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Sample records for alkali labile sites

  1. The formation of DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites in human blood lymphocytes exposed to 365-nm UVA radiation.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Andreyan N; Smetanina, Nadezhda M; Pustovalova, Margarita V; Arkhangelskaya, Ekaterina; Klokov, Dmitry

    2014-08-01

    The potency of UVA radiation, representing 90% of solar UV light reaching the earth's surface, to induce human skin cancer is the subject of continuing controversy. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of reactive oxygen species in DNA damage produced by the exposure of human cells to UVA radiation. This knowledge is important for better understanding of UV-induced carcinogenesis. We measured DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites in human lymphocytes exposed ex vivo to various doses of 365-nm UV photons compared to X-rays and hydrogen peroxide using the comet assay. We demonstrated that the UVA-induced DNA damage increased in a linear dose-dependent manner. The rate of DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites after exposure to 1J/cm(2) was similar to the rate induced by exposure to 1 Gy of X-rays or 25 μM hydrogen peroxide. The presence of either the hydroxyl radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide or the singlet oxygen quencher sodium azide resulted in a significant reduction in the UVA-induced DNA damage, suggesting a role for these reactive oxygen species in mediating UVA-induced DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites. We also showed that chromatin relaxation due to hypertonic conditions resulted in increased damage in both untreated and UVA-treated cells. The effect was the most significant in the presence of 0.5M Na(+), implying a role for histone H1. Our data suggest that the majority of DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites after exposure of human lymphocytes to UVA are produced by reactive oxygen species (the hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen) and that the state of chromatin may substantially contribute to the outcome of such exposures.

  2. Alkali lability of bacteriophage phi W-14 DNA.

    PubMed

    Lewis, H A; Miller, R C; Stone, J C; Warren, R A

    1975-12-01

    The molecular weight of bacteriophage phi W-14 DNA, determined by velocity sedimentation in neutral sucrose gradients, was 92 +/- 6 X 10(6). The DNA showed marked fragmentation in alkaline sucrose gradients. This fragmentation was not a consequence of preexisting single-strand interruptions in the DNA, since thermal denaturation of DNA yielded intact single strands. The alpha-putrescinylthymine groups in phi W-14 DNA appeared to be labile; some, or parts of some, of these groups were cleaved from the DNA in alkali. PMID:1202241

  3. UVA and visible light photons produce frank strand breaks in human P3 cell DNA as well as a new class of alkali-labile lesion

    SciTech Connect

    Peak, M.J.; Peak, J.G.

    1994-05-01

    Human P3 epithelioid cells were exposed to UVA (290--400 nm), as well as to blue and green photons in the 400--520 mm region of the spectrum, and the production of strand breaks in their DNA was measured by using elution. After exposure to blue photons the profiles were convex (downturning), shown to be due to the induction of a mixture of frank single-strand DNA breaks (SSB) plus rapidly developing alkali-labile sites (ALS). as well as latent breaks that develop during the first 6 h of the elution, termed slowly developing alkali-labile sites (SDALS). A significant proportion of the lesions produced by P3 cells by blue light photons are SDALS, whereas green light photons at 520 nm and UVA photons at 365 nm produce no SDALS and the elution profiles are exponential. This is also the case for Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed to 405 nm, evidence that a unique chromophore in P3 cells that absorbs strongly in the blue region leads to the formation of SDALS. The similarity in induction of SDALS at 460 and 405 nm is evidence that the chromophore is not a porphyrin, because these compounds have sharp absorption maxima in the lower 400 nm region. The chemical nature of these lesions as well as the cellular responses to them remain enigmatic.

  4. Abundant alkali-sensitive sites in DNA of human and mouse sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, N.P.; Danner, D.B.; McCoy, M.T.; Collins, G.D.; Schneider, E.L. ); Tice, R.R. )

    1989-10-01

    The DNA of human and mouse sperm cells was analyzed by single-cell microgel electrophoresis, by agarose gel electrophoresis, and by alkaline elution-three techniques that can detect single-strand DNA breaks and/or labile sites. Under these conditions a surprisingly large number of single-strand DNA breaks, approximately 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7} per genome, were detected in human and mouse sperm but not in human lymphocytes or in mouse bone marrow cells. These breaks were also present in chicken erythrocyte DNA, which is also highly condensed. These breaks were not observed under neutral pH conditions nor under denaturing conditions not involving alkali, suggesting that these sites are alkali-sensitive and do not represent preexisting single-strand breaks. The high frequency of such sites in sperm from healthy mouse and human donors suggest that they represent a functional characteristic of condensed chromatin rather than DNA damage.

  5. Mechanisms of recovery from sublethal damage and potentially lethal damage induced by BrdUrd/313 nm light treatment: alkali-labile lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, M. P.; Han, A.; Smith, V. N.

    1984-01-01

    BrdUrd pulse labelling of synchronous Chinese hamster cell cultures was used to correlate repair of sublethal damage with removal of alkali-labile lesions. Both processes were modified in a quantitatively similar manner by cysteamine. In addition, the age responses for repair of sublethal damage and for cysteamine reduction of repair agreed. Through the use of thymidine as an S-phase-blocking agent it was further demonstrated that progression past the S-phase of the cell cycle was required for the loss of resistance to UVB light in BrdUrd-substituted cells. Similarly, a thymidine block administered before synthesis upon the BrdUrd-substituted template prevented the cell from acquiring the sensitivity to UVB light normally associated with synthesis on a lesioned template. The UVB-light-sensitive mutant V79-UC was shown to have reduced capacities both for the accumulation of sublethal injury and for the removal of alkali-labile lesions. These data support the notion that alkali-labile lesions are responsible for sublethal damage in BrdUrd pulse-labelled Chinese hamster cells. PMID:6582920

  6. Radiation-induced heat-labile sites that convert into DNA double-strand breaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The yield of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in SV40 DNA irradiated in aqueous solution was found to increase by more than a factor of two as a result of postirradiation incubation of the DNA at 50 degrees C and pH 8.0 for 24 h. This is in agreement with data from studies performed at 37 degrees C that were published previously. Importantly, similar results were also obtained from irradiation of mammalian DNA in agarose plugs. These results suggest that heat-labile sites within locally multiply damaged sites are produced by radiation and are subsequently transformed into DSBs. Since incubation at 50 degrees C is typically employed for lysis of cells in commonly used pulsed-field gel assays for detection of DSBs in mammalian cells, the possibility that heat-labile sites are present in irradiated cells was also studied. An increase in the apparent number of DSBs as a function of lysis time at 50 degrees C was found with kinetics that was similar to that for irradiated DNA, although the magnitude of the increase was smaller. This suggests that heat-labile sites are also formed in the cell. If this is the case, a proportion of DSBs measured by the pulsed-field gel assays may occur during the lysis step and may not be present in the cell as breaks but as heat-labile sites. It is suggested that such sites consist mainly of heat-labile sugar lesions within locally multiply damaged sites. Comparing rejoining of DSBs measured with short and long lysis procedure indicates that the heat-labile sites are repaired with fast kinetics in comparison with repair of the bulk of DSBs.

  7. Formation of alkali labile linkages in DNA by hedamycin and use of hedamycin as a probe of protein-DNA complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, G N

    1982-01-01

    Hedamycin forms a stable complex with DNA and introduces alkali labile linkages in the DNA. These labile linkages are located at deoxyguanosine residues and are cleaved by the treatment used for breakage at bases alkylated by dimethyl sulfate. The reaction of hedamycin with all G residues in the chain is not uniform, and certain positions, particularily those in TG tracts, are especially reactive. The reaction of hedamycin with DNA can be inhibited by ethidium bromide, suggesting that intercalation is important in positioning the reactive group of hedamycin near to the base which is modified. The low amount of hedamycin needed to produce observable breakage, its specificity for reaction with DNA and its ability to react with DNA under mild conditions make it suitable for use as a probe of protein-DNA complexes. This was shown by the ability of lac repressor and RNA polymerase to block reaction of hedamycin with the DNA of the lac regulatory region. Images PMID:7133991

  8. Biochemical and proteomic characterisation of haemolymph serum reveals the origin of the alkali-labile phosphate (ALP) in mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis).

    PubMed

    Oliveri, Caterina; Peric, Lorena; Sforzini, Susanna; Banni, Mohammed; Viarengo, Aldo; Cavaletto, Maria; Marsano, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    Mollusc haemolymph proteins are known to play several important physiological roles in the immune system, heavy metal transport and the tissue distribution of lipophilic compounds. In this study, we analysed acetone-extracted proteins from mussel haemolymph by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The proteins were identified by comparing mass spectrometry data with the invertebrate EST database, allowing us to establish the mussel haemolymph serum proteome. Extrapallial protein (EP) precursor represents the most abundant serum protein; astacin and CuZn superoxide dismutase were also detected. Slight contamination from muscle proteins, due to the sampling method, was also found. No differences were observed in the profiles obtained for male and female serum proteins. One aspect of interest was the previously reported finding that alkali-labile phosphate (ALP) from haemolymph serum may be representative of vitellogenin (vtg)-like protein content in the circulatory fluid of molluscs. In our analysis of mussel haemolymph serum, vitellogenin-like proteins were never found. To confirm these data, a typical methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) extraction, which is specific for vtg-like proteins, was performed, and the results of the electrophoretic analyses were compared with those obtained by acetonic precipitation. The results showed that the electrophoretic profiles are similar and that vtg-like proteins cannot be identified. Moreover, the main phosphoprotein present in female and male extracts is EP protein precursor. In addition, agarose gel electrophoresis demonstrates that high-molecular-weight forms of vtg-like proteins are not detectable.

  9. Alkali-sensitive sites in DNA from human cells treated with ultraviolet light, 1'-acetoxysafrole or 1'-acetoxyestragole

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.H.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1982-01-01

    The formation and repair of alkali-labile sites in the DNA of human cells treated with 254 nm u.v. light, 1'-acetoxyestragole (1'-AcO-E) or 1'-acetoxysafrole (1'-AcO-S) have been studied. DNA was analysed by sedimentation in alkaline sucrose gradients after the cells had been layered on the gradients in lysis solution for 15 h (long lysis) or for only 0.75 h (short lysis). With the long lysis technique, a dose of 20 J/m2 resulted in 0.2-0.4 strand breaks/10(8) daltons while treatment of cells with 0.5 mM 1'-AcO-E or 1'-AcO-S caused 0.1-0.3 strand breaks/10(8) daltons. In excision repair proficient T98G cells, one third to two thirds of these strand breaks disappeared upon 4 h incubation after exposure to each of the three agents. In excision repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts (XPA), the alkali-labile sites produced by 1'-AcO-E or 1'-AcO-S were still repaired, although those resulting from u.v.-irradiation were not. Similar characteristics were observed after the short lysis period. The sedimentation velocities of nucleoids, prepared from treated XPA cells, in neutral sucrose gradients containing ethidium bromide, did not reveal the presence of overt strand breaks in the DNA, suggesting that the lesions were of a type in which the sugar-phosphate backbone was intact but sensitive to hydrolysis by alkali. The contribution of this type of damage to the total DNA damage produced by the agents was estimated to be less than 1% for u.v., and less than 2.5% for 1'-AcO-E and 1'-AcO-S.

  10. Evaluation of yolk protein levels as estrogenic biomarker in bivalves; comparison of the alkali-labile phosphate method (ALP) and a species-specific immunoassay (ELISA).

    PubMed

    Morthorst, Jane E; Holbech, Henrik; Jeppesen, Morten; Kinnberg, Karin L; Pedersen, Knud L; Bjerregaard, Poul

    2014-11-01

    Altered concentration of the vertebrate yolk protein precursor vitellogenin is a recognized biomarker for endocrine disruption in fish, and within recent years yolk protein alteration has also been associated with endocrine disruption in bivalves. Species-specific, direct and sensitive methods for quantification of vitellogenin in fish have been available for years whereas bivalve yolk protein levels have been estimated indirectly by alkali-labile phosphate (ALP) liberated from high molecular weight proteins because the sequence and biochemical structure of most bivalve yolk proteins are unknown. By applying a species-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for accurate determination of yolk protein level the impact of 17β-estradiol (57, 164 and 512 ng/L) on the freshwater bivalve Unio tumidus was investigated and compared with ALP estimations. Seven weeks of exposure during the pre-spawning and spawning period had no consistent effect on yolk protein concentration in hemolymph, and ALP levels in hemolymph also remained unchanged in both males and females. Further, basal male and female ALP levels were indistinguishable whereas the ELISA demonstrated that yolk protein levels of females exceeded male levels at the time of sampling, although male basal levels were high compared to fish. Altogether it is shown that individual ALP levels do not reflect yolk protein levels and hence hemolymph ALP levels cannot serve as biomarker for estrogenic exposure during the pre-spawning and spawning period in U. tumidus. The necessity of sensitive and validated biomarkers for reliable interpretation of data and the utility of ALP and yolk protein levels as biomarkers in bivalves are discussed. PMID:25066673

  11. Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  12. Induction of heat-labile sites in DNA of mammalian cells by the antitumor alkylating drug CC-1065

    SciTech Connect

    Zsido, T.J.; Woynarowski, J.M.; Baker, R.M.; Gawron, L.S.; Beerman, T.A. )

    1991-04-16

    CC-1065 is a very potent antitumor antibiotic capable of covalent and noncovalent binding to the minor groove of naked DNA. Upon thermal treatment, covalent adducts formed between CC-1065 and DNA generate strand break. The authors have shown that this molecular damage can be detected following CC-1065 treatment of mammalian whole cells. Using alkaline sucrose gradient analysis, They observe thermally induced breakage of ({sup 14}C)thymidine-prelabeled DNA from drug-treated African green monkey kidney BSC-1 cells. Very little damage to cellular DNA by CC-1065 can be detected without first heating the drug-treated samples. CC-1065 can also generate heat-labile sites within DNA during cell lysis and heating, subsequent to the exposure of cells to drug, suggesting that a pool of free and noncovalently bound drug is available for posttreatment adduct formation. This effect was controlled for by mixing ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled untreated cells with the ({sup 14}C)thymidine-labeled drug-treated samples. The lowest drug dose at which heat-labile sites were detected was 3 nM CC-1065 (3 single-stranded breaks/10{sup 6} base pairs). This concentration reduced survival of BSC-1 cells to 0.1% in cytotoxicity assays. The generation of CC-1065-induced lesions in cellular DNA is time dependent (the frequency of lesions caused by a 60 nM treatment reaching a plateau at 2 h) and is not readily reversible. The results of this study demonstrate that CC-1065 does generate heat-labile sites with the cellular DNA of intact cells and suggest that a mechanism of cytotoxic action of CC-1065 involves formation of covalent adducts to DNA.

