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Sample records for alkali halide solutions

  1. Molecular dispersion energy parameters for alkali and halide ions in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, S.; Deublein, S.; Hasse, H.; Vrabec, J.

    2014-01-28

    Thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions containing alkali and halide ions are determined by molecular simulation. The following ions are studied: Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cs{sup +}, F{sup −}, Cl{sup −}, Br{sup −}, and I{sup −}. The employed ion force fields consist of one Lennard-Jones (LJ) site and one concentric point charge with a magnitude of ±1 e. The SPC/E model is used for water. The LJ size parameter of the ion models is taken from Deublein et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 084501 (2012)], while the LJ energy parameter is determined in the present study based on experimental self-diffusion coefficient data of the alkali cations and the halide anions in aqueous solutions as well as the position of the first maximum of the radial distribution function of water around the ions. On the basis of these force field parameters, the electric conductivity, the hydration dynamics of water molecules around the ions, and the enthalpy of hydration is predicted. Considering a wide range of salinity, this study is conducted at temperatures of 293.15 and 298.15 K and a pressure of 1 bar.

  2. Solvation at nanoscale: Alkali-halides in water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Partanen, Leena; Mikkelae, Mikko-Heikki; Huttula, Marko; Tchaplyguine, Maxim; Zhang Chaofan; Andersson, Tomas; Bjoerneholm, Olle

    2013-01-28

    The solvation of alkali-halides in water clusters at nanoscale is studied by photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The Na 2p, K 3p, Cl 2p, Br 3d, and I 4d core level binding energies have been measured for salt-containing water clusters. The results have been compared to those of alkali halide clusters and the dilute aqueous salt solutions. It is found that the alkali halides dissolve in small water clusters as ions.

  3. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  4. The Additive Coloration of Alkali Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jirgal, G. H.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an inexpensive, vacuum furnace designed to produce F-centers in alkali halide crystals by additive coloration. The method described avoids corrosion or contamination during the coloration process. Examination of the resultant crystals is discussed and several experiments using additively colored crystals are…

  5. Long-lived submicrometric bubbles in very diluted alkali halide water solutions.

    PubMed

    Duval, Eugène; Adichtchev, Sergey; Sirotkin, Sergey; Mermet, Alain

    2012-03-28

    Solutions of LiCl and of NaCl in ultrapure water were studied through Rayleigh/Brillouin scattering as a function of the concentration (molarity, M) of dissolved salt from 0.2 M to extremely low concentration (2 × 10(-17) M). The Landau-Placzek ratio, R/B, of the Rayleigh scattering intensity over the total Brillouin was measured thanks to the dynamically controlled stability of the used Fabry-Perot interferometer. It was observed that the R/B ratio follows two stages as a function of increasing dilution rate: after a strong decrease between 0.2 M and 2 × 10(-5) M, it increases to reach a maximum between 10(-9) M and 10(-16) M. The first stage corresponds to the decrease of the Rayleigh scattering by the ion concentration fluctuations with the decrease of salt concentration. The second stage, at lower concentrations, is consistent with the increase of the Rayleigh scattering by long-lived sub-microscopic bubbles with the decrease of ion concentration. The origin of these sub-microscopic bubbles is the shaking of the solutions, which was carried out after each centesimal dilution. The very long lifetime of the sub-microscopic bubbles and the effects of aging originate in the electric charge of bubbles. The increase of R/B with the decrease of the low salt concentration corresponds to the increase of the sub-microscopic bubble size with the decrease of concentration, which is imposed by the bubble stability due to the covering of the surface bubble by negative ions.

  6. Is surface layering of aqueous alkali halides determined by ion pairing in the bulk solution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Eva; Stage, Christiane; Motschmann, Hubert; Rieder, Julian; Buchner, Richard

    2014-11-01

    This contribution aims to elucidate the connection between ion-ion-solvent interactions in the bulk of aqueous electrolyte solutions and the properties of their liquid-air interface. In particular, we were interested in the conditions under which ion pairs form at the surface and whether this is linked to ion pairing in the bulk. For this reason different combinations of hard (Cl-, Li+) and soft ions (I-, Cs+) were investigated. Ion hydration and possible ion association in the bulk was probed with dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. This technique monitors the cooperative reorientation of the dipolar solvent molecules and detects all ion-pair species possibly present in the solution. At the interface, the formation of contact ion pairs was investigated by infrared-visible-sum frequency spectroscopy (SFG). This nonlinear optical technique possesses an inherent surface specificity and can be used for the characterization of interfacial water. The intensity of the SFG-active vibrational stretching modes depends on the number of oriented water molecules. The electric field at the surface of a charged aqueous interface aligns the water dipoles, which in turn increases the SFG response. Hence, the enhancement of the oscillator strengths of the water vibrational modes can be used to draw some conclusions on the strengths and geometrical extension of the electric field. The formation of ion pairs at the interface reduces the intensity of the band associated with hydrogen-bonded water. The underlying theory is presented. The combined data show that there are no contact ion pairs in the bulk of the fluid and—at best—only small amounts of solvent shared ion pairs. On the other hand, the combination of hard/hard or soft/soft ions leads to the formation of ion pairs at the liquid-air interface.

  7. Infrared spectra of FHF - in alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunnilall, C. J.; Sherman, W. F.

    1982-03-01

    The bifluoride ion, FHF -, has been substitutionally isolated within single crystal samples of several different alkali halides. Infrared spectra of these crystals have been studied for sample temperatures down to 8K when half-bandwidths of less than 1 cm -1 have been observed. (Note that at room temperature ν 3 is observed to have a half-bandwidth of about 40 cm -1). The frequency shifts and half-bandwidth changes caused by cooling are considered together with the frequency shifts caused by pressures up to 10 k bar. The low temperature spectra clearly indicate that FHF - is a linear symmetrical ion when substitutionally isolated within alkali halides of either the NaCl or CsCl structure.

  8. Ionic alkali halide XUV laser feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.T.; Gylys, V.T.; Bower, R.D.; Harris, D.G.; Blauer, J.A.; Turner, C.E.; Hindy, R.N.

    1989-11-10

    The objective of this work is to assess the feasibility of a select set of ionic alkali halide XUV laser concepts by obtaining the relevant kinetic and spectroscopic parameters required for a proof-of-principle and conceptual design. The proposed lasers operate in the 80--200 nm spectral region and do not require input from outside radiation sources for their operation. Frequency up-conversion and frequency mixing techniques and therefore not considered in the work to be described. An experimental and theoretical study of a new type of laser operating in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength region has been conducted. The lasing species are singly ionized alkali halide molecules such as Rb{sup 2+}F{sub {minus}}, Rb{sup 2+}Br{sup {minus}} and Cs{sup 2+}F{sup {minus}}. These species are similar in electronic structure to the rare gas halide excimers, such as XeF and Krf, except that the ionic molecules emit at wavelengths of 80--200 nm, much shorter than the conventional rare-gas halide excimer laser. The radiative lifetime of these molecules are typically near 1 ns, which is about an order of magnitude shorter than that for rare-gas halide systems. The values of the cross section for stimulated emission are on the order of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}16}cm{sup 2}. Because of the fundamental similarity to existing UV lasers, these systems show promise as a high power, efficient XUV lasers. 55 refs., 50 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Relation between the electroforming voltage in alkali halide-polymer diodes and the bandgap of the alkali halide

    SciTech Connect

    Bory, Benjamin F.; Wang, Jingxin; Janssen, René A. J.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Gomes, Henrique L.; De Leeuw, Dago M.

    2014-12-08

    Electroforming of indium-tin-oxide/alkali halide/poly(spirofluorene)/Ba/Al diodes has been investigated by bias dependent reflectivity measurements. The threshold voltages for electrocoloration and electroforming are independent of layer thickness and correlate with the bandgap of the alkali halide. We argue that the origin is voltage induced defect formation. Frenkel defect pairs are formed by electron–hole recombination in the alkali halide. This self-accelerating process mitigates injection barriers. The dynamic junction formation is compared to that of a light emitting electrochemical cell. A critical defect density for electroforming is 10{sup 25}/m{sup 3}. The electroformed alkali halide layer can be considered as a highly doped semiconductor with metallic transport characteristics.

  10. Metal induced gap states at alkali halide/metal interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiguchi, Manabu; Yoshikawa, Genki; Ikeda, Susumu; Saiki, Koichiro

    2004-10-01

    The electronic state of a KCl/Cu(0 0 1) interface was investigated using the Cl K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). A pre-peak observed on the bulk edge onset of thin KCl films has a similar feature to the peak at a LiCl/Cu(0 0 1) interface, which originates from the metal induced gap state (MIGS). The present result indicates that the MIGS is formed universally at alkali halide/metal interfaces. The decay length of MIGS to an insulator differs from each other, mainly due to the difference in the band gap energy of alkali halide.

  11. Infrared Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Alkali Metal Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ei; Hommerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton; Trivedi, Sudhir; Samuels, Alan; Snyder, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. LIBS is a relatively simple technique and has been successfully employed in applications such as environmental monitoring, materials analysis, medical diagnostics, industrial process control, and homeland security. Most LIBS applications are limited to emission features in the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-VIS-NIR) region arising from atoms and simple molecular fragments. In the present work, we report on the observation of mid- infrared emission lines from alkali metal halides due to laser-induced breakdown processes. The studied alkali metal halides included LiCl, NaCl, NaBr, KCl, KBr, KF, RbCl, and RbBr. The laser-induced plasma was produced by focusing a 16 mJ pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) on the target. The LIBS infrared emission from alkali halides showed intense and narrow bands located in the region from 2-8 μm. The observed emission features were assigned to atomic transitions between higher-lying Rydberg states of neutral alkali atoms. More detailed results of the performed IR LIBS studies on alkali metal halides will be discussed at the conference.

  12. Cohesive Energy-Lattice Constant and Bulk Modulus-Lattice Constant Relationships: Alkali Halides, Ag Halides, Tl Halides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert

    1992-01-01

    In this note we present two expressions relating the cohesive energy, E(sub coh), and the zero pressure isothermal bulk modulus, B(sub 0), of the alkali halides. Ag halides and TI halides, with the nearest neighbor distances, d(sub nn). First, we show that the product E(sub coh)d(sub 0) within families of halide crystals with common crystal structure is to a good approximation constant, with maximum rms deviation of plus or minus 2%. Secondly, we demonstrate that within families of halide crystals with a common cation and common crystal structure the product B(sub 0)d(sup 3.5)(sub nn) is a good approximation constant, with maximum rms deviation of plus or minus 1.36%.

  13. Interfacial tension in immiscible mixtures of alkali halides.

    PubMed

    Lockett, Vera; Rukavishnikova, Irina V; Stepanov, Victor P; Tkachev, Nikolai K

    2010-02-01

    The interfacial tension of the liquid-phase interface in seven immiscible reciprocal ternary mixtures of lithium fluoride with the following alkali halides: CsCl, KBr, RbBr, CsBr, KI, RbI, and CsI was measured using the cylinder weighing method over a wide temperature range. It was shown that for all mixtures the interfacial tension gradually decreases with growing temperature. The interfacial tension of the reciprocal ternary mixtures at a given temperature increases both with the alkali cation radius (K(+) < Rb(+) < Cs(+)) and with the radius of the halogen anion (Cl(-) < Br(-) < I(-)). PMID:20094678

  14. Na+ and Rb+ tracer diffusion in alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniere, F.; Sen, S. K.

    1991-11-01

    We have undertaken a fundamental study of heterodiffusion of foreign ions in pure single crystals. The present work describes the measurements of the diffusion coefficient of monovalent cations in some alkali halides, namely Na+ and Rb+ into KCl, KBr, NaI and KI. The priority is given to the super-accuracy of the experimental data. The target is to test the validity of the existing theories for calculating the enthalpy and entropy of migration.

  15. Volcanic Origin of Alkali Halides on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, L.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The recent observation of NaCl (gas) on Io confirms our earlier prediction that NaCl is produced volcanically. Here we extend our calculations by modeling thermochemical equilibrium of O, S, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, F, Cl, Br, and I as a function of temperature and pressure in a Pele-like volcanic gas with O/S/Na/Cl/K = 1.518/1/0.05/0.04/0.005 and CI chondritic ratios of the other (as yet unobserved) alkalis and halogens. For reference, the nominal temperature and pressure for Pele is 1760 plus or minus 210 K and 0.01 bars based on Galileo data and modeling.

  16. A new polarizable force field for alkali and halide ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, Péter T.; Baranyai, András

    2014-09-21

    We developed transferable potentials for alkali and halide ions which are consistent with our recent model of water [P. T. Kiss and A. Baranyai, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 204507 (2013)]. Following the approach used for the water potential, we applied Gaussian charge distributions, exponential repulsion, and r{sup −6} attraction. One of the two charges of the ions is fixed to the center of the particle, while the other is connected to this charge by a harmonic spring to express polarization. Polarizability is taken from quantum chemical calculations. The repulsion between different species is expressed by the combining rule of Kong [J. Chem. Phys. 59, 2464 (1972)]. Our primary target was the hydration free energy of ions which is correct within the error of calculations. We calculated water-ion clusters up to 6 water molecules, and, as a crosscheck, we determined the density and internal energy of alkali-halide crystals at ambient conditions with acceptable accuracy. The structure of hydrated ions was also discussed.

  17. Classical trajectories studies of diet from alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrzejek, C.; Ciepliński, L.

    1994-03-01

    Desorption of positive ions in alkali halides resulting from the repulsive environment created by core-hole Auger decay has been previously found not likely due to lattice rearrangement and trapping of the ion. We revisit the problem by studying ion trajectories using classical molecular dynamics in the crystalline (rather than cluster) geometry with careful account of the Madelung energy. We find that the previous findings remain unchanged. In contrast to previous works, we also assume that the positive ion gained substantial amount of kinetic energy at the onset of simulations, crudely mimicking ion-stimulated desorption. Then the ejection of the formed positive halogen ion occurs for initial kinetic energies of the order 2 eV for NaF and 0.65 eV for LiF. Implications for viability of the Knotek-Feibelman mechanism are discussed.

  18. Fabrication of alkali halide UV photocathodes by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Brendel', V M; Bukin, V V; Garnov, Sergei V; Bagdasarov, V Kh; Denisov, N N; Garanin, Sergey G; Terekhin, V A; Trutnev, Yurii A

    2012-12-31

    A technique has been proposed for the fabrication of atmospheric corrosion resistant alkali halide UV photocathodes by pulsed laser deposition. We produced photocathodes with a highly homogeneous photoemissive layer well-adherent to the substrate. The photocathodes were mounted in a vacuum photodiode, and a tungsten grid was used as an anode. Using pulsed UV lasers, we carried out experiments aimed at evaluating the quantum efficiency of the photocathodes. With a dc voltage applied between the photocathode and anode grid, we measured a shunt signal proportional to the total charge emitted by the cathode exposed to UV laser light. The proposed deposition technique enables one to produce photocathodes with photoemissive layers highly uniform in quantum efficiency, which is its main advantage over thin film growth by resistive evaporation. (laser technologies)

  19. The Structure and Thermodynamics of Alkali Halide Vapors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, John George

    A comprehensive set of electron diffraction experiments were performed on 16 of the alkali halides in the vapor phase. A 40kev electron beam was scattered from the vapor effusing out of the nozzle of a temperature controlled gas cell. The resulting data were analyzed at the University of Edinburgh with the program ED80. This resulted in values for the bond lengths of monomers and the dimers, the bond angle of the dimers and the monomer-dimer ratios. In several cases, it was possible to further refine the data to obtain information on the mean amplitudes of vibration. As a check on the accuracy of the results, the monomer bond distances obtained by electron diffraction were compared to values obtained previously by microwave spectroscopy. The average monomer bond length r_{a} is corrected to obtain the equilibrium bond distance r_{e}. This value is then compared to the value of r_{e } obtained from microwave spectroscopy and found to be in excellent agreement. The bond lengths and angles of the dimers were compared against model calculations. While no one model was found to accurately predict the dimer structure parameters of all of the alkali halides, the Rittner model of Gowda et al was found to accurately predict the structure of six of the dimers. Thermodynamical calculations were performed on the model data which resulted in theoretical curves of the monomer-dimer ratios. Comparison of these curves with the experimental monomer-dimer ratio permits an evaluation of the model vibration frequencies. The enthalpy of formation of the dimer, Delta H_sp{2}{f}(298) is examined with regard to the size of the variation necessary to bring about agreement of the experimental and model monomer-dimer ratios.

  20. Alkali Metal Halide Salts as Interface Additives to Fabricate Hysteresis-Free Hybrid Perovskite-Based Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Moghe, Dhanashree; Hafezian, Soroush; Chen, Pei; Young, Margaret; Elinski, Mark; Martinu, Ludvik; Kéna-Cohen, Stéphane; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-09-01

    A new method was developed for doping and fabricating hysteresis-free hybrid perovskite-based photovoltaic devices by using alkali metal halide salts as interface layer additives. Such salt layers introduced at the perovskite interface can provide excessive halide ions to fill vacancies formed during the deposition and annealing process. A range of solution-processed halide salts were investigated. The highest performance of methylammonium lead mixed-halide perovskite device was achieved with a NaI interlayer and showed a power conversion efficiency of 12.6% and a hysteresis of less than 2%. This represents a 90% improvement compared to control devices without this salt layer. Through depth-resolved mass spectrometry, optical modeling, and photoluminescence spectroscopy, this enhancement is attributed to the reduction of iodide vacancies, passivation of grain boundaries, and improved hole extraction. Our approach ultimately provides an alternative and facile route to high-performance and hysteresis-free perovskite solar cells. PMID:27532662

  1. Alkali Metal Halide Salts as Interface Additives to Fabricate Hysteresis-Free Hybrid Perovskite-Based Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Moghe, Dhanashree; Hafezian, Soroush; Chen, Pei; Young, Margaret; Elinski, Mark; Martinu, Ludvik; Kéna-Cohen, Stéphane; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-09-01

    A new method was developed for doping and fabricating hysteresis-free hybrid perovskite-based photovoltaic devices by using alkali metal halide salts as interface layer additives. Such salt layers introduced at the perovskite interface can provide excessive halide ions to fill vacancies formed during the deposition and annealing process. A range of solution-processed halide salts were investigated. The highest performance of methylammonium lead mixed-halide perovskite device was achieved with a NaI interlayer and showed a power conversion efficiency of 12.6% and a hysteresis of less than 2%. This represents a 90% improvement compared to control devices without this salt layer. Through depth-resolved mass spectrometry, optical modeling, and photoluminescence spectroscopy, this enhancement is attributed to the reduction of iodide vacancies, passivation of grain boundaries, and improved hole extraction. Our approach ultimately provides an alternative and facile route to high-performance and hysteresis-free perovskite solar cells.

  2. Reverse osmosis transport of alkali halides and nickel salts through cellulose triacetate membranes. Performance prediction from NaCl experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nirmal, J.D.; Pandya, V.P.; Desai, N.V.; Rangarajan, R. )

    1992-10-01

    The separation of alkali metal halides, nickel chloride, and nickel sulfate was determined for cellulose triacetate reverse osmosis (CTA RO) membranes. From transport analysis, the relative free energy parameters for transport of these salts through CTA membranes were determined. From these relative free energy parameters of salts, the solute separation by CTA membranes could be predicted from RO experiment with NaCl solution. The transport analysis and an illustration of how the concept is useful are presented in this paper.

  3. Efficient destruction of CF4 through in situ generation of alkali metals from heated alkali halide reducing mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Churl; Choi, Wonyong

    2002-03-15

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are the most potent green house gases that are very recalcitrant at destruction. An effective way of converting PFCs using hot solid reagents into safe products has been recently introduced. By investigating the thermal reductive destruction of tetrafluoromethane (CF4) we provided new insight and more physicochemical consideration on this novel process. The complete destruction of CF4was successfully achieved by flowing the gas through a heated reagent bed (400-950 degrees C) that contained powder mixtures of alkali halides, CaO, and Si. The silicon acted as a reducing agent of alkali halides for the in-situ production of alkali metals, and the calcium oxide played the role of a halide ion acceptor. The absence of any single component in this ternary mixture drastically reduced the destruction efficiency of CF4. The CF4 destruction efficiencies with the solid reagent containing the alkali halide, MX, increased in the order of Li approximately Na < K < Cs for alkali cations and I < Br < Cl < F for halide anions. This trend agreed with the endothermicity of the alkali metal generation reaction: the higher the endothermicity, the lower the destruction efficiency. Alkali metal generation was indirectly detected by monitoring H2 production from its reaction with water. The production of alkali metals increased with NaF, KF, and CsF in this order. The CsF/CaO/Si system exhibited the complete destruction of CF4 at as low as 600 degrees C. The solid product analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the formation of CaF2 and the depletion of Si with black carbon particles formed in the solid reagent residue. No CO/CO2 and toxic HF and SiF4 formation were detected in the exhaust gas.

  4. Strong Turbulence in Alkali Halide Negative Ion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Daniel

    1999-11-01

    Negative ion plasmas (NIPs) are charge-neutral plasmas in which the negative charge is dominated by negative ions rather than electrons. They are found in laser discharges, combustion products, semiconductor manufacturing processes, stellar atmospheres, pulsar magnetospheres, and the Earth's ionosphere, both naturally and man-made. They often display signatures of strong turbulence^1. Development of a novel, compact, unmagnetized alkali halide (MX) NIP source will be discussed, it incorporating a ohmically-heated incandescent (2500K) tantulum solenoid (3cm dia, 15 cm long) with heat shields. The solenoid ionizes the MX vapor and confines contaminant electrons, allowing a very dry (electron-free) source. Plasma densities of 10^10 cm-3 and positive to negative ion mass ratios of 1 <= fracm_+m- <= 20 are achievable. The source will allow tests of strong turbulence theory^2. 1 Sheehan, D.P., et al., Phys. Fluids B5, 1593 (1993). 2 Tsytovich, V. and Wharton, C.W., Comm. Plasma Phys. Cont. Fusion 4, 91 (1978).

  5. Alkali Halide Interfacial Behavior in a Sequence of Charged Slit Pores

    SciTech Connect

    Wander, Matthew C; Shuford, Kevin L

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a variety of alkali halide, aqueous electrolyte solutions in contact with charged, planar-graphite slit-pores are simulated using classical molecular dynamics. Size trends in structure and transport properties are examined by varying the choice of ions among the alkali metal and halide series. As with the uncharged pores, system dynamics are driven by changes in water hydration behavior and specifically by variations in the number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule. Overall, the larger ions diffuse more rapidly under high surface charge conditions than the smaller ions. In particular, for the 1 nmslit, ion diffusivity increased by a factor of 4 compared to the uncharged case. Finally, a quantitative fit to the interfacial charge structure is presented, which confirms the presence of two distinct types of layers in an aqueous interface. This model indicates that the chemistry of the interface is able to create a small interfacial potential, and it shows how water molecules can rotate to increase charge separation in response to a surface potential.

  6. Graphitic cage transformation by electron-beam-induced catalysis with alkali-halide nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Jun-ichi; Tachi, Masashi; Ito, Naoto; Murakami, Katsuhisa; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    We found that alkali-halide nanocrystals, such as KCl and NaCl, have strong catalytic capability to form graphitic carbon cages from amorphous carbon shells under electron beam irradiation. In addition to the electron beam irradiation strongly inducing the decomposition of alkali-halide nanocrystals, graphene fragments were formed and linked together to form the final product of thin graphitic carbon cages after the evaporation of alkali-halide nanocrystals. The required electron dose was approximately 1 to 20 C/cm2 at 120 keV at room temperature, which was about two orders of magnitude smaller than that required for conventional beam-induced graphitization. The “knock-on” effect of primary electrons strongly induced the decomposition of the alkali-halide crystal inside the amorphous carbon shell. However, the strong ionic cohesion quickly reformed the crystal into thin layers inside the amorphous shell. The bond excitation induced by the electron beam irradiation seemed to enhance strongly the graphitization at the interface between the outer amorphous carbon shell and the inner alkali-halide crystal.

  7. Ion Segregation and Deliquescence of Alkali Halide Nanocrystals on SiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Arima, Kenta; Jiang, Peng; Lin, Deng-Sung; Verdaguer, Albert; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-08-11

    The adsorption of water on alkali halide (KBr, KCl, KF, NaCl) nanocrystals on SiO{sub 2} and their deliquescence was investigated as a function of relative humidity (RH) from 8% to near saturation by scanning polarization force microscopy. At low humidity, water adsorption solvates ions at the surface of the crystals and increases their mobility. This results in a large increase in the dielectric constant, which is manifested in an increase in the electrostatic force and in an increase in the apparent height of the nanocrystals. Above 58% RH, the diffusion of ions leads to Ostwald ripening, where larger nanocrystals grow at the expense of the smaller ones. At the deliquescence point, droplets were formed. For KBr, KCl, and NaCl, the droplets exhibit a negative surface potential relative to the surrounding region, which is indicative of the preferential segregation of anions to the air/solution interface.

  8. Study of alkali halide/FHF - systems at 10 - 290 K, 0 - 8 kBAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunnilall, C. J.; Sherman, W. F.; Wilkinson, G. R.

    1984-03-01

    The bifluoride ion FHF -, (and FDF -), has been substitutionally isolated within single crystal samples of several alkali halides. Infrared and Raman spectra of these crystals have been studied at variable temperature and pressure. The infrared absorptions are strong, whereas the Raman is weak. At low temperatures the bands are very sharp with halfwidths less than 1 cm -1. On applying pressure, ν3 increases in frequency whereas ν2 decreases. On reducing temperature, ν3 decreases in frequency whereas ν2 increases. Hence the effect of volume contraction is overridden in the temperature dependent case. The deuterated spectra confirm that the bifluoride ion is well isolated within the alkali halide matrix.

  9. Electronic properties of metal-induced gap states formed at alkali-halide/metal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiguchi, Manabu; Yoshikawa, Genki; Ikeda, Susumu; Saiki, Koichiro

    2005-04-01

    The spatial distribution and site distribution of metal-induced gap states (MIGS) are studied by thickness-dependent near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and by comparing the cation and anion-edge NEXAFS. The thickness-dependent NEXAFS shows that the decay length of MIGS depends on an alkali-halide rather than a metal, and it is larger for alkali-halides with smaller band gap energies. By comparing the Cl-edge and K-edge NEXAFS for KCl/Cu (001) , MIGS are found to be states localizing at anion sites.

  10. Reactions between cold methyl halide molecules and alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Jesse J.; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-07

    We investigate the potential energy surfaces and activation energies for reactions between methyl halide molecules CH{sub 3}X (X = F, Cl, Br, I) and alkali-metal atoms A (A = Li, Na, K, Rb) using high-level ab initio calculations. We examine the anisotropy of each intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) and the mechanism and energetics of the only available exothermic reaction pathway, CH{sub 3}X + A → CH{sub 3} + AX. The region of the transition state is explored using two-dimensional PES cuts and estimates of the activation energies are inferred. Nearly all combinations of methyl halide and alkali-metal atom have positive barrier heights, indicating that reactions at low temperatures will be slow.

  11. Theory of metal atom-water interactions and alkali halide dimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, K. D.; Kurtz, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the interactions of metal atoms with water and some of its isoelectronic analogs, and of the properties of alkali halides and their aggregates are discussed. Results are presented of ab initio calculations of the heats of reaction of the metal-water adducts and hydroxyhydrides of Li, Be, B, Na, Mg, and Al, and of the bond lengths and angles an; the heats of reaction for the insertion of Al into HF, H2O, NH3, H2S and CH3OH, and Be and Mg into H2O. Calculations of the electron affinities and dipole moments and polarizabilities of selected gas phase alkali halide monomers and dimers are discussed, with particular attention given to results of calculations of the polarizability of LiF taking into account electron correlation effects, and the polarizability of the dimer (LiF)2.

  12. Temperature Dependence of Interatomic Separation and Bulk Modulus for Alkali Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quan

    2016-07-01

    The values of interatomic separation r with the change of temperature T for seven alkali halides have been investigated with the help of an isobaric equation of state. The calculated results are used to predict the values of bulk modulus at different temperatures. The results are compared with the available experimental data and other theoretical results and are further discussed in view of recent research in the field of high temperature physics.

  13. Theoretical analysis of the kinetics of low-temperature defect recombination in alkali halide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzovkov, V. N.; Popov, A. I.; Kotomin, E. A.; Moskina, A. M.; Vasilchenko, E.; Lushchik, A.

    2016-07-01

    We analyzed carefully the experimental kinetics of the low-temperature diffusion-controlled F, H center recombination in a series of irradiated alkali halides and extracted the migration energies and pre-exponential parameters for the hole H centers. The migration energy for the complementary electronic F centers in NaCl was obtained from the colloid formation kinetics observed above room temperature. The obtained parameters were compared with data available from the literature.

  14. Development of processes for the production of solar grade silicon from halides and alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickson, C. R.; Gould, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    High temperature reactions of silicon halides with alkali metals for the production of solar grade silicon in volume at low cost were studied. Experiments were performed to evaluate product separation and collection processes, measure heat release parameters for scaling purposes, determine the effects of reactants and/or products on materials of reactor construction, and make preliminary engineering and economic analyses of a scaled-up process.

  15. The change of the electronic structure of alkali halide films on W(110) under electron bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckhoff, S.; Maus-Friedrichs, W.; Kempter, V.

    1992-03-01

    NaCl and Csl films of up to four layers were deposited onto W(110) surfaces and investigated by metastable impact electron spectroscopy (MIES), UPS and AES. The electronic structure of the films under electron bombardment was then studied by MIES/UPS. The results are compared with the corresponding ones obtained by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). An interpretation of the results is attempted on the basis of existing theories for desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) of alkali halides.

  16. Alkali metal/halide thermal energy storage systems performance evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.; Stearns, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    A pseudoheat-pipe heat transfer mechanism has been demonstrated effective in terms of both total heat removal efficiency and rate, on the one hand, and system isothermal characteristics, on the other, for solar thermal energy storage systems of the kind being contemplated for spacecraft. The selection of appropriate salt and alkali metal substances for the system renders it applicable to a wide temperature range. The rapid heat transfer rate obtainable makes possible the placing of the thermal energy storage system around the solar receiver canister, and the immersing of heat transfer fluid tubes in the phase change salt to obtain an isothermal heat source.

  17. Calculation of the melting point of alkali halides by means of computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragones, J. L.; Sanz, E.; Valeriani, C.; Vega, C.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we study the liquid-solid coexistence of NaCl-type alkali halides, described by interaction potentials such as Tosi-Fumi (TF), Smith-Dang (SD), and Joung-Cheatham (JC), and compute their melting temperature (Tm) at 1 bar via three independent routes: (1) liquid/solid direct coexistence, (2) free-energy calculations, and (3) Hamiltonian Gibbs-Duhem integration. The melting points obtained by the three routes are consistent with each other. The calculated Tm of the Tosi-Fumi model of NaCl is in good agreement with the experimental value as well as with other numerical calculations. However, the other two models considered for NaCl, SD and JC, overestimate the melting temperature of NaCl by more than 200 K. We have also computed the melting temperature of other alkali halides using the Tosi-Fumi interaction potential and observed that the predictions are not always as close to the experimental values as they are for NaCl. It seems that there is still room for improvement in the area of force-fields for alkaline halides, given that so far most models are still unable to describe a simple yet important property such as the melting point.

  18. Metal Hydride and Alkali Halide Opacities in Extrasolar Giant Planets and Cool Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weck, Philippe F.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Kirby, Kate; Schweitzer, Andreas; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2006-01-01

    The lack of accurate and complete molecular line and continuum opacity data has been a serious limitation to developing atmospheric models of cool stars and Extrasolar Giant Planets (EGPs). We report our recent calculations of molecular opacities resulting from the presence of metal hydrides and alkali halides. The resulting data have been included in the PHOENIX stellar atmosphere code (Hauschildt & Baron 1999). The new models, calculated using spherical geometry for all gravities considered, also incorporate our latest database of nearly 670 million molecular lines, and updated equations of state.

  19. Method for calcining nuclear waste solutions containing zirconium and halides

    DOEpatents

    Newby, Billie J.

    1979-01-01

    A reduction in the quantity of gelatinous solids which are formed in aqueous zirconium-fluoride nuclear reprocessing waste solutions by calcium nitrate added to suppress halide volatility during calcination of the solution while further suppressing chloride volatility is achieved by increasing the aluminum to fluoride mole ratio in the waste solution prior to adding the calcium nitrate.

  20. Silicon Halide-alkali Metal Flames as a Source of Solar Grade Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D. B.; Gould, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A program is presented which was aimed at determining the feasibility of using high temperature reactions of alkali metals and silicon halides to produce low cost solar-grade silicon. Experiments are being conducted to evaluate product separation and collection processes, measure heat release parameters for scaling purposes, and determine the effects of the reactants and/or products on materials of reactor construction. During the current reporting period, the results of heat release experiments were used to design and construct a new type of thick-wall graphite reactor to produce larger quantities of silicon. A reactor test facility was constructed. Material compatibility tests were performed for Na in contact with graphite and several coated graphites. All samples were rapidly degraded at T = 1200K, while samples retained structural strength at 1700K. Pyrolytic graphite coatings cracked and separated from substances in all cases.

  1. Role of water in alkali halide heterogeneous chemistry relevant to the atmosphere: A surface science study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Sutapa

    2001-05-01

    Water is a ubiquitous atmospheric constituent. The interaction of water in its various forms (vapor, liquid, ice) with other atmospheric constituents has a significant impact on the chemistry of the atmosphere. Another class of compounds that are of considerable importance in atmospheric chemistry are alkali halide salts such as sea salt particles. Heterogeneous reactions of alkali halides with gas phase pollutants are believed to be an important source of halogens in the troposphere. There is an increasing amount of evidence that the presence of water plays an important role in the heterogeneous chemistry of alkali halide particles. It is the goal of this dissertation to contribute to the understanding of the interaction of water with alkali halide surfaces and its atmospheric implications. Surface processes are of fundamental importance in heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry, but they are often difficult to study because of their inherent complexity. As this dissertation shows, the use of modern surface science techniques offer valuable insights into these complex processes and as such offer complementary alternatives to the traditional atmospheric chemistry experiments. The surface science techniques used in this dissertation are X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning polarization force microscopy (SPFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Presented here are the results of the XPS and SEM studies undertaken to determine the nature and content of surface adsorbed water on NaCl as a function of surface defects. The details of HNO3 uptake on NaCl and the effect of surface adsorbed water on this uptake are also discussed. Our results show that the amount of ``strongly adsorbed water'' (SAW) on the surface of NaCl particles depends on the particle size and hence, on the concentration of surface defects. Unlike the (100) single crystal the more defective surfaces show dissociative water uptake at room temperature upon exposure to water vapor well below

  2. Transport coefficients and the Stokes-Einstein relation in molten alkali halides with polarisable ion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Yoshiki; Kasai, Satoshi; Salanne, Mathieu; Ohtori, Norikazu

    2015-09-01

    A polarisable ion model is parameterised for the whole series of molten alkali halides by using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. Viscosity, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity are determined using molecular dynamics simulations via the Green-Kubo formulae and confronted to experimental results. The calculated transport coefficients are generally in much better agreement than those obtained with the empirical Fumi-Tosi potentials. The inclusion of polarisation effects significantly decreases the viscosity and thermal conductivity, while it increases the electrical conductivity. The individual dynamics of the ions is analysed using the Stokes-Einstein relation. The anion behaviour is always well represented using the slip boundary condition, while for cations there is an apparent shift from slip to stick condition when the ionic radius decreases. This difference is interpreted by subtle changes in their coordinating environment, which are maximised in the case of Li+ cation.

  3. Ab initio perspective on the Mollwo-Ivey relation for F centers in alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwald, Paul; Karsai, Ferenc; Laskowski, Robert; Gräfe, Stefanie; Blaha, Peter; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Wirtz, Ludger

    2015-10-01

    We revisit the well-known Mollwo-Ivey relation that describes the "universal" dependence of the absorption energies of F-type color centers on the lattice constant a of alkali-halide crystals, Eabs∝a-n. We perform both state-of-the-art ab initio quantum chemistry and post-DFT calculations of F-center absorption spectra. By "tuning" independently the lattice constant and the atomic species we show that the scaling with the lattice constant alone (keeping the elements fixed) would yield n =2 in agreement with the "particle-in-the-box" model. Keeping the lattice constant fixed and changing the atomic species enables us to quantify the ion-size effects which are shown to be responsible for the exponent n ≈1.8 .

  4. Ion Pairing in Alkali Nitrate Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-10

    In this study, we investigate the thermodynamics of alkali nitrate salt solutions, especially the formation of contact ion pairs between alkali cation and nitrate anion. The ion-pairing propensity shows an order of LiNO3 < NaNO3 < KNO3. Such results explain the salt activity coefficients and suggest that the empirical "law of matching water affinity" is followed by these alkali nitrate salt solutions. The spatial patterns of contact ion pairs are different in the three salt solutions studied here: Li(+) forms the contact ion pair with only one oxygen of the nitrate while Na(+) and K(+) can also be shared by two oxygens of the nitrate. In reproducing the salt activity coefficient using Kirkwood-Buff theory, we find that it is essential to include electronic polarization for Li(+) which has a high charge density. The electronic continuum correction for nonpolarizable force field significantly improves the agreement between the calculated activity coefficients and their experimental values. This approach also improves the performance of the force field on salt solubility. From these two aspects, this study suggests that electronic continuum correction can be a promising approach to force-field development for ions with high charge densities. PMID:26901167

  5. Ion Pairing in Alkali Nitrate Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-10

    In this study, we investigate the thermodynamics of alkali nitrate salt solutions, especially the formation of contact ion pairs between alkali cation and nitrate anion. The ion-pairing propensity shows an order of LiNO3 < NaNO3 < KNO3. Such results explain the salt activity coefficients and suggest that the empirical "law of matching water affinity" is followed by these alkali nitrate salt solutions. The spatial patterns of contact ion pairs are different in the three salt solutions studied here: Li(+) forms the contact ion pair with only one oxygen of the nitrate while Na(+) and K(+) can also be shared by two oxygens of the nitrate. In reproducing the salt activity coefficient using Kirkwood-Buff theory, we find that it is essential to include electronic polarization for Li(+) which has a high charge density. The electronic continuum correction for nonpolarizable force field significantly improves the agreement between the calculated activity coefficients and their experimental values. This approach also improves the performance of the force field on salt solubility. From these two aspects, this study suggests that electronic continuum correction can be a promising approach to force-field development for ions with high charge densities.

  6. Silicon halide-alkali metal flames as a source of solar grade silicon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.B.; Miller, W.J.; Gould, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    The object of this program was to determine the feasibility of using continuous high-temperature reactions of alkali metals and silicon halides to produce silicon in large quantities and of suitable purity for use in the production of photovoltaic solar cells. Equilibrium calculations showed that a range of conditions were available where silicon was produced as a condensed phase but the byproduct alkali metal salt was a vapor. A process was proposed using the vapor phase reaction of Na with SiCl/sub 4/. Low pressure experiments were performed demonstrating that free silicon was produced and providing experience with the construction of reactant vapor generators. Further experiments at higher reagent flow rates were performed in a low temperature flow tube configuration with co-axial injection of reagents. Relatively pure silicon was produced in these experiments. A high temperature graphite flow tube was built and continuous separation of Si from NaCl was demonstrated. A larger-scaled well-stirred reactor was built. Experiments were performed to investigate the compatibility of graphite-based reactor materials of construction with sodium. At 1100 to 1200 K none of these materials were found to be suitable. At 1700 K the graphites performed well with little damage except to coatings of pyrolytic graphite and silicon carbide which were damaged.

  7. Silicon halide-alkali metal flames as a source of solar grade silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, D. B.; Miller, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of using alkali metal-silicon halide diffusion flames to produce solar-grade silicon in large quantities and at low cost is demonstrated. Prior work shows that these flames are stable and that relatively high purity silicon can be produced using Na + SiCl4 flames. Silicon of similar purity is obtained from Na + SiF4 flames although yields are lower and product separation and collection are less thermochemically favored. Continuous separation of silicon from the byproduct alkali salt was demonstrated in a heated graphite reactor. The process was scaled up to reduce heat losses and to produce larger samples of silicon. Reagent delivery systems, scaled by a factor of 25, were built and operated at a production rate of 0.5 kg Si/h. Very rapid reactor heating rates are observed with wall temperatures reaching greater than 2000 K. Heat release parameters were measured using a cooled stainless steel reactor tube. A new reactor was designed.

  8. Atomic force microscopy studies of alkali halide surfaces nanostructured by DIET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryl, M.; Such, B.; Krok, F.; Meisel, K.; Kolodziej, J. J.; Szymonski, M.

    2005-11-01

    We report on surface topography modification of single crystal alkali halides due to creation of the excitonic states by keV electron irradiation. The DIET—structured surfaces have been studied with nanometer scale resolution by means of a dynamic (non-contact) atomic force microscopy (DFM) in UHV. The force microscopy studies reveal that randomly spread rectangular pits of monolayer depth in the topmost layer of the crystal are formed during irradiation. Growth and coalescence of the pits lead to almost layer-by-layer desorption mode. It is demonstrated that varying surface topography affects the yield of both the halogen and the alkali atom desorption component, as well as velocity spectrum of desorbing halogen atoms (thermal versus non-thermal ratio). We propose a model in which periodic changes of the surface topography with the increasing electron fluence (from initially flat to rough at about half monolayer desorbed, back to flat after a complete monolayer removal) are modulating the surface recombination probability for the excited F-centers. By controlling the population of traps in the bulk these surface processes are causing modulation of the diffusion range of mobile defects migrating from the bulk of the material towards its surface and the bulk recombination probabilities of F- and H-centres.

  9. Chemistry of alkali cation exchanged faujasite and mesoporous NaX using alkyl halides and phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min-Hong

    The purpose of this work was to increase the reactivity of Faujasite X (NaX) zeolite toward the reactive decontamination of materials subject to nucleophilic attack by means of zeolite cation optimization and by means of the synthesis of mesoporous Faujasite X. Primary alkyl halides and trialkyl phosphates have been the test materials on which the cation-optimized and mesoporous zeolites have been tested. In the alkali cation optimization work, reactions of methyl iodide and 1-chloropropane with alkali metal cation exchanged Faujasite zeolite X were investigated at room temperature. The reactivity of the framework and the product formation were shown to depend on zeolite framework counter-cation. A quantitative study of zeolite product formation has been carried out, primarily using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Large alkali cations showed preference toward substitution chemistry. In contrast, alkyl halide exposed LiX and NaX zeolites underwent both substitution and elimination. Subsequently introduced water molecules led to hydrolysis of framework species that was sensitive to framework counter-cation. The mesoporous NaX zeolites work undertakes to test whether an improvement in surface chemical reactivity can be achieved by introducing mesopores into the already reactive nucleophilic microporous NaX zeolite. Incorporation of the polydiallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (PDADMAC) template and the formation of mesopores in Faujasite X zeolite (NaX) were successful and well-characterized. The mesopores are proposed to have occurred from incorporation of the cationic PDADMAC polymer into the zeolite by compensating zeolite framework charge. Subsequent sodium cation exchange of calcined mesoporous NaX was shown to restore the chemical reactivity characteristic of as-synthesized NaX. Trialkyl organophosphorous compounds underwent substitution reactions. The reactivity of both microporous and mesoporous Faujasite zeolite X and the product formation was shown to depend on

  10. Physics of solid and liquid alkali halide surfaces near the melting point.

    PubMed

    Zykova-Timan, T; Ceresoli, D; Tartaglino, U; Tosatti, E

    2005-10-22

    This paper presents a broad theoretical and simulation study of the high-temperature behavior of crystalline alkali halide surfaces typified by NaCl(100), of the liquid NaCl surface near freezing, and of the very unusual partial wetting of the solid surface by the melt. Simulations are conducted using two-body rigid-ion Born-Mayer-Huggins-Fumi-Tosi (BMHFT) potentials, with full treatment of long-range Coulomb forces. After a preliminary check of the description of bulk NaCl provided by these potentials, which seems generally good even at the melting point, we carry out a new investigation of solid and liquid surfaces. Solid NaCl(100) is found in this model to be very anharmonic and yet exceptionally stable when hot. It is predicted by a thermodynamic integration calculation of the surface free energy that NaCl(100) should be a well-ordered, nonmelting surface, metastable even well above the melting point. By contrast, the simulated liquid NaCl surface is found to exhibit large thermal fluctuations and no layering order. In spite of that, it is shown to possess a relatively large surface free energy. The latter is traced to a surface entropy deficit, reflecting some kind of surface short-range order. We show that the surface short-range order is most likely caused by the continuous transition of the bulk ionic melt into the vapor, made of NaCl molecules and dimers rather than of single ions. Finally, the solid-liquid interface free energy is derived through Young's equation from direct simulation of partial wetting of NaCl(100) by a liquid droplet. The resulting interface free energy is large, in line with the conspicuous solid-liquid 27% density difference. A partial wetting angle near 50 degrees close to the experimental value of 48 degrees is obtained in the process. It is concluded that three elements, namely, the exceptional anharmonic stability of the solid (100) surface, the molecular short-range order at the liquid surface, and the costly solid

  11. Molecular simulation of aqueous electrolyte solubility. 3. Alkali-halide salts and their mixtures in water and in hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Moučka, Filip; Lísal, Martin; Smith, William R

    2012-05-10

    We extend the osmotic ensemble Monte Carlo (OEMC) molecular simulation method (Moučka et al. J. Phys Chem. B 2011, 115, 7849-7861) for directly calculating the aqueous solubility of electrolytes and for calculating their chemical potentials as functions of concentration to cases involving electrolyte hydrates and mixed electrolytes, including invariant points involving simultaneous precipitation of several solutes. The method utilizes a particular semigrand canonical ensemble, which performs simulations of the solution at a fixed number of solvent molecules, pressure, temperature, and specified overall electrolyte chemical potential. It avoids calculations for the solid phase, incorporating available solid chemical potential data from thermochemical tables, which are based on well-defined reference states, or from other sources. We apply the method to a range of alkali halides in water and to selected examples involving LiCl monohydrate, mixed electrolyte solutions involving water and hydrochloric acid, and invariant points in these solvents. The method uses several existing force-field models from the literature, and the results are compared with experiment. The calculated results agree qualitatively well with the experimental trends and are of reasonable accuracy. The accuracy of the calculated solubility is highly dependent on the solid chemical potential value and also on the force-field model used. Our results indicate that pairwise additive effective force-field models developed for the solution phase are unlikely to also be good models for the corresponding crystalline solid. We find that, in our OEMC simulations, each ionic force-field model is characterized by a limiting value of the total solution chemical potential and a corresponding aqueous concentration. For higher values of the imposed chemical potential, the solid phase in the simulation grows in size without limit.

  12. Silicon halide-alkali metal flames as a source of solar grade silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D. B.; Miller, W. J.; Gould, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using continuous high-temperature reactions of alkali metals and silicon halides to produce silicon in large quantities and of suitable purity for use in the production of photovoltaic solar cells was demonstrated. Low pressure experiments were performed demonstrating the production of free silicon and providing experience with the construction of reactant vapor generators. Further experiments at higher reagent flow rates were performed in a low temperature flow tube configuration with co-axial injection of reagents and relatively pure silicon was produced. A high temperature graphite flow tube was built and continuous separation of Si from NaCl was demonstrated. A larger scaled well stirred reactor was built. Experiments were performed to investigate the compatability of graphite based reactor materials of construction with sodium. At 1100 to 1200 K none of these materials were found to be suitable. At 1700 K the graphites performed well with little damage except to coatings of pyrolytic graphite and silicon carbide which were damaged.

  13. Surface Spectroscopy Studies of the Reactive Uptake of Ozone on Alkali Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberg, J. T.; Hemminger, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    Heterogeneous reactions in the atmosphere have attracted a lot of attention. In particular, reactions involving sea-salt in the form of aerosol droplets, particles, and/or sea-ice have been implicated to significantly affect the chemistry and composition of the marine boundary layer. For example, highly reactive chlorine and bromine atoms resulting from the oxidation of sea-salt halides (Cl- and Br-) have been implicated in tropospheric ozone depletion in the arctic and in lower latitude marine regions, as well as the deposition of mercury. While the heterogeneous processing of sea-salt has been studied extensively in laboratory, field and model studies, the mechanistic details behind the release of gas-phase halogens remains unclear and has sparked some interests. Recently there has been attention focused on the interaction of important atmospheric oxidants (e.g., OH and O3) with halides that reside at the air-particle interface of sea-salt. Such chemical interactions at the surface of particles may lead to unique chemical transformations that can alter current views of known chemical processing of sea-salt particles. There are several laboratory investigations which have investigated the surface reactivity of salts by measuring the reactive loss and/or formation of gas-phase species, indicating that reactions at the interface likely play an important role in aerosol chemistry. The efficacy of such surface-phase chemistry has yet to be elucidated with surface spectroscopy studies. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a surface spectroscopy technique with submonolayer resolution. Using XPS, we have investigated changes in the surface chemistry of various alkali halide salts upon exposure to ozone in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) instrument. Salt samples were either freshly cleaved single crystals which were prepared from a melt, or purified salt crystals/powders pressed into pellets. Upon exposure to ozone, oxygen on the salt surfaces was monitored by measuring

  14. Solubility of alkali metal halides in the ionic liquid [C4C1im][OTf].

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, O; Bordes, E; Schmauck, J; Hunt, P A; Hallett, J P; Welton, T

    2016-06-28

    The solubilities of the metal halides LiF, LiCl, LiBr, LiI, NaF, NaCl, NaBr, NaI, KF, KCl, KBr, KI, RbCl, CsCl, CsI, were measured at temperatures ranging from 298.15 to 378.15 K in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([C4C1im][OTf]). Li(+), Na(+) and K(+) salts with anions matching the ionic liquid have also been investigated to determine how well these cations dissolve in [C4C1im][OTf]. This study compares the influence of metal cation and halide anion on the solubility of salts within this ionic liquid. The highest solubility found was for iodide salts, and the lowest solubility for the three fluoride salts. There is no outstanding difference in the solubility of salts with matching anions in comparison to halide salts. The experimental data were correlated employing several phase equilibria models, including ideal mixtures, van't Hoff, the λh (Buchowski) equation, the modified Apelblat equation, and the non-random two-liquid model (NRTL). It was found that the van't Hoff model gave the best correlation results. On the basis of the experimental data the thermodynamic dissolution parameters (ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG) were determined for the studied systems together with computed gas phase metathesis parameters. Dissolution depends on the energy difference between enthalpies of fusion and dissolution of the solute salt. This demonstrates that overcoming the lattice energy of the solid matrix is the key to the solubility of inorganic salts in ionic liquids. PMID:27264676

  15. Solubility of alkali metal halides in the ionic liquid [C4C1im][OTf].

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, O; Bordes, E; Schmauck, J; Hunt, P A; Hallett, J P; Welton, T

    2016-06-28

    The solubilities of the metal halides LiF, LiCl, LiBr, LiI, NaF, NaCl, NaBr, NaI, KF, KCl, KBr, KI, RbCl, CsCl, CsI, were measured at temperatures ranging from 298.15 to 378.15 K in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([C4C1im][OTf]). Li(+), Na(+) and K(+) salts with anions matching the ionic liquid have also been investigated to determine how well these cations dissolve in [C4C1im][OTf]. This study compares the influence of metal cation and halide anion on the solubility of salts within this ionic liquid. The highest solubility found was for iodide salts, and the lowest solubility for the three fluoride salts. There is no outstanding difference in the solubility of salts with matching anions in comparison to halide salts. The experimental data were correlated employing several phase equilibria models, including ideal mixtures, van't Hoff, the λh (Buchowski) equation, the modified Apelblat equation, and the non-random two-liquid model (NRTL). It was found that the van't Hoff model gave the best correlation results. On the basis of the experimental data the thermodynamic dissolution parameters (ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG) were determined for the studied systems together with computed gas phase metathesis parameters. Dissolution depends on the energy difference between enthalpies of fusion and dissolution of the solute salt. This demonstrates that overcoming the lattice energy of the solid matrix is the key to the solubility of inorganic salts in ionic liquids.

  16. Oxidative alkoxylation of phosphine in alcohol solutions of copper halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polimbetova, G. S.; Borangazieva, A. K.; Ibraimova, Zh. U.; Bugubaeva, G. O.; Keynbay, S.

    2016-08-01

    The phosphine oxidation reaction with oxygen in alcohol solutions of copper (I, II) halides is studied. Kinetic parameters, intermediates, and by-products are studied by means of NMR 31Р-, IR-, UV-, and ESR- spectroscopy; and by magnetic susceptibility, redox potentiometry, gas chromatography, and elemental analysis. A reaction mechanism is proposed, and the optimum conditions are found for the reaction of oxidative alkoxylation phosphine.

  17. Oxidative alkoxylation of phosphine in alcohol solutions of copper halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polimbetova, G. S.; Borangazieva, A. K.; Ibraimova, Zh. U.; Bugubaeva, G. O.; Keynbay, S.

    2016-08-01

    The phosphine oxidation reaction with oxygen in alcohol solutions of copper (I, II) halides is studied. Kinetic parameters, intermediates, and by-products are studied by means of NMR 31P-, IR-, UV-, and ESR- spectroscopy; and by magnetic susceptibility, redox potentiometry, gas chromatography, and elemental analysis. A reaction mechanism is proposed, and the optimum conditions are found for the reaction of oxidative alkoxylation phosphine.

  18. Optical properties of alkali halide crystals from all-electron hybrid TD-DFT calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, R. Harrison, N. M.; Bernasconi, L.

    2015-06-07

    We present a study of the electronic and optical properties of a series of alkali halide crystals AX, with A = Li, Na, K, Rb and X = F, Cl, Br based on a recent implementation of hybrid-exchange time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) (TD-B3LYP) in the all-electron Gaussian basis set code CRYSTAL. We examine, in particular, the impact of basis set size and quality on the prediction of the optical gap and exciton binding energy. The formation of bound excitons by photoexcitation is observed in all the studied systems and this is shown to be correlated to specific features of the Hartree-Fock exchange component of the TD-DFT response kernel. All computed optical gaps and exciton binding energies are however markedly below estimated experimental and, where available, 2-particle Green’s function (GW-Bethe-Salpeter equation, GW-BSE) values. We attribute this reduced exciton binding to the incorrect asymptotics of the B3LYP exchange correlation ground state functional and of the TD-B3LYP response kernel, which lead to a large underestimation of the Coulomb interaction between the excited electron and hole wavefunctions. Considering LiF as an example, we correlate the asymptotic behaviour of the TD-B3LYP kernel to the fraction of Fock exchange admixed in the ground state functional c{sub HF} and show that there exists one value of c{sub HF} (∼0.32) that reproduces at least semi-quantitatively the optical gap of this material.

  19. Optical properties of alkali halide crystals from all-electron hybrid TD-DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, R.; Bernasconi, L.; Harrison, N. M.

    2015-06-01

    We present a study of the electronic and optical properties of a series of alkali halide crystals AX, with A = Li, Na, K, Rb and X = F, Cl, Br based on a recent implementation of hybrid-exchange time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) (TD-B3LYP) in the all-electron Gaussian basis set code CRYSTAL. We examine, in particular, the impact of basis set size and quality on the prediction of the optical gap and exciton binding energy. The formation of bound excitons by photoexcitation is observed in all the studied systems and this is shown to be correlated to specific features of the Hartree-Fock exchange component of the TD-DFT response kernel. All computed optical gaps and exciton binding energies are however markedly below estimated experimental and, where available, 2-particle Green's function (GW-Bethe-Salpeter equation, GW-BSE) values. We attribute this reduced exciton binding to the incorrect asymptotics of the B3LYP exchange correlation ground state functional and of the TD-B3LYP response kernel, which lead to a large underestimation of the Coulomb interaction between the excited electron and hole wavefunctions. Considering LiF as an example, we correlate the asymptotic behaviour of the TD-B3LYP kernel to the fraction of Fock exchange admixed in the ground state functional cHF and show that there exists one value of cHF (˜0.32) that reproduces at least semi-quantitatively the optical gap of this material.

  20. Oxide Film Aging on Alloy 22 in Halide Containing Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Martin A.; Carranza, Ricardo M.; Rebak, Raul B.

    2007-07-01

    Passive and corrosion behaviors of Alloy 22 in chloride and fluoride containing solutions, changing the heat treatment of the alloy, the halide concentration and the pH of the solutions at 90 deg. C, was investigated. The study was implemented using electrochemical techniques, which included open circuit potential monitoring over time, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements carried out at open circuit and at passivity potentials. Corrosion rates obtained by EIS measurements after 24 h immersion in naturally aerated solutions were below 0.5 {mu}m/year. The corrosion rates were practically independent of solution pH, alloy heat treatment and halide ion nature and concentration. EIS low frequency resistance values increased with applied potential in the passive domain and with polarization time in pH 6 - 1 M NaCl at 90 deg. C. This effect was attributed to an increase in the oxide film thickness and oxide film aging. High frequency capacitance measurements indicated that passive oxide on Alloy 22 presented a double n-type/p-type semiconductor behavior in the passive potential range. (authors)

  1. Temperature-dependent solubilities and mean ionic activity coefficients of alkali halides in water from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mester, Zoltan; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2015-07-01

    The mean ionic activity coefficients of aqueous KCl, NaF, NaI, and NaCl solutions of varying concentrations have been obtained from molecular dynamics simulations following a recently developed methodology based on gradual insertions of salt molecules [Z. Mester and A. Z. Panagiotopoulos, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 044507 (2015)]. The non-polarizable ion models of Weerasinghe and Smith [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11342 (2003)], Gee et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 1369 (2011)], Reiser et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044504 (2014)], and Joung and Cheatham [J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 9020 (2008)] were used along with the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) water model [Berendsen et al., J. Phys. Chem. 91, 6269 (1987)] in the simulations. In addition to the chemical potentials in solution used to obtain the activity coefficients, we also calculated the chemical potentials of salt crystals and used them to obtain the solubility of these alkali halide models in SPC/E water. The models of Weerasinghe and Smith [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11342 (2003)] and Gee et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 1369 (2011)] provide excellent predictions of the mean ionic activity coefficients at 298.15 K and 1 bar, but significantly underpredict or overpredict the solubilities. The other two models generally predicted the mean ionic activity coefficients only qualitatively. With the exception of NaF for which the solubility is significantly overpredicted, the model of Joung and Cheatham predicts salt solubilities that are approximately 40%-60% of the experimental values. The models of Reiser et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044504 (2014)] make good predictions for the NaCl and NaI solubilities, but significantly underpredict the solubilities for KCl and NaF. We also tested the transferability of the models to temperatures much higher than were used to parametrize them by performing simulations for NaCl at 373.15 K and 1 bar, and at 473.15 K and 15.5 bar. All models overpredict the drop in the values of mean ionic

  2. Universal scaling of potential energy functions describing intermolecular interactions. II. The halide-water and alkali metal-water interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Werhahn, Jasper C.; Akase, Dai; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2014-08-14

    The scaled versions of the newly introduced [S. S. Xantheas and J. C. Werhahn, J. Chem. Phys.141, 064117 (2014)] generalized forms of some popular potential energy functions (PEFs) describing intermolecular interactions – Mie, Lennard-Jones, Morse, and Buckingham exponential-6 – have been used to fit the ab initio relaxed approach paths and fixed approach paths for the halide-water, X-(H2O), X = F, Cl, Br, I, and alkali metal-water, M+(H2O), M = Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, interactions. The generalized forms of those PEFs have an additional parameter with respect to the original forms and produce fits to the ab initio data that are between one and two orders of magnitude better in the χ2 than the original PEFs. They were found to describe both the long-range, minimum and repulsive wall of the respective potential energy surfaces quite accurately. Overall the 4-parameter extended Morse (eM) and generalized Buckingham exponential-6 (gBe-6) potentials were found to best fit the ab initio data for these two classes of ion-water interactions. Finally, the fitted values of the parameter of the (eM) and (gBe-6) PEFs that control the repulsive wall of the potential correlate remarkably well with the ionic radii of the halide and alkali metal ions.

