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Sample records for alkali feldspar plagioclase

  1. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility in alkali feldspar and plagioclase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, Andrea R.; Pettke, Thomas; Angel, Ross J.; Hirt, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Feldspars are the most abundant rock-forming minerals in the Earth's crust, but their magnetic properties have not been rigorously studied. This work focuses on the intrinsic magnetic anisotropy of 31 feldspar samples with various chemical compositions. Because feldspar is often twinned or shows exsolution textures, measurements were performed on twinned and exsolved samples as well as single crystals. The anisotropy is controlled by the diamagnetic susceptibility and displays a consistent orientation of principal susceptibility axes; the most negative or minimum susceptibility is parallel to [010], and the maximum (least negative) is close to the crystallographic [001] axis. However, the magnetic anisotropy is weak when compared to other rock-forming minerals, 1.53*10-9 m3 kg-1 at maximum. Therefore, lower abundance minerals such as augite, hornblende or biotite often dominate the bulk paramagnetic anisotropy of a rock. Ferromagnetic anisotropy is not significant in most samples. In the few samples that do show ferromagnetic anisotropy, the principal susceptibility directions of the ferromagnetic subfabric do not display a systematic orientation with respect to the feldspar lattice. These results suggest that paleointensity estimates of the geomagnetic field made on single crystals of feldspar will not be affected by a systematic orientation of the ferromagnetic inclusions within the feldspar lattice.

  2. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility in alkali feldspar and plagioclase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, Andrea R.; Pettke, Thomas; Angel, Ross J.; Hirt, Ann M.

    2016-04-01

    Feldspars are the most abundant rock-forming minerals in the Earth's crust, but their magnetic properties have not been rigorously studied. This work focuses on the intrinsic magnetic anisotropy of 31 feldspar samples with various chemical compositions. Because feldspar is often twinned or shows exsolution textures, measurements were performed on twinned and exsolved samples as well as single crystals. The anisotropy is controlled by the diamagnetic susceptibility and displays a consistent orientation of principal susceptibility axes; the most negative or minimum susceptibility is parallel to [010], and the maximum (least negative) is close to the crystallographic [001] axis. However, the magnetic anisotropy is weak when compared to other rock-forming minerals, 1.53 × 10-9 m3 kg-1 at maximum. Therefore, lower abundance minerals, such as augite, hornblende or biotite, often dominate the bulk paramagnetic anisotropy of a rock. Ferromagnetic anisotropy is not significant in most samples. In the few samples that do show ferromagnetic anisotropy, the principal susceptibility directions of the ferromagnetic subfabric do not display a systematic orientation with respect to the feldspar lattice. These results suggest that palaeointensity estimates of the geomagnetic field made on single crystals of feldspar will not be affected by a systematic orientation of the ferromagnetic inclusions within the feldspar lattice.

  3. Elasticity of plagioclase feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. Michael; Angel, Ross J.; Ross, Nancy L.

    2016-02-01

    Elastic properties are reported for eight plagioclase feldspars that span compositions from albite (NaSi3AlO8) to anorthite (CaSi2Al2O8). Surface acoustic wave velocities measured using Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering and compliance sums from high-pressure X-ray compression studies accurately determine all 21 components of the elasticity tensor for these triclinic minerals. The overall pattern of elasticity and the changes in individual elastic components with composition can be rationalized on the basis of the evolution of crystal structures and chemistry across this solid-solution join. All plagioclase feldspars have high elastic anisotropy; a* (the direction perpendicular to the b and c axes) is the softest direction by a factor of 3 in albite. From albite to anorthite the stiffness of this direction undergoes the greatest change, increasing twofold. Small discontinuities in the elastic components, inferred to occur between the three plagioclase phases with distinct symmetry (C1>¯, I1>¯, and P1>¯), appear consistent with the nature of the underlying conformation of the framework-linked tetrahedra and the associated structural changes. Measured body wave velocities of plagioclase-rich rocks, reported over the last five decades, are consistent with calculated Hill-averaged velocities using the current moduli. This confirms long-standing speculation that previously reported elastic moduli for plagioclase feldspars are systematically in error. The current results provide greater assurance that the seismic structure of the middle and lower crusts can be accurately estimated on the basis of specified mineral modes, chemistry, and fabric.

  4. P- T conditions of crystallization and origin of plagioclase-mantled alkali feldspar megacrysts in the Mesozoic granitoids in the Qinling orogen (China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Wang, Tao; Haapala, Ilmari; Mao, Jingwen

    2008-07-01

    The Qinling orogen between the North China and South China cratons was intruded at 211-217 Ma by calc-alkaline quartz monzonitic to monzogranitic plutons characterized by I- to A-type geochemistry and in many places contain plagioclase-mantled alkali feldspar megacrysts (rapakivi texture sensu lato). The felsic rocks contain mafic to intermediate magmatic enclaves suggestive of mingling and mixing of mafic and felsic magmas. The P- T conditions of crystallization have been determined for early mineral assemblages (inner parts of alkali feldspar megacrysts and their plagioclase, quartz, amphibole and biotite inclusions) and late assemblages (matrix minerals) of the rapakivi-textured granitoids. Al contents in amphibole from the early and late mineral assemblages yield pressures of 1.2-3.0 and 0.7-3.0 kbar, respectively, and indicate only minor pressure change between the crystallization of the early and late assemblages. Amphibole-plagioclase thermometry gives temperatures mainly of the order of 900 to 1000 °C for both the early and late assemblages indicating nearly isothermal conditions. Feldspar thermometers yield lower temperatures. Relative abundances of minerals and their chemical compositions indicate that the late mineral assemblages tend to be richer in MgO, Na 2O and CaO than the early assemblages. Rapakivi texture is interpreted in this case mainly as a result of compositional changes related to the hybridization between granitic and more mafic magmas. Small release of pressure during crystallization of the magmas may have contributed to the origin of the mantled alkali feldspar megacrysts.

  5. Thermal expansion of plagioclase feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribaudino, M.; Angel, R. J.; Cámara, F.; Nestola, F.; Pasqual, D.; Margiolaki, I.

    2010-12-01

    The volume thermal expansion coefficient and the anisotropy of thermal expansion were determined for nine natural feldspars with compositions, in terms of albite (NaAlSi3O8, Ab) and anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8, An), of Ab100, An27Ab73, An35Ab65, An46Ab54, An60Ab40, An78Ab22, An89Ab11, An96Ab4 and An100 by high resolution powder diffraction with a synchrotron radiation source. Unit-cell parameters were determined from 124 powder patterns of each sample, collected over the temperature range 298-935 K. The volume thermal expansion coefficient of the samples determined by a linear fit of V/ V 0 = α( T - T 0) varies with composition ( X An in mol %) as: αV = 2.90left( 4 right) × 10^{ - 5} - 3.0left( 2 right) × 10^{ - 7} *X_{text{An}} + 1.8left( 2 right) × 10^{ - 9} *X_{text{An}}2 Two empirical models for the non-linear behaviour of volume with temperature give a better fit to the experimental data. The change with composition in the a° parameter of the non-linear Holland-Powell model V/ V 0 = 1 + a°( T - T 0) + 20a° (√ T - √ T 0) is: a^circ = 4.96left( 5 right) × 10^{ - 5} - 4.7left( 2 right) × 10^{ - 7} *X_{text{An}} + 2.2left( 2 right) × 10^{ - 9} *X_{text{An}}2 For the Berman model, V/ V 0 = a 1( T - T 0) + a 2*( T- T 0)2, the parameters change with composition as: begin{aligned}& a1 = 2.44left( {15} right) × 10^{ - 5} - 3.1left( 6 right) × 10^{ - 7} *X_{text{An}}\\& quad + 1.8left( 5 right) × 10^{ - 9} *X_{text{An}}2 \\& a2 = 9left( 1 right) × 10^{ - 9} - 4left( 2 right) × 10^{ - 11} *X_{text{An}} \\ The thermal expansion of all plagioclases is very anisotropic, with more than 70% of the volume expansion being accommodated by a direction fairly close to the (100) plane normal, whereas perpendicular directions exhibit smaller, and in some cases slightly negative or zero, thermal expansion.

  6. Europium anomaly in plagioclase feldspar: experimental results and semiquantitative model.

    PubMed

    Weill, D F; Drake, M J

    1973-06-01

    The partition of europium between plagioclase feldspar and magmatic liquid is considered in terms of the distribution coefficients for divalent and trivalent europium. A model equation is derived giving the europium anomaly in plagioclase as a function of temperature and oxygen fugacity. The model explains europium anomalies in plagioclase synthesized under controlled laboratory conditions as well as the variations of the anomaly observed in natural terrestrial and extraterrestrial igneous rocks. PMID:17806582

  7. Cathodoluminescence Characterization of Maskelynite and Alkali Feldspar in Shergottite (Dhofar 019)

    SciTech Connect

    Kayama, M.; Nakazato, T.; Nishido, H.; Ninagawa, K.; Gucsik, A.

    2009-08-17

    Dhofar 019 is classified as an olivine-bearing basaltic shergottite and consists of subhedral grains of pyroxene, olivine, feldspar mostly converted to maskelynite and minor alkali feldspar. The CL spectrum of its maskelynite exhibits an emission band at around 380 nm. Similar UV-blue emission has been observed in the plagioclase experimentally shocked at 30 and 40 GPa, but not in terrestrial plagioclase. This UV-blue emission is a notable characteristic of maskelynite. CL spectrum of alkali feldspar in Dhofar 019 has an emission bands at around 420 nm with no red emission. Terrestrial alkali feldspar actually consists of blue and red emission at 420 and 710 nm assigned to Al-O{sup -}-Al and Fe{sup 3+} centers, respectively. Maskelynite shows weak and broad Raman spectral peaks at around 500 and 580 cm{sup -1}. The Raman spectrum of alkali feldspar has a weak peak at 520 cm{sup -1}, whereas terrestrial counterpart shows the emission bands at 280, 400, 470, 520 and 1120 cm{sup -1}. Shock pressure on this meteorite transformed plagioclase and alkali feldspar into maskelynite and almost glass phase, respectively. It eliminates their luminescence centers, responsible for disappearance of yellow and/or red emission in CL of maskelynite and alkali feldspar. The absence of the red emission band in alkali feldspar can also be due to the lack of Fe{sup 3+} in the feldspar as it was reported for some lunar feldspars.

  8. Modeling H, Na, and K diffusion in plagioclase feldspar by relating point defect parameters to bulk properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baohua; Shan, Shuangming; Wu, Xiaoping

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen and alkali ion diffusion in plagioclase feldspars is important to study the evolution of the crust and the kinetics of exsolution and ion-exchange reactions in feldspars. Using the available PVT equation of state of feldspars, we show that the diffusivities of H and alkali in plagioclase feldspars as a function of temperature can be successfully reproduced in terms of the bulk elastic and expansivity data through a thermodynamic model that interconnects point defect parameters with bulk properties. Our calculated diffusion coefficients of H, Na, and K well agree with experimental ones when uncertainties are considered. Additional point defect parameters such as activation enthalpy, activation entropy, and activation volume are also predicted. Furthermore, the electrical conductivity of feldspars inferred from our predicted diffusivities of H, Na, and K through the Nernst-Einstein equation is compared with previous experimental data.

  9. Visible/Near-Infrared Spectra of Experimentally Shocked Plagioclase Feldspars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Minerals subjected to high shock pressures exhibit structural changes with increasing pressure (e.g., fractures, deformations, formation of diaplectic glass, and complete melting [1-6]). Petrologic and thermal infrared spectroscopic studies have shown that diaplectic glass (maskelynite) formation in feldspars occurs between 25-45 GPa, while significant melting occurs above 45 GPa [7- 12]. Past studies of visible/near-infrared spectra of shocked plagioclase feldspars demonstrated few variations in spectral features with pressure except for a decrease in the absorption feature near 1250 nm and an overall decrease in albedo [13-17]. We report new visible/near-infrared spectra of albite- and anorthiterich rocks experimentally shocked from 17-56 GPa.

  10. Thermal infrared spectroscopy and modeling of experimentally shocked plagioclase feldspars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Horz, F.; Staid, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal infrared emission and reflectance spectra (250-1400 cm-1; ???7???40 ??m) of experimentally shocked albite- and anorthite-rich rocks (17-56 GPa) demonstrate that plagioclase feldspars exhibit characteristic degradations in spectral features with increasing pressure. New measurements of albite (Ab98) presented here display major spectral absorptions between 1000-1250 cm-1 (8-10 ??m) (due to Si-O antisymmetric stretch motions of the silica tetrahedra) and weaker absorptions between 350-700 cm-1 (14-29 ??m) (due to Si-O-Si octahedral bending vibrations). Many of these features persist to higher pressures compared to similar features in measurements of shocked anorthite, consistent with previous thermal infrared absorption studies of shocked feldspars. A transparency feature at 855 cm-1 (11.7 ??m) observed in powdered albite spectra also degrades with increasing pressure, similar to the 830 cm-1 (12.0 ??m) transparency feature in spectra of powders of shocked anorthite. Linear deconvolution models demonstrate that combinations of common mineral and glass spectra can replicate the spectra of shocked anorthite relatively well until shock pressures of 20-25 GPa, above which model errors increase substantially, coincident with the onset of diaplectic glass formation. Albite deconvolutions exhibit higher errors overall but do not change significantly with pressure, likely because certain clay minerals selected by the model exhibit absorption features similar to those in highly shocked albite. The implication for deconvolution of thermal infrared spectra of planetary surfaces (or laboratory spectra of samples) is that the use of highly shocked anorthite spectra in end-member libraries could be helpful in identifying highly shocked calcic plagioclase feldspars.

  11. Visible/near-infrared spectra of experimentally shocked plagioclase feldspars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Horz, F.

    2003-01-01

    High shock pressures cause structural changes in plagioclase feldspars such as mechanical fracturing and disaggregation of the crystal lattice at submicron scales, the formation of diaplectic glass (maskelynite), and genuine melting. Past studies of visible/ near-infrared spectra of shocked feldspars demonstrated few spectral variations with pressure except for a decrease in the depth of the absorption feature near 1250-1300 nm and an overall decrease in reflectance. New visible/near-infrared spectra (400-2500 nm) of experimentally shocked (17-56 GPa) albite- and anorthite-rich rock powders demonstrate similar trends, including the loss of minor hydrated mineral bands near 1410, 1930, 2250, and 2350 nm. However, the most interesting new observations are increases in reflectance at intermediate pressures, followed by subsequent decreases in reflectance at higher pressures. The amount of internal scattering and overall sample reflectance is controlled by the relative proportions of micro-fractures, submicron grains, diaplectic glass, and melts formed during shock metamorphism. We interpret the observed reflectance increases at intermediate pressures to result from progressively larger proportions of submicron feldspar grains and diaplectic glass. The ensuing decreases in reflectance occur after diaplectic glass formation is complete and the proportion of genuine melt inclusions increases. The pressure regimes over which these reflectance variations occur differ between albite and anorthite, consistent with thermal infrared spectra of these samples and previous studies of shocked feldspars. These types of spectral variations associated with different peak shock pressures should be considered during interpretation and modeling of visible/near-infrared remotely sensed spectra of planetary and asteroidal surfaces.

  12. Visible/near-infrared spectra of experimentally shocked plagioclase feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Hörz, Friedrich

    2003-11-01

    High shock pressures cause structural changes in plagioclase feldspars such as mechanical fracturing and disaggregation of the crystal lattice at submicron scales, the formation of diaplectic glass (maskelynite), and genuine melting. Past studies of visible/near-infrared spectra of shocked feldspars demonstrated few spectral variations with pressure except for a decrease in the depth of the absorption feature near 1250-1300 nm and an overall decrease in reflectance. New visible/near-infrared spectra (400-2500 nm) of experimentally shocked (17-56 GPa) albite- and anorthite-rich rock powders demonstrate similar trends, including the loss of minor hydrated mineral bands near 1410, 1930, 2250, and 2350 nm. However, the most interesting new observations are increases in reflectance at intermediate pressures, followed by subsequent decreases in reflectance at higher pressures. The amount of internal scattering and overall sample reflectance is controlled by the relative proportions of micro-fractures, submicron grains, diaplectic glass, and melts formed during shock metamorphism. We interpret the observed reflectance increases at intermediate pressures to result from progressively larger proportions of submicron feldspar grains and diaplectic glass. The ensuing decreases in reflectance occur after diaplectic glass formation is complete and the proportion of genuine melt inclusions increases. The pressure regimes over which these reflectance variations occur differ between albite and anorthite, consistent with thermal infrared spectra of these samples and previous studies of shocked feldspars. These types of spectral variations associated with different peak shock pressures should be considered during interpretation and modeling of visible/near-infrared remotely sensed spectra of planetary and asteroidal surfaces.

  13. Electron microprobe study of lunar and planetary zoned plagioclase feldspars: An analytical and experimental study of zoning in plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. K.; Lofgren, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    Natural and experimentally grown zoned plagioclase feldspars were examined by electron microprobe. The analyses revealed discontinuous, sector, and oscillary chemical zoning superimposed on continuous normal or reverse zoning trends. Postulated mechanisms for the origin of zoning are based on either physical changes external to the magma (P, T, H2O saturation) or kinetic changes internal to the magma (diffusion, supersaturation, growth rate). Comparison of microprobe data on natural zoned plagioclase with zoned plagioclase grown in controlled experiments show that it may be possible to distinguish zonal development resulting from physio-chemical changes to the bulk magma from local kinetic control on the growth of individual crystals.

  14. Elastic properties of alkali-feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waeselmann, N.; Brown, J.; Angel, R. J.; Ross, N.; Kaminsky, W.

    2013-12-01

    New measurements of single crystal elastic moduli for a suite of the alkali feldspars are reported. In order to interpret Earth's seismic structure, knowledge of the elastic properties of constituent minerals is essential. The elasticity of feldspar minerals, despite being the most abundant phase in Earth's crust (estimated to be more than 60%), were previously poorly characterized. All prior seismic and petrologic studies have utilized 50-year-old results, of questionable quality, based on 1-bar measurements on pseudo-single crystals. Alkali-feldspars present a large experimental challenge associated with their structural complexity. In the K-end member (KAlSi3O8) the symmetry is governed by Al/Si ordering, in the Na-end member (NaAlSi3O8) the symmetry is governed by whether or not there is a displacive collapse of the framework independent of the Al/Si ordering. K-feldspars exhibit monoclinic (C2/m) symmetry (necessitating determination of 13 elastic moduli) if disordered and triclinic (C-1) symmetry (21 elastic moduli) if ordered. Exsolution of Na-rich and K-rich phases is ubiquitous in natural samples, making it difficult to find suitable single phase and untwinned samples for study. The small single domain samples selected for this study were previously characterized by x-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis to ensure adequate sample quality. Surface wave velocities were measured on oriented surfaces of natural and synthetic single crystals using impulsively stimulated light scattering. A surface corrugation with a spacing of about 2 microns was impulsively created by the overlap of 100 ps infrared light pulses. The time evolution of the stimulated standing elastic waves was detected by measuring the intensity of diffraction from the surface corrugation of a variably delayed probe pulse. This method allows accurate (better than 0.2%) determination of velocities on samples smaller than 100 microns. The combination of measured surface wave velocities and

  15. Shock effects in plagioclase feldspar from the Mistastin Lake impact structure, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickersgill, Annemarie E.; Osinski, Gordon R.; Flemming, Roberta L.

    2015-09-01

    Shock metamorphism, caused by hypervelocity impact, is a poorly understood process in feldspar due to the complexity of the crystal structure, the relative ease of weathering, and chemical variations, making optical studies of shocked feldspars challenging. Understanding shock metamorphism in feldspars, and plagioclase in particular, is vital for understanding the history of Earth's moon, Mars, and many other planetary bodies. We present here a comprehensive study of shock effects in andesine and labradorite from the Mistastin Lake impact structure, Labrador, Canada. Samples from a range of different settings were studied, from in situ central uplift materials to clasts from various breccias and impact melt rocks. Evidence of shock metamorphism includes undulose extinction, offset twins, kinked twins, alternate twin deformation, and partial to complete transformation to diaplectic plagioclase glass. In some cases, isotropization of alternating twin lamellae was observed. Planar deformation features (PDFs) are notably absent in the plagioclase, even when present in neighboring quartz grains. It is notable that various microlites, twin planes, and compositionally different lamellae could easily be mistaken for PDFs and so care must be taken. A pseudomorphous zeolite phase (levyne-Ca) was identified as a replacement mineral of diaplectic feldspar glass in some samples, which could, in some instances, also be potentially mistaken for PDFs. We suggest that the lack of PDFs in plagioclase could be due to a combination of structural controls relating to the crystal structure of different feldspars and/or the presence of existing planes of weakness in the form of twin and cleavage planes.

  16. Infrared reflectance spectra (2.2-15 microns) of plagioclase feldspars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Douglas B.; Salisbury, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory results show that (1) the Christiansen frequency (CF) feature in mid-infrared reflectance spectra of powders can be used to accurately distinguish plagioclase composition, and (2) the wavelength position of the CF is not affected by vitrification of the plagioclase. Although the CF position does not distinguish glass from crystalline forms of plagioclase, other features (combination-tone, overtone, restrahlen bands) in the mid-IR spectra of plagioclase can be used for that purpose. These results have important implications for application of thermal emission spectroscopy to mapping the surface composition of regolith-covered planetary bodies like the moon, Mars, and asteroids.

  17. Effects of Al/Si ordering on feldspar dissolution: Part II. The pH dependence of plagioclases' dissolution rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Min, Yujia; Jun, Young-Shin

    2014-02-01

    The rate of mineral dissolution in an aquatic environment is sensitive to the pH of the contacting solution. The pH dependence of mineral dissolution rate has been interpreted by the Transition State Theory-Surface Complexation Model (TST-SCM) formalism in terms of pH-sensitive variability in surface chemistry. In this study, we provide an alternative interpretation for the experimentally observed nonlinear pH dependence of feldspar dissolution rates. The interpretation is based on a new formalism for feldspar dissolution which, while compatible with the TST-SCM formalism, incorporates the effects of both surface chemistry and bulk chemistry on feldspar dissolution into the quantification of dissolution rate. The pH dependence of dissolution rate varies from one feldspar specimen to another because different TOT linkages within one solid matrix can respond differently to the attack of proton. Our results suggest that the pH dependence of feldspar dissolution rate is not a constant in general, and could be affected by pH, substitutional Al/Si ordering, chemical composition of the specimen, and the relative rapidness of linkage hydrolysis according to different mechanisms. The rate law proposed in this study is able to capture the experimentally observed pH dependence of the dissolution rates of a series of plagioclases, including albite, andesine, labradorite, bytownite, and anorthite. The effectiveness of the newly proposed formalism for feldspar dissolution, hence, suggests that dissolution reactions of minerals are combinations of surface renewal and heterogeneous chemical reactions. The currently widely used TST-SCM-based rate laws can be further improved by taking into account the effects of bulk chemistry and surface renewal in the prediction of mineral dissolution rates. An improved formalism for mineral dissolution will be mineral-specific, and will reflect the effects of the temporal decay in the availability of reactive surface sites as well as the

  18. Crystal-chemical controls on the partitioning of Sr and Ba between plagioclase feldspar, silicate melts, and hydrothermal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundy, Jonathan D.; Wood, Bernard J.

    1991-01-01

    The isothermal (750°C) experiments of LAGACHE and DUJON (1987) reveal that the partitioning of Sr between plagioclase feldspar and hydrothermal solutions is a funtion of the anorthite (An) content of the plagioclase, indicating that crystal chemistry may exert a powerful influence on trace element partitioning. In order to compare these results with those on trace element partitioning between plagioclase and silicate melts we have compiled from the literature a large dataset of experimental and volcanic distribution coefficients ( D's) for Sr (and Ba). These data, which span a compositional range from lunar basalt to high silica rhyolite and a temperature range of over 650°C, show a relationship between DSr (and DBa) and mole fraction An ( XAn) which is similar to that exhibited by the hydrothermal results obtained at constant temperature. Plots of In DSr and In DBa versus XAn are linear with negative slope, indicating that both elements are more compatible in albite than anorthite. In terms of molar distribution coefficients ( D Sr∗) the hydrothermal and silicate melt data display an identical linear relationship between RT In D Sr∗ (where T is the absolute temperature in K and R is the gas constant, 8.314 JK -1 mol -1) and XAn. We conclude therefore that crystal chemistry provides the dominant control on partitioning of Sr and Ba into plagioclase and that the effects of temperature, pressure, and fluid composition are minor. Apparent relationships between DSr (and DBa) and the reciprocal temperature (1/ T) are artefacts of the linear relationships between XAn and 1/ T in the experimental studies. By defining a Henry's law standard state for the silicate melts and hydrothermal solutions, and considering plagioclases to be ternary regular solutions, we are able to relate the observed relationships between RT In D i∗ (where i is Ba or Sr) and XAn to the excess free energies of the trace element partitioning reactions between plagioclase and melt or

  19. Shock melting of K-feldspar and interlacing with cataclastically deformed plagioclase in granitic rocks at Toqqusap Nunaa, southern West Greenland: Implications for the genesis of the Maniitsoq structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keulen, Nynke; Garde, Adam A.; Jørgart, Tommy

    2015-11-01

    Folded sheets of Mesoarchaean, leucocratic plagioclase-K-feldspar-mesoperthite-bearing granitic rocks in the Toqqusap Nunaa area of the Maniitsoq structure, West Greenland, are characterised by their very fine grain sizes and microstructures without normal igneous or planar/linear tectonic fabrics. Quartz forms equidimensional and branching, ductilely deformed aggregates and bifurcating panels with protrusions, constrictions and chains of ball-shaped grains with healed, radiating intergranular fractures. Plagioclase (An10-20) was cataclastically deformed and comminuted, whereas K-feldspar and mesoperthite are devoid of cataclastic microstructures. K-feldspar forms dispersed, highly irregular grains with numerous cusps and saddles, indicating almost ubiquitous direct (shock) melting of this mineral. It is commonly located along former fractures in plagioclase, resulting in an 'interlaced' feldspar microstructure with contact shapes indicating subsequent melting of plagioclase directly adjacent to K-feldspar. Mesoperthite forms separate, rounded, and irregular grains with protrusions and cusped margins indicating crystallisation from melts. Some mesoperthite grains are texturally and compositionally heterogeneous and contain internal lenses of K-feldspar and/or plagioclase. Other mesoperthite grains comprise coarsened, 'unzipped' areas, presumably due to localised, fluid-controlled dissolution-reprecipitation processes. The ternary feldspar precursor of the mesoperthite is interpreted as having crystallised from variably effectively mixed K-feldspar shock melts and plagioclase contact melts. Direct melting of K-feldspar, but no whole-rock melting, requires shock metamorphism with a short-lived temperature excursion to above the melting temperature of K-feldspar (~ 1300 °C). The presence of three different feldspar species and absence of chemical zonation, magmatic mantling, or metamorphic coronas furthermore hinders interpretations solely by means of endogenic

  20. Thermodynamic assessment of hydrothermal alkali feldspar-mica-aluminosilicate equilibria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sverjensky, D.A.; Hemley, J.J.; d'Angelo, W. M.

    1991-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of minerals retrieved from consideration of solid-solid and dehydration equilibria with calorimetric reference values, and those of aqueous species derived from studies of electrolytes, are not consistent with experimentally measured high-temperature solubilities in the systems K2O- and Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O-HCl (e.g., K-fs - Ms - Qtz - K+ - H+). This introduces major inaccuracies into the computation of ionic activity ratios and the acidities of diagenetic, metamorphic, and magmatic hydrothermal fluids buffered by alkali silicate-bearing assemblages. We report a thermodynamic analysis of revised solubility equilibria in these systems that integrates the thermodynamic properties of minerals obtained from phase equilibria studies (Berman, 1988) with the properties of aqueous species calculated from a calibrated equation of state (Shock and Helgeson, 1988). This was achieved in two separate steps. First, new values of the free energies and enthalpies of formation at 25??C and 1 bar for the alkali silicates muscovite and albite were retrieved from the experimental solubility equilibria at 300??C and Psat. Because the latter have stoichiometric reaction coefficients different from those for solid-solid and dehydration equilibria, our procedure preserves exactly the relative thermodynamic properties of the alkali-bearing silicates (Berman, 1988). Only simple arithmetic adjustments of -1,600 and -1,626 (??500) cal/mol to all the K- and Na-bearing silicates, respectively, in Berman (1988) are required. In all cases, the revised values are within ??0.2% of calorimetric values. Similar adjustments were derived for the properties of minerals from Helgeson et al. (1978). Second, new values of the dissociation constant of HCl were retrieved from the solubility equilibria at temperatures and pressures from 300-600??C and 0.5-2.0 kbars using a simple model for aqueous speciation. The results agree well with the conductance-derived dissociation

  1. Experimental alkali feldspar dissolution at 100 degree C by carboxylic acids and their anions

    SciTech Connect

    Stoessell, R.K. ); Pittman, E.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Feldspar dissolution will enhance sandstone porosity if the released aluminum can be transported away in the subsurface waters. Carboxylic acids have been proposed to provide hydrogen ions to promote dissolution and anions to complex aqueous aluminum to keep it in solution. However, the hydrogen ions should react quickly following acid generation in source beds, leaving monocarboxylic anions with lesser amounts of dicarboxylic acids and their anions on feldspar dissolution and the apparent complexing of aluminum in solution. Two-week dissolution experiments of alkali feldspar were run at 100{degree}C and 300 bars in acetic acid, oxalic acid, and sodium salt solutions of chloride, acetate, propionate, oxalate, and malonate. Extrapolation of the results, to reservoir conditions during sandstone diagenesis, implies that concentrations of aluminum-organic complexes are not significant for acetate and propionate and are possibly significant for oxalate and malonate, depending upon fluid compositions. Propionate appeared to inhibit feldspar dissolution and hence might decrease secondary porosity formation. Increases in aluminum concentrations in the presence of oxalic and acetic acid solutions appear to be due to enhanced dissolution kinetics and greater aluminum solubility under low-pH conditions. Such low-pH fluids are generally absent in subsurface reservoirs, making this an unlikely mechanism for enhancing porosity. Furthermore, the observed thermal instability of oxalate and malonate anions explains their general low concentrations in subsurface fluids which limits their aluminum complexing potential in reservoirs during late diagenesis.

  2. Lattice strain across Na-K interdiffusion fronts in alkali feldspar: an electron back-scatter diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäffer, Anne-Kathrin; Jäpel, Tom; Zaefferer, Stefan; Abart, Rainer; Rhede, Dieter

    2014-11-01

    Cation exchange experiments between gem quality sanidine and KCl melt produced chemical alteration of alkali feldspar starting at the grain surface and propagating inwards by highly anisotropic Na-K interdiffusion on the alkali sublattice. Diffusion fronts developing in b-direction are very sharp, while diffusion fronts within the a- c-plane are comparatively broad. Due to the composition dependence of the lattice parameters of alkali feldspar, the diffusion induced compositional heterogeneity induces coherency stress and elastic strain. Electron back-scatter diffraction combined with the cross-correlation technique was employed to determine the lattice strain distribution across the Na-K interdiffusion fronts in partially exchanged single crystals of alkali feldspar. The strain changes gradually across the broad fronts within the a- c-plane, with a successive extension primarily in a-direction conferring to the composition strain in unstressed alkali feldspar. In contrast, lattice strain characterised by pronounced extension in b-direction is localised at the sharp diffusion fronts parallel to b, followed by a slight expansion in a-direction in the orthoclase-rich rim. This strain pattern does not confer with the composition induced lattice strain in a stress-free alkali feldspar. It may rather be explained by the mechanical coupling of the exchanged surface layer and the mechanically strong substratum. The lattice distortion localised at the sharp diffusion front may have an influence on the diffusion process and appears to produce a self-sharpening feedback, leading to a local reduction of component mobilities.

  3. Crystallization kinetics of alkali feldspars in cooling and decompression-induced crystallization experiments in trachytic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Carroll, Michael R.

    2013-10-01

    Cooling and decompression experiments have been carried out on trachytic melts in order to investigate crystallization kinetics of alkali feldspar, the effect of the degree of undercooling ( ΔT = T liquidus - T experimental) and time on nucleation and crystal growth process. This experimental work gives us new data about crystallization kinetics of trachytic melts, and it that will be useful to better understand the natural system of Campi Flegrei volcanoes. Experiments have been conducted using cold seal pressure vessel apparatus, at pressure between 30 and 200 MPa, temperature between 750 and 855 °C, time between 7,200 and 57,600 s and redox condition close to the NNO +0.8 buffer. These conditions are ideal to reproducing pre- and syn-eruptive conditions of the Campi Flegrei volcanoes, where the "conditions" pertain to the complete range of pressures, temperatures and time at which the experiments were performed. Alkali feldspar is the main phase present in this trachyte, and its abundance can strongly vary with small changes in pressure, temperature and water content in the melt, implying appreciable variations in the textures and in the crystallization kinetics. The obtained results show that crystallization kinetics are strictly related to ΔT, time, final pressure, superheating (- ΔT) and water content in the melt. ΔT is the driving force of the crystallization, and it has a strong influence on nucleation and growth processes. In fact, the growth process dominates crystallization at small ΔT, whereas the nucleation dominates crystallization at large ΔT. Time also is an important variable during crystallization process, because long experiment durations involve more nucleation events of alkali feldspar than short experiment durations. This is an important aspect to understand magma evolution in the magma chamber and in the conduit, which in turn has strong effects on magma rheology.

  4. Origin of alkali-feldspar granites: An example from the Poimena Granite, northeastern Tasmania, Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, D.E.; Black, L.P.; Sun, Shensu )

    1988-10-01

    The Lottah Granite is a composite pluton of tin mineralized strongly peraluminous alkali-feldspar granite which intrudes the Poimena Granite, a major component of the mid-Devonian Blue Tier Batholith of northeastern Tasmania. Earlier workers interpreted the Lottah Granite as a metasomatised differentiate of the Poimena Granite. The Poimena Granite is a slightly peraluminous, felsic, I-type biotite granite which contains restite minerals and shows linear trends on Harker plots, both consistent with restite separation. The mineralogy, chemical variation, and isotopic characteristics of the Lottah Granite are consistent with origin as a magma genetically unrelated to the host granite. The Lottah Granite contains sanidine, albite, topaz, zinnwaldite and other minerals consistent with crystallization from a melt. Furthermore, Rb-Sr isotopic dating indicates that the Lottah Granite was emplaced about 10 Ma after the Poimena Granite, and initial Sr and Nd isotope ratios indicate that the Lottah Granite was derived from a higher-{sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr, higher-{epsilon}Nd source composition. Chemical and mineralogical evolution of the Lottah Granite conform to the experimental behavior of Li-F-rich melts, and indicate a possible crystallization temperature range as extreme as 750-430{degree}C. Many other examples of alkali-feldspar granite, and much of the associated mineralization, are probably also of essentially primary magmatic origin rather than of metasomatic or hydrothermal origin as commonly interpreted. They may also be genetically unrelated to granites with which they are associated.

  5. 3D distribution and evolution of porosity during albitization and patch perthitization of alkali feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, N.; Neusser, G.; Wirth, R.; Harlov, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Fluid-mediated replacement of minerals and rocks often results in the formation of an extensive porosity. This reaction-induced porosity is generally assumed to be pervasive enabling the constant progress of the alteration process and fluid infiltration of initially impermeable rocks (e.g. Putnis, 2009 Rev Min Geochem, 70, 87). This hypothesis was tested utilizing state-of-the-art micro- to nano-analytical techniques including FIB in combination with SEM and TEM. For this study two different alkali feldspar replacement reactions common in natural rocks were reproduced experimentally; (i) albitization of K-rich alkali-feldspar (Or85-95) and (ii) patch perthitization of intermediate (exsolved) alkali feldspars (Ab60Or40). 3D analysis of the pore distribution was done by a combination of alternate removal of 100 nm slices using FIB followed by SE imaging of the dissected surface. Series of 100-200 SE images were obtained from 20 × 8 × 20 µm3 sample blocks and translated into a 3-dimensional model using Fiji software package (resolution ~0.03 × 0.03 × 0.1 µm3). Analyses of the experimentally albitized and patch-perthitized alkali feldspar demonstrate that in both cases single-crystalline starting materials are replaced by highly porous, polycrystalline replacement products. In the case of albitization the replacement rim consists of two generations of polycrystalline intergrowths of slightly tilted albite sub-grains visible in TEM. These are a fine-grained, highly porous and a coarse-grained, almost non-porous albite that seems to progressively replace the former. The total reaction-induced porosity clearly exceeds the difference in the molar volume of the reaction of ~ -7.5%. Pores are mostly elongated forming several micron long channels. However, despite the abundance of porosity within the albitized areas, neither 3D analysis nor TEM could detect any significant interconnection between these channels. The same holds true in the case of patch perthitization

  6. Structure-dependent interactions between alkali feldspars and organic compounds: implications for reactions in geologic carbon sequestration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Min, Yujia; Jun, Young-Shin

    2013-01-01

    Organic compounds in deep saline aquifers may change supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2))-induced geochemical processes by attacking specific components in a mineral's crystal structure. Here we investigate effects of acetate and oxalate on alkali feldspar-brine interactions in a simulated geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) environment at 100 atm of CO(2) and 90 °C. We show that both organics enhance the net extent of feldspar's dissolution, with oxalate showing a more prominent effect than acetate. Further, we demonstrate that the increased reactivity of Al-O-Si linkages due to the presence of oxalate results in the promotion of both Al and Si release from feldspars. As a consequence, the degree of Al-Si order may affect the effect of oxalate on feldspar dissolution: a promotion of ~500% in terms of cumulative Si concentration was observed after 75 h of dissolution for sanidine (a highly disordered feldspar) owing to oxalate, while the corresponding increase for albite (a highly ordered feldspar) was ~90%. These results provide new insights into the dependence of feldspar dissolution kinetics on the crystallographic properties of the mineral under GCS conditions. PMID:22978468

  7. Pristine moon rocks - An alkali anorthosite with coarse augite exsolution from plagioclase, a magnesian harzburgite, and other oddities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, P. H.; Jerde, E. A.; Kallemeyn, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on the analyses of 18 samples of pristine rocks obtained from the primarily mare Apollo 12 site and from the primarily highland Apollo 14 site, as well as samples from the nonmare Apollo 15 site. It was found that, while two of anorthosites from Apollo 12 were similar in composition to most other anorthosites from the west-central near region, the texture of an alkali anorthosite featured a long and narrow crystal of augite surrounded by a single crystal of plagioclase, clearly suggesting that the augite formed by exsolution out of the plagioclase. Another Apollo 12 rocklet was an unusual magnesian harzburite, with subequal amounts of enstatite and olivine, traces of Cr-Fe spinel, and FeNi metal, but no plagioclase; the bulk composition was found to be remarkably Ir-rich (53 percent) for a pristine rock, and the texture was also unusual. Apollo 14 samples included several uncommonly Al-rich and REE-poor impact melt breccias.

  8. Ionic conductivity in gem-quality single-crystal alkali feldspar from the Eifel: temperature, orientation and composition dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Maanaoui, Hamid; Wilangowski, Fabian; Maheshwari, Aditya; Wiemhöfer, Hans-Dieter; Abart, Rainer; Stolwijk, Nicolaas A.

    2016-05-01

    We measured the ion conductivity of single-crystal alkali feldspar originating from two different locations in the Eifel/Germany, named Volkesfeld and Rockeskyller sanidine and having potassium site fractions C_K of 0.83 and 0.71, respectively. The dc conductivities resulting from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy over the temperature range of 300-900°C show a weak composition dependence but pronounced differences between the b-direction [perp (010)] and c^{*}-direction [perp (001)] of the monoclinic feldspar structure. Conductivity activation energies obtained from the observed linear Arrhenius plots are close to 1.2 eV in all cases, which is closely similar to the activation energies of the ^{22}Na tracer diffusivity in the same crystals. Taking into account literature data on K tracer diffusion and diffusion correlation effects, the present results point to a predominance of the interstitialcy mechanism over the vacancy mechanism in mass and charge transport on the alkali sublattice in potassium-rich alkali feldspar.

  9. Time-temperature evolution of microtextures and contained fluids in a plutonic alkali feldspar during heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Ian; Fitz Gerald, John D.; Lee, James K. W.; Ivanic, Tim; Golla-Schindler, Ute

    2010-08-01

    Microtextural changes brought about by heating alkali feldspar crystals from the Shap granite, northern England, at atmospheric pressure, have been studied using transmission and scanning electron microscopy. A typical unheated phenocryst from Shap is composed of about 70 vol% of tweed orthoclase with strain-controlled coherent or semicoherent micro- and crypto-perthitic albite lamellae, with maximum lamellar thicknesses <1 μm. Semicoherent lamellae are encircled by nanotunnel loops in two orientations and cut by pull-apart cracks. The average bulk composition of this microtexture is Ab27.6Or71.8An0.6. The remaining 30 vol% is deuterically coarsened, microporous patch and vein perthite composed of incoherent subgrains of oligoclase, albite and irregular microcline. The largest subgrains are ~3 μm in diameter. Heating times in the laboratory were 12 to 6,792 h and T from 300°C into the melting interval at 1,100°C. Most samples were annealed at constant T but two were heated to simulate an 40Ar/39Ar step-heating schedule. Homogenisation of strain-controlled lamellae by Na↔K inter-diffusion was rapid, so that in all run products at >700°C, and after >48 h at 700°C, all such regions were essentially compositionally homogeneous, as indicated by X-ray analyses at fine scale in the transmission electron microscope. Changes in lamellar thickness with time at different T point to an activation energy of ~350 kJmol-1. A lamella which homogenised after 6,800 h at 600°C, therefore, would have required only 0.6 s to do so in the melting interval at 1,100°C. Subgrains in patch perthite homogenised more slowly than coherent lamellae and chemical gradients in patches persisted for >5,000 h at 700°C. Homogenisation T is in agreement with experimentally determined solvi for coherent ordered intergrowths, when a 50-100°C increase in T for An1 is applied. Homogenisation of lamellae appears to proceed in an unexpected manner: two smooth interfaces, microstructurally sharp

  10. Can cathodoluminescence of feldspar be used as provenance indicator?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholonek, Christiane; Augustsson, Carita

    2016-05-01

    We have studied feldspar from crystalline rocks for its textural and spectral cathodoluminescence (CL) characteristics with the aim to reveal their provenance potential. We analyzed ca. 60 rock samples of plutonic, volcanic, metamorphic, and pegmatitic origin from different continents and of 16 Ma to 2 Ga age for their feldspar CL textures and ca. 1200 feldspar crystals from these rocks for their CL color spectra. Among the analyzed rocks, igneous feldspar is most commonly zoned, whereby oscillatory zoning can be confirmed to be typical for volcanic plagioclase. The volcanic plagioclase also less commonly contains twin lamellae that are visible in CL light than crystals from other rock types. Alkali feldspar, particularly from igneous and pegmatitic rocks, was noted to be most affected by alteration features, visible as dark spots, lines and irregular areas. The size of all textural features of up to ca. 150 μm, in combination with possible alteration in both the source area and the sedimentary system, makes the CL textures of feldspar possible to use for qualitative provenance research only. We observed alkali feldspar mostly to luminesce in a bluish color and sometimes in red, and plagioclase in green to yellow. The corresponding CL spectra are dominated by three apparent intensity peaks at 440-520 nm (mainly blue), 540-620 nm (mainly green) and 680-740 nm (red to infrared). A dominance of the peak in the green wavelength interval over the blue one for plagioclase makes CL particularly useful for the differentiation of plagioclase from alkali feldspar. An apparent peak position in red to infrared at < 710 nm for plagioclase mainly is present in mafic rocks. Present-day coastal sand from Peru containing feldspar with the red to infrared peak position mainly exceeding 725 nm for northern Peruvian sand and a larger variety for sand from southern Peru illustrates a discriminative effect of different source areas. We conclude that the provenance application

  11. Coupled alkali feldspar dissolution and secondary mineral precipitation in batch systems: 4. Numerical modeling of kinetic reaction paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen; Lu, Peng; Zheng, Zuoping; Ganor, Jiwchar

    2010-07-01

    This paper explores how dissolution and precipitation reactions are coupled in batch reactor experimental systems at elevated temperatures. This is the fourth paper in our series of "Coupled Alkali Feldspar Dissolution and Secondary Mineral Precipitation in Batch Systems". In our third paper, we demonstrated via speciation-solubility modeling that partial equilibrium between secondary minerals and aqueous solutions was not attained in feldspar hydrolysis batch reactors at 90-300 °C and that a strong coupling between dissolution and precipitation reactions follows as a consequence of the slower precipitation of secondary minerals ( Zhu and Lu, 2009). Here, we develop this concept further by using numerical reaction path models to elucidate how the dissolution and precipitation reactions are coupled. Modeling results show that a quasi-steady state was reached. At the quasi-steady state, dissolution reactions proceeded at rates that are orders of magnitude slower than the rates measured at far from equilibrium. The quasi-steady state is determined by the relative rate constants, and strongly influenced by the function of Gibbs free energy of reaction ( ΔG) in the rate laws. To explore the potential effects of fluid flow rates on the coupling of reactions, we extrapolate a batch system ( Ganor et al., 2007) to open systems and simulated one-dimensional reactive mass transport for oligoclase dissolution and kaolinite precipitation in homogeneous porous media. Different steady states were achieved at different locations along the one-dimensional domain. The time-space distribution and saturation indices (SI) at the steady states were a function of flow rates for a given kinetic model. Regardless of the differences in SI, the ratio between oligoclase dissolution rates and kaolinite precipitation rates remained 1.626, as in the batch system case ( Ganor et al., 2007). Therefore, our simulation results demonstrated coupling among dissolution, precipitation, and flow rates

  12. Principles of Thermal Expansion in Feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovis, Guy; Medford, Aaron; Conlon, Maricate; Tether, Allison; Romanoski, Anthony

    2010-05-01

    Following the recent thermal expansion work of Hovis et al. (1) on AlSi3 feldspars, we have investigated the thermal expansion of plagioclase, Ba-K, and Ca-K feldspar crystalline solutions. X-ray powder diffraction data were collected between room temperature and 925 °C on six natural plagioclase specimens ranging in composition from anorthite to oligoclase, the K-exchanged equivalents of these plagioclase specimens, and five synthetic Ba-K feldspars with compositions ranging from 25 to 99 mol % BaAl2Si2O8. The resulting thermal expansion coefficients (α) for volume have been combined with earlier results for end-member Na- and K-feldspars (2,3). Unlike AlSi3 feldspars, Al2Si2 feldspars, including anorthite and celsian from the present study plus Sr- and Pb-feldspar from other workers (4,5), show essentially constant and very limited thermal expansion, regardless of divalent cation size. In the context of structures where the Lowenstein rule (6) requires Al and Si to alternate among tetrahedra, the proximity of bridging Al-O-Si oxygen ions to divalent neighbors (ranging from 0 to 2) produces short Ca-O (or Ba-O) bonds (7,8) that apparently are the result of local charge-balance requirements (9). Gibbs et al. (10) suggest that short bonds such as these have a partially covalent character. This in turn stiffens the structure. Thus, for feldspar series with coupled substitution the change away from a purely divalent M-site occupant gives the substituting (less strongly bonded) monovalent cations increasingly greater influence on thermal expansion. Overall, then, thermal expansion in the feldspar system is well represented on a plot of α against room-temperature volume, where one sees a quadrilateral bounded by data for (A) AlSi3 feldspars whose expansion behavior is controlled largely by the size of the monovalent alkali-site occupant, (B) Al2Si2 feldspars whose expansion is uniformly limited by partially-covalent bonds between divalent M-site occupants and

  13. Mineralogy of silicate inclusions of the Colomera IIE iron and crystallization of Cr-diopside and alkali feldspar from a partial melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Hsu, Weibiao; Huss, Gary R.

    2003-06-01

    We studied the mineralogy, mineral chemistry, and compositions of 48 interior silicate inclusions and a large K-rich surface inclusion from the Colomera IIE iron meteorite. Common minerals in the interior silicate inclusions are Cr diopside and Na plagioclase (albite). They are often enclosed by or coexist with albitic glasses with excess silica and minor Fe-Mg components. This mineral assemblage is similar to the "andesitic" material found in the Caddo County IAB iron meteorite for which a partial melt origin has been proposed. The fairly uniform compositions of Cr diopside (Ca 44Mg 46Fe 10) and Na plagioclase (Or 2.5Ab 90.0An 7.5 to Or 3.5Ab 96.1An 0.4) in Colomera interior inclusions and the angular boundaries between minerals and metal suggest that diopside and plagioclase partially crystallized under near-equilibrium conditions from a common melt before emplacement into molten metal. The melt-crystal assemblage has been called "crystal mush." The bulk compositions of the individual composite inclusions form an array between the most diopside-rich inclusion and plagioclase. This is consistent only with a simple mechanical mixing relationship, not a magmatic evolution series. We propose a model in which partly molten metal and crystal mush were mixed together by impact on the IIE parent body. Other models involving impact melting of the chondritic source material followed by growth of diopside and plagioclase do not easily explain near equilibrium growth of diopside and Na plagioclase, followed by rapid cooling. In the K-rich surface inclusion, K feldspar, orthopyroxene, and olivine were found together with diopside for the first time. K feldspar (sanidine, Or 92.7Ab 7.2An 0.1 to Or 87.3Ab 11.0An 1.7) occurs in an irregular veinlike region in contact with large orthopyroxene crystals of nearly uniform composition (Ca 1.3Mg 80.5Fe 17.8 to Ca 3.1Mg 78.1Fe 18.9) and intruding into a relict olivine with deformed-oval shape. Silica and subrounded Cr diopside are

  14. A detailed study of ice nucleation by feldspar minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whale, T. F.; Murray, B. J.; Wilson, T. W.; Carpenter, M. A.; Harrison, A.; Holden, M. A.; Vergara Temprado, J.; Morris, J.; O'Sullivan, D.

    2015-12-01

    Immersion mode heterogeneous ice nucleation plays a crucial role in controlling the composition of mixed phase clouds, which contain both supercooled liquid water and ice particles. The amount of ice in mixed phase clouds can affect cloud particle size, lifetime and extent and so affects radiative properties and precipitation. Feldspar minerals are probably the most important minerals for ice nucleation in mixed phase clouds because they nucleate ice more efficiently than other components of atmospheric mineral dust (Atkinson et al. 2013). The feldspar class of minerals is complex, containing numerous chemical compositions, several crystal polymorphs and wide variations in microscopic structure. Here we present the results of a study into ice nucleation by a wide range of different feldspars. We found that, in general, alkali feldspars nucleate ice more efficiently than plagioclase feldspars. However, we also found that particular alkali feldspars nucleate ice relatively inefficiently, suggesting that chemical composition is not the only important factor that dictates the ice nucleation efficiency of feldspar minerals. Ice nucleation by feldspar is described well by the singular model and is probably site specific in nature. The alkali feldspars that do not nucleate ice efficiently possess relatively homogenous structure on the micrometre scale suggesting that the important sites for nucleation are related to surface topography. Ice nucleation active site densities for the majority of tested alkali feldspars are similar to those found by Atkinson et al (2013), meaning that the validity of global aerosol modelling conducted in that study is not affected. Additionally, we have found that ice nucleation by feldspars is strongly influenced, both positively and negatively, by the solute content of droplets. Most other nucleants we have tested are unaffected by solutes. This provides insight into the mechanism of ice nucleation by feldspars and could be of importance

  15. Alkali feldspar dissolution and secondary mineral precipitation in batch systems: 3. Saturation states of product minerals and reaction paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen; Lu, Peng

    2009-06-01

    In order to evaluate the complex interplay between dissolution and precipitation reaction kinetics, we examined the hypothesis of partial equilibria between secondary mineral products and aqueous solutions in feldspar-water systems. Speciation and solubility geochemical modeling was used to compute the saturation indices (SI) for product minerals in batch feldspar dissolution experiments at elevated temperatures and pressures and to trace the reaction paths on activity-activity diagrams. The modeling results demonstrated: (1) the experimental aqueous solutions were supersaturated with respect to product minerals for almost the entire duration of the experiments; (2) the aqueous solution chemistry did not evolve along the phase boundaries but crossed the phase boundaries at oblique angles; and (3) the earlier precipitated product minerals did not dissolve but continued to precipitate even after the solution chemistry had evolved into the stability fields of minerals lower in the paragenesis sequence. These three lines of evidence signify that product mineral precipitation is a slow kinetic process and partial equilibria between aqueous solution and product minerals were not held. In contrast, the experimental evidences are consistent with the hypothesis of strong coupling of mineral dissolution/precipitation kinetics [e.g., Zhu C., Blum A. E. and Veblen D. R. (2004a) Feldspar dissolution rates and clay precipitation in the Navajo aquifer at Black Mesa, Arizona, USA. In Water-Rock Interaction (eds. R. B. Wanty and R. R. I. Seal). A.A. Balkema, Saratoga Springs, New York. pp. 895-899]. In all batch experiments examined, the time of congruent feldspar dissolution was short and supersaturation with respect to the product minerals was reached within a short period of time. The experimental system progressed from a dissolution driven regime to a precipitation limited regime in a short order. The results of this study suggest a complex feedback between dissolution and

  16. Origin of hydrous alkali feldspar-silica intergrowth in spherulites from intra-plate A2-type rhyolites at the Jabal Shama, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surour, Adel A.; El-Nisr, Said A.; Bakhsh, Rami A.

    2016-03-01

    Miocene rhyolites (19.2 ± 0.9 Ma) at the Jabal Shama in western Saudi Arabia represent an example of rift-related silicic volcanism that took place during the formation of the Red Sea. They mostly consist of tuffaceous varieties with distinct flow banding, and pea-sized spherulites, obsidian and perlitized rhyolite tuffs. Although they have the geochemical signature of A2-type rhyolites, these silicic rocks are not typically alkaline but alkali-calcic to calc-alkaline. They developed in a within-plate regime and possibly derived from a recycled mafic subducted slab in depleted sub-continental mantle beneath the western Arabian plate. The Jabal Shama rhyolites are younger in age than their Miocene counterparts in Yemen and Ethiopia. The Jabal Shama spherulites consist of hydrous alkali feldspar-silica radial intergrowths with an occasional brown glass nucleus. Carbonate- and glass-free spherulites give up to 4.45 wt% L.O.I. The hydrous nature of these silicates and the absence of magnetite in the spherulites is a strong indication of oxidizing conditions. The spherulites contain hydrous feldspars with up to ∼6 wt% H2O, and they develop by diffusion and devitrification of glass in the rhyolite tuff at ∼800 °C. Owing to higher undercooling due to supersaturation, the radial hydrous phases within spherulites might grow faster and led to coagulation. The polygonal contacts between spherulites and the ∼120° dihedral angle suggest solid-state modification and recrystallization as the process of devitrification proceeds as low as ∼300 °C. The sum of FeO + MgO is positively correlated with total alkalies along with magnetite oxidation in the matrix to Fe-oxyhydroxides, and to the incorporation of OH- into silicates within the spehrulites themselves. Structural H2O in glass of the Jabal Shama perlite (obsidian) is considerable (∼9-12 wt%) with 3.72-5.6 wt% L.O.I. of the whole-rock. The presence of deleterious silica impurities would lower the ore grade due to

  17. Petrology and geochemistry of alkali gabbronorites from lunar breccia 67975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Odette B.; Flohr, Marta K.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed results of petrologic and compositional studies of three clasts found in thin sections of the Apollo 16 lunar breccia 67975 and of four clasts extracted from the breccia (for instrumental neutron activation analysis) prior to thin sectioning are reported. The alkali gabbronorites of the breccia form two distinct subgroups, magnesian and ferroan. The magnesian gabbronorites are composed of bytownitic plagioclase, hypersthene, augite, a silica mineral, and trace Ba-rich K-feldspar. The ferroan gabbronorites are composed of ternary plagioclase, pigeonite, augite, Ba-rich K-feldspar, and a silica mineral. Trace minerals in both subgroups are apatite, REE-rich whitlockite, and zircon. The magnesian and ferroan alkali gabbronorites appear to have formed by progressive differentiation of the same, or closely related, parent REE-rich magmas.

  18. The Thermal Expansion Of Feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovis, G. L.; Medford, A.; Conlon, M.

    2009-12-01

    Hovis and others (1) investigated the thermal expansion of natural and synthetic AlSi3 feldspars and demonstrated that the coefficient of thermal expansion (α) decreases significantly, and linearly, with increasing room-temperature volume (VRT). In all such feldspars, therefore, chemical expansion limits thermal expansion. The scope of this work now has been broadened to include plagioclase and Ba-K feldspar crystalline solutions. X-ray powder diffraction data have been collected between room temperature and 925 °C on six plagioclase specimens ranging in composition from anorthite to oligoclase. When combined with thermal expansion data for albite (2,3,4) a steep linear trend of α as a function of VRT emerges, reflecting how small changes in composition dramatically affect expansion behavior. The thermal expansion data for five synthetic Ba-K feldspars ranging in composition from 20 to 100 mole percent celsian, combined with data for pure K-feldspar (3,4), show α-VRT relationships similar in nature to the plagioclase series, but with a slope and intercept different from the latter. Taken as a group all Al2Si2 feldspars, including anorthite and celsian from the present study along with Sr- (5) and Pb-feldspar (6) from other workers, show very limited thermal expansion that, unlike AlSi3 feldspars, has little dependence on the divalent-ion (or M-) site occupant. This apparently is due to the necessitated alternation of Al and Si in the tetrahedral sites of these minerals (7), which in turn locks the tetrahedral framework and makes the M-site occupant nearly irrelevant to expansion behavior. Indeed, in feldspar series with coupled chemical substitution it is the change away from a 1:1 Al:Si ratio that gives feldspars greater freedom to expand. Overall, the relationships among α, chemical composition, and room-temperature volume provide useful predictive tools for estimating feldspar thermal expansion and give insight into the controls of expansion behavior in

  19. Calorimetric investigation of the excess entropy of mixing in analbite-sanidine solid solutions: lack of evidence for Na,K short- range order and implications for two-feldspar thermometry.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haselton, H.T., Jr.; Hovis, G.L.; Hemingway, B.S.; Robie, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Heat capacities (5-380 K) have been measured by adiabatic calorimetry for five highly disordered alkali feldspars (Ab99Or1, Ab85Or15, Ab55Or45, Ab25Or75 and Ab1Or99). The thermodynamic and mineralogical implications of the results are discussed. The new data are also combined with recent data for plagioclases in order to derive a revised expression for the two-feldspar thermometer. T calculated from the revised expression tend to be higher than previous calculations.-J.A.Z.

  20. Systematic variations of argon diffusion in feldspars and implications for thermochronometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cassata, William S.; Renne, Paul R.

    2013-03-07

    Coupled information about the time-dependent production and temperature-dependent diffusion of radiogenic argon in feldspars can be used to constrain the thermal evolution attending a host of Earth and planetary processes. To better assess the accuracy of thermal models, an understanding of the mechanisms and pathways by which argon diffuses in feldspars is desirable. Here we present step-heating Ar diffusion experiments conducted on feldspars with diverse compositions, structural states, and microstructural characteristics. The experiments reveal systematic variations in diffusive behavior that appear closely related to these variables, with apparent closure temperatures for 0.1–1 mm grains of ~200–400 °C (assuming a 10more » °C/Ma cooling rate). Given such variability, there is no broadly applicable set of diffusion parameters that can be utilized in feldspar thermal modeling; sample-specific data are required. Diffusion experiments conducted on oriented cleavage flakes do not reveal directionally-dependent diffusive anisotropy to within the resolution limits of our approach (approximately a factor of 2). Additional experiments aimed at constraining the physical significance of the diffusion domain are presented and indicate that unaltered feldspar crystals with or without coherent exsolution lamellae diffuse at the grain-scale, whereas feldspars containing hydrothermal alteration and/or incoherent sub-grain intergrowths do not. Arrhenius plots for argon diffusion in plagioclase and alkali feldspars appear to reflect a confluence of intrinsic diffusion kinetics and structural transitions that occur during incremental heating experiments. These structural transitions, along with sub-grain domain size variations, cause deviations from linearity (i.e., upward and downward curvature) on Arrhenius plots. An atomistic model for Arrhenius behavior is proposed that incorporates the variable lattice deformations of different feldspars in response to heating and

  1. Systematic variations of argon diffusion in feldspars and implications for thermochronometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cassata, William S.; Renne, Paul R.

    2013-03-07

    Coupled information about the time-dependent production and temperature-dependent diffusion of radiogenic argon in feldspars can be used to constrain the thermal evolution attending a host of Earth and planetary processes. To better assess the accuracy of thermal models, an understanding of the mechanisms and pathways by which argon diffuses in feldspars is desirable. Here we present step-heating Ar diffusion experiments conducted on feldspars with diverse compositions, structural states, and microstructural characteristics. The experiments reveal systematic variations in diffusive behavior that appear closely related to these variables, with apparent closure temperatures for 0.1–1 mm grains of ~200–400 °C (assuming a 10 °C/Ma cooling rate). Given such variability, there is no broadly applicable set of diffusion parameters that can be utilized in feldspar thermal modeling; sample-specific data are required. Diffusion experiments conducted on oriented cleavage flakes do not reveal directionally-dependent diffusive anisotropy to within the resolution limits of our approach (approximately a factor of 2). Additional experiments aimed at constraining the physical significance of the diffusion domain are presented and indicate that unaltered feldspar crystals with or without coherent exsolution lamellae diffuse at the grain-scale, whereas feldspars containing hydrothermal alteration and/or incoherent sub-grain intergrowths do not. Arrhenius plots for argon diffusion in plagioclase and alkali feldspars appear to reflect a confluence of intrinsic diffusion kinetics and structural transitions that occur during incremental heating experiments. These structural transitions, along with sub-grain domain size variations, cause deviations from linearity (i.e., upward and downward curvature) on Arrhenius plots. An atomistic model for Arrhenius behavior is proposed that incorporates the variable lattice deformations of different feldspars in response to heating and

  2. An FTIR Calibration for Structural Hydrogen in Feldspars Using 1H MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E. A.; Rossman, G. R.

    2002-05-01

    -200 ppm H2O by weight. The microclines contain structural H2O molecules (1000-1400 ppm H2O) and sanidine contains structural OH (170 ppm H2O). Plots of the total integrated mid-IR absorbance and total mid-IR peak height vs. concentration of structural H in plagioclase and alkali feldspars produce linear trends. Therefore, it is sufficient to use one absorption coefficient for both types of structural H (OH and H2O) in all feldspar compositions. The integral absorption coefficient for total mid-IR peak area is 16 ppm-1ṡcm-2 or 114000 Lṡ(mol H2O)-1ṡcm-2. The absorption coefficient for total mid-IR peak height is 0.06 ppm-1ṡcm-1 or 418 Lṡ(mol H2O) -1ṡcm-1. Since most of the mid-IR band intensity occurs with E || a in plagioclase, it may be possible to determine H concentration in plagioclase using a single polarized spectrum with E || a, facilitating the measurement of H concentration in fine-grained or twinned natural feldspars.

  3. Argon Diffusion in Shocked Pyroxene, Feldspar, and Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, J.; Isachsen, C. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Swindle, T.

    2010-12-01

    Background: The diffusion rate of argon (Ar) in unshocked feldspar has been well studied, but studies on pyroxene and olivine are limited or non-existent. Likewise, the effects of shock on these mineral groups is also limited or non-existent. Understanding how shock affects these mineral groups is important for determining the thermal history of shocked meteorites and collisional impact craters. We have analyzed the Ar diffusion rate of an albitite and a pyroxenite at various experimental shock pressures up to ~60GPa, unshocked high-Ca pyroxene, and an olivine mineral separate from the Springwater meteorite. A previous study of shocked feldspar has shown that Ar diffusion in plagioclase (An67) is unaffected by experimental shock [1]. Re-reduction of data from another study [2] suggests naturally shocked K-rich feldspar is affected, though experimentally shocked oligoclase feldspar (An10-30) is not affected. However, previous shock experiments on feldspar were performed with low temperature resolution and only a single extraction at each temperature. This makes determining the diffusion parameters difficult because the presence of multiple grain sizes can compromise the data. By performing our experiments with a higher temperature resolution and with two extractions at each temperature, we can attain higher quality and more reliable data. The effects of shock on pyroxene and olivine have never been studied. Results: We have found that experimental shock undoubtedly raises the diffusivity of albite (Ab97), and lowers the activation energy required for diffusion. Comparison with previous data indicates that the Ca content may be controlling the response to shock. Pyroxene seems to be somewhat variable regardless of shock pressure, even within the same sample. Shock may have an effect on the diffusion rate of pyroxene, but given the variability it is difficult to delineate. The range of pyroxene diffusion rates is similar to previous studies. Olivine is found to have a

  4. Spectral emissivity measurements of Mercury's surface indicate Mg- and Ca-rich mineralogy, K-spar, Na-rich plagioclase, rutile, with possible perovskite, and garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, A. L.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Kozlowski, R. W. H.; Helbert, J.; Maturilli, A.; Warell, J. B.; Hora, J. L.

    2009-03-01

    Mid-infrared 2-D spectroscopic measurements from 8.0 to 12.7 μm of Mercury were taken using Boston University's Mid-Infrared Spectrometer and Imager (MIRSI) mounted on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, 7-11 April 2006. Measurements reported here cover radar bright region C, a dark plains region west of Caloris Basin, and the interior of Caloris Basin. By use of spectral deconvolution with a large spectral library composed of many mineral compositions and grain size separates, we fitted, or "unmixed", the Mercury spectra. We find mineral suites composed of magnesium-rich orthopyroxene and olivine, Ca-, Mg-, Na-rich clinopyroxene, potassium feldspar, and Na-bearing plagioclase feldspar. Both Ca- and Mg-rich garnet (pyrope and grossular, respectively) are apparently present in small amounts. Opaque minerals are required for spectral matching, with rutile (TiO 2) repeatedly providing the "best fit". However, in the case of the radar bright region C, perovskite also contributed to a very good fit. Caloris Basin infill is rich in both potassium feldspar and Na-rich plagioclase. There is little or no olivine in the Caloris interior smooth plains. Together with the high alkali content, this indicates that resurfacing magmas were low to intermediate in SiO 2. Data suggest the dark plains exterior to Caloris are highly differentiated low-iron basaltic magmas resulting in material that might be classified as oligoclase basalts.

  5. Differential rates of feldspar weathering in granitic regoliths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Bullen, T.D.; Schulz, M.S.; Blum, A.E.; Huntington, T.G.; Peters, N.E.

    2001-01-01

    Differential rates of plagioclase and K-feldspar weathering commonly observed in bedrock and soil environments are examined in terms of chemical kinetic and solubility controls and hydrologic permeability. For the Panola regolith, in the Georgia Piedmont Province of southeastern United States, petrographic observations, coupled with elemental balances and 87Sr/86Sr ratios, indicate that plagioclase is being converted to kaolinite at depths > 6 m in the granitic bedrock. K-feldspar remains pristine in the bedrock but subsequently weathers to kaolinite at the overlying saprolite. In contrast, both plagioclase and K-feldspar remain stable in granitic bedrocks elsewhere in Piedmont Province, such as Davis Run, Virginia, where feldspars weather concurrently in an overlying thick saprolite sequence. Kinetic rate constants, mineral surface areas, and secondary hydraulic conductivities are fitted to feldspar losses with depth in the Panola and Davis Run regoliths using a time-depth computer spreadsheet model. The primary hydraulic conductivities, describing the rates of meteoric water penetration into the pristine granites, are assumed to be equal to the propagation rates of weathering fronts, which, based on cosmogenic isotope dating, are 7 m/106 yr for the Panola regolith and 4 m/106 yr for the Davis Run regolith. Best fits in the calculations indicate that the kinetic rate constants for plagioclase in both regoliths are factors of two to three times faster than K-feldspar, which is in agreement with experimental findings. However, the range for plagioclase and K-feldspar rates (kr = 1.5 x 10-17 to 2.8 x 10-16 mol m-2 s-1) is three to four orders of magnitude lower than for that for experimental feldspar dissolution rates and are among the slowest yet recorded for natural feldspar weathering. Such slow rates are attributed to the relatively old geomorphic ages of the Panola and Davis Run regoliths, implying that mineral surface reactivity decreases significantly with

  6. Alkali-calcic and alkaline post-orogenic (PO) granite magmatism: petrologic constraints and geodynamic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Bernard; Azzouni-Sekkal, Abla; Bussy, François; Ferrag, Sandrine

    1998-12-01

    The end of an orogenic Wilson cycle corresponds to amalgamation of terranes into a Pangaea and is marked by widespread magmatism dominated by granitoids. The post-collision event starts with magmatic processes still influenced by subducted crustal materials. The dominantly calc-alkaline suites show a shift from normal to high-K to very high-K associations. Source regions are composed of depleted and later enriched orogenic subcontinental lithospheric mantle, affected by dehydration melting and generating more and more K- and LILE-rich magmas. In the vicinity of intra-crustal magma chambers, anatexis by incongruent melting of hydrous minerals may generate peraluminous granitoids bearing mafic enclaves. The post-collision event ends with emplacement of bimodal post-orogenic (PO) suites along transcurrent fault zones. Two suites are defined, (i) the alkali-calcic monzonite-monzogranite-syenogranite-alkali feldspar granite association characterised by [biotite+plagioclase] fractionation and moderate [LILE+HFSE] enrichments and (ii) the alkaline monzonite-syenite-alkali feldspar granite association characterised by [amphibole+alkali feldspar] fractionation and displaying two evolutionary trends, one peralkaline with sodic mafic mineralogy and higher enrichments in HFSE than in LILE, and the other aluminous biotite-bearing marked by HFSE depletion relative to LILE due to accessory mineral precipitation. Alkali-calcic and alkaline suites differ essentially in the amounts of water present within intra-crustal magma chambers, promoting crystallisation of various mineral assemblages. The ultimate enriched and not depleted mantle source is identical for the two PO suites. The more primitive LILE and HFSE-rich source rapidly replaces the older orogenic mantle source during lithosphere delamination and becomes progressively the thermal boundary layer of the new lithosphere. Present rock compositions are a mixture of major mantle contribution and various crustal components

  7. Residence times of alkali feldspar phenocrysts from magma feeding the Agnano-Monte Spina Eruption (4.7 ka), Campi Flegrei caldera (Napoli, southern Italy) based on Ba-zonation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iovine, Raffaella Silvia; Wörner, Gerhard; Carmine Mazzeo, Fabio; Arienzo, Ilenia; Fedele, Lorenzo; Civetta, Lucia; D'Antonio, Massimo; Orsi, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Timescales governing the development of crustal magma reservoirs are a key for understanding magmatic processes such as ascent, storage and mixing event. An estimate of these timescales can provide important constraints for volcanic hazard assessment of active volcanoes. We studied the Agnano-Monte Spina eruption (A-MS; 4.7 ka; VEI = 4; 0.85 km3 D.R.E. of magma erupted) of the Campi Flegrei caldera, one of the most dangerous volcanic areas on Earth. The A-MS eruption has been fed by magmas varying from more to less evolved trachyte whose variable 87Sr/86Sr and trace elements features suggest magma mixing between two end-members. Ba zonation profiles of alkali feldspar phenocrysts have been determined through combined energy-dispersive and wavelength-dispersive electron microprobe analyses (EDS-WDS-EMPA). We focused on distinct compositional breaks near the rim of the crystals that likely represent the last mixing event prior to eruption. We always chose the steepest gradients close to the crystal rims, taking into account that any effects related to cutting angles or crystal orientation should give longer apparent diffusion times. Two different approaches were undertaken: (1) a quantitative Ba compositional profiles were measured by point analyses along a short transect crossing growth discontinuities and (2) grey-scale profiles were taken parallel to the acquired point profiles. Assuming that Ba dominates the backscattered electron intensities in sanidines, greyscale gradients can be used as a diffusive tracer. BSE images were processed using the ImageJ® software, in order to extract a numerical greyscale profile. In both cases, each profile was interpolated through a non-linear Boltzmann fit curve with the Mathematica® software. A few traverses done at angles smaller than 90° to the compositional boundary interface were corrected by multiplying the distance values by the sinus of the traverse angle relative to the vertical on the interface. Our preliminary

  8. Partial melting and fractionation in the Mesa Chivato alkali basalt-trachyte series, Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, C. M.; Schmidt, M. E.; Crumpler, L. S.; Wolff, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Mesa Chivato comprises a series of alkaline cones, flows, and domes within the Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF) in northwest New Mexico. Compositions range from alkali basalt to trachyte. Intermediate magmas are less well represented than mafic and felsic rocks, but benmoreites and transitional benmoreite-trachytes provide a window into the differentiation processes. Major element, trace element, and isotopic data suggest that petrogenesis of benmoreite proceeded by fractional crystallization of mafic liquids and magma mixing with partially melted mafic rocks. Major element mass balance models permit the derivation of transitional benmoreite/trachyte from the benmoreite by 20-25% crystallization of microphenocryst phases (olivine, plagioclase, Ti-magnetite, and apatite) and further fractionation to trachyte by 10-15% crystallization of olivine, plagioclase and alkali feldspar, Fe-Ti oxide, and apatite. These models are supported by SiO2-Sr and -Ba systematics. However, the hawaiite to benmoreite gap cannot be crossed by fractional crystallization alone. While major element models permit the mafic lavas to yield the benmoreite, they require extensive fractionation of clinopyroxene and plagioclase - this is unsupported by petrography (clinopyroxene phenocrysts are rare in the mafic rocks and lacking in the intermediate rocks) and cannot explain the benmoreite's very high Sr contents (>1800 ppm), which would have been depleted by plagioclase fractionation. From LA-ICPMS analysis of plagioclase: 87Sr/86Sr of early alkali basalt (0.70285-0.70300) and late hawaiite (0.70406-0.70421) bracket the 87Sr/86Sr of the benmoreite (0.70361-0.70406). Thus, either could represent the fractionated liquid parental to the benmoreite and the other the partially melted source.

