar cells, smart energy-saving windows, and flexible electronics. Technical requirements of TCs include not only high electrical conductivity and transparency but also environmental stability and mechanical property which are often overlooked in the research environment. Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) coatings have been suggested as alternative TC materials but typically lack sufficient wear resistance compared to ITO. Balancing conductance, transparency, durability, and flexibility is a formidable challenge, which leads us to the introduction of a new TC figure of merit, PiTC, incorporating all these qualities. Maximization of PiTC to that of ITO or better can be suggested as an initial research goal. Fine tuning of SWNT layer-by-layer (LBL) polymeric nanocomposite structures makes possible integration of all the necessary properties. The produced TC demonstrated resistivity of 86 Omega/sq with 80.2% optical transmittance combined with tensile modulus, strength, and toughness of the film of 12.3+/-3.4 GPa, 218+/-13 MPa, and 8+/-1.7 J/g, respectively. A new transparent capping layer to conserve these properties in the hostile environment with matching or better strength, toughness, and transparency parameters was also demonstrated. Due to application demands, bending performance of TC made by LBL was of special interest and exceeded that of ITO by at least 100 times. Cumulative figure of merit PiTC for the produced coatings was 0.15 Omega(-1), whereas the conventional ITO showed PiTC<0.07 Omega(-1). With overall electrical and optical performance comparable to ITO and exceptional mechanical properties, the described coatings can provide an excellent alternative to ITO or other nanowire- and nanotube-based TC specifically in flexible electronics, displays, and sensors. PMID:20552974

  4. Alkali slurry ozonation to produce a high capacity nickel battery material

    DOEpatents

    Jackovitz, John F.; Pantier, Earl A.

    1984-11-06

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  5. Mixed alkali effect on the spectroscopic properties of alkali-alkaline earth oxide borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, G.; Ramesh, B.; Shareefuddin, Md.; Chary, M. N.; Sayanna, R.

    2016-05-01

    The mixed alkali and alkaline earth oxide borate glass with the composition xK2O - (25-x) Li2O-12.5BaO-12.5MgO-50B2O3 (x = 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25mol %) and doped with 1mol% CuO were prepared by the melt quenching technique. From the optical absorption spectra the optical band gap, electronic polarizability(α02-), interaction parameter (A), theoretical and experimental optical basicity (Λ) values were evaluated. From the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectral data the number of spins (N) and susceptibility (χ) were evaluated. The values of (α02-), and (Λ) increases with increasing of K2O content and electronic polarizability and interaction parameter show opposite behaviuor which may be due to the creation of non-bridging oxygens and expansion of borate network. The reciprocal of susceptibility (1/χ) and spin concentration (N) as a function of K2O content, varied nonlinearly which may be due to creation of non-bridging oxygens in the present glass system. This may be attributed to mixed alkali effect (MAE).

  6. Hydrothermal alkali metal catalyst recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Eakman, James M.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.

    1979-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles primarily in the form of water soluble alkali metal formates by treating the particles with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of added carbon monoxide. During the treating process the water insoluble alkali metal compounds comprising the insoluble alkali metal residues are converted into water soluble alkali metal formates. The resultant aqueous solution containing water soluble alkali metal formates is then separated from the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment process, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal formates serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. This process permits increased recovery of alkali metal constituents, thereby decreasing the overall cost of the gasification process by reducing the amount of makeup alkali metal compounds necessary.

  7. Electrolytic method to make alkali alcoholates using ion conducting alkali electrolyte/separator

    DOEpatents

    Joshi, Ashok V.; Balagopal, Shekar; Pendelton, Justin

    2011-12-13

    Alkali alcoholates, also called alkali alkoxides, are produced from alkali metal salt solutions and alcohol using a three-compartment electrolytic cell. The electrolytic cell includes an anolyte compartment configured with an anode, a buffer compartment, and a catholyte compartment configured with a cathode. An alkali ion conducting solid electrolyte configured to selectively transport alkali ions is positioned between the anolyte compartment and the buffer compartment. An alkali ion permeable separator is positioned between the buffer compartment and the catholyte compartment. The catholyte solution may include an alkali alcoholate and alcohol. The anolyte solution may include at least one alkali salt. The buffer compartment solution may include a soluble alkali salt and an alkali alcoholate in alcohol.

  8. The calcium-alkali syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Mariangeli; Fenves, Andrew Z; Emmett, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The milk-alkali syndrome was a common cause of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and renal failure in the early 20th century. It was caused by the ingestion of large quantities of milk and absorbable alkali to treat peptic ulcer disease. The syndrome virtually vanished after introduction of histamine-2 blockers and proton pump inhibitors. More recently, a similar condition called the calcium-alkali syndrome has emerged as a common cause of hypercalcemia and alkalosis. It is usually caused by the ingestion of large amounts of calcium carbonate salts to prevent or treat osteoporosis and dyspepsia. We describe a 78-year-old woman who presented with weakness, malaise, and confusion. She was found to have hypercalcemia, acute renal failure, and metabolic alkalosis. Upon further questioning, she reported use of large amounts of calcium carbonate tablets to treat recent heartburn symptoms. Calcium supplements were discontinued, and she was treated with intravenous normal saline. After 5 days, the calcium and bicarbonate levels normalized and renal function returned to baseline. In this article, we review the pathogenesis of the calcium-alkali syndrome as well as the differences between the traditional and modern syndromes. PMID:23543983

  9. Progress in Understanding Alkali-Alkali Spin Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Happer, William; Chann, Bien; Kadlecek, Stephen; Anderson, L. W.; Walker, Thad G.

    2000-06-01

    In extensive experiments we have shown that a spin interaction with a relatively long correlation time causes much of the spin relaxation in very dense alkali-metal vapors. The spin relaxation is affected by the pressure of the helium or nitrogen buffer gas, although there is little dependence at pressures above one atmosphere. There are substantial differences in the relaxation rates for different isotopes of the same element, for example ^87Rb and ^85Rb. We have completed extensive modeling of how singlet and triplet dimers and doublet trimers of the alkali-metal atoms could cause spin relaxation in dense alkali-metal vapors. In the case of doublet trimers or triplet dimers, we assume the main coupling to the nuclear spins is through the Fermi Contact interaction with the unpaired electrons. Spin loss to the rotation of the molecule is assumed to occur through the electronic spin-rotation and spin-axis (dipole-dipole) interactions for the triplet dimers. For the singlet dimers, we assume that the nuclear spins couple directly to the rotational angular momentum of the molecule through the electric quadrupole interaction. We account for all of the total nuclear spin states that occur for the dimers and trimers. We have also considered the possibility that the collisional breakup and formation rates of the dimers or trimers could saturate with increasing buffer gas pressure. Such saturation occurs in many other unimolecular reactions and is often ascribed to breakup through activated states.

  10. Positron-alkali atom scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.; Ward, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron-alkali atom scattering was recently investigated both theoretically and experimentally in the energy range from a few eV up to 100 eV. On the theoretical side calculations of the integrated elastic and excitation cross sections as well as total cross sections for Li, Na and K were based upon either the close-coupling method or the modified Glauber approximation. These theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the total cross section for both Na and K. Resonance structures were also found in the L = 0, 1 and 2 partial waves for positron scattering from the alkalis. The structure of these resonances appears to be quite complex and, as expected, they occur in conjunction with the atomic excitation thresholds. Currently both theoretical and experimental work is in progress on positron-Rb scattering in the same energy range.

  11. Alkali metal/sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Joginder N.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

  12. Superconductivity in alkali metal fullerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, D. W.; Rosseinsky, M. J.; Haddon, R. C.; Ramirez, A. P.; Hebard, A. F.; Tycko, R.; Fleming, R. M.; Dabbagh, G.

    1991-12-01

    The recent synthesis of macroscopic quantities of spherical molecular carbon compounds, commonly called fullerenes, has stimulated a wide variety of studies of the chemical and physical properties of this novel class of compounds. We discovered that the smallest of the known fullerenes, C 60, could be made conducting and superconducting by reaction with alkali metals. In this paper, an overview of the motivation for these discoveries and some recent results are presented.

  13. Alkali metal sources for OLED devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattaneo, Lorena; Longoni, Giorgio; Bonucci, Antonio; Tominetti, Stefano

    2005-07-01

    In OLED organic layers electron injection is improved by using alkali metals as cathodes, to lower work function or, as dopants of organic layer at cathode interface. The creation of an alkali metal layer can be accomplished through conventional physical vapor deposition from a heated dispenser. However alkali metals are very reactive and must be handled in inert atmosphere all through the entire process. If a contamination takes place, it reduces the lithium deposition rate and also the lithium total yield in a not controlled way. An innovative alkali metal dispensing technology has been developed to overcome these problems and ensure OLED alkali metal cathode reliability. The alkali Metal dispenser, called Alkamax, will be able to release up to a few grams of alkali metals (in particular Li and Cs) throughout the adoption of a very stable form of the alkali metal. Lithium, for example, can be evaporated "on demand": the evaporation could be stopped and re-activated without losing alkali metal yield because the metal not yet consumed remains in its stable form. A full characterization of dispensing material, dispenser configuration and dispensing process has been carried out in order to optimize the evaporation and deposition dynamics of alkali metals layers. The study has been performed applying also inside developed simulations tools.

  14. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  15. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  16. Alkali-Metal Spin Maser.

    PubMed

    Chalupczak, W; Josephs-Franks, P

    2015-07-17

    Quantum measurement is a combination of a read-out and a perturbation of the quantum system. We explore the nonlinear spin dynamics generated by a linearly polarized probe beam in a continuous measurement of the collective spin state in a thermal alkali-metal atomic sample. We demonstrate that the probe-beam-driven perturbation leads, in the presence of indirect pumping, to complete polarization of the sample and macroscopic coherent spin oscillations. As a consequence of the former we report observation of spectral profiles free from collisional broadening. Nonlinear dynamics is studied through exploring its effect on radio frequency as well as spin noise spectra. PMID:26230788

  17. Metal-to-insulator crossover in alkali doped zeolite

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Mutsuo; Jeglič, Peter; Krajnc, Andraž; Žitko, Rok; Nakano, Takehito; Nozue, Yasuo; Arčon, Denis

    2016-01-01

    We report a systematic nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of the 23Na spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, in sodium loaded low-silica X (LSX) zeolite, Nan/Na12-LSX, for various loading levels of sodium atoms n across the metal-to-insulator crossover. For high loading levels of n ≥ 14.2, 1/T1T shows nearly temperature-independent behaviour between 10 K and 25 K consistent with the Korringa relaxation mechanism and the metallic ground state. As the loading levels decrease below n ≤ 11.6, the extracted density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level sharply decreases, although a residual DOS at Fermi level is still observed even in the samples that lack the metallic Drude-peak in the optical reflectance. The observed crossover is a result of a complex loading-level dependence of electric potential felt by the electrons confined to zeolite cages, where the electronic correlations and disorder both play an important role. PMID:26725368

  18. Process for the disposal of alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Leroy C.

    1977-01-01

    Large quantities of alkali metals may be safely reacted for ultimate disposal by contact with a hot concentrated caustic solution. The alkali metals react with water in the caustic solution in a controlled reaction while steam dilutes the hydrogen formed by the reaction to a safe level.

  19. The alkali metals: 200 years of surprises.

    PubMed

    Dye, James L

    2015-03-13

    Alkali metal compounds have been known since antiquity. In 1807, Sir Humphry Davy surprised everyone by electrolytically preparing (and naming) potassium and sodium metals. In 1808, he noted their interaction with ammonia, which, 100 years later, was attributed to solvated electrons. After 1960, pulse radiolysis of nearly any solvent produced solvated electrons, which became one of the most studied species in chemistry. In 1968, alkali metal solutions in amines and ethers were shown to contain alkali metal anions in addition to solvated electrons. The advent of crown ethers and cryptands as complexants for alkali cations greatly enhanced alkali metal solubilities. This permitted us to prepare a crystalline salt of Na(-) in 1974, followed by 30 other alkalides with Na(-), K(-), Rb(-) and Cs(-) anions. This firmly established the -1 oxidation state of alkali metals. The synthesis of alkalides led to the crystallization of electrides, with trapped electrons as the anions. Electrides have a variety of electronic and magnetic properties, depending on the geometries and connectivities of the trapping sites. In 2009, the final surprise was the experimental demonstration that alkali metals under high pressure lose their metallic character as the electrons are localized in voids between the alkali cations to become high-pressure electrides! PMID:25666067

  20. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, Raymond D.; McPheeters, Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  1. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C.

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  2. OSL studies of alkali fluoroperovskite single crystals for radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, D. Joseph; Raja, A.; Madhusoodanan, U.; Annalakshmi, O.; Ramasamy, P.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a preliminary investigation of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of alkali fluoroperovskite single crystals for radiation dosimetry. The perovskite-like KMgF3, NaMgF3 and LiBaF3 polycrystalline compounds doped with rare earths (Eu2+ and Ce3+) were synthesized by standard solid state reaction technique. Phase purity of the synthesized compounds was analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction technique. Single crystals of these compounds have been grown from melt by using vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger method. The Linearly Modulated OSL and Continuous Wave OSL measurements were performed in these alkali fluorides using blue light stimulation. Thermal bleaching experiments have shown that OSL signals originate from traps which are unstable near 200 °C, thus proving the suitability of the signals for dosimetric purposes. Optical bleaching measurements were also performed for these fluoride samples. OSL dose response was studied as a function of dose which was found to increase with beta dose.

  3. Temperature dependence of nonlinear optical properties in Li doped nano-carbon bowl material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei-qi; Zhou, Xin; Chang, Ying; Quan Tian, Wei; Sun, Xiu-Dong

    2013-04-01

    The mechanism for change of nonlinear optical (NLO) properties with temperature is proposed for a nonlinear optical material, Li doped curved nano-carbon bowl. Four stable conformations of Li doped corannulene were located and their electronic properties were investigated in detail. The NLO response of those Li doped conformations varies with relative position of doping agent on the curved carbon surface of corannulene. Conversion among those Li doped conformations, which could be controlled by temperature, changes the NLO response of bulk material. Thus, conformation change of alkali metal doped carbon nano-material with temperature rationalizes the variation of NLO properties of those materials.

  4. Alkali burns from wet cement.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    When water is added to the dry materials of Portland cement calcium hydroxide is formed; the wet cement is caustic (with a pH as high as 12.9) and can produce third-degree alkali burns after 2 hours of contact. Unlike professional cement workers, amateurs are usually not aware of any danger and may stand or kneel in the cement for long periods. As illustrated in a case report, general physicians may recognize neither the seriousness of the injury in its early stages nor the significance of a history of prolonged contact with wet cement. All people working with cement should be warned about its dangers and advised to immediately wash and dry the skin if contact does occur. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6561052

  5. Integrating Sphere Alkali-Metal Vapor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuyer, Bart; Ben-Kish, Amit; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2010-03-01

    An integrating sphere is an optical multi-pass cavity that uses diffuse reflection to increase the optical path length. Typically applied in photometry and radiometry, integrating spheres have previously been used to detect trace gases and to cool and trap alkali-metal atoms. Here, we investigate the potential for integrating spheres to enhance optical absorption in optically thin alkali-metal vapor cells. In particular, we consider the importance of dielectric effects due to a glass container for the alkali-metal vapor. Potential applications include miniature atomic clocks and magnetometers, where multi-passing could reduce the operating temperature and power consumption.

  6. Alkali Silicate Vehicle Forms Durable, Fireproof Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John B.; Seindenberg, Benjamin

    1964-01-01

    The problem: To develop a paint for use on satellites or space vehicles that exhibits high resistance to cracking, peeling, or flaking when subjected to a wide range of temperatures. Organic coatings will partially meet the required specifications but have the inherent disadvantage of combustibility. Alkali-silicate binders, used in some industrial coatings and adhesives, show evidence of forming a fireproof paint, but the problem of high surface-tension, a characteristic of alkali silicates, has not been resolved. The solution: Use of a suitable non-ionic wetting agent combined with a paint incorporating alkali silicate as the binder.

  7. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  8. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  9. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  10. Synergistic capture mechanisms for alkali and sulfur species from combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.W.; Shadman, F.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Mwabe, P.O.

    1994-02-01

    Experimental work was carried out on a 17 kW, 600 cm long, gas laboratory combustor, to investigate the post flame reactive capture of alkali species by kaolinite. Emphasis was on alkali/sorbent interactions occurring in flue gas at temperatures above the alkali dewpoint and on the formation of water insoluble reaction products. Time-temperature studies were carried out by injecting kaolinite at different axial points along the combustor. The effect of chlorine and sulfur on alkali capture was investigated by doping the flame with SO{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2} gases to simulate coal flame environments. Particle time and temperature history was kept as close as possible to that which would ordinarily be found in a practical boiler. Experiments designed to extract apparent initial reaction rates were carried using a narrow range, 1-2 {mu}m modal size sorbent, while, a coarse, multi size sorbent was used to investigate the governing transport mechanisms. The capture reaction has been proposed to be between alkali hydroxide and activated kaolinite, and remains so in the presence of sulfur and chlorine. The presence of sulfur reduces sodium capture by under 10% at 1300{degree}C. Larger reductions at lower temperatures are attributed to the elevated dewpoint of sodium ({approximately}850{degree}C) with subsequent reduction in sorbent residence time in the alkali gas phase domain. Chlorine reduces sodium capture by 30% across the temperature range covered by the present experiments. This result has been linked to thermodynamic equilibria between sodium hydroxide, sodium chloride and water.

  11. A p-i-n junction diode based on locally doped carbon nanotube network

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaodong; Chen, Changxin; Wei, Liangming; Hu, Nantao; Song, Chuanjuan; Liao, Chenghao; He, Rong; Dong, Xusheng; Wang, Ying; Liu, Qinran; Zhang, Yafei

    2016-01-01

    A p-i-n junction diode constructed by the locally doped network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was investigated. In this diode, the two opposite ends of the SWNT-network channel were selectively doped by triethyloxonium hexachloroantimonate (OA) and polyethylenimine (PEI) to obtain the air-stable p- and n-type SWNTs respectively while the central area of the SWNT-network remained intrinsic state, resulting in the formation of a p-i-n junction with a strong built-in electronic field in the SWNTs. The results showed that the forward current and the rectification ratio of the diode increased as the doping degree increased. The forward current of the device could also be increased by decreasing the channel length. A high-performance p-i-n junction diode with a high rectification ratio (~104), large forward current (~12.2 μA) and low reverse saturated current (~1.8 nA) was achieved with the OA and PEI doping time of 5 h and 18 h for a channel length of ~6 μm. PMID:26996610

  12. A p-i-n junction diode based on locally doped carbon nanotube network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Chen, Changxin; Wei, Liangming; Hu, Nantao; Song, Chuanjuan; Liao, Chenghao; He, Rong; Dong, Xusheng; Wang, Ying; Liu, Qinran; Zhang, Yafei

    2016-03-01

    A p-i-n junction diode constructed by the locally doped network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was investigated. In this diode, the two opposite ends of the SWNT-network channel were selectively doped by triethyloxonium hexachloroantimonate (OA) and polyethylenimine (PEI) to obtain the air-stable p- and n-type SWNTs respectively while the central area of the SWNT-network remained intrinsic state, resulting in the formation of a p-i-n junction with a strong built-in electronic field in the SWNTs. The results showed that the forward current and the rectification ratio of the diode increased as the doping degree increased. The forward current of the device could also be increased by decreasing the channel length. A high-performance p-i-n junction diode with a high rectification ratio (~104), large forward current (~12.2 μA) and low reverse saturated current (~1.8 nA) was achieved with the OA and PEI doping time of 5 h and 18 h for a channel length of ~6 μm.

  13. Alkali metal for ultraviolet band-pass filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick (Inventor); Fraschetti, George A. (Inventor); Mccann, Timothy A. (Inventor); Mayall, Sherwood D. (Inventor); Dunn, Donald E. (Inventor); Trauger, John T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An alkali metal filter having a layer of metallic bismuth deposited onto the alkali metal is provided. The metallic bismuth acts to stabilize the surface of the alkali metal to prevent substantial surface migration from occurring on the alkali metal, which may degrade optical characteristics of the filter. To this end, a layer of metallic bismuth is deposited by vapor deposition over the alkali metal to a depth of approximately 5 to 10 A. A complete alkali metal filter is described along with a method for fabricating the alkali metal filter.

  14. Alkali Metal Handling Practices at NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvail, Patrick G.; Carter, Robert R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is NASA s principle propulsion development center. Research and development is coordinated and carried out on not only the existing transportation systems, but also those that may be flown in the near future. Heat pipe cooled fast fission cores are among several concepts being considered for the Nuclear Systems Initiative. Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a capability to handle high-purity alkali metals for use in heat pipes or liquid metal heat transfer loops. This capability is a low budget prototype of an alkali metal handling system that would allow the production of flight qualified heat pipe modules or alkali metal loops. The processing approach used to introduce pure alkali metal into heat pipe modules and other test articles are described in this paper.

  15. Alkali metal intercalates of molybdenum disulfide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.

    1973-01-01

    Study of some of the physicochemical properties of compounds obtained by subjecting natural molybdenite and single crystals of molybdenum disulfide grown by chemical vapor transport to intercalation with the alkali group of metals (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) by means of the liquid ammonia technique. Reported data and results include: (1) the intercalation of the entire alkali metal group, (2) stoichiometries and X-ray data on all of the compounds, and (3) superconductivity data for all the intercalation compounds.

  16. Desulfurizing Coal With an Alkali Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravindram, M.; Kalvinskas, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental coal-desulfurization process uses alkalies and steam in fluidized-bed reactor. With highly volatile, high-sulfur bituminous coal, process removed 98 percent of pyritic sulfur and 47 percent of organic sulfur. Used in coal liquefaction and in production of clean solid fuels and synthetic liquid fuels. Nitrogen or steam flows through bed of coal in reactor. Alkalies react with sulfur, removing it from coal. Nitrogen flow fluidizes bed while heating or cooling; steam is fluidizing medium during reaction.

  17. Alkali metal crystalline polymer electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuhong; Gamble, Stephen; Ainsworth, David; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Andreev, Yuri G; Bruce, Peter G

    2009-07-01

    Polymer electrolytes have been studied extensively because uniquely they combine ionic conductivity with solid yet flexible mechanical properties, rendering them important for all-solid-state devices including batteries, electrochromic displays and smart windows. For some 30 years, ionic conductivity in polymers was considered to occur only in the amorphous state above Tg. Crystalline polymers were believed to be insulators. This changed with the discovery of Li(+) conductivity in crystalline poly(ethylene oxide)(6):LiAsF(6). However, new crystalline polymer electrolytes have proved elusive, questioning whether the 6:1 complex has particular structural features making it a unique exception to the rule that only amorphous polymers conduct. Here, we demonstrate that ionic conductivity in crystalline polymers is not unique to the 6:1 complex by reporting several new crystalline polymer electrolytes containing different alkali metal salts (Na(+), K(+) and Rb(+)), including the best conductor poly(ethylene oxide)(8):NaAsF(6) discovered so far, with a conductivity 1.5 orders of magnitude higher than poly(ethylene oxide)(6):LiAsF(6). These are the first crystalline polymer electrolytes with a different composition and structures to that of the 6:1 Li(+) complex. PMID:19543313

  18. Emergence of new red-shifted carbon nanotube photoluminescence based on proximal doped-site design.

    PubMed

    Shiraki, Tomohiro; Shiraishi, Tomonari; Juhász, Gergely; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2016-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) show unique photoluminescence (PL) in the near-infrared (NIR) region. Here we propose a concept based on the proximal modification in local covalent functionalization of SWNTs. Quantum mechanical simulations reveal that the SWNT band gap changes specifically based on the proximal doped-site design. Thus, we synthesize newly-designed bisdiazonium molecules and conduct local fucntionalisation of SWNTs. Consequently, new red-shifted PL (E11(2*)) from the bisdiazonium-modified SWNTs with (6, 5) chirality is recognized around 1250 nm with over ~270 nm Stokes shift from the PL of the pristine SWNTs and the PL wavelengths are shifted depending on the methylene spacer lengths of the modifiers. The present study revealed that SWNT PL modulation is enable by close-proximity-local covalent modification, which is highly important for fundamental understanding of intrinsic SWNT PL properties as well as exciton engineering-based applications including photonic devices and (bio)imaging/sensing. PMID:27345862

  19. Emergence of new red-shifted carbon nanotube photoluminescence based on proximal doped-site design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraki, Tomohiro; Shiraishi, Tomonari; Juhász, Gergely; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2016-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) show unique photoluminescence (PL) in the near-infrared (NIR) region. Here we propose a concept based on the proximal modification in local covalent functionalization of SWNTs. Quantum mechanical simulations reveal that the SWNT band gap changes specifically based on the proximal doped-site design. Thus, we synthesize newly-designed bisdiazonium molecules and conduct local fucntionalisation of SWNTs. Consequently, new red-shifted PL (E112*) from the bisdiazonium-modified SWNTs with (6, 5) chirality is recognized around 1250 nm with over ~270 nm Stokes shift from the PL of the pristine SWNTs and the PL wavelengths are shifted depending on the methylene spacer lengths of the modifiers. The present study revealed that SWNT PL modulation is enable by close-proximity-local covalent modification, which is highly important for fundamental understanding of intrinsic SWNT PL properties as well as exciton engineering–based applications including photonic devices and (bio)imaging/sensing.

  20. Emergence of new red-shifted carbon nanotube photoluminescence based on proximal doped-site design

    PubMed Central

    Shiraki, Tomohiro; Shiraishi, Tomonari; Juhász, Gergely; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2016-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) show unique photoluminescence (PL) in the near-infrared (NIR) region. Here we propose a concept based on the proximal modification in local covalent functionalization of SWNTs. Quantum mechanical simulations reveal that the SWNT band gap changes specifically based on the proximal doped-site design. Thus, we synthesize newly-designed bisdiazonium molecules and conduct local fucntionalisation of SWNTs. Consequently, new red-shifted PL (E112*) from the bisdiazonium-modified SWNTs with (6, 5) chirality is recognized around 1250 nm with over ~270 nm Stokes shift from the PL of the pristine SWNTs and the PL wavelengths are shifted depending on the methylene spacer lengths of the modifiers. The present study revealed that SWNT PL modulation is enable by close-proximity-local covalent modification, which is highly important for fundamental understanding of intrinsic SWNT PL properties as well as exciton engineering–based applications including photonic devices and (bio)imaging/sensing. PMID:27345862

  1. On the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Studies in Mixed Alkali Borate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Padmaja, G.; Reddy, T. Goverdhan; Kistaiah, P.

    2011-10-20

    Mixed alkali effect in oxide based glasses is one of the current research activity and studies on the behavior of spectroscopic parameters in these systems are quite important to understand the basic nature of this phenomenon. EPR studies of mixed alkali glasses Li{sub 2}O-K{sub 2}O-ZnO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped with Fe{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} were carried out at room temperature. The EPR spectra show typical resonances of d{sup 5} system (Fe{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+}) in all the measured glass specimens. Evaluated hyperfine constant, number of paramagnetic centers and paramagnetic susceptibility values show deviation from the linearity with the progressive substitution of the Li ion with K in glass network.

  2. Electron phonon renormalization in N-doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podila, Ramakrishna; Ayala, Paola; Spear, John; Pichler, Thomas; Rao, Apparao

    2012-02-01

    Current research efforts are aimed at controlling the electronic properties graphene sheets using electron (or hole) doping for successful device fabrication. The presence of strong coupling between electronic and vibrational properties in graphene greatly assists Raman spectroscopy in probing the dopant-induced electronic energy changes. Previously, Raman spectroscopy was employed as a tool to probe the electron and phonon renormalization in doped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). It was found that the increase in electron velocity in?uences lattice vibrations locally near a negatively charged defect. These local renormalization effects were observed to result in a new effectively downshifted (up-shifted) Raman peak below the G' peak for n-doped (p-doped) SWNTs. In case of graphene, we find that the several Raman features for CVD grown N-doped graphene vary depending upon local dopant bonding environment. For instance, non-graphitic dopants (pyridinic, pyrrolic) were observed to result in highly intense D & D'-band unlike the graphitic dopants. We explain these results in terms of the zig-zag (armchair) edges formed by graphitic (non-graphitic) bonding environment of the dopant.

  3. DFT STUDY OF HYDROGEN STORAGE ON Li- AND Na-DOPED C59B HETEROFULLERENE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedi, Ehsan; Mozaffari, Majid

    2014-05-01

    Effect of light alkali metal (Li and Na) decorated on the C59B heterofullerene for hydrogen storage is considered using DFT-MPW1PW91 method. Results show that Li and Na atoms strongly prefer to adsorb on top of five-member and six-member ring where a carbon atom is replaced by a boron atom. Significant charge transfer from the alkali metal to the C59B compensates for the electron deficiency of C59B and makes the latter aromatic in nature. Corrected binding energies of hydrogen molecule on the alkali-doped C59B using counterpoise method, structural properties and NBO analysis indicate that first hydrogen molecule is adsorbed physically and does not support minimal conditions of DOE requirement. Finally, positive values of binding energies for the adsorption of a second hydrogen molecule show that alkali doped C59B are capable of storing a maximum of one hydrogen molecule.

  4. Alkali metal adsorption on Al(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, J. N.; Lundgren, E.; Nyholm, R.; Qvarford, M.

    1993-06-01

    The submonolayer adsorption of Na, K, Rb, and Cs on the Al(111) surface at 100 K and at room temperature is investigated by high resolution core level spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. It is found that the first alkali atoms on the surface adsorb at surface defects. At higher coverages, up to approximately one third of the maximum submonolayer coverage, alkali atoms adsorbed at defects coexist with a dispersed phase. At higher coverages island formation is found to occur for the majority of the systems. It is argued that all of the ordered structures formed at room temperature involve a disruption of the Al(111) surface in contrast to the situation at 100 K where the alkali atoms adsorb as adatoms.

  5. SAFE Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    Alkali metal heat pipes are among the best understood and tested of components for first generation space fission reactors. A flight reactor will require production of a hundred or more heat pipes with assured reliability over a number of years. To date, alkali metal heat pipes have been built mostly in low budget development environments with little formal quality assurance. Despite this, heat pipe test samples suggest that high reliability can be achieved with the care justified for space flight qualification. Fabrication procedures have been established that, if consistently applied, ensure long-term trouble-free heat pipe operation. Alkali metal heat pipes have been successfully flight tested in micro gravity and also have been shown capable of multi-year operation with no evidence of sensitivity to fast neutron fluence up to 1023 n/cm2. This represents 50 times the fluence of the proposed Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE-100) heat pipe reactor core.

  6. The mixed alkali effect in zinc-compensated (K,Na)-β-gallate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrashekhar, G. V.; Foster, L. M.

    1982-03-01

    The "mixed alkali effect" was investigated in a Zn-doped K-β-gallate fast ion conductor with partial replacement of the K by Na. A minimum in conductivity occurs at about 0.8 atom fraction Na. A model is proposed in which the site occupancies are determined by the interstitial pair concept, and the conductivity minimum occurs when Beevers-Ross sites are occupied by K + only. A knee in the Arrhenius plots of samples containing potassium is explained as the onset of activation of K + away from interstitial complexes bound coulombically to the zinc charge-compensating centers.

  7. Diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs): an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupke, William F.

    2008-05-01

    The concept of power-scalable, high beam-quality diode pumped alkali lasers was introduced in 2003 [Krupke, US Patent No. 6,643,311; Opt. Letters, 28, 2336 (2003)]. Since then several laboratory DPAL devices have been reported on, confirming many of the spectroscopic, kinetic, and laser characteristics projected from literature data. This talk will present an overview of the DPAL concept, summarize key relevant properties of the cesium, rubidium, and potassium alkali vapor gain media so-far examined, outline power scaling considerations, and highlight results of published DPAL laboratory experiments.

  8. Alkali metal vapors - Laser spectroscopy and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stwalley, W. C.; Koch, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the rapidly expanding use of lasers for spectroscopic studies of alkali metal vapors. Since the alkali metals (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium) are theoretically simple ('visible hydrogen'), readily ionized, and strongly interacting with laser light, they represent ideal systems for quantitative understanding of microscopic interconversion mechanisms between photon (e.g., solar or laser), chemical, electrical and thermal energy. The possible implications of such understanding for a wide variety of practical applications (sodium lamps, thermionic converters, magnetohydrodynamic devices, new lasers, 'lithium waterfall' inertial confinement fusion reactors, etc.) are also discussed.

  9. Alkali-aggregate reaction in concrete containing high-alkali cement and granite aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Owsiak, Z

    2004-01-01

    The paper discusses results of the research into the influence of high-alkali Portland cement on granite aggregate. The deformation of the concrete structure occurred after 18 months. The research was carried out by means of a scanning electron microscope equipped with a high-energy dispersive X-ray analyzer that allowed observation of unpolished sections of concrete bars exhibiting the cracking pattern typical of the alkali-silica reaction. Both the microscopic observation and the X-ray elemental analysis confirm the presence of alkali-silica gel and secondary ettringite in the cracks.

  10. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, W.Y.

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased, preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  11. Salts of alkali metal anions and process of preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Dye, James L.; Ceraso, Joseph M.; Tehan, Frederick J.; Lok, Mei Tak

    1978-01-01

    Compounds of alkali metal anion salts of alkali metal cations in bicyclic polyoxadiamines are disclosed. The salts are prepared by contacting an excess of alkali metal with an alkali metal dissolving solution consisting of a bicyclic polyoxadiamine in a suitable solvent, and recovered by precipitation. The salts have a gold-color crystalline appearance and are stable in a vacuum at -10.degree. C. and below.

  12. Airplane dopes and doping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W H

    1919-01-01

    Cellulose acetate and cellulose nitrate are the important constituents of airplane dopes in use at the present time, but planes were treated with other materials in the experimental stages of flying. The above compounds belong to the class of colloids and are of value because they produce a shrinking action on the fabric when drying out of solution, rendering it drum tight. Other colloids possessing the same property have been proposed and tried. In the first stages of the development of dope, however, shrinkage was not considered. The fabric was treated merely to render it waterproof. The first airplanes constructed were covered with cotton fabric stretched as tightly as possible over the winds, fuselage, etc., and flying was possible only in fine weather. The necessity of an airplane which would fly under all weather conditions at once became apparent. Then followed experiments with rubberized fabrics, fabrics treated with glue rendered insoluble by formaldehyde or bichromate, fabrics treated with drying and nondrying oils, shellac, casein, etc. It was found that fabrics treated as above lost their tension in damp weather, and the oil from the motor penetrated the proofing material and weakened the fabric. For the most part the film of material lacked durability. Cellulose nitrate lacquers, however were found to be more satisfactory under varying weather conditions, added less weight to the planes, and were easily applied. On the other hand, they were highly inflammable, and oil from the motor penetrated the film of cellulose nitrate, causing the tension of the fabric to be relaxed.

  13. Faraday rotation density measurements of optically thick alkali metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vliegen, E.; Kadlecek, S.; Anderson, L. W.; Walker, T. G.; Erickson, C. J.; Happer, William

    2001-03-01

    We investigate the measurement of alkali number densities using the Faraday rotation of linearly polarized light. We find that the alkali number density may be reliably extracted even in regimes of very high buffer gas pressure, and very high alkali number density. We have directly verified our results in potassium using absorption spectroscopy on the second resonance (4 2S→5 2P).