  3. Electronic properties of metal-induced gap states at insulator/metal interfaces: Dependence on the alkali halide and the possibility of excitonic mechanism of superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Ryotaro; Tanida, Yoshiaki; Kuroki, Kazuhiko; Aoki, Hideo

    2004-03-01

    Motivated from the experimental observation of metal-induced gap states (MIGS) at insulator/metal interfaces by Kiguchi et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 196803 (2003)], we have theoretically investigated the electronic properties of MIGS at interfaces between various alkali halides and a metal represented by a jellium with the first-principles density-functional method. We have found that, on top of the usual evanescent state, MIGS generally have appreciable amplitudes on halogen sites with a pz-like character, whose penetration depth (λ) is as large as half the lattice constant of bulk alkali halides. This implies that λ, while little dependent on the carrier density in the jellium, is dominated by the energy gap of the alkali halide, and is scaled by the lattice constant, where λLiF<λLiCl<λLiI. We also propose a possibility of the MIGS working favorably for the exciton-mediated superconductivity, especially in a system where ˜10 Å of metal is sandwiched by alkali halide substrates.

  4. Development of processes for the production of solar grade silicon from halides and alkali metals, phase 1 and phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, C. R.; Gould, R. K.; Felder, W.

    1981-03-01

    High temperature reactions of silicon halides with alkali metals for the production of solar grade silicon are described. Product separation and collection processes were evaluated, measure heat release parameters for scaling purposes and effects of reactants and/or products on materials of reactor construction were determined, and preliminary engineering and economic analysis of a scaled up process were made. The feasibility of the basic process to make and collect silicon was demonstrated. The jet impaction/separation process was demonstrated to be a purification process. The rate at which gas phase species from silicon particle precursors, the time required for silane decomposition to produce particles, and the competing rate of growth of silicon seed particles injected into a decomposing silane environment were determined. The extent of silane decomposition as a function of residence time, temperature, and pressure was measured by infrared absorption spectroscopy. A simplistic model is presented to explain the growth of silicon in a decomposing silane enviroment.

  5. Development of processes for the production of solar grade silicon from halides and alkali metals, phase 1 and phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickson, C. R.; Gould, R. K.; Felder, W.

    1981-01-01

    High temperature reactions of silicon halides with alkali metals for the production of solar grade silicon are described. Product separation and collection processes were evaluated, measure heat release parameters for scaling purposes and effects of reactants and/or products on materials of reactor construction were determined, and preliminary engineering and economic analysis of a scaled up process were made. The feasibility of the basic process to make and collect silicon was demonstrated. The jet impaction/separation process was demonstrated to be a purification process. The rate at which gas phase species from silicon particle precursors, the time required for silane decomposition to produce particles, and the competing rate of growth of silicon seed particles injected into a decomposing silane environment were determined. The extent of silane decomposition as a function of residence time, temperature, and pressure was measured by infrared absorption spectroscopy. A simplistic model is presented to explain the growth of silicon in a decomposing silane enviroment.

  6. Lattice model calculation of elastic and thermodynamic properties at high pressure and temperature. [for alkali halides in NaCl lattice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarest, H. H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The elastic constants and the entire frequency spectrum were calculated up to high pressure for the alkali halides in the NaCl lattice, based on an assumed functional form of the inter-atomic potential. The quasiharmonic approximation is used to calculate the vibrational contribution to the pressure and the elastic constants at arbitrary temperature. By explicitly accounting for the effect of thermal and zero point motion, the adjustable parameters in the potential are determined to a high degree of accuracy from the elastic constants and their pressure derivatives measured at zero pressure. The calculated Gruneisen parameter, the elastic constants and their pressure derivatives are in good agreement with experimental results up to about 600 K. The model predicts that for some alkali halides the Grunesen parameter may decrease monotonically with pressure, while for others it may increase with pressure, after an initial decrease.

  7. Ca-Fe and Alkali-Halide Alteration of an Allende Type B CAI: Aqueous Alteration in Nebular or Asteroidal Settings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. K.; Simon, J. I.; Simon, S. B.; Grossman, L.

    2012-01-01

    Ca-Fe and alkali-halide alteration of CAIs is often attributed to aqueous alteration by fluids circulating on asteroidal parent bodies after the various chondritic components have been assembled, although debate continues about the roles of asteroidal vs. nebular modification processes [1-7]. Here we report de-tailed observations of alteration products in a large Type B2 CAI, TS4 from Allende, one of the oxidized subgroup of CV3s, and propose a speculative model for aqueous alteration of CAIs in a nebular setting. Ca-Fe alteration in this CAI consists predominantly of end-member hedenbergite, end-member andradite, and compositionally variable, magnesian high-Ca pyroxene. These phases are strongly concentrated in an unusual "nodule" enclosed within the interior of the CAI (Fig. 1). The Ca, Fe-rich nodule superficially resembles a clast that pre-dated and was engulfed by the CAI, but closer inspection shows that relic spinel grains are enclosed in the nodule, and corroded CAI primary phases interfinger with the Fe-rich phases at the nodule s margins. This CAI also contains abundant sodalite and nepheline (alkali-halide) alteration that occurs around the rims of the CAI, but also penetrates more deeply into the CAI. The two types of alteration (Ca-Fe and alkali-halide) are adjacent, and very fine-grained Fe-rich phases are associated with sodalite-rich regions. Both types of alteration appear to be replacive; if that is true, it would require substantial introduction of Fe, and transport of elements (Ti, Al and Mg) out of the nodule, and introduction of Na and Cl into alkali-halide rich zones. Parts of the CAI have been extensively metasomatized.

  8. Interaction of wide band gap single crystals with 248 nm excimer laser radiation. XII. The emission of negative atomic ions from alkali halides

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Kenichi; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.

    2007-12-01

    Many wide band gap materials yield charged and neutral emissions when exposed to sub-band-gap laser radiation at power densities below the threshold for optical breakdown and plume formation. In this work, we report the observation of negative alkali ions from several alkali halides under comparable conditions. We observe no evidence for negative halogen ions, in spite of the high electron affinities of the halogens. Significantly, the positive and negative alkali ions show a high degree of spatial and temporal overlap. A detailed study of all the relevant particle emissions from potassium chloride (KCl) suggests that K{sup -} is formed by the sequential attachment of two electrons to K{sup +}.

  9. Influence of Halide Solutions on Collagen Networks: Measurements of Physical Properties by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kempe, André; Lackner, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    The influence of aqueous halide solutions on collagen coatings was tested. The effects on resistance against indentation/penetration on adhesion forces were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the change of Young's modulus of the coating was derived. Comparative measurements over time were conducted with halide solutions of various concentrations. Physical properties of the mesh-like coating generally showed large variability. Starting with a compact set of physical properties, data disperse after minutes. A trend of increase in elasticity and permeability was found for all halide solutions. These changes were largest in NaI, displaying a logical trend with ion size. However a correlation with concentration was not measured. Adhesion properties were found to be independent of mechanical properties. The paper also presents practical experience for AFM measurements of soft tissue under liquids, particularly related to data evaluation. The weakening in physical strength found after exposure to halide solutions may be interpreted as widening of the network structure or change in the chemical properties in part of the collagen fibres (swelling). In order to design customized surface coatings at optimized conditions also for medical applications, halide solutions might be used as agents with little impact on the safety of patients. PMID:27721994

  10. Picosecond pulse radiolysis of direct and indirect radiolytic effects in highly concentrated halide aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Balcerzyk, Anna; Schmidhammer, Uli; El Omar, Abdel Karim; Jeunesse, Pierre; Larbre, Jean-Philippe; Mostafavi, Mehran

    2011-08-25

    Recently we measured the amount of the single product, Br(3)(-), of steady-state radiolysis of highly concentrated Br(-) aqueous solutions, and we showed the effect of the direct ionization of Br(-) on the yield of Br(3)(-). Here, we report the first picosecond pulse-probe radiolysis measurements of ionization of highly concentrated Br(-) and Cl(-) aqueous solutions to describe the oxidation mechanism of the halide anions. The transient absorption spectra are reported from 350 to 750 nm on the picosecond range for halide solutions at different concentrations. In the highly concentrated halide solutions, we observed that, due to the presence of Na(+), the absorption band of the solvated electron is shifted to shorter wavelengths, but its decay, taking place during the spur reactions, is not affected within the first 4 ns. The kinetic measurements in the UV reveal the direct ionization of halide ions. The analysis of pulse-probe measurements show that after the electron pulse, the main reactions in solutions containing 1 M of Cl(-) and 2 M of Br(-) are the formation of ClOH(-•) and BrOH(-•), respectively. In contrast, in highly concentrated halide solutions, containing 5 M of Cl(-) and 6 M of Br(-), mainly Cl(2)(-•) and Br(2)(-•) are formed within the electron pulse without formation of ClOH(-•) and BrOH(-•). The results suggest that, not only Br(-) and Cl(-) are directly ionized into Br(•) and Cl(•) by the electron pulse, the halide atoms can also be rapidly generated through the reactions initiated by excitation and ionization of water, such as the prompt oxidation by the hole, H(2)O(+•), generated in the coordination sphere of the anion.

  11. Molecular compressibility of some halides in alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serban, C.; Auslaender, D.

    1974-01-01

    After measuring ultrasonic velocity and density, the molecular compressibility values from Wada's formula were calculated, for alkali metal halide solutions in methyl, ethyl, butyl, and glycol alcohol. The temperature and concentration dependence were studied, finding deviations due to the hydrogen bonds of the solvent.

  12. Preparation and use of electrodes in the electrolysis of alkali halides

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, R.N.; Byrd, C.E.; Alexander, L.E.

    1986-02-25

    A process is described for electrolysis of aqueous solutions of sodium chloride in an electrolytic cell comprising an anolyte compartment and catholyte compartment separated by a diaphragm to produce an aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide in the catholyte compartment, and chlorine in the anolyte compartment. The cathode of the process is a low hydrogen overvoltage cathode made by applying to an electroconductive substrate a coating solution of nickel oxide and ruthenium oxide precursor compounds and an etchant capable of etching the surface of the substrate and/or any previously applied coating. Heating is done to remove volatiles from the so-coated substrate to cause the metal values of the precursor compounds and those etched from the substrate or previously applied coating. Further, heating is performed in the presence of oxygen, air or an oxidizing agent, to a temperature sufficient to oxidize the metal values, thereby obtaining on the substrate an electrocatalytically-active heaterogeneous metal oxide structure comprising RuO/sub 2/ and NiO.

  13. Transmission of IR light by light guides made of silver halide solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmygalev, A. S.; Zhilkin, B. P.; Korsakov, A. S.; Nizovtsev, M. I.; Sterlyagov, A. N.; Terekhov, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The possibility of transferring IR emission by light guides made of silver halide solid solutions has been experimentally studied. The energy loss in transmission of the heat radiation through a light guide in various wavelength ranges of IR light was determined. The possibility of using IR light guides for transport of thermal energy and temperature measurements by IR thermography was considered.

  14. Chemistry of alkali halide and ice surfaces: Characterization of reactions relevant to atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangmeister, Christopher Douglas

    Atmospherically-relevant surface reactions were studied. These reactions were investigated to provide insight into the products formed on sea salt atmospheric particle surfaces, the quantitative distribution of species on the surface of model sea salt particles, and the molecular environment of the interfacial region of HNO3/H2O ices. The reactions of model sea salt particles (NaCl) exposed to mineral acids (HNO3 and H2SO4) were studied using Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The reaction of powdered NaCl with HNO3 was studied using Raman spectroscopy. NANO3 growth was monitored as a function of HNO3 exposure in a flow cell. Mode-specific changes in the NO3- vibrational mode intensities with HNO3 exposure suggest a rearrangement of the NaNO3 film with coverage. In the absence of H 2O, intensities of NaNO3 bands increase with HNO3 exposure until a capping layer of NaNO3 forms. The capping layer prevents subsequent HNO3 from reacting with the underlying. The reaction of NaCl with H2SO4 is investigated using Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Raman spectra are consistent with the formation of NaHSO4 with no evidence for Na2SO4. The spectra indicate that the phase of NaHSO 4 varies with the amount of H2O in the H2SO 4. The reaction produces anhydrous β-NaHSO4 which undergoes a phase change to anhydrous α- NaHSO4. AFM measurements on NaCl (100) show the formation of two distinct types of NaHSO4 structures consistent in shape with α- NaHSO4 and β-NaHSO4 . Model sea salt particles were gown from solution to determine the surface Br/Cl of crystals grown from solution. These studies show surface Br concentration is 35 times that of the bulk concentration. This data is useful in the understanding of enhanced volatile Br compounds in the Arctic troposphere. Thin films of model polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) surfaces were studied in ultrahigh vacuum. Low temperature data show the preferential orientation of HNO3 on crystalline H2O

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of the dynamic and energetic properties of alkali and halide ions using water-model-specific ion parameters.

    PubMed

    Joung, In Suk; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2009-10-01

    The dynamic and energetic properties of the alkali and halide ions were calculated using molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy simulations with various different water and ion force fields including our recently developed water-model-specific ion parameters. The properties calculated were activity coefficients, diffusion coefficients, residence times of atomic pairs, association constants, and solubility. Through calculation of these properties, we can assess the validity and range of applicability of the simple pair potential models and better understand their limitations. Due to extreme computational demands, the activity coefficients were only calculated for a subset of the models. The results qualitatively agree with experiment. Calculated diffusion coefficients and residence times between cation-anion, water-cation, and water-anion showed differences depending on the choice of water and ion force field used. The calculated solubilities of the alkali-halide salts were generally lower than the true solubility of the salts. However, for both the TIP4P(EW) and SPC/E water-model-specific ion parameters, solubility was reasonably well-reproduced. Finally, the correlations among the various properties led to the following conclusions: (1) The reliability of the ion force fields is significantly affected by the specific choice of water model. (2) Ion-ion interactions are very important to accurately simulate the properties, especially solubility. (3) The SPC/E and TIP4P(EW) water-model-specific ion force fields are preferred for simulation in high salt environments compared to the other ion force fields.

  16. Cellulose aerogels from aqueous alkali hydroxide-urea solution.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jie; Kimura, Satoshi; Wada, Masahisa; Kuga, Shigenori; Zhang, Lina

    2008-01-01

    Highly porous and strong cellulose aerogels were prepared by gelation of cellulose from aqueous alkali hydroxide/urea solution, followed by drying with supercritical CO2. Their morphology, pore structure, and physical properties were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption measurements, UV/Vis spectrometry, and tensile tests. The cellulose hydrogel was composed of interconnected about 20 nm wide. By using supercritical CO2 drying, the network structure in the hydrogel was well preserved in the aerogel. The results are preliminary but demonstrate the ability of this method to give cellulose aerogels of large surface areas (400-500 m2 g(-1)) which may be useful as adsorbents, heat/sound insulators, filters, catalyst supports, or carbon aerogel precursors. PMID:18605678

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Dynamic and Energetic Properties of Alkali and Halide Ions Using Water-Model-Specific Ion Parameters

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic and energetic properties of the alkali and halide ions were calculated using molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy simulations with various different water and ion force fields including our recently developed water-model-specific ion parameters. The properties calculated were activity coefficients, diffusion coefficients, residence times of atomic pairs, association constants, and solubility. Through calculation of these properties, we can assess the validity and range of applicability of the simple pair potential models and better understand their limitations. Due to extreme computational demands, the activity coefficients were only calculated for a subset of the models. The results qualitatively agree with experiment. Calculated diffusion coefficients and residence times between cation−anion, water−cation, and water−anion showed differences depending on the choice of water and ion force field used. The calculated solubilities of the alkali−halide salts were generally lower than the true solubility of the salts. However, for both the TIP4PEW and SPC/E water-model-specific ion parameters, solubility was reasonably well-reproduced. Finally, the correlations among the various properties led to the following conclusions: (1) The reliability of the ion force fields is significantly affected by the specific choice of water model. (2) Ion−ion interactions are very important to accurately simulate the properties, especially solubility. (3) The SPC/E and TIP4PEW water-model-specific ion force fields are preferred for simulation in high salt environments compared to the other ion force fields. PMID:19757835

  18. Theoretical study of mixed LiLnX4 (Ln = La, Dy; X = F, Cl, Br, I) rare earth/alkali halide complexes.

    PubMed

    Groen, C P; Oskam, A; Kovács, A

    2000-12-25

    The structure, bonding and vibrational properties of the mixed LiLnX4 (Ln = La, Dy; X = F, Cl, Br, I) rare earth/alkali halide complexes were studied using various quantum chemical methods (HF, MP2 and the Becke3-Lee-Yang-Parr exchange-correlation density functional) in conjunction with polarized triple-zeta valence basis sets and quasi-relativistic effective core potentials for the heavy atoms. Our comparative study indicated the superiority of MP2 theory while the HF and B3-LYP methods as well as less sophisticated basis sets failed for the correct energetic relations. In particular, f polarization functions on Li and X proved to be important for the Li...X interaction in the complexes. From the three characteristic structures of such complexes, possessing 1-(C3v), 2-(C2v), or 3-fold coordination (C3v) between the alkali metal and the bridging halide atoms, the bi- and tridentate forms are located considerably lower on the potential energy surface then the monodentate isomer. Therefore only the bi- and tridentate isomers have chemical relevance. The monodentate isomer is only a high-lying local minimum in the case of X = F. For X = Cl, Br, and I this structure is found to be a second-order saddle point. The bidentate structure was found to be the global minimum for the systems with X = F, Cl, and Br. However, the relative stability with respect to the tridentate structure is very small (1-5 kJ/mol) for the heavier halide derivatives and the relative order is reversed in the case of the iodides. The energy difference between the three structures and the dissociation energy decrease in the row F to I. The ionic bonding in the complexes was characterized by natural charges and a topological analysis of the electron density distribution according to Bader's theorem. Variation of the geometrical and bonding characteristics between the lanthanum and dysprosium complexes reflects the effect of "lanthanide contraction". The calculated vibrational data indicate that

  19. Solution structure and behavior of dimeric uranium(III) metallocene halides

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, W.W. Jr.; Beshouri, S.M.; Stuart, A.L.; Andersen, R.A.

    1999-03-29

    The variable-temperature {sup 1}H NMR behavior of the uranium(III) dimers [Cp{double_prime}{sub 2}UX]{sub 2} and [Cp{sup {double_dagger}}{sub 2}UX]{sub 2}, where X is F, Cl, Br, or I, Cp{double_prime} is 1,3-(Me{sub 3}Si){sub 2}C{sub 5}H{sub 3}, and Cp{sup {double_dagger}} is 1,3-(Me{sub 3}C){sub 2}C{sub 5}H{sub 3}, has been examined. At low temperature, the number of inequivalent CMe{sub 3} or SiMe{sub 3} groups implies that the solution structure is the same as the solid-state structure in all of these complexes. The barriers to ring rotation in the Cp{double_prime} series are strongly dependent upon the U-X distance, but all of the barriers to ring rotation in the Cp{sup {double_dagger}} series are the same. The trends in ring rotation barriers are explained by the different conformations of the Cp ligands in the dimers. In addition to the homo-halide dimers, the variable-temperature NMR behavior of the hetero-halide dimers Cp{prime}{sub 4}({mu}-X)({mu}-Y), where Cp{prime} is Cp{double_prime} or Cp{sup {double_dagger}} and X and Y are halides where X {ne} Y, was examined. Above room temperature, the halide atoms exchange sites rapidly on the NMR time scale.

  20. A multi-frequency EPR and ENDOR study of Rh and Ir complexes in alkali and silver halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callens, F.; Vrielinck, H.; Matthys, P.

    2003-01-01

    Aliovalent Rh and Ir cations have been frequently used to influence the photographic properties of silver halide emulsions. The doping introduces several types of related defects with distinct trapping and recombination properties. EPR and ENDOR are, in principle, ideally suited for the determination of the microscopic structure of the individual centres but it will be demonstrated that well-chosen, sometimes sophisticated multi-frequency experiments are necessary in order to (partially) reach this goal. Model studies on single crystals of AgCl and NaCl also appeared indispensable for the unravelling of the spectra. In the review of Rh-centres in NaCl and AgCl special attention is paid to methods that allow to detect cation vacancies near Rh2+ complexes. An alternative explanation for the high temperature behaviour of the [RhCl6](4-) complexes in AgCl is presented.

  1. Complete-velocity-range description of negative-ion conversion of neutral atoms on an alkali-metal-halide surface under grazing geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hu; Zhou, Wang; Zhang, Meixiao; Zhou, Lihua; Ma, Yulong; Wang, Guangyi; Wu, Yong; Li, Bowen; Chen, Ximeng

    2016-06-01

    We propose a simple theoretical approach to consider negative-ion conversion of neutral atoms grazing on alkali-metal-halide crystal surfaces over the complete velocity range. The conversion process is viewed as a series of successive binary collisions between the projectile and the negatively charged sites on the surface along their trajectories due to localization of valence-band electrons at the anionic sites of the crystal. Conversion from F0 to F- via grazing scattering in LiF(100) and KI(100) is demonstrated with this model, which incorporates the key factors of image interaction and Mott-Littleton polarization interaction for electron capture. It also incorporates the decrease in the electron affinity due to Coulomb barrier tunneling of large-velocity negative ions to the vacuum level near surface anion sites. The pronounced differences in the efficiency of F- formation at LiF(100) and KI(100) surfaces are well explained by the proposed model. The relative efficiency and related saturation of the negative-ion formation for LiF and KI crystals compare well with experimental results.

  2. Band-structure calculations of noble-gas and alkali halide solids using accurate Kohn-Sham potentials with self-interaction correction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Krieger, J.B. ); Norman, M.R. ); Iafrate, G.J. )

    1991-11-15

    The optimized-effective-potential (OEP) method and a method developed recently by Krieger, Li, and Iafrate (KLI) are applied to the band-structure calculations of noble-gas and alkali halide solids employing the self-interaction-corrected (SIC) local-spin-density (LSD) approximation for the exchange-correlation energy functional. The resulting band gaps from both calculations are found to be in fair agreement with the experimental values. The discrepancies are typically within a few percent with results that are nearly the same as those of previously published orbital-dependent multipotential SIC calculations, whereas the LSD results underestimate the band gaps by as much as 40%. As in the LSD---and it is believed to be the case even for the exact Kohn-Sham potential---both the OEP and KLI predict valence-band widths which are narrower than those of experiment. In all cases, the KLI method yields essentially the same results as the OEP.

  3. Solvation structure around ruthenium(II) tris(bipyridine) in lithium halide solutions

    PubMed Central

    Josefsson, Ida; Eriksson, Susanna K.; Rensmo, Håkan; Odelius, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The solvation of the ruthenium(II) tris(bipyridine) ion ([Ru(bpy)3]2+) is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations of lithium halide solutions in polar solvents. The anion distribution around the [Ru(bpy)3]2+ complex exhibits a strong solvent dependence. In aqueous solution, the iodide ion forms a solvent shared complex with [Ru(bpy)3]2+, but not in the other solvents. Between Cl– and [Ru(bpy)3]2+, the strong hydration of the chloride ion results in a solvent separated complex where more than one solvent molecule separates the anion from the metal center. Hence, tailored solvation properties in electrolytes is a route to influence ion-ion interactions and related electron transfer processes. PMID:26798838

  4. Solution growth of single crystal methylammonium lead halide perovskite nanostructures for optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yongping; Meng, Fei; Rowley, Matthew B; Thompson, Blaise J; Shearer, Melinda J; Ma, Dewei; Hamers, Robert J; Wright, John C; Jin, Song

    2015-05-01

    Understanding crystal growth and improving material quality is important for improving semiconductors for electronic, optoelectronic, and photovoltaic applications. Amidst the surging interest in solar cells based on hybrid organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites and the exciting progress in device performance, improved understanding and better control of the crystal growth of these perovskites could further boost their optoelectronic and photovoltaic performance. Here, we report new insights on the crystal growth of the perovskite materials, especially crystalline nanostructures. Specifically, single crystal nanowires, nanorods, and nanoplates of methylammonium lead halide perovskites (CH3NH3PbI3 and CH3NH3PbBr3) are successfully grown via a dissolution-recrystallization pathway in a solution synthesis from lead iodide (or lead acetate) films coated on substrates. These single crystal nanostructures display strong room-temperature photoluminescence and long carrier lifetime. We also report that a solid-liquid interfacial conversion reaction can create a highly crystalline, nanostructured MAPbI3 film with micrometer grain size and high surface coverage that enables photovoltaic devices with a power conversion efficiency of 10.6%. These results suggest that single-crystal perovskite nanostructures provide improved photophysical properties that are important for fundamental studies and future applications in nanoscale optoelectronic and photonic devices.

  5. Characterization of an Alkali- and Halide-Resistant Laccase Expressed in E. coli: CotA from Bacillus clausii

    PubMed Central

    Brander, Søren; Mikkelsen, Jørn D.; Kepp, Kasper P.

    2014-01-01

    The limitations of fungal laccases at higher pH and salt concentrations have intensified the search for new extremophilic bacterial laccases. We report the cloning, expression, and characterization of the bacterial cotA from Bacillus clausii, a supposed alkalophilic ortholog of cotA from B. subtilis. Both laccases were expressed in E. coli strain BL21(DE3) and characterized fully in parallel for strict benchmarking. We report activity on ABTS, SGZ, DMP, caffeic acid, promazine, phenyl hydrazine, tannic acid, and bilirubin at variable pH. Whereas ABTS, promazine, and phenyl hydrazine activities vs. pH were similar, the activity of B. clausii cotA was shifted upwards by ∼0.5–2 pH units for the simple phenolic substrates DMP, SGZ, and caffeic acid. This shift is not due to substrate affinity (KM) but to pH dependence of catalytic turnover: The kcat of B. clausii cotA was 1 s−1 at pH 6 and 5 s−1 at pH 8 in contrast to 6 s−1 at pH 6 and 2 s−1 at pH 8 for of B. subtilis cotA. Overall, kcat/KM was 10-fold higher for B. subtilis cotA at pHopt. While both proteins were heat activated, activation increased with pH and was larger in cotA from B. clausii. NaCl inhibited activity at acidic pH, but not up to 500–700 mM NaCl in alkaline pH, a further advantage of the alkali regime in laccase applications. The B. clausii cotA had ∼20 minutes half-life at 80°C, less than the ∼50 minutes at 80°C for cotA from B. subtilis. While cotA from B. subtilis had optimal stability at pH∼8, the cotA from B. clausii displayed higher combined salt- and alkali-resistance. This resistance is possibly caused by two substitutions (S427Q and V110E) that could repel anions to reduce anion-copper interactions at the expense of catalytic proficiency, a trade-off of potential relevance to laccase optimization. PMID:24915287

  6. Characterization of an alkali- and halide-resistant laccase expressed in E. coli: CotA from Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Brander, Søren; Mikkelsen, Jørn D; Kepp, Kasper P

    2014-01-01

    The limitations of fungal laccases at higher pH and salt concentrations have intensified the search for new extremophilic bacterial laccases. We report the cloning, expression, and characterization of the bacterial cotA from Bacillus clausii, a supposed alkalophilic ortholog of cotA from B. subtilis. Both laccases were expressed in E. coli strain BL21(DE3) and characterized fully in parallel for strict benchmarking. We report activity on ABTS, SGZ, DMP, caffeic acid, promazine, phenyl hydrazine, tannic acid, and bilirubin at variable pH. Whereas ABTS, promazine, and phenyl hydrazine activities vs. pH were similar, the activity of B. clausii cotA was shifted upwards by ~0.5-2 pH units for the simple phenolic substrates DMP, SGZ, and caffeic acid. This shift is not due to substrate affinity (K(M)) but to pH dependence of catalytic turnover: The k(cat) of B. clausii cotA was 1 s⁻¹ at pH 6 and 5 s⁻¹ at pH 8 in contrast to 6 s⁻¹ at pH 6 and 2 s⁻¹ at pH 8 for of B. subtilis cotA. Overall, k(cat)/K(M) was 10-fold higher for B. subtilis cotA at pH(opt). While both proteins were heat activated, activation increased with pH and was larger in cotA from B. clausii. NaCl inhibited activity at acidic pH, but not up to 500-700 mM NaCl in alkaline pH, a further advantage of the alkali regime in laccase applications. The B. clausii cotA had ~20 minutes half-life at 80°C, less than the ~50 minutes at 80°C for cotA from B. subtilis. While cotA from B. subtilis had optimal stability at pH~8, the cotA from B. clausii displayed higher combined salt- and alkali-resistance. This resistance is possibly caused by two substitutions (S427Q and V110E) that could repel anions to reduce anion-copper interactions at the expense of catalytic proficiency, a trade-off of potential relevance to laccase optimization. PMID:24915287

  7. Laboratory determination of the carbon kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for reactions of methyl halides with various nucleophiles in solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baesman, S.M.; Miller, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    Large carbon kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) were measured for reactions of methyl bromide (MeBr), methyl chloride (MeCl), and methyl iodide (MeI) with various nucleophiles at 287 and 306 K in aqueous solutions. Rates of reaction of MeBr and MeI with H2O (neutral hydrolysis) or Cl- (halide substitution) were consistent with previous measurements. Hydrolysis rates increased with increasing temperature or pH (base hydrolysis). KIEs for hydrolysis were 51 ?? 6??? for MeBr and 38 ?? 8??? for MeI. Rates of halide substitution increased with increasing temperature and greater reactivity of the attacking nucleophile, with the fastest reaction being that of MeI with Br-. KIEs for halide substitution were independent of temperature but varied with the reactant methyl halide and the attacking nucleophile. KIEs were similar for MeBr substitution with Cl- and MeCl substitution with Br- (57 ?? 5 and 60 ?? 9??? respectively). The KIE for halide exchange of MeI was lower overall (33 ?? 8??? and was greater for substitution with Br- (46 ?? 6???) than with Cl- (29 ?? 6???). ?? Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005.

  8. Pre- and initial stages of epitaxy in alkali halide systems. II. Interaction of molecular beams of CsCl with (100) surfaces of NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabringhaus, H.; Haag, M.

    The interaction of molecular beams of CsCl with (100) surfaces of NaCl is studied for crystal temperatures between 560 and 620 K and for molecular beam fluxes between 2 × 10 7 and 2 × 10 13 cm -2 s -1 by measurements of transient and steady state desorption fluxes, by static SIMS, and by electron microscopy. Also for the large Cs + ions a fast cation exchange Cs + ⇌ Na + between CsCl molecules adsorbed on the terrace and the outermost surface layer of the NaCl crystal is observed. The results for undersaturation are interpreted by incorporation of Cs + ions in the outermost surface layer of the NaCl crystal and by adsorption of CsCl molecules at the monatomic steps on the surface. The outermost surface layer proves to have a maximum capacity for Cs + of 2.4 × 10 11 cm -2. The residence time of Cs + ions in the outermost surface layer is determined as τ0 = 1.6 × 10 -12 exp(1.49 (eV)/ kT), the time for desorption of CsCl molecules from the monatomic steps as τ1 = 2.9 × 10 -14 exp(1.60 (eV)/ kT). By experiments with an additional NaCl flux onto the surface it is shown that τ0 is the time for a back-exchange of Cs + ions from the outermost surface layer against Na + from NaCl admolecules. For supersaturation the growth of polymorphic CsCl islands is observed. In the first growth stages these islands show the NaCl-type structure, while for later growth stages the CsCl type structure is found. A comparative discussion of all studied alkali halide systems shows that the different results can be attributed to the different radii of guest and host cation and to lattice misfits, respectively.

  9. Thermal transport properties of halide solid solutions: Experiments vs equilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gheribi, Aïmen E. Chartrand, Patrice; Salanne, Mathieu

    2015-03-28

    The composition dependence of thermal transport properties of the (Na,K)Cl rocksalt solid solution is investigated through equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations in the entire range of composition and the results are compared with experiments published in recent work [Gheribi et al., J. Chem. phys. 141, 104508 (2014)]. The thermal diffusivity of the (Na,K)Cl solid solution has been measured from 473 K to 823 K using the laser flash technique, and the thermal conductivity was deduced from critically assessed data of heat capacity and density. The thermal conductivity was also predicted at 900 K in the entire range of composition by a series of EMD simulations in both NPT and NVT statistical ensembles using the Green-Kubo theory. The aim of the present paper is to provide an objective analysis of the capability of EMD simulations in predicting the composition dependence of the thermal transport properties of halide solid solutions. According to the Klemens-Callaway [P. G. Klemens, Phys. Rev. 119, 507 (1960) and J. Callaway and H. C. von Bayer, Phys. Rev. 120, 1149 (1960)] theory, the thermal conductivity degradation of the solid solution is explained by mass and strain field fluctuations upon the phonon scattering cross section. A rigorous analysis of the consistency between the theoretical approach and the EMD simulations is discussed in detail.

  10. Freeze-induced formation of bromine/chlorine interhalogen species from aqueous halide ion solutions.

    PubMed

    O'Concubhair, Ruairí; Sodeau, John R

    2012-10-01

    Both gaseous bromine and bromine chloride have been monitored in polar environments and implicated in the destruction of tropospheric ozone. The formation mechanisms operating for these halogen compounds have been suggested previously. However, few laboratory studies have been performed using environmentally relevant concentrations of bromide and chloride ions in polar ice mimics. In aqueous solutions held at room temperature, previous studies have shown that the major product is the Cl(2)Br¯ trihalide ion when solutions of bromate, hydrochloric acid, and bromide ions are left to equilibrate. In contrast, the results of the cryochemical experiments presented here suggest that the dibromochloride ion (BrBrCl¯) is the major product when solutions of bromate, sulfuric acid, bromide, and chloride ions are frozen. Such a species would preferentially release bromine to the gas phase. Hence, similar halide starting materials form structurally different trihalide ions when frozen, which are capable of releasing differing active halogens, BrCl and Br(2), to the gas-phase. This is a potentially important finding because Br(2) is photolyzed more readily and to longer wavelengths than BrCl and therefore the efficiency in forming products that can lead to ozone destruction in the atmosphere would be increased. Evidence is provided for the mechanism to occur by means of both the freeze-concentration effect and the incorporation of ions into the growing ice phase.

  11. Infrared Spectra of Simple Inorganic Ion Pairs in Solid Solution: A Physical Inorganic Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Philip J.; Tong, William G.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a physical inorganic experiment in which large single crystals of the alkali halides doped with divalent ion impurities are prepared easily. Demonstrates the ion pairing of inorganic ions in solid solution. (CS)

  12. Role of hydrogen bonding in solubility of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes in sodium halide solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin-Jun, Zhao; Zhi-Fu, Gao

    2016-07-01

    By employing molecular theory, we systematically investigate the shift of solubility of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) brushes in sodium halide solutions. After considering PNIPAM–water hydrogen bonds, water–anion hydrogen bonds, and PNIPAM–anion bonds and their explicit coupling to the PNIPAM conformations, we find that increasing temperature lowers the solubility of PNIPAM, and results in a collapse of the layer at high enough temperatures. The combination of the three types of bonds would yield a decrease in the solubility of PNIPAM following the Hofmeister series: NaCl>NaBr>NaI. PNIPAM–water hydrogen bonds are affected by water–anion hydrogen bonds and PNIPAM–anion bonds. The coupling of polymer conformations and the competition among the three types of bonds are essential for describing correctly a decrease in the solubility of PNIPAM brushes, which is determined by the free energy associated with the formation of the three types of bonds. Our results agree well with the experimental observations, and would be very important for understanding the shift of the lower critical solution temperature of PNIPAM brushes following the Hofmeister series. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21264016, 11464047, and 21364016) and the Joint Funds of Xinjiang Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 2015211C298).

  13. Relativistic and Solvation Effects on the Stability of Gold(III) Halides in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Theilacker, Kolja; Schlegel, H Bernhard; Kaupp, Martin; Schwerdtfeger, Peter

    2015-10-19

    The redox stability of gold halide complexes in aqueous solution has been examined quantum-chemically by a systematic comparison of scalar- and nonrelativistic pseudopotential calculations, using both COSMO and D-COSMO-RS solvent models for water. After a computational benchmarking of density-functional methods against CCSD(T) results for the gas phase decomposition AuX4(-) → AuX2(-) + X2, B3LYP calculations have been used to establish solvent contributions. While relativity clearly enhances the stability of AuX4(-) (X = F, Cl, Br, I) complexes against X2 elimination, solvation favors the lower oxidation state. Solvation and relativity are nonadditive, due to the relativistic reduction of bond polarity. At scalar relativistic D-COSMO-RS level, the reaction AuX4(-) ⇌ AuX2(-) + X2 is computed to be endergonic, except for X = I, where it is slightly exergonic. Under the chosen conditions, partial hydrolysis of AuCl4(-) to AuCl3OH(-) is exergonic. The latter complex in turn is stable against Cl2 elimination. The disproportionation 3 AuCl2(-) ⇌ AuCl4(-) + 2 Au(s) + 2 Cl(-) is clearly exergonic. All of the computed reaction energies at scalar relativistic D-COSMO-RS level agree well with the observed speciation in dilute pH-neutral solutions at ambient temperatures. PMID:26421633

  14. Alteration of alkali reactive aggregates autoclaved in different alkali solutions and application to alkali-aggregate reaction in concrete (II) expansion and microstructure of concrete microbar

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Duyou . E-mail: duyoulu@njut.edu.cn; Mei Laibao; Xu Zhongzi; Tang Mingshu; Mo Xiangyin; Fournier, Benoit

    2006-06-15

    The effect of the type of alkalis on the expansion behavior of concrete microbars containing typical aggregate with alkali-silica reactivity and alkali-carbonate reactivity was studied. The results verified that: (1) at the same molar concentration, sodium has the strongest contribution to expansion due to both ASR and ACR, followed by potassium and lithium; (2) sufficient LiOH can completely suppress expansion due to ASR whereas it can induce expansion due to ACR. It is possible to use the duplex effect of LiOH on ASR and ACR to clarify the ACR contribution when ASR and ACR may coexist. It has been shown that a small amount of dolomite in the fine-grained siliceous Spratt limestone, which has always been used as a reference aggregate for high alkali-silica reactivity, might dedolomitize in alkaline environment and contribute to the expansion. That is to say, Spratt limestone may exhibit both alkali-silica and alkali-carbonate reactivity, although alkali-silica reactivity is predominant. Microstructural study suggested that the mechanism in which lithium controls ASR expansion is mainly due to the favorable formation of lithium-containing less-expansive product around aggregate particles and the protection of the reactive aggregate from further attack by alkalis by the lithium-containing product layer.

  15. Detection of gamma photons using solution-grown single crystals of hybrid lead halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakunin, Sergii; Dirin, Dmitry N.; Shynkarenko, Yevhen; Morad, Viktoriia; Cherniukh, Ihor; Nazarenko, Olga; Kreil, Dominik; Nauser, Thomas; Kovalenko, Maksym V.

    2016-09-01

    The decay of the majority of radioactive isotopes involves the emission of gamma (γ) photons with energies of ∼50 keV to 10 MeV. Detectors of such hard radiation that are low-cost, highly sensitive and operate at ambient temperatures are desired for numerous applications in defence and medicine, as well as in research. We demonstrate that 0.3–1 cm solution-grown single crystals (SCs) of semiconducting hybrid lead halide perovskites (MAPbI3, FAPbI3 and I-treated MAPbBr3, where MA = methylammonium and FA = formamidinium) can serve as solid-state gamma-detecting materials. This possibility arises from a high charge-carrier mobility–lifetime (μτ) product of 1.0–1.8 × 10‑2 cm2 V‑1, a low dark carrier density of 109–1011 cm‑3 (refs 3,4), a low density of charge traps of 109–1010 cm‑3 (refs 4,5) and a high absorptivity of hard radiation by the lead and iodine atoms. We demonstrate the utility of perovskite detectors for testing the radiopurity of medical radiotracer compounds such as 18F-fallypride. Energy-resolved sensing at room temperature is presented using FAPbI3 SCs and an 241Am source.

  16. Detection of gamma photons using solution-grown single crystals of hybrid lead halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakunin, Sergii; Dirin, Dmitry N.; Shynkarenko, Yevhen; Morad, Viktoriia; Cherniukh, Ihor; Nazarenko, Olga; Kreil, Dominik; Nauser, Thomas; Kovalenko, Maksym V.

    2016-09-01

    The decay of the majority of radioactive isotopes involves the emission of gamma (γ) photons with energies of ˜50 keV to 10 MeV. Detectors of such hard radiation that are low-cost, highly sensitive and operate at ambient temperatures are desired for numerous applications in defence and medicine, as well as in research. We demonstrate that 0.3-1 cm solution-grown single crystals (SCs) of semiconducting hybrid lead halide perovskites (MAPbI3, FAPbI3 and I-treated MAPbBr3, where MA = methylammonium and FA = formamidinium) can serve as solid-state gamma-detecting materials. This possibility arises from a high charge-carrier mobility-lifetime (μτ) product of 1.0-1.8 × 10-2 cm2 V-1, a low dark carrier density of 109-1011 cm-3 (refs 3,4), a low density of charge traps of 109-1010 cm-3 (refs 4,5) and a high absorptivity of hard radiation by the lead and iodine atoms. We demonstrate the utility of perovskite detectors for testing the radiopurity of medical radiotracer compounds such as 18F-fallypride. Energy-resolved sensing at room temperature is presented using FAPbI3 SCs and an 241Am source.

  17. Blue-Green Color Tunable Solution Processable Organolead Chloride-Bromide Mixed Halide Perovskites for Optoelectronic Applications.

    PubMed

    Sadhanala, Aditya; Ahmad, Shahab; Zhao, Baodan; Giesbrecht, Nadja; Pearce, Phoebe M; Deschler, Felix; Hoye, Robert L Z; Gödel, Karl C; Bein, Thomas; Docampo, Pablo; Dutton, Siân E; De Volder, Michael F L; Friend, Richard H

    2015-09-01

    Solution-processed organo-lead halide perovskites are produced with sharp, color-pure electroluminescence that can be tuned from blue to green region of visible spectrum (425-570 nm). This was accomplished by controlling the halide composition of CH3NH3Pb(BrxCl1-x)3 [0 ≤ x ≤ 1] perovskites. The bandgap and lattice parameters change monotonically with composition. The films possess remarkably sharp band edges and a clean bandgap, with a single optically active phase. These chloride-bromide perovskites can potentially be used in optoelectronic devices like solar cells and light emitting diodes (LEDs). Here we demonstrate high color-purity, tunable LEDs with narrow emission full width at half maxima (FWHM) and low turn on voltages using thin-films of these perovskite materials, including a blue CH3NH3PbCl3 perovskite LED with a narrow emission FWHM of 5 nm.

  18. Blue-Green Color Tunable Solution Processable Organolead Chloride-Bromide Mixed Halide Perovskites for Optoelectronic Applications.

    PubMed

    Sadhanala, Aditya; Ahmad, Shahab; Zhao, Baodan; Giesbrecht, Nadja; Pearce, Phoebe M; Deschler, Felix; Hoye, Robert L Z; Gödel, Karl C; Bein, Thomas; Docampo, Pablo; Dutton, Siân E; De Volder, Michael F L; Friend, Richard H

    2015-09-01

    Solution-processed organo-lead halide perovskites are produced with sharp, color-pure electroluminescence that can be tuned from blue to green region of visible spectrum (425-570 nm). This was accomplished by controlling the halide composition of CH3NH3Pb(BrxCl1-x)3 [0 ≤ x ≤ 1] perovskites. The bandgap and lattice parameters change monotonically with composition. The films possess remarkably sharp band edges and a clean bandgap, with a single optically active phase. These chloride-bromide perovskites can potentially be used in optoelectronic devices like solar cells and light emitting diodes (LEDs). Here we demonstrate high color-purity, tunable LEDs with narrow emission full width at half maxima (FWHM) and low turn on voltages using thin-films of these perovskite materials, including a blue CH3NH3PbCl3 perovskite LED with a narrow emission FWHM of 5 nm. PMID:26236949

  19. Blue-Green Color Tunable Solution Processable Organolead Chloride–Bromide Mixed Halide Perovskites for Optoelectronic Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Solution-processed organo-lead halide perovskites are produced with sharp, color-pure electroluminescence that can be tuned from blue to green region of visible spectrum (425–570 nm). This was accomplished by controlling the halide composition of CH3NH3Pb(BrxCl1–x)3 [0 ≤ x ≤ 1] perovskites. The bandgap and lattice parameters change monotonically with composition. The films possess remarkably sharp band edges and a clean bandgap, with a single optically active phase. These chloride–bromide perovskites can potentially be used in optoelectronic devices like solar cells and light emitting diodes (LEDs). Here we demonstrate high color-purity, tunable LEDs with narrow emission full width at half maxima (FWHM) and low turn on voltages using thin-films of these perovskite materials, including a blue CH3NH3PbCl3 perovskite LED with a narrow emission FWHM of 5 nm. PMID:26236949

  20. Structure and properties of alizarin complex formed with alkali metal hydroxides in methanol solution.

    PubMed

    Jeliński, Tomasz; Cysewski, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    Quantum chemical computations were used for prediction of the structure and color of alizarin complex with alkali metal hydroxides in methanolic solutions. The color prediction relying on the single Gaussian-like band once again proved the usefulness of the PBE0 density functional due to the observed smallest color difference between computed and experimentally derived values. It was found that the alkali metal hydroxide molecules can bind to the two oxygen atoms of both hydroxyl groups of alizarin or to one of these atoms and the oxygen atom from the keto group in a complex with three methanol molecules. This means that two electronic transitions need to be taken into account when considering the spectra of the studied complexes. The resulting bond lengths and angles are correlated with the properties of the alkali metal atoms. The molar mass, the atomic radius, and the Pauling electronegativity of studied metals are quite accurate predictors of the geometric properties of hydroxide complexes with alizarin in methanol solution. Graphical abstract The spectra of the neutral and monoanionic form of alizarin together with color changes resulting from addition of different metal hydroxides and represented in CIE color space. PMID:27178415

  1. Structure and properties of alizarin complex formed with alkali metal hydroxides in methanol solution.

    PubMed

    Jeliński, Tomasz; Cysewski, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    Quantum chemical computations were used for prediction of the structure and color of alizarin complex with alkali metal hydroxides in methanolic solutions. The color prediction relying on the single Gaussian-like band once again proved the usefulness of the PBE0 density functional due to the observed smallest color difference between computed and experimentally derived values. It was found that the alkali metal hydroxide molecules can bind to the two oxygen atoms of both hydroxyl groups of alizarin or to one of these atoms and the oxygen atom from the keto group in a complex with three methanol molecules. This means that two electronic transitions need to be taken into account when considering the spectra of the studied complexes. The resulting bond lengths and angles are correlated with the properties of the alkali metal atoms. The molar mass, the atomic radius, and the Pauling electronegativity of studied metals are quite accurate predictors of the geometric properties of hydroxide complexes with alizarin in methanol solution. Graphical abstract The spectra of the neutral and monoanionic form of alizarin together with color changes resulting from addition of different metal hydroxides and represented in CIE color space.

  2. Ultraviolet emission from porous silicon photosynthesized in aqueous alkali fluoride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Kaoru; Tomioka, Katsuhiro; Adachi, Sadao

    2006-07-01

    Stable ultraviolet (UV) photoluminescence (PL) has been observed at room temperature in porous silicon (PSi) fabricated by photoetching in aqueous alkali fluoride solutions. The aqueous solutions used are 1 M NaF and 1 M KF. They give an alkaline reaction caused by partial hydrolysis. The PL peaks at {approx}3.3 eV have a full width at half maximum of {approx}0.1 eV, which is much smaller than those reported previously ({>=}0.5 eV). Spectral analyses suggest that both quantum confinement and surface passivation effects enable the observation of UV emission in NaF- and KF-prepared PSi samples.

  3. Electrolytic systems and methods for making metal halides and refining metals

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Justin M.; Cecala, David M.

    2015-05-26

    Disclosed are electrochemical cells and methods for producing a halide of a non-alkali metal and for electrorefining the halide. The systems typically involve an electrochemical cell having a cathode structure configured for dissolving a hydrogen halide that forms the halide into a molten salt of the halogen and an alkali metal. Typically a direct current voltage is applied across the cathode and an anode that is fabricated with the non-alkali metal such that the halide of the non-alkali metal is formed adjacent the anode. Electrorefining cells and methods involve applying a direct current voltage across the anode where the halide of the non-alkali metal is formed and the cathode where the non-alkali metal is electro-deposited. In a representative embodiment the halogen is chlorine, the alkali metal is lithium and the non-alkali metal is uranium.

  4. Low-frequency dynamics of aqueous alkali chloride solutions as probed by terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kann, Z. R.; Skinner, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Terahertz (far infrared) spectroscopy provides a useful tool for probing both ionic motions in solution and the effect of ionic solutes on the dynamics of the solvent. In this study, we calculate terahertz spectra of aqueous alkali chloride solutions using classical but novel (the water model includes three-body interactions, the ion parameterization is non-standard, and the dipole surface is polarizable) molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated spectra compare reasonably well to experimental spectra. Decomposition of the calculated spectra is used to gain a deeper understanding of the physical phenomena underlying the spectra and the connection to, for instance, the vibrational density of states for the ions. The decomposed results are also used to explain many of the cation-dependent trends observed in the experimental spectra.

  5. Low-frequency dynamics of aqueous alkali chloride solutions as probed by terahertz spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kann, Z R; Skinner, J L

    2016-06-21

    Terahertz (far infrared) spectroscopy provides a useful tool for probing both ionic motions in solution and the effect of ionic solutes on the dynamics of the solvent. In this study, we calculate terahertz spectra of aqueous alkali chloride solutions using classical but novel (the water model includes three-body interactions, the ion parameterization is non-standard, and the dipole surface is polarizable) molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated spectra compare reasonably well to experimental spectra. Decomposition of the calculated spectra is used to gain a deeper understanding of the physical phenomena underlying the spectra and the connection to, for instance, the vibrational density of states for the ions. The decomposed results are also used to explain many of the cation-dependent trends observed in the experimental spectra. PMID:27334173

  6. Thermal gelation of chitosan in an aqueous alkali-urea solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Chong; Han, Qiuyan; Guan, Ying; Zhang, Yongjun

    2014-11-01

    Chitosan can readily dissolve in a precooled aqueous alkali-urea solution, a solvent that has previously been developed to dissolve cellulose. Upon heating, the resulting solutions quickly become a gel. The thermal gelling of the chitosan solutions was studied by rheology. Initially, a temperature ramp test was used to determine the gelation temperatures (Tgel). It was found that Tgel does not significantly change with chitosan concentration. The in situ formed gels liquefy on cooling, but the liquefication temperature (Tliq) is considerably lower than Tgel, indicating a large hysteresis in the cooling process. In addition, Tliq decreases with increasing polymer concentration. The kinetics of thermal gelation was then studied by isothermal curing. The solution gels were cured not only at temperatures above the Tgel, which was determined in the temperature ramp test, but also at temperatures far below the Tgel, provided that the solution is cured at the temperature for a long enough time. The solutions become gel faster when cured at higher temperatures. When cured at the same temperature, higher concentration solutions become gel faster. The apparent activation energy for the thermal gelation of the chitosan solutions was determined to be ∼200 kJ mol(-1). Physical gels of pure chitosan were obtained by repeated soaking the in situ formed gels in water. Preliminary test shows that new gels are highly biocompatible. PMID:25182118

  7. Tunable room-temperature spin-selective optical Stark effect in solution-processed layered halide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Giovanni, David; Chong, Wee Kiang; Dewi, Herlina Arianita; Thirumal, Krishnamoorthy; Neogi, Ishita; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Mhaisalkar, Subodh; Mathews, Nripan; Sum, Tze Chien

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast spin manipulation for opto–spin logic applications requires material systems that have strong spin-selective light-matter interaction. Conventional inorganic semiconductor nanostructures [for example, epitaxial II to VI quantum dots and III to V multiple quantum wells (MQWs)] are considered forerunners but encounter challenges such as lattice matching and cryogenic cooling requirements. Two-dimensional halide perovskite semiconductors, combining intrinsic tunable MQW structures and large oscillator strengths with facile solution processability, can offer breakthroughs in this area. We demonstrate novel room-temperature, strong ultrafast spin-selective optical Stark effect in solution-processed (C6H4FC2H4NH3)2PbI4 perovskite thin films. Exciton spin states are selectively tuned by ~6.3 meV using circularly polarized optical pulses without any external photonic cavity (that is, corresponding to a Rabi energy of ~55 meV and equivalent to applying a 70 T magnetic field), which is much larger than any conventional system. The facile halide and organic replacement in these perovskites affords control of the dielectric confinement and thus presents a straightforward strategy for tuning light-matter coupling strength. PMID:27386583

  8. Tunable room-temperature spin-selective optical Stark effect in solution-processed layered halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Giovanni, David; Chong, Wee Kiang; Dewi, Herlina Arianita; Thirumal, Krishnamoorthy; Neogi, Ishita; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Mhaisalkar, Subodh; Mathews, Nripan; Sum, Tze Chien

    2016-06-01

    Ultrafast spin manipulation for opto-spin logic applications requires material systems that have strong spin-selective light-matter interaction. Conventional inorganic semiconductor nanostructures [for example, epitaxial II to VI quantum dots and III to V multiple quantum wells (MQWs)] are considered forerunners but encounter challenges such as lattice matching and cryogenic cooling requirements. Two-dimensional halide perovskite semiconductors, combining intrinsic tunable MQW structures and large oscillator strengths with facile solution processability, can offer breakthroughs in this area. We demonstrate novel room-temperature, strong ultrafast spin-selective optical Stark effect in solution-processed (C6H4FC2H4NH3)2PbI4 perovskite thin films. Exciton spin states are selectively tuned by ~6.3 meV using circularly polarized optical pulses without any external photonic cavity (that is, corresponding to a Rabi energy of ~55 meV and equivalent to applying a 70 T magnetic field), which is much larger than any conventional system. The facile halide and organic replacement in these perovskites affords control of the dielectric confinement and thus presents a straightforward strategy for tuning light-matter coupling strength. PMID:27386583

  9. The effects of lithium hydroxide solution on alkali silica reaction gels created with opal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Lyndon D.; Beaudoin, James J.; Grattan-Bellew, Patrick

    2004-04-01

    The reaction of Nevada opal with calcium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide and lithium hydroxide solutions was investigated. In addition, opal was exposed to a combined solution of these three hydroxides. The progress of the three reactions was followed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD results indicated the presence of a low-angle peak exclusive to the lithium-based reactions. The NMR results suggested a change in the silicate structure in the presence of lithium. These techniques indicated that the reaction of the alkali with the opal starting material is inhibited and perhaps stopped in the presence of lithium hydroxide. SEM revealed that the morphology of the reaction products on the surface of the reacted opal grains is markedly different invariably. It was concluded that evidence to support the theory of a protective layer exists and that the nature of the layer varies with ion type.

  10. Computation of methodology-independent single-ion solvation properties from molecular simulations. IV. Optimized Lennard-Jones interaction parameter sets for the alkali and halide ions in water

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, Maria M.; Huenenberger, Philippe H.

    2011-04-14

    The raw single-ion solvation free energies computed from atomistic (explicit-solvent) simulations are extremely sensitive to the boundary conditions and treatment of electrostatic interactions used during these simulations. However, as shown recently [M. A. Kastenholz and P. H. Huenenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224501 (2006); M. M. Reif and P. H. Huenenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144103 (2010)], the application of appropriate correction terms permits to obtain methodology-independent results. The corrected values are then exclusively characteristic of the underlying molecular model including in particular the ion-solvent van der Waals interaction parameters, determining the effective ion size and the magnitude of its dispersion interactions. In the present study, the comparison of calculated (corrected) hydration free energies with experimental data (along with the consideration of ionic polarizabilities) is used to calibrate new sets of ion-solvent van der Waals (Lennard-Jones) interaction parameters for the alkali (Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cs{sup +}) and halide (F{sup -}, Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -}, I{sup -}) ions along with either the SPC or the SPC/E water models. The experimental dataset is defined by conventional single-ion hydration free energies [Tissandier et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 7787 (1998); Fawcett, J. Phys. Chem. B 103, 11181] along with three plausible choices for the (experimentally elusive) value of the absolute (intrinsic) hydration free energy of the proton, namely, {Delta}G{sub hyd} {sup O-minus} [H{sup +}]=-1100, -1075 or -1050 kJ mol{sup -1}, resulting in three sets L, M, and H for the SPC water model and three sets L{sub E}, M{sub E}, and H{sub E} for the SPC/E water model (alternative sets can easily be interpolated to intermediate {Delta}G{sub hyd} {sup O-minus} [H{sup +}] values). The residual sensitivity of the calculated (corrected) hydration free energies on the volume-pressure boundary conditions and on the effective

  11. Properties of alkali-solubilized collagen solution crosslinked by N-hydroxysuccinimide activated adipic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yihui; Zhang, Min; Liu, Wentao; Li, Guoying

    2011-03-01

    The effect of N-hydroxysuccinimide activated adipic acid (NHS-AA) on the properties of alkali-solubilized collagen solutions was examined. The residual amino group content in crosslinked collagen, determined by trinitrobenzensulfonic acid (TNBS) assay, was decreased with increasing NHS-AA concentration. The results from differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) indicated that the maximum denaturation temperature ( T d) of crosslinked collagen solution was about 4.2°C higher than that of un-crosslinked collagen solution (36.6°C). Moreover, the values of storage modulus ( G'), loss modulus ( G″) and complex viscosity ( η*), obtained by means of dynamic frequency sweeps, were increased as NHS-AA concentration added up to 1.5 mM, and then decreased slightly when further increased NHS-AA concentration. Besides, for collagen solution crosslinked with 1.5 mM NHS-AA, dynamic denaturation temperature ( T dd) was about 1.1°C lower than T d (40.8°C), and the Arrhenius-type time-temperature superposition (TTS) principle was applied to yield the activation energy to be 474.4 kJmol-1.

  12. Structural properties and adsorption capacity of holocellulose aerogels synthesized from an alkali hydroxide-urea solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Gu-Joong; Kim, Dae-Young; Hwang, Jae-Hyun; Kang, Joo-Hyon

    2014-05-01

    A tulip tree was used to synthesize a holocellulose aerogel from an aqueous alkali hydroxide-urea solution with the substitution of an organic solvent followed by freeze-drying. For comparison, the synthesized holocellulose aerogels were divided into two groups according to the source of the hydrogel, an upper suspended layer and a bottom concentrated layer of the centrifuged solution of cellulose and NaOH/urea solvents. We investigated the effects of the temperature of the pre-cooled NaOH/urea solution ( i.e., dissolution temperature) on the pore structure and the adsorption capacity of the holocellulose aerogel. A nano-fibrillar network structure of the holocellulose aerogel was observed, with little morphological difference in pore structure for different dissolution temperatures. Both micropores and mesopores were observed in the holocellulose aerogel. The specific surface area of the holocellulose aerogel was generally greater at lower dissolution temperatures. In a series of adsorption tests using methylene blue, the holocellulose aerogel showed the greatest adsorption capacity at the lowest dissolution temperature tested (-2°C). However, the dissolution temperature generally had little effect on the adsorption capacity. The holocellulose aerogel produced from the upper suspended layer of the centrifuged hydrogel solution showed a greater porosity and adsorption capacity than the one produced from the bottom concentrated layer. Overall, the aerogel made by utilizing a delignified tulip tree display a high surface area and a high adsorption property, indicating its possible application in eco-friendly adsorption materials.