  13. Repair of radiation-induced heat-labile sites is independent of DNA-PKcs, XRCC1 or PARP

    SciTech Connect

    Stenerlöw, Bo; Karlsson, Karin H.; Radulescu, Irina; Rydberg, Bjorn; Stenerlow, Bo

    2008-04-29

    Ionizing radiation induces a variety of different DNA lesions: in addition to the most critical DNA damage, the DSB, numerous base alterations, SSBs and other modifications of the DNA double-helix are formed. When several non-DSB lesions are clustered within a short distance along DNA, or close to a DSB, they may interfere with the repair of DSBs and affect the measurement of DSB induction and repair. We have previously shown that a substantial fraction of DSBs measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) are in fact due to heat-labile sites (HLS) within clustered lesions, thus reflecting an artifact of preparation of genomic DNA at elevated temperature. To further characterize the influence of HLS on DSB induction and repair, four human cell lines (GM5758, GM7166, M059K, U-1810) with apparently normal DSB rejoining were tested for bi-phasic rejoining after gamma irradiation. When heat-released DSBs were excluded from the measurements the fraction of fast rejoining decreased to less than 50% of the total. However, neither the half-times of the fast (t{sub 1/2} = 7-8 min) or slow (t{sub 1/2} = 2.5 h) DSB rejoining were changed significantly. At t=0 the heat-released DSBs accounted for almost 40% of the DSBs, corresponding to 10 extra DSB/cell/Gy in the initial DSB yield. These heat-released DSBs were repaired within 60-90 min in all tested cells, including M059K cells treated with wortmannin or DNA-PKcs defect M059J cells. Furthermore, cells lacking XRCC1 or Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) rejoined both total DSBs and heat-released DSBs similar to normal cells. In summary, the presence of heat-labile sites have a substantial impact on DSB induction yields and DSB rejoining rates measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and HLS repair is independent of DNA-PKcs, XRCC1 and PARP.

  14. Synthetic receptors as models for alkali metal cation- binding sites in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wall, Stephen L.; Meadows, Eric S.; Barbour, Leonard J.; Gokel, George W.

    2000-06-01

    The alkali metal cations Na+ and K+ have several important physiological roles, including modulating enzyme activity. Recent work has suggested that alkali metal cations may be coordinated by systems, such as the aromatic amino acid side chains. The ability of K+ to interact with an aromatic ring has been assessed by preparing a family of synthetic receptors that incorporate the aromatic side chains of phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. Thesereceptors are constructed around a diaza-18-crown-6 scaffold, which serves as the primary binding site for an alkali metal cation. The ability of the aromatic rings to coordinate a cation was determined by crystallizing each of the receptors in the presence of K+ and by solving the solid state structures. In all cases, complexation of K+ by the pi system was observed. When possible, the structures of the unbound receptors also were determined for comparison. Further proof that the aromatic ring makes an energetically favorable interaction with the cation was obtained by preparing a receptor in which the arene was perfluorinated. Fluorination of the arene reverses the electrostatics, but the aromaticity is maintained. The fluorinated arene rings do not coordinate the cation in the solid state structure of the K+ complex. Thus, the results of the predicted electrostatic reversal were confirmed. Finally, the biological implications of the alkali metal cation-pi interaction are addressed.

  15. CD44 Binding to Hyaluronic Acid Is Redox Regulated by a Labile Disulfide Bond in the Hyaluronic Acid Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Kellett-Clarke, Helena; Stegmann, Monika; Barclay, A. Neil; Metcalfe, Clive

    2015-01-01

    CD44 is the primary leukocyte cell surface receptor for hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix. Enzymatic post translational cleavage of labile disulfide bonds is a mechanism by which proteins are structurally regulated by imparting an allosteric change and altering activity. We have identified one such disulfide bond in CD44 formed by Cys77 and Cys97 that stabilises the HA binding groove. This bond is labile on the surface of leukocytes treated with chemical and enzymatic reducing agents. Analysis of CD44 crystal structures reveal the disulfide bond to be solvent accessible and in the–LH hook configuration characteristic of labile disulfide bonds. Kinetic trapping and binding experiments on CD44-Fc chimeric proteins show the bond is preferentially reduced over the other disulfide bonds in CD44 and reduction inhibits the CD44-HA interaction. Furthermore cells transfected with CD44 no longer adhere to HA coated surfaces after pre-treatment with reducing agents. The implications of CD44 redox regulation are discussed in the context of immune function, disease and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26379032

  16. Distinctive crystal chemistry and site configuration of the clinopyroxene from alkali basaltic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Negro, A.; Cundari, A.; Piccirillo, E. M.; Molin, G. M.; Uliana, D.

    1986-01-01

    A crystal chemical investigation of clinopyroxenes from a suite of nepheline-bearing lavas located in the Nyambeni Range of Kenya has delineated the polyhedral site configurations and related intracrystalline relationships. These are distinct from those determined for the clinopyroxene in an analogous suite of leucite-bearing lavas from the Sabatini volcanoes in the Roman Region of Italy (Dal Negro et al. 1985). The Nyambeni clinopyroxene, varying from salite to hedenbergite, preferentially accepts Na in the M2 site to balance increasing Fe2+ and Si, respectively, whereas the Sabatini clinopyroxene is confined within the salite field and preferentially accepts Aliv to balance the effect of increasing (Fe3++Ti4++Alvi+Cr3+)M1. The Fe2+/Fe3+ and K/Na ratios of the host rocks emerge as significant factors in determining the different polyhedral configurations and evolutions of the clinopyroxene from the two lava suites, respectively. The resulting Mg-Fe2+ order-disorder relationships in M1 M2 are also distinct in the two clinopyroxenes. A high degree of MgFe2+ order in M1 M2 corresponds to the largest configurational, hence energetic, difference between M1 and M2 in the Nyambeni clinopyroxene, whereas the converse applies to the Sabatini clinopyroxene. In view of the significant crystal chemical differences and distinct evolution trends, it is proposed that salites from alkali volcanic rocks may be referred to as Nyambeni-type or Sabatini-type, respectively.

  17. Organochlorine compounds in Purple Heron eggs (Ardea purpurea) nesting in sites located around a chlor-alkali plant (Ebro River).

    PubMed

    Huertas, David; Grimalt, Joan O; Jover, Lluís; Sanpera, Carola; Ruiz, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Eggs of Purple Heron (Ardea purpurea) were collected from three sampled sites inside the Ebro River basin in years 2006 and 2007. These sites were located besides (Flix), upstream (Aiguabarreig) and downstream (Delta) a chlor-alkali plant. Organochlorine compounds (OCs) such as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), polychlorostyrenes (PCSs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), pentachlorobenzene (PeCB) and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) were analysed to assess what are the accumulation patterns of these compounds in aquatic migratory birds breeding in the area of influence of the emissions from this industrial installation. Comparison of the egg concentrations between the three sites show higher concentrations of compounds manufactured in the past in the factory (PCBs, p,p'-DDT) or by-products of OC synthesis (HCB, PeCB and PCSs) in Flix than in Aiguabarreig reflecting a clear influence from the emissions of the chlor-alkali plant. The eggs collected in the Ebro Delta showed higher concentrations of total DDTs (mainly p,p'-DDE) than in the reference site (Aiguabarreig) which could reflect past applications of this insecticide in the area for agriculture. In contrast, HCHs were found in higher concentrations in the Delta and Aiguabarreig than in the Flix Reservoir. These compounds have been used as insecticides in agriculture and were not manufactured in the chlor-alkali plant. The present results show that despite Purple Herons are migratory birds, the food web transfer of OCs during the breeding season is sufficient for the accumulation of these compounds in the eggs, leading to statistically significant concentration differences between sites. These differences are consistent with the emissions of these pollutants from industrial or agricultural sources to the aquatic environments. Some of the p,p'-DDE concentrations observed in the area nearby the chlor-alkali plant are above the threshold effects for reproductive impairment. PMID:26202210

  18. Organochlorine compounds in Purple Heron eggs (Ardea purpurea) nesting in sites located around a chlor-alkali plant (Ebro River).

    PubMed

    Huertas, David; Grimalt, Joan O; Jover, Lluís; Sanpera, Carola; Ruiz, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Eggs of Purple Heron (Ardea purpurea) were collected from three sampled sites inside the Ebro River basin in years 2006 and 2007. These sites were located besides (Flix), upstream (Aiguabarreig) and downstream (Delta) a chlor-alkali plant. Organochlorine compounds (OCs) such as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), polychlorostyrenes (PCSs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), pentachlorobenzene (PeCB) and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) were analysed to assess what are the accumulation patterns of these compounds in aquatic migratory birds breeding in the area of influence of the emissions from this industrial installation. Comparison of the egg concentrations between the three sites show higher concentrations of compounds manufactured in the past in the factory (PCBs, p,p'-DDT) or by-products of OC synthesis (HCB, PeCB and PCSs) in Flix than in Aiguabarreig reflecting a clear influence from the emissions of the chlor-alkali plant. The eggs collected in the Ebro Delta showed higher concentrations of total DDTs (mainly p,p'-DDE) than in the reference site (Aiguabarreig) which could reflect past applications of this insecticide in the area for agriculture. In contrast, HCHs were found in higher concentrations in the Delta and Aiguabarreig than in the Flix Reservoir. These compounds have been used as insecticides in agriculture and were not manufactured in the chlor-alkali plant. The present results show that despite Purple Herons are migratory birds, the food web transfer of OCs during the breeding season is sufficient for the accumulation of these compounds in the eggs, leading to statistically significant concentration differences between sites. These differences are consistent with the emissions of these pollutants from industrial or agricultural sources to the aquatic environments. Some of the p,p'-DDE concentrations observed in the area nearby the chlor-alkali plant are above the threshold effects for reproductive impairment.

  19. A reciprocal allosteric mechanism for efficient transfer of labile intermediates between active sites in CAD, the mammalian pyrimidine-biosynthetic multienzyme polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Irvine, H S; Shaw, S M; Paton, A; Carrey, E A

    1997-08-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate is the product of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS II) activity and the substrate of the aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) activity, each of which is found in CAD, a large 240-kDa multienzyme polypeptide in mammals that catalyses the first three steps in pyrimidine biosynthesis. In our study of the transfer of the labile intermediate between the two active sites, we have used assays that differentiate the synthesis of carbamoyl phosphate from the overall reaction of CPS II and ATCase that produces carbamoyl aspartate. We provided excess exogenous carbamoyl phosphate and monitored its access to the respective active sites through the production of carbamoyl phosphate and carbamoyl aspartate from radiolabelled bicarbonate. Three features indicate interactions between the folded CPS II and ATCase domains causing reciprocal conformational changes. First, even in the presence of approximately 1 mM unlabelled carbamoyl phosphate, when the aspartate concentration is high ATCase uses endogenous carbamoyl phosphate for the synthesis of radiolabelled carbamoyl aspartate. In contrast, the isolated CPS II forward reaction is inhibited by excess unlabelled carbamoyl phosphate. Secondly, the affinity of the ATCase for carbamoyl phosphate and aspartate is modulated when substrates bind to CPS II. Thirdly, the transition-state analogue phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate is a less efficient inhibitor of the ATCase when the substrates for CPS II are present. All these effects operate when CPS II is in the more active P state, which is induced by high concentrations of ATP and magnesium ions and when 5'-phosphoribosyl diphosphate (the allosteric activator) is present with low concentrations of ATP; these are conditions that would be met during active biosynthesis in the cell. We propose a phenomenon of reciprocal allostery that encourages the efficient transfer of the labile intermediate within the multienzyme polypeptide CAD. In this model, binding of aspartate to

  20. The mechanism of stereospecific C-H oxidation by Fe(Pytacn) complexes: bioinspired non-heme iron catalysts containing cis-labile exchangeable sites.

    PubMed

    Prat, Irene; Company, Anna; Postils, Verònica; Ribas, Xavi; Que, Lawrence; Luis, Josep M; Costas, Miquel

    2013-05-17

    A detailed mechanistic study of the hydroxylation of alkane C-H bonds using H2O2 by a family of mononuclear non heme iron catalysts with the formula [Fe(II)(CF3SO3)2(L)] is described, in which L is a tetradentate ligand containing a triazacyclononane tripod and a pyridine ring bearing different substituents at the α and γ positions, which tune the electronic or steric properties of the corresponding iron complexes. Two inequivalent cis-labile exchangeable sites, occupied by triflate ions, complete the octahedral iron coordination sphere. The C-H hydroxylation mediated by this family of complexes takes place with retention of configuration. Oxygen atoms from water are incorporated into hydroxylated products and the extent of this incorporation depends in a systematic manner on the nature of the catalyst, and the substrate. Mechanistic probes and isotopic analyses, in combination with detailed density functional theory (DFT) calculations, provide strong evidence that C-H hydroxylation is performed by highly electrophilic [Fe(V)(O)(OH)L] species through a concerted asynchronous mechanism, involving homolytic breakage of the C-H bond, followed by rebound of the hydroxyl ligand. The [Fe(V)(O)(OH)L] species can exist in two tautomeric forms, differing in the position of oxo and hydroxide ligands. Isotopic-labeling analysis shows that the relative reactivities of the two tautomeric forms are sensitively affected by the α substituent of the pyridine, and this reactivity behavior is rationalized by computational methods.

  1. An intrinsically labile α-helix abutting the BCL9-binding site of β-catenin is required for its inhibition by carnosic acid

    PubMed Central

    de la Roche, Marc; Rutherford, Trevor J.; Gupta, Deepti; Veprintsev, Dmitry B.; Saxty, Barbara; Freund, Stefan M.; Bienz, Mariann

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling controls development and tissue homeostasis. Moreover, activated β-catenin can be oncogenic and, notably, drives colorectal cancer. Inhibiting oncogenic β-catenin has proven a formidable challenge. Here we design a screen for small-molecule inhibitors of β-catenin's binding to its cofactor BCL9, and discover five related natural compounds, including carnosic acid from rosemary, which attenuates transcriptional β-catenin outputs in colorectal cancer cells. Evidence from NMR and analytical ultracentrifugation demonstrates that the carnosic acid response requires an intrinsically labile α-helix (H1) amino-terminally abutting the BCL9-binding site in β-catenin. Similarly, in colorectal cancer cells with hyperactive β-catenin signalling, carnosic acid targets predominantly the transcriptionally active ('oncogenic') form of β-catenin for proteasomal degradation in an H1-dependent manner. Hence, H1 is an 'Achilles' Heel' of β-catenin, which can be exploited for destabilization of oncogenic β-catenin by small molecules, providing proof-of-principle for a new strategy for developing direct inhibitors of oncogenic β-catenin. PMID:22353711

  2. [Analysis of characteristics of dioxin contamination in the chlor-alkali site that uses graphite anode for production].

    PubMed

    Yu, Li-Feng; Wei, Wen-Xia; Tian, Ya-Jing; Wu, Guang-Long; Li, Pei-Zhong; Zhao, Dan

    2012-06-01

    In order to find out the characteristics of dioxin contamination, we sampled and analyzed the soil and groundwater on a chlor-alkali factory site that uses graphite anode for production. The results show that the toxic equivalent quantity (TEQ) of dioxins in soil samples exceeds the U. S. EPA region screening value (RSL), with the chlorine hydrogen processing workshop, the electric tank workshop, the asbestos stack area, the sewage treatment plant and the oil depot were affected. The dioxin concentration limit of the groundwater sample doesn't exceed the drinking water standard of China. Considering the fingerprints characteristics of dioxin-contaminated concentration, dioxin isomers content and TEQ, the priority pollutants for control on this site are 2,3,7,8-TCDF, 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF, 1,2,3,4,7,8-HxCDF, OCDD and 2,3,7,8-TCDD. The results show that dioxin pollution is very serious in the chlor-alkali plant that uses graphite anode for production, and the environmental supervision is imperative.