  14. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  15. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  16. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  17. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  18. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  3. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  4. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  5. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  6. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  7. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  9. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  10. Computational studies of solid-state alkali conduction in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deng, Zhi; Mo, Yifei; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-03-25

    The facile conduction of alkali ions in a crystal host is of crucial importance in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries, the dominant form of energy storage today. In this review, we provide a comprehensive survey of computational approaches to study solid-state alkali diffusion. We demonstrate how these methods have provided useful insights into the design of materials that form the main components of a rechargeable alkali-ion battery, namely the electrodes, superionic conductor solid electrolytes and interfaces. We will also provide a perspective on future challenges and directions. Here, the scope of this review includes the monovalent lithium- and sodium-ion chemistries that aremore » currently of the most commercial interest.« less

  11. Alkali resistant optical coatings for alkali lasers and methods of production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Soules, Thomas F; Beach, Raymond J; Mitchell, Scott C

    2014-11-18

    In one embodiment, a multilayer dielectric coating for use in an alkali laser includes two or more alternating layers of high and low refractive index materials, wherein an innermost layer includes a thicker, >500 nm, and dense, >97% of theoretical, layer of at least one of: alumina, zirconia, and hafnia for protecting subsequent layers of the two or more alternating layers of high and low index dielectric materials from alkali attack. In another embodiment, a method for forming an alkali resistant coating includes forming a first oxide material above a substrate and forming a second oxide material above the first oxide material to form a multilayer dielectric coating, wherein the second oxide material is on a side of the multilayer dielectric coating for contacting an alkali.

  12. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-05-12

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization.

  13. The Additive Coloration of Alkali Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jirgal, G. H.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an inexpensive, vacuum furnace designed to produce F-centers in alkali halide crystals by additive coloration. The method described avoids corrosion or contamination during the coloration process. Examination of the resultant crystals is discussed and several experiments using additively colored crystals are…

  14. Hyaline membrane disease, alkali, and intraventricular haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Wigglesworth, J S; Keith, I H; Girling, D J; Slade, S A

    1976-01-01

    The relation between intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) and hyaline membrane disease (HMD) was studied in singletons that came to necropsy at Hammersmith Hospital over the years 1966-73. The incidence of IVH in singleton live births was 3-22/1000 and of HMD 4-44/1000. Although the high figures were partily due to the large number of low birthweight infants born at this hospital, the incidence of IVH in babies weighing 1001-1500 g was three times as great as that reported in the 1658 British Perinatal Mortality Survey. Most IVH deaths were in babies with HMD, but the higher frequency of IVH was not associated with any prolongation of survival time of babies who died with HMD as compared with the 1958 survey. IVH was seen frequently at gestations of up to 36 weeks in babies with HMD but was rare above 30 weeks' gestation in babies without HMD. This indicated that factors associated with HMD must cause most cases of IVH seen at gestations above 30 weeks. Comparison of clinical details in infants with HMD who died with or without IVH (at gestations of 30-37 weeks) showed no significant differences between the groups other than a high incidence of fits and greater use of alkali therapy in the babies with IVH. During the 12 hours when most alkali therapy was given, babies dying with IVD received a mean total alkali dosage of 10-21 mmol/kg and those dying without IVH 6-34 mmol/kg (P less than 0-001).There was no difference in severity of hypoxia or of metabolic acidosis between the 2 groups. Babies who died with HMD and germinal layer haemorrhage (GLH) without IVH had received significantly more alkali than those who died with HMD alone, whereas survivors of severe respiratory distress syndrome had received lower alkali doses than other groups. It is suggested that the greatly increased death rate from IVH in babies with HMD indicates some alteration of management of HMD (since 1958) as a causative factor. Liberal use of hypertonic alkali solutions is the common factor

  15. Studies of Non-Proportionality in Alkali Halide and Strontium Iodide Scintillators Using SLYNCI

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, L; Bizarri, G; Boatner, L; Cherepy, N J; Choong, W; Moses, W W; Payne, S A; Shah, K; Sheets, S; Sturm, B W

    2009-05-05

    Recently a collaboration of LLNL and LBNL has constructed a second generation Compton coincidence instrument to study the non-proportionality of scintillators [1-3]. This device, known as SLYNCI (Scintillator Light-Yield Non-proportionality Characterization Instrument), has can completely characterize a sample with less than 24 hours of running time. Thus, SLYNCI enables a number of systematic studies of scintillators since many samples can be processed in a reasonable length of time. These studies include differences in nonproportionality between different types of scintillators, different members of the same family of scintillators, and impact of different doping levels. The results of such recent studies are presented here, including a study of various alkali halides, and the impact of europium doping level in strontium iodide. Directions of future work area also discussed.

  16. Studies of non-proportionality in alkali halide and strontium iodide scintillators using SLYNCI

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, Larry; Bizarri, Gregory; Boatner, Lynn; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.; Payne, Stephen A.; Shah, Kanai; Sheets, Steven; Sturm, Benjamin, W.

    2010-10-14

    Recently a collaboration of LLNL and LBNL has constructed a second generation Compton coincidence instrument to study the non-proportionality of scintillators. This device, known as SLYNCI (Scintillator Light-Yield Non-proportionality Characterization Instrument), has can completely characterize a sample with less than 24 hours of running time. Thus, SLYNCI enables a number of systematic studies of scintillators since many samples can be processed in a reasonable length of time. These studies include differences in nonproportionality between different types of scintillators, different members of the same family of scintillators, and impact of different doping levels. The results of such recent studies are presented here, including a study of various alkali halides, and the impact of europium doping level in strontium iodide. Directions of future work area also discussed.

  17. Structure of lithium-doped polyacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, N. S.; Shacklette, L. W.; Baughman, R. H.

    1989-12-01

    A trigonal structure with three polymer chains per lithium column is proposed for lithium-doped polyacetylene. A calculation of the x-ray diffraction profile, using the unit-cell dimension and the lithium concentration as the only variables, is in good agreement with the observed data. The proposed structure optimizes the electrostatic interactions by maximizing both the Li+-Li+ separations and the coordination of negatively charged carbons and positively charged lithiums. Unlike the tetragonal lattice found in polyacetylene complexed with larger alkali-metal ions (K+, Rb+, and Cs+), the trigonal structure permits the undoped and the doped phases to coexist without any significant lattice mismatch at the boundary between the two phases. While the chain axis expands by ~1% upon doping with lithium, the projected area per chain remains essentially unchanged.

  18. Physics and chemistry of alkali-silica reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, S.; Barneyback, R.S. Jr.; Struble, L.J.

    1981-01-01

    The philosophy underlying recent research on alkali-silica reactions is reviewed and illustrations of recent results are provided. It has been possible to follow the kinetics of the chemical reaction between dissolved alkalis and opal in mortars by monitoring the rate at which alkalis are removed from the pore solutions of reacting mortars. Studies of the expansion behavior of synthetic alkali silica gels under controlled conditions were carried out and show no obvious correlation to chemical composition. The alkali reaction in mortars was found to produce changes in the appearance of opal grains documentable by the use of a scanning electron microscope.

  19. Calcium-Alkali Syndrome in the Modern Era

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ami M.; Adeseun, Gbemisola A.; Goldfarb, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    The ingestion of calcium, along with alkali, results in a well-described triad of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and renal insufficiency. Over time, the epidemiology and root cause of the syndrome have shifted, such that the disorder, originally called the milk-alkali syndrome, is now better described as the calcium-alkali syndrome. The calcium-alkali syndrome is an important cause of morbidity that may be on the rise, an unintended consequence of shifts in calcium and vitamin D intake in segments of the population. We review the pathophysiology of the calcium-alkali syndrome. PMID:24288027

  20. pH-Sensitive photoinduced energy transfer from bacteriorhodopsin to single-walled carbon nanotubes in SWNT-bR hybrids.

    PubMed

    El Hadj, Karim; Bertoncini, Patricia; Chauvet, Olivier

    2013-10-22

    Energy transfer mechanisms in noncovalently bound bacteriorhodopsin/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) hybrids are investigated using optical absorption and photoluminescence excitation measurements. The morphology of the hybrids was investigated by atomic force microscopy. In this study, proteins are immobilized onto the sidewall of the carbon nanotubes using a sodium cholate suspension-dialysis method that maintains the intrinsic optical and fluorescence properties of both molecules. The hybrids are stable in aqueous solutions for pH ranging from 4.2 to 9 and exhibit photoluminescence properties that are pH-dependent. The study reveals that energy transfer from bacteriorhodopsin to carbon nanotubes takes place. So, at pH higher than 5 and up to 9, the SWNTs absorb the photons emitted by the aromatic residues of the protein, inducing a strong increase in intensity of the E11 emissions of SWNTs through their E33 and E44 excitations. From pH = 4.2 to pH = 5, the protein fluorescence is strongly quenched whatever the emission wavelengths, while additional fluorescence features appear at excitation wavelengths ranging from 660 to 680 nm and at 330 nm. The presence of these features is attributed to a resonance energy transfer mechanism that has an efficiency of 0.94 ± 0.02. More, by increasing the pH of the dispersion, the fluorescence characteristics become those observed at higher pH values and vice versa. PMID:24011351

  1. Alkali metal recovery from carbonaceous material conversion process

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.; Gorbaty, Martin L.; Tsou, Joe M.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced in the gasifier or similar reaction zone, alkali metal constitutents are recovered from the particles by withdrawing and passing the particles from the reaction zone to an alkali metal recovery zone in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen and treating the particles in the recovery zone with water or an aqueous solution in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen. The solution formed by treating the particles in the recovery zone will contain water-soluble alkali metal constituents and is recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preventing contact of the particles with oxygen as they are withdrawn from the reaction zone and during treatment in the recovery zone avoids the formation of undesirable alkali metal constituents in the aqueous solution produced in the recovery zone and insures maximum recovery of water-soluble alkali metal constituents from the alkali metal residues.

  2. Alkali element background reduction in laser ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, C. W., Jr.; Norris, C. A.

    2014-11-01

    Alkali backgrounds in laser ablation ICP-MS analyses can be enhanced by electron-induced ionization of alkali contamination on the skimmer cone, reducing effective detection limits for these elements. Traditionally, this problem is addressed by isolating analyses of high alkali materials onto a designated cone set, or by operating the ICP-MS in a "soft extraction" mode, which reduces the energy of electrons repelled into the potentially contaminated sampling cone by the extraction field. Here we present a novel approach, where we replace the traditional alkali glass tuning standards with synthetic low-alkali glass reference materials. Using this vitreous tuning solution, we find that this approach reduces the amount of alkali contamination produced, halving backgrounds for the heavy alkali elements without any change to analytical procedures. Using segregated cones is still the most effective method for reducing lithium backgrounds, but since the procedures are complimentary both can easily be applied to the routine operations of an analytical lab.

  3. Alkali element background reduction in laser ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, C. W., Jr.; Norris, C. A.

    2015-03-01

    Alkali backgrounds in laser ablation ICP-MS analyses can be enhanced by electron-induced ionisation of alkali contamination on the skimmer cone, reducing effective detection limits for these elements. Traditionally, this problem is addressed by isolating analyses of high-alkali materials onto a designated cone set, or by operating the ICP-MS in a "soft extraction" mode, which reduces the energy of electrons repelled into the potentially contaminated sampling cone by the extraction field. Here we present a novel approach, where we replace the traditional alkali glass tuning standards with synthetic low-alkali glass reference materials. Using this vitreous tuning solution, we find that this approach reduces the amount of alkali contamination produced, halving backgrounds for the heavy alkali elements without any change to analytical procedures. Using segregated cones is still the most effective method for reducing lithium backgrounds, but since the procedures are complimentary, both can easily be applied to the routine operations of an analytical lab.

  4. Developments in alkali-metal atomic magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltzer, Scott Jeffrey

    Alkali-metal magnetometers use the coherent precession of polarized atomic spins to detect and measure magnetic fields. Recent advances have enabled magnetometers to become competitive with SQUIDs as the most sensitive magnetic field detectors, and they now find use in a variety of areas ranging from medicine and NMR to explosives detection and fundamental physics research. In this thesis we discuss several developments in alkali-metal atomic magnetometry for both practical and fundamental applications. We present a new method of polarizing the alkali atoms by modulating the optical pumping rate at both the linear and quadratic Zeeman resonance frequencies. We demonstrate experimentally that this method enhances the sensitivity of a potassium magnetometer operating in the Earth's field by a factor of 4, and we calculate that it can reduce the orientation-dependent heading error to less than 0.1 nT. We discuss a radio-frequency magnetometer for detection of oscillating magnetic fields with sensitivity better than 0.2 fT/ Hz , which we apply to the observation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals from polarized water, as well as nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signals from ammonium nitrate. We demonstrate that a spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer can measure all three vector components of the magnetic field in an unshielded environment with comparable sensitivity to other devices. We find that octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) acts as an anti-relaxation coating for alkali atoms at temperatures below 170°C, allowing them to collide with a glass surface up to 2,000 times before depolarizing, and we present the first demonstration of high-temperature magnetometry with a coated cell. We also describe a reusable alkali vapor cell intended for the study of interactions between alkali atoms and surface coatings. Finally, we explore the use of a cesium-xenon SERF comagnetometer for a proposed measurement of the permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs

  5. Effect of alkali lignins with different molecular weights from alkali pretreated rice straw hydrolyzate on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Qi, Benkun; Luo, Jianquan; Wan, Yinhua

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of alkali lignins with different molecular weights on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose. Different alkali lignins fractions, which were obtained from cascade ultrafiltration, were added into the dilute acid pretreated (DAP) and alkali pretreated (AP) rice straws respectively during enzymatic hydrolysis. The results showed that the addition of alkali lignins enhanced the hydrolysis and the enhancement for hydrolysis increased with increasing molecular weights of alkali lignins, with maximum enhancement being 28.69% for DAP and 20.05% for AP, respectively. The enhancement was partly attributed to the improved cellulase activity, and filter paper activity increased by 18.03% when adding lignin with highest molecular weight. It was found that the enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis was correlated with the adsorption affinity of cellulase on alkali lignins, and the difference in surface charge and hydrophobicity of alkali lignins were responsible for the difference in affinity between cellulase and lignins. PMID:26496216

  6. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    BREHM, W.F.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  7. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  8. Geopolymers and Related Alkali-Activated Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provis, John L.; Bernal, Susan A.

    2014-07-01

    The development of new, sustainable, low-CO2 construction materials is essential if the global construction industry is to reduce the environmental footprint of its activities, which is incurred particularly through the production of Portland cement. One type of non-Portland cement that is attracting particular attention is based on alkali-aluminosilicate chemistry, including the class of binders that have become known as geopolymers. These materials offer technical properties comparable to those of Portland cement, but with a much lower CO2 footprint and with the potential for performance advantages over traditional cements in certain niche applications. This review discusses the synthesis of alkali-activated binders from blast furnace slag, calcined clay (metakaolin), and fly ash, including analysis of the chemical reaction mechanisms and binder phase assemblages that control the early-age and hardened properties of these materials, in particular initial setting and long-term durability. Perspectives for future research developments are also explored.

  9. Quantum magnetism of alkali Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovskaya, Svetlana; Liu, Gengyuan

    2016-05-01

    We discuss a method to control dynamics in many-body spin states of 87Rb Rydberg atoms. The method permits excitation of cold gases and form ordered structures of alkali atoms. It makes use of a two-photon excitation scheme with circularly polarized and linearly chirped pulses. The method aims for controlled quantum state preparation in large ensembles. It is actual for experiments studding the spin hopping dynamics and realization of quantum random walks.

  10. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    One approach to space fission power system design is predicated on the use of alkali metal heat pipes, either as radiator elements, thermal management components, or as part of the core primary heat-transfer system. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where more detailed information can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstrational purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Project Prometheus point designs.

  11. Alkali metal protective garment and composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Ballif, J.L.; Yuan, W.W.

    1980-09-16

    A protective garment and composite material providing satisfactory heat resistance and physical protection for articles and personnel exposed to hot molten alkali metals, such as sodium are described. Physical protection is provided by a continuous layer of nickel foil. Heat resistance is provided by an underlying backing layer of thermal insulation. Overlying outer layers of fireproof woven ceramic fibers are used to protect the foil during storage and handling.

  12. Alkali metal protective garment and composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Ballif, III, John L.; Yuan, Wei W.

    1980-01-01

    A protective garment and composite material providing satisfactory heat resistance and physical protection for articles and personnel exposed to hot molten alkali metals, such as sodium. Physical protection is provided by a continuous layer of nickel foil. Heat resistance is provided by an underlying backing layer of thermal insulation. Overlying outer layers of fireproof woven ceramic fibers are used to protect the foil during storage and handling.

  13. Study of superconducting state parameters of alkali alkali binary alloys by a pseudopotential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Aditya M.

    2006-12-01

    A detailed study of the superconducting state parameters (SSP) viz. electron-phonon coupling strength λ, Coulomb pseudopotential μ∗, transition temperature TC, isotope effect exponent α and effective interaction strength N OV of ten alkali-alkali binary alloys i.e. Li 1- xNa x, Li 1- xK x, Li 1- xRb x, Li 1- xCs x, Na 1- xK x, Na 1- xRb x, Na 1- xCs x, K 1- xRb x, K 1- xCs x and Rb 1- xCs x are made within the framework of the model potential formalism and employing the pseudo-alloy-atom (PAA) model for the first time. We use the Ashcroft’s empty core (EMC) model potential for evaluating the superconducting properties of alkali alloys. Five different forms of local field correction functions viz. Hartree (H), Taylor (T), Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU), Farid et al. (F) and Sarkar et al. (S) are used to incorporate the exchange and correlation effects. A considerable influence of various exchange and correlation functions on λ and μ∗ is found from the present study. Reasonable agreement with the theoretical values of the SSP of pure components is found (corresponding to the concentration x = 0 or 1). It is also concluded that nature of the SSP strongly depends on the value of the atomic volume Ω0 of alkali-alkali binary alloys.

  14. Ion Pairing in Alkali Nitrate Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-10

    In this study, we investigate the thermodynamics of alkali nitrate salt solutions, especially the formation of contact ion pairs between alkali cation and nitrate anion. The ion-pairing propensity shows an order of LiNO3 < NaNO3 < KNO3. Such results explain the salt activity coefficients and suggest that the empirical "law of matching water affinity" is followed by these alkali nitrate salt solutions. The spatial patterns of contact ion pairs are different in the three salt solutions studied here: Li(+) forms the contact ion pair with only one oxygen of the nitrate while Na(+) and K(+) can also be shared by two oxygens of the nitrate. In reproducing the salt activity coefficient using Kirkwood-Buff theory, we find that it is essential to include electronic polarization for Li(+) which has a high charge density. The electronic continuum correction for nonpolarizable force field significantly improves the agreement between the calculated activity coefficients and their experimental values. This approach also improves the performance of the force field on salt solubility. From these two aspects, this study suggests that electronic continuum correction can be a promising approach to force-field development for ions with high charge densities. PMID:26901167

  15. Photoluminescence Imaging of Oxygen Doped Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalcin, Sibel Ebru; Yamaguchi, Hisato; Galande, Charudatta; Crochet, Jared J.; Mohite, Aditya D.; Gupta, Gautam; Ma, Xuedan; Htoon, Han; Doorn, Stephen K.; Los Alamos National Laboratory Collaboration; Rice University Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are attractive candidates for near-IR optoelectronic applications. But they show low fluorescence quantum yield. Recent oxygen doping studies have shown that the quantum yield of the excitons can be enhanced by an order of magnitude due to the formation of local 0D sites on the SWNT surface. However, these studies have been limited to ensemble measurements. Understanding the dopant site, exciton migration and trapping dynamics on individual SWNTs is critical for controllably tuning the photo-physical behavior. We have studied ozonated individual (6,5) nanotubes as a function of progressive ozonation. We spatially resolved the pristine and doped state using visible and NIR sensitive cameras. We demonstrate PL imaging as a probe of the emission dynamics as a function of dopant concentration. The spectral studies show the red-shifted emission in the PL of the NTs due to the ozonated site.

  16. Contributions to the mixed-alkali effect in molecular dynamics simulations of alkali silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, Heiko; Heuer, Andreas

    2005-12-01

    The mixed-alkali effect in the cation dynamics in silicate glasses is analyzed via molecular dynamics simulations. Observations suggest a description of the dynamics in terms of stable sites mostly specific to one ionic species. As main contributions to the mixed-alkali slow down longer residence times and an increased probability of correlated backjumps are identified. The slow down is related to the limited accessibility of foreign sites. The mismatch experienced in a foreign site is stronger and more retarding for the larger ions, the smaller ions can be temporarily accommodated. Also correlations between unlike as well as like cations are demonstrated that support cooperative behavior.

  17. Method for the safe disposal of alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Terry R.

    1977-01-01

    Alkali metals such as those employed in liquid metal coolant systems can be safely reacted to form hydroxides by first dissolving the alkali metal in relatively inert metals such as lead or bismuth. The alloy thus formed is contacted with a molten salt including the alkali metal hydroxide and possibly the alkali metal carbonate in the presence of oxygen. This oxidizes the alkali metal to an oxide which is soluble within the molten salt. The salt is separated and contacted with steam or steam-CO.sub.2 mixture to convert the alkali metal oxide to the hydroxide. These reactions can be conducted with minimal hydrogen evolution and with the heat of reaction distributed between the several reaction steps.

  18. Determination of the common and rare alkalies in mineral analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.C.; Stevens, R.E.

    1934-01-01

    Methods are described which afford a determination of each member of the alkali group and are successful in dealing with the quantities of the rare alkalies found in rocks and minerals. The procedures are relatively rapid and based chiefly on the use of chloroplatinic acid, absolute alcohol and ether, and ammonium sulfate. The percentages of all the alkalies found in a number of minerals are given.

  19. Environmental mercury contamination around a chlor-alkali plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lodenius, M.; Tulisalo, E.

    1984-04-01

    The chlor-alkali industry is one of the most important emitters of mercury. This metal is effectively spread from chlor-alkali plants into the atmosphere and it has been reported that only a few percent of the mercury emissions are deposited locally the major part spreading over very large areas. The purpose of this investigation was to study the spreading of mercury up to 100 km from a chlor-alkali plant using three different biological indicators.

  20. Superconductivity in doped fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Hebard, A.F. )

    1992-11-01

    While there is not complete agreement on the microscopic mechanism of superconductivity in alkali-metal-doped C[sub 60], further research may well lead to the production of analogous materials that lose resistance at even higher temperatures. Carbon 60 is a fascinating and arrestingly beautiful molecule. With 12 pentagonal and 20 hexagonal faces symmetrically arrayed in a soccer-ball-like structure that belongs to the icosahedral point group, I[sub h], its high symmetry alone invites special attention. The publication in September 1990 of a simple technique for manufacturing and concentrating macroscopic amounts of this new form of carbon announced to the scientific community that enabling technology had arrived. Macroscopic amounts of C[sub 60] (and the higher fullerenes, such as C[sub 70] and C[sub 84]) can now be made with an apparatus as simple as an arc furnace powered with an arc welding supply. Accordingly, chemists, physicists and materials scientists have joined forces in an explosion of effort to explore the properties of this unusual molecular building block. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, D.C.; Mailhe, C.C.; De Jonghe, L.C.

    1985-07-10

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  2. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, David C.; Mailhe, Catherine C.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    1986-01-01

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  3. Electrodes For Alkali-Metal Thermoelectric Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Wheeler, Bob L.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Lamb, James L.; Bankston, C. Perry; Cole, Terry

    1989-01-01

    Combination of thin, porous electrode and overlying collector grid reduces internal resistance of alkali-metal thermoelectric converter cell. Low resistance of new electrode and grid boosts power density nearly to 1 W/cm2 of electrode area at typical operating temperatures of 1,000 to 1,300 K. Conductive grid encircles electrode film on alumina tube. Bus wire runs along tube to collect electrical current from grid. Such converters used to transform solar, nuclear, and waste heat into electric power.

  4. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  5. Cathode architectures for alkali metal / oxygen batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Steven J; Nimon, Vitaliy; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Volfkovich, Yury; Bograchev, Daniil

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical energy storage devices, such as alkali metal-oxygen battery cells (e.g., non-aqueous lithium-air cells), have a cathode architecture with a porous structure and pore composition that is tailored to improve cell performance, especially as it pertains to one or more of the discharge/charge rate, cycle life, and delivered ampere-hour capacity. A porous cathode architecture having a pore volume that is derived from pores of varying radii wherein the pore size distribution is tailored as a function of the architecture thickness is one way to achieve one or more of the aforementioned cell performance improvements.

  6. Elucidation of transport mechanism and enhanced alkali ion transference numbers in mixed alkali metal-organic ionic molten salts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Forsyth, Maria

    2016-07-28

    Mixed salts of Ionic Liquids (ILs) and alkali metal salts, developed as electrolytes for lithium and sodium batteries, have shown a remarkable ability to facilitate high rate capability for lithium and sodium electrochemical cycling. It has been suggested that this may be due to a high alkali metal ion transference number at concentrations approaching 50 mol% Li(+) or Na(+), relative to lower concentrations. Computational investigations for two IL systems illustrate the formation of extended alkali-anion aggregates as the alkali metal ion concentration increases. This tends to favor the diffusion of alkali metal ions compared with other ionic species in electrolyte solutions; behavior that has recently been reported for Li(+) in a phosphonium ionic liquid, thus an increasing alkali transference number. The mechanism of alkali metal ion diffusion via this extended coordination environment present at high concentrations is explained and compared to the dynamics at lower concentrations. Heterogeneous alkali metal ion dynamics are also evident and, somewhat counter-intuitively, it appears that the faster ions are those that are generally found clustered with the anions. Furthermore these fast alkali metal ions appear to correlate with fastest ionic liquid solvent ions. PMID:27375042

  7. (abstract) Fundamental Mechanisms of Electrode Kinetics and Alkali Metal Atom Transport at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kisor, A.; Kikkert, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of electrode kinetics and mass transport of alkali metal oxidation and alkali metal cation reduction at the solid electrolyte/porous electrode boundary as well as alkali metal transport through porous metal electrodes has important applications in optimizing device performance in alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) cells which are high temperature, high current density electrochemical cells. Basic studies of these processes also affords the opportunity to investigate a very basic electrochemical reaction over a wide range of conditions; and a variety of mass transport modes at high temperatures via electrochemical techniques. The temperature range of these investigations covers 700K to 1240K; the alkali metal vapor pressures range from about 10(sup -2) to 10(sup 2) Pa; and electrodes studied have included Mo, W, Mo/Na(sub 2)MoO(sub 4), W/Na(sub 2)WO(sub 4), WPt(sub x), and WRh(sub x) (1.0 < x < 6.0 ) with Na at Na-beta'-alumina, and Mo with K at K-beta'-alumina. Both liquid metal/solid electrolyte/alkali metal vapor and alkali metal vapor/solid electrolyte/vapor cells have been used to characterize the reaction and transport processes. We have previously reported evidence of ionic, free molecular flow, and surface transport of sodium in several types of AMTEC electrodes.

  8. Multiband effects on the superconductivity in doped C[sub 60

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, H. ); Rice, M.J. )

    1994-03-01

    We consider multiband effects on the superconductivity in the alkali-doped fullerenes. It is shown that the multiband superconducting gap is reduced to the well-known Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer expression due to a cyclic symmetry in the orientationally ordered phases, thereby justifying many previous works assuming single-band [ital s]-wave pairing without considering several conduction bands explicitly.

  9. An assessment of Mercury immobilisation in alkali activated fly ash (AAFA) cements.

    PubMed

    Donatello, Shane; Fernández-Jiménez, Ana; Palomo, Angel

    2012-04-30

    This paper presents total and soluble Mercury contents for three coal fly ashes and alkali-activated fly ash (AAFA) cements consisting of 100% fly ash as starting material. To evaluate the potential of the AAFA cement matrix to immobilise Hg from an external source, another batch of cements, doped with 5000 mg/kg Hg as highly soluble HgCl(2), was prepared. The ashes and control AAFA cements complied with Mercury leaching criteria for non-hazardous wastes according to both TCLP and EN 12457 tests. Fly ash activated cements doped with 5000 mg/kg Hg and aged for 2 days immobilised 98.8-99.6% and 97.3-98.8% of Hg according to TCLP and EN 12457 tests respectively. Evidence from SEM-EDX suggests that Hg was immobilised by precipitation as highly insoluble HgS or Hg(2)S, although partial precipitation as less insoluble HgO or Hg silicates could not be entirely ruled out based on data presented. The results for Hg-doped cements contribute to the growing body of evidence that shows AAFA cement as a useful material for immobilizing elevated concentrations of toxic and hazardous elements. PMID:22341491

  10. Interaction of alkali metals with perylene-3,4,9,10- tetracarboxylic-dianhydride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Wuesten, J.; Berger, S.; Heimer, K.; Lach, S.; Ziegler, Ch.

    2005-07-01

    n doping of the molecular organic semiconductor perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) is often achieved by use of alkali metals as dopants. This doping process is commonly performed in two steps. In the first the dopant is evaporated onto the surface of the PTCDA film. As it has been believed that the dopant shows an inhomogeneous diffusion profile through the layer with most of the dopant accumulated in the first few layers, a subsequent annealing step has been performed in order to reach a homogeneous distribution of the dopant in the whole layer. In this paper experimental results concerning chemical composition ((angle resolved) X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, secondary-ion-mass spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), electronic structure (ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, inverse photoemission spectroscopy), as well as electrical properties (conductivity, Seebeck coefficient) are shown before and after doping and before and after annealing. These results suggest that the deposited dopant is redistributed and partially removed during the annealing step. A model for the dopant distribution is suggested.

  11. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides.

    PubMed

    Krzton-Maziopa, A; Svitlyk, V; Pomjakushina, E; Puzniak, R; Conder, K

    2016-07-27

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations. PMID:27248118

  12. Durability of Alkali Activated Blast Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, K.; Alharbi, N.; Matheu, P. S.; Varela, B.; Hailstone, R.

    2015-11-01

    The alkali activation of blast furnace slag has the potential to reduce the environmental impact of cementitious materials and to be applied in geographic zones where weather is a factor that negatively affects performance of materials based on Ordinary Portland Cement. The scientific literature provides many examples of alkali activated slag with high compressive strengths; however research into the durability and resistance to aggressive environments is still necessary for applications in harsh weather conditions. In this study two design mixes of blast furnace slag with mine tailings were activated with a potassium based solution. The design mixes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, BET analysis and compressive strength testing. Freeze-thaw testing up to 100 freeze-thaw cycles was performed in 10% road salt solution. Our findings included compressive strength of up to 100 MPa after 28 days of curing and 120 MPa after freeze-thaw testing. The relationship between pore size, compressive strength, and compressive strength after freeze-thaw was explored.

  13. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Svitlyk, V.; Pomjakushina, E.; Puzniak, R.; Conder, K.

    2016-07-01

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2‑y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  14. Decalcification resistance of alkali-activated slag.

    PubMed

    Komljenović, Miroslav M; Baščarević, Zvezdana; Marjanović, Nataša; Nikolić, Violeta

    2012-09-30

    This paper analyses the effects of decalcification in concentrated 6M NH(4)NO(3) solution on mechanical and microstructural properties of alkali-activated slag (AAS). Portland-slag cement (CEM II/A-S 42.5 N) was used as a benchmark material. Decalcification process led to a decrease in strength, both in AAS and in CEM II, and this effect was more pronounced in CEM II. The decrease in strength was explicitly related to the decrease in Ca/Si atomic ratio of C-S-H gel. A very low ratio of Ca/Si ~0.3 in AAS was the consequence of coexistence of C-S-H(I) gel and silica gel. During decalcification of AAS almost complete leaching of sodium and tetrahedral aluminum from C-S-H(I) gel also took place. AAS showed significantly higher resistance to decalcification in relation to the benchmark CEM II due to the absence of portlandite, high level of polymerization of silicate chains, low level of aluminum for silicon substitution in the structure of C-S-H(I), and the formation of protective layer of polymerized silica gel during decalcification process. In stabilization/solidification processes alkali-activated slag represents a more promising solution than Portland-slag cement due to significantly higher resistance to decalcification. PMID:22818592

  15. Dynamics of reactive ultracold alkali polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quéméner, Goulven; Bohn, John; Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2011-05-01

    Recently, ultracold polar molecules of KRb have been created. These molecules are chemically reactive and their lifetime in a trap is limited. However, their lifetime increases when they are loaded into a 1D optical lattice in the presence of an electric field. These results naturally raise the question of manipulating ultracold collisions of other species of alkali dimer molecules, with an eye toward both novel stereochemistry, as well as suppressing unwanted reactions, to enable condensed matter applications. In this talk, we report on a comparative study between the bi-alkali polar molecules of LiNa, LiK, LiRb, LiCs which have been predicted to be reactive. We compute the isotropic C6 coefficients of these systems and we predict the elastic and reactive rate coefficients when an electric field is applied in a 1D optical lattice. We will discuss the efficacy of evaporative cooling for each species. This work was supported by a MURI-AFOSR grant.

  16. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical..., chemical destruction and carbon adsorption. (iv) Release to water. Requirements as specified in § 721.90...

  17. Formation of lysinoalanine in egg white under alkali treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Luo, Xuying; Li, Jianke; Xu, Mingsheng; Tu, Yonggang

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the formation mechanism of lysinoalanine (LAL) in eggs during the alkali treatment process, NaOH was used for the direct alkali treatment of egg white, ovalbumin, and amino acids; in addition, the amount of LAL formed during the alkali treatment process was measured. The results showed that the alkali treatment resulted in the formation of LAL in the egg white. The LAL content increased with increasing pH and temperature, with the LAL content first increasing and then leveling off with increasing time. The amount of LAL formed in the ovalbumin under the alkali treatment condition accounted for approximately 50.51% to 58.68% of the amount of LAL formed in the egg white. Thus, the LAL formed in the ovalbumin was the main source for the LAL in the egg white during the alkali treatment process. Under the alkali treatment condition, free L-serine, L-cysteine, and L-cystine reacted with L-lysine to form LAL; therefore, they are the precursor amino acids of LAL formed in eggs during the alkali treatment process. PMID:26772660

  18. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, Wen Y.

    1984-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them (46, 53, 61, 69) with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide (63) to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased (81), preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated (84) to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process (86, 18, 17) where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  19. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  3. Self-discharge in bimetallic cells containing alkali metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, M. S.; Hesson, J. C.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of thermally regenerative bimetallic cells with alkali metal anodes shows a relation between the current drawn and the rate of discharge under open-circuit conditions. The self-discharge rate of the cell is due to the dissolution and ionization of alkali metal atoms in the fused-salt electrolyte

  4. COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-08-01

    A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

  5. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in...

  6. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl...

  7. Effects of alkali treatments on Ag nanowire transparent conductive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunho; Kang, Jun-gu; Eom, Tae-yil; Moon, Bongjin; Lee, Hoo-Jeong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we employ various alkali materials (alkali metals with different base strengths, and ammonia gas and solution) to improve the conductivity of silver nanowire (Ag NW)-networked films. The alkali treatment appears to remove the surface oxide and improve the conductivity. When applied with TiO2 nanoparticles, the treatment appears more effective as the alkalis gather around wire junctions and help them weld to each other via heat emitted from the reduction reaction. The ammonia solution treatment is found to be quick and aggressive, damaging the wires severely in the case of excessive treatment. On the other hand, the ammonia gas treatment seems much less aggressive and does not damage the wires even after a long exposure. The results of this study highlight the effectiveness of the alkali treatment in improving of the conductivity of Ag NW-networked transparent conductive films.

  8. Performance of Straight Steel Fibres Reinforced Alkali Activated Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faris, Meor Ahmad; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Nizar Ismail, Khairul; Muniandy, Ratnasamy; Putra Jaya, Ramadhansyah

    2016-06-01

    This paper focus on the performance of alkali activated concrete produced by using fly ash activated by sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. These alkali activated concrete were reinforced with straight steel fibres with different weight percentage starting from 0 % up to 5 %. Chemical composition of raw material in the production alkali activated concrete which is fly ash was first identified by using X-ray fluorescence. Results reveal there have an effect of straight steel fibres inclusion to the alkali activated concrete. Highest compressive strength of alkali activated concrete which is 67.72 MPa was obtained when 3 % of straight fibres were added. As well as flexural strength, highest flexural strength which is 6.78 MPa was obtained at 3 % of straight steel fibres inclusions.