  13. [Fluorescence enhancement of flavoxate hydrochloride in alkali solution and its application in pharmaceutical analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-hong; Sun, Chong-mei; Wei, Yong-ju

    2015-10-01

    Fluorescence enhancement reaction of flavoxate hydrochloride (FX) in strong alkali solution was studied, the mechanism of the reaction was investigated, and a novel fluorimetric method for analysis of FX in drug sample was established. FX has no intrinsic fluorescence, but it can slowly produce fluorescence in strong alkali solution. Heating can promote the fluorescence enhancement reaction. In 3D fluorescence spectra of the decomposition product of FX, two fluorescence peaks, located respectively at excitation wavelengths λex/ emission wavelength λem =223/410 nm, and 302/410 nm, were observed. Using quinine sulfate as a reference, fluorescence quantum yield of the decomposition product was measured to be 0.50. The structural characteriza- tion and spectral analysis of the decomposition product reveal that ester bond hydrolysis reaction of FX is firstly occurred during heating process, forming 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid (MFA), then a cleavage reaction of the γ-pyrone ring of MFA occurred, producing α, β-unsaturated ketone. This product includes adjacent hydroxyl benzoic acid group in its molecule, which can form intramolecular hydrogen bond under alkaline condition, so that increase the conjugate degree and enhance the rigidity of the molecule, and thereby cause fluorescence enhancement. Based on this fluorescence enhancement reaction, a fluorimetric method was proposed for the determination of FX. A linear calibration curve covered the concentration range 0.020 3-0.487 µg · mL. The regression equation was I(F) = 23.9 + 5357.3 c, with correlation coefficient r = 0.999 7 (n = 8), detection limit D = 1.1 ng · mL(-1). The method was applied to the analysis of FX tablets, with a spiked recovery rate of 100.2%. The reliability of the method was verified by a UV-spectrophotometric method.

  14. [Fluorescence enhancement of flavoxate hydrochloride in alkali solution and its application in pharmaceutical analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-hong; Sun, Chong-mei; Wei, Yong-ju

    2015-10-01

    Fluorescence enhancement reaction of flavoxate hydrochloride (FX) in strong alkali solution was studied, the mechanism of the reaction was investigated, and a novel fluorimetric method for analysis of FX in drug sample was established. FX has no intrinsic fluorescence, but it can slowly produce fluorescence in strong alkali solution. Heating can promote the fluorescence enhancement reaction. In 3D fluorescence spectra of the decomposition product of FX, two fluorescence peaks, located respectively at excitation wavelengths λex/ emission wavelength λem =223/410 nm, and 302/410 nm, were observed. Using quinine sulfate as a reference, fluorescence quantum yield of the decomposition product was measured to be 0.50. The structural characteriza- tion and spectral analysis of the decomposition product reveal that ester bond hydrolysis reaction of FX is firstly occurred during heating process, forming 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid (MFA), then a cleavage reaction of the γ-pyrone ring of MFA occurred, producing α, β-unsaturated ketone. This product includes adjacent hydroxyl benzoic acid group in its molecule, which can form intramolecular hydrogen bond under alkaline condition, so that increase the conjugate degree and enhance the rigidity of the molecule, and thereby cause fluorescence enhancement. Based on this fluorescence enhancement reaction, a fluorimetric method was proposed for the determination of FX. A linear calibration curve covered the concentration range 0.020 3-0.487 µg · mL. The regression equation was I(F) = 23.9 + 5357.3 c, with correlation coefficient r = 0.999 7 (n = 8), detection limit D = 1.1 ng · mL(-1). The method was applied to the analysis of FX tablets, with a spiked recovery rate of 100.2%. The reliability of the method was verified by a UV-spectrophotometric method. PMID:26837181

  15. Heat capacity of molten halides.

    PubMed

    Redkin, Alexander A; Zaikov, Yurii P; Korzun, Iraida V; Reznitskikh, Olga G; Yaroslavtseva, Tatiana V; Kumkov, Sergey I

    2015-01-15

    The heat capacities of molten salts are very important for their practical use. Experimental investigation of this property is challenging because of the high temperatures involved and the corrosive nature of these materials. It is preferable to combine experimental investigations with empirical relationships, which allows for the evaluation of the heat capacity of molten salt mixtures. The isobaric molar heat capacities of all molten alkali and alkaline-earth halides were found to be constant for each group of salts. The value depends on the number of atoms in the salt, and the molar heat capacity per atom is constant for all molten halide salts with the exception of the lithium halides. The molar heat capacities of molten halides do not change when the anions are changed.

  16. Heat capacity of molten halides.

    PubMed

    Redkin, Alexander A; Zaikov, Yurii P; Korzun, Iraida V; Reznitskikh, Olga G; Yaroslavtseva, Tatiana V; Kumkov, Sergey I

    2015-01-15

    The heat capacities of molten salts are very important for their practical use. Experimental investigation of this property is challenging because of the high temperatures involved and the corrosive nature of these materials. It is preferable to combine experimental investigations with empirical relationships, which allows for the evaluation of the heat capacity of molten salt mixtures. The isobaric molar heat capacities of all molten alkali and alkaline-earth halides were found to be constant for each group of salts. The value depends on the number of atoms in the salt, and the molar heat capacity per atom is constant for all molten halide salts with the exception of the lithium halides. The molar heat capacities of molten halides do not change when the anions are changed. PMID:25530462

  17. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  18. Washing of Petroleum and Arsenic Contaminated Soil with Ultrasound and Alkali Phosphate Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung Hwa; Kim, Jae Gon; Cho, Yong-chan; Chon, Chul-Min; Nam, In-Hyun; Keum, Mi Jung

    2015-04-01

    Soil washing of fine textured soil has been a challenging remedial strategy due to its low remediation efficiency. We adapted ultrasound and dispersion solution to increase the remediation efficiency of the soil washing. The ultrasound and dispersion agent may enhance the dispersion of the aggregate into individual particles and may enhance release of contaminants from the aggregate. We collected the arsenic (As) contaminated silt loam soil from a smelting site, spiked with 1% of diesel and incubated for 6 months. We tested the dispersion rate and the release of diesel with the incubated soil at various pH and concentrations of orthophosphate, pyrophosphate and hexametaphosphate with or without the ultrasound of 28 kHz and 400 W. The As concentrations of coarse (> medium silt) and fine (solution. The application of ultrasound sharply increased the dispersion rate and diesel release comparing with no ultrasound. The optimum condition of the soil washing was turned out to be pH 11_10 mM Na-hexametaphosphate with the ultrasound. The concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbon of the incubated soil reduced from 3101.3 mg kg-1 to 14.0 mg kg-1 after 10 minute washing at the optimum condition. The fine fraction had much higher As concentration than the coarse fraction: 44.4 mg kg-1 for the fine fraction and 14.4 mg kg-1 for the coarse fraction. The results of this study indicate that the ultrasound and alkali phosphate solution increase the soil washing efficiency and can be a promising technology for the remediation of fine textured contaminated soils. Key Words : Ultrasound, Phosphate solution, Soil washing, Mixed contaminants

  19. Release of gas-phase halogens by photolytic generation of OH in frozen halide-nitrate solutions: an active halogen formation mechanism?

    PubMed

    Abbatt, J; Oldridge, N; Symington, A; Chukalovskiy, V; McWhinney, R D; Sjostedt, S; Cox, R A

    2010-06-17

    To better define the mechanisms by which condensed-phase halides may be oxidized to form gas-phase halogens under polar conditions, experiments have been conducted whereby frozen solutions containing chloride (1 M), bromide (1.6 x 10(-3) to 5 x 10(-2) M), iodide (<1 x 10(-5) M), and nitrate (0.01 to 1 M) have been illuminated by ultraviolet light in a continually flushed cell. Gas-phase products are quantified using chemical ionization mass spectrometry, and experiments were conducted at both 248 and 263 K. Br(2) was the dominant product, along with smaller yields of IBr and trace BrCl and I(2). The Br(2) yields were largely independent of the Br(-)/Cl(-) ratio of the frozen solution, down to seawater composition. However, the yields of halogens were strongly dependent on the levels of NO(3)(-) and acidity in solution, consistent with a mechanism whereby NO(3)(-) photolysis yields OH that oxidizes the condensed-phase halides. In support, we observed the formation of gas-phase NO(2), formed simultaneously with OH. Gas-phase HONO was also observed, suggesting that halide oxidation by HONO in the condensed phase may also occur to some degree. By measuring the production rate of condensed-phase OH, using benzoic acid as a radical trap, we determine that the molar yield of Br(2) formation relative to OH generation is 0.6, consistent with each OH being involved in halide oxidation. These studies suggest that gas-phase halogen formation should occur simultaneously with NO(x) release from frozen sea ice and snow surfaces that contain sufficient halides and deposited nitrate.

  20. Oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.; Fullam, Harold T.

    1985-01-01

    A process for oxidizing hydrogen halides having substantially no sulfur impurities by means of a catalytically active molten salt is disclosed. A mixture of the subject hydrogen halide and an oxygen bearing gas is contacted with a molten salt containing an oxidizing catalyst and alkali metal normal sulfates and pyrosulfates to produce an effluent gas stream rich in the elemental halogen and substantially free of sulfur oxide gases.

  1. Dilute nitric or nitrous acid solution containing halide ions as effective media for pure gold dissolution.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Masashi; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Okamura, Kei

    2015-08-14

    The greatly enhanced oxidation ability of dilute aqueous nitric acid (0.10-2.0 mol L(-1)) containing bromide and iodide salts as well as chloride salts has been examined based on the dissolution kinetics of pure gold at 30-60 °C. It has been found that bromide salts are more effective than chloride salts in gaining the ability of dissolving gold in dilute aqueous nitric acid solution. At 60 °C, a piece of gold-wire (ca. 20 mg) is dissolved in 20 mL of as low as 0.10 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution containing 1.0-5.0 mol L(-1) NaBr and the dissolution rate constant, log(k/s(-1)), increases linearly (from -5.78 to -4.52) with the increasing NaBr concentration. The addition of organic solvents, such as acetonitrile and acetic acid, causes acceleration of gold dissolution in LiBr and NaBr solutions. With increasing MeCN contents, for instance, the log(k/s(-1)) value of 0.10 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution containing 2.0 mol L(-1) NaBr increases linearly from -5.30 to -4.61 at 30% (v/v) MeCN. The bromide salts affect the gold dissolution rate constant in the order of KBr < NaBr < LiBr < CaBr2. With increasing NaI concentration (0.20-3.0 mol L(-1)), some acceleration in log(k/s(-1)) of 0.50 or 1.0 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution has been observed; however, the slope of acceleration as the function of NaI concentration is much smaller than that of NaCl or NaBr. The gold dissolution ability has been examined also for nitrous acid containing chloride and bromide ions at 35 °C. The NaNO2 solution containing twice or more amounts of HX (X = Cl, Br) gives the maximum efficiency for gold dissolution, according to the log(k/s(-1)) values of the mixed solutions of NaNO2 (0.10-2.0 mol L(-1)) and HX of various concentrations. The influence of oxidation by dilute nitric and nitrous acids on the gold dissolution is discussed from the standpoint of the redox potentials in "modified" aqueous solutions and not of the changes in the activity coefficients of ions.

  2. The Origin of Alkali and Ocean Island Basalts: Contradictions and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, K.; Langmuir, C. H.; Goldstein, S. L.; Lagatta, A.

    2001-12-01

    OIB are generally thought to be derived as melts of subducted ocean crust. Nd and Sr isotopes are consistent with this model and require long term source depletion. But this model is difficult to reconcile with OIB chemical compositions. (1) Sun and Hanson (1974), in the first attempt at trace element inversion, showed that the OIB mantle source is LREE enriched . But recycled MORB are LREE depleted. (2) OIB incompatible element ratios are not consistent with recycled MORB converted to eclogite or pyroxenite, which would melt to large extents in the upwelling mantle, and highly incompatible elements would not be fractionated. (3). Primitive OIB have magnesian major element compositions that suggest equilibration with peridotite, and are generally inconsistent with being partial melts of recycled MORB. (4) Volatiles are released during subduction, so recycled materials should be volatile poor, and primitive noble gas signitures should be absent. Instead, OIB are volatile- and 3He-rich. These are the geochemical aspects of the OIB Paradox. There are also geological contradictions. While OIB are believed to come from plumes derived from recycled ocean crust, the OIB magma type is not restricted to hot spot locations. OIB-like lavas occur throughout the ocean floor, in and behind convergent margins, in continental rifts, and elsewhere- as also pointed out by Sun and Hanson. A solution to these contradictions is that OIB reservoirs form by addition of low degree melts of subducted ocean crust to surrounding mantle. Generically, this model accounts for the problems listed above. Low degree melts contain most of the radiogenic elements and therefore impart the isotope signature of the recycled materials. The low degree melts do not modify the major element composition of the mantle significantly, and therefore allow OIB to be melts of peridotite. Very low extents of melting are able to fractionate highly incompatible elements and create relatively constant incompatible

  3. Highly stable solution processed metal-halide perovskite lasers on nanoimprinted distributed feedback structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Philipp; Stulz, Mareike; Kapp, Dorothee; Abzieher, Tobias; Paetzold, Ulrich W.; Quintilla, Aina; Howard, Ian A.; Kalt, Heinz; Lemmer, Uli

    2016-10-01

    We report on the performance and stability of distributed feedback lasers based on the solution-processed methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3). The CH3NH3PbI3 layers are processed via solution-casting in ambient atmosphere onto nanoimprinted second order Bragg gratings. This way, we achieve highly polarized surface-emitted lasing at room temperature with a linewidth of less than 0.2 nm and a laser threshold of 120 kW/cm2. The lasing is stable; no change in the laser emission within 15 h of pulsed excitation with a repetition rate of 1 kHz (corresponding to >5 × 107 pulses) is observed, exceeding the stability achieved for solution processed organic semiconductor lasers. Furthermore, adjustment of the grating period allowed the lasing wavelength to be varied over the entire bandwidth of the amplified spontaneous emission (between 781 and 794 nm). The fabrication process of nanoimprinting followed by solution-casting of the gain material demonstrates that stable CH3NH3PbI3 lasers are compatible with scalable production technologies and offers a route towards electrically pumped diode architectures.

  4. Studies on extraction of beryllium from thiocyanate solutions by quaternary ammonium halides.

    PubMed

    El-Yamani, I S; El-Messieh, E N

    A 0.4M tricaprylmethylammonium chloride solution in n-hexane was used for the quantitative extraction of beryllium from hydrochloric acid (pH 3) and 5M potassium thiocyanate. Beryllium was stripped from the organic phase with 1M sodium hydroxide, then determined volumetrically with bismuthyl perchlorate and bromocresol green indicator. Beryllium was extracted in presence of a large number of elements which are usually associated with it in beryl and in fission products of nuclear fuel.

  5. Detection of X-ray photons by solution-processed lead halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakunin, Sergii; Sytnyk, Mykhailo; Kriegner, Dominik; Shrestha, Shreetu; Richter, Moses; Matt, Gebhard J.; Azimi, Hamed; Brabec, Christoph J.; Stangl, Julian; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Heiss, Wolfgang

    2015-07-01

    The evolution of real-time medical diagnostic tools such as angiography and computer tomography from radiography based on photographic plates was enabled by the development of integrated solid-state X-ray photon detectors made from conventional solid-state semiconductors. Recently, for optoelectronic devices operating in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions, solution-processed organic and inorganic semiconductors have also attracted a great deal of attention. Here, we demonstrate a possibility to use such inexpensive semiconductors for the sensitive detection of X-ray photons by direct photon-to-current conversion. In particular, methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) offers a compelling combination of fast photoresponse and a high absorption cross-section for X-rays, owing to the heavy Pb and I atoms. Solution-processed photodiodes as well as photoconductors are presented, exhibiting high values of X-ray sensitivity (up to 25 μC mGyair-1 cm-3) and responsivity (1.9 × 104 carriers/photon), which are commensurate with those obtained by the current solid-state technology.

  6. Water adsorption, solvation and deliquescence of alkali halide thin films on SiO2 studied by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Arima, Kenta; Jiang, Peng; Deng, Xingyi; Bluhm, Henrik; Salmeron, Miquel

    2010-03-31

    The adsorption of water on KBr thin films evaporated onto SiO2 was investigated as a function of relative humidity (RH) by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. At 30percent RH adsorbed water reaches a coverage of approximately one monolayer. As the humidity continues to increase, the coverage of water remains constant or increases very slowly until 60percent RH, followed by a rapid increase up to 100percent RH. At low RH a significant number of the Br atoms are lost due to irradiation damage. With increasing humidity solvation increases ion mobility and gives rise to a partial recovery of the Br/K ratio. Above 60percent RH the increase of the Br/K ratio accelerates. Above the deliquescence point (85percent RH), the thickness of the water layer continues to increase and reaches more than three layers near saturation. The enhancement of the Br/K ratio at this stage is roughly a factor 2.3 on a 0.5 nm KBr film, indicating a strong preferential segregation of Br ions to the surface of the thin saline solution on SiO2.

  7. [Effect of myosin alkali light chains on myosin subfragment 1 interaction with actin in solution and in ghost muscle fiber].

    PubMed

    Levistkiĭ, D I; Borovikov, Iu S; Nikolaeva, O P; Golitsyna, N L; Poglazov, B F

    1990-09-01

    At low ionic strength (7-25 mM) Mg2(+)-ATPase of myosin subfragment 1 (S1) isoforms containing alkali light chain A1 [S1(A1)] is activated by actin 1.5-2.5 times as strongly as Mg2(+)-ATPase of S1 isoforms containing alkali light chain A2[S1(A2)]. Data from analytical ultracentrifugation suggest that at low ionic strength in the absence of ATP in solution S1(A1) displays a higher affinity for F-actin than S1(A2). Such a higher affinity of S1(A1) for F-actin was also demonstrated by experiments, in which the interaction of S1 isoforms fluorescently labeled by 1.5-IAEDANS with F-actin of ghost fibers (single glycerinated muscle fibers containing F-actin but devoid of myosin) was studied. Using polarization microfluorimetry, it was shown that the interaction of both S1 isoforms with ghost fiber F-actin induces similar changes in the parameters of polarized tryptophan fluorescence. At the same time the mobility of the fluorescent probe, 1.5-IAEDANS, specifically attached to the SH-group of Cys-374 in the C-terminal region of action is markedly decreased by S1(A1) and is only slightly affected by S1(A2). The data obtained suggest that S1(A1) and S1(A2) interact with the C-terminal region of the actin molecule in different ways, i.e. S1(A1) is attached more firmly than S1(A2). This may be due to the existence of contacts between the alkali light chain of A1 of S1(A1) and the C-terminal region of actin as well as to the absence of such contacts in the case of S1(A2).

  8. A facile one-step solution deposition via non-solvent/solvent mixture for efficient organometal halide perovskite light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Bo; Zhu, Xiaobo; Wu, Wen; Dong, Hua; Xia, Bin; Xi, Jun; Lei, Ting; Hou, Xun; Wu, Zhaoxin

    2016-06-01

    Although organometal halide perovskite materials have shown great potential in light-emitting diodes, their performance is greatly restricted by the poor morphology of the perovskite layer. In this work, we demonstrate a facile one-step solution method to improve the perovskite film morphology via a non-solvent/solvent mixture. An efficient CH3NH3PbBr3-based light-emitting diode was prepared with a chlorobenzene/N,N-dimethylformamide mixed solvent. A high efficiency of 0.54 cd A(-1) is demonstrated, which is 22 times higher than that of a device fabricated by a traditional one-step solution process. Furthermore, the uniformity of the emission region and the device stability are strongly improved by this facile one-step solution process. Our work paves a new way for the morphological control of perovskite films for application in light-emitting diodes.

  9. Tuning indium tin oxide work function with solution-processed alkali carbonate interfacial layers for high-efficiency inverted organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Chen, Qi; Mao, Lin; Wang, Yixin; Huang, Xun; Lu, Wei; Wang, Bing; Chen, Liwei

    2013-12-01

    Selective electron collection by an interfacial layer modified indium tin oxide cathode is critically important for achieving high-efficiency inverted structure organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Here, we demonstrate that solution-processed alkali carbonates, such as Li2CO3, Na2CO3, K2CO3, Rb2CO3, Cs2CO3, are good interfacial layer materials. Both carbonate concentration and annealing conditions can affect cathode work function and surface roughness. By proper optimization, different alkali carbonates can be almost equally effective as the cathode interfacial layer. Furthermore, good device performance can be achieved at a low annealing temperature (<50 ° C), which allows for potential applications in solution-processed inverted OPV cells on plastic substrates. This work indicates that alkali carbonates, not just cesium carbonate, are valid choices as the cathode interlayer in inverted OPV devices.

  10. Bioactive surface modification of Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy through alkali solution treatments.

    PubMed

    Takematsu, E; Katsumata, K; Okada, K; Niinomi, M; Matsushita, N

    2016-05-01

    Bioactive surface modification of Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy (TNTZ) was performed through three different alkali solution treatments, including the electrochemical (E), hydrothermal (H), and hydrothermal-electrochemical (HE) processes; all of the processes lead to the formation of sodium-contained amorphous titanium oxide layers on TNTZ samples. The TNTZ samples subjected to the E, H, and HE processes exhibit a flat surface, smooth and fine mesh-like structure surface, and rough mesh-like structure surface, respectively. In the bioactive test, namely, simulated body fluid test, apatite inductivity increases as the surface morphology becomes rough. The order of inductivity for the three processes was HE>H>E. The surface chemical composition also affects the apatite induction ability. The surface with fewer niobium species exhibits better apatite inductivity. PMID:26952470

  11. Bioactive surface modification of Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy through alkali solution treatments.

    PubMed

    Takematsu, E; Katsumata, K; Okada, K; Niinomi, M; Matsushita, N

    2016-05-01

    Bioactive surface modification of Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy (TNTZ) was performed through three different alkali solution treatments, including the electrochemical (E), hydrothermal (H), and hydrothermal-electrochemical (HE) processes; all of the processes lead to the formation of sodium-contained amorphous titanium oxide layers on TNTZ samples. The TNTZ samples subjected to the E, H, and HE processes exhibit a flat surface, smooth and fine mesh-like structure surface, and rough mesh-like structure surface, respectively. In the bioactive test, namely, simulated body fluid test, apatite inductivity increases as the surface morphology becomes rough. The order of inductivity for the three processes was HE>H>E. The surface chemical composition also affects the apatite induction ability. The surface with fewer niobium species exhibits better apatite inductivity.

  12. Solution-Derived, Chloride-Containing Minerals as a Waste Form for Alkali Chlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Matyas, Josef; McCloy, John S.; Lepry, William C.

    2012-10-01

    Sodalite [Na8(AlSiO4)6Cl2] and cancrinite [(Na,K)6Ca2Al6Si6O24Cl4] are environmentally stable, chloride-containing minerals and are a logical waste form option for the mixed alkali chloride salt waste stream that is generated from a proposed electrochemical separations process during nuclear fuel reprocessing. Due to the volatility of chloride salts at moderate temperatures, the ideal processing route for these salts is a low-temperature approach such as the sol-gel process. The sodalite structure can be easily synthesized by the sol-gel process; however, it is produced in the form of a fine powder with particle sizes on the order of 1–10 µm. Due to the small particle size, these powders require additional treatment to form a monolith. In this study, the sol-gel powders were pressed into pellets and fired to achieve > 90% of theoretical density. The cancrinite structure, identified as the best candidate mineral form in terms of waste loading capacity, was only produced on a limited basis following the sol-gel process and converted to sodalite upon firing. Here we discuss the sol-gel process specifics, chemical durability of select waste forms, and the steps taken to maximize chloride-containing phases, decrease chloride loss during pellet firing, and increase pellet densities.

  13. Electrolytic method to make alkali alcoholates using ion conducting alkali electrolyte/separator

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Ashok V.; Balagopal, Shekar; Pendelton, Justin

    2011-12-13

    Alkali alcoholates, also called alkali alkoxides, are produced from alkali metal salt solutions and alcohol using a three-compartment electrolytic cell. The electrolytic cell includes an anolyte compartment configured with an anode, a buffer compartment, and a catholyte compartment configured with a cathode. An alkali ion conducting solid electrolyte configured to selectively transport alkali ions is positioned between the anolyte compartment and the buffer compartment. An alkali ion permeable separator is positioned between the buffer compartment and the catholyte compartment. The catholyte solution may include an alkali alcoholate and alcohol. The anolyte solution may include at least one alkali salt. The buffer compartment solution may include a soluble alkali salt and an alkali alcoholate in alcohol.

  14. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  15. X-ray and neutron scattering studies of the hydration structure of alkali ions in concentrated aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Ansell, S; Barnes, A C; Mason, P E; Neilson, G W; Ramos, S

    2006-12-01

    The presence of ions in water provides a rich and varied environment in which many natural processes occur with important consequences in biology, geology and chemistry. This article will focus on the structural properties of ions in water and it will be shown how the 'difference' methods of neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution (NDIS) and anomalous X-ray diffraction (AXD) can be used to obtain direct information regarding the radial pair distribution functions of many cations and anions in solution. This information can subsequently be used to calculate coordination numbers and to determine ion-water conformation in great detail. As well as enabling comparisons to be made amongst ions in particular groups in the periodic table, such information can also be contrasted with results provided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation techniques. To illustrate the power of these 'difference' methods, reference will be made to the alkali group of ions, all of which have been successfully investigated by the above methods, with the exception of the radioactive element francium. Additional comments will be made on how NDIS measurements are currently being combined with MD simulations to determine the structure around complex ions and molecules, many of which are common in biological systems. PMID:16815625

  16. Alkali metal Rankine cycle boiler technology challenges and some potential solutions for space nuclear power and propulsion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, James R.

    1994-07-01

    Alkali metal boilers are of interest for application to future space Rankine cycle power conversion systems. Significant progress on such boilers was accomplished in the 1960's and early 1970's, but development was not continued to operational systems since NASA's plans for future space missions were drastically curtailed in the early 1970's. In particular, piloted Mars missions were indefinitely deferred. With the announcement of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) in July 1989 by President Bush, interest was rekindled in challenging space missions and, consequently in space nuclear power and propulsion. Nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) were proposed for interplanetary space vehicles, particularly for Mars missions. The potassium Rankine power conversion cycle became of interest to provide electric power for NEP vehicles and for 'dual-mode' NTP vehicles, where the same reactor could be used directly for propulsion and (with an additional coolant loop) for power. Although the boiler is not a major contributor to system mass, it is of critical importance because of its interaction with the rest of the power conversion system; it can cause problems for other components such as excess liquid droplets entering the turbine, thereby reducing its life, or more critically, it can drive instabilities-some severe enough to cause system failure. Funding for the SEI and its associated technology program from 1990 to 1993 was not sufficient to support significant new work on Rankine cycle boilers for space applications. In Fiscal Year 1994, funding for these challenging missions and technologies has again been curtailed, and planning for the future is very uncertain. The purpose of this paper is to review the technologies developed in the 1960's and 1970's in the light of the recent SEI applications. In this way, future Rankine cycle boiler programs may be conducted most efficiently. This report is aimed at evaluating alkali metal boiler

  17. Alkali Metal Rankine Cycle Boiler Technology Challenges and Some Potential Solutions for Space Nuclear Power and Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, James R.

    1994-01-01

    Alkali metal boilers are of interest for application to future space Rankine cycle power conversion systems. Significant progress on such boilers was accomplished in the 1960's and early 1970's, but development was not continued to operational systems since NASA's plans for future space missions were drastically curtailed in the early 1970's. In particular, piloted Mars missions were indefinitely deferred. With the announcement of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) in July 1989 by President Bush, interest was rekindled in challenging space missions and, consequently in space nuclear power and propulsion. Nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) were proposed for interplanetary space vehicles, particularly for Mars missions. The potassium Rankine power conversion cycle became of interest to provide electric power for NEP vehicles and for 'dual-mode' NTP vehicles, where the same reactor could be used directly for propulsion and (with an additional coolant loop) for power. Although the boiler is not a major contributor to system mass, it is of critical importance because of its interaction with the rest of the power conversion system; it can cause problems for other components such as excess liquid droplets entering the turbine, thereby reducing its life, or more critically, it can drive instabilities-some severe enough to cause system failure. Funding for the SEI and its associated technology program from 1990 to 1993 was not sufficient to support significant new work on Rankine cycle boilers for space applications. In Fiscal Year 1994, funding for these challenging missions and technologies has again been curtailed, and planning for the future is very uncertain. The purpose of this paper is to review the technologies developed in the 1960's and 1970's in the light of the recent SEI applications. In this way, future Rankine cycle boiler programs may be conducted most efficiently. This report is aimed at evaluating alkali metal boiler

  18. Alkali modified hydrochar of grape pomace as a perspective adsorbent of Pb(2+) from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Petrović, Jelena T; Stojanović, Mirjana D; Milojković, Jelena V; Petrović, Marija S; Šoštarić, Tatjana D; Laušević, Mila D; Mihajlović, Marija L

    2016-11-01

    Hydrochar produced via hydrothermal carbonization of grape pomace was considered as novel sorbent of Pb(2+) from aqueous solution. In order to enhance the adsorption capacity, hydrochar was chemically modified using 2 M KOH solution. Both materials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction technique. Batch experiments were performed to examine the effect of sorbent dosage, pH and contact time. Obtained results showed that the KOH treatment increased the sorption capacity of hydrochar from 27.8 mg g(-1) up to 137 mg g(-1) at pH 5. Adsorption of lead on either of the materials was achieved through ion-exchange mechanism, chemisorption and Pb(2+)-π interaction. The Sips isotherm model gave the best fit with the experimental data obtained for Pb(2+) sorption using activated hydrochar. The adsorption kinetic followed a pseudo second-order model. Thermodynamic parameters implied that the Pb(2+) binding for hydrochar surface was spontaneous and exothermic process. Findings from this work suggest that the hydrothermal carbonization is a promising route for production of efficient Pb (2+) sorbents for wastewater treatment. PMID:27494605

  19. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Wolfs, Denise Y.; Clavenna, Le Roy R.; Eakman, James M.; Kalina, Theodore

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  20. Water and magmas: insights about the water solution mechanisms in alkali silicate melts from infrared, Raman, and 29Si solid-state NMR spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Losq, Charles; Mysen, Bjorn O.; Cody, George D.

    2015-12-01

    Degassing of water during the ascent of hydrous magma in a volcanic edifice produces dramatic changes in the magma density and viscosity. This can profoundly affect the dynamics of volcanic eruptions. The water exsolution history, in turn, is driven by the water solubility and solution mechanisms in the silicate melt. Previous studies pointed to dissolved water in silicate glasses and melts existing as molecules (H2Omol species) and hydroxyl groups, OH. These latter OH groups commonly are considered bonded to Si4+ but may form other bonds, such as with alkali or alkaline-earth cations, for instance. Those forms of bonding influence the structure of hydrous melts in different ways and, therefore, their properties. As a result, exsolution of water from magmas may have different eruptive consequences depending on the initial bonding mechanisms of the dissolved water. However, despite their importance, the solution mechanisms of water in silicate melts are not clear. In particular, how chemical composition of melts affects water solubility and solution mechanism is not well understood. In the present experimental study, components of such information are reported via determination of how water interacts with the cationic network of alkali (Li, Na, and K) silicate quenched melts. Results from 29Si single-pulse magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (29Si SP MAS NMR), infrared, and Raman spectroscopies show that decreasing the ionic radius of alkali metal cation in silicate melts results in decreasing fraction of water dissolved as OH groups. The nature of OH bonding also changes as the alkali ionic radius changes. Therefore, as the speciation and bonding of water controls the degree of polymerization of melts, water will have different effects on the transport properties of silicate melts depending on their chemical composition. This conclusion, in turn, may affect volcanic phenomena related to the viscous relaxation of hydrous magmas, such as for instance the

  1. Process for recovering alkali metals and sulfur from alkali metal sulfides and polysulfides

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier

    2016-10-25

    Alkali metals and sulfur may be recovered from alkali monosulfide and polysulfides in an electrolytic process that utilizes an electrolytic cell having an alkali ion conductive membrane. An anolyte solution includes an alkali monosulfide, an alkali polysulfide, or a mixture thereof and a solvent that dissolves elemental sulfur. A catholyte includes molten alkali metal. Applying an electric current oxidizes sulfide and polysulfide in the anolyte compartment, causes alkali metal ions to pass through the alkali ion conductive membrane to the catholyte compartment, and reduces the alkali metal ions in the catholyte compartment. Liquid sulfur separates from the anolyte solution and may be recovered. The electrolytic cell is operated at a temperature where the formed alkali metal and sulfur are molten.

  2. Zero-dipole molecular organic cations in mixed organic-inorganic halide perovskites: possible chemical solution for the reported anomalous hysteresis in the current-voltage curve measurements.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Giacomo; Yamashita, Koichi

    2015-11-01

    Starting from a brief description of the main architectures characterizing the novel solar technology of perovskite-based solar cells, we focus our attention on the anomalous hysteresis experimentally found to affect the measurement of the current-voltage curve of such devices. This detrimental effect, associated with slow dynamic reorganization processes, depends on several parameters; among them, the scan rate of the measurements, the architecture of the cell, and the perovskite deposition rate are crucial. Even if a conclusive explanation of the origin of the hysteresis has not been provided so far, several experimental findings ascribe its origin to ionic migration at an applied bias and dielectric polarization that occurs in the perovskite layer. Consistently, a dipole-moment-reduced cation such as formamidinium ion is experimentally reported to quantitatively reduce the hysteresis from perovskite-based devices. By means of a density-functional theory-based set of calculations, we have predicted and characterized guanidinium ion (GA = (+)[C(NH2)3], a zero-dipole moment cation by symmetry)-based organic-inorganic halide perovskite's structural and electronic properties, speculating that such a cation and the alloys it may form with other organic cations can represent a possible chemical solution for the puzzling issue of the hysteresis.

  3. CO2 Extraction from Ambient Air Using Alkali-Metal Hydroxide Solutions Derived from Concrete Waste and Steel Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolaroff, J. K.; Lowry, G. V.; Keith, D. W.

    2003-12-01

    To mitigate global climate change, deep reductions in CO2 emissions are required in the coming decades. Carbon sequestration will play a crucial role in this reduction. Early adoption of carbon sequestration in low-cost niche markets will help develop the technology and experience required for large-scale deployment. One such niche may be the use of alkali metals from industrial waste streams to form carbonate minerals, a safe and stable means of sequestering carbon. In this research, the potential of using two industrial waste streams---concrete and steel slag---for sequestering carbon is assessed. The scheme is outlined as follows: Ca and Mg are leached with water from a finely ground bed of steel slag or concrete. The resulting solution is sprayed through air, capturing CO2 and forming solid carbonates, and collected. The feasibility of this scheme is explored with a combination of experiments, theoretical calculations, cost accounting, and literature review. The dissolution kinetics of steel slag and concrete as a function of particle size and pH is examined. In stirred batch reactors, the majority of Ca which dissolved did so within the first hour, yielding between 50 and 250 (mg; Ca)/(g; slag) and between 10 and 30 (mg; Ca)/(g; concrete). The kinetics of dissolution are thus taken to be sufficiently fast to support the type of scheme described above. As proof-of-concept, further experiments were performed where water was dripped slowly through a stagnant column of slag or concrete and collected at the bottom. Leachate Ca concentrations in the range of 15 mM were achieved --- sufficient to support the scheme. Using basic physical principles and numerical methods, the quantity of CO2 captured by falling droplets is estimated. Proportion of water loss and required pumping energy is similarly estimated. The results indicate that sprays are capable of capturing CO2 from the air and that the water and energy requirements are tractable. An example system for

  4. 1 : 2 Adducts of copper(I) halides with 1,2-bis(di-2-pyridylphosphino)ethane: solid state and solution structural studies and antitumour activity.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Richard J; Navarro, Maribel; Shearwood, Anne-Marie J; Healy, Peter C; Skelton, Brian W; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Berners-Price, Susan J

    2009-12-28

    The 1 : 2 adducts of copper(I) halides with 1,2-bis(2-pyridylphosphino)ethane (d2pype) have been synthesized and solution properties characterized by variable temperature (1)H, (31)P and (65)Cu NMR spectroscopy. Single-crystal structure determinations for the chloride, bromide and iodide complexes show these to crystallize from acetonitrile in the triclinic space group P1 as isostructural centrosymmetric dimers [(d2pype)Cu(mu-d2pype)(2)Cu(d2pype)]X(2).(solvent) with a approximately 12.6, b approximately 12.7, c approximately 15.3 A, alpha approximately 84, beta approximately 67, gamma approximately 84 degrees. In contrast to the analogous AuCl:2(d2pype) and AgNO(3):2(d2pype) adducts, in solution these CuX:2(d2pype) adducts (where X = Cl, Br and I) exist almost exclusively as bis-chelated monomeric [Cu(d2pype)(2)]X; evidence for an equilibrium between monomeric and dimeric forms is detected only for the CuCl adduct in methanol. Cytotoxicity studies in two human breast cancer lines and two matched liver progenitor cell lines indicate that [Cu(d2pype)(2)]Cl is non selectively toxic to both non-tumourigenic and tumourigenic cells. However, the analogous Au(I) compound [Au(d2pype)(2)]Cl, is toxic to highly tumourigenic cells and more selective in its toxicity to tumourigenic cells compared to non-tumourigenic cells. The significance of these results to the further development of selective, mitochondria-targeted, Au(I) antitumour complexes is discussed.

  5. Dissecting ion-specific dielectric spectra of sodium-halide solutions into solvation water and ionic contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, Klaus F.; Gekle, Stephan; Netz, Roland R.

    2014-12-01

    Using extensive equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations we determine the dielectric spectra of aqueous solutions of NaF, NaCl, NaBr, and NaI. The ion-specific and concentration-dependent shifts of the static dielectric constants and the dielectric relaxation times match experimental results very well, which serves as a validation of the classical and non-polarizable ionic force fields used. The purely ionic contribution to the dielectric response is negligible, but determines the conductivity of the salt solutions. The ion-water cross correlation contribution is negative and reduces the total dielectric response by about 5%-10% for 1 M solutions. The dominating water dielectric response is decomposed into different water solvation shells and ion-pair configurations, by this the spectral blue shift and the dielectric decrement of salt solutions with increasing salt concentration is demonstrated to be primarily caused by first-solvation shell water. With rising salt concentration the simulated spectra show more pronounced deviations from a single-Debye form and can be well described by a Cole-Cole fit, in quantitative agreement with experiments. Our spectral decomposition into ionic and different water solvation shell contributions does not render the individual contributions more Debye-like, this suggests the non-Debye-like character of the dielectric spectra of salt solutions not to be due to the superposition of different elementary relaxation processes with different relaxation times. Rather, the non-Debye-like character is likely to be an inherent spectral signature of solvation water around ions.

  6. Dissecting ion-specific dielectric spectra of sodium-halide solutions into solvation water and ionic contributions.

    PubMed

    Rinne, Klaus F; Gekle, Stephan; Netz, Roland R

    2014-12-01

    Using extensive equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations we determine the dielectric spectra of aqueous solutions of NaF, NaCl, NaBr, and NaI. The ion-specific and concentration-dependent shifts of the static dielectric constants and the dielectric relaxation times match experimental results very well, which serves as a validation of the classical and non-polarizable ionic force fields used. The purely ionic contribution to the dielectric response is negligible, but determines the conductivity of the salt solutions. The ion-water cross correlation contribution is negative and reduces the total dielectric response by about 5%-10% for 1 M solutions. The dominating water dielectric response is decomposed into different water solvation shells and ion-pair configurations, by this the spectral blue shift and the dielectric decrement of salt solutions with increasing salt concentration is demonstrated to be primarily caused by first-solvation shell water. With rising salt concentration the simulated spectra show more pronounced deviations from a single-Debye form and can be well described by a Cole-Cole fit, in quantitative agreement with experiments. Our spectral decomposition into ionic and different water solvation shell contributions does not render the individual contributions more Debye-like, this suggests the non-Debye-like character of the dielectric spectra of salt solutions not to be due to the superposition of different elementary relaxation processes with different relaxation times. Rather, the non-Debye-like character is likely to be an inherent spectral signature of solvation water around ions.

  7. Dissecting ion-specific dielectric spectra of sodium-halide solutions into solvation water and ionic contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Rinne, Klaus F.; Netz, Roland R.; Gekle, Stephan

    2014-12-07

    Using extensive equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations we determine the dielectric spectra of aqueous solutions of NaF, NaCl, NaBr, and NaI. The ion-specific and concentration-dependent shifts of the static dielectric constants and the dielectric relaxation times match experimental results very well, which serves as a validation of the classical and non-polarizable ionic force fields used. The purely ionic contribution to the dielectric response is negligible, but determines the conductivity of the salt solutions. The ion-water cross correlation contribution is negative and reduces the total dielectric response by about 5%-10% for 1 M solutions. The dominating water dielectric response is decomposed into different water solvation shells and ion-pair configurations, by this the spectral blue shift and the dielectric decrement of salt solutions with increasing salt concentration is demonstrated to be primarily caused by first-solvation shell water. With rising salt concentration the simulated spectra show more pronounced deviations from a single-Debye form and can be well described by a Cole-Cole fit, in quantitative agreement with experiments. Our spectral decomposition into ionic and different water solvation shell contributions does not render the individual contributions more Debye-like, this suggests the non-Debye-like character of the dielectric spectra of salt solutions not to be due to the superposition of different elementary relaxation processes with different relaxation times. Rather, the non-Debye-like character is likely to be an inherent spectral signature of solvation water around ions.

  8. Alkali Metal/Salt Thermal-Energy-Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Wayne W.; Stearns, John W.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed thermal-energy-storage system based on mixture of alkali metal and one of its halide salts; metal and salt form slurry of two immiscible melts. Use of slurry expected to prevent incrustations of solidified salts on heat-transfer surfaces that occur where salts alone used. Since incrustations impede heat transfer, system performance improved. In system, charging heat-exchanger surface immersed in lower liquid, rich in halide-salt, phase-charge material. Discharging heat exchanger surface immersed in upper liquid, rich in alkali metal.

  9. Alkali Metal Salts with Designable Aryltrifluoroborate Anions.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kazuki; Yoshii, Kazuki; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Matsumoto, Hajime; Tsuda, Tetsuya; Kuwabata, Susumu

    2016-09-01

    Aryltrifluoroborate ([ArBF3](-)) has a designable basic anion structure. Various [ArBF3](-)-based anions were synthesized to create novel alkali metal salts using a simple and safe process. Nearly 40 novel alkali metal salts were successfully obtained, and their physicochemical characteristics, particularly their thermal properties, were elucidated. These salts have lower melting points than those of simple inorganic alkali halide salts, such as KCl and LiCl, because of the weaker interactions between the alkali metal cations and the [ArBF3](-) anions and the anions' larger entropy. Moreover, interestingly, potassium cations were electrochemically reduced in the potassium (meta-ethoxyphenyl)trifluoroborate (K[m-OEtC6H4BF3]) molten salt at 433 K. These findings contribute substantially to furthering molten salt chemistry, ionic liquid chemistry, and electrochemistry. PMID:27510799

  10. All solution-processed lead halide perovskite-BiVO4 tandem assembly for photolytic solar fuels production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-Siou; Manser, Joseph S; Kamat, Prashant V

    2015-01-21

    The quest for economic, large-scale hydrogen production has motivated the search for new materials and device designs capable of splitting water using only energy from the sun. Here we introduce an all solution-processed tandem water splitting assembly composed of a BiVO4 photoanode and a single-junction CH3NH3PbI3 hybrid perovskite solar cell. This unique configuration allows efficient solar photon management, with the metal oxide photoanode selectively harvesting high energy visible photons, and the underlying perovskite solar cell capturing lower energy visible-near IR wavelengths in a single-pass excitation. Operating without external bias under standard AM 1.5G illumination, the photoanode-photovoltaic architecture, in conjunction with an earth-abundant cobalt phosphate catalyst, exhibits a solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 2.5% at neutral pH. The design of low-cost tandem water splitting assemblies employing single-junction hybrid perovskite materials establishes a potentially promising new frontier for solar water splitting research.

  11. Optimum conditions to prepare high yield, phase pure α-Ni(OH) 2 nanoparticles by urea hydrolysis and electrochemical ageing in alkali solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayalakshmi, M.; Venugopal, N.; Reddy, B. Ramachandra; Rao, M. Mohan

    Phase pure alpha nickel hydroxide (α-Ni(OH) 2) is synthesized by a hydrothermal method using urea and nickel nitrate in an autoclave. Optimum conditions to obtain high yield and phase pure α-Ni(OH) 2 are identified by varying experimental parameters such as urea concentration, ramp time, and temperature. In a typical experiment, a 94% yield of phase pure α-Ni(OH) 2 is successfully prepared. The nickel content, analyzed by means of atomic absorption spectroscopy, is 44% in all samples. The α-Ni(OH) 2 nanoparticles are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The BET surface area and tap density of the nickel hydroxide nanoparticles are also determined. Electrochemical characterization is undertaken via cyclic voltammetry for which the nanoparticles are immobilized on the surface of paraffin impregnated graphite electrodes in 1.0 M alkali solutions. The ageing of the alpha phase occurs within 27 min (30 cycles) of exposure in alkali solutions.

  12. Hydrothermal alkali metal catalyst recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Eakman, James M.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.

    1979-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles primarily in the form of water soluble alkali metal formates by treating the particles with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of added carbon monoxide. During the treating process the water insoluble alkali metal compounds comprising the insoluble alkali metal residues are converted into water soluble alkali metal formates. The resultant aqueous solution containing water soluble alkali metal formates is then separated from the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment process, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal formates serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. This process permits increased recovery of alkali metal constituents, thereby decreasing the overall cost of the gasification process by reducing the amount of makeup alkali metal compounds necessary.

  13. Influence of PbCl2 content in PbI2 solution of DMF on the absorption, crystal phase, morphology of lead halide thin films and photovoltaic performance in planar perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mao; Shi, Chengwu; Zhang, Jincheng; Wu, Ni; Ying, Chao

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the influence of PbCl2 content in PbI2 solution of DMF on the absorption, crystal phase and morphology of lead halide thin films was systematically investigated and the photovoltaic performance of the corresponding planar perovskite solar cells was evaluated. The result revealed that the various thickness lead halide thin film with the small sheet-like, porous morphology and low crystallinity can be produced by adding PbCl2 powder into PbI2 solution of DMF as a precursor solution. The planar perovskite solar cell based on the 300-nm-thick CH3NH3PbI3-xClx thin film by the precursor solution with the mixture of 0.80 M PbI2 and 0.20 M PbCl2 exhibited the optimum photoelectric conversion efficiency of 10.12% along with an open-circuit voltage of 0.93 V, a short-circuit photocurrent density of 15.70 mA cm-2 and a fill factor of 0.69.

  14. Oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens with catalytic molten salt mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.

    1978-01-01

    A process for oxidizing hydrogen halides by means of a catalytically active molten salt is disclosed. The subject hydrogen halide is contacted with a molten salt containing an oxygen compound of vanadium and alkali metal sulfates and pyrosulfates to produce an effluent gas stream rich in the elemental halogen. The reduced vanadium which remains after this contacting is regenerated to the active higher valence state by contacting the spent molten salt with a stream of oxygen-bearing gas.

  15. Exfoliation of WS2 in the semiconducting phase using a group of lithium halides: a new method of Li intercalation.

    PubMed

    Ghorai, Arup; Midya, Anupam; Maiti, Rishi; Ray, Samit K

    2016-10-14

    Lithium halide assisted high yield synthesis of few layers of 2H phase semiconducting WS2 in organic solvents is reported. A group of lithium halides (LiCl, LiBr and LiI) has been employed for the first time to intercalate WS2 by using Li, followed by mild sonication to exfoliate in dispersive polar solvents. In contrast to the n-butyllithium (n-BuLi) assisted exfoliation method, which yields only the metallic 1T phase on prolonged reaction (3-7 days) at higher temperatures, the proposed exfoliation method produces only semiconducting 2H WS2 in a much shorter time (5 minute sonication). A very high yield of 19 mg ml(-1) has been obtained using LiI as an exfoliating agent due to its lower lattice energy compared to other alkali halides and the smaller size of the cation. Detailed microscopy and spectroscopic characterization reveals exfoliation of few layered WS2 with stoichiometric composition. Absorption and emission characteristics of the 2D WS2 layer exhibit a characteristic band edge and quantum confined transitions. As a proof-of-concept, we have successfully demonstrated photodetector devices comprising solution proccessed p-WS2/n-Si heterojunctions, which behave as diodes with a high rectification ratio (>10(2)) exhibiting a broad band photoresponse over the entire visible region. PMID:27560159

  16. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, W.Y.

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased, preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  17. Bio-conventional bleaching of kadam kraft-AQ pulp by thermo-alkali-tolerant xylanases from two strains of Coprinellus disseminatus for extenuating adsorbable organic halides and improving strength with optical properties and energy conservation.

    PubMed

    Lal, Mohan; Dutt, Dharm; Tyagi, C H

    2012-04-01

    Two novel thermo-alkali-tolerant crude xylanases namely MLK-01 (enzyme-A) and MLK-07 (enzyme-B) from Coprinellus disseminatus mitigated kappa numbers of Anthocephalus cadamba kraft-AQ pulps by 32.5 and 34.38%, improved brightness by 1.5 and 1.6% and viscosity by 5.75 and 6.47% after (A)XE(1) and (B)XE(1)-stages, respectively. The release of reducing sugars and chromophores was the highest during prebleaching of A. cadamba kraft-AQ pulp at enzyme doses of 5 and 10 IU/g, reaction times 90 and 120 min, reaction temperatures 75 and 65°C and consistency 10% for MLK-01 and MLK-07, respectively. MLK-07 was more efficient than MLK01 in terms of producing pulp brightness, improving mechanical strength properties and reducing pollution load. MLK-01 and MLK-07 reduced AOX by 19.51 and 42.77%, respectively at 4% chlorine demands with an increase in COD and colour due to removal of lignin carbohydrates complexes. A. cadamba kraft-AQ pulps treated with xylanases from MLK-01 to MLK-07 and followed by CEHH bleaching at half chlorine demand (2%) showed a drastic reduction in brightness with slight improvement in mechanical strength properties compared to pulp bleached at 4% chlorine demand. MLK-01 reduced AOX, COD and colour by 43.83, 39.03 and 27.71% and MLK-07 by 38.34, 40.48 and 30.77%, respectively at half chlorine demand compared to full chlorine demand (4%). pH variation during prebleaching of A. cadamba kraft-AQ pulps with strains MLK-01 and MLK-07 followed by CEHH bleaching sequences showed a decrease in pulp brightness, AOX, COD and colour with an increase in mechanical strength properties, pulp viscosity and PFI revolutions to get a beating level of 35 ± 1 °SR at full chlorine demand. PMID:22805918

  18. Optical and Spectral Studies on β Alanine Metal Halide Hybrid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetlin, M. Daniel; Selvarajan, P.; Perumal, S.; Ramalingom, S.

    2011-10-01

    We have synthesized and grown β alanine metal halide hybrid crystals viz. β alanine cadmium chloride (BACC), an amino acid transition metal halide complex crystal and β alanine potassium chloride (BAPC), an amino acid alkali metal halide complex crystal by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals were found to be transparent and have well defined morphology. The optical characteristics of the grown crystals were carried out with the help of UV-Vis Spectroscopy. The optical transmittances of the spectrums show that BAPC is more transparent than BACC. The Photoluminescence of the materials were determined by the Photoluminescent Spectroscopy

  19. Process for the disposal of alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Leroy C.

    1977-01-01

    Large quantities of alkali metals may be safely reacted for ultimate disposal by contact with a hot concentrated caustic solution. The alkali metals react with water in the caustic solution in a controlled reaction while steam dilutes the hydrogen formed by the reaction to a safe level.

  20. Process for oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOEpatents

    Lyke, Stephen E.

    1992-01-01

    An improved process for generating an elemental halogen selected from chlorine, bromine or iodine, from a corresponding hydrogen halide by absorbing a molten salt mixture, which includes sulfur, alkali metals and oxygen with a sulfur to metal molar ratio between 0.9 and 1.1 and includes a dissolved oxygen compound capable of reacting with hydrogen halide to produce elemental halogen, into a porous, relatively inert substrate to produce a substrate-supported salt mixture. Thereafter, the substrate-supported salt mixture is contacted (stage 1) with a hydrogen halide while maintaining the substrate-supported salt mixture during the contacting at an elevated temperature sufficient to sustain a reaction between the oxygen compound and the hydrogen halide to produce a gaseous elemental halogen product. This is followed by purging the substrate-supported salt mixture with steam (stage 2) thereby recovering any unreacted hydrogen halide and additional elemental halogen for recycle to stage 1. The dissolved oxygen compound is regenerated in a high temperature (stage 3) and an optical intermediate temperature stage (stage 4) by contacting the substrate-supported salt mixture with a gas containing oxygen whereby the dissolved oxygen compound in the substrate-supported salt mixture is regenerated by being oxidized to a higher valence state.

  1. Vitrification of IFR and MSBR halide salt reprocessing wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Siemer, D.D.

    2013-07-01

    Both of the genuinely sustainable (breeder) nuclear fuel cycles (IFR - Integral Fast Reactor - and MSBR - Molten Salt Breeder Reactor -) studied by the USA's national laboratories would generate high level reprocessing waste (HLRW) streams consisting of a relatively small amount ( about 4 mole %) of fission product halide (chloride or fluoride) salts in a matrix comprised primarily (about 95 mole %) of non radioactive alkali metal halide salts. Because leach resistant glasses cannot accommodate much of any of the halides, most of the treatment scenarios previously envisioned for such HLRW have assumed a monolithic waste form comprised of a synthetic analog of an insoluble crystalline halide mineral. In practice, this translates to making a 'substituted' sodalite ('Ceramic Waste Form') of the IFR's chloride salt-based wastes and fluoroapatite of the MSBR's fluoride salt-based wastes. This paper discusses my experimental studies of an alternative waste management scenario for both fuel cycles that would separate/recycle the waste's halide and immobilize everything else in iron phosphate (Fe-P) glass. It will describe both how the work was done and what its results indicate about how a treatment process for both of those wastes should be implemented (fluoride and chloride behave differently). In either case, this scenario's primary advantages include much higher waste loadings, much lower overall cost, and the generation of a product (glass) that is more consistent with current waste management practices. (author)

  2. Enthalpies of formation of CaAl4O7 and CaAl12O19 (hibonite) by high temperature, alkali borate solution calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, C. A.; Kleppa, O. J.; Grossman, L.; Mysen, B. O.; Lattimer, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Enthalpies of formation were determined for two calcium aluminate phases, CaAl4O7 and CaAl12O19, using high-temperature alkali borate solution calorimetry. The aluminates were synthesized by multiple-cycle heating and grinding stoichiometric mixtures of CaCO3 and Al2O3, and the products were characteized by X-ray diffraction and SEM microbeam analysis. The data on impurities (CaAl4O7 was found to be about 89.00 percent pure by weight and the CaAl12O19 samples about 91.48 percent pure) were used to correct the heat of solution values of the synthetic products. The enthalpies of formation, at 1063 K, from oxides, were found to be equal to -(25.6 + or - 4.7) kJ/g.f.w. for CaAl4O7 and -(33.0 + or - 9.7) kJ/g.f.w. for CaAl12O19; the respective standard enthalpies of formation from elements, at 298 K, were estimated to be -4007 + or - 5.2 kJ/g.f.w. and -10,722 + or - 12 kJ/g.f.w.

  3. Changes in the shape of atomic lines of alkali metals in sonoluminescence spectra of solutions of surfactants and halogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazachek, M. V.; Gordeychuk, T. V.

    2013-11-01

    The multibubble sonoluminescence spectra of aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate, of the mixture of sodium dodecyl sulfate with lithium and potassium chlorides, and of sodium and potassium halogenides were measured near the lines of metals at an ultrasonic frequency of 20 kHz. The Na, Li, and K lines in spectra of surfactant solutions are noticeably narrower than those obtained in solutions of metal chlorides. The width of Na lines in spectra of metal fluorides, chlorides, and iodides remains constant, while that of the K line increases with increasing atomic weight of a halogen. The results are discussed in the context of the effect that the bonding strength of an atom possibly has on the formation of metal lines in sonoluminescence spectra.

  4. Mixed-Halide CH3 NH3 PbI3-x Xx (X=Cl, Br, I) Perovskites: Vapor-Assisted Solution Deposition and Application as Solar Cell Absorbers.

    PubMed

    Sedighi, Rahime; Tajabadi, Fariba; Shahbazi, Saeed; Gholipour, Somayeh; Taghavinia, Nima

    2016-08-01

    There have been recent reports on the formation of single-halide perovskites, CH3 NH3 PbX3 (X=Cl, Br, I), by means of vapor-assisted solution processing. Herein, the successful formation of mixed-halide perovskites (CH3 NH3 PbI3-x Xx ) by means of a vapor-assisted solution method at ambient atmosphere is reported. The perovskite films are synthesized by exposing PbI2 film to CH3 NH3 X (X=I, Br, or Cl) vapor. The prepared perovskite films have uniform surfaces with good coverage, as confirmed by SEM images. The inclusion of chlorine and bromine into the structure leads to a lower temperature and shorter reaction time for optimum perovskite film formation. In the case of CH3 NH3 PbI3-x Clx , the optimum reaction temperature is reduced to 100 °C, and the resulting phases are CH3 NH3 PbI3 (with trace Cl) and CH3 NH3 PbCl3 with a ratio of about 2:1. In the case of CH3 NH3 PbI3-x Brx , single-phase CH3 NH3 PbI2 Br is formed in a considerably shorter reaction time than that of CH3 NH3 PbI3 . The mesostructured perovskite solar cells based on CH3 NH3 PbI3 films show the best optimal power conversion efficiency of 13.5 %, whereas for CH3 NH3 PbI3-x Clx and CH3 NH3 PbI3-x Brx the best recorded efficiencies are 11.6 and 10.5 %, respectively.

  5. Selective Chemical Conversion of Sugars in Aqueous Solutions without Alkali to Lactic Acid Over a Zn-Sn-Beta Lewis Acid-Base Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenjie; Shen, Zheng; Peng, Boyu; Gu, Minyan; Zhou, Xuefei; Xiang, Bo; Zhang, Yalei

    2016-05-01

    Lactic acid is an important platform molecule in the synthesis of a wide range of chemicals. However, in aqueous solutions without alkali, its efficient preparation via the direct catalysis of sugars is hindered by a side dehydration reaction to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural due to Brønsted acid, which originates from organic acids. Herein, we report that a previously unappreciated combination of common two metal mixed catalyst (Zn-Sn-Beta) prepared via solid-state ion exchange synergistically promoted this reaction. In water without a base, a conversion exceeding 99% for sucrose with a lactic acid yield of 54% was achieved within 2 hours at 190 °C under ambient air pressure. Studies of the acid and base properties of the Zn-Sn-Beta zeolite suggest that the introduction of Zn into the Sn-Beta zeolite sequentially enhanced both the Lewis acid and base sites, and the base sites inhibited a series of side reactions related to fructose dehydration to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and its subsequent decomposition.

