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Sample records for alkali halides doped

  1. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  2. Relation between the electroforming voltage in alkali halide-polymer diodes and the bandgap of the alkali halide

    SciTech Connect

    Bory, Benjamin F.; Wang, Jingxin; Janssen, René A. J.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Gomes, Henrique L.; De Leeuw, Dago M.

    2014-12-08

    Electroforming of indium-tin-oxide/alkali halide/poly(spirofluorene)/Ba/Al diodes has been investigated by bias dependent reflectivity measurements. The threshold voltages for electrocoloration and electroforming are independent of layer thickness and correlate with the bandgap of the alkali halide. We argue that the origin is voltage induced defect formation. Frenkel defect pairs are formed by electron–hole recombination in the alkali halide. This self-accelerating process mitigates injection barriers. The dynamic junction formation is compared to that of a light emitting electrochemical cell. A critical defect density for electroforming is 10{sup 25}/m{sup 3}. The electroformed alkali halide layer can be considered as a highly doped semiconductor with metallic transport characteristics.

  3. The Additive Coloration of Alkali Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jirgal, G. H.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an inexpensive, vacuum furnace designed to produce F-centers in alkali halide crystals by additive coloration. The method described avoids corrosion or contamination during the coloration process. Examination of the resultant crystals is discussed and several experiments using additively colored crystals are…

  4. Ionic alkali halide XUV laser feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.T.; Gylys, V.T.; Bower, R.D.; Harris, D.G.; Blauer, J.A.; Turner, C.E.; Hindy, R.N.

    1989-11-10

    The objective of this work is to assess the feasibility of a select set of ionic alkali halide XUV laser concepts by obtaining the relevant kinetic and spectroscopic parameters required for a proof-of-principle and conceptual design. The proposed lasers operate in the 80--200 nm spectral region and do not require input from outside radiation sources for their operation. Frequency up-conversion and frequency mixing techniques and therefore not considered in the work to be described. An experimental and theoretical study of a new type of laser operating in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength region has been conducted. The lasing species are singly ionized alkali halide molecules such as Rb{sup 2+}F{sub {minus}}, Rb{sup 2+}Br{sup {minus}} and Cs{sup 2+}F{sup {minus}}. These species are similar in electronic structure to the rare gas halide excimers, such as XeF and Krf, except that the ionic molecules emit at wavelengths of 80--200 nm, much shorter than the conventional rare-gas halide excimer laser. The radiative lifetime of these molecules are typically near 1 ns, which is about an order of magnitude shorter than that for rare-gas halide systems. The values of the cross section for stimulated emission are on the order of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}16}cm{sup 2}. Because of the fundamental similarity to existing UV lasers, these systems show promise as a high power, efficient XUV lasers. 55 refs., 50 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Alkali Halide Nanotubes: Structure and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Lima, Francisco A.; Henkes, Aline Verônica; da Silveira, Enio F.; Nascimento, Marco Antonio Chaer

    2013-01-01

    Accurate density functional theory (DFT) and coupled-cluster (CCSD) calculations on a series of (LiF)n=2,36 neutral clusters suggest that nanotube structures with hexagonal and octagonal transversal cross sections show stability equal to or greater than that of the typical cubic form of large LiF crystals. The nanotube stability was further corroborated by quantum dynamic calculations at room temperature. The fact that stable nanotube structures were also found for other alkali halides (e.g., NaCl and KBr) suggests that this geometry may be widely implemented in material sciences. PMID:24376901

  6. Electrochemical Doping of Halide Perovskites with Ion Intercalation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qinglong; Chen, Mingming; Li, Junqiang; Wang, Mingchao; Zeng, Xiaoqiao; Besara, Tiglet; Lu, Jun; Xin, Yan; Shan, Xin; Pan, Bicai; Wang, Changchun; Lin, Shangchao; Siegrist, Theo; Xiao, Qiangfeng; Yu, Zhibin

    2017-01-24

    Halide perovskites have recently been investigated for various solution-processed optoelectronic devices. The majority of studies have focused on using intrinsic halide perovskites, and the intentional incoporation of dopants has not been well explored. In this work, we discovered that small alkali ions, including lithium and sodium ions, could be electrochemically intercalated into a variety of halide and pseudohalide perovskites. The ion intercalation caused a lattice expansion of the perovskite crystals and resulted in an n-type doping of the perovskites. Such electrochemical doping improved the conductivity and changed the color of the perovskites, leading to an electrochromism with more than 40% reduction of transmittance in the 450-850 nm wavelength range. The doped perovskites exhibited improved electron injection efficiency into the pristine perovskite crystals, resulting in bright light-emitting diodes with a low turn-on voltage.

  7. Cohesive Energy-Lattice Constant and Bulk Modulus-Lattice Constant Relationships: Alkali Halides, Ag Halides, Tl Halides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert

    1992-01-01

    In this note we present two expressions relating the cohesive energy, E(sub coh), and the zero pressure isothermal bulk modulus, B(sub 0), of the alkali halides. Ag halides and TI halides, with the nearest neighbor distances, d(sub nn). First, we show that the product E(sub coh)d(sub 0) within families of halide crystals with common crystal structure is to a good approximation constant, with maximum rms deviation of plus or minus 2%. Secondly, we demonstrate that within families of halide crystals with a common cation and common crystal structure the product B(sub 0)d(sup 3.5)(sub nn) is a good approximation constant, with maximum rms deviation of plus or minus 1.36%.

  8. Alkali Halide Microstructured Optical Fiber for X-Ray Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeHaven, S. L.; Wincheski, R. A.; Albin, S.

    2014-01-01

    Microstructured optical fibers containing alkali halide scintillation materials of CsI(Na), CsI(Tl), and NaI(Tl) are presented. The scintillation materials are grown inside the microstructured fibers using a modified Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers, with and without an aluminum film coating are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The photon count results show significant variations in the fiber output based on the materials. The alkali halide fiber output can exceed that of the CdTe detector, dependent upon photon counter efficiency and fiber configuration. The results and associated materials difference are discussed.

  9. Alkali halide microstructured optical fiber for X-ray detection

    SciTech Connect

    DeHaven, S. L. E-mail: russel.a.wincheski@nasa.gov; Wincheski, R. A. E-mail: russel.a.wincheski@nasa.gov; Albin, S.

    2015-03-31

    Microstructured optical fibers containing alkali halide scintillation materials of CsI(Na), CsI(Tl), and NaI(Tl) are presented. The scintillation materials are grown inside the microstructured fibers using a modified Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers, with and without an aluminum film coating are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The photon count results show significant variations in the fiber output based on the materials. The alkali halide fiber output can exceed that of the CdTe detector, dependent upon photon counter efficiency and fiber configuration. The results and associated materials difference are discussed.

  10. Far Infrared Optical Spectroscopy of Alkali Halide-Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWhirter, J. T.; Broderick, S. D.; Rodriguez, G. A.

    1998-03-01

    Composite samples of small (dimension < 10 =B5m) alkali halide crystallites in a polymer matrix (low density polyethylene and polytetrafluoroethylene) have been prepared. The far infrared optical spectra of these samples are presented, spanning a temperature range of 300 to <10 K, and a dominant absorption feature due to absorption by the transverse optic phonon of the alkali halide constituent is observed. An effective medium analysis of the samples, using the Maxwell-Garnett model, is shown to accurately reproduce the main absorption feature, but requires a shape factor for the inclusion geometry corresponding to flat, plate-like inclusions, and a plausible explanation for such a geometry is proposed. The temperature dependence of the frequency and linewidth of the absorption peak is presented. The temperature shift of the line-center-frequency is found to be adequately described by a quasiharmonic description of the transverse optic phonon energy shift of the alkali halide due to lattice thermal expansion, using published values for the mode Gruneisen parameter and the temperature dependence of the lattice thermal coefficient. In contrast, the linewidth (phonon lifetime) of the composite samples is roughly twice as large as that observed for thin film and bulk crystals, and has a much stronger temperature dependence as well.

  11. Volcanic Origin of Alkali Halides on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, L.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The recent observation of NaCl (gas) on Io confirms our earlier prediction that NaCl is produced volcanically. Here we extend our calculations by modeling thermochemical equilibrium of O, S, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, F, Cl, Br, and I as a function of temperature and pressure in a Pele-like volcanic gas with O/S/Na/Cl/K = 1.518/1/0.05/0.04/0.005 and CI chondritic ratios of the other (as yet unobserved) alkalis and halogens. For reference, the nominal temperature and pressure for Pele is 1760 plus or minus 210 K and 0.01 bars based on Galileo data and modeling.

  12. Absorption Coefficient of Alkali Halides. Part I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-01

    442 LIAY OF ~:S42.~SON T111 ALiSON ,’FlON CU12rCIUNT OF .l~i~ FLUORIVIl: (iviunLvr Iiepcndcncu) (cort .i.j) S’t .~Ue Rne uhr~) ~clo Wvna,br n rt...al. [134j reported their results for the region from 0.170 to 0.197 um and Handi et al. [24] reported results for the range of 35 to 770 pm. Li (331...lection Spectra of Pure and Doped Potassium Iodide at Low Temperatures," Appl. Opt., 7(1), 161-5 (1968). L, __ 243 26. Vergnat, P., Claudel, J., Handi

  13. Alkali Metal Halide Salts as Interface Additives to Fabricate Hysteresis-Free Hybrid Perovskite-Based Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Moghe, Dhanashree; Hafezian, Soroush; Chen, Pei; Young, Margaret; Elinski, Mark; Martinu, Ludvik; Kéna-Cohen, Stéphane; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-09-07

    A new method was developed for doping and fabricating hysteresis-free hybrid perovskite-based photovoltaic devices by using alkali metal halide salts as interface layer additives. Such salt layers introduced at the perovskite interface can provide excessive halide ions to fill vacancies formed during the deposition and annealing process. A range of solution-processed halide salts were investigated. The highest performance of methylammonium lead mixed-halide perovskite device was achieved with a NaI interlayer and showed a power conversion efficiency of 12.6% and a hysteresis of less than 2%. This represents a 90% improvement compared to control devices without this salt layer. Through depth-resolved mass spectrometry, optical modeling, and photoluminescence spectroscopy, this enhancement is attributed to the reduction of iodide vacancies, passivation of grain boundaries, and improved hole extraction. Our approach ultimately provides an alternative and facile route to high-performance and hysteresis-free perovskite solar cells.

  14. Dislocation unpinning model of acoustic emission from alkali halide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, B. P.; Gour, Anubha S.; Chandra, Vivek K.; Patil, Yuvraj

    2004-06-01

    The present paper reports the dislocation unpinning model of acoustic emis- sion (AE) from alkali halide crystals. Equations are derived for the strain dependence of the transient AE pulse rate, peak value of the AE pulse rate and the total number of AE pulse emitted. It is found that the AE pulse rate should be maximum for a particular strain of the crystals. The peak value of the AE pulse rate should depend on the volume and strain rate of the crystals, and also on the pinning time of dislocations. Since the pinning time of dislocations decreases with increasing strain rate, the AE pulse rate should be weakly dependent on the strain rate of the crystals. The total number of AE should increase linearly with deformation and then it should attain a saturation value for the large deformation. By measuring the strain dependence of the AE pulse rate at a fixed strain rate, the time constant tau_{s} for surface annihilation of dislocations and the pinning time tau_{p} of the dislocations can be determined. A good agreement is found between the theoretical and experimental results related to the AE from alkali halide crystals.

  15. Pressure variation of melting temperatures of alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafin, Sayyadul; Singh, Ram N.

    2017-02-01

    The melting temperatures of alkali halides (LiCl, LiF, NaBr, NaCl, NaF, NaI, KBr, KCl, KF, KI, RbBr, RbCl, RbI and CsI) have been evaluated over a wide range of pressures. The solid-liquid transition of alkali halides is of considerable significance due to their huge industrial applications. Our formalism requires a priori knowledge of the bulk modulus and the Grüneisen parameter at ambient conditions to compute Tm at high pressures. The computed values are in very good agreement with the available experimental results. The formalism can satisfactorily be used to compute Tm at high pressures where the experimental data are scanty. Most of the melting curves (Tm versus P) exhibit nonlinear variation with increasing pressure having curvatures downward and exhibit a maximum in some cases like NaCl, RbBr, RbCl and RbI. The values of Tmmax and Pmax corresponding to the maxima of the curves are given.

  16. A new polarizable force field for alkali and halide ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, Péter T.; Baranyai, András

    2014-09-21

    We developed transferable potentials for alkali and halide ions which are consistent with our recent model of water [P. T. Kiss and A. Baranyai, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 204507 (2013)]. Following the approach used for the water potential, we applied Gaussian charge distributions, exponential repulsion, and r{sup −6} attraction. One of the two charges of the ions is fixed to the center of the particle, while the other is connected to this charge by a harmonic spring to express polarization. Polarizability is taken from quantum chemical calculations. The repulsion between different species is expressed by the combining rule of Kong [J. Chem. Phys. 59, 2464 (1972)]. Our primary target was the hydration free energy of ions which is correct within the error of calculations. We calculated water-ion clusters up to 6 water molecules, and, as a crosscheck, we determined the density and internal energy of alkali-halide crystals at ambient conditions with acceptable accuracy. The structure of hydrated ions was also discussed.

  17. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  18. Thermal neutron detection using alkali halide scintillators with Li-6 and pulse shape discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, Erik; Dibble, Dean C.; Mengesha, Wondwosen; Yang, Pin

    2013-09-01

    An ideal 3He detector replacement for the near- to medium-term future will use materials that are easy to produce and well understood, while maintaining thermal neutron detection efficiency and gamma rejection close to the 3He standard. Toward this end, we investigated the use of standard alkali halide scintillators interfaced with 6Li and read out with photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Thermal neutrons are captured on 6Li with high efficiency, emitting high-energy and triton (3H) reaction products. These particles deposit energy in the scintillator, providing a thermal neutron signal; discrimination against gamma interactions is possible via pulse shape discrimination (PSD), since heavy particles produce faster pulses in alkali halide crystals. We constructed and tested two classes of detectors based on this concept. In one case 6Li is used as a dopant in polycrystalline NaI; in the other case a thin Li foil is used as a conversion layer. In the configurations studied here, these systems are sensitive to both gamma and neutron radiation, with discrimination between the two and good energy resolution for gamma spectroscopy. We present results from our investigations, including measurements of the neutron efficiency and gamma rejection for the two detector types. We also show a comparison with Cs2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC), which is emerging as the standard scintillator for simultaneous gamma and thermal neutron detection, and also allows PSD. We conclude that 6Li foil with CsI scintillating crystals has near-term promise as a thermal neutron detector in applications previously dominated by 3He detectors. The other approach, 6Li-doped alkali halides, has some potential, but require more work to understand material properties and improve fabrication processes.

  19. The Effect of Radiation "Memory" in Alkali-Halide Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovkin, M. V.; Sal'nikov, V. N.

    2017-01-01

    The exposure of the alkali-halide crystals to ionizing radiation leads to the destruction of their structure, the emergence of radiation defects, and the formation of the electron and hole color centers. Destruction of the color centers upon heating is accompanied by the crystal bleaching, luminescence, and radio-frequency electromagnetic emission (REME). After complete thermal bleaching of the crystal, radiation defects are not completely annealed, as the electrons and holes released from the color centers by heating leave charged and locally uncompensated defects. Clusters of these "pre centers" lead to electric microheterogeneity of the crystal, the formation of a quasi-electret state, and the emergence of micro-discharges accompanied by radio emission. The generation of REME associated with residual defectiveness, is a manifestation of the effect of radiation "memory" in dielectrics.

  20. Potential function and dissociation energy of alkali halide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Abhay P.; Pandey, Anjani K.; Pandey, Brijesh K.

    2016-05-01

    Dissociation energy of some alkali halides have been calculated by using different interaction potential function such as Born-Mayer, Varshani-Shukla and L5 potential model. The theoretical calculation is compared with experimental values. The Result shows that the values of dissociation energy as calculated by using different potential models have an equal amount of deviation with experimental values. The above said deviation with experimental values can be explained by consideration of rotational-vibrational coupling between the constituents of molecules in the limelight of molecular spectroscopy. Findings of present work suggest that the existing potential model need to be reviewed in view of the correction factors solely depending on the rotational, vibrational and electronic coupling between the constituents of molecules.

  1. The entropies of the hard sphere alkali halide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, John W.; Beyerlein, Adolph L.

    1982-08-01

    An asymptotic expansion for the entropy of hard-sphere alkali halide crystals with N small and large particle pairs is obtained: SN/NkB ≃τ→13 ln(σls2e)/(λlλs) +3 ln(τ1/3-1)+3 ln ɛ-C-Dɛ-Eɛ2+ṡṡṡ, where kB is the Boltzman constant, e is the natural number, τ is the ratio of the system volume to its high compression limiting volume, λl and λs are the mean thermal de Broglie wavelengths [λ=(h2/2πmkBT)1/2, m being the mass] of the large and small particles, respectively, σls is the hard-sphere collision diameter of nearest neighbor large and small particles; C, D, E, etc. are well-defined parameters dependent on the small to large particle radius ratio and the lattice structure, and ɛ=[(τ1/3-1)+(1-σls/σls')], where σls' is the average distance between nearest neighbor large and small particles in the high compression limit. If the small to large particle radius ratio is less than √2-1 for the ''NaCl'' lattice and less than √3-1 for the ''CsCl'' lattice σls<σls'. For greater small to large particle radius ratios σls=σls'. The result differs from the asymptotic expansion for a crystal of N uniform spheres obtained by Salsburg, Stillinger, and co-workers [J. Chem. Phys. 49, 4857 (1968)] in that it contains the additional logarithmic term 3 ln ɛ and a smallness parameter ɛ that differs from τ1/3-1, used by the earlier workers. Estimates of the leading parameter C were made using the modified cell cluster expansion. The predicted entropies of the alkali metal fluoride salts approach the experimental values at temperatures approaching the melting point which is consistent with the contention that the hard sphere contribution to the entropy dominates other contributions at high temperatures. The predicted difference between the entropies of the two alkali halide lattices is also consistent with the experimental data at higher temperatures.

  2. Efficient destruction of CF4 through in situ generation of alkali metals from heated alkali halide reducing mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Churl; Choi, Wonyong

    2002-03-15

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are the most potent green house gases that are very recalcitrant at destruction. An effective way of converting PFCs using hot solid reagents into safe products has been recently introduced. By investigating the thermal reductive destruction of tetrafluoromethane (CF4) we provided new insight and more physicochemical consideration on this novel process. The complete destruction of CF4was successfully achieved by flowing the gas through a heated reagent bed (400-950 degrees C) that contained powder mixtures of alkali halides, CaO, and Si. The silicon acted as a reducing agent of alkali halides for the in-situ production of alkali metals, and the calcium oxide played the role of a halide ion acceptor. The absence of any single component in this ternary mixture drastically reduced the destruction efficiency of CF4. The CF4 destruction efficiencies with the solid reagent containing the alkali halide, MX, increased in the order of Li approximately Na < K < Cs for alkali cations and I < Br < Cl < F for halide anions. This trend agreed with the endothermicity of the alkali metal generation reaction: the higher the endothermicity, the lower the destruction efficiency. Alkali metal generation was indirectly detected by monitoring H2 production from its reaction with water. The production of alkali metals increased with NaF, KF, and CsF in this order. The CsF/CaO/Si system exhibited the complete destruction of CF4 at as low as 600 degrees C. The solid product analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the formation of CaF2 and the depletion of Si with black carbon particles formed in the solid reagent residue. No CO/CO2 and toxic HF and SiF4 formation were detected in the exhaust gas.

  3. Strong Turbulence in Alkali Halide Negative Ion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Daniel

    1999-11-01

    Negative ion plasmas (NIPs) are charge-neutral plasmas in which the negative charge is dominated by negative ions rather than electrons. They are found in laser discharges, combustion products, semiconductor manufacturing processes, stellar atmospheres, pulsar magnetospheres, and the Earth's ionosphere, both naturally and man-made. They often display signatures of strong turbulence^1. Development of a novel, compact, unmagnetized alkali halide (MX) NIP source will be discussed, it incorporating a ohmically-heated incandescent (2500K) tantulum solenoid (3cm dia, 15 cm long) with heat shields. The solenoid ionizes the MX vapor and confines contaminant electrons, allowing a very dry (electron-free) source. Plasma densities of 10^10 cm-3 and positive to negative ion mass ratios of 1 <= fracm_+m- <= 20 are achievable. The source will allow tests of strong turbulence theory^2. 1 Sheehan, D.P., et al., Phys. Fluids B5, 1593 (1993). 2 Tsytovich, V. and Wharton, C.W., Comm. Plasma Phys. Cont. Fusion 4, 91 (1978).

  4. FTIR study of matrix-isolated halides of dysprosium and thulium and their gaseous heterocomplexes with alkali halides

    SciTech Connect

    Feltrin, A.; Cesaro, S.N.

    1996-06-01

    Vibrational spectra of dysprosium and thulium chlorides, bromides, and iodides isolated in argon have been studied for the first time. The appearance of a single band, even in heavy deposits, suggested a planar geometry for all the samples examined. The complexity of Dy and Tm chlorides spectra, partly because of isotopic patterns, required a reinvestigation of NdCl{sub 3} isolated in argon and have been explained by comparison. Vapors in equilibrium over heated equimolar mixtures of a number of Dy, Tm, and Nd halides with alkali halides trapped in argon have been also investigated. FTIR measurements gave experimental evidence for the formation of gaseous heterocomplexes whose geometry is discussed.

  5. Laser induced irreversible absorption changes in alkali halides at 10.6 µm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S.-T.; Bass, M.

    1981-12-01

    Laser induced irreversible changes in the absorption of alkali halides has been observed by using repetitively pulsed laser calorimetry. These changes occur at intensities below that required for laser induced breakdown and necessitate a change in the definition of laser damage threshold. A simple model is proposed to explain these observations based on the accumulation of microscopic failures as a result of each pulse.

  6. CO/sub 2/ laser absorption and saturation studies of molecular impurities in alkali halide crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sievers, A.J.

    1980-12-01

    The objective of this research program has been to explore the equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamical properties of ReO/sub 4//sup -/ molecules embedded in alkali halide lattices using electromagnetic radiation. Both incoherent sources and CO/sub 2/ laser radiation have been used to explore the full dynamic range of the molecular vibrational modes. To achieve this objective stable molecular dopant - alkali halide combinations have been fabricated which have vibrational modes near the CO/sub 2/ laser frequencies. In order to uncouple the molecular modes from the lattice modes, to simplify the analysis as much as possible, low temperature spectroscopic measurements were required. In general, it was found that the molecular vibrational modes in the low temperature quiescent lattice had extremely narrow linewidths (less than 0.1 cm/sup -1/) so that most of the coincidences with the CO/sub 2/ laser lines were eliminated.

  7. Reactions between cold methyl halide molecules and alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Jesse J.; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-07

    We investigate the potential energy surfaces and activation energies for reactions between methyl halide molecules CH{sub 3}X (X = F, Cl, Br, I) and alkali-metal atoms A (A = Li, Na, K, Rb) using high-level ab initio calculations. We examine the anisotropy of each intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) and the mechanism and energetics of the only available exothermic reaction pathway, CH{sub 3}X + A → CH{sub 3} + AX. The region of the transition state is explored using two-dimensional PES cuts and estimates of the activation energies are inferred. Nearly all combinations of methyl halide and alkali-metal atom have positive barrier heights, indicating that reactions at low temperatures will be slow.

  8. Development of processes for the production of solar grade silicon from halides and alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickson, C. R.; Gould, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    High temperature reactions of silicon halides with alkali metals for the production of solar grade silicon in volume at low cost were studied. Experiments were performed to evaluate product separation and collection processes, measure heat release parameters for scaling purposes, determine the effects of reactants and/or products on materials of reactor construction, and make preliminary engineering and economic analyses of a scaled-up process.

  9. Effects of Alkali Cations and Halide Anions on the Self-Assembly of Phosphatidylcholine in Oils.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Ting; Lin, Chen-Shin; Chang, Ya-Ying; Whitten, Andrew E; Sokolova, Anna; Wu, Chun-Ming; Ivanov, Viktor A; Khokhlov, Alexei R; Tung, Shih-Huang

    2016-11-22

    The interactions between ions and phospholipids are closely associated with the structures and functions of cell membrane. Instead of conventional aqueous systems, we systematically investigated the effects of inorganic ions on the self-assembly of lecithin, a zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine, in cyclohexane. Previous studies have shown that addition of inorganic salts with specific divalent and trivalent cations can transform lecithin organosols into organogels. In this study, we focused on the effect of monovalent alkali halides. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to demonstrate that the binding strength of the alkali cations with the phosphate of lecithin is in the order Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+). More importantly, the cation-phosphate interaction is affected by the paired halide anions, and the effect follows the series I(-) > Br(-) > Cl(-). The salts of stronger interactions with lecithin, including LiCl, LiBr, LiI, and NaI, were found to induce cylindrical micelles sufficiently long to form organogels, while others remain organosols. A mechanism based on the charge density of ions and the enthalpy change of the ion exchange between alkali halides and lecithin headgroup is provided to explain the contrasting interactions and the effectiveness of the salts to induce organogelation.

  10. Skylab experiments on semiconductors and alkali halides. [single crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    The space processing experiments performed during the Skylab missions included one on single crystal growth of germanium selenide and telluride, one on pure and doped germanium crystals, two on pure and doped indium antimonide, one on gallium-indium-antimony systems, and one on a sodium chloride-sodium fluoride eutectic. In each experiment, three ampoules of sample were processed in the multipurpose electric furnace within the Skylab Materials Processing Facility. All were successful in varying degrees and gave important information about crystal growth removed from the effects of earth surface gravity.

  11. Calculation of the melting point of alkali halides by means of computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Aragones, J L; Sanz, E; Valeriani, C; Vega, C

    2012-09-14

    In this paper, we study the liquid-solid coexistence of NaCl-type alkali halides, described by interaction potentials such as Tosi-Fumi (TF), Smith-Dang (SD), and Joung-Cheatham (JC), and compute their melting temperature (T(m)) at 1 bar via three independent routes: (1) liquid/solid direct coexistence, (2) free-energy calculations, and (3) Hamiltonian Gibbs-Duhem integration. The melting points obtained by the three routes are consistent with each other. The calculated T(m) of the Tosi-Fumi model of NaCl is in good agreement with the experimental value as well as with other numerical calculations. However, the other two models considered for NaCl, SD and JC, overestimate the melting temperature of NaCl by more than 200 K. We have also computed the melting temperature of other alkali halides using the Tosi-Fumi interaction potential and observed that the predictions are not always as close to the experimental values as they are for NaCl. It seems that there is still room for improvement in the area of force-fields for alkaline halides, given that so far most models are still unable to describe a simple yet important property such as the melting point.

  12. Mn(2+)-Doped Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals with Dual-Color Emission Controlled by Halide Content.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenyong; Lin, Qianglu; Li, Hongbo; Wu, Kaifeng; Robel, István; Pietryga, Jeffrey M; Klimov, Victor I

    2016-11-16

    Impurity doping has been widely used to endow semiconductor nanocrystals with novel optical, electronic, and magnetic functionalities. Here, we introduce a new family of doped NCs offering unique insights into the chemical mechanism of doping, as well as into the fundamental interactions between the dopant and the semiconductor host. Specifically, by elucidating the role of relative bond strengths within the precursor and the host lattice, we develop an effective approach for incorporating manganese (Mn) ions into nanocrystals of lead-halide perovskites (CsPbX3, where X = Cl, Br, or I). In a key enabling step not possible in, for example, II-VI nanocrystals, we use gentle chemical means to finely and reversibly tune the nanocrystal band gap over a wide range of energies (1.8-3.1 eV) via postsynthetic anion exchange. We observe a dramatic effect of halide identity on relative intensities of intrinsic band-edge and Mn emission bands, which we ascribe to the influence of the energy difference between the corresponding transitions on the characteristics of energy transfer between the Mn ion and the semiconductor host.

  13. Superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerene nanowhiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Toshio; Hirata, Chika; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Miyazawa, Kun'ichi; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2016-09-01

    Superconductivity in alkali metal-doped fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs) was observed in K3.3C60NWs, Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs with transition temperatures at 17, 25 and 26 K, respectively. Almost full shielding volume fraction (~80%) was observed in K3.3C60NWs when subjected to thermal treatment at 200 °C for a duration of 24 h. In contrast, the shielding fraction of Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs were calculated to be 8% and 6%, respectively. Here we report on an extensive investigation of the superconducting properties of these AC60NWs (A  =  K3.3, Rb3.0 and Cs2.0Rb1.0). These properties are compared to the ones reported on the corresponding conventional (single-crystal or powder) K-doped fullerene. We also evaluated the critical current densities of these C60NWs using the Bean model under an applied magnetic field up to 50 kOe.

  14. Metal Hydride and Alkali Halide Opacities in Extrasolar Giant Planets and Cool Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weck, Philippe F.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Kirby, Kate; Schweitzer, Andreas; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2006-01-01

    The lack of accurate and complete molecular line and continuum opacity data has been a serious limitation to developing atmospheric models of cool stars and Extrasolar Giant Planets (EGPs). We report our recent calculations of molecular opacities resulting from the presence of metal hydrides and alkali halides. The resulting data have been included in the PHOENIX stellar atmosphere code (Hauschildt & Baron 1999). The new models, calculated using spherical geometry for all gravities considered, also incorporate our latest database of nearly 670 million molecular lines, and updated equations of state.

  15. Alkali Halide Interfacial Behavior in a Sequence of Charged Slit Pores

    SciTech Connect

    Wander, Matthew C; Shuford, Kevin L

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a variety of alkali halide, aqueous electrolyte solutions in contact with charged, planar-graphite slit-pores are simulated using classical molecular dynamics. Size trends in structure and transport properties are examined by varying the choice of ions among the alkali metal and halide series. As with the uncharged pores, system dynamics are driven by changes in water hydration behavior and specifically by variations in the number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule. Overall, the larger ions diffuse more rapidly under high surface charge conditions than the smaller ions. In particular, for the 1 nmslit, ion diffusivity increased by a factor of 4 compared to the uncharged case. Finally, a quantitative fit to the interfacial charge structure is presented, which confirms the presence of two distinct types of layers in an aqueous interface. This model indicates that the chemistry of the interface is able to create a small interfacial potential, and it shows how water molecules can rotate to increase charge separation in response to a surface potential.

  16. Molecular dispersion energy parameters for alkali and halide ions in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, S.; Deublein, S.; Hasse, H.; Vrabec, J.

    2014-01-28

    Thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions containing alkali and halide ions are determined by molecular simulation. The following ions are studied: Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cs{sup +}, F{sup −}, Cl{sup −}, Br{sup −}, and I{sup −}. The employed ion force fields consist of one Lennard-Jones (LJ) site and one concentric point charge with a magnitude of ±1 e. The SPC/E model is used for water. The LJ size parameter of the ion models is taken from Deublein et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 084501 (2012)], while the LJ energy parameter is determined in the present study based on experimental self-diffusion coefficient data of the alkali cations and the halide anions in aqueous solutions as well as the position of the first maximum of the radial distribution function of water around the ions. On the basis of these force field parameters, the electric conductivity, the hydration dynamics of water molecules around the ions, and the enthalpy of hydration is predicted. Considering a wide range of salinity, this study is conducted at temperatures of 293.15 and 298.15 K and a pressure of 1 bar.

  17. Superconductivity in alkali-metal-doped picene.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Ryoji; Suzuki, Yuta; Yamanari, Yusuke; Mitamura, Hiroki; Kambe, Takashi; Ikeda, Naoshi; Okamoto, Hideki; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Yamaji, Minoru; Kawasaki, Naoko; Maniwa, Yutaka; Kubozono, Yoshihiro

    2010-03-04

    Efforts to identify and develop new superconducting materials continue apace, motivated by both fundamental science and the prospects for application. For example, several new superconducting material systems have been developed in the recent past, including calcium-intercalated graphite compounds, boron-doped diamond and-most prominently-iron arsenides such as LaO(1-x)F(x)FeAs (ref. 3). In the case of organic superconductors, however, no new material system with a high superconducting transition temperature (T(c)) has been discovered in the past decade. Here we report that intercalating an alkali metal into picene, a wide-bandgap semiconducting solid hydrocarbon, produces metallic behaviour and superconductivity. Solid potassium-intercalated picene (K(x)picene) shows T(c) values of 7 K and 18 K, depending on the metal content. The drop of magnetization in K(x)picene solids at the transition temperature is sharp (<2 K), similar to the behaviour of Ca-intercalated graphite. The T(c) of 18 K is comparable to that of K-intercalated C(60) (ref. 4). This discovery of superconductivity in K(x)picene shows that organic hydrocarbons are promising candidates for improved T(c) values.

  18. Superconductivity in an Alkali Doped Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon, Picene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokumoto, Madoka; Shimizu, Fumihiko; Hata, Yoshiaki; Sawai, Shinya; Han, Jing; Inoue, Katsuya

    2010-03-01

    The effect of carrier doping into polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, including perylene and pentacene, has been extensively studied.[1] As a result of halogen or alkali metal doping, a drastic increase in electrical conductivity was observed. However, superconductivity has not been reported except the one by Sch"on et al.[2] Recently, Kubozono reported that one of them, i.e. picene (C22H14) showed superconductivity at 20 K by doping with potassium.[3] We anticipate that it will lead to surprising findings of hidden organic molecular superconductors. In this presentation, we will report on the characterization of superconducting properties of alkali doped picene. Instead of ordinary vapor phase alkali metal doping, we employ thermal decomposition of alkali azides, i.e. AN3 where A = K, Rb. We followed the doping procedure of thermal decomposition applied to fullerene C60.[4] A systematic variation of the superconducting transition temperature and fraction are studied as a function of alkali metal composition. [1] H. Akamatu, H. Inokuchi, and Y. Matsunaga, Nature 173 (1954) 168. [2] J. H. Sch"on, Ch. Kloc & B. Batlogg, Nature 406 (2000) 702; retraction, Nature 422 (2003) 93. [3] R. Mitsuhashi, Y. Kubozono et al.: private communication. [4] M. Tokumoto, et al. , J. Phys. Chem. Solids, 54 (1993) 1667.

  19. Effect of radiation-induced emission of Schottky defects on the formation of colloids in alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinko, V. I.; Vainshtein, D. I.; den Hartog, H. W.

    2003-10-01

    Formation of vacancy clusters in irradiated crystals is considered taking into account radiation-induced Schottky defect emission (RSDE) from extended defects. RSDE acts in the opposite direction compared with Frenkel pair production, and it results in the radiation-induced recovery processes. In the case of alkali halides, Schottky defects can be produced as a result of the interaction of extended defects with excitons , as has been suggested by Seitz in 1954. We consider a model that takes into account excitonic mechanisms for the creation of both Frenkel and Schottky defects, and which shows that although the contribution of the latter mechanism to the production of primary defects may be small, its role in the radiation-induced evolution of microstructure can be very significant. The model is applied to describe the evolution of sodium colloids and the formation of voids in NaCl, which is followed by a sudden fracture of the material, presenting a potential problem in rock salt-based nuclear waste repositories. The temperature, dose rate and dose dependence of colloid growth in NaCl doped with different types of impurities is analyzed. We have found that colloid growth may become negative below a threshold temperature (or above a threshold dose rate), or below a certain impurity concentration , which is determined by the RSDE, that depends strongly on the type and concentration of the impurities. The results obtained with the model are compared with experimental observations.

  20. Ab initio perspective on the Mollwo-Ivey relation for F centers in alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwald, Paul; Karsai, Ferenc; Laskowski, Robert; Gräfe, Stefanie; Blaha, Peter; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Wirtz, Ludger

    2015-10-01

    We revisit the well-known Mollwo-Ivey relation that describes the "universal" dependence of the absorption energies of F-type color centers on the lattice constant a of alkali-halide crystals, Eabs∝a-n. We perform both state-of-the-art ab initio quantum chemistry and post-DFT calculations of F-center absorption spectra. By "tuning" independently the lattice constant and the atomic species we show that the scaling with the lattice constant alone (keeping the elements fixed) would yield n =2 in agreement with the "particle-in-the-box" model. Keeping the lattice constant fixed and changing the atomic species enables us to quantify the ion-size effects which are shown to be responsible for the exponent n ≈1.8 .

  1. Silicon Halide-alkali Metal Flames as a Source of Solar Grade Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D. B.; Gould, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A program is presented which was aimed at determining the feasibility of using high temperature reactions of alkali metals and silicon halides to produce low cost solar-grade silicon. Experiments are being conducted to evaluate product separation and collection processes, measure heat release parameters for scaling purposes, and determine the effects of the reactants and/or products on materials of reactor construction. During the current reporting period, the results of heat release experiments were used to design and construct a new type of thick-wall graphite reactor to produce larger quantities of silicon. A reactor test facility was constructed. Material compatibility tests were performed for Na in contact with graphite and several coated graphites. All samples were rapidly degraded at T = 1200K, while samples retained structural strength at 1700K. Pyrolytic graphite coatings cracked and separated from substances in all cases.

  2. Indirect NMR spin-spin coupling constants in diatomic alkali halides.

    PubMed

    Jaszuński, Michał; Antušek, Andrej; Demissie, Taye B; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2016-12-28

    We report the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spin-spin coupling constants for diatomic alkali halides MX, where M = Li, Na, K, Rb, or Cs and X = F, Cl, Br, or I. The coupling constants are determined by supplementing the non-relativistic coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles (CCSD) values with relativistic corrections evaluated at the four-component density-functional theory (DFT) level. These corrections are calculated as the differences between relativistic and non-relativistic values determined using the PBE0 functional with 50% exact-exchange admixture. The total coupling constants obtained in this approach are in much better agreement with experiment than the standard relativistic DFT values with 25% exact-exchange, and are also noticeably better than the relativistic PBE0 results obtained with 50% exact-exchange. Further improvement is achieved by adding rovibrational corrections, estimated using literature data.

  3. Ion Segregation and Deliquescence of Alkali Halide Nanocrystals on SiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Arima, Kenta; Jiang, Peng; Lin, Deng-Sung; Verdaguer, Albert; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-08-11

    The adsorption of water on alkali halide (KBr, KCl, KF, NaCl) nanocrystals on SiO{sub 2} and their deliquescence was investigated as a function of relative humidity (RH) from 8% to near saturation by scanning polarization force microscopy. At low humidity, water adsorption solvates ions at the surface of the crystals and increases their mobility. This results in a large increase in the dielectric constant, which is manifested in an increase in the electrostatic force and in an increase in the apparent height of the nanocrystals. Above 58% RH, the diffusion of ions leads to Ostwald ripening, where larger nanocrystals grow at the expense of the smaller ones. At the deliquescence point, droplets were formed. For KBr, KCl, and NaCl, the droplets exhibit a negative surface potential relative to the surrounding region, which is indicative of the preferential segregation of anions to the air/solution interface.

  4. Superconductivity at 5 K in alkali-metal-doped phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    Wang, X F; Liu, R H; Gui, Z; Xie, Y L; Yan, Y J; Ying, J J; Luo, X G; Chen, X H

    2011-10-18

    Organic superconductors have π-molecular orbitals, from which electrons can become delocalized, giving rise to metallic conductivity due to orbital overlap between adjacent molecules. Here we report the discovery of superconductivity at a transition temperature (T(c)) of ~5 K in alkali-metal-doped phenanthrene. A 1-GPa pressure leads to a 20% increase of T(c), suggesting that alkali-metal-doped phenanthrene shows unconventional superconductivity. Raman spectra indicate that alkali-metal doping injects charge into the system to realize the superconductivity. The discovery of superconductivity in A(3)phenanthrene (where A can be either K or Rb) produces a novel broad class of superconductors consisting of fused hydrocarbon benzene rings with π-electron networks. An increase of T(c) with increasing number of benzene rings from three to five suggests that organic hydrocarbons with long chains of benzene rings are potential superconductors with high T(c).

  5. Silicon halide-alkali metal flames as a source of solar grade silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, D. B.; Miller, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of using alkali metal-silicon halide diffusion flames to produce solar-grade silicon in large quantities and at low cost is demonstrated. Prior work shows that these flames are stable and that relatively high purity silicon can be produced using Na + SiCl4 flames. Silicon of similar purity is obtained from Na + SiF4 flames although yields are lower and product separation and collection are less thermochemically favored. Continuous separation of silicon from the byproduct alkali salt was demonstrated in a heated graphite reactor. The process was scaled up to reduce heat losses and to produce larger samples of silicon. Reagent delivery systems, scaled by a factor of 25, were built and operated at a production rate of 0.5 kg Si/h. Very rapid reactor heating rates are observed with wall temperatures reaching greater than 2000 K. Heat release parameters were measured using a cooled stainless steel reactor tube. A new reactor was designed.

  6. Acid and alkali doped PBI electrolyte in electrochemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Baozhong

    In this work the conductivity of blank PBI membrane, acid doped PBI and alkaline doped PBI was systematically studied. A new methodology for sorption kinetics study in electrolyte solution has been established by monitoring the conductivity change during the sorption process. The model of the doping process and mechanism of conductivity are proposed. The performance of PBI (doped under optimum conditions) in fuel cell as PEM was evaluated. The experimental results show that the blank PBI in acid solution is an ionic insulator. It clarified the long time confusion in this area. The acid doped PBI membrane is an ionic conductor. The conductivity increases with the concentration of the acid solution. In high concentration acid solution, the conductivity increases with the type of acid in the order: H2SO 4 > H3PO4 > HClO4 > HNO3 > HCl. The kinetics of the doping process was studied, by a continuous method. The ionic conductivity mechanism was established. The PBI membranes doped with H2SO4 and H3PO4 exhibit better performance than NafionRTM. The doped FBI has more resistance to CO poison. 3% CO in H2 has little effect on the H3PO 4 doped PBI membrane at 185°C. The conductivity of the alkali doped PBI membrane changes with the concentration of the alkaline solution and the type of the alkalis. The conductivity has a maximum in KOH and NaOH solution. The maximum conductivity in KOH is higher than in NaOH and LiOH. It is about 5 times of that of NafionRTM in alkaline solution. The two-step sorption process in alkaline solution was observed. The first step is the permeation process of the alkalis in the PBI membrane. The permeation is the results of diffusion and interaction. It is concluded that the permeation process is controlled by the rate of interaction between the alkali and PBI molecule. The second step is the relaxation process in the membrane. This step contributes more to the conductivity for the membrane than the first step. The ionic conductivity mechanism

  7. High capacity nickel battery material doped with alkali metal cations

    DOEpatents

    Jackovitz, John F.; Pantier, Earl A.

    1982-05-18

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  8. Dependence of the density of solutions of alkali metal halides on the composition of methylpyrrolidone-water mixed solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, A. N.; Lenina, O. F.; Vasilev, V. A.

    2008-07-01

    The densities of solutions of alkali metal halides in methylpyrrolidone (MP)-water mixtures were measured at 298.15 K over the entire range of mixed solvent compositions. The standard partial molar volumes of the electrolytes overline {V_2^ circ } were calculated. The overline {V_2^ circ } values of alkali metal halides in MP-H2O mixtures were related linearly to the overline {V_2^ circ } values in aqueous solutions. These dependences were used to determine the standard partial molar volumes of ions overline {V_i^ circ } in the mixtures studied. The standard partial molar volumes of transfer of the ions from water into MP-water mixtures were calculated.

  9. PRESSURE DEPENDENCE OF THE DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF SOME ORGANIC LIQUIDS AND OF FIFTEEN OF THE ALKALI HALIDES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    eugenol , glycerol, diethyl ether, LiF, LiCl, NaF, NaCl, NaBr, NaI, KF, KCl, KBr, KI, RbBr, RbI, CsBr, CsI (single crystals). Temperature range 0-100...deg C., pressure range 1-4,000 kgf/sq. cm, frequency range 20-8 million Hz. Temperature dependence of the permittivity of alkali halides measured and dielectric dispersion in glycerol and eugenol investigated. (Author)

  10. Reverse osmosis transport of alkali halides and nickel salts through cellulose triacetate membranes. Performance prediction from NaCl experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nirmal, J.D.; Pandya, V.P.; Desai, N.V.; Rangarajan, R. )

    1992-10-01

    The separation of alkali metal halides, nickel chloride, and nickel sulfate was determined for cellulose triacetate reverse osmosis (CTA RO) membranes. From transport analysis, the relative free energy parameters for transport of these salts through CTA membranes were determined. From these relative free energy parameters of salts, the solute separation by CTA membranes could be predicted from RO experiment with NaCl solution. The transport analysis and an illustration of how the concept is useful are presented in this paper.

  11. Physics of solid and liquid alkali halide surfaces near the melting point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykova-Timan, T.; Ceresoli, D.; Tartaglino, U.; Tosatti, E.

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents a broad theoretical and simulation study of the high-temperature behavior of crystalline alkali halide surfaces typified by NaCl(100), of the liquid NaCl surface near freezing, and of the very unusual partial wetting of the solid surface by the melt. Simulations are conducted using two-body rigid-ion Born-Mayer-Huggins-Fumi-Tosi (BMHFT) potentials, with full treatment of long-range Coulomb forces. After a preliminary check of the description of bulk NaCl provided by these potentials, which seems generally good even at the melting point, we carry out a new investigation of solid and liquid surfaces. Solid NaCl(100) is found in this model to be very anharmonic and yet exceptionally stable when hot. It is predicted by a thermodynamic integration calculation of the surface free energy that NaCl(100) should be a well-ordered, nonmelting surface, metastable even well above the melting point. By contrast, the simulated liquid NaCl surface is found to exhibit large thermal fluctuations and no layering order. In spite of that, it is shown to possess a relatively large surface free energy. The latter is traced to a surface entropy deficit, reflecting some kind of surface short-range order. We show that the surface short-range order is most likely caused by the continuous transition of the bulk ionic melt into the vapor, made of NaCl molecules and dimers rather than of single ions. Finally, the solid-liquid interface free energy is derived through Young's equation from direct simulation of partial wetting of NaCl(100) by a liquid droplet. The resulting interface free energy is large, in line with the conspicuous solid-liquid 27% density difference. A partial wetting angle near 50° close to the experimental value of 48° is obtained in the process. It is concluded that three elements, namely, the exceptional anharmonic stability of the solid (100) surface, the molecular short-range order at the liquid surface, and the costly solid-liquid interface, all

  12. Molecular Modeling and Monte Carlo Simulation of Concentrated Aqueous Alkali Halide Solutions at 25 C.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llano-Restrepo, Mario Andres

    A study of concentrated aqueous alkali halide solutions is made at the molecular level, through modeling and computer simulation of their structural and thermodynamic properties. It is found that the HNC approximation is the best integral equation theory to predict such properties within the framework of the primitive model (PM). The intrinsic limitations of the PM in describing ionic association and hydration effects are addressed and discussed in order to emphasize the need for explicitly including the water molecules in the treatment of aqueous electrolyte solutions by means of a civilized model (CM). As a step toward developing a CM as simple as possible, it is shown that a modified version of the SPC model of liquid water in which the Lennard-Jones interaction between intermolecular oxygen sites is replaced by a hard core interaction, is still successful enough to predict the degree of hydrogen bonding of real water. A simple civilized model (SCM) (in which the ions are treated as hard spheres interacting through Coulombic potentials and the water molecules are simulated using the simplified SPC model) is introduced in order to study the changes in the structural features of various aqueous alkali halide solutions upon varying both the concentration and the size of the ions. Both cations and anions are found to be solvated by the water molecules at expense of a breakdown in the hydrogen-bonded water network. Hydration numbers are reported for the first time for NaBr and KBr, and the first simulation -based estimates for LiBr, NaI and KI are also obtained. In several cases, values of the hydration numbers based on the SCM are found to be in excellent agreement with available experimental results obtained from x-ray diffraction measurements. Finally, it is shown that a neoprimitive model (NPM) can be developed by incorporating some of the structural features seen in the SCM into the short-range part of the PM interionic potential via a shielded square well whose

  13. Transport properties of alkali metal doped fullerides

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Daluram Yadav, Nishchhal

    2015-07-31

    We have studied the intercage interactions between the adjacent C{sub 60} cages and expansion of lattice due to the intercalation of alkali atoms based on the spring model to estimate phonon frequencies from the dynamical matrix for the intermolecular alkali-C{sub 60} phonons. We considered a two-peak model for the phonon density of states to investigate the nature of electron pairing mechanism for superconducting state in fullerides. Coulomb repulsive parameter and the electron phonon coupling strength are obtained within the random phase approximation. Transition temperature, T{sub c}, is obtained in a situation when the free electrons in lowest molecular orbital are coupled with alkali-C{sub 60} phonons as 5 K, which is much lower as compared to reported T{sub c} (20 K). The superconducting pairing is mainly driven by the high frequency intramolecular phonons and their effects enhance it to 22 K. The importance of the present study, the pressure effect and normal state transport properties are calculated within the same model leading superconductivity.

  14. Silicon halide-alkali metal flames as a source of solar grade silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D. B.; Miller, W. J.; Gould, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using continuous high-temperature reactions of alkali metals and silicon halides to produce silicon in large quantities and of suitable purity for use in the production of photovoltaic solar cells was demonstrated. Low pressure experiments were performed demonstrating the production of free silicon and providing experience with the construction of reactant vapor generators. Further experiments at higher reagent flow rates were performed in a low temperature flow tube configuration with co-axial injection of reagents and relatively pure silicon was produced. A high temperature graphite flow tube was built and continuous separation of Si from NaCl was demonstrated. A larger scaled well stirred reactor was built. Experiments were performed to investigate the compatability of graphite based reactor materials of construction with sodium. At 1100 to 1200 K none of these materials were found to be suitable. At 1700 K the graphites performed well with little damage except to coatings of pyrolytic graphite and silicon carbide which were damaged.

  15. Physics of solid and liquid alkali halide surfaces near the melting point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykova-Timan, Tatyana; Ceresoli, Davide; Tartaglino, Ugo; Tosatti, Erio

    2006-03-01

    NaCl (and other alkali halide) crystal surfaces have the peculiar property of repelling their own melt. As a result they let themselves be wetted only partially by their own liquid at the melting point TM. We recently investigated the physical reasons for this unusual behavior. We found them through theory and molecular dynamics simulation to stem from the conspiracy of three factors. First, the solid NaCl(100) surface is exceptionally anharmonic,but also exceptionally stable. It can in fact survive even well above the melting point, for unlike most other surfaces it does not spontaneously melt. Second, the solid-liquid interface is very costly, due to a 27% density difference between solid and liquid. Third, the surface tension of liquid NaCl is relatively high. This last feature is due to an unexpected entropy deficit, that can in turn be traced to incipient molecular charge order in the outermost regions of the molten salt surface[1,2].[1] T. Zykova-Timan, D. Ceresoli, U. Tartaglino, E. Tosatti, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 176105 (2005) [2] T. Zykova-Timan, D. Ceresoli, U. Tartaglino, E. Tosatti, J. Chem. Phys. 123, 164701 (2005)

  16. Simple electrolyte solutions: Comparison of DRISM and molecular dynamics results for alkali halide solutions

    PubMed Central

    Joung, In Suk; Luchko, Tyler; Case, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Using the dielectrically consistent reference interaction site model (DRISM) of molecular solvation, we have calculated structural and thermodynamic information of alkali-halide salts in aqueous solution, as a function of salt concentration. The impact of varying the closure relation used with DRISM is investigated using the partial series expansion of order-n (PSE-n) family of closures, which includes the commonly used hypernetted-chain equation (HNC) and Kovalenko-Hirata closures. Results are compared to explicit molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, using the same force fields, and to experiment. The mean activity coefficients of ions predicted by DRISM agree well with experimental values at concentrations below 0.5 m, especially when using the HNC closure. As individual ion activities (and the corresponding solvation free energies) are not known from experiment, only DRISM and MD results are directly compared and found to have reasonably good agreement. The activity of water directly estimated from DRISM is nearly consistent with values derived from the DRISM ion activities and the Gibbs-Duhem equation, but the changes in the computed pressure as a function of salt concentration dominate these comparisons. Good agreement with experiment is obtained if these pressure changes are ignored. Radial distribution functions of NaCl solution at three concentrations were compared between DRISM and MD simulations. DRISM shows comparable water distribution around the cation, but water structures around the anion deviate from the MD results; this may also be related to the high pressure of the system. Despite some problems, DRISM-PSE-n is an effective tool for investigating thermodynamic properties of simple electrolytes. PMID:23387564

  17. Optical properties of alkali halide crystals from all-electron hybrid TD-DFT calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, R. Harrison, N. M.; Bernasconi, L.

    2015-06-07

    We present a study of the electronic and optical properties of a series of alkali halide crystals AX, with A = Li, Na, K, Rb and X = F, Cl, Br based on a recent implementation of hybrid-exchange time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) (TD-B3LYP) in the all-electron Gaussian basis set code CRYSTAL. We examine, in particular, the impact of basis set size and quality on the prediction of the optical gap and exciton binding energy. The formation of bound excitons by photoexcitation is observed in all the studied systems and this is shown to be correlated to specific features of the Hartree-Fock exchange component of the TD-DFT response kernel. All computed optical gaps and exciton binding energies are however markedly below estimated experimental and, where available, 2-particle Green’s function (GW-Bethe-Salpeter equation, GW-BSE) values. We attribute this reduced exciton binding to the incorrect asymptotics of the B3LYP exchange correlation ground state functional and of the TD-B3LYP response kernel, which lead to a large underestimation of the Coulomb interaction between the excited electron and hole wavefunctions. Considering LiF as an example, we correlate the asymptotic behaviour of the TD-B3LYP kernel to the fraction of Fock exchange admixed in the ground state functional c{sub HF} and show that there exists one value of c{sub HF} (∼0.32) that reproduces at least semi-quantitatively the optical gap of this material.