  9. Thermal Emission Spectrometer Mosaics of Impact Craters: Progress on Shocked Plagioclase Detections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Staid, M. I.; Titus, T. N.; Gaddis, L.

    2003-01-01

    High shock pressures disorder the mineral lattice of plagioclase feldspars and cause weakening and shifts in thermal infrared absorption bands related to an increase in diaplectic glass content, particularly at shock pressures above 20-25 GPa [1- 9]. We are continuing our investigation of spectral deconvolutions of TES mosaics and mosaics using standard TES orbits for eight impact crater areas. Using a combination of mineral laboratory spectra and spectra of experimentally shocked bytownite feldspars [5] to deconvolve the TES spectra, we find that locations of shocked feldspar detections are not restricted to ejecta near large craters.

  10. Plagioclase-Hosted Magnetite Inclusions From the Bushveld Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Scott, G. R.; Renne, P. R.; Wenk, H.

    2004-12-01

    Gabbros from the Main Zone of the 2.064 Ga Bushveld Complex have long been known to possess unusually stable magnetizations due to the presence of high coercivity, exsolved magnetite inclusions in plagioclase and clinopyroxene. The paleomagnetic pole for these rocks has been used to anchor apparent polar wander paths for the Kaapval craton during the Early-Mid Proterozoic. To better understand the rock magnetic properties of silicate-hosted magnetite inclusions, oriented paleomagnetic samples of gabbro were collected from quarries near Belfast and Rustenberg, South Africa, sampling the eastern and western limbs of the Complex, respectively. Plagioclase composition at both sites ranges from An55 (rims) to An65 (cores) based on optical and electron microprobe data. Four kinds of inclusions are present within the plagioclase: elongate magnetite needles, nanometer-scale magnetite particles (responsible for the "cloudy" appearance of some crystals), translucent brown hematite/ilmenite platelets, and colorless euhedral inclusions of pyroxene and/or feldspar. Magnetite inclusions are most abundant at the cores of the plagioclase crystals. Orientations of the needles and the platelets are crystallographically controlled by the silicate host. Although the elongation direction of the magnetite inclusions can occur in any of five possible orientations, only two or three of these directions dominates each plagioclase crystal. Alternating field demagnetization of bulk samples (NRM = 1.5 x 101 A m-1) shows univectorial remanence with average median destructive fields (MDF) of 115 mT (Belfast) and 90 mT (Rustenberg). AF demagnetization of single plagioclase crystals (NRM = 100 A m-1) also shows single component remanence with average MDFs >150 mT. The NRM coercivity spectra of single plagioclase crystals are indistinguishable from that of the bulk samples. When normalized to their abundance in bulk samples the magnetite-bearing plagioclase fully accounts for the NRM of Bushveld

  11. Alkali basalts and enclosed ultramafic xenoliths near Ushuaia, Tierra Del Fuego, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Rogelio Daniel

    2016-01-01

    At the southernmost part of Tierra del Fuego a few outcrops and erratic boulders of alkali basaltic rocks with ultramafic enclaves have been studied. Alkali basalt plugs or pipes hitherto identified are scarce, and host rocks are constituted by slates that belong to Mesozoic deposition. The petrography, texture and composition of the basalt and xenoliths were investigated by petrographic microscope and electron microprobe analysis. Xenocrysts of amphibole and alkali feldspar, phenocrysts of nepheline, olivine, spinel, phlogopite and Fe-Ti minerals (10 %) and a diversity of xenoliths, mainly lherzolitic, pyroxenite and wehrlitic nodules (15 %), but also from metamorphic rocks provenance, are contained in the basalt groundmass (75 %). This finer-grained material is made up of laths or needles of plagioclase, pyroxene, opaque minerals, apatite and glass, with intersertal, hyalopilitic and pilotaxitic. Locally, rock has an even granoblastic texture. Former amygdules are filled by analcite, zeolites, sodalite and calcite. The normative classification, based on nepheline content, conclude that this rock is an alkali basalt. The chemical classification, considering immobile elements as Zr/TiO2 versus Nb/Y indicate an alkali basalt too and plots over the TAS diagram fall in the foidite (Na-rich or nephelinite) and basanite fields. The REE patterns are fractionated (La/Yb primitive mantle normalized is approximately 30). The K-Ar isotopic technique on individual macrocrysts gave ages of 146 ± 5 Ma (amphibole) and 127 ± 4 Ma (alkali feldspar); and K-Ar whole rock datum reported 8.3 ± 0.3 Ma. Nevertheless, fertile samples show geochemical features typical of deep derived material thus, based on the position in the actual tectonic setting, indicate that the basalt is older than its isotopic age. PMID:27610313

  12. Oriented feldspar-feldspathoid intergrowths in rocks of the Khibiny massif: genetic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageeva, Olga A.; Abart, Rainer; Habler, Gerlinde; Ye. Borutzky, Boris; Trubkin, Nikolay V.

    2012-09-01

    Poikilitic megacrysts of alkali feldspar with abundant inclusions of feldspar-nepheline and feldspar-kalsilite micrographic or lamellar intergrowths are characteristic for the rischorrites of the Khibiny massif. Strict crystallographic orientation relations were identified among the intergrowth phases based on optical investigation using a 4-axes universal stage and crystal orientation imaging using electron back scatter diffraction. The most frequently observed orientation relation is the parallel orientation of the kalsilite and nepheline [001] directions with the [010] direction of the alkali feldspar host and concomitant coincidence of the feldspathoid [100] directions with the [100]-, [101]- and [001] directions of the alkali feldspar. The presence of relic nepheline within intergrowth domains and the successive replacement of precursor nepheline by alkali feldspar and associated formation of feldspar-feldspathoid intergrowth suggest development of the rischorrites from feldspar urtites, in which nepheline is the dominant felsic phase. The metasomatic nature of the transformation of urtites to rischorrites is identified from massive introduction of potassium and silica and removal of sodium. Metasomatism occurred at high temperature; the gigantic apatite deposits of the Khibiny massif seem to be related to this metasomatic event.

  13. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth’s crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts. Here we investigated in closer detail the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. Finally, we give a potential explanation of this effect, finding alkali-metal ions having different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar surfaces. PMID:25584435

  14. Plagioclase sub-species in Chinese loess deposits: Implications for dust source migration and past climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tong; Liu, Lianwen; Chen, Yang; Sheng, Xuefen; Ji, Junfeng

    2016-01-01

    Plagioclase mineral sub-species in the Lingtai Section in central Chinese Loess Plateau are examined using Mineral Liberation Analyzer techniques, showing that loess and paleosol samples exhibit similar patterns in terms of plagioclase feldspar sub-species content. This suggests that both loess and paleosol units have preserved their primary Ca-bearing plagioclase compositions of loess source regions. Weighted average CaO (%) in Ca-bearing plagioclase lies within a narrow range and is equivalent to the average plagioclase composition for upper continental crust. This fact supports the hypothesis that Chinese loess deposits are the result of a thorough mixing of dust sources. The sum of Ca-bearing plagioclase content exhibits a general increasing trend superimposed by glacial-interglacial oscillations. In combination with observed plagioclase data in the deserts, the variations of Ca-bearing plagioclase minerals might be used as a proxy for dust source migration and climate changes in the loess source regions. Furthermore, linear relationship between lithogenic magnetic susceptibility (MS) component input and contents of Ca-bearing plagioclase in loess units revises a MS proxy for reconstructing paleo-monsoon precipitation history. The revised MS and plagioclase sub-species records help in understanding the mechanism of glaciation across northern Tibetan Plateau.

  15. The destruction of quartz, amorphous silica minerals, and feldspars in model experiments and in soils: Possible mechanisms, rates, and diagnostics (the analysis of literature)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, T. A.

    2013-01-01

    The dissolution of quartz and amorphous SiO2 proceeds via the adsorption of water molecules on the surface of these minerals with the further formation of four silanol groups around the silicon atom and the detachment of the molecules of orthosilicic acid from the surface. The rates of quartz dissolution at pH 7 and 3 constitute 10-15.72 and 10-16.12 mol/m2 s, respectively. They increase by three orders of magnitude upon the rise in pH from 7 to 10; they also increase in the solutions of strong electrolytes and in the presence of the anions of polybasic organic acids. The dissolution of feldspars begins from the release of alkali metals and calcium from the surface of crystal lattices of these minerals into the solution in the course of the cation exchange reaction. This is a fast process, and it does not control the rate of the feldspar dissolution that depends on the concentrations of protonated (in the acid medium) and deprotonated (in the alkaline medium) complexes with participation of the surface Si-O-Si and Al-O-Si groups of the mineral lattices. The rate of dissolution of K-Na feldspars decreases from n × 10-11 to n × 10-12 mol/m2 s upon the rise in pH from 3 to 5; it also increases in the plagioclase series with an increase in the portion of anorthite molecules and in the presence of the anions of polybasic organic acids in the solution. The rate of dissolution of feldspars in the model experiments is by 1-3 orders of magnitude higher than that obtained by different methods for native soils. This may be related to the adequacy of determination of the specific surface and its changes with time in native soils.

  16. Comparative Planetary Mineralogy: Basaltic Plagioclase from Earth, Moon, Mars and 4 Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karner, J. M.; Papike, J. J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2003-01-01

    Major, minor and trace element analysis of silicates has allowed for the study of planetary basalts in a comparative planetary mineralogy context. We continue this initiative by exploring the chemistry of plagioclase feldspar in basalts from the Earth, Moon, Mars and 4 Vesta. This paper presents new data on plagioclase from six terrestrial basalt suites including Keweenawan, Island Arc, Hawaiian, Columbia Plateau, Taos Plateau, and Ocean Floor; six lunar basalt suites including Apollo 11 Low K, Apollo 12 Ilmenite, Apollo 12 Olivine, Apollo 12 Pigeonite, Apollo 15 Olivine, and Apollo 15 Pigeonite; two basaltic martian meteorites, Shergotty and QUE 94201; and one unequilibrated eucrite, Pasamonte.

  17. Plagioclase flotation and lunar crust formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Hays, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    Anorthitic plagioclase floats in liquids parental to the lunar highlands crust. The plagioclase enrichment that is characteristic of lunar highlands rocks can be the result of plagioclase flotation. Such rocks would form a gravitationally stable upper crust on their parental magma.

  18. The origin of felsic microgranitoid enclaves: Insights from plagioclase crystal size distributions and thermodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Adriana; Pereira, Giovanna de Souza; Janasi, Valdecir de Assis; Higgins, Michael; Polo, Liza Angelica; Juriaans, Orlando Stanley; Ribeiro, Bruno Vieira

    2015-12-01

    Magma mixing is widely recognized in contemporary petrology as one of the primary igneous processes. Microgranitoid enclaves (MEs) are considered to be remnants of such mixing processes, and the term has a well-established genetic implication. However, microgranitoid enclaves span a wide range of compositions, and felsic varieties are also frequently reported. Nd-Sr isotope and textural data from felsic microgranitoid enclaves (FMEs), mafic microgranitoid enclaves (MMEs) and host granites from the Salto pluton, Itu Granitic Province, show that the cm-sized MMEs are dioritic, have medium-grained igneous textures and xenocrysts of alkali feldspar and quartz. The FMEs are cm- to meter-sized, have spheric shapes, show corrugated contacts with the host granites, and have resorbed feldspars and deformed quartz crystals interpreted as xenocrysts set in a fine-grained groundmass. Compared to the host granites, both MME and FME samples have increased FeO, MgO, TiO2, P2O5 and Zr contents, but their Sr and Nd isotope signatures are identical: FME 87Sr/86Sri = 0.7088-0.7063, εNdi = - 10.0 to - 10.2; MME 87Sr/86Sri = 0.7070, εNdi = - 10.5; host granite 87Sr/86Sri 0.7056-0.7060, εNdi = - 10.2 to - 10.3. These indicate that the enclaves derive from a similar source, although the melts from which they formed were probably hotter and chemically more primitive than their host granites. Crystal size distributions (CSDs) of plagioclase in samples drilled from rinds and cores of three FMEs show that the rind samples are systematically finer-grained than the samples from the cores, which indicates that the FMEs cooled inwards and contradict interpretations that the FMEs are autoliths. Thermal modeling suggests that a slightly more primitive, hotter magma would be thermally equilibrated with an evolved resident melt within weeks after mixing/mingling. Upon thermal equilibrium, the FMEs would have an increased crystal cargo, and the resulting touching framework would impart a solid

  19. Crystallography of some lunar plagioclases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, D.B.; Appleman, D.E.; Huebner, J.S.; Clark, J.R.

    1970-01-01

    Crystals of calcic bytownite from type B rocks have space group U with c ??? 14 angstroms. Bytownite crystals from type A rocks are more sodic and have space group C1, c ??? 7 angstroms. Cell parameters of eight bulk feldspar separates from crystalline rocks indicate that the range of angle gamma is about 23 times the standard error of measurement, and its value might be useful for estimation of composition. Cell parameters of seven ilmenites are close to those of pure FeTiO3.

  20. Formation of halloysite from feldspar: Low temperature, artificial weathering versus natural weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parham, W.E.

    1969-01-01

    Weathering products formed on surfaces of both potassium and plagioclase feldspar (An70), which were continuously leached in a Soxhlet extraction apparatus for 140 days with 7.21 of distilled water per day at a temperature of approximately 78 ??C, are morphologically identical to natural products developed on potassium feldspars weathered under conditions of good drainage in the humid tropics. The new products, which first appear as tiny bumps on the feldspar surface, start to develop mainly at exposed edges but also at apparently random sites on flat cleavage surfaces. As weathering continues, the bumps grow outward from the feldspar surface to form tapered projections, which then develop into wide-based thin films or sheets. The thin sheets of many projections merge laterally to form one continuous flame-shaped sheet. The sheets formed on potassium feldspars may then roll to form tubes that are inclined at a high angle to the feldspar surface. Etch pits of triangular outline on the artificially weathered potassium feldspars serve as sites for development of continuous, non-rolled, hollow tubes. It is inferred from its morphology that this weathering product is halloysite or its primitive form. The product of naturally weathered potassium feldspars is halloysite . 4H2O. The flame-shaped films or sheets formed on artificially weathered plagioclase feldspar do not develop into hollow tubes, but instead give rise to a platy mineral that is most probably boehmite. These plates form within the flame-shaped films, and with continued weathering are released as the film deteriorates. There is no indication from this experiment that platy pseudohexagonal kaolinite forms from any of these minerals under the initial stage of weathering. ?? 1969.

  1. Feldspars Detected by ChemCam in Gale Crater with Implications for Future Martian Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasda, P. J.; Carlson, E.; Wiens, R. C.; Bridges, J.; Sautter, V.; Cousin, A.; Maurice, S.; Gasnault, O.; Clegg, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Feldspar is a common igneous mineral that can shed light on parent magma temperatures, pressures, and compositions. During the first 801 sols of the NASA Mars Science Laboratory mission, we have detected 125 possible feldspar grains using the ChemCam LIBS instrument. We analyzed spectra from successive laser shots at the same location and approximate whole rock compositions for each target. Feldspar-containing targets range from tephrite-basanite to trachyandesite. The most common feldspar type is andesine; no targets are >An60. Over 30% are anorthoclase, and ~10% have potassium contents up to Or60. Individual shot measurements in a single spot suggest some feldspars are zoned. Most of these rocks are either float or incorporated into conglomerates, and thus we do not know their provenance. Many of the samples may originate from the Gale crater walls, indicative of Southern Highland ancient crust. Some may also be flung from further away (e.g., emplaced by impact processes). Hence, these rocks may give us a general clue to the variety of evolved igneous materials on Mars. The ubiquity of feldspars at Gale suggests that they have been significantly underestimated for the Southern Highlands, if not for the whole of Mars. For example, significant abundance of andesitic feldspars in both the southern highland and northern lowlands of Mars would imply that Martian volcanism has produced a greater extent of evolved igneous materials to a greater degree than previously thought. Remote sensing instruments are insensitive to plagioclase due to dust cover, lack of exposures, or low feldspar FeO content. However, the Mars 2020 rover will be equipped with 3 new instruments, the arm-mounted SHERLOC Raman, PIXL μXRF, and the mast-mounted SuperCam combined Raman-LIBS instruments, which should help characterize Martian feldspars. Additionally, the SuperCam instrument plans to include three feldspars in its suite of 20+ onboard standards to improve feldspar chemical analysis.

  2. Melt segregation in plagioclase-poikilitic mesosiderites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewins, R. H.; Harriott, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Budalan and Mincy mesosiderites contain a poikilitic-plagioclase matrix with orthopyroxene chadacrysts and interstitial-subophitic inverted pigeonite. Orthopyroxene chadacrysts in both mesosiderites are uniformly more aluminous than orthopyroxene clasts, suggesting that they were not derived from clasts by metamorphism. Interstitial inverted pigeonite is more ferroan than adjacent orthopyroxene in the matrix, consistent with the crystallization of a melt with the sequence orthopyroxene followed by pigeonite. The magnesium chadcrysts in Mincy could not have formed from a melt in equilibrium with the clasts but could have crystallized from impact melt. The most Mg chadacrysts are enclosed in large reversely zoned plagioclase crystals as a result of the undercooling in melt-lacking plagioclase clasts and associated nuclei. Mincy contains both plagioclase-poor and plagioclase-rich regions, explained by a separation of silicate melt into pools. Reckling Peak A80258, a plagioclase-poikilitic mesosiderite with a very high chadacryst/plagioclase ratio, resembles Mincy material from which melt has been extracted. It is suggested that the origin of the plagioclase-poikilitic mesosiderites is impact melting of a metal-silicate mixture.

  3. Chemical Zoning of Feldspars in Lunar Granitoids: Implications for the Origins of Lunar Silicic Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, R. D; Simon, J. I.; Alexander, C.M. O'D.; Wang, J.; Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z..

    2014-01-01

    Fine-scale chemical and textural measurements of alkali and plagioclase feldspars in the Apollo granitoids (ex. Fig. 1) can be used to address their petrologic origin(s). Recent findings suggest that these granitoids may hold clues of global importance, rather than of only local significance for small-scale fractionation. Observations of morphological features that resemble silicic domes on the unsampled portion of the Moon suggest that local, sizable net-works of high-silica melt (>65 wt % SiO2) were present during crust-formation. Remote sensing data from these regions suggest high concentrations of Si and heat-producing elements (K, U, and Th). To help under-stand the role of high-silica melts in the chemical differentiation of the Moon, three questions must be answered: (1) when were these magmas generated?, (2) what was the source material?, and (3) were these magmas produced from internal differentiation. or impact melting and crystallization? Here we focus on #3. It is difficult to produce high-silica melts solely by fractional crystallization. Partial melting of preexisting crust may therefore also have been important and pos-sibly the primary mechanism that produced the silicic magmas on the Moon. Experimental studies demonstrate that partial melting of gabbroic rock under mildly hydrated conditions can produce high-silica compositions and it has been suggested by that partial melting by basaltic underplating is the mechanism by which high-silica melts were produced on the Moon. TEM and SIMS analyses, coordinated with isotopic dating and tracer studies, can help test whether the minerals in the Apollo granitoids formed in a plutonic setting or were the result of impact-induced partial melting. We analyzed granitoid clasts from 3 Apollo samples: polymict breccia 12013,141, crystalline-matrix breccia 14303,353, and breccia 15405,78

  4. Investigation of Plagioclase Reactivity in Wet Supercritical CO2 by In Situ Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C.; Gauglitz, K.; Loring, J.; Schaef, T.; Miller, Q.; Johnson, K. T.; Wang, Z.; Rosso, K. M.; McGrail, P.

    2013-12-01

    Increasingly, CO2 capture and subsequent storage in deep geologic reservoirs is being implemented as a viable approach for reducing anthropogenic emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere. Several mechanisms may act to secure the injected CO2, including hydrodynamic confinement, dissolution into reservoir fluids, retention of CO2 as a separate phase in pore spaces, and carbonation of reservoir minerals. This latter mechanism is the most permanent, but it requires the presence of reactive minerals and potentially significant amounts of time for the reactions to proceed. Plagioclase feldspars are highly abundant in the earth's crust and are present in the caprocks and storage formations of many target reservoirs. Although the dissolution kinetics and carbonation reactions of feldspars have been well studied in the aqueous phase, comparatively little work has focused on plagioclase reactivity in the CO2-rich fluid at conditions relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. In this study, we used in situ infrared spectroscopy to investigate the carbonation potential of a powdered plagioclase sample similar to labradorite [(Ca,Na)(Al,Si)4O8] that had been isolated from a Hawaiian basalt. Experiments were carried out at 50 °C and 91 bar by circulating a stream of dry or wet supercritical CO2 (scCO2) past a sample overlayer deposited on the window of a high-pressure infrared flow cell. Water concentrations ranged from 0% to 125% relative to saturation, and transmission-mode absorbance spectra were recorded as a function of time for 24 hours. In experiments with excess water, a controlled temperature gradient was used to intentionally condense a film of liquid water on the overlayers' surfaces. No discernible reaction was detected when the samples were exposed to anhydrous scCO2. When water was added, a thin film of liquid-like water was observed on the samples' surfaces, and up to 0.3% of the plagioclase was converted to a carbonate phase. Calcite is the most likely reaction

  5. Water Content of Lunar Alkali Fedlspar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, R. D.; Simon, J. I.; Wang, J.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of indigenous hydrogen in a diversity of lunar materials, including volcanic glass, melt inclusions, apatite, and plagioclase suggests water may have played a role in the chemical differentiation of the Moon. Spectroscopic data from the Moon indicate a positive correlation between water and Th. Modeling of lunar magma ocean crystallization predicts a similar chemical differentiation with the highest levels of water in the K- and Th-rich melt residuum of the magma ocean (i.e. urKREEP). Until now, the only sample-based estimates of water content of KREEP-rich magmas come from measurements of OH, F, and Cl in lunar apatites, which suggest a water concentration of < 1 ppm in urKREEP. Using these data, predict that the bulk water content of the magma ocean would have <10 ppm. In contrast, estimate water contents of 320 ppm for the bulk Moon and 1.4 wt % for urKREEP from plagioclase in ferroan anorthosites. Results and interpretation: NanoSIMS data from granitic clasts from Apollo sample 15405,78 show that alkali feldspar, a common mineral in K-enriched rocks, can have approx. 20 ppm of water, which implies magmatic water contents of approx. 1 wt % in the high-silica magmas. This estimate is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that estimated from apatite in similar rocks. However, the Cl and F contents of apatite in chemically similar rocks suggest that these melts also had high Cl/F ratios, which leads to spuriously low water estimates from the apatite. We can only estimate the minimum water content of urKREEP (+ bulk Moon) from our alkali feldspar data because of the unknown amount of degassing that led to the formation of the granites. Assuming a reasonable 10 to 100 times enrichment of water from urKREEP into the granites produces an estimate of 100-1000 ppm of water for the urKREEP reservoir. Using the modeling of and the 100-1000 ppm of water in urKREEP suggests a minimum bulk silicate Moon water content between 2 and 20 ppm. However, hydrogen loss was

  6. Mesoscale Approach to Feldspar Dissolution: Quantification of Dissolution Incongruency Based on Al/Si Ordering State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Min, Y.; Jun, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Dissolution mechanism of aluminosilicates is important for understanding natural and anthropogenic carbon cycles. The total mass of atmospheric CO2 is regulated by the weathering of silicate minerals, and the fate of geologically sequestered CO2 is affected by the interactions between brine, sandstone, caprock, and CO2, which is initiated by mineral dissolution. It has been shown through both experimental and ab initio studies that the dissolution/weathering reactivities of Al and Si in the matrix of an aluminosilicate can be different under many conditions. A subsequent observation is that the release rates of Al and Si, both from the same mineral, may not be stoichiometric when compared to the bulk chemistry of the mineral. For a very long time, the relationship between mineral dissolution incongruency and mineral crystallographic properties remain largely qualitative and descriptive. Here we study the dissolution incongruency of feldspars, the most abundant aluminosilicate on earth. Mineral dissolution experiments for a series of alkali feldspars (albite, anorthoclase, sanidine, and microcline) and plagioclases (oligoclase, andesine, labradorite, bytownite, and anorthite) were conducted at pH 1.68 under ambient conditions. Synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and water chemistry analysis (ICP-MS) are combined to examine the effect of Al/Si ordering on mineral dissolution. Our analysis based on a C1 structure model shows that the incongruency, stemming from the different reactivities of Al-O-Si and Si-O-Si linkages in feldspar's framework, is quantifiable and closely related to the Al/Si ordering state of a feldspar. Our results also suggest that the more random the Al/Si distribution of a mineral, the greater the dissolution incongruency. Our results have significant implications for understanding water-rock interactions. First, when studying the effect of water chemistry on water-rock interaction, smaller

  7. Microbial extracellular polysaccharides and plagioclase dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, S.A.; Barker, W.W.; Banfield, J.F.

    1999-05-01

    Bytownite feldspar was dissolved in batch reactors in solutions of starch (glucose polymer), gum xanthan (glucose, mannose, glucuronic acid), pectin (poly-galacturonic acid), and four alginates (mannuronic and guluronic acid) with a range of molecular weights (low, medium, high and uncharacterized) to evaluate the effect of extracellular microbial polymers on mineral dissolution rates. Solutions were analyzed for dissolved Si and Al as an indicator of feldspar dissolution. At neutral pH, feldspar dissolution was inhibited by five of the acid polysaccharides, gum xanthan, pectin, alginate low, alginate medium, alginate high, compared to an organic-free control. An uncharacterized alginate substantially enhanced both Si and Al release from the feldspar. Starch, a neutral polysaccharide, had no apparent effect. Under mildly acidic conditions, initial pH {approx} 4, all of the polymers enhanced feldspar dissolution compared to the inorganic controls. Si release from feldspar in starch solution exceeded the control by a factor of three. Pectin and gum xanthan increased feldspar dissolution by a factor of 10, and the alginates enhanced feldspar dissolution by a factor of 50 to 100. Si and Al concentrations increased with time, even though solutions were supersaturated with respect to several possible secondary phases. Under acidic conditions, initial pH {approx} 3, below the pK{sub a} of the carboxylic acid groups, dissolution rates increased, but the relative increase due to the polysaccharides is lower, approximately a factor of two to ten. Microbial extracellular polymers play a complex role in mineral weathering. Polymers appear to inhibit dissolution under some conditions, possibly by irreversibly binding to the mineral surfaces. The extracellular polysaccharides can also enhance dissolution by providing protons and complexing with ions in solution.

  8. Plagioclase mineralogy of olivine alkaline basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    A geological and mineralogical study of the Potrillo volcanics is reported. The investigation consisted first of field mapping to establish and identify the different rock types and volcanic features in order to determine the geological history. Next, samples were collected and analyzed petrographically to determine suitable rocks from the various stratigraphic units for study of plagioclase. Samples selected for further study were crushed and the plagioclase extracted for the determination of composition and structural state. These results were then related to the petrology and crystallization of the basalt.

  9. Energy related studies utilizing K-feldspar thermochronology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Two distinct sources of information are available from a [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar step-heating experiment: the age spectrum and Arrhenius plot. Model ages are calculated from the flux of radiogenic argon ([sup 40]Ar*) (assuming trapped argon of atmospheric composition) relative to the reactor produced [sup 39]Ar evolved during discrete laboratory heating steps. With the additional assumption that the [sup 39]Ar is uniformly distributed within the sample, we can infer the spatial distribution of the daughter product. ne associated Arrhenius plot, derived by plotting the diffusion coefficient (obtained from the inversion of the 39[sup Ar] release function assuming a single domain) against the inverse temperature of laboratory heating, are a convolution of the parameters which characterize the individual diffusion domains (whether these be dictated by varying length scale, energetics, etc.). However, many and perhaps Most [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar age spectra for slowly cooled alkali feldspars are significantly different from model age spectra calculated assuming a single diffusion-domain size. In addition, Arrhenius plots calculated from the measured loss of [sup 39]Ar during the step heating experiment show departures from linearity that are inconsistent with diffusion from domains of equal size. By extending the single diffusion-domain closure model (Dodsontype) to apply to minerals with a discrete distribution of domain sizes, we obtained an internally consistent explanation for the commonly observed features of alkali feldspar age spectra and their associated Arrhenius plots.

  10. The effect of organic acids on plagioclase dissolution rates and stoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Susan A.; Ullman, William J.

    1993-06-01

    The rates of plagioclase dissolution in solutions containing organic acids are up to ten times greater than the rates determined in solutions containing inorganic acids at the same acidity. Initial rates of dissolution are poorly reproduced in replicate experiments. After a day, however, the rates of plagioclase dissolution calculated from the rates of silicon release are reproducible and constant for up to nineteen days. Steady-state rates of dissolution are highest (up to 1.3 × 10 -8 mol/m 2/sec) in acidic solutions (pH ≈ 3) and decrease (to 1 × 10 -11 mol/m 2/sec) as acidity decreases toward neutral pH. The polyfunctional acids, oxalate, citrate, succinate, pyruvate, and 2-ketoglutarate, are the most effective at promoting dissolution. Acetate and propionate are not as effective as the other organic acids but are nonetheless more effective than solutions containing only inorganic acids. The degree of ligand-promoted enhancement of dissolution rate (rate in organic-containing solution/rate in inorganic solution at the same pH) decreases as acidity increases, indicating that the ligand-promoted dissolution mechanism becomes relatively more important as the rate of proton-promoted dissolution decreases. The stoichiometry of release to solution indicates that dissolution is selective even after the rates of dissolution become constant. As in previously published studies, Na and Ca are rapidly released from the plagioclase feldspar, leaving a surface enriched in Si and/or Al. The ratio of Al/Si released to solution indicates that the stoichiometry of the residual plagioclase surface is a function of pH and the nature of the organic ligand. The ligands which remove Al in preference to Si from the dissolving mineral surface are also those which enhance overall plagioclase dissolution rates.

  11. In situ feldspar dissolution rates in an aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen

    2005-03-01

    In situ silicate dissolution rates within the saturated Navajo sandstone, at Black Mesa, Arizona were determined from elemental fluxes in the aquifer. The mass transfer between groundwater and mineral matrix along flow paths was calculated from inverse mass balance modeling. The reaction time is bound by 14C-based travel time. BET surface areas were measured with N 2 gas adsorption. Dissolution rates for K-feldspar and plagioclase are 10 -19 and 10 -16 mol (feldspar) m -2 s -1, respectively, which are ˜10 5 times slower than laboratory experiment-derived rates under similar pH and temperature but at far from equilibrium conditions. The rates obtained in this study are consistent with the slower field rates found in numerous watershed and soil profile studies. However, these rates are from saturated aquifers, overcoming some concerns on estimated rates from unsaturated systems. The Navajo sandstone is a quartz-sandstone with a relatively simple and well-studied hydrogeology, groundwater geochemistry, and lithology, a large number of groundwater analyses and 14C groundwater ages, groundwater residence times up to ˜37 ky, groundwater pH from ˜8 to 10, and temperature from ˜15 to 35°C.

  12. Rock-Forming feldspars of the Khibiny alkaline pluton, Kola Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyuk, G. Yu.; Pakhomovsky, Ya. A.; Konopleva, N. G.; Kalashnikov, A. O.; Korchak, Yu. A.; Selivanova, E. A.; Yakovenchuk, V. N.

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the structural-compositional zoning of the well-known Khibiny pluton in regard to rock-forming feldspars. The content of K-Na-feldspars increases inward and outward from the Main foidolite ring. The degree of coorientation of tabular K-Na-feldspar crystals sharply increases in the Main ring zone, and microcline-dominant foyaite turns into orthoclase-dominant foyaite. The composition of K-Na-feldspars in the center of the pluton and the Main ring zone is characterized by an enrichment in Al. This shift is compensated by a substitution of some K and Na with Ba (the Main ring zone) or by an addition of K and Na cations to the initially cation-deficient microcline (the central part of the pluton). Feldspars of volcanosedimentary rocks occurring as xenoliths in foyaite primarily corresponded to plagioclase An15-40, but high-temperature fenitization and formation of hornfels in the Main ring zone gave rise to the crystallization of anorthoclase subsequently transformed into orthoclase and albite due to cooling and further fenitization. Such a zoning is the result of filling the Main ring fault zone within the homogeneous foyaite pluton with a foidolite melt, which provided the heating and potassium metasomatism of foyaite and xenoliths of volcanosedimentary rocks therein. The process eventually led to the transformation of foyaite into rischorrite-lyavochorrite, while xenoliths were transformed into aluminum hornfels with anorthoclase, annite, andalusite, topaz, and sekaninaite.

  13. Exchange of Na+ and K+ between water vapor and feldspar phases at high temperature and low vapor pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.

    1976-01-01

    In order to determine whether gas (steam) containing a small amount of dissolved alkali chloride is effective in promoting base exchange of Na+ and K+ among alkali feldspars and coexisting brine or brine plus solid salt, experiments were carried out at 400-700??C and steam densities ranging down to less than 0.05. For bulk compositions rich in potassium, the low pressure results are close to previous high-pressure results in composition of the fluid and coexisting solid phase. However, when the bulk composition is more sodic, alkali feldspars are relatively richer in potassium at low pressure than at high pressure. This behaviour corresponds to enrichment of potassium in the gas phase relative to coexisting brine and precipitation of solid NaCl when the brine plus gas composition becomes moderately sodic. The gas phase is very effective in promoting base exchange between coexisting alkali feldspars at high temperature and low water pressure. This suggests that those igneous rocks which contain coexisting alkali feldspars out of chemical equilibrium either remained very dry during the high-temperature part of their cooling history or that the pore fluid was a gas containing very little potassium relative to sodium. ?? 1976.

  14. Effects of shock pressures on calcic plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, R. V.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Calcic plagioclase single crystals were subjected to shock loading up to a pressure of 496 kbar; optical and electron microscope studies were conducted to investigate the shock-induced effects on the mineral, which is found in terrestrial and lunar rocks and in meteorites. It was observed that up to 287 kbar pressure, the recovered samples are essentially crystalline, while samples subjected to pressures between 300 and 400 kbar are almost 100% diaplectic glasses, suggesting shock transformation in the solid state. Samples shock-loaded to pressures greater than 400 kbar yielded glasses with refractive indices similar to those of thermally fused glass. It is concluded that planar features, absent in all the specimens, may not be definitive shock indicators, but may be linked to local heterogeneous dynamic stresses experienced by plagioclase grains within shocked rocks.

  15. Anorthosites and anorthosites: Contrasting plagioclase-rich rocks in the Archaean and Proterozoic

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, B.E. . Dept. of Earth Planetary Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Anorthosites -- rocks consisting predominantly of plagioclase feldspar -- have figured prominently in at least two distinct intervals of Earth history: the late-Archaean and mid-Proterozoic. Archaean anorthosites (AA) are a key component of high-grade gneiss terranes, where they typically form laterally extensive deformed sheets or sills up to a km thick. In contrast, Proterozoic anorthosites (PA) form plutons or plutonic complexes, and are most abundant in a quasi-continuous belt across NE N. America. In addition to these temporal and structural contrasts, AA and PA display markedly different mineralogical and geochemical properties, including, respectively: (1) equant plagioclase megacrysts vs. tabular megacrysts; (2) highly calcic compositions vs. intermediate to alkalic compositions; (3) amphibole vs. olivine or orthopyroxene as the dominant mafic mineral; (4) the presence of chromite, locally in ore-grade layers vs. massive, cross-cutting Fe-Ti oxide ores; (5) low levels of Sr and Ba vs. high to extreme levels; (6) high levels of ferromagnesian trace elements vs. low levels; (7) Ga/Al values typical of basaltic plagioclase vs. much lower values; and (8) moderately vs. extremely fractionated REE patterns. Given these contrasts, it appears that the only property AA and PA share is their plag-rich nature, suggesting that there must be more than one process (and probably multiple processes) capable of producing anorthosite.

  16. Thermodynamic Mixing Properties of Rb-K-Na Feldspars and Relevance to Rb-, NH4-, K-, Na-, and Li-Feldspar Thermal Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovis, G. L.; Morabito, J.; Mott, A.

    2006-12-01

    We have investigated a ten-member Rb-K feldspar solid solution series having an ordered Al-Si distribution. Rb-microcline, or rubicline, was synthesized via repeated ion exchange experiments of microcline in molten RbCl. This resulted in Rb-feldspar containing ~92 mol percent Rb, which appears to be the maximum amount of Rb that ordered feldspars can take up using ion-exchange techniques at 1 kbar. [Similarly synthesized Al-Si disordered Rb-feldspar is even more limited in Rb content (Kovalskii and Kotelnikov, EMPG IX, 2002).] Compositions between 0 and 92 mol percent Rb were synthesized by combining rubicline and microcline in the desired molar proportions, then chemically homogenizing the samples at elevated temperature. Enthalpies of solution (20.1 wt percent HF, 50 °C, isoperibolic conditions) for the series are nearly linear with composition, with the possibility of low-magnitude positive enthalpies of Rb-K mixing at Rb-rich compositions. This behavior contrasts sharply with the considerably greater enthalpies of mixing in K-Na feldspars (Hovis, 1986, Journal of Petrology). Feldspars, therefore, which have but a single alkali site, exhibit larger enthalpies of mixing when there is a clear contrast in the sizes of the ions occupying that site. This is not surprising in light of the tendency of chemically homogeneous K-Na feldspars to undergo exsolution with cooling. In the case of the Rb end member, the feldspar structure appears to be stretched nearly to its limit. This is reflected by the coefficients of thermal expansion for Rb, NH4, K, Na and Li feldspar end members (all of which we have measured) that show a linear relationship with room-temperature unit-cell volume: The larger the unit cell at room temperature, the less potential there is for thermal expansion. [Similar relations are found as a function of K:Na in nepheline - kalsilite framework silicates (Hovis and others, Mineralogical Magazine, 2003).] Thus, even at room temperature the Rb-feldspar

  17. Toward quantification of strain-related mosaicity in shocked lunar and terrestrial plagioclase by in situ micro-X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickersgill, Annemarie E.; Flemming, Roberta L.; Osinski, Gordon R.

    2015-11-01

    Studies of shock metamorphism of feldspar typically rely on qualitative petrographic observations, which, while providing invaluable information, can be difficult to interpret. Shocked feldspars, therefore, are now being studied in greater detail by various groups using a variety of modern techniques. We apply in situ micro-X-ray diffraction (μXRD) to shocked lunar and terrestrial plagioclase feldspar to contribute to the development of a quantitative scale of shock deformation for the feldspar group. Andesine and labradorite from the Mistastin Lake impact structure, Labrador, Canada, and anorthite from Earth's Moon, returned during the Apollo program, were examined using optical petrography and assigned to subgroups of the optical shock level classification system of Stöffler (1971). Two-dimensional μXRD patterns from the same samples revealed increased peak broadening in the chi dimension (χ), due to strain-related mosaicity, with increased optical signs of deformation. Measurement of the full width at half maximum along χ (FWHMχ) of these peaks provides a quantitative way to measure strain-related mosaicity in plagioclase feldspar as a proxy for shock level.

  18. Atmospheric weathering and silica-coated feldspar: Analogy with zeolite molecular sieves, granite weathering, soil formation, ornamental slabs, and ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joseph V.

    1998-01-01

    Feldspar surfaces respond to chemical, biological, and mechanical weathering. The simplest termination is hydroxyl (OH), which interacts with any adsorption layer. Acid leaching of alkalis and aluminum generated a silica-rich, nanometers-thick skin on certain feldspars. Natural K, Na-feldspars develop fragile surfaces as etch pits expand into micrometer honeycombs, possibly colonized by lichens. Most crystals have various irregular coats. Based on surface-catalytic processes in molecular sieve zeolites, I proposed that some natural feldspars lose weakly bonded Al-OH (aluminol) to yield surfaces terminated by strongly bonded Si-OH (silanol). This might explain why some old feldspar-bearing rocks weather slower than predicted from brief laboratory dissolution. Lack of an Al-OH infrared frequency from a feldspar surface is consistent with such a silanol-dominated surface. Raman spectra of altered patches on acid-leached albite correspond with amorphous silica rather than hydroxylated silica–feldspar, but natural feldspar may respond differently. The crystal structure of H-exchanged feldspar provides atomic positions for computer modeling of complex ideas for silica-terminated feldspar surfaces. Natural weathering also depends on swings of temperature and hydration, plus transport of particles, molecules, and ionic complexes by rain and wind. Soil formation might be enhanced by crushing granitic outcrops to generate new Al-rich surfaces favorable for chemical and biological weathering. Ornamental slabs used by architects and monumental masons might last longer by minimizing mechanical abrasion during sawing and polishing and by silicifying the surface. Silica-terminated feldspar might be a promising ceramic surface. PMID:9520371

  19. Feldspar dissolution rates in the Topopah Spring Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bryan, C.R.; Helean, K.B.; Marshall, B.D.; Brady, P.V.

    2009-01-01

    Two different field-based methods are used here to calculate feldspar dissolution rates in the Topopah Spring Tuff, the host rock for the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The center of the tuff is a high silica rhyolite, consisting largely of alkali feldspar (???60 wt%) and quartz polymorphs (???35 wt%) that formed by devitrification of rhyolitic glass as the tuff cooled. First, the abundance of secondary aluminosilicates is used to estimate the cumulative amount of feldspar dissolution over the history of the tuff, and an ambient dissolution rate is calculated by using the estimated thermal history. Second, the feldspar dissolution rate is calculated by using measured Sr isotope compositions for the pore water and rock. Pore waters display systematic changes in Sr isotopic composition with depth that are caused by feldspar dissolution. The range in dissolution rates determined from secondary mineral abundances varies from 10-16 to 10-17 mol s-1 kg tuff-1 with the largest uncertainty being the effect of the early thermal history of the tuff. Dissolution rates based on pore water Sr isotopic data were calculated by treating percolation flux parametrically, and vary from 10-15 to 10-16 mol s-1 kg tuff-1 for percolation fluxes of 15 mm a-1 and 1 mm a-1, respectively. Reconciling the rates from the two methods requires that percolation fluxes at the sampled locations be a few mm a-1 or less. The calculated feldspar dissolution rates are low relative to other measured field-based feldspar dissolution rates, possibly due to the age (12.8 Ma) of the unsaturated system at Yucca Mountain; because oxidizing and organic-poor conditions limit biological activity; and/or because elevated silica concentrations in the pore waters (???50 mg L-1) may inhibit feldspar dissolution. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Degassing driving crystallization of plagioclase phenocrysts in lava tube stalactites on Mount Etna (Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzafame, Gabriele; Ferlito, Carmelo

    2014-10-01

    Basaltic lava flows can form tubes in response to the cooling of the outer surface. We collected lava stalactites (frozen lava tears) and sampled lava from the ceilings of three lava tubes on Mount Etna. Comparison of the petrographic characters between ceiling lavas and relative stalactites reveals surprising differences in the groundmass textures and crystal compositions. Major and trace element contents in stalactites show only a slight increase in alkali and SiO2 compared to ceiling lava, whereas significant differences exist in composition and textures between plagioclases within the ceiling lava and those within the stalactites, being in the last case definitively more An-rich. We advance the hypothesis that the high temperature reached in the cave caused the exsolution of the volatiles still trapped in the dripping melt. The volatiles, mainly H2O, formed bubbles and escaped from the melt; such a water-loss might have promoted the silicate polymerization in the stalactites resulting in the growth of An-rich plagioclase phenocrysts. Our results have important implications: in fact plagioclase phenocrysts are usually associated with intratelluric growth and are often considered as the main petrologic evidence for the existence of a magma chamber. The textural and chemical features of plagioclases in stalactites prove that phenocryst growth in syn to post-eruptive conditions is plausible and clearly explains the relatively low viscosity of many phenocryst-rich lava flows on Mount Etna, as well as on many other volcanoes around the world. Therefore, we can conclude that plagioclase phenocrysts cannot exclusively be considered as having originated within a magma chamber.

  1. Secondary porosity revisited: The chemistry of feldspar dissolution by carboxylic acids and anions

    SciTech Connect

    Stoessell, R.K. ); Pittman, E.D. )

    1990-12-01

    Carboxylic acids in subsurface waters have been proposed as agents for dissolving feldspars and complexing aluminum to create secondary porosity in sandstones. Previously published experimental work indicated high aluminum mobility in the presence of carboxylic acid solutions. In order to further evaluate aluminum mobility, alkali feldspar dissolution experiments were run at 100C and 300 bars in the presence of mono- and dicarboxylic acids and their anions. Experimental results imply that under reservoir conditions, aluminum-organic anion complexes are insignificant for acetate and propionate and possibly significant for oxalate and malonate. Propionate appeared to inhibit alkali feldspar dissolution and, hence, may retard aluminum mobility. Dissolution of feldspar in the presence of oxalic and acetic acid can be explained by enhanced dissolution kinetics and greater aluminum mobility under low-pH conditions. The general absence of such low-pH fluids in subsurface reservoirs makes this an unlikely mechanism for creating secondary porosity. Also, the thermal instability of oxalate and malonate limits their aluminum-complexing potential in reservoirs at temperatures above 100C.

  2. Evidence for the compaction of feldspar-rich cumulates in the Pleasant Bay layered intrusion, coastal Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Horrigan, E.K. )

    1993-03-01

    The Pleasant Bay intrusion is roughly 12 km by 20 km. It consists of prominent rhythmic layers, up to 100 m thick, that grade from chilled gabbro on the base, to coarse-grained gabbroic, dioritic, or granitic rocks on the top. These layers were formed by multiple injections of basalt into a large chamber of silicic magma. The focus of this study is on one layer that is about 100 m thick, and is overlain by another basally chilled gabbroic layer at least 50 m thick. Silicic pipes and veins extend upward into the overlying gabbroic chill. The lower part of the layer has dominant calcic plagioclase, An60, augite, and olivine, with subordinate hornblende and biotite. The uppermost part has dominant sodic plagioclase, An20, and two pyroxenes with subordinate quartz, K-feldspar and hornblende. SiO[sub 2] and MgO vary from 49% and 5% at the base to 58% and 1% at the top, respectively. The top 7 m of this layer are characterized by variably deformed minerals. The deformation grades from bent biotite and plagioclase near the bottom to sutured plagioclase at the top. Pockets of undeformed quartz and K-feldspar in the uppermost rocks demonstrate that interstitial liquid was present during a after compaction. The pipes and veins probably represent trapped liquid and some crystals that were expelled into the overlying gabbroic chill.

  3. Regional and local correlations of feldspar geochemistry of the Peach Spring Tuff, Alvord Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buesch, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition of feldspar grains in an ignimbrite from the Spanish Canyon Formation in the Alvord Mountain area, California, have been used to confirm similarities in three measured sections locally, and they are similar to exposures of the Peach Spring Tuff (PST) regionally. Feldspar grains were identified on the basis of texture (zoning, as mantled feldspars, or in crystal clusters), whether the grains were attached to glass or were in pumice clasts, or were simply crystal fragments with no textural context. Chemistry was determined by electron microprobe analysis, and each analysis is calculated in terms of the percent endmember and plotted on orthoclase (Or) versus anorthite (An) plots. In general, the PST has sanidine and plagioclase compositions that are consistent with having formed in high-silica rhyolite and trachyte within a zoned magma chamber. Feldspars from the PST in Spanish Canyon area cluster along the rhyolitic trend with no grains along the trachytic trend. Similar clustering of feldspars along the rhyolitic trend with no grains along the trachytic trend also occur in the PST from Granite Spring and Providence Mountains to the east of the Alvord Mountain area, and the ranges in compositions are also similar in these locations. In contrast, the PST in the Kane Wash area of the Newberry Mountains has feldspars only from the rhyolitic trend in the basal deposits, but some grains from the trachytic trend are in the upper part of the deposit, and the range in compositions are greater than in the Spanish Canyon area. The variations in vertical compositional zoning and compositional range in these different deposits suggests there were probably different flow paths (or timing of the delivery) during the eruption and runout of the pyroclastic flow(s) generated from the climactic eruption of the PST magma chamber.

  4. Magnetic Properties Of Feldspars And Other Rock-forming Minerals: Evaluation Of Their Potential As Paleointensity Recorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottrell, R. D.; Smirnov, A. V.; Tarduno, J. A.

    The continued development of highly sensitive SQUID magnetometers has opened the way for paleomagnetic and paleointensity studies of individual rock forming miner- als. The motivation for these studies is the desire to avoid contamination of magnetic data related to secondary minerals that commonly form in the ground mass of igneous rocks on geologic timescales or during laboratory experiments. As part of a survey of various mineral phases we have examined magnetic hysteresis data of olivine, py- roxene and feldspar separated from mafic lavas flows, quartz separated from tuffs and zircon separated from granites. Our studies of optically clear plagioclase feldspar have shown them to have several properties favorable for paleointensity investigations. Hys- teresis properties indicate that the domain state of magnetic inclusions in the feldspar crystals is single or pseudosingle domain while that of the groundmass is pseudosingle to multidomain. High resolution SEM and TEM analyses indicate that the magnetic inclusions are equant to slightly elongated and are 50 to 350 nm in size. Low tempera- ture data and magnetic unblocking temperatures indicate that the overall composition of the inclusions is similar to that of the bulk volcanic rocks from which they were separated. These properties, together with the relatively rapid cooling characteristics of lavas, suggest that Thellier analyses of plagioclase feldspars will continue to yield important paleointensity data. The potential of other mineral phases for paleomagnetic and paleointensity studies will be discussed.

  5. Potassium Feldspar Megacrysts in Granites: Passive Markers of Magma Dynamics or Products of Textural Coarsening?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. R.; Glazner, A. F.; Coleman, D. S.

    2006-12-01

    Megacrysts of potassium feldspar (K-spar) in granitic rocks are commonly interpreted as early-crystallizing phases whose textural relationships record flow, settling, and diapirism within evolving magma chambers. However, experimental studies on granitic magmas show that K-spar does not begin to nucleate until the system is at least 30% crystalline, and that much of the final crystallization history records co-crystallization of K-spar, quartz, and sodic plagioclase. These data require that the megacrysts cannot have reached large sizes until the magma was largely crystallized and incapable of flow. We have made chemical and textural observations of K-spar megacrysts from the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite (TIS), California. Cathodoluminescence images show sawtooth oscillatory zoning in K-spars, albite-rich rims on plagioclase, reaction zones at boundaries between plagioclase and K-spar, and almost no perthite. Electron microprobe analyses of the sawtooth zones reveal a sharp outward increase in Ba concentration at each zone boundary. Plagioclase core compositions follow whole-rock compositions, becoming increasingly albitic toward the center of the TIS, but K-spar in all units is highly potassic (Or80-95). A three-feldspar assemblage (An15-35, An1-7, and Or80-95) occurs in several megacrystic samples. Stained rock slabs reveal tentacles of interstitial K-spar radiating from megacryst edges far into the adjacent matrix, and a deficit of smaller K-spar crystals in megacrystic units. K-spar size measurements across the contacts of the TIS from the 10 largest crystals within a 1 m2 area show a steady increase in the average megacryst area from 0.2 to 30 cm2. In contrast, bulk rock K2O and K-spar mode (vol%) are constant across this same transect (at 3.7± 0.5 wt% and 22± 5 vol% respectively). Extreme feldspar compositions, phase equilibria, and textural observations argue for late development of K- spar megacrysts during the prolonged and probably cyclic cooling history of

  6. A study of strontium diffusion in plagioclase using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Daniele J.; Watson, E. Bruce

    1994-12-01

    Strontium chemical diffusion has been measured in plagioclase of three intermediate compositions (between An 23 and An 67) under anhydrous, 1-atmosphere conditions. A strontium oxide-aluminosilicate powder mixture was used as the diffusant source material, with Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) used to measure diffusion profiles. Over the temperature range 725-1075°C, the following Arrhenius relations were obtained for diffusion normal to (001) ( D in m 2 s -1): Oligoclase (An 23): log D = (-6.07 ± 0.58) + (-273 ± 13 kJ mol -1)/RT . Andesine (An 43): log D = (-6.75 ± 0.33) + (-265 ± 8 kJ mol -1)/RT . Labradorite (An 67): log D = (-7.03 ± 0.37) + (-268 ± 8 kJ mol -1)/RT . In the labradorite, diffusion of Sr normal to (010) was somewhat slower (by ~0.7 log units) than diffusion perpendicular to (001). The activation energy for diffusion normal to (010) appears to follow a trend similar to that observed for diffusion perpendicular to (001). In oligoclase, diffusion normal to (001) also appears to be somewhat faster than diffusion normal to (010), but the differences are less pronounced than in labradorite. No significant crystallographic anisotropy was noted in the andesine. The results show a clear trend of increasing Sr diffusivity with decreasing An content of the plagioclase. Profiles of Ca and Na, measured with RBS and Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) respectively, indicate that Sr is exchanging with both of these species in the plagioclase. In each feldspar composition, decreases in Ca and Na in the near-surface region are nearly proportional to their bulk concentrations, indicating that there is no significant substitutional preference of Sr for either cation in those feldspars investigated. NRA measurements of Al, showing a corresponding uptake of Al and Sr, suggest that a coupled exchange, possibly Sr +2 + Al +3 → Na +1 + Si +4, is taking place when Sr exchanges with Na. Chemical diffusion of Sr in calcic plagioclase is dominated by Sr +2

  7. Thermochemistry of the high structural state plagioclases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, R. C.; Charlu, T. V.; Kleppa, O. J.

    1980-07-01

    The enthalpies of solution of a suite of 19 high-structural state synthetic plagioclases were measured in a Pb 2B 2O 5 melt at 970 K. The samples were crystallized from analyzed glasses at 1200°C and 20 kbar pressure in a piston-cylinder apparatus. A number of runs were also made on Amelia albite and Amelia albite synthetically disordered at 1050-1080°C and one bar for one month and at 1200°C and 20 kbar for 10 hr. The component oxides of anorthite, CaO, Al 2O 3 and SiO 2, were remeasured. The ΔH of disorder of albite inferred in the present study from albite crystallized from glass is 3.23 kcal, which agrees with the 3.4 found by HOLM and KLEPPA (1968). It is not certain whether this value includes the ΔH of a reversible displacive transition to monoclinic symmetry, as suggested by HELGESONet al. (1978) for the Holm-Kleppa results. The enthalpy of solution value for albite accepted for the solid solution series is based on the heat-treated Amelia albite and is 2.86 kcal less than for untreated Amelia albite. The enthalpy of formation from the oxides at 970 K of synthetic anorthite is -24.06 ± 0.31 kcal, significantly higher than the -23.16 kcal found by CHARLUet al. (1978), and in good agreement with the value of -23.89 ± 0.82 given by ROBIEet al. (1979), based on acid calorimetry. The excess enthalpy of mixing in high plagioclase can be represented by the expression, valid at 970 K: ΔHex(±0.16 kcal) = 6.7461 XabX2An + 2.0247 XAnX2Ab where XAb and XAn are, respectively, the mole fractions of NaAlSi 3O 8 and CaAl 2Si 2O 8. This ΔH ex, together with the mixing entropy of KERRICK and DARKEN'S (1975) Al-avoidance model, reproduces almost perfectly the free energy of mixing found by ORVILLE (1972) in aqueous cation-exchange experiments at 700°C. It is likely that Al-avoidance is the significant stabilizing factor in the high plagioclase series, at least for XAn≥ 0.3. At high temperatures the plagioclases have nearly the free energies of ideal one

  8. Grain size reduction of feldspar and pyroxene, phase mixing, and strain localization in lower crustal shear zones (Lofoten, Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegon, L.; Stunitz, H.; Nasipuri, P.; Svahnberg, H.; Heilbronner, R.

    2011-12-01

    High temperature shear zones are common in the magmatic suite of the granulite facies Lofoten basement of Norway, and typically consist of narrow structures (1 cm to 1 m in thickness) showing a mylonite-to ultramylonite transition from the shear zone boundary to the shear zone center. In this contribution we examine the deformation microstructures and synkinematic mineral assemblages of shear zones developed from a mangerite (=monzonite) protolith. The mineral assemblage in the host mangerite indicates anhydrous conditions (mesoperthite + clinopyroxene ± orthopyroxene), whereas the mineral assemblage in the shear zones consists of plagioclase + K-feldspar + quartz + hornblende + calcite + biotite ± clinopyroxene and indicates hydrated conditions. Hornblende-plagioclase geothermobarometry yields upper amphibolite- to granulite facies conditions during shearing (730-760° C, 0.55-0.8 GPa). The mylonite consists of two distinct compositional domains: a pyroxene-derived aggregate and a feldspar-derived aggregate. The pyroxene-derived aggregate consists of the products of the following breakdown reaction: clinopyroxene + plagioclase ± K-feldspar ± orthopyroxene + H2O + CO2 --> quartz + hornblende + calcite ± biotite. In the feldspar-derived aggregate fractured fragments of mesoperthite are surrounded by a bi-phase mixture of recrystallized plagioclase and K-feldspar. EBSD analysis indicates that the recrystallized grains originated as micro-fragments from fracturation, and recrystallization was compositionally-induced (e.g. An22 average composition of plagioclase in the mesoperthite, An14 in the recrystallized aggregate). Detailed grain size, grain shape and EBSD analysis indicate that diffusion creep was the dominant deformation mechanism in both aggregates. Spatial distribution of K-feldspar and plagioclase shows a well dispersed aggregate and may serve as a tool to characterize diffusion creep deformation in phase mixtures. In the ultramylonite the two

  9. Uncommon behavior of plagioclase and the ancient lunar crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekvasil, Hanna; Lindsley, Donald H.; DiFrancesco, Nicholas; Catalano, Tristan; Coraor, Aron E.; Charlier, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Calcic plagioclase, the dominant mineral of the anorthositic lunar crust, fails to show the Na enrichment during cooling that is typical of magmatic plagioclase. We show that this enigmatic behavior may arise during fractionation of highly calcic plagioclase at depths greater than ~70 km in the lunar magma ocean because of the development of a negative azeotropic configuration at high anorthite contents that impedes and may even reverse the standard plagioclase albite enrichment with dropping temperature. This result supports a high-pressure origin of this plagioclase consistent with the lunar magma ocean model. It also provides a new mechanism for forming lunar lithologies with sodic plagioclase from a highly Na-depleted Moon through gravitational settling of spinel and refines the compositional characteristics of the late stage residual liquids of the lunar magma ocean.

  10. Dissolution of K-feldspar at CO2-saturated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenqvist, Jörgen; Kilpatrick, Andrew D.; Yardley, Bruce W. D.; Rochelle, Christopher A.

    2014-05-01

    Underground storage of carbon dioxide on a very large scale is widely considered to be an essential part of any strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere. Aquifers in deep sedimentary basins have been identified as suitable targets for geological carbon dioxide storage, especially aquifers located in sandstone host rock. This has led to renewed interest in studying the interaction between sandstone minerals and aqueous fluids, as there is a paucity of data for CO2-containing systems at relevant conditions. In an attempt to improve data coverage for important silicate minerals, we have measured the dissolution kinetics of K-feldspar in CO2-saturated fluids over a range of temperatures. K-feldspar fragments were hand-picked from a larger sample, crushed to a narrow size range and cleaned. The grains were reacted with water in batch-type reactors at temperatures from 20°C to 200°C and pressures up to 200 bar, and the dissolution was followed by periodic withdrawal of aliquots of solution. The mineral grains were allowed to react with pure water for a number of weeks before injection of CO2 into the system. Excess CO2 was provided to ensure CO2 saturation in the experimental systems. While the reaction time before injection was not long enough to attain complete equilibrium, it did considerably lower the degree of undersaturation with respect to K-feldspar and helped highlight the effect of CO2 injection into a rock-equilibrated aqueous fluid. At all temperatures studied, injection of CO2 resulted in a rapid increase in the soluble concentrations of K and Si (and also Na from a plagioclase component). The dissolution then reached apparent steady state conditions after a few days, with observed dissolution rates in the range of 1E-9 to 1E-12 mol/m2/s over the temperature range studied. The CO2-saturated solutions maintained mildly acidic conditions throughout the experiments and the observed rates therefore fall roughly between rates measured in

  11. Biochemical evolution II: origin of life in tubular microstructures on weathered feldspar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Parsons, I; Lee, M R; Smith, J V

    1998-12-22

    Mineral surfaces were important during the emergence of life on Earth because the assembly of the necessary complex biomolecules by random collisions in dilute aqueous solutions is implausible. Most silicate mineral surfaces are hydrophilic and organophobic and unsuitable for catalytic reactions, but some silica-rich surfaces of partly dealuminated feldspars and zeolites are organophilic and potentially catalytic. Weathered alkali feldspar crystals from granitic rocks at Shap, north west England, contain abundant tubular etch pits, typically 0.4-0.6 microm wide, forming an orthogonal honeycomb network in a surface zone 50 microm thick, with 2-3 x 10(6) intersections per mm2 of crystal surface. Surviving metamorphic rocks demonstrate that granites and acidic surface water were present on the Earth's surface by approximately 3.8 Ga. By analogy with Shap granite, honeycombed feldspar has considerable potential as a natural catalytic surface for the start of biochemical evolution. Biomolecules should have become available by catalysis of amino acids, etc. The honeycomb would have provided access to various mineral inclusions in the feldspar, particularly apatite and oxides, which contain phosphorus and transition metals necessary for energetic life. The organized environment would have protected complex molecules from dispersion into dilute solutions, from hydrolysis, and from UV radiation. Sub-micrometer tubes in the honeycomb might have acted as rudimentary cell walls for proto-organisms, which ultimately evolved a lipid lid giving further shelter from the hostile outside environment. A lid would finally have become a complete cell wall permitting detachment and flotation in primordial "soup." Etch features on weathered alkali feldspar from Shap match the shape of overlying soil bacteria. PMID:9860941

  12. Alkali Bee

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alkali bee, Nomia melanderi, is native to deserts and semi-arid desert basins of the western United States. It is a very effective and manageable pollinator for the production of seed in alfalfa (=lucerne) and some other crops, such as onion. It is the world’s only intensively managed ground-n...

  13. Petrogenesis of calcic plagioclase megacrysts in Archean rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, W. C.; Morrison, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Anorthositic complexes with large equidimensional plagioclase grains of highly calcic composition occur in nearly all Archean cratons. Similar plagioclase occur as megacrysts in many Archean sills, dikes, and volcanic flows. In the Canadian Shield these units occur throughout the Archean portions of the entire shield and are particularly common as dikes over an area of a few 100,000 sq km in Ontario and Manitoba during a period of at least 100 m.y. in many different rock types and metamorphic grades. The plagioclase generally occurs in three modes: as inclusions in mafic intrusions at various stages of fractionation, as crystal segregations in anorthosite complexes, or as megacrysts in fractionated sills, dikes, and flows. Most occurrences suggest that the plagioclase was formed elsewhere before being transported to its present location. The evidence seems to be quite clear that occurrences of these types of calcic plagioclase require: (1) ponding of a relatively undifferentiated Archean tholeiitic melt at some depth; (2) isothermal crystallization of large, equidimensional homogeneous plagioclase crystals; (3) separation of the plagioclase crystals from any other crystalline phases; (4) further fractionation of melt; (5)transport of various combinations of individual plagioclase crystals and clusters of crystals by variously fractionated melts; and (6) emplacement as various types of igneous intrusions or flows.

  14. Feldspar dissolution kinetics and Gibbs free energy dependence in a CO 2-enriched groundwater system, Green River, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampman, Niko; Bickle, Mike; Becker, John; Assayag, Nelly; Chapman, Hazel

    2009-07-01

    Reactions between CO 2-charged brines and reservoir minerals might either enhance the long-term storage of CO 2 in geological reservoirs or facilitate leakage by corroding cap rocks and fault seals. Modelling the progress of such reactions is frustrated by uncertainties in the absolute mineral surface reaction rates and the significance of other rate limiting steps in natural systems. Here we use the chemical evolution of groundwater from the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone, part of a leaking natural accumulation of CO 2 at Green River, Utah, in the Colorado Plateau, USA, to place constraints on the rates and potential controlling mechanisms of the mineral-fluid reactions, under elevated CO 2 pressures, in a natural system. The progress of individual reactions, inferred from changes in groundwater chemistry is modelled using mass balance techniques. The mineral reactions are close to stoichiometric with plagioclase and K-feldspar dissolution largely balanced by precipitation of clay minerals and carbonate. Mineral modes, in conjunction with published surface area measurements and flow rates estimated from hydraulic head measurements, are then used to quantify the kinetics of feldspar dissolution. Maximum estimated dissolution rates for plagioclase and K-feldspar are 2 × 10 - 14 and 4 × 10 - 16 mol m - 2 s - 1 , respectively. Fluid ion-activity products are close to equilibrium (e.g. Δ Gr for plagioclase between - 2 and - 10 kJ/mol) and lie in the region in which mineral surface reaction rates show a strong dependence on Δ Gr. Local variation in Δ Gr is attributed to the injection and disassociation of CO 2 which initially depresses silicate mineral saturation in the fluid, promoting feldspar dissolution. With progressive flow through the aquifer feldspar hydrolysis reactions consume H + and liberate solutes to solution which increase mineral saturation in the fluid and rates slow as a consequence. The measured plagioclase dissolution rates at low Δ Gr of 2 × 10

  15. Natural radioactivity and rare earth elements in feldspar samples, Central Eastern desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Walley El-Dine, Nadia; El-Shershaby, Amal; Afifi, Sofia; Sroor, Amany; Samir, Eman

    2011-05-01

    The pegmatite bodies of the Eastern Desert of Egypt are widely distributed especially along the Marsa-Alam-Idfu road. The Abu Dob area covers about 150km(2) of the Arabian Nubian shield at the central part of the Eastern Desert of Egypt. Most of the pegmatite is zoned; the zonation starts with milky quartz at the core followed by alkali feldspar at the margins. The feldspars vary in color from rose to milky and in composition from K-feldspar to Na-feldspar, sometimes interactions of both types are encountered. Thirteen feldspar samples were collected from different locations in the Abu Dob area for measuring the natural radioactivity of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K using an HPGe detector. The variation in concentration of radionuclides for the area under investigation can be classified into regions of high, medium and low natural radioactivity. The average concentration in BqKg(-1) has been observed to be from 9.5 to 183675.7BqKg(-1) for (238)U, between 6.1 and 94,314.2BqKg(-1) for (232)Th and from 0 to 7894.6BqKg(-1) for (40)K. Radium equivalent activities (Ra(eq)), dose rate (D(R)) and external hazard (H(ex)) have also been determined. In the present work, the concentration of rare earth elements are measured for two feldspar samples using two techniques, Environmental Scanning Electron microscope XIL 30 ESEM, Philips, and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The existence of rare earth elements in this area are very high and can be used in different important industries. PMID:21324705

  16. Prediction of plagioclase-melt equilibria in anhydrous silicate melts at 1-atm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namur, Olivier; Charlier, Bernard; Toplis, Michael J.; Vander Auwera, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Many models for plagioclase-melt equilibria have been proposed over the past 30 years, but the focus is increasingly on the effects of water content and pressure. However, many geological and petrological applications concern low pressure and low water systems, such as the differentiation of large terrestrial basaltic magma chambers, and lunar and asteroidal magmatism. There is, therefore, a justified need to quantify the influence of anhydrous liquid composition on the composition of equilibrium plagioclase at 1-atm. With this in mind, a database of over 500 experimentally determined plagioclase-liquid pairs has been created. The selected low pressure, anhydrous, experiments include both natural and synthetic liquids, whose compositions range from basalt to rhyolite. Four equations are proposed, derived from this data. The first is based on a thermodynamically inspired formalism, explicitly integrating the effect of temperature. This equation uses free energies and activities of crystalline anorthite available from the literature. For the activity of anorthite in the liquid phase, it is found that current models of the activity of individual oxides are insufficient to account for the experimental results. We have therefore derived an empirical expression for the variation of anorthite activity in the liquid as a function of melt composition, based upon inversion of the experimental data. Using this expression allows the calculation of plagioclase composition with a relative error less than 10%. However, in light of the fact that temperature is not necessarily known for many petrological applications, an alternative set of T-independent equations is also proposed. For this entirely empirical approach, the database has been divided into three compositional groups, treated independently for regression purposes: mafic-ultramafic, alkali-rich mafic-ultramafic, and intermediate-felsic. This separation into distinct subgroups was found to be necessary to maintain errors

  17. Plagioclase-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites - Liquid condensates?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wark, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics and formation of coarse-grained, plagioclase-rich inclusions are investigated. The textures, mineralogical compositions, and initial Al-26/Al-27 ratios for the plagioclase-rich inclusions are described. It is observed that plagioclase-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites are either Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) composed of 30-60 vol pct anorthite, and less than 35 vol pct Ti-Al-pyroxene and melilite, or CA chondrites composed of plagioclase, pyroxene, olivine, spinel, and melilite. It is observed that CA chondrules are chemically and mineralogically the most similar components shared by carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites. The textural changes observed in the inclusions are examined. The data reveal that the CAIs have three textural groups: coarse anorthite laths, equigranular anorthite and Ti-Al-pyroxene, and lacy Ti-Al-pyroxene and fine-grained anorthite.

  18. Plagioclase-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites - Liquid condensates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, D. A.

    1987-02-01

    The characteristics and formation of coarse-grained, plagioclase-rich inclusions are investigated. The textures, mineralogical compositions, and initial Al-26/Al-27 ratios for the plagioclase-rich inclusions are described. It is observed that plagioclase-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites are either Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) composed of 30-60 vol pct anorthite, and less than 35 vol pct Ti-Al-pyroxene and melilite, or CA chondrites composed of plagioclase, pyroxene, olivine, spinel, and melilite. It is observed that CA chondrules are chemically and mineralogically the most similar components shared by carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites. The textural changes observed in the inclusions are examined. The data reveal that the CAIs have three textural groups: coarse anorthite laths, equigranular anorthite and Ti-Al-pyroxene, and lacy Ti-Al-pyroxene and fine-grained anorthite.

  19. The Nature of Feldspar Clouding and Its Paleomagnetic Significance With Reference To The 2.45 Ga Matachewan Dyke Swarm, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halls, Henry C.; Zhang, Baoxing; Garland, Mary

    Clouding in calcic plagioclase is a common occurrence in Precambrian diabase dyke swarms worldwide, particularly those of Paleoproterozoic age. The occurrence of this clouding in 2.45 Ga Matachewan dykes within uplifted blocks of the Kapuskasing Zone (KZ) in Canada, and not in dykes of the same swarm at shallower crustal levels in surrounding terranes, suggests that the clouding is produced as a re- equilibration of the felspar in response to declining temperatures but in the presence of pressures appropriate to mid - to lower- crustal levels. We have made the following observations on feldspar separates extracted from the dykes: (1) Curie Balance, and low temperature SIRM acquisition studies show Curie temperarures of 580° C and a Verwey transition at 110-120K appropriate for Ti-poor magnetite; (2) Saturation magnetization is proportional to clouding intensity as determined from image analysis techniques; (3) Hysteresis and SEM studies indicate that the particles are small, typically about 1 micron (PSD) in size; (4) A baked contact test on cloudy feldspar dykes within the KZ is negative, but positive for dykes outside the KZ; (5) Magnetite in cloudy feldspars carries a high coercivity N component of magnetization which increases with clouding intensity, whereas dykes outside the KZ mostly carry an older R remanence; (6) Since sets of R dykes become N along strike on entering the KZ, the magnetization carried by cloudy feldspars is secondary; (7) The presence of R host rocks adjacent to an N cloudy dyke and the occasional survival of lower Hc and lower Tub R components in N cloudy dykes within the KZ suggests that the N magnetization of the feldspar magnetite is a CRM; (8) SEM shows that feldspars of different clouding intensity (from image analysis) have a near constant atomic percentage of Fe, so that the degree of clouding is determined in part by the concentration of magnetite rather than by total Fe and indicates that from 30-90% of the total Fe is used in

  20. Heterogeneous plagioclase compositions in the Maralinga CK4 chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.

    1993-01-01

    One of the characteristic features of CK chondrites is the wide compositional range displayed by feldspar grains in matrix relative to the narrow range of compositions exhibited by the highly equilibrated olivines and pyroxenes. Recently, it was suggested that these heterogeneous feldspar compositions may have been strongly influenced by shock metamorphisms. It is shown that the apparent range of feldspar compositions in Maralinga probably results from annealing during parent body thermal metamorphism rather than shock. The majority of matrix feldspars in Maralinga are typically 50 microns in size and are compositionally zoned, with oligoclase cores (approximately An40) and bytownite rims (approximately An80). The contact between core and rim is sharp and abrupt and is readily observed in backscattered scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images.