  6. Selective Chemical Conversion of Sugars in Aqueous Solutions without Alkali to Lactic Acid Over a Zn-Sn-Beta Lewis Acid-Base Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wenjie; Shen, Zheng; Peng, Boyu; Gu, Minyan; Zhou, Xuefei; Xiang, Bo; Zhang, Yalei

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid is an important platform molecule in the synthesis of a wide range of chemicals. However, in aqueous solutions without alkali, its efficient preparation via the direct catalysis of sugars is hindered by a side dehydration reaction to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural due to Brønsted acid, which originates from organic acids. Herein, we report that a previously unappreciated combination of common two metal mixed catalyst (Zn-Sn-Beta) prepared via solid-state ion exchange synergistically promoted this reaction. In water without a base, a conversion exceeding 99% for sucrose with a lactic acid yield of 54% was achieved within 2 hours at 190 °C under ambient air pressure. Studies of the acid and base properties of the Zn-Sn-Beta zeolite suggest that the introduction of Zn into the Sn-Beta zeolite sequentially enhanced both the Lewis acid and base sites, and the base sites inhibited a series of side reactions related to fructose dehydration to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and its subsequent decomposition. PMID:27222322

  7. Selective Chemical Conversion of Sugars in Aqueous Solutions without Alkali to Lactic Acid Over a Zn-Sn-Beta Lewis Acid-Base Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenjie; Shen, Zheng; Peng, Boyu; Gu, Minyan; Zhou, Xuefei; Xiang, Bo; Zhang, Yalei

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid is an important platform molecule in the synthesis of a wide range of chemicals. However, in aqueous solutions without alkali, its efficient preparation via the direct catalysis of sugars is hindered by a side dehydration reaction to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural due to Brønsted acid, which originates from organic acids. Herein, we report that a previously unappreciated combination of common two metal mixed catalyst (Zn-Sn-Beta) prepared via solid-state ion exchange synergistically promoted this reaction. In water without a base, a conversion exceeding 99% for sucrose with a lactic acid yield of 54% was achieved within 2 hours at 190 °C under ambient air pressure. Studies of the acid and base properties of the Zn-Sn-Beta zeolite suggest that the introduction of Zn into the Sn-Beta zeolite sequentially enhanced both the Lewis acid and base sites, and the base sites inhibited a series of side reactions related to fructose dehydration to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and its subsequent decomposition. PMID:27222322

  8. Selective Chemical Conversion of Sugars in Aqueous Solutions without Alkali to Lactic Acid Over a Zn-Sn-Beta Lewis Acid-Base Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenjie; Shen, Zheng; Peng, Boyu; Gu, Minyan; Zhou, Xuefei; Xiang, Bo; Zhang, Yalei

    2016-05-25

    Lactic acid is an important platform molecule in the synthesis of a wide range of chemicals. However, in aqueous solutions without alkali, its efficient preparation via the direct catalysis of sugars is hindered by a side dehydration reaction to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural due to Brønsted acid, which originates from organic acids. Herein, we report that a previously unappreciated combination of common two metal mixed catalyst (Zn-Sn-Beta) prepared via solid-state ion exchange synergistically promoted this reaction. In water without a base, a conversion exceeding 99% for sucrose with a lactic acid yield of 54% was achieved within 2 hours at 190 °C under ambient air pressure. Studies of the acid and base properties of the Zn-Sn-Beta zeolite suggest that the introduction of Zn into the Sn-Beta zeolite sequentially enhanced both the Lewis acid and base sites, and the base sites inhibited a series of side reactions related to fructose dehydration to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and its subsequent decomposition.

  9. Chemical equilibrium model for interfacial activity of crude oil in aqueous alkaline solution: the effects of pH, alkali and salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.; Yen, T.F.

    1980-11-01

    A chemical equilibrium model for interfacial activity of crude in aqueous alkaline solution is proposed. The model predicts the observed effects of pH and concentrations of alkali and salt on the interfacial tension (IFT). The model proposed was shown to describe the observed effects of acid content, pH, and sodium ions on the interfacial activity of crude oil in water. Once the pH of the interface reaches the pKa of the acids, sometimes with the help of addition of some salt, the IFT experiences a sudden steep drop to the range of 10/sup -2/ dynes/cm. After that, further addition of sodium either in the form of NaOH or NaCl is going to increase the IFT due to a shift of equilibriumn to the formation of undissociated soap. This was confirmed by the difference in the observed effect of sodium on the IFT of the extracted soap molecules which are dissociated easily and those which are associated highly and precipitated easily. These soap molecules have dissociation constant values ranging from below 10/sup -2/ to above one. 13 references.

  10. Alkali hydrolysis of trinitrotoluene.

    PubMed

    Karasch, Christian; Popovic, Milan; Qasim, Mohamed; Bajpai, Rakesh K

    2002-01-01

    Data for alkali hydrolysis of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in aqueous solution at pH 12.0 under static (pH-controlled) as well as dynamic (pH-uncontrolled) conditions are reported. The experiments were conducted at two different molar ratios of TNT to hydroxyl ions at room temperature. The TNT disappeared rapidly from the solution as a first-order reaction. The complete disappearance of aromatic structure from the aqueous solution within 24 h was confirmed by the ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectra of the samples. Cuvet experiments in a UV-VIS spectrophotometer demonstrated the formation of Meisenheimer complex, which slowly disappeared via formation of aromatic compounds with fewer nitro groups. The known metabolites of TNT were found to accumulate only in very small quantities in the liquid phase.

  11. Lanthanide-halide based humidity indicators

    DOEpatents

    Beitz, James V.; Williams, Clayton W.

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses a lanthanide-halide based humidity indicator and method of producing such indicator. The color of the present invention indicates the humidity of an atmosphere to which it is exposed. For example, impregnating an adsorbent support such as silica gel with an aqueous solution of the europium-containing reagent solution described herein, and dehydrating the support to dryness forms a substance with a yellow color. When this substance is exposed to a humid atmosphere the water vapor from the air is adsorbed into the coating on the pore surface of the silica gel. As the water content of the coating increases, the visual color of the coated silica gel changes from yellow to white. The color change is due to the water combining with the lanthanide-halide complex on the pores of the gel.

  12. Cold ablation driven by localized forces in alkali halides.

    PubMed

    Hada, Masaki; Zhang, Dongfang; Pichugin, Kostyantyn; Hirscht, Julian; Kochman, Michał A; Hayes, Stuart A; Manz, Stephanie; Gengler, Regis Y N; Wann, Derek A; Seki, Toshio; Moriena, Gustavo; Morrison, Carole A; Matsuo, Jiro; Sciaini, Germán; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2014-01-01

    Laser ablation has been widely used for a variety of applications. Since the mechanisms for ablation are strongly dependent on the photoexcitation level, so called cold material processing has relied on the use of high-peak-power laser fluences for which nonthermal processes become dominant; often reaching the universal threshold for plasma formation of ~1 J cm(-2) in most solids. Here we show single-shot time-resolved femtosecond electron diffraction, femtosecond optical reflectivity and ion detection experiments to study the evolution of the ablation process that follows femtosecond 400 nm laser excitation in crystalline sodium chloride, caesium iodide and potassium iodide. The phenomenon in this class of materials occurs well below the threshold for plasma formation and even below the melting point. The results reveal fast electronic and localized structural changes that lead to the ejection of particulates and the formation of micron-deep craters, reflecting the very nature of the strong repulsive forces at play. PMID:24835317

  13. Skylab experiments on semiconductors and alkali halides. [single crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    The space processing experiments performed during the Skylab missions included one on single crystal growth of germanium selenide and telluride, one on pure and doped germanium crystals, two on pure and doped indium antimonide, one on gallium-indium-antimony systems, and one on a sodium chloride-sodium fluoride eutectic. In each experiment, three ampoules of sample were processed in the multipurpose electric furnace within the Skylab Materials Processing Facility. All were successful in varying degrees and gave important information about crystal growth removed from the effects of earth surface gravity.

  14. Salts of alkali metal anions and process of preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Dye, James L.; Ceraso, Joseph M.; Tehan, Frederick J.; Lok, Mei Tak

    1978-01-01

    Compounds of alkali metal anion salts of alkali metal cations in bicyclic polyoxadiamines are disclosed. The salts are prepared by contacting an excess of alkali metal with an alkali metal dissolving solution consisting of a bicyclic polyoxadiamine in a suitable solvent, and recovered by precipitation. The salts have a gold-color crystalline appearance and are stable in a vacuum at -10.degree. C. and below.

  15. High Biomass Specific Methyl Halide Production Rates of Selected Coastal Marsh Plants and its Relationship to Halide Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manley, S. L.; Wang, N.; Cicerone, R. J.

    2002-12-01

    Salt tolerant coastal marsh plants (halophytes) have previously been shown to be globally significant producers of methyl chloride (MeCl) and methyl bromide (MeBr). While halophytes are known for their high salt content, there are few reports of their halide content. Our studies have attempted to quantify biomass specific methyl halide (MeX) production from these plants and relate it to tissue halide levels. MeCl, MeBr and MeI production rates and tissue chloride, bromide and iodide concentrations from selected coastal marsh plants were measured for nearly a year. Certain halophyte species (i.e. Batis and Frankenia) have very high summer biomass specific production rates for MeX (e.g. Frankenia: 1 ug MeCl /gfwt/hr; 80 ng MeBr/gfwt/hr; 8 ng MeI/gfwt/hr). These rates of MeCl and MeBr production are much higher than those from other coastal marsh plants or seaweeds. Plant halide levels remain high throughout the year, while MeX production peaks at a high level in mid summer falling to low winter rates. This implies a linkage to plant growth. Higher levels of chloride and bromide were seen in the fleshy marsh plants such as Batis (saltwort, approximately 20 percent dry wt chloride, 0.4 percent dry wt bromide) and Salicornia (pickleweed) than in the others such as Frankenia (alkali heath) approx 7 percent dry wt chloride, 0.1 percent dry wt bromide) or Spartina (cordgrass). No such trend was seen for iodide, which ranged from 4 - 10 ppm. Calculations show the daily halide losses from MeX production are far less than the variability in tissue halide content. MeX production removes a small fraction of the total tissue halide from these plants suggesting that MeX production is not a mechanism used by these species to control internal halide levels. Saltwort cell-free extracts incubated with bromide or iodide in the presence of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) produced the corresponding MeX. MeBr production was inhibited by caffeic acid the substrate of lignin-specific O

  16. Properties of films composed of cellulose nanowhiskers and a cellulose matrix regenerated from alkali/urea solution.

    PubMed

    Qi, Haisong; Cai, Jie; Zhang, Lina; Kuga, Shigenori

    2009-06-01

    All-cellulose composite films were prepared, for the first time, from native cellulose nanowhiskers and cellulose matrix regenerated from aqueous NaOH-urea solvent system on the basis of their temperature-dependent solubility. The cellulose whiskers retained their needlelike morphology with mean length and diameter of 300 and 21 nm as well as native crystallinity when added to the latter solution at ambient temperature. The structure and physical properties of the nanocomposite films were characterized by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and tensile tests. The composite films were isotropic and transparent to visible light and showed good mechanical properties as a result of the reinforcement by the whiskers. By varying the ratio of the cellulose whiskers to regenerated cellulose matrix (cellulose II), the tensile strength and elastic modulus of the nanocomposite films could be tuned to reach 124 MPa and 5 GPa, respectively. The tensile strength of the nanocomposite films could reach 157 MPa through a simple drawing process, with the calculated Hermans' orientation parameter of 0.30. This work provided a novel pathway for the preparation of biodegradable all-cellulose nanocomposites, which are expected to be useful as biomaterials and food ingredients.

  17. PREPARATION OF HALIDES OF PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Garner, C.S.; Johns, I.B.

    1958-09-01

    A dry chemical method is described for preparing plutonium halides, which consists in contacting plutonyl nitrate with dry gaseous HCl or HF at an elevated temperature. The addition to the reaction gas of a small quantity of an oxidizing gas or a reducing gas will cause formation of the tetra- or tri-halide of plutonium as desired.

  18. The alkali metals: 200 years of surprises.

    PubMed

    Dye, James L

    2015-03-13

    Alkali metal compounds have been known since antiquity. In 1807, Sir Humphry Davy surprised everyone by electrolytically preparing (and naming) potassium and sodium metals. In 1808, he noted their interaction with ammonia, which, 100 years later, was attributed to solvated electrons. After 1960, pulse radiolysis of nearly any solvent produced solvated electrons, which became one of the most studied species in chemistry. In 1968, alkali metal solutions in amines and ethers were shown to contain alkali metal anions in addition to solvated electrons. The advent of crown ethers and cryptands as complexants for alkali cations greatly enhanced alkali metal solubilities. This permitted us to prepare a crystalline salt of Na(-) in 1974, followed by 30 other alkalides with Na(-), K(-), Rb(-) and Cs(-) anions. This firmly established the -1 oxidation state of alkali metals. The synthesis of alkalides led to the crystallization of electrides, with trapped electrons as the anions. Electrides have a variety of electronic and magnetic properties, depending on the geometries and connectivities of the trapping sites. In 2009, the final surprise was the experimental demonstration that alkali metals under high pressure lose their metallic character as the electrons are localized in voids between the alkali cations to become high-pressure electrides!

  19. The alkali metals: 200 years of surprises.

    PubMed

    Dye, James L

    2015-03-13

    Alkali metal compounds have been known since antiquity. In 1807, Sir Humphry Davy surprised everyone by electrolytically preparing (and naming) potassium and sodium metals. In 1808, he noted their interaction with ammonia, which, 100 years later, was attributed to solvated electrons. After 1960, pulse radiolysis of nearly any solvent produced solvated electrons, which became one of the most studied species in chemistry. In 1968, alkali metal solutions in amines and ethers were shown to contain alkali metal anions in addition to solvated electrons. The advent of crown ethers and cryptands as complexants for alkali cations greatly enhanced alkali metal solubilities. This permitted us to prepare a crystalline salt of Na(-) in 1974, followed by 30 other alkalides with Na(-), K(-), Rb(-) and Cs(-) anions. This firmly established the -1 oxidation state of alkali metals. The synthesis of alkalides led to the crystallization of electrides, with trapped electrons as the anions. Electrides have a variety of electronic and magnetic properties, depending on the geometries and connectivities of the trapping sites. In 2009, the final surprise was the experimental demonstration that alkali metals under high pressure lose their metallic character as the electrons are localized in voids between the alkali cations to become high-pressure electrides! PMID:25666067

  20. Alkali metal recovery from carbonaceous material conversion process

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.; Gorbaty, Martin L.; Tsou, Joe M.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced in the gasifier or similar reaction zone, alkali metal constitutents are recovered from the particles by withdrawing and passing the particles from the reaction zone to an alkali metal recovery zone in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen and treating the particles in the recovery zone with water or an aqueous solution in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen. The solution formed by treating the particles in the recovery zone will contain water-soluble alkali metal constituents and is recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preventing contact of the particles with oxygen as they are withdrawn from the reaction zone and during treatment in the recovery zone avoids the formation of undesirable alkali metal constituents in the aqueous solution produced in the recovery zone and insures maximum recovery of water-soluble alkali metal constituents from the alkali metal residues.

  1. Formation of tungsten monocarbide from a molten tungstate-halide phase by gas sparging

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, J.M.; Raddatz, A.E.; Baglin, E.G.

    1988-02-23

    A process for preparation of tungsten monocarbide is described comprising: (a) providing a molten composition comprising an alkali metal halide and an oxygen compound of tungsten; (b) sparging the composition with a gas comprising a gaseous hydrocarbon which is selected from the group consisting of natural gas, methane, ethane, acetylene, propane, butane, mixtures thereof, and admixtures of these gases with H/sub 2/ or CO, at a temperature of about 900/sup 0/ to 1100/sup 0/C for a sufficient time for the tungsten compound to be substantially converted to tungsten carbide; and (c) decanting the molten halide from the tungsten carbide product.

  2. Preventing the accelerated low-temperature oxidation of MoSi{sub 2} (pesting) by the application of superficial alkali-salt layers

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.; Wang, G.; Rapp, R.A.

    1996-02-01

    Previous work showed that MoSi{sub 2} diffusion coatings formed by a NaF-activated pack cementation process did not pest. A Na-Al-oxide by-product layer resulting from the NaF activator formed a Na-silicate layer to passivate MoSi{sub 2}. Superficial NaF layers were then used to prevent the pesting of MoSi{sub 2} diffusion coatings that were otherwise susceptible to pest disintegration. In this study, the use of superficial alkali-salt layers to prevent the accelerated oxidation of bulk MoSi{sub 2} at 500{degrees}C is investigated more broadly. The application of Na-halide, KF, LiF, Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}, or Na-silicate layers prior to oxidation prevented accelerated oxidation and pesting for at least 2000 hr at 500{degrees}C in air. The formation of a fast-growing, Na-silicate layer passivates MoSi{sub 2}. The MoO{sub 3} that forms during oxidation absorbs sodium by intercalation to form stable Na-molybdate precipitates. Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}, Na-silicate, LiF, and KF prevented accelerated oxidation at 500{degrees}C by a similar mechanism. The application of alkali-halide salts is a simple, effective solution to prevent the accelerated oxidation and pesting of MoSi{sub 2}.

  3. Alkali Silicate Vehicle Forms Durable, Fireproof Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John B.; Seindenberg, Benjamin

    1964-01-01

    The problem: To develop a paint for use on satellites or space vehicles that exhibits high resistance to cracking, peeling, or flaking when subjected to a wide range of temperatures. Organic coatings will partially meet the required specifications but have the inherent disadvantage of combustibility. Alkali-silicate binders, used in some industrial coatings and adhesives, show evidence of forming a fireproof paint, but the problem of high surface-tension, a characteristic of alkali silicates, has not been resolved. The solution: Use of a suitable non-ionic wetting agent combined with a paint incorporating alkali silicate as the binder.

  4. Search for improved-performance scintillator candidates among the electronic structures of mixed halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Williams, Richard T.; Burger, Arnold; Adhikari, Rajendra; Biswas, Koushik

    2014-09-01

    The application of advanced theory and modeling techniques has become an essential component to understand material properties and hasten the design and discovery of new ones. This is true for diverse applications. Therefore, current efforts aimed towards finding new scintillator materials are also aligned with this general predictive approach. The need for large scale deployment of efficient radiation detectors requires discovery and development of high-performance, yet low-cost, scintillators. While Tl-doped NaI and CsI are still some of the widely used scintillators, there are promising new developments, for example, Eu-doped SrI2 and Ce-doped LaBr3. The newer candidates have excellent light yield and good energy resolution, but challenges persist in the growth of large single crystals. We will discuss a theoretical basis for anticipating improved proportionality as well as light yield in solid solutions of certain systems, particularly alkali iodides, based on considerations of hot-electron group velocity and thermalization. Solid solutions based on NaI and similar alkali halides are attractive to consider in more detail because the end point compositions are inexpensive and easy to grow. If some of this quality can be preserved while reaping improved light yield and possibly improved proportionality of the mixture, the goal of better performance at the low price of NaI:Tl might be attainable by such a route. Within this context, we will discuss a density functional theory (DFT) based study of two prototype systems: mixed anion NaIxBr1-x and mixed cation NaxK1-xI. Results obtained from these two prototype candidates will lead to further targeted theoretical and experimental search and discovery of new scintillator hosts.

  5. Making and Breaking of Lead Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Manser, Joseph S; Saidaminov, Makhsud I; Christians, Jeffrey A; Bakr, Osman M; Kamat, Prashant V

    2016-02-16

    A new front-runner has emerged in the field of next-generation photovoltaics. A unique class of materials, known as organic metal halide perovskites, bridges the gap between low-cost fabrication and exceptional device performance. These compounds can be processed at low temperature (typically in the range 80-150 °C) and readily self-assemble from the solution phase into high-quality semiconductor thin films. The low energetic barrier for crystal formation has mixed consequences. On one hand, it enables inexpensive processing and both optical and electronic tunability. The caveat, however, is that many as-formed lead halide perovskite thin films lack chemical and structural stability, undergoing rapid degradation in the presence of moisture or heat. To date, improvements in perovskite solar cell efficiency have resulted primarily from better control over thin film morphology, manipulation of the stoichiometry and chemistry of lead halide and alkylammonium halide precursors, and the choice of solvent treatment. Proper characterization and tuning of processing parameters can aid in rational optimization of perovskite devices. Likewise, gaining a comprehensive understanding of the degradation mechanism and identifying components of the perovskite structure that may be particularly susceptible to attack by moisture are vital to mitigate device degradation under operating conditions. This Account provides insight into the lifecycle of organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites, including (i) the nature of the precursor solution, (ii) formation of solid-state perovskite thin films and single crystals, and (iii) transformation of perovskites into hydrated phases upon exposure to moisture. In particular, spectroscopic and structural characterization techniques shed light on the thermally driven evolution of the perovskite structure. By tuning precursor stoichiometry and chemistry, and thus the lead halide charge-transfer complexes present in solution, crystallization

  6. Actinide halide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Avens, L.R.; Zwick, B.D.; Sattelberger, A.P.; Clark, D.L.; Watkin, J.G.

    1991-02-07

    A compound of the formula MX{sub n}L{sub m} wherein M = Th, Pu, Np,or Am thorium, X = a halide atom, n = 3 or 4, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is 3 or 4 for monodentate ligands or is 2 for bidentate ligands, where n + m = 7 or 8 for monodentate ligands or 5 or 6 for bidentate ligands, a compound of the formula MX{sub n} wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant, are provided.

  7. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-11-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of PFBC technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an altemative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. As shown in Fig. 1, the RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no HTHP sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-leaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6M-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite [8]. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed.

  8. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of PFBC technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an altemative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. As shown in Fig. 1, the RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no HTHP sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-leaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6M-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite [8]. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed.

  9. METHOD OF PREPARING METAL HALIDES

    DOEpatents

    Hendrickson, A.V.

    1958-11-18

    The conversion of plutonium halides from plutonium peroxide can be done by washing the peroxide with hydrogen peroxide, drying the peroxide, passing a dry gaseous hydrohalide over the surface of the peroxide at a temperature of about lOO icient laborato C until the reaction rate has stabillzed, and then ralsing the reaction temperature to between 400 and 600 icient laborato C until the conversion to plutonium halide is substantially complete.

  10. Alkali cation specific adsorption onto fcc(111) transition metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mills, J N; McCrum, I T; Janik, M J

    2014-07-21

    The presence of alkali cations in electrolyte solutions is known to impact the rate of electrocatalytic reactions, though the mechanism of such impact is not conclusively determined. We use density functional theory (DFT) to examine the specific adsorption of alkali cations to fcc(111) electrode surfaces, as specific adsorption may block catalyst sites or otherwise impact surface catalytic chemistry. Solvation of the cation-metal surface structure was investigated using explicit water models. Computed equilibrium potentials for alkali cation adsorption suggest that alkali and alkaline earth cations will specifically adsorb onto Pt(111) and Pd(111) surfaces in the potential range of hydrogen oxidation and hydrogen evolution catalysis in alkaline solutions.

  11. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, Wen Y.

    1984-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them (46, 53, 61, 69) with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide (63) to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased (81), preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated (84) to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process (86, 18, 17) where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  12. Impact of the organic halide salt on final perovskite composition for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David T.; Sai, Hiroaki; Wee Tan, Kwan; Estroff, Lara A.; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2014-08-01

    The methylammonium lead halide perovskites have shown significant promise as a low-cost, second generation, photovoltaic material. Despite recent advances, however, there are still a number of fundamental aspects of their formation as well as their physical and electronic behavior that are not well understood. In this letter we explore the mechanism by which these materials crystallize by testing the outcome of each of the reagent halide salts. We find that components of both salts, lead halide and methylammonium halide, are relatively mobile and can be readily exchanged during the crystallization process when the reaction is carried out in solution or in the solid state. We exploit this fact by showing that the perovskite structure is formed even when the lead salt's anion is a non-halide, leading to lower annealing temperature and time requirements for film formation. Studies into these behaviors may ultimately lead to improved processing conditions for photovoltaic films.

  13. Methyl Halide Production by Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailey, G. D.; Varner, R. K.; Blanchard, R. O.; Sive, B. C.; Crill, P. M.

    2005-12-01

    Methyl chloride (CH3Cl), methyl bromide (CH3Br) and methyl iodide (CH3I) are methyl halide gases that contribute significant amounts of halogen radicals to the atmosphere. In an effort to better understand the global budget of methyl halides and their impact on the atmosphere, we need to identify the natural sources in addition to the known anthropogenic sources of these compounds. We are investigating the role of fungi in the production of methyl halides in the soils and wetlands in southern New Hampshire, USA. Previous research has shown that wood decay fungi and ectomycorrhizal fungi, which are within a group of fungi called basidiomycetes, emit methyl halides. In our study, measurements of headspace gas extracted from flasks containing fungi grown in culture demonstrate that a variety of fungi, including basidiomycetes and non-basidiomycetes, emit methyl halides. Our research sites include four ecosystems: an agricultural field, a temperate forest, a fresh water wetland, and coastal salt marshes. We have collected and isolated fungi at each site by culturing tissue samples of fruiting bodies and plant material, by using wood baits, and from the direct culture of soil. We compared the rates of methyl halide emissions from the fungi in the four ecosystems. In addition, we measured emissions from previously assayed fungal isolates after reintroducing them to sterilized soils that were collected from their original environments. Fungal biomass was determined by substrate-induced respiration (SIR). The emission rate by the fungus was determined by a linear regression of the concentration of methyl halide in the sample headspace over time divided by the fungal biomass.

  14. Actinide halide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Avens, Larry R.; Zwick, Bill D.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Clark, David L.; Watkin, John G.

    1992-01-01

    A compound of the formula MX.sub.n L.sub.m wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands, a compound of the formula MX.sub.n wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant, are provided.

  15. Actinide halide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Avens, L.R.; Zwick, B.D.; Sattelberger, A.P.; Clark, D.L.; Watkin, J.G.

    1992-11-24

    A compound is described of the formula MX[sub n]L[sub m] wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands. A compound of the formula MX[sub n] wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds are described including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant.

  16. Ion Partitioning at the liquid/vapor interface of a multi-component alkali halidesolution: A model for aqueous sea salt aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, Sutapa; Brown, Matthew A.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Krisch, Maria J.; Salmeron, Miquel; Jungwirth, Pavel; Hemminger, John C.

    2008-12-22

    The chemistry of Br species associated with sea salt ice and aerosols has been implicated in the episodes of ozone depletion reported at Arctic sunrise. However, Br{sup -} is only a minor component in sea salt, which has a Br{sup -}/Cl{sup -} molar ratio of {approx}0.0015. Sea salt is a complex mixture of many different species, with NaCl as the primary component. In recent years experimental and theoretical studies have reported enhancement of the large, more polarizable halide ion at the liquid/vapor interface of corresponding aqueous alkali halide solutions. The proposed enhancement is likely to influence the availability of sea salt Br{sup -} for heterogeneous reactions such as those involved in the ozone depletion episodes. We report here ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies and molecular dynamics simulations showing direct evidence of Br{sup -} enhancement at the interface of an aqueous NaCl solution doped with bromide. The experiments were carried out on samples with Br{sup -}/Cl{sup -} ratios in the range 0.1% to 10%, the latter being also the ratio for which simulations were carried out. This is the first direct measurement of interfacial enhancement of Br{sup -} in a multi-component solution with particular relevance to sea salt chemistry.

  17. Removal of mercury(II) from aqueous solutions and chlor-alkali industry effluent by steam activated and sulphurised activated carbons prepared from bagasse pith: kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Anoop Krishnan, K; Anirudhan, T S

    2002-05-27

    The adsorption of mercury from aqueous solutions and chlor-alkali industry effluent on steam activated and sulphurised steam activated carbons prepared from bagasse pith have been studied comparatively. The uptake of mercury(II) (Hg(II)) was maximum by steam activated carbon in presence of SO(2) and H(2)S (SA-SO(2)-H(2)S-C) followed by steam activated carbon in presence of SO(2) (SA-SO(2)-C), steam activated carbon in presence of H(2)S (SA-H(2)S-C) and steam activated carbon (SA-C) at the same concentration, pH and temperature of the solution. Adsorption experiments demonstrate that the adsorption process corresponds to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and equilibrium results correspond to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Kinetic parameters as a function of initial concentration, for all adsorbents were calculated. Batch studies indicated that the optimum pH range for the adsorption of Hg(II) on sulphurised carbons was between 4 and 9 and for sulphur free carbon was between 6 and 9 at 30 degrees C. The adsorptive behaviour of the activated carbons is explained on the basis of their chemical nature and porous texture. Decrease in ionic strength and increase in temperature of the solution has been found to improve the uptake of Hg(II). Synthetic and chlor-alkali industrial wastewaters were also treated by sulphurised activated carbons to demonstrate their efficiencies in removing Hg(II) from wastewaters. Some feasibility experiments have been carried out with a view to recover the adsorbed Hg(II) and regenerate the spent activated carbons using 0.2M HCl solution. The data obtained point towards viable adsorbents, which are both effective as well as economically attractive for Hg(II) removal from wastewaters.

  18. Halide-Substituted Electronic Properties of Organometal Halide Perovskite Films: Direct and Inverse Photoemission Studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Chi; Wei, Jian; Sato, Mikio; Koike, Harunobu; Xie, Zhong-Zhi; Li, Yan-Qing; Kanai, Kaname; Kera, Satoshi; Ueno, Nobuo; Tang, Jian-Xin

    2016-05-11

    Solution-processed perovskite solar cells are attracting increasing interest due to their potential in next-generation hybrid photovoltaic devices. Despite the morphological control over the perovskite films, quantitative information on electronic structures and interface energetics is of paramount importance to the optimal photovoltaic performance. Here, direct and inverse photoemission spectroscopies are used to determine the electronic structures and chemical compositions of various methylammonium lead halide perovskite films (MAPbX3, X = Cl, Br, and I), revealing the strong influence of halide substitution on the electronic properties of perovskite films. Precise control over halide compositions in MAPbX3 films causes the manipulation of the electronic properties, with a qualitatively blue shift along the I → Br → Cl series and showing the increase in ionization potentials from 5.96 to 7.04 eV and the change of transport band gaps in the range from 1.70 to 3.09 eV. The resulting light absorption of MAPbX3 films can cover the entire visible region from 420 to 800 nm. The results presented here provide a quantitative guide for the analysis of perovskite-based solar cell performance and the selection of optimal carrier-extraction materials for photogenerated electrons and holes. PMID:27101940

  19. Preparation of cerium halide solvate complexes

    DOEpatents

    Vasudevan, Kalyan V; Smith, Nickolaus A; Gordon, John C; McKigney, Edward A; Muenchaussen, Ross E

    2013-08-06

    Crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide solvate complex resulted from a process of forming a paste of a cerium(III) halide in an ionic liquid, adding a solvent to the paste, removing any undissolved solid, and then cooling the liquid phase. Diffusing a solvent vapor into the liquid phase also resulted in crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide complex.

  20. COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-08-01

    A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

  1. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  2. Effects of alkali treatments on Ag nanowire transparent conductive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunho; Kang, Jun-gu; Eom, Tae-yil; Moon, Bongjin; Lee, Hoo-Jeong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we employ various alkali materials (alkali metals with different base strengths, and ammonia gas and solution) to improve the conductivity of silver nanowire (Ag NW)-networked films. The alkali treatment appears to remove the surface oxide and improve the conductivity. When applied with TiO2 nanoparticles, the treatment appears more effective as the alkalis gather around wire junctions and help them weld to each other via heat emitted from the reduction reaction. The ammonia solution treatment is found to be quick and aggressive, damaging the wires severely in the case of excessive treatment. On the other hand, the ammonia gas treatment seems much less aggressive and does not damage the wires even after a long exposure. The results of this study highlight the effectiveness of the alkali treatment in improving of the conductivity of Ag NW-networked transparent conductive films.

  3. Atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions for surface interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Outlaw, R. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base developed from analysis of the two-body potential data, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas surfaces and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  4. Development of Halide and Oxy-Halides for Isotopic Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Jana Pfeiffer; Martha R. Finck

    2014-10-01

    The goal of this project was to synthesize a volatile form of Np for introduction into mass spectrometers at INL. Volatile solids of the 5f elements are typically those of the halides (e.g. UF6), however fluorine is highly corrosive to the sensitive internal components of the mass separator, and the other volatile halides exist as several different stable isotopes in nature. However, iodide is both mono-isotopic and volatile, and as such presents an avenue for creation of a form of Np suitable for introduction into the mass separator. To accomplish this goal, the technical work in the project sought to establish a novel synthetic route for the conversion NpO2+ (dissolved in nitric acid) to NpI3 and NpI4.

  5. Elucidation of transport mechanism and enhanced alkali ion transference numbers in mixed alkali metal-organic ionic molten salts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Forsyth, Maria

    2016-07-28

    Mixed salts of Ionic Liquids (ILs) and alkali metal salts, developed as electrolytes for lithium and sodium batteries, have shown a remarkable ability to facilitate high rate capability for lithium and sodium electrochemical cycling. It has been suggested that this may be due to a high alkali metal ion transference number at concentrations approaching 50 mol% Li(+) or Na(+), relative to lower concentrations. Computational investigations for two IL systems illustrate the formation of extended alkali-anion aggregates as the alkali metal ion concentration increases. This tends to favor the diffusion of alkali metal ions compared with other ionic species in electrolyte solutions; behavior that has recently been reported for Li(+) in a phosphonium ionic liquid, thus an increasing alkali transference number. The mechanism of alkali metal ion diffusion via this extended coordination environment present at high concentrations is explained and compared to the dynamics at lower concentrations. Heterogeneous alkali metal ion dynamics are also evident and, somewhat counter-intuitively, it appears that the faster ions are those that are generally found clustered with the anions. Furthermore these fast alkali metal ions appear to correlate with fastest ionic liquid solvent ions. PMID:27375042

  6. Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  7. Metal halide perovskites for energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Eperon, Giles E.; Snaith, Henry J.

    2016-06-01

    Exploring prospective materials for energy production and storage is one of the biggest challenges of this century. Solar energy is one of the most important renewable energy resources, due to its wide availability and low environmental impact. Metal halide perovskites have emerged as a class of semiconductor materials with unique properties, including tunable bandgap, high absorption coefficient, broad absorption spectrum, high charge carrier mobility and long charge diffusion lengths, which enable a broad range of photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications. Since the first embodiment of perovskite solar cells showing a power conversion efficiency of 3.8%, the device performance has been boosted up to a certified 22.1% within a few years. In this Perspective, we discuss differing forms of perovskite materials produced via various deposition procedures. We focus on their energy-related applications and discuss current challenges and possible solutions, with the aim of stimulating potential new applications.

  8. Apparatus enables accurate determination of alkali oxides in alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupraw, W. A.; Gahn, R. F.; Graab, J. W.; Maple, W. E.; Rosenblum, L.

    1966-01-01

    Evacuated apparatus determines the alkali oxide content of an alkali metal by separating the metal from the oxide by amalgamation with mercury. The apparatus prevents oxygen and moisture from inadvertently entering the system during the sampling and analytical procedure.

  9. TRANSURANIC METAL HALIDES AND A PROCESS FOR THE PRODUCTION THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Fried, S.

    1951-03-20

    Halides of transuranic elements are prepared by contacting with aluminum and a halogen, or with an aluminum halide, a transuranic metal oxide, oxyhalide, halide, or mixture thereof at an elevated temperature.

  10. Ionic molecular interactions in solutions of alkali metal iodides in N-methylpyrrolidone at 298.15 K according to calorimetry and densimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, A. N.; Rassokhina, L. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    The heat capacity and density of the ternary solutions of NaI-KI- N-methylpyrrolidone (MP), NaI-RbI-MP, KI-RbI-MP, and KI-BaI2-MP at 298.15 K were studied by calorimetry and densimetry. The changes in the heat capacity and volume during the formation of the ternary systems from binary solutions were calculated and discussed. Ion association was found to dominate during the mixing of electrolyte solutions of this type in MP, with ion resolvation occasionally producing a significant effect on ion association.

  11. Metal halide perovskite light emitters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Cho, Himchan; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years after layer-type metal halide perovskites were successfully developed, 3D metal halide perovskites (shortly, perovskites) were recently rediscovered and are attracting multidisciplinary interest from physicists, chemists, and material engineers. Perovskites have a crystal structure composed of five atoms per unit cell (ABX3) with cation A positioned at a corner, metal cation B at the center, and halide anion X at the center of six planes and unique optoelectronic properties determined by the crystal structure. Because of very narrow spectra (full width at half-maximum ≤20 nm), which are insensitive to the crystallite/grain/particle dimension and wide wavelength range (400 nm ≤ λ ≤ 780 nm), perovskites are expected to be promising high-color purity light emitters that overcome inherent problems of conventional organic and inorganic quantum dot emitters. Within the last 2 y, perovskites have already demonstrated their great potential in light-emitting diodes by showing high electroluminescence efficiency comparable to those of organic and quantum dot light-emitting diodes. This article reviews the progress of perovskite emitters in two directions of bulk perovskite polycrystalline films and perovskite nanoparticles, describes current challenges, and suggests future research directions for researchers to encourage them to collaborate and to make a synergetic effect in this rapidly emerging multidisciplinary field. PMID:27679844

  12. Preliminary Study on Synthesis of Organolead Halide with Lead Derived from Solder Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratiwi, P.; Rahmi, G. N.; Aimon, A. H.; Iskandar, F.; Abdullah, M.; Nuryadin, B. W.

    2016-08-01

    Organolead halide has attracted great attention for application in perovskite solar cells due to its high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of up to 20.1%. One of the most common perovskite materials is lead based reagent. In this research, we have synthesized organolead halide with lead extracted from solder wire. In the preparation procedure, first PbCl2 and PbI2 are produced by reacting lead from the solder wire with NaCl and KI, which are used as the basic substance for the perovskite material. Then, in order to get perovskite solution, the powders are reacted with methylamine iodide (MAI) in dimethylformamide (DMF) using a solution based method. Further, the spin coating method is used to fabricate perovskite thin film. The XRD peak results agreed with JCPDS Powder Diffraction of PbCl2 and PbI2. Based on FTIR, the transmittance spectra of the organolead mixed halide that was prepared using solder wire lead exhibited absorption peaks identical to organolead mixed halide using commercial lead. The UV-Vis absorbance spectra of the organolead mixed halide from solder wire lead also exhibited the same absorption ability as from commercial lead. Morever, EDS measurement showed that the element composition of the perovskite thin film using lead from solder wire identical to that from commercial lead. This indicates that solder wire lead is suitable enough for organolead halide material synthesis.

  13. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  14. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  15. Performance of Straight Steel Fibres Reinforced Alkali Activated Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faris, Meor Ahmad; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Nizar Ismail, Khairul; Muniandy, Ratnasamy; Putra Jaya, Ramadhansyah

    2016-06-01

    This paper focus on the performance of alkali activated concrete produced by using fly ash activated by sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. These alkali activated concrete were reinforced with straight steel fibres with different weight percentage starting from 0 % up to 5 %. Chemical composition of raw material in the production alkali activated concrete which is fly ash was first identified by using X-ray fluorescence. Results reveal there have an effect of straight steel fibres inclusion to the alkali activated concrete. Highest compressive strength of alkali activated concrete which is 67.72 MPa was obtained when 3 % of straight fibres were added. As well as flexural strength, highest flexural strength which is 6.78 MPa was obtained at 3 % of straight steel fibres inclusions.

  16. Chlor-Alkali Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkatesh, S.; Tilak, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    Chlor-alkali technology is one of the largest electrochemical industries in the world, the main products being chlorine and caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) generated simultaneously by the electrolysis of sodium chloride. This technology is reviewed in terms of electrochemical principles and manufacturing processes involved. (Author/JN)

  17. Stability diagrams for fourfold coordination of polyvalent metal ions in molten mixtures of halide salts

    SciTech Connect

    Akdeniz, Z. Istanbul Univ. . Dept. of Physics); Tosi, M.P. . Dipt. di Fisica Teorica Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1988-11-01

    The stability of local fourfold coordination for divalent and trivalent metal ions in liquid mixtures of polyvalent metal halides and alkali halides is classified by means of structural coordinates obtained from properties of the elements. In parallel with earlier classifications of compound crystal structures and molecular shapes, the elemental properties are taken from first-principles calculations of valence electron orbitals in atoms, in the form of (i) the nodal radii of Andreoni, Baldereschi and Guizzetti or (ii) the pseudopotential radii or Zunger and Cohen. As a third alternative a classification based on Pettifor's phenomenological chemical scale of the elements is also considered. The alternative structural classification schemes that are developed from these elemental properties are generally successfully in distinguishing molten mixtures in which the available experimental evidence indicates long-lived fourfold coordination of polyvalent metal ions. In addition, Pettifor's chemical scale scheme is useful in sorting out finer details of local coordination in the liquid state. 3 figs., 71 refs.

  18. Conversion of methyl halides to hydrocarbons on basic zeolites. A discovery by in situ NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, D.K.; Chang, J.W.; Haw, J.F. )

    1993-06-02

    It is shown that methyl halides (I, Br, Cl) react to form ethylene and other hydrocarbons on basic, alkali metal-exchanged zeolites at low temperatures. For example, methyl iodide is converted to ethylene on CsX zeolite at ca. 500 K. The order of reactivity of various catalyst/adsorbate combinations is consistent with the predictions of elementary chemical principles. The order of reactivity of the methyl halides follows the expected leaving-group trend. The activity of the catalyst framework correlates with its basicity (or nucleophilicity). All reactions were performed in a batch mode in sealed magic angle spinning (MAS) rotors while the contents were continuously monitored by in situ [sup 13]C NMR. Methyl iodide reacts on CsX below room temperature to form a framework-bound methoxy species in high yield. An analogous ethoxy species readily formed from ethyliodide. These species were characterized in detail. The ethoxy species was quantitatively converted to ethylene below 500 K. [sup 133]Cs MAS NMR was used to characterize the interactions of methyl iodide and other adsorbates with the cation in zeolite CsZSM-5. Solvation of the alkali metal cation was reflected in large, loading-dependent chemical shifts for [sup 133]Cs. Interactions between the cation and adsorbates were also reflected in the [sup 13]C shifts of the alkyl halides and ethylene. The cumulative evidence suggests a mechanism for carbon-carbon bond formation analogous to one proposed by Chang and co-workers for methanol-to-gasoline chemistry on acidic zeolites (J. Chem. Soc., Chem. Commun, 1987, 1320) that involves framework-bound methoxy and ethoxy species. The mechanism for methyl halide conversion is proposed to include roles for the basicity of the zeolite framework as well as the Lewis acidity of the cation. 68 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Multiple-Wavelength Metal/Halide Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerheim, N. M.

    1984-01-01

    Single device produces multiple lasing lines. Laser capable of producing many lasing lines has several reservoirs of halide lasant mixed with chlorides of copper, manganese and iron. Convection-control technique possible to rapidly change from one metal halide to another at maximum energy.

  20. Mechanistic Aspects of Aryl-Halide Oxidative Addition, Coordination Chemistry, and Ring-Walking by Palladium.

    PubMed

    Zenkina, Olena V; Gidron, Ori; Shimon, Linda J W; Iron, Mark A; van der Boom, Milko E

    2015-11-01

    This contribution describes the reactivity of a zero-valent palladium phosphine complex with substrates that contain both an aryl halide moiety and an unsaturated carbon-carbon bond. Although η(2) -coordination of the metal center to a C=C or C≡C unit is kinetically favored, aryl halide bond activation is favored thermodynamically. These quantitative transformations proceed under mild reaction conditions in solution or in the solid state. Kinetic measurements indicate that formation of η(2) -coordination complexes are not nonproductive side-equilibria, but observable (and in several cases even isolated) intermediates en route to aryl halide bond cleavage. At the same time, DFT calculations show that the reaction with palladium may proceed through a dissociation-oxidative addition mechanism rather than through a haptotropic intramolecular process (i.e., ring walking). Furthermore, the transition state involves coordination of a third phosphine to the palladium center, which is lost during the oxidative addition as the C-halide bond is being broken. Interestingly, selective activation of aryl halides has been demonstrated by adding reactive aryl halides to the η(2) -coordination complexes. The product distribution can be controlled by the concentration of the reactants and/or the presence of excess phosphine.

  1. Raman and infrared spectroscopic investigations on aqueous alkali metal phosphate solutions and density functional theory calculations of phosphate-water clusters.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Wolfram W; Irmer, Gert

    2007-12-01

    Phosphate (PO(4)(3-)) solutions in water and heavy water have been studied by Raman and infrared spectroscopy over a broad concentration range (0.0091-5.280 mol/L) including a hydrate melt at 23 degrees C. In the low wavenumber range, spectra in R-format have been constructed and the R normalization procedure has been briefly discussed. The vibrational modes of the tetrahedral PO(4)(3-)(aq) (T(d) symmetry) have been assigned and compared to the calculated values derived from the density functional theory (DFT) method for the unhydrated PO(4)(3-)(T(d)) and phosphate-water clusters: PO(4)(3-).H(2)O (C(2v)), PO(4)(3-).2H(2)O (D(2d)), PO(4)(3-).4H(2)O (D(2d)), PO(4)(3-).6H(2)O (T(d)), and PO(4)(3-).12H(2)O (T), a cluster with a complete first hydration sphere of water molecules. A cluster with a second hydration sphere of 12 water molecules and 6 in the first sphere, PO(4)(3-).18H(2)O (T), has also been calculated. Agreement between measured and calculated vibrational modes is best in the case of the PO(4)(3-).12H(2)O cluster and the PO(4)(3-).18H(2)O cluster but far less so in the case of the unhydrated PO(4)(3-) or phosphate-water cluster with a lower number of water molecules than 12. The asymmetric, broad band shape of v(1)(a(1)) PO(4)(3-) in aqueous solutions has been measured as a function of concentration and the asymmetric and broad band shape was explained. However, the same mode in heavy water has only half the full width at half-height compared to the mode in normal water. The PO(4)(3-) is strongly hydrated in aqueous solutions. This has been verified by Raman spectroscopy comparing v(2)(H(2)O), the deformation mode of water, and the stretching modes, the v(1)OH and v(3)OH of water, in K(3)PO(4) solutions as a function of concentration and comparison with the same modes in pure water. A mode at approximately 240 cm(-1) (isotropic R spectrum) has been detected and assigned to the restricted translational mode of the strong hydrogen bonds formed between

  2. Hygroscopicity Evaluation of Halide Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, M; Stand, L; Wei, H; Hobbs, C. L.; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.; Tupitsyn, E; Melcher, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative study of relative hygroscopicity of anhydrous halide scintillators grown at various laboratories is presented. We have developed a technique to evaluate moisture sensitivity of both raw materials and grown crystals, in which the moisture absorption rate is measured using a gravimetric analysis. Degradation of the scintillation performance was investigated by recording gamma-ray spectra and monitoring the photopeak position, count rate and energy resolution. The accompanying physical degradation of the samples exposed to ambient atmosphere was photographically recorded as well. The results were compared with ben

  3. Dynamic chiral-at-metal stability of tetrakis(d/l-hfc)Ln(III) complexes capped with an alkali metal cation in solution.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yiji; Zou, Fang; Wan, Shigang; Ouyang, Jie; Lin, Lirong; Zhang, Hui

    2012-06-14

    Chiral tetrakis(β-diketonate) Ln(III) complexes Δ-[NaLa(d-hfc)(4)(CH(3)CN)] (1) and Λ-[NaLa(l-hfc)(4) (CH(3)CN)] (2) (d/l-hfc(-) = 3-heptafluo-robutylryl-(+)/(-)-camphorate) are a pair of enantiomers and crystallize in the same Sohncke space group (P2(1)2(1)2(1)) with dodecahedral (DD) geometry. Typically positive and negative exciton splitting patterns around 320 nm were observed in the solid-state circular dichroism (CD) spectra of complexes 1 and 2, which indicate that their shell configurational chiralities are Δ and Λ, respectively. The apparent bisignate couplets in the solid-state CD spectra of [CsLn(d-hfc)(4)(H(2)O)] [Ln = La (3), Yb (5)] and [CsLn(l-hfc)(4)(H(2)O)] [Ln = La (4), Yb (6)] show that they are a pair of enantiomers and their absolute configurations are denoted Δ and Λ, respectively. The crystallographic data of 5 reveals that its coordination polyhedron is the square antiprism (SAP) geometry and it undergoes a phase transition from triclinic (α phase, P1) to monoclinic (β phase, C2) upon cooling. The difference between the two phases is brought about by the temperature dependent behaviour of the coordination water molecules, but this did not affect the configurational chirality of the Δ-SAP-[Yb(d-hfc)(4)](-) moiety. Furthermore, time-dependent CD, UV-vis and (19)F NMR were applied to study the solution behavior of these complexes. It was found that the chiral-at-metal stability of the three pairs of complexes is different and affected by both the Ln(3+) and M(+) ion size. The results show that the Cs(+) cation can retain the metal center chirality and stablize the structures of [Ln(d/l-hfc)(4)](-) or the dissociated tris(d/l-hfc)Ln(III) species in solution for a longer time than that of the Na(+) cation, and it is important that the Cs(+) ion successfully lock the configurational chirality around the Yb(3+) center of the complex species in solution. This is reasoned by the short Cs(+)···FC, Cs(+)···O-Yb and Cs(+)···Yb(3

  4. Alkali-vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.; Krupke, W. F.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the results from several of our alkali laser systems. We show highly efficient performance from an alexandrite-pumped rubidium laser. Using a laser diode stack as a pump source, we demonstrate up to 145 W of average power from a CW system. We present a design for a transversely pumped demonstration system that will show all of the required laser physics for a high power system.

  5. Impurity segregation in zone-refined precursors for crystalline halide scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swider, S.; Lam, S.; Motakef, S.; Donohoe, E.; Coers, L.; Taylor, S.; Spencer, S.

    2015-06-01

    Successful growth of halide scintillator crystals depends on a supply of ultra-high purity (UHP) precursor materials. Metallic interstitials and substitutions may provide traps that quench luminescence. Oxygen impurities can create competing compounds within a matrix, such as oxyhalides, that disrupt crystallinity and nucleate cracks. Using mass spectroscopy and oxygen combustion analysis, we analyzed impurities in SrI2, EuI2, and YCl3 precursors before and after zone refining. The data show most alkali and alkali earth impurities segregated easily. However, with the exception of iron, many transition metals were incorporated into the solid. Reliable oxygen measurements proved difficult to achieve. Additional oxygen was measured in nitrates and sulfates, via ion chromatography. Zone refining reduced the overall impurity content, but levels remained above a 10 ppm target.

  6. Lasing in robust cesium lead halide perovskite nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Samuel W.; Lai, Minliang; Gibson, Natalie A.; Wong, Andrew B.; Dou, Letian; Ma, Jie; Wang, Lin-Wang; Leone, Stephen R.; Yang, Peidong

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly growing field of nanoscale lasers can be advanced through the discovery of new, tunable light sources. The emission wavelength tunability demonstrated in perovskite materials is an attractive property for nanoscale lasers. Whereas organic–inorganic lead halide perovskite materials are known for their instability, cesium lead halides offer a robust alternative without sacrificing emission tunability or ease of synthesis. Here, we report the low-temperature, solution-phase growth of cesium lead halide nanowires exhibiting low-threshold lasing and high stability. The as-grown nanowires are single crystalline with well-formed facets, and act as high-quality laser cavities. The nanowires display excellent stability while stored and handled under ambient conditions over the course of weeks. Upon optical excitation, Fabry–Pérot lasing occurs in CsPbBr3 nanowires with an onset of 5 μJ cm−2 with the nanowire cavity displaying a maximum quality factor of 1,009 ± 5. Lasing under constant, pulsed excitation can be maintained for over 1 h, the equivalent of 109 excitation cycles, and lasing persists upon exposure to ambient atmosphere. Wavelength tunability in the green and blue regions of the spectrum in conjunction with excellent stability makes these nanowire lasers attractive for device fabrication. PMID:26862172

  7. Iodomethane-Mediated Organometal Halide Perovskite with Record Photoluminescence Lifetime.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weidong; McLeod, John A; Yang, Yingguo; Wang, Yimeng; Wu, Zhongwei; Bai, Sai; Yuan, Zhongcheng; Song, Tao; Wang, Yusheng; Si, Junjie; Wang, Rongbin; Gao, Xingyu; Zhang, Xinping; Liu, Lijia; Sun, Baoquan

    2016-09-01

    Organometallic lead halide perovskites are excellent light harvesters for high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. However, as the key component in these devices, a perovskite thin film with good morphology and minimal trap states is still difficult to obtain. Herein we show that by incorporating a low boiling point alkyl halide such as iodomethane (CH3I) into the precursor solution, a perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3-xClx) film with improved grain size and orientation can be easily achieved. More importantly, these films exhibit a significantly reduced amount of trap states. Record photoluminescence lifetimes of more than 4 μs are achieved; these lifetimes are significantly longer than that of pristine CH3NH3PbI3-xClx films. Planar heterojunction solar cells incorporating these CH3I-mediated perovskites have demonstrated a dramatically increased power conversion efficiency compared to the ones using pristine CH3NH3PbI3-xClx. Photoluminescence, transient absorption, and microwave detected photoconductivity measurements all provide consistent evidence that CH3I addition increases the number of excitons generated and their diffusion length, both of which assist efficient carrier transport in the photovoltaic device. The simple incorporation of alkyl halide to enhance perovskite surface passivation introduces an important direction for future progress on high efficiency perovskite optoelectronic devices. PMID:27529636

  8. Shallow halogen vacancies in halide optoelectronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Halogen vacancies (VH ) are usually deep color centers (F centers) in halides and can act as major electron traps or recombination centers. The deep VH contributes to the typically poor carrier transport properties in halides. However, several halides have recently emerged as excellent optoelectronic materials, e.g., C H3N H3Pb I3 and TlBr. Both C H3N H3Pb I3 and TlBr have been found to have shallow VH , in contrast to commonly seen deep VH in halides. In this paper, several halide optoelectronic materials, i.e., C H3N H3Pb I3 , C H3N H3Sn I3 (photovoltaic materials), TlBr, and CsPbB r3 (gamma-ray detection materials) are studied to understand the material chemistry and structure that determine whether VH is a shallow or deep defect in a halide material. It is found that crystal structure and chemistry of n s2 ions both play important roles in creating shallow VH in halides such as C H3N H3Pb I3 , C H3N H3Sn I3 , and TlBr. The key to identifying halides with shallow VH is to find the right crystal structures and compounds that suppress cation orbital hybridization at VH , such as those with large cation-cation distances and low anion coordination numbers and those with crystal symmetry that prevents strong hybridization of cation dangling bond orbitals at VH . The results of this paper provide insight and guidance to identifying halides with shallow VH as good electronic and optoelectronic materials.

  9. Shallow halogen vacancies in halide optoelectronic materials

    DOE PAGES

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao -Hua

    2014-11-05

    Halogen vacancies (VH) are usually deep color centers (F centers) in halides and can act as major electron traps or recombination centers. The deep VH contributes to the typically poor carrier transport properties in halides. However, several halides have recently emerged as excellent optoelectronic materials, e.g., CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr. Both CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr have been found to have shallow VH, in contrast to commonly seen deep VH in halides. In this paper, several halide optoelectronic materials, i.e., CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3 (photovoltaic materials), TlBr, and CsPbBr3, (gamma-ray detection materials) are studied to understand the material chemistry and structure that determine whether VHmore » is a shallow or deep defect in a halide material. It is found that crystal structure and chemistry of ns2 ions both play important roles in creating shallow VH in halides such as CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3, and TlBr. The key to identifying halides with shallow VH is to find the right crystal structures and compounds that suppress cation orbital hybridization at VH, such as those with long cation-cation distances and low anion coordination numbers, and those with crystal symmetry that prevents strong hybridization of cation dangling bond orbitals at VH. Furthermore, the results of this paper provide insight and guidance to identifying halides with shallow VH as good electronic and optoelectronic materials.« less

  10. Tuning the Optical Properties of Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals by Anion Exchange Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that, via controlled anion exchange reactions using a range of different halide precursors, we can finely tune the chemical composition and the optical properties of presynthesized colloidal cesium lead halide perovskite nanocrystals (NCs), from green emitting CsPbBr3 to bright emitters in any other region of the visible spectrum, and back, by displacement of Cl– or I– ions and reinsertion of Br– ions. This approach gives access to perovskite semiconductor NCs with both structural and optical qualities comparable to those of directly synthesized NCs. We also show that anion exchange is a dynamic process that takes place in solution between NCs. Therefore, by mixing solutions containing perovskite NCs emitting in different spectral ranges (due to different halide compositions) their mutual fast exchange dynamics leads to homogenization in their composition, resulting in NCs emitting in a narrow spectral region that is intermediate between those of the parent nanoparticles. PMID:26214734

  11. Effect of cavitation on removal of alkali elements from coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivalli, H.; Nirmal, L.; Nagarajan, R.

    2015-12-01

    The main impurities in coal are sulphur, ash and alkali. On combustion, the volatile forms of these impurities are either condensed on the boilers, or emitted in the form of potentially hazardous gases. The alkali elements present in coal help the fly ash particles adhere to boiler surfaces by providing a wet surface on which collection of these particles can take place. Use of ultrasonic techniques in cleaning of coal has stirred interest among researchers in recent times. Extraction of alkali elements by cavitation effect using low-frequency ultrasound, in the presence of reagents (HNO3 and H2O2) is reported in this paper. Powdered coal was dissolved with the reagent and exposed to ultrasonic fields of various frequencies at different time intervals. The treated solution is filtered and tested for alkali levels.

  12. Simulating Monovalent and Divalent Ions in Aqueous Solution Using a Drude Polarizable Force Field

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haibo; Whitfield, Troy W.; Harder, Edward; Lamoureux, Guillaume; Vorobyov, Igor; Anisimov, Victor M.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Roux, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    An accurate representation of ion solvation in aqueous solution is critical for meaningful computer simulations of a broad range of physical and biological processes. Polarizable models based on classical Drude oscillators are introduced and parametrized for a large set of monoatomic ions including cations of the alkali metals (Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+ and Cs+) and alkaline earth elements (Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+) along with Zn2+ and halide anions (F−, Cl−, Br− and I−). The models are parameterized, in conjunction with the polarizable SWM4-NDP water model [Lamoureux et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 418, 245 (2006)], to be consistent with a wide assortment of experimentally measured aqueous bulk thermodynamic properties and the energetics of small ion-water clusters. Structural and dynamic properties of the resulting ion models in aqueous solutions at infinite dilution are presented. PMID:20300554

  13. PROCESS OF RECOVERING ALKALI METALS

    DOEpatents

    Wolkoff, J.

    1961-08-15

    A process is described of recovering alkali metal vapor by sorption on activated alumina, activated carbon, dehydrated zeolite, activated magnesia, or Fuller's earth preheated above the vaporization temperature of the alkali metal and subsequent desorption by heating the solvent under vacuum. (AEC)

  14. Ober Phaseniibergange von Ammonium-Alkali-Jodiden und verwandten Halogeniden / Phase Transitions of Ammonium-alkali Iodides and Related Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Peter

    1981-03-01

    The investigation of the order-disorder transitions of the ammonium-chlorides and -bromides, in which some of the NH4+ are replaced by Cs+, Rb+ or K+, is extended to the corresponding iodides using birefringence and differential thermal analysis. As the temperature range of the martensitic transition (Pm 3 m↔Fm 3 m) is now overlapping the temperature range of the orderdisorder transitions, the former must be included in the measurements. The results allowing an overlook are discussed using the work of Garland, Lushington, and Leung [5

  15. Plasmonic characterization of photo-induced silver nanoparticles extracted from silver halide based TEM film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer, Tiwari, P.; Varshney, G. K.; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    The plasmonic responses of silver nanoparticles extracted from silver halide based electron microscope film are investigated. Photo-reduction process is carried out to convert the silver halide grains into the metallic silver. The centrifuge technique is used for separating the silver nanoparticles from the residual solution. Morphological study performed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) shows that all the nanoparticles have an average diameter of ~120 nm with a high degree of mono dispersion in size. The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption peak at ~537 nm confirms the presence of large size silver nanoparticles.

  16. High-Efficiency Flexible Solar Cells Based on Organometal Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuming; Bai, Sai; Cheng, Lu; Wang, Nana; Wang, Jianpu; Gao, Feng; Huang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Flexible and light-weight solar cells are important because they not only supply power to wearable and portable devices, but also reduce the transportation and installation cost of solar panels. High-efficiency organometal halide perovskite solar cells can be fabricated by a low-temperature solution process, and hence are promising for flexible-solar-cell applications. Here, the development of perovskite solar cells is briefly discussed, followed by the merits of organometal halide perovskites as promising candidates as high-efficiency, flexible, and light-weight photovoltaic materials. Afterward, recent developments of flexible solar cells based on perovskites are reviewed. PMID:26669326

  17. High-Efficiency Flexible Solar Cells Based on Organometal Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuming; Bai, Sai; Cheng, Lu; Wang, Nana; Wang, Jianpu; Gao, Feng; Huang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Flexible and light-weight solar cells are important because they not only supply power to wearable and portable devices, but also reduce the transportation and installation cost of solar panels. High-efficiency organometal halide perovskite solar cells can be fabricated by a low-temperature solution process, and hence are promising for flexible-solar-cell applications. Here, the development of perovskite solar cells is briefly discussed, followed by the merits of organometal halide perovskites as promising candidates as high-efficiency, flexible, and light-weight photovoltaic materials. Afterward, recent developments of flexible solar cells based on perovskites are reviewed.