  18. Optical properties of alkali halide crystals from all-electron hybrid TD-DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Webster, R; Bernasconi, L; Harrison, N M

    2015-06-07

    We present a study of the electronic and optical properties of a series of alkali halide crystals AX, with A = Li, Na, K, Rb and X = F, Cl, Br based on a recent implementation of hybrid-exchange time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) (TD-B3LYP) in the all-electron Gaussian basis set code CRYSTAL. We examine, in particular, the impact of basis set size and quality on the prediction of the optical gap and exciton binding energy. The formation of bound excitons by photoexcitation is observed in all the studied systems and this is shown to be correlated to specific features of the Hartree-Fock exchange component of the TD-DFT response kernel. All computed optical gaps and exciton binding energies are however markedly below estimated experimental and, where available, 2-particle Green's function (GW-Bethe-Salpeter equation, GW-BSE) values. We attribute this reduced exciton binding to the incorrect asymptotics of the B3LYP exchange correlation ground state functional and of the TD-B3LYP response kernel, which lead to a large underestimation of the Coulomb interaction between the excited electron and hole wavefunctions. Considering LiF as an example, we correlate the asymptotic behaviour of the TD-B3LYP kernel to the fraction of Fock exchange admixed in the ground state functional cHF and show that there exists one value of cHF (∼0.32) that reproduces at least semi-quantitatively the optical gap of this material.

  19. Optical properties of alkali halide crystals from all-electron hybrid TD-DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, R.; Bernasconi, L.; Harrison, N. M.

    2015-06-01

    We present a study of the electronic and optical properties of a series of alkali halide crystals AX, with A = Li, Na, K, Rb and X = F, Cl, Br based on a recent implementation of hybrid-exchange time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) (TD-B3LYP) in the all-electron Gaussian basis set code CRYSTAL. We examine, in particular, the impact of basis set size and quality on the prediction of the optical gap and exciton binding energy. The formation of bound excitons by photoexcitation is observed in all the studied systems and this is shown to be correlated to specific features of the Hartree-Fock exchange component of the TD-DFT response kernel. All computed optical gaps and exciton binding energies are however markedly below estimated experimental and, where available, 2-particle Green's function (GW-Bethe-Salpeter equation, GW-BSE) values. We attribute this reduced exciton binding to the incorrect asymptotics of the B3LYP exchange correlation ground state functional and of the TD-B3LYP response kernel, which lead to a large underestimation of the Coulomb interaction between the excited electron and hole wavefunctions. Considering LiF as an example, we correlate the asymptotic behaviour of the TD-B3LYP kernel to the fraction of Fock exchange admixed in the ground state functional cHF and show that there exists one value of cHF (˜0.32) that reproduces at least semi-quantitatively the optical gap of this material.

  20. IR spectroscopy of aqueous alkali halide solutions: Pure salt-solvated water spectra and hydration numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Jean-Joseph; Chapados, Camille

    2001-08-01

    Extrapolation techniques were used to obtain pure salt-solvated water spectra from the attenuated total reflection infrared spectra (ATR-IR) of aqueous solutions of the nine alkali halide salts LiCl, NaCl, KCl, CsCl, NaBr, KBr, NaI, KI, and CsI and the alkaline-earth chloride salt MgCl2. These salts ionize completely in water. The ions by themselves do not absorb in the IR, but their interactions with water can be observed and analyzed. A pure salt-solvated water spectrum is easier to analyze than that of a combined solution of pure water and salt-solvated water. Although the salt-solvated water spectra examined have distinctive signatures, they can be classified in three categories: those similar to NaCl; those not similar to NaCl; and MgCl2, in a class by itself. Each of the pure salt-solvated water spectra differs from that of liquid water, though the number of bands is the same. From the Gaussian band fitting, we found that the positions of the bands were fairly constant, whereas their intensities differed. The salt hydration numbers were determined: for NaCl, KCl, NaBr, KBr, and CsI solutions it is 5; for KI and MgCL2 it is 4; for NaI it is 3.5; for CsCl it is 3; and for LiCl it is 2. From these results we found that each pair of ions (monoatomic ions) of the ten salt solutions studied are close bound and form a complex in a cluster organization with a fixed number of water molecules.

  1. Microwave irradiation affects ion pairing in aqueous solutions of alkali halide salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohorič, Tomaž; Bren, Urban

    2017-01-01

    Using the molecular dynamics simulations with separate thermostats for translational and rotational degrees of freedom, we investigate the effects of water's rotational motion on the ion pairing of ionic solutes in aqueous solutions. The situation with rotational temperature higher than the translational one, Trot>Ttrs , is mimicking the non-equilibrium effects of microwaves on model solutions of alkali halide salts. The simulations reveal that an increase in the rotational temperature at constant translational temperature exerts significant changes in the structure of the solution. The latter are reflected in increased pairing of the oppositely charged ions, which can be explained by the weaker ability of rotationally excited water to screen and separate the opposite charges. It seems that Collins' law of matching water affinities retains its validity also in the non-equilibrium situation where the rotational temperature exceeds the translational one. On the other hand, the equilibrium effect (i.e., an increase in the solution's overall temperature T ≡Trot = Ttrs) favors the formation of small-small (NaCl), while it has a little effect on large-large (CsI) ion pairs. This is in accordance with water becoming less polar solvent upon a temperature increase. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of excited translational motion of water (and ions) on the ion pairing by increasing the translational temperature, while keeping the rotational one unchanged (i.e., Ttrs>Trot ). Interestingly, in certain cases the faster translational motion causes an increase in correlations. The temperature variations in the like-ion association constants, Kas++ and Kas-, are also examined. Here the situation is more complex but, in most cases, a decrease in the ion pairing is observed.

  2. Crystal lattice properties fully determine short-range interaction parameters for alkali and halide ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Albert H.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2012-08-01

    Accurate models of alkali and halide ions in aqueous solution are necessary for computer simulations of a broad variety of systems. Previous efforts to develop ion force fields have generally focused on reproducing experimental measurements of aqueous solution properties such as hydration free energies and ion-water distribution functions. This dependency limits transferability of the resulting parameters because of the variety and known limitations of water models. We present a solvent-independent approach to calibrating ion parameters based exclusively on crystal lattice properties. Our procedure relies on minimization of lattice sums to calculate lattice energies and interionic distances instead of equilibrium ensemble simulations of dense fluids. The gain in computational efficiency enables simultaneous optimization of all parameters for Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+, F-, Cl-, Br-, and I- subject to constraints that enforce consistency with periodic table trends. We demonstrate the method by presenting lattice-derived parameters for the primitive model and the Lennard-Jones model with Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules. The resulting parameters successfully reproduce the lattice properties used to derive them and are free from the influence of any water model. To assess the transferability of the Lennard-Jones parameters to aqueous systems, we used them to estimate hydration free energies and found that the results were in quantitative agreement with experimentally measured values. These lattice-derived parameters are applicable in simulations where coupling of ion parameters to a particular solvent model is undesirable. The simplicity and low computational demands of the calibration procedure make it suitable for parametrization of crystallizable ions in a variety of force fields.

  3. Exotic s-wave superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerides.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yusuke; Sakai, Shiro; Capone, Massimo; Arita, Ryotaro

    2016-04-20

    Alkali-doped fullerides (A3C60 with A = K, Rb, Cs) show a surprising phase diagram, in which a high transition-temperature (Tc) s-wave superconducting state emerges next to a Mott insulating phase as a function of the lattice spacing. This is in contrast with the common belief that Mott physics and phonon-driven s-wave superconductivity are incompatible, raising a fundamental question on the mechanism of the high-Tc superconductivity. This article reviews recent ab initio calculations, which have succeeded in reproducing comprehensively the experimental phase diagram with high accuracy and elucidated an unusual cooperation between the electron-phonon coupling and the electron-electron interactions leading to Mott localization to realize an unconventional s-wave superconductivity in the alkali-doped fullerides. A driving force behind the exotic physics is unusual intramolecular interactions, characterized by the coexistence of a strongly repulsive Coulomb interaction and a small effectively negative exchange interaction. This is realized by a subtle energy balance between the coupling with the Jahn-Teller phonons and Hund's coupling within the C60 molecule. The unusual form of the interaction leads to a formation of pairs of up- and down-spin electrons on the molecules, which enables the s-wave pairing. The emergent superconductivity crucially relies on the presence of the Jahn-Teller phonons, but surprisingly benefits from the strong correlations because the correlations suppress the kinetic energy of the electrons and help the formation of the electron pairs, in agreement with previous model calculations. This confirms that the alkali-doped fullerides are a new type of unconventional superconductors, where the unusual synergy between the phonons and Coulomb interactions drives the high-Tc superconductivity.

  4. Exotic s-wave superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yusuke; Sakai, Shiro; Capone, Massimo; Arita, Ryotaro

    2016-04-01

    Alkali-doped fullerides ({{A}3}{{\\text{C}}60} with A  =  K, Rb, Cs) show a surprising phase diagram, in which a high transition-temperature ({{T}\\text{c}} ) s-wave superconducting state emerges next to a Mott insulating phase as a function of the lattice spacing. This is in contrast with the common belief that Mott physics and phonon-driven s-wave superconductivity are incompatible, raising a fundamental question on the mechanism of the high-{{T}\\text{c}} superconductivity. This article reviews recent ab initio calculations, which have succeeded in reproducing comprehensively the experimental phase diagram with high accuracy and elucidated an unusual cooperation between the electron-phonon coupling and the electron-electron interactions leading to Mott localization to realize an unconventional s-wave superconductivity in the alkali-doped fullerides. A driving force behind the exotic physics is unusual intramolecular interactions, characterized by the coexistence of a strongly repulsive Coulomb interaction and a small effectively negative exchange interaction. This is realized by a subtle energy balance between the coupling with the Jahn-Teller phonons and Hund’s coupling within the {{\\text{C}}60} molecule. The unusual form of the interaction leads to a formation of pairs of up- and down-spin electrons on the molecules, which enables the s-wave pairing. The emergent superconductivity crucially relies on the presence of the Jahn-Teller phonons, but surprisingly benefits from the strong correlations because the correlations suppress the kinetic energy of the electrons and help the formation of the electron pairs, in agreement with previous model calculations. This confirms that the alkali-doped fullerides are a new type of unconventional superconductors, where the unusual synergy between the phonons and Coulomb interactions drives the high-{{T}\\text{c}} superconductivity.

  5. Low-Energy Grazing Ion-Scattering From Alkali-Halide Surfaces: A Novel Approach To C-14 Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. W.; Galutschek, E.; Hotchkis, M.

    2009-03-01

    Carbon-14 labeled compounds are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry, e.g., as tracers to determine the fate of these compounds in vivo. Conventional accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is one approach that offers sufficiently high sensitivity to avoid radiological waste and contamination issues in such studies, but requires large, expensive facilities that are usually not solely dedicated to this task. At the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) we are exploring a small size, low cost alternative to AMS for biomedical 14C tracer studies that utilizes ECR-ion-source-generated keV-energy-range multicharged C beams grazingly incident on an alkali halide target, where efficient negative ion production by multiple electron capture takes place. By using C ion charge states of +3 or higher, the molecular isobar interference at mass 14, e.g. 12CH2 and 13CH, is eliminated. The negatively charged ions in the beam scattered from the alkali halide surface are separated from other scattered charge states by two large acceptance (˜15 msr) stages of electrostatic analysis. The N-14 isobar interference is thus removed, since N does not support a stable negative ion. Initial results for C-14 detection obtained using C-14 enriched CO2 from ANSTO will be described.

  6. Low-Energy Grazing Ion-Scattering from Alkali-Halide Surfaces: A Novel Approach to C-14 Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Fred W; Galutschek, Ernst; Hotchkis, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Carbon-14 labeled compounds are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry, e.g., as tracers to determine the fate of these compounds in vivo. Conventional accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is one approach that offers sufficiently high sensitivity to avoid radiological waste and contamination issues in such studies, but requires large, expensive facilities that are usually not solely dedicated to this task. At the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) we are exploring a small size, low cost alternative to AMS for biomedical 14C tracer studies that utilizes ECR-ion-source-generated keV-energy-range multicharged C beams grazingly incident on an alkali halide target, where efficient negative ion production by multiple electron capture takes place. By using C ion charge states of +3 or higher, the molecular isobar interference at mass 14, e.g. 12CH2 and 13CH, is eliminated. The negatively charged ions in the beam scattered from the alkali halide surface are separated from other scattered charge states by two large acceptance ({approx}15 msr) stages of electrostatic analysis. The N-14 isobar interference is thus removed, since N does not support a stable negative ion. Initial results for C-14 detection obtained using C-14 enriched CO2 from ANSTO will be described.

  7. Low-Energy Grazing Ion-Scattering From Alkali-Halide Surfaces: A Novel Approach To C-14 Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, F. W.; Galutschek, E.; Hotchkis, M.

    2009-03-10

    Carbon-14 labeled compounds are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry, e.g., as tracers to determine the fate of these compounds in vivo. Conventional accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is one approach that offers sufficiently high sensitivity to avoid radiological waste and contamination issues in such studies, but requires large, expensive facilities that are usually not solely dedicated to this task. At the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) we are exploring a small size, low cost alternative to AMS for biomedical {sup 14}C tracer studies that utilizes ECR-ion-source-generated keV-energy-range multicharged C beams grazingly incident on an alkali halide target, where efficient negative ion production by multiple electron capture takes place. By using C ion charge states of +3 or higher, the molecular isobar interference at mass 14, e.g. {sup 12}CH{sub 2} and {sup 13}CH, is eliminated. The negatively charged ions in the beam scattered from the alkali halide surface are separated from other scattered charge states by two large acceptance ({approx}15 msr) stages of electrostatic analysis. The N-14 isobar interference is thus removed, since N does not support a stable negative ion. Initial results for C-14 detection obtained using C-14 enriched CO{sub 2} from ANSTO will be described.

  8. Universal scaling of potential energy functions describing intermolecular interactions. II. The halide-water and alkali metal-water interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Werhahn, Jasper C.; Akase, Dai; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2014-08-14

    The scaled versions of the newly introduced [S. S. Xantheas and J. C. Werhahn, J. Chem. Phys.141, 064117 (2014)] generalized forms of some popular potential energy functions (PEFs) describing intermolecular interactions – Mie, Lennard-Jones, Morse, and Buckingham exponential-6 – have been used to fit the ab initio relaxed approach paths and fixed approach paths for the halide-water, X-(H2O), X = F, Cl, Br, I, and alkali metal-water, M+(H2O), M = Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, interactions. The generalized forms of those PEFs have an additional parameter with respect to the original forms and produce fits to the ab initio data that are between one and two orders of magnitude better in the χ2 than the original PEFs. They were found to describe both the long-range, minimum and repulsive wall of the respective potential energy surfaces quite accurately. Overall the 4-parameter extended Morse (eM) and generalized Buckingham exponential-6 (gBe-6) potentials were found to best fit the ab initio data for these two classes of ion-water interactions. Finally, the fitted values of the parameter of the (eM) and (gBe-6) PEFs that control the repulsive wall of the potential correlate remarkably well with the ionic radii of the halide and alkali metal ions.

  9. Development of processes for the production of solar grade silicon from halides and alkali metals, phase 1 and phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickson, C. R.; Gould, R. K.; Felder, W.

    1981-01-01

    High temperature reactions of silicon halides with alkali metals for the production of solar grade silicon are described. Product separation and collection processes were evaluated, measure heat release parameters for scaling purposes and effects of reactants and/or products on materials of reactor construction were determined, and preliminary engineering and economic analysis of a scaled up process were made. The feasibility of the basic process to make and collect silicon was demonstrated. The jet impaction/separation process was demonstrated to be a purification process. The rate at which gas phase species from silicon particle precursors, the time required for silane decomposition to produce particles, and the competing rate of growth of silicon seed particles injected into a decomposing silane environment were determined. The extent of silane decomposition as a function of residence time, temperature, and pressure was measured by infrared absorption spectroscopy. A simplistic model is presented to explain the growth of silicon in a decomposing silane enviroment.

  10. Processes that Intervene in the Generation of the Photoacoustic Effect in Alkali Halides with F-Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, Luis F.

    2004-01-01

    The photoacoustic effect, produced by the F-center in alkali halide crystals, is analyzed using the configuration coordinate model. By using the configuration coordinate model it is possible to explain the temperature increase of the sample when the sample is illuminated and the F-centers absorb light. Also this model explains the piston effect upon the atmosphere that surrounds the sample when the sample is illuminated. The temperature increase and the piston effect, produced during the development of the photoacoustic effect, cause the sound wave generation in the atmosphere that surrounds the sample when the F-centers absorb light. Using this model, the temperature increase value for a KCl sample and the displacement of the faces of the crystal during the process for the following crystals: KCl, KBr, KI and NaCl, have been determined.

  11. Integrating 2-D position sensitive X-ray detectors with low-density alkali halide storage targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubold, H.-G.; Hoheisel, W.; Hiller, P.

    1986-05-01

    For the use in scattering experiments with synchrotron radiation, integrating position sensitive X-ray detectors are discussed. These detectors store the photon number equivalent charge (PNEC) in low-density alkali halide targets. Performance tests are given for a detector which uses a Gd 2O 2S fluorescence screen for X-ray detection and the low-density KCl storage target of a television SEC vidicon tube for photon integration. Rather than directly by X-rays, this target is charged by 6 keV electrons from the image intensifier section of the vidicon. Its excellent storage capability allows measurements of extremely high-contrast, high-flux X-ray patterns with the same accuracy as achieved with any single photon detection system if the discussed readout techniques are applied.

  12. Tin as reducing agent in ? doped alkali-earth fluorophosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dafinova, R.; Caralampydu, A.

    1998-07-01

    The blue europium band in alkali-earth fluorophosphates, determining the 0953-8984/10/27/017/img2 allowed electric-dipole transitions in the 0953-8984/10/27/017/img3 ion, is studied. The simultaneous doping with 0953-8984/10/27/017/img4 provides a possibility of the realization of 0953-8984/10/27/017/img5 transitions and of formation of 0953-8984/10/27/017/img3 ions as blue emission centres of high intensity. The 0953-8984/10/27/017/img7 position is assumed for the 0953-8984/10/27/017/img3 ions in the apatite structure of the matrix.

  13. Ultrabroad Photoluminescence and Electroluminescence at New Wavelengths from Doped Organometal Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Yong, Zi-Jun; Zhang, Kai-Cheng; Liu, Bo-Mei; Wang, Zhao-Wei; Hou, Jing-Shan; Fang, Yong-Zheng; Zhou, Yi; Sun, Hong-Tao; Song, Bo

    2016-07-21

    Doping of semiconductors by introducing foreign atoms enables their widespread applications in microelectronics and optoelectronics. We show that this strategy can be applied to direct bandgap lead-halide perovskites, leading to the realization of ultrawide photoluminescence (PL) at new wavelengths enabled by doping bismuth (Bi) into lead-halide perovskites. Structural and photophysical characterization reveals that the PL stems from one class of Bi doping-induced optically active center, which is attributed to distorted [PbI6] units coupled with spatially localized bipolarons. Additionally, we find that compositional engineering of these semiconductors can be employed as an additional way to rationally tune the PL properties of doped perovskites. Finally, we accomplished the electroluminescence at cryogenic temperatures by using this system as an emissive layer, marking the first electrically driven devices using Bi-doped photonic materials. Our results suggest that low-cost, earth-abundant, solution-processable Bi-doped perovskite semiconductors could be promising candidate materials for developing optical sources operating at new wavelengths.

  14. Growth and Studies of Halides doped Zinc Tris-Thiourea Sulphate(HZTS) Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suveetha, P.; Sathya, T.; Sudha, S.; Raj, M. B. Jessie

    2012-10-01

    Single crystals of Sodium chloride and Potassium iodide (Halides) doped Zinc tris-thiourea sulphate (ZTS) were grown from low temperature solution growth technique by slow evaporation method using water as solvent. The powder X-Ray diffraction pattern were recorded and indexed. The UV transmittance spectrum has been recorded. The optical band gap was estimated using Taucís plot. The TGA/DTA studies show the thermal properties of the crystals.

  15. Size distributions and geometries of alkali halide nanoclusters probed using ESI FT-ICR mass spectrometry and quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, K.; Sadjadi, S.; Seward, T.

    2010-12-01

    The structures and energetic properties of ionic alkali metal halide clusters play a significant role in our understanding of aqueous geochemical processes such as salt dissolution, precipitation and neutralization reactions. Mass spectrometric and quantum chemical studies of such systems offer new opportunities to study the size-dependent evolution of cluster structures, the occurrence of magic number species as well as their fundamental properties. The work here presents new results for the stability, abundance and structure of pure [Na(NaClm)]+ , [K(KCl)m]+ and mixed [Na(NaCl)p(KCl)q]+ metal halide clusters with m<23 and p+q<14, respectively, using ultra-high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR/MS) in combination with the Gn and CBS-x multistep ab initio methods. Ion-cluster experiments were conducted on a modified 7T Bruker FT-ICR/MS equipped with electrospray ionization (ESI) sources and a custom-designed solvent gas inlet interface. In ESI FT-ICR/MS experiments performed with solutions containing NaCl and KCl salts (1mM; 80/20 CH3CN/H2O), singly and doubly charged salt clusters were generated up to a cluster size of [Na(NaCl)22]+, [K(KCl)17]+ and [K2(KCl)21,23]2+, respectively, including “magic number” clusters that correspond to the completed cluster cuboids with the dimensions 3x3x1 (m=4), 3x3x2+3 (m=10) 3x3x3 (m=13) and 3x3x5 (m=22) (see Figure). On the other hand, no pure clusters except [K(KCl)1-3]+ were generated when alkali halides were electrosprayed from 1mM NaCl/KCl solutions. Instead, mixed [Na(NaCl)p(KCl)q]+ clusters are generated up to p+q=14, which are the largest mixed alkali halide clusters yet generated in mass spectrometric experiments, including a suite of ionic species that are generated via CH3CN fragmentation and charge transfer in [Na(CH3CN)n]+ to yield the clusters [Na(NaCN)(CH3CN)n-1]+. We describe our ESI FT-ICR/MS experiments and discuss ion cluster abundances and extent of clustering

  16. An Investigation of Ion-Pairing of Alkali Metal Halides in Aqueous Solutions Using the Electrical Conductivity and the Monte Carlo Computer Simulation Methods

    PubMed Central

    Gujt, Jure; Bešter-Rogač, Marija; Hribar-Lee, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The ion pairing is, in very dilute aqueous solutions, of rather small importance for solutions’ properties, which renders its precise quantification quite a laborious task. Here we studied the ion pairing of alkali halides in water by using the precise electric conductivity measurements in dilute solutions, and in a wide temperature range. The low-concentration chemical model was used to analyze the results, and to estimate the association constant of different alkali halide salts. It has been shown that the association constant is related to the solubility of salts in water and produces a ’volcano relationship’, when plotted against the difference between the free energy of hydration of the corresponding individual ions. The computer simulation, using the simple MB+dipole water model, were used to interprete the results, to find a microscopic basis for Collins’ law of matching water affinities. PMID:24526801

  17. Lattice model calculation of elastic and thermodynamic properties at high pressure and temperature. [for alkali halides in NaCl lattice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarest, H. H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The elastic constants and the entire frequency spectrum were calculated up to high pressure for the alkali halides in the NaCl lattice, based on an assumed functional form of the inter-atomic potential. The quasiharmonic approximation is used to calculate the vibrational contribution to the pressure and the elastic constants at arbitrary temperature. By explicitly accounting for the effect of thermal and zero point motion, the adjustable parameters in the potential are determined to a high degree of accuracy from the elastic constants and their pressure derivatives measured at zero pressure. The calculated Gruneisen parameter, the elastic constants and their pressure derivatives are in good agreement with experimental results up to about 600 K. The model predicts that for some alkali halides the Grunesen parameter may decrease monotonically with pressure, while for others it may increase with pressure, after an initial decrease.

  18. Solubility of alkali metal halides in the ionic liquid [C4C1im][OTf].

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, O; Bordes, E; Schmauck, J; Hunt, P A; Hallett, J P; Welton, T

    2016-06-28

    The solubilities of the metal halides LiF, LiCl, LiBr, LiI, NaF, NaCl, NaBr, NaI, KF, KCl, KBr, KI, RbCl, CsCl, CsI, were measured at temperatures ranging from 298.15 to 378.15 K in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([C4C1im][OTf]). Li(+), Na(+) and K(+) salts with anions matching the ionic liquid have also been investigated to determine how well these cations dissolve in [C4C1im][OTf]. This study compares the influence of metal cation and halide anion on the solubility of salts within this ionic liquid. The highest solubility found was for iodide salts, and the lowest solubility for the three fluoride salts. There is no outstanding difference in the solubility of salts with matching anions in comparison to halide salts. The experimental data were correlated employing several phase equilibria models, including ideal mixtures, van't Hoff, the λh (Buchowski) equation, the modified Apelblat equation, and the non-random two-liquid model (NRTL). It was found that the van't Hoff model gave the best correlation results. On the basis of the experimental data the thermodynamic dissolution parameters (ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG) were determined for the studied systems together with computed gas phase metathesis parameters. Dissolution depends on the energy difference between enthalpies of fusion and dissolution of the solute salt. This demonstrates that overcoming the lattice energy of the solid matrix is the key to the solubility of inorganic salts in ionic liquids.

  19. Exciton-to-Dopant Energy Transfer in Mn-Doped Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Parobek, David; Roman, Benjamin J; Dong, Yitong; Jin, Ho; Lee, Elbert; Sheldon, Matthew; Son, Dong Hee

    2016-12-14

    We report the one-pot synthesis of colloidal Mn-doped cesium lead halide (CsPbX3) perovskite nanocrystals and efficient intraparticle energy transfer between the exciton and dopant ions resulting in intense sensitized Mn luminescence. Mn-doped CsPbCl3 and CsPb(Cl/Br)3 nanocrystals maintained the same lattice structure and crystallinity as their undoped counterparts with nearly identical lattice parameters at ∼0.2% doping concentrations and no signature of phase separation. The strong sensitized luminescence from d-d transition of Mn(2+) ions upon band-edge excitation of the CsPbX3 host is indicative of sufficiently strong exchange coupling between the charge carriers of the host and dopant d electrons mediating the energy transfer, essential for obtaining unique properties of magnetically doped quantum dots. Highly homogeneous spectral characteristics of Mn luminescence from an ensemble of Mn-doped CsPbX3 nanocrystals and well-defined electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of Mn(2+) in host CsPbX3 nanocrystal lattices suggest relatively uniform doping sites, likely from substitutional doping at Pb(2+). These observations indicate that CsPbX3 nanocrystals, possessing many superior optical and electronic characteristics, can be utilized as a new platform for magnetically doped quantum dots expanding the range of optical, electronic, and magnetic functionality.

  20. Ca-Fe and Alkali-Halide Alteration of an Allende Type B CAI: Aqueous Alteration in Nebular or Asteroidal Settings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. K.; Simon, J. I.; Simon, S. B.; Grossman, L.

    2012-01-01

    Ca-Fe and alkali-halide alteration of CAIs is often attributed to aqueous alteration by fluids circulating on asteroidal parent bodies after the various chondritic components have been assembled, although debate continues about the roles of asteroidal vs. nebular modification processes [1-7]. Here we report de-tailed observations of alteration products in a large Type B2 CAI, TS4 from Allende, one of the oxidized subgroup of CV3s, and propose a speculative model for aqueous alteration of CAIs in a nebular setting. Ca-Fe alteration in this CAI consists predominantly of end-member hedenbergite, end-member andradite, and compositionally variable, magnesian high-Ca pyroxene. These phases are strongly concentrated in an unusual "nodule" enclosed within the interior of the CAI (Fig. 1). The Ca, Fe-rich nodule superficially resembles a clast that pre-dated and was engulfed by the CAI, but closer inspection shows that relic spinel grains are enclosed in the nodule, and corroded CAI primary phases interfinger with the Fe-rich phases at the nodule s margins. This CAI also contains abundant sodalite and nepheline (alkali-halide) alteration that occurs around the rims of the CAI, but also penetrates more deeply into the CAI. The two types of alteration (Ca-Fe and alkali-halide) are adjacent, and very fine-grained Fe-rich phases are associated with sodalite-rich regions. Both types of alteration appear to be replacive; if that is true, it would require substantial introduction of Fe, and transport of elements (Ti, Al and Mg) out of the nodule, and introduction of Na and Cl into alkali-halide rich zones. Parts of the CAI have been extensively metasomatized.

  1. Influence of gallium and alkali halide addition on the optical and thermo mechanical properties of GeSe2-Ga2Se3 glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, Y. V.; Malyarevich, A. M.; Yumashev, K. V.; Matrosov, V. N.; Matrosova, T. A.; Kupchenko, M. I.

    2007-10-01

    A systematic compositional study of a new family of chalcogenide glasses, transparent from the visible range up to 16 μm has been performed. Numerous glass forming regions were explored in the GeSe2-Ga2Se3-MX system (MX = alkali halide) in order to understand the role of alkali halides and the effect of Ga substitution for Sb in the glass structure. To that avail, several ternary diagrams were investigated, and optical and thermo-mechanical measurements were performed. It is shown that the introduction of an alkali halide in the GeSe2-Ga2Se3 glasses increased the band-gap energy Eg by stabilizing electrons from the lone pairs of selenium. However, the glass hardness was lowered due to a decrease in the glass network reticulation. The chemical resistance was studied in a glass containing high CsCl content. Significant corrosion occurred when the glass was exposed to hot water for several hours. There is a great deal of interest in these glasses for use in thermal imaging devices, as they permit the alignment of infrared optical systems with visible red light. Furthermore, the low cost of raw materials and the possibility of shaping these glasses into lenses by molding could extend their utilization from defense to civilian applications.

  2. Influence of gallium and alkali halide addition on the optical and thermo-mechanical properties of GeSe2-Ga2Se3 glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvez, L.; Lucas, P.; Rozé, M.; Ma, H. L.; Lucas, J.; Zhang, X. H.

    2007-10-01

    A systematic compositional study of a new family of chalcogenide glasses, transparent from the visible range up to 16 μm has been performed. Numerous glass forming regions were explored in the GeSe2-Ga2Se3-MX system (MX = alkali halide) in order to understand the role of alkali halides and the effect of Ga substitution for Sb in the glass structure. To that avail, several ternary diagrams were investigated, and optical and thermo-mechanical measurements were performed. It is shown that the introduction of an alkali halide in the GeSe2-Ga2Se3 glasses increased the band-gap energy Eg by stabilizing electrons from the lone pairs of selenium. However, the glass hardness was lowered due to a decrease in the glass network reticulation. The chemical resistance was studied in a glass containing high CsCl content. Significant corrosion occurred when the glass was exposed to hot water for several hours. There is a great deal of interest in these glasses for use in thermal imaging devices, as they permit the alignment of infrared optical systems with visible red light. Furthermore, the low cost of raw materials and the possibility of shaping these glasses into lenses by molding could extend their utilization from defense to civilian applications.

  3. Interaction of wide band gap single crystals with 248 nm excimer laser radiation. XII. The emission of negative atomic ions from alkali halides

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Kenichi; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.

    2007-12-01

    Many wide band gap materials yield charged and neutral emissions when exposed to sub-band-gap laser radiation at power densities below the threshold for optical breakdown and plume formation. In this work, we report the observation of negative alkali ions from several alkali halides under comparable conditions. We observe no evidence for negative halogen ions, in spite of the high electron affinities of the halogens. Significantly, the positive and negative alkali ions show a high degree of spatial and temporal overlap. A detailed study of all the relevant particle emissions from potassium chloride (KCl) suggests that K{sup -} is formed by the sequential attachment of two electrons to K{sup +}.

  4. Electrical field profile and doping in planar lead halide perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Antonio; Juarez-Perez, Emilio J.; Bisquert, Juan; Mora-Sero, Ivan; Garcia-Belmonte, Germà

    2014-09-01

    Hybrid lead halide perovskites (PVKs) have emerged as novel materials for photovoltaics and have rapidly reached very large solar to electricity power conversion efficiencies. As occurring with other kind of solar technologies establishing the working energy-band diagram constitutes a primary goal for device physics analysis. Here, the macroscopic electrical field distribution is experimentally determined using capacitance-voltage and Kelvin probe techniques. Planar structures comprising CH3NH3PbI3-xClx PVK exhibit p-doping character and form a p-n heterojunction with n-doped TiO2 compact layers. Depletion width at equilibrium within the PVK bulk has an extent about 300 nm (approximately half of the layer thickness), leaving as a consequence a significant neutral zone towards the anode contact. Charge collection properties are then accessible relying on the relative weight that diffusion and drift have as carrier transport driven forces.

  5. Evidence for New Excess Electron Localization Sites in Na{sub {ital n}}F{sub {ital n}{minus}1 } Alkali-Halide Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, G.; Spiegelmann, F.; Labastie, P.; LHermite, J.; Poncharal, P.

    1997-07-01

    This Letter examines new types of localization sites for an excess electron in finite alkali-halide clusters resulting from defects on cuboidal structures, namely {open_quotes}edge states,{close_quotes} R center, and other surface defects. We present theoretical calculations on Na{sub n}F {sub n{minus}1} clusters with one excess electron. Comparisons with experimental results are presented for different cluster sizes (n=17 , 23, 28, and 29). Structures with edge or surface defects are relevant for n=23 , 28, and 29. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Well-ordered monolayers of alkali-doped coronene and picene: Molecular arrangements and electronic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, M.; Endo, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Okada, R.; Yamada, Y. Sasaki, M.

    2014-07-21

    Adsorptions of alkali metals (such as K and Li) on monolayers of coronene and picene realize the formation of ordered phases, which serve as well-defined model systems for metal-intercalated aromatic superconductors. Upon alkali-doping of the monolayers of coronene and picene, scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed the rearrangement of the entire molecular layer. The K-induced reconstruction of both monolayers resulted in the formation of a structure with a herringbone-like arrangement of molecules, suggesting the intercalation of alkali metals between molecular planes. Upon reconstruction, a shift in both the vacuum level and core levels of coronene was observed as a result of a charge transfer from alkali metals to coronene. In addition, a new density of states near the Fermi level was formed in both the doped coronene and the doped picene monolayers. This characteristic electronic feature of the ordered monolayer has been also reported in the multilayer picene films, ensuring that the present monolayer can model the properties of the metal-intercalated aromatic hydrocarbons. It is suggested that the electronic structure near the Fermi level is sensitive to the molecular arrangement, and that both the strict control and determinations of the molecular structure in the doped phase should be important for the determination of the electronic structure of these materials.

  7. Measurement of the Electric Dipole Polarizabilities of Alkali Halide Dimers, and DOUBLET-P(1/2) Indium and Thallium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guella, Thomas Paul

    1985-12-01

    An electric field deflection technique has been used to obtain the average dimer polarizabilities of all the alkali halides, and the scalar ('2)P(, 1/2) polarizabilities of indium and thallium. The experimental procedure consisted of passing a well collimated effusive beam through a region of inhomogeneous electric field and analyzing the deflected beam pattern, with respect to the undeflected beam shape, at the detector. The beam deflections were analyzed in two ways. One method consisted of normalizing the deflections by comparing the experi- mental deflections to those obtained from atomic lithium, whose polarizability is known to within 2%. The normalization reduces the polarizability determination to the ratio of measured line slopes. This procedure lessens systematic errors resulting from a lack of detailed information concerning field variations along the beam path within the interaction region. A second method, employing a C.D.C. Cyber 360 computer, comprizes a quantitative analysis of the monomer and dimer deflections in which part of the actual deflected beam shape is used. Our results are compared with the polarizability values obtained from a simple 'mass-spring' model for the dimer which employs calculated (and experimental) vibrational frequencies and effective ionic polarizabilities from various dimer models. In addition to an electric deflection measurement, and E-H gradient balance technique was also employed for the indium and thallium ('2)P(, 1/2) measurements. This method consisted of balancing the magnetic dipole force for negative magnetic substates against the induced electric dipole force in a region where simultaneous and congruent inhomogeneous electric and magnetic fields are estab- lished. These measurements were normalized to an m = -3 substate of Cs whose polarizability is known to within (.5%). The results of our electric deflection and E-H gradient balance measurements for these atomic systems were (UNFORMATTED TABLE FOLLOWS). In Tl

  8. Heteroatom-Containing Porous Carbons Derived from Ionic Liquid-Doped Alkali Organic Salts for Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingyue; Xu, Dan; Qian, Wenjing; Zhang, Jinyu; Yan, Feng

    2016-04-13

    A simple strategy for the synthesis of heteroatom-doped porous carbon materials (CMs) via using ionic liquid (IL)-doped alkali organic salts as small molecular precursors is developed. Doping of alkali organic salts (such as sodium glutamate, sodium tartrate, and sodium citrate) with heteroatoms containing ILs (including 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chlorine and 3-butyl-4-methythiazolebromination) not only incorporates the heteroatoms into the carbon frameworks but also highly improves the carbonization yield, as compared with that of either alkali organic salts or ILs as precursors. The porous structure of CMs can be tuned by adjusting the feed ratio of ILs. The porous CMs derived from 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chlorine-doped sodium glutamate exhibit high charge storage capacity with a specific capacitance of 287 F g(-1) and good stability over 5000 cycles in 6 m KOH at a current density of 1 A g(-1) for supercapacitors. This strategy opens a simple and efficient method for the synthesis of heteroatom-doped porous CMs.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of the dynamic and energetic properties of alkali and halide ions using water-model-specific ion parameters.

    PubMed

    Joung, In Suk; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2009-10-08

    The dynamic and energetic properties of the alkali and halide ions were calculated using molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy simulations with various different water and ion force fields including our recently developed water-model-specific ion parameters. The properties calculated were activity coefficients, diffusion coefficients, residence times of atomic pairs, association constants, and solubility. Through calculation of these properties, we can assess the validity and range of applicability of the simple pair potential models and better understand their limitations. Due to extreme computational demands, the activity coefficients were only calculated for a subset of the models. The results qualitatively agree with experiment. Calculated diffusion coefficients and residence times between cation-anion, water-cation, and water-anion showed differences depending on the choice of water and ion force field used. The calculated solubilities of the alkali-halide salts were generally lower than the true solubility of the salts. However, for both the TIP4P(EW) and SPC/E water-model-specific ion parameters, solubility was reasonably well-reproduced. Finally, the correlations among the various properties led to the following conclusions: (1) The reliability of the ion force fields is significantly affected by the specific choice of water model. (2) Ion-ion interactions are very important to accurately simulate the properties, especially solubility. (3) The SPC/E and TIP4P(EW) water-model-specific ion force fields are preferred for simulation in high salt environments compared to the other ion force fields.

  10. Evaluation of the physi- and chemisorption of hydrogen in alkali (Na, Li) doped fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Patrick A.; Teprovich, Jr., Jospeph A.; Compton, Robert N.; Schwartz, Viviane; Veith, Gabriel M.; Zidan, Ragiay

    2015-01-11

    Here, alkali doped fullerenes synthesized by two different solvent assisted mixing techniques are compared for their hydrogen uptake activity. In this study we investigated the interaction of hydrogen with alkali doped fullerenes via physisorption. In addition, we present the first mass spectrometric evidence for the formation of C60H60 via chemisorption. Hydrogen physisorption isotherms up to 1 atm at temperatures ranging from 77-303 K were measured demonstrating an increase in hydrogen uptake versus pure C60 and increased isosteric heats of adsorption for the lithium doped fullerene Li12C60. However, despite these improvements the low amount of physisorbed hydrogen at 1 atm and 77 K in these materials suggests that fullerenes do not possess enough accessible surface area to effectively store hydrogen due to their close packed crystalline nature.

  11. Evaluation of the physi- and chemisorption of hydrogen in alkali (Na, Li) doped fullerenes

    DOE PAGES

    Ward, Patrick A.; Teprovich, Jr., Jospeph A.; Compton, Robert N.; ...

    2015-01-11

    Here, alkali doped fullerenes synthesized by two different solvent assisted mixing techniques are compared for their hydrogen uptake activity. In this study we investigated the interaction of hydrogen with alkali doped fullerenes via physisorption. In addition, we present the first mass spectrometric evidence for the formation of C60H60 via chemisorption. Hydrogen physisorption isotherms up to 1 atm at temperatures ranging from 77-303 K were measured demonstrating an increase in hydrogen uptake versus pure C60 and increased isosteric heats of adsorption for the lithium doped fullerene Li12C60. However, despite these improvements the low amount of physisorbed hydrogen at 1 atm andmore » 77 K in these materials suggests that fullerenes do not possess enough accessible surface area to effectively store hydrogen due to their close packed crystalline nature.« less

  12. Deliberate and Accidental Gas-Phase Alkali Doping of Chalcogenide Semiconductors: Cu(In,Ga)Se2.

    PubMed

    Colombara, Diego; Berner, Ulrich; Ciccioli, Andrea; Malaquias, João C; Bertram, Tobias; Crossay, Alexandre; Schöneich, Michael; Meadows, Helene J; Regesch, David; Delsante, Simona; Gigli, Guido; Valle, Nathalie; Guillot, Jérome; El Adib, Brahime; Grysan, Patrick; Dale, Phillip J

    2017-02-24

    Alkali metal doping is essential to achieve highly efficient energy conversion in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) solar cells. Doping is normally achieved through solid state reactions, but recent observations of gas-phase alkali transport in the kesterite sulfide (Cu2ZnSnS4) system (re)open the way to a novel gas-phase doping strategy. However, the current understanding of gas-phase alkali transport is very limited. This work (i) shows that CIGSe device efficiency can be improved from 2% to 8% by gas-phase sodium incorporation alone, (ii) identifies the most likely routes for gas-phase alkali transport based on mass spectrometric studies, (iii) provides thermochemical computations to rationalize the observations and (iv) critically discusses the subject literature with the aim to better understand the chemical basis of the phenomenon. These results suggest that accidental alkali metal doping occurs all the time, that a controlled vapor pressure of alkali metal could be applied during growth to dope the semiconductor, and that it may have to be accounted for during the currently used solid state doping routes. It is concluded that alkali gas-phase transport occurs through a plurality of routes and cannot be attributed to one single source.

  13. Deliberate and Accidental Gas-Phase Alkali Doping of Chalcogenide Semiconductors: Cu(In,Ga)Se2

    PubMed Central

    Colombara, Diego; Berner, Ulrich; Ciccioli, Andrea; Malaquias, João C.; Bertram, Tobias; Crossay, Alexandre; Schöneich, Michael; Meadows, Helene J.; Regesch, David; Delsante, Simona; Gigli, Guido; Valle, Nathalie; Guillot, Jérome; El Adib, Brahime; Grysan, Patrick; Dale, Phillip J.

    2017-01-01

    Alkali metal doping is essential to achieve highly efficient energy conversion in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) solar cells. Doping is normally achieved through solid state reactions, but recent observations of gas-phase alkali transport in the kesterite sulfide (Cu2ZnSnS4) system (re)open the way to a novel gas-phase doping strategy. However, the current understanding of gas-phase alkali transport is very limited. This work (i) shows that CIGSe device efficiency can be improved from 2% to 8% by gas-phase sodium incorporation alone, (ii) identifies the most likely routes for gas-phase alkali transport based on mass spectrometric studies, (iii) provides thermochemical computations to rationalize the observations and (iv) critically discusses the subject literature with the aim to better understand the chemical basis of the phenomenon. These results suggest that accidental alkali metal doping occurs all the time, that a controlled vapor pressure of alkali metal could be applied during growth to dope the semiconductor, and that it may have to be accounted for during the currently used solid state doping routes. It is concluded that alkali gas-phase transport occurs through a plurality of routes and cannot be attributed to one single source. PMID:28233864

  14. Deliberate and Accidental Gas-Phase Alkali Doping of Chalcogenide Semiconductors: Cu(In,Ga)Se2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombara, Diego; Berner, Ulrich; Ciccioli, Andrea; Malaquias, João C.; Bertram, Tobias; Crossay, Alexandre; Schöneich, Michael; Meadows, Helene J.; Regesch, David; Delsante, Simona; Gigli, Guido; Valle, Nathalie; Guillot, Jérome; El Adib, Brahime; Grysan, Patrick; Dale, Phillip J.

    2017-02-01

    Alkali metal doping is essential to achieve highly efficient energy conversion in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) solar cells. Doping is normally achieved through solid state reactions, but recent observations of gas-phase alkali transport in the kesterite sulfide (Cu2ZnSnS4) system (re)open the way to a novel gas-phase doping strategy. However, the current understanding of gas-phase alkali transport is very limited. This work (i) shows that CIGSe device efficiency can be improved from 2% to 8% by gas-phase sodium incorporation alone, (ii) identifies the most likely routes for gas-phase alkali transport based on mass spectrometric studies, (iii) provides thermochemical computations to rationalize the observations and (iv) critically discusses the subject literature with the aim to better understand the chemical basis of the phenomenon. These results suggest that accidental alkali metal doping occurs all the time, that a controlled vapor pressure of alkali metal could be applied during growth to dope the semiconductor, and that it may have to be accounted for during the currently used solid state doping routes. It is concluded that alkali gas-phase transport occurs through a plurality of routes and cannot be attributed to one single source.

  15. Orbital disproportionation of electronic density is a universal feature of alkali-doped fullerides

    PubMed Central

    Iwahara, Naoya; Chibotaru, Liviu F.

    2016-01-01

    Alkali-doped fullerides show a wide range of electronic phases in function of alkali atoms and the degree of doping. Although the presence of strong electron correlations is well established, recent investigations also give evidence for dynamical Jahn–Teller instability in the insulating and the metallic trivalent fullerides. In this work, to reveal the interplay of these interactions in fullerides with even electrons, we address the electronic phase of tetravalent fulleride with accurate many-body calculations within a realistic electronic model including all basic interactions extracted from first principles. We find that the Jahn–Teller instability is always realized in these materials too. In sharp contrast to the correlated metals, tetravalent system displays uncorrelated band-insulating state despite similar interactions present in both fullerides. Our results show that the Jahn–Teller instability and the accompanying orbital disproportionation of electronic density in the degenerate lowest unoccupied molecular orbital band is a universal feature of fullerides. PMID:27713426

  16. Development of processes for the production of solar grade silicon from halides and alkali metals, Phase 1 and Phase 2. Final report, October 1979 - February 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, C.R.; Gould, R.K.; Felder, W.

    1981-03-01

    High temperature reactions of silicon halides with alkali metals for the production of solar grade silicon are described. Product separation and collection processes were evaluated, measure heat release parameters for scaling purposes and effects of reactants and/or products on materials of reactor construction were determined, and preliminary engineering and economic analysis of a scaled up process were made. The feasibility of the basic process to make and collect silicon was demonstrated. The jet impaction/separation process was demonstrated to be a purification process. The rate at which gas phase species from silicon particle precursors, the time required for silane decomposition to produce particles, and the competing rate of growth of silicon seed particles injected into a decomposing silane environment were determined. The extent of silane decomposition as a function of residence time, temperature, and pressure was measured by infrared absorption spectroscopy. A simplistic model is presented to explain the growth of silicon in a decomposing silane enviroment.

  17. Magnetism in alkali-metal-doped wurtzite semiconductor materials controlled by strain engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J. H.; Li, T. H.; Liu, L. Z.; Hu, F. R.

    2016-09-01

    The study of the magnetism and optical properties of semiconductor materials by defect engineering has attracted much attention because of their potential uses in spintronic and optoelectronic devices. In this paper, first-principle calculations discloses that cationic vacancy formation energy of the doped wurtzite materials can be sharply decreased due to alkali metal dopants and shows that their magnetic properties strongly depend on defect and doping concentration. This effect can be ascribed to the volume change induced by foreign elements doped into the host system and atomic population's difference. The symmetric deformation induced by biaxial strain can further regulate this behavior. Our results suggest that the formation of cationic vacancy can be tailored by strain engineering and dopants incorporation.

  18. Capacitance of the double electrical layer on the copper-group metals in molten alkali metal halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillova, E. V.; Stepanov, V. P.

    2016-08-01

    The electrochemical impedance is measured to study the capacitance of the double electrical layer of metallic Au, Ag, and Cu as a function of potential and temperature in nine molten salts, namely, the chlorides, bromides, and iodides of sodium, potassium, and cesium. The C- E curve of a gold electrode has an additional minimum in the anodic branch. This minimum for silver is less pronounced and is only observed at low ac signal frequencies in cesium halides. The additional minimum is not detected for copper in any salt under study. This phenomenon is explained on the assumption that the adsorption of halide anions on a positively charged electrode surface has a predominantly chemical rather than an electrostatic character. The specific adsorption in this case is accompanied by charge transfer through the interface and the formation of an adsorbent-adsorbate covalent bond.

  19. Stability of alkali-metal hydrides: effects of n-type doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olea Amezcua, Monica Araceli; de La Peña Seaman, Omar; Rivas Silva, Juan Francisco; Heid, Rolf; Bohnen, Klaus-Peter

    Metal hydrides could be considered ideal solid-state hydrogen storage systems, they have light weight and high hydrogen volumetric densities, but the hydrogen desorption process requires excessively high temperatures due to their high stability. Efforts have been performed to improve their dehydrogenation properties, based on the introduction of defects, impurities and doping. We present a systematic study of the n-type (electronic) doping effects on the stability of two alkali-metal hydrides: Na1-xMgxH and Li1-xBexH. These systems have been studied within the framework of density functional perturbation theory, using a mixed-basis pseudopotential method and the self-consistent version of the virtual crystal approximation to model the doping. The full-phonon dispersions are analyzed for several doping content, paying special attention to the crystal stability. It is found a doping content threshold for each system, where they are close to dynamical instabilities, which are related to charge redistribution in interstitial zones. Applying the quasiharmonic approximation, the vibrational free energy, the linear thermal expansion and heat capacities are obtained for both hydrides systems and are analyzed as a function of the doping content. This work is partially supported by the VIEP-BUAP 2016 and CONACYT-México (No.221807) projects.

  20. Self-trapped excitons in pure and Na- and Tl-doped caesium halides and the recombination luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chun-Rong; Chen, Ling-Fu; Song, K. S.

    1999-07-01

    On the basis of a method used earlier to predict the off-centre relaxed triplet self-trapped excitons in alkali halides, similar systems in caesium halides are studied. This work confirms the expected off-centre relaxation along the [100] cubic axes with increasing magnitude in the order CsI, CsBr and CsCl. The calculated emission energies are in reasonable agreement with observed values. The well-known 2.95 eV emission band of CsI:Na has been studied as a tunnelling recombination between a close pair consisting of a VK centre and a Na atom. For a number of close-pair geometries the emission energies are close to 3 eV. The strong emission bands of CsI:Tl at 2.25 eV and 2.55 eV have been interpreted as arising from tunnelling recombination of close pairs each consisting of a Tl0 and a VK centre. The calculated emission energies and polarizations are discussed in conjunction with the experimental data.

  1. Crystal structure search and electronic properties of alkali-doped phenanthrene and picene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghavi, S. Shahab; Tosatti, Erio

    2014-08-01

    Alkali-doped aromatic compounds have shown evidence of metallic and superconducting phases whose precise nature is still mysterious. In potassium and rubidium-doped phenanthrene, superconducting temperatures around 5 K have been detected, but such basic elements as the stoichiometry, crystal structure, and electronic bands are still speculative. We seek to predict the crystal structure of M3-phenanthrene (M = K, Rb) using ab initio evolutionary simulation in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT), and find metal but also insulator phases with distinct structures. The original P21 herringbone structure of the pristine molecular crystal is generally abandoned in favor of different packing and chemical motifs. The metallic phases are frankly ionic with three electrons acquired by each molecule. In the nonmagnetic insulating phases the alkalis coalesce reducing the donated charge from three to two per phenanthrene molecule. A similar search for K3-picene yields an old and a new structure, with unlike potassium positions and different electronic bands, but both metallic retaining the face-to-edge herringbone structure and the P21 symmetry of pristine picene. Both the new K3-picene and the best metallic M3-phenanthrene are further found to undergo a spontaneous transition from metal to antiferromagnetic insulator when spin polarization is allowed, a transition which is not necessarily real, but which underlines the necessity to include correlations beyond DFT. Features of the metallic phases that may be relevant to phonon-driven superconductivity are underlined.

  2. Optical absorption and photoluminescence properties of Er3+ doped mixed alkali borate glasses.

    PubMed

    Ratnakaram, Y C; Kumar, A Vijaya; Naidu, D Tirupathi; Rao, J L

    2005-07-01

    An investigations of the optical absorption and fluorescence spectra of 0.2 mol% Er2O3 in mixed alkali borate glasses of the type 67.8B2O3 x xLi2O(32-x)Na2O, 67.8B2O3 x xLi2O(32-x)K2O and 67.8B2O3 x xNa2O(32-x)K2O (where x = 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24) are presented. The glasses were obtained by quenching melts consisting of H3BO3, Li2CO3, Na2CO3, K2CO3 and Er2O3 (950-1100 degrees C, 1.5-2 h) between two brass plates. Spectroscopic parameters like Racah (E1, E2 and E3), spin-orbit (xi(4f)) and configuration interaction (alpha) parameters are deduced as function of x. Using Judd-Ofelt theory, Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters (omega2, omega4 and omega6) are obtained. Radiative and non-radiative transition rates (A(T) and W(MPR)), radiative lifetimes (tauR), branching ratios (beta) and integrated absorption cross-sections (sigma) have been computed for certain excited states of Er3+ in these mixed alkali borate glasses. Emission spectra have been studied for all the three Er3+ doped mixed alkali borate glasses. The present paper throws light on the trends observed in the intensity parameters, radiative lifetimes, branching ratios and emission cross-sections as a function of x in these borate glasses, keeping in view the effect of mixed alkalies in borate glasses.