  9. Diversity and Mechanisms of Alkali Tolerance in Lactobacilli▿

    PubMed Central

    Sawatari, Yuki; Yokota, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    We determined the maximum pH that allows growth (pHmax) for 34 strains of lactobacilli. High alkali tolerance was exhibited by strains of Lactobacillus casei, L. paracasei subsp. tolerans, L. paracasei subsp. paracasei, L. curvatus, L. pentosus, and L. plantarum that originated from plant material, with pHmax values between 8.5 and 8.9. Among these, L. casei NRIC 1917 and L. paracasei subsp. tolerans NRIC 1940 showed the highest pHmax, at 8.9. Digestive tract isolates of L. gasseri, L. johnsonii, L. reuteri, L. salivarius subsp. salicinius, and L. salivarius subsp. salivarius exhibited moderate alkali tolerance, with pHmax values between 8.1 and 8.5. Dairy isolates of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis, and L. helveticus exhibited no alkali tolerance, with pHmax values between 6.7 and 7.1. Measurement of the internal pH of representative strains revealed the formation of transmembrane proton gradients (ΔpH) in a reversed direction (i.e., acidic interior) at alkaline external-pH ranges, regardless of their degrees of alkali tolerance. Thus, the reversed ΔpH did not determine alkali tolerance diversity. However, the ΔpH contributed to alkali tolerance, as the pHmax values of several strains decreased with the addition of nigericin, which dissipates ΔpH. Although neutral external-pH values resulted in the highest glycolysis activity in the presence of nigericin regardless of alkali tolerance, substantial glucose utilization was still detected in the alkali-tolerant strains, even in a pH range of between 8.0 and 8.5, at which the remaining strains lost most activity. Therefore, the alkali tolerance of glycolysis reactions contributes greatly to the determination of alkali tolerance diversity. PMID:17449704

  10. EPR study of polarons in a conducting polymer with nondegenerate ground states: Alkali metal complexes of poly (p-phenylene) and phenylene oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, L.D.; Joseph, J.; Miller, G.G.; Baughman, R.H.

    1984-08-15

    EPR measurements are used to characterize electronic states relevant for carrier transport in alkali metal doped poly(p-phenylene), PPP, fully deuterated poly(p-phenylene), DPPP, and phenylene oligomers. Observed spin concentrations per carbon are at least one decade higher than the Curie spin concentration for Na-doped polyacetylene. The number of these spins, which likely corresponds to polarons (mobile radical anions), is much less than the amount of alkali metal dopant, suggesting that much of the charge on the polymer chains is in bipolarons (spinless dianions). Relevant to the interaction between spins on the polymer chain and the metal cations, the observed g values are close to the free electron value and do not substantially vary with the donor dopant, temperature, or the molecular weight of the phenylene chain. Although the spin-orbit effect on g values is small, room temperature linewidth tends to increase with increasing atomic number of dopant: suggesting some interaction, albeit a smaller magnitude effect than for alkali-metal graphite complexes. The EPR linewidths are exchange narrowed and proton hyperfine broadening is significant. The latter explains the generally broader linewidths for doped PPP than for doped DPPP. The measured susceptibilities have a temperature dependence which suggests equilibrium between separated polaron defects and singlet and triplet spin states formed intermolecularly via polaron pairing. The interaction is antiferromagnetic and the binding energy between polarons is about 2.2 to 3.3 meV. An upper limit estimate of the Fermi-surface density of states for K-doped PPP (0.7 states/eV phenyl) is derived from an upper limit estimate of Pauli susceptibility.

  11. Elastic properties of alkali-feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waeselmann, N.; Brown, J.; Angel, R. J.; Ross, N.; Kaminsky, W.

    2013-12-01

    New measurements of single crystal elastic moduli for a suite of the alkali feldspars are reported. In order to interpret Earth's seismic structure, knowledge of the elastic properties of constituent minerals is essential. The elasticity of feldspar minerals, despite being the most abundant phase in Earth's crust (estimated to be more than 60%), were previously poorly characterized. All prior seismic and petrologic studies have utilized 50-year-old results, of questionable quality, based on 1-bar measurements on pseudo-single crystals. Alkali-feldspars present a large experimental challenge associated with their structural complexity. In the K-end member (KAlSi3O8) the symmetry is governed by Al/Si ordering, in the Na-end member (NaAlSi3O8) the symmetry is governed by whether or not there is a displacive collapse of the framework independent of the Al/Si ordering. K-feldspars exhibit monoclinic (C2/m) symmetry (necessitating determination of 13 elastic moduli) if disordered and triclinic (C-1) symmetry (21 elastic moduli) if ordered. Exsolution of Na-rich and K-rich phases is ubiquitous in natural samples, making it difficult to find suitable single phase and untwinned samples for study. The small single domain samples selected for this study were previously characterized by x-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis to ensure adequate sample quality. Surface wave velocities were measured on oriented surfaces of natural and synthetic single crystals using impulsively stimulated light scattering. A surface corrugation with a spacing of about 2 microns was impulsively created by the overlap of 100 ps infrared light pulses. The time evolution of the stimulated standing elastic waves was detected by measuring the intensity of diffraction from the surface corrugation of a variably delayed probe pulse. This method allows accurate (better than 0.2%) determination of velocities on samples smaller than 100 microns. The combination of measured surface wave velocities and

  12. Intercalation of heavy alkali metals (K, Rb and Cs) in the bundles of single wall nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclaux, L.; Méténier, K.; Lauginie, P.; Salvetat, J. P.; Bonnamy, S.; Beguin, F.

    2000-11-01

    The electric-arc discharge carbon deposits (collaret) containing Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) were heat treated at 1600 °C during 2 days under N2 flow in order to eliminate the Ni catalyst by sublimation, without modifications of the SWNTs ropes. Sorting this deposit by gravity enabled to obtain in the coarsest particles higher amount of SWNTs ropes than in other particle sizes. The coarser particles of the carbon deposits were reacted with the alkali metals vapor giving intercalated samples with a MC8 composition. The intercalation led to an expansion of the 2D lattice of the SWNTs so that the alkali metals were intercalated in between the tubes within the bundles. Disordered lattices were observed after intercalation of Rb and Cs. The simulations of the X-ray diffractograms of SWNTs reacted with K, gave the best fit for three K ions occupying the inter-tubes triangular cavities. The investigations by EPR, and 13C NMR, showed that doped carbon deposits are metallic.

  13. Solvent-averaged potentials for alkali-, earth alkali-, and alkylammonium halide aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Berk; van der Vegt, Nico F. A.

    2007-12-01

    We derive effective, solvent-free ion-ion potentials for alkali-, earth alkali-, and alkylammonium halide aqueous solutions. The implicit solvent potentials are parametrized to reproduce experimental osmotic coefficients. The modeling approach minimizes the amount of input required from atomistic (force field) models, which usually predict large variations in the effective ion-ion potentials at short distances. For the smaller ion species, the reported potentials are composed of a Coulomb and a Weeks-Chandler-Andersen term. For larger ions, we find that an additional, attractive potential is required at the contact minimum, which is related to solvent degrees of freedom that are usually not accounted for in standard electrostatics models. The reported potentials provide a simple and accurate force field for use in molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations of (poly-)electrolyte systems.

  14. Alkali oxide-tantalum oxide and alkali oxide-niobium oxide ionic conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R. S.; Parker, H. S.; Brower, W. S.; Minor, D.

    1974-01-01

    A search was made for new cationic conducting phases in alkali-tantalate and niobate systems. The phase equilibrium diagrams were constructed for the six binary systems Nb2O5-LiNbO3, Nb2O5-NaNbO3, Nb2O5-KNbO3, Ta2O5-NaTaO3, Ta2O5-LiTaO3, and Ta2O5-KTaO3. Various other binary and ternary systems were also examined. Pellets of nineteen phases were evaluated (by the sponsoring agency) by dielectric loss measurements. Attempts were made to grow large crystals of eight different phases. The system Ta2O5-KTaO3 contains at least three phases which showed peaks in dielectric loss vs. temperature. All three contain structures related to the tungsten bronzes with alkali ions in non-stoichiometric crystallographic positions.

  15. Esr Spectra of Alkali-Metal Atoms on Helium Nanodroplets: a Theoretical Model for the Prediction of Helium Induced Hyperfine Structure Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, Reas W.; Filatov, Michael; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2013-06-01

    We predict He-droplet-induced changes of the isotropic HFS constant a_{HFS} of the alkali-metal atoms M = Li, Na, K and Rb on the basis of a model description. Optically detected electron spin resonance spectroscopy has allowed high resolution measurements that show the influence of the helium droplet and its size on the unpaired electron spin density at the alkali nucleus. Our theoretical approach to describe this dependence is based on a combination of two well established techniques: Results of relativistic coupled-cluster calculations on the alkali-He dimers (energy and HFS constant as functions of the binding length) are mapped onto the doped-droplet-situation with the help of helium-density functional theory. We simulate doped droplets He_{N} with N ranging from 50 to 10000, using the diatomic alkali-He-potential energy curves as input. From the obtained density profiles we evaluate average distances between the dopant atom and its direct helium neighborhood. The distances are then set in relation to the variation of the HFS constant with binding length in the simplified alkali-He-dimer model picture. This method yields reliable relative shifts but involves a systematic absolute error. Hence, the absolute values of the shifts are tied to one experimentally determined HFS constant for ^{85}Rb-He_{N = 2000}. With this parameter choice we obtain results in good agreement with the available experimental data for Rb and K^{a,b} confirming the predicted 1/N trend of the functional dependence^{c}. M. Koch, G. Auböck, C. Callegari, and W. E. Ernst, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 035302-1-4 (2009) M. Koch, C. Callegari, and W. E. Ernst, Mol. Phys. 108 (7), 1005-1011 (2010) A. W. Hauser, T. Gruber, M. Filatov, and W. E. Ernst, ChemPhysChem (2013) online DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200697

  16. Volcanic Origin of Alkali Halides on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, L.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The recent observation of NaCl (gas) on Io confirms our earlier prediction that NaCl is produced volcanically. Here we extend our calculations by modeling thermochemical equilibrium of O, S, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, F, Cl, Br, and I as a function of temperature and pressure in a Pele-like volcanic gas with O/S/Na/Cl/K = 1.518/1/0.05/0.04/0.005 and CI chondritic ratios of the other (as yet unobserved) alkalis and halogens. For reference, the nominal temperature and pressure for Pele is 1760 plus or minus 210 K and 0.01 bars based on Galileo data and modeling.

  17. Alkali differentiation in LL-chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlotzka, F.; Palme, H.; Spettel, B.; Wanke, H.; Fredriksson, K.; Noonan, A. F.

    1983-04-01

    The Kraehenberg and Bhola LL-group chondrites are heterogeneous agglomerates which contain a variety of lithic fragments and chondrules as well as crystal fragments. Both meteorites contain large, cm-sized fragments with high K enrichments. The K-rich inclusions are fragments of larger rock bodies which crystallized from melts of chondritic parent material that had previously been enriched in K and in heavier alkalies,while also being depleted in Na and metal. It is suggested that the K enrichment occurred as an exchange for Na in feldspars via a vapor phase, whose presence on the chondrite parent body (or bodies) is supported by the recent finding of fluid inclusions in chondritic silicates. Cooling rate considerations indicate that the K-rich rock units could not have been very large, implying that the K-rich materials were locally molten by, for example, impact.

  18. Heat pipes containing alkali metal working fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A technique for improving high temperature evaporation-condensation heat-transfer devices which have important and unique advantage in terrestrial and space energy processing is described. The device is in the form of a heat pipe comprising a sealed container or envelope which contains a capillary wick. The temperature of one end of the heat pipe is raised by the input of heat from an external heat source which is extremely hot and corrosive. A working fluid of a corrosive alkali metal, such as lithium, sodium, or potassium transfers this heat to a heat receiver remote from the heat source. The container and wick are fabricated from a superalloy containing a small percentage of a corrosion inhibiting or gettering element. Lanthanum, scandium, yttrium, thorium, and hafnium are utilized as the alloying metal.

  19. Comparative alkali washing of simulated radioactive sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Fugate, G.A.; Ensor, D.D.; Egan, B.Z.

    1996-10-01

    The treatment of large volumes of radioactive sludge generated from uranium and plutonium recovery processes is a pressing problem in the environmental restoration currently planned at various U.S. Department of Energy sites. This sludge, commonly stored in underground tanks, is mainly in the form of metal oxides or precipitated metal hydroxides and the bulk of this material is nonradioactive. One method being developed to pretreat this waste takes advantage of the amphoteric character of aluminum and other nonradioactive elements. Previous studies have reported on the dissolution of eleven elements from simulated sludge using NaOH solutions up to 6M. This work provides a comparative study using KOH. The effectiveness of the alkali washing as a treatment method to reduce the bulk of radioactive sludge requiring long term isolation will be discussed.

  20. Solid state cell with alkali metal halo-alkali thiocyanate electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, B. M.; Silbernagel, B. G.

    1980-02-26

    A novel electrochemical cell is disclosed utilizing: (A) an anode which contains an alkali metal as an anode-active material; (B) a cathode and (C) an electrolyte comprising an electrolytically effective amount of one or more compounds having the formula: (Ax)ma'scn wherein a is an alkali metal, X is a halogen, a' is an alkali metal and 0.1 < or = N < or = 10. Preferred systems include lithium-containing anodes, lithium-containing electrolytes and cathodes which contain cathode-active material selected from the group consisting of cathode-active sulfurs, halogens, halides, chromates, phosphates, oxides and chalcogenides, especially those chalcogenides of the empirical formula mzm wherein M is one or more metals selected from the group consisting of iron, titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum and vanadium, Z is one or more chalcogens selected from the group consisting of oxygen, sulfur, selenium and tellurium, and M is a numerical value between about 1.8 and about 3.2.

  1. Ionic alkali halide XUV laser feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.T.; Gylys, V.T.; Bower, R.D.; Harris, D.G.; Blauer, J.A.; Turner, C.E.; Hindy, R.N.

    1989-11-10

    The objective of this work is to assess the feasibility of a select set of ionic alkali halide XUV laser concepts by obtaining the relevant kinetic and spectroscopic parameters required for a proof-of-principle and conceptual design. The proposed lasers operate in the 80--200 nm spectral region and do not require input from outside radiation sources for their operation. Frequency up-conversion and frequency mixing techniques and therefore not considered in the work to be described. An experimental and theoretical study of a new type of laser operating in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength region has been conducted. The lasing species are singly ionized alkali halide molecules such as Rb{sup 2+}F{sub {minus}}, Rb{sup 2+}Br{sup {minus}} and Cs{sup 2+}F{sup {minus}}. These species are similar in electronic structure to the rare gas halide excimers, such as XeF and Krf, except that the ionic molecules emit at wavelengths of 80--200 nm, much shorter than the conventional rare-gas halide excimer laser. The radiative lifetime of these molecules are typically near 1 ns, which is about an order of magnitude shorter than that for rare-gas halide systems. The values of the cross section for stimulated emission are on the order of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}16}cm{sup 2}. Because of the fundamental similarity to existing UV lasers, these systems show promise as a high power, efficient XUV lasers. 55 refs., 50 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Controlled in-situ dissolution of an alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jeffrey Donald; Dooley, Kirk John; Tolman, David Donald

    2012-09-11

    A method for the controllable dissolution of one or more alkali metals from a vessel containing a one or more alkali metals and/or one or more partially passivated alkali metals. The vessel preferably comprising a sodium, NaK or other alkali metal-cooled nuclear reactor that has been used. The alkali metal, preferably sodium, potassium or a combination thereof, in the vessel is exposed to a treatment liquid, preferably an acidic liquid, more preferably citric acid. Preferably, the treatment liquid is maintained in continuous motion relative to any surface of unreacted alkali metal with which the treatment liquid is in contact. The treatment liquid is preferably pumped into the vessel containing the one or more alkali metals and the resulting fluid is extracted and optionally further processed. Preferably, the resulting off-gases are processed by an off-gas treatment system and the resulting liquids are processed by a liquid disposal system. In one preferred embodiment, an inert gas is pumped into the vessel along with the treatment liquid.

  3. Ultrasonic coal washing to leach alkali elements from coals.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, S; Reddy, V Midhun; Nagarajan, R

    2015-11-01

    Deposition of fly ash particles onto heat-transfer surfaces is often one of the reasons for unscheduled shut-downs of coal-fired boilers. Fouling deposits encountered in convective sections of a boiler are characterized by arrival of ash particles in solidified (solid) state. Fouling is most frequently caused by condensation and chemical reaction of alkali vapors with the deposited ash particles creating a wet surface conducive to collect impacting ash particles. Hence, the amount of alkali elements present in coals, which, in turn, is available in the flue gas as condensable vapors, determines the formation and growth of fouling deposits. In this context, removal of alkali elements becomes vital when inferior coals having high-ash content are utilized for power generation. With the concept of reducing alkali elements present in a coal entering the combustor, whereby the fouling deposits can either be minimized or be weakened due to absence of alkali gluing effect, the ultrasonic leaching of alkali elements from coals is investigated in this study. Ultrasonic water-washing and chemical-washing, in comparison with agitation, are studied in order to estimate the intensification of the alkali removal process by sonication. PMID:26186840

  4. Alkali elemental and potassium isotopic compositions of Semarkona chondrules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, C.M. O'D.; Grossman, J.N.

    2005-01-01

    We report measurements of K isotope ratios in 28 Semarkona chondrules with a wide range of petrologic types and bulk compositions as well as the compositions of CPX-mesostasis pairs in 17 type I Semarkona chondrules, including two chondrules with radial alkali zonation and 19 type II chondrules. Despite the wide range in K/Al ratios, no systematic variations in K isotopic compositions were found. Semarkona chondrules do not record a simple history of Rayleigh-type loss of K. Experimentally determined evaporation rates suggest that considerable alkali evaporation would have occurred during chondrule formation. Nevertheless, based on Na CPX-mesostasis distribution coefficients, the alkali contents of the cores of most chondrules in Semarkona were probably established at the time of final crystallization. However, Na CPX-mesostasis distribution coefficients also show that alkali zonation in type I Semarkona chondrules was produced by entry of alkalis after solidification, probably during parent body alteration. This alkali metasomatism may have gone to completion in some chondrules. Our preferred explanation for the lack of systematic isotopic enrichments, even in alkali depleted type I chondrule cores, is that they exchanged with the ambient gas as they cooled. ?? The Meteoritical Society, 2005.

  5. Highly Effective Pt-Based Water-Gas Shift Catalysts by Surface Modification with Alkali Hydroxide Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Kusche, Matthias; Bustillo, Karen; Agel, Friederike; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2015-01-29

    Here, we describe an economical and convenient method to improve the performance of Pt/alumina catalysts for the water–gas shift reaction through surface modification of the catalysts with alkali hydroxides according to the solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer approach. The results are in agreement with our findings reported earlier for methanol steam reforming. This report indicates that alkali doping of the catalyst plays an important role in the observed catalyst activation. In addition, the basic and hygroscopic nature of the salt coating contributes to a significant improvement in the performance of the catalyst. During the reaction, a partly liquid film of alkali hydroxide forms on the alumina surface, which increases the availability of H2O at the catalytically active sites. Kinetic studies reveal a negligible effect of the KOH coating on the rate dependence of CO and H2O partial pressures. In conclusion, TEM studies indicate an agglomeration of the active Pt clusters during catalyst preparation; restructuring of Pt nanoparticles occurs under reaction conditions, which leads to a highly active and stable system over 240h time on stream. Excessive pore fillings with KOH introduce a mass transfer barrier as indicated in a volcano-shaped curve of activity versus salt loading. The optimum KOH loading was found to be 7.5wt%.

  6. Highly Effective Pt-Based Water-Gas Shift Catalysts by Surface Modification with Alkali Hydroxide Salts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kusche, Matthias; Bustillo, Karen; Agel, Friederike; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2015-01-29

    Here, we describe an economical and convenient method to improve the performance of Pt/alumina catalysts for the water–gas shift reaction through surface modification of the catalysts with alkali hydroxides according to the solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer approach. The results are in agreement with our findings reported earlier for methanol steam reforming. This report indicates that alkali doping of the catalyst plays an important role in the observed catalyst activation. In addition, the basic and hygroscopic nature of the salt coating contributes to a significant improvement in the performance of the catalyst. During the reaction, a partly liquid filmmore » of alkali hydroxide forms on the alumina surface, which increases the availability of H2O at the catalytically active sites. Kinetic studies reveal a negligible effect of the KOH coating on the rate dependence of CO and H2O partial pressures. In conclusion, TEM studies indicate an agglomeration of the active Pt clusters during catalyst preparation; restructuring of Pt nanoparticles occurs under reaction conditions, which leads to a highly active and stable system over 240h time on stream. Excessive pore fillings with KOH introduce a mass transfer barrier as indicated in a volcano-shaped curve of activity versus salt loading. The optimum KOH loading was found to be 7.5wt%.« less

  7. Highly Effective Pt-Based Water–Gas Shift Catalysts by Surface Modification with Alkali Hydroxide Salts

    PubMed Central

    Kusche, Matthias; Bustillo, Karen; Agel, Friederike; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we describe an economical and convenient method to improve the performance of Pt/alumina catalysts for the water–gas shift reaction through surface modification of the catalysts with alkali hydroxides according to the solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer approach. The results are in agreement with our findings reported earlier for methanol steam reforming. This report indicates that alkali doping of the catalyst plays an important role in the observed catalyst activation. In addition, the basic and hygroscopic nature of the salt coating contributes to a significant improvement in the performance of the catalyst. During the reaction, a partly liquid film of alkali hydroxide forms on the alumina surface, which increases the availability of H2O at the catalytically active sites. Kinetic studies reveal a negligible effect of the KOH coating on the rate dependence of CO and H2O partial pressures. TEM studies indicate an agglomeration of the active Pt clusters during catalyst preparation; restructuring of Pt nanoparticles occurs under reaction conditions, which leads to a highly active and stable system over 240 h time on stream. Excessive pore fillings with KOH introduce a mass transfer barrier as indicated in a volcano-shaped curve of activity versus salt loading. The optimum KOH loading was found to be 7.5 wt %. PMID:26413174

  8. Theoretical investigation of superconductivity in doped fullerenes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jishi, R.A.

    1995-03-01

    The aim of the research the authors are conducting is to understand the phenomenon of superconductivity in the fullerene system. Towards achieving this goal they have conducted a series of studies and have published several papers quite recently. They have developed a force-constant model for the C60 molecule which accounts for all measured frequencies in C60. The model employs four bond-stretching and four angle-bending force constants that were doped to reproduce the correct values of the frequencies of the Raman-active vibrational modes. The model was successfully applied to higher fullerenes, such as C70 and the effect of doping by alkali metal atoms on the phonon modes in C60 and in C70 was considered. The study of the phonon spectrum in doped C60 and doped C70 is an important step in view of the fact that while doped C60 is superconducting, doped C70 is not. The studies the authors have carried out, combined with studies on the electronic states in doped C70, could elucidate the difference in the electrical properties between these two materials.

  9. Increasing Class C fly ash reduces alkali silica reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, J.K.

    2007-07-01

    Contrary to earlier studies, it has been found that incremental additions of Class C fly ash do reduce alkali silica reactivity (ASR), in highly reactive, high alkali concrete mixes. AST can be further reduced by substituting 5% metakaolin or silica fume for the aggregate in concrete mixes with high (more than 30%) Class C fly ash substitution. The paper reports results of studies using Class C fly ash from the Labadie Station plant in Missouri which typically has between 1.3 and 1.45% available alkalis by ASTM C311. 7 figs.

  10. Electrochemical cell utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Virkar, Anil V.; Miller, Gerald R.

    1983-11-04

    An improved electrochemical cell comprising an additive-modified molten alkali metal electrode-reactant and/or electrolyte is disclosed. Various electrochemical cells employing a molten alkali metal, e.g., sodium, electrode in contact with a cationically conductive ceramic membrane experience a lower resistance and a lower temperature coefficient of resistance whenever small amounts of selenium are present at the interface of the electrolyte and the molten alkali metal. Further, cells having small amounts of selenium present at the electrolyte-molten metal interface exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte under long term cycling conditions.

  11. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaren, C.; Heffner, W.; Tessarollo, R.; Raj, R.; Jain, H.

    2015-11-01

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown.

  12. The 4843 Alkali Metal Storage Facility Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The 4843 AMSF has been used primarily to provide a centralized building to receive and store dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste, including sodium and lithium, which has been generated at the Fast Flux Test Facility and at various other Hanford Site operations that used alkali metals. Most of the dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste received consists of retired equipment from liquid sodium processes. The unit continues to store material. In general, only solid alkali metal waste that is water reactive is stored at the 4843 AMSF. The 4843 AMSF will be closed in a manner consistent with Ecology guidelines and regulations (WAC 173-303-610). The general closure procedure is detailed as follows.

  13. Hall Determination of Atomic Radii of Alkali Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    I will propose here an alternative method for determining atomic radii of alkali metals based on the Hall measurements of their free electron densities and the knowledge of their crystal structure. (Contains 2 figures.)

  14. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, M.M.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.

    1995-08-22

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  15. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, Marca M.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard

    1995-01-01

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  16. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, C.; Heffner, W.; Jain, H.; Tessarollo, R.; Raj, R.

    2015-11-02

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown.

  17. Effect of cavitation on removal of alkali elements from coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivalli, H.; Nirmal, L.; Nagarajan, R.

    2015-12-01

    The main impurities in coal are sulphur, ash and alkali. On combustion, the volatile forms of these impurities are either condensed on the boilers, or emitted in the form of potentially hazardous gases. The alkali elements present in coal help the fly ash particles adhere to boiler surfaces by providing a wet surface on which collection of these particles can take place. Use of ultrasonic techniques in cleaning of coal has stirred interest among researchers in recent times. Extraction of alkali elements by cavitation effect using low-frequency ultrasound, in the presence of reagents (HNO3 and H2O2) is reported in this paper. Powdered coal was dissolved with the reagent and exposed to ultrasonic fields of various frequencies at different time intervals. The treated solution is filtered and tested for alkali levels.

  18. Alkali absorption and citrate excretion in calcium nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakhaee, K.; Williams, R. H.; Oh, M. S.; Padalino, P.; Adams-Huet, B.; Whitson, P.; Pak, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The role of net gastrointestinal (GI) alkali absorption in the development of hypocitraturia was investigated. The net GI absorption of alkali was estimated from the difference between simple urinary cations (Ca, Mg, Na, and K) and anions (Cl and P). In 131 normal subjects, the 24 h urinary citrate was positively correlated with the net GI absorption of alkali (r = 0.49, p < 0.001). In 11 patients with distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA), urinary citrate excretion was subnormal relative to net GI alkali absorption, with data from most patients residing outside the 95% confidence ellipse described for normal subjects. However, the normal relationship between urinary citrate and net absorbed alkali was maintained in 11 patients with chronic diarrheal syndrome (CDS) and in 124 stone-forming patients devoid of RTA or CDS, half of whom had "idiopathic" hypocitraturia. The 18 stone-forming patients without RTA or CDS received potassium citrate (30-60 mEq/day). Both urinary citrate and net GI alkali absorption increased, yielding a significantly positive correlation (r = 0.62, p < 0.0001), with the slope indistinguishable from that of normal subjects. Thus, urinary citrate was normally dependent on the net GI absorption of alkali. This dependence was less marked in RTA, confirming the renal origin of hypocitraturia. However, the normal dependence was maintained in CDS and in idiopathic hypocitraturia, suggesting that reduced citrate excretion was largely dietary in origin as a result of low net alkali absorption (from a probable relative deficiency of vegetables and fruits or a relative excess of animal proteins).

  19. Rock Degradation by Alkali Metals: A Possible Lunar Erosion Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Naughton, J J; Barnes, I L; Hammond, D A

    1965-08-01

    When rocks melt under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions, their alkali components volatilize as metals. These metal vapors act to comminute polycrystalline rocks to their component minerals. The resultant powder is porous and loosely packed and its characteristics may be compatible with the lunar surface as revealed by the Ranger photographs. If meteorite impact or lunar volcanism has produced vaporization or areas of molten lava, alkali erosion may have given dust of this character in adjacent solid areas. PMID:17747570

  20. Electrochemical cell having an alkali-metal-nitrate electrode

    DOEpatents

    Roche, M.F.; Preto, S.K.

    1982-06-04

    A power-producing secondary electrochemical cell includes a molten alkali metal as the negative-electrode material and a molten-nitrate salt as the positive-electrode material. The molten material in the respective electrodes are separated by a solid barrier of alkali-metal-ion conducting material. A typical cell includes active materials of molten sodium separated from molten sodium nitrate and other nitrates in mixture by a layer of sodium ..beta..'' alumina.

  1. Alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide double alkoxide precursors to alkali metal yttrium oxide nanomaterials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Neville, Michael L.; Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; Cramer, Roger

    2016-03-15

    In this study, a series of alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide ([AY(ONep)4]) compounds were developed as precursors to alkali yttrium oxide (AYO2) nanomaterials. The reaction of yttrium amide ([Y(NR2)3] where R=Si(CH3)3) with four equivalents of H-ONep followed by addition of [A(NR2)] (A=Li, Na, K) or Ao (Ao=Rb, Cs) led to the formation of a complex series of AnY(ONep)3+n species, crystallographically identified as [Y2Li3(μ3-ONep)(μ3-HONep)(μ-ONep)5(ONep)3(HONep)2] (1), [YNa2(μ3-ONep)4(ONep)]2 (2), {[Y2K3(μ3-ONep)3(μ-ONep)4(ONep)2(ηξ-tol)2][Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4]•ηx-tol]} (3), [Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4] (3a), [Y2Rb3(μ4-ONep)3(μ-ONep)6] (4), and [Y2Cs4(μ6-O)(μ3-ONep)6(μ3-HONep)2(ONep)2(ηx-tol)4]•tol (5). Compounds 1–5 were investigated as single source precursors to AYOx nanomaterials following solvothermal routes (pyridine, 185 °C for 24h). The final products after thermal processing weremore » found by powder X-ray diffraction experiments to be Y2O3 with variable sized particles based on transmission electron diffraction. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy studies indicated that the heavier alkali metal species were present in the isolated nanomaterials.« less

  2. Alkali-slag cements for the immobilization of radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, C.; Day, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    Alkali-slag cements consist of glassy slag and an alkaline activator and can show both higher early and later strengths than Type III Portland cement, if a proper alkaline activator is used. An examination of microstructure of hardened alkali-slag cement pastes with the help of XRD and SEM with EDAX shows that the main hydration product is C-S-H (B) with low C/S ratio and no crystalline substances exist such as Ca(OH){sub 2}, Al (OH){sub 3} and sulphoaluminates. Mercury intrusion tests indicate that hardened alkali-slag cement pastes have a lower porosity than ordinary Portland cement, and contain mainly gel pores. The fine pore structure of hardened alkali-slag cement pastes will restrict the ingress of deleterious substances and the leaching of harmful species such as radionuclides. The leachability of Cs{sup + } from hardened alkali-slag cement pastes is only half of that from hardened Portland cement. From all these aspects, it is concluded that alkali-slag cements are a better solidification matrix than Portland cement for radioactive wastes.

  3. Temperature dependence of elastic properties in alkali borate binary glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Mitsuru; Matsuda, Yu; Kojima, Seiji

    2011-05-01

    The elastic properties of alkali borate glasses, xM 2O·(100 - x)B 2O 3 (M = Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, x = 14, 28), have been investigated by Brillouin scattering spectroscopy from room temperature up to 1100 °C. Above the glass transition temperature, Tg, the longitudinal sound velocity, VL, decreases markedly on heating. Such significant changes of the elastic properties result from the breakdown of the glass network above Tg. Alkali borate family with the same x shows the similar behavior in the temperature variations of VL up to around Tg. The absorption coefficient, αL, increases gradually above Tg. With the increase of the size of an alkali ion, the slope of VL just above Tg decreases. Since the fragility is related to the slope, the present results suggest that the fragility of alkali borate glasses increases as the size of alkali ion decreases. Such an alkali dependence of the fragility is discussed on the basis of the fluctuation of the boron coordination number.

  4. Two-phase alkali-metal experiments in reduced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-06-01

    Future space missions envision the use of large nuclear reactors utilizing either a single or a two-phase alkali-metal working fluid. The design and analysis of such reactors require state-of-the-art computer codes that can properly treat alkali-metal flow and heat transfer in a reduced-gravity environment. A literature search of relevant experiments in reduced gravity is reported on here, and reveals a paucity of data for such correlations. The few ongoing experiments in reduced gravity are noted. General plans are put forth for the reduced-gravity experiments which will have to be performed, at NASA facilities, with benign fluids. A similar situation exists regarding two-phase alkali-metal flow and heat transfer, even in normal gravity. Existing data are conflicting and indequate for the task of modeling a space reactor using a two-phase alkali-metal coolant. The major features of past experiments are described here. Data from the reduced-gravity experiments with innocuous fluids are to be combined with normal gravity data from the two-phase alkali-metal experiments. Analyses undertaken here give every expectation that the correlations developed from this data base will provide a valid representation of alkali-metal heat transfer and pressure drop in reduced gravity.

  5. Reduction of phosphorus and alkali levels in coking coals

    SciTech Connect

    Hoare, I.C.; Waugh, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    A number of coals, though exhibiting desirable coking properties, can have undesirable levels of alkalis and phosphorus. All the phosphorus in the coal will report to the coke, eventually to the iron and thence to the steel, with adverse effects on its metallurgical properties. Alkalis have damaging effects on the blast furnace operation and can be responsible for loss of heat, loss of production, efficiency loss and reduced furnace life. Buyers of coking coal commonly specify such parameters as phosphorus in coal and alkalis in ash, with penalties and rejection over certain limits. With the introduction of new direct reduction technologies such as COREX and HISMELT, and others such as PCI, it is anticipated that coal producers will have even tighter phosphorus and alkali specifications imposed on their products. Phosphorus is predominantly inorganic in origin occurring in a wide variety of minerals in coal, but its main source is apatite. It can be found mainly in the lower density fractions of the coal and intimately bound, so that conventional physical beneficiation techniques are relatively ineffective. CSIRO has developed a cost effective, selective chemical demineralization treatment, which can be applied to the problem of high alkali, high phosphorus coals. This particular technique makes use of unrefined organic acid, which also has the advantage of being low in cost and environmentally benign. In this paper, the effectiveness of acid demineralization of a number of coals is discussed, within the context of their phosphorus and alkali distributions throughout various size/density fractions.