  1. Characterization and Thermodynamics Studies of Feldspar and Feldspathoid Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudow, M.; Lilova, K.

    2015-12-01

    The application of thermal analysis and calorimetry for the studies of minerals has a history as long as the existence of the thermal methods themselves. New advanced calorimetric techniques have been developed for more accurate characterization of both bulk and nano materials thus impacting their design, processing, and applications. TG-DTA and TG-DSC are used to characterize the composition of complex minerals (e.g. [KxNa1-x(AlSi3)O8]) based on the weight changes and phase transformations observed with temperature increase. Additionally, those techniques allow to determine the quantity of the different types of water contained in natural feldspars and feldspathoids (absorbed, interlayer, structural). The results for several clays will be discussed. The geochemical properties and thermal stability of another class of minerals - aluminosilicate frameworks (alkali sodalities, natrolites, etc.) as related to high-level nuclear waste treatment facilities, radioactive waste storage and management were studied. The natural sodalite Na8[Al6Si6O24]Cl2 and similar frameworks with different anions are part of sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) low activity radioactive waste produced during steam reforming process treatment. The enthalpies and entropies of formation and the hydration enthalpies of the above-mentioned feltspathoids are obtained and the effect of the different cations and anions on the thermodynamic stability was studied. The results will allow to predict the long term behavior of the compounds in the environment under different conditions.

  2. Deformation of the deep crust: Insights from physiochemical characteristics of deformation microstructures of plagioclase and quartz in gneiss from the Salt Mylonite Zone, Western Gneiss Region, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renedo, R. N.; Piazolo, S.; Whitney, D. L.; Teyssier, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    The deformation behavior of quartz and feldspar controls the rheology of large parts of the continental crust. One way to understand the deformation of these abundant and important minerals in the deep crust is to compare their behavior within and outside of naturally-deformed shear zones. To this end, three samples of quartzofeldspathic gneiss within and adjacent to the Salt Mylonite Zone, a discrete ductile deformation zone in the ultrahigh-pressure Western Gneiss Region of Norway, are investigated in terms of microstructure, chemical composition, and fabric. The three samples represent the microstructural variation across the shear zone including grain size variation, layered (quartz ribbon bearing) v. non-layered gneiss, and variation in modal abundance. Layered gneiss is composed of one grain thick, laterally continuous quartz ribbons with plagioclase and accessory phases in the intervening regions. Non-layered gneiss consists of isolated quartz (individual grains or clusters of up to four grains) within an interconnected network of plagioclase and accessory phases. In layered gneiss, quartz preserves a well-developed crystallographic preferred orientation consistent with dominant activation of the prism and rhomb slip systems, and plagioclase preserves a nearly random fabric. Quartz fabrics from layered shear zone gneiss are stronger than those of quartz from layered gneiss outside of the shear zone. In non-layered gneiss, plagioclase develops a fabric that is consistent with activation of the (001) <010> slip system whereas quartz exhibits a random fabric. Plagioclase in all samples is zoned from Na-richer cores to Ca-richer rims (reverse zoning); zoning is weaker outside of the shear zone (average core-to-rim ΔAn 6%) than within the shear zone (average core-to-rim ΔAn 10%). Results suggest a change in plagioclase and quartz deformation mechanisms occurred during decompression and shear zone development owing to strain/strain-rate variation.

  3. The surface chemistry of dissolving labradorite feldspar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, William H.; Westrich, Henry R.; Arnold, George W.; banfield, Jillian F.

    1989-04-01

    Elastic recoil detection (ERD) analysis was used in conjunction with Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analysis to determine depth profiles of hydrogen, silicon, aluminum and calcium in labradorite crystals reacted under various pH conditions. The inventory of hydrogen in the mineral is strongly affected by solution pH. Hydrogen extensively infiltrates the mineral during reaction for 264 hours with solutions in the pH range 1-3. Infiltration is accompanied by extensive removal of sodium, calcium and aluminum from the mineral. This incongruent reaction proceeds to several hundreds of angstroms of depth and produces a silicon-rich surface which is amorphous to electron diffraction. The amount of hydrogen in the reacted layer is much less than is predicted from knowledge of the quantity of cations leached from the feldspar. These low inventories of hydrogen suggest that hydrogen-bearing groups in the reacted layer repolymermize subsequent to ion exchange and depolymerization reactions. This repolymerization eliminates hydrogen from the layer. At higher pH conditions (pH > 5), hydrogen inventories in the crystals decrease with time relative to an unreacted reference crystal. Hydrogen does not infiltrate beyond the first few unit cells of feldspar. Thus, dissolution in slightly acid, near-neutral, and basic solutions proceeds at the immediate surface of the feldspar. Within the limit of the RBS technique, there is no evidence for incongruent dissolution at these conditions.

  4. Deformation behaviour of feldspar in greenschist facies granitoide shear zones from the Austroalpine basement to the south of the western Tauern window, Eastern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, Felix; Trepmann, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    Objective of this study is to elucidate the feldspar deformation behaviour at greenschist facies conditions relevant for the long-term rheological properties of continental crust. Uncertainties in models for the rheological properties are partly due to a poor knowledge of the deformation mechanisms taking place in granitoid rocks at inaccessible depth. The deformation behaviour of feldspar, the most abundant mineral in the continental crust, is characterized by an interaction of brittle, dissolution-precipitation and crystal-plastic processes, which is difficult to evaluate in experiments given the problematic extrapolation of experimental conditions to reasonable natural conditions. However, microfabrics of metamorphic granitoid rocks record the grain-scale deformation mechanisms and involved chemical reactions proceeding during their geological history. This usually includes deformation and modification through several stages in space (depth, i.e., P, T conditions) and/or time. For deciphering the rock's record this implies both, challenge and chance to resolve these different stages. Here, we use the deformation record of mylonitic pegmatites from the Austroalpine basement south to the western Tauern window. The structural, crystallographic and chemical characteristics of the feldspar microfabrics are determined via micro-analytical techniques (polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, SEM, electron back scatter diffraction, EBSD) to identify the relevant deformation mechanisms and deformation conditions. The pegmatites represent a relatively simple Ca-poor granitoid system, mineralogically dominated by albite-rich plagioclase, K-feldspar and quartz. The matrix of the mylonitic pegmatites is composed of alternating monomineralic albite and quartz ribbons defining the foliation. Fragmented tourmaline and K-feldspar porphyroclasts occur isolated within the matrix. At sites of dilation along the stretching lineation K-feldspar porphyroclasts show

  5. Sintering behaviour of feldspar and influence of electric charge effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallala, W.; Gaied, M. E.

    2011-04-01

    The characterization of feldspar for electric porcelain and the behaviour of these materials after heating at 1230°C were studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) were used to identify the present phases and the densification level. Feldspar sand was treated by flotation. The floated feldspar is constituted by microcline, quartz, and minor amounts of albite. The microstructure of sintered feldspar at 1230°C is essentially vitreous with open microporosities. The dielectrical properties of composites were characterized by using the induced courant method (ICM), which indicates that the charge trapping capacity depends on the mineralogical and chemical composition of feldspar.

  6. Energy related studies utilizing K-feldspar thermochronology. Progress performance report, 1990--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    Two distinct sources of information are available from a {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar step-heating experiment: the age spectrum and Arrhenius plot. Model ages are calculated from the flux of radiogenic argon ({sup 40}Ar*) (assuming trapped argon of atmospheric composition) relative to the reactor produced {sup 39}Ar evolved during discrete laboratory heating steps. With the additional assumption that the {sup 39}Ar is uniformly distributed within the sample, we can infer the spatial distribution of the daughter product. ne associated Arrhenius plot, derived by plotting the diffusion coefficient (obtained from the inversion of the 39{sup Ar} release function assuming a single domain) against the inverse temperature of laboratory heating, are a convolution of the parameters which characterize the individual diffusion domains (whether these be dictated by varying length scale, energetics, etc.). However, many and perhaps Most {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age spectra for slowly cooled alkali feldspars are significantly different from model age spectra calculated assuming a single diffusion-domain size. In addition, Arrhenius plots calculated from the measured loss of {sup 39}Ar during the step heating experiment show departures from linearity that are inconsistent with diffusion from domains of equal size. By extending the single diffusion-domain closure model (Dodsontype) to apply to minerals with a discrete distribution of domain sizes, we obtained an internally consistent explanation for the commonly observed features of alkali feldspar age spectra and their associated Arrhenius plots.

  7. Distribution and textures of K-feldspar grains in the George Ashley Block layered-aplite pegmatite intrusive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleck, W. D.

    2013-12-01

    Both Johns & Tuttle (1963) and London (2008) note that the distribution of potassium is neither uniform nor symmetrical in some pegmatite bodies. A detailed chemical and mineral analysis of the George Ashley Block (Kleck & Foord 1999) shows that the distribution of K-feldspar over the entire body is generally uniform, but not symmetrical. The amounts of quartz, plagioclase, muscovite, and garnet are neither uniform nor symmetrical. It is noted that layered-aplite, pegmatite intrusives (terminology of Jahns & Tuttle 1963) are intruded horizontally, and it is suggested that these are the pegmatite bodies which have this non-uniform distribution of minerals. These types of pegmatite bodies are distinctly different from other pegmatite bodies in several ways. The core zone in these bodies is not centrally located and typically divides these bodies into a pegmatitic top and an aplitic bottom; the top and bottom appear to be contemporaneous. The features and content of the border- and core-zones are not included in this discussion. The texture of the K-feldspar in the top of these bodies is generally pegmatitic; some of the K-feldspar grains may exist as ultra-large grains which have a teardrop shape or minor-crystal surfaces. In the bottom of these bodies, the K-feldspar is commonly rounded grains approximately 1 mm in diameter; rarely, some K-feldspar grains here are centimeter-grained with crystal surfaces indicating growth. In the George Ashley Block, the concentration and distribution of K-feldspar is inversely symmetrical in the top vs. bottom. In the top it increases toward the core zone; K-feldspar--20 increasing to 60 vol% (all values one significant figure) and K2O--3 increasing to 8 wt%. In the bottom it decreases toward the core zone; K-feldspar--40 decreasing to 0 vol% and K2O--4 decreasing to 0 wt%. The two trends are approximately parallel and the total amounts are approximately constant. The suggested conditions and mechanisms (with the added condition of

  8. Plagioclase deformation in upper-greenschist facies meta-pegmatite mylonites from the Austroalpine Matsch Unit (Eastern Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberlei, Tobias; Habler, Gerlinde; Abart, Rainer; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Feldspars are common rock forming minerals as they are stable over a wide range of bulk rock compositions and metamorphic conditions within the Earth's crust. The deformation mechanisms of feldspar play an important role in rheological models for the crust and therefore have received considerable attention in studies on natural rocks and in experimental studies. The interaction of frictional and viscous deformation mechanisms and the onset of crystal plastic deformation in feldspars occur over a broad range of pressures and temperatures. In this work, we present new microstructural, textural and mineral chemical data of plagioclase from Permian metapegmatites within the Austroalpine Matsch Unit in Southern Tyrol (Italy). These crystalline basement rocks were deformed and metamorphosed at conditions close to the greenschist/amphibolites facies transition at 480±26°C during the Cretaceous (Habler et al., 2009). The investigated samples have been collected from meter-scale shear zones which typically occur at boundaries of lithological subunits. The southern tectonic boundary of this unit is commonly referred to as the "Vinschgau Shear Zone" (Schmid & Haas, 1989). We applied the Electron Backscatter Diffraction method to investigate the grain- and subgrain-boundaries and the nature of effective deformation mechanisms in plagioclase. Large albite porphyroclasts in the mylonitic Permian metapegmatites show grain internal traces of dissolution surfaces and the formation of new, strain-free grains with straight grain boundary segments and partly 120° grain boundary triple junctions in dilatant sites. The aggregates of new grains neither have a lattice preferred orientation nor a crystallographic orientation relation with the adjacent clast, and are characterized by the lack of grain internal deformation, suggesting that these are new precipitates rather than clast-fragments or recrystallized subgrains. Furthermore, the porphyroclasts show cracks and kinks, associated

  9. Linking Plagioclase Zoning Patterns to Active Magma Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbekov, P. E.; Nicolaysen, K. P.; Neill, O. K.; Shcherbakov, V.; Plechov, P.; Eichelberger, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Plagioclase, one of the most common and abundant mineral phases in volcanic products, will vary in composition in response to changes in temperature, pressure, composition of the ambient silicate melt, and melt H2O concentration. Changes in these parameters may cause dissolution or growth of plagioclase crystals, forming characteristic textural and compositional variations (zoning patterns), the complete core-to-rim sequence of which describes events experienced by an individual crystal from its nucleation to the last moments of its growth. Plagioclase crystals in a typical volcanic rock may look drastically dissimilar despite their spatial proximity and the fact that they have erupted together. Although they shared last moments of their growth during magma ascent and eruption, their prior experiences could be very different, as plagioclase crystals often come from different domains of the same magma system. Distinguishing similar zoning patterns, correlating them across the entire population of plagioclase crystals, and linking these patterns to specific perturbations in the magmatic system may provide additional perspective on the variety, extent, and timing of magma processes at active volcanic systems. Examples of magma processes, which may be distinguished based on plagioclase zoning patterns, include (1) cooling due to heat loss, (2) heating and/or pressure build up due to an input of new magmatic material, (3) pressure drop in response to magma system depressurization, and (4) crystal transfer between different magma domains/bodies. This review will include contrasting examples of zoning patters from recent eruptions of Karymsky, Bezymianny, and Tolbachik Volcanoes in Kamchatka, Augustine and Cleveland Volcanoes in Alaska, as well as from the drilling into an active magma body at Krafla, Iceland.

  10. Thermal history and origin of the Tanzanian Craton from Pb isotope thermochronology of feldspars from lower crustal xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, Jeremy J.; McDonough, William F.; Rudnick, Roberta L.

    2011-01-01

    Common and radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions of plagioclase and anti-perthitic feldspars from granulite-facies lower crustal xenoliths from the Labait Volcano on the eastern margin of the Tanzanian Craton have been measured via laser ablation MC-ICP-MS. Common Pb in plagioclase and a single stage Pb evolution model indicate that the lower crust of the Tanzanian Craton was extracted from mantle having a 238U/ 204Pb of 8.1 ± 0.3 and a 232Th/ 238U of 4.3 ± 0.1 at 2.71 ± 0.09 Ga (all uncertainties are 2σ). Since 2.4 Ga, some orthoclase domains within anti-perthites have evolved with a maximum 238U/ 204Pb of 6 and 232Th/ 238U of 4.3. The spread in Pb isotopic composition in the anti-perthitic feldspars yields single crystal Pb-Pb isochrons of ˜ 2.4 Ga, within uncertainty of U-Pb zircon ages from the same sample suite. The Pb isotopic heterogeneities imply that these granulites resided at temperatures < 600 °C in the lower crust of the Tanzanian Craton from ca. 2.4 Ga to the present. In concert with the chemistry of surface samples, mantle xenoliths, and lower crustal xenoliths, our data imply that the cratonic lithosphere in Tanzania formed ca. ˜ 2.7 Ga, in a convergent margin setting, and has remained undisturbed since 2.7 Ga.

  11. Igneous phenocrystic origin of K-feldspar megacrysts in granitic rocks from the Sierra Nevada batholith

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Sisson, T.W.

    2008-01-01

    Study of four K-feldspar megacrystic granitic plutons and related dikes in the Sierra Nevada composite batholith indicates that the megacrysts are phenocrysts that grew in contact with granitic melt. Growth to megacrystic sizes was due to repeated replenishment of the magma bodies by fresh granitic melt that maintained temperatures above the solidus for extended time periods and that provided components necessary for K-feldspar growth. These intrusions cooled 89-83 Ma, are the youngest in the range, and represent the culminating magmatic phase of the Sierra Nevada batholith. They are the granodiorite of Topaz Lake, the Cathedral Peak Granodiorite, the Mono Creek Granite, the Whitney Granodiorite, the Johnson Granite Porphyry, and the Golden Bear Dike. Megacrysts in these igneous bodies attain 4-10 cm in length. All have sawtooth oscillatory zoning marked by varying concentration of BaO ranging generally from 3.5 to 0.5 wt%. Some of the more pronounced zones begin with resorption and channeling of the underlying zone. Layers of mineral inclusions, principally plagioclase, but also biotite, quartz, hornblende, titanite, and accessory minerals, are parallel to the BaO-delineated zones, are sorted by size along the boundaries, and have their long axes preferentially aligned parallel to the boundaries. These features indicate that the K-feldspar megacrysts grew while surrounded by melt, allowing the inclusion minerals to periodically attach themselves to the faces of the growing crystals. The temperature of growth of titanite included within the K-feldspar megacrysts is estimated by use of a Zr-in-titanite geothermometer. Megacryst-hosted titanite grains all yield temperatures typical of felsic magmas, mainly 735-760 ??C. Titanite grains in the granodiorite hosts marginal to the megacrysts range to lower growth temperatures, in some instances into the subsolidus. The limited range and igneous values of growth temperatures for megacryst-hosted titanite grains support the

  12. Feldspar-fluid interactions in braid microperthites: pleated rims and vein microperthites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Martin R.; Waldron, Kim A.; Parsons, I.; Brown, William L.

    Braid microperthitic alkali feldspars in the Klokken, South Greenland and Coldwell, Ontario syenite intrusions have bulk-compositional variations along grain boundaries called pleated rims. These, together with vein microperthites in aplites which cross-cut the syenites, have been investigated by SEM and TEM. We distinguish two main types of pleated rims, ``arched '' and ``parallel-sided '', consisting of alternating Ab- and Or-rich areas on (001), which are 0.5-300 μm in length normal to (010) and 0.2-20 μm in width along (010). The smallest pleats, which occur on intracrystalline boundaries in Klokken feldspars, are fully coherent and composed of low albite and low microcline. Above the heads of some of the coarser pleats, braid microperthite grades into a film crypto- and micro-perthite and antiperthite microtexture called a ``transitional zone'' containing roughly planar lamellae of low albite and tweed orthoclase. During pleat development, local alternating volumes form in which the proportions of the phases differ ( phase separation) and the morphology of the intergrowths changes from braided to straight in response to this change in local bulk composition. Straightening is also accompanied by transformation of low microcline to tweed orthoclase. The coarsest pleats, which occur along grain boundaries in feldspars from the Coldwell syenite, are semi- or in-coherent and have a thick coherent and semicoherent transitional zone. Coarsening of pleats and development of the transitional zone has been facilitated by diffusion of ``water'' into grain interiors. In many cases, pleated rims have suffered deuteric alteration, by dissolution-reprecipitation processes, through the action of a water-rich fluid from the grain boundary, in which tweed orthoclase was transformed into irregular microcline and micropores developed. Vein microperthites in aplites from Klokken, and by extension the vein microperthites almost universal in most alkali granites, are interpreted

  13. Saddle-shaped 40Ar /39Ar age spectra from young, microstructurally complex potassium feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitler, Peter K.; Fitz Gerald, John D.

    1986-06-01

    A suite of young potassium feldspars show markedly saddle-shaped 40Ar /39Ar age spectra as a result of incorporating 10 -10 to 10 -9 mol/g of excess 40Ar. The minima of these age spectra record reasonable cooling ages, based on the known thermal history and geology of the samples. Acid etching of one sample indicates that excess 40Ar is concentrated near grain margins. The release of a substantial portion of this excess Ar at high temperatures in the laboratory requires that this component be situated in a more retentive site than radiogenic 40Ar. Anion vacancies have been proposed to act in this role in plagioclase, and we speculate that this is so in K-feldspar as well. Such a mechanism would explain the observation that relative to radiogenic 40Ar, excess 40Ar is incorporated at low temperatures in nature but is released at high temperatures in the laboratory. Oxygen diffusion provides an appropriate analogy for this phenomenon, being relatively fast under natural, hydrothermal conditions, but extremely slow in anhydrous environments such as an Ar-extraction system. TEM observations made on two of the samples confirm that their effective grain sizes for diffusion are likely to be on the order of ten microns, due to the presence of such microstructures as incoherent exsolution lamellae, dislocations, and stepped twins. TEM observations also reveal the presence in one sample of orthoclase enclaves in a microcline host.

  14. The origin of olivine-rich troctolites/plagioclase-dunites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garapic, G.; Faul, U.; Kruckenberg, S. C.; Wiejaczka, J.; Newton, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Olivine-rich troctolites or plagioclase dunites are a type of rock commonly found in oceanic crust and peridotite massifs that does not fit into a IUGS classification. Part of the reason is that their origin is poorly constrained, in particular whether these rocks are cumulates or residual mantle rocks. To avoid implications for origin or process Blackman et al. 2006 defined as olivine-rich troctolites rocks that contain > 70% olivine,with plagioclase, cpx and spinel. We examined this type of rock in Krivaja peridotite massif in Bosnia-Herzegovina where it occurs as massive outcrops with an area of several tens of square kilometres. The plagioclase dunites are underlain by peridotites that contain plagioclase patches indicative of melt migration. These peridotites are progressively depleted of pyroxene and cross-cut by gabbro veins. The plagioclase dunites have Mg# predominantly from 89 - 90 and Ni contents from 2500 - 3500 ppm, similar to the peridotites. EBSD mapping of whole thin sections shows orientation distribution functions (odf) that are unlike any of the fabric types observed in naturally or experimentally deformed rocks with a strong maximum in (001) near the foliation plane (although this plane is poorly defined) and weak girdles of the other two axes perpendicular to it. For comparison, we also mapped known cumulates from the Rum and Stillwater layered intrusions with somewhat lower Mg# of 84 - 86. The odf of these samples show a strong maximum of (010) perpendicular to the foliation plane and weak girdles of the other two axes in the plane. This fabric type has been explained by crystal settling and compaction in a magma chamber. Together these observations show that the plagioclase dunites from Krivaja, as well as rocks with similar characteristics e.g. from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (Drouin et al. 2010) and Italy (Renna and Tribuzio, 2011) are not cumulates but are of mantle origin. An important characteristic of the plagioclase dunites is that the

  15. Shocked plagioclase signatures in Thermal Emission Spectrometer data of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Staid, M.I.; Titus, T.N.; Becker, K.

    2006-01-01

    The extensive impact cratering record on Mars combined with evidence from SNC meteorites suggests that a significant fraction of the surface is composed of materials subjected to variable shock pressures. Pressure-induced structural changes in minerals during high-pressure shock events alter their thermal infrared spectral emission features, particularly for feldspars, in a predictable fashion. To understand the degree to which the distribution and magnitude of shock effects influence martian surface mineralogy, we used standard spectral mineral libraries supplemented by laboratory spectra of experimentally shocked bytownite feldspar [Johnson, J.R., Ho??rz, F., Christensen, P., Lucey, P.G., 2002b. J. Geophys. Res. 107 (E10), doi:10.1029/2001JE001517] to deconvolve Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data from six relatively large (>50 km) impact craters on Mars. We used both TES orbital data and TES mosaics (emission phase function sequences) to study local and regional areas near the craters, and compared the differences between models using single TES detector data and 3 ?? 2 detector-averaged data. Inclusion of shocked feldspar spectra in the deconvolution models consistently improved the rms errors compared to models in which the spectra were not used, and resulted in modeled shocked feldspar abundances of >15% in some regions. However, the magnitudes of model rms error improvements were within the noise equivalent rms errors for the TES instrument [Hamilton V., personal communication]. This suggests that while shocked feldspars may be a component of the regions studied, their presence cannot be conclusively demonstrated in the TES data analyzed here. If the distributions of shocked feldspars suggested by the models are real, the lack of spatial correlation to crater materials may reflect extensive aeolian mixing of martian regolith materials composed of variably shocked impact ejecta from both local and distant sources. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  16. Synthesis for Lunar Simulants: Glass, Agglutinate, Plagioclase, Breccia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Michael; Wilson, Stephen A.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Stoeser, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The video describes a process for making glass for lunar regolith simulants that was developed from a patented glass-producing technology. Glass composition can be matched to simulant design and specification. Production of glass, pseudo agglutinates, plagioclase, and breccias is demonstrated. The system is capable of producing hundreds of kilograms of high quality glass and simulants per day.

  17. Porphyry copper enrichment linked to excess aluminium in plagioclase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, B. J.; Herrington, R. J.; Morris, A.

    2016-03-01

    Porphyry copper deposits provide around 75%, 50% and 20% of world copper, molybdenum and gold, respectively. The deposits are mainly centred on calc-alkaline porphyry magmatic systems in subduction zone settings. Although calc-alkaline magmas are relatively common, large porphyry copper deposits are extremely rare and increasingly difficult to discover. Here, we compile existing geochemical data for magmatic plagioclase, a dominant mineral in calc-alkaline rocks, from fertile (porphyry-associated) and barren magmatic systems worldwide, barren examples having no associated porphyry deposit. We show that plagioclase from fertile systems is distinct in containing `excess’ aluminium. This signature is clearly demonstrated in a case study carried out on plagioclase from the fertile La Paloma and Los Sulfatos copper porphyry systems in Chile. Further, the presence of concentric zones of high excess aluminium suggests its incorporation as a result of magmatic processes. As excess aluminium has been linked to high melt water contents, the concentric zones may record injections of hydrous fluid or fluid-rich melts into the sub-porphyry magma chamber. We propose that excess aluminium may exclude copper from plagioclase, so enriching the remaining melts. Furthermore, this chemical signature can be used as an exploration indicator for copper porphyry deposits.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Plagioclase Growth During Magma Storage and Ascent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, O. E.; Gorokhova, N. V.; Plechov, P.

    2012-12-01

    A mathematical model of plagioclase growth from a magmatic melt is developed. Plagioclase is one of the main rock-forming minerals. Plagioclase is composed of molecules of two types: anorthite and albite. Crystallization occurs as a result of component (albite and anorthite) diffusion to the boundary of the growing crystal and opposite diffusion of residual melt components. The model is based on multicomponent diffusion equations with the real dependencies between crystal and melt compositions, pressure and temperature. Mass conservation is applied as a boundary condition on a crystal-melt interface. Crystal growth rate depends on local magma undercooling in the vicinity of the crystal. We assume that the growth is in 1D and that the crystal is located in a cell with symmetry (no mass flux) conditions on the cell boundaries. Diffusion of components within the crystal is negligibly slow. Based on this model variation of plagioclase composition with respect of monotonic cooling or pressure drop is studied. It is shown that due to interplay between diffusion of melt components to crystal-melt interface and crystal growth rate crystal composition can vary in a non-monotonic way in response to linear decrease in temperature. A condition of presence of plagioclase zonation is obtained as a result of parametric studies. A growth of rims on plagioclase crystals related to magma ascent during dome building eruptions on Bezymianny volcano (Kamchatka) is simulated. Bezymianny Volcano supplies material to the Earth surface about every half a year. Eruptions of 2000, 2006 and 2007 were selected to determine the magma ascent conditions as the most typical for the last activity cycle. The role of initial conditions, crystal growth rate, the ratio between anorthite and albite diffusion rates and ascent conditions on the rim composition is investigated. The ascent conditions of magma for Bezymianny Volcano eruptions were reconstructed. Simulations suggest ascent from a pressure of

  19. A newly calibrated plagioclase-liquid hygrometer for rhyolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, R. A.; Waters, L.

    2012-12-01

    Rhyolite is the most differentiated silicate magma type on Earth and makes up some of the largest explosive eruptions (100-1000's km3), including those at Yellowstone and Long Valley calderas. Understanding the origin and evolution of large-volume rhyolitic magmatic systems is of considerable interest because their formation must fundamentally re-constitute and differentiate continental crust. The mineral phases in rhyolites often provide a rich opportunity to examine pre-eruptive temperatures, oxidation states, and melt water concentrations, as well as time scales for melt accumulation in the upper crust. Given the wealth of information that can be derived from various mineral phases in rhyolites, it is perhaps surprising that so few phase-equilibrium experiments exist for natural high-silica rhyolite melt compositions. The limitation in the experimental data set for rhyolites was a problem encountered by Lange et al. (2009) during their calibration of the plagioclase-liquid hygrometer. Available high-quality experiments (e.g., those with glass totals, including H2O, ≤ 97%) were restricted to those with plagioclase ≥ An37. Results from the experimental study of Couch et al. (2003) on a low-SiO2 rhyolite (71.4 wt%) were included in the Lange et al. (2009) calibration, whereas experiments on a rhyolite (75.2 wt% SiO2) from a more recent study (Tomiya et al., 2010) were published afterwards. Therefore, application of the 2009 plagioclase-liquid hygrometer to rhyolites with sodic plagioclase (plagioclase-liquid hygrometer well calibrated for rhyolites. Moreover, at fluid-saturated, shallow crustal conditions (100-250 MPa) plagioclase often saturates at higher pressures than quartz in many rhyolites, and therefore the

  20. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  1. Milk-alkali syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000332.htm Milk-alkali syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Milk-alkali syndrome is a condition in which there ...

  2. Reactions of the feldspar surface with metal ions: Sorption of Pb(II), U(VI) and Np(V), and surface analytical studies of reaction with Pb(II) and U(VI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chardon, Emmanuelle S.; Bosbach, Dirk; Bryan, Nicholas D.; Lyon, Ian C.; Marquardt, Christian; Römer, Jürgen; Schild, Dieter; Vaughan, David J.; Wincott, Paul L.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Livens, Francis R.

    2008-01-01

    Feldspar minerals are thermodynamically unstable in the near-surface environment and their surfaces are well known to react readily with aqueous solutions, leading to incongruent dissolution at low pH values, but congruent dissolution at neutral and high pH values. Interactions with mineral surfaces are an important control on the environmental transport of trace elements and detrital feldspars are abundant in soils and sediments. However, the interactions of metal ions in solution with the reacting feldspar surface have not been widely explored. The interactions of Pb(II), U(VI) and Np(V) ions with the feldspar surface have therefore been studied. Lead is taken up by the microcline surface at pH 6 and 10, but no uptake could be measured at pH 2. There was measurable uptake of Pb(II) on the plagioclase surface at pH 2, 6 and 10. Uptake always increased with pH. In most conditions, Pb(II) reacts through cation exchange process although, at high pH, a discrete phase, probably hydrocerrusite, is observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) to precipitate on the plagioclase surface. Supersaturation with hydrocerrusite in these conditions is expected from thermodynamic calculations. Uptake of uranyl ion (UO22+), generally through surface complex formation, could only be measured at pH 6 and 10. At pH 6 and an initial U(VI) concentration above 21.0 μM, precipitation of becquerelite (Ca[(UO2)3O2(OH)3]2·8H2O), identified by AFM and characterised by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, is observed on plagioclase. The U(VI) concentration range in which becquerelite precipitation begins (dissolved U(VI) 1-5 μM) is consistent with that predicted from thermodynamic modelling. On plagioclase feldspar, secondary ion mass spectrometry showed diffusion of uranium into the altered surface layer. Uptake of the neptunyl ion (Np(V)) was found at pH 6 and 10 for microcline and at pH 2, 6 and 10 for plagioclase, and was generally lower than uptake of

  3. Skaergaard Liquidus Temperatures and the Frailty of Plagioclase Thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Because of its refractory nature and low diffusivity, plagioclase is the only mineral likely to record liquidus temperatures of mafic magmas. As such, it has become a talisman of such thermometry, but with limited success. Precise thermal information can perhaps best be obtained experimentally by finding the unique cotectic assemblage of all relevant mineral compositions with melt at relevant pressure. By repeating such experiments at more evolved compositions a relevant plagioclase thermometric history should be obtained. This principle of cotectic calibration was that used as a starting point by Morse (2008). By contrast, unfiltered literature results of experimental plagioclase - liquid determinations were used by Thy et al. (2009), with a T-X regression through all the data including evolved compositions, to describe the Skaergaard liquidus. Implicit in this exercise was the hypothesis that all the data represented stable equilibria and that low-melting components at static melting behaved the same as if in fractional crystallization. Tests for stable equilibrium in such a database [including that of Putirka (2005) and many others as e.g. in LEPR (lepr.ofm-research.org)] can usefully start with an examination of plagioclase loop width versus temperature or plagioclase composition. The loop width of a binary solution against either T or X is described by a slightly skewed parabola anchored at zero at both ends and rising to a broad maximum near An60 in the case of plagioclase. The peak width in XAn (Sol - Liq) has a value of 0.32 at 1 atm in Di-An-Ab and 0.24 at An-57 in a MORB fractional crystallization exercise. Values falling outside this range downward are likely to reflect metastable compositions. All of the 54 data points in one source used by Thy et al. (2009) fall below this range and are scattered to as low as 0.04. Such a shotgun scatter defines metastability and the loss of calibration. Moderate scatter at much higher values of loop width in the LEPR

  4. Plagioclase dissolution during CO₂-SO₂ cosequestration: effects of sulfate.

    PubMed

    Min, Yujia; Kubicki, James D; Jun, Young-Shin

    2015-02-01

    Geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS) is one of the most promising methods to mitigate the adverse impacts of global climate change. The performance of GCS can be affected by mineral dissolution and precipitation induced by injected CO2. Cosequestration with acidic gas such as SO2 can reduce the high cost of GCS, but it will increase the sulfate's concentration in GCS sites, where sulfate can potentially affect plagioclase dissolution/precipitation. This work investigated the effects of 0.05 M sulfate on plagioclase (anorthite) dissolution and subsequent mineral precipitation at 90 °C, 100 atm CO2, and 1 M NaCl, conditions relevant to GCS sites. The adsorption of sulfate on anorthite, a Ca-rich plagioclase, was examined using attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and then simulated using density functional theory calculations. We found that the dissolution rate of anorthite was enhanced by a factor of 1.36 by the formation of inner-sphere monodentate complexes between sulfate and the aluminum sites on anorthite surfaces. However, this effect was almost completely suppressed in the presence of 0.01 M oxalate, an organic ligand that can exist in GCS sites. Interestingly, sulfate also inhibited the formation of secondary mineral precipitation through the formation of aluminum-sulfate complexes in the aqueous phase. This work, for the first time, reports the surface complexation between sulfate and plagioclase that can occur in GCS sites. The results provide new insights for obtaining scientific guidelines for the proper amount of SO2 coinjection and finally for evaluating the economic efficiency and environmental safety of GCS operations. PMID:25549263

  5. Grain-Recycling Zoning of Plagioclase and Metamorphic Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, M. A.; Wheeler, J.

    2008-12-01

    Quartzo-feldspathic gneisses make up much of the continental crust often having enjoyed a complex thermal history. Determining peak metamorphic conditions using conventional equilibrium thermodynamics is difficult because there are too many degrees of freedom. Zoned minerals are problematic, because of uncertainties in the exact equilibrium assemblage at any particular time, but provide a time-dependent measure of changes in equilibrium conditions. Zoning can arise due to diffusion of atoms into a homogeneous lattice from grain boundarys or through mineral growth under changing pressure, temperature or bulk rock composition. Conventional growth zoning considers a porphyroblast (commonly garnet) growing in an effectively homogeneous matrix with the growth rate controlled by reactions that produce new porphyroblast material. However, simulations of zoning developed by grain growth in a monophase domains of more complex rocks show boundary migration rates control the zoning geometry as shrinking grains are cannibalised by growing grains. This new grain-recycling zoning develops because chemical reactions change the composition of the material that is swept by the grain boundary without changing the mineral. A model of this process has been created using the Gibbs free energy minimisation software Theriak-Domino controlled by our custom written Matlab control program. This program assumes an initially homogeneous composition of equigranular plagioclase then uses the experimentally determined normal growth law for plagioclase to calculate the grain-size increase for a given time-step thus giving the amount of material swept. Assuming this is all available for reaction at the same time, the rest of the plagioclase is removed from the bulk composition, the equilibrium plagioclase composition calculated, and added to the growing grain. This fractionation alters the range of plagioclase compositions available over a given temperature range, changing PT estimates obtained

  6. A New Thermodynamic Model for the Plagioclase-Liquid Hygrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    A new thermodynamic model for the plagioclase-liquid hygrometer is presented, which is based on the equilibrium exchange of the An (CaAl2Si2O8) and Ab (NaAlSi3O8) components between plagioclase solid solution and magmatic liquid solution. The reaction is: CaAl2Si2O8 (plag) + NaAlSi3O8 (liq) = CaAl2Si2O8 (liq) + NaAlSi3O8 (plag). The equilibrium for this reaction as a function of temperature, pressure, and composition is calculated from: DeltaG(T,P)/RT = 0 = DeltaH°(T)/RT - DeltaS°(T)/R + lnK + intDeltaV°(P)/RT, where R is the universal gas constant and K is the equilibrium constant. In this equation, DeltaH°(T) and DeltaS°(T) are equal to the difference between the enthalpy and entropy of fusion of pure An and pure Ab, respectively, as a function of temperature. These data are obtained from the drop calorimetric experiments of Stebbins et al. (1983) and Richet and Bottinga (1984). Similarly, DeltaV°T(P) is the difference between the volume of fusion of pure An and that of pure Ab at temperature T as a function of pressure. The volumetric data for the crystalline phases are taken from Wruck et al. (1991), Berman (1988), Fei (1995), Downs et al. (1993), and Angel (2004). The volumetric data for the liquid phase are taken from Lange (1997), Kress et al. (1988) and Ai and Lange (2005). The THERMOCALC model of Powell et al. (1998) is used to calculate the activity- composition relation for crystalline plagioclase. For the liquid components, the ideal contribution to their activity terms is taken as the mole fraction of CaO for the An component and NaO0.5 for the Ab component. The ln ratio of their activity coefficient terms is equated to: aXH2O + b + cXSiO2, where a, b, and c are parameters fitted from regression against hydrous liquid-plagioclase equilibria. The fact that XH2O strongly affects the liquid activity coefficient terms for albite and anorthite forms the basis of the plagioclase hygrometer. The thermodynamic model outlined above was calibrated against

  7. Feldspar microtextures and multistage thermal history of syenites from the Coldwell Complex, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, Kim A.; Parsons, Ian

    1992-06-01

    Optical and TEM (transmission electron microscopy) observations of perthites from augite syenites in the Coldwell Complex (Ontario) reveal a complex set of microtextures that outline a multistage thermal history. Regular microtextures (linear or braid texture, straincontrolled, coherent intergrowths) show a progressive evolution from the margin of the intrusion inwards with lamellar spacings in the range 40 100 nm. The textures evolve in a manner similar to those for the Klokken intrusion and reflect differences in cooling rates and bulk composition. Superimposed upon the regular microtexture are 10 μm scale compositional fluctuations which we call “ripples”. The boundary relationships and bulk composition of ripples, which are themselves Ab-rich and Or-rich linear coherent cryptoperthites, suggest that they formed by coarsening during a phase of high-temperature (˜530°C) fluid-feldspar interaction. This was followed by a return to coherent exsolution in which fluid was not involved. Coarse, irregular, patch microperthite cross-cuts all other microtextures. These final “deuteric” intergrowths are believed to result from a further low-temperature (< 380° C) fluid-feldspar interaction and are associated with subgrain formation and the presence of micropores. The outermost syenite sample, against a gabbro ring structure, has distinctive, modified microtextures, indicating that the gabbro is, at least in part, a later intrusion. Our findings show that TEM work on alkali feldspar microtextures can identify discrete thermal events in the cooling history of igneous plutons and illustrates the potential of such microtextures for establishing the relative ages of intrusive rocks.

  8. Lunar granites with unique ternary feldspars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, G.; Stoeser, D. B.; Marvin, U. B.; Bower, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    An unusually high concentration of granitic fragments, with textures ranging from holocrystalline to glassy, occurs throughout Boulder 1, a complex breccia of highland rocks from Apollo 17, Station 2. Among the minerals included in the granites are enigmatic K-Ca-rich feldspars that fall in the forbidden region of the ternary diagram. The great variability in chemistry and texture is probably the result of impact degradation and melting of a granitic source-rock. Studies of the breccia matrix suggest that this original granitic source-rock may have contained more pyroxenes and phosphates than most of the present clasts contain. Petrographic observations on Apollo 15 KREEP basalts indicate that granitic liquids may be produced by differentiation without immiscibility, and the association of the granites with KREEP-rich fragments in the boulder suggests that the granites represent a residual liquid from the plutonic fractional crystallization of a KREEP-rich magma. Boulder 1 is unique among Apollo 17 samples in its silica-KREEP-rich composition. We conclude that the boulder represents a source-rock unlike the bedrock of South Massif.

  9. Evidence for 26Al in Feldspars from the H4 Chondrite Ste. Marguerite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinner, E.; Gopel, C.

    1992-07-01

    One of the important questions for the history of the early solar system is whether or not there was enough ^26Al to melt small planetary bodies through the heat released by its decay. Although there is ample evidence for the existence of live ^26Al in refractory inclusions (Wasserburg and Papanastassiou, 1982; Hutcheon, 1982; Podosek et al., 1991), CAIs are special objects with peculiar properties and their Al is not necessarily representative of that of their host meteorites nor the early solar systems. Furthermore, some inclusions do not show any evidence for ^26Al (Wasserburg and Papanastassiou, 1982; Ireland, 1990; Virag et al., 1991), raising the possibility of ^26Al heterogeneity. The only previous observation of ^26Mg excesses attributed to the decay of ^26Al outside of CAIs was in an igneous clast from Semarkona (Hutcheon and Hutchison, 1989) leading to the conclusion that ^26Al indeed could have been a heat source for planetary melting. We have measured Al-Mg in plagioclase grains from the H4 chondrite Ste. Marguerite by ion microprobe mass spectrometry. Feldspars from H4 chondrites are good samples for addressing the problem of ^26Al as heat source because most Al resides in this phase and some H4s experienced fast cooling (Pellas and Storzer, 1981); in fact, the possibility of live ^26Al in feldspars from H4 chondrites that cooled fast has been predicted by Pellas and Storzer (1981). Furthermore, extremely precise absolute Pb/Pb ages exist for these meteorites (Gopel et al., 1991). Figure 1 shows the measurements on five feldspar crystals. All show ^26Mg excesses. A fit through the data points and the normal ^26Mg/^24Mg ratio of 0.13962 obtained from Lake County plagioclase measured under the same instrumental conditions as the Ste. Marguerite samples yields a (^26Al/^27Al)(sub)0 ratio of (2.0 +- 0.6) x 10^-7. If interpreted chronologically this ratio dates the retention of radiogenic ^26Mg in Ste. Marguerite feldspar to 5.6 +- 0.4 Ma after the

  10. Spectral properties of plagioclase and pyroxene mixtures and the interpretation of lunar soil spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crown, David A.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1987-01-01

    Pyroxene and plagioclase mixtures' spectral characteristics are investigated with a view to particle size and mineral proportion effects in the cases of variously proportioned labradorite/enstatite compositional mixtures. The amount of plagioclase that will allow its band to be observed in discrete absorption is particle size-dependent; plagioclase is detectable in the flattening of the pyroxene reflectance peak that lies between the 0.9 and 1.9 micron absorption bands, if sufficient plagioclase is present. Attention is given to the combined effects of mineral proportions and particle size for plagioclase/pyroxene mixtures in the case of analogs of mature and immature lunar highland soils.

  11. Weathering of plagioclase across variable flow and solute transport regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Fernando A. L.; Van der Weijden, Cornelis H.

    2012-02-01

    SummaryThe study area is situated in a fault zone with fractured granites and metasediments. In a conceptual model, infiltrating water first passes the bedrock cover of soil and saprolite and then partly enters the fractures. Weathering reactions of minerals occur in small pores and fissures in the bedrock cover zone to continue in the larger fractures. Pumping tests were carried out in a number of boreholes to measure the drawdown as a function of pumping time. From the results, values of transmissivity ( T) could be derived. In combination with the storage coefficient ( S) for similar fault zones, the hydraulic diffusivity ( D = T/ S) could be computed. Water samples, collected from the boreholes, represent fluid packets with a history of weathering reactions in the bedrock cover and in the larger fractures. The major element composition of these samples was used by means of the SiB mass balance algorithm ( Pacheco and Van der Weijden, 1996) to calculate the moles L -1 of dissolved plagioclase (oligoclase with An ≈ 0.20) and the moles L -1 of secondary phases (gibbsite, halloysite, smectite) precipitated along the flow paths of the samples. These results were then used to calculate the net dissolved silica concentrations ( [HSiO40]) related to dissolution of plagioclase followed by precipitation of each of the secondary phases. An interpretation of a plot of each of these [HSiO40] 's versusD is that at D < 0.7 m 2 s -1, dissolution of plagioclase is followed by precipitation of halloysite in the large fractures of the fault zone (open system), whereas at D ⩾ 0.7 m 2 s -1 precipitation of both halloysite and smectite occurs in the rock matrix with small fissures and pores (semi-open system). Before being pumped, the percolating fluids travelled 0.01-13.7 years. During these periods, plagioclase weathered at rates ( W Pl) of 10 -(12.9±1.1) moles m -2 s -1, which are approximately 2.2 orders of magnitude higher than solid-state weathering rates reported in

  12. Alkali differentiation in LL-chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlotzka, F.; Palme, H.; Spettel, B.; Wanke, H.; Fredriksson, K.; Noonan, A. F.

    1983-04-01

    The Kraehenberg and Bhola LL-group chondrites are heterogeneous agglomerates which contain a variety of lithic fragments and chondrules as well as crystal fragments. Both meteorites contain large, cm-sized fragments with high K enrichments. The K-rich inclusions are fragments of larger rock bodies which crystallized from melts of chondritic parent material that had previously been enriched in K and in heavier alkalies,while also being depleted in Na and metal. It is suggested that the K enrichment occurred as an exchange for Na in feldspars via a vapor phase, whose presence on the chondrite parent body (or bodies) is supported by the recent finding of fluid inclusions in chondritic silicates. Cooling rate considerations indicate that the K-rich rock units could not have been very large, implying that the K-rich materials were locally molten by, for example, impact.

  13. APPLICATIONS OF CATHODOLUMINESCENCE OF QUARTZ AND FELDSPAR TO SEDIMENTARY PETROLOGY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.

    1987-01-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL), the emission of visible light during electron bombardment, was first used in sandstone petrology in the mid-1960's. CL techniques are especially useful for determining the origin and source of quartz and feldspar, two of the most common constituents in clastic rocks. CL properties of both minerals are dependent on their temperature of crystallization, duration of cooling, and/or history of deformation. Detrital quartz and feldspar are typically derived from igneous and metamorphic sources and luminesce in the visible range whereas authigenic quartz and feldspar form at low temperatures and do not luminesce. Quantification of luminescent and non-luminescent quartz and feldspar with the scanning electron microscope, electron microprobe, or a commercial CL device can allow for the determination of origin, diagenesis, and source of clastic rocks when used in conjunction with field and other petrographic analyses.

  14. Immersion freezing of aqueous suspensions of K-feldspar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckhaus, Andreas; Kiselev, Alexei; Leisner, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Recent laboratory measurements showed an increased ice nucleation ability of Kalium-rich feldspar particles in the immersion freezing mode [1]. It was suggested that the proportion of K-feldspar in atmospherically relevant ice nuclei is related to their ice nucleation ability. The importance of K-feldspar is further supported by the field measurements, indicating that it can make a mass fraction of up to 24% in Asian and African mineral dusts [2]. In this contribution we present results of immersion freezing experiments with monodisperse droplets of aqueous suspensions of K-feldspar on a cold stage. We show that the ice nucleation activity strongly depends on i) the particle size distribution (in particular the ice nucleation properties of submicron feldspar particles) ii) the weight concentration of the particles in the aqueous suspension and thus on the total particle surface immersed into the droplets and iii) the age of the particles in an aqueous environment. Further a comparison of different K-feldspars is presented indicating that the origin and the processing methods have a significant impact on the IN activity. The mineralogical composition of feldspar samples is analyzed by means of Raman spectroscopy and a quantification of the particle surface is carried out with environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The results of freezing experiments are interpreted within the concept of ice nucleation active surface site (INAS) density, which allows a comparison with data obtained with different experimental methods (IN counters, expansion chambers, etc.) 1. Atkinson, J.D., et al., The importance of feldspar for ice nucleation by mineral dust in mixed-phase clouds. Nature, 2013. 498(7454): p. 355-358. 2. Nickovic, S., et al., Technical Note: High-resolution mineralogical database of dust-productive soils for atmospheric dust modeling. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2012. 12(2): p. 845-855.

  15. Igneous origin of K-feldspar Megacrysts in Granitic Rocks of the Sierra Nevada Batholith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. G.; Sisson, T. W.

    2007-12-01

    Study of the four principal K-feldspar megacrystic granitic plutons and related porphyrys in the Sierra Nevada composite batholith indicates that the included megacrysts are phenocrysts that grew in contact with granitic melt in long-lasting magma chambers. These 89-83 Ma plutons or intrusions are the youngest in the range, and represent the culminating magmatic phase of the batholith. They are the: Granodiorite of Topaz Lake; Cathedral Peak Granodiorite, Mono Creek Granite, Whitney Granodiorite, Johnson Granite Porphyry, and Golden Bear Dike. The zoned megacrysts in each of these igneous bodies attain 4-10 cm in length and all display oscillatory zoning with each zone beginning with a sharp increase followed by a gradual decrease in the concentration of BaO - commonly from 3 to 1 weight percent. Some of the more pronounced zones overlie resorption and channeling features on the underlying zone. Trains of small mineral inclusions (plagioclase, biotite, hornblende, quartz, sphene, and accessory minerals) are parallel to the BaO-delineated zones. The long axes of the inclusions are preferentially aligned parallel to the zone boundaries and inclusions are sorted by size from zone to zone. The growth temperature of sphene included in K-feldspar megacrysts is estimated by use of a Zr-in-sphene geothermometer. The sphene grains all yield igneous temperatures, mainly 735 - 760 °C. Sphene grains in the granodiorite host marginal to the megacrysts range to lower growth temperatures, in some instances into the subsolidus range. The zoning of the megacrysts, their presence in quenched porphry dikes, and the limited range and igneous values of growth temperatures of sphene inclusions within them, support the interpretation that the megacrysts formed as igneous sanidine phenocrysts, and that intrusion temperatures varied by only small amounts while the megacrysts grew. Each Ba- enriched zone was apparently formed by a repeated surge of new, hot melt injected into the large

  16. In situ 40K-40Ca ‘double-plus’ SIMS dating resolves Klokken feldspar 40K-40Ar paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, T. Mark; Heizler, Matthew T.; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Schmitt, Axel K.

    2010-11-01

    The 40K- 40Ca decay system has not been widely utilized as a geochronometer because quantification of radiogenic daughter is difficult except in old, extremely high K/Ca domains. Even these environments have not heretofore been exploited by ion microprobe analysis due to the very high mass resolving power (MRP) of 25,000 required to separate 40K + from 40Ca +. We introduce a method that utilizes doubly-charged K and Ca species which permits isotopic measurements to be made at relatively low MRP (~ 5000). We used this K-Ca 'double-plus' approach to address an enduring controversy in 40Ar/ 39Ar thermochronology revolving around exsolved alkali feldspars from the 1166 Ma Klokken syenite (southern Greenland). Ion microprobe 40K- 40Ca analysis of Klokken samples reveal both isochron and pseudoisochron behaviors that reflect episodic isotopic and chemical exchange of coarsely exsolved perthites and a near end-member K-feldspar until ≤ 719 Ma, and perhaps as late at ~ 400 Ma. Feldspar microtextures in the Klokken syenite evolved over a protracted interval by non-thermal processes (fluid-assisted recrystallization) and thus this sample makes a poor model from which to address the general validity of 40Ar/ 39Ar thermochronological methodologies.

  17. Investigation of Potassium Feldspar Reactivity in Wet Supercritical CO2 by In Situ Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C.; Widener, C.; Schaef, T.; Loring, J.; McGrail, B. P.

    2014-12-01

    Capture and subsequent storage of CO2 in deep geologic reservoirs is progressively being considered as a viable approach to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. In the long term, injected CO2 may become permanently entrapped as silicate minerals react with CO2 enriched fluids to form stable carbonate minerals. Potassium feldspars are highly abundant in the earth's crust and are present in the caprocks and storage formations of many target reservoirs. While the dissolution kinetics and carbonation reactions of feldspars have been well studied in the aqueous phase, comparatively little work has focused on K-feldspar reactivity in the CO2-rich fluid. In this study, we used in situ infrared spectroscopy to investigate the carbonation reactions of natural microcline samples. Experiments were carried out at 50 °C and 91 bar by circulating dry or wet supercritical CO2 (scCO2) past a thin film of powdered sample. Water concentrations ranged from 0% to 125% relative to saturation, and transmission-mode absorbance spectra were recorded as a function of time for 48 hours. No discernible reaction was detected when the samples were exposed to anhydrous scCO2. However, in fully water-saturated scCO2, a thin film of liquid-like water was observed on the samples' surfaces, and up to 0.6% of the microcline was converted to a carbonate phase. Potassium carbonate is the most likely reaction product, but minor amounts of sodium carbonate and siderite may also have formed from minor sample impurities. The extent of reaction appears to be related to the thickness of the water film and is likely a consequence of the film's ability to solvate and transport ions in the vicinity of the mineral surface. Other features observed in the spectra correspond to microcline dissolution and precipitation of amorphous silica. Implications about the role of water in these reactions and the relative effectiveness of alkali feldspars for mineral trapping of CO2 will be discussed.

  18. Brittle grain-size reduction of feldspar, phase mixing and strain localization in granitoids at mid-crustal conditions (Pernambuco shear zone, NE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viegas, Gustavo; Menegon, Luca; Archanjo, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    The Pernambuco shear zone (northeastern Brazil) is a large-scale strike-slip fault that, in its eastern segment, deforms granitoids at mid-crustal conditions. Initially coarse-grained (> 50 µm) feldspar porphyroclasts are intensively fractured and reduced to an ultrafine-grained mixture consisting of plagioclase and K-feldspar grains (< 15 µm) localized in C' shear bands. Detailed microstructural observations and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis do not show evidence of intracrystalline plasticity in feldspar porphyroclasts and/or fluid-assisted replacement reactions. Quartz occurs either as thick (˜ 1-2 mm) monomineralic veins transposed along the shear zone foliation or as thin ribbons ( ≤ 25 µm width) dispersed in the feldspathic mixture. The microstructure and c axis crystallographic-preferred orientation are similar in the thick monomineralic veins and in the thin ribbons, and they suggest dominant subgrain rotation recrystallization and activity of prism < a > and rhomb < a > slip systems. However, the grain size in monophase recrystallized domains decreases when moving from the quartz monomineralic veins to the thin ribbons embedded in the feldspathic C' bands (14 µm vs. 5 µm respectively). The fine-grained feldspar mixture has a weak crystallographic-preferred orientation interpreted as the result of shear zone parallel-oriented growth during diffusion creep, as well as the same composition as the fractured porphyroclasts, suggesting that it generated by mechanical fragmentation of rigid porphyroclasts with a negligible role of chemical disequilibrium. Once C' shear bands were generated and underwent viscous deformation at constant stress conditions, the polyphase feldspathic aggregate would have deformed at a strain rate 1 order of magnitude faster than the monophase quartz monomineralic veins, as evidenced by applying experimentally and theoretically calibrated flow laws for dislocation creep in quartz and diffusion creep in

  19. The evolution and significance of microfracturing within feldspars in low-grade granitic mylonites: A case study from the Eastern Ghats Mobile Belt, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Suspa; Alsop, G. Ian; Biswal, T. K.

    2010-10-01

    Patterns of microfracturing are investigated in plagioclase and K-feldspar porphyroclasts formed within granitic mylonites along the boundary of the Eastern Ghats Mobile Belt, India. The mineral assemblage comprising quartz, feldspar, biotite and hornblende suggests lower greenschist facies conditions during mylonitisation, with the contrasting ductile behaviour of quartz and brittle fracturing of feldspars restricting the temperature range during deformation to 300-350 °C. Microfracturing of feldspars takes place by concentration of pure shear within the feldspar-rich layers. This may reflect strain partitioning into dominantly pure and simple shear due to the competency contrasts between the two major constituent minerals (quartz and feldspar). The microfractures occur in conjugates (here designated T 1 and T 2) with T 1 inclined in the same direction as the S-fabric and showing an antithetic sense to the NW verging shear, while T 2 is inclined in an opposite sense to the S-fabric and displays synthetic shear. The direction of maximum compression occurs at high angles to the C-fabric, and the T 1 and T 2 fractures are the result of pure shear localized into brittle layers within the mylonite. With progressive shear, the fractures along with their host feldspar grains are rotated. Theoretical graphs are plotted between bulk shear ( γ) and the angle of initiation ( α) of T 1 and T 2 with respect to C-planes, for fractures hosted in a circular or elliptical objects. The kinematics of these fractures are also analyzed with regard to variations in shear strain and sense of shear along them. The sense of shear may vary or remain stable within fractures, depending on their initial angle of inclination with respect to the C-fabric. As T 1 is inclined at low angles to the XY plane and in the same direction as the S-fabric, it undergoes maximum shear strain compared to T 2 and may even exceed the bulk shear. This facilitates breakdown of feldspar porphyroclasts during

  20. Quartz and feldspar zoning in the eastern Erzgebirge volcano-plutonic complex (Germany, Czech Republic): evidence of multiple magma mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Axel; Breiter, Karel; Seltmann, Reimar; Pécskay, Zoltán

    2005-03-01

    Zoned quartz and feldspar phenocrysts of the Upper Carboniferous eastern Erzgebirge volcano-plutonic complex were studied by cathodoluminescence and minor and trace element profiling. The results verify the suitability of quartz and feldspar phenocrysts as recorders of differentiation trends, magma mixing and recharge events, and suggest that much heterogeneity in plutonic systems may be overlooked on a whole-rock scale. Multiple resorption surfaces and zones, element concentration steps in zoned quartz (Ti) and feldspar phenocrysts (anorthite content, Ba, Sr), and plagioclase-mantled K-feldspars etc. indicate mixing of silicic magma with a more mafic magma for several magmatic phases of the eastern Erzgebirge volcano-plutonic complex. Generally, feldspar appears to be sensitive to the physicochemical changes of the melt, whereas quartz phenocrysts are more stable and can survive a longer period of evolution and final effusion of silicic magmas. The regional distribution of mixing-compatible textures suggests that magma mingling and mixing was a major process in the evolution of these late-Variscan granites and associated volcanic rocks. Quartz phenocrysts from 14 magmatic phases of the eastern Erzgebirge volcano-plutonic complex provide information on the relative timing of different mixing processes, storage and recharge, allowing a model for the distribution of magma reservoirs in space and time. At least two levels of magma storage are envisioned: deep reservoirs between 24 and 17 km (the crystallisation level of quartz phenocrysts) and subvolcanic reservoirs between 13 and 6 km. Deflation of the shallow reservoirs during the extrusion of the Teplice rhyolites triggered the formation of the Altenberg-Teplice caldera above the eastern Erzgebirge volcano-plutonic complex. The deep magma reservoir of the Teplice rhyolite also has a genetic relationship to the younger mineralised A-type granites, as indicated by quartz phenocryst populations. The pre

  1. Xenon diffusion following ion implantation into feldspar - Dependence on implantation dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, C. L.; Burnett, D. S.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    The diffusion properties of xenon implanted into feldspar, a major mineral in meteorites and lunar samples, are investigated in light of the importance of xenon diffusion in the interpretation of early solar system chronologies and the retention time of solar-wind-implanted Xe. Known doses of Xe ions were implanted at an energy of 200 keV into single-crystal plagioclase targets, and depth profiles were measured by alpha particle backscattering before and after annealing for one hour at 900 or 1000 C. The fraction of Xe retained following annealing is found to be strongly dependent on implantation dose, being greatest at a dose of 3 x 10 to the 15th ions/sq cm and decreasing at higher and lower doses. Xe retention is also observed to be unaffected by two-step anneals, or by implantation with He or Ar. Three models of the dose-dependent diffusion properties are considered, including epitaxial crystal regrowth during annealing controlled by the extent of radiation damage, the creation of trapping sites by radiation damage, and the inhibition of recrystallization by Xe during annealing

  2. Plagioclase twin laws in lunar highland rocks - Possible petrogenetic significance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowty, E.; Keil, K.; Prinz, M.

    1974-01-01

    Plagioclases in different types of lunar highland rocks (all highly feldspathic) are twinned according to different laws and in different styles. Carlsbad and Carlsbad-albite twins, presumed to be growth twins, occur mainly in rocks which show igneous texture, and which have not been severely brecciated. These two twin laws appear to be absent from cataclastic rocks, including cataclastic anorthosite, possibly because the original twins were preferentially broken up in cataclasis (the composition plane being a plane of weakness). Pericline and lamellar albite twins, presumed to be deformation twins (except for some albite growth twins) occur in all types of rocks, and obvious deformation features, such as bending of lamellae, are well shown in many cataclastic rocks. Surprisingly, some Carlsbad and Carlsbad-albite twins are found in rocks with granoblastic texture, which presumably recrystallized in the solid state.

  3. Origin of plagioclase-olivine inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Y. J.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1991-02-01

    The origin of plagioclase-olivine inclusions (POIs) from three CV chondrites and one ungrouped chondrite was investigated by examining the chemical, mineralogical, and isotopic characteristics of a group of POIs from these chondrites. Results of these analyses demonstrate that the mixing and the partial melting processes in these inclusions were superimposed on more ancient isotopically heterogeneous material. A comparison of the essential characteristics of POIs and CAIs suggests that the major processes leading to the formation of POIs (such as condensation, dust/gas fractionation, aggregation of chemically and isotopically disparate materials, and partial melting) are common to most CAIs and chondrules. A scenario for the origin of POIs is proposed, showing that the homogeneity of the final assemblage (whether a POI, a CAI, or a chondrite) is primarily a reflection of the thermal history rather than the nature of precursor materials.

  4. The Petrogenetic significance of Plagioclase megacrysts in Archean rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. A.; Phinney, W. C.; Maczuga, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    The petrogenetic significance of plagioclase megacryst-bearing Archean rocks was considered. It was suggested that these developed in mid-to upper-crustal magma chambers that were repeatedly replenished. Crystallization of megacrysts from a primitive liquid that evolves to an Fe-rich tholeiite (with LREE enrichment) is nearly isothermal and is an equilibrium process. Cumulates probably form near the margins of the chambers and liquids with megacrysts are periodically extracted and can appear as volcanics. Some flows and intrusives are found in arc-like settings in greenstone belts. Megacrystic dikes represent large volumes of melt and dike swarms such as the Metachawan swarm of Ontario suggest multiple sources of similar compositions. A complex series of melt ponding and migration are probable and involve large amounts of liquid.

  5. Diversity in the Visible-NIR Absorption Band Characteristics of Lunar and Asteroidal Plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiroi, T.; Kaiden, H.; Misawa, K.; Kojima, H.; Uemoto, K.; Ohtake, M.; Arai, T.; Sasaki, S.; Takeda, H.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.

    2012-01-01

    Studying the visible and near-infrared (VNIR) spectral properties of plagioclase has been challenging because of the difficulty in obtaining good plagioclase separates from pristine planetary materials such as meteorites and returned lunar samples. After an early study indicated that the 1.25 m band position of plagioclase spectrum might be correlated with the molar percentage of anorthite (An#) [1], there have been few studies which dealt with the band center behavior. In this study, the VNIR absorption band parameters of plagioclase samples have been derived using the modified Gaussian model (MGM) [2] following a pioneering study by [3].

  6. Origin of minor and trace element compositional diversity in anorthitic feldspar phenocrysts and melt inclusions from the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, David T.; Nielsen, Roger L.; Kent, Adam J.R.; Tepley, Frank J., III

    2011-01-01

    Melt inclusions trapped in phenocryst phases are important primarily due to their potential of preserving a significant proportion of the diversity of magma composition prior to modification of the parent magma array during transport through the crust. The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the impact of formational and post-entrapment processes on the composition of melt inclusions hosted in high anorthite plagioclase in MORB. Our observations from three plagioclase ultra-phyric lavas from the Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge document a narrow range of major elements and a dramatically greater range of minor and trace elements within most host plagioclase crystals. Observed host/inclusion partition coefficients for Ti are consistent with experimental determinations. In addition, observed values of DTi are independent of inclusion size and inclusion TiO2 content of the melt inclusion. These observations preclude significant effects from the re-homogenization process, entrapment of incompatible element boundary layers or dissolution/precipitation. The observed wide range of TiO2 contents in the host feldspar, and between bands of melt inclusions within individual crystals rule out modification of TiO contents by diffusion, either pre-eruption or due to re-homogenization. However, we do observe comparatively small ranges for values of K2O and Sr compared to P2O5 and TiO2 in both inclusions and crystals that can be attributed to diffusive processes that occurred prior to eruption.

  7. Brittle grain size reduction of feldspar, phase mixing and strain localization in granitoids at mid-crustal conditions (Pernambuco shear zone, NE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viegas, Gustavo; Menegon, Luca; Archanjo, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    The Pernambuco shear zone (northeastern Brazil) is a large-scale strike-slip fault that, in its eastern segment, deforms granitoids at mid-crustal conditions. Initially coarse (> 50 μm) grained feldspar porphyroclasts are intensively fractured and reduced to an ultrafine-grained mixture consisting of plagioclase and K-feldspar grains (< 15 μm in size) localized in C' shear bands. Detailed microstructural observations and EBSD analysis do not show evidence of intracrystalline plasticity in feldspar porphyroclasts and/or fluid-assisted replacement reactions. Quartz occurs either as thick (˜ 1-2 mm) monomineralic bands or as thin ribbons dispersed in the feldspathic mixture. The microstructure and c-axis crystallographic preferred orientation are similar in the thick monomineralic band and in the thin ribbons, and suggest dominant subgrain rotation recrystallization and activity of prism and rhomb slip systems. However, the grain size in monophase recrystallized domains decreases when moving from the monomineralic veins to the thin ribbons embedded in the feldspathic C' bands (14 μm vs 5 μm, respectively).The fine-grained feldspar mixture has a weak crystallographic preferred orientation interpreted as the result of oriented growth during diffusion creep, as well as the same composition as the fractured porphyroclasts, suggesting that it generated by mechanical fragmentation of rigid porphyroclasts with a negligible role of chemical disequilibrium. Assuming that the C' shear bands deformed under constant stress conditions, the polyphase feldspathic aggregate would have deformed at a strain rate one order of magnitude faster than the monophase quartz ribbons. Overall, our dataset indicates that feldspar underwent a brittle-viscous transition while quartz was deforming via crystalline plasticity. The resulting rock microstructure consists of a two-phase rheological mixture (fine-grained feldspars and recrystallized quartz) in which the feldspathic material

  8. Brittle grain size reduction of feldspar, phase mixing and strain localization in granitoids at mid-crustal conditions (Pernambuco shear zone, NE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viegas, G.; Menegon, L.; Archanjo, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    The Pernambuco shear zone (northeastern Brazil) is a large-scale strike-slip fault that, in its eastern segment, deforms granitoids at mid-crustal conditions. Initially coarse (> 50 μm) grained feldspar porphyroclasts are intensively fractured and reduced to an ultrafine-grained mixture consisting of plagioclase and K-feldspar grains (~ < 15 μm in size) localized in C' shear bands. Detailed microstructural observations and EBSD analysis do not show evidence of intracrystalline plasticity in feldspar porphyroclasts and/or fluid-assisted replacement reactions. Quartz occurs either as thick (~ 1-2 mm) monomineralic bands or as thin ribbons dispersed in the feldspathic mixture. The microstructure and c axis crystallographic preferred orientation are similar in the thick monomineralic band and in the thin ribbons, and suggest dominant subgrain rotation recrystallization and activity of prism ⟨a⟩ and rhomb ⟨a⟩ slip systems. However, the grain size in monophase recrystallized domains decreases when moving from the transposed veins to the thin ribbons embedded in the feldspathic C' bands (14 μm vs. 5 μm, respectively). The fine-grained feldspar mixture has a weak crystallographic preferred orientation interpreted as the result of oriented growth during diffusion creep, as well as the same composition as the fractured porphyroclasts, suggesting that it generated by mechanical fragmentation of rigid porphyroclasts with a negligible role of chemical disequilibrium. Assuming that the C' shear bands deformed under constant stress conditions, the polyphase feldspathic aggregate would have deformed at a strain rate one order of magnitude faster than the monophase quartz ribbons. Overall, our dataset indicates that feldspar underwent a brittle-viscous transition while quartz was deforming via crystal plasticity. The resulting rock microstructure consists of a two-phase rheological mixture (fine-grained feldspars and recrystallized quartz) in which the polyphase

  9. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  10. Immersion Freezing of Potassium-feldspar and related Natural Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Grothe, Hinrich

    2014-05-01

    Ice nucleation activities of mineral dust particles were investigated. The experiments were carried out using cryo-microscopy which is an oil-emulsion based method. The immersion freezing mode was addressed with this experimental setup. The studied samples were common inorganic atmospheric aerosols. Single minerals and natural samples were tested [1]. Mineral dust particles are active ice nuclei in the immersion freezing mode up to 256 K. Only recently potassium-feldspar has been identified as the by far most active ice nucleus followed by other silicates [2, 3]. Natural samples which contain more than 5% K-feldspar are also active. The activity of K-feldspar can be attributed to its surface structure and the presence of potassium ions in the surface. Ice nucleation on mineral dust particles takes place at certain nucleation sites. These sites are domains of molecular sites where water is stabilized in an ice-like structure. To form a good ice nucleation site, the site density of molecular sites needs to be high. More molecular sites are able to form larger domains on the surface, leading to better nucleation sites. This suggests further that the nucleation temperature of mineral dust particles scales with the surface area. The exact configuration of a molecular site is material specific and influenced by the local chemistry and structure of the dust particle surface. A favourable arrangement of the functional groups like surface hydroxyl and oxygen is proposed for the K-feldspar. Potassium ions seem to have a positive or neutral effect on the ice nucleation property of a silicate surface while cations with a higher charge density like calcium and sodium have a negative influence. K-feldspar is abundant in the environment and actually is the most important dust ice nucleus in the atmosphere. The nucleation temperatures of the K-feldspar particles are sufficient to enable further meteorological glaciation processes in high altitude clouds. References [1] Zolles, T

  11. Ion microprobe mass analysis of plagioclase from 'non-mare' lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, C., Jr.; Anderson, D. H.; Bradley, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    The ion microprobe was used to measure the composition and distribution of trace elements in lunar plagioclase, and these analyses are used as criteria in determining the possible origins of some nonmare lunar samples. The Apollo 16 samples with metaclastic texture and high-bulk trace-element contents contain plagioclase clasts with extremely low trace-element contents. These plagioclase inclusions represent unequilibrated relicts of anorthositic, noritic, or troctolitic rocks that have been intermixed as a rock flour into the KREEP-rich matrix of these samples. All of the plagioclase-rich inclusions which were analyzed in the KREEP-rich Apollo 14 breccias were found to be rich in trace elements. This does not seem to be consistent with the interpretation that the Apollo 14 samples represent a pre-Imbrium regolith, because such an ancient regolith should have contained many plagioclase clasts with low trace-element contents more typical of plagioclase from the pre-Imbrium crust. Ion-microprobe analyses for Ba and Sr in large plagioclase phenocrysts in 14310 and 68415 are consistent with the bulk compositions of these rocks and with the known distribution coefficients for these elements. The distribution coefficient for Li (basaltic liquid/plagioclase) was measured to be about 2.

  12. Sr-Isotope Composition of Feldspar: Implication for age and Evolution of Gabbros from Uralian-Alaskan Type Complexes in the Ural Mountains, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruegmann, G. E.; Krause, J.; Pushkarev, E.