  3. Band-structure calculations of noble-gas and alkali halide solids using accurate Kohn-Sham potentials with self-interaction correction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Krieger, J.B. ); Norman, M.R. ); Iafrate, G.J. )

    1991-11-15

    The optimized-effective-potential (OEP) method and a method developed recently by Krieger, Li, and Iafrate (KLI) are applied to the band-structure calculations of noble-gas and alkali halide solids employing the self-interaction-corrected (SIC) local-spin-density (LSD) approximation for the exchange-correlation energy functional. The resulting band gaps from both calculations are found to be in fair agreement with the experimental values. The discrepancies are typically within a few percent with results that are nearly the same as those of previously published orbital-dependent multipotential SIC calculations, whereas the LSD results underestimate the band gaps by as much as 40%. As in the LSD---and it is believed to be the case even for the exact Kohn-Sham potential---both the OEP and KLI predict valence-band widths which are narrower than those of experiment. In all cases, the KLI method yields essentially the same results as the OEP.

  4. Implementation of Kunz-Klein Localization in Icecap and AN Application to the Problem of Off-Center Isovalent Substitutional Impurities in Alkali Halides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keegstra, Phillip Brooks

    Theoretical models of off-center isovalent substitutional impurities in alkali halides are examined. Calculations have been performed on Li('+) in KCl, a representative system known experimentally to exhibit off-center behavior. The potential seen by the Li('+) ion in the lattice has been calculated within the shell model using the computer program HADES and by means of an Unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) cluster embedded in a shell model lattice using the computer program ICECAP. For the case using HADES, off-center behavior was predicted, and the resulting potential was used to predict the tunnelling splitting of the system and the Grueneisen parameter. The tunnelling splitting was calculated to be 1.19 meV for ('7)Li('+) and 1.26 meV for ('6)Li('+), compared to experimental results of 0.10 meV and 0.14 meV, respectively. The Grueneisen parameters were found to be 60 for ('7)Li('+) and 66 for ('6)Li('+), compared to experimental results of 150 for both isotopes. For the cases using ICECAP and UHF, off-center behavior was predicted, but the quantitative agreement with experimental barrier heights was not as good as that for HADES.

  5. [Sources of error in the European Pharmacopoeia assay of halide salts of organic bases by titration with alkali].

    PubMed

    Kószeginé, S H; Ráfliné, R Z; Paál, T; Török, I

    2000-01-01

    A short overview has been given by the authors on the titrimetric assay methods of halide salts of organic bases in the pharmacopoeias of greatest importance. The alternative procedures introduced by the European Pharmacopoeia Commission some years ago to replace the non-aqueous titration with perchloric acid in the presence of mercuric acetate have also been presented and evaluated. The authors investigated the limits of applicability and the sources of systematic errors (bias) of the strongly preferred titration with sodium hydroxide in an alcoholic medium. To assess the bias due to the differences between the results calculated from the two inflexion points of the titration curves and the two real endpoints corresponding to the strong and weak acids, respectively, the mathematical analysis of the titration curve function was carried out. This bias, generally negligible when the pH change near the endpoint of the titration is more than 1 unit, is the function of the concentration, the apparent pK of the analyte and the ionic product of water (ethanol) in the alcohol-water mixtures. Using the validation data gained for the method with the titration of ephedrine hydrochloride the authors analysed the impact of carbon dioxide in the titration medium on the additive and proportional systematic errors of the method. The newly introduced standardisation procedure of the European Pharmacopoeia for the sodium hydroxide titrant to decrease the systematic errors caused by carbon dioxide has also been evaluated.

  6. Doping of AlH3 with alkali metal hydrides for enhanced decomposition kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James

    2005-03-01

    Aluminum hydride, AlH3, has inherently high gravimetric and volumetric properties for onboard vehiclular hydrogen storage (10 wt% H2 and 0.148 kg H2/L). Yet it has been widely neglected because of its kinetic limitations for low-temperature H2 desorption and the thermodynamic difficulties associated with recharging. This paper considers a scenario whereby doped AlH3 is decomposed onboard and recharged offboard. In particular, we show that particle size control and doping with small levels of alkali metal hydrides (e.g., LiH) results in accelerated H2 desorption rates nearly high enough to supply fuel-cell and ICE vehicles. The mechanism of enhanced H2 desorption is associated with the formation of alanate windows (e.g., LiAlH4) between the AlH3 particles and the external gas phase. These alanate windows can be doped with Ti to further enhance transparency, even to the point of accomplishing slow decomposition of AlH3 at room temperature. It is highly likely 2010 gravimetric and volumetric vehicular system targets (6 wt% H2 and 0.045 kg/L) can be met with AlH3. But a new, low-cost method of offboard regeneration of spent Al back to AlH3 is yet needed.

  7. Structural, dielectric and AC conductivity properties of Co2+ doped mixed alkali zinc borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhu, B. J.; Banu, Syed Asma; Harshitha, G. A.; Shilpa, T. M.; Shruthi, B.

    2013-02-01

    The Co2+ doped 19.9ZnO+5Li2CO3+25Na2CO3+50B2O3 (ZLNB) mixed alkali zinc borate glasses have been prepared by a conventional melt quenching method. The structural (XRD & FT-IR), dielectric and a.c. conductivity (σac) properties have been investigated. Amorphous nature of these glasses has been confirmed from their XRD pattern. The dielectric properties and electrical conductivity (σac) of these glasses have been studied from 100Hz to 5MHz at the room temperature. Based on the observed trends in the a.c. conductivities, the present glass samples are found to exhibit a non-Debye behavior.

  8. Characterization of an alkali- and halide-resistant laccase expressed in E. coli: CotA from Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Brander, Søren; Mikkelsen, Jørn D; Kepp, Kasper P

    2014-01-01

    The limitations of fungal laccases at higher pH and salt concentrations have intensified the search for new extremophilic bacterial laccases. We report the cloning, expression, and characterization of the bacterial cotA from Bacillus clausii, a supposed alkalophilic ortholog of cotA from B. subtilis. Both laccases were expressed in E. coli strain BL21(DE3) and characterized fully in parallel for strict benchmarking. We report activity on ABTS, SGZ, DMP, caffeic acid, promazine, phenyl hydrazine, tannic acid, and bilirubin at variable pH. Whereas ABTS, promazine, and phenyl hydrazine activities vs. pH were similar, the activity of B. clausii cotA was shifted upwards by ~0.5-2 pH units for the simple phenolic substrates DMP, SGZ, and caffeic acid. This shift is not due to substrate affinity (K(M)) but to pH dependence of catalytic turnover: The k(cat) of B. clausii cotA was 1 s⁻¹ at pH 6 and 5 s⁻¹ at pH 8 in contrast to 6 s⁻¹ at pH 6 and 2 s⁻¹ at pH 8 for of B. subtilis cotA. Overall, k(cat)/K(M) was 10-fold higher for B. subtilis cotA at pH(opt). While both proteins were heat activated, activation increased with pH and was larger in cotA from B. clausii. NaCl inhibited activity at acidic pH, but not up to 500-700 mM NaCl in alkaline pH, a further advantage of the alkali regime in laccase applications. The B. clausii cotA had ~20 minutes half-life at 80°C, less than the ~50 minutes at 80°C for cotA from B. subtilis. While cotA from B. subtilis had optimal stability at pH~8, the cotA from B. clausii displayed higher combined salt- and alkali-resistance. This resistance is possibly caused by two substitutions (S427Q and V110E) that could repel anions to reduce anion-copper interactions at the expense of catalytic proficiency, a trade-off of potential relevance to laccase optimization.

  9. Characterization of an Alkali- and Halide-Resistant Laccase Expressed in E. coli: CotA from Bacillus clausii

    PubMed Central

    Brander, Søren; Mikkelsen, Jørn D.; Kepp, Kasper P.

    2014-01-01

    The limitations of fungal laccases at higher pH and salt concentrations have intensified the search for new extremophilic bacterial laccases. We report the cloning, expression, and characterization of the bacterial cotA from Bacillus clausii, a supposed alkalophilic ortholog of cotA from B. subtilis. Both laccases were expressed in E. coli strain BL21(DE3) and characterized fully in parallel for strict benchmarking. We report activity on ABTS, SGZ, DMP, caffeic acid, promazine, phenyl hydrazine, tannic acid, and bilirubin at variable pH. Whereas ABTS, promazine, and phenyl hydrazine activities vs. pH were similar, the activity of B. clausii cotA was shifted upwards by ∼0.5–2 pH units for the simple phenolic substrates DMP, SGZ, and caffeic acid. This shift is not due to substrate affinity (KM) but to pH dependence of catalytic turnover: The kcat of B. clausii cotA was 1 s−1 at pH 6 and 5 s−1 at pH 8 in contrast to 6 s−1 at pH 6 and 2 s−1 at pH 8 for of B. subtilis cotA. Overall, kcat/KM was 10-fold higher for B. subtilis cotA at pHopt. While both proteins were heat activated, activation increased with pH and was larger in cotA from B. clausii. NaCl inhibited activity at acidic pH, but not up to 500–700 mM NaCl in alkaline pH, a further advantage of the alkali regime in laccase applications. The B. clausii cotA had ∼20 minutes half-life at 80°C, less than the ∼50 minutes at 80°C for cotA from B. subtilis. While cotA from B. subtilis had optimal stability at pH∼8, the cotA from B. clausii displayed higher combined salt- and alkali-resistance. This resistance is possibly caused by two substitutions (S427Q and V110E) that could repel anions to reduce anion-copper interactions at the expense of catalytic proficiency, a trade-off of potential relevance to laccase optimization. PMID:24915287

  10. Alkali metal cation doped Al-SBA-15 for carbon dioxide adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zukal, Arnošt; Mayerová, Jana; Čejka, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Mesoporous aluminosilicate adsorbents for carbon dioxide were prepared by the grafting of aluminium into SBA-15 silica using an aqueous solution of aluminium chlorohydrate. As the ion exchange sites are primarily associated with the presence of tetrahedrally coordinated aluminium, extra-framework aluminium on the SBA-15 surface was inserted into the silica matrix by a treatment with an aqueous solution of NH(4)OH. Synthesized mesoporous aluminosilicate preserving all the characteristic features of a mesoporous molecular sieve was finally modified by the alkali metal cation exchange. To examine carbon dioxide adsorption on prepared materials, adsorption isotherms in the temperature range from 0 °C to 60 °C were measured. Based on the known temperature dependence of adsorption isotherms, isosteric adsorption heats giving information on the surface energetics of CO(2) adsorption were calculated and discussed. The comparison of carbon dioxide isotherms obtained on aluminosilicate SBA-15, aluminosilicate SBA-15 containing cations Na(+) and K(+) and activated alumina F-200 reveals that the doping with sodium or potassium cations dramatically enhances adsorption in the region of equilibrium pressures lower than 10 kPa. Therefore, synthesized aluminosilicate adsorbents doped with Na(+) or K(+) cations are suitable for carbon dioxide separation from dilute gas mixtures.

  11. Unified understanding of superconductivity and Mott transition in alkali-doped fullerides from first principles.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yusuke; Sakai, Shiro; Capone, Massimo; Arita, Ryotaro

    2015-08-01

    Alkali-doped fullerides A 3C60 (A = K, Rb, Cs) are surprising materials where conventional phonon-mediated superconductivity and unconventional Mott physics meet, leading to a remarkable phase diagram as a function of volume per C60 molecule. We address these materials with a state-of-the-art calculation, where we construct a realistic low-energy model from first principles without using a priori information other than the crystal structure and solve it with an accurate many-body theory. Remarkably, our scheme comprehensively reproduces the experimental phase diagram including the low-spin Mott-insulating phase next to the superconducting phase. More remarkably, the critical temperatures T c's calculated from first principles quantitatively reproduce the experimental values. The driving force behind the surprising phase diagram of A 3C60 is a subtle competition between Hund's coupling and Jahn-Teller phonons, which leads to an effectively inverted Hund's coupling. Our results establish that the fullerides are the first members of a novel class of molecular superconductors in which the multiorbital electronic correlations and phonons cooperate to reach high T c s-wave superconductivity.

  12. Physical, structural and spectroscopic investigations of Sm3+ doped ZnO mixed alkali borate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sailaja, B.; Joyce Stella, R.; Thirumala Rao, G.; Jaya Raja, B.; Pushpa Manjari, V.; Ravikumar, R. V. S. S. N.

    2015-09-01

    Glass of 20ZnO-15 Li2O-15 Na2O-49.9 B2O3 doped with 0.1 mol% of Sm3+ (ZLNB) was prepared by the melt quenching technique. Physical properties were studied and analysed. The XRD studies confirm the amorphous nature of sample. The FT-IR spectral investigation discloses the BO3, BO4 groups, H and OH bonds. Optical absorption and emission spectra were recorded and characterized. Judd-Ofelt theory was applied to f ↔ f transitions to evaluate Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters (Ωλ). The oscillator strengths and bonding parameters were determined from absorption spectra. The trend observed was Ω4 > Ω6 > Ω2. High value of Ω4 reveals higher rigidity and covalency around the Sm3+ ion. Low value of Ω2 implies ionic nature of ligands and site symmetry around Sm3+ ion. luminescence data and Judd-Ofelt parameters Ωλ (λ = 2, 4, and 6) were used to evaluate various radiative probabilities like spontaneous radiative emission probabilities (AR), radiative lifetime (τR) and branching ratios (βR) stimulated emission cross section (σe) and CIE colour coordinates were measured, CCT temperature evaluated and the values were used to ascertain potential laser transitions at the optimum mixed alkali effect observed for the glass sample prepared. The preparedness of the material as the efficient laser active material is examined.

  13. Luminescence spectra and structure of Er3+ doped alkali borate and fluoroborate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arul Rayappan, I.; Marimuthu, K.

    2013-11-01

    Trivalent erbium (Er3+) ion doped alkali borate and fluoroborate glasses were prepared and their structural and spectroscopic properties have been studied through XRD, FTIR, optical absorption and luminescence spectral measurements. The FTIR spectral studies reveal the presence of BO3, BO4 structural units and the strong OH- bonds in the title glasses. The absorption spectra were used to determine the bonding parameters (β¯,δ) of the prepared glasses. Judd—Ofelt intensity parameters (Ωλ, λ=2, 4 and 6) have been calculated from the optical absorption spectra and are used to predict the important radiative properties like radiative transition probability (A), stimulated emission cross-section (σPE) and branching ratios (βR) for the excited state transitions such as 2H9/2→4I15/2 and 4S3/2→4I15/2 of the Er3+ ions in the prepared glasses. Optical band gap energy (Eopt) values through direct, indirect allowed transitions and the Urbach energy (ΔE) values of the prepared Er3+ glasses have also been determined and compared with similar studies. The spectral characteristics of the Er3+ ions due to compositional changes have been examined and reported in the present work.

  14. Unified understanding of superconductivity and Mott transition in alkali-doped fullerides from first principles

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Yusuke; Sakai, Shiro; Capone, Massimo; Arita, Ryotaro

    2015-01-01

    Alkali-doped fullerides A3C60 (A = K, Rb, Cs) are surprising materials where conventional phonon-mediated superconductivity and unconventional Mott physics meet, leading to a remarkable phase diagram as a function of volume per C60 molecule. We address these materials with a state-of-the-art calculation, where we construct a realistic low-energy model from first principles without using a priori information other than the crystal structure and solve it with an accurate many-body theory. Remarkably, our scheme comprehensively reproduces the experimental phase diagram including the low-spin Mott-insulating phase next to the superconducting phase. More remarkably, the critical temperatures Tc’s calculated from first principles quantitatively reproduce the experimental values. The driving force behind the surprising phase diagram of A3C60 is a subtle competition between Hund’s coupling and Jahn-Teller phonons, which leads to an effectively inverted Hund’s coupling. Our results establish that the fullerides are the first members of a novel class of molecular superconductors in which the multiorbital electronic correlations and phonons cooperate to reach high Tc s-wave superconductivity. PMID:26601242

  15. Electrolytic systems and methods for making metal halides and refining metals

    DOEpatents

    Holland, Justin M.; Cecala, David M.

    2015-05-26

    Disclosed are electrochemical cells and methods for producing a halide of a non-alkali metal and for electrorefining the halide. The systems typically involve an electrochemical cell having a cathode structure configured for dissolving a hydrogen halide that forms the halide into a molten salt of the halogen and an alkali metal. Typically a direct current voltage is applied across the cathode and an anode that is fabricated with the non-alkali metal such that the halide of the non-alkali metal is formed adjacent the anode. Electrorefining cells and methods involve applying a direct current voltage across the anode where the halide of the non-alkali metal is formed and the cathode where the non-alkali metal is electro-deposited. In a representative embodiment the halogen is chlorine, the alkali metal is lithium and the non-alkali metal is uranium.

  16. Alkali Halide FLIR Lens Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    testing. Also, an identification number is written on the edge. Then the sealant is cured at 70 to 800C for 15 minutes. Only the coated area is...3/PE/PPE failed beginning at isolated points, which presumably were due to imperfections in the coating. Thus, it was inferred that this coating...in isolated spots because of defects in the coating layers. To optimize the coating process, improvement of coating procedures leading toward defect

  17. Optical parameters and upconversion fluorescence in Tm3+/Yb3+-doped alkali-barium-bismuth-tellurite glasses.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hai; Liu, Ke; Lin, Lin; Hou, Yanyan; Yang, Dianlai; Ma, Tiecheng; Pun, Edwin Yun Bun; An, Qingda; Yu, Jiayou; Tanabe, Setsuhisa

    2006-11-01

    Tm(3+)/Yb(3+)-doped alkali-barium-bismuth-tellurite (LKBBT) glasses have been fabricated and characterized. Density, refractive index, optical absorption, absorption and emission cross-sections of Yb(3+), Judd-Ofelt parameters and spontaneous transition probabilities of Tm(3+) have been measured and calculated, respectively. Intense blue three-photon upconversion fluorescence and near-infrared two-photon upconversion fluorescence were investigated under the excitation of a 980 nm diode laser at room temperature. Wide infrared transmission window, high refractive index and strong blue three-photon upconversion emission of Tm(3+) indicate that Tm(3+)/Yb(3+) co-doped LKBBT glasses are promising upconversion optical and laser materials.

  18. Structural and electronic engineering of 3DOM WO3 by alkali metal doping for improved NO2 sensing performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihua; Fan, Xiaoxiao; Han, Dongmei; Gu, Fubo

    2016-05-19

    Novel alkali metal doped 3DOM WO3 materials were prepared using a simple colloidal crystal template method. Raman, XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS, PL, Hall and UV-Vis techniques were used to characterize the structural and electronic properties of all the products, while the corresponding sensing performances targeting ppb level NO2 were determined at different working temperatures. For the overall goal of structural and electronic engineering, the co-effect of structural and electronic properties on the improved NO2 sensing performance of alkali metal doped 3DOM WO3 was studied. The test results showed that the gas sensing properties of 3DOM WO3/Li improved the most, with the fast response-recovery time and excellent selectivity. More importantly, the response of 3DOM WO3/Li to 500 ppb NO2 was up to 55 at room temperature (25 °C). The especially high response to ppb level NO2 at room temperature (25 °C) in this work has a very important practical significance. The best sensing performance of 3DOM WO3/Li could be ascribed to the most structure defects and the highest carrier mobility. And the possible gas sensing mechanism based on the model of the depletion layer was proposed to demonstrate that both structural and electronic properties are responsible for the NO2 sensing behavior.

  19. Alkali doping of graphene: The crucial role of high-temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademi, A.; Sajadi, E.; Dosanjh, P.; Bonn, D. A.; Folk, J. A.; Stöhr, A.; Starke, U.; Forti, S.

    2016-11-01

    The doping efficiency of lithium deposited at cryogenic temperatures on epitaxial and chemical vapor deposition monolayer graphene has been investigated under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. Change of charge-carrier density was monitored by gate voltage shift of the Dirac point and by Hall measurements in low and high doping regimes. It was found that preannealing the graphene greatly enhanced the maximum levels of doping that could be achieved: doping saturated at Δ n =2 ×1013e- /cm2 without annealing, independent of sample type or previous processing; after a 900 K anneal, the saturated doping rose one order of magnitude to Δ n =2 ×1014e- /cm2.

  20. Structural and electronic engineering of 3DOM WO3 by alkali metal doping for improved NO2 sensing performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihua; Fan, Xiaoxiao; Han, Dongmei; Gu, Fubo

    2016-05-01

    Novel alkali metal doped 3DOM WO3 materials were prepared using a simple colloidal crystal template method. Raman, XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS, PL, Hall and UV-Vis techniques were used to characterize the structural and electronic properties of all the products, while the corresponding sensing performances targeting ppb level NO2 were determined at different working temperatures. For the overall goal of structural and electronic engineering, the co-effect of structural and electronic properties on the improved NO2 sensing performance of alkali metal doped 3DOM WO3 was studied. The test results showed that the gas sensing properties of 3DOM WO3/Li improved the most, with the fast response-recovery time and excellent selectivity. More importantly, the response of 3DOM WO3/Li to 500 ppb NO2 was up to 55 at room temperature (25 °C). The especially high response to ppb level NO2 at room temperature (25 °C) in this work has a very important practical significance. The best sensing performance of 3DOM WO3/Li could be ascribed to the most structure defects and the highest carrier mobility. And the possible gas sensing mechanism based on the model of the depletion layer was proposed to demonstrate that both structural and electronic properties are responsible for the NO2 sensing behavior.Novel alkali metal doped 3DOM WO3 materials were prepared using a simple colloidal crystal template method. Raman, XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS, PL, Hall and UV-Vis techniques were used to characterize the structural and electronic properties of all the products, while the corresponding sensing performances targeting ppb level NO2 were determined at different working temperatures. For the overall goal of structural and electronic engineering, the co-effect of structural and electronic properties on the improved NO2 sensing performance of alkali metal doped 3DOM WO3 was studied. The test results showed that the gas sensing properties of 3DOM WO3/Li improved the most, with the fast response-recovery time and

  1. Crystal growth and near infrared optical properties of Pr 3+ doped lead halide materials for resonantly pumped eye safe laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ivy Krystal

    In this dissertation the material development and optical spectroscopy of Pr3+ activated low phonon energy halide crystals is presented for possible applications in resonantly pumped eye-safe solid-state laser gain media. In the last twenty years, the developments in fiber and diode lasers have enabled highly efficient resonant pumping of Pr3+ doped crystals for possible lasing in the 1.6--1.7 microm region. In this work, the results of the purification, crystal growth, and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic characterization of Pr3+ doped lead (II) chloride, PbCl2 and lead (II) bromide, PbBr2 are presented. The investigated PbCl2 and PbBr2 crystals are non-hygroscopic with maximum phonon energies between ~180--200 cm-1, which enable efficient emission in the NIR spectral region (~ 1.6 microm) from the 3F3/3F4 → 3H4 transition of Pr3+ ions. The commercial available starting materials were purchased as ultra dry, high purity (~ 99.999 %) beads and purified through a combination of zone-refinement and halogenation. The crystal growth of Pr3+ doped PbCl 2 and PbBr2 was performed via vertical Bridgman technique using a two-zone furnace. The resulting Pr3+ doped PbCl 2 and PbBr2 crystals exhibited characteristic IR absorption bands in the 1.5--1.7 microm region (3H4 → 3F3/3F4), which allow for resonant pumping using commercial diode lasers. A broad IR emission band centered at ~1.6 microm was observed under ~1445 nm diode laser excitation from both Pr3+ doped halides. This dissertation presents comparative spectroscopic results for Pr 3+:PbCl2 and Pr3+:PbBr2 including NIR absorption and emission studies, lifetime measurements, modelling of radiative and non-radiative decay rates, determination of transition cross-section, and the net effective gain cross sections.

  2. Alkali doped poly (2,5-benzimidazole) membrane for alkaline water electrolysis: Characterization and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Liliana A.; Hnát, Jaromír; Heredia, Nayra; Bruno, Mariano M.; Viva, Federico A.; Paidar, Martin; Corti, Horacio R.; Bouzek, Karel; Abuin, Graciela C.

    2016-04-01

    The properties and performance of linear and cross-linked KOH doped ABPBI membranes as electrolyte/separator for zero gap alkaline water electrolysis cells are evaluated and compared with a commercial Zirfon® diaphragm. Stability in alkaline environment, swelling, thermal properties, water sorption, KOH uptake and conductivity of linear (L-ABPBI) and cross-linked (C-ABPBI) membranes doped with different concentrations of KOH are analyzed. Linear membranes show stability up to 3.0 mol·dm-3 KOH doping, while cross-linked membranes are stable up to 4.2 mol·dm-3 KOH doping. Both kinds of membranes exhibit good thermal stability and reasonable specific ionic conductivity at 22 °C in the range between 7 and 25 mS·cm-1, being slightly higher the conductivity of C-ABPBI membranes than that of L-ABPBI ones. In short-term electrolysis tests both L-ABPBI and C-ABPBI membranes show better performance than Zirfon diaphragm in the range from 50 to 70 °C. A current density of 335 mA·cm-2 at a cell voltage of 2.0 V is attained with C-ABPBI membranes doped in 3 mol·dm-3 KOH at 70 °C, a performance comparable with that of commercial units operating at temperatures ca. 80 °C and 30 wt% KOH (6.7 mol·dm-3) as electrolyte.

  3. Oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.; Fullam, Harold T.

    1985-01-01

    A process for oxidizing hydrogen halides having substantially no sulfur impurities by means of a catalytically active molten salt is disclosed. A mixture of the subject hydrogen halide and an oxygen bearing gas is contacted with a molten salt containing an oxidizing catalyst and alkali metal normal sulfates and pyrosulfates to produce an effluent gas stream rich in the elemental halogen and substantially free of sulfur oxide gases.

  4. Doping the alkali atom: an effective strategy to improve the electronic and nonlinear optical properties of the inorganic Al12N12 nanocage.

    PubMed

    Niu, Min; Yu, Guangtao; Yang, Guanghui; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Xingang; Huang, Xuri

    2014-01-06

    Under ab initio computations, several new inorganic electride compounds with high stability, M@x-Al12N12 (M = Li, Na, and K; x = b66, b64, and r6), were achieved for the first time by doping the alkali metal atom M on the fullerene-like Al12N12 nanocage, where the alkali atom is located over the Al-N bond (b66/b64 site) or six-membered ring (r6 site). It is revealed that independent of the doping position and atomic number, doping the alkali atom can significantly narrow the wide gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) (EH-L = 6.12 eV) of the pure Al12N12 nanocage in the range of 0.49-0.71 eV, and these doped AlN nanocages can exhibit the intriguing n-type characteristic, where a high energy level containing the excess electron is introduced as the new HOMO orbital in the original gap of pure Al12N12. Further, the diffuse excess electron also brings these doped AlN nanostructures the considerable first hyperpolarizabilities (β0), which are 1.09 × 10(4) au for Li@b66-Al12N12, 1.10 × 10(4), 1.62 × 10(4), 7.58 × 10(4) au for M@b64-Al12N12 (M = Li, Na, and K), and 8.89 × 10(5), 1.36 × 10(5), 5.48 × 10(4) au for M@r6-Al12N12 (M = Li, Na, and K), respectively. Clearly, doping the heavier Na/K atom over the Al-N bond can get the larger β0 value, while the reverse trend can be observed for the series with the alkali atom over the six-membered ring, where doping the lighter Li atom can achieve the larger β0 value. These fascinating findings will be advantageous for promoting the potential applications of the inorganic AlN-based nanosystems in the new type of electronic nanodevices and high-performance nonlinear optical (NLO) materials.

  5. Dy3+ ions doped single and mixed alkali fluoro tungsten tellurite glasses for LASER and white LED applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annapurna Devi, Ch. B.; Mahamuda, Sk.; Venkateswarlu, M.; Swapna, K.; Srinivasa Rao, A.; Vijaya Prakash, G.

    2016-12-01

    A new-fangled series of Dy3+ ions doped Single and Mixed Alkali Fluoro Tungsten Tellurite Glasses have been prepared by using melt quenching technique and their spectroscopic behaviour was investigated by using XRD, optical absorption, photoluminescence and lifetime measurements. The bonding parameter studies reveal the ionic nature of the Dysbnd O bond in the present glasses. From the absorption spectra, the Judd-Ofelt (J-O) intensity parameters have been determined and in turn used to determine various radiative properties for the different emission transitions from the 4F9/2 fluorescent level. The photoluminescence spectra of all the glasses exhibit two intensified peaks in blue and yellow regions corresponding to the transitions 4F9/2 → 6H15/2 (483 nm) and 4F9/2 → 6H13/2 (575 nm) respectively. From the photoluminescence spectra, it is observed that the luminescence intensity is maximum for Dy3+ ion doped potassium combination of tungsten tellurite glass (TeWK:1Dy). The highest emission cross-section and branching ratio values observed for the 4F9/2 → 6H15/2 and 4F9/2 → 6H13/2 transitions suggest the possible laser action in the visible region from these glasses. By correlating the experimental lifetimes (τexp) measured from the decay spectral features with radiative lifetimes (τR), the quantum efficiencies (η) for all the glasses have been evaluated and found to be maximum for potassium combination tungsten tellurite (TeWK:1Dy) glass. The CIE colour chromaticity coordinates (x, y), (u, v), colour correlated temperature (CCT) and Y/B ratio were also estimated from the photoluminescence spectra for different compositions of glasses. The chromaticity colour coordinates evaluated for all the glasses fall within the white light region and white light emission can be tuned by varying the composition of the glass. From all these studies, it was concluded that 1 mol% of Dy3+ ions doped TeWK glass is more suitable for lasing and white-LED applications.

  6. Spectroscopic characterization of alkali modified zinc-tellurite glasses doped with neodymium.

    PubMed

    Rajeswari, R; Babu, S Surendra; Jayasankar, C K

    2010-09-15

    Neodymium doped zinc-tellurite glasses of composition TeO(2)-ZnO-Na(2)O-Li(2)O have been prepared and characterized for their thermal, structural and optical properties. Differential thermal analysis revealed reasonably good forming tendency of the glass composition. FTIR spectra were used to analyze the functional groups present in the glass. Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters were derived from the absorption spectrum and used to calculate the radiative lifetime, branching ratio and stimulated emission cross-section for (4)F(3/2)-->(4)I(9/2, 11/2, 13/2) transitions. The quantum efficiency of the (4)F(3/2) level is comparable to the typical values obtained for the Nd(2)O(3)-doped glasses. The decay properties for higher concentration of Nd(2)O(3) were analyzed using Inokuti-Hirayama model to investigate the non-radiative relaxation of the (4)F(3/2) emitting level. The experimental values of branching ratio and saturation intensity of (4)F(3/2)-->(4)I(11/2) transition and calculated spectroscopic quality factor indicate the favourable lasing action in these glasses.

  7. Electrochemical properties of dual phase neodymium-doped ceria alkali carbonate composite electrolytes in intermediate temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji-Tae; Lee, Tae-Hee; Park, Ka-Young; Seo, Yongho; Kim, Ki Buem; Song, Sun-Ju; Park, Byoungnam; Park, Jun-Young

    2015-02-01

    Composite electrolyte materials composed of neodymium-doped ceria (Nd0.2Ce0.8O1.9; NDC) and (Li-0.5Na)2CO3 are investigated to understand the unique behaviors of their multi-ionic conduction. In the intermediate temperature, the NDC-based carbonate composite electrolytes exhibit a much higher conductivity compared to pure NDC. It has been claimed that the oxide ions are transported in the doped-ceria phase via oxygen vacancies and the protons are conducted through the second carbonate phase, thereby resulting in an enhanced ionic conductivity. However, it has not been experimentally demonstrated if the proton conduction within the carbonate phase aided in improving the conductivity of oxygen ions in the composite system. Hence, the primary objective of this work is to cultivate a deeper insight into the conduction property of these composites as an attempt to clarify the ionic transport phenomenon responsible for enhanced conductivity. Electrical conductivities of NDC and NDC/carbonate materials are investigated as a function of oxygen partial pressure and vapor pressure of water to understand transport properties of composite electrolytes. The ionic and electronic transference numbers of composite electrolytes are measured by the oxygen- and hydrogen-concentration cells containing water. The dominant charge carriers are identified quantitatively through the analysis of the partial conductivity of proton, oxygen ions, and electrons (holes). Understanding the transport properties and transference numbers of composite electrolytes can contribute to the development of commercial solid oxide fuel cells, which can be done by reducing the operating temperature using a highly ionic conductive NDC/carbonate composite electrolyte at the intermediate temperature.

  8. Structural investigation and electron paramagnetic resonance of vanadyl doped alkali niobium borate glasses.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A; Sheoran, A; Sanghi, S; Bhatnagar, V; Gupta, S K; Arora, M

    2010-03-01

    Glasses with compositions xNb(2)O(5).(30-x)M(2)O.69B(2)O(3) (where M=Li, Na, K; x=0, 4, 8 mol%) doped with 1 mol% V(2)O(5) have been prepared using normal melt quench technique. The IR transmission spectra of the glasses have been studied over the range 400-4000 cm(-1). The changes caused by the addition of Nb(2)O(5) on the structure of these glasses have been reported. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of VO(2+) ions in these glasses have been recorded in X-band (9.14 GHz) at room temperature (300 K). The spin Hamiltonian parameters, dipolar hyperfine coupling parameter and Fermi contact interaction parameter have been calculated. It is observed that the resultant resonance spectra contain hyperfine structures (hfs) due to V(4+) ions which exist as VO(2+) ions in octahedral coordination with a tetragonal compression in the present glasses. The tetragonality of V(4+)O(6) complex decreases with increasing concentration of Nb(2)O(5). The 3d(xy) orbit contracts with increase in Nb(2)O(5):M(2)O ratio. Values of the theoretical optical basicity, Lambda(th), have also been reported.

  9. Electron-Phonon Coupling in Alkali Doped Bilayer Graphene Studied by ARPES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleeman, James; Sugawara, Katsuaki; Sato, Takafumi; Takahashi, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    Graphene intercalation compounds are a class of materials consisting of stacked graphene sheets, with dopant adatoms ordered in-between them. These materials exhibit an unusual superconducting state, for which characteristic electron-phonon coupling has been suggested. Recent advances in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) have enabled high precision measurement of electron-phonon coupling in GICs. Coupling at the graphite-derived π bands was found to be highly anisotropic in the GIC KC8, being much stronger in the K-M than K- Γ directions. This unusual anisotropy is not predicted by previous superconducting theories. A much smaller anisotropy has also been seen in recent studies of K-doped graphene monolayers. In order to examine the presence of anisotropic coupling in the graphene-metal system, we have performed ARPES on the bilayer graphene GIC. We have found that C8RbC8 exhibits strong, anisotropic coupling, similar to that in GICs. The origin of this coupling, as well as its relation to possible superconductivity in ultrathin GICs is discussed.

  10. Optical properties and frequency upconversion fluorescence in a Tm3+ -doped alkali niobium tellurite glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Gadiaere; L.; Cassanjes, Fabia C.; de Araújo, Cid B.; Jerez, Vladimir A.; Ribeiro, Sidney J. L.; Messaddeq, Younes; Poulain, Marcel

    2003-03-01

    Optical spectroscopic properties of Tm3+-doped 60TeO2-10GeO2-10K2O-10Li2O-10Nb2O5 glass are reported. The absorption spectra were obtained and radiative parameters were determined using the Judd-Ofelt theory. Characteristics of excited states were studied in two sets of experiments. Excitation at 360 nm originates a relatively narrow band emission at 450 nm attributed to transition 1D2→3F4 of the Tm3+ ion with photon energy larger than the band-gap energy of the glass matrix. Excitation at 655 nm originates a frequency upconverted emission at 450 nm (1D2→3F4) and emission at 790 nm (3H4→3H6). The radiative lifetimes of levels 1D2 and 3H4 were measured and the differences between their experimental values and the theoretical predictions are understood as due to the contribution of energy transfer among Tm3+ ions.

  11. Molecular compressibility of some halides in alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serban, C.; Auslaender, D.

    1974-01-01

    After measuring ultrasonic velocity and density, the molecular compressibility values from Wada's formula were calculated, for alkali metal halide solutions in methyl, ethyl, butyl, and glycol alcohol. The temperature and concentration dependence were studied, finding deviations due to the hydrogen bonds of the solvent.

  12. Promoting oxygen vacancy formation and p-type conductivity in SrTiO3via alkali metal doping: a first principles study.

    PubMed

    Triggiani, Leonardo; Muñoz-García, Ana B; Agostiano, Angela; Pavone, Michele

    2016-10-19

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3, STO) is a prototypical perovskite oxide, widely exploited in many technological applications, from catalysis to energy conversion devices. In the context of solid-oxide fuel cells, STO has been recently applied as an epitaxial substrate for nano-sized layers of mixed ion-electron conductive catalysts with enhanced electrochemical performances. To extend the applications of such heterogeneous nano-cathodes in real devices, also the STO support should be active for both electron transport and oxide diffusion. To this end, we explored using first-principles calculations the strategy of doping of STO at the Sr site with sodium and potassium. These two ions fit in the perovskite structure and induce holes in the STO valence band, so as to obtain the desired p-type electronic conduction. At the same time, the doping with alkali ions also promotes the formation of oxygen vacancies in STO, a prerequisite for effective oxide diffusion. Analysis of electron density rearrangements upon defect formation allows relating the favorable vacancy formation energies to an improved electronic delocalization over the oxide sub-lattice, as observed in closely related materials (e.g. Sr2Fe1.5Mo0.5O6). Overall, our results suggest the alkali-doped STO as a new potential substrate material in nanoscale heterogeneous electrodes for solid oxide electrochemical cells.

  13. The Production of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Anions in Inert Gas Matrices Doped with Alkali Metals. Electronic Absorption Spectra of the Pentacene Anion (C22H14(-))

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halasinski, Thomas M.; Hudgins, Douglas M.; Salama, Farid; Allamandola, Louis J.; Mead, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The absorption spectra of pentacene (C22H14) and its radical cation (C22H14(+)) and anion (C22H14(-)) isolated in inert-gas matrices of Ne, Ar, and Kr are reported from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared. The associated vibronic band systems and their spectroscopic assignments are discussed together with the physical and chemical conditions governing ion (and counterion) production in the solid matrix. In particular, the formation of isolated pentacene anions is found to be optimized in matrices doped with alkali metal (Na and K).

  14. Computation of methodology-independent single-ion solvation properties from molecular simulations. IV. Optimized Lennard-Jones interaction parameter sets for the alkali and halide ions in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Maria M.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2011-04-01

    The raw single-ion solvation free energies computed from atomistic (explicit-solvent) simulations are extremely sensitive to the boundary conditions and treatment of electrostatic interactions used during these simulations. However, as shown recently [M. A. Kastenholz and P. H. Hünenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224501 (2006), 10.1529/biophysj.106.083667; M. M. Reif and P. H. Hünenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144103 (2010)], the application of appropriate correction terms permits to obtain methodology-independent results. The corrected values are then exclusively characteristic of the underlying molecular model including in particular the ion-solvent van der Waals interaction parameters, determining the effective ion size and the magnitude of its dispersion interactions. In the present study, the comparison of calculated (corrected) hydration free energies with experimental data (along with the consideration of ionic polarizabilities) is used to calibrate new sets of ion-solvent van der Waals (Lennard-Jones) interaction parameters for the alkali (Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+) and halide (F-, Cl-, Br-, I-) ions along with either the SPC or the SPC/E water models. The experimental dataset is defined by conventional single-ion hydration free energies [Tissandier et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 7787 (1998), 10.1021/jp982638r; Fawcett, J. Phys. Chem. B 103, 11181] along with three plausible choices for the (experimentally elusive) value of the absolute (intrinsic) hydration free energy of the proton, namely, Δ G_hyd^{ominus }[H+] = -1100, -1075 or -1050 kJ mol-1, resulting in three sets L, M, and H for the SPC water model and three sets LE, ME, and HE for the SPC/E water model (alternative sets can easily be interpolated to intermediate Δ G_hyd^{ominus }[H+] values). The residual sensitivity of the calculated (corrected) hydration free energies on the volume-pressure boundary conditions and on the effective ionic radius entering into the calculation of the correction terms is

  15. Direct surface charging and alkali-metal doping for tuning the interlayer magnetic order in planar nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasa, Tamene R.; Stepanyuk, Valeri S.

    2015-08-01

    The continuous reduction of magnetic units to ultrasmall length scales inspires efforts to look for a suitable means of controlling magnetic states. In this study, we show two surface charge alteration techniques for tuning the interlayer exchange coupling of ferromagnetic layers separated by paramagnetic spacers. Our ab initio study reveals that already a modest amount of extra charge can switch the mutual alignment of the magnetization from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic or vice versa. We also propose adsorption of alkali metals as an alternative way of varying the electronic and chemical properties of magnetic surfaces. Clear evidence is found that the interlayer magnetic order can be reversed by adsorbing alkali metals on the magnetic layer. Moreover, alkali-metal overlayers strongly enhance the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in FePt thin films. These findings combined with atomistic spin model calculations suggest that the electronic or ionic way of surface charging can have a crucial role for magnetic hardening and spin state control.

  16. Computation of methodology-independent single-ion solvation properties from molecular simulations. IV. Optimized Lennard-Jones interaction parameter sets for the alkali and halide ions in water

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, Maria M.; Huenenberger, Philippe H.

    2011-04-14

    The raw single-ion solvation free energies computed from atomistic (explicit-solvent) simulations are extremely sensitive to the boundary conditions and treatment of electrostatic interactions used during these simulations. However, as shown recently [M. A. Kastenholz and P. H. Huenenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224501 (2006); M. M. Reif and P. H. Huenenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144103 (2010)], the application of appropriate correction terms permits to obtain methodology-independent results. The corrected values are then exclusively characteristic of the underlying molecular model including in particular the ion-solvent van der Waals interaction parameters, determining the effective ion size and the magnitude of its dispersion interactions. In the present study, the comparison of calculated (corrected) hydration free energies with experimental data (along with the consideration of ionic polarizabilities) is used to calibrate new sets of ion-solvent van der Waals (Lennard-Jones) interaction parameters for the alkali (Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cs{sup +}) and halide (F{sup -}, Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -}, I{sup -}) ions along with either the SPC or the SPC/E water models. The experimental dataset is defined by conventional single-ion hydration free energies [Tissandier et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 7787 (1998); Fawcett, J. Phys. Chem. B 103, 11181] along with three plausible choices for the (experimentally elusive) value of the absolute (intrinsic) hydration free energy of the proton, namely, {Delta}G{sub hyd} {sup O-minus} [H{sup +}]=-1100, -1075 or -1050 kJ mol{sup -1}, resulting in three sets L, M, and H for the SPC water model and three sets L{sub E}, M{sub E}, and H{sub E} for the SPC/E water model (alternative sets can easily be interpolated to intermediate {Delta}G{sub hyd} {sup O-minus} [H{sup +}] values). The residual sensitivity of the calculated (corrected) hydration free energies on the volume-pressure boundary conditions and on the effective

  17. Vacancy defects and defect clusters in alkali metal ion-doped MgO nanocrystallites studied by positron annihilation and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellaiyan, S.; Uedono, A.; Sivaji, K.; Janet Priscilla, S.; Sivasankari, J.; Selvalakshmi, T.

    2016-10-01

    Pure and alkali metal ion (Li, Na, and K)-doped MgO nanocrystallites synthesized by solution combustion technique have been studied by positron lifetime and Doppler broadening spectroscopy methods. Positron lifetime analysis exhibits four characteristic lifetime components for all the samples. Doping reduces the Mg vacancy after annealing to 800 °C. It was observed that Li ion migrates to the vacancy site to recover Mg vacancy-type defects, reducing cluster vacancies and micropores. For Na- and K-doped MgO, the aforementioned defects are reduced and immobile at 800 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening studies show the positron trapping sites as vacancy clusters. The decrease in the S parameter is due to the particle growth and reduction in the defect concentration at 800 °C. Photoluminescence study shows an emission peak at 445 nm and 498 nm, associated with F2 2+ and recombination of higher-order vacancy complexes. Further, annealing process is likely to dissociate F2 2+ to F+ and this F+ is converted into F centers at 416 nm.

  18. Chloride, bromide and iodide scintillators with europium doping

    DOEpatents

    Zhuravleva, Mariya; Yang, Kan

    2014-08-26

    A halide scintillator material is disclosed where the halide may comprise chloride, bromide or iodide. The material is single-crystalline and has a composition of the general formula ABX.sub.3 where A is an alkali, B is an alkali earth and X is a halide which general composition was investigated. In particular, crystals of the formula ACa.sub.1-yEu.sub.yI.sub.3 where A=K, Rb and Cs were formed as well as crystals of the formula CsA.sub.1-yEu.sub.yX.sub.3 (where A=Ca, Sr, Ba, or a combination thereof and X=Cl, Br or I or a combination thereof) with divalent Europium doping where 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, and more particularly Eu doping has been studied at one to ten mol %. The disclosed scintillator materials are suitable for making scintillation detectors used in applications such as medical imaging and homeland security.

  19. Substantial enhancement in intrinsic coercivity on M-type strontium hexaferrite through the increase in magneto-crystalline anisotropy by co-doping of group-V and alkali elements

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Kyunghan Ryu, Byungki; Korolev, Dmitry; Jae Kang, Young

    2013-12-09

    The effect of d{sup 1} impurity doping in Sr-hexaferrite (SrM) on the magnetic anisotropy is investigated. First-principles calculations revealed that group-V elements (V, Nb) are stabilized with co-doping of alkali elements. Na{sup 1+}/K{sup 1+} doping at Sr{sup 2+}-site is found to be critical to form the d{sup 1} impurities at Fe-site. Experimentally, Na–V doped SrM shows the intrinsic coercivity of ∼5.4 kOe, which is ∼300% enhancement compared to undoped SrM and comparable value to La–Co co-doped SrM. Finally, the spin-orbit coupling from non-vanishing angular momentum of d{sup 1} impurity in SrM should be a main factor for such a substantial improvement of intrinsic coercivity.

  20. High Temperature Alkali Corrosion of Dense SN4 Coated with CMZP and Mg-Doped A21TiO5 in Coal Gas

    SciTech Connect

    J. J. Brown; Nguyen Thierry

    1997-10-01

    Si3N4 heat exchangers used in industrial systems are usually operating in harsh environments. Not only is this structural material experiencing high temperatures, but it is also subjected to corrosive gases and condensed phases. Past studies have demonstrated that condensed phases severely attack Si3N4 and as a consequence, dramatically reduce its lifetime in industrial operating systems.1,2 Previous research conducted at Virginia Tech on low thermal expansion coefficient oxide ceramics,3,4,5 (Ca1-X,MgX)Zr4(PO4)6 (CMZP), and Mg-doped Al2TiO5, for structural application have shown that these two materials exhibited better resistance to alkaline corrosion than Si3N4. Thus, they were envisioned as good candidates for a protective coating on Si3N4 heat exchangers. As a result, the goal of the present work is to develop CMZP and Mg-doped Al2TiO5 protective thin films using the sol-gel process and the dip coating technique and to test their effectiveness in an alkali-containing atmosphere.

  1. The Silver Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahyun, M. R. V.

    1977-01-01

    Illustrates the type of fractional bonding for solid silver halides. Treats the silver halides as electron excess compounds, and develops a model of a localized bonding unit that may be iterated in three dimensions to describe the bulk phase. (MLH)

  2. Metal-halide mixtures for latent heat energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K.; Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    Alkali metal and alkali halide mixtures are identified which may be suitable for thermal energy storage at temperatures above 600 C. The use of metal-halides is appropriate because of their tendency to form two immiscible melts with a density difference, which reduces scale formation and solidification on heat transfer surfaces. Also, the accumulation of phase change material along the melt interface is avoided by the self-dispersing characteristic of some metal-halides, in particular Sr-SrCl2, Ba-BaCl2, and Ba-BaBr2 mixtures. Further advantages lie in their high thermal conductivities, ability to cope with thermal shock, corrosion inhibition, and possibly higher energy densities.

  3. Fast synthesis and single crystal growth of Pb-free and Pb-doped Bi-2223 superconductors using alkali chlorides flux technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Yamamoto, A.; Tajima, S.

    2001-09-01

    Here we report our recent results for the fast synthesis of Bi 2Sr 2Ca 2Cu 3O 10+ x phase in powder and single crystal forms using modified alkali chlorides flux technique. For many factors such as flux, crucibles materials, chemical and phase composition of the precursor, temperature and duration of heat treatment, evaporation rate of the flux, their effects on the formation and growth of 2223 have been studied. By optimization of these parameters, the single-phase samples of Pb-doped and Pb-free 2223 phase were obtained in the temperature range of 850-870°C and heat treatment for <15 h, that is much faster, compared with a solid-state reaction technique. The single crystals with the size of 0.5 mm were isolated and characterized using XRD, SEM/EDX, susceptibility and resistivity measurements. The effect of post-annealing in different atmospheres on the oxygen content and superconductivity of the samples was studied by TG and chemical analyses.

  4. Gadolinia-doped ceria mixed with alkali carbonates for solid oxide fuel cell applications: I. A thermal, structural and morphological insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benamira, M.; Ringuedé, A.; Albin, V.; Vannier, R.-N.; Hildebrandt, L.; Lagergren, C.; Cassir, M.

    Ceria-based composites are developed and considered as potential electrolytes for intermediate solid oxide fuel cell applications (ITSOFC). After giving a survey of the most relevant results in the literature, the structural, thermal and morphological properties of composite materials based on gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) and alkali carbonates (Li 2CO 3-K 2CO 3 or Li 2CO 3-Na 2CO 3) are carefully examined. Thermal analyses demonstrate the stability of the composite with very low weight losses of both water and CO 2 during thermal cycling and after 168 h ageing. High-temperature and room-temperature X-ray diffraction allowed determining the precise structure of the composite and its regular and reversible evolution with the temperature. The microstructure and morphology of electrolyte pellets, as observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), show two-well separated phases: nanocrystals of GDC and a well-distributed carbonate phase. Finally, electrical conductivity determined by impedance spectroscopy is presented as a function of time to highlight the stability of such composites over 1500 h.

  5. Alkali Metal/Salt Thermal-Energy-Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Wayne W.; Stearns, John W.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed thermal-energy-storage system based on mixture of alkali metal and one of its halide salts; metal and salt form slurry of two immiscible melts. Use of slurry expected to prevent incrustations of solidified salts on heat-transfer surfaces that occur where salts alone used. Since incrustations impede heat transfer, system performance improved. In system, charging heat-exchanger surface immersed in lower liquid, rich in halide-salt, phase-charge material. Discharging heat exchanger surface immersed in upper liquid, rich in alkali metal.

  6. Search for improved-performance scintillator candidates among the electronic structures of mixed halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Williams, Richard T.; Burger, Arnold; Adhikari, Rajendra; Biswas, Koushik

    2014-09-01

    The application of advanced theory and modeling techniques has become an essential component to understand material properties and hasten the design and discovery of new ones. This is true for diverse applications. Therefore, current efforts aimed towards finding new scintillator materials are also aligned with this general predictive approach. The need for large scale deployment of efficient radiation detectors requires discovery and development of high-performance, yet low-cost, scintillators. While Tl-doped NaI and CsI are still some of the widely used scintillators, there are promising new developments, for example, Eu-doped SrI2 and Ce-doped LaBr3. The newer candidates have excellent light yield and good energy resolution, but challenges persist in the growth of large single crystals. We will discuss a theoretical basis for anticipating improved proportionality as well as light yield in solid solutions of certain systems, particularly alkali iodides, based on considerations of hot-electron group velocity and thermalization. Solid solutions based on NaI and similar alkali halides are attractive to consider in more detail because the end point compositions are inexpensive and easy to grow. If some of this quality can be preserved while reaping improved light yield and possibly improved proportionality of the mixture, the goal of better performance at the low price of NaI:Tl might be attainable by such a route. Within this context, we will discuss a density functional theory (DFT) based study of two prototype systems: mixed anion NaIxBr1-x and mixed cation NaxK1-xI. Results obtained from these two prototype candidates will lead to further targeted theoretical and experimental search and discovery of new scintillator hosts.

  7. Nonmagnetic 2p-block elements (B, C, N, and O)-doped AgCl for potential halide spintronic applications: A first-principles perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi-Lin; Dong, Shengjie; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Hui; Wu, Ping

    2016-08-01

    The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of 2p-block non-metallic elements (B, C, N, and O)-doped silver chloride were investigated by using ab initio approaches. The results indicate that B, C, N, and O substitution can produce magnetism and the magnetization is mainly from the 2p component of the 2p-block impurities. The total magnetic moments are 2.00, 3.00, 2.00, and 0.98 μB per 2 × 2 × 2 supercell for B, C, N, and O doping, respectively. Semiconducting, half-metallic, and nearly half-metallic magnetic states were generally observed in these cases. The ferromagnetic coupling was observed for B-, N-, and O-doped samples except for C-doped model. Thus, although the calculated magnetic moment of C-doped AgCl is 3.00 μB, the total net magnetic moment should be zero due to the antiferromagnetic order. Several possible explanations have been rationalized from the diversification of the electron count, the hole-mediated p- p and p- d interactions' coupling mechanisms, the elements' electronegativity and the relationship between guest and host atoms.