  18. Influence of halide flux on the crystallinity, microstructure and thermoluminescence properties of CdSiO{sub 3}:Co{sup 2+} nanophosphor

    SciTech Connect

    Manjunatha, C.; Nagabhushana, B.M.; Sunitha, D.V.; Nagabhushana, H.; Sharma, S.C.; Chakradhar, R.P.S.

    2013-01-15

    Graphical abstract: TL glow curves of CdSiO{sub 3}:Co{sup 2+} different alkali flux (inset without adding flux). Display Omitted Highlights: ► CdSiO{sub 3}:Co{sup 2+} (1–7 mol%) nanocrystalline phosphors synthesized by combustion route. ► Flux effect on thermoluminescence behavior of CdSiO{sub 3}:Co{sup 2+} reported for first time. ► Addition of 2 wt% of flux would drastically enhance the TL properties. ► Well resolved single glow peak at ∼170 °C was recorded for all the samples. ► Among all the alkali flux, NaCl shows highest TL peak intensity. -- Abstract: CdSiO{sub 3}:Co{sup 2+} (1–7 mol %) nanophosphors have been prepared via solution combustion method with post calcination at 800 °C for 2 h for the first time. The formation of expected monoclinic phase was investigated by Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) measurements. The effect of different fluxes like NaF, NaCl, NH{sub 4}F and NH{sub 4}Cl on the crystallinity, phase and morphology of CdSiO{sub 3} was investigated in detail. The crystallinity of the samples can be greatly enhanced by using fluxes rather than increasing the calcination temperature. Scanning electronic micrograph (SEM) image shows that the powder morphologies are highly influenced by flux addition. The addition of 2 wt% of fluxes would drastically enhance the crystallinity when NaCl, NH{sub 4}F and NH{sub 4}Cl fluxes are used. A well resolved single thermoluminescent glow peak at ∼170 °C was recorded for all the samples. Among all the halide fluxes, NaCl flux was found to be the potential one in enhancing the TL peak intensity along with crystallinity.

  19. Halide Ion Enhancement of Nitrate Ion Photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, N. K.; Wingen, L. M.; Callahan, K. M.; Tobias, D. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrate ion photochemistry is an important source of NOx in the polar regions. It is uncertain whether coexisting ions such as halides play a role in nitrate photochemistry. The effect of halides on NO3 photolysis was investigated using photolysis experiments in 230 L Teflon chambers that contain deliquesced aerosols of NaBr:NaNO3, KBr:KNO3 and ternary mixtures of NaCl:NaBr:NaNO3. Gas phase NO2 and gaseous halogen products were measured as a function of photolysis time using long path FTIR, NOx chemiluminescence and API-MS (atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry). Experiments were conducted with NO3- held at a constant 0.5 M and with the amount of total halide concentration varying from 0.25 M to 4 M. Studies on NaBr:NaNO3 mixtures suggest that as the bromide ion to nitrate ion ratio increases, there is an enhancement in the rate of production of NO2 in the nitrate-bromide mixtures over that formed in the photolysis of NaNO3. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations provide molecular level insight into the ions near the air-water interface in the aqueous halide-nitrate mixtures. These studies suggest that the presence of sodium halides at the air-water interface may encourage some nitrate ions to approach the top layers of water, allowing for more efficient escape of photoproducts than is seen in the absence of halides. Experiments on mixtures of KBr:KNO3 are being conducted to determine potential cation effects. In addition, ternary mixtures of NaCl:NaBr:NaNO3 are being examined to determine the effects of mixtures of halides on production of NO2 and gaseous halogen products. The implications of this photochemistry for tropospheric chemistry will be discussed.

  20. Mixed alkali effect in nonconventional alkali gallotitanate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Miyaji, Fumiaki; Hasegawa, Shinya; Yoko, Toshinobu; Sakka, Sumio . Inst. for Chemical Research)

    1993-02-01

    The mixed alkali effect on electrical conductivity, that is, the reduction of conductivity due to alkali mixing, was observed in Na[sub 2]O-K[sub 2]O-Ga[sub 2]O[sub 3]-TiO[sub 2] glasses, which are nonconventional in the sense that glass-forming oxides defined by Zachariasen are not involved. The magnitude of the reduction in conductivity of the present glasses due to alkali mixing was similar to that of corresponding mixed alkali silicate and phosphate glasses. The activation energy for electrical conduction showed a maximum around the composition Na/(Na + K) = 0.5, where the conductivity was at a minimum.

  1. Dimming of metal halide lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    We ran some tests on the effect of dimming of metal halide (MH) lamps upon the stability and the spectral quality of the light output. Lamps used were a new Philips lamp HPI-T 250W, a similar Philips lamp with a few thousand burning hours and a new Osram lamp HQI-T 250W/D. The ballast was a BBC type DJ 250/2KS, the starter a BAS TORGI type MZN 250 SE and the dimmer an Elstrom Control System type ERHQ-T 250. Power was derived from a Philips stabilizer, type PE 1602. Lamp output was monitored with a PAR meter. Spectra were taken at 100% and at 50% output as measured with the PAR meter. Lamps were allowed to stabilize at any setting for 30 minutes before measurements were made. Lamp manufacturers advise against dimming for fear of poor stability and intolerable changes of the spectrum. However, none of the lamps showed a decrease in stability, no flicker or wandering of the discharge, and the changes of the spectrum were not negligible, but certainly not dramatic. Lamps of either manufacture retain their white color, relative peak heights of spectral lines did shift, but no gaps in the spectrum occurred. Spectra taken at 50% with 30 minutes intervals coincided. Differences between the new and the older Philips lamp were noticeable, but not really significant.

  2. Infrared evanescent field sensing with quantum cascade lasers and planar silver halide waveguides.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Christy; Katzir, Abraham; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2005-07-15

    We demonstrate the first midinfrared evanescent field absorption measurements with an InGaAs/AlInAs/InP distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade laser (QCL) light source operated at room temperature coupled to a free-standing, thin-film, planar, silver halide waveguide. Two different analytes, each matched to the emission frequency of a QCL, were investigated to verify the potential of this technique. The emission of a 1650 cm(-1) QCL overlaps with the amide absorption band of urea, which was deposited from methanol solution, forming urea crystals at the waveguide surface after solvent evaporation. Solid urea was detected down to 80.7 microg of precipitate at the waveguide surface. The emission frequency of a 974 cm(-1) QCL overlaps with the CH3-C absorption feature of acetic anhydride. Solutions of acetic anhydride in acetonitrile have been detected down to a volume of 0.01 microL (10.8 microg) of acetic anhydride solution after deposition at the planar waveguide (PWG) surface. Free-standing, thin-film, planar, silver halide waveguides were produced by press-tapering heated, cylindrical, silver halide fiber segments to create waveguides with a thickness of 300-190 microm, a width of 3 mm, and a length of 35 mm. In addition, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) evanescent field absorption measurements with planar silver halide waveguides and transmission absorption QCL measurements verify the obtained results.

  3. Alkali-aggregate reactivity of typical siliceious glass and carbonate rocks in alkali-activated fly ash based geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Duyou; Liu, Yongdao; Zheng, Yanzeng; Xu, Zhongzi; Shen, Xiaodong

    2013-08-01

    For exploring the behaviour of alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR) in alkali-activated geopolymeric materials and assessing the procedures for testing AAR in geopolymers, the expansion behaviour of fly ash based geopolymer mortars with pure silica glass and typical carbonate rocks were studied respectively by curing at various conditions, i.e. 23°C and 38°C with relative humidity over 95%, immersed in 1M NaOH solution at 80°C. Results show that, at various curing conditions, neither harmful ASR nor harmful ACR was observed in geopolymers with the criteria specified for OPC system. However, with the change of curing conditions, the geopolymer binder and reactive aggregates may experience different reaction processes leading to quite different dimensional changes, especially with additional alkalis and elevated temperatures. It suggests that high temperature with additional alkali for accelerating AAR in traditional OPC system may not appropriate for assessing the alkali-aggregate reactivity behaviour in geopolymers designed for normal conditions. On the other hand, it is hopeful to control the dimensional change of geopolymer mortar or concrete by selecting the type of aggregates and the appropriate curing conditions, thus changing the harmful AAR in OPC into beneficial AAR in geopolymers and other alkali-activated cementitious systems.

  4. Enthalpies of formation of CaAl sub 4 O sub 7 and CaAl sub 12 O sub 19 (hibonite) by high temperature, alkali borate solution calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, C.A.; Kleppa, O.J.; Mysen, B.O.; Lattimer, J.M.; Grossman, L. )

    1988-06-01

    The enthalpies of formation of CaAl{sub 4}O{sub 7} and CaAl{sub 12}O{sub 19} (hibonite), by alkali borate solution calorimetry at 1063 K are discussed. Using these experimental enthalpy data for CaAl{sub 4}O{sub 7} and estimated values for CaAl{sub 12}O{sub 19}, the standard enthalpies of formation of these compounds from the elements at 298 K are derived. Comparison with high-temperature galvanic cell data for the Gibbs energy of formation of CaAl{sub 12}O{sub 19} allows a calculation of the standard entropy of hibonite. This value is only about 2% larger than the oxide sum. Hence it is inferred that the standard entropy of hibonite at 298 K is probably only slightly larger than oxide sum value of 343.7 J/K g.f.w. The present data were used to extrapolate Kumar and Kay's (1985) data for the Gibbs energies of formation of hibonite and CaAl{sub 4}O{sub 7} to the temperature range 1500-1700 K. These data were then used in equilibrium thermodynamic calculations of the condensation of a gas of solar composition. Contrary to calculations of Kornacki and Fegley (1984), who used thermodynamic data of Allibert et al. (1981) for calcium aluminates, the authors results show no stability field for CaAl{sub 4}O{sub 7} in a gas of solar composition at 10{sup {minus}3} to 10{sup {minus}5} atm total pressure. At 10{sup {minus}3} atm pressure, hibonite forms by reaction of corundum with the gas at 1725 K, begins to react with the gas to form gehlenite at 1607 K and disappears completely in a reaction to form spinel at 1494 K. The absence of CaAl{sub 4}O{sub 7}, from hibonite-, spinel-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites cannot be used as an argument against a condensation origin for these objects.

  5. Shallow halogen vacancies in halide optoelectronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao -Hua

    2014-11-05

    Halogen vacancies (VH) are usually deep color centers (F centers) in halides and can act as major electron traps or recombination centers. The deep VH contributes to the typically poor carrier transport properties in halides. However, several halides have recently emerged as excellent optoelectronic materials, e.g., CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr. Both CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr have been found to have shallow VH, in contrast to commonly seen deep VH in halides. In this paper, several halide optoelectronic materials, i.e., CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3 (photovoltaic materials), TlBr, and CsPbBr3, (gamma-ray detection materials) are studied to understand the material chemistry and structure that determine whether VH is a shallow or deep defect in a halide material. It is found that crystal structure and chemistry of ns2 ions both play important roles in creating shallow VH in halides such as CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3, and TlBr. The key to identifying halides with shallow VH is to find the right crystal structures and compounds that suppress cation orbital hybridization at VH, such as those with long cation-cation distances and low anion coordination numbers, and those with crystal symmetry that prevents strong hybridization of cation dangling bond orbitals at VH. Furthermore, the results of this paper provide insight and guidance to identifying halides with shallow VH as good electronic and optoelectronic materials.

  6. The Remarkable Reactivity of Aryl Halides with Nucleophiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunnett, Joseph F.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the reactivity of aryl halides with nucleophilic or basic reagents, including nucleophilic attacks on carbon, hydrogen, halogen, and arynes. Suggestions are made concerning revisions of the sections on aryl halide chemistry courses and the corresponding chapters in textbooks. (CC)

  7. 40 CFR 721.4095 - Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4095 Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides. (a... generically as quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides (PMNs...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4095 - Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4095 Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides. (a... generically as quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides (PMNs...

  9. Tunable Near-Infrared Luminescence in Tin Halide Perovskite Devices.

    PubMed

    Lai, May L; Tay, Timothy Y S; Sadhanala, Aditya; Dutton, Siân E; Li, Guangru; Friend, Richard H; Tan, Zhi-Kuang

    2016-07-21

    Infrared emitters are reasonably rare in solution-processed materials. Recently, research into hybrid organo-lead halide perovskite, originally popular in photovoltaics,1-3 has gained traction in light-emitting diodes (LED) due to their low-cost solution processing and good performance.4-9 The lead-based electroluminescent materials show strong colorful emission in the visible region, but lack emissive variants further in the infrared. The concerns with the toxicity of lead may, additionally, limit their wide-scale applications. Here, we demonstrate tunable near-infrared electroluminescence from a lead-free organo-tin halide perovskite, using an ITO/PEDOT:PSS/CH3NH3Sn(Br1-xIx)3/F8/Ca/Ag device architecture. In our tin iodide (CH3NH3SnI3) LEDs, we achieved a 945 nm near-infrared emission with a radiance of 3.4 W sr(-1) m(-2) and a maximum external quantum efficiency of 0.72%, comparable with earlier lead-based devices. Increasing the bromide content in these tin perovskite devices widens the semiconductor bandgap and leads to shorter wavelength emissions, tunable down to 667 nm. These near-infrared LEDs could find useful applications in a range of optical communication, sensing and medical device applications.

  10. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  11. Method for recovering hydrocarbons from molten metal halides

    DOEpatents

    Pell, Melvyn B.

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy carbonaceous materials by contacting such carbonaceous materials with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst to produce hydrocarbons having lower molecular weights and thereafter recovering the hydrocarbons so produced from the molten metal halide, an improvement comprising injecting into the spent molten metal halide, a liquid low-boiling hydrocarbon stream is disclosed.

  12. 40 CFR 721.575 - Substituted alkyl halide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted alkyl halide. 721.575... Substances § 721.575 Substituted alkyl halide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted alkyl halide (PMN P-83-1222)...

  13. 40 CFR 721.575 - Substituted alkyl halide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted alkyl halide. 721.575... Substances § 721.575 Substituted alkyl halide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted alkyl halide (PMN P-83-1222)...

  14. 40 CFR 721.575 - Substituted alkyl halide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted alkyl halide. 721.575... Substances § 721.575 Substituted alkyl halide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted alkyl halide (PMN P-83-1222)...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10698 - Polyfluorinated alkyl halide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polyfluorinated alkyl halide (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10698 Polyfluorinated alkyl halide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... polyfluorinated alkyl halide (PMN P-11-527) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  16. 40 CFR 721.575 - Substituted alkyl halide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted alkyl halide. 721.575... Substances § 721.575 Substituted alkyl halide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted alkyl halide (PMN P-83-1222)...

  17. 40 CFR 721.575 - Substituted alkyl halide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted alkyl halide. 721.575... Substances § 721.575 Substituted alkyl halide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted alkyl halide (PMN P-83-1222)...

  18. Recent advances in technetium halide chemistry.

    PubMed

    Poineau, Frederic; Johnstone, Erik V; Czerwinski, Kenneth R; Sattelberger, Alfred P

    2014-02-18

    Transition metal binary halides are fundamental compounds, and the study of their structure, bonding, and other properties gives chemists a better understanding of physicochemical trends across the periodic table. One transition metal whose halide chemistry is underdeveloped is technetium, the lightest radioelement. For half a century, the halide chemistry of technetium has been defined by three compounds: TcF6, TcF5, and TcCl4. The absence of Tc binary bromides and iodides in the literature was surprising considering the existence of such compounds for all of the elements surrounding technetium. The common synthetic routes that scientists use to obtain binary halides of the neighboring elements, such as sealed tube reactions between elements and flowing gas reactions between a molecular complex and HX gas (X = Cl, Br, or I), had not been reported for technetium. In this Account, we discuss how we used these routes to revisit the halide chemistry of technetium. We report seven new phases: TcBr4, TcBr3, α/β-TcCl3, α/β-TcCl2, and TcI3. Technetium tetrachloride and tetrabromide are isostructural to PtX4 (X = Cl or Br) and consist of infinite chains of edge-sharing TcX6 octahedra. Trivalent technetium halides are isostructural to ruthenium and molybdenum (β-TcCl3, TcBr3, and TcI3) and to rhenium (α-TcCl3). Technetium tribromide and triiodide exhibit the TiI3 structure-type and consist of infinite chains of face-sharing TcX6 (X = Br or I) octahedra. Concerning the trichlorides, β-TcCl3 crystallizes with the AlCl3 structure-type and consists of infinite layers of edge-sharing TcCl6 octahedra, while α-TcCl3 consists of infinite layers of Tc3Cl9 units. Both phases of technetium dichloride exhibit new structure-types that consist of infinite chains of [Tc2Cl8] units. For the technetium binary halides, we studied the metal-metal interaction by theoretical methods and magnetic measurements. The change of the electronic configuration of the metal atom from d(3) (Tc

  19. Recent advances in technetium halide chemistry.

    PubMed

    Poineau, Frederic; Johnstone, Erik V; Czerwinski, Kenneth R; Sattelberger, Alfred P

    2014-02-18

    Transition metal binary halides are fundamental compounds, and the study of their structure, bonding, and other properties gives chemists a better understanding of physicochemical trends across the periodic table. One transition metal whose halide chemistry is underdeveloped is technetium, the lightest radioelement. For half a century, the halide chemistry of technetium has been defined by three compounds: TcF6, TcF5, and TcCl4. The absence of Tc binary bromides and iodides in the literature was surprising considering the existence of such compounds for all of the elements surrounding technetium. The common synthetic routes that scientists use to obtain binary halides of the neighboring elements, such as sealed tube reactions between elements and flowing gas reactions between a molecular complex and HX gas (X = Cl, Br, or I), had not been reported for technetium. In this Account, we discuss how we used these routes to revisit the halide chemistry of technetium. We report seven new phases: TcBr4, TcBr3, α/β-TcCl3, α/β-TcCl2, and TcI3. Technetium tetrachloride and tetrabromide are isostructural to PtX4 (X = Cl or Br) and consist of infinite chains of edge-sharing TcX6 octahedra. Trivalent technetium halides are isostructural to ruthenium and molybdenum (β-TcCl3, TcBr3, and TcI3) and to rhenium (α-TcCl3). Technetium tribromide and triiodide exhibit the TiI3 structure-type and consist of infinite chains of face-sharing TcX6 (X = Br or I) octahedra. Concerning the trichlorides, β-TcCl3 crystallizes with the AlCl3 structure-type and consists of infinite layers of edge-sharing TcCl6 octahedra, while α-TcCl3 consists of infinite layers of Tc3Cl9 units. Both phases of technetium dichloride exhibit new structure-types that consist of infinite chains of [Tc2Cl8] units. For the technetium binary halides, we studied the metal-metal interaction by theoretical methods and magnetic measurements. The change of the electronic configuration of the metal atom from d(3) (Tc

  20. ELECTROLYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Alter, H.W.; Barney, D.L.

    1958-09-30

    A process is presented for the treatment of radioactivc waste nitric acid solutions. The nitric acid solution is neutralized with an alkali metal hydroxide in an amount sufficient to precipitate insoluble hydroxides, and after separation of the precipitate the solution is electrolyzed to convert the alkali nitrate formed, to alkali hydroxide, gaseous ammonla and oxygen. The solution is then reusable after reducing the volume by evaporating the water and dissolved ammonia.

  1. Durability of Alkali Activated Blast Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, K.; Alharbi, N.; Matheu, P. S.; Varela, B.; Hailstone, R.

    2015-11-01

    The alkali activation of blast furnace slag has the potential to reduce the environmental impact of cementitious materials and to be applied in geographic zones where weather is a factor that negatively affects performance of materials based on Ordinary Portland Cement. The scientific literature provides many examples of alkali activated slag with high compressive strengths; however research into the durability and resistance to aggressive environments is still necessary for applications in harsh weather conditions. In this study two design mixes of blast furnace slag with mine tailings were activated with a potassium based solution. The design mixes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, BET analysis and compressive strength testing. Freeze-thaw testing up to 100 freeze-thaw cycles was performed in 10% road salt solution. Our findings included compressive strength of up to 100 MPa after 28 days of curing and 120 MPa after freeze-thaw testing. The relationship between pore size, compressive strength, and compressive strength after freeze-thaw was explored.

  2. Decalcification resistance of alkali-activated slag.

    PubMed

    Komljenović, Miroslav M; Baščarević, Zvezdana; Marjanović, Nataša; Nikolić, Violeta

    2012-09-30

    This paper analyses the effects of decalcification in concentrated 6M NH(4)NO(3) solution on mechanical and microstructural properties of alkali-activated slag (AAS). Portland-slag cement (CEM II/A-S 42.5 N) was used as a benchmark material. Decalcification process led to a decrease in strength, both in AAS and in CEM II, and this effect was more pronounced in CEM II. The decrease in strength was explicitly related to the decrease in Ca/Si atomic ratio of C-S-H gel. A very low ratio of Ca/Si ~0.3 in AAS was the consequence of coexistence of C-S-H(I) gel and silica gel. During decalcification of AAS almost complete leaching of sodium and tetrahedral aluminum from C-S-H(I) gel also took place. AAS showed significantly higher resistance to decalcification in relation to the benchmark CEM II due to the absence of portlandite, high level of polymerization of silicate chains, low level of aluminum for silicon substitution in the structure of C-S-H(I), and the formation of protective layer of polymerized silica gel during decalcification process. In stabilization/solidification processes alkali-activated slag represents a more promising solution than Portland-slag cement due to significantly higher resistance to decalcification. PMID:22818592

  3. Oxidation of Halide Ions in Sea Salt from the Photolysis of Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, N. K.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrate ions coexist with halide ions in sea salt particles as well as in the Arctic snowpack, where nitrate ion photochemistry is believed to be an important source of NOx (NO + NO2). Little is known about the impact halide ions have on nitrate ion photochemistry or the effect nitrate ion photochemistry has on the oxidation of halide ions to produce halogen gases. The effect of halide ions on NO3- photochemistry was investigated at 298 K using 311 nm irradiation of thin films of deliquesced aerosols of synthetic sea salt with added nitrate. Gas phase NO2, NO and halogen products were measured as a function of photolysis time using long path FTIR, NOy chemiluminescence and API-MS (atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry). Studies on synthetic sea salt with added nitrate show that NO2 production increases over pure NaNO3 as the halide-to-nitrate ratio increases. Similarities in rates of NO2 production in these experiments and in comparable NaCl/NaNO3 experiments suggest that the rate of NO2 production is controlled by chloride and sodium ions, and additional ions have little effect on nitrate photolysis. Halogen production also increased as the halide-to-nitrate ratio increased, which is consistent with NO3- photolysis yielding OH which oxidizes halide ions in the film. Halogen yields increased with addition of NaBr to synthetic sea salt, whereas NO2 yields remained constant. Gaseous halogen yields suggest that with lower [Cl-]/[Br-] ratios, e.g., higher bromide concentration, halide ions become more efficient in trapping photolytically generated OH/O-. Yields of gas phase halogens were also strongly dependent on the acidity of the solution, while that of NO2 was not. Substantial concentrations of NO were observed at low pH, suggesting an additional halogen formation mechanism contributes. The implications of this photochemistry will be discussed in terms of the role of nitrate ion photolysis in sea salt particles and in snowpacks.

  4. Physiological Evaluation of Alkali-Salt Tolerance of Thirty Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guofu; Liu, Yiming; Zhang, Xunzhong; Yao, Fengjiao; Huang, Yan; Ervin, Erik H.; Zhao, Bingyu

    2015-01-01

    Soil salt-alkalization is a major limiting factor for crop production in many regions. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a warm-season C4 perennial rhizomatous bunchgrass and a target lignocellulosic biofuel species. The objective of this study was to evaluate relative alkali-salt tolerance among 30 switchgrass lines. Tillers of each switchgrass line were transplanted into pots filled with fine sand. Two months after transplanting, plants at E5 developmental stage were grown in either half strength Hoagland’s nutrient solution with 0 mM Na+ (control) or half strength Hoagland’s nutrient solution with 150 mM Na+ and pH of 9.5 (alkali-salt stress treatment) for 20 d. Alkali-salt stress damaged cell membranes [higher electrolyte leakage (EL) ], reduced leaf relative water content (RWC), net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (gs), and transpiration rate (Tr). An alkali-salt stress tolerance trait index (ASTTI) for each parameter was calculated based on the ratio of the value under alkali-salt stress and the value under non-stress conditions for each parameter of each line. Relative alkali-salt tolerance was determined based on principal components analysis and cluster analysis of the physiological parameters and their ASTTI values. Significant differences in alkali-salt stress tolerance were found among the 30 lines. Lowland lines TEM-SEC, Alamo, TEM-SLC and Kanlow were classified as alkali-salt tolerant. In contrast, three lowland lines (AM-314/MS-155, BN-13645-64) and two upland lines (Caddo and Blackwell-1) were classified as alkali-salt sensitive. The results suggest wide variations exist in alkali-salt stress tolerance among the 30 switchgrass lines. The approach of using a combination of principal components and cluster analysis of the physiological parameters and related ASTTI is feasible for evaluating alkali-salt tolerance in switchgrass. PMID:26146987

  5. Physiological Evaluation of Alkali-Salt Tolerance of Thirty Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) Lines.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guofu; Liu, Yiming; Zhang, Xunzhong; Yao, Fengjiao; Huang, Yan; Ervin, Erik H; Zhao, Bingyu

    2015-01-01

    Soil salt-alkalization is a major limiting factor for crop production in many regions. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a warm-season C4 perennial rhizomatous bunchgrass and a target lignocellulosic biofuel species. The objective of this study was to evaluate relative alkali-salt tolerance among 30 switchgrass lines. Tillers of each switchgrass line were transplanted into pots filled with fine sand. Two months after transplanting, plants at E5 developmental stage were grown in either half strength Hoagland's nutrient solution with 0 mM Na+ (control) or half strength Hoagland's nutrient solution with 150 mM Na+ and pH of 9.5 (alkali-salt stress treatment) for 20 d. Alkali-salt stress damaged cell membranes [higher electrolyte leakage (EL)], reduced leaf relative water content (RWC), net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (gs), and transpiration rate (Tr). An alkali-salt stress tolerance trait index (ASTTI) for each parameter was calculated based on the ratio of the value under alkali-salt stress and the value under non-stress conditions for each parameter of each line. Relative alkali-salt tolerance was determined based on principal components analysis and cluster analysis of the physiological parameters and their ASTTI values. Significant differences in alkali-salt stress tolerance were found among the 30 lines. Lowland lines TEM-SEC, Alamo, TEM-SLC and Kanlow were classified as alkali-salt tolerant. In contrast, three lowland lines (AM-314/MS-155, BN-13645-64) and two upland lines (Caddo and Blackwell-1) were classified as alkali-salt sensitive. The results suggest wide variations exist in alkali-salt stress tolerance among the 30 switchgrass lines. The approach of using a combination of principal components and cluster analysis of the physiological parameters and related ASTTI is feasible for evaluating alkali-salt tolerance in switchgrass. PMID:26146987

  6. Shear viscosity of molten alkali halides from equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galamba, N.; Nieto de Castro, C. A.; Ely, James F.

    2005-06-01

    The shear viscosity of molten NaCl and KCl was calculated through equilibrium (EMD) and nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics (NEMD) simulations in the canonical (N,V,T) ensemble. Two rigid-ion potentials were investigated, namely, the Born-Mayer-Huggins-Tosi-Fumi potential and the Michielsen-Woerlee-Graaf-Ketelaar potential with the parameters proposed by Ladd. The NEMD simulations were performed using the SLLOD equations of motion [D. J. Evans and G. P. Morriss, Phys. Rev. A 30, 1528 (1984)] with a Gaussian isokinetic thermostat and the results are compared with those obtained from Green-Kubo EMD (N,V,T) simulations and experimental shear viscosity data. The NEMD zero strain rate shear viscosity, η(0), was obtained by fitting a simplified Carreau-type equation and by application of mode-coupling theory, i.e., a η-γ1/2 linear relationship. The values obtained from the first method are found to be significantly lower than those predicted by the second. The agreement between the EMD and NEMD results with experimental data is satisfactory for the two potentials investigated. The ion-ion radial distribution functions obtained with the two rigid-ion potentials for both molten salts are discussed in terms of the differences between the two models.

  7. Epitaxial growth of pentacene on alkali halide surfaces studied by Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Neff, Julia L; Milde, Peter; León, Carmen Pérez; Kundrat, Matthew D; Eng, Lukas M; Jacob, Christoph R; Hoffmann-Vogel, Regina

    2014-04-22

    In the field of molecular electronics, thin films of molecules adsorbed on insulating surfaces are used as the functional building blocks of electronic devices. Control of the structural and electronic properties of the thin films is required for reliably operating devices. Here, noncontact atomic force and Kelvin probe force microscopies have been used to investigate the growth and electrostatic landscape of pentacene on KBr(001) and KCl(001) surfaces. We have found that, together with molecular islands of upright standing pentacene, a new phase of tilted molecules appears near step edges on KBr. Local contact potential differences (LCPD) have been studied with both Kelvin experiments and density functional theory calculations. Our images reveal that differently oriented molecules display different LCPD and that their value is independent of the number of molecular layers. These results point to the formation of an interface dipole, which may be explained by a partial charge transfer from the pentacene to the surface. Moreover, the monitoring of the evolution of the pentacene islands shows that they are strongly affected by dewetting: Multilayers build up at the expense of monolayers, and in the Kelvin images, previously unknown line defects appear, which reveal the epitaxial growth of pentacene crystals.

  8. Holding onto electrons in alkali metal halide clusters: decreasing polarizability with increasing coordination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaofan; Andersson, Tomas; Svensson, Svante; Björneholm, Olle; Huttula, Marko; Mikkelä, Mikko-Heikki; Anin, Dmitri; Tchaplyguine, Maxim; Öhrwall, Gunnar

    2012-12-13

    The connection between the electronic polarizability and the decrease of the system size from macroscopic solid to nanoscale clusters has been addressed in a combined experimental and model-calculation study. A beam of free neutral potassium chloride clusters has been probed using synchrotron-radiation-based photoelectron spectroscopy. The introduction of "effective" polarizability for chlorine, lower than that in molecules and dimers and decreasing with increasing coordination, has allowed us to significantly improve the agreement between the experimental electron binding energies and the electrostatic model predictions. Using the calculated site-specific binding energies, we have been able to assign the spectral details of the cluster response to the ionizing X-ray radiation, and to explain its change with cluster size. From our assignments we find that the higher-coordination face-atom responses in the K 3p spectra increase significantly with increasing cluster size relative to that of the edge atoms. The reasons behind the decrease of polarizability predicted earlier by ab initio calculations are discussed in terms of the limited mobility of the electron clouds caused by the interaction with the neighboring ions.

  9. Metal-Induced Gap States at Well Defined Alkali-Halide/Metal Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiguchi, Manabu; Arita, Ryotaro; Yoshikawa, Genki; Tanida, Yoshiaki; Katayama, Masao; Saiki, Koichiro; Koma, Atsushi; Aoki, Hideo

    2003-05-01

    In order to search for states specific to insulator/metal interfaces, we have studied epitaxially grown interfaces with element-selective near edge x-ray absorption fine structure. An extra peak is observed below the bulk edge onset for LiCl films on Cu and Ag substrates. The nature of chemical bonds as probed by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy remains unchanged, so we regard this as evidence for metal-induced gap states (MIGS) formed by the proximity to a metal, rather than local bonds at the interface. The dependence on the film thickness shows that the MIGS are as thin as one monolayer. An ab initio electronic structure calculation supports the existence of the MIGS that are strongly localized at the interface.

  10. Metal-induced gap states at well defined alkali-halide/metal interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kiguchi, Manabu; Arita, Ryotaro; Yoshikawa, Genki; Tanida, Yoshiaki; Katayama, Masao; Saiki, Koichiro; Koma, Atsushi; Aoki, Hideo

    2003-05-16

    In order to search for states specific to insulator/metal interfaces, we have studied epitaxially grown interfaces with element-selective near edge x-ray absorption fine structure. An extra peak is observed below the bulk edge onset for LiCl films on Cu and Ag substrates. The nature of chemical bonds as probed by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy remains unchanged, so we regard this as evidence for metal-induced gap states (MIGS) formed by the proximity to a metal, rather than local bonds at the interface. The dependence on the film thickness shows that the MIGS are as thin as one monolayer. An ab initio electronic structure calculation supports the existence of the MIGS that are strongly localized at the interface.

  11. Elastic properties of alpha quartz and the alkali halides based on an interatomic force model.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, D. J.; Simmons, G.

    1972-01-01

    A two-body central-force atomic model can be used to describe accurately the elastic properties of alpha quartz if the nontetrahedral O:O forces are included. The strength of the Si:O interaction has little effect on the bulk modulus. The technique is sufficiently general to allow calculations of the elastic properties of a specified structure under arbitrary pressure from a complete description of the interatomic forces. The elastic constants for the NaCl structure and the CsCl structure are examined. Our model includes two-body, central, anion-anion, anion-cation, and electrostatic interactions.

  12. The aluminum electrode in AlCl3-alkali-halide melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleck, G. L.; Giner, J.

    1972-01-01

    Passivation phenomena were observed upon cathodic and anodic polarization of the Al electrode in AlCl3-KCl-NaCl melts between 100 and 160 C. They are caused by formation of a solid salt layer at the electrode surface resulting from concentration changes upon current flow. The anodic limiting currents increased with temperature and with decreasing AlCl3 content of the melt. Current voltage curves obtained on a rotating aluminum disk showed a linear relationship between the anodic limiting current and 1/sq root of 2 pi (rps). Upon cathodic polarization dentrite formation occurs at the Al electrode. The activation overvoltage in AlCl3-KCl-NaCl (57.5-12.5-20 mol%) was determined by galvanostatic current step methods. An apparent exchange current density of 270 mA/cm2 at 130 C and a double layer capacity of 40 plus or minus 10 microfarad/cm2 were measured.

  13. IR and XRD Study of the Tribochemical Reactions of Copper Sulfate with Alkali Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, J.; González, E.; de Oñate, J.; López, R.; Navarro, E.

    1993-12-01

    Tribochemical reactions of CuSO 4 · 5H 2O and CuSO 4 during milling with KCl, KBr, and KI have been studied by IR and XRD techniques. The reactions are rather similar for the hydrated and anhydrous salts, but proceed faster with the former. With KCl, the reaction leads directly to CuK 2SO 4Cl 2 also known as the mineral chlorothionite. With KBr, the mixed salts CuK 2(SO 4) 2 · 2H 2O and CuK 2 (SO 4) 2 · 6H 2O are first obtained which transform to a new compound upon further milling, that we postulate as CuK 2SO 4Br 2. With KI, there is a fast reaction to a mixture of CuK 2(SO 4) 2 · 6H 2O, γ-CuI, and I 2, later proceeding to K 2SO 4, γ-CuI, and I 2.

  14. Alkali Halide Opacity in Brown Dwarf and Cool Stellar Atmospheres: A Study of Lithium Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, K.; Weck, P. F.; Schweitzer, A.; Stancil, P. C.; Hauschildt, P. H.

    2003-12-01

    Recent thermochemical equilibrium calculations have revealed the important role played by lithium chloride in the lithium chemistry of cool dwarf atmospheres (K. Lodders 1999, ApJ 519, 793). Indeed, LiCl appears to be the dominant Li-bearing gas over an extended domain of the (P,T) diagram, typically for temperatures below 1500 K. LiCl has a large dipole moment in its ground electronic state which can give rise to intense rovibrational line spectra. In addition, LiCl can make dipole transitions to several low-lying unbound excited states, causing dissociation of the molecule. For these reasons, LiCl may be a significant source of line and continuum opacity in brown dwarf and cool stellar atmospheres. In this work, we report calculations of complete lists of line oscillator strengths and photodissociation cross sections for the low-lying electronic states of LiCl. We have performed single- and double-excitation configuration interaction calculations using the ALCHEMY ab initio package (Mc Lean et al. 1991, MOTECC 91, Elsevier, Leiden) and obtained the potential curves and the corresponding dipole transition moment functions between the X 1Σ ^+ ground state and the B 1Σ ^+ and A 1Π excited states. The resulting line oscillator strengths and molecular photodissociation cross sections have been included in the PHOENIX stellar atmosphere code (Hauschildt & Baron 1999, J. Comput. App. Math. 102, 41). The new models, calculated using spherical geometry for all gravities considered, also incorporate our latest database of nearly 670 million molecular lines, and updated equations of state (EOS). This work was supported in part by NSF grants AST-9720704 and AST-0086246, NASA grants NAG5-8425, NAG5-9222, and NAG5-10551 as well as NASA/JPL grant 961582.

  15. Detection of alkali-silica reaction swelling in concrete by staining

    DOEpatents

    Guthrie, Jr., George D.; Carey, J. William

    1998-01-01

    A method using concentrated aqueous solutions of sodium cobaltinitrite and rhodamine B is described which can be used to identify concrete that contains gels formed by the alkali-silica reaction (ASR). These solutions present little health or environmental risk, are readily applied, and rapidly discriminate between two chemically distinct gels; K-rich, Na--K--Ca--Si gels are identified by yellow staining, and alkali-poor, Ca--Si gels are identified by pink staining.

  16. Detection of alkali-silica reaction swelling in concrete by staining

    DOEpatents

    Guthrie, G.D. Jr.; Carey, J.W.

    1998-04-14

    A method using concentrated aqueous solutions of sodium cobalt nitrite and rhodamine B is described which can be used to identify concrete that contains gels formed by the alkali-silica reaction (ASR). These solutions present little health or environmental risk, are readily applied, and rapidly discriminate between two chemically distinct gels; K-rich, Na-K-Ca-Si gels are identified by yellow staining, and alkali-poor, Ca-Si gels are identified by pink staining.

  17. Hydrothermal chemistry, structures, and luminescence studies of alkali hafnium fluorides.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Christopher C; McMillen, Colin D; Chen, Hongyu; Anker, Jeffery N; Kolis, Joseph W

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the hydrothermal chemistry of alkali hafnium fluorides, including the synthesis and structural characterization of five new alkali hafnium fluorides. Two ternary alkali hafnium fluorides are described: Li(2)HfF(6) in space group P31m with a = 4.9748(7) Å and c = 4.6449(9) Å and Na(5)Hf(2)F(13) in space group C2/m with a = 11.627(2) Å, b = 5.5159(11) Å, and c = 8.4317(17) Å. Three new alkali hafnium oxyfluorides are also described: two fluoroelpasolites, K(3)HfOF(5) and (NH(4))(3)HfOF(5), in space group Fm3m with a = 8.9766(10) and 9.4144(11) Å, respectively, and K(2)Hf(3)OF(12) in space group R3m with a = 7.6486(11) Å and c = 28.802(6) Å. Infrared (IR) spectra were obtained for the title solids to confirm the structure solutions. Comparison of these materials was made based on their structures and synthesis conditions. The formation of these species in hydrothermal fluids appears to be dependent upon both the concentration of the alkali fluoride mineralizer solution and the reaction temperature. Both X-ray and visible fluorescence studies were conducted on compounds synthesized in this study and showed that fluorescence was affected by a variety of factors, such as alkali metal size, the presence/absence of oxygen in the compound, and the coordination environment of Hf(4+).

  18. Persistent dopants and phase segregation in organolead mixed-halide perovskites

    DOE PAGES

    Rosales, Bryan A.; Men, Long; Cady, Sarah D.; Hanrahan, Michael P.; Rossini, Aaron J.; Vela, Javier

    2016-07-25

    Organolead mixed-halide perovskites such as CH3NH3PbX3–aX'a (X, X' = I, Br, Cl) are interesting semiconductors because of their low cost, high photovoltaic power conversion efficiencies, enhanced moisture stability, and band gap tunability. Using a combination of optical absorption spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and, for the first time, 207Pb solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR), we probe the extent of alloying and phase segregation in these materials. Because 207Pb ssNMR chemical shifts are highly sensitive to local coordination and electronic structure, and vary linearly with halogen electronegativity and band gap, this technique can provide the true chemical speciation and compositionmore » of organolead mixed-halide perovskites. We specifically investigate samples made by three different preparative methods: solution phase synthesis, thermal annealing, and solid phase synthesis. 207Pb ssNMR reveals that nonstoichiometric dopants and semicrystalline phases are prevalent in samples made by solution phase synthesis. We show that these nanodomains are persistent after thermal annealing up to 200 °C. Further, a novel solid phase synthesis that starts from the parent, single-halide perovskites can suppress phase segregation but not the formation of dopants. Our observations are consistent with the presence of miscibility gaps and spontaneous spinodal decomposition of the mixed-halide perovskites at room temperature. This underscores how strongly different synthetic procedures impact the nanostructuring and composition of organolead halide perovskites. In conclusion, better optoelectronic properties and improved device stability and performance may be achieved through careful manipulation of the different phases and nanodomains present in these materials.« less

  19. Non-conventional halide oxidation pathways : oxidation by imidazole triplet and surface specific oxidation by ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, Markus; Corral-Arroyo, Pablo; Aellig, Raphael; Orlando, Fabrizio; Lee, Ming-Tao; Artiglia, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Oxidation of halide ions (chloride, bromide, iodide) are the starting point of halogen release mechanisms out of sea water, marine aerosol or other halide containing continental aerosols. Slow oxidation of chloride and bromide by ozone in the bulk aqueous phase is of limited relevance. Faster surface specific oxidation has been suggested based on heterogeneous kinetics experiments. We provide first insight into very efficient bromide oxidation by ozone at the aqueous solution - air interface by surface sensitive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicating significant build-up of an oxidized intermediate at the surface within millisecond time scales. The second source of oxidants in the condensed we have considered is the absorption of light by triplet forming photosensitizers at wavelengths longer than needed for direct photolysis and radical formation. We have performed coated wall flow tube experiments with mixtures of citric acid (CA) and imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde (IC) to represent secondary organic material rich marine aerosol. The halide ions bromide and iodide have been observed to act as efficient electron donors leading to their oxidation, HO2 formation and finally release of molecular halogen compounds. The photosensitization of imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde (IC) involves a well-known mechanism where the triplet excited state of IC is reduced by citric acid to a reduced ketyl radical that reacts with halide ions. A competition kinetics approach has been used to evaluate the rate limiting steps and to assess the significance of this source of halogens to the gas phase.

  20. Recovery of Ga(III) by Raw and Alkali Treated Citrus limetta Peels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Alkali treated Citrus limetta peels were used for recovery of Ga(III) from its aqueous solution. The raw and alkali treated peels were characterized for functional groups. The efficiency of adsorption increased from 47.62 mg/g for raw peels to 83.33 mg/g for alkali treated peels. Between pH 1 and 3, the adsorption increased and thereafter decreased drastically. The adsorption followed pseudosecond order kinetics and Langmuir isotherm gave the best fit for the experimental data. Desorption studies showed 95.28% desorption after 3 cycles for raw peels while it was 89.51% for alkali treated peels. Simulated Bayer liquor showed 39.57% adsorption for gallium ions on raw peels which was enhanced to 41.13% for alkali treated peels. PMID:27382624

  1. Giant photostriction in organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yang; You, Lu; Wang, Shiwei; Ku, Zhiliang; Fan, Hongjin; Schmidt, Daniel; Rusydi, Andrivo; Chang, Lei; Wang, Le; Ren, Peng; Chen, Liufang; Yuan, Guoliang; Chen, Lang; Wang, Junling

    2016-04-01

    Among the many materials investigated for next-generation photovoltaic cells, organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites have demonstrated great potential thanks to their high power conversion efficiency and solution processability. Within a short period of about 5 years, the efficiency of solar cells based on these materials has increased dramatically from 3.8 to over 20%. Despite the tremendous progress in device performance, much less is known about the underlying photophysics involving charge-orbital-lattice interactions and the role of the organic molecules in this hybrid material remains poorly understood. Here, we report a giant photostrictive response, that is, light-induced lattice change, of >1,200 p.p.m. in methylammonium lead iodide, which could be the key to understand its superior optical properties. The strong photon-lattice coupling also opens up the possibility of employing these materials in wireless opto-mechanical devices.

  2. Giant photostriction in organic–inorganic lead halide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; You, Lu; Wang, Shiwei; Ku, Zhiliang; Fan, Hongjin; Schmidt, Daniel; Rusydi, Andrivo; Chang, Lei; Wang, Le; Ren, Peng; Chen, Liufang; Yuan, Guoliang; Chen, Lang; Wang, Junling

    2016-01-01

    Among the many materials investigated for next-generation photovoltaic cells, organic–inorganic lead halide perovskites have demonstrated great potential thanks to their high power conversion efficiency and solution processability. Within a short period of about 5 years, the efficiency of solar cells based on these materials has increased dramatically from 3.8 to over 20%. Despite the tremendous progress in device performance, much less is known about the underlying photophysics involving charge–orbital–lattice interactions and the role of the organic molecules in this hybrid material remains poorly understood. Here, we report a giant photostrictive response, that is, light-induced lattice change, of >1,200 p.p.m. in methylammonium lead iodide, which could be the key to understand its superior optical properties. The strong photon-lattice coupling also opens up the possibility of employing these materials in wireless opto-mechanical devices. PMID:27044485

  3. Alkali and transition metal phospholides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezkishko, I. A.; Zagidullin, A. A.; Milyukov, V. A.; Sinyashin, O. G.

    2014-06-01

    Major tendencies in modern chemistry of alkali and transition metal phospholides (phosphacyclopentadienides) are systematized, analyzed and generalized. Basic methods of synthesis of these compounds are presented. Their chemical properties are considered with a special focus on their complexing ability. Potential applications of phospholides and their derivatives are discussed. The bibliography includes 184 references.

  4. Bright Light-Emitting Diodes Based on Organometal Halide Perovskite Nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Ling, Yichuan; Yuan, Zhao; Tian, Yu; Wang, Xi; Wang, Jamie C; Xin, Yan; Hanson, Kenneth; Ma, Biwu; Gao, Hanwei

    2016-01-13

    Bright light-emitting diodes based on solution-processable organometal halide perovskite nanoplatelets are demonstrated. The nanoplatelets created using a facile one-pot synthesis exhibit narrow-band emissions at 529 nm and quantum yield up to 85%. Using these nanoparticles as emitters, efficient electroluminescence is achieved with a brightness of 10 590 cd m(-2) . These ligand-capped nanoplatelets appear to be quite stable in moisture, allowing out-of-glovebox device fabrication.

  5. Electrochemistry of acetylides, nitrides and carbon cathodes in molten halides. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Selman, J. R.

    1980-04-01

    Additional experimental data on acetylide solutions in contact with graphite and carbon indicate that intercalation occurs not only in Li/sup +/-containing melts but also in Ca/sup 2 +/ melts. Emf measurements are being carried out to determine the calcium activity in Ca-Al alloys. Proposed work include carbonate reduction to acetylides and the mechanism of the corrosion resistance of Mo in molten halides. (DLC)

  6. Morphology-Controlled Synthesis of Organometal Halide Perovskite Inverse Opals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun; Tüysüz, Harun

    2015-11-01

    The booming development of organometal halide perovskites in recent years has prompted the exploration of morphology-control strategies to improve their performance in photovoltaic, photonic, and optoelectronic applications. However, the preparation of organometal halide perovskites with high hierarchical architecture is still highly challenging and a general morphology-control method for various organometal halide perovskites has not been achieved. A mild and scalable method to prepare organometal halide perovskites in inverse opal morphology is presented that uses a polystyrene-based artificial opal as hard template. Our method is flexible and compatible with different halides and organic ammonium compositions. Thus, the perovskite inverse opal maintains the advantage of straightforward structure and band gap engineering. Furthermore, optoelectronic investigations reveal that morphology exerted influence on the conducting nature of organometal halide perovskites. PMID:26376773

  7. Flame inhibition by hydrogen halides - Some spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, N. R.; Cagliostro, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    The far-ultraviolet absorption spectrum of an air-propane diffusion flame inhibited with hydrogen halides has been studied. Plots of the absorption of light by hydrogen halides as a function of position in the flame and also as a function of the amount of hydrogen halide added to the flame have been obtained. The hydrogen halides are shown to be more stable on the fuel side of the reaction zone than they are on the air side. Thermal diffusion is seen to be important in determining the concentration distribution of the heavier hydrogen halides in diffusion flames. The relationship between the concentration distribution of the hydrogen halides in the flame and the flame inhibition mechanism is discussed.

  8. Morphology-Controlled Synthesis of Organometal Halide Perovskite Inverse Opals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun; Tüysüz, Harun

    2015-11-01

    The booming development of organometal halide perovskites in recent years has prompted the exploration of morphology-control strategies to improve their performance in photovoltaic, photonic, and optoelectronic applications. However, the preparation of organometal halide perovskites with high hierarchical architecture is still highly challenging and a general morphology-control method for various organometal halide perovskites has not been achieved. A mild and scalable method to prepare organometal halide perovskites in inverse opal morphology is presented that uses a polystyrene-based artificial opal as hard template. Our method is flexible and compatible with different halides and organic ammonium compositions. Thus, the perovskite inverse opal maintains the advantage of straightforward structure and band gap engineering. Furthermore, optoelectronic investigations reveal that morphology exerted influence on the conducting nature of organometal halide perovskites.

  9. Halide electroadsorption on single crystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ocko, B.M.; Wandlowski, T.

    1997-07-01

    The structure and phase behavior of halides have been investigated on single crystals of Ag and Au using synchrotron x-ray scattering techniques. The adlayer coverages are potential dependent. For all halides studied the authors found that with increasing potential, at a critical potential, a disordered adlayer transforms into an ordered structure. Often these ordered phases are incommensurate and exhibit potential-dependent lateral separations (electrocompression). The authors have analyzed the electrocompression in terms of a model which includes lateral interactions and partial charge. A continuous compression is not observed for Br on Ag(100). Rather, they find that the adsorption is site-specific (lattice gas) in both the ordered and disordered phases. The coverage increases with increasing potential and at a critical potential the disordered phase transforms to a well-ordered commensurate structure.

  10. Research Update: Challenges for high-efficiency hybrid lead-halide perovskite LEDs and the path towards electrically pumped lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangru; Price, Michael; Deschler, Felix

    2016-09-01

    Hybrid lead-halide perovskites have emerged as promising solution-processed semiconductor materials for thin-film optoelectronics. In this review, we discuss current challenges in perovskite LED performance, using thin-film and nano-crystalline perovskite as emitter layers, and look at device performance and stability. Fabrication of electrically pumped, optical-feedback devices with hybrid lead halide perovskites as gain medium is a future challenge, initiated by the demonstration of optically pumped lasing structures with low gain thresholds. We explain the material parameters affecting optical gain in perovskites and discuss the challenges towards electrically pumped perovskite lasers.

  11. Grand Canonical Monte Carlo coupled multiscale simulation for electrochemical and solvent parameters of silver halide systems in water.

    PubMed

    Sudha, V; Harinipriya, S; Sangaranarayanan, M V

    2016-07-01

    Grand Canonical Monte Carlo methods in conjunction with continuum Multiscale simulation to estimate the hydration energies and surface potentials of silver halides as demonstrated elsewhere is employed by incorporating random distribution of molecules, nearest neighbor distances and hydration numbers. The extent of dehydration during each step and the corresponding variation in the hydration numbers are evaluated, assuming the validity of hard spheres. These estimates are then employed to deduce the redox potential of the reaction viz. 2AgX(solution)⇔2Ag(solid)+X2(gas). The dependence of these values on the nature of the halides and solvation characteristics is indicated. PMID:27442589

  12. An insight into liquid water networks through hydrogen bonding halide anion: Stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenghan; Fang, Wenhui; Li, Tianyu; Li, Fangfang; Sun, Chenglin; Li, Zuowei; Huang, Yuxin; Men, Zhiwei

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the interaction between water molecules and halide anions and acquired the influence of concentration by the spontaneous Raman spectrum. The results agreed well with the previous researches. To explore further, the stimulated Raman scattering of a halide-water binary solution is measured to study the nature of the hydrogen bonding between water molecules and halogen anions. Under the effect of laser-induced plasma, the OH stretching vibration spectra of aqueous solutions of halogen ions pretty exhibit different trend compared with that of spontaneous Raman spectrum. The frequency shifts of water OH vibration show different values and directions with adding different halide anions. The red shift of F-- and Cl--water molecule clusters is due to the process of charge transfer, whereas the blue shift of Br-- and I--water molecule cluster is due to polarization effect without charge transfer. The results demonstrate that F- and Cl- slightly weaken the hydrogen bond (HB), whereas Br- and I- enhance HB in the water cluster. The decrease of concentration of halogen ions aqueous solution can weaken the effect on the HB.

  13. Process and composition for drying of gaseous hydrogen halides

    DOEpatents

    Tom, Glenn M.; Brown, Duncan W.

    1989-08-01

    A process for drying a gaseous hydrogen halide of the formula HX, wherein X is selected from the group consisting of bromine, chlorine, fluorine, and iodine, to remove water impurity therefrom, comprising: contacting the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide with a scavenger including a support having associated therewith one or more members of the group consisting of: (a) an active scavenging moiety selected from one or more members of the group consisting of: (i) metal halide compounds dispersed in the support, of the formula MX.sub.y ; and (ii) metal halide pendant functional groups of the formula -MX.sub.y-1 covalently bonded to the support, wherein M is a y-valent metal, and y is an integer whose value is from 1 to 3; (b) corresponding partially or fully alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, of the metal halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); wherein the alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, when present, are reactive with the gaseous hydrogen halide to form the corresponding halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); and M being selected such that the heat of formation, .DELTA.H.sub.f of its hydrated halide, MX.sub.y.(H.sub.2 O).sub.n, is governed by the relationship: .DELTA.H.sub.f .gtoreq.n.times.10.1 kilocalories/mole of such hydrated halide compound wherein n is the number of water molecules bound to the metal halide in the metal halide hydrate. Also disclosed is an appertaining scavenger composition and a contacting apparatus wherein the scavenger is deployed in a bed for contacting with the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide.

  14. Acid and alkali doped PBI electrolyte in electrochemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Baozhong

    In this work the conductivity of blank PBI membrane, acid doped PBI and alkaline doped PBI was systematically studied. A new methodology for sorption kinetics study in electrolyte solution has been established by monitoring the conductivity change during the sorption process. The model of the doping process and mechanism of conductivity are proposed. The performance of PBI (doped under optimum conditions) in fuel cell as PEM was evaluated. The experimental results show that the blank PBI in acid solution is an ionic insulator. It clarified the long time confusion in this area. The acid doped PBI membrane is an ionic conductor. The conductivity increases with the concentration of the acid solution. In high concentration acid solution, the conductivity increases with the type of acid in the order: H2SO 4 > H3PO4 > HClO4 > HNO3 > HCl. The kinetics of the doping process was studied, by a continuous method. The ionic conductivity mechanism was established. The PBI membranes doped with H2SO4 and H3PO4 exhibit better performance than NafionRTM. The doped FBI has more resistance to CO poison. 3% CO in H2 has little effect on the H3PO 4 doped PBI membrane at 185°C. The conductivity of the alkali doped PBI membrane changes with the concentration of the alkaline solution and the type of the alkalis. The conductivity has a maximum in KOH and NaOH solution. The maximum conductivity in KOH is higher than in NaOH and LiOH. It is about 5 times of that of NafionRTM in alkaline solution. The two-step sorption process in alkaline solution was observed. The first step is the permeation process of the alkalis in the PBI membrane. The permeation is the results of diffusion and interaction. It is concluded that the permeation process is controlled by the rate of interaction between the alkali and PBI molecule. The second step is the relaxation process in the membrane. This step contributes more to the conductivity for the membrane than the first step. The ionic conductivity mechanism

  15. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  16. Bromine and heavy halide chemistry at the air/water and air/ice interfaces: a computational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladich, I.; Shepson, P. B.; Szleifer, I.; Carignano, M.

    2010-12-01

    The air-water and air-ice interfaces are critically important surfaces, with respect to the physical and chemical properties of the Earth's atmosphere. In particular chloride, bromide and iodide ions are strongly involved in the reactions occurring at aerosol surfaces that are hydrated and at the air-ice interface in the polar boundary layer. Unfortunately, experimental access to these interfaces are quite problematic and the computational approach, based on molecular dynamic simulations and quantum mechanic calculations, is an interesting alternative approach. In this work, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations are used to study the halide enhancements at the air-water interface in the case of a dilute mixture of iodide, bromide and chloride ions. The MD results show how the air- water halide enhancement is different in the case of mixtures from the case of binary solutions (i.e. anions plus counter-positive ions) and how the presence of these halides at the interfaces depends from their relative concentrations in solution. In detail, heavy halides are strongly enhanced at the interfaces even if they are minor constituents in the bulk. Furthermore the enhancement of the larger halide ions, like bromide, at the surface is greater if lighter halides, like chloride, are in greater excess in the bulk. The applications of this last result on some real system, like sea-water, and the importance of bromide ions in the polar chemistry of ozone depletion events suggest a combined approach, MD and quantum mechanism (QM) calculation, to investigate the ozonation reaction of bromide (Br-+O3 → BrO-+O2 ) in the ice-QLL and in bulk water. The study of the reaction constants suggests how the different environments can affect the kinetics of such reaction. These results can help to understand the complex chemistry occurring at the air-water interface of hydrated aerosol and at the air-ice interface in the polar boundary layer.

  17. Enhancement of tensile strength of lignocellulosic jute fibers by alkali-steam treatment.

    PubMed

    Saha, Prosenjit; Manna, Suvendu; Chowdhury, Sougata Roy; Sen, Ramkrishna; Roy, Debasis; Adhikari, Basudam

    2010-05-01

    The physico-chemical properties of jute fibers treated with alkali (NaOH) solution have been investigated in this study. The treatments were applied under ambient and elevated temperatures and high pressure steaming conditions. To the knowledge of these authors the influence of alkali-steam treatment on the uniaxial tensile strength of natural ligno-cellulosic fibers, such as jute, has not been investigated earlier. The results from this investigation indicate that a 30 min dipping of the fibers in 0.5% alkali solution followed by 30 min alkali-steam treatment leads to an increase in the tensile strength of up to 65%. The increase appears to be due to fiber separation and removal of non-cellulosic materials, which, in turn, resulted in an increased crystallinity.

  18. Mechanism and Selectivity in Nickel-Catalyzed Cross-Electrophile Coupling of Aryl Halides with Alkyl Halides

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Soumik; Weix, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    The direct cross-coupling of two different electrophiles, such as an aryl halide with an alkyl halide, offers many advantages over conventional cross-coupling methods that require a carbon nucleophile. Despite its promise as a versatile synthetic strategy, a limited understanding of the mechanism and origin of cross selectivity has hindered progress in reaction development and design. Herein, we shed light on the mechanism for the nickel-catalyzed cross-electrophile coupling of aryl halides with alkyl halides and demonstrate that the selectivity arises from an unusual catalytic cycle that combines both polar and radical steps to form the new C-C bond. PMID:23952217

  19. Regio- and enantiospecific rhodium-catalyzed allylic etherification reactions using copper(I) alkoxides: influence of the copper halide salt on selectivity.

    PubMed

    Evans, P Andrew; Leahy, David K

    2002-07-10

    The transition metal-catalyzed allylic etherification represents a fundamentally important cross-coupling reaction for the construction of allylic ethers. We have developed a new regio- and enantiospecific rhodium-catalyzed allylic etherification of acyclic unsymmetrical allylic alcohol derivatives using copper(I) alkoxides derived from primary, secondary and tertiary alcohols. This study demonstrates that the choice of copper(I) halide salt is crucial for obtaining excellent regio- and enantiospecificity, providing another example of the effect of halide ions in asymmetric transition metal-catalyzed reactions. Finally, the ability to alter the reactivity of the alkali metal alkoxides in this manner may provide a useful method for related metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions involving heteroatoms.