  6. Alkali-metal azides interacting with metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Armata, Nerina; Cortese, Remedios; Duca, Dario; Triolo, Roberto

    2013-01-14

    Interactions between alkali-metal azides and metal-organic framework (MOF) derivatives, namely, the first and third members of the isoreticular MOF (IRMOF) family, IRMOF-1 and IRMOF-3, are studied within the density functional theory (DFT) paradigm. The investigations take into account different models of the selected IRMOFs. The mutual influence between the alkali-metal azides and the π rings or Zn centers of the involved MOF derivatives are studied by considering the interactions both of the alkali-metal cations with model aromatic centers and of the alkali-metal azides with distinct sites of differently sized models of IRMOF-1 and IRMOF-3. Several exchange and correlation functionals are employed to calculate the corresponding interaction energies. Remarkably, it is found that, with increasing alkali-metal atom size, the latter decrease for cations interacting with the π-ring systems and increase for the azides interacting with the MOF fragments. The opposite behavior is explained by stabilization effects on the azide moieties and determined by the Zn atoms, which constitute the inorganic vertices of the IRMOF species. Larger cations can, in fact, coordinate more efficiently to both the aromatic center and the azide anion, and thus stabilizing bridging arrangements of the azide between one alkali-metal and two Zn atoms in an η(2) coordination mode are more favored. PMID:23161861

  7. Quantification of the boron speciation in alkali borosilicate glasses by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shaodong; Yang, Guang; Zhao, Yanqi; Peng, MingYing; Skibsted, Jørgen; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and related analytical techniques have been widely used to study the microstructure of different materials. However, few research works have been performed in the field of glasses, possibly due to the electron-beam irradiation damage. In this paper, we have developed a method based on electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data acquisition and analyses, which enables determination of the boron speciation in a series of ternary alkali borosilicate glasses with constant molar ratios. A script for the fast acquisition of EELS has been designed, from which the fraction of BO4 tetrahedra can be obtained by fitting the experimental data with linear combinations of the reference spectra. The BO4 fractions (N4) obtained by EELS are consistent with those from 11B MAS NMR spectra, suggesting that EELS can be an alternative and convenient way to determine the N4 fraction in glasses. In addition, the boron speciation of a CeO2 doped potassium borosilicate glass has been analyzed by using the time-resolved EELS spectra. The results clearly demonstrate that the BO4 to BO3 transformation induced by the electron beam irradiation can be efficiently suppressed by doping CeO2 to the borosilicate glasses. PMID:26643370

  8. Small diatomic alkali molecules at ultracold temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tout Taotao

    This thesis describes experimental work done with two of the smallest diatomic alkali molecules, 6Li2 and 23Na 6Li, each formed out of its constituent atoms at ultracold temperatures. The 23Na6Li molecule was formed for the first time at ultracold temperatures, after previous attempts failed due to an incorrect assignment of Feshbach resonances in the 6Li+23Na system. The experiment represents successful molecule formation around the most difficult Feshbach resonance ever used, and opens up the possibility of transferring NaLi to its spin-triplet ground state, which has both magnetic and electric dipole moments and is expected to be long-lived. For 6Li2, the experimental efforts in this thesis have solved a long-standing puzzle of apparently long lifetimes of closed-channel fermion pairs around a narrow Feshbach resonance, finding that the lifetime is in fact short, as expected in the absence of Pauli suppression of collisions. Moreover, measurements of collisions of Li2 with free Li atoms demonstrates a striking first example of collisions involving molecules at ultracold temperatures described by physics beyond universal long-range van der Waals interactions.

  9. The timing of alkali metasomatism in paleosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacFarlane, A. W.; Holland, H. D.

    1991-01-01

    We have measured the concentrations of rubidium and strontium and 87Sr/86Sr values of whole-rock samples from three paleosols of different ages. The oldest of the three weathering horizons, the 2,760 Ma Mt. Roe #1 paleosol in the Fortescue Group of Western Australia, experienced addition of Rb, and probably Sr, at 2,168 +/- 10 Ma. The intermediate paleosol, developed on the Hekpoort Basalt in South Africa, is estimated to have formed at 2,200 Ma, and yields a Rb-Sr isochron age of 1,925 +/- 32 Ma. The youngest of the three paleosols, developed on the Ongeluk basalt in Griqualand West, South Africa ca. 1,900 Ma, yielded a Rb-Sr age of 1,257 +/- 11 Ma. The Rb-Sr systematics of all three paleosols were reset during post-weathering metasomatism related to local or regional thermal disturbances. The Rb-Sr systematics of the paleosols were not subsequently disturbed. The near-complete removal of the alkali and alkaline earth elements from these paleosols during weathering made them particularly susceptible to resetting of their Rb-Sr systematics. Paleosols of this type are therefore sensitive indicators of the timing of thermal disturbances.

  10. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced. PMID:26860297

  11. Efficient destruction of CF4 through in situ generation of alkali metals from heated alkali halide reducing mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Churl; Choi, Wonyong

    2002-03-15

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are the most potent green house gases that are very recalcitrant at destruction. An effective way of converting PFCs using hot solid reagents into safe products has been recently introduced. By investigating the thermal reductive destruction of tetrafluoromethane (CF4) we provided new insight and more physicochemical consideration on this novel process. The complete destruction of CF4was successfully achieved by flowing the gas through a heated reagent bed (400-950 degrees C) that contained powder mixtures of alkali halides, CaO, and Si. The silicon acted as a reducing agent of alkali halides for the in-situ production of alkali metals, and the calcium oxide played the role of a halide ion acceptor. The absence of any single component in this ternary mixture drastically reduced the destruction efficiency of CF4. The CF4 destruction efficiencies with the solid reagent containing the alkali halide, MX, increased in the order of Li approximately Na < K < Cs for alkali cations and I < Br < Cl < F for halide anions. This trend agreed with the endothermicity of the alkali metal generation reaction: the higher the endothermicity, the lower the destruction efficiency. Alkali metal generation was indirectly detected by monitoring H2 production from its reaction with water. The production of alkali metals increased with NaF, KF, and CsF in this order. The CsF/CaO/Si system exhibited the complete destruction of CF4 at as low as 600 degrees C. The solid product analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the formation of CaF2 and the depletion of Si with black carbon particles formed in the solid reagent residue. No CO/CO2 and toxic HF and SiF4 formation were detected in the exhaust gas. PMID:11944694

  12. Alkali-aggregate reactivity of typical siliceious glass and carbonate rocks in alkali-activated fly ash based geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Duyou; Liu, Yongdao; Zheng, Yanzeng; Xu, Zhongzi; Shen, Xiaodong

    2013-08-01

    For exploring the behaviour of alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR) in alkali-activated geopolymeric materials and assessing the procedures for testing AAR in geopolymers, the expansion behaviour of fly ash based geopolymer mortars with pure silica glass and typical carbonate rocks were studied respectively by curing at various conditions, i.e. 23°C and 38°C with relative humidity over 95%, immersed in 1M NaOH solution at 80°C. Results show that, at various curing conditions, neither harmful ASR nor harmful ACR was observed in geopolymers with the criteria specified for OPC system. However, with the change of curing conditions, the geopolymer binder and reactive aggregates may experience different reaction processes leading to quite different dimensional changes, especially with additional alkalis and elevated temperatures. It suggests that high temperature with additional alkali for accelerating AAR in traditional OPC system may not appropriate for assessing the alkali-aggregate reactivity behaviour in geopolymers designed for normal conditions. On the other hand, it is hopeful to control the dimensional change of geopolymer mortar or concrete by selecting the type of aggregates and the appropriate curing conditions, thus changing the harmful AAR in OPC into beneficial AAR in geopolymers and other alkali-activated cementitious systems.

  13. On-chip fabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, K.; Ban, K.; Hirai, Y.; Sugano, K.; Tsuchiya, T.; Mizutani, N.; Tabata, O.

    2013-11-01

    We describe a novel on-chip microfabrication technique for the alkali-metal vapor cell of an optically pumped atomic magnetometer (OPAM), utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet (AMST). The newly proposed AMST is a millimeter-sized piece of porous alumina whose considerable surface area holds deposited alkali-metal chloride (KCl) and barium azide (BaN6), source materials that effectively produce alkali-metal vapor at less than 400 °C. Our experiments indicated that the most effective pore size of the AMST is between 60 and 170 µm. The thickness of an insulating glass spacer holding the AMST was designed to confine generated alkali metal to the interior of the vapor cell during its production, and an integrated silicon heater was designed to seal the device using a glass frit, melted at an optimum temperature range of 460-490 °C that was determined by finite element method thermal simulation. The proposed design and AMST were used to successfully fabricate a K cell that was then operated as an OPAM with a measured sensitivity of 50 pT. These results demonstrate that the proposed concept for on-chip microfabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells may lead to effective replacement of conventional glassworking approaches.

  14. The reaction dynamics of alkali dimer molecules and electronically excited alkali atoms with simple molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, H.

    1995-12-01

    This dissertation presents the results from the crossed molecular beam studies on the dynamics of bimolecular collisions in the gas phase. The primary subjects include the interactions of alkali dimer molecules with simple molecules, and the inelastic scattering of electronically excited alkali atoms with O2. The reaction of the sodium dimers with oxygen molecules is described in Chapter 2. Two reaction pathways were observed for this four-center molecule-molecule reaction, i.e. the formations of NaO2 + Na and NaO + NaO. NaO2 products exhibit a very anisotropic angular distribution, indicating a direct spectator stripping mechanism for this reaction channel. The NaO formation follows the bond breaking of O2, which is likely a result of a charge transfer from Na2 to the excited state orbital of O2-. The scattering of sodium dimers from ammonium and methanol produced novel molecules, NaNH3 and Na(CH3OH), respectively. These experimental observations, as well as the discussions on the reaction dynamics and the chemical bonding within these molecules, will be presented in Chapter 3. The lower limits for the bond dissociation energies of these molecules are also obtained. Finally, Chapter 4 describes the energy transfer between oxygen molecules and electronically excited sodium atoms.

  15. Water Content of Lunar Alkali Fedlspar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, R. D.; Simon, J. I.; Wang, J.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of indigenous hydrogen in a diversity of lunar materials, including volcanic glass, melt inclusions, apatite, and plagioclase suggests water may have played a role in the chemical differentiation of the Moon. Spectroscopic data from the Moon indicate a positive correlation between water and Th. Modeling of lunar magma ocean crystallization predicts a similar chemical differentiation with the highest levels of water in the K- and Th-rich melt residuum of the magma ocean (i.e. urKREEP). Until now, the only sample-based estimates of water content of KREEP-rich magmas come from measurements of OH, F, and Cl in lunar apatites, which suggest a water concentration of < 1 ppm in urKREEP. Using these data, predict that the bulk water content of the magma ocean would have <10 ppm. In contrast, estimate water contents of 320 ppm for the bulk Moon and 1.4 wt % for urKREEP from plagioclase in ferroan anorthosites. Results and interpretation: NanoSIMS data from granitic clasts from Apollo sample 15405,78 show that alkali feldspar, a common mineral in K-enriched rocks, can have approx. 20 ppm of water, which implies magmatic water contents of approx. 1 wt % in the high-silica magmas. This estimate is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that estimated from apatite in similar rocks. However, the Cl and F contents of apatite in chemically similar rocks suggest that these melts also had high Cl/F ratios, which leads to spuriously low water estimates from the apatite. We can only estimate the minimum water content of urKREEP (+ bulk Moon) from our alkali feldspar data because of the unknown amount of degassing that led to the formation of the granites. Assuming a reasonable 10 to 100 times enrichment of water from urKREEP into the granites produces an estimate of 100-1000 ppm of water for the urKREEP reservoir. Using the modeling of and the 100-1000 ppm of water in urKREEP suggests a minimum bulk silicate Moon water content between 2 and 20 ppm. However, hydrogen loss was

  16. Theory of Magnetotransport Anomalies in Alkali Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaodong

    The galvanomagnetic properties of alkali metals, especially those of potassium, are studied taking into account the existence of an incommensurate change-density wave (CDW) structure. Occurrence of the CDW broken symmetry truncates the Fermi surface with a large number of energy gaps. Furthermore, any macroscopic crystal is likely divided into CDW (')Q-domains. An orientational (')Q-texture leads to a preferred direction in the crystal. For such an exotic system the effective magnetoresistivity tensor is anomalous and is derived for various magnetic fields. The residual (zero-field) resistance is also anisotropic. For fields 0.5 - 3T, Hall coefficients are found to be anisotropic, and a longitudinal-transverse mixing effect is discovered. The diagonal elements of the magnetoresistivity tensor are found to have a linear magnetoresistance. When the field is increased above 4T sharp open-orbit magnetoresistance spectrum develops. From the theoretical magnetoresistivity tensor, the induced-torque amplitude and phase patterns for potassium spheres are calculated. The theory quantitatively explains all of the induced-torque anomalies found experimentally in the last fourteen years. An interacting electron system, which is free of the CDW instabilities, is also studied by considering its spin response to a weak sinusoidal magnetic field. The many-body correction G(,-)((')q,(omega)) caused by exchange and correlation is introduced to describe the correct wave -vector- and frequency-dependent spin susceptibility. The exact behavior of G(,-)((')q,(omega)) in the large-q limit is shown to be related to the pair distribution function g((')r) at r = 0. G(,-)((')q,(omega)) (--->) 4g(0)-1 /3, as q (--->) (INFIN).At metallic densities this value is negative, opposite in sign to the limit at small wave vectors. Thus the spin susceptibility for large wave vectors is suppressed, rather than enhanced, by many-body effects.

  17. Alkali content of alpine ultramafic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, W.; Mountjoy, W.

    1965-01-01

    The lower limit of abundance of sodium and potassium in ultramafic rocks is less than the threshold amount detectable by conventional analytical methods. By a dilutionaddition modification of the flame-spectrophotometric method, sodium and potassium have been determined in 40 specimens of alpine ultramafic rocks. Samples represent six regions in the United States and one in Australia, and include dunite, peridotite, pyroxenite, and their variably serpentinized and metamorphosed derivatives. The median value found for Na2O is 0.004 per cent, and the range of Na2O is 0.001-0.19. The median value for K2O is 0.0034 per cent and the range is 0.001-0.031 per cent. Alkali concentrations are below 0.01 per cent Na2O in 28 samples and below 0.01 per cent K2O in 35. Derivation of basalt magma from upper-mantle material similar to such ultramafic rocks, as has been postulated, is precluded by the relative amounts of sodium and potassium, which are from 200 to 600 times more abundant in basalt than in the ultramafic rocks. Similar factors apply to a number of other elements. No reasonable process could produce such concentrations in, for example, tens of thousands of cubic miles of uniform tholeiitic basalt. The ultramafic rocks might have originated either as magmatic crystal precipitates or as mantle residues left after fusion and removal of basaltic magma. Injection of ultramafic rocks to exposed positions is tectonic rather than magmatic. ?? 1965.

  18. Spin tuning of electron-doped metal-phthalocyanine layers.

    PubMed

    Stepanow, Sebastian; Lodi Rizzini, Alberto; Krull, Cornelius; Kavich, Jerald; Cezar, Julio C; Yakhou-Harris, Flora; Sheverdyaeva, Polina M; Moras, Paolo; Carbone, Carlo; Ceballos, Gustavo; Mugarza, Aitor; Gambardella, Pietro

    2014-04-01

    The spin state of organic-based magnets at interfaces is to a great extent determined by the organic environment and the nature of the spin-carrying metal center, which is further subject to modifications by the adsorbate-substrate coupling. Direct chemical doping offers an additional route for tailoring the electronic and magnetic characteristics of molecular magnets. Here we present a systematic investigation of the effects of alkali metal doping on the charge state and crystal field of 3d metal ions in Cu, Ni, Fe, and Mn phthalocyanine (Pc) monolayers adsorbed on Ag. Combined X-ray absorption spectroscopy and ligand field multiplet calculations show that Cu(II), Ni(II), and Fe(II) ions reduce to Cu(I), Ni(I), and Fe(I) upon alkali metal adsorption, whereas Mn maintains its formal oxidation state. The strength of the crystal field at the Ni, Fe, and Mn sites is strongly reduced upon doping. The combined effect of these changes is that the magnetic moment of high- and low-spin ions such as Cu and Ni can be entirely turned off or on, respectively, whereas the magnetic configuration of MnPc can be changed from intermediate (3/2) to high (5/2) spin. In the case of FePc a 10-fold increase of the orbital magnetic moment accompanies charge transfer and a transition to a high-spin state. PMID:24635343

  19. Multi-photon processes in alkali metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Baodong; Hu, Shu; Li, Hui; Shi, Zhe; Cai, Xianglong; Guo, Jingwei; Tan, Yannan; Liu, Wanfa; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2015-02-01

    Achieving population inversion through multi-photon cascade pumping is almost always difficult, and most laser medium work under 1-photon excitation mechanism. But for alkali atoms such as cesium, relatively large absorption cross sections of several low, cascading energy levels enable them properties such as up conversion. Here we carried out research on two-photon excitation alkali fluorescence. Two photons of near infrared region are used to excite alkali atoms to n 2 D5/2, n 2 D3/2 or higher energy levels, then the blue fluorescence of (n+1) 2 P3/2,(n+1) 2 P1/2-->n 2 S1/2 are observed. Different pumping paths are tried and by the recorded spectra, transition routes of cesium are deducted and concluded. Finally the possibility of two-photon style DPALs (diode pumped alkali laser) are discussed, such alkali lasers can give output wavelengths in the shorter end of visual spectroscopy (400-460 nm) and are expected to get application in underwater communication and material laser processing.

  20. Structural and optical investigations of Eu3+ ions in lead containing alkali fluoroborate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deva Prasad Raju, B.; Madhukar Reddy, C.

    2012-06-01

    Lead containing alkali fluoroborate glasses (LAFB) with molar composition of 20PbO + 5CaO + 5ZnO + 10AF + 59B2O3 + 1Eu2O3 (where A = Li, Na and K) were prepared and investigated by the TG-DTA, FT-Raman, optical absorption, fluorescence and decay curve analysis. The influence of alkali content on the structure of borate glasses was investigated by FT-Raman spectroscopy. The thermal properties of the glasses have been studied by TG-DTA analysis. Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters are derived from the absorption spectra and also from the emission spectra under various constraints. The effect of thermalization on the oscillator strengths of the absorption transitions originating from the ground (7F0) and the first excited (7F1) states of Eu3+ ions have been discussed. The J-O intensity parameters obtained by applying thermal correction to 7F0 → 5D2 and 7F6 absorption oscillator strengths were used to calculate the various spectroscopic properties. The predicted values of radiative lifetime (τR) and luminescence intensity branching ratio (βR) are compared with the measured values for 5D0 level. The decay profiles were found to be single exponential in all the three glasses. The spectroscopic properties confirm the potentiality of present LAFB glasses doped with Eu3+ ions as laser host materials to produce an intense red luminescence at 612 nm corresponding to 5D0 → 7F2 emission level and have significant importance in the development of emission rich optical systems.

  1. Maternal exposure to alkali, alkali earth, transition and other metals: Concentrations and predictors of exposure.

    PubMed

    Hinwood, A L; Stasinska, A; Callan, A C; Heyworth, J; Ramalingam, M; Boyce, M; McCafferty, P; Odland, J Ø

    2015-09-01

    Most studies of metals exposure focus on the heavy metals. There are many other metals (the transition, alkali and alkaline earth metals in particular) in common use in electronics, defense industries, emitted via combustion and which are naturally present in the environment, that have received limited attention in terms of human exposure. We analysed samples of whole blood (172), urine (173) and drinking water (172) for antimony, beryllium, bismuth, cesium, gallium, rubidium, silver, strontium, thallium, thorium and vanadium using ICPMS. In general most metals concentrations were low and below the analytical limit of detection with some high concentrations observed. Few factors examined in regression models were shown to influence biological metals concentrations and explained little of the variation. Further study is required to establish the source of metals exposures at the high end of the ranges of concentrations measured and the potential for any adverse health impacts in children. PMID:25984984

  2. Thermodynamics of Liquid Alkali Metals and Their Binary Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakor, P. B.; Patel, Minal H.; Gajjar, P. N.; Jani, A. R.

    2009-07-01

    The theoretical investigation of thermodynamic properties like internal energy, entropy, Helmholtz free energy, heat of mixing (ΔE) and entropy of mixing (ΔS) of liquid alkali metals and their binary alloys are reported in the present paper. The effect of concentration on the thermodynamic properties of Ac1Bc2 alloy of the alkali-alkali elements is investigated and reported for the first time using our well established local pseudopotential. To investigate influence of exchange and correlation effects, we have used five different local field correction functions viz; Hartree(H), Taylor(T), Ichimaru and Utsumi(IU), Farid et al. (F) and Sarkar et al. (S). The increase of concentration C2, increases the internal energy and Helmholtz free energy of liquid alloy Ac1Bc2. The behavior of present computation is not showing any abnormality in the outcome and hence confirms the applicability of our model potential in explaining the thermodynamics of liquid binary alloys.

  3. Orbital Feshbach Resonance in Alkali-Earth Atoms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ren; Cheng, Yanting; Zhai, Hui; Zhang, Peng

    2015-09-25

    For a mixture of alkali-earth atomic gas in the long-lived excited state ^{3}P_{0} and the ground state ^{1}S_{0}, in addition to nuclear spin, another "orbital" index is introduced to distinguish these two internal states. In this Letter we propose a mechanism to induce Feshbach resonance between two atoms with different orbital and nuclear spin quantum numbers. Two essential ingredients are the interorbital spin-exchange process and orbital dependence of the Landé g factors. Here the orbital degrees of freedom plays a similar role as the electron spin degree of freedom in magnetic Feshbach resonance in alkali-metal atoms. This resonance is particularly accessible for the ^{173}Yb system. The BCS-BEC crossover in this system requires two fermion pairing order parameters, and displays a significant difference compared to that in an alkali-metal system. PMID:26451561

  4. Orbital Feshbach Resonance in Alkali-Earth Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ren; Cheng, Yanting; Zhai, Hui; Zhang, Peng

    2015-09-01

    For a mixture of alkali-earth atomic gas in the long-lived excited state 3P0 and the ground state 1S0, in addition to nuclear spin, another "orbital" index is introduced to distinguish these two internal states. In this Letter we propose a mechanism to induce Feshbach resonance between two atoms with different orbital and nuclear spin quantum numbers. Two essential ingredients are the interorbital spin-exchange process and orbital dependence of the Landé g factors. Here the orbital degrees of freedom plays a similar role as the electron spin degree of freedom in magnetic Feshbach resonance in alkali-metal atoms. This resonance is particularly accessible for the 173Yb system. The BCS-BEC crossover in this system requires two fermion pairing order parameters, and displays a significant difference compared to that in an alkali-metal system.

  5. Release and sorption of alkali metals in coal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Witthohn, A.; Oeltjen, L.; Hilpert, K.

    1998-07-01

    Released as gaseous species during coal combustion and gasification, alkali metal compounds cause high temperature corrosion especially at the gas turbine blading of coal-fired combined cycle power plants. Experimental and theoretical basic investigations are presented, which contribute to the understanding of the release and sorption of these contaminants. Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry was used to study the vaporization of coal ashes and slags at temperatures between 200 and 1,800 C and to determine the released alkali species and their partial pressures. The data base system FACT and the modified quasi-chemical model for non-ideal solutions were applied to model the thermodynamic behavior of coal slags and to determine material compositions of maximum alkali sorption capacity.

  6. The alkali-labile linkage between keratan sulphate and protein

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, John J.; Robinson, H. Clem

    1974-01-01

    Keratan sulphate was isolated from adult intervertebral disc in 90% yield by sequential digestion of the whole tissue with papain, Pronase and Proteus vulgaris chondroitin sulphate lyase. Treatment of this preparation with alkali cleaved a glycosidic bond between N-acetylgalactosamine and threonine and produced, by an alkali-catalysed `peeling' reaction, an unsaturated derivative of N-acetylgalactosamine which reacted as a chromogen in the Morgan–Elson reaction, but remained covalently bonded to the keratan sulphate chain. This derivative was reduced and labelled by alkaline NaB3H4. The substituent at position 3 of N-acetylgalactosamine in the keratan sulphate–protein linkage was identified as a disaccharide, N-acetylneuraminylgalactose, which was isolated from the reaction mixture after alkali treatment. PMID:4281652

  7. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of alkali metal deficiency and excess.

    PubMed

    Yung, C Y

    1984-01-01

    The alkali metals from the Group IA of the periodic table (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium and francium) are reviewed. The neuropsychiatric aspects of alkali metal deficiencies and excesses (intoxications) are described. Emphasis was placed on lithium due to its clinical uses. The signs and symptoms of these conditions are characterized by features of an organic brain syndrome with delirium and encephalopathy prevailing. There are no clinically distinctive features that could be reliably used for diagnoses. Sodium and potassium are two essential alkali metals in man. Lithium is used as therapeutic agent in bipolar affective disorders. Rubidium has been investigated for its antidepressant effect in a group of psychiatric disorders. Cesium is under laboratory investigation for its role in carcinogenesis and in depressive illness. Very little is known of francium due to its great instability for experimental study. PMID:6395136

  8. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of alkali metal deficiency and excess

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, C.Y.

    1984-01-01

    The alkali metals from the Group IA of the periodic table (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium and francium) are reviewed. The neuropsychiatric aspects of alkali metal deficiencies and excesses (intoxications) are described. Emphasis was placed on lithium due to its clinical uses. The signs and symptoms of these conditions are characterized by features of an organic brain syndrome with delirium and encephalopathy prevailing. There are no clinically distinctive features that could be reliably used for diagnoses. Sodium and potassium are two essential alkali metals in man. Lithium is used as therapeutic agent in bipolar affective disorders. Rubidium has been investigated for its antidepressant effect in a group of psychiatric disorders. Cesium is under laboratory investigation for its role in carcinogenesis and in depressive illness. Very little is known of francium due to its great instability for experimental study.

  9. Theoretical study of the alkali and alkaline-earth monosulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Ab initio calculations have been used to obtain accurate spectroscopic constants for the X2Pi and A2Sigma(+) states of the alkali sulfides and the X1Sigma(+), a3Pi, and A1Pi states of the alkaline-earth sulfides. In contrast to the alkali oxides, the alkali sulfides are found to have X2Pi ground states, due to the larger electrostatic interaction. Dissociation energies of 3.27 eV for BeS, 2.32 eV for MgS, 3.29 eV for CaS, and 3.41 eV for SrS have been obtained for the X1Sigma(+) states of the alkaline-earth sulfides, in good agreement with experimental results. Core correlation is shown to increase the Te values for the a3Pi and A1Pi states of MgS, CaS, and SrS.

  10. Spill-Resistant Alkali-Metal-Vapor Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, William

    2005-01-01

    A spill-resistant vessel has been developed for dispensing an alkali-metal vapor. Vapors of alkali metals (most commonly, cesium or rubidium, both of which melt at temperatures slightly above room temperature) are needed for atomic frequency standards, experiments in spectroscopy, and experiments in laser cooling. Although the present spill-resistant alkali-metal dispenser was originally intended for use in the low-gravity environment of outer space, it can also be used in normal Earth gravitation: indeed, its utility as a vapor source was confirmed by use of cesium in a ground apparatus. The vessel is made of copper. It consists of an assembly of cylinders and flanges, shown in the figure. The uppermost cylinder is a fill tube. Initially, the vessel is evacuated, the alkali metal charge is distilled into the bottom of the vessel, and then the fill tube is pinched closed to form a vacuum seal. The innermost cylinder serves as the outlet for the vapor, yet prevents spilling by protruding above the surface of the alkali metal, no matter which way or how far the vessel is tilted. In the event (unlikely in normal Earth gravitation) that any drops of molten alkali metal have been shaken loose by vibration and are floating freely, a mesh cap on top of the inner cylinder prevents the drops from drifting out with the vapor. Liquid containment of the equivalent of 1.2 grams of cesium was confirmed for all orientations with rubbing alcohol in one of the prototypes later used with cesium.

  11. Interaction of alkali-metal overlayers with oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Hrbek, J.; Xu, G.; Sham, T.K.; Shek, M.L.

    1989-05-01

    The interaction of oxygen with alkali metals (Li, Na, K, and Cs) was studied with valence and core-level photoemission (PE) using synchrotron radiation and by multiple mass thermal desorption (TDS). During a stepwise coadsorption of oxygen at 80 K, an increase in the emission intensity, a linewidth broadening, and a negative binding-energy shift of alkali-metal core levels is observed. Two stages of oxygen adsorption are identified in PE and TDS. In the low O/sub 2/ exposure range, an oxide species is formed; at higher exposures, peroxide and superoxide species are observed in Na, K, and Cs. The potassium--oxygen interaction is discussed in detail.

  12. Upgrading of petroleum oil feedstocks using alkali metals and hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A method of upgrading an oil feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the oil feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase separable from the organic oil feedstock material. The upgradant hydrocarbon bonds to the oil feedstock material and increases the number of carbon atoms in the product. This increase in the number of carbon atoms of the product increases the energy value of the resulting oil feedstock.

  13. Synergistic capture mechanisms for alkali and sulfur species from combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.W.; Shadman, F.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Wu, Baochun.

    1992-01-10

    Due to the generation of a wide variety of pollutants during coal combustion, research on the development of a multifunction sorbent for adsorbing SO{sub 2} and alkali compounds simultaneously is ongoing at the University of Arizona. The current work focuses on the thermodynamic behavior of the reacting system for alkali adsorption especially in gas phase. The temperature and pressure effects on sodium species and on the system are intensively investigated under the simulated flue gas composition condition. The interaction of sulfur dioxide with sodium chloride vapor and some other system elements is also explored.

  14. Interfacial tension in immiscible mixtures of alkali halides.

    PubMed

    Lockett, Vera; Rukavishnikova, Irina V; Stepanov, Victor P; Tkachev, Nikolai K

    2010-02-01

    The interfacial tension of the liquid-phase interface in seven immiscible reciprocal ternary mixtures of lithium fluoride with the following alkali halides: CsCl, KBr, RbBr, CsBr, KI, RbI, and CsI was measured using the cylinder weighing method over a wide temperature range. It was shown that for all mixtures the interfacial tension gradually decreases with growing temperature. The interfacial tension of the reciprocal ternary mixtures at a given temperature increases both with the alkali cation radius (K(+) < Rb(+) < Cs(+)) and with the radius of the halogen anion (Cl(-) < Br(-) < I(-)). PMID:20094678

  15. Feasibility of supersonic diode pumped alkali lasers: Model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2013-04-08

    The feasibility of supersonic operation of diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) is studied for Cs and K atoms applying model calculations, based on a semi-analytical model previously used for studying static and subsonic flow DPALs. The operation of supersonic lasers is compared with that measured and modeled in subsonic lasers. The maximum power of supersonic Cs and K lasers is found to be higher than that of subsonic lasers with the same resonator and alkali density at the laser inlet by 25% and 70%, respectively. These results indicate that for scaling-up the power of DPALs, supersonic expansion should be considered.

  16. Dosimetric properties of new europium doped KBr phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, R.; Tostado-García, W.; Alday-Samaniego, K. R.; Cruz-Vázquez, C.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    2003-03-01

    In this work, dosimetric properties of new sintered europium-doped KBr phosphors subjected to beta irradiation are investigated. The obtained results show that these phosphors exhibit promising thermoluminescence properties that made them a viable alternative to substitute the conventional alkali halides crystals of similar composition for dosimetric purposes, considering as important advantages the simplicity and economy of the fabrication. The thermoluminescence response shows a linear dose dependence up to order of some Grays, which is higher than the linearity presented by the crystals of similar composition. Also, the thermoluminiscence fading is stabilized faster than that of the crystals do.

  17. Ternary alkali-metal and transition metal or metalloid acetylides as alkali-metal intercalation electrodes for batteries

    DOEpatents

    Nemeth, Karoly; Srajer, George; Harkay, Katherine C; Terdik, Joseph Z

    2015-02-10

    Novel intercalation electrode materials including ternary acetylides of chemical formula: A.sub.nMC.sub.2 where A is alkali or alkaline-earth element; M is transition metal or metalloid element; C.sub.2 is reference to the acetylide ion; n is an integer that is 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4 when A is alkali element and 0, 1, or 2 when A is alkaline-earth element. The alkali elements are Lithium (Li), Sodium (Na), Potassium (K), Rubidium (Rb), Cesium (Cs) and Francium (Fr). The alkaline-earth elements are Berilium (Be), Magnesium (Mg), Calcium (Ca), Strontium (Sr), Barium (Ba), and Radium (Ra). M is a transition metal that is any element in groups 3 through 12 inclusive on the Periodic Table of Elements (elements 21 (Sc) to element 30 (Zn)). In another exemplary embodiment, M is a metalloid element.

  18. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  19. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  20. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  1. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  2. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  3. Alkali Metal Halide Salts as Interface Additives to Fabricate Hysteresis-Free Hybrid Perovskite-Based Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Moghe, Dhanashree; Hafezian, Soroush; Chen, Pei; Young, Margaret; Elinski, Mark; Martinu, Ludvik; Kéna-Cohen, Stéphane; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-09-01

    A new method was developed for doping and fabricating hysteresis-free hybrid perovskite-based photovoltaic devices by using alkali metal halide salts as interface layer additives. Such salt layers introduced at the perovskite interface can provide excessive halide ions to fill vacancies formed during the deposition and annealing process. A range of solution-processed halide salts were investigated. The highest performance of methylammonium lead mixed-halide perovskite device was achieved with a NaI interlayer and showed a power conversion efficiency of 12.6% and a hysteresis of less than 2%. This represents a 90% improvement compared to control devices without this salt layer. Through depth-resolved mass spectrometry, optical modeling, and photoluminescence spectroscopy, this enhancement is attributed to the reduction of iodide vacancies, passivation of grain boundaries, and improved hole extraction. Our approach ultimately provides an alternative and facile route to high-performance and hysteresis-free perovskite solar cells. PMID:27532662

  4. The magnetic moments of vanadium impurities in alkali hosts and induced spin current in alkali films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Funing

    Thin quench-condensed films of Na, K, Rb, and Cs are covered with 1/100 of a monolayer of Vanadium. Then the V impurities are covered with several atomic layers of the host. The magnetization of the sandwiches is measured by means of the anomalous Hall effect. For V impurities on the surface of Na and K, a magnetic moment of 7 Bohr magnetons is observed. After coverage with the host, the V moment became 6.5muB for the Na host. These results contradict the favored atomic model (predicting 0.6muB) and the resonance model. The V moment on the surface and in the bulk of Rb and Cs is about 4muB and considerably smaller than the measured moments of V in Na. Furthermore, the sign of the anomalous Hall resistance changes from negative for the Na host to positive for the Cs host. This indicates a change of the electronic structure of the impurity (plus host environment) when going from Na to Cs hosts. Sandwiches of FeK and FeCs are prepared at helium temperature and under ultra-high vacuum. The mean free path within these sandwiches can exceed the film thickness by a factor of five. This implies almost perfect specular reflection of the electrons at the interfaces. Therefore, the mean free path of the film is strongly dependent on the degree of the specular reflection. Furthermore, the experiments suggest that the specular reflections for spin-up and spin-down electrons are different at the Fe interface, resulting in a spin current in the alkali films. In order to detect this current, dilute Pb impurities are condensed on top of the free surface of the alkali films. Strong spin-orbit scatterers, such as Pb, introduce an anomalous Hall effect in the presence of a spin current, which can be detected through straightforward Hall measurements. The results of the AHE experiments clearly indicate the existence of a local spin current.

  5. The effect of alkali metal on the surface properties of potassium doped Au-Beta zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Sobczak, Izabela; Rydz, Michal; Ziolek, Maria

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Interaction of gold with K leads to the change of electronic state and redox properties of gold. ► The amount of potassium incorporated into Au-zeolites determines the size of gold particles. ► K(0.2 wt.%)/Au-Beta exhibits the best performance in decomposition of N{sub 2}O and removal of Bu{sub 2}S. -- Abstract: Beta zeolite was applied as support for gold introduced by gold-precipitation method and potassium added by impregnation or adsorption. The effect of zeolite composition and the amount of potassium introduced on the surface properties of the final materials was considered. Moreover, the interaction of gold and potassium species was found to be related to the adsorptive and catalytic behaviour of zeolites in NO reduction with propene and deodorization. K/Au-Beta(Impregnated) exhibits the best performance in the above mentioned processes because of the small gold particles (between 2 and 5 nm) and interaction of gold with potassium species leading to the change of electronic properties of the surface (the appearance of cationic gold species). Potassium added as a promoter improves the catalytic properties of Au-zeolite in N{sub 2}O decomposition and also in deodorization (increase of the ability to dibutyl sulphide oxidation). The catalysts prepared were characterized by XRD, XPS, UV–vis, TEM, pyridine adsorption combined with FTIR and test reaction (2-propanol transformation).