  3. INFLUENCE OF A CHLOR-ALKALI SUPERFUND SITE ON MERCURY BIOACCUMULATION IN PERIPHYTON AND LOW-TROPHIC LEVEL FAUNA

    PubMed Central

    Buckman, Kate L.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark; Taylor, Vivien F.; Chalmers, Ann; Broadley, Hannah J.; Agee, Jennifer; Jackson, Brian P.; Chen, Celia Y.

    2015-01-01

    In Berlin, NH, the Androscoggin River flows adjacent to a former chlor-alkali facility that is a US EPA Superfund site and source of mercury (Hg) to the river. A study was conducted to determine the fate and bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) to lower trophic-level taxa in the river. Surface sediment directly adjacent to the source showed significantly elevated MeHg (10–40x increase, mean±sd: 20.1±24.8 ng g−1 DW) and total mercury (THg, 10–30x increase, mean±sd: 2045±2669 ng g−1 DW) compared to all other reaches, with sediment THg and MeHg from downstream reaches elevated (3–7x on average) relative to the reference (THg mean±sd: 33.5±9.33 ng g−1 DW; MeHg mean±sd: 0.52±0.21 ng g−1 DW). Water column THg concentrations adjacent to the point source for both particulate (0.23 ng L−1) and dissolved (0.76 ng L−1) fractions were 5-fold higher than at the reference sites, and 2–5-fold higher than downstream. Methylmercury production potential (MPP) of periphyton material was highest (2–9 ng g−1 d−1 DW) adjacent to the Superfund site; other reaches were close to or below reporting limits (0. 1 ng g−1 d−1 DW). Total Hg and MeHg bioaccumulation in fauna was variable across sites and taxa, with no clear spatial patterns downstream of the contamination source. Crayfish, mayflies and shiners showed a weak positive relationship with porewater MeHg concentration. PMID:25732794

  4. Alkali element enrichments on the BABBs at the IODP Expedition 333 Site C0012 in the northern Shikoku Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haraguchi, S.; Nakamura, K.; Fujinaga, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Shikoku Basin is a back arc basin located westside of the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin) arc, spreading was from 25 to 15 Ma. The drilling of the DSDP, ODP and IODP recovered the backarc basin basalt (BABB) of the Shikoku Basin. Site C0012, south of the Kii Peninsula, was operated during the IODP Exp 333, and BABB was recovered 100m thickness under the 520m of sediment. This BABB is divided into upper aphyric pillow (Unit 1) and lower massive flow (Unit 2) divided at the 560 mbsf, and show variable degree of alteration, clay mineral and zeolite depositions. SiO2 and MgO contents of these basalts are 47-55 and 5-8 wt%. These basalts show wide variation of enrichment of alkali elements, 2.3-7.5 and 0.4-4.2 wt% of Na2O and K2O. Na2O+K2O contents show 3.2-8.0 wt%, and 2 wt% higher trends than other BABBs in the Shikoku Basin at the same SiO2 contents. Na2O and K2O show proportional and anti-proportional trends with increasing LOI. Therefore, both alkali element enrichments in these rocks are caused by secondary mineralization, and host phase of Na2O is hydrous and that of K2O is anhydrous minerals. Secondary mineral phases was mainly identified by XRD. The identified host phases of Na are analcime and thomsonite. Analcime is observed in rocks of more than 4 wt% of Na2O. Chlorite and smectite are identified to clay minerals. This mineral assemblage indicates the high-temperature zeolite facies alteration. The host phases of K are mainly identified into K-feldspar. We assume that secondary mineralization of K-fd is associated with low-temperature albitization. Compared to the lithostratigraphy, the Na enrichment is prominent in the Unit 1 and upper 20 m of the Unit 2, and the K enrichment is prominent in lower part of the Unit 2. We consider that the Na enrichment associated with zeolite depositions occurred under high water/rock ratio with active hydrothermal circulation because of high water permeability of pillow lava, and K enrichment associated with albitization occurred

  5. Isomer-specific analysis and toxic evaluation of polychlorinated naphthalenes in soil, sediment, and biota collected near the site of a former chlor-alkali plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, K.; Blankenship, A.L.; Giesy, J.P.; Imagawa, T.

    1998-09-01

    Concentrations and composition of polychlorinated naphthalene (PCN) congeners were determined in soil, sediments, blue crab, striped mullet, and boat-tailed grackle collected near a chlor-alkali plant to determine their congener profile, bioaccumulation properties, and toxic potential. Concentrations of total PCNs as high as 23 {micro}g/g, dry wt, were found in sediments collected at the marsh contaminated by disposal of wastes from the chlor-alkali process. The spatial distribution of sediment-PCN concentrations was not related with those observed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The PCN congener profile did not resemble those of any technical mixtures. Hepta- and octa-chloronaphthalenes were the most abundant congeners accounting for greater than 50% of the total PCN concentrations in soil and sediments. A characteristic profile of PCNs in samples collected at the chlor-alkali site suggests the formation of chloronaphthalene congeners during chlor-alkali process, as has been suggested for polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs). Concentrations of total PCNs in biota were 3--5 orders of magnitude less than in sediments. The profile of PCN congeners in biota was predominated by tetra- or penta-chloronaphthalenes, while hepta- and octa-chloronaphthalenes were not detected.

  6. Influence of a chlor-alkali superfund site on mercury bioaccumulation in periphyton and low-trophic level fauna

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckman, Kate L.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Taylor, Vivien F.; Chalmers, Ann T.; Broadley, Hannah J.; Agee, Jennifer L.; Jackson, Brian P.; Chen, Celia Y.

    2015-01-01

    In Berlin, New Hampshire, USA, the Androscoggin River flows adjacent to a former chlor-alkali facility that is a US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund site and source of mercury (Hg) to the river. The present study was conducted to determine the fate and bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) to lower trophic-level taxa in the river. Surface sediment directly adjacent to the source showed significantly elevated MeHg (10–40× increase, mean ± standard deviation [SD]: 20.1 ± 24.8 ng g–1 dry wt) and total mercury (THg; 10–30× increase, mean ± SD: 2045 ± 2669 ng g–1 dry wt) compared with all other reaches, with sediment THg and MeHg from downstream reaches elevated (3–7× on average) relative to the reference (THg mean ± SD: 33.5 ± 9.33 ng g–1 dry wt; MeHg mean ± SD: 0.52 ± 0.21 ng g–1 dry wt). Water column THg concentrations adjacent to the point source for both particulate (0.23 ng L–1) and dissolved (0.76 ng L–1) fractions were 5-fold higher than at the reference sites, and 2-fold to 5-fold higher than downstream. Methylmercury production potential of periphyton material was highest (2–9 ng g–1 d–1 dry wt) adjacent to the Superfund site; other reaches were close to or below reporting limits (0. 1 ng g–1 d–1 dry wt). Total Hg and MeHg bioaccumulation in fauna was variable across sites and taxa, with no clear spatial patterns downstream of the contamination source. Crayfish, mayflies, and shiners showed a weak positive relationship with porewater MeHg concentration.

  7. MEASUREMENT OF TOTAL SITE MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A CHLOR-ALKALI PLANT USING OPEN-PATH UV-DOAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In December 2003, the EPA promulgated the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants for mercury cell chlor-alkali plants. In February 2004, the Natural Resources Defense Council filed petitions on the final rule in U.S. district court citing, among other issues, th...

  8. Analyzing relationships between surface perturbations and local chemical reactivity of metal sites: Alkali promotion of O2 dissociation on Ag(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Hongliang; Linic, Suljo

    2016-06-01

    Many commercial heterogeneous catalysts are complex structures that contain metal active sites promoted by multiple additives. Developing fundamental understanding about the impact of these perturbations on the local surface reactivity is crucial for catalyst development and optimization. In this contribution, we develop a general framework for identifying underlying mechanisms that control the changes in the surface reactivity of a metal site (more specifically the adsorbate-surface interactions) upon a perturbation in the local environment. This framework allows us to interpret fairly complex interactions on metal surfaces in terms of specific, physically transparent contributions that can be evaluated independently of each other. We use Cs-promoted dissociation of O2 as an example to illustrate our approach. We concluded that the Cs adsorbate affects the outcome of the chemical reaction through a strong alkali-induced electric field interacting with the static dipole moment of the O2/Ag(111) system.

  9. Post-depositional memory record of mercury in sediment near the effluent disposal site of a chlor-alkali plant in Thane Creek-Mumbai Harbour, India.

    PubMed

    Rama, Anirudh; Rokade, M A; Zingde, D; Boroleb, D V

    2009-07-01

    A mercury-cell chlor-alkali plant, operating for 40 years at Airoli (eastern bank of Thane Creek), India, has caused widespread contamination of the surrounding environment. Untreated wastewater from the plant was discharged to Thane Creek for several years. Thane Creek joins the Ulhas Estuary by a narrow arm and opens to the Arabian Sea through Mumbai Harbour. The Ulhas Estuary is impacted by mercury (Hg) released from several industries including two chlor-alkali industries. In order to understand the historical record of anthropogenic Hg and its association to Al, Fe and total organic carbon (TOC), estimation of Hg, Al, Fe and TOC was made in surface sediments and cores from Thane Creek-Mumbai Harbour and the adjacent coastal area. Though 70% of the chlor-alkali plant has been changed to membrane cell technology, surficial sediment in the vicinity of effluent release contains a high concentration (up to 1.19 microg g(-1) dry wt) of Hg compared with its background value (0.10 microg g(-1) dry wt). The contaminated creek sediments are prone to current-driven resuspension and are acting as a strong source of Hg to the sediment of the coastal region. Several rocks and sediments from the catchment area were analysed to find out the natural background level of Hg. A high suspended load transported from the catchment region provides natural dilution to the Hg-contaminated sediment of the Bay. Lithogenic and anthropogenic Hg buried in marine sediments is quantified based on normalization with Al, Fe and TOC, and inter-comparisons of the results indicate comparable values obtained by using Al and Fe, while discernible deviations are found when normalization is carried out using TOC. The Hg profile in the core, from the effluent release site for which sedimentation rate has been established, is discussed in terms of the progressive removal of Hg from the effluent after the mid-1970s and partial changeover of the manufacturing process from Hg cell to membrane cell

  10. Site-isolated luminescent europium complexes with polyester macroligands: metal-centered heteroarm stars and nanoscale assemblies with labile block junctions.

    PubMed

    Bender, Jessica L; Corbin, Perry S; Fraser, Cassandra L; Metcalf, David H; Richardson, Frederick S; Thomas, Edwin L; Urbas, Augustine M

    2002-07-24

    The synthesis of a series of polymeric Eu(III) complexes with polyester ligands, along with supporting emission spectra, luminescence lifetimes, and, for a Eu block copolymer film, atomic force microscopy (AFM) data, is presented. Dibenzoylmethane was derivatized with a hydroxyl initiator site (dbmOH, 1) for tin octoate catalyzed ring opening polymerization of dl-lactide. The resulting poly(lactic acid) macroligand, dbmPLA (2), was combined with EuCl3 to generate Eu(dbmPLA)3 (3). Chelation of both dbmPLA and a polycaprolactone-functionalized bipyridine ligand (bpyPCL2) led to the Eu(III)-centered heteroarm star Eu(dbmPLA)3(bpyPCL2) (4). Unpolarized emission spectra and luminescence lifetimes were recorded for the Eu polymers in CH2Cl2 and for Eu(dbmPLA)3, as a film. Solution data for Eu(dbm)3 and Eu(dbm)3(bpy) were collected for comparison. For Eu tris(dbm) complexes, data were fit to a double exponential decay, indicating the presence of multiple species. Relative amounts of the longer lifetime component increase in the series Eu(dbm)3 solutions to Eu(dbmPLA)3 solutions to Eu(dbmPLA)3 films, perhaps suggesting benefits of the "polymer shell effect" and the diminishment of aquo adducts known to shorten lifetimes. As with the nonpolymeric analogue, data for Eu(dbmPLA)3(bpyPCL2) fit to a single-exponential decay. The sharpness of the feature at 579.7 nm, attributable to the 5D0 --> 7F0 transition in the emission spectrum of 4, lends further support for a homogeneous sample. AFM studies of "as cast" thin films of 4 reveal a lamellar structure with a 17.5 nm repeat. These microstructures, inferred to contain Eu luminophores at the glassy PLA-crystalline PCL domain interfaces, are modified by thermal treatment.

  11. Site-isolated luminescent europium complexes with polyester macroligands: metal-centered heteroarm stars and nanoscale assemblies with labile block junctions.

    PubMed

    Bender, Jessica L; Corbin, Perry S; Fraser, Cassandra L; Metcalf, David H; Richardson, Frederick S; Thomas, Edwin L; Urbas, Augustine M

    2002-07-24

    The synthesis of a series of polymeric Eu(III) complexes with polyester ligands, along with supporting emission spectra, luminescence lifetimes, and, for a Eu block copolymer film, atomic force microscopy (AFM) data, is presented. Dibenzoylmethane was derivatized with a hydroxyl initiator site (dbmOH, 1) for tin octoate catalyzed ring opening polymerization of dl-lactide. The resulting poly(lactic acid) macroligand, dbmPLA (2), was combined with EuCl3 to generate Eu(dbmPLA)3 (3). Chelation of both dbmPLA and a polycaprolactone-functionalized bipyridine ligand (bpyPCL2) led to the Eu(III)-centered heteroarm star Eu(dbmPLA)3(bpyPCL2) (4). Unpolarized emission spectra and luminescence lifetimes were recorded for the Eu polymers in CH2Cl2 and for Eu(dbmPLA)3, as a film. Solution data for Eu(dbm)3 and Eu(dbm)3(bpy) were collected for comparison. For Eu tris(dbm) complexes, data were fit to a double exponential decay, indicating the presence of multiple species. Relative amounts of the longer lifetime component increase in the series Eu(dbm)3 solutions to Eu(dbmPLA)3 solutions to Eu(dbmPLA)3 films, perhaps suggesting benefits of the "polymer shell effect" and the diminishment of aquo adducts known to shorten lifetimes. As with the nonpolymeric analogue, data for Eu(dbmPLA)3(bpyPCL2) fit to a single-exponential decay. The sharpness of the feature at 579.7 nm, attributable to the 5D0 --> 7F0 transition in the emission spectrum of 4, lends further support for a homogeneous sample. AFM studies of "as cast" thin films of 4 reveal a lamellar structure with a 17.5 nm repeat. These microstructures, inferred to contain Eu luminophores at the glassy PLA-crystalline PCL domain interfaces, are modified by thermal treatment. PMID:12121083

  12. Geophysical bed sediment characterization of the Androscoggin River from the former Chlor-Alkali Facility Superfund Site, Berlin, New Hampshire, to the state border with Maine, August 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Degnan, James R.; Teeple, Andrew P.; Johnston, Craig M.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Luce, Darryl

    2011-01-01

    The former Chlor-Alkali Facility in Berlin, New Hampshire, was listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency National Priorities List in 2005 as a Superfund site. The Chlor-Alkali Facility lies on the east bank of the Androscoggin River. Elemental mercury currently discharges from that bank into the Androscoggin River. The nature, extent, and the speciation of mercury and the production of methyl mercury contamination in the adjacent Androscoggin River is the subject of continuing investigations. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Region I of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, used geophysical methods to determine the distribution, thickness, and physical properties of sediments in the Androscoggin River channel at a small area of an upstream reference reach and downstream from the site to the New Hampshire–Maine State border. Separate reaches of the Androscoggin River in the study area were surveyed with surface geophysical methods including ground-penetrating radar and step-frequency electromagnetics. Results were processed to assess sediment characteristics including grain size, electrical conductivity, and pore-water specific conductance. Specific conductance measured during surface- and pore-water sampling was used to help interpret the results of the geophysical surveys. The electrical resistivity of sediment samples was measured in the laboratory with intact pore water for comparison with survey results. In some instances, anthropogenic features and land uses, such as roads and power lines affected the detection of riverbed properties using geophysical methods; when this occurred, the data were removed. Through combining results, detailed riverbed sediment characterizations were made. Results from ground-penetrating radar surveys were used to image and measure the depth to the riverbed, depth to buried riverbeds, riverbed thickness and to interpret material-type variations in terms of relative grain size. Fifty two percent of the

  13. Stepwise assembly of mixed-metal coordination cages containing both kinetically inert and kinetically labile metal ions: introduction of metal-centred redox and photophysical activity at specific sites.