  8. Oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens with catalytic molten salt mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.

    1978-01-01

    A process for oxidizing hydrogen halides by means of a catalytically active molten salt is disclosed. The subject hydrogen halide is contacted with a molten salt containing an oxygen compound of vanadium and alkali metal sulfates and pyrosulfates to produce an effluent gas stream rich in the elemental halogen. The reduced vanadium which remains after this contacting is regenerated to the active higher valence state by contacting the spent molten salt with a stream of oxygen-bearing gas.

  9. Metal-halide mixtures for latent heat energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K.; Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    Some candidates for alkali metal and alkali halide mixtures suitable for thermal energy storage at temperatures 600 C are identified. A solar thermal system application which offer advantages such as precipitation of salt crystals away from heat transfer surfaces, increased thermal conductivity of phase change materials, corrosion inhibition, and a constant monotectic temperature, independent of mixture concentrations. By using the lighters, metal rich phase as a heat transfer medium and the denser, salt rich phase as a phase change material for latent heat storage, undesirable solidification on the heat transfer surface may be prevented, is presented.

  10. Optical and Spectral Studies on β Alanine Metal Halide Hybrid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetlin, M. Daniel; Selvarajan, P.; Perumal, S.; Ramalingom, S.

    2011-10-01

    We have synthesized and grown β alanine metal halide hybrid crystals viz. β alanine cadmium chloride (BACC), an amino acid transition metal halide complex crystal and β alanine potassium chloride (BAPC), an amino acid alkali metal halide complex crystal by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals were found to be transparent and have well defined morphology. The optical characteristics of the grown crystals were carried out with the help of UV-Vis Spectroscopy. The optical transmittances of the spectrums show that BAPC is more transparent than BACC. The Photoluminescence of the materials were determined by the Photoluminescent Spectroscopy

  11. Binary technetium halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, Erik Vaughan

    In this work, the synthetic and coordination chemistry as well as the physico-chemical properties of binary technetium (Tc) chlorides, bromides, and iodides were investigated. Resulting from these studies was the discovery of five new binary Tc halide phases: alpha/beta-TcCl3, alpha/beta-TcCl 2, and TcI3, and the reinvestigation of the chemistries of TcBr3 and TcX4 (X = Cl, Br). Prior to 2009, the chemistry of binary Tc halides was poorly studied and defined by only three compounds, i.e., TcF6, TcF5, and TcCl4. Today, ten phases are known (i.e., TcF6, TcF5, TcCl4, TcBr 4, TcBr3, TcI3, alpha/beta-TcCl3 and alpha/beta-TcCl2) making the binary halide system of Tc comparable to those of its neighboring elements. Technetium binary halides were synthesized using three methods: reactions of the elements in sealed tubes, reactions of flowing HX(g) (X = Cl, Br, and I) with Tc2(O2CCH3)4Cl2, and thermal decompositions of TcX4 (X = Cl, Br) and alpha-TcCl 3 in sealed tubes under vacuum. Binary Tc halides can be found in various dimensionalities such as molecular solids (TcF6), extended chains (TcF5, TcCl4, alpha/beta-TcCl2, TcBr 3, TcI3), infinite layers (beta-TcCl3), and bidimensional networks of clusters (alpha-TcCl3); eight structure-types with varying degrees of metal-metal interactions are now known. The coordination chemistry of Tc binary halides can resemble that of the adjacent elements: molybdenum and ruthenium (beta-TcCl3, TcBr3, TcI 3), rhenium (TcF5, alpha-TcCl3), platinum (TcCl 4, TcBr4), or can be unique (alpha-TcCl2 and beta-TcCl 2) in respect to other known transition metal binary halides. Technetium binary halides display a range of interesting physical properties that are manifested from their electronic and structural configurations. The thermochemistry of binary Tc halides is extensive. These compounds can selectively volatilize, decompose, disproportionate, or convert to other phases. Ultimately, binary Tc halides may find application in the nuclear fuel

  12. Vitrification of IFR and MSBR halide salt reprocessing wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Siemer, D.D.

    2013-07-01

    Both of the genuinely sustainable (breeder) nuclear fuel cycles (IFR - Integral Fast Reactor - and MSBR - Molten Salt Breeder Reactor -) studied by the USA's national laboratories would generate high level reprocessing waste (HLRW) streams consisting of a relatively small amount ( about 4 mole %) of fission product halide (chloride or fluoride) salts in a matrix comprised primarily (about 95 mole %) of non radioactive alkali metal halide salts. Because leach resistant glasses cannot accommodate much of any of the halides, most of the treatment scenarios previously envisioned for such HLRW have assumed a monolithic waste form comprised of a synthetic analog of an insoluble crystalline halide mineral. In practice, this translates to making a 'substituted' sodalite ('Ceramic Waste Form') of the IFR's chloride salt-based wastes and fluoroapatite of the MSBR's fluoride salt-based wastes. This paper discusses my experimental studies of an alternative waste management scenario for both fuel cycles that would separate/recycle the waste's halide and immobilize everything else in iron phosphate (Fe-P) glass. It will describe both how the work was done and what its results indicate about how a treatment process for both of those wastes should be implemented (fluoride and chloride behave differently). In either case, this scenario's primary advantages include much higher waste loadings, much lower overall cost, and the generation of a product (glass) that is more consistent with current waste management practices. (author)

  13. Process for oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOEpatents

    Lyke, Stephen E.

    1992-01-01

    An improved process for generating an elemental halogen selected from chlorine, bromine or iodine, from a corresponding hydrogen halide by absorbing a molten salt mixture, which includes sulfur, alkali metals and oxygen with a sulfur to metal molar ratio between 0.9 and 1.1 and includes a dissolved oxygen compound capable of reacting with hydrogen halide to produce elemental halogen, into a porous, relatively inert substrate to produce a substrate-supported salt mixture. Thereafter, the substrate-supported salt mixture is contacted (stage 1) with a hydrogen halide while maintaining the substrate-supported salt mixture during the contacting at an elevated temperature sufficient to sustain a reaction between the oxygen compound and the hydrogen halide to produce a gaseous elemental halogen product. This is followed by purging the substrate-supported salt mixture with steam (stage 2) thereby recovering any unreacted hydrogen halide and additional elemental halogen for recycle to stage 1. The dissolved oxygen compound is regenerated in a high temperature (stage 3) and an optical intermediate temperature stage (stage 4) by contacting the substrate-supported salt mixture with a gas containing oxygen whereby the dissolved oxygen compound in the substrate-supported salt mixture is regenerated by being oxidized to a higher valence state.

  14. IONIC THERMOCURRENTS IN ALKALI HALIDE CRYSTALS CONTAINING SUBSTITUTIONAL BERYLLIUM IONS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    omega - 3 and omega-4); (3) the activation energy for the diffusion of Be ions is .5 eV for NaCl and .45 eV for KCl. In discussing the results, the possibility that the Be ions occupy off-center positions is considered. (Author)

  15. Sonoluminescing single bubble in concentrated alkali halide solutions.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shigeo; Nozaki, Kenji; Hatanaka, Shin-ichi

    2006-12-22

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence is generated in concentrated aqueous solutions of LiBr and LiCl. The moving-bubble state, a type of unstable state in which sonoluminescence is still emitted, is observed above the stable-sonoluminescence state similarly to that in aqueous solutions of NaCl and KCl. Luminosity is increased at similar magnitudes for LiBr, LiCl, NaCl and KCl of the same concentration.

  16. Cold ablation driven by localized forces in alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Masaki; Zhang, Dongfang; Pichugin, Kostyantyn; Hirscht, Julian; Kochman, Michał A.; Hayes, Stuart A.; Manz, Stephanie; Gengler, Regis Y. N.; Wann, Derek A.; Seki, Toshio; Moriena, Gustavo; Morrison, Carole A.; Matsuo, Jiro; Sciaini, Germán; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2014-05-01

    Laser ablation has been widely used for a variety of applications. Since the mechanisms for ablation are strongly dependent on the photoexcitation level, so called cold material processing has relied on the use of high-peak-power laser fluences for which nonthermal processes become dominant; often reaching the universal threshold for plasma formation of ~1 J cm-2 in most solids. Here we show single-shot time-resolved femtosecond electron diffraction, femtosecond optical reflectivity and ion detection experiments to study the evolution of the ablation process that follows femtosecond 400 nm laser excitation in crystalline sodium chloride, caesium iodide and potassium iodide. The phenomenon in this class of materials occurs well below the threshold for plasma formation and even below the melting point. The results reveal fast electronic and localized structural changes that lead to the ejection of particulates and the formation of micron-deep craters, reflecting the very nature of the strong repulsive forces at play.

  17. Formation of Na2SO4 and K2SO4 in flames doped with sulfur and alkali chlorides and carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Miller, R. A.; Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    High pressure, free-jet expansion, mass spectrometric sampling was used to identify directly and to measure reaction products formed in doped methane-oxygen flames. Flames were doped with SO2 or CH3SH and sodium or potassium chlorides or carbonates. Gaseous Na2SO4 or K2SO4 molecules were formed in residence times on the order of 1 msec for each combination of dopants used. Composition profiles of combustion products were measured and compared with equilibrium thermodynamic calculations of product composition.

  18. Formation of Na2SO4 and K2SO4 in flames doped with sulfur and alkali chlorides and carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Miller, R. A.; Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    High pressure, free-jet expansion, mass spectrometric sampling was used to identify directly and to measure reaction products formed in doped methane-oxygen flames. Flames were doped with SO2 or CH3SH and sodium or potassium chlorides or carbonates. Gaseous NA2SO4 or K2S04 molecules were formed in residence times on the order of msec for each combination of dopants used. Composition profiles of combustion products were measured and compared with equilibrium thermodynamic calculations of product composition.

  19. Investigation of the local structure of Cu2+ ions doped in alkali lead tetraborate glasses by their electron paramagnetic resonance and optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying; Chen, Zhi

    2014-06-01

    The local structure of the Cu2+ centers in alkali lead tetraborate glasses was theoretically studied based on the optical spectra data and high-order perturbation formulas of the spin Hamiltonian parameters (electron paramagnetic resonance g factors g∥, g⊥ and hyperfine structure constants A∥, A⊥) for a 3d9 ion in a tetragonally elongated octahedron. In these formulas, the relative axial elongation of the ligand O2- octahedron around the Cu2+ due to the Jahn-Teller effect is taken into account by considering the contributions to the g factors from the tetragonal distortion which is characterized by the tetragonal crystal-field parameters Ds and Dt. From the calculations, the ligand O2- octahedral around Cu2+ is determined to suffer about 19.2% relative elongation along the C4 axis of the alkali lead tetraborate glass system, and a negative sign for A∥ and a positive sign for A⊥ for these Cu2+ centers are suggested in the discussion.

  20. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  1. PREPARATION OF HALIDES OF PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Garner, C.S.; Johns, I.B.

    1958-09-01

    A dry chemical method is described for preparing plutonium halides, which consists in contacting plutonyl nitrate with dry gaseous HCl or HF at an elevated temperature. The addition to the reaction gas of a small quantity of an oxidizing gas or a reducing gas will cause formation of the tetra- or tri-halide of plutonium as desired.

  2. Halide laser glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1982-01-14

    Energy storage and energy extraction are of prime importance for efficient laser action and are affected by the line strengths and linewidths of optical transitions, excited-state lifetimes, nonradiative decay processes, spectroscopic inhomogeneities, nonlinear refractive index, and damage threshold. These properties are all host dependent. To illustrate this, the spectroscopic properties of Nd/sup 3 +/ have been measured in numerous oxide, oxyhalide, and halide glasses. A table summarizes the reported ranges of stimulated emission cross sections, peak wavelengths, linewidths, and radiative lifetimes associated with the /sup 4/F/sub 3/2/ ..-->.. /sup 4/I/sub 11/2/ lasing transition.

  3. Milk-alkali syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000332.htm Milk-alkali syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Milk-alkali syndrome is a condition in which there ...

  4. Silver-halide gelatin holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, B. J.; Winick, K.

    1980-05-01

    The use of a silver-halide gelatin for volume phase holograms having a wide spectral response and lower exposure requirements than alternatives and using commercially available silver salts, is proposed. The main difference between the dichromated gelatin and silver-halide processes is the creation of a hologram latent image, which is given in the form of a hardness differential between exposed and unexposed regions in the silver halide hologram; the differential is in turn created by the reaction products of either tanning development or tanning bleach, which harden the gelatin with link-bonds between molecules.

  5. Actinide halide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Avens, L.R.; Zwick, B.D.; Sattelberger, A.P.; Clark, D.L.; Watkin, J.G.

    1991-02-07

    A compound of the formula MX{sub n}L{sub m} wherein M = Th, Pu, Np,or Am thorium, X = a halide atom, n = 3 or 4, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is 3 or 4 for monodentate ligands or is 2 for bidentate ligands, where n + m = 7 or 8 for monodentate ligands or 5 or 6 for bidentate ligands, a compound of the formula MX{sub n} wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant, are provided.

  6. Passive particle dosimetry. [silver halide crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, C. B.

    1977-01-01

    Present methods of dosimetry are reviewed with emphasis on the processes using silver chloride crystals for ionizing particle dosimetry. Differences between the ability of various crystals to record ionizing particle paths are directly related to impurities in the range of a few ppm (parts per million). To understand the roles of these impurities in the process, a method for consistent production of high purity silver chloride, and silver bromide was developed which yields silver halides with detectable impurity content less than 1 ppm. This high purity silver chloride was used in growing crystals with controlled doping. Crystals were grown by both the Czochalski method and the Bridgman method, and the Bridgman grown crystals were used for the experiments discussed. The distribution coefficients of ten divalent cations were determined for the Bridgman crystals. The best dosimeters were made with silver chloride crystals containing 5 to 10 ppm of lead; other impurities tested did not produce proper dosimeters.

  7. Ion Partitioning at the liquid/vapor interface of a multi-component alkali halidesolution: A model for aqueous sea salt aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, Sutapa; Brown, Matthew A.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Krisch, Maria J.; Salmeron, Miquel; Jungwirth, Pavel; Hemminger, John C.

    2008-12-22

    The chemistry of Br species associated with sea salt ice and aerosols has been implicated in the episodes of ozone depletion reported at Arctic sunrise. However, Br{sup -} is only a minor component in sea salt, which has a Br{sup -}/Cl{sup -} molar ratio of {approx}0.0015. Sea salt is a complex mixture of many different species, with NaCl as the primary component. In recent years experimental and theoretical studies have reported enhancement of the large, more polarizable halide ion at the liquid/vapor interface of corresponding aqueous alkali halide solutions. The proposed enhancement is likely to influence the availability of sea salt Br{sup -} for heterogeneous reactions such as those involved in the ozone depletion episodes. We report here ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies and molecular dynamics simulations showing direct evidence of Br{sup -} enhancement at the interface of an aqueous NaCl solution doped with bromide. The experiments were carried out on samples with Br{sup -}/Cl{sup -} ratios in the range 0.1% to 10%, the latter being also the ratio for which simulations were carried out. This is the first direct measurement of interfacial enhancement of Br{sup -} in a multi-component solution with particular relevance to sea salt chemistry.

  8. METHOD OF PREPARING METAL HALIDES

    DOEpatents

    Hendrickson, A.V.

    1958-11-18

    The conversion of plutonium halides from plutonium peroxide can be done by washing the peroxide with hydrogen peroxide, drying the peroxide, passing a dry gaseous hydrohalide over the surface of the peroxide at a temperature of about lOO icient laborato C until the reaction rate has stabillzed, and then ralsing the reaction temperature to between 400 and 600 icient laborato C until the conversion to plutonium halide is substantially complete.

  9. Silver-Halide Gelatin Holograms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    PREPARATION OF R-10 TYPE BLEACHES Stock Solution A: Distilled water - 500 ml Ammonium dichromate - 20g Concentrated sulfuric acid - 14 ml Distilled water to...for the preparation of a bleach solution 5 Rinse in running water for 15 seconds Red Light 6 Soak in 0.5% ammonium dichromate for 5 minutes Red Light...those of con- ventional dichromated gelatin holograms, can be formed employing commercial silver-halide films. Major advantages of silver-halide

  10. Fullerene-C60 and crown ether doped on C60 sensors for high sensitive detection of alkali and alkaline earth cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghmarzi, Fatemeh Alipour; Zahedi, Mansour; Mola, Adeleh; Abedini, Saboora; Arshadi, Sattar; Ahmadzadeh, Saeed; Etminan, Nazanin; Younesi, Omran; Rahmanifar, Elham; Yoosefian, Mehdi

    2017-03-01

    Fullerenes are effective acceptor components with high electron affinity for charge transfer. The significant influences of chemical adsorption of the cations on the electrical sensitivity of pristine C60 and 15-(C2H4O)5/C60 nanocages could be the basis of new generation of electronic sensor design. The density functional theory calculation for alkali and alkaline earth cations detection by pristine C60 and 15-(C2H4O)5/C60 nanocages are considered at B3LYP level of theory with 6-31 G(d) basis set. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules analysis have been performed to understand the nature of intermolecular interactions between the cations and nanocages. Also, the natural bond orbital analysis have been performed to assess the intermolecular interactions in detail. Furthermore, the frontier molecular orbital, energy gap, work function, electronegativity, number of transferred electron (∆N), dipole moment as well as the related chemical hardness and softness are investigated and calculated in this study. The results show that the adsorption of cations (M=Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) are exothermic and the binding energy in pristine C60 nanocage and 15-(C2H4O)5/C60 increases with respect to the cations charge. The results also denote a decrease in the energy gap and an increase in the electrical conductivity upon the adsorption process. In order to validate the obtained results, the density of state calculations are employed and presented in the end as well.

  11. Physical and optical properties of Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} doped 20ZnO + xLi{sub 2}O + (30 − x)K{sub 2}O + 50B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (5 ≤ x ≤ 25) glasses: Observation of mixed alkali effect

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna Kumari, G.; Muntaz Begum, Sk.; Rama Krishna, Ch.; Sathish, D.V.; Murthy, P.N.; Rao, P.S.; Ravikumar, R.V.S.S.N.

    2012-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Composition dependence of density and Urbach energy of Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} doped ZLKB glasses: (a) Co{sup 2+} doped glasses and (b) Ni{sup 2+} doped glasses. Both are exhibited mixed alkali effect. Highlights: ► Mixed alkali effect is observed. ► Band gap studies indicate that the glasses are structural stable. ► The glasses are observed to be partially covalent in nature. -- Abstract: Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} ions doped 20ZnO + xLi{sub 2}O + (30 − x) K{sub 2}O + 50B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (5 ≤ x ≤ 25) mol% glasses are prepared using melt quenching technique. Structural changes of the prepared glasses by addition of transition metal oxides, CoO and NiO are investigated by UV–vis–NIR, FT-IR spectroscopy and XRD. The XRD pattern indicates the amorphous nature of prepared glasses. FT-IR measurements of the all glasses revealed that the network structure of the glasses are mainly based on BO{sub 3} and BO{sub 4} units placed in different structural groups in which the BO{sub 3} units being dominant. The optical absorption spectra suggest the site symmetry of Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} ions in the glasses are near octahedral. Crystal field and inter-electronic repulsion parameters are also evaluated. The optical band gap and Urbach energies exhibited the mixed alkali effect. Various physical parameters such as density, refractive index, optical dielectric constant, polaron radius, electronic polarizability and inter-ionic distance are also determined.

  12. Methyl Halide Production by Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailey, G. D.; Varner, R. K.; Blanchard, R. O.; Sive, B. C.; Crill, P. M.

    2005-12-01

    Methyl chloride (CH3Cl), methyl bromide (CH3Br) and methyl iodide (CH3I) are methyl halide gases that contribute significant amounts of halogen radicals to the atmosphere. In an effort to better understand the global budget of methyl halides and their impact on the atmosphere, we need to identify the natural sources in addition to the known anthropogenic sources of these compounds. We are investigating the role of fungi in the production of methyl halides in the soils and wetlands in southern New Hampshire, USA. Previous research has shown that wood decay fungi and ectomycorrhizal fungi, which are within a group of fungi called basidiomycetes, emit methyl halides. In our study, measurements of headspace gas extracted from flasks containing fungi grown in culture demonstrate that a variety of fungi, including basidiomycetes and non-basidiomycetes, emit methyl halides. Our research sites include four ecosystems: an agricultural field, a temperate forest, a fresh water wetland, and coastal salt marshes. We have collected and isolated fungi at each site by culturing tissue samples of fruiting bodies and plant material, by using wood baits, and from the direct culture of soil. We compared the rates of methyl halide emissions from the fungi in the four ecosystems. In addition, we measured emissions from previously assayed fungal isolates after reintroducing them to sterilized soils that were collected from their original environments. Fungal biomass was determined by substrate-induced respiration (SIR). The emission rate by the fungus was determined by a linear regression of the concentration of methyl halide in the sample headspace over time divided by the fungal biomass.

  13. Electron thermalization and trapping rates in pure and doped alkali and alkaline-earth iodide crystals studied by picosecond optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucer, K. B.; Bizarri, G.; Burger, A.; Gektin, A.; Trefilova, L.; Williams, R. T.

    2014-04-01

    Although light continues to be emitted from insulating crystals used as scintillators over a period of nanoseconds to microseconds after stopping of an energetic particle, much of what determines the nonlinearity of response goes on in the first picoseconds. On this time scale, free carriers and excitons are at high density near the track core and thus are subject to nonlinear quenching. The hot (free) electrons eventually cool to low enough energy that trapping on holes, dopants, or defects can commence. In the track environment, spatial distributions of trapped carriers determined on the picosecond time scale can influence the proportionality between light yield and the initial particle energy throughout the whole light pulse. Picosecond spectroscopy of optical absorption induced by a short pulse of above-gap excitation provides a useful window on what occurs during the crucial early evolution of excited populations. The laser excitation can be tuned to excite carriers that are initially very hot (˜3 eV) relative to the band edges, or that are almost thermalized (˜0.1 eV excess energy) at the outset. Undoped and doped samples of NaI:Tl(0%, 0.1%), CsI:Tl(0%, 0.01%, 0.04%, 0.3%), and SrI2:Eu(0%, 0.2%, 0.5%, 3%) are studied in this work.

  14. Broadband infrared light-emitting patterns in optical glass by laser-induced nanostructuring of NiO-doped alkali-gallium germanosilicates.

    PubMed

    Lotarev, S V; Lipatiev, A S; Golubev, N V; Ignat'eva, E S; Malashkevich, G E; Mudryi, A V; Priseko, Y S; Lorenzi, R; Paleari, A; Sigaev, V N

    2013-02-15

    In this Letter, we show functionalization of NiO-doped 7.5Li(2)O·2.5Na(2)O·20Ga(2)O(3)·35SiO(2)·35GeO(2) glass by space-selective nanocrystallization via exposure to the focused beam of a pulsed copper vapor laser (510.6 and 578.2 nm) at temperature close to the glass transition point (570°C). Irradiated areas drastically change their color, caused by electronic transitions of Ni(2+) dopant ions, without any alteration of the optical quality. Importantly, irradiated regions acquire broadband infrared luminescence (centered at about 1400 nm and possessing 400 nm effective bandwidth) typical of Ni(2+) ions in crystalline environment, and by positive change of refractive index (more than 10(-3)). Spectroscopic and diffractometric data of the irradiated regions indeed resemble those previously observed in thermally nanocrystallized glass, with Ni(2+) ions embedded in γ-Ga(2)O(3) nanocrystals. The results demonstrate the possibility of laser writing nanocrystallized multifunction patterns in germanosilicate glasses for the fabrication of active integrated devices.

  15. Actinide halide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Avens, L.R.; Zwick, B.D.; Sattelberger, A.P.; Clark, D.L.; Watkin, J.G.

    1992-11-24

    A compound is described of the formula MX[sub n]L[sub m] wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands. A compound of the formula MX[sub n] wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds are described including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant.

  16. Actinide halide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Avens, Larry R.; Zwick, Bill D.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Clark, David L.; Watkin, John G.

    1992-01-01

    A compound of the formula MX.sub.n L.sub.m wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands, a compound of the formula MX.sub.n wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant, are provided.

  17. Radiochemical synthesis of pure anhydrous metal halides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.; May, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Method uses radiation chemistry as practical tool for inorganic preparations and in particular deposition of metals by irradiation of their aqueous metal salt solutions with high energy electrons. Higher valence metal halide is dissolved in organic liquid and exposed to high energy electrons. This causes metal halide to be reduced to a lower valence metal halide.

  18. Preparation of cerium halide solvate complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, Kalyan V; Smith, Nickolaus A; Gordon, John C; McKigney, Edward A; Muenchaussen, Ross E

    2013-08-06

    Crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide solvate complex resulted from a process of forming a paste of a cerium(III) halide in an ionic liquid, adding a solvent to the paste, removing any undissolved solid, and then cooling the liquid phase. Diffusing a solvent vapor into the liquid phase also resulted in crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide complex.

  19. Monte Carlo simulations of electron thermalization in alkali iodide and alkaline-earth fluoride scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiguo; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien

    2012-07-01

    A Monte Carlo model of electron thermalization in inorganic scintillators, which was developed and applied to CsI in a previous publication [Wang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064903 (2011)], is extended to another material of the alkali halide class, NaI, and to two materials from the alkaline-earth halide class, CaF2 and BaF2. This model includes electron scattering with both longitudinal optical (LO) and acoustic phonons as well as the effects of internal electric fields. For the four pure materials, a significant fraction of the electrons recombine with self-trapped holes and the thermalization distance distributions of the electrons that do not recombine peak between approximately 25 and 50 nm and extend up to a few hundreds of nanometers. The thermalization time distributions of CaF2, BaF2, NaI, and CsI extend to approximately 0.5, 1, 2, and 7 ps, respectively. The simulations show that the LO phonon energy is a key factor that affects the electron thermalization process. Indeed, the higher the LO phonon energy is, the shorter the thermalization time and distance are. The thermalization time and distance distributions show no dependence on the incident γ-ray energy. The four materials also show different extents of electron-hole pair recombination due mostly to differences in their electron mean free paths (MFPs), LO phonon energies, initial densities of electron-hole pairs, and static dielectric constants. The effect of thallium doping is also investigated for CsI and NaI as these materials are often doped with activators. Comparison between CsI and NaI shows that both the larger size of Cs+ relative to Na+, i.e., the greater atomic density of NaI, and the longer electron mean free path in NaI compared to CsI contribute to an increased probability for electron trapping at Tl sites in NaI versus CsI.

  20. Monte Carlo simulations of electron thermalization in alkali iodide and alkaline-earth fluoride scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhiguo; Gao Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien; Xie Yulong; Campbell, Luke W.

    2012-07-01

    A Monte Carlo model of electron thermalization in inorganic scintillators, which was developed and applied to CsI in a previous publication [Wang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064903 (2011)], is extended to another material of the alkali halide class, NaI, and to two materials from the alkaline-earth halide class, CaF{sub 2} and BaF{sub 2}. This model includes electron scattering with both longitudinal optical (LO) and acoustic phonons as well as the effects of internal electric fields. For the four pure materials, a significant fraction of the electrons recombine with self-trapped holes and the thermalization distance distributions of the electrons that do not recombine peak between approximately 25 and 50 nm and extend up to a few hundreds of nanometers. The thermalization time distributions of CaF{sub 2}, BaF{sub 2}, NaI, and CsI extend to approximately 0.5, 1, 2, and 7 ps, respectively. The simulations show that the LO phonon energy is a key factor that affects the electron thermalization process. Indeed, the higher the LO phonon energy is, the shorter the thermalization time and distance are. The thermalization time and distance distributions show no dependence on the incident {gamma}-ray energy. The four materials also show different extents of electron-hole pair recombination due mostly to differences in their electron mean free paths (MFPs), LO phonon energies, initial densities of electron-hole pairs, and static dielectric constants. The effect of thallium doping is also investigated for CsI and NaI as these materials are often doped with activators. Comparison between CsI and NaI shows that both the larger size of Cs{sup +} relative to Na{sup +}, i.e., the greater atomic density of NaI, and the longer electron mean free path in NaI compared to CsI contribute to an increased probability for electron trapping at Tl sites in NaI versus CsI.

  1. Organometal Halide Perovskite Artificial Synapses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Cho, Himchan; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Young-Tae; Wolf, Christoph; Park, Chan-Gyung; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-07-01

    Organometal halide perovskite synaptic devices are fabricated; they emulate important working principles of a biological synapse, including excitatory postsynaptic current, paired-pulse facilitation, short-term plasticity, long-term plasticity, and spike-timing dependent plasticity. These properties originate from possible ion migration in the ion-rich perovskite matrix. This work has extensive applicability and practical significance in neuromorphic electronics.

  2. Optical Properties of Tm(3+) Ions in Alkali Germanate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.; Barnes, Norman P.; Reichle, Donald J.; Jiang, Shibin

    2006-01-01

    Tm-doped alkali germanate glass is investigated for use as a laser material. Spectroscopic investigations of bulk Tm-doped germanate glass are reported for the absorption, emission and luminescence decay. Tm:germanate shows promise as a fiber laser when pumped with 0.792 m diodes because of low phonon energies. Spectroscopic analysis indicates low nonradiative quenching and pulsed laser performance studies confirm this prediction by showing a quantum efficiency of 1.69.

  3. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  4. Development of Halide and Oxy-Halides for Isotopic Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Leigh R.; Johnson, Aaron T.; Pfeiffer, Jana; Finck, Martha R.

    2014-10-01

    The goal of this project was to synthesize a volatile form of Np for introduction into mass spectrometers at INL. Volatile solids of the 5f elements are typically those of the halides (e.g. UF6), however fluorine is highly corrosive to the sensitive internal components of the mass separator, and the other volatile halides exist as several different stable isotopes in nature. However, iodide is both mono-isotopic and volatile, and as such presents an avenue for creation of a form of Np suitable for introduction into the mass separator. To accomplish this goal, the technical work in the project sought to establish a novel synthetic route for the conversion NpO2+ (dissolved in nitric acid) to NpI3 and NpI4.

  5. Atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions for surface interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Outlaw, R. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base developed from analysis of the two-body potential data, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas surfaces and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  6. Charge carrier mobility in hybrid halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Motta, Carlo; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Sanvito, Stefano

    2015-08-03

    The charge transport properties of hybrid halide perovskites are investigated with a combination of density functional theory including van der Waals interaction and the Boltzmann theory for diffusive transport in the relaxation time approximation. We find the mobility of electrons to be in the range 5-10 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) and that for holes within 1-5 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1), where the variations depend on the crystal structure investigated and the level of doping. Such results, in good agreement with recent experiments, set the relaxation time to about 1 ps, which is the time-scale for the molecular rotation at room temperature. For the room temperature tetragonal phase we explore two possible orientations of the organic cations and find that the mobility has a significant asymmetry depending on the direction of the current with respect to the molecular axis. This is due mostly to the way the PbI3 octahedral symmetry is broken. Interestingly we find that substituting I with Cl has minor effects on the mobilities. Our analysis suggests that the carrier mobility is probably not a key factor in determining the high solar-harvesting efficiency of this class of materials.

  7. Charge carrier mobility in hybrid halide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Carlo; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Sanvito, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The charge transport properties of hybrid halide perovskites are investigated with a combination of density functional theory including van der Waals interaction and the Boltzmann theory for diffusive transport in the relaxation time approximation. We find the mobility of electrons to be in the range 5–10 cm2V−1s−1 and that for holes within 1–5 cm2V−1s−1, where the variations depend on the crystal structure investigated and the level of doping. Such results, in good agreement with recent experiments, set the relaxation time to about 1 ps, which is the time-scale for the molecular rotation at room temperature. For the room temperature tetragonal phase we explore two possible orientations of the organic cations and find that the mobility has a significant asymmetry depending on the direction of the current with respect to the molecular axis. This is due mostly to the way the PbI3 octahedral symmetry is broken. Interestingly we find that substituting I with Cl has minor effects on the mobilities. Our analysis suggests that the carrier mobility is probably not a key factor in determining the high solar-harvesting efficiency of this class of materials. PMID:26235910

  8. TRANSURANIC METAL HALIDES AND A PROCESS FOR THE PRODUCTION THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Fried, S.

    1951-03-20

    Halides of transuranic elements are prepared by contacting with aluminum and a halogen, or with an aluminum halide, a transuranic metal oxide, oxyhalide, halide, or mixture thereof at an elevated temperature.

  9. From unexpected reactions to a new family of ionic co-crystals: the case of barbituric acid with alkali bromides and caesium iodide.

    PubMed

    Braga, Dario; Grepioni, Fabrizia; Maini, Lucia; Prosperi, Susanna; Gobetto, Roberto; Chierotti, Michele R

    2010-11-07

    Pressing solid barbituric acid with KBr to prepare samples for IR spectroscopy leads to the formation of an ionic co-crystal, in which the co-former is a classical ionic salt; co-crystal formation is also obtained with the other alkali bromides (LiBr, NaBr, RbBr and CsBr) and with caesium iodide. The simultaneous presence of alkali and halide ions affects the dissolution properties of barbituric acid in water.

  10. Metal halide perovskite light emitters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Cho, Himchan; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years after layer-type metal halide perovskites were successfully developed, 3D metal halide perovskites (shortly, perovskites) were recently rediscovered and are attracting multidisciplinary interest from physicists, chemists, and material engineers. Perovskites have a crystal structure composed of five atoms per unit cell (ABX3) with cation A positioned at a corner, metal cation B at the center, and halide anion X at the center of six planes and unique optoelectronic properties determined by the crystal structure. Because of very narrow spectra (full width at half-maximum ≤20 nm), which are insensitive to the crystallite/grain/particle dimension and wide wavelength range (400 nm ≤ λ ≤ 780 nm), perovskites are expected to be promising high-color purity light emitters that overcome inherent problems of conventional organic and inorganic quantum dot emitters. Within the last 2 y, perovskites have already demonstrated their great potential in light-emitting diodes by showing high electroluminescence efficiency comparable to those of organic and quantum dot light-emitting diodes. This article reviews the progress of perovskite emitters in two directions of bulk perovskite polycrystalline films and perovskite nanoparticles, describes current challenges, and suggests future research directions for researchers to encourage them to collaborate and to make a synergetic effect in this rapidly emerging multidisciplinary field. PMID:27679844

  11. Apparatus enables accurate determination of alkali oxides in alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupraw, W. A.; Gahn, R. F.; Graab, J. W.; Maple, W. E.; Rosenblum, L.

    1966-01-01

    Evacuated apparatus determines the alkali oxide content of an alkali metal by separating the metal from the oxide by amalgamation with mercury. The apparatus prevents oxygen and moisture from inadvertently entering the system during the sampling and analytical procedure.

  12. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    DOEpatents

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  13. Ideas about Acids and Alkalis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toplis, Rob

    1998-01-01

    Investigates students' ideas, conceptions, and misconceptions about acids and alkalis before and after a teaching sequence in a small-scale research project. Concludes that student understanding of acids and alkalis is lacking. (DDR)

  14. The influence of halides in polyoxotitanate cages; dipole moment, splitting and expansion of d-orbitals and electron-electron repulsion.

    PubMed

    Hanf, Schirin; Matthews, Peter D; Li, Ning; Luo, He-Kuan; Wright, Dominic S

    2017-01-03

    Metal-doped polyoxotitanate (M-POT) cages have been shown to be efficient single-source precursors to metal-doped titania [TiO2(M)] (state-of-the-art photocatalytic materials) as well as molecular models for the behaviour of dopant metal ions in bulk titania. Here we report the influence halide ions have on the optical and electronic properties of a series of halide-only, and cobalt halide-'doped' POT cages. In this combined experimental and computational study we show that halide ions can have several effects on the band gaps of halide-containing POT cages, influencing the dipole moment (hole-electron separation) and the structure of the valance band edge. Overall, the band gap behaviour stems from the effects of increasing orbital energy moving from F to I down Group 17, as well as crystal-field splitting of the d-orbitals, the potential effects of the Nephelauxetic influence of the halides and electron-electron repulsion.

  15. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  16. Synthesis of aryl halides via organoborane chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kabalka, G.W.; Sastry, K.A.R.; Sastry, U.; Somayaji, V.

    1982-01-01

    A method for the rapid synthesis of a variety of substituted aryl halides by the reaction of organoboranes with halide ions in the presence of chloramine-T is described in detail. The products were purified by column chromatography on silica gel using a mixture of petroleum ether-ethyl acetate as eluent.

  17. Chlor-Alkali Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkatesh, S.; Tilak, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    Chlor-alkali technology is one of the largest electrochemical industries in the world, the main products being chlorine and caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) generated simultaneously by the electrolysis of sodium chloride. This technology is reviewed in terms of electrochemical principles and manufacturing processes involved. (Author/JN)

  18. Freeze Enhanced Halate Halide Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberg, J. T.; Weaver, K.; Broderick, A.

    2014-12-01

    Relatively little is known about halate ion species (XO3-; X = I, Br, Cl) in atmospheric condensed phases. It was initial thought that iodate was a terminal stable species upon iodide oxidation. However, it is becoming increasingly recognized that reactions involving iodate can lead to reactive iodine, and this chemistry is accelerated under acidic conditions. The environmental concentrations and chemistry of bromate and chlorate are largely unexplored in environmental ices. We present results from a series of aqueous phase halate ion reactions with halides under acidic conditions, showing that the kinetics are strongly enhanced upon freezing. The products of these reactions are reactive halogens, which have important implications to marine boundary layer chemistry.

  19. Hygroscopicity Evaluation of Halide Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, M; Stand, L; Wei, H; Hobbs, C. L.; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.; Tupitsyn, E; Melcher, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative study of relative hygroscopicity of anhydrous halide scintillators grown at various laboratories is presented. We have developed a technique to evaluate moisture sensitivity of both raw materials and grown crystals, in which the moisture absorption rate is measured using a gravimetric analysis. Degradation of the scintillation performance was investigated by recording gamma-ray spectra and monitoring the photopeak position, count rate and energy resolution. The accompanying physical degradation of the samples exposed to ambient atmosphere was photographically recorded as well. The results were compared with ben

  20. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Wolfs, Denise Y.; Clavenna, Le Roy R.; Eakman, James M.; Kalina, Theodore

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  1. Impurity segregation in zone-refined precursors for crystalline halide scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swider, S.; Lam, S.; Motakef, S.; Donohoe, E.; Coers, L.; Taylor, S.; Spencer, S.

    2015-06-01

    Successful growth of halide scintillator crystals depends on a supply of ultra-high purity (UHP) precursor materials. Metallic interstitials and substitutions may provide traps that quench luminescence. Oxygen impurities can create competing compounds within a matrix, such as oxyhalides, that disrupt crystallinity and nucleate cracks. Using mass spectroscopy and oxygen combustion analysis, we analyzed impurities in SrI2, EuI2, and YCl3 precursors before and after zone refining. The data show most alkali and alkali earth impurities segregated easily. However, with the exception of iron, many transition metals were incorporated into the solid. Reliable oxygen measurements proved difficult to achieve. Additional oxygen was measured in nitrates and sulfates, via ion chromatography. Zone refining reduced the overall impurity content, but levels remained above a 10 ppm target.

  2. Shallow halogen vacancies in halide optoelectronic materials

    DOE PAGES

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao -Hua

    2014-11-05

    Halogen vacancies (VH) are usually deep color centers (F centers) in halides and can act as major electron traps or recombination centers. The deep VH contributes to the typically poor carrier transport properties in halides. However, several halides have recently emerged as excellent optoelectronic materials, e.g., CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr. Both CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr have been found to have shallow VH, in contrast to commonly seen deep VH in halides. In this paper, several halide optoelectronic materials, i.e., CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3 (photovoltaic materials), TlBr, and CsPbBr3, (gamma-ray detection materials) are studied to understand the material chemistry and structure that determine whether VHmore » is a shallow or deep defect in a halide material. It is found that crystal structure and chemistry of ns2 ions both play important roles in creating shallow VH in halides such as CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3, and TlBr. The key to identifying halides with shallow VH is to find the right crystal structures and compounds that suppress cation orbital hybridization at VH, such as those with long cation-cation distances and low anion coordination numbers, and those with crystal symmetry that prevents strong hybridization of cation dangling bond orbitals at VH. Furthermore, the results of this paper provide insight and guidance to identifying halides with shallow VH as good electronic and optoelectronic materials.« less

  3. Shallow halogen vacancies in halide optoelectronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Halogen vacancies (VH ) are usually deep color centers (F centers) in halides and can act as major electron traps or recombination centers. The deep VH contributes to the typically poor carrier transport properties in halides. However, several halides have recently emerged as excellent optoelectronic materials, e.g., C H3N H3Pb I3 and TlBr. Both C H3N H3Pb I3 and TlBr have been found to have shallow VH , in contrast to commonly seen deep VH in halides. In this paper, several halide optoelectronic materials, i.e., C H3N H3Pb I3 , C H3N H3Sn I3 (photovoltaic materials), TlBr, and CsPbB r3 (gamma-ray detection materials) are studied to understand the material chemistry and structure that determine whether VH is a shallow or deep defect in a halide material. It is found that crystal structure and chemistry of n s2 ions both play important roles in creating shallow VH in halides such as C H3N H3Pb I3 , C H3N H3Sn I3 , and TlBr. The key to identifying halides with shallow VH is to find the right crystal structures and compounds that suppress cation orbital hybridization at VH , such as those with large cation-cation distances and low anion coordination numbers and those with crystal symmetry that prevents strong hybridization of cation dangling bond orbitals at VH . The results of this paper provide insight and guidance to identifying halides with shallow VH as good electronic and optoelectronic materials.

  4. Rapid solid-state metathesis route to transition-metal doped titanias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Nathaniel; Perera, Sujith; Gillan, Edward G.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid solid-state metathesis (SSM) reactions are often short-lived highly exothermic reactions that yield a molten alkali halide salt that aids in product growth and crystallization. SSM reactions may also produce kinetically stabilized structures due to the short (seconds) reaction times. This report describes the investigation of rapid SSM reactions in the synthesis of transition-metal doped titanias (M-TiO2). The dopant targeted compositions were ten mol percent and based on elemental analysis, many of the M-TiO2 samples were close to this targeted level. Based on surface analysis, some samples showed large enrichment in surface dopant content, particularly chromium and manganese doped samples. Due to the highly exothermic nature of these reactions, rutile structured TiO2 was observed in all cases. The M-TiO2 samples are visible colored and show magnetic and optical properties consistent with the dopant in an oxide environment. UV and visible photocatalytic experiments with these visibly colored rutile M-TiO2 powders showed that many of them are strongly absorbent for methylene blue dye and degrade the dye under both UV and visible light illumination. This work may open up SSM reactions as an alternate non-thermodynamic reaction strategy for dopant incorporation into a wide range of oxide and non-oxides.

  5. Rapid solid-state metathesis route to transition-metal doped titanias

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Nathaniel; Perera, Sujith; Gillan, Edward G.

    2015-12-15

    Rapid solid-state metathesis (SSM) reactions are often short-lived highly exothermic reactions that yield a molten alkali halide salt that aids in product growth and crystallization. SSM reactions may also produce kinetically stabilized structures due to the short (seconds) reaction times. This report describes the investigation of rapid SSM reactions in the synthesis of transition-metal doped titanias (M–TiO{sub 2}). The dopant targeted compositions were ten mol percent and based on elemental analysis, many of the M–TiO{sub 2} samples were close to this targeted level. Based on surface analysis, some samples showed large enrichment in surface dopant content, particularly chromium and manganese doped samples. Due to the highly exothermic nature of these reactions, rutile structured TiO{sub 2} was observed in all cases. The M–TiO{sub 2} samples are visible colored and show magnetic and optical properties consistent with the dopant in an oxide environment. UV and visible photocatalytic experiments with these visibly colored rutile M–TiO{sub 2} powders showed that many of them are strongly absorbent for methylene blue dye and degrade the dye under both UV and visible light illumination. This work may open up SSM reactions as an alternate non-thermodynamic reaction strategy for dopant incorporation into a wide range of oxide and non-oxides.

  6. Alkalis in alternative biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr.; Bryers, R.W.; Baxter, L.L.; Jenkins, B.M.; Oden, L.L.

    1994-12-31

    The alkali content and behavior of inorganic material of annually produced biofuels severely limits their use for generating electrical power in conventional furnaces. A recent eighteen-month investigation of the chemistry and firing characteristics of 26 different biofuels has been conducted. Firing conditions were simulated in the laboratory for eleven biofuels. This paper describes some results from the investigation including fuel properties, deposits, deposition mechanisms, and implications for biomass boiler design, fuel sampling and characterizations. Urban wood fuel, agricultural residues, energy crops, and other potential alternate fuels are included in the study. Conventional methods for establishing fuel alkali content and determining ash sticky temperatures were deceptive. The crux of the problem was found to be the high concentration of potassium in biofuels and its reactions with other fuel constituents which lower the ``sticky temperature`` of the ash to the 650 C to 760 C (1,200 F-1,400 F).

  7. Alkali-vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.; Krupke, W. F.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the results from several of our alkali laser systems. We show highly efficient performance from an alexandrite-pumped rubidium laser. Using a laser diode stack as a pump source, we demonstrate up to 145 W of average power from a CW system. We present a design for a transversely pumped demonstration system that will show all of the required laser physics for a high power system.

  8. Reactive scattering of electronically excited alkali atoms with molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Mestdagh, J.M.; Balko, B.A.; Covinsky, M.H.; Weiss, P.S.; Vernon, M.F.; Schmidt, H.; Lee, Y.T.

    1987-06-01

    Representative families of excited alkali atom reactions have been studied using a crossed beam apparatus. For those alkali-molecule systems in which reactions are also known for ground state alkali and involve an early electron transfer step, no large differences are observed in the reactivity as Na is excited. More interesting are the reactions with hydrogen halides (HCl): it was found that adding electronic energy into Na changes the reaction mechanism. Early electron transfer is responsible of Na(5S, 4D) reactions, but not of Na(3P) reactions. Moreover, the NaCl product scattering is dominated by the HCl/sup -/ repulsion in Na(5S, 4D) reactions, and by the NaCl-H repulsion in the case of Na(3P). The reaction of Na with O/sub 2/ is of particular interest since it was found to be state specific. Only Na(4D) reacts, and the reaction requires restrictive constraints on the impact parameter and the reactants' relative orientation. The reaction with NO/sub 2/ is even more complex since Na(4D) leads to the formation of NaO by two different pathways. It must be mentioned however, that the identification of NaO as product in these reactions has yet to be confirmed.

  9. The optical properties of alkali nitrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anan'ev, Vladimir; Miklin, Mikhail

    2000-08-01

    Absorption of non-polarized light by a uniaxial crystal has been studied. The degree of absorption polarization has been calculated as a function of the ratio of optical densities in the region of low and high absorbances. This function is proposed for analysis of the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of uniaxial crystal absorption spectra. Non-polarized light spectra of alkali nitrate single crystals, both pure and doped with thallium, have been studied. It is shown that the absorption band at 300 nm is due to two transitions, whose intensities depend on temperature in various ways. There is a weak band in a short wavelength range of the absorption spectrum of potassium nitrate crystal, whose intensity increases with thallium doping. The band parameters of alkali nitrate single crystals have been calculated. Low-energy transitions in the nitrate ion have been located.

  10. Reflection silver-halide gelatin holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usanov, Yuri E.; Vavilova, Ye. A.; Kosobokova, N. L.; Shevtsov, Michail K.

    1991-02-01

    A new principle of reflection silverhalide gelatin (SHG) holograms generation is presented. The formation mechanism of the micro-cavity structure of holographic gratings is investigated. Based on the principle discussed here three methods of processing are suggested for making highly efficient SHG reflection holograms in the blue the green and the red regions of spectra with properties similar to those of conventional dichromated gelatin (DCG) holograms. 2. SHG HOLOGRAMS AND ANALYSIS OF THE PRINCIPAL OF THEIR FABRICATION Optical properties of DCG holograms and high light sensitivity of silver halide materials in the whole visible spectrum range can be combined in SHG holograms in which light field interference pattern recording is realized on silver halide grains while the light diffraction during the reconstruction takes place on a gelatin layer similar to DCG layer having a refractive index modulation. There exist a number of methods for transforming a ''silver'' structure into refracted index modulation structure. They are based on selective hardening of silver-halide layer gelatin. According to Pennington et. al. [1] selective hardening takes place as a result of the effect of laser or UV light on a silver halide developed fixed bleached and ammonium dichromate sensitized. A gelatin in isophase grating planes is hardened to a less degree that between planes due to high adsorption of a halide silver. After the removal of halide silver from the layer during the next fixing process

  11. Epitaxial Halide Perovskite Lateral Double Heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiping; Chen, Zhizhong; Deschler, Felix; Sun, Xin; Lu, Toh-Ming; Wertz, Esther A; Hu, Jia-Mian; Shi, Jian

    2017-03-28

    Epitaxial III-V semiconductor heterostructures are key components in modern microelectronics, electro-optics, and optoelectronics. With superior semiconducting properties, halide perovskite materials are rising as promising candidates for coherent heterostructure devices. In this report, spinodal decomposition is proposed and experimentally implemented to produce epitaxial double heterostructures in halide perovskite system. Pristine epitaxial mixed halide perovskites rods and films were synthesized via van der Waals epitaxy by chemical vapor deposition method. At room temperature, photon was applied as a knob to regulate the kinetics of spinodal decomposition and classic coarsening. By this approach, halide perovskite double heterostructures were created carrying epitaxial interfaces and outstanding optical properties. Reduced Fröhlich electron-phonon coupling was discovered in coherent halide double heterostructure, which is hypothetically attributed to the classic phonon confinement effect widely existing in III-V double heterostructures. As a proof-of-concept, our results suggest that halide perovskite-based epitaxial heterostructures may be promising for high-performance and low-cost optoelectronics, electro-optics, and microelectronics. Thus, ultimately, for practical device applications, it may be worthy to pursue these heterostructures via conventional vapor phase epitaxy approaches widely practised in III-V field.

  12. Homoepitaxial growth of metal halide crystals investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Pei; Kuttipillai, Padmanaban S.; Wang, Lili; ...

    2017-01-10

    Here, we report the homoepitaxial growth of a metal halide on single crystals investigated with in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Epitaxial growth of NaCl on NaCl (001) is explored as a function of temperature and growth rate which provides the first detailed report of RHEED oscillations for metal halide growth. Layer-by-layer growth is observed at room temperature accompanied by clear RHEED oscillations while the growth mode transitions to an island (3D) mode at low temperature. At higher temperatures (>100 °C), RHEED oscillations and AFM data indicate a transition to a step-flowmore » growth mode. To show the importance of such metal halide growth, green organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are demonstrated using a doped NaCl film with a phosphorescent emitter as the emissive layer. This study demonstrates the ability to perform in situ and non-destructive RHEED monitoring even on insulating substrates and could enable doped single crystals and crystalline substrates for a range of optoelectronic applications.« less

  13. Homoepitaxial Growth of Metal Halide Crystals Investigated by Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei; Kuttipillai, Padmanaban S.; Wang, Lili; Lunt, Richard R.

    2017-01-01

    We report the homoepitaxial growth of a metal halide on single crystals investigated with in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Epitaxial growth of NaCl on NaCl (001) is explored as a function of temperature and growth rate which provides the first detailed report of RHEED oscillations for metal halide growth. Layer-by-layer growth is observed at room temperature accompanied by clear RHEED oscillations while the growth mode transitions to an island (3D) mode at low temperature. At higher temperatures (>100 °C), RHEED oscillations and AFM data indicate a transition to a step-flow growth mode. To show the importance of such metal halide growth, green organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are demonstrated using a doped NaCl film with a phosphorescent emitter as the emissive layer. This study demonstrates the ability to perform in situ and non-destructive RHEED monitoring even on insulating substrates and could enable doped single crystals and crystalline substrates for a range of optoelectronic applications. PMID:28071732

  14. Homoepitaxial Growth of Metal Halide Crystals Investigated by Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pei; Kuttipillai, Padmanaban S.; Wang, Lili; Lunt, Richard R.

    2017-01-01

    We report the homoepitaxial growth of a metal halide on single crystals investigated with in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Epitaxial growth of NaCl on NaCl (001) is explored as a function of temperature and growth rate which provides the first detailed report of RHEED oscillations for metal halide growth. Layer-by-layer growth is observed at room temperature accompanied by clear RHEED oscillations while the growth mode transitions to an island (3D) mode at low temperature. At higher temperatures (>100 °C), RHEED oscillations and AFM data indicate a transition to a step-flow growth mode. To show the importance of such metal halide growth, green organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are demonstrated using a doped NaCl film with a phosphorescent emitter as the emissive layer. This study demonstrates the ability to perform in situ and non-destructive RHEED monitoring even on insulating substrates and could enable doped single crystals and crystalline substrates for a range of optoelectronic applications.

  15. Preparation of alkali metal dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Landel, R. F. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for producing alkali metal dispersions of high purity. The dispersions are prepared by varying the equilibrium solubility of the alkali metal in a suitable organic solvent in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The equilibrium variation is produced by temperature change. The size of the particles is controlled by controlling the rate of temperature change.

  16. PROCESS OF RECOVERING ALKALI METALS

    DOEpatents

    Wolkoff, J.