  6. Evidence of superconductivity-induced phonon spectra renormalization in alkali-doped iron selenides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Opačić, M.; Lazarević, N.; Šćepanović, M.; Ryu, Hyejin; Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.; Popović, Z. V.

    2015-11-16

    Polarized Raman scattering spectra of superconducting KxFe2-ySe2 and nonsuperconducting K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2 single crystals were measured in a temperature range from 10 K up to 300 K. Two Raman active modes from the I4/mmm phase and seven from the I4/m phase are observed in frequency range from 150 to 325 cm -1 in both compounds, suggesting that K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2 single crystal also has two-phase nature. Temperature dependence of Raman mode energy is analyzed in terms of lattice thermal expansion and phonon-phonon interaction. Temperature dependence of Raman mode linewidth is considered as temperature-induced anharmonic effects. It is shown that change of Raman mode energymore » with temperature is dominantly driven by thermal expansion of the crystal lattice. Abrupt change of the A1g mode energy near TC was observed in KxFe2-ySe2 , whereas it is absent in K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2. Phonon energy hardening at low temperatures in the superconducting sample is a consequence of superconductivity-induced redistribution of the electronic states below critical temperature.« less

  7. Growth and characterization of ADP single crystals doped with alkali and alkaline metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavya, H.; Bhavyashree, M.; Kumari, R. Ananda

    2016-05-01

    Pure and KBr, KI, MgCl2 & LiCl added ammonium dihydrogen orthophosphate (ADP) single crystals have been grown at room temperature by the slow evaporation method. The grown crystals have been subjected to powder XRD, FTIR, UV-Vis, and SHG studies. The crystallinity and the functional groups are confirmed by powder XRD and FTIR spectroscopy. Good transparency in the entire visible region which is an essential requirement for a nonlinear optical crystal is observed for the grown crystals. Results of the non-linear optical measurements indicate the enhancement of second harmonic generation efficiency due to the dopants and show the suitability of the ingot for nonlinear optical application

  8. Evidence of superconductivity-induced phonon spectra renormalization in alkali-doped iron selenides.

    PubMed

    Opačić, M; Lazarević, N; Šćepanović, M; Ryu, Hyejin; Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C; Popović, Z V

    2015-12-01

    Polarized Raman scattering spectra of superconducting K(x)Fe(2-y)Se2 and non-superconducting K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2 single crystals were measured in the temperature range from 10 K up to 300 K. Two Raman active modes from the I4/mmm phase and seven from the I4/m phase are observed in the frequency range from 150 to 325 cm(-1) in both compounds, suggesting that the K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2 single crystal also has a two-phase nature. The temperature dependence of the Raman mode energy is analyzed in terms of lattice thermal expansion and phonon-phonon interaction. The temperature dependence of the Raman mode linewidth is dominated by temperature-induced anharmonic effects. It is shown that the change in Raman mode energy with temperature is dominantly driven by thermal expansion of the crystal lattice. An abrupt change of the A1g mode energy near T(C) was observed in K(x)Fe(2-y) Se2, whereas it is absent in non-superconducting K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2. Phonon energy hardening at low temperatures in the superconducting sample is a consequence of superconductivity-induced redistribution of the electronic states below the critical temperature. PMID:26569081

  9. Evidence of superconductivity-induced phonon spectra renormalization in alkali-doped iron selenides

    SciTech Connect

    Opačić, M.; Lazarević, N.; Šćepanović, M.; Ryu, Hyejin; Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.; Popović, Z. V.

    2015-11-16

    Polarized Raman scattering spectra of superconducting KxFe2-ySe2 and nonsuperconducting K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2 single crystals were measured in a temperature range from 10 K up to 300 K. Two Raman active modes from the I4/mmm phase and seven from the I4/m phase are observed in frequency range from 150 to 325 cm -1 in both compounds, suggesting that K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2 single crystal also has two-phase nature. Temperature dependence of Raman mode energy is analyzed in terms of lattice thermal expansion and phonon-phonon interaction. Temperature dependence of Raman mode linewidth is considered as temperature-induced anharmonic effects. It is shown that change of Raman mode energy with temperature is dominantly driven by thermal expansion of the crystal lattice. Abrupt change of the A1g mode energy near TC was observed in KxFe2-ySe2 , whereas it is absent in K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2. Phonon energy hardening at low temperatures in the superconducting sample is a consequence of superconductivity-induced redistribution of the electronic states below critical temperature.

  10. Chlor-Alkali Industry: A Laboratory Scale Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez-Sanchez, C. M.; Exposito, E.; Frias-Ferrer, A.; Gonzalez-Garaia, J.; Monthiel, V.; Aldaz, A.

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory experiment for students in the last year of degree program in chemical engineering, chemistry, or industrial chemistry is presented. It models the chlor-alkali process, one of the most important industrial applications of electrochemical technology and the second largest industrial consumer of electricity after aluminium industry.

  11. PVC waterproofing membranes and alkali-aggregated reaction in dams

    SciTech Connect

    Scuero, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    A waterproofing polyvinylchloride (PVC) based geocomposite was installed on two dams subject to alkali-aggregate reaction, to eliminate water intrusion and to protect the facing from further deterioration. The installation system allows drainage of the infiltrated water, thus accomplishing dehydration of the dam body. On one dam, the membrane also provided protection for future slot cutting.

  12. Influence of temperature on alkali stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes cells may induce alkali stress adaptation when exposed to sublethal concentrations of alkaline cleaners and sanitizers that may be frequently used in the food processing environment. In the present study, the effect of temperature on the induction and the stability of such alk...

  13. Assesment of Alkali Resistance of Basalt Used as Concrete Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    al-Swaidani, Aref M.; Baddoura, Mohammad K.; Aliyan, Samira D.; Choeb, Walid

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to report a part of an ongoing research on the influence of using crushed basalt as aggregates on one of durability-related properties of concrete (i.e. alkali-silica reaction which is the most common form of Alkali-Aggregate Reaction). Alkali resistance has been assessed through several methods specified in the American Standards. Results of petrographic examination, chemical test (ASTM C289) and accelerated mortar bar test (ASTM C1260) have particularly been reported. In addition, the weight change and compressive strength of 28 days cured concrete containing basaltic aggregates were also reported after 90 days of exposure to 10% NaOH solution. Dolomite aggregate were used in the latter test for comparison. The experimental results revealed that basaltic rocks quarried from As-Swaida'a region were suitable for production of aggregates for concrete. According to the test results, the studied basalt aggregates can be classified as innocuous with regard to alkali-silica reaction. Further, the 10% sodium hydroxide attack did not affect the compressive strength of concrete.

  14. DUAL ALKALI TEST AND EVALUATION PROGRAM. VOLUME I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volume I of the report is an executive summary of the results of a three-task program to investigate, characterize, and evaluate the basic process chemistry and the various operating modes of sodium-based dual alkali scrubbing processes. The tasks were: I, laboratory studies at b...

  15. Modeling of alkali aggregate reaction effects in concrete dams

    SciTech Connect

    Capra, B.; Bournazel, J.P.; Bourdarot, E.

    1995-12-31

    Alkali Aggregate Reactions (AAR) are difficult to model due to the random distribution of the reactive sites and the imperfect knowledge of these chemical reactions. A new approach, using fracture mechanics and probabilities, capable to describe the anisotropic swelling of a structure is presented.

  16. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances §...

  17. LABORATORY STUDY OF LIMESTONE REGENERATION IN DUAL ALKALI SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a series of open- and closed-loop laboratory bench scale experiments which were carried out to study parameters which affect the reaction of limestone with dual alkali flue gas desulfurization system process liquors. It gives details of several sets of operat...

  18. Method of assembling and sealing an alkali metal battery

    DOEpatents

    Elkins, P.E.; Bell, J.E.; Harlow, R.A.; Chase, G.G.

    1983-03-01

    A method of initially assembling and then subsequently hermetically sealing a container portion of an alkali metal battery to a ceramic portion of such a battery is disclosed. Sealing surfaces are formed respectively on a container portion and a ceramic portion of an alkali metal battery. These sealing surfaces are brought into juxtaposition and a material is interposed there between. This interposed material is one which will diffuse into sealing relationship with both the container portion and the ceramic portion of the alkali metal battery at operational temperatures of such a battery. A pressure is applied between these sealing surfaces to cause the interposed material to be brought into intimate physical contact with such juxtaposed surfaces. A temporary sealing material which will provide a seal against a flow of alkali metal battery reactants there through at room temperatures and is applied over the juxtaposed sealing surfaces and material interposed there between. The entire assembly is heated to an operational temperature so that the interposed material diffuses into the container portion and the ceramic portion to form a hermetic seal there between. The pressure applied to the juxtaposed sealing surfaces is maintained in order to ensure the continuation of the hermetic seal. 4 figs.

  19. Method of assembling and sealing an alkali metal battery

    DOEpatents

    Elkins, Perry E.; Bell, Jerry E.; Harlow, Richard A.; Chase, Gordon G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of initially assembling and then subsequently hermetically sealing a container portion of an alkali metal battery to a ceramic portion of such a battery is disclosed. Sealing surfaces are formed respectively on a container portion and a ceramic portion of an alkali metal battery. These sealing surfaces are brought into juxtaposition and a material is interposed therebetween. This interposed material is one which will diffuse into sealing relationship with both the container portion and the ceramic portion of the alkali metal battery at operational temperatures of such a battery. A pressure is applied between these sealing surfaces to cause the interposed material to be brought into intimate physical contact with such juxtaposed surfaces. A temporary sealing material which will provide a seal against a flow of alkali metal battery reactants therethrough at room temperatures and is applied over the juxtaposed sealing surfaces and material interposed therebetween. The entire assembly is heated to an operational temperature so that the interposed material diffuses into the container portion and the ceramic portion to form a hermetic seal therebetween. The pressure applied to the juxtaposed sealing surfaces is maintained in order to ensure the continuation of the hermetic seal.

  20. ALKALI-ACTIVATED SLAG CEMENTS AS A SUSTAINABLE BUILDING MATERIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall goal of this project is to develop and characterize alkali-activated slag cements with minimal carbon footprints, as well as to answer scientific questions that have yet to be satisfactorily addressed by prior research. These questions include the final disposition...

  1. Electro-optic contribution to Raman scattering from alkali halides

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G.D.; Subbaswamy, K.R.

    1986-06-15

    The electro-optic contributions to second-order Raman scattering and field-induced first-order scattering from alkali halides are calculated explicitly in terms of the ionic hyperpolarizability coefficients. The relevant local-field corrections are evaluated. Illustrative numerical results are presented.

  2. Aqueous alkali metal hydroxide insoluble cellulose ether membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1969-01-01

    A membrane that is insoluble in an aqueous alkali metal hydroxide medium is described. The membrane is a resin which is a water-soluble C2-C4 hydroxyalkyl cellulose ether polymer and an insolubilizing agent for controlled water sorption, a dialytic and electrodialytic membrane. It is particularly useful as a separator between electrodes or plates in an alkaline storage battery.

  3. Observation of negative and positive trions in the electrochemically carrier-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Sung; Hirana, Yasuhiko; Mouri, Shinichiro; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Nakashima, Naotoshi; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2012-09-01

    Understanding of electronic and optical features of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been a central issue in science and nanotechnology of carbon nanotubes. We describe the detection of both the positive trion (positively charged exciton) and negative trion (negatively charged exciton) as a three-particle bound state in the SWNTs at room temperature by an in situ photoluminescence spectroelectrochemistry method for an isolated SWNT film cast on an ITO electrode. The electrochemical hole and electron dopings enable us to detect such trions on the SWNTs. The large energy difference between the singlet bright exciton and the negative and positive trions showing a tube diameter dependence is determined by both the exchange splitting energy and the trion binding energy. In contrast to conventional compound semiconductors, on the SWNTs, the negative trion has almost the same binding energy to the positive trion, which is attributed to nearly identical effective masses of the holes and electrons. PMID:22870955

  4. Electronic structure, conductivity and superconductivity of metal doped C60

    SciTech Connect

    Haddon, R.C.

    1993-12-31

    The curvature and topology required for fullerene formation strongly enhances the electronegativity of the carbon clusters and as a result C60 readily accepts electrons. Solid C60 undergoes doping with a variety of metals to produce intercalation compounds which are conductors. In the case of the alkali metals the predominant phases present are: C60, A3C60, and A6C60. The A3C60 compounds are formed from C60 by occupancy of the interstitial sites of the fcc lattice. These phases constitute the first 3-dimensional organic conductors and for A=K, Rb the A3C60 compounds are superconductors with transition temperatures of Tc=19 and 28K, respectively. There is evidence to suggest that the superconductivity in these systems is driven by the intramolecular vibrations of the reduced C60 molecule. Recent experiments on a variety of metal doped C60 thin films will be presented.

  5. Doping dependent plasmon dispersion in 2 H -transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Eric; Büchner, Bernd; Habenicht, Carsten; König, Andreas; Knupfer, Martin; Berger, Helmuth; Huotari, Simo

    2016-07-01

    We report the behavior of the charge carrier plasmon of 2 H -transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) as a function of intercalation with alkali metals. Intercalation and concurrent doping of the TMD layers have a substantial impact on plasmon energy and dispersion. While the plasmon energy shifts are related to the intercalation level as expected within a simple homogeneous electron gas picture, the plasmon dispersion changes in a peculiar manner independent of the intercalant and the TMD materials. Starting from a negative dispersion, the slope of the plasmon dispersion changes sign and grows monotonously upon doping. Quantitatively, the increase of this slope depends on the orbital character (4 d or 5 d ) of the conduction bands, which indicates a decisive role of band structure effects on the plasmon behavior.

  6. Alkali element constraints on Earth-Moon relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, M. D.; Drake, M. J.; Jones, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    Given their range of volatilities, alkali elements are potential tracers of temperature-dependent processes during planetary accretion and formation of the Earth-Moon system. Under the giant impact hypothesis, no direct connection between the composition of the Moon and the Earth is required, and proto-lunar material does not necessarily experience high temperatures. Models calling for multiple collisions with smaller planetesimals derive proto-lunar materials mainly from the Earth's mantle and explicitly invoke vaporization, shock melting and volatility-related fractionation. Na/K, K/Rb, and Rb/Cs should all increase in response to thermal volatization, so theories which derive the Moon substantially from Earth's mantle predict these ratios will be higher in the Moon than in the primitive mantle of the Earth. Despite the overall depletion of volatile elements in the Moon, its Na/K and K/Rb are equal to or less than those of Earth. A new model presented here for the composition of Earth's continental crust, a major repository of the alkali elements, suggests the Rb/Cs of the Moon is also less than that of Earth. Fractionation of the alkali elements between Earth and Moon are in the opposite sense to predictions based on the relative volatilities of these elements, if the Moon formed by high-T processing of Earth's mantle. Earth, rather than the Moon, appears to carry a signature of volatility-related fractionation in the alkali elements. This may reflect an early episode of intense heating on Earth with the Moon's alkali budget accreting from cooler material.

  7. Interactions and low-energy collisions between an alkali ion and an alkali atom of a different nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Arpita; Ghanmi, Chedli; Berriche, Hamid; Deb, Bimalendu

    2016-05-01

    We study theoretically interaction potentials and low-energy collisions between different alkali atoms and alkali ions. Specifically, we consider systems such as X + {{{Y}}}+, where X({{{Y}}}+) is either Li(Cs+) or Cs(Li+), Na(Cs+) or Cs(Na+) and Li(Rb+) or Rb(Li+). We calculate the molecular potentials of the ground and first two excited states of these three systems using a pseudopotential method and compare our results with those obtained by others. We derive ground-state scattering wave functions and analyze the cold collisional properties of these systems for a wide range of energies. We find that, in order to get convergent results for the total scattering cross sections for energies of the order 1 K, one needs to take into account at least 60 partial waves. The low-energy scattering properties calculated in this paper may serve as a precursor for experimental exploration of quantum collisions between an alkali atom and an alkali ion of a different nucleus.

  8. Doped Artificial Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia; Libal, Andras; Reichhardt, Charles

    We examine square and kagome artificial spin ice for colloids confined in arrays of double-well traps. Unlike magnetic artificial spin ices, colloidal and vortex artificial spin ice realizations allow creation of doping sites through double occupation of individual traps. We find that doping square and kagome ice geometries produces opposite effects. For square ice, doping creates local excitations in the ground state configuration that produce a local melting effect as the temperature is raised. In contrast, the kagome ice ground state can absorb the doping charge without generating non-ground-state excitations, while at elevated temperatures the hopping of individual colloids is suppressed near the doping sites. These results indicate that in the square ice, doping adds degeneracy to the ordered ground state and creates local weak spots, while in the kagome ice, which has a highly degenerate ground state, doping locally decreases the degeneracy and creates local hard regions.

  9. Fluorescence investigation of Ho3+ in Yb3+ sensitized mixed-alkali bismuth gallate glasses.

    PubMed

    Lin, H; Zhang, Y Y; Pun, E Y B

    2008-12-15

    Efficient 2.0 microm infrared and visible upconversion emissions have been observed in Ho3+/Yb3+ co-doped mixed-alkali bismuth gallate (LKBBG) glasses having a maximum-phonon energy of 673 cm(-1). The Judd-Ofelt parameters Omega2, Omega4 and Omega6 of Ho3+ indicate that there is a high asymmetry and strong covalent environment in LKBBG glasses. The large absorption and emission cross-sections of Yb3+ confirm that it is a suitable sensitizer for capturing and transferring pump energy to Ho3+. The emission cross-section profile for the 5I7-->5I8 transition is derived using the reciprocity method and the peak value is 5.54 x 10(-21)cm2, which is much larger than the value in fluorozircoaluminate glasses. LKBBG glasses exhibit low maximum-phonon energy and large refractive index, and it is possible to achieve an effective 1.66 microm U-band emission of Ho3+ under 900 nm laser radiation. PMID:18586553

  10. [Measurement of Mole Ratio for Alkali Metal Mixture by Using Spectral Absorption Method].

    PubMed

    Zou, Sheng; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Yao; Chen, Xi-yuan

    2015-08-01

    The ratio of alkali metal mixture is one of the most important parameters in gauge head belonging to the ultra-sensitivity inertial measurement equipment, which is required to detect precisely. According to the feature that ratio of alkali metal is related to alkali metal vapor density, the theory of optical depth is used to detect the ratio of alkali metal in the present article. The result shows that the data got by the theory of optical depth compared with empirical formula differs at three orders of magnitude, which can't ensure the accuracy. By changing the data processing method, model between spectral absorption rate and temperature in cell is established. The temperature in alkali metal cell is calibrated by spectral absorption rate. The ratio of alkali metal atoms in the cell is analyzed by calculating the alkali density with empirical formula. The computational error is less than 10%. PMID:26672309

  11. Chloride, bromide and iodide scintillators with europium doping

    DOEpatents

    Zhuravleva, Mariya; Yang, Kan

    2014-08-26

    A halide scintillator material is disclosed where the halide may comprise chloride, bromide or iodide. The material is single-crystalline and has a composition of the general formula ABX.sub.3 where A is an alkali, B is an alkali earth and X is a halide which general composition was investigated. In particular, crystals of the formula ACa.sub.1-yEu.sub.yI.sub.3 where A=K, Rb and Cs were formed as well as crystals of the formula CsA.sub.1-yEu.sub.yX.sub.3 (where A=Ca, Sr, Ba, or a combination thereof and X=Cl, Br or I or a combination thereof) with divalent Europium doping where 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, and more particularly Eu doping has been studied at one to ten mol %. The disclosed scintillator materials are suitable for making scintillation detectors used in applications such as medical imaging and homeland security.

  12. Evidence for Strong Electronic Correlations in the Spectra of Gate-Doped Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hartleb, Holger; Späth, Florian; Hertel, Tobias

    2015-10-27

    We have investigated the photophysical properties of electrochemically gate-doped semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs). A comparison of photoluminescence (PL) and simultaneously recorded absorption spectra reveals that free-carrier densities correlate well with the first sub-band exciton or trion oscillator strengths but not with PL intensities. We thus used a global analysis of the first sub-band exciton absorption for a detailed investigation of gate-doping, here of the (6,5) SWNT valence band. Our data are consistent with a doping-induced valence band shift according to Δϵv = n × b, where n is the free-carrier density, ϵv is the valence band edge, and b = 0.15 ± 0.05 eV·nm. We also predict such band gap renormalization of one-dimensional gate-doped semiconductors to be accompanied by a stepwise increase of the carrier density by Δn = (32meffb)/(πℏ)(2) (meff is effective carrier mass). Moreover, we show that the width of the spectroelectrochemical window of the first sub-band exciton of 1.55 ± 0.05 eV corresponds to the fundamental band gap of the undoped (6,5) SWNTs in our samples and not to the renormalized band gap of the doped system. These observations as well as a previously unidentified absorption band emerging at high doping levels in the Pauli-blocked region of the single-particle Hartree band structure provide clear evidence for strong electronic correlations in the optical spectra of SWNTs. PMID:26381021

  13. Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  14. Electronic properties of bromine-doped carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, Marvin L.

    2002-07-15

    Intercalation of bromine molecules (Br2) into single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes is studied using the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method. Electronic and vibrational properties of the SWNT and Br2 are studied for various bromine concentrations. A drastic change in the charge transfer, bromine stretching-mode, and bromine bond-length is observed when the bromine-bromine distance decreases. Calculated electronic structures show that, at high bromine concentrations, the bromine ppsigma level broadens due to the interbromine interaction. These states overlap with the electronic bands of the SWNT near the Fermi level which results in a substantial charge transfer from carbon to bromine.

  15. Petrology and geochemistry of alkali gabbronorites from lunar breccia 67975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Odette B.; Flohr, Marta K.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed results of petrologic and compositional studies of three clasts found in thin sections of the Apollo 16 lunar breccia 67975 and of four clasts extracted from the breccia (for instrumental neutron activation analysis) prior to thin sectioning are reported. The alkali gabbronorites of the breccia form two distinct subgroups, magnesian and ferroan. The magnesian gabbronorites are composed of bytownitic plagioclase, hypersthene, augite, a silica mineral, and trace Ba-rich K-feldspar. The ferroan gabbronorites are composed of ternary plagioclase, pigeonite, augite, Ba-rich K-feldspar, and a silica mineral. Trace minerals in both subgroups are apatite, REE-rich whitlockite, and zircon. The magnesian and ferroan alkali gabbronorites appear to have formed by progressive differentiation of the same, or closely related, parent REE-rich magmas.

  16. Alkali Halide Microstructured Optical Fiber for X-Ray Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeHaven, S. L.; Wincheski, R. A.; Albin, S.

    2014-01-01

    Microstructured optical fibers containing alkali halide scintillation materials of CsI(Na), CsI(Tl), and NaI(Tl) are presented. The scintillation materials are grown inside the microstructured fibers using a modified Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers, with and without an aluminum film coating are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The photon count results show significant variations in the fiber output based on the materials. The alkali halide fiber output can exceed that of the CdTe detector, dependent upon photon counter efficiency and fiber configuration. The results and associated materials difference are discussed.

  17. Wetting Transitions of Inert Gases on Alkali Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojan, M. J.; McDonald, I. A.; Cole, M. W.; Steele, W. A.

    1996-03-01

    Theoretical and experimental discoveries have been made recently of wetting and prewetting transitions of helium and hydrogen films on alkali metal surfaces [1,2]. New experiments show anomalous nonwetting behavior of Ne on Rb and Cs [3]. Building on earlier work [4], we have done and will describe results from the first Monte Carlo simulations showing wetting transitions for classical gases on alkali metal surfaces. * Research supported by an NSF Materials Research Group grant. 1. R. B.Hallock, J. Low Temp. Phys. 101, 31, 1995 2. M. W. Cole, J. Low Temp. Phys. 101, 25, 1995. 3. G. B. Hess, M. Sabatini, and M. H. W. Chan, unpublished 4. J. E. Finn and P. A. Monson, Phys. Rev. A 39, 6402, 1989.

  18. Properties and Performance of Alkali-Activated Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Robert J.

    Alkali-activated concrete (AAC) made with industrial byproducts as the sole binder is rapidly emerging as a sustainable alternative to ordinary portland cement concrete (PCC). Despite its exemplary mechanical performance and durability, there remain several barriers to widespread commercialization of AAC. This dissertation addresses several of these barriers. Mathematical models are proposed which efficiently and accurately predict the compressive strength of AAC as a function of activator composition, binder type, and curing condition. The relationships between compressive strength and other mechanical properties (i.e., tensile strength and modulus of elasticity) are discussed, as are stress-strain relationships. Several aspects related to the durability of AAC are also discussed, including dimensional stability under drying conditions, alkali-silica reactivity, and chloride permeability. The results of these experimental investigations are disseminated in the context of real-world applicability.

  19. Alkali halide microstructured optical fiber for X-ray detection

    SciTech Connect

    DeHaven, S. L. E-mail: russel.a.wincheski@nasa.gov; Wincheski, R. A. E-mail: russel.a.wincheski@nasa.gov; Albin, S.

    2015-03-31

    Microstructured optical fibers containing alkali halide scintillation materials of CsI(Na), CsI(Tl), and NaI(Tl) are presented. The scintillation materials are grown inside the microstructured fibers using a modified Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers, with and without an aluminum film coating are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The photon count results show significant variations in the fiber output based on the materials. The alkali halide fiber output can exceed that of the CdTe detector, dependent upon photon counter efficiency and fiber configuration. The results and associated materials difference are discussed.

  20. Alkali elements in the Earth's core: Evidence from enstatite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lodders, K.

    1995-01-01

    The abundances of alkali elements in the Earth's core are predicted by assuming that accretion of the Earth started from material similar in composition to enstatite chondrites and that enstatite achondrites (aubrites) provide a natural laboratory to study core-mantle differentiation under extremely reducing conditions. If core formation on the aubrite parent body is comparable with core formation on the early Earth, it is found that 2600 (+/- 1000) ppm Na, 550 (+/- 260) ppm K, 3.4 (+/- 2.1) ppm Rb, and 0.31 (+/- 0.24) ppm Cs can reside in the Earth's core. The alkali-element abundances are consistent with those predicted by independent estimates based on nebula condensation calculations and heat flow data.

  1. Coherent coupling of alkali atoms by random collisions.

    PubMed

    Katz, Or; Peleg, Or; Firstenberg, Ofer

    2015-09-11

    Random spin-exchange collisions in warm alkali vapor cause rapid decoherence and act to equilibrate the spin state of the atoms in the vapor. In contrast, here we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically a coherent coupling of one alkali species to another species, mediated by these random collisions. We show that the minor species (potassium) inherits the magnetic properties of the dominant species (rubidium), including its lifetime (T_{1}), coherence time (T_{2}), gyromagnetic ratio, and spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetic-field threshold. We further show that this coupling can be completely controlled by varying the strength of the magnetic field. Finally, we explain these phenomena analytically by mode mixing of the two species via spin-exchange collisions. PMID:26406827

  2. Renal tubular acidosis due to the milk-alkali syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rochman, J; Better, O S; Winaver, J; Chaimowitz, C; Barzilai, A; Jacobs, R

    1977-06-01

    A 60-year-old man with a history of excessive ingestion of calcium carbonate presented with azotemia, hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. His acid-base status was initially normal. Following the cessation of calcium carbonate treatment, the hypercalcemia and azotemia disappeared, and the patient was found to be in metabolic acidosis with blunted acid excretion and a urine pH of 6.1. Kidney biopsy showed focal tubular calcification; the tubular damage was apparently caused by hypercalcemia and had resulted in renal tubular acidosis. During the three months of observation since that time there has been a tendecy for spontaneous remission of the renal tubular acidosis. Impaired renal hydrogen ion excretion prevented the development of metabolic alkalosis despite ingestion of alkali initially, and was later responsible for the metabolic acidosis. Renal tubular acidosis occurring as a sequel to the milk-alkali syndrome may aggravate the danger of nephrocalcinosis in this syndrome. PMID:885714

  3. Operation and performance of a double-alkali scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Sachtschale, J.R.; Dydo, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    Santa Fe Energy Co. (SFEC) installed a double-alkali sulfur dioxide absorber at its Kern River field near Bakersfield, CA. The flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system is designed to remove 95% of the sulfur dioxide from the exhaust of eight oil-fired steam generators when 1.5 wt% sulfur fuel oil is burned. The chemistry of the double-alkali process and the results of compliance and performance emissions testing are presented. Sulfur dioxide emission results are analyzed. Performance tests showed that total outlet sulfur dioxide emissions were 28.7 lbm/hr (0.00363 kg/s). If offset emissions are included, the net sulfur dioxide emissions were 0.22 lbm/hr (0.00003 kg/s).

  4. Polymerization reactivity of sulfomethylated alkali lignin modified with horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongjie; Wu, Xiaolei; Qiu, Xueqing; Chang, Yaqi; Lou, Hongming

    2014-03-01

    Alkali lignin (AL) was employed as raw materials in the present study. Sulfomethylation was conducted to improve the solubility of AL, while sulfomethylated alkali lignin (SAL) was further polymerized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). HRP modification caused a significant increase in molecular weight of SAL which was over 20 times. It was also found to increase the amount of sulfonic and carboxyl groups while decrease the amount of phenolic and methoxyl groups in SAL. The adsorption quantity of self-assembled SAL film was improved after HRP modification. Sulfonation and HRP modification were mutually promoted. The polymerization reactivity of SAL in HRP modification was increased with its sulfonation degree. Meanwhile, HRP modification facilitated SAL's radical-sulfonation reaction. PMID:24534439

  5. Synthesis and studies on microhardness of alkali zinc borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhashini, Bhattacharya, Soumalya; Shashikala, H. D.; Udayashankar, N. K.

    2014-04-01

    The mixed alkali effect on zinc borate glasses have been reported. The glass systems of nominal composition 10Zn+xLi2O+yNa2O+80B2O3 (x = y = 0, 5, 10, 15 mol%) were prepared using standard melt quenching method. The structural, physical and mechanical properties of the samples have been studied using X-ray diffraction(XRD), density measurement and Vickers hardness measurement, respectively. A consistent increase in the density was observed, which explains the role of the modifiers (Li2O and Na2O) in the network modification of borate structure. The molar volume is decreasing linearly with the alkali concentration, which is attributed to the conversion of tetrahedral boron (BO4/2)- into (BO3/2)-. The microhardness studies reveals the anisotropy nature of the material. It further confirms that the samples belong to hard glass category.

  6. Optical reflectivity and Raman scattering in few-layer-thick graphene highly doped by K and Rb.

    PubMed

    Jung, Naeyoung; Kim, Bumjung; Crowther, Andrew C; Kim, Namdong; Nuckolls, Colin; Brus, Louis

    2011-07-26

    We report the optical reflectivity and Raman scattering of few layer (L) graphene exposed to K and Rb vapors. Samples many tens of layers thick show the reflectivity and Raman spectra of the stage 1 bulk alkali intercalation compounds (GICs) KC(8) and RbC(8). However, these bulk optical and Raman properties only begin to appear in samples more than about 15 graphene layers thick. The 1 L to 4 L alkali exposed graphene Raman spectra are profoundly different than the Breit-Wigner-Fano (BWF) spectra of the bulk stage 1 compounds. Samples less than 10 layers thick show Drude-like plasma edge reflectivity dip in the visible; alkali exposed few layer graphenes are significantly more transparent than intrinsic graphene. Simulations show the in-plane free electron density is lower than in the bulk stage 1 GICs. In few layer graphenes, alkalis both intercalate between layers and adsorb on the graphene surfaces. Charge transfer electrically dopes the graphene sheets to densities near and above 10(+14) electrons/cm(2). New intrinsic Raman modes at 1128 and 1264 cm(-1) are activated by in-plane graphene zone folding caused by strongly interacting, locally crystalline alkali adlayers. The K Raman spectra are independent of thickness for L = 1-4, indicating that charge transfer from adsorbed and intercalated K layers are similar. The Raman G mode is downshifted and significantly broadened from intrinsic graphene. In contrast, the Rb spectra vary strongly with L and show increased doping by intercalated alkali as L increases. Rb adlayers appear to be disordered liquids, while intercalated layers are locally crystalline solids. A significant intramolecular G mode electronic resonance Raman enhancement is observed in K exposed graphene, as compared with intrinsic graphene. PMID:21682332

  7. Lithological influence of aggregate in the alkali-carbonate reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Buendia, A.M. . E-mail: angel.lopez@aidico.es; Climent, V. . E-mail: vcliment@grupogla.com; Verdu, P.

    2006-08-15

    The reactivity of carbonate rock with the alkali content of cement, commonly called alkali-carbonate reaction (ACR), has been investigated. Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) can also contribute in the alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR) in carbonate rock, mainly due to micro- and crypto-crystalline quartz or clay content in carbonate aggregate. Both ACR and ASR can occur in the same system, as has been also evidenced on this paper. Carbonate aggregate samples were selected using lithological reactivity criteria, taking into account the presence of dedolomitization, partial dolomitization, micro- and crypto-crystalline quartz. Selected rocks include calcitic dolostone with chert (CDX), calcitic dolostone with dedolomitization (CDD), limestone with chert (LX), marly calcitic dolostone with partial dolomitization (CD), high-porosity ferric dolostone with clays (FD). To evaluate the reactivity, aggregates were studied using expansion tests following RILEM AAR-2, AAR-5, a modification using LiOH AAR-5Li was also tested. A complementary study was done using petrographic monitoring with polarised light microscopy on aggregates immersed in NaOH and LiOH solutions after different ages. SEM-EDAX has been used to identify the presence of brucite as a product of dedolomitization. An ACR reaction showed shrinkage of the mortar bars in alkaline solutions explained by induced dedolomitization, while an ASR process typically displayed expansion. Neither shrinkage nor expansion was observed when mortar bars were immersed in solutions of lithium hydroxide. Carbonate aggregate classification with AAR pathology risk has been elaborated based on mechanical behaviours by expansion and shrinkage. It is proposed to be used as a petrographic method for AAR diagnosis to complement the RILEM AAR1 specifically for carbonate aggregate. Aggregate materials can be classified as I (non-reactive), II (potentially reactive), and III (probably reactive), considering induced dedolomitization ACR

  8. Precision optical metrology with alkali-atom isoclinic points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Nathan; Driskell, Travis; Camparo, James

    2016-06-01

    Vapour-phase spectroscopy rarely involves transitions between well-isolated atomic states. Routinely, the spectra comprise overlapped Doppler/pressure-broadened resonances, which leads to a “pulling” of the spectral peaks from their true atomic resonance frequencies. This pulling gives the absorption resonances a temperature sensitivity, which limits their utility for precision spectroscopy when sub-Doppler techniques are not viable. Here, we discuss the use of alkali isoclinic points as a solution to this problem.

  9. Resonances in low-energy positron-alkali scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horbatsch, M.; Ward, S. J.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    Close-coupling calculations were performed with up to five target states at energies in the excitation threshold region for positron scattering from Li, Na and K. Resonances were discovered in the L = 0, 1 and 2 channels in the vicinity of the atomic excitation thresholds. The widths of these resonances vary between 0.2 and 130 MeV. Evidence was found for the existence of positron-alkali bound states in all cases.

  10. High-energy transversely pumped alkali vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.

    2011-03-01

    We report on the results from our transversely pumped alkali laser. This system uses an Alexandrite laser to pump a stainless steel laser head. The system uses methane and helium as buffer gasses. Using rubidium, the system produced up to 40 mJ of output energy when pumped with 63 mJ. Slope efficiency was 75%. Using potassium as the lasing species the system produced 32 mJ and a 53% slope efficiency.