    2006-12-01

    Compared to whole-rock or bulk mineral analyses single mineral composition could reveal disequilibrium features between crystals or within individual crystals which provide important information on magma chamber processes. We applied a LA-ICPMS technique to determine Sr isotopes in plagioclase and K-feldspar of gabbroic rocks from the Nizhnii Tagil and Kytlym complexes in the Ural Mountains in Russia. These complexes are Uralian-Alaskan-type zoned mafic-ultramafic complexes, consisting of dunite, clinopyroxenite and gabbro bodies. The rock association is considered to represent a cumulate sequence of a single parental melt feeding a magma chamber system. The instruments used were a NU Plasma MC-ICPMS and a solid-state 193 and 213 nm Nd:YAG laser ablation system from New Wave. The data of the present study includes up to five spot analyses (100-120 μm spot size) of each mineral in a thin section. Baselines for analyses were measured on-peak for 20 s while flushing the sample chamber with He. About 300 to 500 isotope ratios were measured during the ablation time of 80-100 s. Raw data were exported to an external data reduction spreadsheet and corrected for interferences (Kr, Rb) and mass bias using 87Sr/^{88}Sr=0.1194. During the time of analyses we measured the Sr isotope composition of an in-house marine carbonate reference material. Its 87Sr/86Sr of 0.70923±6 (2SD) agrees within error limits with our TIMS measurements. The gabbros have porphyric textures with clinopyroxene phenocrysts in a matrix of olivine, clinopyroxene and spinel. Two gabbro types can be distinguished based on additional matrix minerals. One type of gabbro is silica saturated, contains plagioclase (An57-88) and in places orthopyroxene as matrix phases. The second gabbro type is silica undersaturated and contains in the matrix plagioclase (An29-56) and pseudoleucite, a fine grained intergrowth of nepheline and K-feldspar (Or30-81). In this gabbro plagioclase has generally higher Sr

  13. The origin of amorphous rims on lunar plagioclase grains: Solar wind damage or vapor condensates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Mckay, David S.

    1991-01-01

    A distinctive feature of micron sized plagioclase grains from mature lunar soils is a thin (20 to 100 nm) amorphous rim surrounding the grains. These rims were originally described from high voltage electron microscope observations of lunar plagioclase grains by Dran et al., who observed rims up to 100 nm thick on plagioclase grains from Apollo 11 and 12 soils. These rims are believed to be the product of solar wind damage. The amorphous rims were studied on micron sized plagioclase grains from a mature Apollo 16 soil using a JEOL 200FX transmission electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive x ray spectrometer. It was found that the amorphous rims are compositionally distinct from the interior plagioclase and it is proposed that a major component of vapor condensates is present in the rims.

  14. Magmatic interactions as recorded in plagioclase phenocrysts of Chaos Crags, Lassen Volcanic Center, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepley, F. J., III; Davidson, J.P.; Clynne, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    The silicic lava domes of Chaos Crags in Lassen Volcanic National Park contain a suite of variably quenched, hybrid basaltic andesite magmatic inclusions. The inclusions represent thorough mixing between rhyodacite and basalt recharge liquids accompanied by some mechanical disaggregation of the inclusions resulting in crystals mixing into the rhyodacite host preserved by quenching on dome emplacement. 87Sr/86Sr ratios (~0.7037-0.7038) of the inclusions are distinctly lower than those of the host rhyodacite (~0.704-0.7041), which are used to fingerprint the origin of mineral components and to monitor the mixing and mingling process. Chemical, isotopic, and textural characteristics indicate that the inclusions are hybrid magmas formed from the mixing and undercooling of recharge basaltic magma with rhyodacitic magma. All the host magma phenocrysts (biotite, plagioclase, hornblende and quartz crystals) also occur in the inclusions, where they are rimmed by reaction products. Compositional and strontium isotopic data from cores of unresorbed plagioclase crystals in the host rhyodacite, partially resorbed plagioclase crystals enclosed within basaltic andesite inclusions, and partially resorbed plagioclase crystals in the rhyodacitic host are all similar. Rim 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the partially resorbed plagioclase crystals in both inclusions and host are lower and close to those of the whole-rock hybrid basaltic andesite values. This observation indicates that some crystals originally crystallized in the silicic host, were partially resorbed and subsequently overgrown in the hybrid basaltic andesite magma, and then some of these partially resorbed plagioclase crystals were recycled back into the host rhyodacite. Textural evidence, in the form of sieve zones and major dissolution boundaries of the resorbed plagioclase crystals, indicates immersion of crystals into a hotter, more calcic magma. The occurrence of partially resorbed plagioclase together with plagioclase

  15. Thermoluminescence signal in K-feldspar grains: Revisited.

    PubMed

    Gong, Gelian; Sun, Weidong; Xu, Hongyun

    2015-11-01

    Recent work has shown that infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals in sedimentary coarse-grain K-feldspars are derived mainly from high temperature thermoluminescence (TL) peaks around 400°C, and the fading components of the IRSL signal can be preferentially removed by prior IR stimulation at relatively low temperature. Considering the complexity of TL signal for very old samples, we may choose non-fading components from K-feldspar TL signals using the combination of optical and thermal activation methods. This paper examines a protocol of post-IR isothermal TL (i.e. pIRITL) signal for sedimentary coarse-grain K-feldspars, which results from isothermal TL measurements following elevated temperature IR bleaching. We show that a sum of two exponential decay functions can fit well to the pIRITL decay curves, and both the holding temperature for isothermal TL measurements and the prior elevated temperature IR bleaching can affect greatly the fast components of pIRITL signal. The dose response ranges of pIRITL signal are wider than those of post-IR IRSL signals, but the relative high residual pIRITL signal means that it is not appropriate for dating young samples. It is expected that one isothermal TL signal for K-feldspar measured at ~400°C following IR bleaching at 290°C (i.e. pIRITL400) is useful for dating very old samples. PMID:26257084

  16. (Energy related studies utilizing K-feldspar thermochronology)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    In our second year of current funding cycle, we have investigated the Ar diffusion properties and microstructures of K-feldspars and the application of domain theory to natural K-feldspars. We completed a combined TEM and argon diffusion study of the effect of laboratory heat treatment on the microstructure and kinetic properties of K-feldspar. We conclude in companion papers that, with one minor exception, no observable change in the diffusion behavior occurs during laboratory extraction procedures until significant fusion occurs at about 1100{degrees}C. The effect that is observed involves a correlation between the homogenization of cryptoperthite lamelle and the apparent increase in retentivity of about 5% of the argon in the K-feldspar under study. We can explain this effect of both as an artifact of the experiment or the loss of a diffusion boundary. Experiments are being considered to resolve this question. Refinements have been made to our experimental protocol that appears that greatly enhance the retrieval of multi-activation energies from K-feldspars. We have applied the multi-domain model to a variety of natural environments (Valles Caldera, Red River fault, Appalachian basin) with some surprising results. Detailed {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39} Ar coverage of the Red River shear zone, thought to be responsible for the accommodation of a significant fraction of the Indo-Asian convergence, strongly suggests that our technique can precisely date both the termination of ductile strike-slip motion and the initiation of normal faulting. Work has continued on improving our numerical codes for calculating thermal histories and the development of computer based graphing tools has significantly increased our productivity.

  17. Energy related studies utilizing K-feldspar thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In our second year of funding, we investigated the Ar diffusion properties and microstructures of K-feldspars and the application of domain theory to natural K-feldspars. We completed a combined TEM and argon diffusion study of the effect of laboratory heat treatment on the microstructure and kinetic properties of K-feldspar. We conclude in companion papers that, with one minor exception, no observable change in the diffusion behavior occurs during laboratory extraction procedures until significant fusion occurs at about 1100 C. The effect that is observed involves a correlation between the homogenization of cryptoperthite lamelle and the apparent increase in retentivity of about 5 percent of the argon in the K-feldspar under study. We can explain this effect of both as an artifact of the experiment or the loss of a diffusion boundary. Experiments are being considered to resolve this question. Refinements have been made to our experimental protocol that appear to enhance the retrieval of multi-activation energies from K-feldspars. We have applied the multi-domain model to a variety of natural environments (Valles Caldera, Red River fault, Appalachian basin) with some surprising results. Detailed Ar-40/Ar-39 coverage of the Red River shear zone, thought to be responsible for the accommodation of a significant fraction of the Indo-Asian convergence, strongly suggests that our technique can precisely date both the termination of ductile strike-slip motion and the initiation of normal faulting. Work has continued on improving our numerical codes for calculating thermal histories and the development of computer based graphing tools has significantly increased our productivity.

  18. Apparatus enables accurate determination of alkali oxides in alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupraw, W. A.; Gahn, R. F.; Graab, J. W.; Maple, W. E.; Rosenblum, L.

    1966-01-01

    Evacuated apparatus determines the alkali oxide content of an alkali metal by separating the metal from the oxide by amalgamation with mercury. The apparatus prevents oxygen and moisture from inadvertently entering the system during the sampling and analytical procedure.

  19. Mineral dissolution in the Cape Cod aquifer, Massachusetts, USA: I . Reaction stoichiometry and impact of accessory feldspar and glauconite on strontium isotopes, solute concentrations, and REY distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau, Michael; Alexander, Brian; Chesley, John T.; Dulski, Peter; Brantley, Susan L.

    2004-03-01

    To compare relative reaction rates of mineral dissolution in a mineralogically simple groundwater aquifer, we studied the controls on solute concentrations, Sr isotopes, and rare earth element and yttrium (REY) systematics in the Cape Cod aquifer. This aquifer comprises mostly carbonate-free Pleistocene sediments that are about 90% quartz with minor K-feldspar, plagioclase, glauconite, and Fe-oxides. Silica concentrations and pH in the groundwater increase systematically with increasing depth, while Sr isotopic ratios decrease. No clear relationship between 87Sr/ 86Sr and Sr concentration is observed. At all depths, the 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio of the groundwater is considerably lower than the Sr isotopic ratio of the bulk sediment or its K-feldspar component, but similar to that of a plagioclase-rich accessory separate obtained from the sediment. The Si- 87Sr/ 86Sr-depth relationships are consistent with dissolution of accessory plagioclase. In addition, solutes such as Sr, Ca, and particularly K show concentration spikes superimposed on their respective general trends. The K-Sr- 87Sr/ 86Sr systematics suggests that accessory glauconite is another major solute source to Cape Cod groundwater. Although the authigenic glauconite in the Cape Cod sediment is rich in Rb, it is low in in-grown radiogenic 87Sr because of its young Pleistocene age. The low 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios are consistent with equilibration of glauconite with seawater. The impact of glauconite is inferred to vary due to its variable abundance in the sediments. In the Cape Cod groundwater, the variation of REY concentrations with sampling depth resembles that of K and Rb, but differs from that of Ca and Sr. Shale-normalized REY patterns are light REY depleted, show negative Ce anomalies and super-chondritic Y/Ho ratios, but no Eu anomalies. REY input from feldspar, therefore, is insignificant compared to input from a K-Rb-bearing phase, inferred to be glauconite. These results emphasize that interpretation of

  20. Effects of changing H2O concentrations and viscosities on plagioclase crystallization in a rhyolite obsidian: experiments and plagioclase speedometry (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, L.; Andrews, B. J.; Lange, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    H2O-saturated phase equilibrium and decompression experiments on a rhyolite obsidian (73 wt% SiO2) from Medicine Lake Volcano, CA demonstrate the effect of changing melt H2O concentrations and melt viscosity on plagioclase crystallization. The natural sample is saturated in plagioclase + orthopyroxene + ilmenite + magnetite + apatite + zircon, despite low phenocryst abundances (<2.3%) and no microlite crystallization. Eruptive temperature and oxygen fugacity (×1σ), on the basis of Fe-Ti oxide thermometry, are 852 × 12°C and ΔNNO +0.3 × 0.1. Plagioclase compositions range from 33-53 mol% An. Given the low crystallinity and absence of significant cooling, the progressive loss of dissolved melt H2O during ascent best explains the broad range in phenocryst composition and the low crystallinity. Phase equilibrium experiments were conducted at temperatures and pressures ranging from 750-950°C and 50-300 MPa, respectively. Experiments were conducted in a Ni-rich pressure vessel (Waspaloy) with Ni filler rod, which produces an intrinsic fO2 of ΔNNO +1 × 0.5 (Geshwind & Rutherford, 1992) and pressurized with H2O (where Ptotal= PH2O). The results of the phase equilibrium experiments show that the most anorthitic plagioclase crystallized at ~3.95 wt% H2O and the most albitic at ~3.49 wt% H2O. Plagioclase crystallization in the natural sample ceased at relatively high melt H2O content (3.49 wt%), which corresponds to a viscosity of 4.85 log10 Pa s (Hui & Zhang, 2007). To evaluate the effect of decompression rate on plagioclase crystallization, experiments were conducted on the rhyolite at two different continuous decompression rates, 3.0 MPa/hr and 0.8 MPa/hr. Two decompression experiments were conducted for each rate over two pressure interals:150 to 89 MPa and from 150 to 58 MPa. The results from our study are combined with the results of single- and multi-step decompression experiments on rhyolites/rhyodacites from Geshwind & Rutherford (1995), Couch et al., (2003

  1. Alkalis and Skin.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, John E; Tan, Jin Lin; Ming, Justin Choong Tzen; Abell, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this editorial is to provide an overview of the chemical interactions occurring in the skin of our patients on contact with alkaline agents. Strongly basic alkali is highly aggressive and will readily hydrolyze (or cleave) key biological molecules such as lipids and proteins. This phenomenon is known as saponification in the case of lipids and liquefactive denaturation for peptides and proteins. A short section on current first-aid concepts is included. A better understanding of the basic science behind alkali burns will make us better teachers and provide an insight into the urgency needed in treating these common and dangerous chemical injuries. PMID:26182072

  2. Magma mixing, recharge and eruption histories recorded in plagioclase phenocrysts from El Chichon Volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepley, F. J., III; Davidson, J.P.; Tilling, R.I.; Arth, Joseph G.

    2000-01-01

    Consistent core-to-rim decreases of 87Sr/86Sr ratios and coincident increases in Sr concentrations in plagioclase phenocrysts of varying size (~ 1 cm to 2 mm) are reported from samples of the 1982 and pre-1982 (~ 200 ka) eruptions of El Chichon Volcano. Maximum 87Sr/86Sr ratios of ~ 0.7054, significantly higher than the whole-rock isotopic ratios (~ 0.7040-0.7045), are found in the cores of plagioclase phenocrysts, and minimum 87Sr/86Sr ratios of ~ 0.7039 are found near some of the rims. Plagioclase phenocrysts commonly display abrupt fluctuations in An content (up to 25 mol %) that correspond to well-developed dissolution surfaces The isotopic, textural and compositional characteristics suggest that these plagioclase phenocrysts grew in a system that was periodically recharged by higher-temperature magma with a lower 87Sr/86Sr ratio and a higher Sr concentration. Rim 87Sr/86Sr ratios in plagioclase phenocrysts of rocks from the 200 ka eruption indicate that, at that time, the magma had already attained the lowest recorded 87Sr/86Sr value of the system (~ 0.7039). In contrast, cores from plagioclase phenocrysts of the 1982 eruption, inferred to have grown in the past few thousand years, have the highest recorded 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the system. Collectively, the Sr isotopic data (for plagioclase and whole rock), disequilibrium textural features of the phenocrysts, known eruption frequencies, and inferred crystal-residence times of the plagioclases are best interpreted in terms of an intermittent magma chamber model. Similar processes, including crustal contamination, magma mixing, periodic recharge by addition of more mafic magma to induce plagioclase disequilibrium (possibly triggering eruption) and subsequent re-equilibration, apparently were operative throughout the 200 ky history of the El Chichon magma system.

  3. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  4. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  5. Sr and Pb isotopic geochemistry of feldspars and implications for the growth of megacrysts in plutonic settings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munnikhuis, J.; Glazner, A. F.; Coleman, D. S.; Mills, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    Why megacrystic textures develop in silicic igneous rocks is still unknown. One hypothesis is that these crystals nucleate early in a magma chamber with a high liquid content. A supportive observation of this hypothesis is areas in plutons with high concentrations of megacrysts suggesting flow sorting. Another group of hypotheses suggest megacrystic textures form during protracted late-stage coarsening in a low-melt, interlocked matrix due to either thermal oscillations from incremental pluton emplacement, or Ostwald ripening. Isotopic analyses of large, euhedral K-feldspar megacrysts from the Cretaceous intrusive suites of the Sierra Nevada batholith (SNB) provide new insight into their origin. Megacrysts from the SNB reach the decimeter scale, are Or rich (85-90%), are perthitic, and host mineral inclusions of nearly all phases in the host rock. In-situ micro-drilling of transects, from core to rim, of the alkali feldspars provides material for Sr and Pb isotopic analyses by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Preliminary 87Sr/86Sr(i) isotopic data from samples from the Cathedral Peak Granodiorite, of the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite range from 0.706337 to 0.706452 (~1.6ɛSr) near the cores, whereas a sawtooth pattern with larger variability, 0.706179 to 0.706533 (~5ɛSr), occurs nears the rims. We interpret these preliminary data to indicate that the late portion of growth (i.e. crystal rim) was dominated by either cannibalism of small K-feldspar crystals with isotopic variability, or by addition of isotopically diverse late components to the magma. By comparing the Sr and Pb isotopic stratigraphy of megacrysts from a variety of rock matrices and different granitoids in the SNB isotopic trends can be evaluated to determine if crystals sizes are dependent on disequilibrium processes or grow at a steady state.

  6. Chlor-Alkali Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkatesh, S.; Tilak, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    Chlor-alkali technology is one of the largest electrochemical industries in the world, the main products being chlorine and caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) generated simultaneously by the electrolysis of sodium chloride. This technology is reviewed in terms of electrochemical principles and manufacturing processes involved. (Author/JN)

  7. Particle size and X-ray analysis of Feldspar, Calvert, Ball, and Jordan soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    Pipette analysis and X-ray diffraction techniques were employed to characterize the particle size distribution and clay mineral content of the feldspar, calvert, ball, and jordan soils. In general, the ball, calvert, and jordan soils were primarily clay size particles composed of kaolinite and illite whereas the feldspar soil was primarily silt-size particles composed of quartz and feldspar minerals.

  8. OSL-thermochronometry of feldspar from the KTB borehole, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guralnik, Benny; Jain, Mayank; Herman, Frédéric; Ankjærgaard, Christina; Murray, Andrew S.; Valla, Pierre G.; Preusser, Frank; King, Georgina E.; Chen, Reuven; Lowick, Sally E.; Kook, Myungho; Rhodes, Edward J.

    2015-08-01

    The reconstruction of thermal histories of rocks (thermochronometry) is a fundamental tool both in Earth science and in geological exploration. However, few methods are currently capable of resolving the low-temperature thermal evolution of the upper ∼2 km of the Earth's crust. Here we introduce a new thermochronometer based on the infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) from feldspar, and validate the extrapolation of its response to artificial radiation and heat in the laboratory to natural environmental conditions. Specifically, we present a new detailed Na-feldspar IRSL thermochronology from a well-documented thermally-stable crustal environment at the German Continental Deep Drilling Program (KTB). There, the natural luminescence of Na-feldspar extracted from twelve borehole samples (0.1-2.3 km depth, corresponding to 10-70 °C) can be either (i) predicted within uncertainties from the current geothermal gradient, or (ii) inverted into a geothermal palaeogradient of 29 ± 2 °C km-1, integrating natural thermal conditions over the last ∼65 ka. The demonstrated ability to invert a depth-luminescence dataset into a meaningful geothermal palaeogradient opens new venues for reconstructing recent ambient temperatures of the shallow crust (<0.3 Ma, 40-70 °C range), or for studying equally recent and rapid transient cooling in active orogens (<0.3 Ma, >200 °C Ma-1 range). Although Na-feldspar IRSL is prone to field saturation in colder or slower environments, the method's primary relevance appears to be for borehole and tunnel studies, where it may offer remarkably recent (<0.3 Ma) information on the thermal structure and history of hydrothermal fields, nuclear waste repositories and hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  9. Kinetics of feldspar and quartz dissolution at 70-80°C and near-neutral pH: effects of organic acids and NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, R. E.; Waltera, L. M.

    1999-07-01

    strong Al-OA interactions. Modeling of the dependence of feldspar dissolution rates on OA concentration in natural diagenetic environments is complicated by the competing effects of overall solution chemistry and ionic strength on the dissolution mechanism. Results of experiments using labradorite (An 70) indicate that in OA-free solutions, dissolution is progressively slower at increasing NaCl concentrations (up to 2.2 M), in agreement with prior experiments on the effects of alkali metals on feldspar dissolution. The combined effects of oxalate and NaCl on labradorite dissolution rates are such that the rate increase due to oxalate is suppressed by the addition of NaCl. Thus, feldspar dissolution kinetics should be most significantly affected by a given concentration of OAs in low ionic strength solutions.

  10. The Petrographic Distinction between Basalt and Andesite Based upon the Arrested Fractionation of Plagioclase Phenocrysts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garlick, G. Donald; Garlick, Benjamin J.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the need to take into account the effects of arrested fractional crystallization in the petrographic classification of volcanic rocks containing plagioclase phenocrysts. Describes the development and use of a computer program to accomplish this task graphically. (TW)

  11. Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Navajo Sandstone aquifer, Black Mesa, Arizona: Electron microscopic characterization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, Chen; Veblen, D.R.; Blum, A.E.; Chipera, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone at Black Mesa, Arizona, was characterized with high-resolution transmission and analytical electron microscope (HRTEM-AEM) and field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). Here, we report the first HRTEM observation of a 10-nm thick amorphous layer on naturally weathered K-feldspar in currently slightly alkaline groundwater. The amorphous layer is probably deficient in K and enriched in Si. In addition to the amorphous layer, the feldspar surfaces are also partially coated with tightly adhered kaolin platelets. Outside of the kaolin coatings, feldspar grains are covered with a continuous 3-5 ??m thick layer of authigenic smectite, which also coats quartz and other sediment grains. Authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth and etch pits were also found on feldspar grains. These characteristics of the aged feldspar surfaces accentuate the differences in reactivity between the freshly ground feldspar powders used in laboratory experiments and feldspar grains in natural systems, and may partially contribute to the commonly observed apparent laboratory-field dissolution rate discrepancy. At Black Mesa, feldspars in the Navajo Sandstone are dissolving at ???105 times slower than laboratory rate at comparable temperature and pH under far from equilibrium condition. The tightly adhered kaolin platelets reduce the feldspar reactive surface area, and the authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth reduces the feldspar reactivity. However, the continuous smectite coating layer does not appear to constitute a diffusion barrier. The exact role of the amorphous layer on feldspar dissolution kinetics depends on the origin of the layer (leached layer versus re-precipitated silica), which is uncertain at present. However, the nanometer thin layer can be detected only with HRTEM, and thus our study raises the possibility of its wide occurrence in geological systems. Rate laws and proposed mechanisms should consider the

  12. Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Navajo Sandstone aquifer, Black Mesa, Arizona: Electron microscopic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen; Veblen, David R.; Blum, Alex E.; Chipera, Stephen J.

    2006-09-01

    Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone at Black Mesa, Arizona, was characterized with high-resolution transmission and analytical electron microscope (HRTEM-AEM) and field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). Here, we report the first HRTEM observation of a 10-nm thick amorphous layer on naturally weathered K-feldspar in currently slightly alkaline groundwater. The amorphous layer is probably deficient in K and enriched in Si. In addition to the amorphous layer, the feldspar surfaces are also partially coated with tightly adhered kaolin platelets. Outside of the kaolin coatings, feldspar grains are covered with a continuous 3-5 μm thick layer of authigenic smectite, which also coats quartz and other sediment grains. Authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth and etch pits were also found on feldspar grains. These characteristics of the aged feldspar surfaces accentuate the differences in reactivity between the freshly ground feldspar powders used in laboratory experiments and feldspar grains in natural systems, and may partially contribute to the commonly observed apparent laboratory-field dissolution rate discrepancy. At Black Mesa, feldspars in the Navajo Sandstone are dissolving at ˜10 5 times slower than laboratory rate at comparable temperature and pH under far from equilibrium condition. The tightly adhered kaolin platelets reduce the feldspar reactive surface area, and the authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth reduces the feldspar reactivity. However, the continuous smectite coating layer does not appear to constitute a diffusion barrier. The exact role of the amorphous layer on feldspar dissolution kinetics depends on the origin of the layer (leached layer versus re-precipitated silica), which is uncertain at present. However, the nanometer thin layer can be detected only with HRTEM, and thus our study raises the possibility of its wide occurrence in geological systems. Rate laws and proposed mechanisms should consider the

  13. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Wolfs, Denise Y.; Clavenna, Le Roy R.; Eakman, James M.; Kalina, Theodore

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  14. Deconvolution of mixtures with high plagioclase content for the remote interpretation of lunar plagioclase-rich regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serventi, Giovanna; Carli, Cristian; Sgavetti, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Anorthositic rocks are widespread on the lunar surface and have probably been formed by flotation of PL over a magma ocean. A large portion of pristine rocks are characterized by a low Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratio, and have been classified as ferroan anorthosite, and recently, after observation from SELENE Spectral Profiler,pure anorthosites regions with more than 98% PL have been recognized. In this paper, we analyze a set of mixtures with PL content similar to the ferroan anorthosites and to the pure anorthosite regions, using the Origin Software and the Modified Gaussian Model. We consider three plagioclases with varying FeOwt% contents (PL1, PL2 and PL3)andthree mafic end-members (1) 100% orthopyroxene, (2) 56% orthopyroxene and 44% clinopyroxene, and (3) 100% olivine (OL). The spectral parameters considered here are: band depth, band center, band width, c0 (the continuum intercept) and c1 (the continuum offset). Here we have shown that in pyroxene (PX)-bearing mixtures, the PX is distinguishable even in mixtures with only 1% PX and that PX band at ca. 900 nm is always deeper than PL1 band while PL2 and PL3 are deeperthan OPX 900 nm band from 95, 96% PL. In OL-bearing mixtures, OL detection limit is 2% when mixed with PL1, and 3% and 4% if mixed with PL2 and PL3. We also demonstrated how spectral parameters vary with PL%, and, generally, increasing the PL content: (1) 1250 nm band depth decreases when mixed with OL, while it deepens in mixtures with PX; (2) 1250 nm band centers generally move towards longer wavelength for PL1-bearing mixtures, while do not show significant variations considering PL2/PL3-mixtures; (3) 1250 nm band width of PL1 in E1 and E5-mixtures substantially widens while in other mixtures it only slightly varies. Here we also proposed an application to a real case, from Proclus crater, revealing how studying terrestrial analogues is fundamental to infer hypothesis on the mineralogical composition of a planetary surface, but also how the spectral

  15. Oxygen isotopic determinations of sequentially erupted plagioclases in the 1974 magma of Fuego Volcano, Guatemala

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, W.I., Jr.; Friedman, I.; Woodruff, L.G.

    1980-01-01

    Plagioclases in the 1974 high-Al basalt from Fuego Volcano have ??O18 values of +6.0 to +8.5 per mil. Meteoric water cannot have played a significant role in Fuego's magma. Large, weakly zone clear phenocrysts had ??O18 values in the accepted mantle range, while patchyzoned and oscillatory-zoned plagioclases inferred to have formed later and shallower levels have slightly heavier oxygen isotopic ratios. ?? 1980 Intern. Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior.

  16. VERY High Temperature Hydrothermal Record in Plagioclase of BLACK Gabbros in Oman Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudier, F. I.; Mainprice, D.; Nicolas, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    The lower crustal section in Oman ophiolite includes 'black gabbros' that have escaped the common medium-low temperature hydrous alteration. Their plagioclases are totally fresh, but contain in their mass, nebulous inclusions most times below the resolution of optical microscope, or expressed as solid silicate phases clinopyroxene and pargasitic amphibole, up to 10 µm sized, having T equilibrium above 900°C with their host plagioclase. These gabbros have a well-expressed magmatic foliation, relayed by plastic strain marked by stretched olivine crystals, and pinching twins in plagioclase. In addition to major elements analyses, the crystallographic relationships of these Mg silicate inclusions to their host plagioclase are explored by Electron Back Scattering Diffraction (EBSD) processing. - Diopsidic clinopyroxene inclusions are dominant over pargasitic amphibole that tend to locate close to the margins of host plagioclase (Fig 1). Some inclusions are mixed clinopyroxene-amphibole, separated by a non-indexed phase that could represent a pyribole-type structure, suggesting transformation from clinopyroxene to amphibole during cooling. High chlorine content in the amphibole sign the seawater contamination at least during the development of this phase. - Preliminary statistical pole figures (Fig. 2) in the six joined plagioclase grains studied, show that both plagioclase and diopside inclusions have a strong crystal preferred orientation (CPO) connected such that the strong [010]pl maximum coincide with the strong [100]di. In addition, a coincidence appears between three sub-maxima of [100]pl and [001]di. These interesting relationships are refined. It is inferred that clinopyroxene developed through corrosion of the plagioclase by a Mg-bearing hydrous fluid, penetrating possibly via twin interface and diffusing at T~1100°C, upper limit of clinopyroxene stability in hydrous conditions. Development of pargasite implies increasing hydration during cooling.

  17. Space weathering on Mercury: Simulation of plagioclase weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Sho; Hiroi, Takahiro; Helbert, Jorn; Arai, Tomoko

    ions may also increase the size of nanophase iron. The other possibility for attenuating space weathering on Mercury would be deeper mixing depth. The surface mixing by impacts on Mercury is greater than that on the Moon, because of higher impact flux and velocity of incoming meteoroid bodies. The difference of space weathering between the Moon and Mercury might be also due to the compositional effect. Mercury surface is considered to be plagioclase-rich like the highland of the Moon. We started experimental simulation of space weathering on Mercury (and the Moon) using anorthite samples. Although pure anorthite is in lack of iron, addition of iron-bearing material could alter the anorthite reflectance. Our experiments show that laser irradiation on pure anorthite should not alter its spectrum largely. The addition of small amount of pyroxene can change the anorthite reflectance upon laser irradiation (darkening/reddening of visible spectrum). Addition of 5 References: [1] Keller, L. P. and McKay, D. S. (1993), Science 261, 1305. [2] Sasaki, S. et al. (2001) Nature 410, 555. [3] Sasaki, S. and Kurahashi, E. (2004) Adv. Space Res. 33, 2152. [4] McClintock, W. E. et al. (2008) Science 321, 62. [5] Noble, S. K. and Pieters, C. M. (2001) Mercury: Space Environ. Surface Interior,8012.

  18. MDD Analysis of Microtexturally Characterized K-Feldspar Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, C. H.; Heizler, M. T.; Parsons, I.; Heizler, L.

    2011-12-01

    Multiple diffusion domain (MDD) analysis of K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar age spectra is a powerful thermochronological tool dating back 25 years, but continued validation of the basic assumptions of the model can be afforded by microanalysis of K-feldspar crystal fragments. MDD theory assumes that diffusion of Ar in K-feldspars is controlled by domains of varying size bounded by infinitely fast diffusion pathways. However, the physical character of these domain boundaries is not fully understood and this issue remains a point of criticism of the MDD model. We have evaluated the relationship between texture, age, and thermal history via step heating and modeling of texturally characterized K-feldspar crystal fragments (250-500 μm). K-feldspar phenocrysts from the Shap granite, chosen for their well-studied and relatively simple microtextures, contain large areas of homogenous regular strain-controlled film perthite with periodicities on the order of ~1 μm and abundant misfit dislocations, as well as areas of much coarser, irregular, slightly turbid, patch and vein perthite. Total gas ages (TGA) for all Shap fragments, regardless of texture, show less than 2% variation, but the shape of the age spectra varies with microtexture. Film perthites produce flat spectra whereas patch/vein perthite spectra have initial steps 5 - 25% older than the age of the emplacement with younger plateau or gently rising steps afterward. Patch/vein perthites have substantial microporosity and their spectral shapes may be a consequence of trapped 40Ar* that has diffused into micropores or other defects that have no continuity with the crystal boundaries. Correlations between spectral shape and heating schedule suggest that initial old ages are produced by the early release of trapped 40Ar* separated from the K parent rather than degassing of excess 40Ar*. The MH-42 K-feldspar from the Chain of Ponds Pluton has two primary microtextures: a coarse patch/vein perthite with lamellae 1-20 μm in

  19. Simple model potential and model wave functions for (H-alkali)+ and (alkali-alkali)+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, S. H.; Tang, K. T.

    2000-07-01

    A simple model potential is proposed to describe the interaction of a valence electron with the alkali core, which incorporates the correct asymptotic behavior in terms of dipolar polarizabilities, and the short-range exchange effects in terms of a hard core adjusted to give the correct energy for the valence electron. Based on this potential, simple wave functions are developed to describe the (H-alkali)+ and (alkali-alkali)+ ions. These wave functions exhibit some important structures of the ions, and provide a universal description of the properties of all (H-alkali)+ and (alkali-alkali)+ ions, in particular, the equilibrium separations of the nuclei and the corresponding dissociation energies. They also allow us to calculate the dipolar polarizabilities of Li2+, Na2+, K2+, Rb2+, and Cs2+.

  20. Alkali-vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.; Krupke, W. F.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the results from several of our alkali laser systems. We show highly efficient performance from an alexandrite-pumped rubidium laser. Using a laser diode stack as a pump source, we demonstrate up to 145 W of average power from a CW system. We present a design for a transversely pumped demonstration system that will show all of the required laser physics for a high power system.

  1. Crystal size distributions of plagioclase in lavas from the July-August 2001 Mount Etna eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaciai, Alessandro; Perinelli, Cristina; Armienti, Pietro; Favalli, Massimiliano

    2015-08-01

    During the 2001 eruption of Mount Etna, two independent vent systems simultaneously erupted two different lavas. The Upper Vents system (UV), opened between 3100 and 2650 m a.s.l., emitted products that are markedly porphyritic and rich in plagioclase, while the Lower Vents system (LV), opened at 2100 and 2550 m a.s.l., emitted products that are sparsely porphyritic with scarce plagioclase. In this study, the crystal size distributions (CSDs) of plagioclase were measured for a series of 14 samples collected from all the main flows of the 2001 eruption. The coefficient of R 2 determination was used to evaluate the goodness of fit of linear models to the CSDs, and the results are represented as a grid of R 2 values by using a numerical code developed ad hoc. R 2 diagrams suggest that the 2001 products can be separated into two main groups with slightly different characteristics: plagioclase CSDs from the UVs can be modeled by three straight lines with different slopes while the plagioclase CSDs from the LVs are largely concave. We have interpreted the CSDs of the UVs as representing three different populations of plagioclases: (i) the large phenocrysts (type I), which started to crystallize at lower cooling rate in a deep reservoir from 13 to 8 months before eruption onset; (ii) the phenocrysts (type II), which crystallized largely during continuous degassing in a shallow reservoir; and (iii) the microlites, which crystallized during magma ascent immediately prior to the eruption. The plagioclase CSD curves for the LVs lava are interpreted to reflect strong and rapid changes in undercooling induced by strong and sudden degassing.

  2. Nonlinear partitioning of OH between Ca-rich plagioclase and arc basaltic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, M.; Ushioda, M.; Takahashi, E.

    2011-12-01

    The hydrogen in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) is becoming a new proxy for dissolved H2O in silicate melts. Plagioclase is one of the NAMs which accommodates hydrogen as OH. Here, we report experimental results on the partitioning of OH between Ca-rich plagioclase and arc basaltic melt. We carried out hydrous melting experiments of arc basaltic magma at 350 MPa using an internally-heated pressure vessel. Starting material was hydrous glass (0.8 wt.%≦H2O≦4.5 wt.%) of an undifferentiated rock from Miyakejima volcano, a frontal-arc volcano in Izu-arc (MTL rock: 50.5% SiO2, 18.1% Al2O3, 4.9% MgO). A grain of Ca-rich plagioclase (≈ 1 mg, about An95, FeOt ≈ 0.5 wt.%) and ≈ 10 mg of powdered glasses were sealed in Au80Pd20 alloy capsule and kept at around the liquidus temperature. Liquidus phase of MTL rock at 350 MPa is always plagioclase with 0 to 4.5 wt.% H2O in melt, and therefore, a grain of plagioclase and hydrous melt are nearly in equilibrium. Oxygen fugacity during the melting experiments was not controlled; the estimated oxygen fugacity was 3 log unit above Ni-NiO buffer. Experiments were quenched after 24-48 hours. Concentrations of H2O in melt and concentration of OH in plagioclase were analyzed by infrared spectroscopy. Obtained correlation between H2O concentration in melt and OH concentration in plagioclase is nonlinear; partition coefficient in molar basis is ≈ 0.01 with low H2O in melt (≤ 1 wt.%), while it decreases down to ≈ 0.005 with increasing H2O in melt (Fig.1). The OH concentration of Ca-rich plagioclase (about An90) from the 1986 summit eruption of Izu-Oshima volcano, also a frontal-arc volcano in Izu arc, shows variation ranging from <50 ppm H2O through 300 ppm H2O as a result of polybaric degassing (Hamada et al. 2011, EPSL 308, 259-266). Melting experiments of hydrous basalts constrained that An90 plagioclase crystallizes form H2O-rich melt (up to 6 wt.% H2O). In consistent with previous studies, our experiments demonstrate

  3. The effect of SEM imaging on the Ar/Ar system in feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flude, S.; Sherlock, S.; Lee, M.; Kelley, S. P.

    2010-12-01

    Complex microtextures form in K-feldspar crystals as they cool and are affected by deuteric alteration. This complex structure is the cause of variable closure temperatures for Ar-Ar, a phenomenon which has been utilized in multi domain diffusion (MDD) modelling to recover thermal histories [1]. However, there has been substantial controversy regarding the precise interaction between feldspar microtextures and Ar-diffusion [2,3]. A number of studies have addressed this issue using coupled SEM imaging and Ar/Ar UV laser ablation microprobe (UV-LAMP) analysis on the same sample, to enable direct comparison of microtextures with Ar/Ar age data [4]. Here we have tested the idea that SEM work may affect Ar/Ar ages, leading to inaccurate results in subsequent Ar/Ar analyses. Three splits of alkali feldspar from the Dartmoor Granite in SW England were selected for Ar/Ar UV-LAMP analysis. Split 1 (“control”) was prepared as a polished thick section for Ar/Ar analysis. Split 2 (“SEM”) was prepared as a polished thick section, was chemically-mechanically polished with colloidal silica and underwent SEM imaging (uncoated) and focussed ion beam (FIB) milling (gold coated); electron beam damage in the SEM was maximised by leaving the sample at high magnification for eight minutes. Split 3 (“Etch”) is a cleavage fragment that was etched with HF vapour and underwent low to moderate magnification SEM imaging. The control split gave a range of laser-spot ages consistent with the expected cooling age of the granite and high yields of radiogenic 40Ar* (>90%). The area of the “SEM” split that experienced significant electron beam damage gave younger than expected ages and 40Ar* yields as low as 57%. These are interpreted as a combination of implantation of atmospheric Ar and local redistribution of K within the sample. The area of “SEM” that underwent FIB milling gave ages and 40Ar* yields comparable to the control split, suggesting that the Au-coat minimises FIB

  4. Adsorption on Alkali Halides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urzua Duran, Gilberto Antonio

    1995-01-01

    Using a variety of interionic potentials, I have computed the configurations of adsorbed alkali halides monomers on the (001) surface of selected alkali halides crystals. In the majority of cases studied it is found that the monomer adsorbs perpendicular to the surface with the cation sitting nearly on top of the surface anion. In about ten percent of the cases though the monomer adsorbs tilted from the vertical. In these cases the ion that is closer to the surface can be the cation or the anion. The effect of polarization forces is found to be important. In order to discuss the effects of surface retaxation with adsorbates, I have evaluated the surface relaxation of the alkali halide crystals, using a shell model for the interionic forces. It is found that surface relaxation and rumpling are generally small, especially when the van der Waals forces are included. A theory of the effect of substrate vibrations on the binding of an adsorbed atom is developed. At T = 0 the binding energy is D_0-E, where D_0 is the surface well depth (classical binding energy) and E is the quantum correction. For several simple models, it is found that E is surprisingly model-independent. We compare D _0-E with the binding energies to a rigid substrate, D_0-E_{rs}, and to a vibrationally averaged substrate, D _0-E_{va}. We prove that E_{va}>=q E>=q E_ {rs} and that similar relations hold at finite temperature for the free energy of binding. In most cases E_{rs} is better than E_{va} as an approximation to E.

  5. Low-temperature multi-OSL-thermochronometry of feldspar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Georgina; Herman, Frederic; Lambert, Renske; Valla, Pierre; Guralnik, Benny

    2016-04-01

    Constraining exhumation rates and landscape histories over Quaternary timescales represents a major challenge for understanding the interaction between changing climate and erosion processes. Facilitated by closure temperatures of as low as ~30 C, OSL-thermochronometry is able to constrain cooling rates from the top few km of the earth's crust, and offers the potential for recent changes in erosion to be determined. Based on the well-established Quaternary dating technique of optically stimulated luminescence dating, OSL-thermochronometry benefits from a strong methodological and theoretical foundation. A further advantage of OSL-thermochronometry is that it is possible to measure multiple luminescence signals from a single mineral, such as feldspar. Therefore OSL-thermochronometry can be used as a multi-thermochronometer whereby different signals from the same mineral have closure temperatures in the range of 30-70 C, enabling the derivation of very precise cooling histories. However, in contrast to other low-temperature methods, OSL-thermochronometry is limited by signal saturation, restricting its application to either elevated temperature settings (e.g. bore holes, tunnels) or rapidly exhuming terranes. Here we outline the principles of multi-OSL-thermochronometry of feldspar and its potential as a low-temperature thermochronometry system.

  6. Is plagioclase removal responsible for the negative Eu anomaly in the source regions of mare basalts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    The nearly ubiquitous presence of a negative Eu anomaly in the mare basalts has been suggested to indicate prior separation and flotation of plagioclase from the basalt source region during its crystallization from a lunar magma ocean (LMO). Are there any mare basalts derived from a mantle source which did not experience prior plagioclase separation? Crystal chemical rationale for REE substitution in pyroxene suggests that the combination of REE size and charge, M2 site characteristics of pyroxene, fO2, magma chemistry, and temperature may account for the negative Eu anomaly in the source region of some types of primitive, low TiO2 mare basalts. This origin for the negative Eu anomaly does not preclude the possibility of the LMO as many mare basalts still require prior plagioclase crystallization and separation and/or hybridization involving a KREEP component.

  7. Significance of major and minor element variations in plagioclase in sodic ferrogabbro and breccia matrix in lunar highlands sample 67915

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiblen, P. W.; Day, W. C.; Miller, J. D., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Attention is given to the significance of the results of a study of Ca, K, Ti, Fe, Mn, and Mg variations in plagioclase in highlands sample 67915,84. This polymict breccia from Outhouse Rock station 11 at the Apollo 16 site has been selected for study because it contains a wide variety of clast types, including a differentiated type-sodic ferrogabbro. It is found that the data on Ca, K, Ti, Fe, Mn, and Mg in plagioclase show no evidence of reaction between sodic ferrogabbro and breccia matrix clasts. Two groups of plagioclase compositions have been recognized in the breccia matrix. The data suggest that the prebreccia characteristics of plagioclase compositions have been preserved in 67915. Data on Mg/(Mg+FE) ratios suggest that the sodic ferrogabbro and the intermediate-Ca plagioclase clasts could be related to the Mg-rich plutonic rock suite and the high-Ca plagioclase clasts to the ferroan anorthosites.

  8. SCR and GCR exposure ages of plagioclase grains from lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etique, P.; Baur, H.; Signer, P.; Wieler, R.

    1986-01-01

    The concentrations of solar wind implanted Ar-36 in mineral grains extracted from lunar soils show that they were exposed to the solar wind on the lunar surface for an integrated time of 10E4 to 10E5 years. From the bulk soil 61501 plagioclase separates of 8 grain size ranges was prepared. The depletion of the implanted gases was achieved by etching aliquot samples of 4 grain sizes to various degrees. The experimental results pertinent to the present discussion are: The spallogenic Ne is, as in most plagioclases from lunar soils, affected by diffusive losses and of no use. The Ar-36 of solar wind origin amounts to (2030 + or - 100) x 10E-8 ccSTP/g in the 150 to 200 mm size fraction and shows that these grains were exposed to the solar wind for at least 10,000 years. The Ne-21/Ne-22 ratio of the spallogenic Ne is 0.75 + or - 0.01 and in very good agreement with the value of this ratio in a plagioclase separate from rock 76535. This rock has had a simple exposure history and its plagioclases have a chemical composition quite similar to those studied. In addition to the noble gases, the heavy particle tracks in an aliquot of the 150 to 200 mm plagioclase separate were investigated and found 92% of the grains to contain more than 10E8 tracks/sq cm. This corresponds to a mean track density of (5 + or - 1) x 10E8 tracks/sq cm. The exploration of the exposure history of the plagioclase separates from the soil 61501 do not contradict the model for the regolith dynamics but also fail to prove it.

  9. Evaluation of laboratory test method for determining the potential alkali contribution from aggregate and the ASR safety of the Three-Gorges dam concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Duyou . E-mail: duyoulu@njut.edu.cn; Zhou, Xiaoling; Xu Zhongzi; Lan Xianghui; Tang Mingshu; Fournier, Benoit

    2006-06-15

    The releasable alkali from granite, which was used in the Three-Gorges concrete dam project in China, and from gneiss and feldspar was estimated by extraction in distilled water and super-saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution. Results show that: i) the finer the particles and the higher the temperature, the greater and faster the release of alkali; ii) compared with extraction by distilled water, super-saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution had a stronger activation on feldspar than on granite and gneiss; iii) for the three rocks tested, thermal activation had the largest effect on gneiss and a lower and similar effect on granite and feldspar. For very fine particles, temperature had a similar effect on the release of alkali by all three rocks. Because the aggregate used in the Three-Gorges dam concrete is non-reactive and a low calcium fly ash was used in the concrete, ASR would not be an issue for the dam, despite the release of alkali from the aggregate into the concrete.

  10. PROCESS OF RECOVERING ALKALI METALS

    DOEpatents

    Wolkoff, J.

    1961-08-15

    A process is described of recovering alkali metal vapor by sorption on activated alumina, activated carbon, dehydrated zeolite, activated magnesia, or Fuller's earth preheated above the vaporization temperature of the alkali metal and subsequent desorption by heating the solvent under vacuum. (AEC)

  11. Preparation of alkali metal dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Landel, R. F. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for producing alkali metal dispersions of high purity. The dispersions are prepared by varying the equilibrium solubility of the alkali metal in a suitable organic solvent in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The equilibrium variation is produced by temperature change. The size of the particles is controlled by controlling the rate of temperature change.

  12. Uptaking of plagioclase xenocryst into H2O-rich rear-arc basaltic magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, M.

    2015-12-01

    Kuritani et al. (2013, Mineral. Petrol.) and Kuritani et al. (2014, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol.) estimated genetic conditions of primary arc magmas beneath the Iwate volcano (a frontal arc volcano in the northeast Japan arc) and the Sannome-gata volcano (a rear-arc volcano in the northeast Japan arc) based on analyses of volcanic rocks and numerical simulation. They estimated that H2O concentrations of primary melts are 4-5 wt.% beneath the Iwate volcano and 6-7 wt.% beneath the Sannnome-gata volcano, respectively. Their arguments mean that primary melts beneath frontal-arc volcanoes and rear-arc volcanoes are both H2O-rich, yet there has been no direct evidence to support their arguments at the Sannnome-gata volcano because volcanic rocks are either almost aphyric and/or almost no melt inclusions were found. Hydrogen concentration in nominally anhydrous minerals serves as a hygrometer of arc basaltic melts (e.g., Hamada et al. 2013, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.). In this study, hydrogen concentration of plagioclase as a crustal xenocryst was analyzed to estimate H2O concentration of basaltic melt coexisted with plagioclase before the eruption. Plagioclase xenocrists were separated from crushed scoria which erupted from the Sannome-gata volcano 20,000-24,000 years ago. Composition of the plagioclase core is homogeneous and ranges from An30 through An35. The rim is 150 to 200-μm-thick dusty zone whose composition is around An60, suggesting that the rim crystallized rapidly from degassed basaltic melt. The profiles of infrared absorption area per unit thickness across the plagioclase core were obtained using Fourier Transform InfraRed spectrometer (FTIR). The inner core contains hydrogen of about 60 wt. ppm H2O, and hydrogen concentration elevates at outer core. Hydrogen concentration at the outermost core of plagioclase is >200 wt. ppm H2O, suggesting that plagioclase xenocrists were taken by hydrous melt (H2O>5 wt.%; Hamada et al. 2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.) and

  13. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  14. Compositional controls on spinel clouding and garnet formation in plagioclase of olivine metagabbros, Adirondack Mountains, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLelland, J.M.; Whitney, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    Olivine metagabbros from the Adirondacks usually contain both clear and spinel-clouded plagioclase, as well as garnet. The latter occurs primarily as the outer rim of coronas surrounding olivine and pyroxene, and less commonly as lamellae or isolated grains within plagioclase. The formation of garnet and metamorphic spinel is dependent upon the anorthite content of the plagioclase. Plagioclase more sodic than An38??2 does not exhibit spinel clouding, and garnet rarely occurs in contact with plagioclase more albitic than An36??4. As a result of these compositional controls, the distribution of spinel and garnet mimics and visually enhances original igneous zoning in plagioclase. Most features of the arrangement of clear (unclouded) plagioclase, including the shells or moats of clear plagioclase which frequently occur inside the garnet rims of coronas, can be explained on the basis of igneous zoning. The form and distribution of the clear zones may also be affected by the metamorphic reactions which have produced the coronas, and by redistribution of plagioclase in response to local volume changes during metamorphism. ?? 1980 Springer-Verlag.

  15. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  16. TEM observation of bacteria-induced plagioclase dissolution and secondary mineral formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, T.; Kyono, A.; Nishimiya, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Silicate minerals are the most common minerals in the earth's crust. Bacteria are also distributed throughout the earth's surface environment. The silicate minerals are known to be dissolved by organic acids and polysaccharides known as bacteria metabolites. The metabolic activity of bacteria therefore plays an important role in the interaction between dissolution of the silicate minerals and formation of secondary minerals. However, little is known about the secondary mineral formation process associated with the bacterial metabolism. To clarify the bacterial effect on the mineral dissolution and the secondary mineral formation, we closely investigated the effect of bacterial activity on surface texture modification and chemical composition changes of plagioclase which is the most abundant silicate mineral in the earth's crust. The bacteria were isolated from soil and then added in a suitable medium with several plagioclase fragments (Ab100% and An100%). It was incubated for 10 days. Al and Si concentrations in the medium were measured by ICP-AES to monitor the dissolution of the plagioclase. Secondary mineral formation during the incubation was observed by TEM, EDS and SAED methods. The authors will give the experiment results and discuss the effect of bacterial activity on the plagioclase dissolution and the secondary mineral formation in detail.

  17. FeO and MgO in plagioclase of lunar anorthosites: Igneous or metamorphic?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, W. C.

    1994-01-01

    The combined evidence from terrestrial anorthosites and experimental laboratory studies strongly implies that lunar anorthosites have been subjected to high-grade metamorphic events that have erased the igneous signatures of FeO and MgO in their plagioclases. Arguments to the contrary have, to this point, been more hopeful than rigorous.

  18. High-temperature hydrothermal alteration of tje Boehls Butte anorthosite: Origin of a bimodal plagioclase assemblage

    SciTech Connect

    Mora, Claudia I; Riciputi, Lee R; Cole, David; Walker, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The Boehls Butte anorthosite consists predominantly of an unusual bimodal assemblage of andesine and bytownite anorthite. Oxygen isotope compositions of the anorthosite were profoundly altered by high temperature, retrograde interaction with meteorichydrothermal fluids that varied in composition from isotopically evolved to nearly pristine meteoric water. Oxygen isotope ratios of bulk plagioclase separates are in the range ?7.0 to -6.2% V-SMOW, however, secondary ion mass spectrometry indicates spot-sized isotope values as low as -16%. Typical inter- and intra-plagioclase grain variability is 3 6%, and extreme heterogeneity of up to 20%is noted in a few samples. High-temperature hydrothermal alteration of intermediate plagioclase is proposed to explain the origin of bytownite anorthite in the anorthosite and creation of its unusual bimodal plagioclase assemblage. The anorthite-forming reaction created retrograde reaction-enhanced permeability which, together with rapid decompression, extension, and unroofing of the anorthosite complex, helped to accommodated influx of significant volumes of meteoric-hydrothermal fluids into the anorthosite.

  19. Hydrogen concentration in plagioclase as a hygrometer of arc basaltic melts: Approaches from melt inclusion analyses and hydrous melting experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Morihisa; Ushioda, Masashi; Fujii, Toshitsugu; Takahashi, Eiichi

    2013-03-01

    The partition coefficients of hydrogen between plagioclase and basaltic melt were determined by two approaches. For the first part of this study, plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions in mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) from the Rodriguez Triple Junction in the Indian Ocean were analyzed. The hydrogen concentration in plagioclase is less than 60 wt ppm water, and the average H2O concentration in melt inclusions is 0.3 wt%. Therefore, the apparent partition coefficient of hydrogen between plagioclase and melt is ≈0.01 on a molar basis. For the second part of this study, hydrous melting experiments of arc basaltic magma were performed at 0.35 GPa using an internally-heated pressure vessel at f≈NNO+3. The starting material was hydrous basaltic glass with H2O ranging from 0.8 to 5.5 wt%. A grain of Ca-rich plagioclase (≈1 mg) and 10 mg of powdered basaltic glass were sealed in a Au80Pd20 alloy capsule, and then kept at near the crystallization temperature of plagioclase as a liquidus phase to attain an equilibrium of hydrogen between plagioclase and melt. Combining the results of these two parts of this study, we formulated two linear equations to correlate the hydrogen concentration in plagioclase and the H2O concentration in melt. When H2O in melt is ≤1 wt%, hydrogen in plagioclase (wt ppm water)≈80×H2O in melt (wt%). When H2O in melt is≥4 wt%, hydrogen in plagioclase (wt ppm water)≈40×H2O in melt (wt%). Hydrogen concentration in plagioclase lies between two equations when H2O in melt ranges from 1 to 4 wt%. In accordance with these formulations, the partition coefficients of hydrogen between plagioclase and basaltic melt switches from 0.01±0.005 under H2O-poor conditions (≤100 wt ppm water in plagioclase, ≤1 wt% H2O in melt) to 0.005±0.001 under H2O-rich conditions (≥150 wt ppm water in plagioclase, ≥4 wt% H2O in melt). Such switches of hydrogen partitioning with an increase in H2O can be related to change of the atomic site for hydrogen in the

  20. Anomalous Plagioclase Compositions from Apollo 16 Impact Melts: Modification of Impact Melts on the Lunar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, A.; Neal, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    A study of Apollo 16 impact melts has been initiated as part of the NASA Lunar Science Institute's Center for Lunar Science and Exploration. The investigation uses a novel approach to investigate the crystallization conditions for the igneous textured samples returned by Apollo 16. This approach uses a combination of crystal size distributions and mineral chemistry to develop a crystal stratigraphy approach to examine crystallization conditions. The Apollo 16 impact melts are enriched in Al2O3 (~25-28%) and are highly feldspathic with only minor amounts of pyroxene, olivine, and opaque minerals. Initial studies focused on sample 60635 where previous whole rock analyses show that, surprisingly this sample possesses a small negative Eu anomaly [1,2]. This is intriguing given the feldspathic nature of the sample (~70% modal plagioclase), which should impart a strong positive Eu anomaly on the whole rock signature. The major element compositions of the plagioclases are relatively homogeneous with a range of An94-98 and an average of An97.2. Plagioclase trace element compositions exhibit a much wider compositional range with some crystals having the predicted positive Eu anomaly but other showing an unexpected negative Eu anomaly. There are about the same number of crystals with a negative Eu anomaly as there are with a positive anomaly and both are equally distributed through the thin section (60635,2). Intriguingly, 5 plagioclase crystals from this sample contain both positive and negative Eu anomalies in different sections of the crystals. Subsequent analyses of other impact melt samples show that a further 4 samples from the LM/Station 10 site also contain plagioclase with both positive and negative Eu anomalies (60235,5; 60335,13; 60615,8; 60618,3 and ,4), along with one sample from Station 4 (64817,3). The hypothesis we are considering is that the impact melt(s) represented by these anomalous samples were generated by impact into typical lunar highlands materials

  1. Spectral variability of plagioclase-mafic mixtures (3): Quantitative analysis applying the MGM algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serventi, Giovanna; Carli, Cristian; Sgavetti, Maria

    2015-07-01

    Among the techniques to detect planet's mineralogical composition remote sensing, visible and near-infrared (VNIR) reflectance spectroscopy is a powerful tool, because crystal field absorption bands are related to particular transitional metals in well-defined crystal structures, e.g., Fe2+ in M1 and M2 sites of olivine (OL) or pyroxene (PX). Although OL, PX and their mixtures have been widely studied, plagioclase (PL), considered a spectroscopically transparent mineral, has been poorly analyzed. In this work we quantitatively investigate the influence of plagioclase absorption band on the absorption bands of Fe, Mg minerals using the Modified Gaussian Model - MGM (Sunshine, J.M. et al. [1990]. J. Geophys. Res. 95, 6955-6966). We consider three plagioclase compositions of varying FeO wt.% contents and five mafic end-members (1) 56% orthopyroxene and 44% clinopyroxene, (2) 28% olivine and 72% orthopyroxene, (3) 30% orthopyroxene and 70% olivine, (4) 100% olivine and (5) 100% orthopyroxene, at two different particle sizes. The spectral parameters considered here are: band depth, band center, band width, c0 (the continuum intercept) and c1 (the continuum offset). In particular, we show the variation of the plagioclase and composite (plagioclase-olivine) band spectral parameters versus the volumetric iron content related to the plagioclase abundance in mixtures. Generally, increasing the vol. FeO% due to the PL: (1) 1250 nm band deepens with linear trend in mixtures with pyroxenes, while it decreases in mixtures with olivine, with trend shifting from parabolic to linear increasing the olivine content in end-member; (2) 1250 nm band center moves towards longer wavelengths with linear trend in pyroxene-rich mixtures and parabolic trend in olivine-rich mixtures; and (3) 1250 nm band clearly widens with linear trend in olivine-free mixtures, while the widening is only slight in olivine-rich mixtures. We also outline how spectral parameters can be ambiguous leading to an

  2. Plagioclase preferred orientation and induced seismic anisotropy in mafic igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shaocheng; Shao, Tongbin; Salisbury, Matthew H.; Sun, Shengsi; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Zhao, Weihua; Long, Changxing; Liang, Fenghua; Satsukawa, Takako

    2014-11-01

    Fractional crystallization and crystal segregation controlled by settling or floating of minerals during the cooling of magma can lead to layered structures in mafic and ultramafic intrusions in continental and oceanic settings in the lower crust. Thus, the seismic properties and fabrics of layered intrusions must be calibrated to gain insight into the origin of seismic reflections and anisotropy in the deep crust. To this end, we have measured P and S wave velocities and anisotropy in 17 plagioclase-rich mafic igneous rocks such as anorthosite and gabbro at hydrostatic pressures up to 650 MPa. Anorthosites and gabbroic anorthosites containing >80 vol% plagioclase and gabbros consisting of nearly equal modal contents of plagioclase and pyroxene display distinctive seismic anisotropy patterns: Vp(Z)/Vp(Y) ≥ 1 and Vp(Z)/Vp(X) ≥ 1 for anorthosites while 0.8 < Vp(Z)/Vp(Y) ≤ 1 and 0.8 < Vp(Z)/Vp(X) ≤ 1 for gabbros. Amphibolites lie in the same domain as gabbros, but show a significantly stronger tendency of Vp(X) > Vp(Y) than the gabbros. Laminated anorthosites with Vp(X) ≈ Vp(Y) ≪ Vp(Z) display a strong crystal preferred orientation (CPO) of plagioclase whose (010) planes and [100] and [001] directions parallel to the foliation. For the gabbros and amphibolites characterized by Vp(X) ≈ Vp(Y) > Vp(Z) and Vp(X) > Vp(Y) > Vp(Z), respectively, pyroxene and amphibole play a dominant role over plagioclase in the formation of seismic anisotropy. The Poisson's ratio calculated using the average P and S wave velocities from the three principal propagation-polarization directions (X, Y, and Z) of a highly anisotropic anorthosite cannot represent the value of a true isotropic equivalent. The CPO-induced anisotropy enhances and decreases the foliation-normal incidence reflectivity at gabbro-peridotite and anorthosite-peridotite interfaces, respectively.

  3. Feldspar basalts in lunar soil and the nature of the lunar continents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, A. M.; Ridley, W. I.; Harmon, R. S.; Warner, J.; Brett, R.; Jakes, P.; Brown, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    It is found that 25% on the Apollo-14 glasses have the same composition as the glasses in two samples taken from the Luna-16 column. The compositions are equivalent to feldspar basalt and anorthosite gabbro, and are similar to the feldspar basalts identified from Surveyor-7 analysis for lunar continents.

  4. Aluminum position in Rb-feldspar as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kyono, Atsushi; Kimata, Mitsuyoshi; Hatta, Tamao

    2003-09-01

    Al/Si configurations in some natural and synthetic Rb-feldspars have been examined carefully by EMPA and XPS analyses. Our results indicate that a small amount of H2O and excess Si and Al are incorporated in hydrothermally synthesized Rb-feldspar. The quantities of excess Al are 0.056 atoms per formula unit and are negatively correlated with those of the Rb, suggesting the presence of excess Al occupying non-tetrahedral sites in feldspar structures. This leads to incorporation of Al(Al3Si)O8 endmember into Rb-feldspars, estimated as one appropriate endmember indication for unusual chemistry of feldspars. In addition, Si2p, Al2p and O1s XPS signals of Rb-feldspars shift drastically toward the higher energy side than those of any natural feldspars. These provide conclusive evidence not only for existence of perceptible excess Si and Al, but also for Al at both extra-framework and tetrahedral sites in feldspar structures. PMID:14504785

  5. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  6. Timescale of emplacement of the Panzhihua gabbroic layered intrusion recorded in giant plagioclase at Sichuan Province, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lilu; Zeng, Ling; Ren, Zhongyuan; Wang, Yu; Luo, Zhaohua

    2014-09-01

    Giant plagioclase crystals carried into the Panzhihua gabbroic layered intrusion from a deeper magma chamber can help constrain the timescales of emplacement of the Panzhihua intrusion in the Emeishan large igneous province (LIP). In this study, we present the petrographic textures and chemical compositions of giant plagioclase and fine-grained gabbro samples along a ~ 50 m horizontal outcrop of the low zone of the Panzhihua deposit. The giant plagioclase gabbro (GPG) dykes mostly intrude into the fine-grained gabbros without significant contact. Both types of gabbros have the similar bulk-rock major and trace element compositions. However, the mineral composition shows that most of the plagioclase megacrysts contain less An than the plagioclase in fine-grained gabbro samples. In situ analyses of Sr isotopes from core-to-rim transects of plagioclase megacrysts are constant, indicating that there are no recycled crystals. The textural characteristics of samples combined with petrological modeling using MELTS suggest that the plagioclase megacrysts should crystallize and grow in a deeper magma chamber. Textual studies of the GPG indicate that these plagioclase megacrysts mostly plot as straight lines on a classic crystal size distribution (CSD) diagram. For a plagioclase growth range of 10- 11-10- 10 mm/s, the plagioclase should have a growth time of 530-8118 years. In a 100 km3 magma chamber releasing thermal energy at a rate of 1000 MW, the Panzhihua intrusion should reach 50% crystallization after ~ 2400 years. The growth time recorded by the megacrysts in the GPG and numerical modeling may indicate that the emplacement and crystallization of the Panzhihua intrusion may have taken place in thousands of years. In the Emeishan LIP, therefore the combination of large volumes of Fe-rich magma flux and efficient metal precipitation led to the formation of a giant Fe-Ti-V oxide deposit in a short period.

  7. Plagioclase-melt (dis)equilibrium due to cooling dynamics: Implications for thermometry, barometry and hygrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollo, Silvio; Putirka, Keith; Iezzi, Gianluca; Del Gaudio, Pierdomenico; Scarlato, Piergiorgio

    2011-07-01

    The compositional variation of plagioclase and the partitioning of major elements between plagioclase and melt have been experimentally measured as a function of the cooling rate. Crystals were grown from a basaltic melt at a pressure of 500 MPa under (i) variable cooling rates of 0.5, 2.1, 3, 9.4, and 15 °C/min from 1250 °C down to 1000 °C, (ii) quenching temperatures of 1025, 1050, 1075, 1090, and 1100 °C at the fixed cooling rate of 0.5 °C/min, and (iii) isothermal temperatures of 1000, 1025, 1050, 1075, 1090, and 1100 °C. Our results show that euhedral, faceted plagioclases form during isothermal and slower cooling experiments exhibiting idiomorphic tabular shapes. In contrast, dendritic shapes are observed from faster cooled charges. As the cooling rate is increased, concentrations of Al + Ca + Fe + Mg increase and Si + Na + K decrease in plagioclase favoring higher An and lower Ab + Or contents. Significant variations of pl-liqKd are also observed by the comparison between isothermal and cooled charges; notably, pl-liqKdAb-An, pl-liqKdCa-Na and pl-liqKdFe-Mg progressively change with increasing cooling rate. Therefore, crystal-melt exchange reactions have the potential to reveal the departure from equilibrium for plagioclase-bearing cooling magmas. Finally, thermometers, barometers, and hygrometers derived through the plagioclase-liquid equilibria have been tested at these non-equilibrium experimental conditions. Since such models are based on assumption of equilibrium, any form of disequilibrium will yield errors. Results show that errors on estimates of temperature, pressure, and melt-water content increase systematically with increasing cooling rate (i.e. disequilibrium condition) depicting monotonic trends towards drastic overestimates. These trends are perfectly correlated with those of pl-liqKdCa-Na, pl-liqKdAb-An, and pl-liqKdFe-Mg, thus demonstrating their ability to test (dis)equilibrium conditions.

  8. Orientations of Exsolved Magnetite Inclusions in Clinopyroxene and Plagioclase Determined With Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Wenk, H.; Scott, G. R.; Renne, P. R.

    2003-12-01

    Crystallographically oriented magnetite inclusions occur as subsolidus exsolution features in slowly cooled mafic rocks and are of interest to paleomagnetism because of their highly stable magnetic remanence. Many inclusions in both clinopyroxene and plagioclase exist as elongate laths with generalized dimensions of 1 μ m x 2 μ m x 50 μ m. Of initial interest is the formation temperature and orientation of these elongate inclusions with respect to their silicate hosts. In this study, the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique is used to determine orientation relationships across exsolution boundaries for magnetite inclusions > 0.5 μ m in diameter in host crystals of both clinopyroxene and plagioclase. Magnetite inclusions in clinopyroxenes from the Early Cretaceous Messum Complex of Namibia occur as two arrays growing within (010) of clinopyroxene and elongated subparallel to either the [100] or [001] axes. Inclusions subparallel to [100]cpx have [-110]mag // [010]cpx, (-1-11)mag // (-101)cpx, and [112]mag // [101]cpx. Inclusions subparallel to [001]cpx have [-110]mag // [010]cpx, (111)mag // (100)cpx, and [-1-12]mag // [001]cpx. Both arrays of inclusions are oriented such that planes of roughly close-packed oxygen atoms in both phases, \\{111\\} in magnetite and (-101) and (100) in clinopyroxene, are aligned. These EBSD-derived orientation relationships agree well with previous TEM and X-ray diffraction studies on similar materials, and are consistent with a high-temperature exsolution origin for the magnetite and coexistent amphibole. In contrast to clinopyroxene, the orientation relationships between plagioclase and its exsolved magnetite inclusions have so far been unexplored. Such inclusions are responsible for stable magnetic remanence in both layered intrusions and oceanic gabbros. Exsolved magnetite inclusions in plagioclase crystals from anorthosites in the Early Jurassic Freetown Complex of Sierra Leone have been investigated. Preliminary

  9. Dissolution rates and surface chemistry of feldspar glass and crystal. Final technical report, June 15, 1995 - August 14, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, S.; Pantano, C.

    2002-06-11

    Final report summarizing the completed work of the project entitled 'Dissolution of Feldspar in the Field and Laboratory.' One of the highly debated questions today in low-temperature geochemical kinetics centers upon the rate and mechanism of dissolution of feldspar, the most common mineral in the crust. In this project, the mechanisms of feldspar dissolution were investigated by emphasizing experiments with feldspar glass and crystal while comparing surface and solution chemistry. Specifically, laboratory work focused on the structure of altered surface layers on feldspars, the rate of dissolution of feldspar crystal and glass, and the presence of porosity and surface coatings on feldspars. In a complementary field project, the use of Sr concentrations and isotopic ratios were used to calculate feldspar dissolution rates.

  10. Plagioclase nucleation and growth kinetics in a hydrous basaltic melt by decompression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Agostini, C.; Landi, P.; Fortunati, A.; Mancini, L.; Carroll, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Isothermal single-step decompression experiments (at temperature of 1075 °C and pressure between 5 and 50 MPa) were used to study the crystallization kinetics of plagioclase in hydrous high-K basaltic melts as a function of pressure, effective undercooling (Δ T eff) and time. Single-step decompression causes water exsolution and a consequent increase in the plagioclase liquidus, thus imposing an effective undercooling (∆ T eff), accompanied by increased melt viscosity. Here, we show that the decompression process acts directly on viscosity and thermodynamic energy barriers (such as interfacial-free energy), controlling the nucleation process and favoring the formation of homogeneous nuclei also at high pressure (low effective undercoolings). In fact, this study shows that similar crystal number densities ( N a) can be obtained both at low and high pressure (between 5 and 50 MPa), whereas crystal growth processes are favored at low pressures (5-10 MPa). The main evidence of this study is that the crystallization of plagioclase in decompressed high-K basalts is more rapid than that in rhyolitic melts on similar timescales. The onset of the crystallization process during experiments was characterized by an initial nucleation event within the first hour of the experiment, which produced the largest amount of plagioclase. This nucleation event, at short experimental duration, can produce a dramatic change in crystal number density ( N a) and crystal fraction ( ϕ), triggering a significant textural evolution in only 1 h. In natural systems, this may affect the magma rheology and eruptive dynamics on very short time scales.

  11. Recycled oceanic crust observed in 'ghost plagioclase' within the source of Mauna Loa lavas

    PubMed

    Sobolev; Hofmann; Nikogosian

    2000-04-27

    The hypothesis that mantle plumes contain recycled oceanic crust is now widely accepted. Some specific source components of the Hawaiian plume have been inferred to represent recycled oceanic basalts, pelagic sediments or oceanic gabbros. Bulk lava compositions, however, retain the specific trace-element fingerprint of the original crustal component in only a highly attenuated form. Here we report the discovery of exotic, strontium-enriched melt inclusions in Mauna Loa olivines. Their complete trace-element patterns strongly resemble those of layered gabbros found in ophiolites, which are characterized by cumulus plagioclase with very high strontium abundances. The major-element compositions of these melts indicate that their composition cannot be the result of the assimilation of present-day oceanic crust through which the melts have travelled. Instead, the gabbro has been transformed into a (high-pressure) eclogite by subduction and recycling, and this eclogite has then been incorporated into the Hawaiian mantle plume. The trace-element signature of the original plagioclase is present only as a 'ghost' signature, which permits specific identification of the recycled rock type. The 'ghost plagioclase' trace-element signature demonstrates that the former gabbro can retain much of its original chemical identity through the convective cycle without completely mixing with other portions of the former oceanic crust. PMID:10801125

  12. Tectonically emplaced ultra-depleted lithospheric mantle records garnet, spinel and plagioclase facies events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czertowicz, Thomas; Scott, James; Palin, Mike

    2014-05-01

    The poorly studied Anita Ultramafites in western New Zealand represent a several km wide slice of lithospheric mantle that was tectonically emplaced onto the Gondwana supercontinent margin. The peridotites are almost exclusively spinel facies dunite and harzburgite, although spinel-orthopyroxene symplectites indicate the former presence of Cr-garnet. Pyroxenite dikes are uncommon, and there is no sign of an ophiolitic type structure. Olivine (~Fo93) and chromite (~Cr# 70) attest to extreme degrees of melt depletion, likely under hydrous conditions. The rocks were decompressed and equilibrated at the spinel facies. The ultramafites were then refertilised by a fluid that was rich in Si, Ca, K, OH and LREE, and probably equates to a low-degree silicate melt. The occurrence of negative and positive Eu and Sr anomalies in amphibole points to the influence of plagioclase, and suggests that refertilisation occurred at a very shallow lithospheric level. An added complication is that the peridotite was metamorphosed to upper amphibolite facies in the Cretaceous after tectonic emplacement. This generated talc, tremolite and chlorite. P-T conditions from adjacent gneisses indicate that this event occurred at ~ 10-12 kbar in association with crustal thickening. Thus, the peridotite may have been pushed back out of plagioclase facies conditions, partially melted, and re-equilibrated back in the spinel facies. The Anita Ultramafics therefore record a sequence of attempts to equilibrate at garnet - spinel - plagioclase - spinel facies, before final exhumation.