    PubMed

    Wragg, Ashley B; Metherell, Alexander J; Cullen, William; Ward, Michael D

    2015-11-01

    Stepwise preparation of the heterometallic octanuclear coordination cages [(M(a))4(M(b))4L12](16+) is reported, in which M(a) = Ru or Os and M(b) = Cd or Co (all in their +2 oxidation state). This requires initial preparation of the kinetically inert mononuclear complexes [(M(a))L3](2+) in which L is a ditopic ligand with two bidentate chelating pyrazolyl-pyridine units: in the complexes [(M(a))L3](2+) one terminus of each ligand is bound to the metal ion, such that the complex has three pendant bidentate sites at which cage assembly can propagate by coordination to additional labile ions M(b) in a separate step. Thus, combination of four [(M(a))L3](2+) units and four [M(b)](2+) ions results in assembly of the complete cages [(M(a))4(M(b))4L12](16+) in which a metal ion lies at each of the eight vertices, and a bridging ligand spans each of the twelve edges, of a cube. The different types of metal ion necessarily alternate around the periphery with each bridging ligand bound to one metal ion of each type. All four cages have been structurally characterised: in the Ru(ii)/Cd(ii) cage (reported in a recent communication) the Ru(ii) and Cd(ii) ions are crystallographically distinct; in the other three cages [Ru(ii)/Co(ii), Os(ii)/Cd(ii) and Os(ii)/Co(ii), reported here] the ions are disordered around the periphery such that every metal site refines as a 50 : 50 mixture of the two metal atom types. The incorporation of Os(ii) units into the cages results in both redox activity [a reversible Os(ii)/Os(iii) couple for all four metal ions simultaneously, at a modest potential] and luminescence [the Os(ii) units have luminescent (3)MLCT excited states which will be good photo-electron donors] being incorporated into the cage superstructure.

  14. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  15. A structural investigation of the alkali metal site distribution within bioactive glass using neutron diffraction and multinuclear solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Martin, Richard A; Twyman, Helen L; Rees, Gregory J; Smith, Jodie M; Barney, Emma R; Smith, Mark E; Hanna, John V; Newport, Robert J

    2012-09-21

    The atomic-scale structure of Bioglass and the effect of substituting lithium for sodium within these glasses have been investigated using neutron diffraction and solid state magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. Applying an effective isomorphic substitution difference function to the neutron diffraction data has enabled the Na-O and Li-O nearest-neighbour correlations to be isolated from the overlapping Ca-O, O-(P)-O and O-(Si)-O correlations. These results reveal that Na and Li behave in a similar manner within the glassy matrix and do not disrupt the short range order of the network former. Residual differences are attributed solely to the variation in ionic radius between the two species. Successful simplification of the 2 < r (Å) < 3 region via the difference method has enabled all the nearest neighbour correlations to be deconvolved. The diffraction data provides the first direct experimental evidence of split Na-O nearest-neighbour correlations in these melt quench bioactive glasses, and an analogous splitting of the Li-O correlations. The observed correlations are attributed to the metal ions bonded either to bridging or to non-bridging oxygen atoms. (23)Na triple quantum MAS (3QMAS) NMR data corroborates the split Na-O correlations. The structural sites present will be intimately related to the release properties of the glass system in physiological fluids such as plasma and saliva, and hence to the bioactivity of the material. Detailed structural knowledge is therefore a prerequisite for optimizing material design. PMID:22868255

  16. The alkali metals: 200 years of surprises.

    PubMed

    Dye, James L

    2015-03-13

    Alkali metal compounds have been known since antiquity. In 1807, Sir Humphry Davy surprised everyone by electrolytically preparing (and naming) potassium and sodium metals. In 1808, he noted their interaction with ammonia, which, 100 years later, was attributed to solvated electrons. After 1960, pulse radiolysis of nearly any solvent produced solvated electrons, which became one of the most studied species in chemistry. In 1968, alkali metal solutions in amines and ethers were shown to contain alkali metal anions in addition to solvated electrons. The advent of crown ethers and cryptands as complexants for alkali cations greatly enhanced alkali metal solubilities. This permitted us to prepare a crystalline salt of Na(-) in 1974, followed by 30 other alkalides with Na(-), K(-), Rb(-) and Cs(-) anions. This firmly established the -1 oxidation state of alkali metals. The synthesis of alkalides led to the crystallization of electrides, with trapped electrons as the anions. Electrides have a variety of electronic and magnetic properties, depending on the geometries and connectivities of the trapping sites. In 2009, the final surprise was the experimental demonstration that alkali metals under high pressure lose their metallic character as the electrons are localized in voids between the alkali cations to become high-pressure electrides!

  17. The alkali metals: 200 years of surprises.

    PubMed

    Dye, James L

    2015-03-13

    Alkali metal compounds have been known since antiquity. In 1807, Sir Humphry Davy surprised everyone by electrolytically preparing (and naming) potassium and sodium metals. In 1808, he noted their interaction with ammonia, which, 100 years later, was attributed to solvated electrons. After 1960, pulse radiolysis of nearly any solvent produced solvated electrons, which became one of the most studied species in chemistry. In 1968, alkali metal solutions in amines and ethers were shown to contain alkali metal anions in addition to solvated electrons. The advent of crown ethers and cryptands as complexants for alkali cations greatly enhanced alkali metal solubilities. This permitted us to prepare a crystalline salt of Na(-) in 1974, followed by 30 other alkalides with Na(-), K(-), Rb(-) and Cs(-) anions. This firmly established the -1 oxidation state of alkali metals. The synthesis of alkalides led to the crystallization of electrides, with trapped electrons as the anions. Electrides have a variety of electronic and magnetic properties, depending on the geometries and connectivities of the trapping sites. In 2009, the final surprise was the experimental demonstration that alkali metals under high pressure lose their metallic character as the electrons are localized in voids between the alkali cations to become high-pressure electrides! PMID:25666067

  18. Measurement of Total Site Mercury Emissions from Chlor-Alkali Plant Using Ultraviolet Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy and Cell Room Roof-Vent Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical note describes a United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) measurement project to determine elemental mercury (Hg0) emissions from a mercury cell chlor-alkali (MCCA) facility in the southeastern U.S. during a 53-day monitoring campaign in the fall of...

  19. Measurement of Total Site Mercury Emissions from a Chlor-Alkali Plant Using Ultraviolet Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy and Cell Room Roof-Vent Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mercury-cell chlor-alkali plants can emit significant quantities of fugitive elemental mercury vapor to the air as part of production operations and maintenance activities. In the fall of 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a measurement project at a ch...

  20. Labile sulfide and sulfite in phytochelatin complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Eannetta, N.T.; Steffens, J.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Heavy metals such as cadmium induce tomato cell cultures to synthesize the metal binding polypeptides ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub 3} and ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub 4}-Gly (phytochelatins). Tomato cells selected for growth on normally lethal concentrations of CdCl{sub 2} synthesize higher quantities of these polypeptides. Cd{sup r} cells are not cross-resistant to other heavy metals, and recent work suggests that metal detoxification by these peptides may be Cd-specific. The occurrence of labile sulfur as a component of the metal complex raises questions concerning possible functions of phytochelatins besides that of Cd binding. The presence of acid-labile sulfide ion in phytochelatin complexes has been reported by several groups. We report the additional finding that labile sulfite is also present in these complexes and in higher amounts than sulfide. Sulfide and sulfite are both released from the metal binding complex by acidification or by treatment with EDTA.

  1. Effects of carbon substrate lability on carbon mineralization dynamics of tropical peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauhiainen, Jyrki; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Könönen, Mari; Limin, Suwido; Vasander, Harri

    2016-04-01

    Extensive draining at tropical ombrotrophic peatlands in Southeast Asia has made them global 'hot spots' for greenhouse gas emissions. Management practises and fires have led to changed substrate status, which affects microbial processes. Here, we present the first data on how management practises affect carbon (C) mineralization processes at these soils. We compared the carbon mineralization potentials of pristine forest soils to those of drained fire affected soils at various depths, with and without additional labile substrates (glucose, glutamate and NO3-N) and in oxic and anoxic conditions by dedicated ex situ experiments. Carbon mineralization (CO2 and CH4 production) rates were higher in the pristine site peat, which contains more labile carbon due to higher input via vegetation. Production rates decreased with depth together with decreasing availability of labile carbon. Consequently, the increase in production rates after labile substrate addition was relatively modest from pristine site as compared to the managed site and from the top layers as compared to deeper layers. Methanogenesis had little importance in total carbon mineralization. Adding labile C and N enhanced heterotrophic CO2 production more than the sole addition of N. Surprisingly, oxygen availability was not an ultimate requirement for substantial CO2 production rates, but anoxic respiration yielded comparable rates, especially at the pristine soils. Flooding of these sites will therefore reduce, but not completely cease, peat carbon loss. Reintroduced substantial vegetation and fertilization in degraded peatlands can enrich recalcitrant peat with simple C and N compounds and thus increase microbiological activity.

  2. Alkali cation specific adsorption onto fcc(111) transition metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mills, J N; McCrum, I T; Janik, M J

    2014-07-21

    The presence of alkali cations in electrolyte solutions is known to impact the rate of electrocatalytic reactions, though the mechanism of such impact is not conclusively determined. We use density functional theory (DFT) to examine the specific adsorption of alkali cations to fcc(111) electrode surfaces, as specific adsorption may block catalyst sites or otherwise impact surface catalytic chemistry. Solvation of the cation-metal surface structure was investigated using explicit water models. Computed equilibrium potentials for alkali cation adsorption suggest that alkali and alkaline earth cations will specifically adsorb onto Pt(111) and Pd(111) surfaces in the potential range of hydrogen oxidation and hydrogen evolution catalysis in alkaline solutions.

  3. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  4. In Situ, High-Resolution Profiles of Labile Metals in Sediments of Lake Taihu.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Gong, Mengdan; Li, Yangyang; Xu, Lv; Wang, Yan; Jing, Rui; Ding, Shiming; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing labile metal distribution and biogeochemical behavior in sediments is crucial for understanding their contamination characteristics in lakes, for which in situ, high-resolution data is scare. The diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) technique was used in-situ at five sites across Lake Taihu in the Yangtze River delta in China to characterize the distribution and mobility of eight labile metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Ni, Cu, Pb, Co and Cd) in sediments at a 3 mm spatial resolution. The results showed a great spatial heterogeneity in the distributions of redox-sensitive labile Fe, Mn and Co in sediments, while other metals had much less marked structure, except for downward decreases of labile Pb, Ni, Zn and Cu in the surface sediment layers. Similar distributions were found between labile Mn and Co and among labile Ni, Cu and Zn, reflecting a close link between their geochemical behaviors. The relative mobility, defined as the ratio of metals accumulated by DGT to the total contents in a volume of sediments with a thickness of 10 mm close to the surface of DGT probe, was the greatest for Mn and Cd, followed by Zn, Ni, Cu and Co, while Pb and Fe had the lowest mobility; this order generally agreed with that defined by the modified BCR approach. Further analyses showed that the downward increases of pH values in surface sediment layer may decrease the lability of Pb, Ni, Zn and Cu as detected by DGT, while the remobilization of redox-insensitive metals in deep sediment layer may relate to Mn cycling through sulphide coprecipitation, reflected by several corresponding minima between these metals and Mn. These in situ data provided the possibility for a deep insight into the mechanisms involved in the remobilization of metals in freshwater sediments. PMID:27608033

  5. In Situ, High-Resolution Profiles of Labile Metals in Sediments of Lake Taihu

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Gong, Mengdan; Li, Yangyang; Xu, Lv; Wang, Yan; Jing, Rui; Ding, Shiming; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing labile metal distribution and biogeochemical behavior in sediments is crucial for understanding their contamination characteristics in lakes, for which in situ, high-resolution data is scare. The diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) technique was used in-situ at five sites across Lake Taihu in the Yangtze River delta in China to characterize the distribution and mobility of eight labile metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Ni, Cu, Pb, Co and Cd) in sediments at a 3 mm spatial resolution. The results showed a great spatial heterogeneity in the distributions of redox-sensitive labile Fe, Mn and Co in sediments, while other metals had much less marked structure, except for downward decreases of labile Pb, Ni, Zn and Cu in the surface sediment layers. Similar distributions were found between labile Mn and Co and among labile Ni, Cu and Zn, reflecting a close link between their geochemical behaviors. The relative mobility, defined as the ratio of metals accumulated by DGT to the total contents in a volume of sediments with a thickness of 10 mm close to the surface of DGT probe, was the greatest for Mn and Cd, followed by Zn, Ni, Cu and Co, while Pb and Fe had the lowest mobility; this order generally agreed with that defined by the modified BCR approach. Further analyses showed that the downward increases of pH values in surface sediment layer may decrease the lability of Pb, Ni, Zn and Cu as detected by DGT, while the remobilization of redox-insensitive metals in deep sediment layer may relate to Mn cycling through sulphide coprecipitation, reflected by several corresponding minima between these metals and Mn. These in situ data provided the possibility for a deep insight into the mechanisms involved in the remobilization of metals in freshwater sediments. PMID:27608033

  6. Apparatus enables accurate determination of alkali oxides in alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupraw, W. A.; Gahn, R. F.; Graab, J. W.; Maple, W. E.; Rosenblum, L.