  11. Diode pumped alkali vapor lasers for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.; Komashko, A.

    2008-02-01

    General Atomics has been engaged in the development of diode pumped alkali vapor lasers. We have been examining the design space looking for designs that are both efficient and easily scalable to high powers. Computationally, we have looked at the effect of pump bandwidth on laser performance. We have also looked at different lasing species. We have used an alexandrite laser to study the relative merits of different designs. We report on the results of our experimental and computational studies.

  12. (abstract) Experimental and Modeling Studies of the Exchange Current at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    The microscopic mechanism of the alkali ion-electron recombination reaction at the three phase boundary zone formed by a porous metal electrode in the alkali vapor on the surface of an alkali beta'-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) ceramic has been studied by comparison of the expected rates for the three simplest reaction mechanisms with known temperature dependent rate data; and the physical parameters of typical porous metal electrode/BASE/alkali metal vapor reaction zones. The three simplest reactions are tunneling of electrons from the alkali coated electrode to a surface bound alkali metal ion; emission of an electron from the electrode with subsequent capture by a surface bound alkali metal ion; and thermal emission of an alkali cation from the BASE and its capture on the porous metal electrode surface where it may recombine with an electron. Only the first reaction adequately accounts for both the high observed rate and its temperature dependence. New results include crude modeling of simple, one step, three phase, solid/solid/gas electrochemical reaction.

  13. Synthesis and Raman Characterization of Boron Doped Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, K.; Gothard, N.; Gai, P. L.; Chou, S. G.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Rao, A. M.

    2003-03-01

    Boron-doped SWNTs were prepared by pulsed laser vaporization of carbon targets containing boron with concentrations ranging between 0.5 - 10 at%. As-prepared samples were characterized using Raman spectroscopy and HRTEM measurements. Above a threshold boron concentration of 3 at%, the growth of SWNT bundles ceases due to the low solubility of boron in carbon at ˜1200 ^oC. Interestingly, a few ˜0.5 nm diameter single walled tubes are found, along with nanographitic material in the soot generated from a target with a boron concentration of ˜7 at%. As expected, the intensity of the ˜1350 cm-1 D-band increases with increasing boron concentration due to boron substitution into the honeycomb lattice. Both the radial breathing mode and tangential G- bands were observed in the Raman spectra in samples with <3 at % boron at ˜186 cm-1 and ˜1591 cm-1, respectively. Implications of boron doping in the nanotube shell will be discussed.

  14. Synthesis and Raman Characterization of Boron Doped Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, K.; Gothard, N.; Gai, P. L.; Chao, S. G.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Rao, A. M.

    2003-11-01

    Boron-doped SWNTs were prepared by pulsed laser vaporization of carbon targets containing boron with concentrations ranging between 0.5 - 10 at%. As-prepared samples were characterized using Raman spectroscopy and HRTEM measurements. Above a threshold boron concentration of 3 at%, the growth of SWNT bundles ceases due to the low solubility of boron in carbon at ˜1200 ^oC. Interestingly, a few ˜0.5 nm diameter single walled tubes are found, along with nanographitic material in the soot generated from a target with a boron concentration of ˜7 at%. As expected, the intensity of the ˜1350 cm-1 D-band increases with increasing boron concentration due to boron substitution into the honeycomb lattice. Both the radial breathing mode and tangential G- bands were observed in the Raman spectra in samples with <3 at % boron at ˜186 cm-1 and ˜1591 cm-1, respectively. Implications of boron doping in the nanotube shell will be discussed.

  15. Spatial Polarization Profile in an Optically Pumped Alkali Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Ben; Patton, Brian; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, Will

    2009-05-01

    Spin-Exchange Optical Pumping (SEOP) is a technique used to polarize nuclei in gases, and more recently in solids, in excess of their equilibrium limit. SEOP is achieved by optically pumping an alkali vapor which subsequently transfers angular momentum to the nuclei of interest. The efficiency of SEOP is governed by optical pumping and relaxation of the alkali atoms, relaxation of the target nuclei, and interactions between the alkali and target substance. In this work we investigate the relationship between optical pumping and relaxation in cesium vapor with absorption spectroscopy at high magnetic field (2.7 T). Cesium vapor within a cylindrical glass vapor cell is optically pumped with a strong laser resonant with a D2 transition. The ground-state population of the vapor is measured at various positions along a diameter of the cell with a small, weak D1 laser beam which translates mechanically. The resulting polarization profile elucidates the interplay between optical pumping, diffusion in the buffer gas, and relaxation at the walls of the vapor cell. We report measurements of the spatial polarization profile in vapor cells with bare Pyrex walls and cells coated with paraffin (an anti-relaxation coating) or CsH salt (a target substance for SEOP), and compare them to numerical simulations. Further investigation might yield a new method for characterizing surface relaxation in vapor cells.

  16. Spin-Exchange Optical Pumping of Alkali Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Ben; Patton, Brian; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, Will; Ishikawa, Kiyoshi

    2008-05-01

    Spin-Exchange Optical Pumping (SEOP) is a technique used to polarize nuclei in excess of their equilibrium limit. SEOP is achieved by optically pumping an alkali vapor which then transfers angular momentum to the nuclei of interest. We have recently hyperpolarized ^133Cs nuclei in solid CsH using SEOP, achieving magnetizations more than an order of magnitude larger than the thermal equilibrium value.ootnotetextIshikawa et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 183004 (2007) In subsequent work, we investigate the mechanisms underlying this transfer of angular momentum. By optically pumping Cs vapor with laser light resonant with several optical transitions, each yielding different nuclear and electronic spin currents to the solid, we attempt to determine the source of transferred angular momentum. Early evidence suggests both electronic and nuclear spin polarization in the vapor contribute to ^133Cs nuclear polarization in the salt. The ^1H polarization is also mildly affected by optical pumping. We compare these results to numerical simulations and to results from other alkali salts. Further studies are warranted to discover if polarization can be transferred to other nuclei (e.g., alkali salts) on the cell walls.

  17. The Interfacial Transition Zone in Alkali-Activated Slag Mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Nicolas, Rackel; Provis, John

    2015-12-01

    The interfacial transition zone (ITZ) is known to strongly influence the mechanical and transport properties of mortars and concretes. This paper studies the ITZ between siliceous (quartz) aggregates and alkali activated slag binders in the context of mortar specimens. Backscattered electron images (BSE) generated in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) are used to identify unreacted binder components, reaction products and porosity in the zone surrounding aggregate particles, by composition and density contrast. X-ray mapping is used to exclude the regions corresponding to the aggregates from the BSE image of the ITZ, thus enabling analysis of only the binder phases, which are segmented into binary images by grey level discrimination. A distinct yet dense ITZ region is present in the alkali-activated slag mortars, containing a reduced content of unreacted slag particles compared to the bulk binder. The elemental analysis of this region shows that it contains a (C,N)-A-S-H gel which seems to have a higher content of Na (potentially deposited through desiccation of the pore solution) and a lower content of Ca than the bulk inner and outer products forming in the main binding region. These differences are potentially important in terms of long-term concrete performance, as the absence of a highly porous interfacial transition zone region is expected to provide a positive influence on the mechanical and transport properties of alkali-activated slag concretes.

  18. Electron Densities and Alkali Atoms in Exoplanet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavvas, P.; Koskinen, T.; Yelle, R. V.

    2014-11-01

    We describe a detailed study on the properties of alkali atoms in extrasolar giant planets, and specifically focus on their role in generating the atmospheric free electron densities, as well as their impact on the transit depth observations. We focus our study on the case of HD 209458b, and we show that photoionization produces a large electron density in the middle atmosphere that is about two orders of magnitude larger than the density anticipated from thermal ionization. Our purely photochemical calculations, though, result in a much larger transit depth for K than observed for this planet. This result does not change even if the roles of molecular chemistry and excited state chemistry are considered for the alkali atoms. In contrast, the model results for the case of exoplanet XO-2b are in good agreement with the available observations. Given these results we discuss other possible scenarios, such as changes in the elemental abundances, changes in the temperature profiles, and the possible presence of clouds, which could potentially explain the observed HD 209458b alkali properties. We find that most of these scenarios cannot explain the observations, with the exception of a heterogeneous source (i.e., clouds or aerosols) under specific conditions, but we also note the discrepancies among the available observations.

  19. An accurate model potential for alkali neon systems.

    PubMed

    Zanuttini, D; Jacquet, E; Giglio, E; Douady, J; Gervais, B

    2009-12-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the ground and lowest excited states of M-Ne dimers, for M=Li, Na, and K. We show that the potential energy curves of these Van der Waals dimers can be obtained accurately by considering the alkali neon systems as one-electron systems. Following previous authors, the model describes the evolution of the alkali valence electron in the combined potentials of the alkali and neon cores by means of core polarization pseudopotentials. The key parameter for an accurate model is the M(+)-Ne potential energy curve, which was obtained by means of ab initio CCSD(T) calculation using a large basis set. For each MNe dimer, a systematic comparison with ab initio computation of the potential energy curve for the X, A, and B states shows the remarkable accuracy of the model. The vibrational analysis and the comparison with existing experimental data strengthens this conclusion and allows for a precise assignment of the vibrational levels. PMID:19968334

  20. Scattering of positrons and electrons by alkali atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. S.; Kauppila, W. E.; Kwan, C. K.; Lukaszew, R. A.; Parikh, S. P.; Wan, Y. J.; Zhou, S.; Dababneh, M. S.

    1990-01-01

    Absolute total scattering cross sections (Q sub T's) were measured for positrons and electrons colliding with sodium, potassium, and rubidium in the 1 to 102 eV range, using the same apparatus and experimental approach (a beam transmission technique) for both projectiles. The present results for positron-sodium and -rubidium collisions represent the first Q sub T measurements reported for these collision systems. Features which distinguish the present comparisons between positron- and electron-alkali atom Q sub T's from those for other atoms and molecules (room-temperature gases) which have been used as targets for positrons and electrons are the proximity of the corresponding positron- and electron-alkali atom Q sub T's over the entire energy range of overlap, with an indication of a merging or near-merging of the corresponding positron and electron Q sub T's near (and above) the relatively low energy of about 40 eV, and a general tendency for the positron-alkali atom Q sub T's to be higher than the corresponding electron values as the projectile energy is decreased below about 40 eV.

  1. Insulin receptor-related receptor as an extracellular alkali sensor

    PubMed Central

    Deyev, Igor E.; Sohet, Fabien; Vassilenko, Konstantin P.; Serova, Oxana V.; Popova, Nadezhda V.; Zozulya, Sergey A.; Burova, Elena B.; Houillier, Pascal; Rzhevsky, Dmitry I.; Berchatova, Anastasiya A.; Murashev, Arkady N.; Chugunov, Anton O.; Efremov, Roman G.; Nikol’sky, Nikolai N.; Bertelli, Eugenio; Eladari, Dominique; Petrenko, Alexander G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The insulin receptor-related receptor (IRR), an orphan receptor tyrosine kinase of the insulin receptor family, can be activated by alkaline media both in vitro and in vivo at pH>7.9. The alkali-sensing property of IRR is conserved in frog, mouse and human. IRR activation is specific, dose-dependent, quickly reversible and demonstrates positive cooperativity. It also triggers receptor conformational changes and elicits intracellular signaling. The pH sensitivity of IRR is primarily defined by its L1F extracellular domains. IRR is predominantly expressed in organs that come in contact with mildly alkaline media. In particular, IRR is expressed in the cell subsets of the kidney that secrete bicarbonate into urine. Disruption of IRR in mice impairs the renal response to alkali loading attested by development of metabolic alkalosis and decreased urinary bicarbonate excretion in response to this challenge. We therefore postulate that IRR is an alkali sensor that functions in the kidney to manage metabolic bicarbonate excess. PMID:21641549

  2. Electron densities and alkali atoms in exoplanet atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Lavvas, P.; Koskinen, T.; Yelle, R. V.

    2014-11-20

    We describe a detailed study on the properties of alkali atoms in extrasolar giant planets, and specifically focus on their role in generating the atmospheric free electron densities, as well as their impact on the transit depth observations. We focus our study on the case of HD 209458b, and we show that photoionization produces a large electron density in the middle atmosphere that is about two orders of magnitude larger than the density anticipated from thermal ionization. Our purely photochemical calculations, though, result in a much larger transit depth for K than observed for this planet. This result does not change even if the roles of molecular chemistry and excited state chemistry are considered for the alkali atoms. In contrast, the model results for the case of exoplanet XO-2b are in good agreement with the available observations. Given these results we discuss other possible scenarios, such as changes in the elemental abundances, changes in the temperature profiles, and the possible presence of clouds, which could potentially explain the observed HD 209458b alkali properties. We find that most of these scenarios cannot explain the observations, with the exception of a heterogeneous source (i.e., clouds or aerosols) under specific conditions, but we also note the discrepancies among the available observations.

  3. Effect of alkali treatment on surface morphology of titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K. J. Wahab, M. A. A. Mahmod, S. Idris, M. I. Abdullah, H. Z.

    2015-07-22

    Alkali and heat treatments were first introduced by Kim et al. to prepare a bioactive surface on titanium. This method has been proven very effective and widely used in other studies to promote titanium osteointegration. This study aims to investigate further the effect of alkali treatment on surface morphology of high purity titanium. High purity titanium foils were immersed in NaOH aqueous solutions of 0.5 M, 5 M and 15 M at 60°C and 80 °C for 1, 3 and 7 days. The surface morphology was examined using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). The obtained phases were analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) in the spectra range of 4000-600 cm{sup −1} at 4 cm{sup −1} resolution and 50 scans. At the same soaking temperature and soaking time, a thicker porous network was observed with increasing concentration of NaOH. At the same soaking temperature, a much porous structure was observed with increasing soaking time. At constant alkali concentration, more homogenously distributed porous surface structure was observed with increasing soaking temperature.

  4. Chlor-alkali producers evaluate safer alternatives to asbestos

    SciTech Connect

    Stadig, W.

    1993-03-01

    Until recently, 75% of all US capacity for producing chlor-alkali - more than 40% of the world's capacity - has used asbestos diaphragm-cell technology. Although the Environmental Protection Agency continues to exempt asbestos use in diaphragms from restrictions, producers are considering alternatives. In Germany, stringent regulations will ban asbestos in chlor-alkali production after 1994. Heavy fines were levied recently against some chlor-alkali producers in the United States when EPA inspectors found asbestos fibers in cell renewal areas. Restrictions on the mining of asbestos raise the cost of obtaining adequate amounts of high-quality asbestos and gradually raise the cost of transporting and discarding spent diaphragms. Two alternatives are to use newly developed, non-asbestos diaphragms or to convert to existing ion-exchange membrane-cell technology. Only the former seems economical in the United States. The non-asbestos diaphragm is based on an inorganic polymer composite developed in 1988 as an asbestos substitute. The composite received Du Pont's Plunkett Award for Innovation with Teflon[trademark], landed on the National Development Association's 1991 Honor Roll and became a 1991 R D 100 Award winner. 6 figs.

  5. The Anti-Doping Movement.

    PubMed

    Willick, Stuart E; Miller, Geoffrey D; Eichner, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Historical reports of doping in sports date as far back as the ancient Greek Olympic Games. The anti-doping community considers doping in sports to be cheating and a violation of the spirit of sport. During the past century, there has been an increasing awareness of the extent of doping in sports and the health risks of doping. In response, the anti-doping movement has endeavored to educate athletes and others about the health risks of doping and promote a level playing field. Doping control is now undertaken in most countries around the world and at most elite sports competitions. As athletes have found new ways to dope, however, the anti-doping community has endeavored to strengthen its educational and deterrence efforts. It is incumbent upon sports medicine professionals to understand the health risks of doping and all doping control processes. PMID:26972261

  6. Polarization induced doped transistor

    DOEpatents

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  7. Investigation of luminescence and spectroscopic properties of Nd3+ions in cadmium alkali borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Shaweta; Thind, Kulwant Singh

    2016-07-01

    Neodymium doped cadmium alkali borate glasses having composition 20CdOsbnd 20R2Osbnd 59.5H3BO3sbnd 0.5Nd2O3; (R = Li, Na and K) were prepared by conventional melt-quenching technique. The amorphous nature of the glasses was confirmed by X-ray diffraction studies. The physical properties such as density, refractive index, molar volume, rare earth ion concentration etc. were determined. Optical absorption and fluorescence spectra were recorded. The Judd-Ofelt theory was applied on the optical absorption spectra of the glasses to evaluate the three phenomenological intensity parameters Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6. These parameters were in turn used to predict the radiative properties such as the radiative transition probability (A), radiative lifetime (τR) and branching ratio (βR) for the fluorescent levels of Nd3+ ion in the present glass series. The lasing efficiency of the prepared glasses has been characterized by the spectroscopic quality factor (Ω4/Ω6), the value of which is in the range of 0.2-1.5, typical for Nd3+ in different laser hosts. The variation of Ω2 with the change in alkali oxide has been attributed to the changes in the asymmetry of the ligand field at the rare earth ion site. The shift of the hypersensitive bands, study of the oscillator strengths and the variation of the spectral profile of the transition 4I9/2 → 4F7/2 + 4S3/2 indicate a maximum covalency of Ndsbnd O bond for glass with potassium ions. From the fluorescence spectra, peak wavelength (λp), effective line widths (Δλeff) and stimulated emission cross-section (σp) have been obtained for the three transitions 4F3/2 → 4I9/2,4F3/2 → 4I11/2 and4F3/2 → 4I13/2 of Nd3+ ion. The relatively high values of σp obtained for Nd3+ in present glass system suggest that these materials can be considered as suitable candidates for laser applications. The glass with potassium ions shows the highest value of the stimulated emission cross-section.

  8. Modifier interaction and mixed-alkali effect in bond constraint theory applied to ternary alkali metaphosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletto Rodrigues, Bruno; Deubener, Joachim; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2016-05-01

    Introducing an interaction parameter γ, we implement modifier interaction and the mixed-alkali effect into bond constraint theory, and apply this extension for simplistic property prediction on ternary phosphate glasses. The severity of the mixed alkali effect results from the interplay of two simultaneous contributions: Bond constraints on the modifier species soften or stiffen with decreasing or increasing γ, respectively. When the modifier size is not too dissimilar the decrease in γ reflects that the alkali ions can easily migrate between different sites, forcing the network to continuously re-accommodate for any subsequent distortions. With increasing size difference, migration becomes increasingly difficult without considerable network deformation. This holds even for smaller ions, where the sluggish dynamics of the larger constituent result in blocking of the fast ion movement, leading to the subsequent increase in γ. Beyond a certain size difference in the modifier pair, a value of γ exceeding unity may indicate the presence of steric hindrance due to the large surrounding modifiers impeding the phosphate network to re-accommodate deformation.

  9. Impact of potassium doping on the electronic structure of tetracene and pentacene: An electron energy-loss study.

    PubMed

    Roth, Friedrich; Knupfer, Martin

    2015-10-21

    We report the doping induced changes of the electronic structure of tetracene and pentacene probed by electron energy-loss spectroscopy in transmission. A comparison between the dynamic response of undoped and potassium-intercalated tetracene and pentacene emphasizes the appearance of a new excitation feature in the former gap upon potassium addition. Interestingly, the momentum dependency of this new excitation shows a negative dispersion. Moreover, the analysis of the C 1s and K 2p core-level excitation results in a significantly lower doping level compared to potassium doped picene, a recently discovered superconductor. Therefore, the present electronic structure investigations open a new pathway to better understand the exceptional differences between acenes and phenacene and their divergent behavior upon alkali doping. PMID:26493923

  10. Impact of potassium doping on the electronic structure of tetracene and pentacene: An electron energy-loss study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Friedrich; Knupfer, Martin

    2015-10-01

    We report the doping induced changes of the electronic structure of tetracene and pentacene probed by electron energy-loss spectroscopy in transmission. A comparison between the dynamic response of undoped and potassium-intercalated tetracene and pentacene emphasizes the appearance of a new excitation feature in the former gap upon potassium addition. Interestingly, the momentum dependency of this new excitation shows a negative dispersion. Moreover, the analysis of the C 1s and K 2p core-level excitation results in a significantly lower doping level compared to potassium doped picene, a recently discovered superconductor. Therefore, the present electronic structure investigations open a new pathway to better understand the exceptional differences between acenes and phenacene and their divergent behavior upon alkali doping.

  11. Impact of potassium doping on the electronic structure of tetracene and pentacene: An electron energy-loss study

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Friedrich

    2015-10-21

    We report the doping induced changes of the electronic structure of tetracene and pentacene probed by electron energy-loss spectroscopy in transmission. A comparison between the dynamic response of undoped and potassium-intercalated tetracene and pentacene emphasizes the appearance of a new excitation feature in the former gap upon potassium addition. Interestingly, the momentum dependency of this new excitation shows a negative dispersion. Moreover, the analysis of the C 1s and K 2p core-level excitation results in a significantly lower doping level compared to potassium doped picene, a recently discovered superconductor. Therefore, the present electronic structure investigations open a new pathway to better understand the exceptional differences between acenes and phenacene and their divergent behavior upon alkali doping.

  12. Observation of Double-Dome Superconductivity in Potassium-Doped FeSe Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Song, Can-Li; Zhang, Hui-Min; Zhong, Yong; Hu, Xiao-Peng; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; Ma, Xu-Cun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-04-15

    We report on the emergence of two disconnected superconducting domes in alkali-metal potassium- (K-)doped FeSe ultrathin films grown on graphitized SiC(0001). The superconductivity exhibits hypersensitivity to K dosage in the lower-T_{c} dome, whereas in the heavily electron-doped higher-T_{c} dome it becomes spatially homogeneous and robust against disorder, supportive of a conventional Cooper-pairing mechanism. Furthermore, the heavily K-doped multilayer FeSe films all reveal a large superconducting gap of ∼14  meV, irrespective of film thickness, verifying the higher-T_{c} superconductivity only in the topmost FeSe layer. The unusual finding of a double-dome superconducting phase is a step towards the mechanistic understanding of superconductivity in FeSe-derived superconductors. PMID:27127981

  13. Enhancement of hydrogen physisorption on graphene and carbon nanotubes by Li doping.

    PubMed

    Cabria, I; López, M J; Alonso, J A

    2005-11-22

    Density-functional calculations of the adsorption of molecular hydrogen on a planar graphene layer and on the external surface of a (4,4) carbon nanotube, undoped and doped with lithium, have been carried out. Hydrogen molecules are physisorbed on pure graphene and on the nanotube with binding energies about 80-90 meV/molecule. However, the binding energies increase to 160-180 meV/molecule for many adsorption configurations of the molecule near a Li atom in the doped systems. A charge-density analysis shows that the origin of the increase in binding energy is the electronic charge transfer from the Li atom to graphene and the nanotube. The results support and explain qualitatively the enhancement of the hydrogen storage capacity observed in some experiments of hydrogen adsorption on carbon nanotubes doped with alkali atoms. PMID:16351307

  14. Observation of Double-Dome Superconductivity in Potassium-Doped FeSe Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Can-Li; Zhang, Hui-Min; Zhong, Yong; Hu, Xiao-Peng; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; Ma, Xu-Cun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-04-01

    We report on the emergence of two disconnected superconducting domes in alkali-metal potassium- (K-)doped FeSe ultrathin films grown on graphitized SiC(0001). The superconductivity exhibits hypersensitivity to K dosage in the lower-Tc dome, whereas in the heavily electron-doped higher-Tc dome it becomes spatially homogeneous and robust against disorder, supportive of a conventional Cooper-pairing mechanism. Furthermore, the heavily K-doped multilayer FeSe films all reveal a large superconducting gap of ˜14 meV , irrespective of film thickness, verifying the higher-Tc superconductivity only in the topmost FeSe layer. The unusual finding of a double-dome superconducting phase is a step towards the mechanistic understanding of superconductivity in FeSe-derived superconductors.

  15. Experiment and simulation study on alkalis transfer characteristic during direct combustion utilization of bagasse.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yanfen; Cao, Yawen; Chen, Tuo; Ma, Xiaoqian

    2015-10-01

    Bagasse is utilized as fuel in the biggest biomass power plant of China, however, alkalis in the fuel created severe agglomeration and slagging problems. Alkalis transfer characteristic, agglomeration causes in engineering practice, additive improvement effects and mechanism during bagasse combustion were investigated via experiments and simulations. Only slight agglomeration occurs in ash higher than 800°C. Serious agglomeration in practical operation should be attributed to the gaseous alkalis evaporating at high temperature and condensing on the cooler grain surfaces in CFB. It can be speculated that ash caking can be avoided with temperature lower than 750°C and heating surface corrosion caused by alkali metal vapor can be alleviated with temperature lower than 850°C. Kaolin added into the bagasse has an apparent advantage over CaO additive both in enhancing ash fusion point and relieving alkali-chloride corrosion by locking alkalis in dystectic solid compounds over the whole temperature range. PMID:26196420

  16. Pretreatment of garden biomass by alkali-assisted ultrasonication: effects on enzymatic hydrolysis and ultrastructural changes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation aims at studying the effectiveness of alkali-assisted ultrasonication on pretreatment of garden biomass (GB). Dry and powdered GB suspended in 1% NaOH was ultrasonicated for 15, 30 and 60 minutes at a frequency of 25 KHZ. The mode of action and effectiveness of alkali-assisted ultrasonication on GB was established through microscopic, scanning electron microscopic and X-ray diffraction studies. A perusal of results showed that alkali-assisted ultrasonication led to fibrillation of GB which ultimately facilitated enzymatic hydrolysis. The results also indicated that alkali-assisted ultrasonication is an efficient means of pretreatment of GB at moderate (45-50°C) working temperature and low (1%) concentration of alkali. The yield of reducing sugar after enzymatic hydrolysis increased almost six times as compared to control due to alkali-assisted ultrasonication. PMID:24843790

  17. Glass transition temperature and conductivity in Li2O and Na2O doped borophosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwajeet, J. S.; Sankarappa, T.; Ramanna, R.; Sujatha, T.; Awasthi, A. M.

    2015-08-01

    Two alkali doped Borophosphate glasses in the composition, (B2O3)0.2. (P2O5)0.3. (Na2O)(0.5-x). (Li2O)x, where x = 0.05 to 0.50 were prepared by standard melt quenching method at 1200K. Non-crystalline nature was confirmed by XRD studies. Room temperature density was measured by Archimedes principle. DC conductivity in the temperature range from 300K to 575K has been measured. Samples were DSC studied in the temperature range from 423K to 673K and glass transition temperature was determined. Glass transition temperature passed through minima for Li2O con.2centration between 0.25 and 0.30 mole fractions. Activation energy of conduction has been determined by analyzing temperature variation of conductivity determining Arrhenius law. Conductivity passed through minimum and activation passed through maximum for Li2O content from 0.25 to 0.30 mole fractions. Glass transition temperature passed through minimum for the same range of Li2O content. These results revealed mixed alkali effect taking place in these glasses. It is for the first time borophosphate glasses doped with Li2O and Na2O have been studied for density and dc conductivity and, the mixed alkali effect (MAE) has been observed.

  18. Recent materials compatibility studies in refractory metal-alkali metal systems for space power applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, R. W.; Hoffman, E. E.; Davies, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced Rankine and other proposed space power systems utilize refractory metals in contact with both single-phase and two-phase alkali metals at elevated temperatures. A number of recent compatibility experiments are described which emphasize the excellent compatibility of refractory metals with the alkali metals, lithium, sodium, and potassium, under a variety of environmental conditions. The alkali metal compatibilities of tantalum-, columbium-, molybdenum-, and tungsten-base alloys are discussed.

  19. Systematics of Alkali and PB Abundances in Meteoritic and Lunar Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, N. T.

    1996-03-01

    The alkali depletion is not a unique characteristic of the moon, but is common to eucrites, angrites, and the earth. Because the moon and the earth are depleted in more volatile Pb in a similar degree to both chondrites and achondrites, it is hard to assume that alkali depletion was caused by vaporization loss during the giant impact event. Alkali and volatile depletion might have originated from their source material which accreted to the planets.

  20. Identifying alkali metal inhibitors of crystal growth: a selection criterion based on ion pair hydration energy.

    PubMed

    Farmanesh, Sahar; Alamani, Bryan G; Rimer, Jeffrey D

    2015-09-21

    We show that alkali metals function as effective modifiers of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystallization wherein alkali-oxalate ion parings reduce the rate of crystal growth by as much as 60%. Our findings reveal a distinct trend in alkali metal efficacy that cannot be explained by colloidal theories or simple descriptors, such as ion size, but is consistent with a theoretical model that accounts for the ion pair's affinity for water. PMID:26242310

  1. Calculation of Radiative Corrections to E1 matrix elements in the Neutral Alkalis

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J; Cheng, K T

    2004-09-28

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkalis but significantly larger for the heavier alkalis, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  2. Aero dopes and varnishes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, H T S

    1927-01-01

    Before proceeding to discuss the preparation of dope solutions, it will be necessary to consider some of the essential properties which should be possessed of a dope film, deposited in and on the surface of an aero fabric. The first is that it should tighten the material and second it should withstand weathering.

  3. Crystallized alkali-silica gel in concrete from the late 1890s

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Karl . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Gress, David . E-mail: dlgress@unh.edu; Van Dam, Tom . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Sutter, Lawrence . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu

    2006-08-15

    The Elon Farnsworth Battery, a concrete structure completed in 1898, is in an advanced state of disrepair. To investigate the potential for rehabilitation, cores were extracted from the battery. Petrographic examination revealed abundant deposits of alkali silica reaction products in cracks associated with the quartz rich metasedimentary coarse aggregate. The products of the alkali silica reaction are variable in composition and morphology, including both amorphous and crystalline phases. The crystalline alkali silica reaction products are characterized by quantitative X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The broad extent of the reactivity is likely due to elevated alkali levels in the cements used.

  4. [Using a modified remote sensing imagery for interpreting changes in cultivated saline-alkali land].

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Liu, Hui-tao; Liu, Hong-juan; Liu, Jin-tong

    2015-04-01

    This paper developed a new interpretation symbol system for grading and classifying saline-alkali land, using Huanghua, a cosatal city in Hebei Province as a case. The system was developed by inverting remote sensing images from 1992 to 2011 based on site investigation, plant cover characteristics and features of remote sensing images. Combining this interpretation symbol system with supervising classification method, the information on arable land was obtained for the coastal saline-alkali ecosystem of Huanghua City, and the saline-alkali land area, changes in intensity of salinity-alkalinity and spatial distribution from 1992 to 2011 were analyzed. The results showed that salinization of arable land in Huanghua City alleviated from 1992 to 2011. The severely and moderately saline-alkali land area decreased in 2011 compared with 1992, while the non/slightly saline land area increased. The moderately saline-alkali land in southeast transformed to non/slightly saline-alkaline, while the severely saline-alkali land in west of the city far from the coastal zone became moderately saline-alkaline. The center of gravity (CG) of severely and non/slightly saline-alkali land moved closer the coastline, while that of the moderately saline-alkali land moved from southwest coastal line to northwest. Factors influencing changes in arable land within the saline-alkali ecosystem of Huanghua City were climate, hydrology and human activities. PMID:26259441

  5. High-temperature interactions of alkali vapors with solids during coal combustion and gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Punjak, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    A temperature and concentration programmed reaction method is used to investigate the mechanism by which organically bound alkali is released from carbonaceous substrates. Vaporization of the alkali is preceded by reduction of oxygen-bearing groups during which CO is generated. A residual amount of alkali remains after complete reduction. This residual level is greater for potassium, indicating that potassium has stronger interactions with graphitic substrates that sodium. Other mineral substrates were exposed to high temperature alkali chloride vapors under both nitrogen and simulated flue gas atmospheres to investigate their potential application as sorbents for the removal of alkali from coal conversion flue gases. The compounds containing alumina and silica are found to readily adsorb alkali vapors and the minerals kaolinite, bauxite and emathlite are identified as promising alkali sorbents. The fundamentals of alkali adsorption on kaolinite, bauxite and emathlite are compared and analyzed both experimentally and through theoretical modeling. The experiments were performed in a microgravimetric reactor system; the sorbents were characterized before and after alkali adsorption using scanning Auger microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, mercury porosimetry and atomic emission spectrophotometry. The results show that the process is not a simple physical condensation, but a complex combination of several diffusion steps and reactions.

  6. Doped graphene supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nanjundan Ashok; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2015-12-11

    Heteroatom-doped graphitic frameworks have received great attention in energy research, since doping endows graphitic structures with a wide spectrum of properties, especially critical for electrochemical supercapacitors, which tend to complement or compete with the current lithium-ion battery technology/devices. This article reviews the latest developments in the chemical modification/doping strategies of graphene and highlights the versatility of such heteroatom-doped graphitic structures. Their role as supercapacitor electrodes is discussed in detail. This review is specifically focused on the concept of material synthesis, techniques for electrode fabrication and metrics of performance, predominantly covering the last four years. Challenges and insights into the future research and perspectives on the development of novel electrode architectures for electrochemical supercapacitors based on doped graphene are also discussed. PMID:26574192

  7. Doped graphene supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok Kumar, Nanjundan; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2015-12-01

    Heteroatom-doped graphitic frameworks have received great attention in energy research, since doping endows graphitic structures with a wide spectrum of properties, especially critical for electrochemical supercapacitors, which tend to complement or compete with the current lithium-ion battery technology/devices. This article reviews the latest developments in the chemical modification/doping strategies of graphene and highlights the versatility of such heteroatom-doped graphitic structures. Their role as supercapacitor electrodes is discussed in detail. This review is specifically focused on the concept of material synthesis, techniques for electrode fabrication and metrics of performance, predominantly covering the last four years. Challenges and insights into the future research and perspectives on the development of novel electrode architectures for electrochemical supercapacitors based on doped graphene are also discussed.

  8. Raman Study of SWNT Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswaran, U.; Rao, A. M.; Richter, E.; Eklund, P. C.; Smalley, R. E.