  13. Feldspar diagenesis in the Frio Formation, Brazoria County, Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Land, L.S.; Milliken, K.L.

    1981-07-01

    Tremendous quantities of detrital feldspar have been dissolved or albitized below about 14000 ft (4267 m) in the Frio Formation (Oligocene), Chocolate Bayou Field, Brazoria County, Texas. Some sandstones no longer contain any unmodified detrital feldspar grains. Material transfer involved in these reactions is immense, affecting at least 15% of the rock volume. Thus, albitization has important implications for several other diagenetic processes that involve feldspars or their components. These processes include formation of secondary porosity, precipitation of quartz and carbonate cements, and the evolution of Na-Ca-Cl formation water.

  14. Trace Elements in High-Ca Pyroxene and Plagioclase in the Bilanga Diogenite: Implications for the Magmatic Evolution of Diogenites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domanik, K. J.; Shearer, C. K.; Hagerty, J.; Kolar, S. E.; Drake, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    High-Ca pyroxene and plagioclase are typically present as minor phases in diogenites. However, although the trace element content of diogenite orthopyroxene has been measured in a number of studies; almost no trace element data is available for the high-Ca pyroxene and plagioclase with which it routinely coexists in these meteorites. These data could provide insights into the nature and evolution of the melts from which diogenites crystallized in the HED parent body. In this study we have obtained initial measurements of several REEs in high-Ca pyroxene, plagioclase, and orthopyroxene in the Bilanga. Measurement of additional incompatible trace element concentrations in these phases is currently in progress.

  15. Alkalis in Coal and Coal Cleaning Products / Alkalia W Węglu I Productach Jego Wzbogacania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytnar, Krzysztof; Burmistrz, Piotr

    2013-09-01

    In the coking process, the prevailing part of the alkalis contained in the coal charge goes to coke. The content of alkalis in coal (and also in coke) is determined mainly by the content of two elements: sodium and potasium. The presence of these elements in coal is connected with their occurrence in the mineral matter and moisture of coal. In the mineral matter and moisture of the coals used for the coke production determinable the content of sodium is 26.6 up to 62. per cent, whereas that of potassium is 37.1 up to 73.4 per cent of the total content of alkalis. Major carriers of alkalis are clay minerals. Occasionally alkalis are found in micas and feldspars. The fraction of alkalis contained in the moisture of the coal used for the production of coke in the total amount of alkalis contained there is 17.8 up to 62.0 per cent. The presence of sodium and potassium in the coal moisture is strictly connected with the presence of the chloride ions. The analysis of the water drained during process of the water-extracting from the flotoconcentrate showed that the Na to K mass ratio in the coal moisture is 20:1. Increased amount of the alkalis in the coal blends results in increased content of the alkalis in coke. This leads to the increase of the reactivity (CRI index), and to the decrease of strength (CSR index) determined with the Nippon Steel Co. method. W procesie koksowania przeważająca część zawartych we wsadzie węglowym alkaliów przechodzi do koksu. Zawartość alkaliów w węglu, a co za tym idzie i w koksie determinowana jest głównie zawartością dwóch pierwiastków: sodu i potasu. Obecność tych pierwiastków w węglu wiąże się z występowaniem ich w substancji mineralnej i wilgoci węgla. W substancji mineralnej oraz wilgoci węgli stosowanych do produkcji koksu, oznaczona zawartość sodu wynosi od 26.6 do 62.9%, a zawartość potasu od 37.1 do 73.4% alkaliów ogółem. Głównymi nośnikami alkaliów w substancji mineralnej są minera

  16. Laser ICP-MS study of trace element partitioning between olivine, plagioclase, orthopyroxene and melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubier, M.; Grove, T. L.; Langmuir, C. H.

    2010-12-01

    Trace element contents in natural minerals such as plagioclase, olivine, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene can be used to correct melt compositions for fractionation and estimate the redox state of magmas. In order to appropriately address fractionation in the different magmatic settings, high precision, fO2 controlled measurements at low pressures and variable temperature of mineral-melt trace element partition coefficients are needed. This study consists of 0.1 Mpa experiments on two starting compositions, a normal MORB AII96-18-1 from the Kane Fracture Zone and a basaltic andesite 85-44 from Mt Shasta. The starting compositions were enriched in 13 elements by addition of elemental standard solutions. The experiments were carried out at MIT in a vertical-tube DelTech quenching furnace with a CO2-H2 gas atmosphere. Both isothermal and cooling rate experiments, as well as non-doped experiments, were performed. The range in temperature was 1150-1175°C for the MORB and 1155-1190°C for the basaltic andesite. The different fO2 conditions were QFM, NNO, and NNO+2. Glasses, olivine, plagioclase and orthopyroxene crystals in the run products were analyzed by laser ICP-MS using a variety of calibration glass and mineral standards. Clinopyroxene crystals were too small to be analyzed accurately for their trace element contents. Fe and Na loss in our experiments is generally low and unlikely to have significant effects on the liquidus temperature. For the MORB composition, the average values for the Ol/Melt exchange distribution coefficient KD Fe-Mg (0.28±0.01), Cpx/Melt KD Fe-Mg (0.24±0.01) and Plg/Melt KD Ca-Na (0.94±0.03) attest for the achievement of chemical equilibrium. Similarly, for the basaltic andesite, the average values are Ol/Melt KD Fe-Mg = 0.28±0.01, Cpx/Melt KD Fe-Mg = 0.291±0.005, Opx/Melt KD Fe-Mg = 0.275±0.015 and Plg/Melt KD Ca-Na = 1.03±0.1. Cooling experiments systematically show different phase proportions, mineral compositions and partition

  17. Experimental studies of alunite: II. Rates of alunite-water alkali and isotope exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoffregen, R.E.; Rye, R.O.; Wasserman, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    Rates of alkali exchange between alunite and water have been measured in hydrothermal experiments of 1 hour to 259 days duration at 150 to 400??C. Examination of run products by scanning electron microscope indicates that the reaction takes place by dissolution-reprecipitation. This exchange is modeled with an empirical rate equation which assumes a linear decrease in mineral surface area with percent exchange (f) and a linear dependence of the rate on the square root of the affinity for the alkali exchange reaction. This equation provides a good fit of the experimental data for f = 17% to 90% and yields log rate constants which range from -6.25 moles alkali m-2s-1 at 400??C to - 11.7 moles alkali m-2s-1 at 200??C. The variation in these rates with temperature is given by the equation log k* = -8.17(1000/T(K)) + 5.54 (r2 = 0.987) which yields an activation energy of 37.4 ?? 1.5 kcal/mol. For comparison, data from O'Neil and Taylor (1967) and Merigoux (1968) modeled with a pseudo-second-order rate expression give an activation energy of 36.1 ?? 2.9 kcal/mol for alkali-feldspar water Na-K exchange. In the absence of coupled alkali exchange, oxygen isotope exchange between alunite and water also occurs by dissolution-reprecipitation but rates are one to three orders of magnitude lower than those for alkali exchange. In fine-grained alunites, significant D-H exchange occurs by hydrogen diffusion at temperatures as low as 100??C. Computed hydrogen diffusion coefficients range from -15.7 to -17.3 cm2s-1 and suggest that the activation energy for hydrogen diffusion may be as low as 6 kcal/mol. These experiments indicate that rates of alkali exchange in the relatively coarse-grained alunites typical of hydrothermal ore deposits are insignificant, and support the reliability of K-Ar age data from such samples. However, the fine-grained alunites typical of low temperature settings may be susceptible to limited alkali exchange at surficial conditions which could cause

  18. Hydrothermal alkali metal catalyst recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Eakman, James M.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.

    1979-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles primarily in the form of water soluble alkali metal formates by treating the particles with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of added carbon monoxide. During the treating process the water insoluble alkali metal compounds comprising the insoluble alkali metal residues are converted into water soluble alkali metal formates. The resultant aqueous solution containing water soluble alkali metal formates is then separated from the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment process, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal formates serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. This process permits increased recovery of alkali metal constituents, thereby decreasing the overall cost of the gasification process by reducing the amount of makeup alkali metal compounds necessary.

  19. Feldspar-Bearing Igneous Rocks at Gale: A ChemCam Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, V.; Fabre, C.; Toplis, M.; Wiens, R. C.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; Mangold, N.

    2014-09-01

    We present the first in situ evidences of feldspar-rich rocks ranging from granodioritic and alkalin effusive rocks (trachy basalts and syenitic liquids). Implication for primitive noachain crust will be discussed.

  20. Authigenic potassium feldspar in Cambrian carbonates: Evidence of Alleghanian brine migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hearn, P.P., Jr.; Sutter, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The shallow-water limestones and dolostones of the Conococheague Limestone (Upper Cambrian) of western Maryland contain large amounts of authigenic potassium feldspar. The presence of halite daughter crystals in breached fluid inclusions, low whole-rock ratios of chlorine to bromine, and thermochemical data suggest that the potassium feldspar formed at low temperature by the reaction of connate brines with intercalated siliciclastic debris. Analyses of argon age spectra indicate that the authigenic feldspar probably formed during Late Pennsylvanian to Early Permian time. These results may indicate mobilization and migration of connate brines brought about by Alleghanian folding. The widespread occurrence of authigenic potassium feldspar in Cambrian and Ordovician carbonate rocks throughout the Appalachians suggests that this may have occurred throughout the entire basin.

  1. Evidence for Coordination and Redox Changes of Iron in Shocked Feldspar from Synchrotron MicroXANES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delaney, J. S.; Dyar, M. D.; Hoerz, F.; Johnson, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Shock modification of feldspar has been documented and experimentally reproduced in many studies since the recognition of maskelynite in Shergotty. Experimentally shocked feldspar samples have been well studied using chemical and crystallographic techniques. The crystallographic, site-specific characterization of major and minor elements is less well documented. We present early x-ray absorption (XAS) spectral data for a suite of albitite samples that were experimentally shocked at pressures between 17 and 50 Gpa.

  2. [Study on the fine structure of K-feldspar of Qichun granite].

    PubMed

    Du, Deng-Wen; Hong, Han-Lie; Fan, Kan; Wang, Chao-Wen; Yin, Ke

    2013-03-01

    Fine structure of K-feldspar from the Qichun granite was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry methods to understand the evolution of the granitic magmatism and its correlation to molybdenite mineralization. The XRD results showed that K-feldspar of the potassic alteration veins has higher ordering index and triclinicity and is namely microcline with triclinic symmetry. K-feldspar of the early cretaceous granite has relatively lower ordering index and has widening [131] peak and is locally triclinic ordering. K-feldspar of the late cretaceous granite has lowest ordering index and sharp [131] peak and is honiogeneously monoclinic. The FTIR results showed that the IR spectra of the Qichun K-feldspar are similar to that of orthoclase reported by Farmer (1974). The 640 cm-1 absorption band increases while the 540 cm-' absorption band decreases with increase in K-feldspar ordering index, also, the 1,010 cm-1 absorption band separates into 1,010 and 1,046 cm-1 absorption bands, with a change in the band shape from widening to sharp outline. The ICP-MS results suggested that K-feldspar of the early cretaceous granite has relatively higher metal elements and rare earth elements, and the granite exhibits better mineralization background, K-feldspar of the potassic alteration veins has markedly lower Sr and Ba, indicating that the alteration fluid originated from the granitic magmatism, and hence, potassic alteration is a good indicator for molybdenite exploration. PMID:23705418

  3. Feldspar concentrations in lower Cambrian limestones of the Moroccan Atlas: Pyroclastic vs authigenic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvaro, J. Javier; Bauluz, Blanca

    2008-02-01

    Carbonate strata containing abundant euhedral feldspar, usually considered as authigenic, are characteristic of some lower Cambrian exposures in the Atlas Mountains, Morocco. Impure limestones are abundant in the Issendalenian Amouslek Formation of the western Anti-Atlas, and in the Banian Lemdad Formation of the southern High Atlas. Some of their limestone beds contain up to 40% acid insoluble residue, of which feldspar comprises as much as 65% in some samples, the remainder consisting of detrital and authigenic quartz, apatite, pyrite, and clay minerals. The host limestones are bioclastic tempestites, ooidal-oncoidal-bioclastic shoal complexes, archaeocyathan-microbial peri-reef settings (mainly flanks but not reef cores), and microbial reefs. A volcanic origin is adopted for the feldspars based on: (i) fluctuations in feldspar concentration paralleling bedding, but unrelated to host-facies (except for the aforementioned archaeocyathan-microbial reef cores that were controlled by turbidity); (ii) the local association with glassy fragments (with feldspars embedded in glass shards); and (iii) the scattered occurrence of gradational lithofacies from silty tuff to tuffitic limestone. The mineral and chemical composition of the host-rock and diagenetic fluids was the determining factor for the kind of feldspar preservation. Although the primary type of K-feldspar replacement is albitization, secondary albite subsequently suffered from illitization, chloritization, and/or replacement by calcite. A direct implication of this work is the possible geochronological dating of both volcanic eruptions and archaeocyath- and trilobite-bearing host-rocks based on radiometric analyses within unaltered K-feldspar pyroclasts extracted after etching.

  4. Origin of biotite-hornblende-garnet coronas between oxides and plagioclase in olivine metagabbros, Adirondack region, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, P.R.; McLelland, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Complex multivariant reactions involving Fe-Ti oxide minerals, plagioclase and olivine have produced coronas of biotite, hornblende and garnet between ilmenite and plagioclase in Adirondack olivine metagabbros. Both the biotite (6-10% TiO2) and the hornblende (3-6% TiO2) are exceptionally Titanium-rich. The garnet is nearly identical in composition to the garnet in coronas around olivine in the same rocks. The coronas form in two stages: (a) Plagioclase+Fe-Ti Oxides+Olivine+water =Hornblende+Spinel+Orthopyroxene??Biotite +more-sodic Plagioclase (b) Hornblende+Orthopyroxene??Spinel+Plagioclase =Garnet+Clinopyroxene+more-sodic Plagioclase The Orthopyroxene and part of the clinopyroxene form adjacent to olivine. Both reactions are linked by exchange of Mg2+ and Fe2+ with the reactions forming pyroxene and garnet coronas around olivine in the same rocks. The reactions occur under granulite fades metamorphic conditions, either during isobaric cooling or with increasing pressure at high temperature. ?? 1983 Springer-Verlag.

  5. A shock-metamorphic model for silicate darkening and compositionally variable plagioclase in CK and ordinary chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, A.E. )

    1992-04-01

    Silicate darkening in ordinary chondrites (OC) is caused by tiny grains of metallic Fe-Ni and troilite occurring mainly within curvilinear trails that traverse silicate interiors and decorate or, in some cases, cut across silicate grain boundaries. Highly shocked OC tend to have greater degrees of silicate darkening than lightly shocked OC; this indicates that silicate darkening is probably a result of shock metamorphism. The low Fe-FeS eutectic temperature (988C) renders metal and troilite susceptible to melting and mobilization during shock heating. Unshocked OC tend to have plagioclase with uniform compositions; shocked OC tend to have plagioclase with more variable (albeit still stoichiometric) compositions. The low impedance of plagioclase to shock compression makes it particularly susceptible to melting and mobilization; this is consistent with the molten appearance of plagioclase in highly shocked OC (e.g., Rose City and Paragould). CK chondrites also have compositionally variable plagioclase. The common association of silicate darkening with compositionally variable plagioclase is consistent with the hypothesis that both are products of shock metamorphism. Some CK and OC chondrites exhibit light shock effects in olivine that are consistent with equilibrium peak shock pressures that are too low to account for the silicate darkening or opaque shock veins in these meteorites. Therefore, the olivine in these chondrites may have been annealed after intense shock produced these effects. A few CK chondrites that contain olivine with undulose or mosaic extinction (e.g., LEW87009 and EET83311) may have been shocked again, after annealing.

  6. Electrolytic method to make alkali alcoholates using ion conducting alkali electrolyte/separator

    DOEpatents

    Joshi, Ashok V.; Balagopal, Shekar; Pendelton, Justin

    2011-12-13

    Alkali alcoholates, also called alkali alkoxides, are produced from alkali metal salt solutions and alcohol using a three-compartment electrolytic cell. The electrolytic cell includes an anolyte compartment configured with an anode, a buffer compartment, and a catholyte compartment configured with a cathode. An alkali ion conducting solid electrolyte configured to selectively transport alkali ions is positioned between the anolyte compartment and the buffer compartment. An alkali ion permeable separator is positioned between the buffer compartment and the catholyte compartment. The catholyte solution may include an alkali alcoholate and alcohol. The anolyte solution may include at least one alkali salt. The buffer compartment solution may include a soluble alkali salt and an alkali alcoholate in alcohol.

  7. The calcium-alkali syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Mariangeli; Fenves, Andrew Z; Emmett, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The milk-alkali syndrome was a common cause of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and renal failure in the early 20th century. It was caused by the ingestion of large quantities of milk and absorbable alkali to treat peptic ulcer disease. The syndrome virtually vanished after introduction of histamine-2 blockers and proton pump inhibitors. More recently, a similar condition called the calcium-alkali syndrome has emerged as a common cause of hypercalcemia and alkalosis. It is usually caused by the ingestion of large amounts of calcium carbonate salts to prevent or treat osteoporosis and dyspepsia. We describe a 78-year-old woman who presented with weakness, malaise, and confusion. She was found to have hypercalcemia, acute renal failure, and metabolic alkalosis. Upon further questioning, she reported use of large amounts of calcium carbonate tablets to treat recent heartburn symptoms. Calcium supplements were discontinued, and she was treated with intravenous normal saline. After 5 days, the calcium and bicarbonate levels normalized and renal function returned to baseline. In this article, we review the pathogenesis of the calcium-alkali syndrome as well as the differences between the traditional and modern syndromes. PMID:23543983

  8. Ion microprobe magnesium isotope analysis of plagioclase and hibonite from ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, R. W.; Bischoff, A.

    1984-01-01

    Ion and electron microprobes were used to examine Mg-26 excesses from Al-26 decay in four Al-rich objects from the type 3 ordinary hibonite clast in the Dhajala chondrite. The initial Al-26/Al-27 ratio was actually significantly lower than Al-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites. Also, no Mg-26 excesses were found in three plagioclase-bearing chondrules that were also examined. The Mg-26 excesses in the hibonite chondrites indicated a common origin for chondrites with the excesses. The implied Al-26 content in a proposed parent body could not, however, be confirmed as a widespread heat source in the early solar system.

  9. Diffuse reflectance spectra of orthopyroxene, olivine, and plagioclase as a function of composition and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Le, L.; Galindo, C.; Morris, R.; Lauer, V.; Vilas, F.

    1993-01-01

    Although many similarities exist between meteorite spectra and 'primitive' asteroids, there are unexplained discrepancies. These discrepancies do not appear to arise from grain size effects. Assuming that primitive meteorites did in fact originate from the 'primitive' asteroids, we believe that there are two testable explanations for the observed spectral discrepancies: compositional or structural differences. We have begun to synthesize and collect reflectance and Mossbauer spectra of pertinent materials, beginning with olivine, pyroxene, and plagioclase (all found in primitive meteorites), and to assess the possible effects composition may have on spectral features. Our study focuses on the combination of composition and structural effects.

  10. Effect of Phase Transition of Intermediate Plagioclase on Elastic Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Y.; Ishikawa, M.; Arima, M.

    2005-12-01

    We measured compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave velocities of plagioclases with albite, labradorite, and bytownite composition up to 700°C at 1 GPa with a piston cylinder high-pressure apparatus. The Vp and Vs measurements were conducted with the pulse reflection method. Simultaneous Vp and Vs measurements were carried out using 10°Y-cut LiNbO3 transducer. The discontinuous change in temperature derivative of Vp and Vs at 400°C is observed in the labradorite while the albite and bytownite show linear Vp and Vs change with elevating temperature up to 700°C. The temperature derivative of Vp (dVp/dT) and Vs (dVs/dT) is -0.9x10-4 km s-1 °C-1 and -1.2x10-4 km s-1 °C-1 in the albite, respectively. In the bytownite dVp/dT is -1.2x10-4 km s-1 °C-1 and dVs/dT is -0.9x10-4 km s-1 °C-1. The dVp/dT and dVs/dT in the labradorite is -0.7x10-4 and -1.2x10-4 km s-1 °C-1 below 400°C, respectively. Above 400°C dVp/dT and dVs/dT increase to -3.0x10-4 and -3.3x10-4 km s-1 °C-1, respectively. The XRD analyses of the labradorite before and after high P-T measurements show that the discontinuous change in temperature derivative of Vp and Vs in the labradorite would be the result of phase transition of plagioclase. The present data suggest that Vp and Vs of intermediate plagioclase above 400°C could not be evaluated by the simple mixing theory using the low temperature Vp and Vs values of end-member plagioclases (albite and anorthite).

  11. A Plagioclase-Augite Inclusion in Caddo County: Low-Temperature Melt of Primitive Achondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, H.; Baba, T.; Saiki, K.; Otsuki, M.; Ebihara, M.

    1993-07-01

    Caddo County is an IAB-iron meteorite with silicate inclusions. Its silicate inclusion with olivine and clinopyroxene as major minerals was studied by INAA by Palme et al. [1]. We report mineralogy and INAA data of an inclusion with abundant augite and plagioclase, which will provide us with information on the missing materials removed from sourse regions of the primitive achondrites. The PTS of Caddo County, 7.5 x 5.5 mm in size has been studied by mineralogical techniques including electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with digital imaging utilities. A thick slice of the specimen next to the PTS was crushed and separated into metal- rich and a silicate-rich fractions for determination of lithophile and sidelophile element concentrations by INAA. The PTS shows aligned textures of silicate inclusions in metallic matrix, suggesting that some parts are intruded into this place. Augite (Aug) and plagioclase fragments are rounded and anhedral, and numerous metal veins fill interstices of the silicate grains. The silicate parts are mainly composed of augite and plagioclase with additional small amounts of minor orthopyroxene (Opx). Olivine is present only as small grains. Crystals of augite reach up to 0.8 x 0.4 mm in size and plagioclase crystals up to 0.6 x 0.3 mm in size. Many plagioclase grains in the metal matrix within one region shear a common crystallographic orientation as indicated by polysynthetic twin lamellae. The Opx distributes in a limited region and Opx and Aug are in contact with curved boundaries even within a grain. The pyroxene compositions are Aug (Ca44.5Mg52.5Fe3) and Opx (Ca2Mg91.5Fe6.5). The plagioclase compositions (Or3Ab80An17) are Na rich and show small ranges from grain to grain. The compositions of olivine (Fa97.5) are similar to that of winonaites [2]. The modal abundances are: Aug 20 vol%, plagioclase 28%, Opx 3%, metallic irons etc. 49% (excluding minor olivine and Opx). Na, Al and REE are enriched in

  12. Change in Magma Dynamics at Okataina Rhyolite Caldera revealed by Plagioclase Textures and Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shane, P. A. R.

    2015-12-01

    A fundamental reorganization of magma dynamics at Okataina volcano, New Zealand, occurred at 26 ka involving a change from smaller volume, high-temperature rhyodacite magmas to a lower eruptive tempo of larger volume, low-temperature, rhyolite magmas. Zircon studies demonstrate the presence of a periodically active, long-lived (100,000 yr) magmatic reservoir. However, there is little correlation between periods of zircon crystallization and eruption events. In contrast, the changing magmatic dynamics is revealed in plagioclase growth histories. Crystals from the ~0.7 ka Kaharoa eruption are characterized by resorbed cores displaying a cellular-texture of high-An (>40) zones partially replaced by low-An (<30) zones, surrounded by a resorption surface and a prominent normal-zoned rim (An50-20). Elevated An, Fe, Mg, Sr and Ti follow the resorption surface and display rimward depletion trends, accompanied by Ba and REE enrichment. The zonation is consistent with fractional crystallization and cooling. The cores display wide trace element diversity, pointing to crystallization in a variety of melts, before transport and mixing into a common magma where the rims grew. Plagioclase from the ~36 ka Hauparu eruption display several regrowth zones separated by resorption surfaces, which surround small resorbed cores with a spongy cellular texture of variable An content (An 40-50). The crystals display step-wise re-growth of successively higher An, Fe, Mg and Ti content, consistent with progressive mafic recharge. Two crystal groups are distinguished by trace element chemistry indicating growth in separate melts and co-occurrence via magma-mingling. The contrasting zoning patterns in plagioclase correspond to the evolutionary history of magmatism at Okataina. Emptying of the magma reservoir following caldera eruption at 46 ka reduced barriers to mafic magma ascent. This is recorded by the frequent resorption and recharge episodes in Hauparu crystals. Subsequent re

  13. Nature and origin of authigenic K-feldspar in Precambrian basement rocks of the North American midcontinent

    SciTech Connect

    Duffin, M.E. )

    1989-08-01

    Authigenic K-feldspar occurs in alteration profiles in uppermost Precambrian igneous and metamorphic basement rocks of the midcontinent. The K-feldspar is widespread and has been identified in six states. The profiles occur directly below the Cambrian-Precambrian unconformity and range from about <1 to 8 m in thickness. Authigenic K-feldspar occurs throughout the profile. The K-feldspar is monoclinic or triclinic by X-ray diffraction, of end-member composition, and may compose 63% of rock volume. Much of the K-feldspar formed by replacement of primary feldspar. A sample of wholly authigenic K-feldspar from altered basement in southern Illinois gives a K/Ar data of 549 {plus minus} 18 Ma (Early Cambrian). This data is in agreement with Early Cambrian Rb/Sr dates for potassic alteration of uppermost Precambrian basement in Ohio. Dated authigenic K-feldspars from both Ohio and Illinois give identical {delta}{sup 18}O values of 17.5, suggesting formation from a very similar fluid. Concordancy of both dates and {delta}{sup 18}O values suggests that the K-feldspar formed during an episode of potassic alteration during Early Cambrian time that affected much of midcontinent North America. The dates and {delta}{sup 18}O values for K-feldspar, when considered together, do not fit any of the hypotheses presented here.

  14. Massive Red-Staining and Albitization of Feldspars in Paleozoic Basement Rocks of Western Europe and Their Association with the Triassic Palaeogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrega, C.; Parcerisa, D.; Franke, C.; Thiry, M.; Yao, K.; Gómez-Gras, D.

    2013-12-01

    Albitization of feldspars is a widespread mineral replacement process of the upper crust. An ubiquitous and pervasive red-staining albitization of feldspars has been observed in the feldspathic rocks of the Variscan basement in the Sudetes, Armorican, Morvan, Roc de Frausa and Montseny-Guilleries Massifs (Western Europe). These crystalline massifs were strongly eroded during Permian and Triassic times and suffered a long-lasting exposition in the Permian-Triassic palaeosurface. The albitized rocks contain minute Fe-oxides hoisted within the microporosity of the secondary albite. The intimate textural relationship between the Fe-oxides and the albite strongly suggest that they are coetaneous with albitization. The microscope, cathodoluminescence, SEM and EMPA analyses reveal that almost all plagioclases and some K-feldspars are albitized in those areas close to the Permian-Triassic palaeosurface. Moving downwards the palaeosurface the albitization of Variscan rocks progressively disappears. Field mapping of the albitized areas points to estimated thickness about 100-200m. In the uppermost parts of the profile almost all plagioclases are totally albitized and the rock shows a strong and pervasive reddening, whereas in the lowermost parts the mineral replacement is restricted to fractures and neighbouring walls and the rock in tinted with a soft pink colour. These observations suggest that albitization is linked to that palaeosurface and constitutes a paleoalteration profile beneath the Permian-Triassic palaeosurface. All these observations suggest that the mineral replacement could have been driven by descending Na+ rich brines related with or coming from the Permian-Triassic palaeosurface. Ricodel et al. (2007) determined a Triassic age for the paleomagnetic signature of the Fe-oxides hoisted within the microporosity of albite in the Morvan Massif. The narrow textural relationship between the Fe-oxides and the albite support the idea that this is the age of

  15. Symplectites in garnet megacrysts captured by alkali mafic magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aseeva, Anna; Vysotskiy, Sergey; Karabtsov, Alexander; Alexandrov, Igor; Chashchin, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Megacrysts are widespread in Cenozoic alkali-basalts of many volcanic provinces of the world. Garnet megacrysts containing symplectites are the most interesting, as can be used for reconstruction of physical and chemical conditions in liquid basalt at the moment of garnet crystal capture. The collection of garnet megacrysts and garnet-pyroxene aggregates from Shavaryn-Tsaram (Hangaj plateau, Mongolia) and Bartoj (Dzhida basaltic field, Russia) paleovolcanoes has studied. Cenozoic alkali basaltic volcanism of these two spatially separated areas is considered to be related to a uniform process of lithosphere spreading in Baikal and related Central Asian rift systems. The studying of garnet-pyroxene aggregate and fragments of garnet megacrysts from these two paleovolcanoes revealed two mineral associations: primary and secondary. The former includes garnet and clinopyroxene, the letter (symplectite) is presented by products of garnet disintegration (clinopyroxene remain unaltered). At least two paragenesis can be allocated: 1) shpinel - plagioclase-olivine sometimes with gedrite and orthopyroxene; 2) olivine (with glass). Experimental modeling of decomposition process in garnet megacryst has been carried out with the help of 'Selector' softwear at various P-T parameters. Physical and chemical conditions of this paragenesis occurrence have also been estimated by up-to-date geothermometers and geobarometers (T 950-1000 C, P 4-4.5 kbar. Conclusions: 1. Garnet megacrysts are apparently in non-equilibrium with alkali-basalts. They were formed in conditions corresponding to zones of mantle plums at the bottom of crust, in magmatic chambers at constant infiltration of fluid. Subsequently megacrysts were captured by alkali-basalt magma and taken out to the surface. 2. Kelyphitic rims on garnet megacrysts is a result of partial melting of megacrysts on interaction with the hosting alkali basaltic rock. During melting garnet transforms with the formation of Na-K glass and Mg

  16. Plagioclase-peridotites recording the incipient stage of oceanic basin formation: new constraints from the Nain ophiolites (central Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirnia Naeini, Tahmineh; Arai, Shoji; Saccani, Emilio

    2016-04-01

    Pargasite-bearing plagioclase peridotites of Nain have recorded a complex tectono-magmatic and -metamorphic history. Based on texture, as well as mineral major and trace element chemistry, two stages of facies exchange have been documented in the peridotites, namely, from plagioclase to spinel and vice versa. The earliest event that influenced the peridotites was a low degree of flux melting (<4%) which occurred at the pargasite stability field. Melting resulted in a small fraction of highly enriched melt as well as a depleted chemistry of the pargasites and coexisting pyroxenes. The produced melt fraction was scanty, and consequently hardly mobile. It crystallized in-situ in the peridotites in form of plagioclase. After the melting stage, cooling caused the peridotites to recrystallize in spinel facies. Recrystallization obliterated all textural features associated with formation of magmatic plagioclase in the peridotites. However, lines of evidence are documented by the chemistry of the spinel-facies mineral assemblage, which strongly suggest the pre-existence of plagioclases. This evidence includes a positive Eu anomaly in pargasites and pyroxenes, as well as a Zr negative anomaly in orthopyroxenes. The spinel-facies assemblage subsequently recrystallized in the plagioclase stability field. Recrystallization occurred in various degrees. Strong recrystallization resulted in the formation of modally typical, but atypically enriched, harzburgite from the lherzolite. Remarkable textural characteristics of peridotites that indicate subsolidus origin for plagioclases include: (1) plagioclase heterogeneous distribution, (2) plagioclase exclusive concurrence with spinel and, (3) plagioclase modal positive correlation with olivine but negative correlation with pyroxenes and pargasite. The transition from spinel to plagioclase-facies was associated with the following compositional variations in the peridotite minerals: (1) Al, Mg, Ni decrease and Cr, Ti, Fe increase in

  17. Evolution of groundwater chemical composition by plagioclase hydrolysis in Norwegian anorthosites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, David; Frengstad, Bjørn

    2006-03-01

    The Precambrian Egersund anorthosites exhibit a wide range of groundwater chemical composition (pH 5.40-9.93, Ca 2+ 1.5-41 mg/L, Na + 12.3-103 mg/L). They also exhibit an evolutionary trend, culminating in high pH, Na-rich, low-Ca groundwaters, that is broadly representative of Norwegian crystalline bedrock aquifers in general. Simple PHREEQC modelling of monomineralic plagioclase-CO 2-H 2O systems demonstrates that the evolution of such waters can be explained solely by plagioclase weathering, coupled with calcite precipitation, without invoking cation exchange. Some degree of reaction in open CO 2 systems seems necessary to generate the observed maximum solute concentrations, while subsequent system closure can be invoked to explain high observed pH values. Empirical data provide observations required or predicted by such a model: (i) the presence of secondary calcite in silicate aquifer systems, (ii) the buffering of pH at around 8.0-8.3 by calcite precipitation, (iii) significant soil gas CO 2 concentrations ( PCO 2 > 10 -2 atm) even in poorly vegetated sub-arctic catchments, and (iv) the eventual re-accumulation of calcium in highly evolved, high pH waters.

  18. A Clinopyroxene-Plagioclase Geobarometer for A-type Silicic Volcanic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, J.; Iveson, A. A.; Davis, K.; Johnson, T. A.; Gahagan, S.; Ellis, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    Constraining the crustal storage depths of magmas is important in understanding volcanism. The reaction: anorthite (pl) = Ca-Tschermak's (cpx) + silica (Q or liq) has a large volume change and hence offers potential as a geobarometer, but has not been extensively exploited as such. One of the chief barriers to its wide application is consistent estimation of melt silica activity for assemblages that lack quartz. We have skirted this problem by confining attention to metaluminous silicic compositions (SiO2 > 60% by weight), for which silica activity during crystallization is presumed to be close to 1, and calibrated the barometer for the range 0 - 2 GPa using the LEPR database and additional experiments from the literature. Additional improvement is obtained by excluding hydrous phase-bearing assemblages. Despite the analytical uncertainties present in older experimental investigations, with knowledge of temperature, and clinopyroxene, plagioclase and host melt compositions, pressures for amphibole- and biotite-free dacites and rhyolites can be estimated to ±0.17 GPa (1 sigma). The limitations of the barometer render it most applicable to intraplate, A-type rhyolites. Application to one such system, the Snake River Plain rhyolites, indicate that both melt-hosted phenocrysts and clinopyroxene-plagioclase aggregate grains found in these rhyolites formed at low pressures, <0.5 GPa. This is consistent with isotopic evidence for a shallow crustal origin for Snake River Plain rhyolites.

  19. Progress in Understanding Alkali-Alkali Spin Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Happer, William; Chann, Bien; Kadlecek, Stephen; Anderson, L. W.; Walker, Thad G.

    2000-06-01

    In extensive experiments we have shown that a spin interaction with a relatively long correlation time causes much of the spin relaxation in very dense alkali-metal vapors. The spin relaxation is affected by the pressure of the helium or nitrogen buffer gas, although there is little dependence at pressures above one atmosphere. There are substantial differences in the relaxation rates for different isotopes of the same element, for example ^87Rb and ^85Rb. We have completed extensive modeling of how singlet and triplet dimers and doublet trimers of the alkali-metal atoms could cause spin relaxation in dense alkali-metal vapors. In the case of doublet trimers or triplet dimers, we assume the main coupling to the nuclear spins is through the Fermi Contact interaction with the unpaired electrons. Spin loss to the rotation of the molecule is assumed to occur through the electronic spin-rotation and spin-axis (dipole-dipole) interactions for the triplet dimers. For the singlet dimers, we assume that the nuclear spins couple directly to the rotational angular momentum of the molecule through the electric quadrupole interaction. We account for all of the total nuclear spin states that occur for the dimers and trimers. We have also considered the possibility that the collisional breakup and formation rates of the dimers or trimers could saturate with increasing buffer gas pressure. Such saturation occurs in many other unimolecular reactions and is often ascribed to breakup through activated states.

  20. Progressive deformation of feldspar recording low-barometry impact processes, Tenoumer impact structure, Mauritania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaret, Steven J.; Kah, Linda C.; Harris, R. Scott

    2014-06-01

    The Tenoumer impact structure is a small, well-preserved crater within Archean to Paleoproterozoic amphibolite, gneiss, and granite of the Reguibat Shield, north-central Mauritania. The structure is surrounded by a thin ejecta blanket of crystalline blocks (granitic gneiss, granite, and amphibolite) and impact-melt rocks. Evidence of shock metamorphism of quartz, most notably planar deformation features (PDFs), occurs exclusively in granitic clasts entrained within small bodies of polymict, glass-rich breccia. Impact-related deformation features in oligoclase and microcline grains, on the other hand, occur both within clasts in melt-breccia deposits, where they co-occur with quartz PDFs, and also within melt-free crystalline ejecta, in the absence of co-occurring quartz PDFs. Feldspar deformation features include multiple orientations of PDFs, enhanced optical relief of grain components, selective disordering of alternate twins, inclined lamellae within alternate twins, and combinations of these individual textures. The distribution of shock features in quartz and feldspar suggests that deformation textures within feldspar can record a wide range of average pressures, starting below that required for shock deformation of quartz. We suggest that experimental analysis of feldspar behavior, combined with detailed mapping of shock metamorphism of feldspar in natural systems, may provide critical data to constrain energy dissipation within impact regimes that experienced low average shock pressures.

  1. Asbestos contamination in feldspar extraction sites: a failure of prevention? Commentary.

    PubMed

    Cavariani, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Fibrous tremolite is a mineral species belonging to the amphibole group. It is present almost everywhere in the world as a natural contaminant of other minerals, like talc and vermiculite. It can be also found as a natural contaminant of the chrysotile form of asbestos. Tremolite asbestos exposures result in respiratory health consequences similar to the other forms of asbestos exposure, including lung cancer and mesothelioma. Although abundantly distributed on the earth's surface, tremolite is only rarely present in significant deposits and it has had little commercial use. Significant presence of amphibole asbestos fibers, characterized as tremolite, was identified in mineral powders coming from the milling of feldspar rocks extracted from a Sardinian mining site (Italy). This evidence raises several problems, in particular the prevention of carcinogenic risks for the workers. Feldspar is widespread all over the world and every year it is produced in large quantities and it is used for several productive processes in many manufacturing industries (over 21 million tons of feldspar mined and marketed every year). Until now the presence of tremolite asbestos in feldspar has not been described, nor has the possibility of such a health hazard for workers involved in mining, milling and handling of rocks from feldspar ores been appreciated. Therefore the need for a wider dissemination of knowledge of these problems among professionals, in particular mineralogists and industrial hygienists, must be emphasized. In fact both disciplines are necessary to plan appropriate environmental controls and adequate protections in order to achieve safe working conditions. PMID:27033611

  2. Positron-alkali atom scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.; Ward, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron-alkali atom scattering was recently investigated both theoretically and experimentally in the energy range from a few eV up to 100 eV. On the theoretical side calculations of the integrated elastic and excitation cross sections as well as total cross sections for Li, Na and K were based upon either the close-coupling method or the modified Glauber approximation. These theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the total cross section for both Na and K. Resonance structures were also found in the L = 0, 1 and 2 partial waves for positron scattering from the alkalis. The structure of these resonances appears to be quite complex and, as expected, they occur in conjunction with the atomic excitation thresholds. Currently both theoretical and experimental work is in progress on positron-Rb scattering in the same energy range.

  3. Chromite-Plagioclase Assemblages as a New Shock Indicator; Implications for the Shock and Thermal Histories of Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    Chromite in ordinary chondrites (OC) can be used as a shock indicator. A survey of 76 equilibrated H, L and LL chondrites shows that unshocked chromite grains occur in equant, subhedral and rounded morphologies surrounded by silicate or intergrown with metallic Fe-Ni and/or troilite. Some unmelted chromite grains are fractured or crushed during whole-rock brecciation. Others are transected by opaque veins; the veins form when impacts cause localized heating of metal-troilite intergrowths above the Fe-FeS eutectic (988 C), mobilization of metal-troilite melts, and penetration of the melt into fractures in chromite grains. Chromite-plagioclase assemblages occur in nearly every shock-stage S3-S6 OC; the assemblages range in size from 20-300 microns and consist of 0.2-20-micron-size euhedral, subhedral, anhedral and rounded chromite grains surrounded by plagioclase or glass of plagioclase composition. Plagioclase has a low impedance to shock compression. Heat from shock-melted plagioclase caused adjacent chromite grains to melt; chromite grains crystallized from this melt. Those chromite grains in the assemblages that are completely surrounded by plagioclase are generally richer in Al2O3, than unmelted, matrix chromite grains in the same meteorite. Chromite veinlets (typically 0.5-2 microns thick and 10-300 microns long) occur typically in the vicinity of chromite-plagioclase assemblages. The veinlets formed from chromite-plagioclase melts that were injected into fractures in neighboring silicate grains; chromite crystallized in the fractures and the residual plagioclase-rich melt continued to flow, eventually pooling to form plagioclase-rich melt pockets. Chromite-rich chondrules (consisting mainly of olivine, plagioclase-normative mesostasis, and 5-15 vol.% chromite) occur in many shocked OC and OC regolith breccias but they are absent from primitive type-3 OC. They may have formed by impact melting chromite, plagioclase and adjacent mafic silicates during higher

  4. Alkali metal/sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Joginder N.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

  5. Superconductivity in alkali metal fullerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, D. W.; Rosseinsky, M. J.; Haddon, R. C.; Ramirez, A. P.; Hebard, A. F.; Tycko, R.; Fleming, R. M.; Dabbagh, G.

    1991-12-01

    The recent synthesis of macroscopic quantities of spherical molecular carbon compounds, commonly called fullerenes, has stimulated a wide variety of studies of the chemical and physical properties of this novel class of compounds. We discovered that the smallest of the known fullerenes, C 60, could be made conducting and superconducting by reaction with alkali metals. In this paper, an overview of the motivation for these discoveries and some recent results are presented.

  6. Alkali metal sources for OLED devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattaneo, Lorena; Longoni, Giorgio; Bonucci, Antonio; Tominetti, Stefano

    2005-07-01

    In OLED organic layers electron injection is improved by using alkali metals as cathodes, to lower work function or, as dopants of organic layer at cathode interface. The creation of an alkali metal layer can be accomplished through conventional physical vapor deposition from a heated dispenser. However alkali metals are very reactive and must be handled in inert atmosphere all through the entire process. If a contamination takes place, it reduces the lithium deposition rate and also the lithium total yield in a not controlled way. An innovative alkali metal dispensing technology has been developed to overcome these problems and ensure OLED alkali metal cathode reliability. The alkali Metal dispenser, called Alkamax, will be able to release up to a few grams of alkali metals (in particular Li and Cs) throughout the adoption of a very stable form of the alkali metal. Lithium, for example, can be evaporated "on demand": the evaporation could be stopped and re-activated without losing alkali metal yield because the metal not yet consumed remains in its stable form. A full characterization of dispensing material, dispenser configuration and dispensing process has been carried out in order to optimize the evaporation and deposition dynamics of alkali metals layers. The study has been performed applying also inside developed simulations tools.

  7. Raman Spectroscopic Characterization of the Feldspars: Implications for Surface Mineral Characterization in Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, J. J.; Wang, Alian; Kuebler, K. E.; Haskin, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    The availability in the last decade of improved Raman instrumentation using small, stable, intense lasers, sensitive CCD array detectors, and advanced fast grating systems enabled us to develop the Mars Microbeam Raman Spectrometer (MMRS), a field-portable Raman spectrometer with precision and accuracy capable of identifying minerals and their different compositions. For example, we can determine Mg cation ratios in pyroxenes and olivines to +/-0.1 on the basis of Raman peak positions. Feldspar is another major mineral formed in igneous systems whose characterization is important for determining rock petrogenesis and alteration. From their Raman spectral pattern, feldspars can be readily distinguished from ortho- and chain-silicates and from other tecto-silicates such as quartz and zeolites. We show here how well Raman spectral analysis can distinguish among members within the feldspar group.

  8. Crystal Zoning in Deccan Giant Plagioclase Basalts: Implications for a Short Duration of Deccan Trap Eruption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, M. R.; Sen, G.; Hart, G. L.; Wolff, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    The lower formations in the Western Ghats Type Section of the 65 Ma Deccan Traps are characterized by spectacular Giant Plagioclase Basalt (GPB) flows that cap individual formations. These flows have plagioclase phenocrysts that reach up to 5 cm in length and constitute as much as 40% by mode of the rock. The lavas that host these giant crystals are also the most differentiated members of their respective formations. In this study, we present new data on crystal sizes, elemental and Sr-isotopic compositions of GPB crystals from the oldest Jawhar Formation, infer their petrogenesis, and discuss their implications for the duration of the Deccan eruption in the Western Ghats. Surprisingly, liquid line of descent calculations (COMAGMAT) suggest that a high-MgO lava from a younger formation represents the most likely parent for the lavas belonging to this oldest formation. Replenishment of magma chambers by less evolved magma along with fractionation and contamination in the conduit system may give rise to the differences in chemistry within and among formations. Individual giant crystals are compositionally near-homogeneous with small (2-3%) changes in An-content, and show oscillatory zoning. Though the crystals are near-homogeneous in major and trace elements, cathodoluminescence imaging reveals distinct core and rim zonations in some crystals. These cores and rims also differ markedly in their 87Sr/86Sr ratio, with ratios of ~0.7096 in the cores and ~0.7106 in the rims. 87Sr/86Sr of the core is similar to that of the groundmass plagioclase in a flow that directly underlies the GPB, whereas the rims have the same composition as the groundmass plagioclase of the GPB flow itself. Thus, the cores of the giant phenocrysts grew in the magma that fed the older flow and their rims grew in the mixed and differentiated batch of magma that later erupted as a GPB flow. Assuming that crystal growth continued uninterrupted, the growth time of the crystal would be the incubation

  9. High geomagnetic intensity during the mid-Cretaceous from Thellier analyses of single plagioclase crystals.

    PubMed

    Tarduno, J A; Cottrell, R D; Smirnov, A V

    2001-03-01

    Recent numerical simulations have yielded the most efficient geodynamo, having the largest dipole intensity when reversal frequency is low. Reliable paleointensity data are limited but heretofore have suggested that reversal frequency and paleointensity are decoupled. We report data from 56 Thellier-Thellier experiments on plagioclase crystals separated from basalts of the Rajmahal Traps (113 to 116 million years old) of India that formed during the Cretaceous Normal Polarity Superchron. These data suggest a time-averaged paleomagnetic dipole moment of 12.5 +/- 1.4 x 10(22) amperes per square meter, three times greater than mean Cenozoic and Early Cretaceous-Late Jurassic dipole moments when geomagnetic reversals were frequent. This result supports a correlation between intervals of low reversal frequency and high geomagnetic field strength. PMID:11230692

  10. Strong climate and tectonic control on plagioclase weathering in granitic terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, C.; Brantley, S.; Richter, D.D.B.; Blum, A.; Dixon, J.; White, A.F.

    2011-01-01

    Investigations to understand linkages among climate, erosion and weathering are central to quantifying landscape evolution. We approach these linkages through synthesis of regolith data for granitic terrain compiled with respect to climate, geochemistry, and denudation rates for low sloping upland profiles. Focusing on Na as a proxy for plagioclase weathering, we quantified regolith Na depletion, Na mass loss, and the relative partitioning of denudation to physical and chemical contributions. The depth and magnitude of regolith Na depletion increased continuously with increasing water availability, except for locations with mean annual temperature <5??C that exhibited little Na depletion, and locations with physical erosion rates <20gm-2yr-1 that exhibited deep and complete regolith Na depletion. Surface Na depletion also tended to decrease with increasing physical erosion. Depth-integrated Na mass loss and regolith depth were both three orders of magnitude greater in the fully depleted, low erosion rate sites relative to other locations. These locations exhibited strong erosion-limitation of Na chemical weathering rates based on correlation of Na chemical weathering rate to total Na denudation. Sodium weathering rates in cool locations with positive annual water balance were strongly correlated to total Na denudation and precipitation, and exhibited an average apparent activation energy (Ea) of 69kJmol-1 Na. The remaining water-limited locations exhibited kinetic limitation of Na weathering rates with an Ea of 136kJmol-1 Na, roughly equivalent to the sum of laboratory measures of Ea and dissolution reaction enthalpy for albite. Water availability is suggested as the dominant factor limiting rate kinetics in the water-limited systems. Together, these data demonstrate marked transitions and nonlinearity in how climate and tectonics correlate to plagioclase chemical weathering and Na mass loss. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Sims Analysis of Water Abundance and Hydrogen Isotope in Lunar Highland Plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Guan, Yunbin; Chen, Yang; Peslier, Anne H.; Zhang, Youxue; Liu, Yang; Rossman, George R.; Eiler, John M.; Neal, Clive R.

    2015-01-01

    The detection of indigenous water in mare basaltic glass beads has challenged the view established since the Apollo era of a "dry" Moon. Since this discovery, measurements of water in lunar apatite, olivine-hosted melt inclusions, agglutinates, and nominally anhydrous minerals have confirmed that lunar igneous materials contain water, implying that some parts of lunar mantle may have as much water as Earth's upper mantle. The interpretation of hydrogen (H) isotopes in lunar samples, however, is controversial. The large variation of H isotope ratios in lunar apatite (delta Deuterium = -202 to +1010 per mille) has been taken as evidence that water in the lunar interior comes from the lunar mantle, solar wind protons, and/or comets. The very low deuterium/H ratios in lunar agglutinates indicate that solar wind protons have contributed to their hydrogen content. Conversely, H isotopes in lunar volcanic glass beads and olivine-hosted melt inclusions being similar to those of common terrestrial igneous rocks, suggest a common origin for water in both Earth and Moon. Lunar water could be inherited from carbonaceous chondrites, consistent with the model of late accretion of chondrite-type materials to the Moon as proposed by. One complication about the sources of lunar water, is that geologic processes (e.g., late accretion and magmatic degassing) may have modified the H isotope signatures of lunar materials. Recent FTIR analyses have shown that plagioclases in lunar ferroan anorthosite contain approximately 6 ppm H2O. So far, ferroan anorthosite is the only available lithology that is believed to be a primary product of the lunar magma ocean (LMO). A possible consequence is that the LMO could have contained up to approximately 320 ppm H2O. Here we examine the possible sources of water in the LMO through measurements of water abundances and H isotopes in plagioclase of two ferroan anorthosites and one troctolite from lunar highlands.

  12. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  13. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  14. Oxalate adsorption at a plagioclase (An47) surface and models for ligand-promoted dissolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stillings, L.L.; Drever, J.I.; Poulson, S.R.

    1998-01-01

    Previous work on adsorption of oxalate at aluminosilicate surfaces suggests that maximum adsorption occurs through a bidentate attachment of the organic ligand, at near-neutral pH. Rates of ligand-promoted dissolution are expected to be greatest at this pH as well. We tested this model by measuring oxalate adsorption on the surface of andesine (An47), in solutions of pH 3- 5 and total oxalate concentrations of 0-8 mM. Contrary to expectation, the greatest adsorption density of 24 ??mol m-2 total oxalate was observed at pH 3 and 8 mM total oxalate. Adsorption is dependent upon the activities of both oxalate (C2O42-) and bioxalate (HC2O4-) in solution and can be modeled with either a two-term Langmuir or a two-term Freundlich isotherm. A Freundlich adsorption model provided the best fit to rate data because it was not constrained to a finite number of adsorption sites, as was the Langmuir model. The two-term ligand adsorption model was incorporated into a rate model: R(tot) = k(H-)[H(ads)/+](L) + k(HOx-)[HOx(ads)/-] + k(Ox2- )[Ox2(ads)/-] where R(tot) is the net dissolution rate of the feldspar, [i(ads)] is the concentration of species i adsorbed to the surface, and k(i) is the rate constant for release of the surface complex. The model was fit to data for oxalate-promoted dissolution of andesine, resulting in estimates for the rate constants of k(HOx-) = 1.16 x 10-12, k(Ox2-) = 1.05 x 10-12, and k(H-) = 9.61 x 10-13 mol of feldspar (??mol of i) (??mol of i)-1 s-1.Previous work on adsorption of oxalate at aluminosilicate surfaces suggests that maximum adsorption occurs through a bidentate attachment of the organic ligand, at near-neutral pH. Rates of ligand-promoted dissolution are expected to be greatest at this pH as well. We tested this model by measuring oxalate adsorption on the surface of andesine (An47), in solutions of pH 3-5 and total oxalate concentrations of 0-8 mM. Contrary to expectation, the greatest adsorption density of 24 ??mol m-2 total oxalate was

  15. 40Ar/39Ar dating of Quaternary feldspar: examples from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pringle, M.S.; McWilliams, M.; Houghton, B.F.; Lanphere, M.A.; Wilson, C.J.N.

    1992-01-01

    Using a continuous laser and resistance furnace, we have measured ages on Quaternary plagioclase with an absolute precision of about ??30 ka and on Quaternary sanidine with a relative precision of better than 1%. Such precision was achieved by using low-temperature heating steps to remove much of the nonradiogenic argon contamination. Plagioclase is one of the most common mineral phases in volcanic rocks; thus, these procedures will be widely applicable to many problems for which precise radiometric age control has not been available. We studied plagioclase and plagioclase-sanidine concentrates from the oldest and the three largest silicic ash-flow deposits of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, one of the world's largest and most active volcanic systems. The results are in close agreement with new magnetostratigraphic data, suggesting that existing fission-track age determinations significantly underestimate the age of older units, and shift the inception of Taupo Vaolcanic Zone volcanism back to at least 1600 ka. -from Authors

  16. Alkali-granitoids as fragments within the ordinary chondrite Adzhi-Bogdo: Evidence for highly fractionated, alkali-granitic liquids on asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bischoff, A.

    1993-01-01

    Adzhi-Bogdo is an ordinary chondrite regolith breccia (LL3-6) that fell October 30, 1949 in Gobi Altay, Mongolia. The rock consists of submm- to cm-sized fragments embedded in a fine-grained elastic matrix. The breccia contains various types of clasts, some of which must be of foreign heritage. Based on chemical compositions of olivine some components have to be classified as L-type. Components of the breccia include chondrules, impact melts (some are K-rich, similar to those found in other LL-chondrites, highly recrystalized rock fragments ('granulites'), pyroxene-rich fragments with achondritic textures, and alkali-granitoidal fragments that mainly consist of K-feldspar and quartz or tridymite. Probably, this is the first report on granitoids from asteroids. It can be ruled out that these fragments represent huge rock assemblages of the parent body like granites do on Earth. Therefore, to avoid misunderstandings, these rocks will be designated as granitoids. In one thin section four granitoids were observed. The main phases within these clasts are K-feldspar and SiO2-phases. Minor phases include albite, Cl-apatite, whitlockite, ilmenite, zircon, Ca-poor pyroxene, and an unidentified Na,Ti-bearing silicate. Based on chemical composition and on optical properties quartz appears to be the SiO2-phase in two fragments, whereas tridymite seems to occur in the other two. The calculated formula of the unknown Na,Ti-rich silicate is very close to (Na,Ca)2.7(Fe,Mg)6(Ti)1.3(Si)7(O)24. Quartz and K-feldspar can reach sizes of up to 700 microns. Thus, the fragments can be described as coarse-grained (by chondritic standards). This is especially the case considering that quartz and K-feldspar are very rare minerals in ordinary chondrites. Representative analyses of minerals from some granitoidal clasts are given. Based on the mineral compositions and the modal abundances the bulk compositions were calculated. Besides these granitoidal rocks, pyroxene-rich fragments occur that

  17. Black Butte Dacitic Dome, Ca: A Study of Ascent Rates Using Amphibole and Plagioclase Reactions and Crystal Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCanta, M.; Rutherford, M.; Hammer, J.

    2001-12-01

    Magma ascent rate can be quantified petrologically utilizing measurement of (1) decompression-driven amphibole breakdown rims, (2) compositional changes in plagioclase phenocryst rims and (3) crystal size distribution (CSD) of groundmass plagioclase microlites, that are known to have grown during ascent and cooling. Measurements of these parameters in both natural and experimental samples allows for an investigation into the relative rates and correlations between amphibole breakdown, plagioclase growth (of both phenocrysts and microlites) and magma ascent. Black Butte, Ca provides a good opportunity to study the effects of ascent rate as determined using the above three methods. Black Butte consists of four overlapping dacitic domes on the southwest flank of Mt. Shasta. At Black Butte the natural phase assemblage consists of amphiboles with well developed breakdown rims, homogeneous An74 plagioclase phenocryst cores decreasing monotonically to An55 rims, and extensive groundmass plagioclase microphenocryst growth. Amphibole breakdown rim widths in natural samples are 30-45 μ m, consistent over all four domes. It is important to note that unlike any other studied dome, these samples exhibit a lack of variable rim thicknesses in any one section, indicating little to no magma mixing in the conduit. Plagioclase phenocryst rim widths, defined by a compositional change, are 10-30 μ m. Textural analysis of the groundmass indicates that crystallization of plagioclase microlites accounts for ~57 volume%, with little variation between samples. CSD plots are approximately log-linear over the size range 1-250 μ m. The characteristic microphenocryst size, volumetric number density, and growth rate are 33μ m, 1.5E-5, ~1.3E-5, respectively. Isothermal, constant rate decompression (P1=200 MPa, P2=2 MPa, dP/dt=6 MPa/day) experiments were run to determine the conditions necessary to produce the rims measured in the natural samples. The starting material was a partially crushed

  18. Alkali-Metal Spin Maser.

    PubMed

    Chalupczak, W; Josephs-Franks, P

    2015-07-17

    Quantum measurement is a combination of a read-out and a perturbation of the quantum system. We explore the nonlinear spin dynamics generated by a linearly polarized probe beam in a continuous measurement of the collective spin state in a thermal alkali-metal atomic sample. We demonstrate that the probe-beam-driven perturbation leads, in the presence of indirect pumping, to complete polarization of the sample and macroscopic coherent spin oscillations. As a consequence of the former we report observation of spectral profiles free from collisional broadening. Nonlinear dynamics is studied through exploring its effect on radio frequency as well as spin noise spectra. PMID:26230788

  19. Preferential cataclastic grain size reduction of feldspar in deformation bands in poorly consolidated arkosic sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2012-10-01

    This study presents microstructural as well as bulk and mineral chemical investigations of deformation bands in uncemented, friable arkosic sands of Miocene age (Vienna Basin, Austria). Our microstructural study indicates grain size reduction by grain flaking in deformation bands with small offsets (0.5-8 cm), and dominant intragranular fracturing and cataclasis of altered feldspar grains at larger displacements (up to 60 cm). Relative to quartz, the sericitized feldspar grains are preferably fractured and abraded, which additionally leads to an enrichment of mainly phyllosilicates by mechanical expulsion from feldspar. Both cataclasis of quartz and feldspar grains and enrichment of phyllosilicates result in grain size reduction within the deformation bands. The measured reduction in porosity of up to 20% is in some cases associated with a permeability reduction, reflected in the retention of iron-oxide rich fluids along deformation bands. These deformation bands formed at very shallow burial depths in unconsolidated sediments indicate that fault sealing may occur in the absence of chemical alteration of the deformation bands and lead to a compartmentalization of a groundwater or hydrocarbon reservoir.

  20. SCR neon and argon in Kapoeta feldspar: Evidence for an active ancient Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Garrison, D. H.; Bogard, D. D.

    1993-01-01

    From etched feldspar size-fractions of Kapoeta, we determine a significant excess of cosmogenic Ne-21 and Ar-38 over that produced by galactic cosmic rays. This excess component is attributed to early production by energetic solar protons and suggest that the energetic proton flux from the ancient Sun was several hundred times more intense than that of the contemporary Sun.

  1. Re-Examination of Anomalous I-Xe Ages: Orgueil and Murchison Magnetites and Allegan Feldspar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenberg, Charles M.; Pravdivtseva, Olga V.; Meshik, Alex P.

    2000-01-01

    Old I-Xe age for Orgueil (and Murchison) magnetite is not confirmed. New results show closure 2.8 Ma after Shallowater/Bjurbole standard, 10.3 Ma later than previously reported. The anomalously old I-Xe age of Allegan feldspar is attributed to shock.

  2. Preferential cataclastic grain size reduction of feldspar in deformation bands in poorly consolidated arkosic sands

    PubMed Central

    Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2012-01-01

    This study presents microstructural as well as bulk and mineral chemical investigations of deformation bands in uncemented, friable arkosic sands of Miocene age (Vienna Basin, Austria). Our microstructural study indicates grain size reduction by grain flaking in deformation bands with small offsets (0.5–8 cm), and dominant intragranular fracturing and cataclasis of altered feldspar grains at larger displacements (up to 60 cm). Relative to quartz, the sericitized feldspar grains are preferably fractured and abraded, which additionally leads to an enrichment of mainly phyllosilicates by mechanical expulsion from feldspar. Both cataclasis of quartz and feldspar grains and enrichment of phyllosilicates result in grain size reduction within the deformation bands. The measured reduction in porosity of up to 20% is in some cases associated with a permeability reduction, reflected in the retention of iron-oxide rich fluids along deformation bands. These deformation bands formed at very shallow burial depths in unconsolidated sediments indicate that fault sealing may occur in the absence of chemical alteration of the deformation bands and lead to a compartmentalization of a groundwater or hydrocarbon reservoir. PMID:26523078

  3. I-Xe Record of Cooling in K-Feldspar Inclusion from the Colomera (IIE) Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdivtseva, Olga; Meshik, Alex; Hohenberg, Charles M.; Wasserburg, Gerald J.

    2000-01-01

    Individual mineral grains from a silicate inclusion of the Colomera IIE iron meteorite were studied by laser extraction to find suitable host phases for I-Xe dating. K-feldspar separate yields an I-Xe age of 4.552 Ga and a cooling rate of 4-16 C/Ma.

  4. [Energy related studies utilizing K-feldspar thermochronology]. Progress report, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    In our second year of current funding cycle, we have investigated the Ar diffusion properties and microstructures of K-feldspars and the application of domain theory to natural K-feldspars. We completed a combined TEM and argon diffusion study of the effect of laboratory heat treatment on the microstructure and kinetic properties of K-feldspar. We conclude in companion papers that, with one minor exception, no observable change in the diffusion behavior occurs during laboratory extraction procedures until significant fusion occurs at about 1100{degrees}C. The effect that is observed involves a correlation between the homogenization of cryptoperthite lamelle and the apparent increase in retentivity of about 5% of the argon in the K-feldspar under study. We can explain this effect of both as an artifact of the experiment or the loss of a diffusion boundary. Experiments are being considered to resolve this question. Refinements have been made to our experimental protocol that appears that greatly enhance the retrieval of multi-activation energies from K-feldspars. We have applied the multi-domain model to a variety of natural environments (Valles Caldera, Red River fault, Appalachian basin) with some surprising results. Detailed {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39} Ar coverage of the Red River shear zone, thought to be responsible for the accommodation of a significant fraction of the Indo-Asian convergence, strongly suggests that our technique can precisely date both the termination of ductile strike-slip motion and the initiation of normal faulting. Work has continued on improving our numerical codes for calculating thermal histories and the development of computer based graphing tools has significantly increased our productivity.

  5. CO2 Sequestration in Feldspar-Rich Sandstone: The Importance of Saturation State and Fluid Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutolo, B. M.; Luhmann, A. J.; Kong, X. Z.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.; Saar, M. O.

    2014-12-01

    To investigate CO2 Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) in sandstones, we performed 150°C flow-through experiments on K-feldspar rich cores from the Eau Claire Formation. We observed mass transfer processes operating on a range of scales by measuring sample porosity, permeability, and surface area and fluid and solid chemistry. The close agreement between our measured K-feldspar dissolution rates and literature values demonstrate that feldspar-fluid interaction can be confidently modeled using our chosen rate parameters and characterization methods, but other hydrogeochemical processes evolve somewhat less predictably. Specifically, a sandstone core through which CO2-rich deionized water was recycled for 52 days decreased in porosity and permeability and increased in surface area while an Al hydroxide mineral, such as boehmite, precipitated within its pore space. However, two samples subjected to ~3 day single-pass experiments run with CO2-rich NaCl brines generally increased in porosity and surface area and decreased in permeability as K-feldspar was converted to a phase with kaolinite-like stoichiometry. Notably, boehmite remained two orders of magnitude less supersaturated than kaolinite in all samples from all experiments, and we therefore hypothesize that the identity of the secondary phase is related to the presence of NaCl in solution. Regardless of their identity, long-lived secondary phase supersaturations and low measured Al molalities suggest that Al is precipitated at approximately the same rate at which it is released to solution through feldspar hydrolysis. Finally, we note that, although core permeability measurably decreased in all three experiments, the magnitude of these changes is unlikely to impact CO2 injectivity over a CCUS reservoir's lifetime. The observations produced here are critical to the application of reactive transport models to CCUS systems, yet more work will be required in order to improve model predictions.

  6. Diverse, Alkali-Rich Igneous and Volcaniclastic Rocks Reflect a Metasomatised Mantle Beneath Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Baker, M. B.; Berger, J. A.; Fisk, M. R.; Gellert, R.; McLennan, S. M.; Newcombe, M. E.; Stolper, E. M.; Thompson, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Although Curiosity landed in a sedimentary setting, geochemical compositions determined by Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and ChemCam suggest that major element concentrations of some rocks were little modified by chemical weathering, and in these cases, the bulk (>70%) of the crystalline components determined by ChemMin are igneous. Gale rocks can therefore largely preserve the composition of their igneous protoliths and provide insight into the crystalline basement exposed in the north crater rim. Four end-member compositions are recognized on the basis of APXS analyses. (1) The diverse, evolved Jake M class (n=12) of inferred igneous origin includes float blocks and cobbles. Jake M rocks are phonotephritic/mugearitic to trachyandesitic and characterized by low MgO contents (3.0-5.7 wt%) and high Al and alkalis, particularly Na2O (up to 7.35 wt%). (2) The Bathurst class of siltstones to coarse sandstones (n=13) occurs as dark-toned float and bedded outcrop and is basaltic to trachybasaltic, ranging to high K2O (up to 3.8 wt%). Alteration of the protolith(s) or during diagenesis may have affected this class. (3) The Darwin class of conglomerates to coarse sandstones (n=10) has high Na and Al, likely reflecting a sodic plagioclase-rich mineralogy, but with higher Fe than Jake M class (13.0-17.1 vs. 6.0-12.5 wt%). (4) The low alkali "normal" Mars basaltic composition is typified by the Portage soils (n=6) and the John Klein class (n=13; includes the Sheepbed mudstone). Some degree of mixing and/or contamination with this low alkali basaltic compositon has affected all APXS analyses. Overall, Gale rocks are strongly enriched in total alkalis (at the same MgO) relative to basaltic shergottites and many have higher K2O than igneous rocks analyzed by Spirit and Opportunity, suggesting that the mantle beneath Gale is alkali-rich (likely as a result of a metasomatic event) and that alkalis are heterogeneously distributed in the planet's interior.

  7. Calc-alkalic vs. tholeiitic series revisited: new insight from isotopic micro-analyses of plagioclase phenocrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumi, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Shimizu, N.

    2004-12-01

    Major, trace and Sr isotopic compositions of plagioclase phenocrysts in calc-alkalic and tholeiitic rocks from Zao volcano, NE Japan were mapped with micro-analyses techniques. Plagioclase in tholeiitic rocks possesses a constant Sr isotopic ratio of ~0.7042, regardless with its Ca/Na ratio or the degree of magmatic differentiation. On the other hand, Sr isotopic ratios of plagioclase in calc-alkalic rocks are lower (0.7034-0.7041) than those for tholeiites, and more importantly, increase with decreasing Ca/Na ratios. Generally accepted mechanisms for production of those two types of arc magmas are fractional crystallization of a mantle-derived basalt magma for tholeiitic rocks and mixing between tholeiitic, mafic magmas and crust-derived, felsic magmas for calc-alkalic rocks. However, the above observation does not support this. Alternatively, tholeiitic magmas could be produced by anatexis of isotopically enriched, lower crustal material; calc-alkalic andesites are mixing products between a mantle-derived, isotopically depleted basalt magma and crust-derived, tholeiitic felsic magmas. Trace element characteristics of such mantle-derived, primary O^calc-alkalicO basalt are deduced based on plagioclase compositions and inferred distribution coefficients.

  8. Valid garnet biotite (GB) geothermometry and garnet aluminum silicate plagioclase quartz (GASP) geobarometry in metapelitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chun-Ming; Cheng, Ben-He

    2006-06-01

    At present there are many calibrations of both the garnet-biotite (GB) thermometer and the garnet-aluminum silicate-plagioclase-quartz (GASP) barometer that may confuse geologists in choosing a reliable thermometer and/or barometer. To test the accuracy of the GB thermometers we have applied the various GB thermometers to reproduce the experimental data and data from natural metapelitic rocks of various prograde sequences, inverted metamorphic zones and thermal contact aureoles. We have concluded that the four GB thermometers (Perchuk, L.L., Lavrent'eva, I.V., 1983. Experimental investigation of exchange equilibria in the system cordierite-garnet-biotite. In: Saxena, S.K. (ed.) Kinetics and equilibrium in mineral reactions. Springer-Verlag New York, Berlin, Heidelberg. pp. 199-239.; Kleemann, U., Reinhardt, J., 1994. Garnet-biotite thermometry revised: the effect of Al VI and Ti in biotite. European Journal of Mineralogy 6, 925-941.; Holdaway, M.J., 2000. Application of new experimental and garnet Margules data to the garnet-biotite geothermometer. American Mineralogist 85, 881-892., Model 6AV; Kaneko, Y., Miyano, T., 2004. Recalibration of mutually consistent garnet-biotite and garnet-cordierite geothermometers. Lithos 73, 255-269. Model B) are the most valid and reliable of this kind of thermometer. More specifically, we prefer the Holdaway (Holdaway, M.J., 2000. Application of new experimental and garnet Margules data to the garnet-biotite geothermometer. American Mineralogist 85, 881-892.) and the Kleemann and Reinhardt (Kleemann, U., Reinhardt, J., 1994. Garnet-biotite thermometry revised: the effect of Al VI and Ti in biotite. European Journal of Mineralogy 6, 925-941.) calibrations due to their small errors in reproducing the experimental temperatures and good accuracy in successfully discerning the systematic temperature changes of the different sequences. In addition, after applying the GASP barometer to 335 natural metapelitic samples containing one kind

  9. Process for the disposal of alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Leroy C.

    1977-01-01

    Large quantities of alkali metals may be safely reacted for ultimate disposal by contact with a hot concentrated caustic solution. The alkali metals react with water in the caustic solution in a controlled reaction while steam dilutes the hydrogen formed by the reaction to a safe level.