    1966-01-01

    Evacuated apparatus determines the alkali oxide content of an alkali metal by separating the metal from the oxide by amalgamation with mercury. The apparatus prevents oxygen and moisture from inadvertently entering the system during the sampling and analytical procedure.

  7. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  8. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  9. Chlor-Alkali Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkatesh, S.; Tilak, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    Chlor-alkali technology is one of the largest electrochemical industries in the world, the main products being chlorine and caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) generated simultaneously by the electrolysis of sodium chloride. This technology is reviewed in terms of electrochemical principles and manufacturing processes involved. (Author/JN)

  10. Reduced contribution of thermally-labile sugar lesions to DNA double-strand break formation after exposure to neutrons.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyendra K; Wu, Wenqi; Stuschke, Martin; Bockisch, Andreas; Iliakis, George

    2012-12-01

    In cells exposed to ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks (DSBs) form within clustered damage sites from lesions disrupting the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. It is commonly assumed that DSBs form promptly and are immediately detected and processed by the cellular DNA damage response apparatus. However, DSBs also form by delayed chemical conversion of thermally-labile sugar lesions (TLSL) to breaks. We recently reported that conversion of thermally-labile sugar lesions to breaks occurs in cells maintained at physiological temperatures. Here, we investigate the influence of radiation quality on the formation of thermally-labile sugar lesions dependent DSBs. We show that, although the yields of total DSBs are very similar after exposure to neutrons and X rays, the yields of thermally-labile sugar lesions dependent DSBs from neutrons are decreased in comparison to that from X rays. Thus, the yields of prompt DSBs for neutrons are greater than for X rays. Notably, after neutron irradiation the decreased yield of thermally-labile sugar lesion dependent DSBs is strongly cell line dependent, likely reflecting subtle differences in DNA organization. We propose that the higher ionization density of neutrons generates with higher probability prompt DSBs within ionization clusters and renders the ensuing chemical evolution of thermally-labile sugar lesions inconsequential to DNA integrity. Modification of thermally-labile sugar lesion evolution may define novel radiation protection strategies aiming at decreasing DSB formation by chemically preserving thermally-labile sugar lesions until other DSB contributing lesions within the clustered damage site are removed by non-DSB repair pathways. PMID:23088767

  11. Reduced contribution of thermally-labile sugar lesions to DNA double-strand break formation after exposure to neutrons.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyendra K; Wu, Wenqi; Stuschke, Martin; Bockisch, Andreas; Iliakis, George

    2012-12-01

    In cells exposed to ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks (DSBs) form within clustered damage sites from lesions disrupting the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. It is commonly assumed that DSBs form promptly and are immediately detected and processed by the cellular DNA damage response apparatus. However, DSBs also form by delayed chemical conversion of thermally-labile sugar lesions (TLSL) to breaks. We recently reported that conversion of thermally-labile sugar lesions to breaks occurs in cells maintained at physiological temperatures. Here, we investigate the influence of radiation quality on the formation of thermally-labile sugar lesions dependent DSBs. We show that, although the yields of total DSBs are very similar after exposure to neutrons and X rays, the yields of thermally-labile sugar lesions dependent DSBs from neutrons are decreased in comparison to that from X rays. Thus, the yields of prompt DSBs for neutrons are greater than for X rays. Notably, after neutron irradiation the decreased yield of thermally-labile sugar lesion dependent DSBs is strongly cell line dependent, likely reflecting subtle differences in DNA organization. We propose that the higher ionization density of neutrons generates with higher probability prompt DSBs within ionization clusters and renders the ensuing chemical evolution of thermally-labile sugar lesions inconsequential to DNA integrity. Modification of thermally-labile sugar lesion evolution may define novel radiation protection strategies aiming at decreasing DSB formation by chemically preserving thermally-labile sugar lesions until other DSB contributing lesions within the clustered damage site are removed by non-DSB repair pathways.

  12. Preparation and Analysis of Oligonucleotides Containing the C4′-Oxidized Abasic Site and Related Mechanistic Probes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeseung; Kreller, Cortney R.; Greenberg, Marc M.

    2005-01-01

    The C4′-oxidized abasic site (C4-AP) is produced by a variety of DNA damaging agents. This alkali labile lesion can exist in up to four diastereomeric cyclic forms, in addition to the acyclic keto-aldehyde. Synthetic oligonucleotides containing the lesion were prepared from a stable photochemical precursor. Chemical integrity of the lesion containing oligonucleotides was probed using phosphodiesterase lability. Analysis of the 3′,5′-phosphate diester of the monomeric lesion released from single diastereomers of photolabile precursors by 1H NMR indicates that isomerization of the hemiacetal and/or hemiketal is rapid. The syntheses and characterization of oligonucleotides containing configurationally stable analogues of C4-AP, which serve as mechanistic probes for deciphering the structural basis of the biochemical and biological effects of the C4′-oxidized abasic lesion, are also described. PMID:16277338

  13. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Wolfs, Denise Y.; Clavenna, Le Roy R.; Eakman, James M.; Kalina, Theodore

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  14. Modeling the cis-oxo-labile binding site motif of non-heme iron oxygenases: water exchange and oxidation reactivity of a non-heme iron(IV)-oxo compound bearing a tripodal tetradentate ligand.

    PubMed

    Company, Anna; Prat, Irene; Frisch, Jonathan R; Mas-Ballesté, Ruben; Güell, Mireia; Juhász, Gergely; Ribas, Xavi; Münck, Eckard; Luis, Josep M; Que, Lawrence; Costas, Miquel

    2011-02-01

    The spectroscopic and chemical characterization of a new synthetic non-heme iron(IV)-oxo species [Fe(IV)(O)((Me,H) Pytacn)(S)](2+) (2, (Me,H)Pytacn=1-(2'-pyridylmethyl)-4,7-dimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, S=CH(3)CN or H(2)O) is described. Complex 2 was prepared by reaction of [Fe(II)(CF(3)SO(3))(2)((Me,H) Pytacn)] (1) with peracetic acid. Complex 2 bears a tetradentate N(4) ligand that leaves two cis sites available for binding an oxo group and a second external ligand but, unlike the related iron(IV)-oxo species with tetradentate ligands, it is remarkably stable at room temperature (t(1/2)>2 h at 288 K). Its ability to exchange the oxygen atom of the oxo ligand with water has been analyzed in detail by means of kinetic studies, and a mechanism is proposed on the basis of DFT calculations. Hydrogen-atom abstraction from C-H bonds and oxygen-atom transfer to sulfides by 2 have also been studied. Despite its thermal stability, 2 proves to be a very powerful oxidant that is capable of breaking the strong C-H bond of cyclohexane (bond dissociation energy=99.3 kcal mol(-1)).

  15. Alkali-vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.; Krupke, W. F.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the results from several of our alkali laser systems. We show highly efficient performance from an alexandrite-pumped rubidium laser. Using a laser diode stack as a pump source, we demonstrate up to 145 W of average power from a CW system. We present a design for a transversely pumped demonstration system that will show all of the required laser physics for a high power system.

  16. Rhizosphere Environment and Labile Phosphorus Release from Organic Waste-Amended Soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Thanh H.

    2015-04-01

    Crop residues and biofertilizers are primary sources of nutrients for organic crop production. However, soils treated with large amounts of nutrient-enriched manure have elevated phosphorus (P) levels in regions of intensive animal agriculture. Surpluses occurred in these amended soils, resulting in large pools of exchangeable inorganic P (Pi) and enzyme-labile organic P (Po) that averaging 30.9 and 68.2 mg kg-1, respectively. Organic acids produced during crop residue decomposition can promote the complexation of counter-ions and decouple and release unbound Pi from metal and alkali metal phosphates. Animal manure and cover crop residues also contain large amounts of soluble organic matter, and likely generate similar ligands. However, a high degree of heterogeneity in P spatial distribution in such amended fields, arising from variances in substrate physical forms ranging from slurries to dried solids, composition, and diverse application methods and equipment. Distinct clusters of Pi and Po were observed, where accumulation of the latter forms was associated with high soil microbial biomass C and reduced phosphomonoesterases' activity. Accurate estimates of plant requirements and lability of soil P pools, and real-time plant and soil P sensing systems are critical considerations to optimally manage manure-derived nutrients in crop production systems. An in situ X-ray fluorescence-based approach to sensing canopy and soil XRFS-P was developed to improve the yield-soil P relationship for optimal nutrient recommendations in addition to allowing in-the-field verification of foliar P status.

  17. Fate and lability of silver in soils: Effect of ageing

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate and lability of added soluble Ag in soils over time was examined by measurement of labile metal (E-value) by isotopic dilution using the 110mAg radioactive isotope and the solid-phase speciation of Ag by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrosco...

  18. The 4843 Alkali Metal Storage Facility Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The 4843 AMSF has been used primarily to provide a centralized building to receive and store dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste, including sodium and lithium, which has been generated at the Fast Flux Test Facility and at various other Hanford Site operations that used alkali metals. Most of the dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste received consists of retired equipment from liquid sodium processes. The unit continues to store material. In general, only solid alkali metal waste that is water reactive is stored at the 4843 AMSF. The 4843 AMSF will be closed in a manner consistent with Ecology guidelines and regulations (WAC 173-303-610). The general closure procedure is detailed as follows.

  19. PROCESS OF RECOVERING ALKALI METALS

    DOEpatents

    Wolkoff, J.

    1961-08-15

    A process is described of recovering alkali metal vapor by sorption on activated alumina, activated carbon, dehydrated zeolite, activated magnesia, or Fuller's earth preheated above the vaporization temperature of the alkali metal and subsequent desorption by heating the solvent under vacuum. (AEC)

  20. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  1. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  2. Effects of chemical amendments on the lability and speciation of metals in anaerobically digested biosolids.

    PubMed

    Donner, Erica; Brunetti, Gianluca; Zarcinas, Bernie; Harris, Paul; Tavakkoli, Ehsan; Naidu, Ravi; Lombi, Enzo

    2013-10-01

    The interaction of inorganic contaminants present in biosolids with iron, aluminum, and manganese oxy/hydroxides has been advocated as a key mechanism limiting their bioavailability. In this study, we investigated whether this is indeed the case, and further, whether it can be exploited to produce optimized biosolids products through the addition of chemical additives during sewage sludge processing. Experiments were conducted to investigate whether the addition of iron- and aluminum-based amendments (at 5 different rates) during the anaerobic digestion phase of wastewater treatment can effectively change the speciation or lability of contaminant metals (copper, zinc and cadmium) in biosolids destined for use in agriculture. The performance of the bioreactors was monitored throughout and the speciation and lability were determined in both fresh and 3-month aged biosolids using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (Cu, Zn) and isotopic dilution ((65)Cu, (65)Zn, (109)Cd). The tested amendments (FeCl3, Al2(SO4)3, and Al-rich water treatment residual) did not cause significant changes in metal speciation and were of limited use for reducing the lability of contaminant metals in good quality biosolids (suitable for use in agriculture), suggesting that high affinity binding sites were already in excess in these materials. However, the use of chemical amendments may offer advantages in terms of treatment process optimization and may also be beneficial when biosolids are used for contaminated site remediation. PMID:23981056

  3. Characteristics of the labile neurotoxin associated with nervous coccidiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Isler, C M; Bellamy, J E; Wobeser, G A

    1987-01-01

    Reported are the results of preliminary attempts to characterize the molecular weight, heat sensitivity and other features of a labile neurotoxin identified in the serum of calves exhibiting neurological signs in association with coccidial enteritis. The labile neurotoxin activity is heat labile (60 degrees C for 30 min) and is lost upon exposure to acidic pH (5.5) and cysteine (1.75 g/100 mL serum). Activity can be recovered from the precipitate of a 30% wt/vol solution of (NH4)2SO4 in serum. Ultrafiltration trials suggest that labile neurotoxin activity may be linked to a molecule of over 300,000 MW. PMID:2955866

  4. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  5. DNA-AP sites generation by Etoposide in whole blood cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Etoposide is currently one of the most commonly used antitumor drugs. The mechanisms of action proposed for its antitumor activity are based mainly on its interaction with topoisomerase II. Etoposide effects in transformed cells have been described previously. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of this drug in non-transformed whole blood cells, such as occurs as collateral damage induced by some chemotherapies. Methods To determine etoposide genotoxicity, we employed Comet assay in two alkaline versions. To evaluate single strand breaks and delay repair sites we use pH 12.3 conditions and pH >13 to evidence alkali labile sites. With the purpose to quantified apurinic or apyrimidine (AP) sites we employed a specific restriction enzyme. Etoposide effects were determined on whole blood cells cultured in absence or presence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) treated during 2 and 24 hours of cultured. Results Alkaline (pH > 13) single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay experiments revealed etoposide-induced increases in DNA damage in phytohemaglutinine (PHA)-stimulated blood and non-stimulated blood cells. When the assay was performed at a less alkaline pH, 12.3, we observed DNA damage in PHA-stimulated blood cells consistent with the existence of alkali labile sites (ALSs). In an effort to elucidate the molecular events underlying this result, we applied exonuclease III (Exo III) in conjunction with a SCGE assay, enabling detection of DNA-AP sites along the genome. More DNA AP-sites were revealed by Exo III and ALSs were recognized by the SCGE assay only in the non-stimulated blood cells treated with etoposide. Conclusion Our results indicate that etoposide induces DNA damage specifically at DNA-AP sites in quiescent blood cells. This effect could be involved in the development of secondary malignancies associated with etoposide chemotherapy. PMID:19917085

  6. Why is firefly oxyluciferin a notoriously labile substance?

    PubMed

    Maltsev, Oleg V; Nath, Naba K; Naumov, Panče; Hintermann, Lukas

    2014-01-13

    The chemistry of firefly bioluminescence is important for numerous applications in biochemistry and analytical chemistry. The emitter of this bioluminescent system, firefly oxyluciferin, is difficult to handle. The cause of its lability was clarified while its synthesis was reinvestigated. A side product was identified and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The reason for the lability of oxyluciferin is now ascribed to autodimerization of the coexisting enol and keto forms in a Mannich-type reaction.

  7. Alkali hydrolysis of trinitrotoluene.

    PubMed

    Karasch, Christian; Popovic, Milan; Qasim, Mohamed; Bajpai, Rakesh K

    2002-01-01

    Data for alkali hydrolysis of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in aqueous solution at pH 12.0 under static (pH-controlled) as well as dynamic (pH-uncontrolled) conditions are reported. The experiments were conducted at two different molar ratios of TNT to hydroxyl ions at room temperature. The TNT disappeared rapidly from the solution as a first-order reaction. The complete disappearance of aromatic structure from the aqueous solution within 24 h was confirmed by the ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectra of the samples. Cuvet experiments in a UV-VIS spectrophotometer demonstrated the formation of Meisenheimer complex, which slowly disappeared via formation of aromatic compounds with fewer nitro groups. The known metabolites of TNT were found to accumulate only in very small quantities in the liquid phase.