  20. Alkali metal/sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Joginder N.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

  1. Assesment of Alkali Resistance of Basalt Used as Concrete Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    al-Swaidani, Aref M.; Baddoura, Mohammad K.; Aliyan, Samira D.; Choeb, Walid

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to report a part of an ongoing research on the influence of using crushed basalt as aggregates on one of durability-related properties of concrete (i.e. alkali-silica reaction which is the most common form of Alkali-Aggregate Reaction). Alkali resistance has been assessed through several methods specified in the American Standards. Results of petrographic examination, chemical test (ASTM C289) and accelerated mortar bar test (ASTM C1260) have particularly been reported. In addition, the weight change and compressive strength of 28 days cured concrete containing basaltic aggregates were also reported after 90 days of exposure to 10% NaOH solution. Dolomite aggregate were used in the latter test for comparison. The experimental results revealed that basaltic rocks quarried from As-Swaida'a region were suitable for production of aggregates for concrete. According to the test results, the studied basalt aggregates can be classified as innocuous with regard to alkali-silica reaction. Further, the 10% sodium hydroxide attack did not affect the compressive strength of concrete.

  2. Alkali-activated binders by use of industrial by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Buchwald, A.; Schulz, M

    2005-05-01

    Cement kiln dust (CKD) materials are used as alkaline accelerators for latent hydraulic substances and as alkali activators for different alumosilicate materials, including ground-granulated blast furnace slag, low-calcium fly ash and metakaolin. The dusts differ in their phase composition, especially in the amount of reactive phases and the kind and amount of alkali salts. The quantitative phase composition, pore solution composition and strength behavior of the activated blends is reported.

  3. Relationships between Lead Halide Perovskite Thin-Film Fabrication, Morphology, and Performance in Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Sharenko, Alexander; Toney, Michael F

    2016-01-20

    Solution-processed lead halide perovskite thin-film solar cells have achieved power conversion efficiencies comparable to those obtained with several commercial photovoltaic technologies in a remarkably short period of time. This rapid rise in device efficiency is largely the result of the development of fabrication protocols capable of producing continuous, smooth perovskite films with micrometer-sized grains. Further developments in film fabrication and morphological control are necessary, however, in order for perovskite solar cells to reliably and reproducibly approach their thermodynamic efficiency limit. This Perspective discusses the fabrication of lead halide perovskite thin films, while highlighting the processing-property-performance relationships that have emerged from the literature, and from this knowledge, suggests future research directions.

  4. The role of halide ions in the anisotropic growth of gold nanoparticles: a microscopic, atomistic perspective.

    PubMed

    Meena, Santosh Kumar; Celiksoy, Sirin; Schäfer, Philipp; Henkel, Andreas; Sönnichsen, Carsten; Sulpizi, Marialore

    2016-05-21

    We provide a microscopic view of the role of halides in controlling the anisotropic growth of gold nanorods through a combined computational and experimental study. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations unveil that Br(-) adsorption is not only responsible for surface passivation, but also acts as the driving force for CTAB micelle adsorption and stabilization on the gold surface in a facet-dependent way. The partial replacement of Br(-) by Cl(-) decreases the difference between facets and the surfactant density. Finally, in the CTAC solution, no halides or micellar structures protect the gold surface and further gold reduction should be uniformly possible. Experimentally observed nanoparticle's growth in different CTAB/CTAC mixtures is more uniform and faster as the amount of Cl(-) increases, confirming the picture from the simulations. In addition, the surfactant layer thickness measured on nanorods exposed to CTAB and CTAC quantitatively agrees with the simulation results. PMID:27118188

  5. [Emissions of methyl halides from coastal salt marshes: A review].

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen-xia; Zhao, Quan-sheng; Cui, Yu-qian; Du, Hui-na; Ye, Si-yuan

    2015-11-01

    Methyl halides are the major carrier of halogens in the atmosphere, and they play an important role in tropospheric and stratospheric ozone depletion. Meanwhile, methyl halides can act as greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, and they are also environmentally significant because of their toxicity. Coastal salt marshes, the important intertidal ecosystems at the land-ocean interface, have been considered to be a large potential natural source of methyl halides. In this paper, the research status of the natural source or sink of methyl halides, the mechanisms of their emission from coastal salt marshes and affecting factors were summarized. In view of this, the following research fields need to be strengthened in the future: 1) Long time-scale and large region-range researches about the emission of methyl halides and the evaluation of their source and sink function, 2) Accurate quantification of contribution rates of different plant species and various biological types to fluxes of methyl halides, 3) Further researches on effects of the tidal fluctuation process and flooding duration on methyl halides emission, 4) Effects of the global change and human activities on methyl halides emission. PMID:26915215

  6. In-Situ Investigation of Tomato Plants as Methyl Halide Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, D. B.; Butler, J. H.; Mondeel, D. J.

    2002-05-01

    Natural halocarbons contribute significantly to the destruction of stratospheric ozone. Methyl bromide and methyl chloride, both of which come primarily from natural sources, supply about one-quarter of the equivalent chlorine to the stratosphere. Other halogenated compounds, such as dibromomethane, bromoform, and methyl iodide, might be significant halogen sources to the stratosphere as well. The budgets of these compounds, and the mechanisms responsible for their production and destruction, generally are poorly understood. For example, known sources of both methyl bromide and methyl chloride outweigh their known sinks by 50-100%, making it difficult to predict future atmospheric concentrations of these compounds. As the global climate changes, atmospheric halocarbon concentrations are likely to respond to changes in sea surface temperature, biological productivity on land and in water, and global wind patterns. Terrestrial plants are a potentially significant source of many light halocarbons. As a first cut to assess this potential, we measured the production of about 20 halocarbons by tomato plants in a hydroponic greenhouse in Northern California. This enabled us to investigate production directly from the plants, without the interference of soils, which have been shown to remove some of these compounds from the atmosphere. Results differed for the methyl halides and the polyhalogenated compounds. Methyl halide production was small or zero during initial experiments. However, the addition of a halide ion solution (KBr, KCl, and KI) to the plants' nutrient mixture appeared to increase production of methyl bromide (by a factor of three) and methyl iodide (by a factor of seven) significantly. In contrast, several polyhalogenated compounds (e.g., bromoform and bromochloromethane) were produced during all experiments, with increases on the order of 50% to 600%. The addition of the halide solution did not affect the production of these compounds. The results from

  7. Nanowire Lasers of Formamidinium Lead Halide Perovskites and Their Stabilized Alloys with Improved Stability.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yongping; Zhu, Haiming; Schrader, Alex W; Liang, Dong; Ding, Qi; Joshi, Prakriti; Hwang, Leekyoung; Zhu, X-Y; Jin, Song

    2016-02-10

    The excellent intrinsic optoelectronic properties of methylammonium lead halide perovskites (MAPbX3, X = Br, I), such as high photoluminescence quantum efficiency, long carrier lifetime, and high gain coupled with the facile solution growth of nanowires make them promising new materials for ultralow-threshold nanowire lasers. However, their photo and thermal stabilities need to be improved for practical applications. Herein, we report a low-temperature solution growth of single crystal nanowires of formamidinium lead halide perovskites (FAPbX3) that feature red-shifted emission and better thermal stability compared to MAPbX3. We demonstrate optically pumped room-temperature near-infrared (∼820 nm) and green lasing (∼560 nm) from FAPbI3 (and MABr-stabilized FAPbI3) and FAPbBr3 nanowires with low lasing thresholds of several microjoules per square centimeter and high quality factors of about 1500-2300. More remarkably, the FAPbI3 and MABr-stabilized FAPbI3 nanowires display durable room-temperature lasing under ∼10(8) shots of sustained illumination of 402 nm pulsed laser excitation (150 fs, 250 kHz), substantially exceeding the stability of MAPbI3 (∼10(7) laser shots). We further demonstrate tunable nanowire lasers in wider wavelength region from FA-based lead halide perovskite alloys (FA,MA)PbI3 and (FA,MA)Pb(I,Br)3 through cation and anion substitutions. The results suggest that formamidinium lead halide perovskite nanostructures could be more promising and stable materials for the development of light-emitting diodes and continuous-wave lasers.

  8. How specific halide adsorption varies hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Stock, Philipp; Müller, Melanie; Utzig, Thomas; Valtiner, Markus

    2016-03-11

    Hydrophobic interactions (HI) are driven by the water structure around hydrophobes in aqueous electrolytes. How water structures at hydrophobic interfaces and how this influences the HI was subject to numerous studies. However, the effect of specific ion adsorption on HI and hydrophobic interfaces remains largely unexplored or controversial. Here, the authors utilized atomic force microscopy force spectroscopy at well-defined nanoscopic hydrophobic interfaces to experimentally address how specific ion adsorption of halide ions as well as NH4 (+), Cs(+), and Na(+) cations alters interaction forces across hydrophobic interfaces. Our data demonstrate that iodide adsorption at hydrophobic interfaces profoundly varies the hydrophobic interaction potential. A long-range and strong hydration repulsion at distances D > 3 nm, is followed by an instability which could be explained by a subsequent rapid ejection of adsorbed iodides from approaching hydrophobic interfaces. In addition, the authors find only a weakly pronounced influence of bromide, and as expected no influence of chloride. Also, all tested cations do not have any significant influence on HI. Complementary, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and quartz-crystal-microbalance with dissipation monitoring showed a clear adsorption of large halide ions (Br(-)/I(-)) onto hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Interestingly, iodide can even lead to a full disintegration of SAMs due to specific and strong interactions of iodide with gold. Our data suggest that hydrophobic surfaces are not intrinsically charged negatively by hydroxide adsorption, as it was generally believed. Hydrophobic surfaces rather interact strongly with negatively charged large halide ions, leading to a surface charging and significant variation of interaction forces.

  9. Ion pair complexes and anion binding in the solution of a ditopic receptor.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, T; Rissanen, K

    2016-04-21

    The synthesis and crystal structures with alkali halides of a ditopic benzo-15-crown-5 bis-urea receptor have been presented. In addition, the anion binding properties of and its alkali metal complexes in solution are presented. A comprehensive single-crystal X-ray crystallographic study of , all together 13 crystal structures, including the ion pair complexes with NaCl, NaBr, NaI, KF, KCl, KBr, KI, RbF, RbCl, and RbI, give a detailed view of how behaves in the solid-state with different alkali halides depending on the size of the cation and anion. In the solid-state forms a 1 : 1 complex with a sodium cation and the anion is complexed as a contact (NaCl) or a separate ion pair (NaBr, NaI). With larger potassium and rubidium cations assembles into a 2 : 1 complex and forms a separated ion pair complex with the anion. Reflecting the crystal structures the forms a 1 : 1 complex with Na(+) in solution, and a 2 : 1 complex with K(+), which were verified by Job's plot analysis in 4 : 1 CDCl3/dimethyl sulfoxide. The binding strength of the monomeric [·Na](+) and the dimeric [2·K](+) toward chloride, bromide and iodide anions was studied by (1)H NMR titrations in 4 : 1 CDCl3/DMSO, and a clear turn-on effect of the cation complexation compared to the neutral receptor alone (Ka with for Cl(-), Br(-) and I(-) being 832, 174 and 32 M(-1), respectively) was observed. The monomeric [·Na](+) binds chloride 9, bromide 8, and iodide 12 times stronger than , while for the dimeric [2K](+) the corresponding increase in binding is 51 (Cl(-)), 84 (Br(-)), and 22 (I(-)) times with the same stoichiometric ratios as observed for the ion pair complexes in the solid-state. PMID:26953675

  10. Chemiluminescence from excited c 2- -alkali cation complexes formed in alkali atom-halocarbon flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, K. K.; Balling, L. C.; Wright, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Vapor phase reactions between alkali atoms and several halocarbon molecules containing C-C bonds have been observed to produce chemiluminescence which appears to originate from C 2-- (alkali) + complexes.

  11. Research Update: Luminescence in lead halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srimath Kandada, Ajay Ram; Petrozza, Annamaria

    2016-09-01

    Efficiency and dynamics of radiative recombination of carriers are crucial figures of merit for optoelectronic materials. Following the recent success of lead halide perovskites in efficient photovoltaic and light emitting technologies, here we review some of the noted literature on the luminescence of this emerging class of materials. After outlining the theoretical formalism that is currently used to explain the carrier recombination dynamics, we review a few significant works which use photoluminescence as a tool to understand and optimize the operation of perovskite based optoelectronic devices.

  12. Nanoscale investigation of organic - inorganic halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacovich, S.; Divitini, G.; Vrućinić, M.; Sadhanala, A.; Friend, R. H.; Sirringhaus, H.; Deschler, F.; Ducati, C.

    2015-10-01

    Over the last few years organic - inorganic halide perovskite-based solar cells have exhibited a rapid evolution, reaching certified power conversion efficiencies now surpassing 20%. Nevertheless the understanding of the optical and electronic properties of such systems on the nanoscale is still an open problem. In this work we investigate two model perovskite systems (based on iodine - CH3NH3PbI3 and bromine - CH3NH3PbBr3), analysing the local elemental composition and crystallinity and identifying chemical inhomogeneities.

  13. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  14. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  15. Unified molecular picture of the surfaces of aqueous acid, base, and salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Mucha, Martin; Frigato, Tomaso; Levering, Lori M; Allen, Heather C; Tobias, Douglas J; Dang, Liem X; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2005-04-28

    The molecular structure of the interfacial regions of aqueous electrolytes is poorly understood, despite its crucial importance in many biological, technological, and atmospheric processes. A long-term controversy pertains between the standard picture of an ion-free surface layer and the strongly ion specific behavior indicating in many cases significant propensities of simple inorganic ions for the interface. Here, we present a unified and consistent view of the structure of the air/solution interface of aqueous electrolytes containing monovalent inorganic ions. Molecular dynamics calculations show that in salt solutions and bases the positively charged ions, such as alkali cations, are repelled from the interface, whereas the anions, such as halides or hydroxide, exhibit a varying surface propensity, correlated primarily with the ion polarizability and size. The behavior of acids is different due to a significant propensity of hydronium cations for the air/solution interface. Therefore, both cations and anions exhibit enhanced concentrations at the surface and, consequently, these acids (unlike bases and salts) reduce the surface tension of water. The results of the simulations are supported by surface selective nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy, which reveals among other things that the hydronium cations are present at the air/solution interface. The ion specific propensities for the air/solution interface have important implications for a whole range of heterogeneous physical and chemical processes, including atmospheric chemistry of aerosols, corrosion processes, and bubble coalescence.

  16. Lithological influence of aggregate in the alkali-carbonate reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Buendia, A.M. . E-mail: angel.lopez@aidico.es; Climent, V. . E-mail: vcliment@grupogla.com; Verdu, P.

    2006-08-15

    The reactivity of carbonate rock with the alkali content of cement, commonly called alkali-carbonate reaction (ACR), has been investigated. Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) can also contribute in the alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR) in carbonate rock, mainly due to micro- and crypto-crystalline quartz or clay content in carbonate aggregate. Both ACR and ASR can occur in the same system, as has been also evidenced on this paper. Carbonate aggregate samples were selected using lithological reactivity criteria, taking into account the presence of dedolomitization, partial dolomitization, micro- and crypto-crystalline quartz. Selected rocks include calcitic dolostone with chert (CDX), calcitic dolostone with dedolomitization (CDD), limestone with chert (LX), marly calcitic dolostone with partial dolomitization (CD), high-porosity ferric dolostone with clays (FD). To evaluate the reactivity, aggregates were studied using expansion tests following RILEM AAR-2, AAR-5, a modification using LiOH AAR-5Li was also tested. A complementary study was done using petrographic monitoring with polarised light microscopy on aggregates immersed in NaOH and LiOH solutions after different ages. SEM-EDAX has been used to identify the presence of brucite as a product of dedolomitization. An ACR reaction showed shrinkage of the mortar bars in alkaline solutions explained by induced dedolomitization, while an ASR process typically displayed expansion. Neither shrinkage nor expansion was observed when mortar bars were immersed in solutions of lithium hydroxide. Carbonate aggregate classification with AAR pathology risk has been elaborated based on mechanical behaviours by expansion and shrinkage. It is proposed to be used as a petrographic method for AAR diagnosis to complement the RILEM AAR1 specifically for carbonate aggregate. Aggregate materials can be classified as I (non-reactive), II (potentially reactive), and III (probably reactive), considering induced dedolomitization ACR

  17. Spectral Features and Charge Dynamics of Lead Halide Perovskites: Origins and Interpretations.

    PubMed

    Sum, Tze Chien; Mathews, Nripan; Xing, Guichuan; Lim, Swee Sien; Chong, Wee Kiang; Giovanni, David; Dewi, Herlina Arianita

    2016-02-16

    Lead halide perovskite solar cells are presently the forerunner among the third generation solution-processed photovoltaic technologies. With efficiencies exceeding 20% and low production costs, they are prime candidates for commercialization. Critical insights into their light harvesting, charge transport, and loss mechanisms have been gained through time-resolved optical probes such as femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy (fs-TAS), transient photoluminescence spectroscopy, and time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. Specifically, the discoveries of long balanced electron-hole diffusion lengths and gain properties in halide perovskites underpin their significant roles in uncovering structure-function relations and providing essential feedback for materials development and device optimization. In particular, fs-TAS is becoming increasingly popular in perovskite characterization studies, with commercial one-box pump-probe systems readily available as part of a researcher's toolkit. Although TAS is a powerful probe in the study of charge dynamics and recombination mechanisms, its instrumentation and data interpretation can be daunting even for experienced researchers. This issue is exacerbated by the sensitive nature of halide perovskites where the kinetics are especially susceptible to pump fluence, sample preparation and handling and even degradation effects that could lead to disparate conclusions. Nonetheless, with end-users having a clear understanding of TAS's capabilities, subtleties, and limitations, cutting-edge work with deep insights can still be performed using commercial setups as has been the trend for ubiquitous spectroscopy instruments like absorption, fluorescence, and transient photoluminescence spectrometers. Herein, we will first briefly examine the photophysical processes in lead halide perovskites, highlighting their novel properties. Next, we proceed to give a succinct overview of the fundamentals of pump-probe spectroscopy in relation

  18. Alkali-Metal Spin Maser.

    PubMed

    Chalupczak, W; Josephs-Franks, P

    2015-07-17

    Quantum measurement is a combination of a read-out and a perturbation of the quantum system. We explore the nonlinear spin dynamics generated by a linearly polarized probe beam in a continuous measurement of the collective spin state in a thermal alkali-metal atomic sample. We demonstrate that the probe-beam-driven perturbation leads, in the presence of indirect pumping, to complete polarization of the sample and macroscopic coherent spin oscillations. As a consequence of the former we report observation of spectral profiles free from collisional broadening. Nonlinear dynamics is studied through exploring its effect on radio frequency as well as spin noise spectra. PMID:26230788

  19. Alkali-Metal Spin Maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalupczak, W.; Josephs-Franks, P.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum measurement is a combination of a read-out and a perturbation of the quantum system. We explore the nonlinear spin dynamics generated by a linearly polarized probe beam in a continuous measurement of the collective spin state in a thermal alkali-metal atomic sample. We demonstrate that the probe-beam-driven perturbation leads, in the presence of indirect pumping, to complete polarization of the sample and macroscopic coherent spin oscillations. As a consequence of the former we report observation of spectral profiles free from collisional broadening. Nonlinear dynamics is studied through exploring its effect on radio frequency as well as spin noise spectra.

  20. Finding New Perovskite Halides via Machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Kim, Chiho; Lookman, Turab

    2016-04-01

    Advanced materials with improved properties have the potential to fuel future technological advancements. However, identification and discovery of these optimal materials for a specific application is a non-trivial task, because of the vastness of the chemical search space with enormous compositional and configurational degrees of freedom. Materials informatics provides an efficient approach towards rational design of new materials, via learning from known data to make decisions on new and previously unexplored compounds in an accelerated manner. Here, we demonstrate the power and utility of such statistical learning (or machine learning) via building a support vector machine (SVM) based classifier that uses elemental features (or descriptors) to predict the formability of a given ABX3 halide composition (where A and B represent monovalent and divalent cations, respectively, and X is F, Cl, Br or I anion) in the perovskite crystal structure. The classification model is built by learning from a dataset of 181 experimentally known ABX3 compounds. After exploring a wide range of features, we identify ionic radii, tolerance factor and octahedral factor to be the most important factors for the classification, suggesting that steric and geometric packing effects govern the stability of these halides. The trained and validated models then predict, with a high degree of confidence, several novel ABX3 compositions with perovskite crystal structure.

  1. Methyl halide production associated with kelp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dastoor, Minoo N.; Manley, Steven L.

    1985-01-01

    Methyl halides (MeX) are important trace constituents of the atmosphere because they, mostly MeCl, have a major impact on the atmospheric ozone layer. Also, MeCl may account for 5 pct. of the total Cl budget and MeI may have a central role in the biogeochemical cycling of iodine. High MeI concentrations were found in seawater from kelp beds and it has been suggested that MeI is produced by kelps and that MeI and MeBr along with numerous other halocarbons were released by non-kelp marine macroalgae. The objective was to determine if kelps (and other seaweeds) are sources of MeX and to assess their contribution to the estimated global source strength (EGSS) of MeX. Although the production of MeX appears to be associated with kelp, microbes involved with kelp degradation also produce MeX. Microbial MeX production may be of global significance. The microbial MeX production potential, assuming annual kelp production equals kelp degradation and 100 pct. conversion of kelp halides to MeX, is approx. 2 x the EGSS. This is not achieved but indicates that microbial production of MeX may be of global significance.

  2. Finding new perovskite halides via machine learning

    DOE PAGES

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Kim, Chiho; Lookman, Turab

    2016-04-26

    Advanced materials with improved properties have the potential to fuel future technological advancements. However, identification and discovery of these optimal materials for a specific application is a non-trivial task, because of the vastness of the chemical search space with enormous compositional and configurational degrees of freedom. Materials informatics provides an efficient approach toward rational design of new materials, via learning from known data to make decisions on new and previously unexplored compounds in an accelerated manner. Here, we demonstrate the power and utility of such statistical learning (or machine learning, henceforth referred to as ML) via building a support vectormore » machine (SVM) based classifier that uses elemental features (or descriptors) to predict the formability of a given ABX3 halide composition (where A and B represent monovalent and divalent cations, respectively, and X is F, Cl, Br, or I anion) in the perovskite crystal structure. The classification model is built by learning from a dataset of 185 experimentally known ABX3 compounds. After exploring a wide range of features, we identify ionic radii, tolerance factor, and octahedral factor to be the most important factors for the classification, suggesting that steric and geometric packing effects govern the stability of these halides. As a result, the trained and validated models then predict, with a high degree of confidence, several novel ABX3 compositions with perovskite crystal structure.« less

  3. Thermal inactivation of alkali phosphatases under various conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atyaksheva, L. F.; Tarasevich, B. N.; Chukhrai, E. S.; Poltorak, O. M.

    2009-02-01

    The thermal inactivation of alkali phosphatases from bacteria Escherichia coli (ECAP), bovine intestines (bovine IAP), and chicken intestines (chicken IAP) was studied in different buffer solutions and in the solid state. The conclusion was made that these enzymes had maximum stability in the solid state, and, in a carbonate buffer solution, their activity decreased most rapidly. It was found that the bacterial enzyme was more stable than animal phosphatases. It was noted that, for ECAP, four intermediate stages preceded the loss of enzyme activity, and, for bovine and chicken IAPs, three intermediate stages were observed. The activation energy of thermal inactivation of ECAP over the range 25-70°C was determined to be 80 kJ/mol; it corresponded to the dissociation of active dimers into inactive monomers. Higher activation energies (˜200 kJ/mol) observed at the initial stage of thermal inactivation of animal phosphatases resulted from the simultaneous loss of enzyme activity caused by dimer dissociation and denaturation. It was shown that the activation energy of denaturation of monomeric animal alkali phosphatases ranged from 330 to 380 kJ/mol depending on buffer media. It was concluded that the inactivation of solid samples of alkali phosphatases at 95°C was accompanied by an about twofold decrease in the content of β structures in protein molecules.

  4. Crystal growth of sulfide materials from alkali polysulfide liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    The fluids experiment system was designed for low temperature solution growth, nominally aqueous solution growth. The alkali polysulfides, compositions in the systems Na2S-S and K2S-S form liquids in the temperature range of 190 C to 400 C. These can be used as solvents for other important classes of materials such as transition metal and other sulfides which are not soluble in aqueous media. Among these materials are luminescent and electroluminescent crystals whose physical properties are sensitive functions of crystal perfection and which could, therefore, serve as test materials for perfection improvement under microgravity conditions.

  5. High-Efficiency Light-Emitting Diodes of Organometal Halide Perovskite Amorphous Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jun; Yan, Fei; Zhao, Yawen; Chen, Shi; Yu, Huakang; Zhang, Qing; Zeng, Rongguang; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sun, Xiaowei; Huan, Alfred; Xiong, Qihua

    2016-07-26

    Organometal halide perovskite has recently emerged as a very promising family of materials with augmented performance in electronic and optoelectronic applications including photovoltaic devices, photodetectors, and light-emitting diodes. Herein, we propose and demonstrate facile solution synthesis of a series of colloidal organometal halide perovskite CH3NH3PbX3 (X = halides) nanoparticles with amorphous structure, which exhibit high quantum yield and tunable emission from ultraviolet to near-infrared. The growth mechanism and photoluminescence properties of the perovskite amorphous nanoparticles were studied in detail. A high-efficiency green-light-emitting diode based on amorphous CH3NH3PbBr3 nanoparticles was demonstrated. The perovskite amorphous nanoparticle-based light-emitting diode shows a maximum luminous efficiency of 11.49 cd/A, a power efficiency of 7.84 lm/W, and an external quantum efficiency of 3.8%, which is 3.5 times higher than that of the best colloidal perovskite quantum-dot-based light-emitting diodes previously reported. Our findings indicate the great potential of colloidal perovskite amorphous nanoparticles in light-emitting devices.

  6. Tailoring Oxygen Sensitivity with Halide Substitution in Difluoroboron Dibenzoylmethane Polylactide Materials

    PubMed Central

    DeRosa, Christopher A.; Kerr, Caroline; Fan, Ziyi; Kolpaczynska, Milena; Mathew, Alexander S.; Evans, Ruffin E.; Zhang, Guoqing; Fraser, Cassandra L.

    2015-01-01

    The dual-emissive properties of solid-state difluoroboron β-diketonate-poly(lactic acid) (BF2bdkPLA) materials have been utilized for biological oxygen sensing. In this work, BF2dbm(X)PLA materials were synthesized, where X = H, F, Cl, Br, and I. The effects of changing the halide substituent and PLA polymer chain length on the optical properties in dilute CH2Cl2 solutions and solid-state polymer films were studied. These luminescent materials show fluorescence, phosphorescence, and lifetime tunability on the basis of molecular weight, as well as lifetime modulation via the halide substituent. Short BF2dbm(Br)PLA (6.0 kDa) and both short and long BF2dbm(I)PLA polymers (6.0 or 20.3 kDa) have fluorescence and intense phosphorescence ideal for ratiometric oxygen sensing. The lighter halide-dye polymers with hydrogen, fluorine, and chlorine substitution have longer phosphorescence lifetimes and can be utilized as ultrasensitive oxygen sensors. Photostability was also analyzed for the polymer films. PMID:26480236

  7. High-Efficiency Light-Emitting Diodes of Organometal Halide Perovskite Amorphous Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jun; Yan, Fei; Zhao, Yawen; Chen, Shi; Yu, Huakang; Zhang, Qing; Zeng, Rongguang; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sun, Xiaowei; Huan, Alfred; Xiong, Qihua

    2016-07-26

    Organometal halide perovskite has recently emerged as a very promising family of materials with augmented performance in electronic and optoelectronic applications including photovoltaic devices, photodetectors, and light-emitting diodes. Herein, we propose and demonstrate facile solution synthesis of a series of colloidal organometal halide perovskite CH3NH3PbX3 (X = halides) nanoparticles with amorphous structure, which exhibit high quantum yield and tunable emission from ultraviolet to near-infrared. The growth mechanism and photoluminescence properties of the perovskite amorphous nanoparticles were studied in detail. A high-efficiency green-light-emitting diode based on amorphous CH3NH3PbBr3 nanoparticles was demonstrated. The perovskite amorphous nanoparticle-based light-emitting diode shows a maximum luminous efficiency of 11.49 cd/A, a power efficiency of 7.84 lm/W, and an external quantum efficiency of 3.8%, which is 3.5 times higher than that of the best colloidal perovskite quantum-dot-based light-emitting diodes previously reported. Our findings indicate the great potential of colloidal perovskite amorphous nanoparticles in light-emitting devices. PMID:27284993

  8. Tailoring Oxygen Sensitivity with Halide Substitution in Difluoroboron Dibenzoylmethane Polylactide Materials.

    PubMed

    DeRosa, Christopher A; Kerr, Caroline; Fan, Ziyi; Kolpaczynska, Milena; Mathew, Alexander S; Evans, Ruffin E; Zhang, Guoqing; Fraser, Cassandra L

    2015-10-28

    The dual-emissive properties of solid-state difluoroboron β-diketonate-poly(lactic acid) (BF2bdkPLA) materials have been utilized for biological oxygen sensing. In this work, BF2dbm(X)PLA materials were synthesized, where X = H, F, Cl, Br, and I. The effects of changing the halide substituent and PLA polymer chain length on the optical properties in dilute CH2Cl2 solutions and solid-state polymer films were studied. These luminescent materials show fluorescence, phosphorescence, and lifetime tunability on the basis of molecular weight, as well as lifetime modulation via the halide substituent. Short BF2dbm(Br)PLA (6.0 kDa) and both short and long BF2dbm(I)PLA polymers (6.0 or 20.3 kDa) have fluorescence and intense phosphorescence ideal for ratiometric oxygen sensing. The lighter halide-dye polymers with hydrogen, fluorine, and chlorine substitution have longer phosphorescence lifetimes and can be utilized as ultrasensitive oxygen sensors. Photostability was also analyzed for the polymer films. PMID:26480236

  9. Lead halide perovskite nanowire lasers with low lasing thresholds and high quality factors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiming; Fu, Yongping; Meng, Fei; Wu, Xiaoxi; Gong, Zizhou; Ding, Qi; Gustafsson, Martin V; Trinh, M Tuan; Jin, Song; Zhu, X-Y

    2015-06-01

    The remarkable performance of lead halide perovskites in solar cells can be attributed to the long carrier lifetimes and low non-radiative recombination rates, the same physical properties that are ideal for semiconductor lasers. Here, we show room-temperature and wavelength-tunable lasing from single-crystal lead halide perovskite nanowires with very low lasing thresholds (220 nJ cm(-2)) and high quality factors (Q ∼ 3,600). The lasing threshold corresponds to a charge carrier density as low as 1.5 × 10(16) cm(-3). Kinetic analysis based on time-resolved fluorescence reveals little charge carrier trapping in these single-crystal nanowires and gives estimated lasing quantum yields approaching 100%. Such lasing performance, coupled with the facile solution growth of single-crystal nanowires and the broad stoichiometry-dependent tunability of emission colour, makes lead halide perovskites ideal materials for the development of nanophotonics, in parallel with the rapid development in photovoltaics from the same materials.

  10. Lead halide perovskite nanowire lasers with low lasing thresholds and high quality factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Haiming; Fu, Yongping; Meng, Fei; Wu, Xiaoxi; Gong, Zizhou; Ding, Qi; Gustafsson, Martin V.; Trinh, M. Tuan; Jin, Song; Zhu, X.-Y.

    2015-06-01

    The remarkable performance of lead halide perovskites in solar cells can be attributed to the long carrier lifetimes and low non-radiative recombination rates, the same physical properties that are ideal for semiconductor lasers. Here, we show room-temperature and wavelength-tunable lasing from single-crystal lead halide perovskite nanowires with very low lasing thresholds (220 nJ cm-2) and high quality factors (Q ~ 3,600). The lasing threshold corresponds to a charge carrier density as low as 1.5 × 1016 cm-3. Kinetic analysis based on time-resolved fluorescence reveals little charge carrier trapping in these single-crystal nanowires and gives estimated lasing quantum yields approaching 100%. Such lasing performance, coupled with the facile solution growth of single-crystal nanowires and the broad stoichiometry-dependent tunability of emission colour, makes lead halide perovskites ideal materials for the development of nanophotonics, in parallel with the rapid development in photovoltaics from the same materials.

  11. PREPARATION OF URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for preparing uranium--aluminum alloys from a solution of uranium halide in an about equimolar molten alkali metal halide-- aluminum halide mixture and excess aluminum. The uranium halide is reduced and the uranium is alloyed with the excess aluminum. The alloy and salt are separated from each other. (AEC)

  12. Photophysics of Hybrid Lead Halide Perovskites: The Role of Microstructure.

    PubMed

    Srimath Kandada, Ajay Ram; Petrozza, Annamaria

    2016-03-15

    Since the first reports on high efficiency, solution processed solar cells based on hybrid lead halide perovskites, there has been an explosion of activities on these materials. Researchers with interests spanning the full range from conventional inorganic to emerging organic and hybrid optoelectronic technologies have been contributing to the prolific research output. This has led to solar cell power conversion efficiencies now exceeding 20% and the demonstration of proofs of concept for electroluminescent and lasing devices. Hybrid perovskites can be self-assembled by a simple chemical deposition of the constituent units, with the possibility of integrating the useful properties of organic and inorganic compounds at the molecular scale within a single crystalline material, thus enabling a fine-tuning of the electronic properties. Tellingly, the fundamental properties of these materials may make us think of a new, solution processable, GaAs-like semiconductor. While this can be true to a first approximation, hybrid perovskites are intrinsically complex materials, where the presence of various types of interactions and structural disorder may strongly affect their properties. In particular, a clear understanding and control of the relative interactions between the organic and inorganic moieties is of paramount importance to properly disentangle their innate physics. In this Account we review our recent studies which aim to clarify the relationship between structural and electronic properties from a molecular to mesoscopic level. First we identify the markers for local disorder at the molecular level by using Raman spectroscopy as a probe. Then, we exploit such a tool to explore the role of microstructure on the absorption and luminescence properties of the semiconductor. Finally we address the controversy surrounding electron-hole interactions and excitonic effects. We show that in hybrid lead-halide perovskites dielectric screening also depends on the local

  13. Nickel-Catalyzed Borylation of Halides and Pseudo-Halides with Tetrahydroxydiboron [B2(OH)4

    PubMed Central

    Molander, Gary A.; Cavalcanti, Livia N.; García-García, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Arylboronic acids are gaining increased importance as reagents and target structures in a variety of useful applications. Recently, the palladium-catalyzed synthesis of arylboronic acids employing the atom economical tetrahydroxydiboron (BBA) reagent has been reported. The high cost associated with palladium, combined with several limitations of both palladium and copper-catalyzed processes, prompted us to develop an alternative method. Thus, the nickel-catalyzed borylation of aryl and heteroaryl halides and pseudo-halides using tetrahydroxydiboron (BBA) has been formulated. The reaction proved to be widely functional group tolerant and applicable to a number of heterocyclic systems. To the best of our knowledge, the examples presented here represent the only effective Ni-catalyzed Miyaura borylations conducted at room temperature. PMID:23777538

  14. Communication: Modeling of concentration dependent water diffusivity in ionic solutions: Role of intermolecular charge transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Yi; Berkowitz, Max L. E-mail: ykanai@unc.edu; Kanai, Yosuke E-mail: ykanai@unc.edu

    2015-12-28

    The translational diffusivity of water in solutions of alkali halide salts depends on the identity of ions, exhibiting dramatically different behavior even in solutions of similar salts of NaCl and KCl. The water diffusion coefficient decreases as the salt concentration increases in NaCl. Yet, in KCl solution, it slightly increases and remains above bulk value as salt concentration increases. Previous classical molecular dynamics simulations have failed to describe this important behavior even when polarizable models were used. Here, we show that inclusion of dynamical charge transfer among water molecules produces results in a quantitative agreement with experiments. Our results indicate that the concentration-dependent diffusivity reflects the importance of many-body effects among the water molecules in aqueous ionic solutions. Comparison with quantum mechanical calculations shows that a heterogeneous and extended distribution of charges on water molecules around the ions due to ion-water and also water-water charge transfer plays a very important role in controlling water diffusivity. Explicit inclusion of the charge transfer allows us to model accurately the difference in the concentration-dependent water diffusivity between Na{sup +} and K{sup +} ions in simulations, and it is likely to impact modeling of a wide range of systems for medical and technological applications.

  15. Communication: Modeling of concentration dependent water diffusivity in ionic solutions: Role of intermolecular charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yi; Berkowitz, Max L; Kanai, Yosuke

    2015-12-28

    The translational diffusivity of water in solutions of alkali halide salts depends on the identity of ions, exhibiting dramatically different behavior even in solutions of similar salts of NaCl and KCl. The water diffusion coefficient decreases as the salt concentration increases in NaCl. Yet, in KCl solution, it slightly increases and remains above bulk value as salt concentration increases. Previous classical molecular dynamics simulations have failed to describe this important behavior even when polarizable models were used. Here, we show that inclusion of dynamical charge transfer among water molecules produces results in a quantitative agreement with experiments. Our results indicate that the concentration-dependent diffusivity reflects the importance of many-body effects among the water molecules in aqueous ionic solutions. Comparison with quantum mechanical calculations shows that a heterogeneous and extended distribution of charges on water molecules around the ions due to ion-water and also water-water charge transfer plays a very important role in controlling water diffusivity. Explicit inclusion of the charge transfer allows us to model accurately the difference in the concentration-dependent water diffusivity between Na(+) and K(+) ions in simulations, and it is likely to impact modeling of a wide range of systems for medical and technological applications.

  16. Communication: Modeling of concentration dependent water diffusivity in ionic solutions: Role of intermolecular charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yi; Berkowitz, Max L.; Kanai, Yosuke

    2015-12-01

    The translational diffusivity of water in solutions of alkali halide salts depends on the identity of ions, exhibiting dramatically different behavior even in solutions of similar salts of NaCl and KCl. The water diffusion coefficient decreases as the salt concentration increases in NaCl. Yet, in KCl solution, it slightly increases and remains above bulk value as salt concentration increases. Previous classical molecular dynamics simulations have failed to describe this important behavior even when polarizable models were used. Here, we show that inclusion of dynamical charge transfer among water molecules produces results in a quantitative agreement with experiments. Our results indicate that the concentration-dependent diffusivity reflects the importance of many-body effects among the water molecules in aqueous ionic solutions. Comparison with quantum mechanical calculations shows that a heterogeneous and extended distribution of charges on water molecules around the ions due to ion-water and also water-water charge transfer plays a very important role in controlling water diffusivity. Explicit inclusion of the charge transfer allows us to model accurately the difference in the concentration-dependent water diffusivity between Na+ and K+ ions in simulations, and it is likely to impact modeling of a wide range of systems for medical and technological applications.

  17. Tellurite glass as a waste form for mixed alkali-chloride waste streams: Candidate materials selection and initial testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Brian J.; Rieck, Bennett T.; McCloy, John S.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Vienna, John D.

    2012-05-01

    Tellurite glasses have historically been shown to host large concentrations of halides. They are here considered for the first time as a waste form for immobilizing chloride wastes, such as may be generated in the proposed molten alkali salt electrochemical separations step in nuclear fuel reprocessing. Key properties of several tellurite glasses are determined to assess acceptability as a chloride waste form. TeO2 glasses with other oxides (PbO, Al2O3 + B2O3, WO3, P2O5, or ZnO) were fabricated with and without 10 mass% of a simulated (non-radioactive) mixed alkali, alkaline-earth, and rare earth chloride waste. Measured chemical durability is compared for the glasses, as determined by the product consistency test (PCT), a common standardized chemical durability test often used to validate borosilicate glass waste forms. The glass with the most promise as a waste form is the TeO2-PbO system, as it offers good halide retention, a low sodium release (by PCT) comparable with high-level waste silicate glass waste forms, and a high storage density.

  18. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C.

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  19. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, Raymond D.; McPheeters, Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  20. Alkali-metal ion coordination in uranyl(VI) poly-peroxide complexes in solution. Part 1: the Li⁺, Na⁺ and K⁺--peroxide-hydroxide systems.

    PubMed

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Vallet, Valerie; Szabó, Zoltán; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2015-01-28

    The alkali metal ions Li(+), Na(+) and K(+) have a profound influence on the stoichiometry of the complexes formed in uranyl(VI)-peroxide-hydroxide systems, presumably as a result of a templating effect, resulting in the formation of two complexes, M[(UO2)(O2)(OH)]2(-) where the uranyl units are linked by one peroxide bridge, μ-η(2)-η(2), with the second peroxide coordinated "end-on", η(2), to one of the uranyl groups, and M[(UO2)(O2)(OH)]4(3-), with a four-membered ring of uranyl ions linked by μ-η(2)-η(2) peroxide bridges. The stoichiometry and equilibrium constants for the reactions: M(+) + 2UO2(2+) + 2HO2(-) + 2H2O → M[(UO2)(O2)(OH)]2(-) + 4H(+) (1) and M(+) + 4UO2(2+) + 4HO2(-) + 4H2O → M[(UO2)(O2)(OH)]4(3-) + 8H(+) (2) have been measured at 25 °C in 0.10 M (tetramethyl ammonium/M(+))NO3 ionic media using reaction calorimetry. Both reactions are strongly enthalpy driven with large negative entropies of reaction; the observation that ΔH(2) ≈ 2ΔH(1) suggests that the enthalpy of reaction is approximately the same when peroxide is added in bridging and "end-on" positions. The thermodynamic driving force in the reactions is the formation of strong peroxide bridges and the role of M(+) cations is to provide a pathway with a low activation barrier between the reactants and in this way "guide" them to form peroxide bridged complexes; they play a similar role as in the synthesis of crown-ethers. Quantum chemical (QC) methods were used to determine the structure of the complexes, and to demonstrate how the size of the M(+)-ions affects their coordination geometry. There are several isomers of Na[(UO2)(O2)(OH)]2(-) and QC energy calculations show that the ones with a peroxide bridge are substantially more stable than the ones with hydroxide bridges. There are isomers with different coordination sites for Na(+) and the one with coordination to the peroxide bridge and two uranyl oxygen atoms is the most stable one.

  1. Unraveling the Role of Monovalent Halides in Mixed-Halide Organic-Inorganic Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Deepa, Melepurath; Ramos, F Javier; Shivaprasad, S M; Ahmad, Shahzada

    2016-03-16

    The performance of perovskite solar cells is strongly influenced by the composition and microstructure of the perovskite. A recent approach to improve the power conversion efficiencies utilized mixed-halide perovskites, but the halide ions and their roles were not directly studied. Unraveling their precise location in the perovskite layer is of paramount importance. Here, we investigated four different perovskites by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and found that among the three studied mixed-halide perovskites, CH3 NH3 Pb(I0.74 Br0.26 )3 and CH3 NH3 PbBr3-x Clx show peaks that unambiguously demonstrate the presence of iodide and bromide in the former, and bromide and chloride in the latter. The CH3 NH3 PbI3-x Clx perovskite shows anomalous behavior, the iodide content far outweighs that of the chloride; a small proportion of chloride, in all likelihood, resides deep within the TiO2 /absorber layer. Our study reveals that there are many distinguishable structural differences between these perovskites, and that these directly impact the photovoltaic performances. PMID:26717046

  2. Passive particle dosimetry. [silver halide crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, C. B.

    1977-01-01

    Present methods of dosimetry are reviewed with emphasis on the processes using silver chloride crystals for ionizing particle dosimetry. Differences between the ability of various crystals to record ionizing particle paths are directly related to impurities in the range of a few ppm (parts per million). To understand the roles of these impurities in the process, a method for consistent production of high purity silver chloride, and silver bromide was developed which yields silver halides with detectable impurity content less than 1 ppm. This high purity silver chloride was used in growing crystals with controlled doping. Crystals were grown by both the Czochalski method and the Bridgman method, and the Bridgman grown crystals were used for the experiments discussed. The distribution coefficients of ten divalent cations were determined for the Bridgman crystals. The best dosimeters were made with silver chloride crystals containing 5 to 10 ppm of lead; other impurities tested did not produce proper dosimeters.

  3. X-ray-absorption spectroscopic investigation of alkali and alkaline earth catalysts in coal gasification. Final report, January 1987-September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, F.E.; Shah, N.; Huffman, G.P.

    1990-04-01

    The structures of alkali and alkaline-earth metal catalyst species in lignite and polymer chars and during pyrolysis pretreatment and char gasification have been investigated using ambient and newly-developed, in situ XAFS spectroscopic techniques. The XAFS data, which were obtained at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, were supplemented by char characterization and reactivity measurements made at the Pennsylvania State University. The findings of the investigation are as follows: (i) the catalytic species, as introduced to the char or lignite, is an atomically-dispersed, metal-ion-oxygen-anion complex, and remains a metal-oxygen complex throughout pyrolysis and gasification; (ii) the catalyst species transforms to a bulk oxide species during pyrolysis pretreatment; (iii) during gasification, the catalyst species rapidly transforms to bulk alkali carbonate in the case of the alkali-metal species and slowly to calcium oxide in the case of the calcium species; (iv) higher catalyst loadings results in an increased number of catalytic sites, rather than any structural variation of the catalyst site due to concentration effects; and (v) reaction of alkali with aluminosilicates (from clays) or silica is the major catalyst poisoning reaction, unless the coal is demineralized in which case the alkali may react with residual halide from HCl or HF used to clean the coal. Such poisoning reactions were not demonstrated for calcium-oxygen species.

  4. Electronic and Ionic Transport Dynamics in Organolead Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Li, Dehui; Wu, Hao; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Wang, Gongming; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-07-26

    Ion migration has been postulated as the underlying mechanism responsible for the hysteresis in organolead halide perovskite devices. However, the electronic and ionic transport dynamics and how they impact each other in organolead halide perovskites remain elusive to date. Here we report a systematic investigation of the electronic and ionic transport dynamics in organolead halide perovskite microplate crystals and thin films using temperature-dependent transient response measurements. Our study reveals that thermally activated ionic and electronic conduction coexist in perovskite devices. The extracted activation energies suggest that the electronic transport is easier, but ions migrate harder in microplates than in thin films, demonstrating that the crystalline quality and grain boundaries can fundamentally modify electronic and ionic transport in perovskites. These findings offer valuable insight on the electronic and ionic transport dynamics in organolead halide perovskites, which is critical for optimizing perovskite devices with reduced hysteresis and improved stability and efficiency.

  5. Coordination Chemistry Dictates the Structural Defects in Lead Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Rahimnejad, Sara; Kovalenko, Alexander; Forés, Sergio Martí; Aranda, Clara; Guerrero, Antonio

    2016-09-19

    We show the influence of species present in precursor solution during formation of lead halide perovskite materials on the structural defects of the films. The coordination of lead by competing solvent molecules and iodide ions dictate the type of complexes present in the films. Depending on the processing conditions all PbIS5 (+) , PbI2 S4, PbI3 S3 (-) , PbI4 S2 (2-) , PbI5 S2 (3-) , PbI6 (4-) and 1D (Pb2 I4 )n chains are observed by absorption measurements. Different parameters are studied such as polarity of the solvent, concentration of iodide ions, concentration of solvent molecules and temperature. It is concluded that strongly coordinating solvents will preferentially form species with a low number of iodide ions and less coordinative solvents generate high concentration of PbI6 (-) . We furthermore propose that all these plumbate ions may act as structural defects determining electronic properties of the photovoltaic films.

  6. Effects of halides on reaction of nucleosides with ozone.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshinori; Kaya, Eriko; Inukai, Michiyo

    2012-01-01

    Ozone (O(3)), a major component of photochemical oxidants, is used recently as a deodorizer in living spaces. It has been reported that O(3) can directly react with DNA, causing mutagenesis in human cells and carcinogenesis in mice. However, little is known about the effects of coexistent ions in the reaction of O(3). In the present study, we analyzed the effects of halides on the reaction of O(3) with nucleosides using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. When aqueous O(3) solution was added to a nucleoside mixture in potassium phosphate buffer (pH 7.3), the nucleosides were consumed with the following decreasing order of importance: dGuo > Thd > dCyd > dAdo. The effects of addition of fluoride and chloride in the system were slight. Bromide suppressed the reactions of dGuo, Thd, and dAdo but enhanced the reaction of dCyd. The major products were 5-hydroxy-2'-deoxycytidine, 5-bromo-2'-deoxycytidine, and 8-bromo-2'-deoxyguanosine. The time course and pH dependence of the product yield indicated formation of hypobromous acid as the reactive agent. Iodide suppressed all the reactions effectively. The results suggest that bromide may alter the mutation spectrum by O(3) in humans. PMID:22646086

  7. Effect of alkali treatment on surface morphology of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, K. J.; Wahab, M. A. A.; Mahmod, S.; Idris, M. I.; Abdullah, H. Z.

    2015-07-01

    Alkali and heat treatments were first introduced by Kim et al. to prepare a bioactive surface on titanium. This method has been proven very effective and widely used in other studies to promote titanium osteointegration. This study aims to investigate further the effect of alkali treatment on surface morphology of high purity titanium. High purity titanium foils were immersed in NaOH aqueous solutions of 0.5 M, 5 M and 15 M at 60°C and 80 °C for 1, 3 and 7 days. The surface morphology was examined using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). The obtained phases were analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) in the spectra range of 4000-600 cm-1 at 4 cm-1 resolution and 50 scans. At the same soaking temperature and soaking time, a thicker porous network was observed with increasing concentration of NaOH. At the same soaking temperature, a much porous structure was observed with increasing soaking time. At constant alkali concentration, more homogenously distributed porous surface structure was observed with increasing soaking temperature.

  8. Effect of alkali treatment on surface morphology of titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K. J. Wahab, M. A. A. Mahmod, S. Idris, M. I. Abdullah, H. Z.

    2015-07-22

    Alkali and heat treatments were first introduced by Kim et al. to prepare a bioactive surface on titanium. This method has been proven very effective and widely used in other studies to promote titanium osteointegration. This study aims to investigate further the effect of alkali treatment on surface morphology of high purity titanium. High purity titanium foils were immersed in NaOH aqueous solutions of 0.5 M, 5 M and 15 M at 60°C and 80 °C for 1, 3 and 7 days. The surface morphology was examined using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). The obtained phases were analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) in the spectra range of 4000-600 cm{sup −1} at 4 cm{sup −1} resolution and 50 scans. At the same soaking temperature and soaking time, a thicker porous network was observed with increasing concentration of NaOH. At the same soaking temperature, a much porous structure was observed with increasing soaking time. At constant alkali concentration, more homogenously distributed porous surface structure was observed with increasing soaking temperature.

  9. Antimicrobial potency of alkali ion substituted calcium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Gbureck, Uwe; Knappe, Oliver; Grover, Liam M; Barralet, Jake E

    2005-12-01

    Potassium and sodium containing nanoapatite cements were produced by the reaction of mechanically activated CaNaPO(4) (CSP), CaKPO(4) (CPP) and Ca(2)KNa(PO(4))(2) (CPCP) with a 2.5% Na(2)HPO(4) solution. The cements exhibited clinically acceptable setting times of approximately 5 min and compressive strengths of 5-10 MPa. The antimicrobial properties of the cements were tested with the agar diffusion test using Streptococcus salvarius, Staphylococcus epidermis and Candida albicans. All types of alkali ion containing cements showed a significantly higher antimicrobial potency with inhibition zones of approx. 4-11 mm than a commercial calcium hydroxide cement which resulted in small inhibition zones around the cement samples of a maximum of 1.5 mm. The antimicrobial properties of all the cements were not found to diminish even after longer incubation times. This behaviour was attributed to the formation of soluble alkaline metal phosphates during setting which increased the pH value in the agar gel around the alkali containing calcium phosphate cement to 8.5-10.7 compared to 6.5-8.0 for the Ca(OH)(2) product. The high antimicrobial potency of alkali-calcium phosphate cements may find an application in dentistry as pulp capping agents, root fillers or cavity liners. PMID:16005511

  10. Chlorine behavior during co-hydrothermal treatment of high alkali coal and PVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, N.; Zhao, P. T.; Li, Z. Z.; Li, T.

    2016-08-01

    The hydrothermal treatment (HT) is an effective method to remove chlorine from chlorinated wastes under mild conditions. However, the alkali was required to improve the dechlorination efficiency. Meanwhile, the alkalis contents removed was necessary to realize the clean and highly efficient utilization of coal. This work was trying to investigate the feasibility of simultaneously removal alkalis and chlorine by co-hydrothermal treatment of PVC and high-alkali coal. The effect of operating conditions including the HT temperature, the holding time and particle sizes of coal on the dechlorination efficiency (DE) of PVC during the HT process was experimentally studied in this work. The results show that the DE increased with the rise of: 1) particle sizes (0.054~0.22mm), 2) holding time (30~90 min) and 3) temperature (240~300 °C). In detail, under 300 °C and 60min of holding time, the 85.18% of DE with first PS was lower than the 93.93% of DE with second PS and 100% of DE with third PS. The organic chlorine mainly transferred into chloridion in aqueous solution in HT process. All the results indicate that it is a prospective way to simultaneously removal alkalis and chlorine by co-hydrothermal treatment of chlorinated wastes and high-alkali coal.

  11. Laboratory measurements of alkali metal containing vapors released during biomass combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A.

    1996-12-31

    Alkali metals, in particular potassium, have been implicated as key ingredients for enhancing fouling and slagging of heat transfer surfaces in power generating facilities that convert biomass to electricity. When biomass is used as a fuel in boilers, the deposits formed reduce efficiency, and in the worst case lead to unscheduled plant downtime. Blending biomass with other fuels is often used as a strategy to control fouling and slagging problems. Depending on the combustor, sorbents can be added to the fuel mixture to sequester alkali metals. Another possibility is to develop methods of hot gas cleanup that reduce the amount of alkali vapor to acceptable levels. These solutions to fouling and slagging, however, would greatly benefit from a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of alkali release during biomass combustion. Identifying these alkali vapor species and understanding how these vapors enhance deposit formation would also be beneficial. The approach is to directly sample the hot gases liberated from the combustion of small biomass samples in a variable-temperature quartz-tube reactor employing a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) system. The authors have successfully used this experimental technique to identify alkali species released during the combustion of selected biomass feedstocks used in larger scale combustion facilities. Fuels investigated include lodgepole pine, eucalyptus, poplar, corn stover, switchgrass, wheat straw, rice straw, pistachio shells, almond shells and hulls, wood wastes, waste paper, alfalfa stems, and willow tops.

  12. A study of the influence of halide adsorption on a reconstructed Au(111) electrode by second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, A.; Shannon, C.; Pettinger, B.

    1991-07-01

    Optical second harmonic generation (SHG) rotational anisotropy measurements were employed to study the influence of specifically adsorbed anions on the reconstructed Au(111)-(1 × 23) surface. Azimuthal rotation of the gold electrode at different potentials yields for the unreconstructed Au(111)-(1 × 1) surface the well-known three-fold symmetry pattern, while for the reconstructed Au(111)-(1 × 23) an additional one-fold symmetry pattern is observed, which leads to an assignment of Cs-symmetry for this surface. Due to the observation of this symmetry change Cs → C3v it is possible to monitor in situ the reversible transition between Au(111)-(1 × 23) and Au(111)-(1 × 1). While in perclorate solution the phase transition occurs over a wide potential region, in halide containing solution the same phase transition is restricted to the sharp potential region typical for the halide adsorption.

  13. Self-regulation mechanism for charged point defects in hybrid halide perovskites

    DOE PAGES

    Walsh, Aron; Scanlon, David O.; Chen, Shiyou; Gong, X. G.; Wei, Su -Huai

    2014-12-11

    Hybrid halide perovskites such as methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) exhibit unusually low free-carrier concentrations despite being processed at low-temperatures from solution. We demonstrate, through quantum mechanical calculations, that an origin of this phenomenon is a prevalence of ionic over electronic disorder in stoichiometric materials. Schottky defect formation provides a mechanism to self-regulate the concentration of charge carriers through ionic compensation of charged point defects. The equilibrium charged vacancy concentration is predicted to exceed 0.4 % at room temperature. Furthermore, this behavior, which goes against established defect conventions for inorganic semiconductors, has implications for photovoltaic performance.

  14. Substrate inhibition competes with halide inhibition in polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Lim, Giselle Grace Fernando; Imura, Yuki; Yoshimura, Etsuro

    2012-10-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is a ubiquitous enzyme important in the food industry. Although PPO activity followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics at catechol concentrations of up to 1 mM, it slowly decreased at catechol concentrations above 2 mM. This result indicated that in addition to the active site (site A), the enzyme possesses a second catechol-binding site (site B) that exerts an inhibitory effect on PPO activity. Halides inhibit PPO activity in such a way that substrate inhibition is lessened when halide concentration is increased. Furthermore, elevated concentrations of catechol diminished the degree of inhibition by halides. These findings suggest that halides also bind to site B to inhibit PPO activity. A steady-state kinetic analysis demonstrated that the dissociation constant between catechol and PPO depended on the binding of halides to site B. The dissociation constants were greatest when chloride bound to the site. Bromide and iodide yielded lower dissociation constants, in that order. These data indicate that the binding of halide to site B modulated the structure of site A, thereby exerting an inhibitory effect.

  15. Genetic control of methyl halide production in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rhew, Robert C; Østergaard, Lars; Saltzman, Eric S; Yanofsky, Martin F

    2003-10-14

    Methyl chloride (CH(3)Cl) and methyl bromide (CH(3)Br) are the primary carriers of natural chlorine and bromine, respectively, to the stratosphere, where they catalyze the destruction of ozone, whereas methyl iodide (CH(3)I) influences aerosol formation and ozone loss in the boundary layer. CH(3)Br is also an agricultural pesticide whose use is regulated by international agreement. Despite the economic and environmental importance of these methyl halides, their natural sources and biological production mechanisms are poorly understood. Besides CH(3)Br fumigation, important sources include oceans, biomass burning, tropical plants, salt marshes, and certain crops and fungi. Here, we demonstrate that the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana produces and emits methyl halides and that the enzyme primarily responsible for the production is encoded by the HARMLESS TO OZONE LAYER (HOL) gene. The encoded protein belongs to a group of methyltransferases capable of catalyzing the S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent methylation of chloride (Cl(-)), bromide (Br(-)), and iodide (I(-)) to produce methyl halides. In mutant plants with the HOL gene disrupted, methyl halide production is largely eliminated. A phylogenetic analysis with the HOL gene suggests that the ability to produce methyl halides is widespread among vascular plants. This approach provides a genetic basis for understanding and predicting patterns of methyl halide production by plants.

  16. Synthesis of methyl halides from biomass using engineered microbes.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Travis S; Widmaier, Daniel M; Temme, Karsten; Mirsky, Ethan A; Santi, Daniel V; Voigt, Christopher A

    2009-05-13

    Methyl halides are used as agricultural fumigants and are precursor molecules that can be catalytically converted to chemicals and fuels. Plants and microorganisms naturally produce methyl halides, but these organisms produce very low yields or are not amenable to industrial production. A single methyl halide transferase (MHT) enzyme transfers the methyl group from the ubiquitous metabolite S-adenoyl methionine (SAM) to a halide ion. Using a synthetic metagenomic approach, we chemically synthesized all 89 putative MHT genes from plants, fungi, bacteria, and unidentified organisms present in the NCBI sequence database. The set was screened in Escherichia coli to identify the rates of CH(3)Cl, CH(3)Br, and CH(3)I production, with 56% of the library active on chloride, 85% on bromide, and 69% on iodide. Expression of the highest activity MHT and subsequent engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in productivity of 190 mg/L-h from glucose and sucrose. Using a symbiotic co-culture of the engineered yeast and the cellulolytic bacterium Actinotalea fermentans, we are able to achieve methyl halide production from unprocessed switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), corn stover, sugar cane bagasse, and poplar (Populus sp.). These results demonstrate the potential of producing methyl halides from non-food agricultural resources.