  10. The alkali metals: 200 years of surprises.

    PubMed

    Dye, James L

    2015-03-13

    Alkali metal compounds have been known since antiquity. In 1807, Sir Humphry Davy surprised everyone by electrolytically preparing (and naming) potassium and sodium metals. In 1808, he noted their interaction with ammonia, which, 100 years later, was attributed to solvated electrons. After 1960, pulse radiolysis of nearly any solvent produced solvated electrons, which became one of the most studied species in chemistry. In 1968, alkali metal solutions in amines and ethers were shown to contain alkali metal anions in addition to solvated electrons. The advent of crown ethers and cryptands as complexants for alkali cations greatly enhanced alkali metal solubilities. This permitted us to prepare a crystalline salt of Na(-) in 1974, followed by 30 other alkalides with Na(-), K(-), Rb(-) and Cs(-) anions. This firmly established the -1 oxidation state of alkali metals. The synthesis of alkalides led to the crystallization of electrides, with trapped electrons as the anions. Electrides have a variety of electronic and magnetic properties, depending on the geometries and connectivities of the trapping sites. In 2009, the final surprise was the experimental demonstration that alkali metals under high pressure lose their metallic character as the electrons are localized in voids between the alkali cations to become high-pressure electrides! PMID:25666067

  11. Application of the Plagioclase-Liquid Hygrometer to the Bishop Tuff: Consistency with Melt Inclusion H2O Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolles, J.; Lange, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    High-silica (74-77 wt% SiO2) rhyolites are the most evolved magmas on Earth and constitute some of the largest eruptions (1000s of km3). Of these, one classic example is the Bishop Tuff, a 760 ka eruption of >670 km3 of high-silica rhyolite erupted from Long Valley caldera, CA. Documenting dissolved H2O contents is crucial for understanding its origin and evolution. Analyses of water contents measured in quartz-hosted melt inclusions from the Bishop Tuff (Wallace et al. 1999; Anderson et al. 2000) show that the Early and Middle Bishop Tuff (Ig1Eb, Ig2Ea) have higher water contents (≤ 6.3 wt% H2O) than the Late Bishop Tuff (Ig2NWa; ≤ 5.2 wt%). Our work utilizes the revised plagioclase-liquid hygrometer (Waters & Lange, 2015), which is applicable to rhyolite, to evaluate internal consistency between Fe-Ti oxide temperatures, the plagioclase hygrometer, and melt inclusion H2O analyses. Two-oxide thermometry (Ghiorso & Evans, 2008), using all possible Fe-Ti oxide pairs (between 56 and 1500 pairs for individual samples), was carried out on 2-3 pumice clasts for each sampled eruptive unit. Resulting temperatures (°C ± 1σ) for individual clasts are: 705 ± 12, 728 ± 10 for unit Ig1Eb; 710 ± 12, 728 ± 11 for unit Ig2Ea; 752 ±10, 776 ± 8, 778 ± 7 for unit Ig2NWa; 791 ± 7, 795 ± 8 for unit Ig2Nb. The compositions of the most calcic plagioclase phenocrysts in the Early and Middle units are An17-19, whereas in the Late units they are An29-30. When the Fe-Ti oxide temperatures, whole rock analyses, and plagioclase compositions are incorporated into the plagioclase hygrometer, they give water contents at the onset of plagioclase crystallization of 6.6-6.9 wt% for the Early and Middle units and 4.8-4.9 wt % for the Late units. These results show internal consistency between melt inclusion analyses of water, Fe-Ti oxide thermometry, and the plagioclase-liquid hygrometer; they further support a temperature gradient across the Early, Middle, and Late Bishop Tuff units.

  12. Multiphase inclusions in plagioclase from anorthosites in the Stillwater Complex, Montana: implications for the origin of the anorthosites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loferski, P.J.; Arculus, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Multiphase inclusions, consisting of clinopyroxene+ilmenite+apatite, occur within cumulus plagioclase grains from anorthosites in the Stillwater Complex, Montana, and in other rocks from the Middle Banded series of the intrusion. The textures and constant modal mineralogy of the inclusions indicate that they were incorporated in the plagioclase as liquid droplets that later crystallized rather than as solid aggregates. Their unusual assemblage, including a distinctive manganiferous ilmenite and the presence of baddeleyite (ZrO2), indicates formation from an unusual liquid. A process involving silicater liquid immiscibility is proposed, whereby small globules of a liquid enriched in Mg, Fe, Ca, Ti, P, REE, Zr and Mn exsolved from the main liquid that gave rise to the anorthosites, became trapped in the plagioclase, and later crystallized to form the inclusions. The immiscibility could have occurred locally within compositional boundaries around crystallizing plagioclase grains or it could have occurred pervasively throughout the liquid. It is proposed that the two immiscible liquids were analogous, n terms of their melt structures, to immiscible liquid pairs reported in the literature both in experiments and in natural basalts. For the previously reported pairs, immiscibility is between a highly polymerized liquid, typically granitic in composition, and a depolymerized liquid, typically ferrobasaltic in composition. In the case of the anorthosites, the depolymerized liquid is represented by the inclusions, and the other liquid was a highly polymerized aluminosilicate melt with a high normative plagioclase content from which the bulk of the anorthosites crystallized. Crystallization of the anorthosites from this highly polymerized liquid accounts for various distinctive textural and chemical features of the anorthosites compared to other rocks in the Stillwater Complex. A lack of correlation between P contents and chondrite-normalized rare earth element (REE) ratios

  13. Magnetic and plagioclase fabrics in Early Cretaceous mafic dykes from Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, M.; Greiling, R. O.; Kontny, A. M.; Trumbull, R. B.

    2011-12-01

    Mafic dyke swarms are major components of the South Atlantic Large Igneous Province, which originated during the Cretaceous break up of Africa and South America. We present data from the major Henties Bay-Outjo dyke swarm (HOD) in coastal and inland NW Namibia where dykes have been emplaced into the Neoproterozoic Damara mobile belt. Most of the dykes strike at a high angle to the coast (NE-SW), but minor proportions are coast-parallel (NNW-SSE), N-S or NNE-SSW. Depending on dyke thickness (ca. 0.1 m to >100 m), the rocks are variably fine- to medium grained with chilled margins. With few exceptions the dyke compositions are tholeiitic basalt to basaltic andesite. Main minerals are plagioclase, clinopyroxene, olivine, Fe-Ti oxides, and accessory apatite and sulphides. For the magnetic study, we investigated 1140 standard cylinders from 41 dykes. The samples were studied microscopically and the following magnetic properties were determined: bulk susceptibility, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (P'), field dependence, hysteresis, Natural Remanent Magnetization (NRM) and Anisotropy of Anhysteretic Remanent Magnetization (AARM). Magnetic susceptibilities vary between 0.16 and 151*10-3 SI units. Microscopic studies and measurements of the temperature-dependent susceptibility identify magnetite and titanomagnetite as the dominant magnetic minerals. Hysteresis loops show that the magnetic domain states of titanomagnetite are pseudo-single or a mixture of single and multi-domain. Anisotropy is mostly low, with P' values between 1.01 and 1.15. Rare values of up to 1.33 reflect a strong magmatic flow fabric. The shapes of the AMS ellipsoids range from prolate to neutral and oblate. Two main fabric types (normal and inverse) can be recognized. We used the normal fabric type samples to interpret magmatic flow fabrics and attribute steep magnetic lineations of normal fabrics to vertical magma flow and shallow magnetic lineations to horizontal flow along the dyke planes. In

  14. Crystal origins and magmatic system beneath Ngauruhoe volcano (New Zealand) revealed by plagioclase textures and compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coote, Alisha C.; Shane, Phil

    2016-09-01

    The textural variation and compositional zoning of plagioclase in pre-historic and historic basaltic andesite lava flows from Ngauruhoe volcano reveals extensive crystal recycling from a multi-level magma system. Most phenocrysts have a calcic (~ An80-90) resorbed core with diffuse or no zonation that is depleted in Fe and Mg. Some cores display patchy zonation from replacement by high An crystallization prior to resorption. The cores are mantled by oscillatory-zoned rims of lower An content (< An60), and are enriched in Fe and Mg. Rim zones vary in relative thickness and textural complexity, and include sieve-textured bands, and/or cyclic calcic growth following dissolution events. A subordinate crystal population display similar features, but lack a resorbed core. These latter crystals display overall rimward enrichment in An, Fe and Mg. The resorbed cores crystallized from magmas more mafic than those erupted at Ngauruhoe, and slow cooling and prolonged storage resulted in loss of An zoning patterns and depletion of Fe and Mg by diffusion. These crystals are likely to have originated from deep cumulates or intrusions, and were subsequently entrained in ascending magmas. Patchy-textured cores were produced during decompression in a water under-saturated magma and staged ascent. The diversity in crystal cores reflect different conduits and ascent histories. The crystal rims grew in a more differentiated magma reservoir, and are in equilibrium with the erupted melt. Most of the zoning patterns in the rim zone require water pressure and/or temperature changes. These changes could have been caused by convective self-mixing in a closed system and/or the intrusion of hydrous melts of similar bulk composition. Other crystals display rimward elemental enrichments consistent with mafic recharge. Previously reported rimward enrichment in 87Sr-86Sr compositions can be explained by the re-cycled origin of the crystal cores and progressive crustal assimilation at shallower

  15. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, Raymond D.; McPheeters, Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  16. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C.

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  17. Authigenic K-feldspar in salt rock (Haselgebirge Formation, Eastern Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    The crystallisation of authigenic quartz under low temperature, saline conditions is well known (Grimm, 1962). Also the growth of low temperature authigenic feldspar in sediments is a long known phenomenon (Kastner & Siever, 1979; Sandler et al., 2004). In this study we intend to show that halite (NaCl) is a major catalyser for authigenic mineral growth. During late Permian (c. 255-250 Ma), when the later Eastern Alps were located around north of the equator, the evaporites of the Haselgebirge Formation were deposited (Piller et al., 2004). The Haselgebirge Fm. consists in salt mines of a two-component tectonite of c. 50 % halite and 50 % sedimentary clastic and other evaporite rocks (Spötl 1998). Most of the clastic rocks are mud- to siltstones ("mudrock"). During this study, we investigated rare sandstones embedded in salt rock form four Alpine salt mines. Around 40 polished thin sections were prepared by dry grinding for thin section analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The sandstones consist mainly of quartz, K-feldspar, rock fragments, micas, accessory minerals and halite in the pore space. They are fine grained and well sorted. Mudrock clasts in sandstone were observed locally, and also coal was observed repeatedly. Asymmetric ripples were found only in the dimension of millimeters to centimeters. Euhedral halite crystals in pores indicate an early presence of halite. During early diagenesis, authigenic minerals crystallized in the following chronological order. (1) Where carbonate (mainly magnesite) occurred, it first filled the pore space. Plant remains were impregnated with carbonate. (2) Halite precipitated between the detritic sandstone grains. Carbonate grains can be completely embedded in halite. (3) K-feldspar and quartz grains usually expose a detritic core and a later grown euhedral inclusion free rim. Euhedral rims of K-feldspar often also enclose a halite core. K-feldspar replaced the pre-existing halite along former grain boundaries of

  18. Lunar rock types - The role of plagioclase in non-mare and highland rock types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, N. J.; Gast, P. W.; Nyquist, L. E.; Rhodes, J. M.; Bansal, B. M.; Wiesmann, H.; Shih, C.-Y.

    1973-01-01

    Some nonmare and highland rock types (14310 type KREEP and very high Al2O3 basalts) have the internal chemical variations expected for a plagioclase-liquid system. The observed Eu variations in these rock types suggest a D(Eu) 1/p of 0.6 to 0.7. The Sr variations suggest a D(Sr) 1/p of about 0.6, with values as low as 0.35 suggested for some materials from sample 14063. Common Apollo 14 KREEP and Apollo 15 KREEP do not show internal Sr, Eu, Al2O3 variations consistent with the D(Eu, Sr) 1/p values derived for 14310 type KREEP. Major element and experimental data indicate that olivine or pyroxene is a large, perhaps dominant, controller of chemical variations within common Apollo 14 KREEP. The application of these distribution coefficients to pure anorthosites like 15415 yields the model dependent conclusion that the silicate liquids with which such anorthosites may have been chemically equilibrated have not yet been analyzed and perhaps not directly sampled.

  19. Crystallization temperature determination of Itokawa particles by plagioclase thermometry with X-ray diffraction data obtained by a high-resolution synchrotron Gandolfi camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masahiko; Nakamura, Tomoki; Noguchi, Takaaki; Nakato, Aiko; Ishida, Hatsumi; Yada, Toru; Shirai, Kei; Fujimura, Akio; Ishibashi, Yukihiro; Abe, Masanao; Okada, Tatsuaki; Ueno, Munetaka; Mukai, Toshifumi

    2014-02-01

    The crystallization temperatures of Itokawa surface particles recovered by the space probe Hayabusa were estimated by a plagioclase geothermometer using sodic plagioclase triclinicity. The Δ131-index required for the thermometer, which is the difference in X-ray diffraction peak positions between the 131 and 13¯1 reflections of plagioclase, was obtained by a high-resolution synchrotron Gandolfi camera developed for the third generation synchrotron radiation beamline, BL15XU at SPring-8. Crystallization temperatures were successfully determined from the Δ131-indices for four particles. The observed plagioclase crystallization temperatures were in a range from 655 to 660 °C. The temperatures indicate crystallization temperatures of plagioclases in the process of prograde metamorphism before the peak metamorphic stage.

  20. Alkali burns from wet cement.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    When water is added to the dry materials of Portland cement calcium hydroxide is formed; the wet cement is caustic (with a pH as high as 12.9) and can produce third-degree alkali burns after 2 hours of contact. Unlike professional cement workers, amateurs are usually not aware of any danger and may stand or kneel in the cement for long periods. As illustrated in a case report, general physicians may recognize neither the seriousness of the injury in its early stages nor the significance of a history of prolonged contact with wet cement. All people working with cement should be warned about its dangers and advised to immediately wash and dry the skin if contact does occur. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6561052

  1. Evidence for two different shock induced high-pressure events and alkali-vapor metasomatism in Peace River and Tenham (L6) chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Goresy, A.; Wopenka, B.; Chen, M.; Weinbruch, S.; Sharp, T. G.

    1997-03-01

    Smooth grains in the Peace River shocked matrix previously described as maskelynite are not diaplectic glass but a crystalline phase with a stoichiometric composition. They formed upon decompression by inversion of a parental high-pressure polymorph that crystallized from a dense K-rich melt. They are surrounded by radiating cracks that have extensively shattered the neighboring minerals due to volume increase induced by decompression. Similar grains in Tenham turned out to be glass-quenched from a dense alkali-rich melt compositionally unrelated to plagioclase. Expansion of the alkali-bearing aluminosilicate in Peace River and the quenched dense glass in Tenham triggered the second high-pressure event. Neither Peace River nor Tenham contain any maskelynite.

  2. Age of K-feldspar authigenesis in Lower Paleozoic and uppermost Precambrian rocks of the Mississippi Valley area

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, R.L.; Liu, J. . Dept. of Geology); Deino, A. . Geochronology Center); Kyser, T.K. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Published K-Ar dates (n = 12) of authigenic K-feldspar in Cambrian and Ordovician rocks of the Mississippi Valley area range from 448 to 375 Ma (Late Ordovician to Middle Devonian), suggesting a lengthy episode of K-feldspar authigenesis. Here the authors report an age span of 465--400 Ma (Middle Ordovician to Early Devonian) for authigenic K-feldspar of two samples from the alteration profile widely developed over Precambrian rocks at the unconformity with Cambrian deposits. This dating was done on 42 to 48 mesh grains of K-feldspar by the laser incremental-heating Ar-40/Ar-39 method. One sample, from west-central Wisconsin, is from a vein formed along a fracture in kaolinitic altered granite. Three grains nearest the fracture yielded plateau ages with a range of 9 Ma and an average of 430 Ma. Three grains distant from the fracture yielded a similar range of 10 Ma but with an average age of 397 Ma. Thus the grains grew over an extended period from at least 430 to 400 Ma. The other sample, from the St. Francois Mts. of Missouri, is of diabase replaced by K-feldspar. Three grains yielded plateau ages ranging over 20 Ma and apparently recording an extended history of K-feldspar growth. The average age of these grains is 454 Ma, compared to a K-Ar date of 444 [+-] 9 Ma obtained from a split of the same sample. The period(s) of K-feldspar authigenesis does not support its linkage with orogenic activity. Oxygen-isotope values of authigenic K-feldspar from lower Paleozoic and uppermost Precambrian rocks range from +19.8 to +23.0 [per thousand] and average 21.4 [per thousand] (N = 11). These values are compatible with formation of the K-feldspar from similar fluids and comparable temperatures.

  3. Oxygen isotope heterogeneity of arc magma recorded in plagioclase from the 2010 Merapi eruption (Central Java, Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Anastassia Y.; Gurenko, Andrey A.; Martel, Caroline; Kouzmanov, Kalin; Cathala, Annick; Bohrson, Wendy A.; Pratomo, Indyo; Sumarti, Sri

    2016-10-01

    Chemical and isotopic compositions of magmatic crystals provide important information to distinguish between deep juvenile and crustal contributions. In this work, high-resolution multicollector secondary ion mass spectrometry data reveal strong variations of δ18O values in three plagioclase crystals (800-1700 μm) from two representative basaltic andesite samples of the 2010 Merapi eruption (Central Java, Indonesia). The δ18O values (from 4.6‰ to 7.9‰) are interpreted to reflect oxygen isotope heterogeneity in the melt composition during plagioclase growth. The lowest δ18O values (4.6-6.6‰) are found in anorthite-rich cores (An82-97), whereas higher δ18O values (5.7-7.9‰) are found in anorthite-poorer zones (An33-86), typically in crystal rims. Combining these new plagioclase δ18O data with δ18O of calc-silicate crustal xenoliths erupted between 1994 and 1998, the composition of glass inclusions hosted by the anorthite-rich plagioclase (An82-92), available experimental data, and the results of thermodynamic modeling using the Magma Chamber Simulator code, we conclude that the abundant anorthite-rich cores crystallized from a mantle-derived hydrous basaltic to basaltic trachyandesite melt that recharged a deeper (200-600 MPa) magma storage zone, whereas lower anorthite zones crystallized at shallower levels (100-200 MPa). The oxygen isotope variations in the plagioclase are explained by a two-stage model of interaction of the hydrous, mafic mantle-derived magma (1) with old crustal rocks depleted in 18O due to high temperature alteration that yielded the low δ18O values in the anorthite-rich cores at deep levels (13-20 km), and later (2) with 18O-enriched carbonate material that yielded the high δ18O values in anorthite-poorer zones at shallow levels (∼4.5-9 km). Thermodynamic modeling is consistent with ∼18 wt.% assimilation of crustal calc-silicate material at 925-950 °C and 100-200 MPa by the 2010 Merapi basaltic andesite magma prior to

  4. Magma mixing recorded by Sr isotopes of plagioclase from dacites of the Quaternary Tengchong volcanic field, SE Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian-Feng; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Robinson, Paul T.; Wang, Christina Yan; Zhao, Jun-Hong; Malpas, John

    2015-02-01

    The Tengchong volcanic field east of the Burma arc in SW China comprises numerous Quaternary volcanoes. The volcanic rocks can be grouped into four units, numbered 1-4 from oldest to youngest. Units 1, 3 and 4 are composed of trachybasalt, basaltic trachyandesite and trachyandesite, respectively, whereas Unit 2 consists of hornblende dacite. Primary minerals in the dacite include plagioclase, clinopyroxene, amphibole and magnetite, all set in a glassy groundmass. Some of the dacites are moderately to highly weathered and show effects of low temperature alteration, with loss on ignition (LOI) up to 9.6 wt% and positive correlations of LOI with Al2O3, but negative correlations with SiO2, CaO and Na2O. Fresh dacites (LOI <3 wt%) belong to the calk-alkaline series and have pronounced negative Ti, Nb and Ta anomalies. They have whole-rock 87Sr/86Sr ratios ranging from 0.7090 to 0.7101, εNd values from -10.8 to -11.8, and εHf values from -5.1 to -6.8. Many of the large plagioclase crystals in the fresh dacites have reverse zoning, ranging from An55 in the cores to An72 in the rims. The smaller phenocrysts have relatively uniform An values between 56 and 50. One plagioclase crystal has an An value of 33.5. Plagioclase in the fresh dacite has relatively high Sr contents and 87Sr/86Sr ratios ranging from 0.7050 to 07125 except for one value of 0.7516, whereas plagioclase in the altered dacite has low Sr contents and highly variable Sr isotopic compositions (0.7039-0.7138), indistinguishable from those of the fresh rocks. Both An values and Sr isotopic compositions of the plagioclase indicate mixing of mantle- and crustally-derived magmas. We therefore propose that mantle-derived basaltic magma caused partial melting of the lower-middle crust and that mixing of the mafic and felsic magmas produced the dacite in staging magma chambers. The dacites contain minerals crystallized from both the mafic and felsic magmas, as well as a few xenocrysts plucked from the country rocks.

  5. Effects of chemical surface modification on the ice nucleation ability of feldspar and illite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin, Stefanie; Wex, Heike; Kanter, Sandra; Ebert, Martin; Niedermeier, Dennis; Stratmann, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Mineral dust is the most abundant ice nuclei (IN) in the atmosphere and thus it is thought to be important for ice nucleation in clouds (Murray et al. [2012]). The clay minerals contribute approximately two thirds of the mineral dust mass (Atkinson et al. [2013]), and illite is the most abundant clay mineral found in the atmosphere [Broadley et al., 2012]. In the past years a lot of the ice nucleation research focused on proxies for clay minerals like Arizona Test Dust (ATD), kaolinite and illite (see reviews by Murray et al. [2012] and Hoose and Möhler. [2012]). In most experiments, these substances acted as IN only at relatively low temperatures (lower than -25°C). Very recently Atkinson et al. (2013) showed that K-feldspar, which is a common crustal material, is the most active mineral dust with freezing temperatures above -20°C. In the present study we compared the immersion freezing behavior of size segregated illite and feldspar particles. We used illite-NX (Arginotec) and a feldspar sample from Minas Gerais, Brazil (consisting to roughly 80% of a K-feldspar with the remainder being a Na-feldspar). Both substances were examined in the framework of the INUIT research project. For the illite-NX particles freezing onset was observed at temperatures around -34°C. The feldspar sample already induced freezing at -23°C. The data obtained was in agreement to those reported in Broadley el al. [2012] and Atkinson et al. [2013]. To simulate chemical aging of the particle surface we coated the particles with sulfuric acid and repeated the measurements. The illite-NX showed a rather small change in the ice nucleation ability, whereas the freezing ability of the feldspar was strongly reduced and became similar to that of illite-NX. It seems that the sulfuric acid destroyed those sites on the particle surface which are responsible for the initiation of freezing. We continue our work in trying to better understand what exactly it is that gives K-feldspar its good IN

  6. Microfluidic Leaching of Soil Minerals: Release of K+ from K Feldspar.

    PubMed

    Ciceri, Davide; Allanore, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    The rate of K+ leaching from soil minerals such as K-feldspar is believed to be too slow to provide agronomic benefit. Currently, theories and methods available to interpret kinetics of mineral processes in soil fail to consider its microfluidic nature. In this study, we measure the leaching rate of K+ ions from a K-feldspar-bearing rock (syenite) in a microfluidic environment, and demonstrate that at the spatial and temporal scales experienced by crop roots, K+ is available at a faster rate than that measured with conventional apparatuses. We present a device to investigate kinetics of mineral leaching at an unprecedented simultaneous resolution of space (~101-102 μm), time (~101-102 min) and fluid volume (~100-101 mL). Results obtained from such a device challenge the notion that silicate minerals cannot be used as alternative fertilizers for tropical soils. PMID:26485160

  7. Microfluidic Leaching of Soil Minerals: Release of K+ from K Feldspar

    PubMed Central

    Ciceri, Davide; Allanore, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    The rate of K+ leaching from soil minerals such as K-feldspar is believed to be too slow to provide agronomic benefit. Currently, theories and methods available to interpret kinetics of mineral processes in soil fail to consider its microfluidic nature. In this study, we measure the leaching rate of K+ ions from a K-feldspar-bearing rock (syenite) in a microfluidic environment, and demonstrate that at the spatial and temporal scales experienced by crop roots, K+ is available at a faster rate than that measured with conventional apparatuses. We present a device to investigate kinetics of mineral leaching at an unprecedented simultaneous resolution of space (~101-102 μm), time (~101-102 min) and fluid volume (~100-101 mL). Results obtained from such a device challenge the notion that silicate minerals cannot be used as alternative fertilizers for tropical soils. PMID:26485160

  8. Quantitative analysis of time-resolved infrared stimulated luminescence in feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Ankjærgaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank; Chithambo, Makaiko L.

    2016-09-01

    Time-resolved infrared-stimulated luminescence (TR-IRSL) from feldspar samples is of importance in the field of luminescence dating, since it provides information on the luminescence mechanism in these materials. In this paper we present new analytical equations which can be used to analyze TR-IRSL signals, both during and after short infrared stimulation pulses. The equations are developed using a recently proposed kinetic model, which describes localized electronic recombination via tunneling between trapped electrons and recombination centers in luminescent materials. Recombination is assumed to take place from the excited state of the trapped electron to the nearest-neighbor center within a random distribution of luminescence recombination centers. Different possibilities are examined within the model, depending on the relative importance of electron de-excitation and recombination. The equations are applied to experimental TR-IRSL data of natural feldspars, and good agreement is found between experimental and modeling results.

  9. 40Ar/39Ar ages in deformed potassium feldspar: evidence of microstructural control on Ar isotope systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Steven M.; Potts, Graham J.; Kelley, Simon P.

    2001-05-01

    Detailed field and microstructural studies have been combined with high spatial resolution ultraviolet laser 40Ar/39Ar dating of naturally deformed K-feldspar to investigate the direct relationship between deformation-related microstructure and Ar isotope systematics. The sample studied is a ~1,000 Ma Torridonian arkose from Skye, Scotland, that contains detrital feldspars previously metamorphosed at amphibolite-facies conditions ~1,700 Ma. The sample was subsequently deformed ~430 Ma ago during Caledonian orogenesis. The form and distribution of deformation-induced microstructures within three different feldspar clasts has been mapped using atomic number contrast and orientation contrast imaging, at a range of scales, to identify intragrain variations in composition and lattice orientation. These variations have been related to thin section and regional structural data to provide a well-constrained deformation history for the feldspar clasts. One hundred and forty-three in-situ 40Ar/39Ar analyses measured using ultraviolet laser ablation record a range of apparent ages (317-1030 Ma). The K-feldspar showing the least strain records the greatest range of apparent ages from 420-1,030 Ma, with the oldest apparent ages being found close to the centre of the feldspar away from fractures and the detrital grain boundary. The most deformed K-feldspar yields the youngest apparent ages (317-453 Ma) but there is no spatial relationship between apparent age and the detrital grain boundary. Within this feldspar, the oldest apparent ages are recorded from orientation domain boundaries and fracture surfaces where an excess or trapped 40Ar component resides. Orientation contrast images at a similar scale to the Ar analyses illustrate a significant deformation-related microstructural difference between the feldspars and we conclude that deformation plays a significant role in controlling Ar systematics of feldspars at both the inter- and intragrain scales even at relatively low

  10. Integrating Sphere Alkali-Metal Vapor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuyer, Bart; Ben-Kish, Amit; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2010-03-01

    An integrating sphere is an optical multi-pass cavity that uses diffuse reflection to increase the optical path length. Typically applied in photometry and radiometry, integrating spheres have previously been used to detect trace gases and to cool and trap alkali-metal atoms. Here, we investigate the potential for integrating spheres to enhance optical absorption in optically thin alkali-metal vapor cells. In particular, we consider the importance of dielectric effects due to a glass container for the alkali-metal vapor. Potential applications include miniature atomic clocks and magnetometers, where multi-passing could reduce the operating temperature and power consumption.

  11. Alkali Silicate Vehicle Forms Durable, Fireproof Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John B.; Seindenberg, Benjamin

    1964-01-01

    The problem: To develop a paint for use on satellites or space vehicles that exhibits high resistance to cracking, peeling, or flaking when subjected to a wide range of temperatures. Organic coatings will partially meet the required specifications but have the inherent disadvantage of combustibility. Alkali-silicate binders, used in some industrial coatings and adhesives, show evidence of forming a fireproof paint, but the problem of high surface-tension, a characteristic of alkali silicates, has not been resolved. The solution: Use of a suitable non-ionic wetting agent combined with a paint incorporating alkali silicate as the binder.

  12. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  13. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  14. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  15. Biochemical evolution. I. Polymerization on internal, organophilic silica surfaces of dealuminated zeolites and feldspars

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joseph V.

    1998-01-01

    Catalysis at mineral surfaces might generate replicating biopolymers from simple chemicals supplied by meteorites, volcanic gases, and photochemical gas reactions. Many ideas are implausible in detail because the proposed mineral surfaces strongly prefer water and other ionic species to organic ones. The molecular sieve silicalite (Union Carbide; = Al-free Mobil ZSM-5 zeolite) has a three-dimensional, 10-ring channel system whose electrically neutral Si-O surface strongly adsorbs organic species over water. Three -O-Si tetrahedral bonds lie in the surface, and the fourth Si-O points inwards. In contrast, the outward Si-OH of simple quartz and feldspar crystals generates their ionic organophobicity. The ZSM-5-type zeolite mutinaite occurs in Antarctica with boggsite and tschernichite (Al-analog of Mobil Beta). Archean mutinaite might have become de-aluminated toward silicalite during hot/cold/wet/dry cycles. Catalytic activity of silicalite increases linearly with Al-OH substitution for Si, and Al atoms tend to avoid each other. Adjacent organophilic and catalytic Al-OH regions in nanometer channels might have scavenged organic species for catalytic assembly into specific polymers protected from prompt photochemical destruction. Polymer migration along weathered silicic surfaces of micrometer-wide channels of feldspars might have led to assembly of replicating catalytic biomolecules and perhaps primitive cellular organisms. Silica-rich volcanic glasses should have been abundant on the early Earth, ready for crystallization into zeolites and feldspars, as in present continental basins. Abundant chert from weakly metamorphosed Archaean rocks might retain microscopic clues to the proposed mineral adsorbent/catalysts. Other framework silicas are possible, including ones with laevo/dextro one-dimensional channels. Organic molecules, transition-metal ions, and P occur inside modern feldspars. PMID:9520372

  16. Gamma activity of stream sediment feldspars as ceramic raw materials and their environmental impact.

    PubMed

    Aboelkhair, Hatem; Ibrahim, Tarek; Saad, Ahmed

    2012-08-01

    In situ gamma spectrometric measurements have been performed to characterise the natural radiation that emitted from the stream sediment feldspars in Wadi El Missikat and Wadi Homret El Gergab, Eastern Desert, Egypt. The measurements of potassium (K, %), equivalent uranium (eU, ppm) and equivalent thorium (eTh, ppm) were converted into specific activities and equivalent dose rate. The average specific activities were 1402 Bq kg(-1) for K, 113 Bq kg(-1) for eU and 108 Bq kg(-1) for eTh in Wadi El Missikat, while they were 1240, 104 and 185 Bq kg(-1) in Wadi Homret El Gergab. The calculated outdoor average effective dose rates was 1.1 mSv y(-1) in wadi El Missikat and 1.3 mSv y(-1) in Wadi Homret El Gergab. The terrestrial-specific activities and effective dose rate levels of the natural radioactivity in the two areas lie within the international recommended limits for occupational feldspar quarry workers. On the other hand, these results indicated that irradiation is higher than the allowable level for members of the public. Therefore, quarrying the feldspar sediments from these locations as ceramic raw materials may yield an undesired impact on the environment, especially through the indoor applications. PMID:22171098

  17. Preparation of ultrafine silica from potash feldspar using sodium carbonate roasting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-nan; Shen, Xiao-yi; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Jun; Zhai, Yu-chun

    2016-08-01

    A novel process was developed for the preparation of ultrafine silica from potash feldspar. In the first step, potash feldspar was roasted with Na2CO3 and was followed by leaching using NaOH solution to increase the levels of potassium, sodium, and aluminum in the solid residue. The leaching solution was then carbonated to yield ultrafine silica. The optimized reaction conditions in the roasting process were as follows: an Na2CO3-to-potash feldspar molar ratio of 1.1, a reaction temperature of 875°C, and a reaction time of 1.5 h. Under these conditions, the extraction rate of SiO2 was 98.13%. The optimized carbonation conditions included a final solution pH value of 9.0, a temperature of 40°C, a CO2 flow rate of 6 mL/min, a stirring intensity of 600 r/min, and an ethanol-to-water volume ratio of 1:9. The precipitation rate and granularity of the SiO2 particles were 99.63% and 200 nm, respectively. We confirmed the quality of the obtained ultrafine silica by comparing the recorded indexes with those specified in Chinese National Standard GB 25576―2010.

  18. Isochron dating of sediments using luminescence of K-feldspar grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Li, Sheng-Hua; Wintle, Ann G.; Zhao, Hui

    2008-06-01

    A new method for dating well-bleached sediments is presented, with results for thirteen samples from China. The method uses an isochron constructed from the measurement of natural radiation doses received by potassium-feldspar grains in a range of grain sizes using the infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signal. The age of deposition of the sediment is calculated from this isochron and from the internal dose rate to the grains from 40K and 87Rb in the crystal lattice. This procedure appears to overcome age underestimation due to anomalous fading, a phenomenon that has precluded conventional luminescence dating of K-feldspars and would be applicable to K-feldspars for which the natural dose is beyond the linear dose response region. Also, since the isochron IRSL method is reliant on only the internal dose rate, it overcomes problems related to (1) changes in past dose rate due to postdepositional migration of radionuclides, (2) changes in water content as water-lain sediments dry out, (3) spatial heterogeneity in the gamma dose rate, and (4) uncertainties in the cosmic ray dose rate during the period of sample burial.

  19. Sorption Mechanisms of Antibiotic Cephapirin onto Quartz and Feldspar by Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Jonathan; Wang, Wei; Gu, Baohua

    2009-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the sorption mechanisms of cephapirin (CHP), a veterinary antibiotic, onto quartz (SiO2) and feldspar (KAlSi3O8) at different pH values. Depending on the charge and surface properties of the mineral, different reaction mechanisms including electrostatic attraction, monodentate and bidentate complexation were found to be responsible for CHP sorption. The zwitterion (CHPo) adsorbs to a quartz(+) surface by electrostatic attraction of the carboxylate anion group ( COO-) at a low pH, but adsorbs to a quartz(-) surface through electrostatic attraction of the pyridinium cation and possibly COO- bridge complexes at relatively higher pH conditions. CHP- bonds to a quartz(-) surface by bidentate complexation between one oxygen of COO- and oxygen from the carbonyl (C=O) of the acetoxymethyl group. On a feldspar surface of mixed charge, CHPo forms monodentate complexes between C=O as well as COO- bridging complexes or electrostatically attached to localized edge (hydr)oxy-Al surfaces. CHP- adsorbs to feldspar(-) through monodentate C=O complexation, and similar mechanisms may operate for the sorption of other cephalosporins. This research demonstrates, for the first time, that Raman spectroscopic techniques can be effective for evaluating the sorption processes and mechanisms of cephalosporin antibiotics even at relatively low sorbed concentrations (97-120 μmol/kg).

  20. Alkali metal for ultraviolet band-pass filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick (Inventor); Fraschetti, George A. (Inventor); Mccann, Timothy A. (Inventor); Mayall, Sherwood D. (Inventor); Dunn, Donald E. (Inventor); Trauger, John T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An alkali metal filter having a layer of metallic bismuth deposited onto the alkali metal is provided. The metallic bismuth acts to stabilize the surface of the alkali metal to prevent substantial surface migration from occurring on the alkali metal, which may degrade optical characteristics of the filter. To this end, a layer of metallic bismuth is deposited by vapor deposition over the alkali metal to a depth of approximately 5 to 10 A. A complete alkali metal filter is described along with a method for fabricating the alkali metal filter.

  1. Preferred lattice orientations of plagioclase from amphibolite and greenschist facies rocks near the Insubric Line (Western Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruhl, Jörn H.

    1987-04-01

    Preferred lattice orientations of plagioclase, measured by the universal stage, from deformed amphibolite and greenschist facies rocks near the Insubric Line (Western Alps), reflect the type and orientation of the strain system: either (001) or (010) are oriented parallel or subparallel to the schistosity and form more or less complete girdles around the stretching direction. By the preferred orientation patterns dominant (010) [001] slip is indicated and, additionally, slip on (001) parallel to the a direction, possibly at somewhat higher temperatures and/or at a higher An content of the plagioclase. It is suggested that obliquities of the symmetry-planes of the orientation patterns against the principle axes of strain are related to the sense of shearing.

  2. Constraints on the accretion of the gabbroic lower oceanic crust from plagioclase lattice preferred orientation in the Samail ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanTongeren, J. A.; Hirth, G.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2015-10-01

    Oceanic crust represents more than 60% of the earth's surface and despite a large body of knowledge regarding the formation and chemistry of the extrusive upper oceanic crust, there still remains significant debate over how the intrusive gabbroic lower oceanic crust is accreted at the ridge axis. The two proposed end-member models, the Gabbro Glacier and the Sheeted Sills, predict radically different strain accumulation in the lower crust during accretion. In order to determine which of these two hypotheses is most applicable to a well-studied lower crustal section, we present data on plagioclase lattice preferred orientations (LPO) in the Wadi Khafifah section of the Samail ophiolite. We observe no systematic change in the strength of the plagioclase LPO with height above the crust-mantle transition, no dominant orientation of the plagioclase a-axis lineation, and no systematic change in the obliquity of the plagioclase LPO with respect to the modal layering and macroscopic foliation evident in outcrop. These observations are most consistent with the Sheeted Sills hypothesis, in which gabbros are crystallized in situ and fabrics are dominated by compaction and localized extension rather than by systematically increasing shear strain with increasing depth in a Gabbro Glacier. Our data support the hypothesis of MacLeod and Yaouancq (2000) that the rotation of the outcrop-scale layering from sub-horizontal in the layered gabbros to sub-vertical near the sheeted dikes is due to rapid vertical melt migration through upper gabbros close to the axial magma chamber. Additionally, our results support the hypothesis that the majority of extensional strain in fast spreading ridges is accommodated in partially molten regions at the ridge axis, whereas in slow and ultra-slow ridges large shear strains are accommodated by plastic deformation.

  3. Chemical bonding and electronic structures of microcline, orthoclase and the plagioclase series by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kloprogge, J Theo; Wood, Barry J

    2015-02-25

    A detailed analysis was undertaken of the X-ray photoelectron spectra obtained from microcline, orthoclase and several samples of plagioclase with varying Na/Ca ratio. Comparison of the spectra was made based on the chemical bonding and structural differences in the Al- and Si-coordination within each specimen. The spectra for Si 2p and Al 2p vary with the change in symmetry between microcline and orthoclase, while in plagioclase an increase in Al-O-Si linkages results in a small but observable decrease in binding energy. The overall shapes of the O 1s peaks observed in all spectra are similar and show shifts similar to those observed for Si 2p and Al 2p. The lower-VB spectra for microcline and orthoclase are similar intermediate between α-SiO2 and α-Al2O3 in terms of binding energies. In the plagioclase series increasing coupled substitution of Na and Si for Ca and Al results in a change of the overall shape of the spectra, showing a distinct broadening associated with the presence of two separate but overlapping bands similar to the 21 eV band observed for quartz and the 23 eV band observed for corundum. The bonding character for microcline and orthoclase is more covalent than that of α-Al2O3, but less than that of α-SiO2. In contrast, the plagioclase samples show two distinct bonding characters that are comparable with those of α-SiO2 and α-Al2O3. PMID:25261735

  4. Alkali Metal Handling Practices at NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvail, Patrick G.; Carter, Robert R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is NASA s principle propulsion development center. Research and development is coordinated and carried out on not only the existing transportation systems, but also those that may be flown in the near future. Heat pipe cooled fast fission cores are among several concepts being considered for the Nuclear Systems Initiative. Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a capability to handle high-purity alkali metals for use in heat pipes or liquid metal heat transfer loops. This capability is a low budget prototype of an alkali metal handling system that would allow the production of flight qualified heat pipe modules or alkali metal loops. The processing approach used to introduce pure alkali metal into heat pipe modules and other test articles are described in this paper.

  5. Alkali-metal intercalation in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béguin, F.; Duclaux, L.; Méténier, K.; Frackowiak, E.; Salvetat, J. P.; Conard, J.; Bonnamy, S.; Lauginie, P.

    1999-09-01

    We report on successful intercalation of multiwall (MWNT) and single wall (SWNT) carbon nanotubes with alkali metals by electrochemical and vapor phase reactions. A LiC10 compound was produced by full electrochemical reduction of MWNT. KC8 and CsC8-MWNT first stage derivatives were synthesized in conditions of alkali vapor saturation. Their identity periods and the 2×2 R 0° alkali superlattice are comparable to their parent graphite compounds. The dysonian shape of KC8 EPR line and the temperature-independent Pauli susceptibility are both characteristic of a metallic behavior, which was confirmed by 13C NMR anisotropic shifts. Exposure of SWNT bundles to alkali vapor led to an increase of the pristine triangular lattice from 1.67 nm to 1.85 nm and 1.87 nm for potassium and rubidium, respectively.

  6. Age and thermochronology of K-feldspars from the Manson Impact Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitler, P. K.; Kunk, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    As a contribution to the effort to obtain a precise age for the Manson Impact Structure, we are approaching the problem from a thermo chronological perspective, with the goal of extracting an age from Ar-40/Ar-39 age-spectrum analysis of partially overprinted K-feldspars taken from granitoid clasts. We find that shocked feldspars from Manson generally show a strong overprint in their age spectra, with more than 50 percent of each spectrum being reset. The reset portions of the age spectra correspond to gas lost from very small diffusion domains, and a characteristic of the Manson samples is the very large range in apparent diffusion dimensions that they display, with the smallest domains being some 400 times smaller than the largest domains. It is also noteworthy that the small domains comprise a substantial portion of the volume of the feldspars (50 percent or more). These observations are consistent with the extreme shock experienced by these samples. In detail, the spectra we have measured to date are saddle-shaped and show minimum ages of between 67 and 72 Ma, which we interpret to be maximum estimates for the age of the impact. In the case of one sample (M1-678.3; K-feldspar from a large syenite block located well below the apparent melt-matrix breccia in the M1 borehole), isotope correlation analysis suggests the presence of a non-atmospheric trapped Ar component (Ar-40/Ar-36 of 660 plus or minus 40), and an age of about 65.3 plus or minus 0.5 Ma (2 sigma). Our interpretation of our results is that the shock of impact greatly reduced the diffusion-domain sizes of our samples, making them susceptible to significant Ar loss during heating associated with impact. It appears that while our feldspars were partially open to Ar loss, they equilibrated with a non-atmospheric Ar component, probably related to impact-related degassing of old basement around the impact site.

  7. Age and thermochronology of K-feldspars from the Manson Impact Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitler, P. K.; Kunk, M. J.

    1993-03-01

    As a contribution to the effort to obtain a precise age for the Manson Impact Structure, we are approaching the problem from a thermo chronological perspective, with the goal of extracting an age from Ar-40/Ar-39 age-spectrum analysis of partially overprinted K-feldspars taken from granitoid clasts. We find that shocked feldspars from Manson generally show a strong overprint in their age spectra, with more than 50 percent of each spectrum being reset. The reset portions of the age spectra correspond to gas lost from very small diffusion domains, and a characteristic of the Manson samples is the very large range in apparent diffusion dimensions that they display, with the smallest domains being some 400 times smaller than the largest domains. It is also noteworthy that the small domains comprise a substantial portion of the volume of the feldspars (50 percent or more). These observations are consistent with the extreme shock experienced by these samples. In detail, the spectra we have measured to date are saddle-shaped and show minimum ages of between 67 and 72 Ma, which we interpret to be maximum estimates for the age of the impact. In the case of one sample (M1-678.3; K-feldspar from a large syenite block located well below the apparent melt-matrix breccia in the M1 borehole), isotope correlation analysis suggests the presence of a non-atmospheric trapped Ar component (Ar-40/Ar-36 of 660 plus or minus 40), and an age of about 65.3 plus or minus 0.5 Ma (2 sigma). Our interpretation of our results is that the shock of impact greatly reduced the diffusion-domain sizes of our samples, making them susceptible to significant Ar loss during heating associated with impact. It appears that while our feldspars were partially open to Ar loss, they equilibrated with a non-atmospheric Ar component, probably related to impact-related degassing of old basement around the impact site.

  8. Alkali metal intercalates of molybdenum disulfide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.

    1973-01-01

    Study of some of the physicochemical properties of compounds obtained by subjecting natural molybdenite and single crystals of molybdenum disulfide grown by chemical vapor transport to intercalation with the alkali group of metals (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) by means of the liquid ammonia technique. Reported data and results include: (1) the intercalation of the entire alkali metal group, (2) stoichiometries and X-ray data on all of the compounds, and (3) superconductivity data for all the intercalation compounds.

  9. Superconductivity in alkali-doped C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Arthur P.

    2015-07-01

    Superconductivity in alkali-doped C60 (A3C60, A = an alkali atom) is well described by an s-wave state produced by phonon mediated pairing. Moderate coupling of electrons to high-frequency shape-changing intra-molecular vibrational modes produces transition temperatures (Tc) up to 33 K in single-phase material. The good understanding of pairing in A3C60 offers a paradigm for the development of new superconducting materials.

  10. Desulfurizing Coal With an Alkali Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravindram, M.; Kalvinskas, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental coal-desulfurization process uses alkalies and steam in fluidized-bed reactor. With highly volatile, high-sulfur bituminous coal, process removed 98 percent of pyritic sulfur and 47 percent of organic sulfur. Used in coal liquefaction and in production of clean solid fuels and synthetic liquid fuels. Nitrogen or steam flows through bed of coal in reactor. Alkalies react with sulfur, removing it from coal. Nitrogen flow fluidizes bed while heating or cooling; steam is fluidizing medium during reaction.

  11. What classic greywacke (litharenite) can reveal about feldspar diagenesis: An example from Permian Rotliegend sandstone in Hessen, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molenaar, Nicolaas; Felder, Marita; Bär, Kristian; Götz, Annette E.

    2015-08-01

    Rotliegend siliciclastic sediments in southern Hessen (Germany) are a good example of dissolution of detrital feldspars, which is a common feature in many sandstones. Dissolution occurred after mechanical compaction of the lithic-rich sandstone, which experienced framework collapse with pores and pore connections filled and obstructed by deformed ductile lithic grains (pseudomatrix) thereby reducing pore space to microporosity., The advanced degree of compaction and reduced porosity caused low permeability and low hydraulic conductivity of the rock mass. This is further reduced by the presence of wackes and shales that occur intercalated with the sandstones. Feldspar dissolution thus took place in low permeable sediments when large-scale flow of meteoric or acidic fluids is ruled out as a cause of feldspar dissolution. Mineral precipitation (illite, kaolinite, and albite) took place within pseudomatrix and detrital matrix as well as in secondary pores created by feldspar dissolution. Feldspar was the source for the authigenesis. The system was thus closed during burial after framework collapse, and diagenetic reactants in the form of detrital components were already present within the system. The original mass was preserved, but redistributed and diagenetic minerals were the local sinks for the dissolved reactants, precipitating within the system. This also suggests that burial diagenesis in general might be more mass conservative than usually assumed. Rotliegend sandstones thus form a case where, despite of the lack of external exchange of mass by fluid flow, major diagenetic processes did take place and significantly modified the original mineralogy and texture. Feldspar diagenesis can take place from other processes than mere large-scale flushing of open systems as often supposed. It implies that the volumes of rock affected by feldspar diagenesis may be much larger than anticipated based upon the common hold believe that feldspar diagenesis is linked to

  12. Comment on “Systematic variations of argon diffusion in feldspars and implications for thermochronometry” by Cassata and Renne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovera, Oscar M.; Harrison, T. Mark; Boehnke, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Cassata and Renne (2013) is a data-rich paper potentially providing opportunities to systematically test long-standing models of argon diffusion behavior in feldspars and we congratulate them on a heroic achievement. That said, several of their interpretations are highly problematic due to misconceptions of both the nature of their sample and diffusion modeling. Evidence of grain-scale diffusion in an exsolved feldspar

  13. Alkali metal crystalline polymer electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuhong; Gamble, Stephen; Ainsworth, David; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Andreev, Yuri G; Bruce, Peter G

    2009-07-01

    Polymer electrolytes have been studied extensively because uniquely they combine ionic conductivity with solid yet flexible mechanical properties, rendering them important for all-solid-state devices including batteries, electrochromic displays and smart windows. For some 30 years, ionic conductivity in polymers was considered to occur only in the amorphous state above Tg. Crystalline polymers were believed to be insulators. This changed with the discovery of Li(+) conductivity in crystalline poly(ethylene oxide)(6):LiAsF(6). However, new crystalline polymer electrolytes have proved elusive, questioning whether the 6:1 complex has particular structural features making it a unique exception to the rule that only amorphous polymers conduct. Here, we demonstrate that ionic conductivity in crystalline polymers is not unique to the 6:1 complex by reporting several new crystalline polymer electrolytes containing different alkali metal salts (Na(+), K(+) and Rb(+)), including the best conductor poly(ethylene oxide)(8):NaAsF(6) discovered so far, with a conductivity 1.5 orders of magnitude higher than poly(ethylene oxide)(6):LiAsF(6). These are the first crystalline polymer electrolytes with a different composition and structures to that of the 6:1 Li(+) complex. PMID:19543313

  14. AUthigenic feldspar as an indicator of paleo-rock/water interactions in Permian carbonates of the Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spotl, C.; Kralik, M.; Kunk, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Dolostones interbedded with Upper Permian evaporites at the base of the Northern Calcareous Alps contain abundant authigenic K-feldspar. Two petrographically, structurally, and isotopically distinct generations of K-feldspar can be distinguished: crystals composed of an inclusion-rich core and a clear rim, and optically unzoned, transparent crystals. Both feldspar types have essentially identical K-feldspar end-member compositions with ??? 99.5 mole % Or component. Low oxygen isotope ratios (+16.1??? to +18.1??? SMOW) suggest precipitation from 18O-enriched, saline fluids at temperatures in excess of ??? 140??C. 40Ar/39Ar plateau-age spectra of five samples range from 145 ?? 1 to 144 ?? 1 Ma (Early Berriasian) and suggest that both types of feldspar were formed within an interval that did not exceed ??? 2 m.y. Rb/Sr model ages range from 152 to 140 Ma, assuming that the burial diagenetic regime was buffered with respect to strontium by the associated marine Permian evaporites. Authigenic K-feldspar records two distinct events of hot brine flow, most likely triggered by tectonic movements (detachment) and by an increase in the subsurface temperature in response to thrust loading.

  15. Surface chemistry of labradorite feldspar reacted with aqueous solutions at pH = 2, 3, and 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, William H.; Westrich, Henry R.; Arnold, George W.

    1988-12-01

    The reaction of feldspar with an aqueous solution is examined by complementing dissolution rate measurements with analysis of mineral surface chemistry. Rates of feldspar dissolution were measured in H 2O - HCl and D 2O - DCl solutions. These measurements were combined with elastic recoil detection (ERD) analysis of hydrogen isotope concentration, and Rutherford backscattering analysis (RBS) of silicon, aluminum and calcium concentrations near the surface of the mineral. Dissolution rates of labradorite feldspar in H 2O - HCl solutions ( pH = 1.7) are 33% more rapid than in D 2O - DCl mixtures ( pD = 1.7). The depth of penetration and inventory of hydrogen in the feldspar is a strong function of solution pH, temperature, and reaction time. Hydrogen infiltrates the feldspar more extensively from an acidic solution than from a basic solution, and complete isotopic exchange between the hydration layer and water proceeds in time on the order of hours. The hydrolysis of bridging Si - O - Al bonds by reaction with a strongly acidic solution for several hundreds of hours progresses to depths of several hundreds of Angstroms into the mineral. Calcium is also removed from the mineral to this depth during reaction with an acidic solution. The composition of the reacted surface, however, cannot be explained solely on the basis of ion exchange or depolymerization reactions. The data suggest that the silicon-rich surface of feldspar continually repolymerizes during reaction, and that this repolymerization eliminates hydrogen from the hydration layer.

  16. FTIR Analysis of Water in Pyroxene and Plagioclase in ALH 84001 and Nakhlites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, A. H.; Cintala, M. J.; Montes, R.; Cardenas, F.

    2016-01-01

    with crustal reservoirs or hydrothermal fluids. Here, nominally anhydrous minerals (pyroxene, olivine, plagioclase, or maskelynite) in orthopyroxenite ALH 84001 and selected nakhlites are analyzed for water and major elements, in order to determine 1) whether they contain any water; 2) if they do, what controls its distribution (crystallization, degassing, hydrothermal or impact processes); and 3) if any of these measurements can be used to infer the water contents of the parent magma and their mantle sources. A shock-reverberation experiment was also performed on terrestrial orthopyroxenes (opx) to simulate the heavily shocked conditions of ALH 84001 (> 31 GPa [17]).

  17. Anomalous isotopes and trace element zoning in plagioclase peridotite xenoliths of Oahu (Hawaii): implications for the Hawaiian plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Gautam; Yang, Huai-Jen; Ducea, Mihai

    2003-02-01

    Survival of plagioclase in the residual melting column during melting can have a significant impact on the melting process beneath a mid-oceanic ridge [Asimow et al., Phil. Trans. R. Soc. London Ser. A 355 (1997) 255-281]. Here we investigate the origin of plagioclase that occurs in some rare mantle xenoliths from Oahu, Hawaii. The xenoliths are harzburgitic with less than 2 modal% clinopyroxene and are characterized by strong foliation and porphyroclastic texture. Olivine and orthopyroxene are common porphyroclasts; and only one xenolith (77PAII-9) contains a single large clinopyroxene porphyroclast with thick exsolved orthopyroxene lamellae. The strongly foliated groundmass shows well-developed triple-point junctions and is dominantly composed of olivine (ol 85-90 opx 7-14 cpx <1-2 plag 3-5 spinel trace). Spinel grains are small and dispersed through the groundmass and show extreme variation in Cr/Al ratio within individual thin sections, indicating that they are out of equilibrium with the other phases in these xenoliths. A highly anorthitic plagioclase (An 92-96) occurs only in the groundmass and its modal abundance (˜3-5%) is too high relative to the abundance of clinopyroxene (commonly <1%) for it to be a residual phase, implying that plagioclase may have an exotic origin. The porphyroclasts show strong compositional zoning near the rims and appear to be relict phases (as are all the spinel grains) that had once equilibrated with melts within the stability field of spinel peridotite (pressure ˜1-3 GPa). Clinopyroxene neoblasts and the single porphyroclast in PAII-9 are all characterized by lithosphere-like strongly depleted light rare earth element (chondrite-normalized) patterns. The clinopyroxene porphyroclast in PAII-9 is zoned in Al, Eu, Cr, and Na. The porphyroclastic ortho- and clinopyroxenes give a homogenized (host+exsolution) temperature of 1300°C, which is inferred to be the temperature at which the porphyroclast cores equilibrated with a MORB

  18. Solution-precipitation of K-feldspar in deformed granitoids and its relationship to the distribution of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Jun-ichi; Okudaira, Takamoto; Satsukawa, Takako; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated K-feldspar recrystallisation in granitoid mylonites within a ductile shear zone from the Ryoke metamorphic belt, SW Japan. Fine-grained K-feldspar (20 μm on average) occurs in the matrix and in pull-apart areas within fractured K-feldspar porphyroclasts. These fine grains are elongated and oriented parallel to the main foliation in the matrix, and their grain surfaces, observed with the scanning electron microscope, are not smooth, but rough due to the development of very fine (< 1 μm) round grains of K-feldspar on the surface of each grain. In pull-apart areas, the crystallographic orientation of fine-grained K-feldspar, as measured by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), is strongly controlled by that of the host porphyroclast, and shows rotations with shear components parallel to fractures. In the matrix, the crystallographic orientation of fine-grained K-feldspar is not consistent with intracrystalline plasticity, but rather with a growth rate that is slightly controlled by nearby porphyroclasts. All this, together with the growth features on grains, suggests that solution-precipitation of K-feldspar from K-rich aqueous fluid occurred during progressive deformation. Infrared (IR) mapping was performed to evaluate the distribution of water in pull-apart areas and the matrix. Water is heterogeneously distributed within K-feldspar porphyroclasts, which contain 150-2200 ppm H2O. In contrast, the water content is low (150-300 ppm H2O) and homogeneously distributed in fine-grained K-feldspar in the matrix and pull-apart areas, even though included in these analyses are grain boundaries that can generally contain abundant aqueous fluid. The results of EBSD analysis and IR mapping indicate that water is released during solution-precipitation of K-feldspar under mid-crustal conditions. The solution-precipitation process under a water-rich environment in the middle crust results in the formation of fine grains, possibly deforming dominantly by

  19. Effect of ageing of K-feldspar on its ice nucleating efficiency in immersion, deposition and contact freezing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckhaus, Andreas; Bachmann, Felix; Hoffmann, Nadine; Koch, Michael; Kiselev, Alexei; Leisner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Recently K-feldspar was identified as one of the most active atmospheric ice nucleating particles (INP) of mineral origin [1]. Seeking the explanation to this phenomena we have conducted extensive experimental investigation of the ice nucleating efficiency of K-feldspar in three heterogeneous freezing modes. The immersion freezing of K-feldspar was investigated with the cold stage using arrays of nanoliter-size droplets containing aqueous suspension of polydisperse feldspar particles. For contact freezing, the charged droplets of supercooled water were suspended in the laminar flow of the DMA-selected feldspar-containing particles, allowing for determination of freezing probability on a single particle-droplet contact [2]. The nucleation and growth of ice via vapor deposition on the crystalline surfaces of macroscopic feldspar particles have been investigated in the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) under humidified nitrogen atmosphere. The ice nucleation experiments were supplemented with measurements of effective surface area of feldspar particles and ion chromatography (IC) analysis of the leached framework cations (K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+). In this contribution we focus on the role of surface chemistry influencing the IN efficiency of K-feldspar, in particular the connection between the degree of surface hydroxylation and its ability to induce local structural ordering in the interfacial layer in water molecules (as suggested by recent modeling efforts). We mimic the natural process of feldspar ageing by suspending it in water or weak aqueous solution of carbonic acid for different time periods, from minutes to months, and present its freezing efficiency as a function of time. Our immersion freezing experiments show that ageing have a nonlinear effect on the freezing behavior of feldspar within the investigated temperature range (-40°C to -10°C). On the other hand, deposition nucleation of ice observed in the ESEM reveals clear different pattern

  20. Ion microprobe investigation of plagioclase and orthopyroxene from lunar Mg-suite norites: Implications for calculating parental melt REE concentrations and for assessing postcrystallization REE redistribution

    SciTech Connect

    Papike, J.J.; Fowler, G.W.; Shearer, C.K.; Layne, G.D.

    1996-10-01

    The lunar Mg-suite, which includes dunites, troctolites, and norites, makes up to 20-30% of the Moon`s crust down to a depth of {approximately}60 km. The remainder is largely anorthosite. This report focuses on norites (which consist mostly of orthopyroxene and plagioclase) because we have found that both phases are effective recorders of their parental melt compositions. In an earlier report, we analyzed orthopyroxene from twelve samples (three from Apollo 14, two from A-15, and seven from A-17) by orthopyroxene from twelve samples (three from Apollo 14, two from A-15, and seven from A-17) by SIMS for eight REE (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Dy, Er, Yb). Inversion of these data to estimated melt compositions yielded extremely high REE concentrations similar to KREEP. In this study, we report SIMS REE data for plagioclase from these same twelve samples. The major objective of this study is to estimate parental REE concentrations from both orthopyroxene and plagioclase data to see if both data inversions produce concordant from both orthopyroxene and plagioclase data to see if both data inversions produce concordant melt compositions and thus better constrain the composition of melts parental to Mg-suite norites. The estimated REE concentrations from both phases show some evidence of slight postcrystallization REE redistribution. Comparison of the observed ratio of REE for pyroxene/plagioclase to the ratio of the Ds for pyroxene/plagioclase is consistent with REE redistribution which involves LREE diffusing from pyroxene into plagioclase and HREE diffusing from plagioclase into pyroxene. However, apparently these postcrystallization exchanges have not seriously affected our ability to estimate melt REE concentrations. 34 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Age of authigenic K-feldspar in Lower Paleozoic and uppermost Precambrian rocks of the Mississippi Valley area

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, R.L.; Liu, J. . Dept. of Geology); Deino, A. . Geochronology Center); Kyser, T.K. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Published K-Ar dates of authigenic K-feldspar in Cambrian and Ordovician rocks of the Mississippi Valley area range from 448 to 375 Ma (Late Ordovician to Middle Devonian), suggesting a lengthy episode of K-feldspar authigenesis. Here the authors report an age span of [approximately]464--400 Ma (Middle Ordovician to Early Devonian) for authigenic K-feldspar of two samples from the alteration profile widely developed over Precambrian rocks at the unconformity with Cambrian deposits. This dating was done on 42 to 48 mesh grains of K-feldspar by the laser incremental-heating [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar method. One sample, from west-central Wisconsin, is from an 8-mm-thick vein formed along a fracture in kaolinitic altered granite. Three grains nearest the fracture yielded plateau ages with a range of [approximately]9 Ma and an average of 430 Ma. Three grains distant from the fracture yielded a similar range of 10 Ma but with an average age of 397 Ma. Thus the grains grew over an extended period from at least [approximately]430 to 400 Ma. A K-Ar date of 411 Ma was obtained from a sample representing the entire thickness of the vein. The other sample, from the St. Francois Mts. of Missouri, is of diabase replaced by K-feldspar. Three grains yielded plateau ages ranging from [approximately]444 to 464 Ma. Oxygen-isotope values of authigenic K-feldspar from lower Paleozoic and uppermost Precambrian rocks range from +19.8 to +22.2[per thousand] and average 21.4[per thousand] (n = 11). These values are compatible with formation of the K-feldspar from similar fluids and comparable temperatures.

  2. Authigenic potassium feldspar: a tracer for the timing of palaeofluid flow in carbonate rocks, Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spotl, C.; Kunk, M.J.; Ramseyer, K.; Longstaffe, F.J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is included in the Special Publication entitled 'Dating and duration of fluid flow and fluid-rock interaction', edited by J. Parnell. Feldspar is a common authigenic constituent in Permian carbonate rocks which occur as tectonically isolated blocks within the evaporitic Haselgebirge melange in the Northern Calcareous Alps (NCA). Coexisting with pyrite, anhydrite, (saddle) dolomite, magnesite, fluorite and calcite, K-feldspar and minor albite record an event of regionally extensive interaction of hot brines with carbonate rocks. Detailed petrographic, crystallographic and geochemical studies reveal a variability in crystal size and shape, Al-Si ordering, elemental and stable isotopic compositions of the K-feldspar, which is only partially consistent with the traditional view of authigenic feldspar as a well-ordered, compositionally pure mineral. 40Ar-39Ar step- heating measurements of authigenic potassium feldspar from several localities yield two age populations, an older one of 145-154 Ma, and a younger one of c.90-97 Ma. Most age spectra reflect cooling through the argon retention temperature interval, which was rapid in some localities (as indicated by plateau ages) and slower in others. Rb-Sr isotope data are more difficult to interpret, because in many K-feldspar samples they are controlled largely by Sr-bearing inclusions. The Jurassic 40Ar-39Ar dates are interpreted as minimum ages of feldspar growth and hence imply that fluid-rock interaction is likely to be simultaneous with or to slightly predate melange formation. Deformation associated with the closure and subduction of the Meliata-Hallstatt ocean south of the NCA during the Upper Jurassic is regarded as the principal geodynamic driving force for both enhanced fluid circulation and melange formation. Some localities were reheated beyond the argon retention temperature for microcline during mid-Cretaceous nappe stacking of the NCA, thus obliterating the older signal.

  3. Water content in arc basaltic magma in the Northeast Japan and Izu arcs: an estimate from Ca/Na partitioning between plagioclase and melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushioda, M.; Takahashi, E.; Hamada, M.; Suzuki, T.

    2015-12-01

    The variation in water content of arc basaltic magmas in the Northeast Japan arc and the Izu arc was estimatedusing a simple plagioclase phenocryst hygrometer. In order to construct a plagioclase phenocryst hygrometeroptimized for arc basalt magmas, we have conducted hydrous melting experiments of relatively primitive basaltfrom the Miyakejima volcano, a frontal-arc volcano in the Izu arc. As a result of the experiments, we found that theCa/Na partition coefficient between plagioclase and hydrous basaltic melt increases linearly with an increase in H2Ocontent in the melts. We then compiled published geochemical data sets of relatively primitive basaltic rocks with no evidence of magma mixing and the most frequent Ca-rich plagioclase phenocrysts from 15 basaltic arc volcanoesincluding both frontal-arc and rear-arc volcanoes. In the 15 volcanoes studied, plagioclase phenocrysts of high anorthitecontent (An > 90) were commonly observed, whereas plagioclase phenocrysts in rear arc volcanoes usually had a loweranorthite content (90 > An > 80). In all volcanoes studied, the estimated H2O content of basaltic magma was at least3 wt.% H2O or higher. The magmas of volcanoes located on the volcanic front have about 5 wt.% H2O in magmawhereas those from the rear-arc side are slightly lower in H2O content.

  4. Water content in arc basaltic magma in the Northeast Japan and Izu arcs: an estimate from Ca/Na partitioning between plagioclase and melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushioda, Masashi; Takahashi, Eiichi; Hamada, Morihisa; Suzuki, Toshihiro

    2014-12-01

    The variation in water content of arc basaltic magmas in the Northeast Japan arc and the Izu arc was estimated using a simple plagioclase phenocryst hygrometer. In order to construct a plagioclase phenocryst hygrometer optimized for arc basalt magmas, we have conducted high-pressure melting experiments of relatively primitive basalt from the Miyakejima volcano, a frontal-arc volcano in the Izu arc. As a result of the experiments, we found that the Ca/Na partition coefficient between plagioclase and hydrous basaltic melt increases linearly with an increase in H2O content in the melts. We then selected from literature geochemical data sets of relatively primitive basaltic rocks with no evidence of magma mixing and the most frequent Ca-rich plagioclase phenocrysts from 15 basaltic arc volcanoes including both frontal-arc and rear-arc volcanoes. In the 15 volcanoes studied, plagioclase phenocrysts of high anorthite content (An > 90) were commonly observed, whereas plagioclase phenocrysts in rear arc volcanoes usually had a lower anorthite content (90 > An > 80). In all volcanoes studied, the estimated H2O content of basaltic magma was at least 3 wt.% H2O or higher. The magmas of volcanoes located on the volcanic front have about 5 wt.% H2O in magma whereas those from the rear-arc side are slightly lower in H2O content.

  5. Melting of plagioclase + spinel lherzolite at low pressures (0.5 GPa): An experimental approach to the evolution of basaltic melt during mantle refertilisation at shallow depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalot-Prat, Françoise; Falloon, Trevor J.; Green, David H.; Hibberson, William O.

    2013-07-01

    The presence of plagioclase + spinel lherzolites among ocean floor samples and in some ophiolite complexes invites speculation on their origin and relationships to processes of magmatism and lithosphere refertilisation beneath mid-ocean ridges. In an experimental approach to their petrogenesis, we have determined the compositions of liquids and co-existing minerals in the six phase assemblage [liquid + olivine + orthopyroxene + clinopyroxene + plagioclase + spinel] at 0.5 GPa and 1100 °C to 1200 °C. In our experimental approach we maintained the olivine Mg# [Mg / (Mg + Fe)] close to 90 (i.e., 88.8-95.5) but varied plagioclase from anorthite to albite. The major variations in liquid compositions are related to plagioclase composition. Liquids have much lower MgO and FeO and higher SiO2 and Al2O3 than liquids in the 6-phase plagioclase + spinel lherzolite at 0.75 GPa and 1 GPa. Liquids are quartz-normative (silica-oversaturated) for plagioclase that are more calcic than An40 but nepheline-normative (critically silica-undersaturated) for plagioclase that are more sodic than An25. Liquid compositions are quite unlike natural MORB glasses with similar Mg# (i.e., compatible with parental magmas from lherzolitic mantle with Mg# ≈ 90). Our study provides no support for models of MORB petrogenesis which suggest extraction of near-solidus melts from plagioclase lherzolite at low pressure. Similarly, referring to numerical models of melting volumes beneath mid-ocean ridges (Langmuir et al., 1992; McKenzie and Bickle, 1988) in which melt increments are calculated for different sites and these increments pooled to form MORB, our data argue that melts equilibrated with plagioclase ± spinel lherzolite at < 1 GPa cannot be significant components of such ‘pooled melt’ focussed from within the melting volume. The compositions of minerals from plagioclase ± spinel lherzolite at Lanzo (northern Italy; Piccardo et al., 2007) are compared with our experimental assemblages at 0

  6. Alkali metal adsorption on Al(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, J. N.; Lundgren, E.; Nyholm, R.; Qvarford, M.

    1993-06-01

    The submonolayer adsorption of Na, K, Rb, and Cs on the Al(111) surface at 100 K and at room temperature is investigated by high resolution core level spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. It is found that the first alkali atoms on the surface adsorb at surface defects. At higher coverages, up to approximately one third of the maximum submonolayer coverage, alkali atoms adsorbed at defects coexist with a dispersed phase. At higher coverages island formation is found to occur for the majority of the systems. It is argued that all of the ordered structures formed at room temperature involve a disruption of the Al(111) surface in contrast to the situation at 100 K where the alkali atoms adsorb as adatoms.

  7. SAFE Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    Alkali metal heat pipes are among the best understood and tested of components for first generation space fission reactors. A flight reactor will require production of a hundred or more heat pipes with assured reliability over a number of years. To date, alkali metal heat pipes have been built mostly in low budget development environments with little formal quality assurance. Despite this, heat pipe test samples suggest that high reliability can be achieved with the care justified for space flight qualification. Fabrication procedures have been established that, if consistently applied, ensure long-term trouble-free heat pipe operation. Alkali metal heat pipes have been successfully flight tested in micro gravity and also have been shown capable of multi-year operation with no evidence of sensitivity to fast neutron fluence up to 1023 n/cm2. This represents 50 times the fluence of the proposed Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE-100) heat pipe reactor core.

  8. Constraints on the accretion of the gabbroic lower oceanic crust from plagioclase lattice preferred orientation in the Samail ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanTongeren, J. A.; Hirth, G.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    The debate over the processes of igneous accretion of gabbroic lower crust at submarine spreading centers is centered on two end-member hypotheses: Gabbro Glaciers and Sheeted Sills. In order to determine which of these two hypotheses is most applicable to a well-studied lower crustal section, we present newly published data (VanTongeren et al., 2015 EPSL v. 427, p. 249-261) on plagioclase lattice preferred orientations (LPO) in the Wadi Khafifah section of the Samail ophiolite, Oman. Based on our results we provide five critical observations that any model for the accretion of the lower oceanic crust must satisfy: (1) There is a distinctive change in the orientation of the outcrop-scale layering from near-vertical to sub-horizontal that is also reflected in the plagioclase fabrics in the uppermost ~1000-1500 m of the gabbroic crust; (2) The distinction between the upper gabbros and lower gabbros is not a geochemical boundary. Rather, the change in outcrop-scale orientation from near-vertical to sub-horizontal occurs stratigraphically lower in the crust than a change in whole-rock geochemistry; (3) There is no systematic difference in plagioclase fabric strength in any crystallographic axis between the upper gabbros and the lower gabbros; (4) Beneath the abrupt transition from sub-vertical to sub-horizontal fabric, there is no systematic change in the geographic orientation of the plagioclase fabric, or in the development of a dominant lineation direction within the upper gabbros or the lower gabbros; (5) In the lower gabbros, the obliquity between the (010) and the modal layering remains approximately constant and indicates a consistent top to the right sense of shear throughout the stratigraphy. Our observations are most consistent with the Sheeted Sills hypothesis, in which the majority of lower crustal gabbros are crystallized in situ and fabrics are dominated by compaction and localized extension rather than by systematically increasing shear strain with

  9. CO2 sequestration in feldspar-rich sandstone: Coupled evolution of fluid chemistry, mineral reaction rates, and hydrogeochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutolo, Benjamin M.; Luhmann, Andrew J.; Kong, Xiang-Zhao; Saar, Martin O.; Seyfried, William E.

    2015-07-01

    To investigate CO2 Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) in sandstones, we performed three 150 °C flow-through experiments on K-feldspar-rich cores from the Eau Claire formation. By characterizing fluid and solid samples from these experiments using a suite of analytical techniques, we explored the coupled evolution of fluid chemistry, mineral reaction rates, and hydrogeochemical properties during CO2 sequestration in feldspar-rich sandstone. Overall, our results confirm predictions that the heightened acidity resulting from supercritical CO2 injection into feldspar-rich sandstone will dissolve primary feldspars and precipitate secondary aluminum minerals. A core through which CO2-rich deionized water was recycled for 52 days decreased in bulk permeability, exhibited generally low porosity associated with high surface area in post-experiment core sub-samples, and produced an Al hydroxide secondary mineral, such as boehmite. However, two samples subjected to ∼3 day single-pass experiments run with CO2-rich, 0.94 mol/kg NaCl brines decreased in bulk permeability, showed generally elevated porosity associated with elevated surface area in post-experiment core sub-samples, and produced a phase with kaolinite-like stoichiometry. CO2-induced metal mobilization during the experiments was relatively minor and likely related to Ca mineral dissolution. Based on the relatively rapid approach to equilibrium, the relatively slow near-equilibrium reaction rates, and the minor magnitudes of permeability changes in these experiments, we conclude that CCUS systems with projected lifetimes of several decades are geochemically feasible in the feldspar-rich sandstone end-member examined here. Additionally, the observation that K-feldspar dissolution rates calculated from our whole-rock experiments are in good agreement with literature parameterizations suggests that the latter can be utilized to model CCUS in K-feldspar-rich sandstone. Finally, by performing a number of reactive

  10. Diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs): an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupke, William F.