  8. K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} and K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9}: The first osmium perovskites containing alkali cations at the 'A' site

    SciTech Connect

    Mogare, Kailash M.; Klein, Wilhelm; Jansen, Martin

    2012-07-15

    K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} and K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} were obtained from solid-state reactions of potassium superoxide, sodium peroxide and osmium metal at elevated oxygen pressures. K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} crystallizes as an oxygen-deficient cubic double perovskite in space group Fm3{sup Macron }m with a=8.4184(5) A and contains isolated OsO{sub 6} octahedra. K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} crystallizes hexagonally in P6{sub 3}/mmc with a=5.9998(4) A and c=14.3053(14) A. K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} consists of face sharing Os{sub 2}O{sub 9} pairs of octahedra. According to magnetic measurements K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} is diamagnetic, whereas K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} displays strong antiferromagnetic coupling (T{sub N}=140 K), indicating enhanced magnetic interactions within the octahedral pair. - Graphical abstract: High oxidation states of Os, obtained by high oxygen pressure synthesis, are accommodated in double and triple perovskite matrices. K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} displays enhanced magnetic interactions. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New osmates containing highly oxidized Os were obtained by high O{sub 2} pressure synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High oxidation states of Os are accommodated in double and triple perovskite matrices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both compounds represent the first Os perovskites with an alkali metal at the A site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} displays enhanced magnetic interactions within the octahedral pair.

  9. In situ high-resolution evaluation of labile arsenic and mercury in sediment of a large shallow lake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Yao, Yu; Wang, Peifang; Hou, Jun; Qian, Jin; Yuan, Ye; Fan, Xiulei

    2016-01-15

    The precise evaluation of arsenic (As) and mercury (Hg) bioavailability in sediment is crucial to controlling As and Hg contamination, but traditional ex situ measurements hamper comprehensive analysis of labile As and Hg in sediment. In this study, we characterized in situ labile As and Hg in sediment of Lake Hongze using the zirconium (Zr) oxide diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique and 3-mercaptopropyl functionalized silica gel DGT, respectively. The concentrations of DGT-labile As and Hg in the sediment profiles were found to exhibit considerable variation, ranging from 0.15 to 4.15 μg L(-1) for As and from 0.04 to 1.35 μg L(-1) for Hg. As and Hg flux values, calculated based on the concentration gradients measured from the DGT profiles for both the overlying water and sediment close to the sediment-water interface, were used to determine the contamination status of As and Hg. Flux values of As and Hg were between -0.066 and 0.067 ng cm(-2)d(-1) and between -0.0187 and 0.0181 ng cm(-2)d(-1), respectively. The GNU's Not Unix R (GNU R) programming language was used to identify outliers of As and Hg at various depths at the sampling sites. The results indicate that the sites with the most outliers were all located in the regions that were seriously affected by contaminants from the Huai River. The DGT-labile As and Hg concentrations in the 0-30 mm layer were found to be significantly correlated with concentrations of labile As and Hg, total dissolved As and Hg, and total As and Hg in the overlying water, as indicated by ex situ measurements. Results show that DGT is a reliable and high-resolution technique that can be used for in situ monitoring of the labile fractions of As and Hg in sediment in fresh water bodies. PMID:26398454

  10. In situ high-resolution evaluation of labile arsenic and mercury in sediment of a large shallow lake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Yao, Yu; Wang, Peifang; Hou, Jun; Qian, Jin; Yuan, Ye; Fan, Xiulei

    2016-01-15

    The precise evaluation of arsenic (As) and mercury (Hg) bioavailability in sediment is crucial to controlling As and Hg contamination, but traditional ex situ measurements hamper comprehensive analysis of labile As and Hg in sediment. In this study, we characterized in situ labile As and Hg in sediment of Lake Hongze using the zirconium (Zr) oxide diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique and 3-mercaptopropyl functionalized silica gel DGT, respectively. The concentrations of DGT-labile As and Hg in the sediment profiles were found to exhibit considerable variation, ranging from 0.15 to 4.15 μg L(-1) for As and from 0.04 to 1.35 μg L(-1) for Hg. As and Hg flux values, calculated based on the concentration gradients measured from the DGT profiles for both the overlying water and sediment close to the sediment-water interface, were used to determine the contamination status of As and Hg. Flux values of As and Hg were between -0.066 and 0.067 ng cm(-2)d(-1) and between -0.0187 and 0.0181 ng cm(-2)d(-1), respectively. The GNU's Not Unix R (GNU R) programming language was used to identify outliers of As and Hg at various depths at the sampling sites. The results indicate that the sites with the most outliers were all located in the regions that were seriously affected by contaminants from the Huai River. The DGT-labile As and Hg concentrations in the 0-30 mm layer were found to be significantly correlated with concentrations of labile As and Hg, total dissolved As and Hg, and total As and Hg in the overlying water, as indicated by ex situ measurements. Results show that DGT is a reliable and high-resolution technique that can be used for in situ monitoring of the labile fractions of As and Hg in sediment in fresh water bodies.

  11. Mixed alkali effect in nonconventional alkali gallotitanate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Miyaji, Fumiaki; Hasegawa, Shinya; Yoko, Toshinobu; Sakka, Sumio . Inst. for Chemical Research)

    1993-02-01

    The mixed alkali effect on electrical conductivity, that is, the reduction of conductivity due to alkali mixing, was observed in Na[sub 2]O-K[sub 2]O-Ga[sub 2]O[sub 3]-TiO[sub 2] glasses, which are nonconventional in the sense that glass-forming oxides defined by Zachariasen are not involved. The magnitude of the reduction in conductivity of the present glasses due to alkali mixing was similar to that of corresponding mixed alkali silicate and phosphate glasses. The activation energy for electrical conduction showed a maximum around the composition Na/(Na + K) = 0.5, where the conductivity was at a minimum.

  12. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  13. Total Dissolved Cobalt and Labile Cobalt in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, M. A.; Noble, A.

    2012-12-01

    This study presents the total and labile dissolved cobalt distributions from the North Atlantic GEOTRACES Zonal Transect expeditions of the fall of 2010 and 2011. Labile cobalt was detected in much of the water column below the euphotic zone, suggesting that strong cobalt binding ligands were not present in excess of the total cobalt concentration. Near complete complexation of cobalt was observed in surface waters, and linear relationships were observed when both total and labile cobalt were compared to phosphate in surface waters, indicative of a strong biological influence on cobalt cycling. Decoupling of cobalt and macronutrients in the surface waters was observed approaching the North American coast, and a relationship between cobalt and salinity was observed, suggesting that coastal inputs may dominate the distributions of cobalt there. In deep waters, both total and labile cobalt were generally lower in concentration than at intermediate depths, which is evidence of scavenging processes removing cobalt from the water column. Elevated concentrations of labile and total cobalt were observed in samples taken within the TAG hydrothermal plume, and a reverse relationship between cobalt and oxygen was observed in the western basin OMZ.

  14. Fate and lability of silver in soils: effect of ageing.

    PubMed

    Settimio, Lara; McLaughlin, Mike J; Kirby, Jason K; Langdon, Kate A; Lombi, Enzo; Donner, Erica; Scheckel, Kirk G

    2014-08-01

    The fate and lability of added soluble Ag in soils over time was examined by measurement of labile metal (E-value) by isotopic dilution using the (110m)Ag radioactive isotope and the solid-phase speciation of Ag by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. After two weeks of ageing the E-values for Ag decreased by 20-90% with a further decrease of 10-40% after six months. The overall decrease in labile Ag for all soils after the 6 month ageing period was 50-100%. The ageing was more rapid and pronounced in the alkaline soils. XANES results for Ag in soils indicated that for the majority of soils the added Ag(+) was reduced to metallic Ag over time, and associations with Fe-oxohydroxides and reduced S groups in organic matter also decreased Ag lability. Strong positive correlations were found between metallic Ag and non-labile Ag and between organic carbon and Ag bonded with S species.

  15. [Techniques of preparation and indications of labile blood products].

    PubMed

    Clément, S

    2011-04-01

    Labile blood products are obtained from samples of whole blood or aphaeresis. The techniques of preparation evolve with technological advances, which allow both an increasing automation and an intensification of the sanitary safety of the blood products. Over the last ten years, thanks to the availability of new technologies, several measures have been introduced in order to reduce the risk of transmission of pathogens and prevent the onset of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): leukoreduction, use of platelet storage solutions, inactivation of plasma and presumably of platelets in a very near future. The control of transfusion risk also depends on proper use of labile blood products. To assist the prescriber in his treatment options and to standardize practices, the French Agency for Sanitary Safety of Health Products has issued recommendations in terms of utilization of blood products that are detailed in this review of major labile blood products available.

  16. Synergistic capture mechanisms for alkali and sulphur species from combustion. Quarterly report No. 10, December 1992--February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.W.; Shadman, F.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Wu, Baochun

    1993-07-26

    A number of sorbents with alumina-silicate base and sulfur capturing active sites have been developed for simultaneous removal of alkali metal compounds and sulfur dioxide. Current report will focus on bauxite sorbents, which includes experiments on sulfur dioxide absorption, alkali capturing and alkali/sulfur absorption simultaneously by bauxite-based sorbents. The alkali compound used here is sodium chloride. Experiments show an effective adsorption of sulfur or alkali separately, and the combined adsorption of alkali/sulfur. Atomic absorption analysis of reaction products shows that there is a much higher sodium content in the combined reaction products than that of the single reaction of alkali absorption by bauxite. Further X-ray diffraction analysis shows that there is sodium sulfate in the final products of simultaneous reaction, which indicates the formation and then condensation of sodium sulfate in the reaction system.

  17. Repeated Labilization-Reconsolidation Processes Strengthen Declarative Memory in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Forcato, Cecilia; Rodríguez, María L. C.; Pedreira, María E.

    2011-01-01

    The idea that memories are immutable after consolidation has been challenged. Several reports have shown that after the presentation of a specific reminder, reactivated old memories become labile and again susceptible to amnesic agents. Such vulnerability diminishes with the progress of time and implies a re-stabilization phase, usually referred to as reconsolidation. To date, the main findings describe the mechanisms associated with the labilization-reconsolidation process, but little is known about its functionality from a biological standpoint. Indeed, two functions have been proposed. One suggests that destabilization of the original memory after the reminder allows the integration of new information into the background of the original memory (memory updating), and the other suggests that the labilization-reconsolidation process strengthens the original memory (memory strengthening). We have previously reported the reconsolidation of human declarative memories, demonstrating memory updating in the framework of reconsolidation. Here we deal with the strengthening function attributed to the reconsolidation process. We triggered labilization-reconsolidation processes successively by repeated presentations of the proper reminder. Participants learned an association between five cue-syllables and their respective response-syllables. Twenty-four hours later, the paired-associate verbal memory was labilized by exposing the subjects to one, two or four reminders. The List-memory was evaluated on Day 3 showing that the memory was improved when at least a second reminder was presented in the time window of the first labilization-reconsolidation process prompted by the earlier reminder. However, the improvement effect was revealed on Day 3, only when at least two reminders were presented on Day2 and not as a consequence of only retrieval. Therefore, we propose central concepts for the reconsolidation process, emphasizing its biological role and the parametrical constrains

  18. Repeated labilization-reconsolidation processes strengthen declarative memory in humans.

    PubMed

    Forcato, Cecilia; Rodríguez, María L C; Pedreira, María E

    2011-01-01

    The idea that memories are immutable after consolidation has been challenged. Several reports have shown that after the presentation of a specific reminder, reactivated old memories become labile and again susceptible to amnesic agents. Such vulnerability diminishes with the progress of time and implies a re-stabilization phase, usually referred to as reconsolidation. To date, the main findings describe the mechanisms associated with the labilization-reconsolidation process, but little is known about its functionality from a biological standpoint. Indeed, two functions have been proposed. One suggests that destabilization of the original memory after the reminder allows the integration of new information into the background of the original memory (memory updating), and the other suggests that the labilization-reconsolidation process strengthens the original memory (memory strengthening). We have previously reported the reconsolidation of human declarative memories, demonstrating memory updating in the framework of reconsolidation. Here we deal with the strengthening function attributed to the reconsolidation process. We triggered labilization-reconsolidation processes successively by repeated presentations of the proper reminder. Participants learned an association between five cue-syllables and their respective response-syllables. Twenty-four hours later, the paired-associate verbal memory was labilized by exposing the subjects to one, two or four reminders. The List-memory was evaluated on Day 3 showing that the memory was improved when at least a second reminder was presented in the time window of the first labilization-reconsolidation process prompted by the earlier reminder. However, the improvement effect was revealed on Day 3, only when at least two reminders were presented on Day 2 and not as a consequence of only retrieval. Therefore, we propose central concepts for the reconsolidation process, emphasizing its biological role and the parametrical

  19. Metal Atom Lability in Polynuclear Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Eames, Emily V.; Sánchez, Raúl Hernández

    2013-01-01

    The asymmetric oxidation product [(PhL)Fe3(µ-Cl)]2 [PhLH6 = MeC(CH2NHPh-o-NHPh)3], where each trinuclear core is comprised of an oxidized diiron unit [Fe2]5+ and an isolated trigonal pyramidal ferrous site, reacts with MCl2 salts to afford heptanuclear bridged structures of the type (PhL)2Fe6M(µ-Cl)4(thf)2, where M = Fe or Co. Zero-field, 57Fe Mössbauer analysis revealed the Co resides within the trinuclear core subunits, not at the octahedral, halide-bridged MCl4(thf)2 position indicating Co migration into the trinuclear subunits has occurred. Reaction of [(PhL)Fe3(µ-Cl)]2 with CoCl2 (2 or 5 equivalents) followed by precipitation via addition of acetonitrile afforded trinuclear products where one or two irons, respectively, can be substituted within the trinuclear core. Metal atom substitution was verified by 1H NMR, 57Fe Mossbauer, single crystal X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, and magnetometry analysis. Spectroscopic analysis revealed that the Co atom(s) substitute into the oxidized dimetal unit ([M2]5+), while the M2+ site remains iron-substituted. Magnetic data acquired for the series are consistent with this analysis revealing the oxidized dimetal unit comprises a strongly coupled S = 1 unit ([FeCo]5+) or S = ½ ([Co2]5+) that is weakly antiferromagnetically coupled to the high spin (S = 2) ferrous site. The kinetic pathway for metal substitution was probed via reaction of [(PhL)Fe3(µ-Cl)]2 with isotopically enriched 57FeCl2(thf)2, the results of which suggest rapid equilibration of 57Fe into both the M2+ site and oxidized diiron site, achieving a 1:1 mixture. PMID:23642178

  20. [Using a modified remote sensing imagery for interpreting changes in cultivated saline-alkali land].