  17. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    1995-01-01

    A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

  18. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  19. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  20. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of the surface tension and structure of salt solutions and clusters.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lu; Li, Xin; Hede, Thomas; Tu, Yaoquan; Leck, Caroline; Ågren, Hans

    2012-03-15

    Sodium halides, which are abundant in sea salt aerosols, affect the optical properties of aerosols and are active in heterogeneous reactions that cause ozone depletion and acid rain problems. Interfacial properties, including surface tension and halide anion distributions, are crucial issues in the study of the aerosols. We present results from molecular dynamics simulations of water solutions and clusters containing sodium halides with the interatomic interactions described by a conventional force field. The simulations reproduce experimental observations that sodium halides increase the surface tension with respect to pure water and that iodide anions reach the outermost layer of water clusters or solutions. It is found that the van der Waals interactions have an impact on the distribution of the halide anions and that a conventional force field with optimized parameters can model the surface tension of the salt solutions with reasonable accuracy.

  2. Alkali metal for ultraviolet band-pass filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick (Inventor); Fraschetti, George A. (Inventor); Mccann, Timothy A. (Inventor); Mayall, Sherwood D. (Inventor); Dunn, Donald E. (Inventor); Trauger, John T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An alkali metal filter having a layer of metallic bismuth deposited onto the alkali metal is provided. The metallic bismuth acts to stabilize the surface of the alkali metal to prevent substantial surface migration from occurring on the alkali metal, which may degrade optical characteristics of the filter. To this end, a layer of metallic bismuth is deposited by vapor deposition over the alkali metal to a depth of approximately 5 to 10 A. A complete alkali metal filter is described along with a method for fabricating the alkali metal filter.

  3. Laboratory investigation of combination of alkali/surfactant/polymer technology for Daqing EOR

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Shutang; Li Huabin; Li Hongfu

    1995-08-01

    Alkali/surfactant/polymer (ASP) formulas were developed for the Daqing oil field, Peoples Republic of China, with two surfactants from the US (Petrostep B-100 and a blend of TRS-18 and TRS-40) and one Chinese surfactant (PS-D{sub 2}). Each ASP solution gave interfacial tension (IFT) values in the range of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mN/m. Rheologic studies with polyacrylamide polymers indicate that solution viscosity decreases with alkali addition, as does the pseudoplasticity of the solution. Addition of surfactant to the alkali/polymer solution increases the solution viscosity with no slope change in the viscosity-vs.-shear-rate plot. Incremental oil recovery was higher than that with waterflood; 20% original oil in place (OOIP) for 0.2-PV ASP injection and 33% OOIP for 0.3-PV ASP injection in Daqing core. Surfactant and alkali retention were both < 1 mg/g sand. The positive results of this laboratory study provided a fluid formula for a pilot ASP flood in the Daqing oil field.

  4. Determination of Alkali Ions in Biological and Environmental Samples.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the common methods for the determination of the alkali metals is given. These are drawn from all of the three principle branches of quantitative analysis and consist mainly of optical atomic spectrometric methods, ion-selective electrodes, and the separation methods of ion-chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. Their main characteristics and performance parameters are discussed. Important specific applications are also examined, namely clinical analysis, single cell analysis, the analysis of soil samples and hydroponic nutrient solutions, as well as the detection of the radioactive (137)Cs isotope. PMID:26860298

  5. Determination of Alkali Ions in Biological and Environmental Samples.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the common methods for the determination of the alkali metals is given. These are drawn from all of the three principle branches of quantitative analysis and consist mainly of optical atomic spectrometric methods, ion-selective electrodes, and the separation methods of ion-chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. Their main characteristics and performance parameters are discussed. Important specific applications are also examined, namely clinical analysis, single cell analysis, the analysis of soil samples and hydroponic nutrient solutions, as well as the detection of the radioactive (137)Cs isotope.

  6. Alkali Metal Handling Practices at NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvail, Patrick G.; Carter, Robert R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is NASA s principle propulsion development center. Research and development is coordinated and carried out on not only the existing transportation systems, but also those that may be flown in the near future. Heat pipe cooled fast fission cores are among several concepts being considered for the Nuclear Systems Initiative. Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a capability to handle high-purity alkali metals for use in heat pipes or liquid metal heat transfer loops. This capability is a low budget prototype of an alkali metal handling system that would allow the production of flight qualified heat pipe modules or alkali metal loops. The processing approach used to introduce pure alkali metal into heat pipe modules and other test articles are described in this paper.

  7. High Pressure Electrochemistry: Application to silver halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havens, K.; Kavner, A.

    2007-12-01

    Electron and ion charge transfer processes help govern electrical conductivity and diffusive mass and heat transport properties in deep Earth minerals. In an attempt to understand how pressure influences charge transfer behavior, the halide silver bromide (AgBr) was studied under the influence of an electric potential difference applied across two electrodes in a diamond anvil cell. This study follows our previous work on AgI, which was found to dissociate to molecular iodine and silver metal due to pressure and voltage influences. We performed two sets of experiments on AgBr at high pressure in a diamond anvil cell: electrochemical dissociation and electrical resistance measurements. In our study, we were able to electrochemically dissociate AgBr at pressures of 0.25-1.6 GPa by applying a voltage across the electrodes in the diamond cell sample chamber. Ag metal grew visibly on the negatively-charged electrode when voltages varying from 0.1 V to 5 V were applied. Additionally, a dark blue color appeared in low pressure areas of the diamond cell and grew darker from both voltage application and light exposure, indicating photochemical effects. We found that the reaction area and growth rate of both metal and dark blue color strongly increased as voltage increased, but tended to decrease with greater pressure. The resistance across the cell was observed to be influenced by both pressure and light exposure. As the AgBr sample was exposed to visible light, the resistance dropped instantaneously, and after the light was turned off, the resistance increased on a timescale of 10's of seconds to minutes. Notably, at higher pressures, the AgBr showed less photosensitivity. Exploration of these metal halide systems has many potential applications. First, these experiments explore the pressure-dependence of photochemical and photovoltaic processes, and may spur development of pressure-tuned microscale electronic devices. Second, these experimental results can be used to

  8. Desulfurizing Coal With an Alkali Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravindram, M.; Kalvinskas, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental coal-desulfurization process uses alkalies and steam in fluidized-bed reactor. With highly volatile, high-sulfur bituminous coal, process removed 98 percent of pyritic sulfur and 47 percent of organic sulfur. Used in coal liquefaction and in production of clean solid fuels and synthetic liquid fuels. Nitrogen or steam flows through bed of coal in reactor. Alkalies react with sulfur, removing it from coal. Nitrogen flow fluidizes bed while heating or cooling; steam is fluidizing medium during reaction.

  9. Analysis of the physical atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions and halogen ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The physical forces between atoms and molecules are important in a number of processes of practical importance, including line broadening in radiative processes, gas and crystal properties, adhesion, and thin films. The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base for the dispersion forces is developed from the literature based on evaluations with the harmonic oscillator dispersion model for higher order coefficients. The Zener model of the repulsive core is used in the context of the recent asymptotic wave functions of Handler and Smith; and an effective ionization potential within the Handler and Smith wave functions is defined to analyze the two body potential data of Waldman and Gordon, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  10. Optical properties of halide and oxide compounds including the excitonic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shwetha, G.; Kanchana, V.

    2014-04-01

    We have studied the optical properties of alkali halide and alkaline-earth oxide compounds including the excitonic effects by using the newly developed bootstrap kernel approximation for the exchange-correlation kernel of the Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) implemented in Full-Potential Linearized Augmented Plane Wave (FP-LAPW) method in the elk code. The bootstrap calculations are computationally less expensive and give results the same quality as the Bethe-Salpeter equation. We found improved results when compared to normal Density Functional Theory calculations, and observed results are comparable with the experiments. The lower energy peak of imaginary part of dielectric spectra shifts to lower energy regions as we move from MgO to BaO indicating the decrease in the band gap of these compounds from MgO to BaO. In all the studied compounds, the lower energy peak of the imaginary part of dielectric function is due to the transition from halogen p or oxide p states to metal derived s/d states.

  11. Color silver halide hologram production and mastering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.; Huang, Qiang

    1997-04-01

    Color reflection holograms recorded with the Denisyuk geometry have been demonstrated by the recently formed HOLOS Corporation in New Hampshire. The Slavich red-green-blue (RGB) sensitized ultra-high resolution silver halide emulsion was used for the hologram recording. The employed laser wavelengths were 647 nm, 532 nm, and 476 nm, generated by an argon ion, a frequency doubled Nd:YAG, and a krypton ion laser, respectively. A beam combination mechanism with dichroic filters enabled a simultaneous RGB exposure, which made the color balance and overall exposure energy easy to control as well as simplifying the recording procedure. HOLOS has been producing limited edition color holograms in various sizes from 4' X 5' to 12' X 16'. A 30 foot long optical table and high power lasers will enable HOLOS to record color holograms up to the size of one meter square in the near future. Various approaches have been investigated in generating color hologram masters which have sufficiently high diffraction efficiency to contact copy the color images onto photopolymer materials. A specially designed test object including the 1931 CIE chromaticity diagram, a rainbow ribbon cable, pure yellow dots, and a cloisonne elephant was used for color recording experiments. In addition, the Macbeth Color Checker chart was used. Both colorimetric evaluation and scattering noise measurements were performed using the PR-650 Photo Research SpectraScan SpectraCalorimeter.

  12. Charge carrier mobility in hybrid halide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Carlo; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Sanvito, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The charge transport properties of hybrid halide perovskites are investigated with a combination of density functional theory including van der Waals interaction and the Boltzmann theory for diffusive transport in the relaxation time approximation. We find the mobility of electrons to be in the range 5–10 cm2V−1s−1 and that for holes within 1–5 cm2V−1s−1, where the variations depend on the crystal structure investigated and the level of doping. Such results, in good agreement with recent experiments, set the relaxation time to about 1 ps, which is the time-scale for the molecular rotation at room temperature. For the room temperature tetragonal phase we explore two possible orientations of the organic cations and find that the mobility has a significant asymmetry depending on the direction of the current with respect to the molecular axis. This is due mostly to the way the PbI3 octahedral symmetry is broken. Interestingly we find that substituting I with Cl has minor effects on the mobilities. Our analysis suggests that the carrier mobility is probably not a key factor in determining the high solar-harvesting efficiency of this class of materials. PMID:26235910

  13. A unified molecular picture of the surfaces of aqueous acid, base, and salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Mucha, M.; Frigato, Tomaso; Levering, Lori; Allen, Heather C.; Tobias, Douglas J.; Dang, Liem X.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2005-04-28

    A unified view of the structure of the air/solution interface of simple aqueous electrolytes containing monovalent inorganic ions is developed using molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy. In salt solutions and bases the positively charged ions, such as alkali cations, are repelled from the air/solution interface, while the anions, such as halides or hydroxide, exhibit a varying propensity for the surface, correlated primarily with the polarizability of the ion. As a result, there is a net depletion of ions from the interfacial layer as a whole, which is connected via the Gibbs adsorption equation to an increase in surface tension with respect to neat water. The behavior of acids, such as aqueous HCl or HBr, is different due to a significant propensity of hydronium cations for the air/solution interface. Therefore, both cations and anions exhibit enhanced concentrations at the surface and, consequently, these acids reduce the surface tension of water. The key to the qualitatively different surface behavior of aqueous salt solutions and bases on one side and acids on the other thus lies in the appreciable adsorption of hydronium cations at the air/solution interface with their “hydrophobic” oxygen side oriented towards the gas phase. The results of the molecular dynamics calculations are supported by surface selective non-linear vibrational spectroscopy, which reveals among other things that the hydronium cations are present at the air/solution interface. The propensity of inorganic ions for the air/solution interface has important implications for heterogeneous chemical processes, in particular for atmospheric chemistry.

  14. Multinuclear Alkali Metal Complexes of a Triphenylene-Based Hexamine and the Transmetalation to Tris(N-heterocyclic tetrylenes) (Ge, Sn, Pb).

    PubMed

    Zhong, Fei; Yang, Xiaodong; Shen, Lingyi; Zhao, Yanxia; Ma, Hongwei; Wu, Biao; Yang, Xiao-Juan

    2016-09-01

    A C3-symmetric hexamine (LH6) based on the triphenylene and ortho-phenylenediamine (PDAH2) skeletons has been synthesized, and was partially or fully deprotonated upon treatment with alkali metal agents to afford amino-amido or diamido coordination sites. Four alkali metal complexes, the dinuclear [Na2(LH4)(DME)5] (1) and [K2(LH4)(DME)4] (2), trinuclear [K3(LH3)(DME)6] (3), and hexanuclear [Li6(L)(DME)6] (4), were obtained and used in transmetalation/ligand exchange with other metals. The hexalithium salt of the fully deprotonated ligand, [Li6L], reacted with heavier group 14 element halides to yield three tris(N-heterocyclic tetrylenes), the germylene [Ge3(L)] (5), stannylene [Sn3(L)] (6), and plumbylene [Pb3(L)] (7). The synthesis and crystal and electronic structures of these compounds are reported. PMID:27525542

  15. 10 CFR 431.322 - Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... is produced by radiation of metal halides and their products of dissociation, possibly in combination... electromagnetic ballast that starts a pulse-start metal halide lamp with high voltage pulses, where lamps shall...

  16. Ab initio modeling of the optical properties in organometallic halide perovskites for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukirch, Amanda; Nei, Wanyi; Pedesseau, Laurent; Even, Jacky; Katan, Claudine; Mohite, Aditya; Tretiak, Segrei

    2015-03-01

    The need for an inexpensive, clean, and plentiful source of energy has generated large amounts of research in an assortment of solution processed organic and hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells. A relative newcomer to the field of solution processed photovoltaics is the lead halide perovskite solar cell. In the past 5 years, the efficiencies of devices made from this material have increased from 3.5% to nearly 20%. Despite the rapid development of organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells, a thorough understanding of the fundamental photophysical processes driving the high performance of these devices is not well understood. I am using state-of-the-art ab initio computational techniques in order to characterize the properties at the interface of perovskite devices in order to aide in materials design and device engineering. I will present an in-depth analysis of the electronic and optical properties of bulk and surface states of pure and mixed halide systems. The high-level static quantum mechanical calculations, including spin-orbit-coupling and the many body GW approach, identify the key electronic states involved in photoinduced dynamics. This knowledge provides important information on how the optical properties change with variations to the system. Supported by the DOE, the LANL LDRD program XW11, and CNLS.

  17. Halide Perovskites: Poor Man's High-Performance Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2016-07-01

    Halide perovskites are a rapidly developing class of medium-bandgap semiconductors which, to date, have been popularized on account of their remarkable success in solid-state heterojunction solar cells raising the photovoltaic efficiency to 20% within the last 5 years. As the physical properties of the materials are being explored, it is becoming apparent that the photovoltaic performance of the halide perovskites is just but one aspect of the wealth of opportunities that these compounds offer as high-performance semiconductors. From unique optical and electrical properties stemming from their characteristic electronic structure to highly efficient real-life technological applications, halide perovskites constitute a brand new class of materials with exotic properties awaiting discovery. The nature of halide perovskites from the materials' viewpoint is discussed here, enlisting the most important classes of the compounds and describing their most exciting properties. The topics covered focus on the optical and electrical properties highlighting some of the milestone achievements reported to date but also addressing controversies in the vastly expanding halide perovskite literature. PMID:27174223

  18. Two Dimensional Organometal Halide Perovskite Nanorods with Tunable Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Aharon, Sigalit; Etgar, Lioz

    2016-05-11

    Organo-metal halide perovskite is an efficient light harvester in photovoltaic solar cells. Organometal halide perovskite is used mainly in its "bulk" form in the solar cell. Confined perovskite nanostructures could be a promising candidate for efficient optoelectronic devices, taking advantage of the superior bulk properties of organo-metal halide perovskite, as well as the nanoscale properties. In this paper, we present facile low-temperature synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) lead halide perovskite nanorods (NRs). These NRs show a shift to higher energies in the absorbance and in the photoluminescence compared to the bulk material, which supports their 2D structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the NRs demonstrates their 2D nature combined with the tetragonal 3D perovskite structure. In addition, by alternating the halide composition, we were able to tune the optical properties of the NRs. Fast Fourier transform, and electron diffraction show the tetragonal structure of these NRs. By varying the ligands ratio (e.g., octylammonium to oleic acid) in the synthesis, we were able to provide the formation mechanism of these novel 2D perovskite NRs. The 2D perovskite NRs are promising candidates for a variety of optoelectronic applications, such as light-emitting diodes, lasing, solar cells, and sensors. PMID:27089497

  19. Halide Perovskites: Poor Man's High-Performance Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2016-07-01

    Halide perovskites are a rapidly developing class of medium-bandgap semiconductors which, to date, have been popularized on account of their remarkable success in solid-state heterojunction solar cells raising the photovoltaic efficiency to 20% within the last 5 years. As the physical properties of the materials are being explored, it is becoming apparent that the photovoltaic performance of the halide perovskites is just but one aspect of the wealth of opportunities that these compounds offer as high-performance semiconductors. From unique optical and electrical properties stemming from their characteristic electronic structure to highly efficient real-life technological applications, halide perovskites constitute a brand new class of materials with exotic properties awaiting discovery. The nature of halide perovskites from the materials' viewpoint is discussed here, enlisting the most important classes of the compounds and describing their most exciting properties. The topics covered focus on the optical and electrical properties highlighting some of the milestone achievements reported to date but also addressing controversies in the vastly expanding halide perovskite literature.

  20. Double-Diffusive Convection During Growth of Halides and Selenides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Su, Ching-Hua; Duval, Walter M. B.

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metal halides and selenides have unique properties which make them excellent materials for chemical, biological and radiological sensors. Recently it has been shown that selenohalides are even better materials than halides or selenides for gamma-ray detection. These materials also meet the strong needs of a wide band imaging technology to cover ultra-violet (UV), midwave infrared wavelength (MWIR) to very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) region for hyperspectral imager components such as etalon filters and acousto-optic tunable filters (AO). In fact AOTF based imagers based on these materials have some superiority than imagers based on liquid crystals, FTIR, Fabry-Perot, grating, etalon, electro-optic modulation, piezoelectric and several other concepts. For example, broadband spectral and imagers have problems of processing large amount of information during real-time observation. Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter (AOTF) imagers are being developed to fill the need of reducing processing time of data, low cost operation and key to achieving the goal of covering long-wave infrared (LWIR). At the present time spectral imaging systems are based on the use of diffraction gratings are typically used in a pushbroom or whiskbroom mode. They are mostly used in systems and acquire large amounts of hyperspectral data that is processed off-line later. In contrast, acousto-optic tunable filter spectral imagers require very little image processing, providing new strategies for object recognition and tracking. They are ideally suited for tactical situations requiring immediate real-time image processing. But the performance of these imagers depends on the quality and homogeneity of acousto-optic materials. In addition for many systems requirements are so demanding that crystals up to sizes of 10 cm length are desired. We have studied several selenides and halide crystals for laser and AO imagers for MWIR and LWIR wavelength regions. We have grown and fabricated crystals of

  1. Single Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals at Low Temperature: Fast Single-Photon Emission, Reduced Blinking, and Exciton Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Metal-halide semiconductors with perovskite crystal structure are attractive due to their facile solution processability, and have recently been harnessed very successfully for high-efficiency photovoltaics and bright light sources. Here, we show that at low temperature single colloidal cesium lead halide (CsPbX3, where X = Cl/Br) nanocrystals exhibit stable, narrow-band emission with suppressed blinking and small spectral diffusion. Photon antibunching demonstrates unambiguously nonclassical single-photon emission with radiative decay on the order of 250 ps, representing a significant acceleration compared to other common quantum emitters. High-resolution spectroscopy provides insight into the complex nature of the emission process such as the fine structure and charged exciton dynamics. PMID:26771336

  2. Regeneration of zinc halide catalyst used in the hydrocracking of polynuclear hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett

    1978-01-01

    Improved recovery of spent molten zinc halide hydro-cracking catalyst is achieved in the oxidative vapor phase regeneration thereof by selective treatment of the zinc oxide carried over by the effluent vapors from the regeneration zone with hydrogen halide gas under conditions favoring the reaction of the zinc oxide with the hydrogen halide, whereby regenerated zinc halide is recovered in a solids-free state with little loss of zinc values.

  3. Cu-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura reactions of primary and secondary benzyl halides with arylboronates.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan-Yan; Yi, Jun; Lu, Xi; Zhang, Zhen-Qi; Xiao, Bin; Fu, Yao

    2014-09-28

    A copper-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of benzyl halides with arylboronates is described. Varieties of primary benzyl halides as well as more challenging secondary benzyl halides with β hydrogens or steric hindrance could be successfully converted into the corresponding products. Thus it provides access to diarylmethanes, diarylethanes and triarylmethanes. PMID:25102380

  4. 40 CFR 721.10181 - Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10181 Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halide salt...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10181 - Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10181 Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halide salt...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10181 - Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10181 Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halide salt...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10181 - Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10181 Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halide salt...

  8. DIET of alkali atoms from mineral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakshinskiy, B. V.; Madey, T. E.

    2003-03-01

    To investigate mechanisms for the origin of alkalis in the atmosphere of the Moon, we are studying the electron- and photon-stimulated desorption (ESD and PSD) of K atoms from model mineral surfaces (SiO 2 films), and ESD and PSD of Na atoms from a lunar basalt sample. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates the existence of traces of Na in the lunar sample. To obtain an increased signal for detailed measurements of desorption parameters (appearance thresholds, yields), a fractional monolayer of Na is deposited onto the lunar sample surface. An alkali atom detector based on surface ionization and a time-of-flight technique are used for DIET measurements, together with a pulsed electron gun, and a mechanically chopped and filtered mercury arc light source. We find that bombardment of the alkali covered surfaces by UV photons or by electrons with energies E>4 eV causes desorption of "hot" alkali atoms. The results are consistent with the model based on charge transfer from the substrate to adsorbate which was developed to explain our previous measurements of sodium desorption from a silica surface and desorption of K atoms from water ice. The data support the suggestion that PSD by UV solar photons is a dominant source process for alkalis in the tenuous lunar atmosphere.

  9. A hetero-alkali-metal version of the utility amide LDA: lithium-potassium diisopropylamide.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, David R; Kennedy, Alan R; Mulvey, Robert E; Robertson, Stuart D

    2013-03-14

    Designed to extend the synthetically important alkali-metal diisopropylamide [N(i)Pr(2); DA] class of compounds, the first example of a hetero-alkali-metallic complex of DA has been prepared as a partial TMEDA solvate. Revealed by an X-ray crystallographic study, its structure exists as a discrete lithium-rich trinuclear Li(2)KN(3) heterocycle, with TMEDA only solvating the largest of the alkali-metals, with the two-coordinate lithium atoms being close to linearity [161.9(2)°]. A variety of NMR spectroscopic studies, including variable temperature and DOSY NMR experiments, suggests that this new form of LDA maintains its integrity in non-polar hydrocarbon solution. This complex thus represents a rare example of a KDA molecule which is soluble in non-polar medium without the need for excessive amounts of solubilizing Lewis donor being added.

  10. Alkali-silica reaction products: Comparison between samples from concrete structures and laboratory test specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Sachlova, Sarka Prikryl, Richard; Pertold, Zdenek

    2010-12-15

    Alkali-silica gels (ASG) were investigated in concrete from bridge structures (constructed from the 1920s to 2000), as well as in experimental specimens; employing optical microscopy, petrographic image analysis, and scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The main differences were found in the chemical composition and morphology of the ASGs. ASGs which had formed in older concrete samples (50-80 years old) show a partly crystalline structure and higher Ca{sup 2+} content, indicating their aging and maturation. Younger concrete samples and experimental test specimens exhibit the presence of amorphous ASG. The chemistry of ASG from experimental specimens reflects the chemical composition of accelerating solutions. - Research Highlights: {yields} Quantitative analysis of alkali-silica gels {yields} Comparison of ASR in experimental conditions with ASR in bridge structures {yields} Investigation of factors affecting alkali-silica reaction {yields} Investigation of ASR of different types of aggregates.

  11. Facile Precursor for Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Alkali Treated Maize Starch

    PubMed Central

    El-Rafie, M. H.; Ahmed, Hanan B.; Zahran, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles were prepared by using alkali treated maize starch which plays a dual role as reducer for AgNO3 and stabilizer for the produced AgNPs. The redox reaction which takes a place between AgNO3 and alkali treated starch was followed up and controlled in order to obtain spherical shaped silver nanoparticles with mean size 4–6 nm. The redox potentials confirmed the principle role of alkali treatment in increasing the reducibility of starch macromolecules. The measurements of reducing sugars at the end of reaction using dinitrosalicylic acid reagent (DNS) were carried out in order to control the chemical reduction reaction. The UV/Vis spectra show that an absorption peak, occurring due to surface plasmon resonance (SPR), exists at 410 nm, which is characteristic to yellow color of silver nanoparticles solution. The samples have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which reveal the nanonature of the particles. PMID:27433508

  12. Sodium-limestone double alkali flue gas desulfurization process with improved limestone utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Biolchini, R.J.; Boward, W.L. Jr.; Wang, K.H.

    1987-08-18

    This patent describes a sodium-limestone double alkali process for the continuous desulfurization of flue gas, having the steps of absorbing sulfur dioxide from an SO/sub 2/-containing gas stream in an absorber with an aqueous solution of sodium sulfite and sodium bisulfite, diverting at least a portion of the absorber effluent solution for regeneration with limestone, introducing limestone into the diverted absorber effluent solution to convert bisulfite to sulfite, separating by-product solids from the limestone-treated solution, and returning regenerated solution to the absorber, the improvement for increasing the utilization of the limestone used during the regeneration operation.

  13. Visualization of alkali-denatured supercoiled plasmid DNA by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Jia; Zhang Zhenfeng; Cao Kou; Huang Xitai

    2008-09-26

    To study the alkali denaturation of supercoiled DNA, plasmid pBR322 was treated with gradient concentrations of NaOH solution. The results of gel electrophoresis showed that the alkali denaturation of the supercoiled DNA occurred in a narrow range of pH value (12.88-12.90). The alkali-denatured supercoiled DNA ran, as a sharp band, faster than the supercoiled DNA. The supercoiled plasmid DNA of pBR322, pACYC184 and pJGX15A were denatured by NaOH, and then visualized by atomic force microscopy. Compared with the supercoiled DNA, the atomic force microscopy images of the alkali-denatured supercoiled DNA showed rough surface with many kinks, bulges on double strands with inhomogeneous diameters. The apparent contour lengths of the denatured DNA were shortened by 16%, 16% and 50% for pBR322, pACYC184 and pJGX15A, respectively. All evidence suggested that the alkali-denatured supercoiled DNA had a stable conformation with unregistered, topologically constrained double strands and intrastrand secondary structure.

  14. Dissolution Process of Palladium in Hydrochloric Acid: A Route via Alkali Metal Palladates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasuya, Ryo; Miki, Takeshi; Morikawa, Hisashi; Tai, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    To improve the safety of the Pd recovery processes that use toxic oxidizers, dissolution of Pd in hydrochloric acid with alkali metal palladates was investigated. Alkali metal palladates were prepared by calcining a mixture of Pd black and alkali metal (Li, Na, and K) carbonates in air. Almost the entire amount of Pd was converted into Li2PdO2 after calcination at 1073 K (800 °C) using Li2CO3. In contrast, PdO was obtained by calcination at 1073 K (800 °C) using Na and K carbonates. Our results indicated that Li2CO3 is the most active reagent among the examined alkali metal carbonates for the formation of palladates. In addition, dissolution of the resulting Li2PdO2 in HCl solutions was evaluated under various conditions. In particular, Li2PdO2 rapidly dissolved in diluted (0.1 M) HCl at ambient temperature. Solubility of Pd of Li2PdO2 was found to be 99 pct or larger after dissolution treatment at 353 K (80 °C) for 5 minutes; in contrast, PdO hardly dissolved in 0.1 M HCl. The dissolution mechanism of Li2PdO2 in HCl was also elucidated by analysis of crystal structures and particulate properties. Since our process is completely free from toxic oxidizers, the dissolution process via alkali metal palladates is much safer than currently employed methods.

  15. Gel nanostructure in alkali-activated binders based on slag and fly ash, and effects of accelerated carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, Susan A.; Provis, John L.; Walkley, Brant; San Nicolas, Rackel; Gehman, John D.; Brice, David G.; Kilcullen, Adam R.; Duxson, Peter; Deventer, Jannie S.J. van

    2013-11-15

    Binders formed through alkali-activation of slags and fly ashes, including ‘fly ash geopolymers’, provide appealing properties as binders for low-emissions concrete production. However, the changes in pH and pore solution chemistry induced during accelerated carbonation testing provide unrealistically low predictions of in-service carbonation resistance. The aluminosilicate gel remaining in an alkali-activated slag system after accelerated carbonation is highly polymerised, consistent with a decalcification mechanism, while fly ash-based binders mainly carbonate through precipitation of alkali salts (bicarbonates at elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations, or carbonates under natural exposure) from the pore solution, with little change in the binder gel identifiable by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In activated fly ash/slag blends, two distinct gels (C–A–S–H and N–A–S–H) are formed; under accelerated carbonation, the N–A–S–H gel behaves comparably to fly ash-based systems, while the C–A–S–H gel is decalcified similarly to alkali-activated slag. This provides new scope for durability optimisation, and for developing appropriate testing methodologies. -- Highlights: •C-A-S-H gel in alkali-activated slag decalcifies during accelerated carbonation. •Alkali-activated fly ash gel changes much less under CO{sub 2} exposure. •Blended slag-fly ash binder contains two coexisting gel types. •These two gels respond differently to carbonation. •Understanding of carbonation mechanisms is essential in developing test methods.

  16. Effect of basic alkali-pickling conditions on the production of lysinoalanine in preserved eggs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Luo, Xuying; Li, Jianke; Xu, Mingsheng; Tu, Yonggang

    2015-09-01

    During the pickling process, strong alkali causes significant lysinoalanine (LAL) formation in preserved eggs, which may reduce the nutritional value of the proteins and result in a potential hazard to human health. In this study, the impacts of the alkali treatment conditions on the production of LAL in preserved eggs were investigated. Preserved eggs were prepared using different times and temperatures, and alkali-pickling solutions with different types and concentrations of alkali and metal salts, and the corresponding LAL contents were measured. The results showed the following: during the pickling period of the preserved egg, the content of LAL in the egg white first rapidly increased and then slowly increased; the content of LAL in the egg yolk continued to increase significantly. During the aging period, the levels of LAL in both egg white and egg yolk slowly increased. The amounts of LAL in the preserved eggs were not significantly different at temperatures between 20 and 25ºC. At higher pickling temperatures, the LAL content in the preserved eggs increased. With the increase of alkali concentration in the alkali-pickling solution, the LAL content in the egg white and egg yolk showed an overall trend of an initial increase followed by a slight decrease. The content of LAL produced in preserved eggs treated with KOH was lower than in those treated with NaOH. NaCl and KCl produced no significant effects on the production of LAL in the preserved eggs. With increasing amounts of heavy metal salts, the LAL content in the preserved eggs first decreased and then increased. The LAL content generated in the CuSO4 group was lower than that in either the ZnSO4 or PbO groups. PMID:26188034

  17. Refractories for high-alkali environments

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, A.W.; Cloer, F.

    1996-01-01

    There are two reliable and cost-effective tests for evaluating refractory materials. They are used to determine which refractory products allow greater variance in fuel type with respect to alkali environment for coal-fired applications. Preselection of a particular refractory is important because of down-time cost for premature failure. One test is a variation of the standard alkali cup test. The second involves reacting test specimens with the contaminant, followed by physical properties testing to determine degree of degradation and properties affected. The alkali cup test rates products using a relative numerical scale based upon visual appearance. This test indicates the presence and relative degree of chemical attack to the refractory. The physical properties test determines the specific properties affected by the given contaminant.

  18. Metal-encapsulated organolead halide perovskite photocathode for solar-driven hydrogen evolution in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Quesada, Micaela; Pazos-Outón, Luis M.; Warnan, Julien; Kuehnel, Moritz F.; Friend, Richard H.; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-09-01

    Lead-halide perovskites have triggered the latest breakthrough in photovoltaic technology. Despite the great promise shown by these materials, their instability towards water even in the presence of low amounts of moisture makes them, a priori, unsuitable for their direct use as light harvesters in aqueous solution for the production of hydrogen through water splitting. Here, we present a simple method that enables their use in photoelectrocatalytic hydrogen evolution while immersed in an aqueous solution. Field's metal, a fusible InBiSn alloy, is used to efficiently protect the perovskite from water while simultaneously allowing the photogenerated electrons to reach a Pt hydrogen evolution catalyst. A record photocurrent density of -9.8 mA cm-2 at 0 V versus RHE with an onset potential as positive as 0.95+/-0.03 V versus RHE is obtained. The photoelectrodes show remarkable stability retaining more than 80% of their initial photocurrent for ~1 h under continuous illumination.

  19. The Renaissance of Halide Perovskites and Their Evolution as Emerging Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2015-10-20

    The recent re-emergence of the halide perovskites, of the type AMX3, derives from a sea-changing breakthrough in the field of photovoltaics that has led to a whole new generation of solar devices with remarkable power conversion efficiency. The success in the field of photovoltaics has led to intense, combined research efforts to better understand these materials both from the fundamental chemistry and physics points of view and for the improvement of applied functional device engineering. This groundswell of activity has breathed new life into this long-known but largely "forgotten" class of perovskites. The impressive achievements of halide perovskites in photovoltaics, as well as other optoelectronic applications, stem from an unusually favorable combination of optical and electronic properties, with the ability to be solution processed into films. This defines them as a brand new class of semiconductors that can rival or exceed the performance of the venerable classes of III-V and II-IV semiconductors, which presently dominate the industries of applied optoelectronics. Our aim in this Account is to highlight the basic pillars that define the chemistry of the halide perovskites and their unconventional electronic properties through the prism of structure-property relationships. We focus on the synthetic requirements under which a halide perovskite can exist and emphasize how the synthetic conditions can determine the structural integrity and the bulk properties of the perovskites. Then we proceed to discuss the origins of the optical and electronic phenomena, using the perovskite crystal structure as a guide. Some of the most remarkable features of the perovskites dealt with in this Account include the evolution of a unique type of defect, which gives rise to superlattices. These can enhance or diminish the fluorescence properties of the perovskites. For example, the exotic self-doping ability of the Sn-based perovskites allows them to adopt electrical

  20. Alkali metal vapors - Laser spectroscopy and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stwalley, W. C.; Koch, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the rapidly expanding use of lasers for spectroscopic studies of alkali metal vapors. Since the alkali metals (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium) are theoretically simple ('visible hydrogen'), readily ionized, and strongly interacting with laser light, they represent ideal systems for quantitative understanding of microscopic interconversion mechanisms between photon (e.g., solar or laser), chemical, electrical and thermal energy. The possible implications of such understanding for a wide variety of practical applications (sodium lamps, thermionic converters, magnetohydrodynamic devices, new lasers, 'lithium waterfall' inertial confinement fusion reactors, etc.) are also discussed.

  1. Cocrystallization of certain 4f and 5f elements in the bivalent state with alkali metal halides

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheev, N.B.; Kamenskaya, A.M.; Veleshko, I.E.; Kulyukhin, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The cocrystallization of Fm/sup 2 +/, Es/sup 2 +/, Cf/sup 2 +/, Am/sup 2 +/, Yb/sup 2 +/, Eu/sup 2 +/ and Sr/sup 2 +/ with NaCl, KCl and KBr in tetrahydrofuran (THF), hexamethylphosphorotriamide (HMPA), and ethanol has been studied. It is shown that in water-ethanol medium An/sup 2 +/ cocrystallize with KCl by the formation of anomalous mixed crystals and Ln/sup 2 +/ do not cocrystallize. In HMPA neither Ln/sup 2 +/ nor An/sup 2 +/ are observed to transfer into the KBr solid phase, while in THF both Ln/sup 2 +/ and An/sup 2 +/ cocrystallize with NaCl. The change in the behavior on Ln/sup 2 +/ and An/sup 2 +/ cocrystallize with a change from one solvent to another is caused by the difference in the effective ionic radii of these elements, which arises from the large nephelauxetic effect for An/sup 2 +/ as well as by the different solvating power of these solvents.

  2. Quantum efficiencies of imaging detectors with alkali halide photocathodes. I - Microchannel plates with separate and integral CsI photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements and comparisons have been made of the quantum efficiencies of microchannel plate (MCP) detectors in the far-UV (below 2000-A) wavelength range using CsI photocathodes (a) deposited on the front surfaces of microchannel plates and (b) deposited on solid substrates as opaque photocathodes with the resulting photoelectrons input to microchannel plates. The efficiences were measured in both pulse-counting and photodiode modes of operation. Typical efficiencies are about 15 percent at 1216 A for a CsI-coated MCP compared with 65 percent for an opaque CsI photocathode MCP detector. Special processing has yielded an efficiency as high as 20 percent for a CsI-coated MCP. This may possibly be further improved by optimization of the tilt angle of the MCP channels relative to the front face of the MCP and incident radiation. However, at present there still remains a factor of at least 3 quantum efficiency advantage in the separate opaque CsI photocathode configuration.

  3. Hybrid lead halide perovskites for light energy conversion: Excited state properties and photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manser, Joseph S.

    The burgeoning class of metal halide perovskites constitutes a paradigm shift in the study and application of solution-processed semiconductors. Advancements in thin film processing and our understanding of the underlying structural, photophysical, and electronic properties of these materials over the past five years have led to development of perovskite solar cells with power conversion efficiencies that rival much more mature first and second-generation commercial technologies. It seems only a matter of time before the real-world impact of these compounds is put to the test. Like oxide perovskites, metal halide perovskites have ABX3 stoichiometry, where typically A is a monovalent cation, B a bivalent post-transition metal, and X a halide anion. Characterizing the behavior of photogenerated charges in metal halide perovskites is integral for understanding the operating principles and fundamental limitations of perovskite optoelectronics. The majority of studies outlined in this dissertation involve fundamental study of the prototypical organic-inorganic compound methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI 3). Time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy serves as a principle tool in these investigations. Excitation of a semiconductor can lead to formation of a number different excited state species and electronic complexes. Through analysis of excited state decay kinetics and optical nonlinearities in perovskite thin films, we identify spontaneous formation of a large fraction of free electrons and holes, whose presence is requisite for efficient photovoltaic operation. Following photogeneration of charge carriers in a semiconductor absorber, these species must travel large distances across the thickness of the material to realize large external quantum efficiencies and efficient carrier extraction. Using a powerful technique known as transient absorption microscopy, we directly image long-range carrier diffusion in a CH3NH3PbI 3 thin film. Charges are unambiguously shown to

  4. Liquid-Structure Forces and Electrostatic Modulation of Biomolecular Interactions in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Sergio A.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular interactions in solution are controlled by the bulk medium and by the forces originating in the structured region of the solvent close to the solutes. In this paper, a model of electrostatic and liquid-structure forces for dynamics simulations of biomolecules is presented. The model introduces information on the microscopic nature of the liquid in the vicinity of polar and charged groups and the associated non-pairwise character of the forces, thus improving upon conventional continuum representations. The solvent is treated as a polar and polarizable medium, with dielectric properties described by an inhomogeneous version of the Onsager theory. This treatment leads to an effective position-dependent dielectric permittivity that incorporates saturation effects of the electric field and the spatial variation of the liquid density. The non-pairwise additivity of the liquid-structure forces is represented by centers of force located at specific points in the liquid phase. These out-of-the-solute centers are positioned at the peaks of liquid density and exert local, external forces on the atoms of the solute. The density is calculated from a barometric law, using a Lennard-Jones-type solute–liquid effective interaction potential. The conceptual aspects of the model and its exact numerical solutions are discussed for single alkali and halide ions and for ion-pair interactions. The practical aspects of the model and the simplifications introduced for efficient computation of forces in molecular solutes are discussed in the context of polar and charged amino acid dimers. The model reproduces the contact and solvent-separated minima and the desolvation barriers of intermolecular potentials of mean force of amino acid dimers, as observed in atomistic dynamics simulations. Possible refinements based on an improved treatment of molecular correlations are discussed. PMID:17201447

  5. Extended Photo-Conversion Spectrum in Low-Toxic Bismuth Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Malin B; Zhu, Huimin; Johansson, Erik M J

    2016-09-01

    Lead-based perovskites show very promising properties for use in solar cells; however, the toxicity of lead is a potential inhibitor for large-scale application of these solar cells. Here, a low-toxic bismuth halide, CsBi3I10, is synthesized from solution and the optical properties and crystal structure are compared with previously reported Cs3Bi2I9 perovskite, and the photovoltaic properties are also investigated. The XRD pattern suggests that the CsBi3I10 film has a layered structure with a different dominating crystal growth direction than the Cs3Bi2I9 perovskite. A band gap of 1.77 eV is obtained for the CsBi3I10 film, which is smaller than the band gap of Cs3Bi2I9 at 2.03 eV, and an extended visible light absorption spectrum is therefore obtained. The solar cell device with CsBi3I10 shows a photocurrent up to 700 nm, and this work shows therefore the possibility for increased light absorption and higher photocurrents in solar cells based on bismuth halide perovskites. PMID:27538852

  6. Extended Photo-Conversion Spectrum in Low-Toxic Bismuth Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Malin B; Zhu, Huimin; Johansson, Erik M J

    2016-09-01

    Lead-based perovskites show very promising properties for use in solar cells; however, the toxicity of lead is a potential inhibitor for large-scale application of these solar cells. Here, a low-toxic bismuth halide, CsBi3I10, is synthesized from solution and the optical properties and crystal structure are compared with previously reported Cs3Bi2I9 perovskite, and the photovoltaic properties are also investigated. The XRD pattern suggests that the CsBi3I10 film has a layered structure with a different dominating crystal growth direction than the Cs3Bi2I9 perovskite. A band gap of 1.77 eV is obtained for the CsBi3I10 film, which is smaller than the band gap of Cs3Bi2I9 at 2.03 eV, and an extended visible light absorption spectrum is therefore obtained. The solar cell device with CsBi3I10 shows a photocurrent up to 700 nm, and this work shows therefore the possibility for increased light absorption and higher photocurrents in solar cells based on bismuth halide perovskites.

  7. Transition metal ion-assisted photochemical generation of alkyl halides and hydrocarbons from carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Carraher, Jack; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2012-03-14

    Near-UV photolysis of aqueous solutions of propionic acid and aqueous Fe3+ in the absence of oxygen generates a mixture of hydrocarbons (ethane, ethylene and butane), carbon dioxide, and Fe2+. The reaction becomes mildly catalytic (about five turnovers) in the presence of oxygen which converts a portion of alkyl radicals to oxidizing intermediates that reoxidize Fe2+. The photochemistry in the presence of halide ions (X− = Cl−, Br−) generates ethyl halides via halogen atom abstraction from FeXn3−n by ethyl radicals. Near-quantitative yields of C2H5X are obtained at ≥0.05 M X−. Competition experiments with Co(NH3)5Br2+ provided kinetic data for the reaction of ethyl radicals with FeCl2+ (k = (4.0 ± 0.5) × 106 M−1 s−1) and with FeBr2+ (k = (3.0 ± 0.5) × 107 M−1 s−1). Photochemical decarboxylation of propionic acid in the presence of Cu2+ generates ethylene and Cu+. Longer-chain acids also yield alpha olefins as exclusive products. These reactions become catalytic under constant purge with oxygen which plays a dual role. It reoxidizes Cu+ to Cu2+, and removes gaseous olefins to prevent accumulation of Cu+(olefin) complexes and depletion of Cu2+. The results underscore the profound effect that the choice of metal ions, the medium, and reaction conditions exert on the photochemistry of carboxylic acids.

  8. Ultrabroad Photoluminescence and Electroluminescence at New Wavelengths from Doped Organometal Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Yong, Zi-Jun; Zhang, Kai-Cheng; Liu, Bo-Mei; Wang, Zhao-Wei; Hou, Jing-Shan; Fang, Yong-Zheng; Zhou, Yi; Sun, Hong-Tao; Song, Bo

    2016-07-21

    Doping of semiconductors by introducing foreign atoms enables their widespread applications in microelectronics and optoelectronics. We show that this strategy can be applied to direct bandgap lead-halide perovskites, leading to the realization of ultrawide photoluminescence (PL) at new wavelengths enabled by doping bismuth (Bi) into lead-halide perovskites. Structural and photophysical characterization reveals that the PL stems from one class of Bi doping-induced optically active center, which is attributed to distorted [PbI6] units coupled with spatially localized bipolarons. Additionally, we find that compositional engineering of these semiconductors can be employed as an additional way to rationally tune the PL properties of doped perovskites. Finally, we accomplished the electroluminescence at cryogenic temperatures by using this system as an emissive layer, marking the first electrically driven devices using Bi-doped photonic materials. Our results suggest that low-cost, earth-abundant, solution-processable Bi-doped perovskite semiconductors could be promising candidate materials for developing optical sources operating at new wavelengths. PMID:27377481

  9. Color-Pure Violet-Light-Emitting Diodes Based on Layered Lead Halide Perovskite Nanoplates.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dong; Peng, Yuelin; Fu, Yongping; Shearer, Melinda J; Zhang, Jingjing; Zhai, Jianyuan; Zhang, Yi; Hamers, Robert J; Andrew, Trisha L; Jin, Song

    2016-07-26

    Violet electroluminescence is rare in both inorganic and organic light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Low-cost and room-temperature solution-processed lead halide perovskites with high-efficiency and color-tunable photoluminescence are promising for LEDs. Here, we report room-temperature color-pure violet LEDs based on a two-dimensional lead halide perovskite material, namely, 2-phenylethylammonium (C6H5CH2CH2NH3(+), PEA) lead bromide [(PEA)2PbBr4]. The natural quantum confinement of two-dimensional layered perovskite (PEA)2PbBr4 allows for photoluminescence of shorter wavelength (410 nm) than its three-dimensional counterpart. By converting as-deposited polycrystalline thin films to micrometer-sized (PEA)2PbBr4 nanoplates using solvent vapor annealing, we successfully integrated this layered perovskite material into LEDs and achieved efficient room-temperature violet electroluminescence at 410 nm with a narrow bandwidth. This conversion to nanoplates significantly enhanced the crystallinity and photophysical properties of the (PEA)2PbBr4 samples and the external quantum efficiency of the violet LED. The solvent vapor annealing method reported herein can be generally applied to other perovskite materials to increase their grain size and, ultimately, improve the performance of optoelectronic devices based on perovskite materials. PMID:27336850

  10. Nonaqueous Halide-Free Flux Reactions with Tin-Based Solders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Guoying; Weinman, Craig J.; Ghosh, Tanushree; Flake, John C.

    2015-04-01

    New halide-free fluxes are becoming more prevalent in electronic packaging; however, their efficacy and reactive behavior with conventional solders has not been well characterized. In this work, we examine nonaqueous halide-free flux reactions of tin (Sn)-based solder surfaces using electrochemical methods. Cyclic voltammetry was used to study reactions of Sn(II) and Sn(IV) species, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to study surface chemistry, and chronopotentiometry was used to quantify equilibrium constants of Sn-carboxylic complexes. Reactions were investigated using carboxylic acid solutions such as adipic acid or maleic acid in polyethylene glycol. Carboxylic acid-based fluxes are practically inactive toward SnO2 removal at room temperature (25°C); however, some species are capable of removing the oxides at temperatures as high as 180°C and at pH as low as 0.1. XPS results suggest the H+ activity of the carboxylic acid is the key to removing SnO2 on Sn-based solder surfaces. Equilibrium coefficients and potential-pH diagrams are given to elucidate the influence of pH on Sn surfaces.

  11. Manipulating Crystallization of Organolead Mixed-Halide Thin Films in Antisolvent Baths for Wide-Bandgap Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuanyuan; Yang, Mengjin; Game, Onkar S; Wu, Wenwen; Kwun, Joonsuh; Strauss, Martin A; Yan, Yanfa; Huang, Jinsong; Zhu, Kai; Padture, Nitin P

    2016-01-27

    Wide-bandgap perovskite solar cells (PSCs) based on organolead (I, Br)-mixed halide perovskites (e.g., MAPbI2Br and MAPbIBr2 perovskite with bandgaps of 1.77 and 2.05 eV, respectively) are considered as promising low-cost alternatives for application in tandem or multijunction photovoltaics (PVs). Here, we demonstrate that manipulating the crystallization behavior of (I, Br)-mixed halide perovskites in antisolvent bath is critical for the formation of smooth, dense thin films of these perovskites. Since the growth of perovskite grains from a precursor solution tends to be more rapid with increasing Br content, further enhancement in the nucleation rate becomes necessary for the effective decoupling of the nucleation and the crystal-growth stages in Br-rich perovskites. This is enabled by introducing simple stirring during antisolvent-bathing, which induces enhanced advection transport of the extracted precursor-solvent into the bath environment. Consequently, wide-bandgap planar PSCs fabricated using these high quality mixed-halide perovskite thin films, Br-rich MAPbIBr2, in particular, show enhanced PV performance.

  12. Students' Understanding of Alkyl Halide Reactions in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz-Ramirez de Arellano, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry is an essential subject for many undergraduate students completing degrees in science, engineering, and pre-professional programs. However, students often struggle with the concepts and skills required to successfully solve organic chemistry exercises. Since alkyl halides are traditionally the first functional group that is…

  13. On the Boiling Points of the Alkyl Halides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, John

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the variety of explanations in organic chemistry textbooks of a physical property of organic compounds. Focuses on those concepts explaining attractive forces between molecules. Concludes that induction interactions play a major role in alkyl halides and other polar organic molecules and should be given wider exposure in chemistry texts.…

  14. Semiempirical and DFT Investigations of the Dissociation of Alkyl Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waas, Jack R.

    2006-01-01

    Enthalpy changes corresponding to the gas phase heats of dissociation of 12 organic halides were calculated using two semiempirical methods, the Hartree-Fock method, and two DFT methods. These calculated values were compared to experimental values where possible. All five methods agreed generally with the expected empirically known trends in the…

  15. Iron-catalysed Negishi coupling of benzyl halides and phosphates.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Robin B; Huwe, Michael; Wilkinson, Mark C

    2009-02-01

    Iron-based catalysts containing either 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)benzene or 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane give excellent activity and good selectivity in the Negishi coupling of aryl zinc reagents with a range of benzyl halides and phosphates.

  16. Kinetic Studies of the Solvolysis of Two Organic Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, J. A.; Pasto, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment which utilizes the solvolysis of organic halides to demonstrate first and second order reaction kinetics. The experiment also investigates the effect of a change of solvent polarity on reaction rate, common-ion and noncommon-ion salt effects, and the activation parameters of a…

  17. Students' understanding of alkyl halide reactions in undergraduate organic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Ramirez de Arellano, Daniel

    Organic chemistry is an essential subject for many undergraduate students completing degrees in science, engineering, and pre-professional programs. However, students often struggle with the concepts and skills required to successfully solve organic chemistry exercises. Since alkyl halides are traditionally the first functional group that is studied in undergraduate organic chemistry courses, establishing a robust understanding of the concepts and reactions related to them can be beneficial in assuring students' success in organic chemistry courses. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to elucidate and describe students' understanding of alkyl halide reactions in an undergraduate organic chemistry course. Participants were interviewed using a think-aloud protocol in which they were given a set of exercises dealing with reactions and mechanisms of alkyl halide molecules in order to shed light on the students' understanding of these reactions and elucidate any gaps in understanding and incorrect warrants that may be present. These interviews were transcribed and analyzed using qualitative inquiry approaches. In general, the findings from this study show that the students exhibited gaps in understanding and incorrect warrants dealing with: (1) classifying substances as bases and/or nucleophiles, (2) assessing the basic or nucleophilic strength of substances, (3) accurately describing the electron movement of the steps that take place during alkyl halide reaction mechanisms, and (4) assessing the viability of their proposed reactive intermediates and breakage of covalent bonds. In addition, implications for teaching and future research are proposed.

  18. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  19. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  9. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  10. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  11. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  12. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  13. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  14. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  15. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  17. Biological neutralization of chlor-alkali industry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rakeshkumar M; Mody, Kalpana H; Keshri, Jitendra; Jha, Bhavanath

    2011-11-01

    The present work reports biological neutralization of chlor-alkali industrial effluent by an alkaliphilic bacterium, isolated from the Gujarat coast, which was identified as Enterococcus faecium strain R-5 on the basis of morphological, biochemical and partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The isolate was capable of bringing down the pH of waste water from 12.0 to 7.0 within 3 h in the presence of carbon and nitrogen sources, with simultaneous reduction in total dissolved solutes (TDS) up to 19-22%. This bacterium produced carboxylic acid, as revealed by FT-IR analysis, which facilitated neutralization of alkaline effluent. The presence of unconventional raw materials viz. Madhuca indica flowers or sugar cane bagasse as carbon and nitrogen sources could effectively neutralize alkaline effluent and thus making the bioremediation process economically viable. The time required for neutralization varied with size of inoculum. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on biological neutralization of a chlor-alkali industrial effluent.

  18. Surface modification by alkali and heat treatments in titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Lee, Baek-Hee; Do Kim, Young; Shin, Ji Hoon; Hwan Lee, Kyu

    2002-09-01

    Pure titanium and titanium alloys are normally used for orthopedic and dental prostheses. Nevertheless, their chemical, biological, and mechanical properties still can be improved by the development of new preparation technologies. This has been the limiting factor for these metals to show low affinity to living bone. The purpose of this study is to improve the bone-bonding ability between titanium alloys and living bone through a chemically activated process and a thermally activated one. Two kinds of titanium alloys, a newly designed Ti-In-Nb-Ta alloy and a commercially available Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy, were used in this study. In this study, surface modification of the titanium alloys by alkali and heat treatments (AHT), alkali treated in 5.0M NaOH solution, and heat treated in vacuum furnace at 600 degrees C, is reported. After AHT, the effects of the AHT on the bone integration property were evaluated in vitro. Surface morphologies of AHT were observed by optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical compositional surface changes were investigated by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Titanium alloys with surface modification by AHT showed improved bioactive behavior, and the Ti-In-Nb-Ta alloy had better bioactivity than the Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy in vitro.

  19. Biological neutralization of chlor-alkali industry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rakeshkumar M; Mody, Kalpana H; Keshri, Jitendra; Jha, Bhavanath

    2011-11-01

    The present work reports biological neutralization of chlor-alkali industrial effluent by an alkaliphilic bacterium, isolated from the Gujarat coast, which was identified as Enterococcus faecium strain R-5 on the basis of morphological, biochemical and partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The isolate was capable of bringing down the pH of waste water from 12.0 to 7.0 within 3 h in the presence of carbon and nitrogen sources, with simultaneous reduction in total dissolved solutes (TDS) up to 19-22%. This bacterium produced carboxylic acid, as revealed by FT-IR analysis, which facilitated neutralization of alkaline effluent. The presence of unconventional raw materials viz. Madhuca indica flowers or sugar cane bagasse as carbon and nitrogen sources could effectively neutralize alkaline effluent and thus making the bioremediation process economically viable. The time required for neutralization varied with size of inoculum. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on biological neutralization of a chlor-alkali industrial effluent. PMID:21944194

  20. Alkali-Activated Aluminium-Silicate Composites as Insulation Materials for Industrial Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembovska, L.; Bajare, D.; Pundiene, I.; Bumanis, G.

    2015-11-01

    The article reports on the study of thermal stability of alkali-activated aluminium- silicate composites (ASC) at temperature 800-1100°C. ASC were prepared by using calcined kaolinite clay, aluminium scrap recycling waste, lead-silicate glass waste and quartz sand. As alkali activator, commercial sodium silicate solution modified with an addition of sodium hydroxide was used. The obtained alkali activation solution had silica modulus Ms=1.67. Components of aluminium scrap recycling waste (aluminium nitride (AlN) and iron sulphite (FeSO3)) react in the alkali media and create gases - ammonia and sulphur dioxide, which provide the porous structure of the material [1]. Changes in the chemical composition of ASC during heating were identified and quantitatively analysed by using DTA/TG, dimension changes during the heating process were determined by using HTOM, pore microstructure was examined by SEM, and mineralogical composition of ASC was determined by XRD. The density of ASC was measured in accordance with EN 1097-7. ASC with density around 560 kg/m3 and heat resistance up to 1100°C with shrinkage less than 5% were obtained. The intended use of this material is the application as an insulation material for industrial purposes at elevated temperatures.

  1. In vitro bioactivity investigation of alkali treated Ti6Al7Nb alloy foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butev, Ezgi; Esen, Ziya; Bor, Sakir

    2015-02-01

    Biocompatible Ti6Al7Nb alloy foams with 70% porosity manufactured by space holder method were activated via alkali treatment using 5 M NaOH solution at 60 °C. The interconnected pore structures enabled formation of homogenous sodium rich coating on the foam surfaces by allowing penetration of alkali solution throughout the pores which had average size of 200 μm. The resulted coating layer having 500 nm thickness exhibited porous network morphology with 100 nm pore size. On the other hand, heat treatment conducted subsequent to alkali treatment at 600 °C in air transformed sodium rich coating into crystalline bioactive sodium titanate phases. Although the coatings obtained by additional heat treatment were mechanically stable and preserved their morphology, oxidation of the samples deteriorated the compressive strength significantly without affecting the elastic modulus. However, heat treated samples revealed better hydroxyapatite formation when soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF) compared to alkali treated foams. On the other hand, untreated surfaces containing bioactive TiO2 layer were observed to comprise of Ca and P rich precipitates only rather than hydroxyapatite within 15 days. The apatite formed on the treated porous surfaces was observed to have flower-like structure with Ca/P ratio around 1.5 close to that of natural bone.

  2. Alkali resistant optical coatings for alkali lasers and methods of production thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Soules, Thomas F; Beach, Raymond J; Mitchell, Scott C

    2014-11-18

    In one embodiment, a multilayer dielectric coating for use in an alkali laser includes two or more alternating layers of high and low refractive index materials, wherein an innermost layer includes a thicker, >500 nm, and dense, >97% of theoretical, layer of at least one of: alumina, zirconia, and hafnia for protecting subsequent layers of the two or more alternating layers of high and low index dielectric materials from alkali attack. In another embodiment, a method for forming an alkali resistant coating includes forming a first oxide material above a substrate and forming a second oxide material above the first oxide material to form a multilayer dielectric coating, wherein the second oxide material is on a side of the multilayer dielectric coating for contacting an alkali.

  3. Computational studies of solid-state alkali conduction in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Zhi; Mo, Yifei; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-03-25

    The facile conduction of alkali ions in a crystal host is of crucial importance in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries, the dominant form of energy storage today. In this review, we provide a comprehensive survey of computational approaches to study solid-state alkali diffusion. We demonstrate how these methods have provided useful insights into the design of materials that form the main components of a rechargeable alkali-ion battery, namely the electrodes, superionic conductor solid electrolytes and interfaces. We will also provide a perspective on future challenges and directions. Here, the scope of this review includes the monovalent lithium- and sodium-ion chemistries that aremore » currently of the most commercial interest.« less

  4. Ingestion of caustic alkali farm products.

    PubMed

    Neidich, G

    1993-01-01

    Since the Poison Prevention Packaging Act took effect, the number of ingestions of caustic alkali from household products has been significantly reduced. Commercial caustic alkalis used on farms, however, were not included in this legislation. Fourteen children over a 5 year period were seen after ingestion of commercial caustic alkalis used on farms. Seven of the children had ingested liquid pipeline cleaners and seven had ingested solid agents used for a variety of reasons. Six of seven children ingesting liquid agents did so from nonoriginal containers into which the caustic had been transferred for convenience. All seven children ingesting solid agents did so from the original container. Eight of the 14 children were found to have second-degree or worse esophageal involvement. Both solid and liquid caustic agents used commercially on farms can cause significant morbidity. Development of a child-resistant container for daily transfer of liquid pipeline agents could be helpful in preventing injuries from liquid pipeline cleaners. Pediatric gastroenterologists as well as primary care physicians in rural areas should be familiar with this type of injury and should take an active role in instructing parents of children living on farms to prevent such injuries. Extension of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act to caustic alkalis used on farms needs to be considered. PMID:8433244

  5. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-05-12

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization.