    1961-08-15

    A process is described of recovering alkali metal vapor by sorption on activated alumina, activated carbon, dehydrated zeolite, activated magnesia, or Fuller's earth preheated above the vaporization temperature of the alkali metal and subsequent desorption by heating the solvent under vacuum. (AEC)

  17. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  18. Dimming of metal halide lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-03-01

    We ran some tests on the effect of dimming of metal halide (MH) lamps upon the stability and the spectral quality of the light output. Lamps used were a new Philips lamp HPI-T 250W, a similar Philips lamp with a few thousand burning hours and a new Osram lamp HQI-T 250W/D. The ballast was a BBC type DJ 250/2KS, the starter a BAS TORGI type MZN 250 SE and the dimmer an Elstrom Control System type ERHQ-T 250. Power was derived from a Philips stabilizer, type PE 1602. Lamp output was monitored with a PAR meter. Spectra were taken at 100% and at 50% output as measured with the PAR meter. Lamps were allowed to stabilize at any setting for 30 minutes before measurements were made. Lamp manufacturers advise against dimming for fear of poor stability and intolerable changes of the spectrum. However, none of the lamps showed a decrease in stability, no flicker or wandering of the discharge, and the changes of the spectrum were not negligible, but certainly not dramatic. Lamps of either manufacture retain their white color, relative peak heights of spectral lines did shift, but no gaps in the spectrum occurred. Spectra taken at 50% with 30 minutes intervals coincided. Differences between the new and the older Philips lamp were noticeable, but not really significant.

  19. Dimming of metal halide lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    We ran some tests on the effect of dimming of metal halide (MH) lamps upon the stability and the spectral quality of the light output. Lamps used were a new Philips lamp HPI-T 250W, a similar Philips lamp with a few thousand burning hours and a new Osram lamp HQI-T 250W/D. The ballast was a BBC type DJ 250/2KS, the starter a BAS TORGI type MZN 250 SE and the dimmer an Elstrom Control System type ERHQ-T 250. Power was derived from a Philips stabilizer, type PE 1602. Lamp output was monitored with a PAR meter. Spectra were taken at 100% and at 50% output as measured with the PAR meter. Lamps were allowed to stabilize at any setting for 30 minutes before measurements were made. Lamp manufacturers advise against dimming for fear of poor stability and intolerable changes of the spectrum. However, none of the lamps showed a decrease in stability, no flicker or wandering of the discharge, and the changes of the spectrum were not negligible, but certainly not dramatic. Lamps of either manufacture retain their white color, relative peak heights of spectral lines did shift, but no gaps in the spectrum occurred. Spectra taken at 50% with 30 minutes intervals coincided. Differences between the new and the older Philips lamp were noticeable, but not really significant.

  20. Structural effects in molecular metal halides.

    PubMed

    Hargittai, Magdolna

    2009-03-17

    Metal halides are a relatively large class of inorganic compounds that participate in many industrial processes, from halogen metallurgy to the production of semiconductors. Because most metal halides are ionic crystals at ambient conditions, the term "molecular metal halides" usually refers to vapor-phase species. These gas-phase molecules have a special place in basic research because they exhibit the widest range of chemical bonding from the purely ionic to mostly covalent bonding through to weakly interacting systems. Although our focus is basic research, knowledge of the structural and thermodynamic properties of gas-phase metal halides is also important in industrial processes. In this Account, we review our most recent work on metal halide molecular structures. Our studies are based on electron diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy, and increasingly, we have augmented our experimental work with quantum chemical computations. Using both experimental and computational techniques has enabled us to determine intriguing structural effects with better accuracy than using either technique alone. We loosely group our discussion based on structural effects including "floppiness", relativistic effects, vibronic interactions, and finally, undiscovered molecules with computational thermodynamic stability. Floppiness, or serious "nonrigidity", is a typical characteristic of metal halides and makes their study challenging for both experimentalists and theoreticians. Relativistic effects are mostly responsible for the unique structure of gold and mercury halides. These molecules have shorter-than-expected bonds and often have unusual geometrical configurations. The gold monohalide and mercury dihalide dimers and the molecular-type crystal structure of HgCl(2) are examples. We also examined spin-orbit coupling and the possible effect of the 4f electrons on the structure of lanthanide trihalides. Unexpectedly, we found that the geometry of their dimers depends on the f

  1. Shallow halogen vacancies in halide optoelectronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao -Hua

    2014-11-05

    Halogen vacancies (VH) are usually deep color centers (F centers) in halides and can act as major electron traps or recombination centers. The deep VH contributes to the typically poor carrier transport properties in halides. However, several halides have recently emerged as excellent optoelectronic materials, e.g., CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr. Both CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr have been found to have shallow VH, in contrast to commonly seen deep VH in halides. In this paper, several halide optoelectronic materials, i.e., CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3 (photovoltaic materials), TlBr, and CsPbBr3, (gamma-ray detection materials) are studied to understand the material chemistry and structure that determine whether VH is a shallow or deep defect in a halide material. It is found that crystal structure and chemistry of ns2 ions both play important roles in creating shallow VH in halides such as CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3, and TlBr. The key to identifying halides with shallow VH is to find the right crystal structures and compounds that suppress cation orbital hybridization at VH, such as those with long cation-cation distances and low anion coordination numbers, and those with crystal symmetry that prevents strong hybridization of cation dangling bond orbitals at VH. Furthermore, the results of this paper provide insight and guidance to identifying halides with shallow VH as good electronic and optoelectronic materials.

  2. The Remarkable Reactivity of Aryl Halides with Nucleophiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunnett, Joseph F.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the reactivity of aryl halides with nucleophilic or basic reagents, including nucleophilic attacks on carbon, hydrogen, halogen, and arynes. Suggestions are made concerning revisions of the sections on aryl halide chemistry courses and the corresponding chapters in textbooks. (CC)

  3. Rapid sonosynthesis of N-doped nano TiO2 on wool fabric at low temperature: introducing self-cleaning, hydrophilicity, antibacterial/antifungal properties with low alkali solubility, yellowness and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Behzadnia, Amir; Montazer, Majid; Rashidi, Abousaeid; Mahmoudi Rad, Mahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Nano nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide was rapidly prepared by hydrolysis of titanium isopropoxide at 75-80°C using in situ sonochemical synthesis by introducing ammonia. Various concentrations of titanium isopropoxide were examined to deposit nano nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide through impregnation of the wool fabric in ultrasound bath followed by curing. The antibacterial/antifungal activities of wool samples were assessed against two common pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and the diploid fungus Candida albicans. The sonotreated wool fabrics indicated no adverse effects on human dermal fibroblasts. The presence of nanoparticles on the sonotreated wool fabrics were confirmed by FE-SEM images and EDS patterns and X-ray mapping and the crystalline size of nanoparticles were estimated through XRD results. The role of both pH and precursor concentration on the various properties of the fabric was investigated and the optimized conditions introduced using response surface methodology.

  4. Method for recovering hydrocarbons from molten metal halides

    DOEpatents

    Pell, Melvyn B.

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy carbonaceous materials by contacting such carbonaceous materials with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst to produce hydrocarbons having lower molecular weights and thereafter recovering the hydrocarbons so produced from the molten metal halide, an improvement comprising injecting into the spent molten metal halide, a liquid low-boiling hydrocarbon stream is disclosed.

  5. Atomic Resolution Imaging of Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi; Zhang, Dandan; Kisielowski, Christian; Dou, Letian; Kornienko, Nikolay; Bekenstein, Yehonadav; Wong, Andrew B; Alivisatos, A Paul; Yang, Peidong

    2016-12-14

    The radiation-sensitive nature of halide perovskites has hindered structural studies at the atomic scale. We overcome this obstacle by applying low dose-rate in-line holography, which combines aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with exit-wave reconstruction. This technique successfully yields the genuine atomic structure of ultrathin two-dimensional CsPbBr3 halide perovskites, and a quantitative structure determination was achieved atom column by atom column using the phase information of the reconstructed exit-wave function without causing electron beam-induced sample alterations. An extraordinarily high image quality enables an unambiguous structural analysis of coexisting high-temperature and low-temperature phases of CsPbBr3 in single particles. On a broader level, our approach offers unprecedented opportunities to better understand halide perovskites at the atomic level as well as other radiation-sensitive materials.

  6. Recent advances in technetium halide chemistry.

    PubMed

    Poineau, Frederic; Johnstone, Erik V; Czerwinski, Kenneth R; Sattelberger, Alfred P

    2014-02-18

    Transition metal binary halides are fundamental compounds, and the study of their structure, bonding, and other properties gives chemists a better understanding of physicochemical trends across the periodic table. One transition metal whose halide chemistry is underdeveloped is technetium, the lightest radioelement. For half a century, the halide chemistry of technetium has been defined by three compounds: TcF6, TcF5, and TcCl4. The absence of Tc binary bromides and iodides in the literature was surprising considering the existence of such compounds for all of the elements surrounding technetium. The common synthetic routes that scientists use to obtain binary halides of the neighboring elements, such as sealed tube reactions between elements and flowing gas reactions between a molecular complex and HX gas (X = Cl, Br, or I), had not been reported for technetium. In this Account, we discuss how we used these routes to revisit the halide chemistry of technetium. We report seven new phases: TcBr4, TcBr3, α/β-TcCl3, α/β-TcCl2, and TcI3. Technetium tetrachloride and tetrabromide are isostructural to PtX4 (X = Cl or Br) and consist of infinite chains of edge-sharing TcX6 octahedra. Trivalent technetium halides are isostructural to ruthenium and molybdenum (β-TcCl3, TcBr3, and TcI3) and to rhenium (α-TcCl3). Technetium tribromide and triiodide exhibit the TiI3 structure-type and consist of infinite chains of face-sharing TcX6 (X = Br or I) octahedra. Concerning the trichlorides, β-TcCl3 crystallizes with the AlCl3 structure-type and consists of infinite layers of edge-sharing TcCl6 octahedra, while α-TcCl3 consists of infinite layers of Tc3Cl9 units. Both phases of technetium dichloride exhibit new structure-types that consist of infinite chains of [Tc2Cl8] units. For the technetium binary halides, we studied the metal-metal interaction by theoretical methods and magnetic measurements. The change of the electronic configuration of the metal atom from d(3) (Tc

  7. Multiline operation of mercury halide lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kushawaha, M.; Mahmood, M.

    1988-01-01

    Emission spectrum of the (B-X) band system of HgX radicals (X=chlorine, bromine, iodine) was observed by passing electrical discharge through flowing vapors of mercury halides. The emission intensity of the most intense band of the (B-X) system of these radicals was observed to decrease in the presence of other mercury halide vapors at temperatures higher than 130C. Laser action was observed from the (B-X) transition of mercurous chloride, mercurous bromide, and mercurous iodide radicals by electrical discharge pumping of mercuric chloride, mercuric bromide and mercuric iodide vapors individually.

  8. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard

    2017-01-17

    A method for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock. The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  9. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  10. Alkali slurry ozonation to produce a high capacity nickel battery material

    DOEpatents

    Jackovitz, John F.; Pantier, Earl A.

    1984-11-06

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  11. Mechanical resistance of silver halide infrared fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkay, Nitzan; Katzir, Abraham

    1992-01-01

    Flexibility resistance of silver-halide infrared fibers was investigated in the plastic bending regime, which is especially useful for internal medical applications. The CO2 laser transmission of the fibers was measured in several positions while being bent. The fibers have been found to operate even after large plastic deformations, and values for various fibers and bending conditions are reported.

  12. Localized corrosion in halides other than chlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, G.H.

    1995-12-31

    This literature survey characterizes the effects of non-chloride halides on localized corrosion. It includes published material and unpublished data obtained through a questionnaire. Chapters cover Stainless Steels, Nickel, Titanium, and Zirconium. The engineer can use this information for material selection.

  13. Photoluminescence and anti-deliquesce of cesium iodide and its sodium-doped films deposited by thermal evaporation at high deposition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jin-Cherng; Chiang, Yueh-Sheng; Ma, Yu-Sheng

    2013-03-01

    Cesium iodide (CsI) and sodium iodide (NaI) are good scintillators due to their high luminescence efficiency. These alkali halides can be excited by ultra-violet or by ionizing radiation. In this study, CsI and its Na-doped films about 8 μm thick were deposited by thermal evaporation boat without heating substrates at high deposition rates of 30, 50, 70, 90, and 110 nm/sec, respectively. The as-deposited films were sequentially deposited a silicon dioxide film to protect from deliquesce. And, the films were also post-annealed in vacuum at 150, 200, 250, and 300 °C, respectively. We calculated the packing densities of the samples according to the measurements of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and observed the luminescence properties by photoluminescence (PL) system. The surfaces and cross sections of the films were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). From the above measurements we can find the optimal deposition rate of 90 nm/sec and post-annealing temperature of 250 °C in vacuum for the asdeposited cesium iodide and its sodium-doped films.

  14. Preparation and use of electrodes in the electrolysis of alkali halides

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, R.N.; Byrd, C.E.; Alexander, L.E.

    1986-02-25

    A process is described for electrolysis of aqueous solutions of sodium chloride in an electrolytic cell comprising an anolyte compartment and catholyte compartment separated by a diaphragm to produce an aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide in the catholyte compartment, and chlorine in the anolyte compartment. The cathode of the process is a low hydrogen overvoltage cathode made by applying to an electroconductive substrate a coating solution of nickel oxide and ruthenium oxide precursor compounds and an etchant capable of etching the surface of the substrate and/or any previously applied coating. Heating is done to remove volatiles from the so-coated substrate to cause the metal values of the precursor compounds and those etched from the substrate or previously applied coating. Further, heating is performed in the presence of oxygen, air or an oxidizing agent, to a temperature sufficient to oxidize the metal values, thereby obtaining on the substrate an electrocatalytically-active heaterogeneous metal oxide structure comprising RuO/sub 2/ and NiO.

  15. Behavior of Alkali Halides as Materials for Optical Components of High Power Lasers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-30

    proas- SO- (V= 188) 4.5.1o-8 pit). (v = 1150) 4.5- 10 - 1 ) (v = 1083) 2.9- 10- 8 2 Cristale KCI /2-) 1.6 10-’ 1.9.5-10 import din URSS nu S-au masurat...probability that the destruction appears after n consecutive pulses of a certain power, is given by P. -(I - P) ’PI, (3.4) where P is the probability

  16. IR and Visible Wavelength Obscuration by Pyrotechnically Generated Alkali-Halide Smokes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    is coated with a fluoroepoxy type urethane (developed at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC) which has surface energy and reactivity...The spectral resolution of this filter is two percent over the wave - 4length interval from 2.5-14 LIm. Data acquisition and reduction is computer...assure the attainment and maintanance of critical flow through the orifice, 3both upstream and downstream vacuums were monitored. Additionally, a flow

  17. Alkali Halide Opacity in Brown Dwarf and Cool Stellar Atmospheres: A Study of Lithium Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, K.; Weck, P. F.; Schweitzer, A.; Stancil, P. C.; Hauschildt, P. H.

    2003-12-01

    Recent thermochemical equilibrium calculations have revealed the important role played by lithium chloride in the lithium chemistry of cool dwarf atmospheres (K. Lodders 1999, ApJ 519, 793). Indeed, LiCl appears to be the dominant Li-bearing gas over an extended domain of the (P,T) diagram, typically for temperatures below 1500 K. LiCl has a large dipole moment in its ground electronic state which can give rise to intense rovibrational line spectra. In addition, LiCl can make dipole transitions to several low-lying unbound excited states, causing dissociation of the molecule. For these reasons, LiCl may be a significant source of line and continuum opacity in brown dwarf and cool stellar atmospheres. In this work, we report calculations of complete lists of line oscillator strengths and photodissociation cross sections for the low-lying electronic states of LiCl. We have performed single- and double-excitation configuration interaction calculations using the ALCHEMY ab initio package (Mc Lean et al. 1991, MOTECC 91, Elsevier, Leiden) and obtained the potential curves and the corresponding dipole transition moment functions between the X 1Σ ^+ ground state and the B 1Σ ^+ and A 1Π excited states. The resulting line oscillator strengths and molecular photodissociation cross sections have been included in the PHOENIX stellar atmosphere code (Hauschildt & Baron 1999, J. Comput. App. Math. 102, 41). The new models, calculated using spherical geometry for all gravities considered, also incorporate our latest database of nearly 670 million molecular lines, and updated equations of state (EOS). This work was supported in part by NSF grants AST-9720704 and AST-0086246, NASA grants NAG5-8425, NAG5-9222, and NAG5-10551 as well as NASA/JPL grant 961582.

  18. Optical/IR Characteristics of Alkali Halide Aerosol Clouds over the Ocean.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    formed if the burn took place while the ship was in motion relative to the surrounding air. When the wind speed was less than the ship’s speed, it was...INDIVIDUAL 22b TELEPHONE (Include Arta Code) 22c. OFFICE SYMBOL S. G. Gathman (202) 767-2022 Code 4117 DO FORM 1473, 84 MAR 83 APR edition may be used until...important but eventually there will be a resupply of the water molecules in the form of vapor to the air surrounding the now larger droplets. The growth and

  19. Elastic properties of alpha quartz and the alkali halides based on an interatomic force model.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, D. J.; Simmons, G.

    1972-01-01

    A two-body central-force atomic model can be used to describe accurately the elastic properties of alpha quartz if the nontetrahedral O:O forces are included. The strength of the Si:O interaction has little effect on the bulk modulus. The technique is sufficiently general to allow calculations of the elastic properties of a specified structure under arbitrary pressure from a complete description of the interatomic forces. The elastic constants for the NaCl structure and the CsCl structure are examined. Our model includes two-body, central, anion-anion, anion-cation, and electrostatic interactions.

  20. Extreme ultraviolet quantum efficiency of opaque alkali halide photocathodes on microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Everman, E.; Vallerga, J. V.; Lampton, M.

    1988-01-01

    Comprehensive measurements are presented for the quantum detection efficiency (QDE) of the microchannel plate materials CsI, KBr, KCl, and MgF2, over the 44-1800 A wavelength range. QDEs in excess of 40 percent are achieved by several materials in specific wavelength regions of the EUV. Structure is noted in the wavelength dependence of the QDE that is directly related to the valence-band/conduction-band gap energy and the onset of atomic-like resonant transitions. A simple photocathode model allows interpretation of these features, together with the QDE efficiency variation, as a function of illumination angle.

  1. Surface Structure and Lattice Dynamics of Alkali Halide Crystals Studied by High-Resolution Ion Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, Yoshiaki; Okazawa, Tetsuaki

    The rumpled surface structure and thermal lattice vibrations of KI(001) and RbI(001) were measured directly by high-resolution medium energy ion scattering (MEIS). The relaxation of interlayer distance between the top and second layer and the rumpling of the top and second layers were determined using the ion shadowing effect with an accuracy of 0.01 Å. From the displaced lattice positions determined above, we derived the dipole moments of the top- and second-layer ions self-consistently employing the polarizabilities estimated from the optical refractive index combined with the Clausius Mossotti relation. The balance between a short-range force and a long-range Coulombic one made it possible to judge the applicability of the short-range pair potentials proposed so far. We also determined the root-mean-square (rms) thermal vibration amplitudes of the bulk and the top-layer ions together with the correlations of the ions in the [001] and [101] strings by taking various kinds of scattering geometries. The results obtained were compared with those calculated from the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on a classical model using the dipole moments determined above and the Born Mayer type pair potential. The present MEIS results are in overall agreement with the MD simulations.

  2. Mixed alkali effect on the spectroscopic properties of alkali-alkaline earth oxide borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, G.; Ramesh, B.; Shareefuddin, Md.; Chary, M. N.; Sayanna, R.

    2016-05-01

    The mixed alkali and alkaline earth oxide borate glass with the composition xK2O - (25-x) Li2O-12.5BaO-12.5MgO-50B2O3 (x = 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25mol %) and doped with 1mol% CuO were prepared by the melt quenching technique. From the optical absorption spectra the optical band gap, electronic polarizability(α02-), interaction parameter (A), theoretical and experimental optical basicity (Λ) values were evaluated. From the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectral data the number of spins (N) and susceptibility (χ) were evaluated. The values of (α02-), and (Λ) increases with increasing of K2O content and electronic polarizability and interaction parameter show opposite behaviuor which may be due to the creation of non-bridging oxygens and expansion of borate network. The reciprocal of susceptibility (1/χ) and spin concentration (N) as a function of K2O content, varied nonlinearly which may be due to creation of non-bridging oxygens in the present glass system. This may be attributed to mixed alkali effect (MAE).

  3. Theoretical characterization of dihydrogen adducts with halide anions

    SciTech Connect

    Vitillo, Jenny G.; Damin, Alessandro; Zecchina, Adriano; Ricchiardi, Gabriele

    2006-06-14

    The interaction between a hydrogen molecule and the halide anions F{sup -}, Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -}, and I{sup -} has been studied at different levels of theory and with different basis sets. The most stable configurations of the complexes have a linear geometry, while the t-shaped complexes are saddle points on the potential energy surface, opposite to what is observed for alkali cations. An electrostatic analysis conducted on the resulting adducts has highlighted the predominance of the electrostatic term in the complexation energy and, in particular, of the quadrupole- and dipole-polarizability dependent contributions. Another striking difference with respect to the positive ions, is the fact that although the binding energies have similar values (ranging between 25 and 3 kJ/mol for F{sup -} and I{sup -}, respectively), the vibrational shift of the {nu}-tilde{sub H-H} and in general the perturbation of the hydrogen molecule in complexes are much greater in the complexes with anions ({delta}{nu}-tilde{sub H-H} ranges between -720 and -65 cm{sup -1}). Another difference with respect to the interaction with cations is a larger charge transfer from the anion to the hydrogen molecule. The {delta}{nu}-tilde is the result of the cooperative role of the electrostatics and of the charge transfer in the interaction. The correlation between binding energies and vibrational shift is far from linear, contrary to what is observed for cation complexes, in accordance with the higher polarizability and dynamic polarizability of the molecule along the molecular axis. The observed correlation may be valuable in the interpretation of spectra and thermodynamic properties of adsorbed H{sub 2} in storage materials.

  4. Hydrothermal alkali metal catalyst recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Eakman, James M.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.

    1979-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles primarily in the form of water soluble alkali metal formates by treating the particles with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of added carbon monoxide. During the treating process the water insoluble alkali metal compounds comprising the insoluble alkali metal residues are converted into water soluble alkali metal formates. The resultant aqueous solution containing water soluble alkali metal formates is then separated from the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment process, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal formates serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. This process permits increased recovery of alkali metal constituents, thereby decreasing the overall cost of the gasification process by reducing the amount of makeup alkali metal compounds necessary.

  5. Exfoliation of WS2 in the semiconducting phase using a group of lithium halides: a new method of Li intercalation.

    PubMed

    Ghorai, Arup; Midya, Anupam; Maiti, Rishi; Ray, Samit K

    2016-10-14

    Lithium halide assisted high yield synthesis of few layers of 2H phase semiconducting WS2 in organic solvents is reported. A group of lithium halides (LiCl, LiBr and LiI) has been employed for the first time to intercalate WS2 by using Li, followed by mild sonication to exfoliate in dispersive polar solvents. In contrast to the n-butyllithium (n-BuLi) assisted exfoliation method, which yields only the metallic 1T phase on prolonged reaction (3-7 days) at higher temperatures, the proposed exfoliation method produces only semiconducting 2H WS2 in a much shorter time (5 minute sonication). A very high yield of 19 mg ml(-1) has been obtained using LiI as an exfoliating agent due to its lower lattice energy compared to other alkali halides and the smaller size of the cation. Detailed microscopy and spectroscopic characterization reveals exfoliation of few layered WS2 with stoichiometric composition. Absorption and emission characteristics of the 2D WS2 layer exhibit a characteristic band edge and quantum confined transitions. As a proof-of-concept, we have successfully demonstrated photodetector devices comprising solution proccessed p-WS2/n-Si heterojunctions, which behave as diodes with a high rectification ratio (>10(2)) exhibiting a broad band photoresponse over the entire visible region.

  6. Alkali Metal Cluster Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. In this thesis, we apply the tight-binding Hubbard model to alkali metal clusters with Hartree-Fock self-consistent methods and perturbation methods for the numerical calculations. We have studied the relation between the equilibrium structures and the range of the hopping matrix elements in the Hubbard Hamiltonian. The results show that the structures are not sensitive to the interaction range but are determined by the number of valence electrons each atom has. Inertia tensors are used to analyse the symmetries of the clusters. The principal axes of the clusters are determined and they are the axes of rotational symmetries of clusters if the clusters have any. The eigenvalues of inertia tensors which are the indication of the deformation of clusters are compared between our model and the ellipsoidal jellium model. The agreement is good for large clusters. At a finite temperature, the thermal motion fluctuates the structures. We defined a fluctuation function with the distance matrix of a cluster. The fluctuation has been studied with the Monte-Carlo simulation method. Our studies show that the clusters remain in the solid state when temperature is low. The small values of fluctuation functions indicates the thermal vibration of atoms around their equilibrium positions. If the temperature is high, the atoms are delocalized. The cluster melts and enters the liquid region. The cluster melting is simulated by the Monte-Carlo simulation with the fluctuation function we defined. Energy levels of clusters are calculated from the Hubbard model. Ionization potentials and magic numbers are also obtained from these energy levels. The results confirm that the Hubbard model is a good approximation for a small cluster. The excitation energy is presented by the difference between the original level and excited level, and the electron-hole interactions. We also have studied cooling of clusters

  7. Transport of Soil Halides through Rice Paddies: A Viable Mechanism for Rapid Dispersion of the Soil Halide Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redeker, K. R.; Manley, S.; Wang, N.; Cicerone, R.

    2002-05-01

    On short time scales (1-10 years) soil halide concentrations have been assumed to be primarily driven by leaching and deposition processes. Recent results however, have shown that terrestrial plants volatilize soil halides in the form of methyl halides. Emissions of methyl chloride, methyl bromide and methyl iodide represent major pathways for delivery of inorganic halogen radicals to the atmosphere. Inorganic halogen radicals destroy ozone in the stratosphere and modify the oxidative capacity of the lower atmosphere. We have previously shown that rice paddies emit methyl halides and that emissions depend on growth stage of the rice plant as well as field water management. We show here that rice grown in a greenhouse at UCI is capable of volatilizing and/or storing up to 30%, 5%, and 10% of the available chloride, bromide and iodide within the top meter of soil. The percent of plant tissue halide volatilized as methyl halide over the course of the season is calculated to be 0.05%, 0.25% and 85.0% for chloride, bromide and iodide. We compare our greenhouse soil halide concentrations to other commercial rice fields around the world and estimate the e-folding time for soil halides within each region. We suggest that rice agriculture is the driving removal mechanism for halides within rice paddies and that terrestrial plants play a larger role in global cycling of halides than previously estimated.

  8. Middle-infrared luminescence of praseodymium ions in silver halide crystals and fibers.

    PubMed

    Nagli, Lev; Gayer, Ofer; Katzir, Abraham

    2005-07-15

    The luminescence of AgBr, AgCl, and AgClBr crystals and fibers doped with Pr3+ ions was investigated in the middle-infrared spectral range. We measured the absorption, emission, and kinetic parameters over a broad temperature range. Strong luminescence in the spectral range 4-5.5 microm was observed for the first time to our knowledge in silver halide crystals and fibers at room temperature. No noticeable differences were observed between the crystals and the fibers. We calculated various optical parameters for Pr:AgBr and Pr:AgCl crystals, using the Judd-Ofelt approximation. Both the measured results and the calculated parameters indicate that these doped crystals and fibers would be good candidates for the fabrication of mid-IR solid-state lasers or fiber lasers.

  9. Interface Engineering in Metal Halides Perovskites: From molecules to devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrozza, Annamaria

    In this talk we review our recent studies which aim to clarify the relationship between structural and electronic properties from a molecular to mesoscopic level. First we identify the markers for local disorder at molecular level by using Raman Spectroscopy as a probe. Then, we exploit such a tool to explore the role of microstructure on the absorption and emission properties of the semiconductor looking both at polycrystalline thin films and single crystals. We address the controversy surrounding electron - hole interactions and excitonic effects. We show that in hybrid lead-halide perovskites dielectric screening also depends on the local microstructure of the hybrid crystals and not only on its chemical composition. This leads to the possibility of band gap engineering and the consequent control of the elementary photo-excitation dynamics that determine the perovskites' performances in different optoelectronic devices. Finally, the role of interface engineering, the effect of ion migration, and interface doping on charge extraction will be elucidated to provide a guideline for the design of hysteresis free solar cells. 1)G. Grancini & AR Srimath Kandada et al., Nature Photonics, 9 (10), 695-701, 2015 2) C. Tao et al,'' Energy Environ. Sci.,8, 2365-2370, 2015

  10. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic transition metal halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengxi; Zhou, Jian; Wu, Haiping; Deng, Kaiming; Jena, Puru; Kan, Erjun

    2017-01-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect is a novel topological spintronic phenomenon arising from inherent magnetization and spin-orbit coupling. Various theoretical and experimental efforts have been devoted in search of intrinsic QAH insulators. However, up to now, it has only been observed in Cr or V doped (Bi,Sb ) 2T e3 film in experiments with very low working temperature. Based on the successful synthesis of transition metal halides, we use first-principles calculations to predict that the Ru I3 monolayer is an intrinsic ferromagnetic QAH insulator with a topologically nontrivial global band gap of 11 meV. This topologically nontrivial band gap at the Fermi level is due to its crystal symmetry, thus the QAH effect is robust. Its Curie temperature, estimated to be ˜360 K using Monte Carlo simulation, is above room temperature and higher than most two-dimensional ferromagnetic thin films. The inclusion of Hubbard U in the Ru-d electrons does not affect this result. We also discuss the manipulation of its exchange energy and nontrivial band gap by applying in-plane strain. Our work adds an experimentally feasible member to the QAH insulator family, which is expected to have broad applications in nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  11. Morphology-Controlled Synthesis of Organometal Halide Perovskite Inverse Opals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun; Tüysüz, Harun

    2015-11-09

    The booming development of organometal halide perovskites in recent years has prompted the exploration of morphology-control strategies to improve their performance in photovoltaic, photonic, and optoelectronic applications. However, the preparation of organometal halide perovskites with high hierarchical architecture is still highly challenging and a general morphology-control method for various organometal halide perovskites has not been achieved. A mild and scalable method to prepare organometal halide perovskites in inverse opal morphology is presented that uses a polystyrene-based artificial opal as hard template. Our method is flexible and compatible with different halides and organic ammonium compositions. Thus, the perovskite inverse opal maintains the advantage of straightforward structure and band gap engineering. Furthermore, optoelectronic investigations reveal that morphology exerted influence on the conducting nature of organometal halide perovskites.

  12. Flame inhibition by hydrogen halides - Some spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, N. R.; Cagliostro, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    The far-ultraviolet absorption spectrum of an air-propane diffusion flame inhibited with hydrogen halides has been studied. Plots of the absorption of light by hydrogen halides as a function of position in the flame and also as a function of the amount of hydrogen halide added to the flame have been obtained. The hydrogen halides are shown to be more stable on the fuel side of the reaction zone than they are on the air side. Thermal diffusion is seen to be important in determining the concentration distribution of the heavier hydrogen halides in diffusion flames. The relationship between the concentration distribution of the hydrogen halides in the flame and the flame inhibition mechanism is discussed.

  13. Lanthanide-halide based humidity indicators

    DOEpatents

    Beitz, James V.; Williams, Clayton W.

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses a lanthanide-halide based humidity indicator and method of producing such indicator. The color of the present invention indicates the humidity of an atmosphere to which it is exposed. For example, impregnating an adsorbent support such as silica gel with an aqueous solution of the europium-containing reagent solution described herein, and dehydrating the support to dryness forms a substance with a yellow color. When this substance is exposed to a humid atmosphere the water vapor from the air is adsorbed into the coating on the pore surface of the silica gel. As the water content of the coating increases, the visual color of the coated silica gel changes from yellow to white. The color change is due to the water combining with the lanthanide-halide complex on the pores of the gel.

  14. Chiral Alkyl Halides: Underexplored Motifs in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gál, Bálint; Bucher, Cyril; Burns, Noah Z.

    2016-01-01

    While alkyl halides are valuable intermediates in synthetic organic chemistry, their use as bioactive motifs in drug discovery and medicinal chemistry is rare in comparison. This is likely attributable to the common misconception that these compounds are merely non-specific alkylators in biological systems. A number of chlorinated compounds in the pharmaceutical and food industries, as well as a growing number of halogenated marine natural products showing unique bioactivity, illustrate the role that chiral alkyl halides can play in drug discovery. Through a series of case studies, we demonstrate in this review that these motifs can indeed be stable under physiological conditions, and that halogenation can enhance bioactivity through both steric and electronic effects. Our hope is that, by placing such compounds in the minds of the chemical community, they may gain more traction in drug discovery and inspire more synthetic chemists to develop methods for selective halogenation. PMID:27827902

  15. Advances in the growth of alkaline-Earth halide single crystals for scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Neal, J. S.; Cherepy, N. J.; Beck, P. R.; Payne, S. A.; Burger, A.; Rowe, E.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2014-09-01

    Alkaline-earth scintillators such as strontium iodide and other alkaline-earth halides activated with divalent europium represent some of the most efficient and highest energy resolution scintillators for use as gamma-ray detectors in a wide range of applications. These applications include the areas of nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, the detection of undeclared nuclear material, nuclear physics and materials science, medical diagnostics, space physics, high energy physics, and radiation monitoring systems for first responders, police, and fire/rescue personnel. Recent advances in the growth of large single crystals of these scintillator materials hold the promise of higher crystal yields and significantly lower detector production costs. In the present work, we describe new processing protocols that, when combined with our molten salt filtration methods, have led to advances in achieving a significant reduction of cracking effects during the growth of single crystals of SrI2:Eu2+. In particular, we have found that extended pumping on the molten crystalgrowth charge under vacuum for time periods extending up to 48 hours is generally beneficial in compensating for variations in the alkaline-earth halide purity and stoichiometry of the materials as initially supplied by commercial sources. These melt-pumping and processing techniques are now being applied to the purification of CaI2:Eu2+ and some mixed-anion europium-doped alkaline-earth halides prior to single-crystal growth by means of the vertical Bridgman technique. The results of initial studies of the effects of aliovalent doping of SrI2:Eu2+ on the scintillation characteristics of this material are also described.

  16. Advances in the growth of alkaline-earth halide single crystals for scintillator detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Kolopus, James A; Neal, John S; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Beck, P; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline-earth scintillators such as strontium iodide and other alkaline-earth halides activated with divalent europium represent some of the most efficient and highest energy resolution scintillators for use as gamma-ray detectors in a wide range of applications. These applications include the areas of nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, the detection of undeclared nuclear material, nuclear physics and materials science, medical diagnostics, space physics, high energy physics, and radiation monitoring systems for first responders, police, and fire/rescue personnel. Recent advances in the growth of large single crystals of these scintillator materials hold the promise of higher crystal yields and significantly lower detector production costs. In the present work, we describe new processing protocols that, when combined with our molten salt filtration methods, have led to advances in achieving a significant reduction of cracking effects during the growth of single crystals of SrI2:Eu2+. In particular, we have found that extended pumping on the molten crystal-growth charge under vacuum for time periods extending up to 48 hours is generally beneficial in compensating for variations in the alkaline-earth halide purity and stoichiometry of the materials as initially supplied by commercial sources. These melt-pumping and processing techniques are now being applied to the purification of CaI2:Eu2+ and some mixed-anion europium-doped alkaline-earth halides prior to single-crystal growth by means of the vertical Bridgman technique. The results of initial studies of the effects of aliovalent doping of SrI2:Eu2+ on the scintillation characteristics of this material are also described.

  17. Process and composition for drying of gaseous hydrogen halides

    DOEpatents

    Tom, Glenn M.; Brown, Duncan W.

    1989-08-01

    A process for drying a gaseous hydrogen halide of the formula HX, wherein X is selected from the group consisting of bromine, chlorine, fluorine, and iodine, to remove water impurity therefrom, comprising: contacting the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide with a scavenger including a support having associated therewith one or more members of the group consisting of: (a) an active scavenging moiety selected from one or more members of the group consisting of: (i) metal halide compounds dispersed in the support, of the formula MX.sub.y ; and (ii) metal halide pendant functional groups of the formula -MX.sub.y-1 covalently bonded to the support, wherein M is a y-valent metal, and y is an integer whose value is from 1 to 3; (b) corresponding partially or fully alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, of the metal halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); wherein the alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, when present, are reactive with the gaseous hydrogen halide to form the corresponding halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); and M being selected such that the heat of formation, .DELTA.H.sub.f of its hydrated halide, MX.sub.y.(H.sub.2 O).sub.n, is governed by the relationship: .DELTA.H.sub.f .gtoreq.n.times.10.1 kilocalories/mole of such hydrated halide compound wherein n is the number of water molecules bound to the metal halide in the metal halide hydrate. Also disclosed is an appertaining scavenger composition and a contacting apparatus wherein the scavenger is deployed in a bed for contacting with the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide.

  18. Interpulse kinetics in copper and copper halide lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K. G.

    1983-01-01

    The various rate processes that govern the interpulse relaxation in metal vapor and metal halide vapor lasers are considered. Computer calculations indicate that the rapid metastable levels relaxation observed in copper and copper halide laser experiments requires the existence of a relatively small resonance in the cross section for metastable excitation or deexcitation near threshold. The accurate calculation of interpulse relaxation requires knowledge of rate constants presently not well known; this is especially so for metal halide lasers.

  19. Electrolytic method to make alkali alcoholates using ion conducting alkali electrolyte/separator

    DOEpatents

    Joshi, Ashok V [Salt Lake City, UT; Balagopal, Shekar [Sandy, UT; Pendelton, Justin [Salt Lake City, UT

    2011-12-13

    Alkali alcoholates, also called alkali alkoxides, are produced from alkali metal salt solutions and alcohol using a three-compartment electrolytic cell. The electrolytic cell includes an anolyte compartment configured with an anode, a buffer compartment, and a catholyte compartment configured with a cathode. An alkali ion conducting solid electrolyte configured to selectively transport alkali ions is positioned between the anolyte compartment and the buffer compartment. An alkali ion permeable separator is positioned between the buffer compartment and the catholyte compartment. The catholyte solution may include an alkali alcoholate and alcohol. The anolyte solution may include at least one alkali salt. The buffer compartment solution may include a soluble alkali salt and an alkali alcoholate in alcohol.

  20. Process for recovering alkali metals and sulfur from alkali metal sulfides and polysulfides

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier

    2016-10-25

    Alkali metals and sulfur may be recovered from alkali monosulfide and polysulfides in an electrolytic process that utilizes an electrolytic cell having an alkali ion conductive membrane. An anolyte solution includes an alkali monosulfide, an alkali polysulfide, or a mixture thereof and a solvent that dissolves elemental sulfur. A catholyte includes molten alkali metal. Applying an electric current oxidizes sulfide and polysulfide in the anolyte compartment, causes alkali metal ions to pass through the alkali ion conductive membrane to the catholyte compartment, and reduces the alkali metal ions in the catholyte compartment. Liquid sulfur separates from the anolyte solution and may be recovered. The electrolytic cell is operated at a temperature where the formed alkali metal and sulfur are molten.

  1. Design strategies for development of SCR catalyst: improvement of alkali poisoning resistance and novel regeneration method.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yue; Li, Junhua; Shi, Wenbo; Xu, Jiayu; Hao, Jiming

    2012-11-20

    Based on the ideas of the additives modification and regeneration method update, two different strategies were designed to deal with the traditional SCR catalyst poisoned by alkali metals. First, ceria doping on the V(2)O(5)-WO(3)/TiO(2) catalyst could promote the SCR performance even reducing the V loading, which resulted in the enhancement of the catalyst's alkali poisoning resistance. Then, a novel method, electrophoresis treatment, was employed to regenerate the alkali poisoned V(2)O(5)-WO(3)/TiO(2) catalyst. This novel technique could dramatically enhance the SCR activities of the alkali poisoned catalysts by removing approximately 95% K or Na ions from the catalyst and showed less hazardous to the environment. Finally, the deactivation mechanisms by the alkali metals were extensively studied by employing both the experimental and DFT theoretical approaches. Alkali atom mainly influences the active site V species rather than W oxides. The decrease of catalyst surface acidity might directly reduce the catalytic activity, while the reducibility of catalysts could be another important factor.

  2. Electrical Resistivity of Alkali Elements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    rubidium, cesium, and francium ) and contains recommended reference values (or provisional or typical values). The compiled data include all the...and information on the electrical resistivity of alkali elements (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, and francium ) and contains...107Ic. Magnetic Flux Density Dependence o.. .. ... .... 112 4.6. Francium ..........................115j a. Temperature Dependence

  3. Making and Breaking of Lead Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Manser, Joseph S; Saidaminov, Makhsud I; Christians, Jeffrey A; Bakr, Osman M; Kamat, Prashant V

    2016-02-16

    A new front-runner has emerged in the field of next-generation photovoltaics. A unique class of materials, known as organic metal halide perovskites, bridges the gap between low-cost fabrication and exceptional device performance. These compounds can be processed at low temperature (typically in the range 80-150 °C) and readily self-assemble from the solution phase into high-quality semiconductor thin films. The low energetic barrier for crystal formation has mixed consequences. On one hand, it enables inexpensive processing and both optical and electronic tunability. The caveat, however, is that many as-formed lead halide perovskite thin films lack chemical and structural stability, undergoing rapid degradation in the presence of moisture or heat. To date, improvements in perovskite solar cell efficiency have resulted primarily from better control over thin film morphology, manipulation of the stoichiometry and chemistry of lead halide and alkylammonium halide precursors, and the choice of solvent treatment. Proper characterization and tuning of processing parameters can aid in rational optimization of perovskite devices. Likewise, gaining a comprehensive understanding of the degradation mechanism and identifying components of the perovskite structure that may be particularly susceptible to attack by moisture are vital to mitigate device degradation under operating conditions. This Account provides insight into the lifecycle of organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites, including (i) the nature of the precursor solution, (ii) formation of solid-state perovskite thin films and single crystals, and (iii) transformation of perovskites into hydrated phases upon exposure to moisture. In particular, spectroscopic and structural characterization techniques shed light on the thermally driven evolution of the perovskite structure. By tuning precursor stoichiometry and chemistry, and thus the lead halide charge-transfer complexes present in solution, crystallization

  4. Mechanism and Selectivity in Nickel-Catalyzed Cross-Electrophile Coupling of Aryl Halides with Alkyl Halides

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Soumik; Weix, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    The direct cross-coupling of two different electrophiles, such as an aryl halide with an alkyl halide, offers many advantages over conventional cross-coupling methods that require a carbon nucleophile. Despite its promise as a versatile synthetic strategy, a limited understanding of the mechanism and origin of cross selectivity has hindered progress in reaction development and design. Herein, we shed light on the mechanism for the nickel-catalyzed cross-electrophile coupling of aryl halides with alkyl halides and demonstrate that the selectivity arises from an unusual catalytic cycle that combines both polar and radical steps to form the new C-C bond. PMID:23952217

  5. [Emissions of methyl halides from coastal salt marshes: A review].

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen-xia; Zhao, Quan-sheng; Cui, Yu-qian; Du, Hui-na; Ye, Si-yuan

    2015-11-01

    Methyl halides are the major carrier of halogens in the atmosphere, and they play an important role in tropospheric and stratospheric ozone depletion. Meanwhile, methyl halides can act as greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, and they are also environmentally significant because of their toxicity. Coastal salt marshes, the important intertidal ecosystems at the land-ocean interface, have been considered to be a large potential natural source of methyl halides. In this paper, the research status of the natural source or sink of methyl halides, the mechanisms of their emission from coastal salt marshes and affecting factors were summarized. In view of this, the following research fields need to be strengthened in the future: 1) Long time-scale and large region-range researches about the emission of methyl halides and the evaluation of their source and sink function, 2) Accurate quantification of contribution rates of different plant species and various biological types to fluxes of methyl halides, 3) Further researches on effects of the tidal fluctuation process and flooding duration on methyl halides emission, 4) Effects of the global change and human activities on methyl halides emission.

  6. How specific halide adsorption varies hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Stock, Philipp; Müller, Melanie; Utzig, Thomas; Valtiner, Markus

    2016-03-11

    Hydrophobic interactions (HI) are driven by the water structure around hydrophobes in aqueous electrolytes. How water structures at hydrophobic interfaces and how this influences the HI was subject to numerous studies. However, the effect of specific ion adsorption on HI and hydrophobic interfaces remains largely unexplored or controversial. Here, the authors utilized atomic force microscopy force spectroscopy at well-defined nanoscopic hydrophobic interfaces to experimentally address how specific ion adsorption of halide ions as well as NH4 (+), Cs(+), and Na(+) cations alters interaction forces across hydrophobic interfaces. Our data demonstrate that iodide adsorption at hydrophobic interfaces profoundly varies the hydrophobic interaction potential. A long-range and strong hydration repulsion at distances D > 3 nm, is followed by an instability which could be explained by a subsequent rapid ejection of adsorbed iodides from approaching hydrophobic interfaces. In addition, the authors find only a weakly pronounced influence of bromide, and as expected no influence of chloride. Also, all tested cations do not have any significant influence on HI. Complementary, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and quartz-crystal-microbalance with dissipation monitoring showed a clear adsorption of large halide ions (Br(-)/I(-)) onto hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Interestingly, iodide can even lead to a full disintegration of SAMs due to specific and strong interactions of iodide with gold. Our data suggest that hydrophobic surfaces are not intrinsically charged negatively by hydroxide adsorption, as it was generally believed. Hydrophobic surfaces rather interact strongly with negatively charged large halide ions, leading to a surface charging and significant variation of interaction forces.

  7. Development of novel growth methods for halide single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Yuui; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Shoji, Yasuhiro; Ohashi, Yuji; Kamada, Kei; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2017-03-01

    We developed novel growth methods for halide scintillator single crystals with hygroscopic nature, Halide micro-pulling-down [H-μ-PD] method and Halide Vertical Bridgman [H-VB] method. The H-μ-PD method with a removable chamber system can grow a single crystal of halide scintillator material with hygroscopicity at faster growth rate than the conventional methods. On the other hand, the H-VB method can grow a large bulk single crystal of halide scintillator without a quartz ampule. CeCl3, LaBr3, Ce:LaBr3 and Eu:SrI2 fiber single crystals could be grown by the H-μ-PD method and Eu:SrI2 bulk single crystals of 1 and 1.5 inch in diameter could be grown by the H-VB method. The grown fiber and bulk single crystals showed comparable scintillation properties to the previous reports using the conventional methods.

  8. Nanoscale investigation of organic - inorganic halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacovich, S.; Divitini, G.; Vrućinić, M.; Sadhanala, A.; Friend, R. H.; Sirringhaus, H.; Deschler, F.; Ducati, C.

    2015-10-01

    Over the last few years organic - inorganic halide perovskite-based solar cells have exhibited a rapid evolution, reaching certified power conversion efficiencies now surpassing 20%. Nevertheless the understanding of the optical and electronic properties of such systems on the nanoscale is still an open problem. In this work we investigate two model perovskite systems (based on iodine - CH3NH3PbI3 and bromine - CH3NH3PbBr3), analysing the local elemental composition and crystallinity and identifying chemical inhomogeneities.

  9. Research Update: Luminescence in lead halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srimath Kandada, Ajay Ram; Petrozza, Annamaria

    2016-09-01

    Efficiency and dynamics of radiative recombination of carriers are crucial figures of merit for optoelectronic materials. Following the recent success of lead halide perovskites in efficient photovoltaic and light emitting technologies, here we review some of the noted literature on the luminescence of this emerging class of materials. After outlining the theoretical formalism that is currently used to explain the carrier recombination dynamics, we review a few significant works which use photoluminescence as a tool to understand and optimize the operation of perovskite based optoelectronic devices.

  10. Improved processing for silver halide pulse holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Viktor N.; Son, Jung-Young; Grinevitskaya, Olga V.; Lee, Hyuk-Soo; Choi, Yong-Jin

    1996-04-01

    Using of an improved developer with optical latensification allowed to significantly increase exposure sensitivity of currently in use silver halide materials. Transmission large-scale holograms (30 X 40 cm2) of diffused objects have been recorded under pulse exposure of about 6.5 X 10-6 J/cm2 for VRP and of about 2 X 10-6 J/cm2 for Agfa-Gavaert 8E56HD, in both cases without appreciable contrast deterioration. Results of the first experiments on pulse reflection holography are also discussed.

  11. Synthesis of lithium cobaltate in halide melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modenov, D. V.; Dokutovich, V. N.; Khokhlov, V. A.; Antonov, B. D.; Kochedykov, V. A.; Zakir'yanova, I. D.

    2013-02-01

    A new method for the synthesis of lithium cobaltate LiCoo2 in salt melts is proposed and tested. The method is based on the oxidation of halide ions with molecular oxygen in Li X-CoCl2 mixtures ( X = Cl, Br, I). The chemical and phase compositions of the prepared powders and the crystal structure of the synthesized compound are studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The average size of LiCoO2 crystallites is estimated from the X-ray diffraction data.

  12. Positron-alkali atom scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.; Ward, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron-alkali atom scattering was recently investigated both theoretically and experimentally in the energy range from a few eV up to 100 eV. On the theoretical side calculations of the integrated elastic and excitation cross sections as well as total cross sections for Li, Na and K were based upon either the close-coupling method or the modified Glauber approximation. These theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the total cross section for both Na and K. Resonance structures were also found in the L = 0, 1 and 2 partial waves for positron scattering from the alkalis. The structure of these resonances appears to be quite complex and, as expected, they occur in conjunction with the atomic excitation thresholds. Currently both theoretical and experimental work is in progress on positron-Rb scattering in the same energy range.

  13. Alkali metal/sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Joginder N.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

  14. 10 CFR 429.54 - Metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures. 429.54 Section... CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.54 Metal halide lamp ballasts... are applicable to metal halide lamp ballasts; and (2) For each basic model of metal halide...

  15. 10 CFR 429.54 - Metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures. 429.54 Section... CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.54 Metal halide lamp ballasts... are applicable to metal halide lamp ballasts; and (2) For each basic model of metal halide...

  16. 10 CFR 429.54 - Metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures. 429.54 Section... CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.54 Metal halide lamp ballasts... are applicable to metal halide lamp ballasts; and (2) For each basic model of metal halide...

  17. Finding New Perovskite Halides via Machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Kim, Chiho; Lookman, Turab

    2016-04-01

    Advanced materials with improved properties have the potential to fuel future technological advancements. However, identification and discovery of these optimal materials for a specific application is a non-trivial task, because of the vastness of the chemical search space with enormous compositional and configurational degrees of freedom. Materials informatics provides an efficient approach towards rational design of new materials, via learning from known data to make decisions on new and previously unexplored compounds in an accelerated manner. Here, we demonstrate the power and utility of such statistical learning (or machine learning) via building a support vector machine (SVM) based classifier that uses elemental features (or descriptors) to predict the formability of a given ABX3 halide composition (where A and B represent monovalent and divalent cations, respectively, and X is F, Cl, Br or I anion) in the perovskite crystal structure. The classification model is built by learning from a dataset of 181 experimentally known ABX3 compounds. After exploring a wide range of features, we identify ionic radii, tolerance factor and octahedral factor to be the most important factors for the classification, suggesting that steric and geometric packing effects govern the stability of these halides. The trained and validated models then predict, with a high degree of confidence, several novel ABX3 compositions with perovskite crystal structure.

  18. Finding new perovskite halides via machine learning

    SciTech Connect

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Kim, Chiho; Lookman, Turab

    2016-04-26

    Advanced materials with improved properties have the potential to fuel future technological advancements. However, identification and discovery of these optimal materials for a specific application is a non-trivial task, because of the vastness of the chemical search space with enormous compositional and configurational degrees of freedom. Materials informatics provides an efficient approach toward rational design of new materials, via learning from known data to make decisions on new and previously unexplored compounds in an accelerated manner. Here, we demonstrate the power and utility of such statistical learning (or machine learning, henceforth referred to as ML) via building a support vector machine (SVM) based classifier that uses elemental features (or descriptors) to predict the formability of a given ABX3 halide composition (where A and B represent monovalent and divalent cations, respectively, and X is F, Cl, Br, or I anion) in the perovskite crystal structure. The classification model is built by learning from a dataset of 185 experimentally known ABX3 compounds. After exploring a wide range of features, we identify ionic radii, tolerance factor, and octahedral factor to be the most important factors for the classification, suggesting that steric and geometric packing effects govern the stability of these halides. As a result, the trained and validated models then predict, with a high degree of confidence, several novel ABX3 compositions with perovskite crystal structure.

  19. Intriguing Optoelectronic Properties of Metal Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Manser, Joseph S; Christians, Jeffrey A; Kamat, Prashant V

    2016-11-09

    A new chapter in the long and distinguished history of perovskites is being written with the breakthrough success of metal halide perovskites (MHPs) as solution-processed photovoltaic (PV) absorbers. The current surge in MHP research has largely arisen out of their rapid progress in PV devices; however, these materials are potentially suitable for a diverse array of optoelectronic applications. Like oxide perovskites, MHPs have ABX3 stoichiometry, where A and B are cations and X is a halide anion. Here, the underlying physical and photophysical properties of inorganic (A = inorganic) and hybrid organic-inorganic (A = organic) MHPs are reviewed with an eye toward their potential application in emerging optoelectronic technologies. Significant attention is given to the prototypical compound methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) due to the preponderance of experimental and theoretical studies surrounding this material. We also discuss other salient MHP systems, including 2-dimensional compounds, where relevant. More specifically, this review is a critical account of the interrelation between MHP electronic structure, absorption, emission, carrier dynamics and transport, and other relevant photophysical processes that have propelled these materials to the forefront of modern optoelectronics research.