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Liu, Hui-tao; Liu, Hong-juan; Liu, Jin-tong

    2015-04-01

    This paper developed a new interpretation symbol system for grading and classifying saline-alkali land, using Huanghua, a cosatal city in Hebei Province as a case. The system was developed by inverting remote sensing images from 1992 to 2011 based on site investigation, plant cover characteristics and features of remote sensing images. Combining this interpretation symbol system with supervising classification method, the information on arable land was obtained for the coastal saline-alkali ecosystem of Huanghua City, and the saline-alkali land area, changes in intensity of salinity-alkalinity and spatial distribution from 1992 to 2011 were analyzed. The results showed that salinization of arable land in Huanghua City alleviated from 1992 to 2011. The severely and moderately saline-alkali land area decreased in 2011 compared with 1992, while the non/slightly saline land area increased. The moderately saline-alkali land in southeast transformed to non/slightly saline-alkaline, while the severely saline-alkali land in west of the city far from the coastal zone became moderately saline-alkaline. The center of gravity (CG) of severely and non/slightly saline-alkali land moved closer the coastline, while that of the moderately saline-alkali land moved from southwest coastal line to northwest. Factors influencing changes in arable land within the saline-alkali ecosystem of Huanghua City were climate, hydrology and human activities.

  1. Alkali Metal Carbenoids: A Case of Higher Stability of the Heavier Congeners.

    PubMed

    Molitor, Sebastian; Gessner, Viktoria H

    2016-06-27

    As a result of the increased polarity of the metal-carbon bond when going down the group of the periodic table, the heavier alkali metal organyl compounds are generally more reactive and less stable than their lithium congeners. We now report a reverse trend for alkali metal carbenoids. Simple substitution of lithium by the heavier metals (Na, K) results in a significant stabilization of these usually highly reactive compounds. This allows their isolation and handling at room temperature and the first structure elucidation of sodium and potassium carbenoids. The control of stability was used to control reactivity and selectivity. Hence, the Na and K carbenoids act as selective carbene-transfer reagents, whereas the more labile lithium systems give rise to product mixtures. Additional fine tuning of the M-C interaction by means of crown ether addition further allows for control of the stability and reactivity. PMID:27100278

  2. Effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Jiang, Long; Wang, Yi; Su, Sheng; Sun, Lushi; Xu, Boyang; He, Limo; Xiang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to investigate effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures. The yield of CO, H2 and C2H4 was increased and that of CO2 was suppressed with increasing temperature. Increasing temperature could also promote depolymerization and aromatization reactions of active tars, forming heavier polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, leading to decrease of tar yields and species diversity. Diverse performance of inherent AAEMs at different temperatures significantly affected the distribution of pyrolysis products. The presence of inherent AAEMs promoted water-gas shift reaction, and enhanced the yield of H2 and CO2. Additionally, inherent AAEMs not only promoted breakage and decarboxylation/decarbonylation reaction of thermally labile hetero atoms of the tar but also enhanced thermal decomposing of heavier aromatics. Inherent AAEMs could also significantly enhance the decomposition of levoglucosan, and alkaline earth metals showed greater effect than alkali metals.

  3. Effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Jiang, Long; Wang, Yi; Su, Sheng; Sun, Lushi; Xu, Boyang; He, Limo; Xiang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to investigate effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures. The yield of CO, H2 and C2H4 was increased and that of CO2 was suppressed with increasing temperature. Increasing temperature could also promote depolymerization and aromatization reactions of active tars, forming heavier polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, leading to decrease of tar yields and species diversity. Diverse performance of inherent AAEMs at different temperatures significantly affected the distribution of pyrolysis products. The presence of inherent AAEMs promoted water-gas shift reaction, and enhanced the yield of H2 and CO2. Additionally, inherent AAEMs not only promoted breakage and decarboxylation/decarbonylation reaction of thermally labile hetero atoms of the tar but also enhanced thermal decomposing of heavier aromatics. Inherent AAEMs could also significantly enhance the decomposition of levoglucosan, and alkaline earth metals showed greater effect than alkali metals. PMID:26005925

  4. Hydrothermal alkali metal catalyst recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Eakman, James M.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.

    1979-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles primarily in the form of water soluble alkali metal formates by treating the particles with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of added carbon monoxide. During the treating process the water insoluble alkali metal compounds comprising the insoluble alkali metal residues are converted into water soluble alkali metal formates. The resultant aqueous solution containing water soluble alkali metal formates is then separated from the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment process, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal formates serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. This process permits increased recovery of alkali metal constituents, thereby decreasing the overall cost of the gasification process by reducing the amount of makeup alkali metal compounds necessary.

  5. In situ measurements of labile Al and Mn in acid mine drainage using diffusive gradients in thin films.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Jens

    2007-08-15

    The technique of diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) can be used for in situ measurements of labile metal species in water, but the application for this method on acid mine drainage (AMD) is complicated due to reduced sampler adsorption of metals at low pH. This study evaluates the use of DGT on labile Al and Mn in AMD (pH 3.1-4.2). DGT measurements were performed both in standard solutions in the laboratory and in situ in the field. Laboratory results show that DGT can be used in water with pH as low as 3.0 for Al and 4.0 for Mn without correcting for reduced adsorption. Below pH 4.0, the adsorption of Mn showed a linearly decrease with pH to approximately 55% at pH 3.0. Taking this correction into account revealed that 84-100% of the total dissolved Al and Mn measured in the field was DGT-labile. Measurements using DGT agreed well with predictions using the speciation program WHAM VI. This study shows that the use of DGT can be extended below the previously reported pH working range for Al, and for Mn using a simple linear correction with respect to pH, and demonstrates that the technique can be applied for monitoring time-integrated labile metal concentrations at AMD sites. PMID:17620010

  6. How to Compute Labile Metal-Ligand Equilibria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Levie, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The different methods used for computing labile metal-ligand complexes, which are suitable for an iterative computer solution, are illustrated. The ligand function has allowed students to relegate otherwise tedious iterations to a computer, while retaining complete control over what is calculated.

  7. Neuropsychological Correlates of Emotional Lability in Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banaschewski, Tobias; Jennen-Steinmetz, Christine; Brandeis, Daniel; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Kuntsi, Jonna; Poustka, Luise; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C.; Albrecht, Bjorn; Chen, Wai; Uebel, Henrik; Schlotz, Wolff; van der Meere, Jaap J.; Gill, Michael; Manor, Iris; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Oades, Robert D.; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Faraone, Stephen V.; Asherson, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Background: Emotional lability (EL) is commonly seen in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The reasons for this association remain currently unknown. To address this question, we examined the relationship between ADHD and EL symptoms, and performance on a range of neuropsychological tasks to clarify whether EL symptoms…

  8. Memory expression is independent of memory labilization/reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Karina A; Suárez, Luis D; Lynch, Victoria M; Molina, Víctor A; Delorenzi, Alejandro

    2013-11-01

    There is growing evidence that certain reactivation conditions restrict the onset of both the destabilization phase and the restabilization process or reconsolidation. However, it is not yet clear how changes in memory expression during the retrieval experience can influence the emergence of the labilization/reconsolidation process. To address this issue, we used the context-signal memory model of Chasmagnathus. In this paradigm a short reminder that does not include reinforcement allows us to evaluate memory labilization and reconsolidation, whereas a short but reinforced reminder restricts the onset of such a process. The current study investigated the effects of the glutamate antagonists, APV (0.6 or 1.5 μg/g) and CNQX (1 μg/g), prior to the reminder session on both behavioral expression and the reconsolidation process. Under conditions where the reminder does not initiate the labilization/reconsolidation process, APV prevented memory expression without affecting long-term memory retention. In contrast, APV induced amnesic effects in the long-term when administered before a reminder session that triggers reconsolidation. Under the present parametric conditions, the administration of CNQX prior to the reminder that allows memory to enter reconsolidation impairs this process without disrupting memory expression. Overall, the present findings suggest that memory reactivation--but not memory expression--is necessary for labilization and reconsolidation. Retrieval and memory expression therefore appear not to be interchangeable concepts.

  9. Electrolytic method to make alkali alcoholates using ion conducting alkali electrolyte/separator

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Ashok V.; Balagopal, Shekar; Pendelton, Justin

    2011-12-13

    Alkali alcoholates, also called alkali alkoxides, are produced from alkali metal salt solutions and alcohol using a three-compartment electrolytic cell. The electrolytic cell includes an anolyte compartment configured with an anode, a buffer compartment, and a catholyte compartment configured with a cathode. An alkali ion conducting solid electrolyte configured to selectively transport alkali ions is positioned between the anolyte compartment and the buffer compartment. An alkali ion permeable separator is positioned between the buffer compartment and the catholyte compartment. The catholyte solution may include an alkali alcoholate and alcohol. The anolyte solution may include at least one alkali salt. The buffer compartment solution may include a soluble alkali salt and an alkali alcoholate in alcohol.

  10. Process for recovering alkali metals and sulfur from alkali metal sulfides and polysulfides

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier

    2016-10-25

    Alkali metals and sulfur may be recovered from alkali monosulfide and polysulfides in an electrolytic process that utilizes an electrolytic cell having an alkali ion conductive membrane. An anolyte solution includes an alkali monosulfide, an alkali polysulfide, or a mixture thereof and a solvent that dissolves elemental sulfur. A catholyte includes molten alkali metal. Applying an electric current oxidizes sulfide and polysulfide in the anolyte compartment, causes alkali metal ions to pass through the alkali ion conductive membrane to the catholyte compartment, and reduces the alkali metal ions in the catholyte compartment. Liquid sulfur separates from the anolyte solution and may be recovered. The electrolytic cell is operated at a temperature where the formed alkali metal and sulfur are molten.

  11. Alkali and transition metal phospholides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezkishko, I. A.; Zagidullin, A. A.; Milyukov, V. A.; Sinyashin, O. G.

    2014-06-01

    Major tendencies in modern chemistry of alkali and transition metal phospholides (phosphacyclopentadienides) are systematized, analyzed and generalized. Basic methods of synthesis of these compounds are presented. Their chemical properties are considered with a special focus on their complexing ability. Potential applications of phospholides and their derivatives are discussed. The bibliography includes 184 references.

  12. Histone Modification via Rapid Cleavage of C4′-Oxidized Abasic Sites in Nucleosome Core Particles

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chuanzheng; Sczepanski, Jonathan T.; Greenberg, Marc M.

    2013-01-01

    The C4′-oxidized abasic site is produced in DNA by a variety of oxidizing agents, including potent cytotoxic antitumor agents. Independent generation of this alkali-labile lesion at defined positions within nucleosome core particles reveals that the histone proteins increase strand scission between 130 and 550-fold. Strand scission proceeds via a Schiff base intermediate but the DNA protein cross-links are unstable. The oxidized abasic site is removed in its entirety from the DNA and transferred to the lysine rich tail region of the proximal histone protein in the form of a lactam. The modification is distributed over several residues within the amino terminal tail of the proximal histone. Transfer of DNA damage to histones could affect gene regulation. PMID:23531104

  13. Quantification of Labile Soil Mercury by Stable Isotope Dilution Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetaya, Waleed; Huang, Jen-How; Osterwalder, Stefan; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that can cause severe health problems to humans. Mercury is emitted to the atmosphere from both natural and anthropogenic sources and can be transported over long distances before it is deposited to aquatic and terrestrial environments. Aside from accumulation in soil solid phases, Hg deposited in soils may migrate to surface- and ground-water or enter the food chain, depending on its lability. There are many operationally-defined extraction methods proposed to quantify soil labile metals. However, these methods are by definition prone to inaccuracies such as non-selectivity, underestimation or overestimation of the labile metal pool. The isotopic dilution technique (ID) is currently the most promising method for discrimination between labile and non-labile metal fractions in soil with a minimum disturbance to soil-solid phases. ID assesses the reactive metal pool in soil by defining the fraction of metal both in solid and solution phases that is isotopically-exchangeable known as the 'E-value'. The 'E-value' represents the metal fraction in a dynamic equilibrium with the solution phase and is potentially accessible to plants. This is carried out by addition of an enriched metal isotope to soil suspensions and quantifying the fraction of metal that is able to freely exchange with the added isotope by measuring the equilibrium isotopic ratio by ICP-MS. E-value (mg kg‑1) is then calculated as follows: E-Value = (Msoil/ W) (CspikeVspike/ Mspike) (Iso1IAspike ‑Iso2IAspikeRss / Iso2IAsoil Rss - Iso1IAsoil) where M is the average atomic mass of the metal in the soil or the spike, W is the mass of soil (kg), Cspike is the concentration of the metal in the spike (mg L‑1), Vspike is the volume of spike (L), IA is isotopic abundance, and Rss is the equilibrium ratio of isotopic abundances (Iso1:Iso2). Isotopic dilution has been successfully applied to determine E-values for several elements. However, to our knowledge, this method has not

  14. Quantification of Labile Soil Mercury by Stable Isotope Dilution Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetaya, Waleed; Huang, Jen-How; Osterwalder, Stefan; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that can cause severe health problems to humans. Mercury is emitted to the atmosphere from both natural and anthropogenic sources and can be transported over long distances before it is deposited to aquatic and terrestrial environments. Aside from accumulation in soil solid phases, Hg deposited in soils may migrate to surface- and ground-water or enter the food chain, depending on its lability. There are many operationally-defined extraction methods proposed to quantify soil labile metals. However, these methods are by definition prone to inaccuracies such as non-selectivity, underestimation or overestimation of the labile metal pool. The isotopic dilution technique (ID) is currently the most promising method for discrimination between labile and non-labile metal fractions in soil with a minimum disturbance to soil-solid phases. ID assesses the reactive metal pool in soil by defining the fraction of metal both in solid and solution phases that is isotopically-exchangeable known as the 'E-value'. The 'E-value' represents the metal fraction in a dynamic equilibrium with the solution phase and is potentially accessible to plants. This is carried out by addition of an enriched metal isotope to soil suspensions and quantifying the fraction of metal that is able to freely exchange with the added isotope by measuring the equilibrium isotopic ratio by ICP-MS. E-value (mg kg-1) is then calculated as follows: E-Value = (Msoil/ W) (CspikeVspike/ Mspike) (Iso1IAspike -Iso2IAspikeRss / Iso2IAsoil Rss - Iso1IAsoil) where M is the average atomic mass of the metal in the soil or the spike, W is the mass of soil (kg), Cspike is the concentration of the metal in the spike (mg L-1), Vspike is the volume of spike (L), IA is isotopic abundance, and Rss is the equilibrium ratio of isotopic abundances (Iso1:Iso2). Isotopic dilution has been successfully applied to determine E-values for several elements. However, to our knowledge, this method has not yet

  15. Hot Stuff: Lability of Forest Floor DOM to Aerobic Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbonniere, R. A.; Creed, I. F.; Kapila, R.; Collins, J.