  6. Ingestion of caustic alkali farm products.

    PubMed

    Neidich, G

    1993-01-01

    Since the Poison Prevention Packaging Act took effect, the number of ingestions of caustic alkali from household products has been significantly reduced. Commercial caustic alkalis used on farms, however, were not included in this legislation. Fourteen children over a 5 year period were seen after ingestion of commercial caustic alkalis used on farms. Seven of the children had ingested liquid pipeline cleaners and seven had ingested solid agents used for a variety of reasons. Six of seven children ingesting liquid agents did so from nonoriginal containers into which the caustic had been transferred for convenience. All seven children ingesting solid agents did so from the original container. Eight of the 14 children were found to have second-degree or worse esophageal involvement. Both solid and liquid caustic agents used commercially on farms can cause significant morbidity. Development of a child-resistant container for daily transfer of liquid pipeline agents could be helpful in preventing injuries from liquid pipeline cleaners. Pediatric gastroenterologists as well as primary care physicians in rural areas should be familiar with this type of injury and should take an active role in instructing parents of children living on farms to prevent such injuries. Extension of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act to caustic alkalis used on farms needs to be considered.

  7. Cohesive Energy of the Alkali Metals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a method, considered appropriate for presentation to undergraduate students in materials science and related courses, for the calculation of cohesive energies of the alkali metals. Uses a description based on the free electron model and gives results to within 0.1 eV of the experimental values. (Author/GS)

  8. Nanocrystals of Cesium Lead Halide Perovskites (CsPbX3, X = Cl, Br, and I): Novel Optoelectronic Materials Showing Bright Emission with Wide Color Gamut

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Metal halides perovskites, such as hybrid organic–inorganic CH3NH3PbI3, are newcomer optoelectronic materials that have attracted enormous attention as solution-deposited absorbing layers in solar cells with power conversion efficiencies reaching 20%. Herein we demonstrate a new avenue for halide perovskites by designing highly luminescent perovskite-based colloidal quantum dot materials. We have synthesized monodisperse colloidal nanocubes (4–15 nm edge lengths) of fully inorganic cesium lead halide perovskites (CsPbX3, X = Cl, Br, and I or mixed halide systems Cl/Br and Br/I) using inexpensive commercial precursors. Through compositional modulations and quantum size-effects, the bandgap energies and emission spectra are readily tunable over the entire visible spectral region of 410–700 nm. The photoluminescence of CsPbX3 nanocrystals is characterized by narrow emission line-widths of 12–42 nm, wide color gamut covering up to 140% of the NTSC color standard, high quantum yields of up to 90%, and radiative lifetimes in the range of 1–29 ns. The compelling combination of enhanced optical properties and chemical robustness makes CsPbX3 nanocrystals appealing for optoelectronic applications, particularly for blue and green spectral regions (410–530 nm), where typical metal chalcogenide-based quantum dots suffer from photodegradation. PMID:25633588

  9. Nanocrystals of Cesium Lead Halide Perovskites (CsPbX₃, X = Cl, Br, and I): Novel Optoelectronic Materials Showing Bright Emission with Wide Color Gamut.

    PubMed

    Protesescu, Loredana; Yakunin, Sergii; Bodnarchuk, Maryna I; Krieg, Franziska; Caputo, Riccarda; Hendon, Christopher H; Yang, Ruo Xi; Walsh, Aron; Kovalenko, Maksym V

    2015-06-10

    Metal halides perovskites, such as hybrid organic-inorganic CH3NH3PbI3, are newcomer optoelectronic materials that have attracted enormous attention as solution-deposited absorbing layers in solar cells with power conversion efficiencies reaching 20%. Herein we demonstrate a new avenue for halide perovskites by designing highly luminescent perovskite-based colloidal quantum dot materials. We have synthesized monodisperse colloidal nanocubes (4-15 nm edge lengths) of fully inorganic cesium lead halide perovskites (CsPbX3, X = Cl, Br, and I or mixed halide systems Cl/Br and Br/I) using inexpensive commercial precursors. Through compositional modulations and quantum size-effects, the bandgap energies and emission spectra are readily tunable over the entire visible spectral region of 410-700 nm. The photoluminescence of CsPbX3 nanocrystals is characterized by narrow emission line-widths of 12-42 nm, wide color gamut covering up to 140% of the NTSC color standard, high quantum yields of up to 90%, and radiative lifetimes in the range of 1-29 ns. The compelling combination of enhanced optical properties and chemical robustness makes CsPbX3 nanocrystals appealing for optoelectronic applications, particularly for blue and green spectral regions (410-530 nm), where typical metal chalcogenide-based quantum dots suffer from photodegradation.

  10. Synthesis and structure of the ternary and quaternary strontium nitride halides, Sr{sub 2}N(X, X') (X, X'=Cl, Br, I)

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Amy; Smith, Ronald I.; Gregory, Duncan H. . E-mail: Duncan.Gregory@Nottingham.ac.uk

    2006-01-15

    A number of new, layered nitride mixed halides have been synthesised in the quaternary phase systems Sr-N-Cl-Br and Sr-N-Br-I. The variation in structure with composition has been investigated by powder X-ray and powder neutron diffraction techniques and the structure of strontium nitride iodide, Sr{sub 2}NI, has been determined for the first time (rhombohedral space group R-3m, a=4.0103(1)A, c=23.1138(2)A, Z=3). A continuous solid solution exists between Sr{sub 2}NCl and Sr{sub 2}NBr with intermediate compounds adopting the same anti-{alpha}-NaFeO{sub 2} structure (rhombohedral space group R-3m) as the ternary end members. A similar smooth and linear relationship between structure and composition is seen from Sr{sub 2}NBr to Sr{sub 2}NI and hence cubic close packing of metal-nitrogen layers is adopted regardless of halide, X (X'). While nitride and halide anions occupy distinct crystallographic sites, there is no ordering of the halides in the quaternary materials irrespective of stoichiometry or temperature (between 3 and 673K)

  11. Ternary and quaternary layered nitride halides, Ca{sub 2}N(X,X') (X,X'=Cl, Br, I): Evolution of structure with composition

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Amy; Smith, Ronald I.; Gregory, Duncan H. . E-mail: Duncan.Gregory@Nottingham.ac.uk

    2005-06-15

    The quaternary systems Ca-N-Cl-Br and Ca-N-Br-I have been investigated resulting in the synthesis of a number of new layered nitride mixed halides. The evolution of structure with composition has been investigated by powder X-ray and powder neutron diffraction techniques. A continuous solid solution exists between Ca{sub 2}NCl and Ca{sub 2}NBr with intermediate compounds adopting the same anti- {alpha}-NaFeO{sub 2} structure (rhombohedral space group R3-bar m) as the ternary end members. A phase transition occurs in the Ca{sub 2}NBr{sub 1-y}I{sub y} system between y=0.7 and y=0.8 corresponding to a switch from cubic close packing to hexagonal close packing of metal-nitrogen layers and corresponding adoption of the anti-{beta}-RbScO{sub 2} (filled anti-CdI{sub 2}) structure (hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}/mmc). While nitride and halide anions occupy distinct crystallographic sites, there is no ordering of halides in quaternary materials irrespective of stoichiometry or structure type. All the nitride halides show temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour between 2 and 300K.

  12. Electric conductivities of 1:1 electrolytes in liquid methanol along the liquid-vapor coexistence curve up to the critical temperature. II. KBr and KI solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshina, Taka-aki; Tanaka, Kensuke; Tsuchihashi, Noriaki; Ibuki, Kazuyasu; Ueno, Masakatsu

    2004-11-01

    The molar conductivities Λ of KBr and KI in dilute methanol solutions were measured along the liquid-vapor coexistence curve up to the critical temperature (240 °C). The concentration dependence of Λ in each condition was analyzed by the Fuoss-Chen-Justice equation to obtain the limiting molar conductivities and the molar association constants. Using the present data together with the literature ones, the validity of the Hubbard-Onsager (HO) dielectric friction theory based on the sphere-in-continuum model was examined for the translational friction coefficients ζ of the halide ions (the Cl-, Br-, and I- ions) in methanol in the density range of 2.989ρc⩾ρ⩾1.506ρc, where ρc=0.2756 g cm-3 is the critical density of methanol. For all the halide ions studied, the friction coefficient decreased with decreasing density at ρ>2.0ρc, while the nonviscous contribution Δζ/ζ increased; Δζ was defined as the difference between ζ and the friction coefficient estimated by the Stokes law. The density dependence of ζ and Δζ/ζ were well reproduced by the HO theory at ρ>2.0ρc. The HO theory also explained the ion-size dependence of Δζ/ζ which decreased with ion-size at ρ>2.0ρc. At ρ<2.0ρc, on the other hand, the HO theory could not explain the density and the ion-size dependences of ζ and Δζ/ζ. These results indicated that the application limit of the HO theory lied about ρ=2.0ρc which is the same as the application limit observed for the alkali metal ions. The present results were also compared with the results in subcritical aqueous solutions.

  13. Correspondence between cluster-ion and bulk solution thermodynamic properties: on the validity of the cluster-pair-based approximation.

    PubMed

    Vlcek, Lukas; Chialvo, Ariel A; Simonson, J Michael

    2013-11-01

    Since the single-ion thermodynamic properties of bulk solutions are not directly accessible from experiments, extrapolations have been devised to estimate them from experimental measurements on small-clusters. Extrapolations based on the cluster-pair-based approximation (CPA) technique (Tissandier et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 1998, 102, 7787-7794) and its variants are currently considered one of the most reliable source of single-ion hydration thermodynamic data and have been used as a benchmark for the development of molecular and continuum solvation models. Despite its importance, the CPA has not been thoroughly tested and recent studies have indicated inconsistencies with molecular simulations. The present work challenges the key CPA assumptions that the hydration properties of single cations and anions in growing clusters rapidly converge to each other following a monotonous trend. Using a combination of simulation techniques to study the transition between alkali halide ions in small clusters and bulk solution, we show that this convergence is rather slow and involves a surprising change in trends, which can result in significant errors in the original estimated single-ion properties. When these cluster-size-dependent effects are taken into account, the inconsistencies between molecular models and experimental predictions disappear, and the value of the proton hydration enthalpy based on the CPA aligns with estimates based on other principles.

  14. Matrix isolation infrared spectra of hydrogen halide and halogen complexes with nitrosyl halides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, Louis J.; Lucas, Donald; Pimentel, George C.

    1982-01-01

    Matrix isolation infrared spectra of nitrosyl halide (XNO) complexes with HX and X2 (X = Cl, Br) are presented. The relative frequency shifts of the HX mode are modest (ClNO H-Cl, delta-nu/nu = -0.045; BrNO H-Br, delta-nu/nu = -0.026), indicating weak hydrogen bonds 1-3 kcal/mol. These shifts are accompanied by significant shifts to higher frequencies in the XN-O stretching mode (CIN-O HCl, delta-nu/nu = +0.016; BrN-O HBr, delta-nu/nu = +0.011). Similar shifts were observed for the XN-O X2 complexes (ClN-O Cl2, delta-nu/nu = +0.009; BrN-O-Br2, delta-nu/nu = +0.013). In all four complexes, the X-NO stretching mode relative shift is opposite in sign and about 1.6 times that of the NO stretching mode. These four complexes are considered to be similar in structure and charge distribution. The XN-O frequency shift suggests that complex formation is accompanied by charge withdrawal from the NO bond ranging from about .04 to .07 electron charges. The HX and X2 molecules act as electron acceptors, drawing electrons out of the antibonding orbital of NO and strengthening the XN-O bond. The implications of the pattern of vibrational shifts concerning the structure of the complexes are discussed.

  15. Ion-exchange behavior of alkali metals on treated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiuddin, G.; Hata, W.Y.; Tolan, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    The ion-exchange behavior of trace quantities of the alkali-metal ions sodium and cesium, on activated carbon impregnated with zirconium phosphate (referred to here as ZrP), was studied. Impregnated carbon had twice as much ion-exchange activity as unimpregnated, oxidized carbon, and 10 times as much as commercial activated carbons. The distribution coefficient of sodium increased with increasing pH; the distribution coefficient of cesium decreased with increasing pH. Sodium and cesium were separated with an electrolytic solution of 0.1 M HCl. Preliminary studies indicated that 0.2 M potassium and cesium can also be separated. Distribution coefficients of the supported ZrP were determined by the elution technique and agreed within 20% of the values for pure ZrP calculated from the literature.

  16. Proposal for halogen atom transfer mechanism for Ullmann O-arylation of phenols with aryl halides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songlin; Zhu, Zhenzhong; Ding, Yuqiang

    2012-12-01

    A systematic theoretical study on reaction mechanisms for copper(I)-catalyzed C-O coupling of phenols with aryl bromides is reported herein. Through evaluation of the relative concentrations of possible copper species in reaction solution and reactivity study of these copper species with aryl halides in the context of several commonly proposed mechanisms for copper(I)-catalyzed Ullmann reactions, we propose that the active copper catalyst should be a neutral (L)Cu(I)-OAr (L denotes an ancillary ligand; OAr denotes an aryloxide ligand) species in nonpolar solvent and Cu(OAr)(2)(-) anion in highly polar solvent. In the reaction solution, these two kinds of copper species should be in equilibrium, the direction of which is highly dependent on the polarity of the solvent. For both kinds of copper species, a halogen atom transfer mechanism is favored where an initial halogen atom transfer from phenyl bromide to the Cu(I) center occurs, resulting in the formation of Cu(II)(OAr)(Br) and a phenyl radical. Subsequent rapid attack of this phenyl radical to the aryloxide ligand bound to copper(II) would yield the coupling product and Cu(I)(Br) species, which can be readily converted to the active Cu(I)-OAr species in the presence of phenols and base. Other mechanisms such as oxidative addition, single electron transfer and σ-bond metathesis mechanisms all possess activation barriers which are too high, rendering them kinetically unfavorable. Electronic effects on phenol rings reveal that electron-donating substituents accelerate the coupling of (phen)Cu(I)(OAr) with aryl halides whereas electron-withdrawing substituents lead to much higher activation barriers, which is consistent with experimental findings and thus lends further support for such a halogen atom transfer mechanism. In view of the widely accepted oxidative addition/reductive elimination mechanism for analogous copper(I)-catalyzed coupling of N-nucleophiles with aryl halides, our results here highlight that the

  17. Thermodynamic Origin of Photoinstability in the CH3NH3Pb(I1-xBrx)3 Hybrid Halide Perovskite Alloy.

    PubMed

    Brivio, Federico; Caetano, Clovis; Walsh, Aron

    2016-03-17

    The formation of solid-solutions of iodide, bromide, and chloride provides the means to control the structure, band gap, and stability of hybrid halide perovskite semiconductors for photovoltaic applications. We report a computational investigation of the CH3NH3PbI3/CH3NH3PbBr3 alloy from density functional theory with a thermodynamic analysis performed within the generalized quasi-chemical approximation. We construct the phase diagram and identify a large miscibility gap, with a critical temperature of 343 K. The observed photoinstability in some mixed-halide solar cells is explained by the thermodynamics of alloy formation, where an initially homogeneous solution is subject to spinodal decomposition with I and Br-rich phases, which is further complicated by a wide metastable region defined by the binodal line. PMID:26952337

  18. Thermodynamic Origin of Photoinstability in the CH3NH3Pb(I1–xBrx)3 Hybrid Halide Perovskite Alloy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The formation of solid-solutions of iodide, bromide, and chloride provides the means to control the structure, band gap, and stability of hybrid halide perovskite semiconductors for photovoltaic applications. We report a computational investigation of the CH3NH3PbI3/CH3NH3PbBr3 alloy from density functional theory with a thermodynamic analysis performed within the generalized quasi-chemical approximation. We construct the phase diagram and identify a large miscibility gap, with a critical temperature of 343 K. The observed photoinstability in some mixed-halide solar cells is explained by the thermodynamics of alloy formation, where an initially homogeneous solution is subject to spinodal decomposition with I and Br-rich phases, which is further complicated by a wide metastable region defined by the binodal line. PMID:26952337

  19. Mixed micelles of alkyltrimethylammonium halides A small-angle neutron-scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aswal, V. K.; Goyal, P. S.

    1998-01-01

    Mixed micelles of alkyltrimethylammonium halides have been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The experiments were carried out on mixed micellar solutions (CTAB + DTAB, CTAB + TTAB and TTAB + DTAB) of surfactants with the same head group but different chain lengths. The measurements were also made from the mixture of surfactants with the same chain length but different head groups of CTAB + CDAB and CTAB + CTAC. The surfactant components were mixed in the molar proportions of 1:1 and the total concentration was kept 0.2 M. It is found that size, aggregation number and the fractional charge on the micelle in the mixed systems have values in between those for the pure-component systems.

  20. Self-regulation mechanism for charged point defects in hybrid halide perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Aron; Scanlon, David O.; Chen, Shiyou; Gong, X. G.; Wei, Su -Huai

    2014-12-11

    Hybrid halide perovskites such as methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) exhibit unusually low free-carrier concentrations despite being processed at low-temperatures from solution. We demonstrate, through quantum mechanical calculations, that an origin of this phenomenon is a prevalence of ionic over electronic disorder in stoichiometric materials. Schottky defect formation provides a mechanism to self-regulate the concentration of charge carriers through ionic compensation of charged point defects. The equilibrium charged vacancy concentration is predicted to exceed 0.4 % at room temperature. Furthermore, this behavior, which goes against established defect conventions for inorganic semiconductors, has implications for photovoltaic performance.

  1. Process for treating spent catalyst including antimony halides from chlorofluorocarbon production

    SciTech Connect

    Kalcevic, V.; McGahan, J.F.

    1988-06-14

    A process for treating spent catalyst from chlorofluorocarbon production is described wherein the catalyst includes antimony halides and undergoes hydrolysis in an aqueous medium to produce insoluble antimony compounds and fluoride ions. The process comprises hydrolyzing the catalyst in an aqueous solution of ferric chloride having a sufficient concentration of ferric ions to complex substantially all of the fluoride ions produced upon hydrolysis of the catalyst, neutralizing the reaction mass present following hydrolysis of the catalyst and complexing of the fluoride ions by contacting the reaction mass with an aqueous suspension of a compound selected from the class consisting of calcium hydroxide and magnesium hydroxide, and separating the insoluble antimony compounds from the neutralized reaction mass.

  2. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic studies on alkali borate glasses: evidence of mixed alkali effect.

    PubMed

    Padmaja, G; Kistaiah, P

    2009-03-19

    A lithium-potassium-borate glass system containing manganese and iron cations has been thoroughly investigated in order to obtain information about the mixed alkali effect and the structural role of both the manganese and iron in such glass hosts. Mixed alkali borate glasses of the (30 - x)Li(2)O - xK(2)O - 10CdO/ZnO - 59B(2)O(3) (x = 0, 10, 15, 20, and 30) doped with 1MnO(2)/1Fe(2)O(3) system were prepared by a melt quench technique. The amorphous phase of the prepared glass samples was confirmed from their X-ray diffraction. The spectroscopic properties of glass samples were studied using infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopic techniques. The density of all the prepared glasses was measured using Archimedes principle. Molar volumes were estimated from the density data. IR spectra of these glasses revealed a dramatic variation of three- and four-coordinated boron structures as a function of mixed alkali concentration. The vibrations due to Li-O, K-O, and MnO(4)/FeO(4) arrangements are consistent in all the compositions and show a nonlinear variation in the intensity with alkali content. Raman spectra of different alkali combinations with CdO and ZnO present drastic changes in the intensity of various Raman bands. The observation of disappearance and reappearance of IR and Raman bands as a function of various alkali concentrations is an important result pertaining to the mixed alkali effect in borate glasses. Acting as complementary spectroscopic techniques, both types of measurements, IR and Raman, revealed that the network structure of the studied glasses is mainly based on BO(3) and BO(4) units placed in different structural groups, the BO(3) units being dominant. The measured IR and Raman spectra of different glasses are used to clarify the optical properties of the present glasses correlating them with their structure and composition. PMID:19235995

  3. Silver halide fiber-based evanescent-wave liquid droplet sensing with room temperature mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Liu, Z; Gmachl, C; Sivco, D

    2005-08-01

    Quantum cascade lasers and unclad silver halide fibers were used to assemble mid-infrared fiber-optics evanescent-wave sensors suitable to measure the chemical composition of liquid droplets. The laser wavelengths were chosen to be in the regions which offer the largest absorption contrast between constituents inside the mixture droplets. A pseudo-Beer-Lambert law fits well with the experimental data. Using a 300microm diameter fiber with a 25 mm immersion length, the signal to noise ratios correspond to 1 vol.% for alpha-tocophenol in squalane and 2 vol.% for acetone in aqueous solution for laser wavenumbers of 1208 cm-1 and 1363 cm-1, respectively.

  4. Methods and Mechanisms for Cross-Electrophile Coupling of Csp2 Halides with Alkyl Electrophiles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Cross-electrophile coupling, the cross-coupling of two different electrophiles, avoids the need for preformed carbon nucleophiles, but development of general methods has lagged behind cross-coupling and C–H functionalization. A central reason for this slow development is the challenge of selectively coupling two substrates that are alike in reactivity. This Account describes the discovery of generally cross-selective reactions of aryl halides and acyl halides with alkyl halides, the mechanistic studies that illuminated the underlying principles of these reactions, and the use of these fundamental principles in the rational design of new cross-electrophile coupling reactions. Although the coupling of two different electrophiles under reducing conditions often leads primarily to symmetric dimers, the subtle differences in reactivity of aryl halides and alkyl halides with nickel catalysts allowed for generally cross-selective coupling reactions. These conditions could also be extended to the coupling of acyl halides with alkyl halides. These reactions are exceptionally functional group tolerant and can be assembled on the benchtop. A combination of stoichiometric and catalytic studies on the mechanism of these reactions revealed an unusual radical-chain mechanism and suggests that selectivity arises from (1) the preference of nickel(0) for oxidative addition to aryl halides and acyl halides over alkyl halides and (2) the greater propensity of alkyl halides to form free radicals. Bipyridine-ligated arylnickel intermediates react with alkyl radicals to efficiently form, after reductive elimination, new C–C bonds. Finally, the resulting nickel(I) species is proposed to regenerate an alkyl radical to carry the chain. Examples of new reactions designed using these principles include carbonylative coupling of aryl halides with alkyl halides to form ketones, arylation of epoxides to form β-aryl alcohols, and coupling of benzyl sulfonate esters with aryl

  5. Methods and Mechanisms for Cross-Electrophile Coupling of Csp(2) Halides with Alkyl Electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Weix, Daniel J

    2015-06-16

    Cross-electrophile coupling, the cross-coupling of two different electrophiles, avoids the need for preformed carbon nucleophiles, but development of general methods has lagged behind cross-coupling and C-H functionalization. A central reason for this slow development is the challenge of selectively coupling two substrates that are alike in reactivity. This Account describes the discovery of generally cross-selective reactions of aryl halides and acyl halides with alkyl halides, the mechanistic studies that illuminated the underlying principles of these reactions, and the use of these fundamental principles in the rational design of new cross-electrophile coupling reactions. Although the coupling of two different electrophiles under reducing conditions often leads primarily to symmetric dimers, the subtle differences in reactivity of aryl halides and alkyl halides with nickel catalysts allowed for generally cross-selective coupling reactions. These conditions could also be extended to the coupling of acyl halides with alkyl halides. These reactions are exceptionally functional group tolerant and can be assembled on the benchtop. A combination of stoichiometric and catalytic studies on the mechanism of these reactions revealed an unusual radical-chain mechanism and suggests that selectivity arises from (1) the preference of nickel(0) for oxidative addition to aryl halides and acyl halides over alkyl halides and (2) the greater propensity of alkyl halides to form free radicals. Bipyridine-ligated arylnickel intermediates react with alkyl radicals to efficiently form, after reductive elimination, new C-C bonds. Finally, the resulting nickel(I) species is proposed to regenerate an alkyl radical to carry the chain. Examples of new reactions designed using these principles include carbonylative coupling of aryl halides with alkyl halides to form ketones, arylation of epoxides to form β-aryl alcohols, and coupling of benzyl sulfonate esters with aryl halides to form

  6. Concentration Effects and Ion Properties Controlling the Fractionation of Halides during Aerosol Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Marcelo I.; Athalye, Richa R.; Rodriguez, Jose M.

    2012-01-01

    During the aerosolization process at the sea surface, halides are incorporated into aerosol droplets, where they may play an important role in tropospheric ozone chemistry. Although this process may significantly contribute to the formation of reactive gas phase molecular halogens, little is known about the environmental factors that control how halides selectively accumulate at the air-water interface. In this study, the production of sea spray aerosol is simulated using electrospray ionization (ESI) of 100 nM equimolar solutions of NaCl, NaBr, NaI, NaNO2, NaNO3, NaClO4, and NaIO4. The microdroplets generated are analyzed by mass spectrometry to study the comparative enrichment of anions (f (Isub x-)) and their correlation with ion properties. Although no correlation exists between f (sub x-) and the limiting equivalent ionic conductivity, the correlation coefficient of the linear fit with the size of the anions R(sub x-), dehydration free-energy ?Gdehyd, and polarizability alpha, follows the order: (R(sub x-)(exp -2)) > (R(sub x-)(exp -1)) >(R(sub x-) > delta G(sub dehyd) > alpha. The same pure physical process is observed in H2O and D2O. The factor f (sub x-) does not change with pH (6.8-8.6), counterion (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+) substitution effects, or solvent polarity changes in methanol - and ethanol-water mixtures (0 <= xH2O <= 1). Sodium polysorbate 20 surfactant is used to modify the structure of the interface. Despite the observed enrichment of I- on the air-water interface of equimolar solutions, our results of seawater mimic samples agree with a model in which the interfacial composition is increasingly enriched in I- < Br- < Cl- over the oceanic boundary layer due to concentration effects in sea spray aerosol formation.

  7. Concentration effects and ion properties controlling the fractionation of halides during aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Marcelo I; Athalye, Richa R; Rodriguez, Jose M

    2012-06-01

    During the aerosolization process at the sea surface, halides are incorporated into aerosol droplets, where they may play an important role in tropospheric ozone chemistry. Although this process may significantly contribute to the formation of reactive gas phase molecular halogens, little is known about the environmental factors that control how halides selectively accumulate at the air-water interface. In this study, the production of sea spray aerosol is simulated using electrospray ionization (ESI) of 100 nM equimolar solutions of NaCl, NaBr, NaI, NaNO(2), NaNO(3), NaClO(4), and NaIO(4). The microdroplets generated are analyzed by mass spectrometry to study the comparative enrichment of anions (f(X(-))) and their correlation with ion properties. Although no correlation exists between f(X(-)) and the limiting equivalent ionic conductivity, the correlation coefficient of the linear fit with the size of the anions R(X(-)), dehydration free-energy ΔG(dehyd), and polarizability α, follows the order: R(X(-))(-2) > R(X(-))(-1) > R(X(-)) > ΔG(dehyd) > α. The same pure physical process is observed in H(2)O and D(2)O. The factor f(X(-)) does not change with pH (6.8-8.6), counterion (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Cs(+)) substitution effects, or solvent polarity changes in methanol- and ethanol-water mixtures (0 ≤ x(H(2)O) ≤ 1). Sodium polysorbate 20 surfactant is used to modify the structure of the interface. Despite the observed enrichment of I(-) on the air-water interface of equimolar solutions, our results of seawater mimic samples agree with a model in which the interfacial composition is increasingly enriched in I(-) < Br(-) < Cl(-) over the oceanic boundary layer due to concentration effects in sea spray aerosol formation.

  8. Hydrogen-bonding interaction of the protonated schiff base with halides in a chloride-pumping bacteriorhodopsin mutant.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Mikihiro; Ihara, Kunio; Kandori, Hideki

    2006-09-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and halorhodopsin (HR) are light-driven proton and chloride ion pumps, respectively, in Halobacterium salinarum. The amino acid identity of these proteins is about 25%, suggesting that each has been optimized for their own functions during evolution. However, it is known that the BR mutants, D85T and D85S, can pump chloride ions. This fact implies that the Schiff base region is important in determining ionic selectivity. The X-ray crystallographic structure of D85S(Br(-)) showed the presence of a bromide ion in the Schiff base region (Facciotti, M. T., Cheung, V. S., Nguyen, D., Rouhani, S., and Glaeser, R. M. (2003) Biophys. J. 85, 451-458). In this article, we report on the study of hydrogen bonds of the Schiff base and water molecules in D85S in the absence and presence of various halides, assigning their N-D and O-D stretching vibrations in D(2)O, respectively, in low-temperature Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. We found that the hydrogen bond of the Schiff base in D85S(Cl(-)) is much stronger than that in HR, being as strong as that in wild-type BR. Similar halide dependence in D85S and in solution implies that the Schiff base forms a direct hydrogen bond with a halide, consistent with the X-ray structure. Photoisomerization causes a weakened hydrogen bond of the Schiff base, and halide dependence on the stretching frequency is lost. These spectral features are similar to those in the photocycle of proton-pumping BR, though the weakened hydrogen bond is more significant for BR. However, the spectral features of water bands in D85S are closer to chloride-pumping HR because O-D stretching vibrations of water are observed only at >2500 cm(-)(1). Unlike in BR, we did not observe strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules for halide-pumping D85S mutants. This observation agrees with our recent hypothesis that strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules are required for the proton-pumping activity of archaeal rhodopsins. Hydrogen

  9. Geopolymers and Related Alkali-Activated Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provis, John L.; Bernal, Susan A.

    2014-07-01

    The development of new, sustainable, low-CO2 construction materials is essential if the global construction industry is to reduce the environmental footprint of its activities, which is incurred particularly through the production of Portland cement. One type of non-Portland cement that is attracting particular attention is based on alkali-aluminosilicate chemistry, including the class of binders that have become known as geopolymers. These materials offer technical properties comparable to those of Portland cement, but with a much lower CO2 footprint and with the potential for performance advantages over traditional cements in certain niche applications. This review discusses the synthesis of alkali-activated binders from blast furnace slag, calcined clay (metakaolin), and fly ash, including analysis of the chemical reaction mechanisms and binder phase assemblages that control the early-age and hardened properties of these materials, in particular initial setting and long-term durability. Perspectives for future research developments are also explored.

  10. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  11. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    One approach to space fission power system design is predicated on the use of alkali metal heat pipes, either as radiator elements, thermal management components, or as part of the core primary heat-transfer system. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where more detailed information can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstrational purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Project Prometheus point designs.

  12. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-07-01

    One approach to fission power system design uses alkali metal heat pipes for the core primary heat-transfer system. Heat pipes may also be used as radiator elements or auxiliary thermal control elements. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where information that is more detailed can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstration purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Nasa Project Prometheus point designs. (author)

  13. Mechanical and microstructural properties of alkali-activated fly ash geopolymers.

    PubMed

    Komljenović, M; Bascarević, Z; Bradić, V

    2010-09-15

    This paper investigates the properties of geopolymer obtained by alkali-activation of fly ash (FA), i.e. the influence of characteristics of the representative group of FA (class F) from Serbia, as well as that of the nature and concentration of various activators on mechanical and microstructural properties of geopolymers. Aqueous solutions of Ca(OH)(2), NaOH, NaOH+Na(2)CO(3), KOH and sodium silicate (water glass) of various concentrations were used as alkali activators. It was established that the nature and concentration of the activator was the most dominant parameter in the alkali-activation process. In respect of physical characteristics of FA, the key parameter was fineness. The geopolymer based on FA with the highest content of fine particles (<43 microm), showed the highest compressive strength in all cases. Regardless of FA characteristics, nature and concentration of the activator, the alkali-activation products were mainly amorphous. The formation of crystalline phases (zeolites) occurred in some cases, depending on the reaction conditions. The highest compressive strength was obtained using sodium silicate. Together with the increase of sodium silicate SiO(2)/Na(2)O mass ratio, the atomic Si/Al ratio in the reaction products was also increased. Under the experimental conditions of this investigation, high strength was directly related to the high Si/Al ratio.

  14. Mechanical and microstructural properties of alkali-activated fly ash geopolymers.

    PubMed

    Komljenović, M; Bascarević, Z; Bradić, V

    2010-09-15

    This paper investigates the properties of geopolymer obtained by alkali-activation of fly ash (FA), i.e. the influence of characteristics of the representative group of FA (class F) from Serbia, as well as that of the nature and concentration of various activators on mechanical and microstructural properties of geopolymers. Aqueous solutions of Ca(OH)(2), NaOH, NaOH+Na(2)CO(3), KOH and sodium silicate (water glass) of various concentrations were used as alkali activators. It was established that the nature and concentration of the activator was the most dominant parameter in the alkali-activation process. In respect of physical characteristics of FA, the key parameter was fineness. The geopolymer based on FA with the highest content of fine particles (<43 microm), showed the highest compressive strength in all cases. Regardless of FA characteristics, nature and concentration of the activator, the alkali-activation products were mainly amorphous. The formation of crystalline phases (zeolites) occurred in some cases, depending on the reaction conditions. The highest compressive strength was obtained using sodium silicate. Together with the increase of sodium silicate SiO(2)/Na(2)O mass ratio, the atomic Si/Al ratio in the reaction products was also increased. Under the experimental conditions of this investigation, high strength was directly related to the high Si/Al ratio. PMID:20554110

  15. Phase holograms formed by silver halide /sensitized/ gelatin processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graver, W. R.; Gladden, J. W.; Eastes, J. W.

    1980-05-01

    A novel recording process for the formation of phase volume holograms at up to 1500 cycles/mm is described. The term silver halide (sensitized) gelatin or SHG denotes an all-gelatin phase material, which records the initial image information through photon absorption by the silver halide. Our process uses a reversal bleach that dissolves the developed silver image and cross-links the gelatin molecules in the vicinity of the developed image. Experiments have determined the stored image as refractive-index differences within the remaining gelatin. The major attributes of SHG holograms are (1) panchromatic response, (2) 100:1 greater light sensitivity than dichromate (sensitized) gelatin, and (3) elimination of darkening (printout) effects.

  16. Large methyl halide emissions from south Texas salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, R. C.; Whelan, M. E.; Min, D.-H.

    2014-06-01

    Coastal salt marshes are natural sources of methyl chloride (CH3Cl) and methyl bromide (CH3Br) to the atmosphere, but measured emission rates vary widely by geography. Here we report large methyl halide fluxes from subtropical salt marshes of south Texas. Sites with the halophytic plant, Batis maritima, emitted methyl halides at rates that are orders of magnitude greater than sites containing other vascular plants or macroalgae. B. maritima emissions were generally highest at midday; however, diurnal variability was more pronounced for CH3Br than CH3Cl, and surprisingly high nighttime CH3Cl fluxes were observed in July. Seasonal and intra-site variability were large, even taking into account biomass differences. Overall, these subtropical salt marsh sites show much higher emission rates than temperate salt marshes at similar times of the year, supporting the contention that low-latitude salt marshes are significant sources of CH3Cl and CH3Br.

  17. Large methyl halide emissions from south Texas salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, R. C.; Whelan, M. E.; Min, D.-H.

    2014-11-01

    Coastal salt marshes are natural sources of methyl chloride (CH3Cl) and methyl bromide (CH3Br) to the atmosphere, but measured emission rates vary widely by geography. Here we report large methyl halide fluxes from subtropical salt marshes of south Texas. Sites with the halophytic plant, Batis maritima, emitted methyl halides at rates that are orders of magnitude greater than sites containing other vascular plants or macroalgae. B. maritima emissions were generally highest at midday; however, diurnal variability was more pronounced for CH3Br than CH3Cl, and surprisingly high nighttime CH3Cl fluxes were observed in July. Seasonal and intra-site variability were large, even taking into account biomass differences. Overall, these subtropical salt marsh sites show much higher emission rates than temperate salt marshes at similar times of the year, supporting the contention that low-latitude salt marshes are significant sources of CH3Cl and CH3Br.

  18. Chemical Reactivity Perspective into the Group 2B Metals Halides.

    PubMed

    Özen, Alimet Sema; Akdeniz, Zehra

    2016-06-30

    Chemical reactivity descriptors within the conceptual density functional theory can be used to understand the nature of the interactions between two monomers of the Group 2B metal halides. This information might be valuable in the development of adequate force law parameters for simulations in the liquid state. In this study, MX2 monomers and dimers, where M = Zn, Cd, Hg and X = F, Cl, Br, I, were investigated in terms of chemical reactivity descriptors. Relativistic effects were taken into account using the effective core potential (ECP) approach. Correlations were produced between global and local reactivity descriptors and dimerization energies. Results presented in this work represent the first systematic investigation of Group 2B metal halides in the literature from a combined point of view of both relativistic effects and chemical reactivity descriptors. Steric effects were found to be responsible for the deviation from the chemical reactivity principles. They were introduced into the chemical reactivity descriptors such as local softness.

  19. Gaseous NH3 Confers Porous Pt Nanodendrites Assisted by Halides

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shuanglong; Eid, Kamel; Li, Weifeng; Cao, Xueqin; Pan, Yue; Guo, Jun; Wang, Liang; Wang, Hongjing; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Tailoring the morphology of Pt nanocrystals (NCs) is of great concern for their enhancement in catalytic activity and durability. In this article, a novel synthetic strategy is developed to selectively prepare porous dendritic Pt NCs with different structures for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) assisted by NH3 gas and halides (F−, Cl−, Br−). The NH3 gas plays critical roles on tuning the morphology. Previously, H2 and CO gas are reported to assist the shape control of metallic nanocrystals. This is the first demonstration that NH3 gas assists the Pt anisotropic growth. The halides also play important role in the synthetic strategy to regulate the formation of Pt NCs. As-made porous dendritic Pt NCs, especially when NH4F is used as a regulating reagent, show superior catalytic activity for ORR compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst and other previously reported Pt-based NCs. PMID:27184228

  20. Gaseous NH3 Confers Porous Pt Nanodendrites Assisted by Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shuanglong; Eid, Kamel; Li, Weifeng; Cao, Xueqin; Pan, Yue; Guo, Jun; Wang, Liang; Wang, Hongjing; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-05-01

    Tailoring the morphology of Pt nanocrystals (NCs) is of great concern for their enhancement in catalytic activity and durability. In this article, a novel synthetic strategy is developed to selectively prepare porous dendritic Pt NCs with different structures for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) assisted by NH3 gas and halides (F‑, Cl‑, Br‑). The NH3 gas plays critical roles on tuning the morphology. Previously, H2 and CO gas are reported to assist the shape control of metallic nanocrystals. This is the first demonstration that NH3 gas assists the Pt anisotropic growth. The halides also play important role in the synthetic strategy to regulate the formation of Pt NCs. As-made porous dendritic Pt NCs, especially when NH4F is used as a regulating reagent, show superior catalytic activity for ORR compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst and other previously reported Pt-based NCs.

  1. Enhanced Born Charge and Proximity to Ferroelectricity in Thallium Halides

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Mao-Hua; Singh, David J

    2010-01-01

    Electronic structure and lattice dynamics calculations on thallium halides show that the Born effective charges in these compounds are more than twice larger than the nominal ionic charges. This is a result of cross-band-gap hybridization between Tl-p and halogen-p states. The large Born charges cause giant splitting between longitudinal and transverse optic phonon modes, bringing the lattice close to ferroelectric instability. Our calculations indeed show spontaneous lattice polarization upon lattice expansion starting at 2%. It is remarkable that the apparently ionic thallium halides with a simple cubic CsCl structure and large differences in electronegativity between cations and anions can be very close to ferroelectricity. This can lead to effective screening of defects and impurities that would otherwise be strong carrier traps and may therefore contribute to the relatively good carrier transport properties in TlBr radiation detectors.

  2. Transport properties of alkali metal doped fullerides

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Daluram Yadav, Nishchhal

    2015-07-31

    We have studied the intercage interactions between the adjacent C{sub 60} cages and expansion of lattice due to the intercalation of alkali atoms based on the spring model to estimate phonon frequencies from the dynamical matrix for the intermolecular alkali-C{sub 60} phonons. We considered a two-peak model for the phonon density of states to investigate the nature of electron pairing mechanism for superconducting state in fullerides. Coulomb repulsive parameter and the electron phonon coupling strength are obtained within the random phase approximation. Transition temperature, T{sub c}, is obtained in a situation when the free electrons in lowest molecular orbital are coupled with alkali-C{sub 60} phonons as 5 K, which is much lower as compared to reported T{sub c} (20 K). The superconducting pairing is mainly driven by the high frequency intramolecular phonons and their effects enhance it to 22 K. The importance of the present study, the pressure effect and normal state transport properties are calculated within the same model leading superconductivity.

  3. Mesoscopic photosystems for solar light harvesting and conversion: facile and reversible transformation of metal-halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Harms, Hauke Arne; Tétreault, Nicolas; Pellet, Norman; Bensimon, Michaël; Grätzel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Recently, hybrid organic-inorganic metal halide perovskites have gained prominence as potent light harvesters in thin film solid-state photovoltaics. In particular the solar-to-electric power conversion efficiency (PCE) of devices using CH(3)NH(3)PbI(3) as sensitizer has increased from 3 to 20.1% within only a few years. This key material can be prepared by solution processing from PbI(2) and CH(3)NH(3)I in one step or by sequential deposition. In the latter case an electron capturing support such as TiO(2) is first covered with PbI(2), which upon exposure to a CH(3)NH(3)I solution is converted to the perovskite. Here we apply for the first time quartz crystal microbalance (QCMD) measurements in conjunction with X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy to analyse the dynamics of the conversion of PbI(2) to CH(3)NH(3)PbI(3). Employing 200 nm thick PbI(2) films as substrates we discover that the CH(3)NH(3)I insertion in the PbI(2) is reversible, with the extraction into the solvent isopropanol occurring on the same time scale of seconds as the intercalation process. This offers an explanation for the strikingly rapid and facile exchange of halide ions in CH(3)NH(3)PbX(3) by solution processing at room temperature. PMID:25643832

  4. Mesoscopic photosystems for solar light harvesting and conversion: facile and reversible transformation of metal-halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Harms, Hauke Arne; Tétreault, Nicolas; Pellet, Norman; Bensimon, Michaël; Grätzel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Recently, hybrid organic-inorganic metal halide perovskites have gained prominence as potent light harvesters in thin film solid-state photovoltaics. In particular the solar-to-electric power conversion efficiency (PCE) of devices using CH(3)NH(3)PbI(3) as sensitizer has increased from 3 to 20.1% within only a few years. This key material can be prepared by solution processing from PbI(2) and CH(3)NH(3)I in one step or by sequential deposition. In the latter case an electron capturing support such as TiO(2) is first covered with PbI(2), which upon exposure to a CH(3)NH(3)I solution is converted to the perovskite. Here we apply for the first time quartz crystal microbalance (QCMD) measurements in conjunction with X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy to analyse the dynamics of the conversion of PbI(2) to CH(3)NH(3)PbI(3). Employing 200 nm thick PbI(2) films as substrates we discover that the CH(3)NH(3)I insertion in the PbI(2) is reversible, with the extraction into the solvent isopropanol occurring on the same time scale of seconds as the intercalation process. This offers an explanation for the strikingly rapid and facile exchange of halide ions in CH(3)NH(3)PbX(3) by solution processing at room temperature.

  5. Copper-catalyzed arylation of alkyl halides with arylaluminum reagents

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Bijay

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report a Cu-catalyzed coupling between triarylaluminum reagents and alkyl halides to form arylalkanes. The reaction proceeds in the presence of N,N,N’,N’-tetramethyl-o-phenylenediamine (NN-1) as a ligand in combination with CuI as a catalyst. This catalyst system enables the coupling of primary alkyl iodides and bromides with electron-neutral and electron-rich triarylaluminum reagents and affords the cross-coupled products in good to excellent yields. PMID:26734088

  6. Copper-catalyzed arylation of alkyl halides with arylaluminum reagents.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Bijay; Giri, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    We report a Cu-catalyzed coupling between triarylaluminum reagents and alkyl halides to form arylalkanes. The reaction proceeds in the presence of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-o-phenylenediamine (NN-1) as a ligand in combination with CuI as a catalyst. This catalyst system enables the coupling of primary alkyl iodides and bromides with electron-neutral and electron-rich triarylaluminum reagents and affords the cross-coupled products in good to excellent yields. PMID:26734088

  7. Ion spatial distributions at the liquid-vapor interface of aqueous potassium fluoride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M A; D'Auria, R; Kuo, I W; Krisch, M J; Starr, D E; Bluhm, H; Tobias, D J; Hemminger, J C

    2008-04-23

    X-ray photoemission spectroscopy operating under ambient pressure conditions is used to probe ion distributions throughout the interfacial region of a free-flowing aqueous liquid micro-jet of 6 M potassium fluoride. Varying the energy of the ejected photoelectrons by carrying out experiments as a function of x-ray wavelength measures the composition of the aqueous-vapor interfacial region at various depths. The F{sup -} to K{sup +} atomic ratio is equal to unity throughout the interfacial region to a depth of 2 nm. The experimental ion profiles are compared with the results of a classical molecular dynamics simulation of a 6 M aqueous KF solution employing polarizable potentials. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with the simulations when integrated over an exponentially decaying probe depth characteristic of an APPES experiment. First principles molecular dynamics simulations have been used to calculate the potential of mean force for moving a fluoride anion across the air-water interface. The results show that the fluoride anion is repelled from the interface, and this is consistent with the depletion of F{sup -} at the interface revealed by the APPES experiment and polarizable force field-based molecular dynamics simulation. Together, the APPES and MD simulation data provide a detailed description of the aqueous-vapor interface of alkali fluoride systems. This work offers the first direct observation of the ion distribution at a potassium fluoride aqueous solution interface. The current experimental results are compared to those previously obtained for saturated solutions of KBr and KI to underscore the strong difference in surface propensity between soft/large and hard/small halide ions in aqueous solution.

  8. Deciphering Halogen Competition in Organometallic Halide Perovskite Growth.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Keum, Jong; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Belianinov, Alex; Chen, Shiyou; Du, Mao-Hua; Ivanov, Ilia N; Rouleau, Christopher M; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2016-04-20

    Organometallic halide perovskites (OHPs) hold great promise for next-generation, low-cost optoelectronic devices. During the chemical synthesis and crystallization of OHP thin films, a major unresolved question is the competition between multiple halide species (e.g., I(-), Cl(-), Br(-)) in the formation of the mixed-halide perovskite crystals. Whether Cl(-) ions are successfully incorporated into the perovskite crystal structure or, alternatively, where they are located is not yet fully understood. Here, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of crystallization dynamics are combined with ex situ TOF-SIMS chemical analysis to reveal that Br(-) or Cl(-) ions can promote crystal growth, yet reactive I(-) ions prevent them from incorporating into the lattice of the final perovskite crystal structure. The Cl(-) ions are located in the grain boundaries of the perovskite films. These findings significantly advance our understanding of the role of halogens during synthesis of hybrid perovskites and provide an insightful guidance to the engineering of high-quality perovskite films, essential for exploring superior-performing and cost-effective optoelectronic devices. PMID:26931634

  9. Deciphering Halogen Competition in Organometallic Halide Perovskite Growth

    DOE PAGES

    Keum, Jong Kahk; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Chen, Shiyou; Du, Mao-Hua; Ivanov, Ilia N; Rouleau, Christopher; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2016-03-01

    Organometallic halide perovskites (OHPs) hold great promise for next-generation, low-cost optoelectronic devices. During the chemical synthesis and crystallization of OHP thin films a major unresolved question is the competition between multiple halide species (e.g. I-, Cl-, Br-) in the formation of the mixed halide perovskite crystals. Whether Cl- ions are successfully incorporated into the perovskite crystal structure or alternatively, where they are located, is not yet fully understood. Here, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of crystallization dynamics are combined with ex situ TOF-SIMS chemical analysis to reveal that Br- or Cl- ions can promote crystal growth, yet reactive I- ionsmore » prevent them from incorporating into the lattice of the final perovskite crystal structure. The Cl- ions are located in the grain boundaries of the perovskite films. These findings significantly advance our understanding of the role of halogens during synthesis of hybrid perovskites, and provide an insightful guidance to the engineering of high-quality perovskite films, essential for exploring superior-performance and cost-effective optoelectronic devices.« less

  10. Methyl halide emissions from greenhouse-grown mangroves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manley, Steven L.; Wang, Nun-Yii; Walser, Maggie L.; Cicerone, Ralph J.

    2007-01-01

    Two mangrove species, Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle, were greenhouse grown for nearly 1.5 years from saplings. A single individual of each species was monitored for the emission of methyl halides from aerial tissue. During the first 240 days, salinity was incrementally increased with the addition of seawater, and was maintained between 18 and 28‰ for the duration of the study. Exponential growth occurred after 180 days. Methyl halide emissions normalized to leaf area were measured throughout the study and varied dramatically. Emission rates normalized to land area (mg m-2 y-1), assuming a LAI = 5, yielded 82 and 29 for CH3Cl, 10 and 1.6 for CH3Br, and 26 and 11 for CH3I, for A. germinans and R. mangle, respectively. From these preliminary determinations, only CH3I emissions emerge as being of possible global atmospheric significance. This study emphasizes the need for field studies of methyl halide emissions from mangrove forests.

  11. Secondary alkyl halides in transition-metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Alena; Lautens, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Enormous effort has gone into the development of metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions with alkyl halides as electrophilic coupling partners. Whereas a wide array of primary alkyl halides can now be used effectively in cross-coupling reactions, the synthetic potential of secondary alkyl halides is just beginning to be revealed. This Minireview summarizes selected examples of the use of secondary alkyl halides as electrophiles in cross-coupling reactions. Emphasis is placed on the transition metals employed, the mechanistic pathways involved, and implications in terms of the stereochemical outcome of reactions.

  12. Systematic analysis of the unique band gap modulation of mixed halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongseob; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Chung, Choong-Heui; Hong, Ki-Ha

    2016-02-14

    Solar cells based on organic-inorganic hybrid metal halide perovskites have been proven to be one of the most promising candidates for the next generation thin film photovoltaic cells. Mixing Br or Cl into I-based perovskites has been frequently tried to enhance the cell efficiency and stability. One of the advantages of mixed halides is the modulation of band gap by controlling the composition of the incorporated halides. However, the reported band gap transition behavior has not been resolved yet. Here a theoretical model is presented to understand the electronic structure variation of metal mixed-halide perovskites through hybrid density functional theory. Comparative calculations in this work suggest that the band gap correction including spin-orbit interaction is essential to describe the band gap changes of mixed halides. In our model, both the lattice variation and the orbital interactions between metal and halides play key roles to determine band gap changes and band alignments of mixed halides. It is also presented that the band gap of mixed halide thin films can be significantly affected by the distribution of halide composition. PMID:26791587

  13. Absorption of inorganic halides produced from Freon 12 by calcium carbonate containing iron(III) oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, Seiichiro; Matsuba, Yoichi; Yamada, Etsu; Takai, Kenji; Utani, Kazunori

    1997-09-01

    Inorganic halides produced by the catalytic decomposition of Freon 12 were fixed by calcium carbonate, which is the main component of limestone. Iron(III) oxide, which is present as a contaminant in limestone, promoted the absorption of the halides by calcium carbonate at low temperatures. The supposed action of iron(III) oxide was to first react with inorganic halides, forming iron halides, and, then, transfer them to calcium carbonate to replace carbonate ion in a catalytic way. Thus, calcium carbonate containing iron oxides (limestone) can be used as an effective absorbent for the inorganic halogens produced during the decomposition of Freons.

  14. Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by use of molten metal halide catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst, thereafter separating at least a substantial portion of the carbonaceous material associated with the reaction mixture from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the metal halide catalyst, an improvement comprising contacting the spent molten metal halide catalyst after removal of a major portion of the carbonaceous material therefrom with an additional quantity of hydrogen is disclosed.

  15. Performance of a biogas upgrading process based on alkali absorption with regeneration using air pollution control residues.

    PubMed

    Baciocchi, Renato; Carnevale, Ennio; Costa, Giulia; Gavasci, Renato; Lombardi, Lidia; Olivieri, Tommaso; Zanchi, Laura; Zingaretti, Daniela

    2013-12-01

    This work analyzes the performance of an innovative biogas upgrading method, Alkali absorption with Regeneration (AwR) that employs industrial residues and allows to permanently store the separated CO2. This process consists in a first stage in which CO2 is removed from the biogas by means of chemical absorption with KOH or NaOH solutions followed by a second stage in which the spent absorption solution is contacted with waste incineration Air Pollution Control (APC) residues. The latter reaction leads to the regeneration of the alkali reagent in the solution and to the precipitation of calcium carbonate and hence allows to reuse the regenerated solution in the absorption process and to permanently store the separated CO2 in solid form. In addition, the final solid product is characterized by an improved environmental behavior compared to the untreated residues. In this paper the results obtained by AwR tests carried out in purposely designed demonstrative units installed in a landfill site are presented and discussed with the aim of verifying the feasibility of this process at pilot-scale and of identifying the conditions that allow to achieve all of the goals targeted by the proposed treatment. Specifically, the CO2 removal efficiency achieved in the absorption stage, the yield of alkali regeneration and CO2 uptake resulting for the regeneration stage, as well as the leaching behavior of the solid product are analyzed as a function of the type and concentration of the alkali reagent employed for the absorption reaction.

  16. Abiotic Formation of Methyl Halides in the Terrestrial Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppler, F.

    2011-12-01

    Methyl chloride and methyl bromide are the most abundant chlorine and bromine containing organic compounds in the atmosphere. Since both compounds have relatively long tropospheric lifetimes they can effectively transport halogen atoms from the Earth's surface, where they are released, to the stratosphere and following photolytic oxidation form reactive halogen gases that lead to the chemical destruction of ozone. Methyl chloride and methyl bromide account for more than 20% of the ozone-depleting halogens delivered to the stratosphere and are predicted to grow in importance as the chlorine contribution to the stratosphere from anthropogenic CFCs decline. Today methyl chloride and methyl bromide originate mainly from natural sources with only a minor fraction considered to be of anthropogenic origin. However, until as recently as 2000 most of the methyl chloride and methyl bromide input to the atmosphere was considered to originate from the oceans, but investigations in recent years have clearly demonstrated that terrestrial sources such as biomass burning, wood-rotting fungi, coastal salt marshes, tropical vegetation and organic matter degradation must dominate the atmospheric budgets of these trace gases. However, many uncertainties still exist regarding strengths of both sources and sinks, as well as the mechanisms of formation of these naturally occurring halogenated gases. A better understanding of the atmospheric budget of both methyl chloride and methyl bromide is therefore required for reliable prediction of future ozone depletion. Biotic and abiotic methylation processes of chloride and bromide ion are considered to be the dominant pathways of formation of these methyl halides in nature. In this presentation I will focus on abiotic formation processes in the terrestrial environment and the potential parameters that control their emissions. Recent advances in our understanding of the abiotic formation pathway of methyl halides will be discussed. This will

  17. Physical and electrochemical study of halide-modified activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barpanda, Prabeer

    The current thesis aims to improve the electrochemical capacity of activated carbon electrodes, which enjoy prominent position in commercial electrochemical capacitors. Our approach was to develop electrochemical capacity by developing faradaic pseudocapacitance in carbon through a novel mechanochemical modification using iodine and bromine. Various commercial carbons were mechanochemically modified via solid-state iodation and vapour phase iodine-incorporation. The halidation-induced changes in the structure, composition, morphology, electrical and electrochemical properties of carbon materials were studied using different characterization techniques encompassing XRD, XRF, XPS, Raman spectroscopy, BET study, TEM, SAXS and electrochemical testing followed by an intensive battery of physical and electrochemical characterization. The introduction of iodine into carbon system led to the formation of polyiodide species that were preferentially reacted within the micropore voids within the carbon leading to the development of a faradaic reaction at 3.1V. In spite of the lower surface area of modified carbon, we observed manyfold increase in its electrochemical capacity. Parallel inception of non-faradaic development and faradaic pseudocapacitive reaction led to promising gravimetric, surface area normalized and volumetric capacity in iodated carbons. With promising electrochemical improvement post halidation process, the chemical halidation method was extended to different class of carbons and halides. Carbons ranging from amorphous (activated) carbons to crystalline carbons (graphites, fluorographites) were iodine-modified to gain further insight on the local graphite-iodine chemical interaction. In addition, the effect of pore size distribution on chemical iodation process was studied by using in-house fabricated microporous carbon. A comparative study of commercial mesoporous carbons and in-house fabricated microporous carbons showed higher iodine-uptake ability and

  18. Diode-pumped alkali laser-bleached wave dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perram, Glen P.; Miller, Wooddy; Hurd, Ed

    2012-11-01

    A three level analytic model for optically pumped alkali metal vapor lasers is developed by considering the steady state rate equations for the longitudinally averaged number densities of the ground 2S 1/2 and first excited 2P3/2, and 2P1/2 states. The threshold pump intensity includes both the requirements to fully bleach the pump transition and exceed optical losses, typically about 200 Watts/cm2. Slope efficiency depends critically on the fraction of incident photons absorbed. For efficient operation, the collisional relaxation between the two upper levels should be fast to prevent bottle-necking. By assuming a statistical distribution between the upper two levels, the limiting analytic solution for the quasi-two level system is achieved. The highly saturated pump limit of the recently developed three-level model for Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers (DPAL) is also developed. The model is anchored to several recent laser demonstrations. A rubidium laser pumped on the 5 2S1/2 - 5 2P3/2 D2 transition by a pulsed dye laser at pump intensities exceeding 3.5 MW/cm2 (< 1000 times threshold) has been demonstrated. Output energies as high as 12 μJ/pulse are limited by the rate for collision relaxation of the pumped 2P3/2 state to the upper laser 2P1/2 state. More than 250 photons are available for every rubidium atom in the pumped volume during each pulse. For modest alkali atom and ethane spin-orbit relaxer concentrations, the gain medium can only process about 50 photons/atom during the 2 - 8 ns pump pulse. At 110° C and 550 Torr of ethane, the system is bottlenecked. The system efficiency based on absorbed photons approaches 36% even for these extreme pump conditions. Furthermore, at 320°C with 2500 torr of helium, a pulsed potassium laser with 1.15 MW/cm2 peak intensity and 9.3% slope efficiency has been demonstrated.

  19. Rare-Earth Tri-Halide Methanol-Adduct Single-Crystal Scintillators for Gamma Ray and Neutron Detection - 8/17/09

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Wisniewski, D.; Neal, John S; Bell, Zane W; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Kolopus, James A; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Custelcean, Radu; Wisniewska, Monika; Peña, K. E.

    2009-01-01

    Cerium activated rare-earth tri- halides represent a well-known family of high performance inorganic rare-earth scintillators - including the high-light-yield, high-energy-resolution scintillator, cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide. These hygroscopic inorganic rare-earth halides are currently grown as single crystals from the melt - either by the Bridgman or Czochralski techniques slow and expensive processes that are frequently characterized by severe cracking of the material due to anisotropic thermal stresses and cleavage effects. We have recently discovered a new family of cerium-activated rare-earth metal organic scintillators consisting of tri-halide methanol adducts of cerium and lanthanum namely CeCl3(CH3OH)4 and LaBr3(CH3OH)4:Ce. These methanol-adduct scintillator materials can be grown near room temperature from a methanol solution, and their high solubility is consistent with the application of the rapid solution growth methods that are currently used to grow very large single crystals of potassium dihydrogen phosphate. The structures of these new rare-earth metal-organic scintillating compounds were determined by single crystal x-ray refinements, and their scintillation response to both gamma rays and neutrons, as presented here, was characterized using different excitation sources. Tri-halide methanol-adduct crystals activated with trivalent cerium apparently represent the initial example of a solution-grown rare-earth metal-organic molecular scintillator that is applicable to gamma ray, x-ray, and fast neutron detection.

  20. Method for the safe disposal of alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Terry R.

    1977-01-01

    Alkali metals such as those employed in liquid metal coolant systems can be safely reacted to form hydroxides by first dissolving the alkali metal in relatively inert metals such as lead or bismuth. The alloy thus formed is contacted with a molten salt including the alkali metal hydroxide and possibly the alkali metal carbonate in the presence of oxygen. This oxidizes the alkali metal to an oxide which is soluble within the molten salt. The salt is separated and contacted with steam or steam-CO.sub.2 mixture to convert the alkali metal oxide to the hydroxide. These reactions can be conducted with minimal hydrogen evolution and with the heat of reaction distributed between the several reaction steps.