    2008-05-01

    The concept of power-scalable, high beam-quality diode pumped alkali lasers was introduced in 2003 [Krupke, US Patent No. 6,643,311; Opt. Letters, 28, 2336 (2003)]. Since then several laboratory DPAL devices have been reported on, confirming many of the spectroscopic, kinetic, and laser characteristics projected from literature data. This talk will present an overview of the DPAL concept, summarize key relevant properties of the cesium, rubidium, and potassium alkali vapor gain media so-far examined, outline power scaling considerations, and highlight results of published DPAL laboratory experiments.

  11. Alkali metal vapors - Laser spectroscopy and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stwalley, W. C.; Koch, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the rapidly expanding use of lasers for spectroscopic studies of alkali metal vapors. Since the alkali metals (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium) are theoretically simple ('visible hydrogen'), readily ionized, and strongly interacting with laser light, they represent ideal systems for quantitative understanding of microscopic interconversion mechanisms between photon (e.g., solar or laser), chemical, electrical and thermal energy. The possible implications of such understanding for a wide variety of practical applications (sodium lamps, thermionic converters, magnetohydrodynamic devices, new lasers, 'lithium waterfall' inertial confinement fusion reactors, etc.) are also discussed.

  12. Alkali-aggregate reaction in concrete containing high-alkali cement and granite aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Owsiak, Z

    2004-01-01

    The paper discusses results of the research into the influence of high-alkali Portland cement on granite aggregate. The deformation of the concrete structure occurred after 18 months. The research was carried out by means of a scanning electron microscope equipped with a high-energy dispersive X-ray analyzer that allowed observation of unpolished sections of concrete bars exhibiting the cracking pattern typical of the alkali-silica reaction. Both the microscopic observation and the X-ray elemental analysis confirm the presence of alkali-silica gel and secondary ettringite in the cracks.

  13. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, W.Y.

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased, preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  14. An exsolution silica-pump model for the origin of myrmekite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castle, R.O.; Lindsley, D.H.

    1993-01-01

    Myrmekite, as defined here, is the microscopic intergrowth between vermicular quartz and modestly anorthitic plagioclase (calcic albite-oligoclase), intimately associated with potassium feldspar in plutonic rocks of granitic composition. Hypotheses previously invoked in explanation of myrmekite include: (1) direct crystallization; (2) replacement; (3) exsolution. The occurrence of myrmekite in paragneisses and its absence in rocks devold of discrete grains of potassium feldspar challenge those hypotheses based on direct crystallization or replacement. However, several lines of evidence indicate that myrmekite may in fact originate in response to kinetic effects associated with the exsolution of calcic alkali feldspar into discrete potassium feldspar and plagioclase phases. Exsolution of potassium feldspar system projected from [AlSi2O8] involves the exchange CaAlK-1Si-1, in which the AlSi-1 tetrahedral couple is resistant to intracrystalline diffusion. By contrast, diffusion of octahedral K proceeds relatively easily where it remains uncoupled to the tetrahedral exchange. We suggest here that where the ternary feldspar system is open to excess silica, the exchange reaction that produces potassium feldspar in the ternary plane is aided by the net-transfer reaction K+Si=Orthoclase, leaving behind indigenous Si that reports as modal quartz in the evolving plagioclase as the CaAl component is concomitantly incorporated in this same phase. Thus silica is "pumped" into the reaction volume from a "silica reservoir", a process that enhances redistribution of both Si and Al through the exsolving ternary feldspar. ?? 1993 Springer-Verlag.

  15. An exsolution silica-pump model for the origin of myrmekite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castle, Robert O.; Lindsley, Donald H.

    1993-03-01

    Myrmekite, as defined here, is the microscopic intergrowth between vermicular quartz and modestly anorthitic plagioclase (calcic albite-oligoclase), intimately associated with potassium feldspar in plutonic rocks of granitic composition. Hypotheses previously invoked in explanation of myrmekite include: (1) direct crystallization; (2) replacement; (3) exsolution. The occurrence of myrmekite in paragneisses and its absence in rocks devold of discrete grains of potassium feldspar challenge those hypotheses based on direct crystallization or replacement. However, several lines of evidence indicate that myrmekite may in fact originate in response to kinetic effects associated with the exsolution of calcic alkali feldspar into discrete potassium feldspar and plagioclase phases. Exsolution of potassium feldspar system projected from [AlSi2O8] involves the exchange CaAlK-1Si-1, in which the AlSi-1 tetrahedral couple is resistant to intracrystalline diffusion. By contrast, diffusion of octahedral K proceeds relatively easily where it remains uncoupled to the tetrahedral exchange. We suggest here that where the ternary feldspar system is open to excess silica, the exchange reaction that produces potassium feldspar in the ternary plane is aided by the net-transfer reaction K+Si=Orthoclase, leaving behind indigenous Si that reports as modal quartz in the evolving plagioclase as the CaAl component is concomitantly incorporated in this same phase. Thus silica is “pumped” into the reaction volume from a “silica reservoir”, a process that enhances redistribution of both Si and Al through the exsolving ternary feldspar.

  16. Salts of alkali metal anions and process of preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Dye, James L.; Ceraso, Joseph M.; Tehan, Frederick J.; Lok, Mei Tak

    1978-01-01

    Compounds of alkali metal anion salts of alkali metal cations in bicyclic polyoxadiamines are disclosed. The salts are prepared by contacting an excess of alkali metal with an alkali metal dissolving solution consisting of a bicyclic polyoxadiamine in a suitable solvent, and recovered by precipitation. The salts have a gold-color crystalline appearance and are stable in a vacuum at -10.degree. C. and below.

  17. Experimental determination of plagioclase dissolution rates as a function of its composition and pH at 22 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudbrandsson, Snorri; Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik; Gislason, Sigurdur R.; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2014-08-01

    The steady-state, far-from-equilibrium dissolution rates of nine distinct plagioclases ranging in composition from An2 to An89 were measured in mixed flow reactors at 22 ± 2 °C and pH from 2 to 11. The dissolution rates of all plagioclases based on silica release show a common U-shaped behaviour as a function of pH, where rates decrease with increasing pH at acid condition but rise with increasing pH at alkaline conditions. Consistent with literature findings, constant pH plagioclase dissolution rates increase with increasing anorthite content at acidic conditions; measured anorthite dissolution rates are ∼2.5 orders of magnitude faster than those of albite at pH ∼2. Perhaps more significantly, rates are independent of plagioclase composition at alkaline conditions. Interpretation and data fitting suggests that plagioclase dissolution rates are consistent with their control by the detachment of Si-rich activated complexes formed by the removal of Al from the mineral framework. Taking account of this mechanism and transition state theory yields equations describing plagioclase dissolution rates (r+) as a function of both the mineral and aqueous fluid compositions found in natural Earth surface systems. For pH ⩾ 6 rates are consistent with Log(r+/(mol/cm/s))=0.35Log(aH3/aAl)-11.53 and for pH < 6 rates are consistent with Log(r+/(mol/cm/s))=nacidLog(aH3/aAl)+0.033An%-14.77 where An% represents the percent anorthite in the plagioclase solid solution, ai corresponds to the activity of the ith aqueous species, and nacid is given by nacid=0.004An%+0.05 .

  18. Faraday rotation density measurements of optically thick alkali metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vliegen, E.; Kadlecek, S.; Anderson, L. W.; Walker, T. G.; Erickson, C. J.; Happer, William

    2001-03-01

    We investigate the measurement of alkali number densities using the Faraday rotation of linearly polarized light. We find that the alkali number density may be reliably extracted even in regimes of very high buffer gas pressure, and very high alkali number density. We have directly verified our results in potassium using absorption spectroscopy on the second resonance (4 2S→5 2P).

  19. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  9. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  10. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  11. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  12. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  13. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  14. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  15. Computational studies of solid-state alkali conduction in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deng, Zhi; Mo, Yifei; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-03-25

    The facile conduction of alkali ions in a crystal host is of crucial importance in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries, the dominant form of energy storage today. In this review, we provide a comprehensive survey of computational approaches to study solid-state alkali diffusion. We demonstrate how these methods have provided useful insights into the design of materials that form the main components of a rechargeable alkali-ion battery, namely the electrodes, superionic conductor solid electrolytes and interfaces. We will also provide a perspective on future challenges and directions. Here, the scope of this review includes the monovalent lithium- and sodium-ion chemistries that aremore » currently of the most commercial interest.« less

  16. Alkali resistant optical coatings for alkali lasers and methods of production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Soules, Thomas F; Beach, Raymond J; Mitchell, Scott C

    2014-11-18

    In one embodiment, a multilayer dielectric coating for use in an alkali laser includes two or more alternating layers of high and low refractive index materials, wherein an innermost layer includes a thicker, >500 nm, and dense, >97% of theoretical, layer of at least one of: alumina, zirconia, and hafnia for protecting subsequent layers of the two or more alternating layers of high and low index dielectric materials from alkali attack. In another embodiment, a method for forming an alkali resistant coating includes forming a first oxide material above a substrate and forming a second oxide material above the first oxide material to form a multilayer dielectric coating, wherein the second oxide material is on a side of the multilayer dielectric coating for contacting an alkali.

  17. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-05-12

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization.

  18. The Additive Coloration of Alkali Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jirgal, G. H.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an inexpensive, vacuum furnace designed to produce F-centers in alkali halide crystals by additive coloration. The method described avoids corrosion or contamination during the coloration process. Examination of the resultant crystals is discussed and several experiments using additively colored crystals are…

  19. Characterization of Quartz and Feldspar Deformation in the Mid-crust: Insights from the Cordillera Blanca Shear Zone, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, C. A.; Jessup, M. J.; Shaw, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Deformation mechanisms within shear zones from various crustal levels must be characterized to develop accurate models of lithospheric rheology. The Cordillera Blanca Shear Zone (CBSZ) in the central Peruvian Andes records changes in temperature, microstructures, and deformation mechanisms that occurred during exhumation through the brittle-ductile-transition during normal-sense slip over the last ~5 m.y. The 100-500-m-thick mylonitic shear zone occupies the footwall of a 200-km-long normal detachment fault, marking the western boundary of the 8 Ma, leucogranodiorite Cordillera Blanca Batholith. Though local variations do occur, including recrystallized quartz veins and local, decimeter- to meter- scale shear zones, the CBSZ follows a general trend of increasing strain towards the detachment. Structurally lowest positions are weakly deformed and transition to protomylonite, mylonite, and ultramylonite at higher positions, truncating at a cataclasite nearest the detachment. We characterize strain using EBSD analyses of quartz lattice preferred orientations and deformation temperatures using quartz and feldspar textures and two-feldspar thermometry of asymmetric strain-induced myrmekite. At the deepest structural positions, feldspar grains record a complex history characterized by bulging recrystallization, myrmekite formation, and brittle fracture, while quartz exhibits dominant grain-boundary migration recrystallization (T> 500 °C) and prism slip. Intermediate samples exhibit more prevalent strain-induced myrmekite, brittle fracture in feldspar, and reaction-associated recrystallization of K-feldspar to mica; quartz records mainly subgrain-rotation recrystallization (400-500 °C) and dominant prism slip with a rhomb component. Shallower positions preserve fewer, smaller, and more rounded feldspar porphyroclasts with no myrmekite, and dominant bulging recrystallization (280-400 °C) in quartz that records prism , rhomb , and some basal slip.

  20. Ar Ar dating of authigenic K-feldspar: Quantitative modelling of radiogenic argon-loss through subgrain boundary networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, D. F.; Kelley, S. P.; Lee, M. R.; Parnell, J.; Sherlock, S. C.; Brown, D. J.

    2008-06-01

    We have analysed two distinct generations of authigenic K-feldspar in Fucoid Bed sandstones from An-t-Sron and Skiag Bridge, NW Highlands, Scotland, which have experienced post-growth heating to levels in excess of the predicted Ar-closure temperature. Authigenic K-feldspars show microtextural similarities to patch perthites; that is subgrains separated by dislocation-rich boundary networks that potentially act as fast diffusion pathways for radiogenic argon. The two generations of authigenic K-feldspar in the Fucoid Bed sandstones can be distinguished by different microtextural zones, bulk mineral compositions, fluid-inclusion populations, and inferred temperatures and chemistries of parent fluids. Ar-Ar age data obtained using high-resolution ultraviolet laser ablation, show that the first cementing generation is Ordovician and the second cementing generation is Silurian. Modelling of Ar diffusion using subgrain size as the effective diffusion dimension and a simplified tectono-thermal thrust model assuming transient heating of the Fucoid Beds is inconsistent with observed data. Removal of heat from the thrust zone through rapid flushing of heated fluids rather than transient heating can be invoked to explain the observed Ar-Ar ages for both generations of cement. Alternatively, Ar-diffusion modelling using overgrowth thickness as the effective diffusion dimension instead of subgrain size also yields models that are consistent with both the Fucoid Bed palaeothermal maxima and determined Ar-Ar age ages for the two generations of K-feldspar cement. Based on this alternate explanation, we propose a theoretical microtextural model that highlights fundamental differences between the microtextures of deuterically formed patch perthites and authigenic K-feldspars, explaining the apparent robustness of authigenic K-feldspar with respect to Ar-retention.

  1. Hyaline membrane disease, alkali, and intraventricular haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Wigglesworth, J S; Keith, I H; Girling, D J; Slade, S A

    1976-01-01

    The relation between intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) and hyaline membrane disease (HMD) was studied in singletons that came to necropsy at Hammersmith Hospital over the years 1966-73. The incidence of IVH in singleton live births was 3-22/1000 and of HMD 4-44/1000. Although the high figures were partily due to the large number of low birthweight infants born at this hospital, the incidence of IVH in babies weighing 1001-1500 g was three times as great as that reported in the 1658 British Perinatal Mortality Survey. Most IVH deaths were in babies with HMD, but the higher frequency of IVH was not associated with any prolongation of survival time of babies who died with HMD as compared with the 1958 survey. IVH was seen frequently at gestations of up to 36 weeks in babies with HMD but was rare above 30 weeks' gestation in babies without HMD. This indicated that factors associated with HMD must cause most cases of IVH seen at gestations above 30 weeks. Comparison of clinical details in infants with HMD who died with or without IVH (at gestations of 30-37 weeks) showed no significant differences between the groups other than a high incidence of fits and greater use of alkali therapy in the babies with IVH. During the 12 hours when most alkali therapy was given, babies dying with IVD received a mean total alkali dosage of 10-21 mmol/kg and those dying without IVH 6-34 mmol/kg (P less than 0-001).There was no difference in severity of hypoxia or of metabolic acidosis between the 2 groups. Babies who died with HMD and germinal layer haemorrhage (GLH) without IVH had received significantly more alkali than those who died with HMD alone, whereas survivors of severe respiratory distress syndrome had received lower alkali doses than other groups. It is suggested that the greatly increased death rate from IVH in babies with HMD indicates some alteration of management of HMD (since 1958) as a causative factor. Liberal use of hypertonic alkali solutions is the common factor

  2. Formation of plagioclase-bearing peridotite and a peridotite-wehrlite-gabbro suite through melt-rock reaction: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saper, L.; Liang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Plagioclase-bearing peridotites are observed among abyssal peridotites, massif peridotites, and mantle sections of ophiolites of lherzolite subtype. Formation of plagioclase-bearing peridotites is often attributed to basalt impregnation into host harzburgite or lherzolite in a thermal boundary layer. During transport through asthenospheric mantle, melt generated in the deep mantle will inevitably interact with the overlying mantle column through reactive dissolution and may leave geochemical imprints on plagioclase-bearing peridotites. To assess the role of melt-rock reaction on the formation of plagioclase-bearing peridotites and its implications for lithosphere composition, we conducted dissolution experiments in which a 88% spinel lherzolite + 12% basalt starting mixture was juxtaposed against a primitive MORB in a graphite-lined molybdenum capsule. The reaction couples were run at 1300°C and 1 GPa for 1 or 24 hrs, and then stepped cooled to 1050°C and 0.7 GPa over the next several days. Cooling promotes in situ crystallization of interstitial melts, allowing us to better characterize the mineral compositional trends produced and observed by melt-rock reaction and crystallization. A gabbro and a plagioclase-bearing peridotite were observed in the two halves of the reaction couple after the experiments were completed. The peridotite from the 24 hr reaction experiment is mostly composed of subhedral to euhedral olivines (10-50 μm in size, Mg# 75-83), poikilitic clinopyroxene (~100 μm in size, Mg# 73-83) with olivine and spinel chadocrysts, and interstitial plagioclase (An# 68-78) and melt. In a control experiment quenched after a 24 hour reaction at 1300°C the basalt completely dissolved the pyroxenes and spinels leaving a residue of rounded olivine grains (10-100 μm in size) surrounded by a relatively large melt fraction. Textural results from the step-cooling experiments suggest the following crystallization sequence from the olivine+melt mush: olivine

  3. Laboratory measurements of upwelled radiance and reflectance spectra of Calvert, Ball, Jordan, and Feldspar soil sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Usry, J. W.; Witte, W. G.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    An effort to investigate the potential of remote sensing for monitoring nonpoint source pollution was conducted. Spectral reflectance characteristics for four types of soil sediments were measured for mixture concentrations between 4 and 173 ppm. For measurements at a spectral resolution of 32 mm, the spectral reflectances of Calvert, Ball, Jordan, and Feldspar soil sediments were distinctly different over the wavelength range from 400 to 980 nm at each concentration tested. At high concentrations, spectral differences between the various sediments could be detected by measurements with a spectral resolution of 160 nm. At a low concentration, only small differences were observed between the various sediments when measurements were made with 160 nm spectral resolution. Radiance levels generally varied in a nonlinear manner with sediment concentration; linearity occurred in special cases, depending on sediment type, concentration range, and wavelength.

  4. Elemental content of feldspar from Eastern Desert, Egypt, determined by INAA and XRF.

    PubMed

    El-Taher, A

    2010-06-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and HPGe detector gamma-spectroscopy were used to determine a total of 16 elements qualitatively and quantitatively for the first time from feldspar rock samples collected from Gabel El Dubb, Eastern desert, Egypt. The elements determined are (Na, Mg, K, Sc, Ga, Cr, Fe, Co, Zn, Nb, Ba, Ce, Eu, Hf, Th and U). The samples were properly prepared together with their standard reference material and simultaneously irradiated by thermal neutrons at the TRIGA Mainz research reactor at a neutron flux of 7x10(11)n/cm(2)s. XRF was also used. Comparison of the results obtained by both techniques showed good agreement for such elements as K, Na, Fe, Mg, Ba and Cr. PMID:20185321

  5. Physics and chemistry of alkali-silica reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, S.; Barneyback, R.S. Jr.; Struble, L.J.

    1981-01-01

    The philosophy underlying recent research on alkali-silica reactions is reviewed and illustrations of recent results are provided. It has been possible to follow the kinetics of the chemical reaction between dissolved alkalis and opal in mortars by monitoring the rate at which alkalis are removed from the pore solutions of reacting mortars. Studies of the expansion behavior of synthetic alkali silica gels under controlled conditions were carried out and show no obvious correlation to chemical composition. The alkali reaction in mortars was found to produce changes in the appearance of opal grains documentable by the use of a scanning electron microscope.

  6. Calcium-Alkali Syndrome in the Modern Era

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ami M.; Adeseun, Gbemisola A.; Goldfarb, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    The ingestion of calcium, along with alkali, results in a well-described triad of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and renal insufficiency. Over time, the epidemiology and root cause of the syndrome have shifted, such that the disorder, originally called the milk-alkali syndrome, is now better described as the calcium-alkali syndrome. The calcium-alkali syndrome is an important cause of morbidity that may be on the rise, an unintended consequence of shifts in calcium and vitamin D intake in segments of the population. We review the pathophysiology of the calcium-alkali syndrome. PMID:24288027

  7. Cathodoluminescence microscopy and petrographic image analysis of aggregates in concrete pavements affected by alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stastna, A.; Sachlova, S.; Pertold, Z.; Prikryl, R.; Leichmann, J.

    2012-03-15

    Various microscopic techniques (cathodoluminescence, polarizing and electron microscopy) were combined with image analysis with the aim to determine a) the modal composition and degradation features within concrete, and b) the petrographic characteristics and the geological types (rocks, and their provenance) of the aggregates. Concrete samples were taken from five different portions of Highway Nos. D1, D11, and D5 (the Czech Republic). Coarse and fine aggregates were found to be primarily composed of volcanic, plutonic, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, as well as of quartz and feldspar aggregates of variable origins. The alkali-silica reaction was observed to be the main degradation mechanism, based upon the presence of microcracks and alkali-silica gels in the concrete. Use of cathodoluminescence enabled the identification of the source materials of the quartz aggregates, based upon their CL characteristics (i.e., color, intensity, microfractures, deformation, and zoning), which is difficult to distinguish only employing polarizing and electron microscopy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASR in concrete pavements on the Highways Nos. D1, D5 and D11 (Czech Republic). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cathodoluminescence was combined with various microscopic techniques and image analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASR was attributed to aggregates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Source materials of aggregates were identified based on cathodoluminescence characteristics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quartz comes from different volcanic, plutonic and metamorphic parent rocks.

  8. Plagioclase-free andesites from Zitácuaro (Michoacán), Mexico: petrology and experimental constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatter, Dawnika L.; Carmichael, Ian S. E.

    Approximately 150km west of Mexico City in the central part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB) near Zitácuaro, Mexico, young volcanism has produced shield volcanoes, large volume silicic deposits, and fault-related basalt and andesite lava flows and cinder cones. This paper concerns a small cluster of Pleistocene andesite cones and flows which can be separated into two distinct groups: high-magnesium andesites (>6% MgO, 57-59% SiO2), conveniently called basaltic andesites, with phenocrysts of orthopyroxene and augite, or augite and olivine; and andesites (60-62% SiO2, <4.6% MgO), which have phenocrysts of orthopyroxene and augite, and ghosts of relict hornblende. Remarkably, plagioclase phenocrysts are absent, and evenly distributed but sparse (0.5-3.5%) quartz xenocrysts are present in all the lavas. In order to establish the conditions under which early crystallizing plagioclase is suppressed in these lavas, water saturated experiments up to 3 kbars were performed on one of the basaltic andesites. The conditions required to reproduce the phenocryst assemblages (either olivine + augite or opx + augite) are temperatures in excess of 1000°C, with water saturated liquids (>3 wt%) at pressures of about 1 kbar. Compared to basaltic andesites of western Mexico, the Zitácuaro basaltic andesites have 2wt% lower Al2O3 concentrations, which causes plagioclase to precipitate at significantly lower temperatures, and it therefore follows the crystallization sequence: olivine, augite, and orthopyroxene. Based on ubiquitous quartz xenocrysts, with glassy rhyolitic inclusions, a reasonable conclusion is that substantial mixing of a quartz-bearing rhyolitic magma with a parental basaltic andesite has occurred at low pressure (shallow depth), and this would account for the low Al2O3 concentrations in the Zitácuaro basaltic andesites. Whatever the mechanism of incorporation, the quartz xenocrysts are evidence of contamination of basaltic magma with more siliceous material, thus

  9. Alkali metal recovery from carbonaceous material conversion process

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.; Gorbaty, Martin L.; Tsou, Joe M.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced in the gasifier or similar reaction zone, alkali metal constitutents are recovered from the particles by withdrawing and passing the particles from the reaction zone to an alkali metal recovery zone in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen and treating the particles in the recovery zone with water or an aqueous solution in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen. The solution formed by treating the particles in the recovery zone will contain water-soluble alkali metal constituents and is recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preventing contact of the particles with oxygen as they are withdrawn from the reaction zone and during treatment in the recovery zone avoids the formation of undesirable alkali metal constituents in the aqueous solution produced in the recovery zone and insures maximum recovery of water-soluble alkali metal constituents from the alkali metal residues.

  10. Alkali element background reduction in laser ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, C. W., Jr.; Norris, C. A.

    2014-11-01

    Alkali backgrounds in laser ablation ICP-MS analyses can be enhanced by electron-induced ionization of alkali contamination on the skimmer cone, reducing effective detection limits for these elements. Traditionally, this problem is addressed by isolating analyses of high alkali materials onto a designated cone set, or by operating the ICP-MS in a "soft extraction" mode, which reduces the energy of electrons repelled into the potentially contaminated sampling cone by the extraction field. Here we present a novel approach, where we replace the traditional alkali glass tuning standards with synthetic low-alkali glass reference materials. Using this vitreous tuning solution, we find that this approach reduces the amount of alkali contamination produced, halving backgrounds for the heavy alkali elements without any change to analytical procedures. Using segregated cones is still the most effective method for reducing lithium backgrounds, but since the procedures are complimentary both can easily be applied to the routine operations of an analytical lab.

  11. Alkali element background reduction in laser ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, C. W., Jr.; Norris, C. A.

    2015-03-01

    Alkali backgrounds in laser ablation ICP-MS analyses can be enhanced by electron-induced ionisation of alkali contamination on the skimmer cone, reducing effective detection limits for these elements. Traditionally, this problem is addressed by isolating analyses of high-alkali materials onto a designated cone set, or by operating the ICP-MS in a "soft extraction" mode, which reduces the energy of electrons repelled into the potentially contaminated sampling cone by the extraction field. Here we present a novel approach, where we replace the traditional alkali glass tuning standards with synthetic low-alkali glass reference materials. Using this vitreous tuning solution, we find that this approach reduces the amount of alkali contamination produced, halving backgrounds for the heavy alkali elements without any change to analytical procedures. Using segregated cones is still the most effective method for reducing lithium backgrounds, but since the procedures are complimentary, both can easily be applied to the routine operations of an analytical lab.

  12. Developments in alkali-metal atomic magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltzer, Scott Jeffrey

    Alkali-metal magnetometers use the coherent precession of polarized atomic spins to detect and measure magnetic fields. Recent advances have enabled magnetometers to become competitive with SQUIDs as the most sensitive magnetic field detectors, and they now find use in a variety of areas ranging from medicine and NMR to explosives detection and fundamental physics research. In this thesis we discuss several developments in alkali-metal atomic magnetometry for both practical and fundamental applications. We present a new method of polarizing the alkali atoms by modulating the optical pumping rate at both the linear and quadratic Zeeman resonance frequencies. We demonstrate experimentally that this method enhances the sensitivity of a potassium magnetometer operating in the Earth's field by a factor of 4, and we calculate that it can reduce the orientation-dependent heading error to less than 0.1 nT. We discuss a radio-frequency magnetometer for detection of oscillating magnetic fields with sensitivity better than 0.2 fT/ Hz , which we apply to the observation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals from polarized water, as well as nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signals from ammonium nitrate. We demonstrate that a spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer can measure all three vector components of the magnetic field in an unshielded environment with comparable sensitivity to other devices. We find that octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) acts as an anti-relaxation coating for alkali atoms at temperatures below 170°C, allowing them to collide with a glass surface up to 2,000 times before depolarizing, and we present the first demonstration of high-temperature magnetometry with a coated cell. We also describe a reusable alkali vapor cell intended for the study of interactions between alkali atoms and surface coatings. Finally, we explore the use of a cesium-xenon SERF comagnetometer for a proposed measurement of the permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs

  13. Experimental quantification of P-T conditions of mantle refertilisation at shallow depth under spreading ridges and formation of plagioclase + spinel lherzolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalot-Prat, Françoise; Falloon, Trevor J.; Green, David H.

    2014-05-01

    We studied the first-order melting process of differentiation in the Earth, and the major process of rejuvenation of the upper mantle after melting related to plate spreading (Chalot-Prat et al, 2010; 2013). We conducted experiments at High Pressure (0.75 and 0.5 GPa) and High Temperature (1260-1100°C) to obtain magma compositions in equilibrium with the mineral assemblages of a plagioclase + spinel lherzolite. These PT conditions prevail at 17-30km below axial oceanic spreading ridges. We used a "trial and error" approach in a system involving nine elements (Cr-Na-Fe-Ca-Mg-Al-Si-Ti-Ni). This approaches as closely as possible a natural mantle composition, Cr being a key element in the system. Our objectives were : • to determine experimentally the compositions of melts in equilibrium with plagioclase + spinel lherzolite, with emphasis on the role of plagioclase composition in controlling melt compositions; • to test the hypothesis that MORB are produced at shallow depth (17-30kms) • to quantify liquid- and mantle residue compositional paths at decreasing T and low P to understand magma differentiation by "percolation-reaction" at shallow depth in the mantle; • to compare experimental mantle mineral compositions to those of re-fertilised oceanic mantle lithosphere outcropping at the axis of oceanic spreading ridges, enabling quantification of the pressure (i.e. depth) and temperature of the re-fertilisation process that leads to formation of plagioclase and indicates the minimum thickness of the lithosphere at ridge axes. In the normative basalt tetrahedron, liquids plot on two parallel cotectic lines from silica-oversaturated (basaltic andesite at 0.75 GPa or andesite at 0.5 GPa) at the calcic end to silica-undersaturated compositions (trachyte) at the sodic end. The lower the pressure, the greater the silica oversaturation. Besides the plagioclase solid solution has a dominant role in determining the solidus temperature of plagioclase + spinel lherzolites

  14. Calcic amphibole thermobarometry in metamorphic and igneous rocks: New calibrations based on plagioclase/amphibole Al-Si partitioning and amphibole/liquid Mg partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, J. F.; Moreno, J. A.; Castro, A.; Rodríguez, C.; Fershtater, G. B.

    2015-09-01

    Dependencies of plagioclase/amphibole Al-Si partitioning, DAl/Siplg/amp, and amphibole/liquid Mg partitioning, DMgamp/liq, on temperature, pressure and phase compositions are investigated employing robust regression methods based on MM-estimators. A database with 92 amphibole-plagioclase pairs - temperature range: 650-1050 °C; amphibole compositional limits: > 0.02 apfu (23O) Ti and > 0.05 apfu Al - and 148 amphibole-glass pairs - temperature range: 800-1100 °C; amphibole compositional limit: CaM4/(CaM4 + NaM4) > 0.75 - compiled from experiments in the literature was used for the calculations (amphibole normalization scheme: 13-CNK method). Statistical analysis reveals a significant dependence of DAl/Siplg/amp on pressure, temperature, Al fraction in amphibole T1-site, XAlT1, and albite fraction in plagioclase, XAb, leading to the barometric expression:

  15. Lingunite-a high-pressure plagioclase polymorph at mineral interfaces in doleritic rock of the Lockne impact structure (Sweden)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Amar; Reznik, Boris; Kontny, Agnes; Heissler, Stefan; Schilling, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Lingunite nanocrystals and amorphous plagioclase (maskelynite) are identified at the contacts between augite and labradorite wedge-shaped interfaces in the doleritic rocks of the Lockne impact structure in Sweden. The occurrence of lingunite suggests that the local pressure was above 19 GPa and the local temperature overwhelmed 1000 °C. These values are up to 10 times higher than previous values estimated numerically for bulk pressure and temperature. High shock-induced temperatures are manifested by maskelynite injections into microfractures in augite located next to the wedges. We discuss a possible model of shock heterogeneity at mineral interfaces, which may lead to longer duration of the same shock pressure and a concentration of high temperature thus triggering the kinetics of labradorite transformation into lingunite and maskelynite.

  16. Lingunite-a high-pressure plagioclase polymorph at mineral interfaces in doleritic rock of the Lockne impact structure (Sweden)

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Amar; Reznik, Boris; Kontny, Agnes; Heissler, Stefan; Schilling, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Lingunite nanocrystals and amorphous plagioclase (maskelynite) are identified at the contacts between augite and labradorite wedge-shaped interfaces in the doleritic rocks of the Lockne impact structure in Sweden. The occurrence of lingunite suggests that the local pressure was above 19 GPa and the local temperature overwhelmed 1000 °C. These values are up to 10 times higher than previous values estimated numerically for bulk pressure and temperature. High shock-induced temperatures are manifested by maskelynite injections into microfractures in augite located next to the wedges. We discuss a possible model of shock heterogeneity at mineral interfaces, which may lead to longer duration of the same shock pressure and a concentration of high temperature thus triggering the kinetics of labradorite transformation into lingunite and maskelynite. PMID:27188436

  17. Lingunite-a high-pressure plagioclase polymorph at mineral interfaces in doleritic rock of the Lockne impact structure (Sweden).

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amar; Reznik, Boris; Kontny, Agnes; Heissler, Stefan; Schilling, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Lingunite nanocrystals and amorphous plagioclase (maskelynite) are identified at the contacts between augite and labradorite wedge-shaped interfaces in the doleritic rocks of the Lockne impact structure in Sweden. The occurrence of lingunite suggests that the local pressure was above 19 GPa and the local temperature overwhelmed 1000 °C. These values are up to 10 times higher than previous values estimated numerically for bulk pressure and temperature. High shock-induced temperatures are manifested by maskelynite injections into microfractures in augite located next to the wedges. We discuss a possible model of shock heterogeneity at mineral interfaces, which may lead to longer duration of the same shock pressure and a concentration of high temperature thus triggering the kinetics of labradorite transformation into lingunite and maskelynite. PMID:27188436

  18. 40Ar/39Ar and cosmic ray exposure ages of plagioclase-rich lithic fragments from Apollo 17 regolith, 78461

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, J. P.; Baldwin, S. L.; Delano, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    Argon isotopic data is used to assess the potential of low-mass samples collected by sample return missions on planetary objects (e.g., Moon, Mars, asteroids), to reveal planetary surface processes. We report the first 40Ar/39Ar ages and 38Ar cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages, determined for eleven submillimeter-sized (ranging from 0.06 to 1.2 mg) plagioclase-rich lithic fragments from Apollo 17 regolith sample 78461 collected at the base of the Sculptured Hills. Total fusion analysis was used to outgas argon from the lithic fragments. Three different approaches were used to determine 40Ar/39Ar ages and illustrate the sensitivity of age determination to the choice of trapped (40Ar/36Ar)t. 40Ar/39Ar ages range from ~4.0 to 4.4 Ga with one exception (Plag#10). Surface CRE ages, based on 38Ar, range from ~1 to 24 Ma. The relatively young CRE ages suggest recent re-working of the upper few centimeters of the regolith. The CRE ages may result from the effect of downslope movement of materials to the base of the Sculptured Hills from higher elevations. The apparent 40Ar/39Ar age for Plag#10 is >5 Ga and yielded the oldest CRE age (i.e., ~24 Ma). We interpret this data to indicate the presence of parentless 40Ar in Plag#10, originating in the lunar atmosphere and implanted in lunar regolith by solar wind. Based on a chemical mixing model, plagioclase compositions, and 40Ar/39Ar ages, we conclude that lithic fragments originated from Mg-suite of highland rocks, and none were derived from the mare region.

  19. Plagioclase and epidote buffering of cation ratios in mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal fluids: Experimental results in and near the supercritical region

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, M.E.; Seyfried, W.E. Jr. ); Janecky, D.R. )

    1989-09-01

    Experiments have been performed with Na-Ca-K-Cl fluids of seawater chlorinity and diabase, basalt, and plagioclase bearing mineral mixtures at 350-425{degree}C and 250-400 bars to help constrain hydrothermal alteration processes at mid-ocean ridges. Dissolved Ca, Na, and pH for all experiments responded systematically to differences in dissolved SiO{sub 2} concentrations and the compositions of plagioclase reactants. Diabase alteration at low fluid/rock mass ratios (0.5 to 1) produces fluids undersaturated with respect to quartz during hydration of primary olivine and orthopyroxene, whereas basalt alteration under similar conditions yields fluids slightly supersaturated with respect to quartz during breakdown of glass to smectite and amphibole. Fluid chemistry in all experiments appears to approach a partial equilibrium state with the albite and anorthite components in plagioclase and approaches a pH consistent with plagioclase alteration to epidote. Trace element data from vent fluids, specifically B and Sr, together with major element chemistry, provides evidence that the reaction zone for black-smoker fluids at mid-ocean ridges is composed of only slightly altered diabase and is characterized by small amounts of epidote, nearly fresh plagioclase and clinopyroxene, and partially to completely hydrated olivine and orthopyroxene. Using equilibrium between plagioclase, the dominant reactant, and epidote, the dominant reaction product in experiments, the authors estimate that temperatures in reaction zones are in excess of 375{degree}C for most vent systems. These temperatures are higher than measured vent temperatures, suggesting that hot spring fluids commonly loose heat during ascent to the sea floor.

  20. Effect of alkali lignins with different molecular weights from alkali pretreated rice straw hydrolyzate on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Qi, Benkun; Luo, Jianquan; Wan, Yinhua

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of alkali lignins with different molecular weights on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose. Different alkali lignins fractions, which were obtained from cascade ultrafiltration, were added into the dilute acid pretreated (DAP) and alkali pretreated (AP) rice straws respectively during enzymatic hydrolysis. The results showed that the addition of alkali lignins enhanced the hydrolysis and the enhancement for hydrolysis increased with increasing molecular weights of alkali lignins, with maximum enhancement being 28.69% for DAP and 20.05% for AP, respectively. The enhancement was partly attributed to the improved cellulase activity, and filter paper activity increased by 18.03% when adding lignin with highest molecular weight. It was found that the enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis was correlated with the adsorption affinity of cellulase on alkali lignins, and the difference in surface charge and hydrophobicity of alkali lignins were responsible for the difference in affinity between cellulase and lignins. PMID:26496216

  1. Fractionation of Stable Si Isotopes During in-situ Dissolution of Feldspars and Formation of Secondary Clay Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georg, R. B.; Reynolds, B. C.; Halliday, A. N.; Zhu, C.

    2005-12-01

    It has been proposed that weathering of igneous silicate minerals may fractionate Si isotopes (Douthitt 1982, de la Rocha et al. 2000). This is supported by the observation that clays yield δ30Si compositions between +0.5‰ and -2.5‰ compared to the igneous range for δ30Si between +0.1‰ and -1‰ respectively (Douthitt 1982). The difference may relate to a discrimination against heavier Si isotopes during clay mineral formation. However, no study has yet shown a direct Si isotope fractionation between coexisting primary igneous and secondary clay mineral phases. We have measured the stable Si isotope fractionation during in-situ feldspar dissolution and formation of secondary clay minerals in the Navajo Sandstone, Black Mesa, Arizona. The Jurassic Navajo Sandstone is composed of about 94% quartz and 2-4% K-feldspar. The K-feldspar grains are covered with kaolinite, and both quartz and feldspars are covered with a mantle of smectite coating. Petrographic studies demonstrate that the clay minerals formed in situ as alteration products of feldspar, and the smectite is of a low-temperature variety (Zhu, 2005). Therefore, the Si isotope fractionation at low temperature (15-35°C) can be evaluated - something that is difficult to replicate in the laboratory. For the Si isotope analyses we used 20-30 mg of 5 separated clay samples, and 0.36 mg of hand picked feldspars. The silicates were fused with an alkaline flux and dissolved in a weak HCl acid. The dissolved Si was then separated by ion-exchange chromatography. The relative Si isotope compositions were measured using a high-resolution MC-ICP-MS (The Nu1700 at ETH Zurich) and are reported in δ notation relative to the international Si standard NBS 28. The bulk rock and separated feldspar fraction have Si isotope compositions are -0.09 ± 0.03‰ and -0.15 ±0.03 ‰ (±2σSEM) δ30Si, respectively. The clay samples have δ30Si values of -0.24 ±0.05‰, -0.16 ±0.03‰, -0.30 ±0.03‰, -0.42 ±0.03‰ and -0

  2. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    BREHM, W.F.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  3. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  4. Geopolymers and Related Alkali-Activated Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provis, John L.; Bernal, Susan A.

    2014-07-01

    The development of new, sustainable, low-CO2 construction materials is essential if the global construction industry is to reduce the environmental footprint of its activities, which is incurred particularly through the production of Portland cement. One type of non-Portland cement that is attracting particular attention is based on alkali-aluminosilicate chemistry, including the class of binders that have become known as geopolymers. These materials offer technical properties comparable to those of Portland cement, but with a much lower CO2 footprint and with the potential for performance advantages over traditional cements in certain niche applications. This review discusses the synthesis of alkali-activated binders from blast furnace slag, calcined clay (metakaolin), and fly ash, including analysis of the chemical reaction mechanisms and binder phase assemblages that control the early-age and hardened properties of these materials, in particular initial setting and long-term durability. Perspectives for future research developments are also explored.

  5. Quantum magnetism of alkali Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovskaya, Svetlana; Liu, Gengyuan

    2016-05-01

    We discuss a method to control dynamics in many-body spin states of 87Rb Rydberg atoms. The method permits excitation of cold gases and form ordered structures of alkali atoms. It makes use of a two-photon excitation scheme with circularly polarized and linearly chirped pulses. The method aims for controlled quantum state preparation in large ensembles. It is actual for experiments studding the spin hopping dynamics and realization of quantum random walks.

  6. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    One approach to space fission power system design is predicated on the use of alkali metal heat pipes, either as radiator elements, thermal management components, or as part of the core primary heat-transfer system. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where more detailed information can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstrational purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Project Prometheus point designs.

  7. Alkali metal protective garment and composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Ballif, J.L.; Yuan, W.W.

    1980-09-16

    A protective garment and composite material providing satisfactory heat resistance and physical protection for articles and personnel exposed to hot molten alkali metals, such as sodium are described. Physical protection is provided by a continuous layer of nickel foil. Heat resistance is provided by an underlying backing layer of thermal insulation. Overlying outer layers of fireproof woven ceramic fibers are used to protect the foil during storage and handling.

  8. Alkali metal protective garment and composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Ballif, III, John L.; Yuan, Wei W.

    1980-01-01

    A protective garment and composite material providing satisfactory heat resistance and physical protection for articles and personnel exposed to hot molten alkali metals, such as sodium. Physical protection is provided by a continuous layer of nickel foil. Heat resistance is provided by an underlying backing layer of thermal insulation. Overlying outer layers of fireproof woven ceramic fibers are used to protect the foil during storage and handling.

  9. Study of superconducting state parameters of alkali alkali binary alloys by a pseudopotential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Aditya M.

    2006-12-01

    A detailed study of the superconducting state parameters (SSP) viz. electron-phonon coupling strength λ, Coulomb pseudopotential μ∗, transition temperature TC, isotope effect exponent α and effective interaction strength N OV of ten alkali-alkali binary alloys i.e. Li 1- xNa x, Li 1- xK x, Li 1- xRb x, Li 1- xCs x, Na 1- xK x, Na 1- xRb x, Na 1- xCs x, K 1- xRb x, K 1- xCs x and Rb 1- xCs x are made within the framework of the model potential formalism and employing the pseudo-alloy-atom (PAA) model for the first time. We use the Ashcroft’s empty core (EMC) model potential for evaluating the superconducting properties of alkali alloys. Five different forms of local field correction functions viz. Hartree (H), Taylor (T), Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU), Farid et al. (F) and Sarkar et al. (S) are used to incorporate the exchange and correlation effects. A considerable influence of various exchange and correlation functions on λ and μ∗ is found from the present study. Reasonable agreement with the theoretical values of the SSP of pure components is found (corresponding to the concentration x = 0 or 1). It is also concluded that nature of the SSP strongly depends on the value of the atomic volume Ω0 of alkali-alkali binary alloys.

  10. Transport properties of alkali metal doped fullerides

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Daluram Yadav, Nishchhal

    2015-07-31

    We have studied the intercage interactions between the adjacent C{sub 60} cages and expansion of lattice due to the intercalation of alkali atoms based on the spring model to estimate phonon frequencies from the dynamical matrix for the intermolecular alkali-C{sub 60} phonons. We considered a two-peak model for the phonon density of states to investigate the nature of electron pairing mechanism for superconducting state in fullerides. Coulomb repulsive parameter and the electron phonon coupling strength are obtained within the random phase approximation. Transition temperature, T{sub c}, is obtained in a situation when the free electrons in lowest molecular orbital are coupled with alkali-C{sub 60} phonons as 5 K, which is much lower as compared to reported T{sub c} (20 K). The superconducting pairing is mainly driven by the high frequency intramolecular phonons and their effects enhance it to 22 K. The importance of the present study, the pressure effect and normal state transport properties are calculated within the same model leading superconductivity.

  11. Transport properties of alkali metal doped fullerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Daluram; Yadav, Nishchhal

    2015-07-01

    We have studied the intercage interactions between the adjacent C60 cages and expansion of lattice due to the intercalation of alkali atoms based on the spring model to estimate phonon frequencies from the dynamical matrix for the intermolecular alkali-C60 phonons. We considered a two-peak model for the phonon density of states to investigate the nature of electron pairing mechanism for superconducting state in fullerides. Coulomb repulsive parameter and the electron phonon coupling strength are obtained within the random phase approximation. Transition temperature, Tc, is obtained in a situation when the free electrons in lowest molecular orbital are coupled with alkali-C60 phonons as 5 K, which is much lower as compared to reported Tc (20 K). The superconducting pairing is mainly driven by the high frequency intramolecular phonons and their effects enhance it to 22 K. The importance of the present study, the pressure effect and normal state transport properties are calculated within the same model leading superconductivity.

  12. Ion Pairing in Alkali Nitrate Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-10

    In this study, we investigate the thermodynamics of alkali nitrate salt solutions, especially the formation of contact ion pairs between alkali cation and nitrate anion. The ion-pairing propensity shows an order of LiNO3 < NaNO3 < KNO3. Such results explain the salt activity coefficients and suggest that the empirical "law of matching water affinity" is followed by these alkali nitrate salt solutions. The spatial patterns of contact ion pairs are different in the three salt solutions studied here: Li(+) forms the contact ion pair with only one oxygen of the nitrate while Na(+) and K(+) can also be shared by two oxygens of the nitrate. In reproducing the salt activity coefficient using Kirkwood-Buff theory, we find that it is essential to include electronic polarization for Li(+) which has a high charge density. The electronic continuum correction for nonpolarizable force field significantly improves the agreement between the calculated activity coefficients and their experimental values. This approach also improves the performance of the force field on salt solubility. From these two aspects, this study suggests that electronic continuum correction can be a promising approach to force-field development for ions with high charge densities. PMID:26901167

  13. Trace element and Pb isotope composition of plagioclase from dome samples from the 2004-2005 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington: Chapter 35 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kent, Adam J.R.; Rowe, Michael C.; Thornber, Carl R.; Pallister, John S.

    2008-01-01

    Plagioclase crystals from gabbronorite inclusions in three dacite samples have markedly different trace-element and Pbisotope compositions from those of plagioclase phenocrysts, despite having a similar range of anorthite contents. Inclusions show some systematic differences from each other but typically have higher Ti, Ba, LREE, and Pb and lower Sr and have lower 208Pb/206Pb and 207Pb/206Pb ratios than coexisting plagioclase phenocrysts. The compositions of plagioclase from inclusions cannot be related to phenocryst compositions by any reasonable petrologic model. From this we suggest that they are unlikely to represent magmatic cumulates or restite inclusions but instead are samples of mafic Tertiary basement from beneath the volcano.

  14. Contact freezing induced by biological (Snomax) and mineral dust (K-feldspar) particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, N.; Schäfer, M.; Duft, D.; Kiselev, A. A.; Leisner, T.

    2013-12-01

    The contact freezing of supercooled cloud droplets is one of the potentially important and the least investigated heterogeneous mechanism of ice formation in tropospheric clouds [1]. On the time scales of cloud lifetime the freezing of supercooled water droplets via contact mechanism may occur at higher temperature compared to the same IN immersed in the droplet. In our experiment we study single water droplets freely levitated in an Electrodynamic Balance [2]. We have shown previously that the rate of freezing at given temperature is governed only by the rate of droplet -particle collision and by the properties of the contact ice nuclei [2, 3]. Recently, we have extended our experiments to feldspar, being the most abundant component of the atmospheric mineral dust particles, and Snomax, as a proxy for atmospheric biological Ice Nuclei (IN). In this contribution we show that both IN exhibits the same temperature, size and material dependency observed previously in immersion mode [4, 5]. Based on these results, we limit the number of mechanisms that could be responsible for the enhancement of contact nucleation of ice in supercooled water. [1] - Ladino, L. A., Stetzer, O., and Lohmann, U.: Contact freezing: a review, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 13, 7811-7869, doi:10.5194/acpd-13-7811-2013, 2013. [2] - Hoffmann, N., Kiselev, A., Rzesanke, D., Duft, D., and Leisner, T.: Experimental quantification of contact freezing in an electrodynamic balance, Atmos. Meas. Tech. Discuss., 6, 3407-3437, doi:10.5194/amtd-6-3407-2013, 2013. [3] - Hoffmann, N., Duft, D., Kiselev, A., and Leisner, T.: Contact freezing efficiency of mineral dust aerosols studied in an electrodynamic balance: quantitative size and temperature dependence for illite particles, Faraday Discuss., doi: 10.1039/C3FD00033H, 2013. [4] - Atkinson, James D., Murray, Benjamin J., Woodhouse, Matthew T., Whale, Thomas F., Baustian, Kelly J., Carslaw, Kenneth S., Dobbie, Steven, O'Sullivan, Daniel, and Malkin, Tamsin

  15. Contributions to the mixed-alkali effect in molecular dynamics simulations of alkali silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, Heiko; Heuer, Andreas

    2005-12-01

    The mixed-alkali effect in the cation dynamics in silicate glasses is analyzed via molecular dynamics simulations. Observations suggest a description of the dynamics in terms of stable sites mostly specific to one ionic species. As main contributions to the mixed-alkali slow down longer residence times and an increased probability of correlated backjumps are identified. The slow down is related to the limited accessibility of foreign sites. The mismatch experienced in a foreign site is stronger and more retarding for the larger ions, the smaller ions can be temporarily accommodated. Also correlations between unlike as well as like cations are demonstrated that support cooperative behavior.

  16. Method for the safe disposal of alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Terry R.

    1977-01-01

    Alkali metals such as those employed in liquid metal coolant systems can be safely reacted to form hydroxides by first dissolving the alkali metal in relatively inert metals such as lead or bismuth. The alloy thus formed is contacted with a molten salt including the alkali metal hydroxide and possibly the alkali metal carbonate in the presence of oxygen. This oxidizes the alkali metal to an oxide which is soluble within the molten salt. The salt is separated and contacted with steam or steam-CO.sub.2 mixture to convert the alkali metal oxide to the hydroxide. These reactions can be conducted with minimal hydrogen evolution and with the heat of reaction distributed between the several reaction steps.

  17. Determination of the common and rare alkalies in mineral analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.C.; Stevens, R.E.

    1934-01-01

    Methods are described which afford a determination of each member of the alkali group and are successful in dealing with the quantities of the rare alkalies found in rocks and minerals. The procedures are relatively rapid and based chiefly on the use of chloroplatinic acid, absolute alcohol and ether, and ammonium sulfate. The percentages of all the alkalies found in a number of minerals are given.

  18. Environmental mercury contamination around a chlor-alkali plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lodenius, M.; Tulisalo, E.

    1984-04-01

    The chlor-alkali industry is one of the most important emitters of mercury. This metal is effectively spread from chlor-alkali plants into the atmosphere and it has been reported that only a few percent of the mercury emissions are deposited locally the major part spreading over very large areas. The purpose of this investigation was to study the spreading of mercury up to 100 km from a chlor-alkali plant using three different biological indicators.

  19. Fluvial terrace gravels of the "Hochterrasse" (N-Alpine Foreland, Austria): luminescence characteristics of quartz and feldspar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickel, L.; Lomax, J.; Fiebig, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Northern Alpine Foreland has played a major role in the investigation of glacial and furthermore paleo-climatic events. It was at the beginning of the 20th century, when Albrecht Penck developed the idea of four big alpine glaciations which extended into the alpine foreland. He developed the model of the glacial series in which he correlated terminal moraines with distinguishable terrace bodies. In the case of the fluvial sediments of the Hochterrasse (correlated with marine isotope stage (MIS) 6 in Austrian geological maps) the existence of numerical ages in the Austrian Alpine Foreland is sparse. This study is aimed at shedding light on the luminescence properties of quartz and feldspar derived from Hochterrasse systems in foreland valleys (Traun, Enns and Ybbs valley) so far attributed to the penultimate glaciation. Coarse grain (100-200 µm) K-feldspar and quartz are analyzed by Infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL), post-Infrared Infrared stimulated luminescence (pIRIR) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) methods. One of the issues that arise when dating glaciofluvial quartz from this area is the apparent underestimation of the quartz ages which can vary up to 50% from the calculated IRSL ages. Linearly modulated OSL shows a big contribution of thermally unstable components to the overall equivalent dose (De) which can add to the general underestimation of quartz. Also the measurement of feldspar aliquots is anything but trivial. Luminescence signal intensities are very viable for the samples from the Enns and Traun valley. The samples derived from the Ybbs valley in contrast show very low feldspar signal intensities on most aliquots. Thermal transfer has shown to have negligible impact on the overall paleodose for the feldspar samples (maximum 1% of the paleodose attributed to thermal transfer). In contrast anomalous fading seems to be affecting all feldspar samples. However an assessment of the amount of signal loss in time is difficult to

  20. Accretion and canal impacts in a rapidly subsiding wetland II: Feldspar marker horizon technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahoon, D.R.; Turner, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Recent (6-12 months) marsh sediment accretion and accumulation rates were measured with feldspar marker horizons in the vicinity of natural waterways and man-made canals with spoil banks in the rapidly subsiding environment of coastal Louisiana. Annual accretion rates in a Spartina alterniflora salt marsh in the Mississippi deltaic plain averaged 6 mm in marsh adjacent to canals compared to 10 mm in marsh adjacent to natural waterways. The rates, however, were not statistically significantly different. The average rate of sediment accretion in the same salt marsh region for a transect perpendicular to a canal (13 mm yr-1) was significantly greater than the rate measured for a transect perpendicular to a natural waterway (7 mm yr-1). Measurements of soil bulk density and organic matter content from the two transects were also different. This spatial variability in accretion rates is probably related to (1) spoil bank influences on local hydrology; and (2) a locally high rate of sediment input from lateral erosion associated with pond enlargement. In a brackish Spatina patens marsh on Louisiana's chenier plain, vertical accretion rates were the same along natural and canal waterways (3-4 mm yr-1) in a hydrologically restricted marsh region. However, the accretion rates for both waterways were significantly lower than the rates along a nonhydrologically restricted natural waterway nearby (11 mm yr-1). The vertical accretion of matter displayed semi-annual differences in the brackish marsh environment.

  1. Adsorption mechanism of mixed cationic/anionic collectors in feldspar-quartz flotation system.

    PubMed

    Vidyadhar, A; Hanumantha Rao, K

    2007-02-15

    The adsorption mechanism of mixed cationic alkyl diamine and anionic sulfonate/oleate collectors at acidic pH values was investigated on microcline and quartz minerals through Hallimond flotation, electrokinetic and diffuse reflectance FTIR studies. In the presence of anionic collectors, neither of the minerals responded to flotation but the diamine flotation of the minerals was observed to be pH and concentration dependent. The presence of sulfonate enhanced the diamine flotation of the minerals by its co-adsorption. The difference in surface charge between the minerals at pH 2 was found to be the basis for preferential feldspar flotation from quartz in mixed diamine/sulfonate collectors. The infrared spectra revealed no adsorption of sulfonate collector when used alone but displayed its co-adsorption as diamine-sulfonate complex when used with diamine. The presence of sulfonate increased the diamine adsorption due to a decrease in the electrostatic head-head repulsion between the adjacent surface ammonium ions and thereby increasing the lateral tail-tail hydrophobic bonds. The mole ratio of diamine/sulfonate was found to be an important factor in the orientation of alkyl chains and thus the flotation response of minerals. The increase in sulfonate concentration beyond diamine concentration leads to the formation of soluble 1:2 diamine-sulfonate complex or precipitate and the adsorption of these species decreased the flotation since the alkyl chains are in chaotical orientation with a conceivable number of head groups directing towards the solution phase. PMID:17098246

  2. Plagioclase zonation styles in hornblende gabbro inclusions from Little Glass Mountain, Medicine Lake volcano, California: Implications for fractionation mechanisms and the formation of composition gaps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brophy, J.G.; Dorais, M.J.; Donnelly-Nolan, J.; Singer, B.S.

    1997-01-01

    The rhyolite of Little Glass Mountain (73-74% SiO2) is a single eruptive unit that contains inclusions of quenched andesite liquid (54-61% SiO2) and partially crystalline cumulate hornblende gabbro (53-55% SiO2). Based on previous studies, the quenched andesite inclusions and host rhyolite lava are related to one another through fractional crystallization and represent an example of a fractionation-generated composition gap. The hornblende gabbros represent the cumulate residue associated with the rhyolite-producing and composition gap-forming fractionation event. This study combines textural (Nomarski Differential Interference Contrast, NDIC, imaging), major element (An content) and trace element (Mg, Fe, Sr, K, Ti, Ba) data on the style of zonation of plagioclase crystals from representative andesite and gabbro inclusions, to assess the physical environment in which the fractionation event and composition gap formation took place. The andesite inclusions (54-61% SiO2) are sparsely phyric with phenocrysts of plagioclase, augite and Fe-oxide??olivine, +/-orthopyroxene, +/-hornblende set within a glassy to crystalline matrix. The gabbro cumulates (53-55% SiO2) consist of an interconnected framework of plagioclase, augite, olivine, orthopyroxene, hornblende and Fe-oxide along with highly vesicular interstitial glass (70-74% SiO2). The gabbros record a two-stage crystallization history of plagioclase + olivine + augite (Stage I) followed by plagioclase+orthopyroxene + hornblende + Fe-oxide (Stage II). Texturally, the plagioclase crystals in the andesite inclusions are characterized by complex, fine-scale oscillatory zonation and abundant dissolution surfaces. Compositionally (An content) the crystals are essentially unzoned from core-to-rim. These features indicate growth within a dynamic (convecting?), reservoir of andesite magma. In contrast, the plagioclase crystals in the gabbros are texturally smooth and featureless with strong normal zonation from An74 at the

  3. Petrology and Geochemistry of Plagioclase-Phyric Basaltic Lava Flows on St. George Island, Alaska: Evidence for a Genetic Link Between Magmatic Centers of the Pribilof Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deraps, M. R.; Feeley, T. C.; Underwood, S. J.; Winer, G. S.

    2006-12-01

    St. George and St. Paul Islands, the two largest Pribilof Islands (Alaska), are located 70 km apart in the Bering Sea 400-450 km north of the Aleutian arc front. The islands are centers of alkaline basaltic volcanism associated with the diffuse Bering Sea basalt province. On St. George an extensive history of volcanism (~2.6-1.4 Ma; Mukasa and Andronikov, JGR, submitted) is exposed in high sea cliffs and several NE-SW and E-W trending fault blocks that define the present topography of the island. In contrast, St. Paul is a potentially active volcanic center (~550-3 ka) with numerous young tephra cones and associated lava flows that show minimal erosion and deformation by faulting. Volcanic rocks erupted on St. George are mainly olivine- + clinopyroxene-phyric basalts and trachy-basalts with high to moderate MgO contents (12-8 wt%). In addition, distinct plagioclase-phyric lavas are present at high stratigraphic levels. The plagioclase-phyric lavas are relatively evolved with 47-51 wt% SiO2 and 6.6-4.9 wt% MgO. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns are LREE-enriched with little to no Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 1.03-1.06), indicating that the evolved compositions and plagioclase-rich nature of the flows are not due to phenocryst accumulation. Instead, production of plagioclase-phyric lavas on St. George likely involved a complex set of differentiation processes, including fractional crystallization and magma mixing. This assertion is supported by major and trace element compositions of the rocks, which define distinct trends on chemical variation diagrams relative to less evolved plagioclase-poor rocks. For example, whereas MgO contents of most St. George lavas as a group decrease with increasing SiO2 contents, these elements show a positive linear correlation for plagioclase-phyric lavas. The linear trends of these samples on chemical variation diagrams are best explained by mixing of at least two distinct evolved endmember magmas. Major element mass balance calculations

  4. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, D.C.; Mailhe, C.C.; De Jonghe, L.C.

    1985-07-10

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  5. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, David C.; Mailhe, Catherine C.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    1986-01-01

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  6. Grain Growth Pinning and Strain Localization: Implications for Plagioclase Flow Laws and Strength of the Lower Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehl, L.; Hirth, G.

    2005-12-01

    The rheology of the lower crust remains poorly understood despite its importance for understanding the strength of plates, driving forces for plate motion, and how strain is translated up to and/or down from the brittle upper crust. In this study we evaluate the applicability of experimental flow laws using insights from the analysis of naturally deformed gabbros from lower oceanic crust (Hole 735B, Southwest Indian Ridge). For comparison with experimentally-derived flow laws, we evaluate stress, temperature, and deformation mechanism in the SWIR samples. Strain is localized in discrete shear zones, and we assume a strain rate of 10-12 to 10-14 s-1. Differential stress ranges from ~20 to 150 MPa, estimated by grain size piezometry with the empirical relationship of Twiss (1977). Syn-deformation temperatures are 800-950 °C, calculated by Fe-Mg-Ca exchange between recrystallized orthopyroxene-clinopyroxene pairs using QUILF (Andersen et al., 1993). Finally, deformation mechanisms were analyzed by measuring the lattice preferred orientation (LPO) with an electron back scattered detector (EBSD) on a scanning electron microscope. Monophase layers within the shear zones have LPOs indicative of deformation by dislocation creep at all grain sizes (down to 12.5 μm). Polyphase layers have random or very weak fabrics implying dominance of diffusion creep, even in samples with a relatively coarse grain size (well within the dislocation creep field). Plagioclase grains in the polyphase layers are smaller than those in monophase layers indicating that grain growth is apparently inhibited by clinopyroxene at grain boundaries. The variation in plagioclase grain size fits models that account for the size and abundance of a pinning phase. We conclude: 1) Flow law parameters for dry An100 (Rybacki and Dresen, 2000) agree well with natural polyphase gabbro shear zones. This is a relatively `strong' flow law that predicts viscosities higher than olivine flow laws for a wet upper

  7. Dry and Wet Friction of Plagioclase: Pure Cataclastic Flow(CF) vs. CF with Concurrent Pressure Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, C.; Tan, W.

    2015-12-01

    To distinguish different deformation mechanisms at hydrothermal conditions, friction experiments of plagioclase under nominally dry conditions were compared with that at hydrothermal conditions documented in a previous study[He et al.,2013]. Preliminary result[Tan and He, 2008] shows that the rate dependence of plagioclase under confining pressure of 150MPa and nominally dry conditions is velocity strengthening at temperatures of 50-600oC, in contrast to the full velocity weakening at hydrothermal conditions. Here a) we conducted data fitting to the rate and state friction law to compare with the hydrothermal case; b) microstructural comparison was performed to understand the difference between the dry and wet conditions in the operative deformation mechanisms. The evolution effect (b value) under dry conditions exhibits much smaller values than that at wet conditions, and in contrast to the increasing trend at wet conditions, b values under dry conditions have a decreasing trend as temperature increases, from ~0.007 at 300oC down to 0 at 600oC. The direct effect (a value) at dry conditions has a peak of ~0.01 at 300oC and decreases to a level of 0.007-0.008 at higher temperatures, in contrast to the increasing trend seen at hydrothermal conditions. In the dry case, microstructure at temperatures of 300-600oC transitions gradually from a fabric characterized by localized Riedel shear zones to pervasive shear deformation, with the grain size reduced to a level of 1-3 micron in a submicron matrix in the latter case, corresponding to a lower porosity. The close association between porosity evolution and that of state variable revealed in previous studies[Morrow and Byerlee, 1989; Marone et al.,1990] suggests that the porosity change contributes largely to the evolution effect in addition to plasticity at intergranular contacts, probably due to gradual switching between different densities of packing. Our dry experiments indicate a cataclastic flow where the evolution

  8. A model that helps explain Sr-isotope disequilibrium between feldspar phenocrysts and melt in large-volume silicic magma systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffield, Wendell A.; Ruiz, Joaquin

    1998-12-01

    Feldspar phenocrysts of silicic volcanic rocks are commonly in Sr-isotopic disequilibrium with groundmass. In some cases the feldspar is more radiogenic, and in others it is less radiogenic. Several explanations have been published previously, but none of these is able to accommodate both senses of disequilibrium. We present a model by which either more- or less-radiogenic feldspar (or even both within a single eruptive unit) can originate. The model requires a magma body open to interaction with biotite- and feldspar-bearing wall rock. Magma is incrementally contaminated as wall rock melts incongruently. Biotite preferentially melts first, followed by feldspar. Such melting behavior, which is supported by both field and experimental studies, first contaminates magma with a relatively radiogenic addition, followed by a less-radiogenic addition. Feldspar phenocrysts lag behind melt (groundmass of volcanic rock) in incorporating the influx of contaminant, thus resulting in Sr-isotopic disequilibrium between the crystals and melt. The sense of disequilibrium recorded in a volcanic rock depends on when eruption quenches the contamination process. This model is testable by isotopic fingerprinting of individual feldspar crystals. For a given set of geologic boundary conditions, specific core-to-rim Sr-isotopic profiles are expectable. Moreover, phenocrysts that nucleate at different times during the contamination process should record different and predictable parts of the history. Initial results of Sr-isotopic fingerprinting of sanidine phenocrysts from the Taylor Creek Rhyolite are consistent with the model. More tests of the model are desirable.

  9. Crystal residence times from trace element zoning in plagioclase reveal changes in magma transfer dynamics at Mt. Etna during the last 400 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viccaro, Marco; Barca, Donatella; Bohrson, Wendy A.; D'Oriano, Claudia; Giuffrida, Marisa; Nicotra, Eugenio; Pitcher, Bradley W.

    2016-04-01

    Trace element zoning in plagioclase of selected alkaline lavas from the historic (1607-1892 AD) and recent (1983-2013 AD) activity of Mt. Etna volcano has been used to explore the possible role that volcano-tectonics exert on magma transfer dynamics. The observed textural characteristics of crystals include near-equilibrium textures (i.e., oscillatory zoning) and textures with variable extent of disequilibrium (patchy zoning, coarse sieve textures and dissolved cores). Historic crystals exhibit lower K concentrations at lower anorthite contents, a feature in agreement with the general more potassic character of the recent lavas if compared to the historic products. Historic plagioclases have statistically higher Ba and lower Sr concentrations than the recent crystals, which result in different Sr/Ba ratios for the two suites of plagioclase. Variations in the anorthite content along core-to-rim profiles obtained on crystals with different types of textures for both the historic and recent eruptive periods were evaluated particularly versus Sr/Ba. At comparable average An contents, crystals characterized by oscillatory zoning, which are representative of near-equilibrium crystallization from the magma, display distinct Sr/Ba ratios. We suggest that these features are primarily related to recharge of a new, geochemically-distinct magma into the storage and transport system of the volcano. In addition to distinct trace element and textural characteristics of plagioclase, Sr diffusion modeling for plagioclase suggests that residence times are generally shorter for crystals found in recently erupted lavas (25-77 years, average 43 years) compared to those of the historic products (43-163 years, average 99 years). Shorter residences times correlate with gradual increases in eruption volume and eruption frequency rates through time. We attribute these features to an increasing influence, since the 17th century, of extensional tectonic structures within the upper 10 km of

  10. Thermobarometry for spinel lherzolite xenoliths in alkali basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Kazuhito; Youbi, Nasrrddine; Boumehdi, Moulay Ahmed; Nagahara, Hiroko

    2016-04-01

    Application of geothermobarometers to peridotite xenoliths has been providing very useful information on thermal and chemical structure of lithospheric or asthenospheric mantle at the time of almost instantaneous sampling by the host magmas, based on which various thermal (e.g., McKenzie et al., 2005), chemical (e.g., Griffin et al., 2003), and rheological (e.g., Ave Lallemant et al., 1980) models of lithosphere have been constructed. Geothermobarometry for garnet or plagioclase-bearing lithologies provide accurate pressure estimation, but this is not the case for the spinel peridotites, which are frequently sampled from Phanerozoic provinces in various tectonic environments (Nixon and Davies, 1987). There are several geobarometers proposed for spinel lherzolite, such as single pyroxene geothermobarometer (Mercier, 1980) and geothermobarometer based on Ca exchange between olivine and clinopyroxene (Köhler and Brey, 1990), but they have essential problems and it is usually believed that appropriated barometers do not exist for spinel lherzolites (O'Reilly et al., 1997; Medaris et al., 1999). It is thus imperative to develop reliable barometry for spinel peridotite xenoliths. We have developed barometry for spinel peridotite xenoliths by exploiting small differences in pressure dependence in relevant reactions, whose calibration was made through careful evaluation of volume changes of the reactions. This is augmented with higher levels of care in application of barometer by choosing mineral domains and their chemical components that are in equilibrium as close as possible. This is necessary because such barometry is very sensitive to changes in chemical composition induced by transient state of the system possibly owing to pressure and temperature changes as well as chemical modification, forming chemical heterogeneity or zoning frequently reported from various mantle xenoliths (Smith, 1999). Thus very carful treatment of heterogeneity, which might be trivial for

  11. Electrodes For Alkali-Metal Thermoelectric Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Wheeler, Bob L.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Lamb, James L.; Bankston, C. Perry; Cole, Terry

    1989-01-01

    Combination of thin, porous electrode and overlying collector grid reduces internal resistance of alkali-metal thermoelectric converter cell. Low resistance of new electrode and grid boosts power density nearly to 1 W/cm2 of electrode area at typical operating temperatures of 1,000 to 1,300 K. Conductive grid encircles electrode film on alumina tube. Bus wire runs along tube to collect electrical current from grid. Such converters used to transform solar, nuclear, and waste heat into electric power.

  12. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  13. Cathode architectures for alkali metal / oxygen batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Steven J; Nimon, Vitaliy; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Volfkovich, Yury; Bograchev, Daniil

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical energy storage devices, such as alkali metal-oxygen battery cells (e.g., non-aqueous lithium-air cells), have a cathode architecture with a porous structure and pore composition that is tailored to improve cell performance, especially as it pertains to one or more of the discharge/charge rate, cycle life, and delivered ampere-hour capacity. A porous cathode architecture having a pore volume that is derived from pores of varying radii wherein the pore size distribution is tailored as a function of the architecture thickness is one way to achieve one or more of the aforementioned cell performance improvements.

  14. Elucidation of transport mechanism and enhanced alkali ion transference numbers in mixed alkali metal-organic ionic molten salts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Forsyth, Maria

    2016-07-28

    Mixed salts of Ionic Liquids (ILs) and alkali metal salts, developed as electrolytes for lithium and sodium batteries, have shown a remarkable ability to facilitate high rate capability for lithium and sodium electrochemical cycling. It has been suggested that this may be due to a high alkali metal ion transference number at concentrations approaching 50 mol% Li(+) or Na(+), relative to lower concentrations. Computational investigations for two IL systems illustrate the formation of extended alkali-anion aggregates as the alkali metal ion concentration increases. This tends to favor the diffusion of alkali metal ions compared with other ionic species in electrolyte solutions; behavior that has recently been reported for Li(+) in a phosphonium ionic liquid, thus an increasing alkali transference number. The mechanism of alkali metal ion diffusion via this extended coordination environment present at high concentrations is explained and compared to the dynamics at lower concentrations. Heterogeneous alkali metal ion dynamics are also evident and, somewhat counter-intuitively, it appears that the faster ions are those that are generally found clustered with the anions. Furthermore these fast alkali metal ions appear to correlate with fastest ionic liquid solvent ions. PMID:27375042

  15. (abstract) Fundamental Mechanisms of Electrode Kinetics and Alkali Metal Atom Transport at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kisor, A.; Kikkert, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of electrode kinetics and mass transport of alkali metal oxidation and alkali metal cation reduction at the solid electrolyte/porous electrode boundary as well as alkali metal transport through porous metal electrodes has important applications in optimizing device performance in alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) cells which are high temperature, high current density electrochemical cells. Basic studies of these processes also affords the opportunity to investigate a very basic electrochemical reaction over a wide range of conditions; and a variety of mass transport modes at high temperatures via electrochemical techniques. The temperature range of these investigations covers 700K to 1240K; the alkali metal vapor pressures range from about 10(sup -2) to 10(sup 2) Pa; and electrodes studied have included Mo, W, Mo/Na(sub 2)MoO(sub 4), W/Na(sub 2)WO(sub 4), WPt(sub x), and WRh(sub x) (1.0 < x < 6.0 ) with Na at Na-beta'-alumina, and Mo with K at K-beta'-alumina. Both liquid metal/solid electrolyte/alkali metal vapor and alkali metal vapor/solid electrolyte/vapor cells have been used to characterize the reaction and transport processes. We have previously reported evidence of ionic, free molecular flow, and surface transport of sodium in several types of AMTEC electrodes.