  20. Methyl halide production associated with kelp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dastoor, Minoo N.; Manley, Steven L.

    1985-01-01

    Methyl halides (MeX) are important trace constituents of the atmosphere because they, mostly MeCl, have a major impact on the atmospheric ozone layer. Also, MeCl may account for 5 pct. of the total Cl budget and MeI may have a central role in the biogeochemical cycling of iodine. High MeI concentrations were found in seawater from kelp beds and it has been suggested that MeI is produced by kelps and that MeI and MeBr along with numerous other halocarbons were released by non-kelp marine macroalgae. The objective was to determine if kelps (and other seaweeds) are sources of MeX and to assess their contribution to the estimated global source strength (EGSS) of MeX. Although the production of MeX appears to be associated with kelp, microbes involved with kelp degradation also produce MeX. Microbial MeX production may be of global significance. The microbial MeX production potential, assuming annual kelp production equals kelp degradation and 100 pct. conversion of kelp halides to MeX, is approx. 2 x the EGSS. This is not achieved but indicates that microbial production of MeX may be of global significance.

  1. Finding new perovskite halides via machine learning

    DOE PAGES

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Kim, Chiho; ...

    2016-04-26

    Advanced materials with improved properties have the potential to fuel future technological advancements. However, identification and discovery of these optimal materials for a specific application is a non-trivial task, because of the vastness of the chemical search space with enormous compositional and configurational degrees of freedom. Materials informatics provides an efficient approach toward rational design of new materials, via learning from known data to make decisions on new and previously unexplored compounds in an accelerated manner. Here, we demonstrate the power and utility of such statistical learning (or machine learning, henceforth referred to as ML) via building a support vectormore » machine (SVM) based classifier that uses elemental features (or descriptors) to predict the formability of a given ABX3 halide composition (where A and B represent monovalent and divalent cations, respectively, and X is F, Cl, Br, or I anion) in the perovskite crystal structure. The classification model is built by learning from a dataset of 185 experimentally known ABX3 compounds. After exploring a wide range of features, we identify ionic radii, tolerance factor, and octahedral factor to be the most important factors for the classification, suggesting that steric and geometric packing effects govern the stability of these halides. As a result, the trained and validated models then predict, with a high degree of confidence, several novel ABX3 compositions with perovskite crystal structure.« less

  2. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  3. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1991-01-22

    This invention relates to a regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor 5 concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC 10 exhaust gases.

  4. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  5. Nickel-Catalyzed Borylation of Halides and Pseudo-Halides with Tetrahydroxydiboron [B2(OH)4

    PubMed Central

    Molander, Gary A.; Cavalcanti, Livia N.; García-García, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Arylboronic acids are gaining increased importance as reagents and target structures in a variety of useful applications. Recently, the palladium-catalyzed synthesis of arylboronic acids employing the atom economical tetrahydroxydiboron (BBA) reagent has been reported. The high cost associated with palladium, combined with several limitations of both palladium and copper-catalyzed processes, prompted us to develop an alternative method. Thus, the nickel-catalyzed borylation of aryl and heteroaryl halides and pseudo-halides using tetrahydroxydiboron (BBA) has been formulated. The reaction proved to be widely functional group tolerant and applicable to a number of heterocyclic systems. To the best of our knowledge, the examples presented here represent the only effective Ni-catalyzed Miyaura borylations conducted at room temperature. PMID:23777538

  6. Preparation of Organometal Halide Perovskite Photonic Crystal Films for Potential Optoelectronic Applications.

    PubMed

    Schünemann, Stefan; Chen, Kun; Brittman, Sarah; Garnett, Erik; Tüysüz, Harun

    2016-09-28

    Herein, a facile method for the preparation of organometal halide perovskite (OHP) thin films in photonic crystal morphology is presented. The OHP photonic crystal thin films with controllable porosity and thicknesses between 2 μm and 6 μm were prepared on glass, fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO), and TiO2 substrates by using a colloidal crystal of polystyrene microspheres as a template to form an inverse opal structure. The composition of OHP could be straightforwardly tuned by varying the halide anions. The obtained OHP inverse opal films possess large ordered domains with a periodic change of the refractive index, which results in pronounced photonic stop bands in the visible light range. By changing the diameter of the polystyrene microspheres, the position of the photonic stop band can be tuned through the visible spectrum. This developed methodology can be used as blueprint for the synthesis of various OHP films that could eventually be used as more effective light harvesting materials for diverse applications.

  7. Unraveling the Role of Monovalent Halides in Mixed-Halide Organic-Inorganic Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Deepa, Melepurath; Ramos, F Javier; Shivaprasad, S M; Ahmad, Shahzada

    2016-03-16

    The performance of perovskite solar cells is strongly influenced by the composition and microstructure of the perovskite. A recent approach to improve the power conversion efficiencies utilized mixed-halide perovskites, but the halide ions and their roles were not directly studied. Unraveling their precise location in the perovskite layer is of paramount importance. Here, we investigated four different perovskites by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and found that among the three studied mixed-halide perovskites, CH3 NH3 Pb(I0.74 Br0.26 )3 and CH3 NH3 PbBr3-x Clx show peaks that unambiguously demonstrate the presence of iodide and bromide in the former, and bromide and chloride in the latter. The CH3 NH3 PbI3-x Clx perovskite shows anomalous behavior, the iodide content far outweighs that of the chloride; a small proportion of chloride, in all likelihood, resides deep within the TiO2 /absorber layer. Our study reveals that there are many distinguishable structural differences between these perovskites, and that these directly impact the photovoltaic performances.

  8. Phonon spectra of alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeković, S.; Vukajlović, F.; Veljković, V.

    1982-10-01

    In this work we used a simple local model pseudopotential which includes screening for the phonon spectra calculations of alkali metals. The results obtained are in very good agreement with experimental data. In some branches of phonon spectra the differences between theoretical and experimental results are within 1-2%, while the maximum error is about 6%. The suggested form of the pseudopotential allows us to describe the phonon spectra of Na, K and Rb with only one, and, at the same time, a unique, parameter. In this case, the maximum disagreements from experiment are 9% for Na, 8% for K and 7% for Rb.

  9. Adsorption of hydrated halide ions on charged electrodes: Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosli, James N.; Philpott, Michael R.

    1993-04-01

    Constant temperature molecular dynamics has been used to simulate the adsorption of hydrated halide ion X(-) = F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), and I(-), and lithium ion Li(+) on a flat uniformly charged surfaces. The simulations were done with either 214 water molecules and two ions (Li(+) and X(-)) in a box 2.362 nm deep or with 430 water molecules and the two ions in a box 4.320 nm deep. The boxes were periodically replicated in the xy directions. The magnitude of the surface charge on the box end was + or - 0.11 c/nm(sup 2), corresponding to an electric field of 2 x 10(exp 7) V/cm. The lateral dimensions of the simulation cell were 1.862 nm x 1.862 nm (x times y) in each case. All of the water molecules and ions interacted with the end walls via a weak 9 - 3 potential. The ST2 water model and parameters optimized for alkali halides interacting with the model ST2 water molecule were used in the calculations. Common practices of truncating the interactions at a finite distance (0.82 nm) and switching off Coulomb interactions at small distances were followed. The temperature was set at T = 2.411 kJ/mole (290 K). Some of the properties calculated were: distribution density profiles for ions and water across the gap important for comparisons iwth Gouy-Chapman theory, adsorbed ion-water pair correlation functions, the number of water molecules in the first and second hydration shells of the ions as a function of time. The time spent by a water molecule in the hydration shell was calculated to be approximately ten times longer for lithium than any other ion. The correlation between distance from the electrode and hydration number was studied and generally found to be pronounced for the larger anions.

  10. Temperature dependence of nonlinear optical properties in Li doped nano-carbon bowl material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei-qi; Zhou, Xin; Chang, Ying; Quan Tian, Wei; Sun, Xiu-Dong

    2013-04-01

    The mechanism for change of nonlinear optical (NLO) properties with temperature is proposed for a nonlinear optical material, Li doped curved nano-carbon bowl. Four stable conformations of Li doped corannulene were located and their electronic properties were investigated in detail. The NLO response of those Li doped conformations varies with relative position of doping agent on the curved carbon surface of corannulene. Conversion among those Li doped conformations, which could be controlled by temperature, changes the NLO response of bulk material. Thus, conformation change of alkali metal doped carbon nano-material with temperature rationalizes the variation of NLO properties of those materials.

  11. Metal-to-insulator crossover in alkali doped zeolite

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Mutsuo; Jeglič, Peter; Krajnc, Andraž; Žitko, Rok; Nakano, Takehito; Nozue, Yasuo; Arčon, Denis

    2016-01-01

    We report a systematic nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of the 23Na spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, in sodium loaded low-silica X (LSX) zeolite, Nan/Na12-LSX, for various loading levels of sodium atoms n across the metal-to-insulator crossover. For high loading levels of n ≥ 14.2, 1/T1T shows nearly temperature-independent behaviour between 10 K and 25 K consistent with the Korringa relaxation mechanism and the metallic ground state. As the loading levels decrease below n ≤ 11.6, the extracted density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level sharply decreases, although a residual DOS at Fermi level is still observed even in the samples that lack the metallic Drude-peak in the optical reflectance. The observed crossover is a result of a complex loading-level dependence of electric potential felt by the electrons confined to zeolite cages, where the electronic correlations and disorder both play an important role. PMID:26725368

  12. Metal-to-insulator crossover in alkali doped zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Mutsuo; Jeglič, Peter; Krajnc, Andraž; Žitko, Rok; Nakano, Takehito; Nozue, Yasuo; Arčon, Denis

    2016-01-01

    We report a systematic nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of the 23Na spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, in sodium loaded low-silica X (LSX) zeolite, Nan/Na12-LSX, for various loading levels of sodium atoms n across the metal-to-insulator crossover. For high loading levels of n ≥ 14.2, 1/T1T shows nearly temperature-independent behaviour between 10 K and 25 K consistent with the Korringa relaxation mechanism and the metallic ground state. As the loading levels decrease below n ≤ 11.6, the extracted density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level sharply decreases, although a residual DOS at Fermi level is still observed even in the samples that lack the metallic Drude-peak in the optical reflectance. The observed crossover is a result of a complex loading-level dependence of electric potential felt by the electrons confined to zeolite cages, where the electronic correlations and disorder both play an important role.

  13. An alkaline tin(II) halide compound Na3Sn2F6Cl: Synthesis, structure, and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Pifu; Luo, Siyang; Huang, Qian; Yang, Yi; Jiang, Xingxing; Liang, Fei; Chen, Chuangtian; Lin, Zheshuai

    2017-04-01

    A new alkali tin(II) halide compound, Na3Sn2F6Cl, is synthesized by hydrothermal method. This compound crystallizes trigonally in space group of R-3c (167), and processes a zero-dimensional (0D) structure consisted of Na+ cations, Cl- anions and the isolated [SnF3]- trigonal pyramids in which the stereochemically active 5s2 lone pair electrons are attached to the Sn2+ cations. Interestingly, the [SnF3]- trigonal pyramids are parallel arranged in the a-b plane, while oppositely arranged in line with rotation along the c- axis. Moreover, the energy bandgap, thermal stability and electronic structure of Na3Sn2F6Cl are characterized and the results reveal that this compound has and indirect bandgap of 3.88 eV and is stable under 270 °C.

  14. Metal halide perovskites for energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Eperon, Giles E.; Snaith, Henry J.

    2016-06-01

    Exploring prospective materials for energy production and storage is one of the biggest challenges of this century. Solar energy is one of the most important renewable energy resources, due to its wide availability and low environmental impact. Metal halide perovskites have emerged as a class of semiconductor materials with unique properties, including tunable bandgap, high absorption coefficient, broad absorption spectrum, high charge carrier mobility and long charge diffusion lengths, which enable a broad range of photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications. Since the first embodiment of perovskite solar cells showing a power conversion efficiency of 3.8%, the device performance has been boosted up to a certified 22.1% within a few years. In this Perspective, we discuss differing forms of perovskite materials produced via various deposition procedures. We focus on their energy-related applications and discuss current challenges and possible solutions, with the aim of stimulating potential new applications.

  15. Tellurium halide IR fibers for remote spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xhang H.; Ma, Hong Li; Blanchetiere, Chantal; Le Foulgoc, Karine; Lucas, Jacques; Heuze, Jean; Colardelle, P.; Froissard, P.; Picque, D.; Corrieu, G.

    1994-07-01

    The new family of IR transmitting glasses, the TeX glasses, based on the association of tellurium and halide (Cl, Br, or I) are characterized by a wide optical window extending from 2 to 18 micrometers and a strong stability towards devitrification. Optical fibers drawn from these glasses exhibit low losses in the 7 - 10 micrometers range (less than 1 dB/m for single index fibers, 1 - 2 dB/m for fibers having a core-clad structure). The TeX glass fibers have been used in a remote analysis set-up which is mainly composed of a FTIR spectrometer coupled with a HgCdTe detector. This prototype system permits qualitative and quantitative analysis in a wide wavelength region lying from 3 to 13 micrometers , covering the fundamental absorption of more organic species. The evolution of a lactic and an alcoholic fermentation has been monitored by means of this set-up.

  16. Hydrophobic Organic Hole Transporters for Improved Moisture Resistance in Metal Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Leijtens, Tomas; Giovenzana, Tommaso; Habisreutinger, Severin N; Tinkham, Jonathan S; Noel, Nakita K; Kamino, Brett A; Sadoughi, Golnaz; Sellinger, Alan; Snaith, Henry J

    2016-03-09

    Solar cells based on organic-inorganic perovskite semiconductor materials have recently made rapid improvements in performance, with the best cells performing at over 20% efficiency. With such rapid progress, questions such as cost and solar cell stability are becoming increasingly important to address if this new technology is to reach commercial deployment. The moisture sensitivity of commonly used organic-inorganic metal halide perovskites has especially raised concerns. Here, we demonstrate that the hygroscopic lithium salt commonly used as a dopant for the hole transport material in perovskite solar cells makes the top layer of the devices hydrophilic and causes the solar cells to rapidly degrade in the presence of moisture. By using novel, low cost, and hydrophobic hole transporters in conjunction with a doping method incorporating a preoxidized salt of the respective hole transporters, we are able to prepare efficient perovskite solar cells with greatly enhanced water resistance.

  17. Suppressed decomposition of organometal halide perovskites by impermeable electron-extraction layers in inverted solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, K.O.; Zhao, J.; Pourdavoud, N.; Becker, T.; Hu, T.; Olthof, S.; Meerholz, K.; Hoffmann, L.; Gahlmann, T.; Heiderhoff, R.; Oszajca, M. F.; Luechinger, N. A.; Rogalla, D.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, B.; Riedl, T

    2017-01-01

    The area of thin-film photovoltaics has been overwhelmed by organometal halide perovskites. Unfortunately, serious stability concerns arise with perovskite solar cells. For example, methyl-ammonium lead iodide is known to decompose in the presence of water and, more severely, even under inert conditions at elevated temperatures. Here, we demonstrate inverted perovskite solar cells, in which the decomposition of the perovskite is significantly mitigated even at elevated temperatures. Specifically, we introduce a bilayered electron-extraction interlayer consisting of aluminium-doped zinc oxide and tin oxide. We evidence tin oxide grown by atomic layer deposition does form an outstandingly dense gas permeation barrier that effectively hinders the ingress of moisture towards the perovskite and—more importantly—it prevents the egress of decomposition products of the perovskite. Thereby, the overall decomposition of the perovskite is significantly suppressed, leading to an outstanding device stability. PMID:28067308

  18. Suppressed decomposition of organometal halide perovskites by impermeable electron-extraction layers in inverted solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, K. O.; Zhao, J.; Pourdavoud, N.; Becker, T.; Hu, T.; Olthof, S.; Meerholz, K.; Hoffmann, L.; Gahlmann, T.; Heiderhoff, R.; Oszajca, M. F.; Luechinger, N. A.; Rogalla, D.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, B.; Riedl, T.

    2017-01-01

    The area of thin-film photovoltaics has been overwhelmed by organometal halide perovskites. Unfortunately, serious stability concerns arise with perovskite solar cells. For example, methyl-ammonium lead iodide is known to decompose in the presence of water and, more severely, even under inert conditions at elevated temperatures. Here, we demonstrate inverted perovskite solar cells, in which the decomposition of the perovskite is significantly mitigated even at elevated temperatures. Specifically, we introduce a bilayered electron-extraction interlayer consisting of aluminium-doped zinc oxide and tin oxide. We evidence tin oxide grown by atomic layer deposition does form an outstandingly dense gas permeation barrier that effectively hinders the ingress of moisture towards the perovskite and--more importantly--it prevents the egress of decomposition products of the perovskite. Thereby, the overall decomposition of the perovskite is significantly suppressed, leading to an outstanding device stability.

  19. Bleaching mechanism of silver halide photochromic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caurant, D.; Gourier, D.; Vivien, D.; Prassas, M.

    1993-02-01

    Thermal bleaching of silver halide photochromic glasses is studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of photoinduced CuII centers. During exposure to ultraviolet light, the only stable CuII species is the (CuIIVAg)A center, which is a CuII-silver vacancy complex with the vacancy in a nearest position. In the dark, this center rapidly decays via two parallel channels. The first involves the dissociation of the complex by displacement of the vacancy along a [110] direction, with an activation energy E3=0.44 eV and a frequency factor k30=3.4×105 s-1. The second channel involves the conversion of the (CuIIVAg)A center into a (CuIICl-VAg)B center, where the silver vacancy is in the next nearest position along the [100] direction. This process occurs with an activation energy E1=0.44 eV and a frequency factor k10=3.1×105 s-1. The (CuIICl-VAg)B center slowly decays by a vacancy hopping mechanism, with an activation energy E2=0.22 eV and a frequency factor k20=4.6 s-1. To explain these two decay channels, it is proposed that the (CuIIVAg)A and (CuIICl-VAg)B centers annihilate via the formation of a CuI ion and a neutral complex (AgIIVAg)A which migrates to the surface of the silver halide particle, where electron-hole recombination occurs.

  20. The Renaissance of Halide Perovskites and Their Evolution as Emerging Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2015-10-20

    The recent re-emergence of the halide perovskites, of the type AMX3, derives from a sea-changing breakthrough in the field of photovoltaics that has led to a whole new generation of solar devices with remarkable power conversion efficiency. The success in the field of photovoltaics has led to intense, combined research efforts to better understand these materials both from the fundamental chemistry and physics points of view and for the improvement of applied functional device engineering. This groundswell of activity has breathed new life into this long-known but largely "forgotten" class of perovskites. The impressive achievements of halide perovskites in photovoltaics, as well as other optoelectronic applications, stem from an unusually favorable combination of optical and electronic properties, with the ability to be solution processed into films. This defines them as a brand new class of semiconductors that can rival or exceed the performance of the venerable classes of III-V and II-IV semiconductors, which presently dominate the industries of applied optoelectronics. Our aim in this Account is to highlight the basic pillars that define the chemistry of the halide perovskites and their unconventional electronic properties through the prism of structure-property relationships. We focus on the synthetic requirements under which a halide perovskite can exist and emphasize how the synthetic conditions can determine the structural integrity and the bulk properties of the perovskites. Then we proceed to discuss the origins of the optical and electronic phenomena, using the perovskite crystal structure as a guide. Some of the most remarkable features of the perovskites dealt with in this Account include the evolution of a unique type of defect, which gives rise to superlattices. These can enhance or diminish the fluorescence properties of the perovskites. For example, the exotic self-doping ability of the Sn-based perovskites allows them to adopt electrical

  1. Process for the disposal of alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Leroy C.

    1977-01-01

    Large quantities of alkali metals may be safely reacted for ultimate disposal by contact with a hot concentrated caustic solution. The alkali metals react with water in the caustic solution in a controlled reaction while steam dilutes the hydrogen formed by the reaction to a safe level.

  2. Electronic and Ionic Transport Dynamics in Organolead Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Li, Dehui; Wu, Hao; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Wang, Gongming; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-07-26

    Ion migration has been postulated as the underlying mechanism responsible for the hysteresis in organolead halide perovskite devices. However, the electronic and ionic transport dynamics and how they impact each other in organolead halide perovskites remain elusive to date. Here we report a systematic investigation of the electronic and ionic transport dynamics in organolead halide perovskite microplate crystals and thin films using temperature-dependent transient response measurements. Our study reveals that thermally activated ionic and electronic conduction coexist in perovskite devices. The extracted activation energies suggest that the electronic transport is easier, but ions migrate harder in microplates than in thin films, demonstrating that the crystalline quality and grain boundaries can fundamentally modify electronic and ionic transport in perovskites. These findings offer valuable insight on the electronic and ionic transport dynamics in organolead halide perovskites, which is critical for optimizing perovskite devices with reduced hysteresis and improved stability and efficiency.

  3. Double-Diffusive Convection During Growth of Halides and Selenides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Su, Ching-Hua; Duval, Walter M. B.

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metal halides and selenides have unique properties which make them excellent materials for chemical, biological and radiological sensors. Recently it has been shown that selenohalides are even better materials than halides or selenides for gamma-ray detection. These materials also meet the strong needs of a wide band imaging technology to cover ultra-violet (UV), midwave infrared wavelength (MWIR) to very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) region for hyperspectral imager components such as etalon filters and acousto-optic tunable filters (AO). In fact AOTF based imagers based on these materials have some superiority than imagers based on liquid crystals, FTIR, Fabry-Perot, grating, etalon, electro-optic modulation, piezoelectric and several other concepts. For example, broadband spectral and imagers have problems of processing large amount of information during real-time observation. Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter (AOTF) imagers are being developed to fill the need of reducing processing time of data, low cost operation and key to achieving the goal of covering long-wave infrared (LWIR). At the present time spectral imaging systems are based on the use of diffraction gratings are typically used in a pushbroom or whiskbroom mode. They are mostly used in systems and acquire large amounts of hyperspectral data that is processed off-line later. In contrast, acousto-optic tunable filter spectral imagers require very little image processing, providing new strategies for object recognition and tracking. They are ideally suited for tactical situations requiring immediate real-time image processing. But the performance of these imagers depends on the quality and homogeneity of acousto-optic materials. In addition for many systems requirements are so demanding that crystals up to sizes of 10 cm length are desired. We have studied several selenides and halide crystals for laser and AO imagers for MWIR and LWIR wavelength regions. We have grown and fabricated crystals of

  4. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C.

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  5. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, Raymond D.; McPheeters, Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  6. OSL studies of alkali fluoroperovskite single crystals for radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, D. Joseph; Raja, A.; Madhusoodanan, U.; Annalakshmi, O.; Ramasamy, P.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a preliminary investigation of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of alkali fluoroperovskite single crystals for radiation dosimetry. The perovskite-like KMgF3, NaMgF3 and LiBaF3 polycrystalline compounds doped with rare earths (Eu2+ and Ce3+) were synthesized by standard solid state reaction technique. Phase purity of the synthesized compounds was analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction technique. Single crystals of these compounds have been grown from melt by using vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger method. The Linearly Modulated OSL and Continuous Wave OSL measurements were performed in these alkali fluorides using blue light stimulation. Thermal bleaching experiments have shown that OSL signals originate from traps which are unstable near 200 °C, thus proving the suitability of the signals for dosimetric purposes. Optical bleaching measurements were also performed for these fluoride samples. OSL dose response was studied as a function of dose which was found to increase with beta dose.

  7. Substrate inhibition competes with halide inhibition in polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Lim, Giselle Grace Fernando; Imura, Yuki; Yoshimura, Etsuro

    2012-10-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is a ubiquitous enzyme important in the food industry. Although PPO activity followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics at catechol concentrations of up to 1 mM, it slowly decreased at catechol concentrations above 2 mM. This result indicated that in addition to the active site (site A), the enzyme possesses a second catechol-binding site (site B) that exerts an inhibitory effect on PPO activity. Halides inhibit PPO activity in such a way that substrate inhibition is lessened when halide concentration is increased. Furthermore, elevated concentrations of catechol diminished the degree of inhibition by halides. These findings suggest that halides also bind to site B to inhibit PPO activity. A steady-state kinetic analysis demonstrated that the dissociation constant between catechol and PPO depended on the binding of halides to site B. The dissociation constants were greatest when chloride bound to the site. Bromide and iodide yielded lower dissociation constants, in that order. These data indicate that the binding of halide to site B modulated the structure of site A, thereby exerting an inhibitory effect.

  8. Influence of mixed alkalies on absorption and emission properties of Sm 3+ ions in borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnakaram, Y. C.; Thirupathi Naidu, D.; Vijaya Kumar, A.; Gopal, N. O.

    2005-04-01

    The present work aims to study the variation of Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters, radiative transition probabilities, absorption and emission cross sections with alkali content in three different Sm 3+-doped mixed alkali borate glasses. Mixed alkali borate glasses in the composition 67H 3BO 3· xLi 2CO 3(32- x)Na 2CO 3·1Sm 2O 3, 67H 3BO 3· xLi 2CO 3(32- x)K 2CO 3·1Sm 2O 3 and 67H 3BO 3· xNa 2CO 3(32- x)K 2CO 3·1Sm 2O 3 with x=8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 mol% were prepared by quenching melts consisting of the above chemicals (850-950 °C, 1-2 h) between two brass plates. Judd-Ofelt theory is used to study the spectral properties and to calculate the radiative transition probabilities and branching ratios. The predicted radiative transition probabilities ( Aed), branching ratios ( β) and integrated absorption cross-sections ( Σ) for certain transitions are reported. From the emission spectra, emission cross-sections ( σ) are obtained for the four transitions, 4G 5/2→ 6H 5/2, 4G 5/2→ 6H 7/2, 4G 5/2→ 6H 9/2 and 4G 5/2→ 6H 11/2 of Sm 3+ ion in these mixed alkali borate glasses. Optical band gaps ( Eopt) and absorption edges are reported for the three Sm 3+-doped mixed alkali borate glasses.

  9. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Schmalzer, D.K.; Steindler, M.J.; Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-12-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of Pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an alternative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no high temperature/high pressure (HTHP) sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-reaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial-grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6{und M}-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed in the following.

  10. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Schmalzer, D.K.; Steindler, M.J.; Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of Pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an alternative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no high temperature/high pressure (HTHP) sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-reaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial-grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6[und M]-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed in the following.

  11. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of PFBC technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an altemative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. As shown in Fig. 1, the RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no HTHP sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-leaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6M-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite [8]. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed.

  12. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-11-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of PFBC technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an altemative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. As shown in Fig. 1, the RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no HTHP sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-leaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6M-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite [8]. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed.

  13. Synergistic capture mechanisms for alkali and sulfur species from combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.W.; Shadman, F.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Mwabe, P.O.

    1994-02-01

    Experimental work was carried out on a 17 kW, 600 cm long, gas laboratory combustor, to investigate the post flame reactive capture of alkali species by kaolinite. Emphasis was on alkali/sorbent interactions occurring in flue gas at temperatures above the alkali dewpoint and on the formation of water insoluble reaction products. Time-temperature studies were carried out by injecting kaolinite at different axial points along the combustor. The effect of chlorine and sulfur on alkali capture was investigated by doping the flame with SO{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2} gases to simulate coal flame environments. Particle time and temperature history was kept as close as possible to that which would ordinarily be found in a practical boiler. Experiments designed to extract apparent initial reaction rates were carried using a narrow range, 1-2 {mu}m modal size sorbent, while, a coarse, multi size sorbent was used to investigate the governing transport mechanisms. The capture reaction has been proposed to be between alkali hydroxide and activated kaolinite, and remains so in the presence of sulfur and chlorine. The presence of sulfur reduces sodium capture by under 10% at 1300{degree}C. Larger reductions at lower temperatures are attributed to the elevated dewpoint of sodium ({approximately}850{degree}C) with subsequent reduction in sorbent residence time in the alkali gas phase domain. Chlorine reduces sodium capture by 30% across the temperature range covered by the present experiments. This result has been linked to thermodynamic equilibria between sodium hydroxide, sodium chloride and water.

  14. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  15. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  16. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  17. Optical properties of halide and oxide compounds including the excitonic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shwetha, G.; Kanchana, V.

    2014-04-01

    We have studied the optical properties of alkali halide and alkaline-earth oxide compounds including the excitonic effects by using the newly developed bootstrap kernel approximation for the exchange-correlation kernel of the Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) implemented in Full-Potential Linearized Augmented Plane Wave (FP-LAPW) method in the elk code. The bootstrap calculations are computationally less expensive and give results the same quality as the Bethe-Salpeter equation. We found improved results when compared to normal Density Functional Theory calculations, and observed results are comparable with the experiments. The lower energy peak of imaginary part of dielectric spectra shifts to lower energy regions as we move from MgO to BaO indicating the decrease in the band gap of these compounds from MgO to BaO. In all the studied compounds, the lower energy peak of the imaginary part of dielectric function is due to the transition from halogen p or oxide p states to metal derived s/d states.

  18. Ultrathin Colloidal Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dandan; Yu, Yi; Bekenstein, Yehonadav; Wong, Andrew B; Alivisatos, A Paul; Yang, Peidong

    2016-10-12

    Highly uniform single crystal ultrathin CsPbBr3 nanowires (NWs) with diameter of 2.2 ± 0.2 nm and length up to several microns were successfully synthesized and purified using a catalyst-free colloidal synthesis method followed by a stepwise purification strategy. The NWs have bright photoluminescence (PL) with a photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of about 30% after surface treatment. Large blue-shifted UV-vis absorption and PL spectra have been observed due to strong two-dimensional quantum confinement effects. A small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) pattern shows the periodic packing of the ultrathin NWs along the radial direction, demonstrates the narrow radial distribution of the wires, and emphasizes the deep intercalation of the surfactants. Despite the extreme aspect ratios of the ultrathin NWs, their composition and the resulting optical properties can be readily tuned by an anion-exchange reaction with good morphology preservation. These bright ultrathin NWs may be used as a model system to study strong quantum confinement effects in a one-dimensional halide perovskite system.

  19. Perspectives on organolead halide perovskite photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariz, Alex

    2016-07-01

    A number of photovoltaic technologies have been developed for large-scale solar-power production. The single-crystal first-generation photovoltaic devices were followed by thin-film semiconductor absorber layers layered between two charge-selective contacts, and more recently, by nanostructured or mesostructured solar cells that utilize a distributed heterojunction to generate charge carriers and to transport holes and electrons in spatially separated conduits. Even though a number of materials have been trialed in nanostructured devices, the aim of achieving high-efficiency thin-film solar cells in such a manner as to rival the silicon technology has yet to be attained. Organolead halide perovskites have recently emerged as a promising material for high-efficiency nanoinfiltrated devices. An examination of the efficiency evolution curve reveals that interfaces play a paramount role in emerging organic electronic applications. To optimize and control the performance in these devices, a comprehensive understanding of the contacts is essential. However, despite the apparent advances made, a fundamental theoretical analysis of the physical processes taking place at the contacts is still lacking. However, experimental ideas, such as the use of interlayer films, are forging marked improvements in efficiencies of perovskite-based solar cells. Furthermore, issues of long-term stability and large-area manufacturing have some way to go before full commercialization is possible.

  20. Color silver halide hologram production and mastering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.; Huang, Qiang

    1997-04-01

    Color reflection holograms recorded with the Denisyuk geometry have been demonstrated by the recently formed HOLOS Corporation in New Hampshire. The Slavich red-green-blue (RGB) sensitized ultra-high resolution silver halide emulsion was used for the hologram recording. The employed laser wavelengths were 647 nm, 532 nm, and 476 nm, generated by an argon ion, a frequency doubled Nd:YAG, and a krypton ion laser, respectively. A beam combination mechanism with dichroic filters enabled a simultaneous RGB exposure, which made the color balance and overall exposure energy easy to control as well as simplifying the recording procedure. HOLOS has been producing limited edition color holograms in various sizes from 4' X 5' to 12' X 16'. A 30 foot long optical table and high power lasers will enable HOLOS to record color holograms up to the size of one meter square in the near future. Various approaches have been investigated in generating color hologram masters which have sufficiently high diffraction efficiency to contact copy the color images onto photopolymer materials. A specially designed test object including the 1931 CIE chromaticity diagram, a rainbow ribbon cable, pure yellow dots, and a cloisonne elephant was used for color recording experiments. In addition, the Macbeth Color Checker chart was used. Both colorimetric evaluation and scattering noise measurements were performed using the PR-650 Photo Research SpectraScan SpectraCalorimeter.

  1. Alkali metal for ultraviolet band-pass filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick (Inventor); Fraschetti, George A. (Inventor); Mccann, Timothy A. (Inventor); Mayall, Sherwood D. (Inventor); Dunn, Donald E. (Inventor); Trauger, John T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An alkali metal filter having a layer of metallic bismuth deposited onto the alkali metal is provided. The metallic bismuth acts to stabilize the surface of the alkali metal to prevent substantial surface migration from occurring on the alkali metal, which may degrade optical characteristics of the filter. To this end, a layer of metallic bismuth is deposited by vapor deposition over the alkali metal to a depth of approximately 5 to 10 A. A complete alkali metal filter is described along with a method for fabricating the alkali metal filter.

  2. Analysis of the physical atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions and halogen ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The physical forces between atoms and molecules are important in a number of processes of practical importance, including line broadening in radiative processes, gas and crystal properties, adhesion, and thin films. The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base for the dispersion forces is developed from the literature based on evaluations with the harmonic oscillator dispersion model for higher order coefficients. The Zener model of the repulsive core is used in the context of the recent asymptotic wave functions of Handler and Smith; and an effective ionization potential within the Handler and Smith wave functions is defined to analyze the two body potential data of Waldman and Gordon, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  3. Lead Halide Perovskites and Other Metal Halide Complexes As Inorganic Capping Ligands for Colloidal Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lead halide perovskites (CH3NH3PbX3, where X = I, Br) and other metal halide complexes (MXn, where M = Pb, Cd, In, Zn, Fe, Bi, Sb) have been studied as inorganic capping ligands for colloidal nanocrystals. We present the methodology for the surface functionalization via ligand-exchange reactions and the effect on the optical properties of IV–VI, II–VI, and III–V semiconductor nanocrystals. In particular, we show that the Lewis acid–base properties of the solvents, in addition to the solvent dielectric constant, must be properly adjusted for successful ligand exchange and colloidal stability. High luminescence quantum efficiencies of 20–30% for near-infrared emitting CH3NH3PbI3-functionalized PbS nanocrystals and 50–65% for red-emitting CH3NH3CdBr3- and (NH4)2ZnCl4-capped CdSe/CdS nanocrystals point to highly efficient electronic passivation of the nanocrystal surface. PMID:24746226

  4. Infrared Spectra of Simple Inorganic Ion Pairs in Solid Solution: A Physical Inorganic Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Philip J.; Tong, William G.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a physical inorganic experiment in which large single crystals of the alkali halides doped with divalent ion impurities are prepared easily. Demonstrates the ion pairing of inorganic ions in solid solution. (CS)

  5. Improved alkali-metal/silicate binders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, J.

    1978-01-01

    Family of inorganic binders utilizes potassium or sodium oxide/silicate dispersion and employs high mole ratio of silicon dioxide to alkali-metal binder. Binders are stable, inexpensive, extremely water resistant, and easy to apply.

  6. Alkali Metal Handling Practices at NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvail, Patrick G.; Carter, Robert R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is NASA s principle propulsion development center. Research and development is coordinated and carried out on not only the existing transportation systems, but also those that may be flown in the near future. Heat pipe cooled fast fission cores are among several concepts being considered for the Nuclear Systems Initiative. Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a capability to handle high-purity alkali metals for use in heat pipes or liquid metal heat transfer loops. This capability is a low budget prototype of an alkali metal handling system that would allow the production of flight qualified heat pipe modules or alkali metal loops. The processing approach used to introduce pure alkali metal into heat pipe modules and other test articles are described in this paper.

  7. Alkali metal propellants for MPD thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, J. E.; Pivirotto, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments performed in the United States in the 1960s and early 1970s and in the Soviet Union with alkali metal-fuelled MPD thrusters indicate performance levels substantially better than those achieved with gaseous propellants. Cathode wear appears to be less in engines with alkali metal propellants also. A critical review of the available data indicates that the data are consistent and reliable. An analysis of testing and systems-level considerations shows that pumping requirements for testing are substantially decreased and reductions in tankage fraction can be expected. In addition, while care must be exercised in handling the alkali metals, it is not prohibitively difficult or hazardous. The greatest disadvantage seems to be the potential for spacecraft contamination, but there appear to be viable strategies for minimizing the impact of propellant deposition on spacecraft surfaces. Renewed examination of alkali metal-fuelled MPD thrusters for ambitious SEI missions is recommended.

  8. Hemibonding of hydroxyl radical and halide anion in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Makoto

    2011-12-29

    Molecular geometries and properties of the possible reaction products between the hydroxyl radical and the halide anions in aqueous solution were investigated. The formation of two-center three-electron bonding (hemibonding) between the hydroxyl radical and halide anions (Cl, Br, I) was examined by density functional theory (DFT) calculation with a range-separated hybrid (RSH) exchange-correlation functional. The long-range corrected hybrid functional (LC-ωPBE), which have given quantitatively satisfactory results for odd electron systems and excited states, was examined by test calculations for dihalogen radical anions (X(2)(-); X = Cl, Br, I) and hydroxyl radical-water clusters. Equilibrium geometries with hemibonding between the hydroxyl radical and halide anions were located by including four hydrogen-bonded water molecules. Excitation energies and oscillator strengths of σ-σ* transitions calculated by the time-dependent DFT method showed good agreement with observed values. Calculated values of the free energy of reaction on the formation of hydroxyl halide radical anion from the hydroxyl radical and halide anion were endothermic for chloride but exothermic for bromide and iodide, which is consistent with experimental values of equilibrium constants.

  9. Two Dimensional Organometal Halide Perovskite Nanorods with Tunable Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Aharon, Sigalit; Etgar, Lioz

    2016-05-11

    Organo-metal halide perovskite is an efficient light harvester in photovoltaic solar cells. Organometal halide perovskite is used mainly in its "bulk" form in the solar cell. Confined perovskite nanostructures could be a promising candidate for efficient optoelectronic devices, taking advantage of the superior bulk properties of organo-metal halide perovskite, as well as the nanoscale properties. In this paper, we present facile low-temperature synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) lead halide perovskite nanorods (NRs). These NRs show a shift to higher energies in the absorbance and in the photoluminescence compared to the bulk material, which supports their 2D structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the NRs demonstrates their 2D nature combined with the tetragonal 3D perovskite structure. In addition, by alternating the halide composition, we were able to tune the optical properties of the NRs. Fast Fourier transform, and electron diffraction show the tetragonal structure of these NRs. By varying the ligands ratio (e.g., octylammonium to oleic acid) in the synthesis, we were able to provide the formation mechanism of these novel 2D perovskite NRs. The 2D perovskite NRs are promising candidates for a variety of optoelectronic applications, such as light-emitting diodes, lasing, solar cells, and sensors.

  10. Halide Perovskites: Poor Man's High-Performance Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2016-07-01

    Halide perovskites are a rapidly developing class of medium-bandgap semiconductors which, to date, have been popularized on account of their remarkable success in solid-state heterojunction solar cells raising the photovoltaic efficiency to 20% within the last 5 years. As the physical properties of the materials are being explored, it is becoming apparent that the photovoltaic performance of the halide perovskites is just but one aspect of the wealth of opportunities that these compounds offer as high-performance semiconductors. From unique optical and electrical properties stemming from their characteristic electronic structure to highly efficient real-life technological applications, halide perovskites constitute a brand new class of materials with exotic properties awaiting discovery. The nature of halide perovskites from the materials' viewpoint is discussed here, enlisting the most important classes of the compounds and describing their most exciting properties. The topics covered focus on the optical and electrical properties highlighting some of the milestone achievements reported to date but also addressing controversies in the vastly expanding halide perovskite literature.

  11. Desulfurizing Coal With an Alkali Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravindram, M.; Kalvinskas, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental coal-desulfurization process uses alkalies and steam in fluidized-bed reactor. With highly volatile, high-sulfur bituminous coal, process removed 98 percent of pyritic sulfur and 47 percent of organic sulfur. Used in coal liquefaction and in production of clean solid fuels and synthetic liquid fuels. Nitrogen or steam flows through bed of coal in reactor. Alkalies react with sulfur, removing it from coal. Nitrogen flow fluidizes bed while heating or cooling; steam is fluidizing medium during reaction.

  12. Measurement of alkali vapors in PFBC flue gas and their removal with a fixed granular-bed sorber, October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Myles, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    Alkali-metal compounds, such as chlorides and sulfates of sodium and potassium, present in the flue gas of coal combustion could cause hot corrosion of a gas turbine. The current industrial gas-turbine specification limit for alkali-metal compounds in the combustion gas entering a turbine is equivalent to 0.024 ppmW. Spacil and Luthra predict that the quantity of alkali vapor in the flue gas from PFBC could be up to two orders of magnitude greater than this allowable level. In contrast, the recent calculations by Scandrett and Clift suggest that, if the aerosol alkali particulate could be removed, the residual alkali vapor in the flue gas would be less than the limit. Measurements of the alkali vapor in PFBC flue gas have been made by several institutions. The measured alkali vapor concentration in the flue gas is in the order of 0.1 to 10 ppmW. Normally, a conventional batch-type extraction of the flue gas, followed by the analysis of the condensate, has been used in these measurements. It was not until recently that a real-time, on-line alkali analyzer was developed and tested in the gas stream of both coal gasification and combustion. A fixed granular-bed sorber is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the control of the alkali vapor in PFBC flue gas. After an extensive screening study, activated bauxite was found to be the most effective sorbent in capturing the NaCl, KCl, and K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ vapors that were doped into a simulated PFBC flue gas. Activated bauxite was also demonstrated to be easily and effectively regenerated for reuse by a simple water-leaching process. A capture efficiency of greater than 99.8% CaCl vapor has been achieved. The effectiveness of activated bauxite for alkali-vapor capture has been confirmed by others. 21 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Regeneration of zinc halide catalyst used in the hydrocracking of polynuclear hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett

    1978-01-01

    Improved recovery of spent molten zinc halide hydro-cracking catalyst is achieved in the oxidative vapor phase regeneration thereof by selective treatment of the zinc oxide carried over by the effluent vapors from the regeneration zone with hydrogen halide gas under conditions favoring the reaction of the zinc oxide with the hydrogen halide, whereby regenerated zinc halide is recovered in a solids-free state with little loss of zinc values.

  14. 40 CFR 721.10181 - Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10181 Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halide salt...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10181 - Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10181 Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halide salt...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10181 - Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10181 Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halide salt...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10181 - Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10181 Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halide salt...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10181 - Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10181 Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halide salt...

  19. 10 CFR 431.322 - Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and... FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts and Fixtures § 431.322 Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures. Ballast efficiency means, in the case of...

  20. 75 FR 5544 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures: Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures: Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework Document AGENCY... conservation standards for certain metal halide lamp fixtures. This document announces that the period for... metal halide lamp fixtures and provide docket number EERE-2009-BT-STD-0018 and/or RIN number 1904-...

  1. 10 CFR Appendix B to Subpart S to... - Certification Report for Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Certification Report for Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts B... PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts and Fixtures Pt. 431, Subpt. S, App. B Appendix B to Subpart S to Part 431—Certification Report for Metal Halide Lamp...

  2. 10 CFR Appendix A to Subpart S of... - Compliance Statement for Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Compliance Statement for Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts A... PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts and Fixtures Pt. 431, Subpt. S, App. A Appendix A to Subpart S of Part 431—Compliance Statement for Metal Halide Lamp...

  3. Alteration of alkali reactive aggregates autoclaved in different alkali solutions and application to alkali-aggregate reaction in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Duyou; Xu Zhongzi; Tang Mingshu; Fournier, Benoit

    2006-06-15

    Surface alteration of typical aggregates with alkali-silica reactivity and alkali-carbonate reactivity, i.e. Spratt limestone (SL) and Pittsburg dolomitic limestone (PL), were studied by XRD and SEM/EDS after autoclaving in KOH, NaOH and LiOH solutions at 150 deg. C for 150 h. The results indicate that: (1) NaOH shows the strongest attack on both ASR and ACR aggregates, the weakest attack is with LiOH. For both aggregates autoclaved in different alkali media, the crystalline degree, morphology and distribution of products are quite different. More crystalline products are formed on rock surfaces in KOH than that in NaOH solution, while almost no amorphous product is formed in LiOH solution; (2) in addition to dedolomitization of PL in KOH, NaOH and LiOH solutions, cryptocrystalline quartz in PL involves in reaction with alkaline solution and forms typical alkali-silica product in NaOH and KOH solutions, but forms lithium silicate (Li{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) in LiOH solution; (3) in addition to massive alkali-silica product formed in SL autoclaved in different alkaline solutions, a small amount of dolomite existing in SL may simultaneously dedolomitize and possibly contribute to expansion; (4) it is promising to use the duplex effect of LiOH on ASR and ACR to distinguish the alkali-silica reactivity and alkali-carbonate reactivity of aggregate when both ASR and ACR might coexist.

  4. On the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Studies in Mixed Alkali Borate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Padmaja, G.; Reddy, T. Goverdhan; Kistaiah, P.

    2011-10-20

    Mixed alkali effect in oxide based glasses is one of the current research activity and studies on the behavior of spectroscopic parameters in these systems are quite important to understand the basic nature of this phenomenon. EPR studies of mixed alkali glasses Li{sub 2}O-K{sub 2}O-ZnO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped with Fe{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} were carried out at room temperature. The EPR spectra show typical resonances of d{sup 5} system (Fe{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+}) in all the measured glass specimens. Evaluated hyperfine constant, number of paramagnetic centers and paramagnetic susceptibility values show deviation from the linearity with the progressive substitution of the Li ion with K in glass network.

  5. Thermodynamic reactivity, growth and characterization of mercurous halide crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Gottlieb, M.; Henningsen, T.; Hopkins, R. H.; Mazelsky, R.; Singh, M.; Glicksman, M. E.; Paradies, C.

    1992-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations were carried out for the Hg-X-O system (X = Cl, Br, I) to identify the potential sources of contamination and relative stability of oxides and oxy-halide phases. The effect of excess mercury vapor pressure on the optical quality of mercurous halide crystal was studied by growing several mercurous chloride crystals from mercury-rich composition. The optical quality of crystals was examined by birefringence interferometry and laser scattering studies. Crystals grown in slightly mercury-rich composition showed improved optical quality relative to stoichiometric crystals.

  6. Activation volumes in lead halides and other solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexopoulos, K.; Lazaridou, M.; Varotsos, P.

    1986-02-01

    Conductivity measurements of PbCl2 and PbBr2 under pressure have been carried out by Oberschmidt and Lazarus. The migration and activation volumes scale with the corresponding enthalpies in a manner predetermined by the bulk properties. By considering the existing data for a large variety of solids (rare-gas solids, lithium halides, lead halides, SrF2, and olivine) in which the defect enthalpies vary by two orders of magnitude we conclude that there is a curve which connects in a unified manner the point-defect data with the bulk properties.

  7. DFT STUDY OF HYDROGEN STORAGE ON Li- AND Na-DOPED C59B HETEROFULLERENE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedi, Ehsan; Mozaffari, Majid

    2014-05-01

    Effect of light alkali metal (Li and Na) decorated on the C59B heterofullerene for hydrogen storage is considered using DFT-MPW1PW91 method. Results show that Li and Na atoms strongly prefer to adsorb on top of five-member and six-member ring where a carbon atom is replaced by a boron atom. Significant charge transfer from the alkali metal to the C59B compensates for the electron deficiency of C59B and makes the latter aromatic in nature. Corrected binding energies of hydrogen molecule on the alkali-doped C59B using counterpoise method, structural properties and NBO analysis indicate that first hydrogen molecule is adsorbed physically and does not support minimal conditions of DOE requirement. Finally, positive values of binding energies for the adsorption of a second hydrogen molecule show that alkali doped C59B are capable of storing a maximum of one hydrogen molecule.

  8. The different poisoning behaviors of various alkali metal containing compounds on SCR catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xuesen; Yang, Guangpeng; Chen, Yanrong; Ran, Jingyu; Zhang, Li

    2017-01-01

    Alkali metals are poisonous to the metal oxide catalyst for NO removal. The chemical configuration of alkali containing substance and interacting temperature can affect the poisoning profile. A computational method based on Frontier Molecular Orbital analysis was proposed to determine the reacting behavior of various alkali-containing substances with SCR catalyst. The results reveal that the poisoning reactivities of various substances can be ranked as: E (MOH) > E (M2SO4) > E(MCl) > E(MNO3) > E(MHSO4). The experimental activity tests of the catalysts calcined at stepped temperatures show that NaOH can react with the catalyst below 200 °C. NaCl and NaNO3 start to react with the catalyst at a temperature between 300 and 400 °C. Unlike MOH, MCl and MNO3, which can produce volatile or decomposable species for the anions after reacting with the catalyst, M2SO4 and MHSO4 will leave both cations and anions on the catalyst surface. The sulfate ions left on the catalyst can generate active acid sites for NH3 adsorption. The experimental results also show that Na2SO4 and NaHSO4 will not lower the NO conversion. The after-reaction influences of various alkali metals were studied using theoretical and experimental methods. The theoretical results show that the acidity decreases with doping of alkali metal. Experiments show a consistent result that the NO conversion decreases as undoped >LiCl > NaCl > KCl.

  9. The effects of halide anions on the dielectric response of potassium halide solutions in visible, UV and far UV region.

    PubMed

    Shagieva, F M; Boinovich, L B

    2013-06-07

    Based on the experimentally measured dispersion of refractive indices, we studied the effects of halide anions on the dielectric response of potassium halide solutions in the visible, UV and far UV regions. It was shown that a specific ion effect according to the Hofmeister series is clearly demonstrated for the visible range of spectra. For the near-, mid-, and far UV ranges of spectra, the specific ion effect essentially depends on solution concentration and temperature. The influence of ions on the behavior of dynamic dielectric permittivity of a solution is discussed on the basis of ion/water and ion/ion electrostatic and electrodynamic interactions and hydration shell structure.

  10. Structural Characterization of Methanol Substituted Lanthanum Halides

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Ottley, Leigh Anna M.; Alam, Todd M.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Yang, Pin; Mcintyre, Sarah K.

    2010-01-01

    The first study into the alcohol solvation of lanthanum halide [LaX3] derivatives as a means to lower the processing temperature for the production of the LaBr3 scintillators was undertaken using methanol (MeOH). Initially the de-hydration of {[La(µ-Br)(H2O)7](Br)2}2 (1) was investigated through the simple room temperature dissolution of 1 in MeOH. The mixed solvate monomeric [La(H2O)7(MeOH)2](Br)3 (2) compound was isolated where the La metal center retains its original 9-coordination through the binding of two additional MeOH solvents but necessitates the transfer of the innersphere Br to the outersphere. In an attempt to in situ dry the reaction mixture of 1 in MeOH over CaH2, crystals of [Ca(MeOH)6](Br)2 (3) were isolated. Compound 1 dissolved in MeOH at reflux temperatures led to the isolation of an unusual arrangement identified as the salt derivative {[LaBr2.75•5.25(MeOH)]+0.25 [LaBr3.25•4.75(MeOH)]−0.25} (4). The fully substituted species was ultimately isolated through the dissolution of dried LaBr3 in MeOH forming the 8-coordinated [LaBr3(MeOH)5] (5) complex. It was determined that the concentration of the crystallization solution directed the structure isolated (4 concentrated; 5 dilute) The other LaX3 derivatives were isolated as [(MeOH)4(Cl)2La(µ-Cl)]2 (6) and [La(MeOH)9](I)3•MeOH (7). Beryllium Dome XRD analysis indicated that the bulk material for 5 appear to have multiple solvated species, 6 is consistent with the single crystal, and 7 was too broad to elucidate structural aspects. Multinuclear NMR (139La) indicated that these compounds do not retain their structure in MeOD. TGA/DTA data revealed that the de-solvation temperatures of the MeOH derivatives 4 – 6 were slightly higher in comparison to their hydrated counterparts. PMID:20514349

  11. Application of lanthanum halide scintillators and low-resolution dense plastics for modern MC&A needs.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, K.; Belian, A. P.; McKigney E. A.; Russo, P. A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent developments in lanthanum halide scintillators and low-resolution dense plastics give breadth to gamma-ray methods of nuclear material detection suitable for modern MC and A needs. Demanding goals for modernization of MC and A cover both portable and continuous on-line measurement applications that are quantitative for inventory/verification, and that serve those quantitative measurement needs plant-wide. Improved performance (sensitivity and reoslution) is important for portable applications in which a single detector must measure many types of materials. Budget is a major issue for continuous inventory measurements with hundreds or even thousands of detectors placed throughout a facility. Experimentally proven resolution of under 4% for 662 keV {sup 137}Cs gamma rays measured with large cerium-doped LaCl{sub 3} (lanthanum chloride) crystals set a new performance standard for versatile, efficient portable applications comparable in price to NaI(Tl), which has been dominant for decades. While the relatively high cost of crystals remains an obstacle for the application of very large numbers of lanthanum halide scintillators as distributed networked detectors, scintillators made from high-density plastic offer a different type of solution for these gamma-ray measurements. Compared to lanthanum halide crystals they are inexpensive and can be larger in size. Despite lower resolution than NaI(Tl), a quantitative interpretation of the photopeak response of the low-cost dense plastic detectors can be tailored to the unique mechanical and spectral properties of different materials at each of hundreds of fixed on-line locations in a plant. This paper describes the properties and presents experimental results for the two new spectrometer types that, together, bracket NaI(Tl) detectors in both performance and cost, fulfilling modern demands for portable and continuous on-line accountability of uranium and plutonium.