    1998-03-01

    A gasketed Merrill-Bassett-type diamond anvil cell was used for high pressure Raman measurements at room temperature. A 4:1 methanol-ethanol mixture served as the pressure transmitting medium. The radial mode (denoted as R, occuring at 186 cm-1 at 1 bar) and tangential modes (designated T_1, T_2, and T_3, located, respectively, at 1550, 1567, and 1593 cm-1 at 1 bar) were recorded for several representative pressures. With increasing pressure, both the R and T modes shift to higher frequencies with gradual weakening of intensity and broadening of linewidth. The radial mode disappears around ~ 2 GPa whereas the tangential modes, albeit weak in intensity, persist until 5.2 GPa. The decrease in Raman intensity under pressure can be attributed to a loss of resonance, since the strong Raman signals observed at ambient pressure have been interpreted as due a resonance with the electronic bands [1]. The R and T mode frequencies are fit to quadratic function of pressure i.e., ω=ω(0)+aP+bP^2 where `a' represents the linear pressure shift of the mode frequency which is proportional to the mode Gruneisen parameter. The linear pressure coefficient for the R mode is found to be nearly twice that of the high frequency T mode. A. M. Rao et al., Science 275, 187, 1997

  9. Symplectites in garnet megacrysts captured by alkali mafic magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aseeva, Anna; Vysotskiy, Sergey; Karabtsov, Alexander; Alexandrov, Igor; Chashchin, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Megacrysts are widespread in Cenozoic alkali-basalts of many volcanic provinces of the world. Garnet megacrysts containing symplectites are the most interesting, as can be used for reconstruction of physical and chemical conditions in liquid basalt at the moment of garnet crystal capture. The collection of garnet megacrysts and garnet-pyroxene aggregates from Shavaryn-Tsaram (Hangaj plateau, Mongolia) and Bartoj (Dzhida basaltic field, Russia) paleovolcanoes has studied. Cenozoic alkali basaltic volcanism of these two spatially separated areas is considered to be related to a uniform process of lithosphere spreading in Baikal and related Central Asian rift systems. The studying of garnet-pyroxene aggregate and fragments of garnet megacrysts from these two paleovolcanoes revealed two mineral associations: primary and secondary. The former includes garnet and clinopyroxene, the letter (symplectite) is presented by products of garnet disintegration (clinopyroxene remain unaltered). At least two paragenesis can be allocated: 1) shpinel - plagioclase-olivine sometimes with gedrite and orthopyroxene; 2) olivine (with glass). Experimental modeling of decomposition process in garnet megacryst has been carried out with the help of 'Selector' softwear at various P-T parameters. Physical and chemical conditions of this paragenesis occurrence have also been estimated by up-to-date geothermometers and geobarometers (T 950-1000 C, P 4-4.5 kbar. Conclusions: 1. Garnet megacrysts are apparently in non-equilibrium with alkali-basalts. They were formed in conditions corresponding to zones of mantle plums at the bottom of crust, in magmatic chambers at constant infiltration of fluid. Subsequently megacrysts were captured by alkali-basalt magma and taken out to the surface. 2. Kelyphitic rims on garnet megacrysts is a result of partial melting of megacrysts on interaction with the hosting alkali basaltic rock. During melting garnet transforms with the formation of Na-K glass and Mg

  10. Research on mouse model of grade II corneal alkali burn

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jun-Qiang; Qin, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Shi-Hong

    2016-01-01

    AIM To choose appropriate concentration of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution to establish a stable and consistent corneal alkali burn mouse model in grade II. METHODS The mice (n=60) were randomly divided into four groups and 15 mice each group. Corneal alkali burns were induced by placing circle filter paper soaked with NaOH solutions on the right central cornea for 30s. The concentrations of NaOH solutions of groups A, B, C, and D were 0.1 mol/L, 0.15 mol/L, 0.2 mol/L, and 1.0 mol/L respectively. Then these corneas were irrigated with 20 mL physiological saline (0.9% NaCl). On day 7 postburn, slit lamp microscope was used to observe corneal opacity, corneal epithelial sodium fluorescein staining positive rate, incidence of corneal ulcer and corneal neovascularization, meanwhile pictures of the anterior eyes were taken. Cirrus spectral domain optical coherence tomography was used to scan cornea to observe corneal epithelial defect and corneal ulcer. RESULTS Corneal opacity scores (x±s) were not significantly different between the group A and group B (P=0.097). Incidence of corneal ulcer in group B was significantly higher than that in group A (P=0.035). Incidence of corneal ulcer and perforation rate in group B was lower than that in group C. Group C and D had corneal neovascularization, and incidence of corneal neovascularization in group D was significantly higher than that in group C (P=0.000). CONCLUSION Using 0.15 mol/L NaOH can establish grade II mouse model of corneal alkali burns. PMID:27162717

  11. Magnetic Resonance Reversals in Optically Pumped Alkali-Metal Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Fei; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2007-06-01

    We report an unusual new phenomenon, peculiar sign reversals of the ground-state magnetic resonances and of the ``zero-dip" resonance (Zeeman resonance at zero field) of optically-pumped, alkali-metal vapors. These anomalies occur when a ``weak" circular polarized D1 laser light is tuned to pump atoms predominantly from the lower ground-state hyperfine multiplet. One can understand the signal reversals in simple, semi-quantitative way with reference to this distribution. uantitative computer simulations are in excellent greement with observations.

  12. Intrinsic Impurities in Glass Alkali-Vapor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Ishikawa, K.; Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2007-07-01

    We report NMR measurements of metallic Cs133 in glass cells. The solid-liquid phase transition was studied by observing the NMR peaks arising from these two phases; surprisingly, many cells yielded two additional NMR peaks below the melting point. We attribute these signals to two distinct impurities which can dissolve in the liquid alkali metal and affect its chemical shift. Intentional contamination of cesium cells with O2 confirms this hypothesis for one peak. The other contaminant remains unknown but can appear in evacuated cells. Similar effects have been seen in Rb87 cells.

  13. Magnetic resonance reversals in optically pumped alkali-metal vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, F.; Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2007-05-01

    We report an unusual phenomenon, peculiar sign reversals of the ground-state magnetic resonances and of the zero-dip resonance (Zeeman resonance at zero field) of optically pumped, alkali-metal vapors. These anomalies occur when a weak circularly polarized D1 laser light is tuned to pump atoms predominantly from the lower ground-state hyperfine multiplet. One can understand the signal reversals in a simple, semiquantitative way with reference to the spin-temperature distribution. Quantitative computer simulations are in excellent agreement with observations.

  14. Determination of Alkali Ions in Biological and Environmental Samples.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the common methods for the determination of the alkali metals is given. These are drawn from all of the three principle branches of quantitative analysis and consist mainly of optical atomic spectrometric methods, ion-selective electrodes, and the separation methods of ion-chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. Their main characteristics and performance parameters are discussed. Important specific applications are also examined, namely clinical analysis, single cell analysis, the analysis of soil samples and hydroponic nutrient solutions, as well as the detection of the radioactive (137)Cs isotope. PMID:26860298

  15. Wave optics simulation of diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masamori; Nagaoka, Ryuji; Nagaoka, Hiroki; Nagai, Toru; Wani, Fumio

    2016-03-01

    A numerical simulation code for a diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL) was developed. The code employs the Fresnel- Kirchhoff diffraction integral for both laser mode and pump light propagations. A three-dimensional rate equation set was developed to determine the local gain. The spectral divergence of the pump beam was represented by a series of monochromatic beams with different wavelengths. The calculated results showed an excellent agreements with relevant experimental results. It was found that the main channel of the pump power drain is the spontaneous emission from the upper level of the lasing transition.

  16. Alkali metal/halide thermal energy storage systems performance evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.; Stearns, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    A pseudoheat-pipe heat transfer mechanism has been demonstrated effective in terms of both total heat removal efficiency and rate, on the one hand, and system isothermal characteristics, on the other, for solar thermal energy storage systems of the kind being contemplated for spacecraft. The selection of appropriate salt and alkali metal substances for the system renders it applicable to a wide temperature range. The rapid heat transfer rate obtainable makes possible the placing of the thermal energy storage system around the solar receiver canister, and the immersing of heat transfer fluid tubes in the phase change salt to obtain an isothermal heat source.

  17. Alkali-silica reaction resistant concrete using pumice blended cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Uma

    Durability of structures is a major challenge for the building industry. One of the many types of concrete deterioration that can affect durability is alkali-silica reaction (ASR). ASR has been found in most types of concrete structures, including dams, bridges, pavements, and other structures that are 20 to 50 years old. The degradation mechanism of ASR produces a gel that significantly expands in the presence of water as supplied from the surrounding environment. This expansion gel product can create high stresses and cracking of the concrete, which can lead to other forms of degradation and expensive structural replacement costs. The four essential factors that produce an expansive ASR gel in concrete are the presence of alkalis, siliceous aggregate, moisture, and free calcium hydroxide (CH). If concrete is starved of any one of these essential components, the expansion can be prevented. Reducing CH through the use of a supplementary cementitious material (SCM) such as natural pozzolan pumice is the focus of this research. By using a pozzolan, the amount of CH is reduced with time based on the effectiveness of the pozzolan. Many pozzolans exist, but one such naturally occurring pozzolanic material is pumice. This research focuses on determining the effect of a finely ground pumice as a SCM in terms of its resistance to ASR expansion, as well as improving resistance to other potential concrete durability mechanisms. In spite of having high alkali contents in the pumice, mixtures containing the SCM pumice more effectively mitigated the ASR expansion reaction than other degradation mechanisms. Depending on the reactivity of the aggregates and fineness of the pumice, 10-15% replacement of cement with the pumice was found to reduce the ASR expansion to the acceptable limits. The amount of CH remaining in the concrete was compared to the ASR expansion in order to improve understanding of the role of CH in the ASR reaction. Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X

  18. Hypercalcemic encephalopathy due to milk alkali syndrome and injection teriparatide.

    PubMed

    Kharb, Sandeep; Gundgurthi, Abhay; Pandit, Aditi; Brar, Karninder S; Garg, M K

    2012-11-01

    An 82-year-old male, a known case of severe osteoporosis with vertebral fracture and prostatic carcinoma, was treated with gonadotropin releasing hormone analogue, calcium carbonate, cholecalciferol sachet and injection teriparatide. His diet consisted of milk and curd. He developed altered behavior and generalized weakness, and on investigation, hypercalcemia, hypokalemia, and metabolic alkalosis with low parathyroid hormone levels were detected. Injection teriparatide was stopped and he was managed with forced saline diuresis and injection zoledronic acid. He was diagnosed as a case of milk alkali syndrome in whom teriparatide and prolonged immobilization played a permissive role in the development of hypercalcemic encephalopathy. PMID:23226658

  19. Optical response of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass

    SciTech Connect

    Burchianti, A; Marinelli, C; Mariotti, E; Bogi, A; Marmugi, L; Giomi, S; Maccari, M; Veronesi, S; Moi, L

    2014-03-28

    We study the influence of optical radiation on adsorption and desorption processes of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass matrices. Exposure of the sample to near-IR or visible light changes the atomic distribution inside the glass nanopores, forcing the entire system to evolve towards a different state. This effect, due to both atomic photodesorption and confinement, causes the growth and evaporation of metastable nanoparticles. It is shown that, by a proper choice of light characteristics and pore size, these processes can be controlled and tailored, thus opening new perspectives for fabrication of nanostructured surfaces. (nanoobjects)

  20. A new mechanism for radiation damage processes in alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinko, V. I.; Turkin, A. A.; Vainshtein, D. I.; den Hartog, H. W.

    1999-12-01

    We present a theory of radiation damage formation in alkali halides based on a new mechanism of dislocation climb, which involves the production of VF centers (self-trapped hole neighboring a cation vacancy) as a result of the absorption of H centers of dislocation lines. We consider the evolution of all experimentally observed extended defects: metal colloids, gas bubbles, and vacancy voids. Voids are shown to arise and grow large due to the reaction between F and VF centers at the surface of halogen bubbles. Voids can ignite a back reaction between the radiolytic products resulting in decomposition of the irradiated material.

  1. Chemical compatibility of structural materials in alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Rink, D.L.; Haglund, R.

    1995-04-01

    The objectives of this task are to (a) evaluate the chemical compatibility of structural alloys such as V-5 wt.%Cr-5 wt.%Ti alloy and Type 316 stainless steel for application in liquid alkali metals such as lithium and sodium-78 wt.% potassium (NaK) at temperatures in the range that are of interest for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER); (b) evaluate the transfer of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen between structural materials and liquid metals; and (c) evaluate the effects of such transfers on the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the materials for long-term service in liquid-metal-environments.

  2. Ground state properties of alkali and alkaline-earth hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentealba, P.; Reyes, O.; Stoll, H.; Preuss, H.

    1987-11-01

    The ground state potential energy curves of alkali (LiH to CsH) and alkaline-earth monohydrides (BeH to BaH) have been calculated. A pseudopotential formalism including a core-polarization potential has been used. For the valence correlation energy, two different methods, the local spin-density functional and the configuration interaction with single and double excitations, have been employed. Dissociation energies, bond lengths, vibrational frequencies, anharmonicity constants, and dipole moments are reported. The agreement with experimental values, where available, is very good. A discussion and a comparison with other theoretical values, at different levels of approximation, are also included.

  3. Polarizability measurements of the alkalis using an atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hromada, Ivan; Holmgren, William; Trubko, Raisa; Ronan, Joseph; Cronin, Alexander

    2011-10-01

    We discuss our latest static DC polarizability measurements of the alkalis: Li through Cs. Our Mach-Zehnder atom interferometer uses nanogratings to diffract and recombine any atom or molecular beam. Because we use the same machine to measure polarizability of different atoms, we are able to report polarizability ratios (e.g., αNa/αLi) with 0.1% precision. To achieve this precision, we also describe a novel technique called phase chopping to measure the atom beam velocity with 0.05% precision.

  4. Nuclear alkali metal Rankine power systems for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Moyers, J.C.; Holcomb, R.S.

    1986-08-01

    Nucler power systems utilizing alkali metal Rankine power conversion cycles offer the potential for high efficiency, lightweight space power plants. Conceptual design studies are being carried out for both direct and indirect cycle systems for steady state space power applications. A computational model has been developed for calculating the performance, size, and weight of these systems over a wide range of design parameters. The model is described briefly and results from parametric design studies, with descriptions of typical point designs, are presented in this paper.

  5. Alkali-lead-iron phosphate glass and associated method

    DOEpatents

    Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.; Franco, S.C.S.

    1994-03-29

    A glass composition and method of preparation utilizes a mixture consisting of phosphorus oxide within the range of about 40 to 49 molar percent, lead oxide within the range of about 10 to 25 molar percent, iron oxide within the range of about 10 to 17 molar percent and an alkali oxide within the range of about 23 to 30 molar percent. The glass resulting from the melting and subsequent solidifying of the mixture possesses a high degree of durability and a coefficient of thermal expansion as high as that of any of a number of metals. Such features render this glass highly desirable in glass-to-metal seal applications. 6 figures.

  6. Alkali-lead-iron phosphate glass and associated method

    DOEpatents

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Sales, Brian C.; Franco, Sofia C. S.

    1994-01-01

    A glass composition and method of preparation utilizes a mixture consisting of phosphorus oxide within the range of about 40 to 49 molar percent, lead oxide within the range of about 10 to 25 molar percent, iron oxide within the range of about 10 to 17 molar percent and an alkali oxide within the range of about 23 to 30 molar percent. The glass resulting from the melting and subsequent solidifying of the mixture possesses a high degree of durability and a coefficient of thermal expansion as high as that of any of a number of metals. Such features render this glass highly desirable in glass-to-metal seal applications.

  7. Workability and mechanical properties of alkali activated slag concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, F.G.; Sanjayan, J.G.

    1999-03-01

    This paper reports the results of an investigation on concrete containing alkali activated slag (AAS) as the binder, with emphasis on achievement of reasonable workability and equivalent one-day strength to portland cement concrete at normal curing temperatures. Two types of activators were used: sodium hydroxide in combination with sodium carbonate and sodium silicate in combination with hydrated lime. The fresh concrete properties reported include slump and slump loss, air content, and bleed. Mechanical properties of AAS concrete, including compressive strength, elastic modulus, flexural strength, drying shrinkage, and creep are contrasted with those of portland cement concrete.

  8. Theoretical determination of the alkali-metal superoxide bond energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Sodupe, Mariona; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    The bond dissociation energies for the alkali-metal superoxides have been computed using extensive Gaussian basis sets and treating electron correlation at the modified coupled-pair functional level. Our computed D0 values are 61.4, 37.2, 40.6, and 38.4 kcal/mol for LiO2, NaO2, KO2, and RbO2, respectively. These values, which are expected to be lower bounds and accurate to 2 kcal/mol, agree well with some of the older flame data, but rule out several recent experimental measurements.

  9. Laser synthesis of ultracold alkali metal dimers: optimization and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazyuk, E. A.; Zaitsevskii, A. V.; Stolyarov, A. V.; Tamanis, M.; Ferber, R.

    2015-10-01

    The review concerns the potential of modern high-resolution laser spectroscopy and state-of-the-art ab initio electronic structure calculations used to obtain comprehensive information on the energy and radiative properties of strongly coupled rovibronic diatomic states. The possibility of deperturbation treatment of the intermediate electronically excited states at the experimental (spectroscopic) level of accuracy is demonstrated taking alkali metal dimers as examples. The deperturbation analysis is of crucial importance to optimize multistep laser synthesis and stabilization of ultracold molecular ensembles in their absolute ground level. The bibliography includes 227 references.

  10. Alkali-metal silicate binders and methods of manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, J. B. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A paint binder is described which uses a potassium or sodium silicate dispersion having a silicon dioxide to alkali-metal oxide mol ratio of from 4.8:1 to 6.0:1. The binder exhibits stability during both manufacture and storage. The process of making the binder is predictable and repeatable and the binder may be made with inexpensive components. The high mol ratio is achieved with the inclusion of a silicon dioxide hydrogel. The binder, which also employs a silicone, is in the final form of a hydrogel sol.

  11. An electron diffraction study of alkali chloride vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mawhorter, R. J.; Fink, M.; Hartley, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    A study of monomers and dimers of the four alkali chlorides NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl in the vapor phase using the counting method of high energy electron diffraction is reported. Nozzle temperatures from 850-960 K were required to achieve the necessary vapor pressures of approximately 0.01 torr. Using harmonic calculations for the monomer and dimer 1 values, a consistent set of structures for all four molecules was obained. The corrected monomer distances reproduce the microwave values very well. The experiment yields information on the amount of dimer present in the vapor, and these results are compared with thermodynamic values.

  12. Crystal growth of sulfide materials from alkali polysulfide liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    The fluids experiment system was designed for low temperature solution growth, nominally aqueous solution growth. The alkali polysulfides, compositions in the systems Na2S-S and K2S-S form liquids in the temperature range of 190 C to 400 C. These can be used as solvents for other important classes of materials such as transition metal and other sulfides which are not soluble in aqueous media. Among these materials are luminescent and electroluminescent crystals whose physical properties are sensitive functions of crystal perfection and which could, therefore, serve as test materials for perfection improvement under microgravity conditions.

  13. Structures of Hydrated Alkali Metal Cations, M+(H2O)nAr (m = Li, Na, K, rb and Cs, n = 3-5), Using Infrared Photodissociation Spectroscopy and Thermodynamic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Haochen; van der Linde, Christian; Lisy, James M.

    2014-06-01

    Alkali metal cations play vital roles in chemical and biochemical systems. Lithium is widely used in psychiatric treatment of manic states and bipolar disorder; Sodium and potassium are essential elements, having major biological roles as electrolytes, balancing osmotic pressure on body cells and assisting the electroneurographic signal transmission; Rubidium has seen increasing usage as a supplementation for manic depression and depression treatment; Cesium doped compounds are used as essential catalysts in chemical production and organic synthesis. Since hydrated alkali metal cations are ubiquitous and the basic form of the alkali metal cations in chemical and biochemical systems, their structural and thermodynamic properties serve as the foundation for modeling more complex chemical and biochemical processes, such as ion transport and ion size-selectivity of ionophores and protein channels. By combining mass spectrometry and infrared photodissociation spectroscopy, we have characterized the structures and thermodynamic properties of the hydrated alkali metal cations, i.e. M+(H2O)nAr, (M = Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs, n = 3-5). Ab initio calculations and RRKM-EE (evaporative ensemble) calculations were used to assist in the spectral assignments and thermodynamic analysis. Results showed that the structures of hydrated alkali metal cations were determined predominantly by the competition between non-covalent interactions, i.e. the water---water hydrogen bonding interactions and the water---cation electrostatic interactions. This balance, however, is very delicate and small changes, i.e. different cations, different levels of hydration and different effective temperatures clearly impact the balance.

  14. Monte Carlo simulations of electron thermalization in alkali iodide and alkaline-earth fluoride scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2012-07-01

    A Monte Carlo model of electron thermalization in inorganic scintillators, which was developed and applied to CsI in a previous publication [Wang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064903 (2011)], is extended to another material of the alkali halide class, NaI, and to two materials from the alkaline-earth halide class, CaF2 and BaF2. This model includes electron scattering with both longitudinal optical (LO) and acoustic phonons as well as the effects of internal electric fields. For the four pure materials, a significant fraction of the electrons recombine with self-trapped holes and the thermalization distance distributions of the electrons that do not recombine peak between approximately 25 and 50 {per_thousand}nm and extend up to a few hundreds of nanometers. The thermalization time distributions of CaF2, BaF2, NaI, and CsI extend to approximately 0.5, 1, 2, and 7 ps, respectively. The simulations show that the LO phonon energy is a key factor that affects the electron thermalization process. Indeed, the higher the LO phonon energy is, the shorter the thermalization time and distance are. The thermalization time and distance distributions show no dependence on the incident {gamma}-ray energy. The four materials also show different extents of electron-hole pair recombination due mostly to differences in their electron mean free paths (MFPs), LO phonon energies, initial densities of electron-hole pairs, and static dielectric constants. The effect of thallium doping is also investigated for CsI and NaI as these materials are often doped with activators. Comparison between CsI and NaI shows that both the larger size of Cs+ relative to Na+, i.e., the greater atomic density of NaI, and the longer electron mean free path in NaI compared to CsI contribute to an increased probability for electron trapping at Tl sites in NaI versus CsI.

  15. Monte Carlo simulations of electron thermalization in alkali iodide and alkaline-earth fluoride scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhiguo; Gao Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien; Xie Yulong; Campbell, Luke W.

    2012-07-01

    A Monte Carlo model of electron thermalization in inorganic scintillators, which was developed and applied to CsI in a previous publication [Wang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064903 (2011)], is extended to another material of the alkali halide class, NaI, and to two materials from the alkaline-earth halide class, CaF{sub 2} and BaF{sub 2}. This model includes electron scattering with both longitudinal optical (LO) and acoustic phonons as well as the effects of internal electric fields. For the four pure materials, a significant fraction of the electrons recombine with self-trapped holes and the thermalization distance distributions of the electrons that do not recombine peak between approximately 25 and 50 nm and extend up to a few hundreds of nanometers. The thermalization time distributions of CaF{sub 2}, BaF{sub 2}, NaI, and CsI extend to approximately 0.5, 1, 2, and 7 ps, respectively. The simulations show that the LO phonon energy is a key factor that affects the electron thermalization process. Indeed, the higher the LO phonon energy is, the shorter the thermalization time and distance are. The thermalization time and distance distributions show no dependence on the incident {gamma}-ray energy. The four materials also show different extents of electron-hole pair recombination due mostly to differences in their electron mean free paths (MFPs), LO phonon energies, initial densities of electron-hole pairs, and static dielectric constants. The effect of thallium doping is also investigated for CsI and NaI as these materials are often doped with activators. Comparison between CsI and NaI shows that both the larger size of Cs{sup +} relative to Na{sup +}, i.e., the greater atomic density of NaI, and the longer electron mean free path in NaI compared to CsI contribute to an increased probability for electron trapping at Tl sites in NaI versus CsI.

  16. Physiological Evaluation of Alkali-Salt Tolerance of Thirty Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) Lines.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guofu; Liu, Yiming; Zhang, Xunzhong; Yao, Fengjiao; Huang, Yan; Ervin, Erik H; Zhao, Bingyu

    2015-01-01

    Soil salt-alkalization is a major limiting factor for crop production in many regions. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a warm-season C4 perennial rhizomatous bunchgrass and a target lignocellulosic biofuel species. The objective of this study was to evaluate relative alkali-salt tolerance among 30 switchgrass lines. Tillers of each switchgrass line were transplanted into pots filled with fine sand. Two months after transplanting, plants at E5 developmental stage were grown in either half strength Hoagland's nutrient solution with 0 mM Na+ (control) or half strength Hoagland's nutrient solution with 150 mM Na+ and pH of 9.5 (alkali-salt stress treatment) for 20 d. Alkali-salt stress damaged cell membranes [higher electrolyte leakage (EL)], reduced leaf relative water content (RWC), net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (gs), and transpiration rate (Tr). An alkali-salt stress tolerance trait index (ASTTI) for each parameter was calculated based on the ratio of the value under alkali-salt stress and the value under non-stress conditions for each parameter of each line. Relative alkali-salt tolerance was determined based on principal components analysis and cluster analysis of the physiological parameters and their ASTTI values. Significant differences in alkali-salt stress tolerance were found among the 30 lines. Lowland lines TEM-SEC, Alamo, TEM-SLC and Kanlow were classified as alkali-salt tolerant. In contrast, three lowland lines (AM-314/MS-155, BN-13645-64) and two upland lines (Caddo and Blackwell-1) were classified as alkali-salt sensitive. The results suggest wide variations exist in alkali-salt stress tolerance among the 30 switchgrass lines. The approach of using a combination of principal components and cluster analysis of the physiological parameters and related ASTTI is feasible for evaluating alkali-salt tolerance in switchgrass. PMID:26146987

  17. Doping semiconductor nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Erwin, Steven C; Zu, Lijun; Haftel, Michael I; Efros, Alexander L; Kennedy, Thomas A; Norris, David J

    2005-07-01

    Doping--the intentional introduction of impurities into a material--is fundamental to controlling the properties of bulk semiconductors. This has stimulated similar efforts to dope semiconductor nanocrystals. Despite some successes, many of these efforts have failed, for reasons that remain unclear. For example, Mn can be incorporated into nanocrystals of CdS and ZnSe (refs 7-9), but not into CdSe (ref. 12)--despite comparable bulk solubilities of near 50 per cent. These difficulties, which have hindered development of new nanocrystalline materials, are often attributed to 'self-purification', an allegedly intrinsic mechanism whereby impurities are expelled. Here we show instead that the underlying mechanism that controls doping is the initial adsorption of impurities on the nanocrystal surface during growth. We find that adsorption--and therefore doping efficiency--is determined by three main factors: surface morphology, nanocrystal shape, and surfactants in the growth solution. Calculated Mn adsorption energies and equilibrium shapes for several nanocrystals lead to specific doping predictions. These are confirmed by measuring how the Mn concentration in ZnSe varies with nanocrystal size and shape. Finally, we use our predictions to incorporate Mn into previously undopable CdSe nanocrystals. This success establishes that earlier difficulties with doping are not intrinsic, and suggests that a variety of doped nanocrystals--for applications from solar cells to spintronics--can be anticipated. PMID:16001066

  18. Isoelectronic co-doping

    DOEpatents

    Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2004-11-09

    Isoelectronic co-doping of semiconductor compounds and alloys with deep acceptors and deep donors is used to decrease bandgap, to increase concentration of the dopant constituents in the resulting alloys, and to increase carrier mobilities lifetimes. Group III-V compounds and alloys, such as GaAs and GaP, are isoelectronically co-doped with, for example, N and Bi, to customize solar cells, thermal voltaic cells, light emitting diodes, photodetectors, and lasers on GaP, InP, GaAs, Ge, and Si substrates. Isoelectronically co-doped Group II-VI compounds and alloys are also included.

  19. Nonlinear pressure shifts of alkali-metal atoms in xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuyer, Bart; Xia, Tian; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2011-05-01

    Compact, portable atomic frequency standards are based on the microwave resonance frequencies of alkali-metal atoms in inert buffer gases. The frequency shift of these resonances due to collisions with the buffer gas is known as the pressure shift. We demonstrate that the microwave resonance frequencies of ground-state 87Rb and 133Cs atoms have a nonlinear dependence on the pressure of the buffer gas Xe. Previous work has demonstrated a nonlinear dependence in Ar and Kr, but not He and N2, which is thought to be due to the loosely-bound van der Waals molecules that are known to form between alkali-metal and buffer-gas atoms in Ar, Kr, and Xe, but not He and N2. Surprisingly, we find that the nonlinearities in Xe are of the opposite sign to those in Ar and Kr, even though the overall shifts for each of these gases are negative. This discrepancy suggests that though the shifts due to the molecules in Ar and Kr are positive, the shifts due to the molecules in Xe are negative. No nonlinearities were observed in the buffer gas Ne to within our experimental accuracy, which suggests that molecules do not form in Ne. Additionally, we present improved measurements of the shifts of Rb and Cs in He and N2 and of Rb in Ar and Kr. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the Department of Defense through the NDSEG program.

  20. Synthesis and studies on microhardness of alkali zinc borate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Subhashini, Bhattacharya, Soumalya Shashikala, H. D. Udayashankar, N. K.

    2014-04-24

    The mixed alkali effect on zinc borate glasses have been reported. The glass systems of nominal composition 10Zn+xLi{sub 2}O+yNa{sub 2}O+80B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (x = y = 0, 5, 10, 15 mol%) were prepared using standard melt quenching method. The structural, physical and mechanical properties of the samples have been studied using X-ray diffraction(XRD), density measurement and Vickers hardness measurement, respectively. A consistent increase in the density was observed, which explains the role of the modifiers (Li{sub 2}O and Na{sub 2}O) in the network modification of borate structure. The molar volume is decreasing linearly with the alkali concentration, which is attributed to the conversion of tetrahedral boron (BO{sub 4/2}){sup −} into (BO{sub 3/2}){sup −}. The microhardness studies reveals the anisotropy nature of the material. It further confirms that the samples belong to hard glass category.

  1. Laser cooling of nuclear spin 0 alkali 78Rb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, J. A.; Gorelov, A.; Anholm, M.

    2015-05-01

    The textbook example for sub-Doppler cooling is a J = 1/2 I = 0 alkali atom in lin ⊥ lin molasses. In the σ+ σ- configuration of a standard MOT, the main sub-Doppler cooling mechanism relies on changing alignment (MF2 population) with the summed linear polarization orientation, but there is no such variation in AC Stark shift for F = 1/2. We have nevertheless looked for signs of sub-Doppler cooling by trapping I = 0 78Rb in a standard MOT and measuring the cloud size as a function of laser detuning and intensity. The 78Rb cloud size does not change significantly with lowered intensity, and expands slightly with detuning, consistent with minimal to no sub-Doppler cooling. Our geometry does show the well-known substantially smaller cloud size with detuning and intensity for I = 3/2 87Rb. Maintaining an I = 0 alkali cloud size with lowered intensity will help our planned β- ν correlation experiments in 38mK decay by suppressing possible production of photoassisted dimers. Supported by NSERC and NRC Canada through TRIUMF.

  2. Alkali oxide-tantalum, niobium and antimony oxide ionic conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R. S.; Brower, W. S.; Parker, H. S.; Minor, D. B.; Waring, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    The phase equilibrium relations of four systems were investigated in detail. These consisted of sodium and potassium antimonates with antimony oxide and tantalum and niobium oxide with rubidium oxide as far as the ratio 4Rb2O:llB2O5 (B=Nb, Ta). The ternary system NaSbO3-Sb2O4-NaF was investigated extensively to determine the actual composition of the body centered cubic sodium antimonate. Various other binary and ternary oxide systems involving alkali oxides were examined in lesser detail. The phases synthesized were screened by ion exchange methods to determine mobility of the mobility of the alkali ion within the niobium, tantalum or antimony oxide (fluoride) structural framework. Five structure types warranted further investigation; these structure types are (1) hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB), (2) pyrochlore, (3) the hybrid HTB-pyrochlore hexagonal ordered phases, (4) body centered cubic antimonates and (5) 2K2O:3Nb2O5. Although all of these phases exhibit good ion exchange properties only the pyrochlore was prepared with Na(+) ions as an equilibrium phase and as a low porosity ceramic. Sb(+3) in the channel interferes with ionic conductivity in this case, although relatively good ionic conductivity was found for the metastable Na(+) ion exchanged analogs of RbTa2O5F and KTaWO6 pyrochlore phases.

  3. Crystal chemistry of hydrothermally grown ternary alkali rare earth fluorides.

    PubMed

    McMillen, Colin D; Comer, Sara; Fulle, Kyle; Sanjeewa, Liurukara D; Kolis, Joseph W

    2015-12-01

    The structural variations of several alkali metal rare earth fluoride single crystals are summarized. Two different stoichiometric formulations are considered, namely those of ARE2F7 and ARE3F10 (A = K, Rb, Cs; RE = Y, La-Lu), over a wide range of ionic radii of both the alkali and rare earth (RE) ions. Previously reported and several new single-crystal structures are considered. The new single crystals are grown using hydrothermal methods and the structures are compared with literature reports of structures grown from both melts and hydrothermal fluids. The data reported here are combined with the literature data to gain a greater understanding of structural subtleties surrounding these systems. The work underscores the importance of the size of the cations to the observed structure type and also introduces synthetic technique as a contributor to the same. New insights based on single-crystal structure analysis in the work introduce a new disordered structure type in the case of ARE2F7, and examine the trends and boundaries of the ARE3F10 stoichiometry. Such fundamental structural information is useful in understanding the potential applications of these compounds as optical materials. PMID:26634734

  4. Formation of Alkali Hydrides via Two-photon Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarros, Elizabeth; Kirby, Kate; Coté, Robin

    2006-05-01

    Alkali hydride molecules are very polar, exhibiting large ground-state dipole moments. Ultracold sources of alkali atoms and hydrogen have been created in the laboratory. We explore theoretically the feasibility of forming such molecules from a mixture of the ultracold atomic gases, employing a two-photon stimulated radiative association process -- Raman excitation. The triplet ground state for lithium hydride is of particular interest since it supports only one bound ro-vibrational level. Using accurate molecular potential energy curves and dipole transition moments, we have calculated the rate coefficients for populating the bound ro-vibrational level of the a^3&+circ; state of LiH via the excited b^3π state. We have found that significant molecule formation rates can be realized with laser intensities and atomic densities that are attainable experimentally. Also, we have calculated the rate coefficients for populating all the vibrational levels of the X^1&+circ; state of LiH via the excited B^1π state. In this case, we have found that significant formation rates into the upper vibrational levels can be realized. We examine the spontaneous emission cascade which takes place from these upper vibrational levels on a timescale of milliseconds, and calculate the resulting rotational populations in v=0. We show that photon emission in the cascade process does not contribute to trap loss.

  5. Interpretation of the IR spectra of alkali borate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Chekhovskii, V.G.

    1985-11-01

    This paper describes methods of interpretation of the IR spectra of alkali borate glasses. In view of the difficulties which are encountered in a strict interpretation of the IR spectra of crystalline oxygen-containing compounds with complex anions, semiempirical methods of interpretation are commonly used. The existence of glasses of groups with an atomic (ionic) arrangement close to that in the crystalline compounds makes it possible to a certain extent to use the spectra of crystalline compounds in the interpretation of the IR spectra of glasses. The alkali borate glass systems were chosen for this study because the information on their structure is the most detailed by comparison with other borate glasses. IR spectrospcopy showed that the spectral regions in which fundamental asymmetrical stretching vibrations in BO/sub 3/ and BO/sub 4/ polyhedra occur, in most cases, are fairly clearly defined independently of the combined or separate presence of these polyhedra. It is proposed that the bands in the IR spectra of sodium and lithium borate glasses be assigned to vibrations mostly localized on specific fragments of polyborate groups present in the glasses. The data from IR spectroscopy confirms that tetraborate groups are present in lithium borate glasses.

  6. Substitution mechanism of alkali metals for strontium in strontium hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Naddari, Thouraya; Hamdi, Besma; Savariault, Jean Michel; El Feki, Hafed; Ben Salah, Abdelhamid

    2003-01-25

    Strontium hydroxyapatites substituted by alkali metals are synthesized by double decomposition method in basic medium. Structures of Sr{sub 9.50}Na{sub 0.30}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 1.30} (SrNaHAp) and Sr{sub 9.81}K{sub 0.12}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 1.74} (SrKHAp) are determined by X-ray powder diffraction. Both compounds are isotypic and crystallize in hexagonal system (space group P63/m) with the following cells: a=9.751(3) A and c=7.279(3) A for SrNaHAp and a=9.755(4) A and c=7.284(3) A for SrKHAp. Results are compared to those of Sr{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}. According to the site occupancy factors, in SrNaHAp sodium is localized in site (I) and in SrKHAp potassium in site (II). Both structures contain vacancies in hydroxyl and metal sites. The mechanism of alkali metals substitution for strontium proposed explains the vacancies formation.