  16. Formation of andesite melts and Ca-rich plagioclase in the submarine Monowai volcanic system, Kermadec arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemner, Fabian; Haase, Karsten M.; Beier, Christoph; Krumm, Stefan; Brandl, Philipp A.

    2015-12-01

    Andesites are typical rocks of island arcs and may either form by fractional crystallization processes or by mixing between a mafic and a felsic magma. Here we present new petrographic and geochemical data from lavas of the submarine Monowai volcanic system in the northern Kermadec island arc that display a continuous range in composition from basalt to andesite. Using petrology, major, trace, and volatile element data, we show that basaltic magmas mostly evolve to andesitic magmas by fractional crystallization. Our thermobarometric calculations indicate that the formation of the large caldera is related to eruption of basaltic-andesitic to andesitic magmas from a magma reservoir in the deeper crust. Small variations in trace element ratios between the caldera and the large active cone imply a homogeneous mantle source. Contrastingly, resurgent dome melts of the caldera stagnated at shallower depths are more depleted and show a stronger subduction input than the other edifices. The Monowai basaltic glasses contain less than 1 wt % H2O and follow typical tholeiitic fractionation trends. High-An plagioclase crystals observed in the Monowai lavas likely reflect mixing of H2O-saturated melt batches with hot and dry tholeiitic, decompression melt batches. The result is a relatively H2O-poor mafic magma at Monowai implying that partial melting of the mantle wedge is only partly due to the volatile flux and that adiabatic melting may play a significant role in the formation of the parental melts of the Monowai volcanic system and possibly other arc volcanoes.

  17. [The characteristics of microstructure and chemical compositions of K-feldspar, sphene and zircon with zoning structure].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Hua; Wu, Cai-Lai; Lei, Min; Qin, Hai-Peng; Li, Ming-Ze

    2013-08-01

    K-feldspar, sphene and zircon in quartz monzonite from Shahewan, south Qinling, showing strong zoning structure. Characteristics of microstructure and chemical compositions of K-feldspar, sphene and zircon with zoning structure were investigated using advanced instruments of electron probe micro analyses equipped with wavelength dispersive spectrometer (EPM-WDS), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) and laser ablation--inductively coupled plasma--mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Our study suggests that K+ could be substituted by small amounts of Na+, Ca2+, Ba2+, Fe2+ and Ce3+. Ca2+ in sphene could be replaced by V3+, Ce3+, Ba2+ and Ti4+ could be substituted by both Fe2+ and Al3+. Zircon contains trace elements like Fe, Th, U, Nb, Ta, Y, Hf, Yb and Pb. Concentration of Si, Al, K, Ca, Na, Mg and Ba in K-feldspar ranked from high to low, among which the contents of K and Na are negatively correlated, the lighter part of BSE images featuring K-feldspar is attributed to comparably higher Ba content, additionally, Si and K contents are elevated while Na content decreased rimward. Ca, Si, Ti, Ba, V, Ce, Al and Fe concentration listed downward, among which higher iron content corresponds to brighter portion of BSE images. Element concentration of zircon could be ranked from high to low as Zr, Si, Nd, Ce, Hf, U, Pb and Th, in which Hf and Zr exhibit negatively correlated. Zr concentration increased while Hf, U and Th concentration decreased from core to rim. PMID:24159884

  18. Buffering capability of mineral assemblage (feldspar + kaolinite + quartz) and its application to predicting illite occurrence in arkosic sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, W.L.

    1986-05-01

    Studies of phase relationships using the activity diagrams involving feldspar, illite, kaolinite, and gibbsite (or boehmite) reveal that the common mineral assemblage of feldspar, kaolinite, and quartz found in arkosic sandstone provides a strong driving force to change the fluid chemistry to conditions thermodynamically favoring illite formation. The driving force involves three major diagenetic reactions: the hydrolysis of feldspar with acidic fluid, the reaction of kaolinite with alkaline fluid, and the saturation of the fluid with respect to quartz. The first and second reactions result in, respectively, the increase and decrease of K/sup +//H/sup +/ activity ratio, whereas the third reaction tends to maintain the Si(OH)/sub 4/ activity in the pore fluid. The resultant fluid chemistry of these reactions coincidentally falls in the stability field of illite. This relationship occurs over a wide range of pressure and temperature conditions with low fluid to rock ratio. Experimental results show that an increase in the fluid to rock ratio will decrease the rate that the fluid chemistry approaches the illite stability field. The effectiveness of the buffering capability, therefore, depends on the relative rate of fluid movement and fluid/rock reaction. This study demonstrates that the most likely condition for illite formation is a quartzofeldspathic system involving the presence of kaolinite and low fluid movement. In the absence of these conditions, the opportunity to precipitate illite in the pore space is significantly reduced. The commonly observed illitization of kaolinite or feldspar during burial diagenesis could be caused simply by the reduced influx of fluid (with any compositions: alkaline, neutral, or acidic) due to deep burial of the sandstone.

  19. Correlation of basic TL, OSL and IRSL properties of ten K-feldspar samples of various origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfampa, I. K.; Polymeris, G. S.; Pagonis, V.; Theodosoglou, E.; Tsirliganis, N. C.; Kitis, G.

    2015-09-01

    Feldspars stand among the most widely used minerals in dosimetric methods of dating using thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Having very good dosimetric properties, they can in principle contribute to the dating of every site of archaeological and geological interest. The present work studies basic properties of ten naturally occurring K-feldspar samples belonging to three feldspar species, namely sanidine, orthoclase and microcline. The basic properties studied are (a) the influence of blue light and infrared stimulation on the thermoluminescence glow-curves, (b) the growth of OSL, IRSL, residual TL and TL-loss as a function of OSL and IRSL bleaching time and (c) the correlation between the OSL and IRSL signals and the energy levels responsible for the TL glow-curve. All experimental data were fitted using analytical expressions derived from a recently developed tunneling recombination model. The results show that the analytical expressions provide excellent fits to all experimental results, thus verifying the tunneling recombination mechanism in these materials and providing valuable information about the concentrations of luminescence centers.

  20. Highly retentive core domains in K-feldspar preserve argon ages from high temperature stages of granite exhumation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Marnie; Lister, Gordon

    2016-04-01

    Retentive core domains are characterized by diffusion parameters that imply K-feldspar should be able to retain argon even at temperatures near or above the granite solidus. In this case it should be possible to date granite emplacement using argon geochronology, and the same answer should be obtained as by using other methods. We present one case study where this is the case, from the elevated Capoas granite stock on Palawan, in the Philippines, and another where it is not, from the South Cyclades Shear Zone, on Ios, Greece. We attempt to determine the factors such as the role of fluid ingress in triggering the in situ recrystallization that can eliminate and/or modify the core domains, leading to relatively youthful ages. Thermochronology is still possible, because less retentive diffusion domains exist, but different methods need to be applied to interpret the data. The work also demonstrates that K-feldspar can be sufficiently retentive as to allow direct dating of processes that reduce the dimensions of diffusion domains, e.g., cataclased and/or recrystallized K-feldspar in fault rock and/or mylonite. These are important developments in the methodology of 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, but to further advance we need to clarify the nature of these highly retentive core domains. In particular, we need better understand how they are modified by microstructural processes during deformation and metamorphism. We need also to assess the role of any crystal structural changes during step-heating in vacuo.

  1. Climate dependence of feldspar weathering in shale soils along a latitudinal gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dere, Ashlee L.; White, Timothy S.; April, Richard H.; Reynolds, Brian; Miller, Thomas E.; Knapp, Elizabeth P.; McKay, Larry D.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2013-12-01

    Although regolith, the mantle of physically, chemically, and biologically altered material overlying bedrock, covers much of Earth’s continents, the rates and mechanisms of regolith formation are not well quantified. Without this knowledge, predictions of the availability of soil to sustain Earth’s growing population are problematic. To quantify the influence of climate on regolith formation, a transect of study sites has been established on the same lithology - Silurian shale - along a climatic gradient in the northern hemisphere as part of the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory, Pennsylvania, USA. The climate gradient is bounded by a cold/wet end member in Wales and a warm/wet end member in Puerto Rico; in between, mean annual temperature (MAT) and mean annual precipitation (MAP) increase to the south through New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee and Alabama. The site in Puerto Rico does not lie on the same shale formation as the Appalachian sites but is similar in composition. Soils and rocks were sampled at geomorphologically similar ridgetop sites to compare and model shale weathering along the transect. Focusing on the low-concentration, non-nutrient element Na, we observe that the extent and depth of Na depletion is greater where mean annual temperature (MAT) and precipitation (MAP) are higher. Na depletion, a proxy for feldspar weathering, is the deepest reaction documented in the augerable soil profiles. This may therefore be the reaction that initiates the transformation of high bulk-density bedrock to regolith of low bulk density. Based on the shale chemistry along the transect, the time-integrated Na release rate (QNa) increases exponentially as a function of MAT and linearly with MAP. NY, the only site with shale-till parent material, is characterized by a QNa that is 18 times faster than PA, an observation which is attributed to the increased surface area of minerals due to grinding of the glacier and kinetically limited

  2. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides.

    PubMed

    Krzton-Maziopa, A; Svitlyk, V; Pomjakushina, E; Puzniak, R; Conder, K

    2016-07-27

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations. PMID:27248118

  3. Durability of Alkali Activated Blast Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, K.; Alharbi, N.; Matheu, P. S.; Varela, B.; Hailstone, R.

    2015-11-01

    The alkali activation of blast furnace slag has the potential to reduce the environmental impact of cementitious materials and to be applied in geographic zones where weather is a factor that negatively affects performance of materials based on Ordinary Portland Cement. The scientific literature provides many examples of alkali activated slag with high compressive strengths; however research into the durability and resistance to aggressive environments is still necessary for applications in harsh weather conditions. In this study two design mixes of blast furnace slag with mine tailings were activated with a potassium based solution. The design mixes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, BET analysis and compressive strength testing. Freeze-thaw testing up to 100 freeze-thaw cycles was performed in 10% road salt solution. Our findings included compressive strength of up to 100 MPa after 28 days of curing and 120 MPa after freeze-thaw testing. The relationship between pore size, compressive strength, and compressive strength after freeze-thaw was explored.

  4. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Svitlyk, V.; Pomjakushina, E.; Puzniak, R.; Conder, K.

    2016-07-01

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2‑y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  5. Unconventional Superconductivity of Alkali-doped Fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potocnik, Anton; Krajnc, Andraz; Jeglic, Peter; Prassides, Kosmas; Rosseinsky, Matthew J.; Arcon, Denis

    2014-03-01

    The superconductivity of the alkali-doped fullerenes (A3C60, A = alkali metal) has been so far discussed within the standard theory of superconductivity developed by Bardeen, Cooper and Shrieffer (BCS), even thought, they exhibit relatively high critical temperatures (up to Tc = 32 K). However, after our recent high-pressure measurements on Cs3C60 such description became questionable. We have shown that the superconducting phase of A3C60, in fact, borders the antiferromagnetic insulating phase (AFI), commonly observed for high-temperature superconductors like cuprates or pnictides. In addition, we also increased the maximal Tc to 38 K. To investigate this peculiar superconductivity close to the border with AFI state we employed nuclear magnetic resonance technique on Cs3-xRbxC60 and on Cs3C60 at various high pressures. Our results could not be correctly explained either by the standard BCS or the extended BCS that includes electron-electron repulsion interaction - the Migdal-Eliashberg theory. Far better agreement is obtained by the Dynamical Mean Field Theory. Due to similarity with other unconventional superconductors these results could also be relevant to other unconventional high-temperature superconductors.

  6. Decalcification resistance of alkali-activated slag.

    PubMed

    Komljenović, Miroslav M; Baščarević, Zvezdana; Marjanović, Nataša; Nikolić, Violeta

    2012-09-30

    This paper analyses the effects of decalcification in concentrated 6M NH(4)NO(3) solution on mechanical and microstructural properties of alkali-activated slag (AAS). Portland-slag cement (CEM II/A-S 42.5 N) was used as a benchmark material. Decalcification process led to a decrease in strength, both in AAS and in CEM II, and this effect was more pronounced in CEM II. The decrease in strength was explicitly related to the decrease in Ca/Si atomic ratio of C-S-H gel. A very low ratio of Ca/Si ~0.3 in AAS was the consequence of coexistence of C-S-H(I) gel and silica gel. During decalcification of AAS almost complete leaching of sodium and tetrahedral aluminum from C-S-H(I) gel also took place. AAS showed significantly higher resistance to decalcification in relation to the benchmark CEM II due to the absence of portlandite, high level of polymerization of silicate chains, low level of aluminum for silicon substitution in the structure of C-S-H(I), and the formation of protective layer of polymerized silica gel during decalcification process. In stabilization/solidification processes alkali-activated slag represents a more promising solution than Portland-slag cement due to significantly higher resistance to decalcification. PMID:22818592

  7. Dynamics of reactive ultracold alkali polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quéméner, Goulven; Bohn, John; Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2011-05-01

    Recently, ultracold polar molecules of KRb have been created. These molecules are chemically reactive and their lifetime in a trap is limited. However, their lifetime increases when they are loaded into a 1D optical lattice in the presence of an electric field. These results naturally raise the question of manipulating ultracold collisions of other species of alkali dimer molecules, with an eye toward both novel stereochemistry, as well as suppressing unwanted reactions, to enable condensed matter applications. In this talk, we report on a comparative study between the bi-alkali polar molecules of LiNa, LiK, LiRb, LiCs which have been predicted to be reactive. We compute the isotropic C6 coefficients of these systems and we predict the elastic and reactive rate coefficients when an electric field is applied in a 1D optical lattice. We will discuss the efficacy of evaporative cooling for each species. This work was supported by a MURI-AFOSR grant.

  8. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical..., chemical destruction and carbon adsorption. (iv) Release to water. Requirements as specified in § 721.90...

  9. Formation of lysinoalanine in egg white under alkali treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Luo, Xuying; Li, Jianke; Xu, Mingsheng; Tu, Yonggang

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the formation mechanism of lysinoalanine (LAL) in eggs during the alkali treatment process, NaOH was used for the direct alkali treatment of egg white, ovalbumin, and amino acids; in addition, the amount of LAL formed during the alkali treatment process was measured. The results showed that the alkali treatment resulted in the formation of LAL in the egg white. The LAL content increased with increasing pH and temperature, with the LAL content first increasing and then leveling off with increasing time. The amount of LAL formed in the ovalbumin under the alkali treatment condition accounted for approximately 50.51% to 58.68% of the amount of LAL formed in the egg white. Thus, the LAL formed in the ovalbumin was the main source for the LAL in the egg white during the alkali treatment process. Under the alkali treatment condition, free L-serine, L-cysteine, and L-cystine reacted with L-lysine to form LAL; therefore, they are the precursor amino acids of LAL formed in eggs during the alkali treatment process. PMID:26772660

  10. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, Wen Y.

    1984-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them (46, 53, 61, 69) with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide (63) to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased (81), preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated (84) to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process (86, 18, 17) where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  11. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  12. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  15. Self-discharge in bimetallic cells containing alkali metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, M. S.; Hesson, J. C.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of thermally regenerative bimetallic cells with alkali metal anodes shows a relation between the current drawn and the rate of discharge under open-circuit conditions. The self-discharge rate of the cell is due to the dissolution and ionization of alkali metal atoms in the fused-salt electrolyte

  16. COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-08-01

    A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

  17. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in...

  18. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl...

  19. Progressive hydrothermal alteration of feldspars from the Comstock Lode Region, Nevada: Submicron elemental imaging by Time of Flight-SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handler, M. R.; Vicenzi, E. P.; Sorensen, S. S.

    2002-05-01

    Time of Flight-Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) allows elemental mapping and depth profiling at lateral and depth resolutions of several hundred nanometers, with near-simultaneous acquisition of the entire elemental mass range and extending to larger hydrocarbon molecules. ToF-SIMS has been greatly utilized by surface scientists, but has rarely been used in terrestrial geosciences (e.g. [1]). Essentially a surface imaging technique, with shallow depth profiling abilities, it is ideal for investigating the distribution of elements and molecules (e.g. OH) on mineral surfaces, thin films [1], around fluid inclusions, and to trace chemical changes during weathering or hydrothermal alteration. To illustrate the potential of this analytical technique we highlight the progressive hydrothermal alteration of feldspars in the host andesites of the Comstock Lode paleohydrothermal system, Nevada. The Miocene Comstock Lode and related Ag-Au deposits are hosted mainly within Miocene Alta andesites, which were extensively sampled in the 1880s by G.F. Becker[2]. A sub-suite of these samples from the Sutro Tunnel document progressive hydrothermal alteration, with whole rock δ 18O values progressing from ~ +6 ‰ in distal andesites to -1.5 ‰ at the Coryell Lode [3]. The andesites are porphyritic with up to 50% feldspar phenocrysts, and minor mafic phases. Feldspar phenocrysts show systematic progression of alteration and replacement textures with decreasing whole rock δ 18O values and increasing proximity to the Coryell Lode. Relatively fresh igneous zoned phenocrysts (An35-55) grade into grains with fluid inclusions, crosscutting calcite +/- quartz veins, and increasingly complex reaction rims. Chemical alteration of feldspar progresses along cracks filled with fluid inclusions. Within 400 m of the Coryell Lode, feldspar phenocrysts have fully recrystallized, following crystallographic controls: Ab98-90 + An58-68, +/- sericite +/- calcite. A combination of BSE

  20. Effects of alkali treatments on Ag nanowire transparent conductive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunho; Kang, Jun-gu; Eom, Tae-yil; Moon, Bongjin; Lee, Hoo-Jeong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we employ various alkali materials (alkali metals with different base strengths, and ammonia gas and solution) to improve the conductivity of silver nanowire (Ag NW)-networked films. The alkali treatment appears to remove the surface oxide and improve the conductivity. When applied with TiO2 nanoparticles, the treatment appears more effective as the alkalis gather around wire junctions and help them weld to each other via heat emitted from the reduction reaction. The ammonia solution treatment is found to be quick and aggressive, damaging the wires severely in the case of excessive treatment. On the other hand, the ammonia gas treatment seems much less aggressive and does not damage the wires even after a long exposure. The results of this study highlight the effectiveness of the alkali treatment in improving of the conductivity of Ag NW-networked transparent conductive films.

  1. Performance of Straight Steel Fibres Reinforced Alkali Activated Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faris, Meor Ahmad; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Nizar Ismail, Khairul; Muniandy, Ratnasamy; Putra Jaya, Ramadhansyah

    2016-06-01

    This paper focus on the performance of alkali activated concrete produced by using fly ash activated by sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. These alkali activated concrete were reinforced with straight steel fibres with different weight percentage starting from 0 % up to 5 %. Chemical composition of raw material in the production alkali activated concrete which is fly ash was first identified by using X-ray fluorescence. Results reveal there have an effect of straight steel fibres inclusion to the alkali activated concrete. Highest compressive strength of alkali activated concrete which is 67.72 MPa was obtained when 3 % of straight fibres were added. As well as flexural strength, highest flexural strength which is 6.78 MPa was obtained at 3 % of straight steel fibres inclusions.

  2. Metamorphism of San Antonio Terrane metapelites, San Gabriel Mountains, California

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, L.; Ishimatsu, J.; Schneiderman, J.S. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Pelitic schists and gneisses from the San Antonio terrane in the eastern San Gabriel Mountains consist of garnet, biotite, plagioclase, quartz, sillimanite, cordierite, hercynite [+-] alkali feldspar. Large garnet porphyroblasts contain quartz, plagioclase and sillimanite inclusions. Cordierite occurs as haloes around garnet porphyroblasts and as small subgrains always associated with hercynite and together replacing sillimanite blades. Hercynite additionally appears to have nucleated on the edges of sillimanite blades. Contrary to previous investigations, hercynite appears to be a late mineral phase. Reaction textures described above have been used to calculate a set of net-transfer reactions that can be used (1) to characterize all possible exchanges of matter between minerals in the system and (2) to construct a reaction space for the system. Fourteen thin sections with large garnet porphyroblasts and abundant biotite were used for microprobe analysis. Detailed probe analyses show well-developed zoning in the plagioclase and alkali feldspar whose character varies depending on location in the thin section relative to neighboring minerals. Generally, large plagioclase porphyroblasts display normal zoning and are not as calcium-rich as plagioclase inclusions in the garnet. Garnet porphyroblasts have flat zoning profiles due to high temperatures of metamorphism. Pressures and temperatures of metamorphism have been calculated from these assemblages using garnet-biotite geothermometry and quartz-garnet-aluminosilicate-plagioclase geobarometry.

  3. Calcic myrmekite in anorthositic and gabbroic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffries, C.M.; Dymek, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Myrmekite is a common feature of granitic plutonic rocks and quartzo-feldspathic gneisses, but it is rarely reported in anorthositic and gabbroic rocks. The authors have identified myrmekitic intergrowths of quartz and calcic plagioclase in a variety of plagioclase-rich cumulate rocks, including samples from a number of massif anorthosites and layered igneous intrusions. It appears that calcic myrmekite has been frequently overlooked, and is a common accessory feature in these rock types. Chemical and textural characteristics of myrmekite in the St-Urbain massif anorthosite (Quebec) and the Bushveld Igneous Complex (South Africa) have several features in common, but this myrmekite appears to be fundamentally different from that described by most previous investigators. Whereas myrmekite typically consists of a vermicular intergrowth of sodic plagioclase and quartz that occurs adjacent to alkali feldspar, the intergrowths in these rocks contain highly calcic plagioclase and lack the intervening alkali feldspar. In addition, the plagioclase in the myrmekite is more calcic than that in the surrounding rock. The boundary between the myrmekite and the host material is generally extremely sharp, although reverse zoning of host plagioclase may obscure the contact in some cases. The textural and chemical evidence is consistent with a replacement origin for these intergrowths; the proportion of quartz in the myrmekite is in close agreement with the predicted amount of silica that is generated by the theoretical replacement reaction. It appears that water played a key role in the replacement process.

  4. Diversity and Mechanisms of Alkali Tolerance in Lactobacilli▿

    PubMed Central

    Sawatari, Yuki; Yokota, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    We determined the maximum pH that allows growth (pHmax) for 34 strains of lactobacilli. High alkali tolerance was exhibited by strains of Lactobacillus casei, L. paracasei subsp. tolerans, L. paracasei subsp. paracasei, L. curvatus, L. pentosus, and L. plantarum that originated from plant material, with pHmax values between 8.5 and 8.9. Among these, L. casei NRIC 1917 and L. paracasei subsp. tolerans NRIC 1940 showed the highest pHmax, at 8.9. Digestive tract isolates of L. gasseri, L. johnsonii, L. reuteri, L. salivarius subsp. salicinius, and L. salivarius subsp. salivarius exhibited moderate alkali tolerance, with pHmax values between 8.1 and 8.5. Dairy isolates of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis, and L. helveticus exhibited no alkali tolerance, with pHmax values between 6.7 and 7.1. Measurement of the internal pH of representative strains revealed the formation of transmembrane proton gradients (ΔpH) in a reversed direction (i.e., acidic interior) at alkaline external-pH ranges, regardless of their degrees of alkali tolerance. Thus, the reversed ΔpH did not determine alkali tolerance diversity. However, the ΔpH contributed to alkali tolerance, as the pHmax values of several strains decreased with the addition of nigericin, which dissipates ΔpH. Although neutral external-pH values resulted in the highest glycolysis activity in the presence of nigericin regardless of alkali tolerance, substantial glucose utilization was still detected in the alkali-tolerant strains, even in a pH range of between 8.0 and 8.5, at which the remaining strains lost most activity. Therefore, the alkali tolerance of glycolysis reactions contributes greatly to the determination of alkali tolerance diversity. PMID:17449704

  5. Isotope and chemical microsampling: Constraints on the history of an S-type rhyolite, San Vincenzo, Tuscany, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldstein, S. N.; Halliday, A. N.; Davies, G. R.; Hall, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    Fine scale heterogeneities in strontium isotope ratios, 40Ar- 39Ar ages, and chemical composition have been determined for individual mineral grains and enclaves in the rhyolites of San Vincenzo, Italy. The rhyolites are peraluminous with phenocrysts of alkali feldspar, plagioclase, biotite, and cordierite and have previously been divided into two groups on the basis of whole rock major element chemistry. Group B lavas are distinguished from Group A in having higher MgO and CaO contents as well as containing two pyroxenes and chilled latite enclaves. The Group B lavas show textural evidence for disequilibrium, such as resorption and sieve zones in feldspars. Laser fusion 40Ar- 39Ar dating of individual alkali feldspar crystals suggests that the eruption of these rhyolites took place 4.38 ± 0.04 Ma, although small amounts of excess argon are present in subhedral and cloudy crystals. The groundmass in the Group A sample has a higher initial 87Sr /86Sr (0.725) than that of the Group B (0.713). The Sr isotope compositions of chemically and texturally characterized individual grains reveal marked disequilibrium between minerals and the host glass as well as within-grain zonation. The feldspars and coarse-grained biotites have initial 87Sr /86Sr that are intermediate between those of the Group A and B glasses, with alkali feldspar generally having higher initial 87Sr /86Sr ratios than plagioclase. Chilled latite enclaves, which are present in only the Group B lavas, have relatively low initial 87Sr /86Sr ratios in the range 0.7082-0.7088. The mineral chemistry and isotope data indicate that restite does not form a significant portion of the crystalline assemblage and, therefore, cannot be the source of the strontium isotope disequilibrium. Xenocrysts mixed into the rhyolite from a mafic magma were identified as clinopyroxene megacrysts, clinopyroxene-orthopyroxene clots, orthopyroxene-plagioclase clots, and plagioclase with extensive sieve textures. These grains all

  6. Albitization of plagioclase crystals in the Stevens sandstone (Miocene), San Joaquin Basin, California, and the Frio Formation (Oligocene), Gulf Coast, Texas. A TEM/AEM study

    SciTech Connect

    Hirt, W.G. ); Wenk, H.R. ); Boles, J.R. )

    1993-06-01

    Conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy (CTEM) and Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) studies of partially albitized plagioclase crystals taken from drill cores from the Stevens sandstone (Miocene), San Joaquin, California, and the Frio Formation (Oligocene), Gulf Coast, Texas, reveal that replacement of Ca-rich plagioclase cores by nearly pure albite (Ab[sub 96]-Ab[sub 100]) occurs along submicroscopic ([minus]15 nm wide) en echelon (001) and (110) cleavages. The cleavages are the result of changes in the localized stress regime created by dissolution of adjacent phases. Photomicrographs show albite-lined brittle cleavage crosscutting albitized semibrittle fractures. Such crosscutting relationships can be explained by a reduction in effective stress associated with the albitization process. On a macroscopic scale, this reduction in effective stress implies that the transition from hydrostatic to lithostatic pressure is discontinuous. 30 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Solvent-averaged potentials for alkali-, earth alkali-, and alkylammonium halide aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Berk; van der Vegt, Nico F. A.

    2007-12-01

    We derive effective, solvent-free ion-ion potentials for alkali-, earth alkali-, and alkylammonium halide aqueous solutions. The implicit solvent potentials are parametrized to reproduce experimental osmotic coefficients. The modeling approach minimizes the amount of input required from atomistic (force field) models, which usually predict large variations in the effective ion-ion potentials at short distances. For the smaller ion species, the reported potentials are composed of a Coulomb and a Weeks-Chandler-Andersen term. For larger ions, we find that an additional, attractive potential is required at the contact minimum, which is related to solvent degrees of freedom that are usually not accounted for in standard electrostatics models. The reported potentials provide a simple and accurate force field for use in molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations of (poly-)electrolyte systems.

  8. Alkali oxide-tantalum oxide and alkali oxide-niobium oxide ionic conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R. S.; Parker, H. S.; Brower, W. S.; Minor, D.

    1974-01-01

    A search was made for new cationic conducting phases in alkali-tantalate and niobate systems. The phase equilibrium diagrams were constructed for the six binary systems Nb2O5-LiNbO3, Nb2O5-NaNbO3, Nb2O5-KNbO3, Ta2O5-NaTaO3, Ta2O5-LiTaO3, and Ta2O5-KTaO3. Various other binary and ternary systems were also examined. Pellets of nineteen phases were evaluated (by the sponsoring agency) by dielectric loss measurements. Attempts were made to grow large crystals of eight different phases. The system Ta2O5-KTaO3 contains at least three phases which showed peaks in dielectric loss vs. temperature. All three contain structures related to the tungsten bronzes with alkali ions in non-stoichiometric crystallographic positions.

  9. Thermal diffusivity of pyroxene, feldspar, and silica melts, glasses, and single-crystals at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertermann, M.; Branlund, J.; Whittington, A.; Hofmeister, A.

    2007-12-01

    Thermal diffusivity (D) due to phonon transport (the lattice component) was measured using laser-flash analysis from oriented single-crystals and of glasses above the glass transition, which proxy as melts. Compositions include SiO2, CaMgSi2O6, LiAlSi2O6, NaAlSi3O8, and CaAl2Si2O8. KAlSi3O8 was studied previously. Viscosity measurements of the supercooled liquids, in the range 106.8 to 1012.3 Pas, confirm near-Arrhenian behavior. For all compositions and for crystal and glass, D decreases with T, approaching a constant generally near 1000 K: Dsat, which is larger in the crystal than in the glass. A rapid decrease in D as T is increased further (ca 1400 K for orthoclase) is consistent with crossing the glass transition, verified from our viscosity data on these systems. The amount of the decrease depends on the chemical composition and similar to the relative decrease observed in heat capacity. Orthoclase values for Dsat are 0.65± 0.3 mm2/s for bulk crystal and 0.53+/-0.03 mm2/s for the glass. Constant D = 0.475+/-.01 mm2/s represents melt. Thermal conductivity (klat) of orthoclase glass, calculated using previous results for heat capacity (CP) and our density data, increases with T due to CP strongly increasing with T, reaching a plateau near 1.45 W/m-K for melt, but is always below klat of the crystal. Similar results were obtained from the other systems studied. Melting of silica, pyroxene, and feldspars impedes heat transport, providing positive thermal feedback that may promote further melting in the continental crust. The consistency of the behavior for these different compositions and structures suggests that our results are universal, holding for oceanic lithosphere as well. Melts, due to being disordered, are poor transporters of heat via vibrations. However, d(ln klat)/dP depends inversely on bulk modulus, suggesting that at some high pressure, the thermal conductivity of the melt and corresponding crystal become equal so that retention of heat by melts

  10. Resolving the gap between laboratory and field rates of feldspar weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Chen; Zhu, Chen; Georg, R. Bastian; Zakon, Yevgeny; Ganor, Jiwchar

    2014-12-01

    Weathering rates of silicate minerals observed in the laboratory are in general up to five orders of magnitude higher than those inferred from field studies. The differences between experimental conditions in the laboratory and natural conditions in the field have been thoroughly discussed in previous studies, however, the discrepancy was never fully resolved. It has been shown in past work that if the field conditions are fully simulated in standard laboratory experiments, it is not possible to measure the slow rates of mineral dissolution that are observed in the field using standard laboratory experiments. Therefore, a novel method that uses the change of Si isotopes ratio in spiked solutions is used in the present study to measure weathering rates of feldspar under close-to-natural conditions. A single-point batch experiment (SPBE) of albite dissolution was performed in the present study with an “untreated” albite sample. During the SPBE the dissolution rate was affected by the change of deviation from equilibrium and by the change in the mineral surface reactivity. In order to quantify the effect of the change in surface reactivity on the measured dissolution rates, two multi-point batch experiments (MPBE) were conducted. In those experiments, surface reactivity was found to depend on the amount of dissolved mineral. The decrease in surface reactivity as a function of the amount of dissolved mineral may be described using empirical power laws. Another MPBE was used to measure far-from-equilibrium dissolution rate of albite using a sample that lost most of the highly reactive sites and highly reactive fine crystal during the initial stage of the experiment. Therefore, the change of its surface reactivity is small over the duration of the laboratory experiment (henceforth, “treated” albite sample). Another SPBE was conducted to quantify the effect of deviation from equilibrium on albite dissolution rate under close-to-equilibrium using the

  11. Grain boundary diffusion of oxygen, potassium and calcium in natural and hot-pressed feldspar aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farver, John R.; Yund, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    Grain boundary diffusion rates of oxygen, potassium and calcium in fine-grained feldspar aggregates were determined experimentally. The starting materials were a natural albite rock from the Tanco pegmatite and aggregates hot-pressed from fragments of Amelia albite or Ab, Or and An composition glasses. The technique employed isotopic tracers (18O, 41K, 42Ca) either evaporated onto the surface or in an aqueous solution surrounding the sample, and depth profiling using an ion microprobe (SIMS). From the depth profiles, the product of the grain boundary diffusion coefficient (D') and effective boundary width (δ) was calculated using numerical solutions to the appropriate diffusion equation. The experimental reproducibility of D'δ is a factor of 3. A separate determination of D' independent of δ yields an effective grain boundary width of ˜3 nm, consistent with high resolution TEM observations of a physical grain boundary width <5 nm. Oxygen (as molecular water) grain boundary diffusion rates were determined in the Ab and Or aggregates at 450°-800°C and 100 MPa (hydrothermal), potassium rates in Or aggregates at 450°-700°C both at 0.1 MPa (in air) and at 100 MPa (hydrothermal), and calcium rates in An aggregates at 700°-1100°C and 0.1 MPa (in air). Oxygen grain boundary diffusion rates are similar in all three of the Ab aggregates and in the Or aggregate. Potassium and oxygen depth profiles measured in the same samples yield different D'δ values, confirming a diffusional transport mechanism. Potassium diffusion in the Or aggregate has a greater activation energy (216 vs 78 kJ/mol) than oxygen, and the Arrhenius relations cross at ˜625°C. Potassium D'δ values in Or aggregates are about a factor of five greater in hydrothermal experiments at 100 MPa than in experiments at 0.1 MPa in air. Calcium grain boundary diffusion rates in An aggregates are 4 to 5 orders of magnitude slower than potassium in Or and have a greater (291 kJ/mol) activation energy. This

  12. Volcanic Origin of Alkali Halides on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, L.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The recent observation of NaCl (gas) on Io confirms our earlier prediction that NaCl is produced volcanically. Here we extend our calculations by modeling thermochemical equilibrium of O, S, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, F, Cl, Br, and I as a function of temperature and pressure in a Pele-like volcanic gas with O/S/Na/Cl/K = 1.518/1/0.05/0.04/0.005 and CI chondritic ratios of the other (as yet unobserved) alkalis and halogens. For reference, the nominal temperature and pressure for Pele is 1760 plus or minus 210 K and 0.01 bars based on Galileo data and modeling.

  13. Heat pipes containing alkali metal working fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A technique for improving high temperature evaporation-condensation heat-transfer devices which have important and unique advantage in terrestrial and space energy processing is described. The device is in the form of a heat pipe comprising a sealed container or envelope which contains a capillary wick. The temperature of one end of the heat pipe is raised by the input of heat from an external heat source which is extremely hot and corrosive. A working fluid of a corrosive alkali metal, such as lithium, sodium, or potassium transfers this heat to a heat receiver remote from the heat source. The container and wick are fabricated from a superalloy containing a small percentage of a corrosion inhibiting or gettering element. Lanthanum, scandium, yttrium, thorium, and hafnium are utilized as the alloying metal.

  14. Comparative alkali washing of simulated radioactive sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Fugate, G.A.; Ensor, D.D.; Egan, B.Z.

    1996-10-01

    The treatment of large volumes of radioactive sludge generated from uranium and plutonium recovery processes is a pressing problem in the environmental restoration currently planned at various U.S. Department of Energy sites. This sludge, commonly stored in underground tanks, is mainly in the form of metal oxides or precipitated metal hydroxides and the bulk of this material is nonradioactive. One method being developed to pretreat this waste takes advantage of the amphoteric character of aluminum and other nonradioactive elements. Previous studies have reported on the dissolution of eleven elements from simulated sludge using NaOH solutions up to 6M. This work provides a comparative study using KOH. The effectiveness of the alkali washing as a treatment method to reduce the bulk of radioactive sludge requiring long term isolation will be discussed.

  15. Solid state cell with alkali metal halo-alkali thiocyanate electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, B. M.; Silbernagel, B. G.

    1980-02-26

    A novel electrochemical cell is disclosed utilizing: (A) an anode which contains an alkali metal as an anode-active material; (B) a cathode and (C) an electrolyte comprising an electrolytically effective amount of one or more compounds having the formula: (Ax)ma'scn wherein a is an alkali metal, X is a halogen, a' is an alkali metal and 0.1 < or = N < or = 10. Preferred systems include lithium-containing anodes, lithium-containing electrolytes and cathodes which contain cathode-active material selected from the group consisting of cathode-active sulfurs, halogens, halides, chromates, phosphates, oxides and chalcogenides, especially those chalcogenides of the empirical formula mzm wherein M is one or more metals selected from the group consisting of iron, titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum and vanadium, Z is one or more chalcogens selected from the group consisting of oxygen, sulfur, selenium and tellurium, and M is a numerical value between about 1.8 and about 3.2.

  16. Ionic alkali halide XUV laser feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.T.; Gylys, V.T.; Bower, R.D.; Harris, D.G.; Blauer, J.A.; Turner, C.E.; Hindy, R.N.

    1989-11-10

    The objective of this work is to assess the feasibility of a select set of ionic alkali halide XUV laser concepts by obtaining the relevant kinetic and spectroscopic parameters required for a proof-of-principle and conceptual design. The proposed lasers operate in the 80--200 nm spectral region and do not require input from outside radiation sources for their operation. Frequency up-conversion and frequency mixing techniques and therefore not considered in the work to be described. An experimental and theoretical study of a new type of laser operating in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength region has been conducted. The lasing species are singly ionized alkali halide molecules such as Rb{sup 2+}F{sub {minus}}, Rb{sup 2+}Br{sup {minus}} and Cs{sup 2+}F{sup {minus}}. These species are similar in electronic structure to the rare gas halide excimers, such as XeF and Krf, except that the ionic molecules emit at wavelengths of 80--200 nm, much shorter than the conventional rare-gas halide excimer laser. The radiative lifetime of these molecules are typically near 1 ns, which is about an order of magnitude shorter than that for rare-gas halide systems. The values of the cross section for stimulated emission are on the order of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}16}cm{sup 2}. Because of the fundamental similarity to existing UV lasers, these systems show promise as a high power, efficient XUV lasers. 55 refs., 50 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Controlled in-situ dissolution of an alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jeffrey Donald; Dooley, Kirk John; Tolman, David Donald

    2012-09-11

    A method for the controllable dissolution of one or more alkali metals from a vessel containing a one or more alkali metals and/or one or more partially passivated alkali metals. The vessel preferably comprising a sodium, NaK or other alkali metal-cooled nuclear reactor that has been used. The alkali metal, preferably sodium, potassium or a combination thereof, in the vessel is exposed to a treatment liquid, preferably an acidic liquid, more preferably citric acid. Preferably, the treatment liquid is maintained in continuous motion relative to any surface of unreacted alkali metal with which the treatment liquid is in contact. The treatment liquid is preferably pumped into the vessel containing the one or more alkali metals and the resulting fluid is extracted and optionally further processed. Preferably, the resulting off-gases are processed by an off-gas treatment system and the resulting liquids are processed by a liquid disposal system. In one preferred embodiment, an inert gas is pumped into the vessel along with the treatment liquid.

  18. Ultrasonic coal washing to leach alkali elements from coals.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, S; Reddy, V Midhun; Nagarajan, R

    2015-11-01

    Deposition of fly ash particles onto heat-transfer surfaces is often one of the reasons for unscheduled shut-downs of coal-fired boilers. Fouling deposits encountered in convective sections of a boiler are characterized by arrival of ash particles in solidified (solid) state. Fouling is most frequently caused by condensation and chemical reaction of alkali vapors with the deposited ash particles creating a wet surface conducive to collect impacting ash particles. Hence, the amount of alkali elements present in coals, which, in turn, is available in the flue gas as condensable vapors, determines the formation and growth of fouling deposits. In this context, removal of alkali elements becomes vital when inferior coals having high-ash content are utilized for power generation. With the concept of reducing alkali elements present in a coal entering the combustor, whereby the fouling deposits can either be minimized or be weakened due to absence of alkali gluing effect, the ultrasonic leaching of alkali elements from coals is investigated in this study. Ultrasonic water-washing and chemical-washing, in comparison with agitation, are studied in order to estimate the intensification of the alkali removal process by sonication. PMID:26186840

  19. Alkali elemental and potassium isotopic compositions of Semarkona chondrules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, C.M. O'D.; Grossman, J.N.

    2005-01-01

    We report measurements of K isotope ratios in 28 Semarkona chondrules with a wide range of petrologic types and bulk compositions as well as the compositions of CPX-mesostasis pairs in 17 type I Semarkona chondrules, including two chondrules with radial alkali zonation and 19 type II chondrules. Despite the wide range in K/Al ratios, no systematic variations in K isotopic compositions were found. Semarkona chondrules do not record a simple history of Rayleigh-type loss of K. Experimentally determined evaporation rates suggest that considerable alkali evaporation would have occurred during chondrule formation. Nevertheless, based on Na CPX-mesostasis distribution coefficients, the alkali contents of the cores of most chondrules in Semarkona were probably established at the time of final crystallization. However, Na CPX-mesostasis distribution coefficients also show that alkali zonation in type I Semarkona chondrules was produced by entry of alkalis after solidification, probably during parent body alteration. This alkali metasomatism may have gone to completion in some chondrules. Our preferred explanation for the lack of systematic isotopic enrichments, even in alkali depleted type I chondrule cores, is that they exchanged with the ambient gas as they cooled. ?? The Meteoritical Society, 2005.

  20. Increasing Class C fly ash reduces alkali silica reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, J.K.

    2007-07-01

    Contrary to earlier studies, it has been found that incremental additions of Class C fly ash do reduce alkali silica reactivity (ASR), in highly reactive, high alkali concrete mixes. AST can be further reduced by substituting 5% metakaolin or silica fume for the aggregate in concrete mixes with high (more than 30%) Class C fly ash substitution. The paper reports results of studies using Class C fly ash from the Labadie Station plant in Missouri which typically has between 1.3 and 1.45% available alkalis by ASTM C311. 7 figs.

  1. Electrochemical cell utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Virkar, Anil V.; Miller, Gerald R.

    1983-11-04

    An improved electrochemical cell comprising an additive-modified molten alkali metal electrode-reactant and/or electrolyte is disclosed. Various electrochemical cells employing a molten alkali metal, e.g., sodium, electrode in contact with a cationically conductive ceramic membrane experience a lower resistance and a lower temperature coefficient of resistance whenever small amounts of selenium are present at the interface of the electrolyte and the molten alkali metal. Further, cells having small amounts of selenium present at the electrolyte-molten metal interface exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte under long term cycling conditions.

  2. A model that helps explain Sr-isotope disequilibrium between feldspar phenocrysts and melt in large-volume silicic magma systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.A.; Ruiz, J.

    1998-01-01

    Feldspar phenocrysts of silicic volcanic rocks are commonly in Sr-isotopic disequilibrium with groundmass. In some cases the feldspar is more radiogenic, and in others it is less radiogenic. Several explanations have been published previously, but none of these is able to accommodate both senses of disequilibrium. We present a model by which either more- or less-radiogenic feldspar (or even both within a single eruptive unit) can originate. The model requires a magma body open to interaction with biotite- and feldspar-bearing wall rock. Magma is incrementally contaminated as wall rock melts incongruently. Biotite preferentially melts first, followed by feldspar. Such melting behavior, which is supported by both field and experimental studies, first contaminates magma with a relatively radiogenic addition, followed by a less-radiogenic addition. Feldspar phenocrysts lag behind melt (groundmass of volcanic rock) in incorporating the influx of contaminant, thus resulting in Sr-isotopic disequilibrium between the crystals and melt. The sense of disequilibrium recorded in a volcanic rock depends on when eruption quenches the contamination process. This model is testable by isotopic fingerprinting of individual feldspar crystals. For a given set of geologic boundary conditions, specific core-to-rim Sr-isotopic profiles are expectable. Moreover, phenocrysts that nucleate at different times during the contamination process should record different and predictable parts of the history. Initial results of Sr-isotopic fingerprinting of sanidine phenocrysts from the Taylor Creek Rhyolite are consistent with the model. More tests of the model are desirable.Feldspar phenocrysts of silicic volcanic rocks are commonly in Sr-isotopic disequilibrium with groundmass. In some cases the feldspar is more radiogenic, and in others it is less radiogenic. Several explanations have been published previously, but none of these is able to accommodate both senses of disequilibrium. We present a

  3. Timescales of magma processes occurred prior to recent Campi Flegrei caldera eruptions: first results from diffusion profiles on plagioclase phenocrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Antonio, Massimo; Arienzo, Ilenia; Fedele, Lorenzo; Iovine, Raffaella; Carmine Mazzeo, Fabio; Civetta, Lucia; Orsi, Giovanni; Wörner, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the timescales of magma rising and stagnation, as well as mingling/mixing processes occurring in the shallow plumbing system of an active volcano is crucial for volcanic hazard assessment and risk mitigation. Among few recently developed methodologies, high-precision, high spatial resolution analysis of major-, minor- and trace elements on zoned phenocrysts through electron microprobe techniques represents a powerful tool to provide good estimates of timescales of pre-eruptive magma rising, stagnation and/or mingling/mixing processes. To this purpose, volcanic rock samples of trachytic composition representative of the Agnano-Monte Spina eruption (4.7 ka CAL BP) occurred at the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy) have been selected. The investigation has been carried out in the framework of Project V2 - Precursori di Eruzioni, funded by the Italian Dipartimento per la Protezione Civile - Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia. The investigated rock samples are pumice fragments from which double-polished, 100 µm thick thin sections have been prepared for analytical purposes. Back-scattered electrons (BSE) images have been acquired at the scanning electron microscope (SEM), in order to identify the plagioclase phenocrysts suitable to be analyzed successively, selected among those that best display their zoning. After a careful observation of the BSE images, major-, minor- and selected trace element contents have been determined through combined energy-dispersive and wavelength-dispersive system electron microprobe analyses (EDS-WDS-EMPA) on transects crossing the growth zones of the selected phenocrysts. This methodology has allowed reconstructing the diffusion profile of some key-elements through the growth zones of the investigated phenocrysts. Successively, the diffusion profiles have been combined with textural features obtained through BSE images in order to obtain diffusion models aimed at estimating the timescales of crystals

  4. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaren, C.; Heffner, W.; Tessarollo, R.; Raj, R.; Jain, H.

    2015-11-01

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown.

  5. The 4843 Alkali Metal Storage Facility Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The 4843 AMSF has been used primarily to provide a centralized building to receive and store dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste, including sodium and lithium, which has been generated at the Fast Flux Test Facility and at various other Hanford Site operations that used alkali metals. Most of the dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste received consists of retired equipment from liquid sodium processes. The unit continues to store material. In general, only solid alkali metal waste that is water reactive is stored at the 4843 AMSF. The 4843 AMSF will be closed in a manner consistent with Ecology guidelines and regulations (WAC 173-303-610). The general closure procedure is detailed as follows.

  6. Hall Determination of Atomic Radii of Alkali Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    I will propose here an alternative method for determining atomic radii of alkali metals based on the Hall measurements of their free electron densities and the knowledge of their crystal structure. (Contains 2 figures.)

  7. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, M.M.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.

    1995-08-22

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  8. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, Marca M.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard

    1995-01-01

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  9. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, C.; Heffner, W.; Jain, H.; Tessarollo, R.; Raj, R.

    2015-11-02

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown.

  10. Effect of cavitation on removal of alkali elements from coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivalli, H.; Nirmal, L.; Nagarajan, R.

    2015-12-01

    The main impurities in coal are sulphur, ash and alkali. On combustion, the volatile forms of these impurities are either condensed on the boilers, or emitted in the form of potentially hazardous gases. The alkali elements present in coal help the fly ash particles adhere to boiler surfaces by providing a wet surface on which collection of these particles can take place. Use of ultrasonic techniques in cleaning of coal has stirred interest among researchers in recent times. Extraction of alkali elements by cavitation effect using low-frequency ultrasound, in the presence of reagents (HNO3 and H2O2) is reported in this paper. Powdered coal was dissolved with the reagent and exposed to ultrasonic fields of various frequencies at different time intervals. The treated solution is filtered and tested for alkali levels.

  11. Hydrothermal alteration and mass exchange in the hornblende latite porphyry, Rico, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Peter B.; Cunningham, Charles G.; Naeser, Charles W.

    1994-03-01

    The Rico paleothermal anomaly, southwestern Colorado, records the effects of a large hydrothermal system that was active at 4 Ma. This hydrothermal system produced the deep Silver Creek stockwork Mo deposit, which formed above the anomaly's heat source, and shallower base and precious-metal vein and replacement deposits. A 65 Ma hornblende latite porphyry is present as widespread sills throughout the area and provided a homogenous material that recorded the effects of the hydrothermal system up to 8 km from the center. Hydrothermal alteration in the latite can be divided into a proximal facies which consists of two assemblages, quartz-illite-calcite and chlorite-epidote, and a distal facies which consists of a distinct propylitic assemblage. Temperatures were gradational vertically and laterally in the anomaly, and decreased away from the centra heat source. A convective hydrothermal plume, 3 km wide and at least 2 km high, was present above the stock-work molybdenum deposit and consisted of upwelling, high-temperature fluids that produced the proximal alteration facies. Distal facies alteration was produced by shallower cooler fluids. The most important shallow base and precious-metal vein deposits in the Rico district are at or close to the boundary of the thermal plume. Latite within the plume had a large loss of Na2O, large addition of CaO, and variable SiO2 exchante. Distal propylitized latite samples lost small amounts of Na2O and CaO and exchanged minor variable amounts of SiO2. The edge of the plume is marked by steep Na2O exchange gradients. Na2O exchange throughout the paleothermal anomaly was controlled by the reaction of the albite components in primary plagioclase and alkali feldspars. Initial feldspar alteration in the distal facies was dominated by reaction of the plagioclase, and the initial molar ratio of reactants (alkali feldspar albite component to plagioclase albite component) was 0.35. This ratio of the moles of plagioclase to alkali feldspar

  12. Dissolution of Quartz, Albite and K-feldspar Into H2O-Saturated Haplogranitic Melt at 800oC and 200 MPa: Diffusive Transport Properties of Granitic Melts at Crustal Anatectic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, A.; London, D.; Dewers, T.; Morgan, G.

    2002-12-01

    With the aim of investigating the diffusive transport properties of granitic melts at crustal anatectic conditions and obtaining some constraints on speciation and coordination in the melt, we conducted albite, K-feldspar and quartz dissolution experiments in H2O-saturated metaluminous haplogranitic glass (nominal composition of the 200 MPa H2O-saturated haplogranite eutectic of Tuttle and Bowen, 1958) at 800oC and 200 MPa. Mineral and glass cylinders were juxtaposed against flat polished surfaces inside platinum or gold capsules, then run for durations in the range 120-960 h. Based on the time dependence of interface retreat dissolution is interface reaction-controlled up to 700 h, and becomes diffusion-controlled afterwards. Upon dissolution of albite, Al and Na entering the melt decouple and Na diffuses away from the interface to maintain a constant Al/Na molar ratio throughout the entire melt column. Potassium from the bulk melt diffuses uphill towards the albite-melt interface to maintain a constant Aluminum Saturation Index (ASI=molar Al2O3/Na2O+K2O) of 1.00 throughout the entire melt column. Dissolution of K-feldspar results in migration of K away from the interface and uphill diffusion of Na from the bulk melt towards the interface, again maintaining constant Al/Na and ASI ratios in the bulk melt. Dissolution of quartz produces enrichment in SiO2 versus dilution of the rest of components in the interface melt. These results indicate that in the five-component H2O-saturated metaluminous haplogranite system, uncoupled diffusion takes place along the following four directions in composition space: SiO2; Na2O; K2O; and a combination of Al2O3 and alkalis such that the Al/Na molar ratio is equal to that in the bulk melt, and the Al2O3/Na2O+K2O molar ratio is equal to the equilibrium ASI of the melt. These observations are in accord with results obtained from corundum and andalusite dissolution experiments in the same system and P-T-X conditions (Acosta-Vigil et

  13. Alkali absorption and citrate excretion in calcium nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakhaee, K.; Williams, R. H.; Oh, M. S.; Padalino, P.; Adams-Huet, B.; Whitson, P.; Pak, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The role of net gastrointestinal (GI) alkali absorption in the development of hypocitraturia was investigated. The net GI absorption of alkali was estimated from the difference between simple urinary cations (Ca, Mg, Na, and K) and anions (Cl and P). In 131 normal subjects, the 24 h urinary citrate was positively correlated with the net GI absorption of alkali (r = 0.49, p < 0.001). In 11 patients with distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA), urinary citrate excretion was subnormal relative to net GI alkali absorption, with data from most patients residing outside the 95% confidence ellipse described for normal subjects. However, the normal relationship between urinary citrate and net absorbed alkali was maintained in 11 patients with chronic diarrheal syndrome (CDS) and in 124 stone-forming patients devoid of RTA or CDS, half of whom had "idiopathic" hypocitraturia. The 18 stone-forming patients without RTA or CDS received potassium citrate (30-60 mEq/day). Both urinary citrate and net GI alkali absorption increased, yielding a significantly positive correlation (r = 0.62, p < 0.0001), with the slope indistinguishable from that of normal subjects. Thus, urinary citrate was normally dependent on the net GI absorption of alkali. This dependence was less marked in RTA, confirming the renal origin of hypocitraturia. However, the normal dependence was maintained in CDS and in idiopathic hypocitraturia, suggesting that reduced citrate excretion was largely dietary in origin as a result of low net alkali absorption (from a probable relative deficiency of vegetables and fruits or a relative excess of animal proteins).

  14. Rock Degradation by Alkali Metals: A Possible Lunar Erosion Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Naughton, J J; Barnes, I L; Hammond, D A

    1965-08-01

    When rocks melt under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions, their alkali components volatilize as metals. These metal vapors act to comminute polycrystalline rocks to their component minerals. The resultant powder is porous and loosely packed and its characteristics may be compatible with the lunar surface as revealed by the Ranger photographs. If meteorite impact or lunar volcanism has produced vaporization or areas of molten lava, alkali erosion may have given dust of this character in adjacent solid areas. PMID:17747570

  15. Electrochemical cell having an alkali-metal-nitrate electrode

    DOEpatents

    Roche, M.F.; Preto, S.K.

    1982-06-04

    A power-producing secondary electrochemical cell includes a molten alkali metal as the negative-electrode material and a molten-nitrate salt as the positive-electrode material. The molten material in the respective electrodes are separated by a solid barrier of alkali-metal-ion conducting material. A typical cell includes active materials of molten sodium separated from molten sodium nitrate and other nitrates in mixture by a layer of sodium ..beta..'' alumina.

  16. Preparation and Characterization of Chitosan/Feldspar Biohybrid as an Adsorbent: Optimization of Adsorption Process via Response Surface Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Maryam; Bahrami, Hajir; Arami, Mokhtar

    2014-01-01

    Chitosan/feldspar biobased beads were synthesized, characterized, and tested for the removal of Acid Black 1 dye from aquatic phases. A four-factor central composite design (CCD) accompanied by response surface modeling (RSM) and optimization was used to optimize the dye adsorption by the adsorbent (chitosan/feldspar composite) in 31 different batch experiments. Independent variables of temperature, pH, initial dye concentration, and adsorbent dose were used to change to coded values. To anticipate the responses, a quadratic model was applied. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) tested the significance of the process factors and their interactions. The adequacy of the model was investigated by the correlation between experimental and predicted data of the adsorption and the calculation of prediction errors. The results showed that the predicted maximum adsorption amount of 21.63 mg/g under the optimum conditions (pH 3, temperature 15°C, initial dye concentration 125 mg/L, and dose 0.2 g/50 mL) was close to the experimental value of 19.85 mg/g. In addition, the results of adsorption behaviors of the dye illustrated that the adsorption process followed the Langmuir isotherm model and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Langmuir sorption capacity was found to be 17.86 mg/g. Besides, thermodynamic parameters were evaluated and revealed that the adsorption process was exothermic and favourable. PMID:24587722

  17. Alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide double alkoxide precursors to alkali metal yttrium oxide nanomaterials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Neville, Michael L.; Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; Cramer, Roger

    2016-03-15

    In this study, a series of alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide ([AY(ONep)4]) compounds were developed as precursors to alkali yttrium oxide (AYO2) nanomaterials. The reaction of yttrium amide ([Y(NR2)3] where R=Si(CH3)3) with four equivalents of H-ONep followed by addition of [A(NR2)] (A=Li, Na, K) or Ao (Ao=Rb, Cs) led to the formation of a complex series of AnY(ONep)3+n species, crystallographically identified as [Y2Li3(μ3-ONep)(μ3-HONep)(μ-ONep)5(ONep)3(HONep)2] (1), [YNa2(μ3-ONep)4(ONep)]2 (2), {[Y2K3(μ3-ONep)3(μ-ONep)4(ONep)2(ηξ-tol)2][Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4]•ηx-tol]} (3), [Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4] (3a), [Y2Rb3(μ4-ONep)3(μ-ONep)6] (4), and [Y2Cs4(μ6-O)(μ3-ONep)6(μ3-HONep)2(ONep)2(ηx-tol)4]•tol (5). Compounds 1–5 were investigated as single source precursors to AYOx nanomaterials following solvothermal routes (pyridine, 185 °C for 24h). The final products after thermal processing weremore » found by powder X-ray diffraction experiments to be Y2O3 with variable sized particles based on transmission electron diffraction. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy studies indicated that the heavier alkali metal species were present in the isolated nanomaterials.« less

  18. Alkali-slag cements for the immobilization of radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, C.; Day, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    Alkali-slag cements consist of glassy slag and an alkaline activator and can show both higher early and later strengths than Type III Portland cement, if a proper alkaline activator is used. An examination of microstructure of hardened alkali-slag cement pastes with the help of XRD and SEM with EDAX shows that the main hydration product is C-S-H (B) with low C/S ratio and no crystalline substances exist such as Ca(OH){sub 2}, Al (OH){sub 3} and sulphoaluminates. Mercury intrusion tests indicate that hardened alkali-slag cement pastes have a lower porosity than ordinary Portland cement, and contain mainly gel pores. The fine pore structure of hardened alkali-slag cement pastes will restrict the ingress of deleterious substances and the leaching of harmful species such as radionuclides. The leachability of Cs{sup + } from hardened alkali-slag cement pastes is only half of that from hardened Portland cement. From all these aspects, it is concluded that alkali-slag cements are a better solidification matrix than Portland cement for radioactive wastes.

  19. Temperature dependence of elastic properties in alkali borate binary glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Mitsuru; Matsuda, Yu; Kojima, Seiji

    2011-05-01

    The elastic properties of alkali borate glasses, xM 2O·(100 - x)B 2O 3 (M = Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, x = 14, 28), have been investigated by Brillouin scattering spectroscopy from room temperature up to 1100 °C. Above the glass transition temperature, Tg, the longitudinal sound velocity, VL, decreases markedly on heating. Such significant changes of the elastic properties result from the breakdown of the glass network above Tg. Alkali borate family with the same x shows the similar behavior in the temperature variations of VL up to around Tg. The absorption coefficient, αL, increases gradually above Tg. With the increase of the size of an alkali ion, the slope of VL just above Tg decreases. Since the fragility is related to the slope, the present results suggest that the fragility of alkali borate glasses increases as the size of alkali ion decreases. Such an alkali dependence of the fragility is discussed on the basis of the fluctuation of the boron coordination number.

  20. Two-phase alkali-metal experiments in reduced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-06-01

    Future space missions envision the use of large nuclear reactors utilizing either a single or a two-phase alkali-metal working fluid. The design and analysis of such reactors require state-of-the-art computer codes that can properly treat alkali-metal flow and heat transfer in a reduced-gravity environment. A literature search of relevant experiments in reduced gravity is reported on here, and reveals a paucity of data for such correlations. The few ongoing experiments in reduced gravity are noted. General plans are put forth for the reduced-gravity experiments which will have to be performed, at NASA facilities, with benign fluids. A similar situation exists regarding two-phase alkali-metal flow and heat transfer, even in normal gravity. Existing data are conflicting and indequate for the task of modeling a space reactor using a two-phase alkali-metal coolant. The major features of past experiments are described here. Data from the reduced-gravity experiments with innocuous fluids are to be combined with normal gravity data from the two-phase alkali-metal experiments. Analyses undertaken here give every expectation that the correlations developed from this data base will provide a valid representation of alkali-metal heat transfer and pressure drop in reduced gravity.

  1. Reduction of phosphorus and alkali levels in coking coals

    SciTech Connect

    Hoare, I.C.; Waugh, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    A number of coals, though exhibiting desirable coking properties, can have undesirable levels of alkalis and phosphorus. All the phosphorus in the coal will report to the coke, eventually to the iron and thence to the steel, with adverse effects on its metallurgical properties. Alkalis have damaging effects on the blast furnace operation and can be responsible for loss of heat, loss of production, efficiency loss and reduced furnace life. Buyers of coking coal commonly specify such parameters as phosphorus in coal and alkalis in ash, with penalties and rejection over certain limits. With the introduction of new direct reduction technologies such as COREX and HISMELT, and others such as PCI, it is anticipated that coal producers will have even tighter phosphorus and alkali specifications imposed on their products. Phosphorus is predominantly inorganic in origin occurring in a wide variety of minerals in coal, but its main source is apatite. It can be found mainly in the lower density fractions of the coal and intimately bound, so that conventional physical beneficiation techniques are relatively ineffective. CSIRO has developed a cost effective, selective chemical demineralization treatment, which can be applied to the problem of high alkali, high phosphorus coals. This particular technique makes use of unrefined organic acid, which also has the advantage of being low in cost and environmentally benign. In this paper, the effectiveness of acid demineralization of a number of coals is discussed, within the context of their phosphorus and alkali distributions throughout various size/density fractions.

  2. Alkali-metal azides interacting with metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Armata, Nerina; Cortese, Remedios; Duca, Dario; Triolo, Roberto

    2013-01-14

    Interactions between alkali-metal azides and metal-organic framework (MOF) derivatives, namely, the first and third members of the isoreticular MOF (IRMOF) family, IRMOF-1 and IRMOF-3, are studied within the density functional theory (DFT) paradigm. The investigations take into account different models of the selected IRMOFs. The mutual influence between the alkali-metal azides and the π rings or Zn centers of the involved MOF derivatives are studied by considering the interactions both of the alkali-metal cations with model aromatic centers and of the alkali-metal azides with distinct sites of differently sized models of IRMOF-1 and IRMOF-3. Several exchange and correlation functionals are employed to calculate the corresponding interaction energies. Remarkably, it is found that, with increasing alkali-metal atom size, the latter decrease for cations interacting with the π-ring systems and increase for the azides interacting with the MOF fragments. The opposite behavior is explained by stabilization effects on the azide moieties and determined by the Zn atoms, which constitute the inorganic vertices of the IRMOF species. Larger cations can, in fact, coordinate more efficiently to both the aromatic center and the azide anion, and thus stabilizing bridging arrangements of the azide between one alkali-metal and two Zn atoms in an η(2) coordination mode are more favored. PMID:23161861

  3. Small diatomic alkali molecules at ultracold temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tout Taotao

    This thesis describes experimental work done with two of the smallest diatomic alkali molecules, 6Li2 and 23Na 6Li, each formed out of its constituent atoms at ultracold temperatures. The 23Na6Li molecule was formed for the first time at ultracold temperatures, after previous attempts failed due to an incorrect assignment of Feshbach resonances in the 6Li+23Na system. The experiment represents successful molecule formation around the most difficult Feshbach resonance ever used, and opens up the possibility of transferring NaLi to its spin-triplet ground state, which has both magnetic and electric dipole moments and is expected to be long-lived. For 6Li2, the experimental efforts in this thesis have solved a long-standing puzzle of apparently long lifetimes of closed-channel fermion pairs around a narrow Feshbach resonance, finding that the lifetime is in fact short, as expected in the absence of Pauli suppression of collisions. Moreover, measurements of collisions of Li2 with free Li atoms demonstrates a striking first example of collisions involving molecules at ultracold temperatures described by physics beyond universal long-range van der Waals interactions.

  4. Superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerene nanowhiskers.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Toshio; Hirata, Chika; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Miyazawa, Kun'ichi; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2016-09-01

    Superconductivity in alkali metal-doped fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs) was observed in K3.3C60NWs, Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs with transition temperatures at 17, 25 and 26 K, respectively. Almost full shielding volume fraction (~80%) was observed in K3.3C60NWs when subjected to thermal treatment at 200 °C for a duration of 24 h. In contrast, the shielding fraction of Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs were calculated to be 8% and 6%, respectively. Here we report on an extensive investigation of the superconducting properties of these AC60NWs (A  =  K3.3, Rb3.0 and Cs2.0Rb1.0). These properties are compared to the ones reported on the corresponding conventional (single-crystal or powder) K-doped fullerene. We also evaluated the critical current densities of these C60NWs using the Bean model under an applied magnetic field up to 50 kOe. PMID:27385220

  5. The timing of alkali metasomatism in paleosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacFarlane, A. W.; Holland, H. D.

    1991-01-01

    We have measured the concentrations of rubidium and strontium and 87Sr/86Sr values of whole-rock samples from three paleosols of different ages. The oldest of the three weathering horizons, the 2,760 Ma Mt. Roe #1 paleosol in the Fortescue Group of Western Australia, experienced addition of Rb, and probably Sr, at 2,168 +/- 10 Ma. The intermediate paleosol, developed on the Hekpoort Basalt in South Africa, is estimated to have formed at 2,200 Ma, and yields a Rb-Sr isochron age of 1,925 +/- 32 Ma. The youngest of the three paleosols, developed on the Ongeluk basalt in Griqualand West, South Africa ca. 1,900 Ma, yielded a Rb-Sr age of 1,257 +/- 11 Ma. The Rb-Sr systematics of all three paleosols were reset during post-weathering metasomatism related to local or regional thermal disturbances. The Rb-Sr systematics of the paleosols were not subsequently disturbed. The near-complete removal of the alkali and alkaline earth elements from these paleosols during weathering made them particularly susceptible to resetting of their Rb-Sr systematics. Paleosols of this type are therefore sensitive indicators of the timing of thermal disturbances.

  6. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced. PMID:26860297

  7. Superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerene nanowhiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Toshio; Hirata, Chika; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Miyazawa, Kun’ichi; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2016-09-01

    Superconductivity in alkali metal-doped fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs) was observed in K3.3C60NWs, Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs with transition temperatures at 17, 25 and 26 K, respectively. Almost full shielding volume fraction (~80%) was observed in K3.3C60NWs when subjected to thermal treatment at 200 °C for a duration of 24 h. In contrast, the shielding fraction of Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs were calculated to be 8% and 6%, respectively. Here we report on an extensive investigation of the superconducting properties of these AC60NWs (A  =  K3.3, Rb3.0 and Cs2.0Rb1.0). These properties are compared to the ones reported on the corresponding conventional (single-crystal or powder) K-doped fullerene. We also evaluated the critical current densities of these C60NWs using the Bean model under an applied magnetic field up to 50 kOe.

  8. Relation between the electroforming voltage in alkali halide-polymer diodes and the bandgap of the alkali halide

    SciTech Connect

    Bory, Benjamin F.; Wang, Jingxin; Janssen, René A. J.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Gomes, Henrique L.; De Leeuw, Dago M.

    2014-12-08

    Electroforming of indium-tin-oxide/alkali halide/poly(spirofluorene)/Ba/Al diodes has been investigated by bias dependent reflectivity measurements. The threshold voltages for electrocoloration and electroforming are independent of layer thickness and correlate with the bandgap of the alkali halide. We argue that the origin is voltage induced defect formation. Frenkel defect pairs are formed by electron–hole recombination in the alkali halide. This self-accelerating process mitigates injection barriers. The dynamic junction formation is compared to that of a light emitting electrochemical cell. A critical defect density for electroforming is 10{sup 25}/m{sup 3}. The electroformed alkali halide layer can be considered as a highly doped semiconductor with metallic transport characteristics.

  9. Efficient destruction of CF4 through in situ generation of alkali metals from heated alkali halide reducing mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Churl; Choi, Wonyong

    2002-03-15

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are the most potent green house gases that are very recalcitrant at destruction. An effective way of converting PFCs using hot solid reagents into safe products has been recently introduced. By investigating the thermal reductive destruction of tetrafluoromethane (CF4) we provided new insight and more physicochemical consideration on this novel process. The complete destruction of CF4was successfully achieved by flowing the gas through a heated reagent bed (400-950 degrees C) that contained powder mixtures of alkali halides, CaO, and Si. The silicon acted as a reducing agent of alkali halides for the in-situ production of alkali metals, and the calcium oxide played the role of a halide ion acceptor. The absence of any single component in this ternary mixture drastically reduced the destruction efficiency of CF4. The CF4 destruction efficiencies with the solid reagent containing the alkali halide, MX, increased in the order of Li approximately Na < K < Cs for alkali cations and I < Br < Cl < F for halide anions. This trend agreed with the endothermicity of the alkali metal generation reaction: the higher the endothermicity, the lower the destruction efficiency. Alkali metal generation was indirectly detected by monitoring H2 production from its reaction with water. The production of alkali metals increased with NaF, KF, and CsF in this order. The CsF/CaO/Si system exhibited the complete destruction of CF4 at as low as 600 degrees C. The solid product analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the formation of CaF2 and the depletion of Si with black carbon particles formed in the solid reagent residue. No CO/CO2 and toxic HF and SiF4 formation were detected in the exhaust gas. PMID:11944694

  10. 26Al in plagioclase-rich chondrules in carbonaceous chondrites: Evidence for an extended duration of chondrule formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheon, I. D.; Marhas, K. K.; Krot, A. N.; Goswami, J. N.; Jones, R. H.

    2009-09-01

    The 26Al- 26Mg isotope systematics in 33 petrographically and mineralogically characterized plagioclase-rich chondrules (PRCs) from 13 carbonaceous chondrites (CCs) - one ungrouped (Acfer 094), six CR, five CV, and one CO - reveal large variations in the initial 26Al/ 27Al ratio, ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0. Well-resolved 26Mg excesses (δ 26Mg) from the in situ decay of the short-lived nuclide 26Al ( t1/2 ˜ 0.72 Ma) were found in nine chondrules, two from Acfer 094, five from the CV chondrites, Allende and Efremovka, and one each from the paired CR chondrites, EET 92147 and EET 92042, with ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 values ranging from ˜3 × 10 -6 to ˜1.5 × 10 -5. Data for seven additional chondrules from three CV and two CR chondrites show evidence suggestive of the presence of 26Al but do not yield well defined values for ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0, while the remaining chondrules do not contain excess radiogenic 26Mg and yield corresponding upper limits of (11-2) × 10 -6 for ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0. The observed range of ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 in PRCs from CCs is similar to the range seen in chondrules from unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs) of low metamorphic grade (3.0-3.4). However, unlike the UOC chondrules, there is no clear trend between the ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 values in PRCs from CCs and the degree of thermal metamorphism experienced by the host meteorites. High and low values of ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 are found equally in PRCs from both CCs lacking evidence for thermal metamorphism (e.g., CRs) and CCs where such evidence is abundant (e.g., CVs). The lower ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 values in PRCs from CCs, relative to most CAIs, are consistent with a model in which 26Al was distributed uniformly in the nebula when chondrule formation began, approximately a million years after the formation of the majority of CAIs. The observed range of ( 26Al/ 27Al) 0 values in PRCs from CCs is most plausibly explained in terms of an extended duration of ˜2-3 Ma for the formation of CC chondrules. This interval is in sharp

  11. Alkali-aggregate reactivity of typical siliceious glass and carbonate rocks in alkali-activated fly ash based geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Duyou; Liu, Yongdao; Zheng, Yanzeng; Xu, Zhongzi; Shen, Xiaodong

    2013-08-01

    For exploring the behaviour of alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR) in alkali-activated geopolymeric materials and assessing the procedures for testing AAR in geopolymers, the expansion behaviour of fly ash based geopolymer mortars with pure silica glass and typical carbonate rocks were studied respectively by curing at various conditions, i.e. 23°C and 38°C with relative humidity over 95%, immersed in 1M NaOH solution at 80°C. Results show that, at various curing conditions, neither harmful ASR nor harmful ACR was observed in geopolymers with the criteria specified for OPC system. However, with the change of curing conditions, the geopolymer binder and reactive aggregates may experience different reaction processes leading to quite different dimensional changes, especially with additional alkalis and elevated temperatures. It suggests that high temperature with additional alkali for accelerating AAR in traditional OPC system may not appropriate for assessing the alkali-aggregate reactivity behaviour in geopo