  12. Airplane dopes and doping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W H

    1919-01-01

    Cellulose acetate and cellulose nitrate are the important constituents of airplane dopes in use at the present time, but planes were treated with other materials in the experimental stages of flying. The above compounds belong to the class of colloids and are of value because they produce a shrinking action on the fabric when drying out of solution, rendering it drum tight. Other colloids possessing the same property have been proposed and tried. In the first stages of the development of dope, however, shrinkage was not considered. The fabric was treated merely to render it waterproof. The first airplanes constructed were covered with cotton fabric stretched as tightly as possible over the winds, fuselage, etc., and flying was possible only in fine weather. The necessity of an airplane which would fly under all weather conditions at once became apparent. Then followed experiments with rubberized fabrics, fabrics treated with glue rendered insoluble by formaldehyde or bichromate, fabrics treated with drying and nondrying oils, shellac, casein, etc. It was found that fabrics treated as above lost their tension in damp weather, and the oil from the motor penetrated the proofing material and weakened the fabric. For the most part the film of material lacked durability. Cellulose nitrate lacquers, however were found to be more satisfactory under varying weather conditions, added less weight to the planes, and were easily applied. On the other hand, they were highly inflammable, and oil from the motor penetrated the film of cellulose nitrate, causing the tension of the fabric to be relaxed.

  13. Cs{sub 7}Sm{sub 11}[TeO{sub 3}]{sub 12}Cl{sub 16} and Rb{sub 7}Nd{sub 11}[TeO{sub 3}]{sub 12}Br{sub 16}, the new tellurite halides of the tetragonal Rb{sub 6}LiNd{sub 11}[SeO{sub 3}]{sub 12}Cl{sub 16} structure type

    SciTech Connect

    Charkin, Dmitri O.; Black, Cameron; Downie, Lewis J.; Sklovsky, Dmitry E.; Berdonosov, Peter S.; Olenev, Andrei V.; Zhou, Wuzong; Lightfoot, Philip; Dolgikh, Valery A.

    2015-12-15

    Two new rare-earth – alkali – tellurium oxide halides were synthesized by a salt flux technique and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structures of the new compounds Cs{sub 7}Sm{sub 11}[TeO{sub 3}]{sub 12}Cl{sub 16} (I) and Rb{sub 7}Nd{sub 11}[TeO{sub 3}]{sub 12}Br{sub 16} (II) (both tetragonal, space group I4/mcm) correspond to the sequence of [MLn{sub 11}(TeO{sub 3}){sub 12}] and [M{sub 6}X{sub 16}] layers and bear very strong similarities to those of known selenite analogs. We discuss the trends in similarities and differences in compositions and structural details between the Se and Te compounds; more members of the family are predicted. - Graphical abstract: Two new rare-earth – alkali – tellurium oxide halides were predicted and synthesized. - Highlights: • Two new rare-earth – alkali – tellurium oxide halides were synthesized. • They adopt slab structure of rare earth-tellurium-oxygen and CsCl-like slabs. • The Br-based CsCl-like slabs have been observed first in this layered family.

  14. Semiempirical and DFT Investigations of the Dissociation of Alkyl Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waas, Jack R.

    2006-01-01

    Enthalpy changes corresponding to the gas phase heats of dissociation of 12 organic halides were calculated using two semiempirical methods, the Hartree-Fock method, and two DFT methods. These calculated values were compared to experimental values where possible. All five methods agreed generally with the expected empirically known trends in the…

  15. On the Boiling Points of the Alkyl Halides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, John

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the variety of explanations in organic chemistry textbooks of a physical property of organic compounds. Focuses on those concepts explaining attractive forces between molecules. Concludes that induction interactions play a major role in alkyl halides and other polar organic molecules and should be given wider exposure in chemistry texts.…

  16. Method for calcining nuclear waste solutions containing zirconium and halides

    DOEpatents

    Newby, Billie J.

    1979-01-01

    A reduction in the quantity of gelatinous solids which are formed in aqueous zirconium-fluoride nuclear reprocessing waste solutions by calcium nitrate added to suppress halide volatility during calcination of the solution while further suppressing chloride volatility is achieved by increasing the aluminum to fluoride mole ratio in the waste solution prior to adding the calcium nitrate.

  17. Kinetic Studies of the Solvolysis of Two Organic Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, J. A.; Pasto, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment which utilizes the solvolysis of organic halides to demonstrate first and second order reaction kinetics. The experiment also investigates the effect of a change of solvent polarity on reaction rate, common-ion and noncommon-ion salt effects, and the activation parameters of a…

  18. Students' understanding of alkyl halide reactions in undergraduate organic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Ramirez de Arellano, Daniel

    Organic chemistry is an essential subject for many undergraduate students completing degrees in science, engineering, and pre-professional programs. However, students often struggle with the concepts and skills required to successfully solve organic chemistry exercises. Since alkyl halides are traditionally the first functional group that is studied in undergraduate organic chemistry courses, establishing a robust understanding of the concepts and reactions related to them can be beneficial in assuring students' success in organic chemistry courses. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to elucidate and describe students' understanding of alkyl halide reactions in an undergraduate organic chemistry course. Participants were interviewed using a think-aloud protocol in which they were given a set of exercises dealing with reactions and mechanisms of alkyl halide molecules in order to shed light on the students' understanding of these reactions and elucidate any gaps in understanding and incorrect warrants that may be present. These interviews were transcribed and analyzed using qualitative inquiry approaches. In general, the findings from this study show that the students exhibited gaps in understanding and incorrect warrants dealing with: (1) classifying substances as bases and/or nucleophiles, (2) assessing the basic or nucleophilic strength of substances, (3) accurately describing the electron movement of the steps that take place during alkyl halide reaction mechanisms, and (4) assessing the viability of their proposed reactive intermediates and breakage of covalent bonds. In addition, implications for teaching and future research are proposed.

  19. Students' Understanding of Alkyl Halide Reactions in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz-Ramirez de Arellano, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry is an essential subject for many undergraduate students completing degrees in science, engineering, and pre-professional programs. However, students often struggle with the concepts and skills required to successfully solve organic chemistry exercises. Since alkyl halides are traditionally the first functional group that is…

  20. Quantum efficiencies of imaging detectors with alkali halide photocathodes. I - Microchannel plates with separate and integral CsI photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements and comparisons have been made of the quantum efficiencies of microchannel plate (MCP) detectors in the far-UV (below 2000-A) wavelength range using CsI photocathodes (a) deposited on the front surfaces of microchannel plates and (b) deposited on solid substrates as opaque photocathodes with the resulting photoelectrons input to microchannel plates. The efficiences were measured in both pulse-counting and photodiode modes of operation. Typical efficiencies are about 15 percent at 1216 A for a CsI-coated MCP compared with 65 percent for an opaque CsI photocathode MCP detector. Special processing has yielded an efficiency as high as 20 percent for a CsI-coated MCP. This may possibly be further improved by optimization of the tilt angle of the MCP channels relative to the front face of the MCP and incident radiation. However, at present there still remains a factor of at least 3 quantum efficiency advantage in the separate opaque CsI photocathode configuration.

  1. Modeling and Investigation of Heavy Oxide and Alkali-Halide Scintillators for Potential Use in Neutron and Gamma Detection Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Gamma rays are a form of high energy electromagnetic radiation created in a nuclear process or transition. Gamma radiation from the decay of...fast neutron detection efficiencies well over 40%, were investigated for potential use as highly efficient gamma-neutron radiation detectors. The...Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code (MCNP) was used to characterize the radiation interactions in a candidate set of crystals, including

  2. Cocrystallization of certain 4f and 5f elements in the bivalent state with alkali metal halides

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheev, N.B.; Kamenskaya, A.M.; Veleshko, I.E.; Kulyukhin, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The cocrystallization of Fm/sup 2 +/, Es/sup 2 +/, Cf/sup 2 +/, Am/sup 2 +/, Yb/sup 2 +/, Eu/sup 2 +/ and Sr/sup 2 +/ with NaCl, KCl and KBr in tetrahydrofuran (THF), hexamethylphosphorotriamide (HMPA), and ethanol has been studied. It is shown that in water-ethanol medium An/sup 2 +/ cocrystallize with KCl by the formation of anomalous mixed crystals and Ln/sup 2 +/ do not cocrystallize. In HMPA neither Ln/sup 2 +/ nor An/sup 2 +/ are observed to transfer into the KBr solid phase, while in THF both Ln/sup 2 +/ and An/sup 2 +/ cocrystallize with NaCl. The change in the behavior on Ln/sup 2 +/ and An/sup 2 +/ cocrystallize with a change from one solvent to another is caused by the difference in the effective ionic radii of these elements, which arises from the large nephelauxetic effect for An/sup 2 +/ as well as by the different solvating power of these solvents.

  3. Theoretical study of Ti0 and Pb+ centers in alkali halide and alkaline earth fluoride type crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriessen, J.; Postma, H.

    1987-04-01

    A theoretical study has been carried out on the hfi of Pb+ defects in KCl, CaF2 and BaF2 using an earlier developed crystal field model. Experimental results can be explained in the same way as was done for Tl0 in KCl. However some parameters seem to have a less physical meaning than in the case of Tl0. A new method is in progress using the ASW band structure procedure in order to estimate genuine solid state effects. Preliminary results are encouraging.

  4. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, W.Y.

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased, preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  5. Alkali metal vapors - Laser spectroscopy and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stwalley, W. C.; Koch, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the rapidly expanding use of lasers for spectroscopic studies of alkali metal vapors. Since the alkali metals (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium) are theoretically simple ('visible hydrogen'), readily ionized, and strongly interacting with laser light, they represent ideal systems for quantitative understanding of microscopic interconversion mechanisms between photon (e.g., solar or laser), chemical, electrical and thermal energy. The possible implications of such understanding for a wide variety of practical applications (sodium lamps, thermionic converters, magnetohydrodynamic devices, new lasers, 'lithium waterfall' inertial confinement fusion reactors, etc.) are also discussed.

  6. Alkali-aggregate reaction in concrete containing high-alkali cement and granite aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Owsiak, Z

    2004-01-01

    The paper discusses results of the research into the influence of high-alkali Portland cement on granite aggregate. The deformation of the concrete structure occurred after 18 months. The research was carried out by means of a scanning electron microscope equipped with a high-energy dispersive X-ray analyzer that allowed observation of unpolished sections of concrete bars exhibiting the cracking pattern typical of the alkali-silica reaction. Both the microscopic observation and the X-ray elemental analysis confirm the presence of alkali-silica gel and secondary ettringite in the cracks.

  7. Salts of alkali metal anions and process of preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Dye, James L.; Ceraso, Joseph M.; Tehan, Frederick J.; Lok, Mei Tak

    1978-01-01

    Compounds of alkali metal anion salts of alkali metal cations in bicyclic polyoxadiamines are disclosed. The salts are prepared by contacting an excess of alkali metal with an alkali metal dissolving solution consisting of a bicyclic polyoxadiamine in a suitable solvent, and recovered by precipitation. The salts have a gold-color crystalline appearance and are stable in a vacuum at -10.degree. C. and below.

  8. Purification and Characterization of an Extracellular, Thermo-Alkali-Stable, Metal Tolerant Laccase from Bacillus tequilensis SN4

    PubMed Central

    Sondhi, Sonica; Sharma, Prince; Saini, Shilpa; Puri, Neena; Gupta, Naveen

    2014-01-01

    A novel extracellular thermo-alkali-stable laccase from Bacillus tequilensis SN4 (SN4LAC) was purified to homogeneity. The laccase was a monomeric protein of molecular weight 32 KDa. UV-visible spectrum and peptide mass fingerprinting results showed that SN4LAC is a multicopper oxidase. Laccase was active in broad range of phenolic and non-phenolic substrates. Catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) showed that 2, 6-dimethoxyphenol was most efficiently oxidized by the enzyme. The enzyme was inhibited by conventional inhibitors of laccase like sodium azide, cysteine, dithiothreitol and β-mercaptoethanol. SN4LAC was found to be highly thermostable, having temperature optimum at 85°C and could retain more than 80% activity at 70°C for 24 h. The optimum pH of activity for 2, 6-dimethoxyphenol, 2, 2′-azino bis[3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate], syringaldazine and guaiacol was 8.0, 5.5, 6.5 and 8.0 respectively. Enzyme was alkali-stable as it retained more than 75% activity at pH 9.0 for 24 h. Activity of the enzyme was significantly enhanced by Cu2+, Co2+, SDS and CTAB, while it was stable in the presence of halides, most of the other metal ions and surfactants. The extracellular nature and stability of SN4LAC in extreme conditions such as high temperature, pH, heavy metals, halides and detergents makes it a highly suitable candidate for biotechnological and industrial applications. PMID:24871763

  9. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  10. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  11. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  12. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  13. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  14. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  15. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  17. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  18. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  2. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in...

  8. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  10. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  11. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in...

  12. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  14. Alkali resistant optical coatings for alkali lasers and methods of production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Soules, Thomas F; Beach, Raymond J; Mitchell, Scott C

    2014-11-18

    In one embodiment, a multilayer dielectric coating for use in an alkali laser includes two or more alternating layers of high and low refractive index materials, wherein an innermost layer includes a thicker, >500 nm, and dense, >97% of theoretical, layer of at least one of: alumina, zirconia, and hafnia for protecting subsequent layers of the two or more alternating layers of high and low index dielectric materials from alkali attack. In another embodiment, a method for forming an alkali resistant coating includes forming a first oxide material above a substrate and forming a second oxide material above the first oxide material to form a multilayer dielectric coating, wherein the second oxide material is on a side of the multilayer dielectric coating for contacting an alkali.

  15. Computational studies of solid-state alkali conduction in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhi; Mo, Yifei; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-03-25

    The facile conduction of alkali ions in a crystal host is of crucial importance in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries, the dominant form of energy storage today. In this review, we provide a comprehensive survey of computational approaches to study solid-state alkali diffusion. We demonstrate how these methods have provided useful insights into the design of materials that form the main components of a rechargeable alkali-ion battery, namely the electrodes, superionic conductor solid electrolytes and interfaces. We will also provide a perspective on future challenges and directions. Here, the scope of this review includes the monovalent lithium- and sodium-ion chemistries that are currently of the most commercial interest.

  16. Computational studies of solid-state alkali conduction in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Zhi; Mo, Yifei; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-03-25

    The facile conduction of alkali ions in a crystal host is of crucial importance in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries, the dominant form of energy storage today. In this review, we provide a comprehensive survey of computational approaches to study solid-state alkali diffusion. We demonstrate how these methods have provided useful insights into the design of materials that form the main components of a rechargeable alkali-ion battery, namely the electrodes, superionic conductor solid electrolytes and interfaces. We will also provide a perspective on future challenges and directions. Here, the scope of this review includes the monovalent lithium- and sodium-ion chemistries that aremore » currently of the most commercial interest.« less

  17. Ingestion of caustic alkali farm products.

    PubMed

    Neidich, G

    1993-01-01

    Since the Poison Prevention Packaging Act took effect, the number of ingestions of caustic alkali from household products has been significantly reduced. Commercial caustic alkalis used on farms, however, were not included in this legislation. Fourteen children over a 5 year period were seen after ingestion of commercial caustic alkalis used on farms. Seven of the children had ingested liquid pipeline cleaners and seven had ingested solid agents used for a variety of reasons. Six of seven children ingesting liquid agents did so from nonoriginal containers into which the caustic had been transferred for convenience. All seven children ingesting solid agents did so from the original container. Eight of the 14 children were found to have second-degree or worse esophageal involvement. Both solid and liquid caustic agents used commercially on farms can cause significant morbidity. Development of a child-resistant container for daily transfer of liquid pipeline agents could be helpful in preventing injuries from liquid pipeline cleaners. Pediatric gastroenterologists as well as primary care physicians in rural areas should be familiar with this type of injury and should take an active role in instructing parents of children living on farms to prevent such injuries. Extension of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act to caustic alkalis used on farms needs to be considered.

  18. Cohesive Energy of the Alkali Metals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a method, considered appropriate for presentation to undergraduate students in materials science and related courses, for the calculation of cohesive energies of the alkali metals. Uses a description based on the free electron model and gives results to within 0.1 eV of the experimental values. (Author/GS)

  19. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-05-12

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization.

  20. Rare-Earth Tri-Halide Methanol-Adduct Single-Crystal Scintillators for Gamma Ray and Neutron Detection - 8/17/09

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Wisniewski, D.; Neal, John S; Bell, Zane W; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Kolopus, James A; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Custelcean, Radu; Wisniewska, Monika; Peña, K. E.

    2009-01-01

    Cerium activated rare-earth tri- halides represent a well-known family of high performance inorganic rare-earth scintillators - including the high-light-yield, high-energy-resolution scintillator, cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide. These hygroscopic inorganic rare-earth halides are currently grown as single crystals from the melt - either by the Bridgman or Czochralski techniques slow and expensive processes that are frequently characterized by severe cracking of the material due to anisotropic thermal stresses and cleavage effects. We have recently discovered a new family of cerium-activated rare-earth metal organic scintillators consisting of tri-halide methanol adducts of cerium and lanthanum namely CeCl3(CH3OH)4 and LaBr3(CH3OH)4:Ce. These methanol-adduct scintillator materials can be grown near room temperature from a methanol solution, and their high solubility is consistent with the application of the rapid solution growth methods that are currently used to grow very large single crystals of potassium dihydrogen phosphate. The structures of these new rare-earth metal-organic scintillating compounds were determined by single crystal x-ray refinements, and their scintillation response to both gamma rays and neutrons, as presented here, was characterized using different excitation sources. Tri-halide methanol-adduct crystals activated with trivalent cerium apparently represent the initial example of a solution-grown rare-earth metal-organic molecular scintillator that is applicable to gamma ray, x-ray, and fast neutron detection.

  1. Matrix isolation infrared spectra of hydrogen halide and halogen complexes with nitrosyl halides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, Louis J.; Lucas, Donald; Pimentel, George C.

    1982-01-01

    Matrix isolation infrared spectra of nitrosyl halide (XNO) complexes with HX and X2 (X = Cl, Br) are presented. The relative frequency shifts of the HX mode are modest (ClNO H-Cl, delta-nu/nu = -0.045; BrNO H-Br, delta-nu/nu = -0.026), indicating weak hydrogen bonds 1-3 kcal/mol. These shifts are accompanied by significant shifts to higher frequencies in the XN-O stretching mode (CIN-O HCl, delta-nu/nu = +0.016; BrN-O HBr, delta-nu/nu = +0.011). Similar shifts were observed for the XN-O X2 complexes (ClN-O Cl2, delta-nu/nu = +0.009; BrN-O-Br2, delta-nu/nu = +0.013). In all four complexes, the X-NO stretching mode relative shift is opposite in sign and about 1.6 times that of the NO stretching mode. These four complexes are considered to be similar in structure and charge distribution. The XN-O frequency shift suggests that complex formation is accompanied by charge withdrawal from the NO bond ranging from about .04 to .07 electron charges. The HX and X2 molecules act as electron acceptors, drawing electrons out of the antibonding orbital of NO and strengthening the XN-O bond. The implications of the pattern of vibrational shifts concerning the structure of the complexes are discussed.

  2. Spectroscopic effects of disorder and vibrational localization in mixed-halide metal-halide chain solids

    SciTech Connect

    Love, S.P.; Scott, B.; Worl, L.A.; Huckett, S.C.; Saxena, A.; Huang, X.Z.; Bishop, A.R.; Swanson, B.I.

    1993-02-01

    Resonance Raman techniques, together with lattice-dynamics and Peierls-Hubbard modelling, are used to explore the electronic and vibrational dynamics of the quasi-one-dimensional metal-halogen chain solids [Pt(en){sub 2}][R(en){sub 2}X{sub 2}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 4}, (en = C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N{sub 2} and X=Cl, Br), abbreviated ``PLX.`` The mixed-halide materials PtCl{sub 1-x}Br{sub x} and PtCl{sub 1-x}I{sub x} consist of long mixed chains with heterojunctions between segments of the two constituent materials. Thus, in addition to providing mesoscale modulation of the chain electronic states, they serve as prototypes for elucidating the properties to be expected for macroscopic heterojunctions of these highly nonlinear materials. Once a detailed understanding of the various local vibrational modes occurring in these disordered solids is developed, the electronic structure of the chain segments and junctions can be probed by tuning the Raman excitation through their various electronic resonances.

  3. Electronic structure and stability of clusters, especially of alkali metals and carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, N. H.

    1993-12-01

    The electronic structure of alkali metal atom clusters of various sizes is first discussed, using a spherically averaged pseudopotential model. The main technique employed is density functional theory, and a connection is established with predictions about dissociation energy from the theory of the inhomogeneous electron gas. This latter theory is then invoked explicitly to discuss the barrier to fission for doubly charged alkali metal atom clusters. In the case of asymmetric fission, comparison is made with experiment following the study of Garcias [F. Garcias, J.A. Alonso, J.M. Lopez and M. Barranco, Phys. Rev. B, 43 (1991) 9459], while for symmetric fission a connection is again made between fission barrier and concepts which follow from the general theory of the inhomogeneous electron gas. Finally, and more briefly, both density functional calculations and quantum-chemical studies of carbon clusters are referred to. After a summary of the work of Adamowicz on small linear C clusters [L. Adamowicz, J. Chem. Phys., 94 (1991) 1241], results on C 60 and its singly and doubly charged anions, and on (C 60) 2, are summarized, the potential relevance to alkali doped buckminsterfullerene superconductivity being emphasized as an important direction for future work.

  4. Effect of Alkali Ions on the Amorphous to Crystalline Phase Transition of Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venezia, A. M.; La Parola, V.; Longo, A.; Martorana, A.

    2001-11-01

    The effect of the addition of alkali ions to commercial amorphous silica, generally used as support for heterogeneous catalysts, has been investigated from the point of view of morphological and structural changes. Samples of alkali-doped silica were prepared by impregnation and subsequent calcination at various temperatures. The structural effect of Li, Na, K, and Cs was determined by use of techniques such as wide-angle (WAXS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The WAXS diffractograms, analyzed with the Rietveld method using the GSAS program, allowed qualitative and quantitative identification of the fraction of the different silica polymorphs like quartz, tridymite, and cristobalite. SAXS measurements, using the classical method based on Porod's law, yielded the total surface area of the systems. The calculated areas were compared with the surface areas determined by the nitrogen adsorption technique using the analytical method of Brunauer-Emmett-Teller. The results are explained in terms of sizes of the alkali ions and cell volume of the different crystalline phases.

  5. Calcium-Alkali Syndrome in the Modern Era

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ami M.; Adeseun, Gbemisola A.; Goldfarb, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    The ingestion of calcium, along with alkali, results in a well-described triad of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and renal insufficiency. Over time, the epidemiology and root cause of the syndrome have shifted, such that the disorder, originally called the milk-alkali syndrome, is now better described as the calcium-alkali syndrome. The calcium-alkali syndrome is an important cause of morbidity that may be on the rise, an unintended consequence of shifts in calcium and vitamin D intake in segments of the population. We review the pathophysiology of the calcium-alkali syndrome. PMID:24288027

  6. Methods and Mechanisms for Cross-Electrophile Coupling of Csp2 Halides with Alkyl Electrophiles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Cross-electrophile coupling, the cross-coupling of two different electrophiles, avoids the need for preformed carbon nucleophiles, but development of general methods has lagged behind cross-coupling and C–H functionalization. A central reason for this slow development is the challenge of selectively coupling two substrates that are alike in reactivity. This Account describes the discovery of generally cross-selective reactions of aryl halides and acyl halides with alkyl halides, the mechanistic studies that illuminated the underlying principles of these reactions, and the use of these fundamental principles in the rational design of new cross-electrophile coupling reactions. Although the coupling of two different electrophiles under reducing conditions often leads primarily to symmetric dimers, the subtle differences in reactivity of aryl halides and alkyl halides with nickel catalysts allowed for generally cross-selective coupling reactions. These conditions could also be extended to the coupling of acyl halides with alkyl halides. These reactions are exceptionally functional group tolerant and can be assembled on the benchtop. A combination of stoichiometric and catalytic studies on the mechanism of these reactions revealed an unusual radical-chain mechanism and suggests that selectivity arises from (1) the preference of nickel(0) for oxidative addition to aryl halides and acyl halides over alkyl halides and (2) the greater propensity of alkyl halides to form free radicals. Bipyridine-ligated arylnickel intermediates react with alkyl radicals to efficiently form, after reductive elimination, new C–C bonds. Finally, the resulting nickel(I) species is proposed to regenerate an alkyl radical to carry the chain. Examples of new reactions designed using these principles include carbonylative coupling of aryl halides with alkyl halides to form ketones, arylation of epoxides to form β-aryl alcohols, and coupling of benzyl sulfonate esters with aryl

  7. Alkali metal recovery from carbonaceous material conversion process

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.; Gorbaty, Martin L.; Tsou, Joe M.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced in the gasifier or similar reaction zone, alkali metal constitutents are recovered from the particles by withdrawing and passing the particles from the reaction zone to an alkali metal recovery zone in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen and treating the particles in the recovery zone with water or an aqueous solution in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen. The solution formed by treating the particles in the recovery zone will contain water-soluble alkali metal constituents and is recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preventing contact of the particles with oxygen as they are withdrawn from the reaction zone and during treatment in the recovery zone avoids the formation of undesirable alkali metal constituents in the aqueous solution produced in the recovery zone and insures maximum recovery of water-soluble alkali metal constituents from the alkali metal residues.

  8. Laser Direct Write Synthesis of Lead Halide Perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Stanley S.; Swartzentruber, Brian S.; Janish, Matthew T.; Meyer, Kristin C.; Biedermann, Laura B.; Okur, Serdal; Burckel, D. Bruce; Carter, C. Barry; Kaehr, Bryan

    2016-09-05

    Lead halide perovskites are increasingly considered for applications beyond photovoltaics, for example, light emission and detection, where an ability to pattern and prototype microscale geometries can facilitate the incorporation of this class of materials into devices. In this study, we demonstrate laser direct write of lead halide perovskites, a remarkably simple procedure that takes advantage of the inverse dependence between perovskite solubility and temperature by using a laser to induce localized heating of an absorbing substrate. We also demonstrate arbitrary pattern formation of crystalline CH3NH3PbBr3 on a range of substrates and fabricate and characterize a microscale photodetector using this approach. This direct write methodology provides a path forward for the prototyping and production of perovskite-based devices.

  9. Laser Direct Write Synthesis of Lead Halide Perovskites

    DOE PAGES

    Chou, Stanley S.; Swartzentruber, Brian S.; Janish, Matthew T.; ...

    2016-09-05

    Lead halide perovskites are increasingly considered for applications beyond photovoltaics, for example, light emission and detection, where an ability to pattern and prototype microscale geometries can facilitate the incorporation of this class of materials into devices. In this study, we demonstrate laser direct write of lead halide perovskites, a remarkably simple procedure that takes advantage of the inverse dependence between perovskite solubility and temperature by using a laser to induce localized heating of an absorbing substrate. We also demonstrate arbitrary pattern formation of crystalline CH3NH3PbBr3 on a range of substrates and fabricate and characterize a microscale photodetector using this approach.more » This direct write methodology provides a path forward for the prototyping and production of perovskite-based devices.« less

  10. Gaseous NH3 Confers Porous Pt Nanodendrites Assisted by Halides

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shuanglong; Eid, Kamel; Li, Weifeng; Cao, Xueqin; Pan, Yue; Guo, Jun; Wang, Liang; Wang, Hongjing; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Tailoring the morphology of Pt nanocrystals (NCs) is of great concern for their enhancement in catalytic activity and durability. In this article, a novel synthetic strategy is developed to selectively prepare porous dendritic Pt NCs with different structures for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) assisted by NH3 gas and halides (F−, Cl−, Br−). The NH3 gas plays critical roles on tuning the morphology. Previously, H2 and CO gas are reported to assist the shape control of metallic nanocrystals. This is the first demonstration that NH3 gas assists the Pt anisotropic growth. The halides also play important role in the synthetic strategy to regulate the formation of Pt NCs. As-made porous dendritic Pt NCs, especially when NH4F is used as a regulating reagent, show superior catalytic activity for ORR compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst and other previously reported Pt-based NCs. PMID:27184228

  11. Double Charged Surface Layers in Lead Halide Perovskite Crystals.

    PubMed

    Sarmah, Smritakshi P; Burlakov, Victor M; Yengel, Emre; Murali, Banavoth; Alarousu, Erkki; El-Zohry, Ahmed M; Yang, Chen; Alias, Mohd S; Zhumekenov, Ayan A; Saidaminov, Makhsud I; Cho, Namchul; Wehbe, Nimer; Mitra, Somak; Ajia, Idris; Dey, Sukumar; Mansour, Ahmed E; Abdelsamie, Maged; Amassian, Aram; Roqan, Iman S; Ooi, Boon S; Goriely, Alain; Bakr, Osman M; Mohammed, Omar F

    2017-03-08

    Understanding defect chemistry, particularly ion migration, and its significant effect on the surface's optical and electronic properties is one of the major challenges impeding the development of hybrid perovskite-based devices. Here, using both experimental and theoretical approaches, we demonstrated that the surface layers of the perovskite crystals may acquire a high concentration of positively charged vacancies with the complementary negatively charged halide ions pushed to the surface. This charge separation near the surface generates an electric field that can induce an increase of optical band gap in the surface layers relative to the bulk. We found that the charge separation, electric field, and the amplitude of shift in the bandgap strongly depend on the halides and organic moieties of perovskite crystals. Our findings reveal the peculiarity of surface effects that are currently limiting the applications of perovskite crystals and more importantly explain their origins, thus enabling viable surface passivation strategies to remediate them.

  12. Laser Direct Write Synthesis of Lead Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Chou, Stanley S; Swartzentruber, Brian S; Janish, Matthew T; Meyer, Kristin C; Biedermann, Laura B; Okur, Serdal; Burckel, D Bruce; Carter, C Barry; Kaehr, Bryan

    2016-10-06

    Lead halide perovskites are increasingly considered for applications beyond photovoltaics, for example, light emission and detection, where an ability to pattern and prototype microscale geometries can facilitate the incorporation of this class of materials into devices. Here we demonstrate laser direct write of lead halide perovskites, a remarkably simple procedure that takes advantage of the inverse dependence between perovskite solubility and temperature by using a laser to induce localized heating of an absorbing substrate. We demonstrate arbitrary pattern formation of crystalline CH3NH3PbBr3 on a range of substrates and fabricate and characterize a microscale photodetector using this approach. This direct write methodology provides a path forward for the prototyping and production of perovskite-based devices.

  13. Solution-Phase Synthesis of Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dandan; Eaton, Samuel W; Yu, Yi; Dou, Letian; Yang, Peidong

    2015-07-29

    Halide perovskites have attracted much attention over the past 5 years as a promising class of materials for optoelectronic applications. However, compared to hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites, the study of their pure inorganic counterparts, like cesium lead halides (CsPbX3), lags far behind. Here, a catalyst-free, solution-phase synthesis of CsPbX3 nanowires (NWs) is reported. These NWs are single-crystalline, with uniform growth direction, and crystallize in the orthorhombic phase. Both CsPbBr3 and CsPbI3 are photoluminescence active, with composition-dependent temperature and self-trapping behavior. These NWs with a well-defined morphology could serve as an ideal platform for the investigation of fundamental properties and the development of future applications in nanoscale optoelectronic devices based on all-inorganic perovskites.

  14. Enhanced Born charge and proximity to ferroelectricity in thallium halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Mao-Hua; Singh, David J.

    2010-04-01

    Electronic-structure and lattice-dynamics calculations on thallium halides show that the Born effective charges in these compounds are more than twice larger than the nominal ionic charges. This is a result of cross-band-gap hybridization between Tlp and halogen- p states. The large Born charges cause giant splitting between longitudinal and transverse-optic phonon modes, bringing the lattice close to ferroelectric instability. Our calculations indeed show that cubic TlBr develops ferroelectric instabilities upon lattice expansion starting at 2%. It is remarkable that the apparently ionic thallium halides with a simple cubic CsCl structure and large differences in electronegativity between cations and anions can be very close to ferroelectricity. This can lead to effective screening of defects and impurities that would otherwise be strong carrier traps and may therefore contribute to the relatively good carrier transport properties in TlBr radiation detectors.

  15. The behaviour of alkali metals in biomass conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hald, P.

    1995-12-31

    Alkali metals present in biomass contribute to problems as agglomeration, deposition and corrosion. In order to reduce the problems. It is of interest to describe the behavior of alkali metals in the conversion systems. Useful tools for die description are equilibrium calculations combined with measurements of gaseous alkali metal and analyses of solid materials. A comprehensive equilibrium study has been conducted and the results organized in tables, showing which alkali metal components can be present, dependent on the temperature and the ratios alkali metal to sulphur and alkali metal to chlorine. The tables presented can be used as a catalogue, giving easy access to equilibrium results. A sampling method for die measurement of gaseous alkali metal is described and the sampling efficiency is given. The developed tools are demonstrated for a straw gasifier and a fluidized bed combustor using a coal/straw mixture as a fuel.

  16. Oxidative alkoxylation of phosphine in alcohol solutions of copper halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polimbetova, G. S.; Borangazieva, A. K.; Ibraimova, Zh. U.; Bugubaeva, G. O.; Keynbay, S.

    2016-08-01

    The phosphine oxidation reaction with oxygen in alcohol solutions of copper (I, II) halides is studied. Kinetic parameters, intermediates, and by-products are studied by means of NMR 31P-, IR-, UV-, and ESR- spectroscopy; and by magnetic susceptibility, redox potentiometry, gas chromatography, and elemental analysis. A reaction mechanism is proposed, and the optimum conditions are found for the reaction of oxidative alkoxylation phosphine.

  17. Copper-catalyzed arylation of alkyl halides with arylaluminum reagents

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Bijay

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report a Cu-catalyzed coupling between triarylaluminum reagents and alkyl halides to form arylalkanes. The reaction proceeds in the presence of N,N,N’,N’-tetramethyl-o-phenylenediamine (NN-1) as a ligand in combination with CuI as a catalyst. This catalyst system enables the coupling of primary alkyl iodides and bromides with electron-neutral and electron-rich triarylaluminum reagents and affords the cross-coupled products in good to excellent yields. PMID:26734088

  18. Organolead Halide Perovskites for Low Operating Voltage Multilevel Resistive Switching.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaeho; Park, Sunghak; Lee, Joohee; Hong, Kootak; Kim, Do-Hong; Moon, Cheon Woo; Park, Gyeong Do; Suh, Junmin; Hwang, Jinyeon; Kim, Soo Young; Jung, Hyun Suk; Park, Nam-Gyu; Han, Seungwu; Nam, Ki Tae; Jang, Ho Won

    2016-08-01

    Organolead halide perovskites are used for low-operating-voltage multilevel resistive switching. Ag/CH3 NH3 PbI3 /Pt cells exhibit electroforming-free resistive switching at an electric field of 3.25 × 10(3) V cm(-1) for four distinguishable ON-state resistance levels. The migration of iodine interstitials and vacancies with low activation energies is responsible for the low-electric-field resistive switching via filament formation and annihilation.

  19. Iron-catalyzed homocoupling of aryl halides and derivatives in the presence of alkyllithiums.

    PubMed

    Toummini, Dounia; Ouazzani, Fouad; Taillefer, Marc

    2013-09-20

    Direct synthesis of biaryl derivatives from aryl halides takes place under very mild temperature conditions by using a ligand-free iron catalytic system. The procedure, which proceeds via an in situ quantitative aryl halide exchange with alkyllithiums, allows for excellent control of the reactivity and is in line with the sustainable development. The method is also applicable to styryl and benzyl halides and to phenylacetylene.

  20. Fundamentals of Digital Photography 1. Silver Halide Photography and Digital Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Kenji

    A major difference between silver halide photography and digital photography lies in the way of processing image data. Parallel processing of the whole image area can be accomplished in silver halide photography. However, image data must be processed serially in digital photography, and this serial processing of image data is called "scan". In silver halide photography, an almighty device "film" does everything from signal conversion, signal processing to signal storage. But separate devices take each role in digital photography.

  1. Excited State Kinetics of Mercury Halides and Mixtures with N2 and Xe.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-28

    methylmercury and mercuric halides . Room t~m~era- ture quenehing rate constants and rate constants for production of HgX(B z ) were measured. Evidence...1311 (1982) Rite constants for the production of excited state products from the reaction of Xe( P ) with several methylmercury and mercuric halides ...v - 0, 1) and Xe( P ) with serveral mercuric and methylmercury halids haVe been simulated to asiign the HgX(B) vibrational * distributions. The

  2. Effects of halides on plasmid-mediated silver resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Maynes, M; Silver, S

    1998-12-01

    Silver resistance of sensitive Escherichia coli J53 and resistance plasmid-containing J53(pMG101) was affected by halides in the growth medium. The effects of halides on Ag+ resistance were measured with AgNO3 and silver sulfadiazine, both on agar and in liquid. Low concentrations of chloride made the differences in MICs between sensitive and resistant strains larger. High concentrations of halides increased the sensitivities of both strains to Ag+.

  3. Effects of Halides on Plasmid-Mediated Silver Resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amit; Maynes, Maria; Silver, Simon

    1998-01-01

    Silver resistance of sensitive Escherichia coli J53 and resistance plasmid-containing J53(pMG101) was affected by halides in the growth medium. The effects of halides on Ag+ resistance were measured with AgNO3 and silver sulfadiazine, both on agar and in liquid. Low concentrations of chloride made the differences in MICs between sensitive and resistant strains larger. High concentrations of halides increased the sensitivities of both strains to Ag+. PMID:9835606

  4. Solid-state 207Pb NMR studies of mixed lead halides, PbFX (X=Cl, Br, or I).

    PubMed

    Glatfelter, Alicia; Dybowski, Cecil; Kragten, David D; Bai, Shi; Perry, Dale L; Lockard, Jenny

    2007-04-01

    Solid-state 207Pb NMR studies have been conducted on mixed lead(II) halides of the type PbFX, where X=Cl, Br, or I. NMR data for the mixed halides are compared to the solid-state NMR data for the divalent, binary lead halides, PbX2 (X=F, Cl, Br, I). The NMR data are evaluated in the context of the structures of the compounds and the effects of the mixed halides on the electronic structure of the divalent lead. Data sets for the mixed halides are discussed and compared to those for the regular lead(II) halides.

  5. Fluorescent Properties of Manganese Halide Benzothiazole Inorganic-Organic Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Mei, YingXuan; Wei, ZhenHong; Mei, GuangQuan; Cai, Hu

    2016-11-01

    The reaction of manganese (II) halides MnX2 and benzothiazole (btz) in the concentrated acids HX (X = Cl, Br) at 80 °C resulted in the formation of two inorganic-organic hybrid complexes: [(btz)2(MnX4)]·2H2O (X = Cl, 1; X = Br, 2). Both compounds showed green luminescence and exhibited moderate quantum yields of 43.17 % for 1 and 26.18 % for 2, which were directly originated from the tetrahedral coordination of Mn(2+) ion. Two organic - inorganic hybrids [(btz)2(MnX4)]·2H2O based on MnCl2, benzothiazole and halide acids emitted green light with the moderate quantum efficiencies when excited by 365 nm light. Graphical abstract Two organic-inorganic hybrids [(btz)2(MnX4)]·2H2O based on MnCl2, benzothiazole and halide acids emitted green light with the moderate quantum efficiencies when excited by 365 nm light.

  6. Deciphering Halogen Competition in Organometallic Halide Perovskite Growth

    DOE PAGES

    Keum, Jong Kahk; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Chen, Shiyou; ...

    2016-03-01

    Organometallic halide perovskites (OHPs) hold great promise for next-generation, low-cost optoelectronic devices. During the chemical synthesis and crystallization of OHP thin films a major unresolved question is the competition between multiple halide species (e.g. I-, Cl-, Br-) in the formation of the mixed halide perovskite crystals. Whether Cl- ions are successfully incorporated into the perovskite crystal structure or alternatively, where they are located, is not yet fully understood. Here, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of crystallization dynamics are combined with ex situ TOF-SIMS chemical analysis to reveal that Br- or Cl- ions can promote crystal growth, yet reactive I- ionsmore » prevent them from incorporating into the lattice of the final perovskite crystal structure. The Cl- ions are located in the grain boundaries of the perovskite films. These findings significantly advance our understanding of the role of halogens during synthesis of hybrid perovskites, and provide an insightful guidance to the engineering of high-quality perovskite films, essential for exploring superior-performance and cost-effective optoelectronic devices.« less

  7. Deciphering Halogen Competition in Organometallic Halide Perovskite Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Keum, Jong Kahk; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Chen, Shiyou; Du, Mao-Hua; Ivanov, Ilia N; Rouleau, Christopher; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2016-03-01

    Organometallic halide perovskites (OHPs) hold great promise for next-generation, low-cost optoelectronic devices. During the chemical synthesis and crystallization of OHP thin films a major unresolved question is the competition between multiple halide species (e.g. I-, Cl-, Br-) in the formation of the mixed halide perovskite crystals. Whether Cl- ions are successfully incorporated into the perovskite crystal structure or alternatively, where they are located, is not yet fully understood. Here, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of crystallization dynamics are combined with ex situ TOF-SIMS chemical analysis to reveal that Br- or Cl- ions can promote crystal growth, yet reactive I- ions prevent them from incorporating into the lattice of the final perovskite crystal structure. The Cl- ions are located in the grain boundaries of the perovskite films. These findings significantly advance our understanding of the role of halogens during synthesis of hybrid perovskites, and provide an insightful guidance to the engineering of high-quality perovskite films, essential for exploring superior-performance and cost-effective optoelectronic devices.

  8. Lasing in robust cesium lead halide perovskite nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Samuel W.; Lai, Minliang; Gibson, Natalie A.; Wong, Andrew B.; Dou, Letian; Ma, Jie; Wang, Lin-Wang; Leone, Stephen R.; Yang, Peidong

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly growing field of nanoscale lasers can be advanced through the discovery of new, tunable light sources. The emission wavelength tunability demonstrated in perovskite materials is an attractive property for nanoscale lasers. Whereas organic–inorganic lead halide perovskite materials are known for their instability, cesium lead halides offer a robust alternative without sacrificing emission tunability or ease of synthesis. Here, we report the low-temperature, solution-phase growth of cesium lead halide nanowires exhibiting low-threshold lasing and high stability. The as-grown nanowires are single crystalline with well-formed facets, and act as high-quality laser cavities. The nanowires display excellent stability while stored and handled under ambient conditions over the course of weeks. Upon optical excitation, Fabry–Pérot lasing occurs in CsPbBr3 nanowires with an onset of 5 μJ cm−2 with the nanowire cavity displaying a maximum quality factor of 1,009 ± 5. Lasing under constant, pulsed excitation can be maintained for over 1 h, the equivalent of 109 excitation cycles, and lasing persists upon exposure to ambient atmosphere. Wavelength tunability in the green and blue regions of the spectrum in conjunction with excellent stability makes these nanowire lasers attractive for device fabrication. PMID:26862172

  9. Properties of volume reflection silver-halide gelatin holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosobokova, N. L.; Usanov, Yuri E.; Shevtsov, Michail K.

    1991-02-01

    Three schemes of realization of micro-cavity method of processing silver halide photomaterials for silver-halide gelatin holograms (SHG) generation are proposed. Factors affecting diffraction efficiency replay wavelength shift and selectivity are discussed. 2. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS In the previous paper on this issue the principle of SHG hologram formation based on a difference of speed hardening of gelatin mass in a photolayer and in a thin cover of gelatin absorbed on silver or silver halide grains was formulated. The investigation of " swelling" factor for layers both containing and not containing solid grains verified the difference in the hardening degree of these layers and demonstrated a possibility of using this phenomenon for the generation of SHG holograms. As a result we proposed three methods of transforming the structure of distribution of solid particles of a layer into the structure of micro-cavity distribution. Processing procedures realizing the micro-cavity (MC) methods are presented in Fig. l. As seen in Fig. l the differentiating feature of each method is the type of grain in a layer during its hardening. In the course of realization of methods MC-l MC-2 and MC-3 a layer to be hardened contains metallic developed silver rehalogenated silver and silver resulting after reversal bleaching of developed silver respectively. The common feature of all methods is dehydration procedure which results in producing micro cavities in the places of removed silver or silver salt grains.

  10. Lasing in robust cesium lead halide perovskite nanowires.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Samuel W; Lai, Minliang; Gibson, Natalie A; Wong, Andrew B; Dou, Letian; Ma, Jie; Wang, Lin-Wang; Leone, Stephen R; Yang, Peidong

    2016-02-23

    The rapidly growing field of nanoscale lasers can be advanced through the discovery of new, tunable light sources. The emission wavelength tunability demonstrated in perovskite materials is an attractive property for nanoscale lasers. Whereas organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite materials are known for their instability, cesium lead halides offer a robust alternative without sacrificing emission tunability or ease of synthesis. Here, we report the low-temperature, solution-phase growth of cesium lead halide nanowires exhibiting low-threshold lasing and high stability. The as-grown nanowires are single crystalline with well-formed facets, and act as high-quality laser cavities. The nanowires display excellent stability while stored and handled under ambient conditions over the course of weeks. Upon optical excitation, Fabry-Pérot lasing occurs in CsPbBr3 nanowires with an onset of 5 μJ cm(-2) with the nanowire cavity displaying a maximum quality factor of 1,009 ± 5. Lasing under constant, pulsed excitation can be maintained for over 1 h, the equivalent of 10(9) excitation cycles, and lasing persists upon exposure to ambient atmosphere. Wavelength tunability in the green and blue regions of the spectrum in conjunction with excellent stability makes these nanowire lasers attractive for device fabrication.

  11. Effect of alkali lignins with different molecular weights from alkali pretreated rice straw hydrolyzate on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Qi, Benkun; Luo, Jianquan; Wan, Yinhua

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of alkali lignins with different molecular weights on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose. Different alkali lignins fractions, which were obtained from cascade ultrafiltration, were added into the dilute acid pretreated (DAP) and alkali pretreated (AP) rice straws respectively during enzymatic hydrolysis. The results showed that the addition of alkali lignins enhanced the hydrolysis and the enhancement for hydrolysis increased with increasing molecular weights of alkali lignins, with maximum enhancement being 28.69% for DAP and 20.05% for AP, respectively. The enhancement was partly attributed to the improved cellulase activity, and filter paper activity increased by 18.03% when adding lignin with highest molecular weight. It was found that the enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis was correlated with the adsorption affinity of cellulase on alkali lignins, and the difference in surface charge and hydrophobicity of alkali lignins were responsible for the difference in affinity between cellulase and lignins.

  12. Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by use of molten metal halide catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst, thereafter separating at least a substantial portion of the carbonaceous material associated with the reaction mixture from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the metal halide catalyst, an improvement comprising contacting the spent molten metal halide catalyst after removal of a major portion of the carbonaceous material therefrom with an additional quantity of hydrogen is disclosed.

  13. Systematic analysis of the unique band gap modulation of mixed halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongseob; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Chung, Choong-Heui; Hong, Ki-Ha

    2016-02-14

    Solar cells based on organic-inorganic hybrid metal halide perovskites have been proven to be one of the most promising candidates for the next generation thin film photovoltaic cells. Mixing Br or Cl into I-based perovskites has been frequently tried to enhance the cell efficiency and stability. One of the advantages of mixed halides is the modulation of band gap by controlling the composition of the incorporated halides. However, the reported band gap transition behavior has not been resolved yet. Here a theoretical model is presented to understand the electronic structure variation of metal mixed-halide perovskites through hybrid density functional theory. Comparative calculations in this work suggest that the band gap correction including spin-orbit interaction is essential to describe the band gap changes of mixed halides. In our model, both the lattice variation and the orbital interactions between metal and halides play key roles to determine band gap changes and band alignments of mixed halides. It is also presented that the band gap of mixed halide thin films can be significantly affected by the distribution of halide composition.

  14. Experimental versus expected halide-ion size differences; structural changes in three series of isotypic bismuth chalcogenide halides.

    PubMed

    Keller, Egbert; Krämer, Volker

    2006-06-01

    Experimentally determined halide-ion size differences are compared with expected size differences in the three series of isotypic bismuth chalcogenide halide compounds, KBi(6)O(9)X (X = Cl, Br and I), BiOX (X = F, Cl, Br and I) and BiSX (X = Cl, Br and I). The strong deviations observed can be assigned to steric strain caused by the heterogeneity of the bond-valence pattern and (for BiOX) to anion-anion repulsion and a change in the connectivity scheme. Some special features of the BiOF structure and the question of "isotypism" within the BiOX series are briefly discussed. Structural changes within the BiSX series are analysed.

  15. Abiotic Formation of Methyl Halides in the Terrestrial Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppler, F.

    2011-12-01

    Methyl chloride and methyl bromide are the most abundant chlorine and bromine containing organic compounds in the atmosphere. Since both compounds have relatively long tropospheric lifetimes they can effectively transport halogen atoms from the Earth's surface, where they are released, to the stratosphere and following photolytic oxidation form reactive halogen gases that lead to the chemical destruction of ozone. Methyl chloride and methyl bromide account for more than 20% of the ozone-depleting halogens delivered to the stratosphere and are predicted to grow in importance as the chlorine contribution to the stratosphere from anthropogenic CFCs decline. Today methyl chloride and methyl bromide originate mainly from natural sources with only a minor fraction considered to be of anthropogenic origin. However, until as recently as 2000 most of the methyl chloride and methyl bromide input to the atmosphere was considered to originate from the oceans, but investigations in recent years have clearly demonstrated that terrestrial sources such as biomass burning, wood-rotting fungi, coastal salt marshes, tropical vegetation and organic matter degradation must dominate the atmospheric budgets of these trace gases. However, many uncertainties still exist regarding strengths of both sources and sinks, as well as the mechanisms of formation of these naturally occurring halogenated gases. A better understanding of the atmospheric budget of both methyl chloride and methyl bromide is therefore required for reliable prediction of future ozone depletion. Biotic and abiotic methylation processes of chloride and bromide ion are considered to be the dominant pathways of formation of these methyl halides in nature. In this presentation I will focus on abiotic formation processes in the terrestrial environment and the potential parameters that control their emissions. Recent advances in our understanding of the abiotic formation pathway of methyl halides will be discussed. This will

  16. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  17. Geopolymers and Related Alkali-Activated Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provis, John L.; Bernal, Susan A.

    2014-07-01

    The development of new, sustainable, low-CO2 construction materials is essential if the global construction industry is to reduce the environmental footprint of its activities, which is incurred particularly through the production of Portland cement. One type of non-Portland cement that is attracting particular attention is based on alkali-aluminosilicate chemistry, including the class of binders that have become known as geopolymers. These materials offer technical properties comparable to those of Portland cement, but with a much lower CO2 footprint and with the potential for performance advantages over traditional cements in certain niche applications. This review discusses the synthesis of alkali-activated binders from blast furnace slag, calcined clay (metakaolin), and fly ash, including analysis of the chemical reaction mechanisms and binder phase assemblages that control the early-age and hardened properties of these materials, in particular initial setting and long-term durability. Perspectives for future research developments are also explored.

  18. Transcriptome Analysis of Alkali Shock and Alkali Adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes 10403S

    PubMed Central

    Giotis, Efstathios S.; Muthaiyan, Arunachalam; Natesan, Senthil; Wilkinson, Brian J.; Blair, Ian S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Alkali stress is an important means of inactivating undesirable pathogens in a wide range of situations. Unfortunately, Listeria monocytogenes can launch an alkaline tolerance response, significantly increasing persistence of the pathogen in such environments. This study compared transcriptome patterns of alkali and nonalkali-stressed L. monocytogenes 10403S cells, to elucidate the mechanisms by which Listeria adapts and/or grows during short- or long-term alkali stress. Transcription profiles associated with alkali shock (AS) were obtained by DNA microarray analysis of midexponential cells suspended in pH 9 media for 15, 30, or 60 min. Transcription profiles associated with alkali adaptation (AA) were obtained similarly from cells grown to midexponential phase at pH 9. Comparison of AS and AA transcription profiles with control cell profiles identified a high number of differentially regulated open-reading frames in all tested conditions. Rapid (15 min) changes in expression included upregulation of genes encoding for multiple metabolic pathways (including those associated with Na+/H+ antiporters), ATP-binding cassette transporters of functional compatible solutes, motility, and virulence-associated genes as well as the σB controlled stress resistance network. Slower (30 min and more) responses to AS and adaptation during growth in alkaline conditions (AA) involved a different pattern of changes in mRNA concentrations, and genes involved in proton export. PMID:20677981

  19. Alkali metal protective garment and composite material

    DOEpatents

    Ballif, III, John L.; Yuan, Wei W.

    1980-01-01

    A protective garment and composite material providing satisfactory heat resistance and physical protection for articles and personnel exposed to hot molten alkali metals, such as sodium. Physical protection is provided by a continuous layer of nickel foil. Heat resistance is provided by an underlying backing layer of thermal insulation. Overlying outer layers of fireproof woven ceramic fibers are used to protect the foil during storage and handling.