  7. Biological neutralization of chlor-alkali industry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rakeshkumar M; Mody, Kalpana H; Keshri, Jitendra; Jha, Bhavanath

    2011-11-01

    The present work reports biological neutralization of chlor-alkali industrial effluent by an alkaliphilic bacterium, isolated from the Gujarat coast, which was identified as Enterococcus faecium strain R-5 on the basis of morphological, biochemical and partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The isolate was capable of bringing down the pH of waste water from 12.0 to 7.0 within 3 h in the presence of carbon and nitrogen sources, with simultaneous reduction in total dissolved solutes (TDS) up to 19-22%. This bacterium produced carboxylic acid, as revealed by FT-IR analysis, which facilitated neutralization of alkaline effluent. The presence of unconventional raw materials viz. Madhuca indica flowers or sugar cane bagasse as carbon and nitrogen sources could effectively neutralize alkaline effluent and thus making the bioremediation process economically viable. The time required for neutralization varied with size of inoculum. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on biological neutralization of a chlor-alkali industrial effluent. PMID:21944194

  8. High and rapid alkali cation storage in ultramicroporous carbonaceous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Young Soo; Lee, Seulbee; Kim, Na Rae; Kang, Minjee; Leal, Cecilia; Park, Kyu-Young; Kang, Kisuk; Jin, Hyoung-Joon

    2016-05-01

    To achieve better supercapacitor performance, efforts have focused on increasing the specific surface area of electrode materials to obtain higher energy and power density. The control of pores in these materials is one of the most effective ways to increase the surface area. However, when the size of pores decreases to a sub-nanometer regime, it becomes difficult to apply the conventional parallel-plate capacitor model because the charge separation distance (d-value) of the electrical double layer has a similar length scale. In this study, ultramicroporous carbonaceous materials (UCMs) containing sub-nanometer-scale pores are fabricated using a simple in situ carbonization/activation of cellulose-based compounds containing potassium. The results show that alkali cations act as charge carriers in the ultramicropores (<0.7 nm), and these materials can deliver high capacitances of ∼300 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1 and 130 F g-1, even at a high current rate of 65 A g-1 in an aqueous medium. In addition, the UCM-based symmetric supercapacitors are stable over 10,000 cycles and have a high energy and power densities of 8.4 Wh kg-1 and 15,000 W kg-1, respectively. This study provides a better understanding of the effects of ultramicropores in alkali cation storage.

  9. A Three Level Analytic Model for Alkali Vapor Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, Gordon D.; Perram, Glen P.

    2010-10-08

    A three level analytic model for optically pumped alkali metal vapor lasers is developed considering the steady-state rate equations for the longitudinally averaged number densities of the ground {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} and first excited {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} and {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} states. The threshold pump intensity includes both the requirements to fully bleach the pump transition and exceed optical losses, typically about 200 W/cm{sup 2}. Slope efficiency depends critically on the fraction of incident photons absorbed and the overlap of pump and resonator modes, approaching the quantum efficiency of 0.95-0.98, depending on alkali atom. For efficient operation, the collisional relaxation between the two upper levels should be fast relative to stimulated emission. By assuming a statistical distribution between the upper levels, the limiting analytic solution for the quasi-two level system is achieved. Application of the model and comparisons to recent laser demonstrations is presented.

  10. A new polarizable force field for alkali and halide ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, Péter T.; Baranyai, András

    2014-09-21

    We developed transferable potentials for alkali and halide ions which are consistent with our recent model of water [P. T. Kiss and A. Baranyai, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 204507 (2013)]. Following the approach used for the water potential, we applied Gaussian charge distributions, exponential repulsion, and r{sup −6} attraction. One of the two charges of the ions is fixed to the center of the particle, while the other is connected to this charge by a harmonic spring to express polarization. Polarizability is taken from quantum chemical calculations. The repulsion between different species is expressed by the combining rule of Kong [J. Chem. Phys. 59, 2464 (1972)]. Our primary target was the hydration free energy of ions which is correct within the error of calculations. We calculated water-ion clusters up to 6 water molecules, and, as a crosscheck, we determined the density and internal energy of alkali-halide crystals at ambient conditions with acceptable accuracy. The structure of hydrated ions was also discussed.

  11. Universalities in ultracold reactions of alkali-metal polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quéméner, Goulven; Bohn, John L.; Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2011-12-01

    We consider ultracold collisions of ground-state heteronuclear alkali-metal dimers that are susceptible to four-center chemical reactions 2AB→A2+B2 even at submicrokelvin temperatures. These reactions depend strongly on species, temperature, electric field, and confinement in an optical lattice. We calculate ab initio van der Waals coefficients for these interactions and use a quantum formalism to study the scattering properties of such molecules under an external electric field and optical lattice. We also apply a quantum threshold model to explore the dependence of reaction rates on the various parameters. We find that, among the heteronuclear alkali-metal fermionic species, LiNa is the least reactive, whereas LiCs is the most reactive. For the bosonic species, LiK is the most reactive in zero field, but all species considered, LiNa, LiK, LiRb, LiCs, and KRb, share a universal reaction rate once a sufficiently high electric field is applied. For indistinguishable bosons, the inelastic/reactive rate increases as d2 in the quantum regime, where d is the dipole moment induced by the electric field. This is a weaker power-law dependence than for indistinguishable fermions, for which the rate behaves as d6.

  12. A new polarizable force field for alkali and halide ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Péter T.; Baranyai, András

    2014-09-01

    We developed transferable potentials for alkali and halide ions which are consistent with our recent model of water [P. T. Kiss and A. Baranyai, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 204507 (2013)]. Following the approach used for the water potential, we applied Gaussian charge distributions, exponential repulsion, and r-6 attraction. One of the two charges of the ions is fixed to the center of the particle, while the other is connected to this charge by a harmonic spring to express polarization. Polarizability is taken from quantum chemical calculations. The repulsion between different species is expressed by the combining rule of Kong [J. Chem. Phys. 59, 2464 (1972)]. Our primary target was the hydration free energy of ions which is correct within the error of calculations. We calculated water-ion clusters up to 6 water molecules, and, as a crosscheck, we determined the density and internal energy of alkali-halide crystals at ambient conditions with acceptable accuracy. The structure of hydrated ions was also discussed.

  13. Dirac Node Lines in Pure Alkali Earth Metals.

    PubMed

    Li, Ronghan; Ma, Hui; Cheng, Xiyue; Wang, Shoulong; Li, Dianzhong; Zhang, Zhengyu; Li, Yiyi; Chen, Xing-Qiu

    2016-08-26

    Beryllium is a simple alkali earth metal, but has been the target of intensive studies for decades because of its unusual electron behavior at surfaces. The puzzling aspects include (i) severe deviations from the description of the nearly free-electron picture, (ii) an anomalously large electron-phonon coupling effect, and (iii) giant Friedel oscillations. The underlying origins for such anomalous surface electron behavior have been under active debate, but with no consensus. Here, by means of first-principles calculations, we discover that this pure metal system, surprisingly, harbors the Dirac node line (DNL) that in turn helps to rationalize many of the existing puzzles. The DNL is featured by a closed line consisting of linear band crossings, and its induced topological surface band agrees well with previous photoemission spectroscopy observations on the Be (0001) surface. We further reveal that each of the elemental alkali earth metals of Mg, Ca, and Sr also harbors the DNL and speculate that the fascinating topological property of the DNL might naturally exist in other elemental metals as well. PMID:27610865

  14. [Socio-medical significance of alkalie resistance, alkalie neutralization and skin-surface lipid content in atopic neurodermatitis and ichthyosis vulgaris (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schnyder, U W; Gloor, M; Taugner, M

    1977-01-01

    In individuals free from skin diseases, the resistance and the neutralisation to alkali, and the quantity of lipids at the surface of the skin, are constitltional factors; these idiotypically (genetically) controlled factors are subject to paratypical (environmental) variations. The frequency of a reduced alkali neutralisation and of sebostasis in case of neurodermitis atopica and of ichthyosis vulgaris is not dealt with in the literature, but it results from literature findings that a pathologic alkali resistance is a facultative feature in neurodermitis atopica, while it is an obligatory one in ichthyosis vulgaris. The difference seems to be conditioned genetically. In neurodermitis atopica, the genotype is in itself of no pathogenic importance since the disease is induced exclusively by exogenous and endogenous, non hereditary agents. In ichthyosis vulgaris, the reduced alkali resistance falls into the pleiotropic character of the disease. PMID:907654

  15. Skylab experiments on semiconductors and alkali halides. [single crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    The space processing experiments performed during the Skylab missions included one on single crystal growth of germanium selenide and telluride, one on pure and doped germanium crystals, two on pure and doped indium antimonide, one on gallium-indium-antimony systems, and one on a sodium chloride-sodium fluoride eutectic. In each experiment, three ampoules of sample were processed in the multipurpose electric furnace within the Skylab Materials Processing Facility. All were successful in varying degrees and gave important information about crystal growth removed from the effects of earth surface gravity.

  16. EVALUATION OF THE LIMESTONE DUAL ALKALI PROTOTYPE SYSTEM PLANT SCHOLZ: SYSTEM DESIGN AND PROGRAM PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the (Phase I) design of both a limestone dual alkali system at Gulf Power Co.'s Scholz steam plant and a related test program. The limestone dual alkali process will be tested at an existing 20 MWe prototype facility at the Scholz plant. The intent of the pro...

  17. 40 CFR 721.2565 - Alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide, alkali and amine salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2565 Alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide, alkali and... substances identified as alkylated sulfonated diphenyl oxide, alkali salt (PMN P-93-352) and...

  18. In situ alkali-silica reaction observed by x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtis, K.E.; Monteiro, P.J.M.; Brown, J.T.; Meyer-Ilse, W.

    1997-04-01

    In concrete, alkali metal ions and hydroxyl ions contributed by the cement and reactive silicates present in aggregate can participate in a destructive alkali-silica reaction (ASR). This reaction of the alkalis with the silicates produces a gel that tends to imbibe water found in the concrete pores, leading to swelling of the gel and eventual cracking of the affected concrete member. Over 104 cases of alkali-aggregate reaction in dams and spillways have been reported around the world. At present, no method exists to arrest the expansive chemical reaction which generates significant distress in the affected structures. Most existing techniques available for the examination of concrete microstructure, including ASR products, demand that samples be dried and exposed to high pressure during the observation period. These sample preparation requirements present a major disadvantage for the study of alkali-silica reaction. Given the nature of the reaction and the affect of water on its products, it is likely that the removal of water will affect the morphology, creating artifacts in the sample. The purpose of this research is to observe and characterize the alkali-silica reaction, including each of the specific reactions identified previously, in situ without introducing sample artifacts. For observation of unconditioned samples, x-ray microscopy offers an opportunity for such an examination of the alkali-silica reaction. Currently, this investigation is focusing on the effect of calcium ions on the alkali-silica reaction.

  19. Difficulties in Interpreting Alkali Metal Trends at the Senior Chemistry Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Berg, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    Explores the reasons for the differences in alkali metal reactivity in water in terms of thermodynamics rather than ionization trends. Shows that differences in alkali metal reactivity with water are more appropriately explained in terms of the kinetics of the reactions. (MM)

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of alkali borate glass using coordination dependent potential

    SciTech Connect

    Park, B.; Cormack, A.N.

    1997-12-31

    The structure of sodium borate glass was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation using coordination dependent potential model. The simulated alkali borate glass consists of basic units, BO{sub 3} triangle, BO{sub 4} tetrahedra and structural groups such as boroxol ring and triborate units. The coordination of boron is converted from 3 to 4 by adding alkali oxide.

  1. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali...

  2. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of...

  3. Structural Investigation of Alkali Activated Clay Minerals for Application in Water Treatment Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumanis, G.; Bajare, D.; Dembovska, L.

    2015-11-01

    Alkali activation technology can be applied for a wide range of alumo-silicates to produce innovative materials with various areas of application. Most researches focuse on the application of alumo-silicate materials in building industry as cement binder replacement to produce mortar and concrete [1]. However, alkali activation technology offers high potential also in biotechnologies [2]. In the processes where certain pH level, especially alkaline environment, must be ensured, alkali activated materials can be applied. One of such fields is water treatment systems where high level pH (up to pH 10.5) ensures efficient removal of water pollutants such as manganese [3]. Previous investigations had shown that alkali activation technology can be applied to calcined clay powder and aluminium scrap recycling waste as a foam forming agent to create porous alkali activated materials. This investigation focuses on the structural investigation of calcined kaolin and illite clay alkali activation processes. Chemical and mineralogical composition of both clays were determined and structural investigation of alkali activated materials was made by using XRD, DTA, FTIR analysis; the microstructure of hardened specimens was observed by SEM. Physical properties of the obtained material were determined. Investigation indicates the essential role of chemical composition of the clay used in the alkali activation process, and potential use of the obtained material in water treatment systems.

  4. Thermodynamic Properties Of Alkali Species In Coal Based Combined Cycle Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Willenborg, W.; Wolf, K.J.; Fricke, C.; Moeller, M.; Prikhodovsky, A.; Hilpert, K.; Singheiser, L.

    2002-09-20

    The aim of this project is to support the development of a concept for a successful alkali removal. Two strategies are possible: optimizing the alkali retention potential of the coal ash slag in the combustion chamber and the liquid slag separators and separate alkali removal with solid sorbents (getters) at temperatures below 1450 C. Therefore in a first step the alkali partial pressure over coal ash slag should be determined in order to get information about the retention potential of the slag. The influence of additives on the retention potential of the slag should be investigated. The measurements should show if the alkali partial pressure over the slag is generally low enough in case of thermodynamic equilibrium. In case of too high alkali partial pressures a separate alkali removal is needed. Therefore in a second step commercial sorbent materials should be investigated concerning their sorption potential for alkalis. To get information about the influence of getter components on the sorption potential some mixtures of pure components, predicted by thermodynamic modeling to be most effective, should be investigated.

  5. SUMMARY REPORT: SULFUR OXIDES CONTROL TECHNOLOGY SERIES: FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION - DUAL ALKALI PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Describes dual alkali (or double alkali) flue gas desulfurization (FGD) which is a throwaway process in which sulfur dioxide (SO2) is removed from the flue gas by a soluble sodium-based scrubbing liquor. he collected SO2 is precipitated as calcium sulfite (CaSO3), calcium sulfate...

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF MERCURY EMISSIONS AT A CHLOR-ALKALI PLANT, VOLUME II. APPENDICES F-J

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a characterization of mercury (Hg) emissions at a chlor-alkali plant. Up to 160 short tons (146 Mg) of Hg is consumed by the chlor-alkali industry each year. Very little quantitative information is currently available however, on the actual Hg losses f...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4663 - Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... metal salts. 721.4663 Section 721.4663 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4663 Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts. (a) Chemical... fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts (PMNs P-95-979/980/981) are subject to reporting under...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... salt (generic). 721.5985 Section 721.5985 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  9. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... salt (generic). 721.5985 Section 721.5985 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10097 - Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali metal salt (generic). 721.10097 Section 721.10097 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10097 - Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali metal salt (generic). 721.10097 Section 721.10097 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN...

  12. 40 CFR 721.4663 - Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... metal salts. 721.4663 Section 721.4663 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4663 Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts. (a) Chemical... fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts (PMNs P-95-979/980/981) are subject to reporting under...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... metal salt (generic). 721.10098 Section 721.10098 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt... identified generically as disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P-03-643) is subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... salt (generic). 721.5985 Section 721.5985 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... metal salt (generic). 721.10098 Section 721.10098 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt... identified generically as disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P-03-643) is subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... metal salt (generic). 721.10098 Section 721.10098 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt... identified generically as disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P-03-643) is subject...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4663 - Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... metal salts. 721.4663 Section 721.4663 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4663 Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts. (a) Chemical... fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts (PMNs P-95-979/980/981) are subject to reporting under...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... metal salt (generic). 721.10098 Section 721.10098 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt... identified generically as disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P-03-643) is subject...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4663 - Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... metal salts. 721.4663 Section 721.4663 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4663 Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts. (a) Chemical... fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts (PMNs P-95-979/980/981) are subject to reporting under...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10097 - Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali metal salt (generic). 721.10097 Section 721.10097 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10097 - Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali metal salt (generic). 721.10097 Section 721.10097 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN...

  2. Potentiometric chemical sensors from lignin-poly(propylene oxide) copolymers doped by carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rudnitskaya, Alisa; Evtuguin, Dmitry V; Costa, Luis C; Graça, M Pedro F; Fernandes, António J S; Correia, M Rosario P; Gomes, M Teresa S R; Oliveira, J A B P

    2013-01-21

    Hardwood and softwood lignins obtained from industrial sulphite and kraft and laboratory oxygen-organosolv pulping processes were employed in co-polymerization with tolylene 2,4-diisocyanate terminated poly(propylene glycol). The obtained lignin-based polyurethanes were doped with 0.72 w/w% of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with the aim of increasing their electrical conductivity to the levels suitable for sensor applications. Effects of the polymer doping with MWCNTs were assessed using electrical impedance (EIS) and UV-Resonance Raman (UV-RR) spectroscopy. Potentiometric sensors were prepared by drop casting of liquid polymer on the surface of carbon glass or platinum electrodes. Lignin-based sensors displayed a very low or no sensitivity to all alkali, alkali-earth and transition metal cations ions except Cr(VI) at pH 2. Response to Cr(VI) values of 39, 50 and 53 mV pX(-1) for the sensors based on kraft, organosolv and lignosulphonate lignins, respectively, were observed. Redox sensitivity values close to the theoretical values of 20 and 21 mV pX(-1) for organosolv and lignosulphonate based sensors respectively were detected in the Cr(III)/Cr(VI) solutions while a very low response was observed in the solutions containing Fe(CN)(6)(3-/4-). Conducting composite lignin-based polyurethanes doped with MWCNTs were suggested as being promising materials for Cr(VI)-sensitive potentiometric sensors. PMID:23162814

  3. First-principles study of ternary graphite compounds cointercalated with alkali atoms (Li, Na, and K) and alkylamines towards alkali ion battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ri, Gum-Chol; Yu, Chol-Jun; Kim, Jin-Song; Hong, Song-Nam; Jong, Un-Gi; Ri, Mun-Hyok

    2016-08-01

    First-principles calculations were carried out to investigate the structural, energetic, and electronic properties of ternary graphite compounds cointercalated with alkali atoms (AM = Li, Na, and K) and normal alkylamine molecules (nCx; x = 1, 2, 3, 4), denoted as AM-nCx-GICs. From the optimization of the orthorhombic unit cells for the crystalline compounds, it was found that, with the increase in the atomic number of alkali atoms, the layer separations decrease in contrast to AM-GICs, while the bond lengths between alkali atoms and graphene layer, and nitrogen atom of alkylamine increase. The calculated formation energies and interlayer binding energies of AM-nC3-GICs indicate that the compounds is increasingly stabilized from Li to K, and the energy barriers for migration of alkali atoms suggest that alkali cation with larger ionic radius diffuses more smoothly in graphite, being similar to AM-GICs. Through the analysis of electronic properties, it was established that more extent of electronic charge is transferred from more electropositive alkali atom to the carbon ring of graphene layer, and the hybridization of valence electron orbitals between alkylamine molecules and graphene layer is occurred.

  4. Methods for Doping Detection.

    PubMed

    Ponzetto, Federico; Giraud, Sylvain; Leuenberger, Nicolas; Boccard, Julien; Nicoli, Raul; Baume, Norbert; Rudaz, Serge; Saugy, Martial

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has focused its efforts on detecting not only small prohibited molecules, but also larger endogenous molecules such as hormones, in the view of implementing an endocrinological module in the Athlete Biological Passport (ABP). In this chapter, the detection of two major types of hormones used for doping, growth hormone (GH) and endogenous anabolic androgenic steroids (EAASs), will be discussed: a brief historical background followed by a description of state-of-the-art methods applied by accredited anti-doping laboratories will be provided and then current research trends outlined. In addition, microRNAs (miRNAs) will also be presented as a new class of biomarkers for doping detection. PMID:27348309

  5. Communication: Dimensionality of the ionic conduction pathways in glass and the mixed-alkali effect.

    PubMed

    Novy, Melissa; Avila-Paredes, Hugo; Kim, Sangtae; Sen, Sabyasachi

    2015-12-28

    A revised empirical relationship between the power law exponent of ac conductivity dispersion and the dimensionality of the ionic conduction pathway is established on the basis of electrical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) measurements on crystalline ionic conductors. These results imply that the "universal" ac conductivity dispersion observed in glassy solids is associated with ionic transport along fractal pathways. EIS measurements on single-alkali glasses indicate that the dimensionality of this pathway D is ∼2.5, while in mixed-alkali glasses, D is lower and goes through a minimum value of ∼2.2 when the concentrations of the two alkalis become equal. D and σ display similar variation with alkali composition, thus suggesting a topological origin of the mixed-alkali effect. PMID:26723583

  6. Recovery of Ga(III) by Raw and Alkali Treated Citrus limetta Peels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Alkali treated Citrus limetta peels were used for recovery of Ga(III) from its aqueous solution. The raw and alkali treated peels were characterized for functional groups. The efficiency of adsorption increased from 47.62 mg/g for raw peels to 83.33 mg/g for alkali treated peels. Between pH 1 and 3, the adsorption increased and thereafter decreased drastically. The adsorption followed pseudosecond order kinetics and Langmuir isotherm gave the best fit for the experimental data. Desorption studies showed 95.28% desorption after 3 cycles for raw peels while it was 89.51% for alkali treated peels. Simulated Bayer liquor showed 39.57% adsorption for gallium ions on raw peels which was enhanced to 41.13% for alkali treated peels.

  7. PEP-1-FK506BP inhibits alkali burn-induced corneal inflammation on the rat model of corneal alkali injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Won; Lee, Sung Ho; Shin, Min Jea; Kim, Kibom; Ku, Sae Kwang; Youn, Jong Kyu; Cho, Su Bin; Park, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chi Hern; Son, Ora; Sohn, Eun Jeong; Cho, Sung-Woo; Park, Jong Hoon; Kim, Hyun Ah; Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2015-11-01

    FK506 binding protein 12 (FK506BP) is a small peptide with a single FK506BP domain that is involved in suppression of immune response and reactive oxygen species. FK506BP has emerged as a potential drug target for several inflammatory diseases. Here, we examined the protective effects of directly applied cell permeable FK506BP (PEP-1-FK506BP) on corneal alkali burn injury (CAI). In the cornea, there was a significant decrease in the number of cells expressing pro-inflammation, apoptotic, and angiogenic factors such as TNF-α, COX-2, and VEGF. Both corneal opacity and corneal neovascularization (CNV) were significantly decreased in the PEP-1-FK506BP treated group. Our results showed that PEP-1-FK506BP can significantly inhibit alkali burn-induced corneal inflammation in rats, possibly by accelerating corneal wound healing and by reducing the production of angiogenic factors and inflammatory cytokines. These results suggest that PEP-1-FK506BP may be a potential therapeutic agent for CAI. PMID:25817214

  8. PEP-1-FK506BP inhibits alkali burn-induced corneal inflammation on the rat model of corneal alkali injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Won; Lee, Sung Ho; Shin, Min Jea; Kim, Kibom; Ku, Sae Kwang; Youn, Jong Kyu; Cho, Su Bin; Park, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chi Hern; Son, Ora; Sohn, Eun Jeong; Cho, Sung-Woo; Park, Jong Hoon; Kim, Hyun Ah; Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2015-01-01

    FK506 binding protein 12 (FK506BP) is a small peptide with a single FK506BP domain that is involved in suppression of immune response and reactive oxygen species. FK506BP has emerged as a potential drug target for several inflammatory diseases. Here, we examined the protective effects of directly applied cell permeable FK506BP (PEP-1-FK506BP) on corneal alkali burn injury (CAI). In the cornea, there was a significant decrease in the number of cells expressing pro-inflammation, apoptotic, and angiogenic factors such as TNF-α, COX-2, and VEGF. Both corneal opacity and corneal neovascularization (CNV) were significantly decreased in the PEP-1-FK506BP treated group. Our results showed that PEP-1-FK506BP can significantly inhibit alkali burn-induced corneal inflammation in rats, possibly by accelerating corneal wound healing and by reducing the production of angiogenic factors and inflammatory cytokines. These results suggest that PEP-1-FK506BP may be a potential therapeutic agent for CAI. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(11): 618-623] PMID:25817214

  9. Properties and Applications of Laser-Induced Gratings in Rare Earth Doped Glasses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Edward Grady

    Scope and method of study. Four-wave-mixing techniques were used in an attempt to create permanent laser-induced grating in Pr^{3+}-, Nd ^{3+}-, Eu^ {3+}-, and Er^{3+ }-doped glasses. The permanent laser-induced grating signal intensity and build-up and erase times were investigated as function of the write beam crossing angle, write beam power, and temperature. Thermal lensing measurements were conducted on Eu^{3+} - and Nd^{3+}-doped glasses and room temperature Raman and resonant Raman spectra were obtained for Eu^{3+}-doped glasses. The permanent laser-induced grating signal intensity was studied in Eu^{3+} -doped alkali-metal glasses as a function of the alkali -metal network modifier ion and a model was developed by treating the sample as a two-level system. Optical device applications of the permanent laser-induced gratings were studied by creating some simple devices. Findings and conclusions. Permanent laser-induced gratings were created in the Pr^{3+ }- and Eu^{3+} -doped glasses. The permanent laser-induced grating is associated with a structural phase change of the glass host. The structural change is produced by high energy phonons which are emitted by radiationless relaxation processes of the rare earth ion. Nd^{3+} and Er^{3+} relax nonradiatively by the emission of phonons of much lower energy which are unable to produce the structural phase change needed to form a permanent laser-induced grating. The difference in energy of the emitted phonons is responsible for the differing characteristics of the thermal lensing experiments. The model does a good job of predicting the experimental results for the asymmetry and other parameters of the two-level system. The application of these laser -induced gratings for optical devices demonstrates their importance to optical technology.

  10. Crystal Structures of Three Framework Alkali Metal Uranyl Phosphate Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locock, Andrew J.; Burns, Peter C.

    2002-08-01

    Three homeotypic hydrated alkali metal uranyl phosphates, A2(UO 2)[(UO 2)(PO 4)] 4(H 2O) 2, A=Cs ( CsUP), Rb ( RbUP), K ( KUP), were synthesized by hydrothermal methods. Intensity data were collected at room temperature using Mo Kα radiation and a CCD-based area detector. Their crystal structures were solved by Patterson ( CsUP) and direct ( RbUP, KUP) methods and refined by full-matrix least-squares techniques to agreement indices ( CsUP, RbUP, KUP) w R2=0.048, 0.230, 0.072 for all data, and R1=0.023, 0.078, 0.038 calculated for 5338, 4738, 4514 unique observed reflections (∣ Fo∣≥4 σF), respectively. The compound CsUP is orthorhombic, space group Cmc2 1, Z=4, a=14.854(1), b=13.879(1), c=12.987(1) Å, V=2677.5(3) Å 3. Both RbUP and KUP are monoclinic, space group Cm, but are presented in the unconventional pseudo-orthorhombic space group Fm11 to facilitate comparison with CsUP and to allow a model for RbUP that includes the effects of pseudo-merohedral twinning. RbUP is monoclinic, space group Fm11, Z=4, a=15.72(2), b=13.84(1), c=13.05(1) Å, α=90.39°(2), V=2839(5) Å 3; KUP is monoclinic, space group Fm11, Z=4, a=15.257(1), b=13.831(1), c=13.007(1) Å, α=91.760°(1), V=2743.4(3) Å 3. The structures consist of sheets of phosphate tetrahedra and uranyl pentagonal bipyramids, with composition [(UO 2)(PO 4)] -, that are topologically identical to the uranyl silicate sheets in uranophane-beta. These sheets are connected by a uranyl pentagonal bipyramid in the interlayer that shares corners with two phosphate tetrahedra on each of two adjacent sheets and whose fifth equatorial vertex is an H 2O group, resulting in an open framework with alkali metal cations in the larger cavities of the structures. Where CsUP and RbUP have two alkali metal positions and a H 2O group in these cavities, KUP has four K atoms and two H 2O groups, all of which are partially occupied, in the interstitial sites.

  11. Synthesis, structural and vibrational studies on mixed alkali metal gadolinium double tungstate, K1-xNaxGd(WO4)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durairajan, A.; Thangaraju, D.; Moorthy Babu, S.

    2013-02-01

    Mixed alkali double tungstates K1-xNaxGd(WO4)2 (KNGW) (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 1) were synthesized by solid state reaction using sodium doped monoclinic KGd(WO4)2 (KGW). Synthesized KNGW powders were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman analysis. DTA analysis confirms that the melting point of the KGW matrix increases from 1063 °C to 1255 °C with increasing sodium content. The Powder XRD analyses reveal that mixed phases were observed up to 40 wt.% of Na in the KGW matrix above that percentage there is domination of scheelite structure in the synthesized powder. Polyhedral type, bi-pyramidal shape and spheroid shape morphology was observed for KGW, NKGW and NGW powders respectively. The Raman analysis was carried out to understand the vibrational characteristic changes with mixing of sodium ions in the KGW matrix.

  12. Ion Size Effect on Glow Peak Temperature in Dielectric Binary Mixed Crystals Doped With Divalent Europium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Mijangos, Ricardo; Perez-Salas, Raul

    2008-03-01

    Thermoluminiscence measurements at room temperature of ``beta'' irradiated divalent Europium doped binary mixed alkali halides with RbCl and KBr components at several concentrations x in molar fraction are carried out. The experiments have been carried out to identify the effect of composition in thermoluminiscense glow peaks. A typical glow peak has been distinguished for each composition. A linear dependence of its temperature on the composition x has been found. This is principally associated with the radii size change of halogen ions. Comparison with results in mixed KCl:KBr. KBr:RbBr and KCl:RbCl support that assertion.

  13. Copper doping of silicate glasses by the ion-exchange technique: A photoluminescence spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsella, E.; Dal Vecchio, A.; Garcı̀a, M. A.; Sada, C.; Gonella, F.; Polloni, R.; Quaranta, A.; van Wilderen, L. J. G. W.

    2002-01-01

    Copper-alkali ion exchange is used for doping superficial layers of different silicate glasses (commercial soda-lime and BK7) with copper ions. Spectroscopic and time-resolved photoluminescence properties of the obtained systems are studied in the range of 80-294 K. Analysis indicates the presence of Cu+ ions located in distorted octahedral sites, and a different position of the triplet electronic levels for the two glass matrices. The luminescence decay-time signal is simulated by a biexponential behavior, interpreted on the basis of a four-level scheme.

  14. Superconductivity in the alkali metal intercalates of molybdenum disulphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.

    1972-01-01

    The complete series of alkali metals, lithium through cesium, have been intercalated into molybdenum disulphide, using both the liquid ammonia and vapor techniques. All the intercalates with the exception of lithium yielded full superconducting transitions with onset temperatures of 6 K for AxMoS2(Ax=K,Rb,Cs) and 4 K for BxMoS2(Bx=Li,Na). The superconducting transition for lithium was incomplete down to 1.5 K. Stoichiometries and unit cell parameters have been determined for the intercalation compounds. Both rhombohedral and hexagonal polymorphs of MoS2 have been intercalated and found to exhibit the same superconductivity behavior. The nature of the extraneous superconducting transition of some intercalated samples on exposure to air was elucidated.

  15. Spin-Exchange Optical Pumping of Solid Alkali Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Brian; Ishikawa, Kiyoshi; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2007-06-01

    We demonstrate enhancement of the ^133Cs nuclear polarization in a film of cesium hydride which has been placed in contact with an optically pumped cesium vapor. The maximum observed polarization at 9.4 T and 137 ^oC is roughly 4 times the equilibrium polarization, but higher magnetizations are possible at lower magnetic fields. In an attempt to determine the mechanism of spin transfer from the alkali vapor to the solid, we have performed this experiment at intermediate magnetic fields (1-2 tesla) while pumping different optical transitions in the vapor. We will discuss the predicted spin current to the CsH layer in this regime of partial hyperfine decoupling and propose new methods for generating even higher polarizations in the solid. Potential applications of this technique will be mentioned as well as its extension to other compounds.

  16. Mechanical stiffening and thermal softening of superionic alkali metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, S.; Shriya, S.; Kumar, J.; Ameri, M.; Varshney, Dinesh

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical (pressure) and thermal (temperature) dependent nature of superionic cubic M2O (M = Li, Na, K, and Rb) alkali metal oxides is studied. The model Hamiltonian in ab initio theory include long-range Coulomb, charge transfer, covalency, van der Waals interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions. The second order elastic constants as functions of pressure discern increasing trend, while to that they decreases with enhanced temperature. From the knowledge of elastic constants, Pugh ratio, Poisson's ratio, heat capacity and thermal expansion coefficient are calculated. It is noticed that cubic M2O is brittle on applied pressure and temperature and mechanically stiffened as a consequence of bond compression and bond strengthening and thermally softened due to bond expansion and bond weakening due to lattice vibrations.

  17. Potential function and dissociation energy of alkali halide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Abhay P.; Pandey, Anjani K.; Pandey, Brijesh K.

    2016-05-01

    Dissociation energy of some alkali halides have been calculated by using different interaction potential function such as Born-Mayer, Varshani-Shukla and L5 potential model. The theoretical calculation is compared with experimental values. The Result shows that the values of dissociation energy as calculated by using different potential models have an equal amount of deviation with experimental values. The above said deviation with experimental values can be explained by consideration of rotational-vibrational coupling between the constituents of molecules in the limelight of molecular spectroscopy. Findings of present work suggest that the existing potential model need to be reviewed in view of the correction factors solely depending on the rotational, vibrational and electronic coupling between the constituents of molecules.

  18. Electrical Resistivity of Liquid Alkali Na-based Binary Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Aditya M.

    2007-11-01

    The study of the electrical resistivity rL of alkali Na-based binary alloys Na1-xLix, Na1-xKx, Na1-xRbx and Na1-xCsx have been made by well-recognized model potential of Gajjar et al. The most recent exchange and correlation functions due to Farid et al (F) and Sarkar et al (S) are used for the first time in the study of electrical resistivity of liquid binary mixtures and found suitable for such study. The results, due to the inclusion of Sarkar et al's local field correction function, are found superior to those obtained due to Farid et al's local field correction function. Electrical resistivity of Na-based binary alloys compare well with the experimental data available in the literature.

  19. Fabrication of alkali halide UV photocathodes by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Brendel', V M; Bukin, V V; Garnov, Sergei V; Bagdasarov, V Kh; Denisov, N N; Garanin, Sergey G; Terekhin, V A; Trutnev, Yurii A

    2012-12-31

    A technique has been proposed for the fabrication of atmospheric corrosion resistant alkali halide UV photocathodes by pulsed laser deposition. We produced photocathodes with a highly homogeneous photoemissive layer well-adherent to the substrate. The photocathodes were mounted in a vacuum photodiode, and a tungsten grid was used as an anode. Using pulsed UV lasers, we carried out experiments aimed at evaluating the quantum efficiency of the photocathodes. With a dc voltage applied between the photocathode and anode grid, we measured a shunt signal proportional to the total charge emitted by the cathode exposed to UV laser light. The proposed deposition technique enables one to produce photocathodes with photoemissive layers highly uniform in quantum efficiency, which is its main advantage over thin film growth by resistive evaporation. (laser technologies)

  20. Spectral mode changes in an alkali rf discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Camparo, J. C.; Mackay, R.

    2007-03-01

    As a result of observations made by Shaw (M.S. thesis, Cornell University, 1964) in the mid-1960s, alkali rf discharges are known to operate in two spectral modes, the so-called ring mode and the red mode. Experience has shown that the ring mode is best for discharge lamps used in quantum-electronic devices such as atomic clocks and optically pumped magnetometers and that the performance of these devices seriously degrades when the lamp operates in the red mode. Understanding the origin of these modes therefore has application to understanding and improving various quantum-electronic devices. Here we show that Shaw's model for these modes is inconsistent with observation, and we propose an alternate model based on the role of radiation trapping in multistep ionization.