  20. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-07-01

    One approach to fission power system design uses alkali metal heat pipes for the core primary heat-transfer system. Heat pipes may also be used as radiator elements or auxiliary thermal control elements. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where information that is more detailed can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstration purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Nasa Project Prometheus point designs. (author)

  1. Thermal positron interactions with alkali covered tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Takashi; Iida, Shimpei; Terabe, Hiroki; Nagashima, Yasuyuki

    2016-11-01

    The branching ratios of positron reemission, positronium emission, positronium negative ion emission and capture to the surface state for thermalized positrons at polycrystalline tungsten surfaces coated with Na, K and Cs have been measured. The data shows that the ratios depend on the coverage of the alkali-metal coating. The fraction of the emitted positronium increases with the coverage of the coating up to 90%.

  2. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    One approach to space fission power system design is predicated on the use of alkali metal heat pipes, either as radiator elements, thermal management components, or as part of the core primary heat-transfer system. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where more detailed information can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstrational purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Project Prometheus point designs.

  3. Petrology and geochemistry of alkali gabbronorites from Lunar Breccia 67975

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Odette B.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.; Flohr, Marta K.

    Clasts of an unusual type of lunar highlands igneous rock, alkali gabbronorite, have been found in Apollo 16 breccia 67975. The alkali gabbronorites form two distinct subgroups, magnesian and ferroan. Modes and bulk compositions are highly varied. The magnesian alkali gabbronorites are composed of bytownitic plagioclase (Or2-5An82-89), hypersthene (Wo3-5En49-62), augite (Wo39-42En36-44), a silica mineral, and trace Ba-rich K-feldspar. The ferroan alkali gabbronorites are composed of ternary plagioclase (Or11-22An65-74), pigeonite (Wo6-9En35-47), augite (Wo38-40En29-35), Ba-rich K-feldspar, and a silica mineral. Trace minerals in both subgroups are apatite, REE-rich whitlockite, and zircon. The magnesian and ferroan alkali gabbronorites appear to have formed by progressive differentiation of the same, or closely related, parent magmas; the compositional data indicate that these magmas were REE-rich. The ternary plagioclase is probably a high-temperature metastable phase formed during crystallization. In composition and mineralogy, the 67975 alkali gabbronorites show many similarities to Apollo 12 and 14 alkali norites, alkali gabbronorites, and alkali anorthosites, and all these rocks together constitute a distinctive alkali suite. In addition, the alkali gabbronorites show some similarities to KREEP basalts, Mg-norites, and some felsites. These data suggest genetic links between some or all of these types of pristine rocks. Two types of relationships are possible. The first is that alkali-suite rocks crystallized in plutons of KREEP basalt magma, and KREEP basalts are their extrusive equivalents. The second is that the alkali-suite rocks and some felsites all crystallized in plutons of Mg-norite parent magmas, and KREEP basalt magmas formed by remelting of these plutons. Additional studies are needed to resolve which of these hypotheses is correct.

  4. Petrology and geochemistry of alkali gabbronorites from lunar breccia 67975

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Odette B.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.; Flohr, Marta K.

    1987-09-01

    Clasts of an unusual type of lunar highlands igneous rock, alkali gabbronorite, have been found in Apollo 16 breccia 67975. The alkali gabbronorites form two distinct subgroups, magnesian and ferroan. Modes and bulk compositions are highly varied. The magnesian alkali gabbronorites are composed of bytownitic plagioclase (Or2-5An82-89), hypersthene (Wo3-5En49-62), augite (Wo39-42En36-44), a silica mineral, and trace Ba-rich K-feldspar. The ferroan alkali gabbronorites are composed of ternary plagioclase (Or11-22An65-74), pigeonite (Wo6-9En35-47), augite (Wo38-40En29-35), Ba-rich K-feldspar, and a silica mineral. Trace minerals in both subgroups are apatite, REE-rich whitlockite, and zircon. The magnesian and ferroan alkali gabbronorites appear to have formed by progressive differentiation of the same, or closely related, parent magmas; the compositional data indicate that these magmas were REE-rich. The ternary plagioclase is probably a high-temperature metastable phase formed during crystallization. In composition and mineralogy, the 67975 alkali gabbronorites show many similarities to Appllo 12 and 14 alkali norites, alkali gabbronorites, and alkali anorthosites, and all these rocks together constitute a distinctive alkali suite. In addition, the alkali gabbronorites, show some similarities to KREEP basalts, Mg-norites, and some felsites. These data suggest genetic links between some or all of these types of pristine rocks. Two types of relationships are possible. The first is that alkali-suite rocks crystallized in plutons of KREEP basalt magma, and KREEP basalts are their extrusive equivalents. The second is that the alkali-suite rocks and some felsites all crystallized in plutons of Mg-norite parent magmas, and KREEP basalt magmas formed by remelting of these plutons. Additional studies are needed to resolve which of these hypotheses is correct.

  5. Chemically induced fracturing in alkali feldspar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidl, K. S.; Schaeffer, A.-K.; Petrishcheva, E.; Habler, G.; Fischer, F. D.; Schreuer, J.; Abart, R.

    2014-01-01

    Fracturing in alkali feldspar during Na+-K+ cation exchange with a NaCl-KCl salt melt was studied experimentally. Due to a marked composition dependence of the lattice parameters of alkali feldspar, any composition gradient arising from cation exchange causes coherency stress. If this stress exceeds a critical level fracturing occurs. Experiments were performed on potassium-rich gem-quality alkali feldspars with polished (010) and (001) surfaces. When the feldspar was shifted toward more sodium-rich compositions over more than about 10 mole %, a system of parallel cracks with regular crack spacing formed. The cracks have a general (h0l) orientation and do not correspond to any of the feldspar cleavages. The cracks are rather oriented (sub)-perpendicular to the direction of maximum tensile stress. The critical stress needed to initiate fracturing is about 325 MPa. The critical stress intensity factor for the propagation of mode I cracks, K Ic, is estimated as 2.30-2.72 MPa m1/2 (73-86 MPa mm1/2) from a systematic relation between characteristic crack spacing and coherency stress. An orientation mismatch of 18° between the crack normal and the direction of maximum tensile stress is ascribed to the anisotropy of the longitudinal elastic stiffness which has pronounced maxima in the crack plane and a minimum in the direction of the crack normal.

  6. Long-lived charge carrier dynamics in polymer/quantum dot blends and organometal halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Hirokazu

    Solution-processable semiconductors offer a potential route to deploy solar panels on a wide scale, based on the possibility of reduced manufacturing costs by using earth-abundant materials and inexpensive production technologies, such as inkjet or roll-to-roll printing. Understanding the fundamental physics underlying device operation is important to realize this goal. This dissertation describes studies of two kinds of solar cells: hybrid polymer/PbS quantum dot solar cells and organometal halide perovskite solar cells. Chapter two discusses details of the experimental techniques. Chapter three and four explore the mechanisms of charge transfer and energy transfer spectroscopically, and find that both processes contribute to the device photocurrent. Chapter four investigates the important question of how the energy level alignment of quantum dot acceptors affects the operation of hybrid polymer/quantum dot solar cells, by making use of the size-tunable energy levels of PbS quantum dots. We observe that long-lived charge transfer yield is diminished at larger dot sizes as the energy level offset at the polymer/quantum dot interface is changed through decreasing quantum confinement using a combination of spectroscopy and device studies. Chapter five discusses the effects of TiO2 surface chemistry on the performance of organometal halide perovskite solar cells. Specifically, chapter five studies the effect of replacing the conventional TiO2 electrode with Zr-doped TiO2 (Zr-TiO2). We aim to explore the correlation between charge carrier dynamics and device studies by incorporating zirconium into TiO2. We find that, compared to Zr-free controls, solar cells employing Zr-TiO2 give rise to an increase in overall power conversion efficiency, and a decrease in hysteresis. We also observe longer carrier lifetimes and higher charge carrier densities in devices on Zr-TiO2 electrodes at microsecond times in transient photovoltage experiments, as well as at longer persistent

  7. Recent advances in tailoring the aggregation of heavier alkaline earth metal halides, alkoxides and aryloxides from non-aqueous solvents.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Katharina M

    2006-11-21

    This overview on one of the subjects treated in our group deals with the synthesis and study of low-dimensional polymer and molecular solid state structures formed with alkaline earth metal ions in non-aqueous solvents. We have chosen several synthetic approaches in order to obtain such compounds. The first concept deals with the "cutting out" of structural fragments from a solid state structure of a binary compound, which will be explained with reference to BaI2. Depending on the size and concentration of oxygen donor ligands, used as chemical scissors on BaI2, three-, two-, one- and zero-dimensional derived adducts of BaI2 are obtained, comparable to a structural genealogy tree for BaI2. A second part deals with the supramolecular approach for the synthesis of low dimensional polymeric compounds based on alkaline earth metal iodides, obtained by the combination of metal ion coordination with hydrogen bonding between the cationic complexes and their anions. Certain circumstances allow rules to be established for the prediction of the dimensionality of a given compound, contributing to the fundamental problem of structure prediction in crystal engineering. A third section describes a synthetic approach for generating pure alkaline earth metal cage compounds as well as alkali and alkaline earth mixed metal clusters. A first step deals with different molecular solvated alkaline earth metal iodides which are investigated as a function of the ligand size in non-aqueous solvents. These are then reacted with some alkali metal compound in order to partially or totally eliminate alkali iodide and to form the targeted clusters. These unique structures of ligand stabilized metal halide, hydroxide and/or alkoxide and aryloxide aggregates are of interest as potential precursors for oxide materials and as catalysts. Approaches to two synthetic methods of the latter, sol-gel and (MO)CVD (metal-organic chemical vapour deposition), are investigated with some of our compounds. (D

  8. Water in the hydration shell of halide ions has significantly reduced Fermi resonance and moderately enhanced Raman cross section in the OH stretch regions.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohammed; Singh, Ajay K; Mondal, Jahur A; Sarkar, Sisir K

    2013-08-22

    Water in the presence of electrolytes plays an important role in biological and industrial processes. The properties of water, such as the intermolecular coupling, Fermi resonance (FR), hydrogen-bonding, and Raman cross section were investigated by measuring the Raman spectra in the OD and OH stretch regions in presence of alkali halides (NaX; X = F, Cl, Br, I). It is observed that the changes in spectral characteristics by the addition of NaX in D2O are similar to those obtained by the addition of H2O in D2O. The spectral width decreases significantly by the addition of NaX in D2O (H2O) than that in the isotopically diluted water. Quantitative estimation, on the basis of integrated Raman intensity, revealed that the relative Raman cross section, σ(H)/σ(b) (σ(H) and σ(b) are the average Raman cross section of water in the first hydration shell of X(-) and in bulk, respectively), in D2O and H2O is higher than those in the respective isotopically diluted water. These results suggest that water in the hydration shell has reduced FR and intermolecular coupling compared to those in bulk. In the isotopically diluted water, the relative Raman cross section increases with increase in size of the halide ions (σ(H)/σ(b) = 0.6, 1.1, 1.5, and 1.9 for F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), and I(-), respectively), which is assignable to the enhancement of Raman cross section by charge transfer from halide ions to the hydrating water. Nevertheless, the experimentally determined σ(H)/σ(b) is lower than the calculated values obtained on the basis of the energy of the charge transfer state of water. The weak enhancement of σ(H)/σ(b) signifies that the charge transfer transition in the hydration shell of halide ions causes little change in the OD (OH) bond lengths of hydrating water.

  9. Alteration of alkali reactive aggregates autoclaved in different alkali solutions and application to alkali-aggregate reaction in concrete (II) expansion and microstructure of concrete microbar

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Duyou . E-mail: duyoulu@njut.edu.cn; Mei Laibao; Xu Zhongzi; Tang Mingshu; Mo Xiangyin; Fournier, Benoit

    2006-06-15

    The effect of the type of alkalis on the expansion behavior of concrete microbars containing typical aggregate with alkali-silica reactivity and alkali-carbonate reactivity was studied. The results verified that: (1) at the same molar concentration, sodium has the strongest contribution to expansion due to both ASR and ACR, followed by potassium and lithium; (2) sufficient LiOH can completely suppress expansion due to ASR whereas it can induce expansion due to ACR. It is possible to use the duplex effect of LiOH on ASR and ACR to clarify the ACR contribution when ASR and ACR may coexist. It has been shown that a small amount of dolomite in the fine-grained siliceous Spratt limestone, which has always been used as a reference aggregate for high alkali-silica reactivity, might dedolomitize in alkaline environment and contribute to the expansion. That is to say, Spratt limestone may exhibit both alkali-silica and alkali-carbonate reactivity, although alkali-silica reactivity is predominant. Microstructural study suggested that the mechanism in which lithium controls ASR expansion is mainly due to the favorable formation of lithium-containing less-expansive product around aggregate particles and the protection of the reactive aggregate from further attack by alkalis by the lithium-containing product layer.

  10. Method for the safe disposal of alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Terry R.

    1977-01-01

    Alkali metals such as those employed in liquid metal coolant systems can be safely reacted to form hydroxides by first dissolving the alkali metal in relatively inert metals such as lead or bismuth. The alloy thus formed is contacted with a molten salt including the alkali metal hydroxide and possibly the alkali metal carbonate in the presence of oxygen. This oxidizes the alkali metal to an oxide which is soluble within the molten salt. The salt is separated and contacted with steam or steam-CO.sub.2 mixture to convert the alkali metal oxide to the hydroxide. These reactions can be conducted with minimal hydrogen evolution and with the heat of reaction distributed between the several reaction steps.

  11. A Modular Control Platform for a Diode Pumped Alkali Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    A Modular Control Platform for a Diode Pumped Alkali Laser Joshua Shapiro, Scott W. Teare New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, 801 Leroy...gain media, such as is done in diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs), has been proposed and early experiments have shown promising results. However...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Modular Control Platform for a Diode Pumped Alkali Laser 5a

  12. Determination of the common and rare alkalies in mineral analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.C.; Stevens, R.E.

    1934-01-01

    Methods are described which afford a determination of each member of the alkali group and are successful in dealing with the quantities of the rare alkalies found in rocks and minerals. The procedures are relatively rapid and based chiefly on the use of chloroplatinic acid, absolute alcohol and ether, and ammonium sulfate. The percentages of all the alkalies found in a number of minerals are given.

  13. Nanostructured Lanthanum Halides and CeBr3 for Nuclear Radiation and Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Guss, Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Ron Guise, Ding Yuan

    2010-06-09

    Scintillator materials are used to detect, and in some cases identify, gamma rays. Higher performance scintillators are expensive, hard to manufacture, fragile, and sometimes require liquid nitrogen or cooling engines. But whereas lower-quality scintillators are cheap, easy to manufacture, and more rugged, their performance is lower. At issue: can the desirable qualities of high-and low-performance scintillators be combined to achieve better performance at lower cost? Preliminary experiments show that a LaF{sub 3}:Ce oleic acid-based nanocomposite exhibits a photopeak when exposed to {sup 137}Cs source gamma-radiation. The chemical synthesis of the cerium-doped lanthanum halide nanoparticles are scalable and large quantities of material can be produced at a time, unlike typical crystal growth processes such as the Bridgeman process. Using a polymer composite (Figure 1), produced by LANL, initial measurements of the unloaded and 8% LaF{sub 3}:Ce-loaded sample have been made using {sup 137}Cs sources. Figure 2 shows an energy spectrum acquired for CeF{sub 3}. The lighter plot is the measured polymer-only spectrum and the black plot is the spectrum from the nanocomposite scintillator. As the development of this material continues, the energy resolution is expected to improve and the photopeak-to-Compton ratio will become greater at higher loadings. These measurements show the expected Compton edge in the polymer-only sample, and the Compton edge and photo-peak expected in the nanophosphor composites that LANL has produced. Using a porous VYCORR with CdSe/ZnS core shell quantum dots, Letant has demonstrated that he has obtained signatures of the 241Am photopeak with energy resolution as good at NaI (Figure 3). We begin with the fact that CeBr{sub 3} crystals do not have a self-activity component as strong as the lanthanum halides. The radioactive 0.090% {sup 138}La component of lanthanum leads to significant self-activity, which will be a problem for very large

  14. A review of bacterial methyl halide degradation: biochemistry, genetics and molecular ecology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, I.R.; Warner, K.L.; McAnulla, C.; Woodall, C.A.; Oremland, R.S.; Murrell, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Methyl halide-degrading bacteria are a diverse group of organisms that are found in both terrestrial and marine environments. They potentially play an important role in mitigating ozone depletion resulting from methyl chloride and methyl bromide emissions. The first step in the pathway(s) of methyl halide degradation involves a methyltransferase and, recently, the presence of this pathway has been studied in a number of bacteria. This paper reviews the biochemistry and genetics of methyl halide utilization in the aerobic bacteria Methylobacterium chloromethanicum CM4T, Hyphomicrobium chloromethanicum CM2T, Aminobacter strain IMB-1 and Aminobacter strain CC495. These bacteria are able to use methyl halides as a sole source of carbon and energy, are all members of the α-Proteobacteria and were isolated from a variety of polluted and pristine terrestrial environments. An understanding of the genetics of these bacteria identified a unique gene (cmuA) involved in the degradation of methyl halides, which codes for a protein (CmuA) with unique methyltransferase and corrinoid functions. This unique functional gene, cmuA, is being used to develop molecular ecology techniques to examine the diversity and distribution of methyl halide-utilizing bacteria in the environment and hopefully to understand their role in methyl halide degradation in different environments. These techniques will also enable the detection of potentially novel methyl halide-degrading bacteria.

  15. Artificial Synapses: Organometal Halide Perovskite Artificial Synapses (Adv. Mater. 28/2016).

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Cho, Himchan; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Young-Tae; Wolf, Christoph; Park, Chan-Gyung; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-07-01

    A synapse-emulating electronic device based on organometal halide perovskite thin films is described by T.-W. Lee and co-workers on page 5916. The device successfully emulates important characteristics of a biological synapse. This work extends the application of organometal halide perovskites to bioinspired electronic devices, and contributes to the development of neuromorphic electronics.

  16. Thermal battery. [solid metal halide electrolytes with enhanced electrical conductance after a phase transition

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, R.W.; Nissen, D.A.

    1973-03-06

    The patent describes an improved thermal battery whose novel design eliminates various disadvantages of previous such devices. Its major features include a halide cathode, a solid metal halide electrolyte which has a substantially greater electrical conductance after a phase transition at some temperature, and a means for heating its electrochemical cells to activation temperature.

  17. THE DETERMINATION OF TOTAL ORGANIC HALIDE IN WATER: AN INTERLABORATORY COMPARATIVE STUDY OF TWO METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total organic halide (TOX) analyzers are commonly used to measure the amount of dissolved halogenated organic byproducts in disinfected waters. Because of the lack of information on the identity of disinfection byproducts, rigorous testing of the dissolved organic halide (DOX) pr...

  18. Intermolecular Addition of Glycosyl Halides to Alkenes Mediated by Visible Light

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-25

    Visible light, an amine reductant, and a Ru(bpy)32+ photocatalyst can be used to mediate the addition of glycosyl halides into alkenes to synthesize...and a Ru(bpy)32+ photocatalyst can be used to mediate the addition of glycosyl halides into alkenes to synthesize important C-glycosides. This method

  19. Cross coupling of magnesium diacetylenides with functional allylic and halide-containing compounds catalyzed by transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhemilev, U.M.; Ibragimov, A.G.; Saraev, R.A.

    1986-08-20

    An efficient method has been developed for the synthesis of 1,4-enynes, conjugated acetylenes and aryl acetylenes by the cross coupling of magnesium diacetylenides with allyl ethers and esters, alkyl halides, allyl halides, aryl halides, allyl sulfides, and allylsulfones, using Ni and Pd complexes as the catalyst.

  20. 10 CFR 431.324 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of metal halide ballasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... energy efficiency of metal halide ballasts. (b) Testing and Calculations. Energy Conservation Standards ... efficiency of metal halide ballasts. 431.324 Section 431.324 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts...

  1. Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels and fuel gas from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by the use of molten metal halide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst in a hydrocracking zone, thereafter separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the spent molten metal halide by incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combustion of carbon and sulfur compounds in the spent molten metal halide in an incineration zone, the improvement comprising: (a) contacting the heavy feedstocks and hydrogen in the presence of the molten metal halide in the hydrocracking zone at reaction conditions effective to convert from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the feedstock to lighter hydrocarbon fuels; (b) separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide; (c) contacting the spent molten metal halide with oxygen in a liquid phase gasification zone at a temperature and pressure sufficient to vaporize from about 25 to about 75 weight percent of the spent metal halide, the oxygen being introduced in an amount sufficient to remove from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the carbon contained in the spent molten metal halide to produce a fuel gas and regenerated metal halide; and (d) incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combusting carbon and sulfur compounds contained therein.

  2. Study on alkali removal technology from coal gasification gas

    SciTech Connect

    Inai, Motoko; Kajibata, Yoshihiro; Takao, Shoichi; Suda, Masamitsu

    1999-07-01

    The authors have proposed a new coal based combined cycle power plant concept. However, there are certain technical problems that must be overcome to establish this system. Major technical problem of the system is hot corrosion of gas turbine blades caused by sulfur and alkali vapor, because of high temperature dust removal without sulfur removal from the coal gas. So the authors have conducted several fundamental studies on dry type alkali removal sorbents for the purposed of reducing the corrosion on gas turbine blades. Based on the fundamental studies the authors found preferable alkali removal sorbents, and made clear their alkali removal performance.

  3. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, David C.; Mailhe, Catherine C.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    1986-01-01

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  4. Alkali cation specific adsorption onto fcc(111) transition metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mills, J N; McCrum, I T; Janik, M J

    2014-07-21

    The presence of alkali cations in electrolyte solutions is known to impact the rate of electrocatalytic reactions, though the mechanism of such impact is not conclusively determined. We use density functional theory (DFT) to examine the specific adsorption of alkali cations to fcc(111) electrode surfaces, as specific adsorption may block catalyst sites or otherwise impact surface catalytic chemistry. Solvation of the cation-metal surface structure was investigated using explicit water models. Computed equilibrium potentials for alkali cation adsorption suggest that alkali and alkaline earth cations will specifically adsorb onto Pt(111) and Pd(111) surfaces in the potential range of hydrogen oxidation and hydrogen evolution catalysis in alkaline solutions.

  5. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, D.C.; Mailhe, C.C.; De Jonghe, L.C.

    1985-07-10

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  6. Calcium phosphate cements with strontium halides as radiopacifiers.

    PubMed

    López, Alejandro; Montazerolghaem, Maryam; Engqvist, Håkan; Ott, Marjam Karlsson; Persson, Cecilia

    2014-02-01

    High radiopacity is required to monitor the delivery and positioning of injectable implants. Inorganic nonsoluble radiopacifiers are typically used in nondegradable bone cements; however, their usefulness in resorbable cements is limited due to their low solubility. Strontium halides, except strontium fluoride, are ionic water-soluble compounds that possess potential as radiopacifiers. In this study, we compare the radiopacity, mechanical properties, composition, and cytotoxicity of radiopaque brushite cements prepared with strontium fluoride (SrF2 ), strontium chloride (SrCl2 ·6H2 O), strontium bromide (SrBr2 ), or strontium iodide (SrI2 ). Brushite cements containing 10 wt % SrCl2 ·6H2 O, SrBr2 , or SrI2 exhibited equal to or higher radiopacity than commercial radiopaque cements. Furthermore, the brushite crystal lattice in cements that contained the ionic radiopacifiers was larger than in unmodified cements and in cements that contained SrF2 , indicating strontium substitution. Despite the fact that the strontium halides increased the solubility of the cements and affected their mechanical properties, calcium phosphate cements containing SrCl2 ·6H2 O, SrBr2 , and SrI2 showed no significant differences in Saos-2 cell viability and proliferation with respect to the control. Strontium halides: SrCl2 ·6H2 O, SrBr2 , and SrI2 may be potential candidates as radiopacifiers in resorbable biomaterials although their in vivo biocompatibility, when incorporated into injectable implants, is yet to be assessed.

  7. Impact of the organic halide salt on final perovskite composition for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David T.; Sai, Hiroaki; Wee Tan, Kwan; Estroff, Lara A.; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2014-08-01

    The methylammonium lead halide perovskites have shown significant promise as a low-cost, second generation, photovoltaic material. Despite recent advances, however, there are still a number of fundamental aspects of their formation as well as their physical and electronic behavior that are not well understood. In this letter we explore the mechanism by which these materials crystallize by testing the outcome of each of the reagent halide salts. We find that components of both salts, lead halide and methylammonium halide, are relatively mobile and can be readily exchanged during the crystallization process when the reaction is carried out in solution or in the solid state. We exploit this fact by showing that the perovskite structure is formed even when the lead salt's anion is a non-halide, leading to lower annealing temperature and time requirements for film formation. Studies into these behaviors may ultimately lead to improved processing conditions for photovoltaic films.

  8. Casting of Halide and Fluoride Alloys for Laser Windows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-15

    a lower temperature (900CC) or by annealing at 1000° C under a better vacuum or under a partial pressure of teflon vapor providing a purifying...castings (3 in. diameter) of SrF2 have been produced with low optical absorption coefficients pi, 5.25 jim. High qurlity CaF2 castings have been...Waltham, Massachusetts under Contract No. F19628-74-C-0148 entitled "Casting of Halide and Fluoride Alloys for Laser Windows. " This work is

  9. Heavy ion passive dosimetry with silver halide single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, C. B.; Parnell, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    A method of detecting radiation damage tracks due to heavy particles in large single crystals of the silver halides is described. The tracks, when made visible with a simple electrical apparatus, appear similar to tracks in emulsions. The properties of the crystals, the technique of printing out the tracks, and evidence concerning the threshold energy for registering particles indicates that this method may find application in heavy ion dosimetry. The method has been found to be sensitive to stopping He nuclei and relativistic M group cosmic rays. Some impurities strongly influence the printout of the tracks, and the effects of these impurities are discussed.

  10. Volatile species in halide-activated-diffusion coating packs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianco, Robert; Rapp, Robert A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1992-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure sampling mass spectrometer was used to identify the vapor species generated in a halide-activated cementation pack. Pack powder mixtures containing a Cr-Al binary masteralloy powder, an NH4Cl activator salt, and either ZrO2 or Y2O3 (or neither) were analyzed at 1000 C. Both the equilibrium calculations for the pack and mass spectrometer results indicated that volatile AlCl(x) and CrCl(y) species were generated by the pack powder mixture; in packs containing the reactive element oxide, volatile ZrCl(z) and YCl(w) species were formed by the conversion of their oxide sources.

  11. Adsorption of hydrated halide ions on charged electrodes. Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosli, James N.; Philpott, Michael R.

    1993-06-01

    Constant temperature molecular dynamics has been used to simulate the adsorption of hydrated halide ions X-=F-, Cl-, Br- and I-, and lithium ion Li+ on flat uniformly charged surfaces. The simulations were done with either 214 water molecules and two ions (Li+ and X-) in a box 2.362 nm deep or with 430 water molecules and the two ions in a box 4.320 nm deep. The boxes were periodically replicated in the xy directions. The magnitude of the surface charge on the box ends was ±0.11 e/(nm)2, corresponding to an electric field of 2×107 V/cm. The lateral dimensions of the simulation cell were 1.862 nm×1.862 nm (x×y) in each case. All of the water molecules and ions interacted with the end walls via a weak 9-3 potential. The Stillinger ST2 water model and parameters optimized for alkali halides interacting with the model ST2 water molecule were used in the calculations. Common particles of truncating the interactions at a finite distance (0.82 nm) and switching off Coulomb interactions at small distances were followed. The temperature was set at T=2.411 kJ/mol (290 K). Some of the properties calculated were distribution density profiles for ions and water across the gap important for comparisons with Gouy-Chapman theory, adsorbed ion-water pair correlation functions, and the number of water molecules in the first and second hydration shells of the ions as a function of time. The time spent by a water molecule in the hydration shell was calculated to be approximately ten times longer for lithium than any other ion. The correlation between distance from the electrode and hydration number was studied and generally found to be pronounced for the larger anions. Comparison of the dynamics of the common ion Li+ for different anions revealed the subtle influence of a transcell interaction in the 2.362 nm thick film. In the given field, the smallest ions Li+ and F- remained fully solvated at all times. Chloride behaved quite differently. Part of the time this ion was far

  12. (abstract) Fundamental Mechanisms of Electrode Kinetics and Alkali Metal Atom Transport at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kisor, A.; Kikkert, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of electrode kinetics and mass transport of alkali metal oxidation and alkali metal cation reduction at the solid electrolyte/porous electrode boundary as well as alkali metal transport through porous metal electrodes has important applications in optimizing device performance in alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) cells which are high temperature, high current density electrochemical cells. Basic studies of these processes also affords the opportunity to investigate a very basic electrochemical reaction over a wide range of conditions; and a variety of mass transport modes at high temperatures via electrochemical techniques. The temperature range of these investigations covers 700K to 1240K; the alkali metal vapor pressures range from about 10(sup -2) to 10(sup 2) Pa; and electrodes studied have included Mo, W, Mo/Na(sub 2)MoO(sub 4), W/Na(sub 2)WO(sub 4), WPt(sub x), and WRh(sub x) (1.0 < x < 6.0 ) with Na at Na-beta'-alumina, and Mo with K at K-beta'-alumina. Both liquid metal/solid electrolyte/alkali metal vapor and alkali metal vapor/solid electrolyte/vapor cells have been used to characterize the reaction and transport processes. We have previously reported evidence of ionic, free molecular flow, and surface transport of sodium in several types of AMTEC electrodes.

  13. Interaction of alkali metals with perylene-3,4,9,10- tetracarboxylic-dianhydride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Wuesten, J.; Berger, S.; Heimer, K.; Lach, S.; Ziegler, Ch.

    2005-07-01

    n doping of the molecular organic semiconductor perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) is often achieved by use of alkali metals as dopants. This doping process is commonly performed in two steps. In the first the dopant is evaporated onto the surface of the PTCDA film. As it has been believed that the dopant shows an inhomogeneous diffusion profile through the layer with most of the dopant accumulated in the first few layers, a subsequent annealing step has been performed in order to reach a homogeneous distribution of the dopant in the whole layer. In this paper experimental results concerning chemical composition ((angle resolved) X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, secondary-ion-mass spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), electronic structure (ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, inverse photoemission spectroscopy), as well as electrical properties (conductivity, Seebeck coefficient) are shown before and after doping and before and after annealing. These results suggest that the deposited dopant is redistributed and partially removed during the annealing step. A model for the dopant distribution is suggested.

  14. An assessment of Mercury immobilisation in alkali activated fly ash (AAFA) cements.

    PubMed

    Donatello, Shane; Fernández-Jiménez, Ana; Palomo, Angel

    2012-04-30

    This paper presents total and soluble Mercury contents for three coal fly ashes and alkali-activated fly ash (AAFA) cements consisting of 100% fly ash as starting material. To evaluate the potential of the AAFA cement matrix to immobilise Hg from an external source, another batch of cements, doped with 5000 mg/kg Hg as highly soluble HgCl(2), was prepared. The ashes and control AAFA cements complied with Mercury leaching criteria for non-hazardous wastes according to both TCLP and EN 12457 tests. Fly ash activated cements doped with 5000 mg/kg Hg and aged for 2 days immobilised 98.8-99.6% and 97.3-98.8% of Hg according to TCLP and EN 12457 tests respectively. Evidence from SEM-EDX suggests that Hg was immobilised by precipitation as highly insoluble HgS or Hg(2)S, although partial precipitation as less insoluble HgO or Hg silicates could not be entirely ruled out based on data presented. The results for Hg-doped cements contribute to the growing body of evidence that shows AAFA cement as a useful material for immobilizing elevated concentrations of toxic and hazardous elements.

  15. Cathode architectures for alkali metal / oxygen batteries

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J; Nimon, Vitaliy; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Volfkovich, Yury; Bograchev, Daniil

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical energy storage devices, such as alkali metal-oxygen battery cells (e.g., non-aqueous lithium-air cells), have a cathode architecture with a porous structure and pore composition that is tailored to improve cell performance, especially as it pertains to one or more of the discharge/charge rate, cycle life, and delivered ampere-hour capacity. A porous cathode architecture having a pore volume that is derived from pores of varying radii wherein the pore size distribution is tailored as a function of the architecture thickness is one way to achieve one or more of the aforementioned cell performance improvements.

  16. Intensity Scaling for Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    unphased diode lasers is absorbed in the near IR by atomic potassium, rubidium , or cesium. The gain cell for a DPAL system using a heat pipe design is...demonstrated linear scaling of a rubidium laser to 32 times threshold.3 In our present work, we explore scaling to pump in- tensities of >100kW/cm2. The...of output power. Each alkali atom in the laser medium may be required to cycle as many as 1010 pump photons per second. We demonstrated a rubidium

  17. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  18. Electrodes For Alkali-Metal Thermoelectric Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Wheeler, Bob L.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Lamb, James L.; Bankston, C. Perry; Cole, Terry

    1989-01-01

    Combination of thin, porous electrode and overlying collector grid reduces internal resistance of alkali-metal thermoelectric converter cell. Low resistance of new electrode and grid boosts power density nearly to 1 W/cm2 of electrode area at typical operating temperatures of 1,000 to 1,300 K. Conductive grid encircles electrode film on alumina tube. Bus wire runs along tube to collect electrical current from grid. Such converters used to transform solar, nuclear, and waste heat into electric power.

  19. Tunable Near-Infrared Luminescence in Tin Halide Perovskite Devices.

    PubMed

    Lai, May L; Tay, Timothy Y S; Sadhanala, Aditya; Dutton, Siân E; Li, Guangru; Friend, Richard H; Tan, Zhi-Kuang

    2016-07-21

    Infrared emitters are reasonably rare in solution-processed materials. Recently, research into hybrid organo-lead halide perovskite, originally popular in photovoltaics,1-3 has gained traction in light-emitting diodes (LED) due to their low-cost solution processing and good performance.4-9 The lead-based electroluminescent materials show strong colorful emission in the visible region, but lack emissive variants further in the infrared. The concerns with the toxicity of lead may, additionally, limit their wide-scale applications. Here, we demonstrate tunable near-infrared electroluminescence from a lead-free organo-tin halide perovskite, using an ITO/PEDOT:PSS/CH3NH3Sn(Br1-xIx)3/F8/Ca/Ag device architecture. In our tin iodide (CH3NH3SnI3) LEDs, we achieved a 945 nm near-infrared emission with a radiance of 3.4 W sr(-1) m(-2) and a maximum external quantum efficiency of 0.72%, comparable with earlier lead-based devices. Increasing the bromide content in these tin perovskite devices widens the semiconductor bandgap and leads to shorter wavelength emissions, tunable down to 667 nm. These near-infrared LEDs could find useful applications in a range of optical communication, sensing and medical device applications.

  20. Sodium-metal halide and sodium-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seongmin; Kim, Jae-Kwang; Choi, Aram; Kim, Youngsik; Lee, Kyu Tae

    2014-07-21

    Impressive developments have been made in the past a few years toward the establishment of Na-ion batteries as next-generation energy-storage devices and replacements for Li-ion batteries. Na-based cells have attracted increasing attention owing to low production costs due to abundant sodium resources. However, applications of Na-ion batteries are limited to large-scale energy-storage systems because of their lower energy density compared to Li-ion batteries and their potential safety problems. Recently, Na-metal cells such as Na-metal halide and Na-air batteries have been considered to be promising for use in electric vehicles owing to good safety and high energy density, although less attention is focused on Na-metal cells than on Na-ion cells. This Minireview provides an overview of the fundamentals and recent progress in the fields of Na-metal halide and Na-air batteries, with the aim of providing a better understanding of new electrochemical systems.

  1. X-ray Scintillation in Lead Halide Perovskite Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Birowosuto, M. D.; Cortecchia, D.; Drozdowski, W.; Brylew, K.; Lachmanski, W.; Bruno, A.; Soci, C.

    2016-01-01

    Current technologies for X-ray detection rely on scintillation from expensive inorganic crystals grown at high-temperature, which so far has hindered the development of large-area scintillator arrays. Thanks to the presence of heavy atoms, solution-grown hybrid lead halide perovskite single crystals exhibit short X-ray absorption length and excellent detection efficiency. Here we compare X-ray scintillator characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) MAPbI3 and MAPbBr3 and two-dimensional (2D) (EDBE)PbCl4 hybrid perovskite crystals. X-ray excited thermoluminescence measurements indicate the absence of deep traps and a very small density of shallow trap states, which lessens after-glow effects. All perovskite single crystals exhibit high X-ray excited luminescence yields of >120,000 photons/MeV at low temperature. Although thermal quenching is significant at room temperature, the large exciton binding energy of 2D (EDBE)PbCl4 significantly reduces thermal effects compared to 3D perovskites, and moderate light yield of 9,000 photons/MeV can be achieved even at room temperature. This highlights the potential of 2D metal halide perovskites for large-area and low-cost scintillator devices for medical, security and scientific applications. PMID:27849019

  2. X-ray Scintillation in Lead Halide Perovskite Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birowosuto, M. D.; Cortecchia, D.; Drozdowski, W.; Brylew, K.; Lachmanski, W.; Bruno, A.; Soci, C.

    2016-11-01

    Current technologies for X-ray detection rely on scintillation from expensive inorganic crystals grown at high-temperature, which so far has hindered the development of large-area scintillator arrays. Thanks to the presence of heavy atoms, solution-grown hybrid lead halide perovskite single crystals exhibit short X-ray absorption length and excellent detection efficiency. Here we compare X-ray scintillator characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) MAPbI3 and MAPbBr3 and two-dimensional (2D) (EDBE)PbCl4 hybrid perovskite crystals. X-ray excited thermoluminescence measurements indicate the absence of deep traps and a very small density of shallow trap states, which lessens after-glow effects. All perovskite single crystals exhibit high X-ray excited luminescence yields of >120,000 photons/MeV at low temperature. Although thermal quenching is significant at room temperature, the large exciton binding energy of 2D (EDBE)PbCl4 significantly reduces thermal effects compared to 3D perovskites, and moderate light yield of 9,000 photons/MeV can be achieved even at room temperature. This highlights the potential of 2D metal halide perovskites for large-area and low-cost scintillator devices for medical, security and scientific applications.

  3. Two-Dimensional Halide Perovskites: Tuning Electronic Activities of Defects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyue; Xiao, Hai; Goddard, William A

    2016-05-11

    Two-dimensional (2D) halide perovskites are emerging as promising candidates for nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. To realize their full potential, it is important to understand the role of those defects that can strongly impact material properties. In contrast to other popular 2D semiconductors (e.g., transition metal dichalcogenides MX2) for which defects typically induce harmful traps, we show that the electronic activities of defects in 2D perovskites are significantly tunable. For example, even with a fixed lattice orientation one can change the synthesis conditions to convert a line defect (edge or grain boundary) from electron acceptor to inactive site without deep gap states. We show that this difference originates from the enhanced ionic bonding in these perovskites compared with MX2. The donors tend to have high formation energies and the harmful defects are difficult to form at a low halide chemical potential. Thus, we unveil unique properties of defects in 2D perovskites and suggest practical routes to improve them.

  4. Alkali sorber (RABSAM), September 1, 1990--August 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a regenerable activated-bauxite sorber alkali monitor that requires no high-temperature/high-pressure sampling line for the reliable in situ measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in the exhaust from the pressurized fluidized-bed combustion of coal. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-08-01

    A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

  6. Formation of lysinoalanine in egg white under alkali treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Luo, Xuying; Li, Jianke; Xu, Mingsheng; Tu, Yonggang

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the formation mechanism of lysinoalanine (LAL) in eggs during the alkali treatment process, NaOH was used for the direct alkali treatment of egg white, ovalbumin, and amino acids; in addition, the amount of LAL formed during the alkali treatment process was measured. The results showed that the alkali treatment resulted in the formation of LAL in the egg white. The LAL content increased with increasing pH and temperature, with the LAL content first increasing and then leveling off with increasing time. The amount of LAL formed in the ovalbumin under the alkali treatment condition accounted for approximately 50.51% to 58.68% of the amount of LAL formed in the egg white. Thus, the LAL formed in the ovalbumin was the main source for the LAL in the egg white during the alkali treatment process. Under the alkali treatment condition, free L-serine, L-cysteine, and L-cystine reacted with L-lysine to form LAL; therefore, they are the precursor amino acids of LAL formed in eggs during the alkali treatment process.

  7. [Raman spectra of endospores of Bacillus subtilis by alkali stress].

    PubMed

    Dong, Rong; Lu, Ming-qian; Li, Feng; Shi, Gui-yu; Huang, Shu-shi

    2013-09-01

    To research the lethal mechanism of spores stressed by alkali, laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) combined with principal components analysis (PCA) was used to study the physiological process of single spore with alkali stress. The results showed that both spores and germinated spores had tolerance with alkali in a certain range, but the ability of spores was obviously lower than that of spores due to the release of their Ca2+ -DPA which plays a key role in spores resistance as well as spores resistance to many stresses; A small amount of Ca2+ -DPA of spores was observed to release after alkali stress, however, the behavior of release was different with the normal Ca2+ -DPA release behavior induced by L-alanine; The data before and after alkali stress of the spores and g. spores with PCA reflected that alkali mainly injured the membrane of spores, and alkali could be easily enter into the inner structure of spores to damage the structure of protein backbone and injure the nucleic acid of spores. We show that the alkali could result in the small amount of Ca2+ -DPA released by destroying the member channel of spores.

  8. Self-discharge in bimetallic cells containing alkali metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, M. S.; Hesson, J. C.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of thermally regenerative bimetallic cells with alkali metal anodes shows a relation between the current drawn and the rate of discharge under open-circuit conditions. The self-discharge rate of the cell is due to the dissolution and ionization of alkali metal atoms in the fused-salt electrolyte

  9. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, Wen Y.

    1984-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them (46, 53, 61, 69) with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide (63) to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased (81), preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated (84) to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process (86, 18, 17) where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  10. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Svitlyk, V.; Pomjakushina, E.; Puzniak, R.; Conder, K.

    2016-07-01

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  11. Durability of Alkali Activated Blast Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, K.; Alharbi, N.; Matheu, P. S.; Varela, B.; Hailstone, R.

    2015-11-01

    The alkali activation of blast furnace slag has the potential to reduce the environmental impact of cementitious materials and to be applied in geographic zones where weather is a factor that negatively affects performance of materials based on Ordinary Portland Cement. The scientific literature provides many examples of alkali activated slag with high compressive strengths; however research into the durability and resistance to aggressive environments is still necessary for applications in harsh weather conditions. In this study two design mixes of blast furnace slag with mine tailings were activated with a potassium based solution. The design mixes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, BET analysis and compressive strength testing. Freeze-thaw testing up to 100 freeze-thaw cycles was performed in 10% road salt solution. Our findings included compressive strength of up to 100 MPa after 28 days of curing and 120 MPa after freeze-thaw testing. The relationship between pore size, compressive strength, and compressive strength after freeze-thaw was explored.

  12. Effects of alkali treatments on Ag nanowire transparent conductive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunho; Kang, Jun-gu; Eom, Tae-yil; Moon, Bongjin; Lee, Hoo-Jeong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we employ various alkali materials (alkali metals with different base strengths, and ammonia gas and solution) to improve the conductivity of silver nanowire (Ag NW)-networked films. The alkali treatment appears to remove the surface oxide and improve the conductivity. When applied with TiO2 nanoparticles, the treatment appears more effective as the alkalis gather around wire junctions and help them weld to each other via heat emitted from the reduction reaction. The ammonia solution treatment is found to be quick and aggressive, damaging the wires severely in the case of excessive treatment. On the other hand, the ammonia gas treatment seems much less aggressive and does not damage the wires even after a long exposure. The results of this study highlight the effectiveness of the alkali treatment in improving of the conductivity of Ag NW-networked transparent conductive films.

  13. Performance of Straight Steel Fibres Reinforced Alkali Activated Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faris, Meor Ahmad; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Nizar Ismail, Khairul; Muniandy, Ratnasamy; Putra Jaya, Ramadhansyah

    2016-06-01

    This paper focus on the performance of alkali activated concrete produced by using fly ash activated by sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. These alkali activated concrete were reinforced with straight steel fibres with different weight percentage starting from 0 % up to 5 %. Chemical composition of raw material in the production alkali activated concrete which is fly ash was first identified by using X-ray fluorescence. Results reveal there have an effect of straight steel fibres inclusion to the alkali activated concrete. Highest compressive strength of alkali activated concrete which is 67.72 MPa was obtained when 3 % of straight fibres were added. As well as flexural strength, highest flexural strength which is 6.78 MPa was obtained at 3 % of straight steel fibres inclusions.

  14. Using Perovskite Nanoparticles as Halide Reservoirs in Catalysis and as Spectrochemical Probes of Ions in Solution.

    PubMed

    Doane, Tennyson L; Ryan, Kayla L; Pathade, Laxmikant; Cruz, Kevin J; Zang, Huidong; Cotlet, Mircea; Maye, Mathew M

    2016-06-28

    The ability of cesium lead halide (CsPbX3; X = Cl(-), Br(-), I(-)) perovskite nanoparticles (P-NPs) to participate in halide exchange reactions, to catalyze Finkelstein organohalide substitution reactions, and to colorimetrically monitor chemical reactions and detect anions in real time is described. With the use of tetraoctylammonium halide salts as a starting point, halide exchange with the P-NPs was performed to calibrate reactivity, stability, and extent of ion exchange. The exchange of CsPbI3 with Cl(-) or Br(-) causes a significant blue-shift in absorption and photoluminescence, whereas reacting I(-) with CsPbBr3 causes a red-shift of similar magnitudes. With the high local halide concentrations and the facile nature of halide exchange in mind, we then explored the ability of P-NPs to catalyze organohalide exchange in Finkelstein like reactions. Results indicate that the P-NPs serve as excellent halide reservoirs for substitution of organohalides in nonpolar media, leading to not only different organohalide products, but also a complementary color change over the course of the reaction, which can be used to monitor kinetics in a precise manner. The merits of using P-NP as spectrochemical probes for real time assaying is then expanded to other anions which can react with, or result in unique, classes of perovskites.

  15. Using Perovskite Nanoparticles as Halide Reservoirs in Catalysis and as Spectrochemical Probes of Ions in Solution

    DOE PAGES

    Doane, Tennyson L.; Ryan, Kayla L.; Pathade, Laxmikant; ...

    2016-05-05

    The ability of cesium lead halide (CsPbX3; X = Cl–, Br–, I–) perovskite nanoparticles (P-NPs) to participate in halide exchange reactions, to catalyze Finkelstein organohalide substitution reactions, and to colorimetrically monitor chemical reactions and detect anions in real time is described. With the use of tetraoctylammonium halide salts as a starting point, halide exchange with the P-NPs was performed to calibrate reactivity, stability, and extent of ion exchange. Also, the exchange of CsPbI3 with Cl– or Br– causes a significant blue-shift in absorption and photoluminescence, whereas reacting I– with CsPbBr3 causes a red-shift of similar magnitudes. With the high localmore » halide concentrations and the facile nature of halide exchange in mind, we then explored the ability of P-NPs to catalyze organohalide exchange in Finkelstein like reactions. Results indicate that the P-NPs serve as excellent halide reservoirs for substitution of organohalides in nonpolar media, leading to not only different organohalide products, but also a complementary color change over the course of the reaction, which can be used to monitor kinetics in a precise manner. Finally, the merits of using P-NP as spectrochemical probes for real time assaying is then expanded to other anions which can react with, or result in unique, classes of perovskites.« less

  16. Alkali-metal electron spin density shift induced by a helium nanodroplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Markus; Callegari, Carlo; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2010-04-01

    Helium (He) nanodroplets provide a cold and virtually unperturbing environment for the study of weakly bound molecules and van der Waals aggregates. High resolution microwave spectroscopy and the detection of electron spin transitions in doped He droplets have recently become possible. Measurements of hyperfine-resolved electron spin resonance in potassium (39K) and rubidium (85Rb) atoms on the surface of He droplets show small line shifts relative to the bare atoms. These shifts were recorded for all 2I + 1 components (I is the nuclear spin) of a transition at high accuracy for He droplets ranging in size from 1000 to 15,000 He atoms. Evaluation of the spectra yields the influence of the He environment on the electron spin density at the alkali-metal nucleus. A semi-empirical model is presented that shows good qualitative agreement with the measured droplet size dependent increase of Fermi contact interaction at the nuclei of dopant K and Rb.

  17. First examples of hybrids based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lamei; Fan Yong; Wang Yan; Xiao Lina; Hu Yangyang; Peng Yu; Wang Tiegang; Gao Zhongmin; Zheng Dafang; Cui Xiaobing; Xu Jiqing

    2012-07-15

    Two new organic-inorganic compounds based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands: [BW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sub 2}[Cu{sub 2}(Phen){sub 4}Cl](H{sub 2}4, 4 Prime -bpy){sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 3}O{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O (1) and [HPW{sub 12}O{sub 40}][Cd{sub 2}(Phen){sub 4}Cl{sub 2}](4, 4 Prime -bpy) (2) (Phen=1, 10-phenanthroline, bpy=bipyridine), have been prepared and characterized by IR, UV-vis, XPS, XRD and single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Crystal structure analyses reveal that compound 1 is constructed from [BW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 5-}, metal halide clusters [Cu{sub 2}(Phen){sub 4}Cl]{sup +}and 4, 4 Prime -bpy ligands, while compound 2 is constructed from [PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 3-}, metal halide cluster [Cd{sub 2}(Phen){sub 4}Cl{sub 2}]{sup 2+} and 4, 4 Prime -bpy ligands. Compound 1 and compound 2 are not common hybrids based on polyoxometalates and metal halide clusters, they also contain dissociated organic ligands, therefore, compound 1 and 2 are the first examples of hybrids based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands. - Graphical Abstract: Two new compounds have been synthesized and characterized. Structure analyses revealed that the two compounds are the first examples of hybrids based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First examples of hybrids based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two different kinds of metal halide clusters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Supramolecular structures based on polyoxometalates, metal halide clusters and organic ligands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hybridization of three different of building blocks.

  18. Intercalation of heavy alkali metals (K, Rb and Cs) in the bundles of single wall nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclaux, L.; Méténier, K.; Lauginie, P.; Salvetat, J. P.; Bonnamy, S.; Beguin, F.

    2000-11-01

    The electric-arc discharge carbon deposits (collaret) containing Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) were heat treated at 1600 °C during 2 days under N2 flow in order to eliminate the Ni catalyst by sublimation, without modifications of the SWNTs ropes. Sorting this deposit by gravity enabled to obtain in the coarsest particles higher amount of SWNTs ropes than in other particle sizes. The coarser particles of the carbon deposits were reacted with the alkali metals vapor giving intercalated samples with a MC8 composition. The intercalation led to an expansion of the 2D lattice of the SWNTs so that the alkali metals were intercalated in between the tubes within the bundles. Disordered lattices were observed after intercalation of Rb and Cs. The simulations of the X-ray diffractograms of SWNTs reacted with K, gave the best fit for three K ions occupying the inter-tubes triangular cavities. The investigations by EPR, and 13C NMR, showed that doped carbon deposits are metallic.

  19. Absorption and emission characteristics of Er3+ ions in alkali chloroborophosphate glasses.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, L R; Rao, T S; Janardhnam, K; Radhapathy, A

    2000-08-01

    Alkali chloroborophosphate glasses containing 1 mol% of Er3+ ions were studied experimentally using the absorption and emission spectroscopy. The energy level scheme for the 4f11 (Er3+) electronic configuration was deduced from the observed band energies of the absorption spectra in terms of a parametrized Hamiltonian using the various free-ion spectroscopic parameters. Oscillator strengths (f) measured from the absorption spectra have been analyzed using the Judd-Ofelt theory to evaluate the three intensity parameters omegalambda (lambda = 2, 4 and 6). Reasonable agreement between the measured and calculated f values has been found. Electric and magnetic dipole transition probabilities, fluorescence branching ratios, integrated emission cross sections and radiative lifetimes were calculated for all the excited states of Er3+ ions. The non-radiative (WNR) relaxation rates from the excited levels to the next lower levels have been calculated and the relationship between the energy gap and non-radiative relaxation rate has been established. These results were used to predict the possible potential laser transitions in Er-doped alkali chloroborophosphate glasses.

  20. Highly doped silicon nanowires by monolayer doping.

    PubMed

    Veerbeek, Janneke; Ye, Liang; Vijselaar, Wouter; Kudernac, Tibor; van der Wiel, Wilfred G; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2017-02-23

    Controlling the doping concentration of silicon nanostructures is challenging. Here, we investigated three different monolayer doping techniques to obtain silicon nanowires with a high doping dose. These routes were based on conventional monolayer doping, starting from covalently bound dopant-containing molecules, or on monolayer contact doping, in which a source substrate coated with a monolayer of a carborane silane was the dopant source. As a third route, both techniques were combined to retain the benefits of conformal monolayer formation and the use of an external capping layer. These routes were used for doping fragile porous nanowires fabricated by metal-assisted chemical etching. Differences in porosity were used to tune the total doping dose inside the nanowires, as measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements. The higher the porosity, the higher was the surface available for dopant-containing molecules, which in turn led to a higher doping dose. Slightly porous nanowires could be doped via all three routes, which resulted in highly doped nanowires with (projected areal) doping doses of 10(14)-10(15) boron atoms per cm(2) compared to 10(12) atoms per cm(2) for a non-porous planar sample. Highly porous nanowires were not compatible with the conventional monolayer doping technique, but monolayer contact doping and the combined route resulted for these highly porous nanowires in tremendously high doping doses up to 10(17) boron atoms per cm(2).