    2004-05-01

    The hypothesis that the lability of DOM to aerobic microbial degradation to CO2 is related to its age and character is tested in an incubation study conducted using an assemblage of soil bacteria in their natural state. Extracts (WF) of leaf and forest floor material characterized by different degrees of degradation: green leaves, fresh fallen leaves, litter (one year weathering), fibric matter, hemic matter and peat were used in this study. The working hypothesis is that these extracts represent a chronosequence of degradation and DOM extracted from them might also represent a similar lability sequence. As well aliquots of the WF extracts were processed to remove DOM fractions. Thus a fulvic acid (FA) fraction was made by precipitating and removing humic acid, and a hydrophilic fraction (HPI) by removing hydrophobics from the FA using XAD-8 resin. Incubations were carried out on all three DOM solutions from each extract to determine if there were differences in lability among the fractions. When comparing the WF solutions for CO2 production, the green leaves, litter, fibric and hemic extracts showed approximately the same CO2 yield, on an equal C basis, and the fresh fallen leaves and peat produced less. For five of the six extracts the respective WF and HPI solutions yielded nearly the same quantity of CO2 per mg C suggesting that the HPI component contributes almost all the lability. Furthermore the magnitudes of the C-normalized CO2 yield for these solutions are similar to that for glucose, which fractionates as HPI. For the same five extracts the FA solution yielded lower quantities of CO2, on an equal C basis, than WF and HPI suggesting that the hydrophobic content of the extracts may inhibit aerobic degradation. The peat extract solutions yielded a different CO2 production distribution with the HPI only slightly higher than the FA which in turn was much greater than WF. The material from which this extract was made is much older and contains significant HA

  16. Total and Labile Phosphorus Concentrations as Influenced by Riparian Buffer Soil Properties.

    PubMed

    Young, Eric O; Ross, Donald S

    2016-01-01

    Riparian buffers can act as a phosphorus (P) source under active stream bank erosion. Using soil and landscape variables (soil series, drainage class, organic matter, and pH) to index P concentrations could improve P loss risk tools for buffers. The objectives of this study were (i) to determine if soil properties could predict total and labile P concentrations within a 10-ha riparian buffer and (ii) to quantify the degree of spatial dependence of P and related properties. Soil samples were taken in 15-cm increments to a depth of 60 cm using a grid ( = 71) from an established riparian buffer along the Rock River in Vermont. Total soil P (TP), plant-available P determined by Modified Morgan extraction (MM-P), pH, soil organic matter (SOM), soil texture, and select cations were measured. We found that TP (152-1536 mg P kg) and MM-P (0.4-14.6 mg kg) ranged widely, with distinct differences between soil series. Mean TP and MM-P were greater in alluvial and glaciolacustrine soils compared with glacial till. Across all samples, MM-P was weakly related to soil properties; however, total labile P (orthophosphate + organic P measured by ICP) and unreactive labile P (ICP-P - colorimetric-P) could both be predicted by SOM ( = 0.59 and 0.73, respectively). Strong spatial dependence was found for P and related properties as revealed by geospatial analyses. Results show that P availability in the buffer was strongly related to soil genesis and support site-specific approaches for P loss risk evaluation in buffers.

  17. Labile methyl balances for normal humans on various dietary regimens.

    PubMed

    Mudd, S H; Poole, J R

    1975-06-01

    Normal young adult male and female subjects were maintained on fixed dietary regimens which were either essentially normal or were semisynthetic and curtailed in methionine and choline intakes and virtually free of cystine. The subjects maintained stable weights and remained in positive nitrogen balance or within the zone of sulfur equilibrium. Choline intakes were calculated, and urinary excretions of creatinine, creatine, and sacrosine were measured. Creatinine excretions of male subjects on essentially normal diets outweighed the total intakes of labile methyl groups. Taking into account the excretions of additional methylated compounds, as judged from published values, it appears that methyl neogenesis must normally play a role in both males and females. When labile methyl intake is curtailed, de novo formation of methyl groups is quantitatively more significant than ingestion of preformed methyl moieties. On the normal diets used in these experiments, the average homocysteinyl moiety in males cycled between methionine and homocysteine at least 1.9 times before being converted to cystathionine. For females, the average number of cycles was at least 1.5. When labile methyl intake was curtailed, the average number of cycles rose to 3.9 for males and 3.0 for females under the conditions employed.

  18. Labile disulfide bonds are common at the leucocyte cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Clive; Cresswell, Peter; Ciaccia, Laura; Thomas, Benjamin; Barclay, A. Neil

    2011-01-01

    Redox conditions change in events such as immune and platelet activation, and during viral infection, but the biochemical consequences are not well characterized. There is evidence that some disulfide bonds in membrane proteins are labile while others that are probably structurally important are not exposed at the protein surface. We have developed a proteomic/mass spectrometry method to screen for and identify non-structural, redox-labile disulfide bonds in leucocyte cell-surface proteins. These labile disulfide bonds are common, with several classes of proteins being identified and around 30 membrane proteins regularly identified under different reducing conditions including using enzymes such as thioredoxin. The proteins identified include integrins, receptors, transporters and cell–cell recognition proteins. In many cases, at least one cysteine residue was identified by mass spectrometry as being modified by the reduction process. In some cases, functional changes are predicted (e.g. in integrins and cytokine receptors) but the scale of molecular changes in membrane proteins observed suggests that widespread effects are likely on many different types of proteins including enzymes, adhesion proteins and transporters. The results imply that membrane protein activity is being modulated by a ‘redox regulator’ mechanism. PMID:22645650

  19. Fluxionality and lability in rhenium 4'-hydroxyterpyridine complexes: evidence for an associative mechanism and correlated fluxionality and lability.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Moreira, Vanesa; Thorp-Greenwood, Flora L; Arthur, Richard J; Kariuki, Benson M; Jenkins, Robert L; Coogan, Michael P

    2010-08-28

    The complexes [ReX(CO)(3)(N,N-eta(2)-4'-hydroxy-2-2',6'-2''-terpyridine)] (X = Cl,Br,I) have been synthesised and their ligand exchange reactions and fluxionality of the terpyridine unit studied. The halides are far more labile in these species than in analogous bipyridines, and it is proposed that the ligand fluxionality is involved in this reactivity. Structural studies of the family are reported along with spectroscopic studies including variable temperature NMR which is used to demonstrate a negative entropy of activation for the fluxional process. Synthesis of an analogue which is incapable of fluxional behaviour confirms the link between fluxionality and lability in these complexes.

  20. Alkali metal/sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Joginder N.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

  1. Microcalorimetric characterization of the basicity in alkali-exchanged x zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, M.; Kaliaguine, S.; Muscas, M.

    1995-11-01

    In this work the chemisorbed pyrrole on alkali-exchanged X zeolites was characterized using differential calorimetry. In fact, heat flow microcalorimetry is one of the best methods known for measuring accurately the differential heats of adsorption and so yielding a thermodynamic scale for the energy distribution of surface sites. A series of alkali-exchanged X zeolites and also a Cs exchanged Y sample were then examined by microcalorimetry using pyrrole as a probe. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Temporal Changes in Photochemically Labile DOM and Implications for Carbon Budgets in Peatland Aquatic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickard, A.

    2015-12-01

    Aquatic systems in peatland catchments are subject to high loading of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from surrounding terrestrial environments. However the significance of photochemical transformation of DOM in peatland carbon budgets remains poorly constrained. In this study UV irradiation experiments were conducted on water samples collected over one year from two contrasting systems in Scotland: a stream draining a peatland with high levels of DOM and a reservoir draining a peat catchment with low levels of DOM. Further samples were collected from the high DOM system during two storm events. After experimental exposure, optical and chemical analyses were employed to determine photochemical lability of the DOM pool. At both sites irradiation-induced decreases in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as a percentage of the total carbon pool were greatest in winter, suggesting that DOM was depleted in photo-reactive molecules in summer. Seasonal variability in DOC was high at the stream site and was positively correlated with CO₂ and CO photoproduction (r2 = 0.81 and 0.83, respectively; p<0.05). Lignin phenol analyses indicate considerable contribution of peat to the DOM pool at the stream site, particularly during summer. Whilst DOC concentrations did not vary greatly during storm events, UV-Vis absorbance indicators did, signifying changing DOM source material from activation of different hydrological pathways. The most photo-reactive DOM occurred 5-10 hours after peak discharge, suggesting that storms replenish photochemically labile DOM in headwater streams. Conservative estimates using data from this study suggest that up to 7% of the DOM pool of peatland streams can be lost (primarily as CO₂ and CO) upon exposure to 8 hours of environmentally representative UV irradiation. Further investigation in field campaigns under natural UV exposure are underway to assess the importance of photodegradation of DOM as a loss pathway of carbon based gases from aquatic systems.

  3. Chemiluminescence from excited c 2- -alkali cation complexes formed in alkali atom-halocarbon flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, K. K.; Balling, L. C.; Wright, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Vapor phase reactions between alkali atoms and several halocarbon molecules containing C-C bonds have been observed to produce chemiluminescence which appears to originate from C 2-- (alkali) + complexes.

  4. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  5. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  6. Reactivation of fear memory renders consolidated amygdala synapses labile.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongyeon; Song, Beomjong; Hong, Ingie; Kim, Jihye; Lee, Junuk; Park, Sungmo; Eom, Jae Yong; Lee, C Justin; Lee, Sukwon; Choi, Sukwoo

    2010-07-14

    It is believed that memory reactivation transiently renders consolidated memory labile and that this labile or deconsolidated memory is reconsolidated in a protein synthesis-dependent manner. The synaptic correlate of memory deconsolidation upon reactivation, however, has not been fully characterized. Here, we show that 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG), an agonist for group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRI), induces synaptic depotentiation only at thalamic input synapses onto the lateral amygdala (T-LA synapses) where synaptic potentiation is consolidated, but not at synapses where synaptic potentiation is not consolidated. Using this mGluRI-induced synaptic depotentiation (mGluRI-depotentiation) as a marker of consolidated synapses, we found that mGluRI-depotentiation correlated well with the state of memory deconsolidation and reconsolidation in a predictable manner. DHPG failed to induce mGluRI-depotentiation in slices prepared immediately after reactivation when the reactivated memory was deconsolidated. DHPG induced mGluRI-depotentiation 1 h after reactivation when the reactivated memory was reconsolidated, but it failed to do so when reconsolidation was blocked by a protein synthesis inhibitor. To test the memory-specificity of mGluRI-depotentiation, conditioned fear was acquired twice using two discriminative tones (2.8 and 20 kHz). Under this condition, mGluRI-depotentiation was fully impaired in slices prepared immediately after reactivation with both tones, whereas mGluRI-depotentiation was partially impaired immediately after reactivation with the 20 kHz tone. Consistently, microinjection of DHPG into the LA 1 h after reactivation reduced fear memory retention, whereas DHPG injection immediately after reactivation failed to do so. Our findings suggest that, upon memory reactivation, consolidated T-LA synapses enter a temporary labile state, displaying insensitivity to mGluRI-depotentiation.

  7. Do Vermont's Floodplains Constitute an Important Source of Labile Carbon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdrial, J. N.; Dolan, A.; Kemsley, M.

    2014-12-01

    Floodplains are extremely heterogeneous landscapes with respect to soil and sediment composition and can present an important source of carbon (C) during floods. For example, stream bank soils and sediments are zones of active erosion and deposition of sediment associated C. Due to the presence of plants, riparian soils contain high amounts of C that is exchanged between stream waters and banks. Abandoned channels and meander wetlands that remain hydrologically connected to the main channel contain high amounts of organic matter that can be flushed into the stream during high discharge. This heterogeneity, result of floodplain geomorphology, land cover and use, can profoundly impact the amount and type of dissolved organic matter (DOM) introduced into streams. In order to assess DOM characteristics leached from heterogeneous floodplain soils, aqueous soil extracts were performed on soil samples representative of different land covers (n=20) at four depths. Extracts were analyzed for dissolved organic C and total dissolved nitrogen with a Shimadzu C analyzer. Colored dissolved organic matter characteristics was measured with the Aqualog Fluorescence Spectrometer and quantified with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Preliminary data from three floodplains in Vermont (Connecticut, Missisquoi and Mad River) show a 3D variability of longitudinal, lateral, and vertical extents on water-extractable, mobile C. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations in meander swamp samples were found up to 9 times higher than in those of soils from agricultural field indicative of an important C source. Although C concentrations in adjacent fields were low, high abundance of labile C (indicated by tryptophan-like fluorescence) in water extracts from fields indicates recent biological production of C. This labile C is easily processed by microbes and transformed to the greenhouse gas CO2. These results provide important information on the contribution and lability of different floodplain

  8. Photo-lability of deep ocean dissolved black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbins, A.; Niggemann, J.; Dittmar, T.

    2012-05-01

    Dissolved black carbon (DBC), defined here as condensed aromatics isolated from seawater via PPL solid phase extraction and quantified as benzenepolycarboxylic acid (BPCA) oxidation products, is a significant component of the oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool. These condensed aromatics are widely distributed in the open ocean and appear to be tens of thousands of years old. As such DBC is regarded as highly refractory. In the current study, the photo-lability of DBC, DOC and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM; ultraviolet-visible absorbance) were determined over the course of a 28 day irradiation of North Atlantic Deep Water under a solar simulator. During the irradiation DBC fell from 1044 ± 164 nM-C to 55 ± 15 nM-C, a 20-fold decrease in concentration. Dissolved black carbon photo-degradation was more rapid and more extensive than for bulk CDOM and DOC. The concentration of DBC correlated with CDOM absorbance and the quality of DBC indicated by the ratios of different BPCAs correlated with CDOM absorbance spectral slope, suggesting the optical properties of CDOM may provide a proxy for both DBC concentrations and quality in natural waters. Further, the photo-lability of components of the DBC pool increased with their degree of aromatic condensation. These trends indicate that a continuum of compounds of varying photo-lability exists within the marine DOC pool. In this continuum, photo-lability scales with aromatic character, specifically the degree of condensation. Scaling the rapid photo-degradation of DBC to rates of DOC photo-mineralisation for the global ocean leads to an estimated photo-chemical half-life for oceanic DBC of less than 800 years. This is more than an order of magnitude shorter than the apparent age of DBC in the ocean. Consequently, photo-degradation is posited as the primary sink for oceanic DBC and the apparent survival of DBC molecules in the oceans for millennia appears to be facilitated not by their inherent inertness but

  9. Alkali-Metal Spin Maser.

    PubMed

    Chalupczak, W; Josephs-Franks, P

    2015-07-17

    Quantum measurement is a combination of a read-out and a perturbation of the quantum system. We explore the nonlinear spin dynamics generated by a linearly polarized probe beam in a continuous measurement of the collective spin state in a thermal alkali-metal atomic sample. We demonstrate that the probe-beam-driven perturbation leads, in the presence of indirect pumping, to complete polarization of the sample and macroscopic coherent spin oscillations. As a consequence of the former we report observation of spectral profiles free from collisional broadening. Nonlinear dynamics is studied through exploring its effect on radio frequency as well as spin noise spectra. PMID:26230788

  10. Alkali-Metal Spin Maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalupczak, W.; Josephs-Franks, P.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum measurement is a combination of a read-out and a perturbation of the quantum system. We explore the nonlinear spin dynamics generated by a linearly polarized probe beam in a continuous measurement of the collective spin state in a thermal alkali-metal atomic sample. We demonstrate that the probe-beam-driven perturbation leads, in the presence of indirect pumping, to complete polarization of the sample and macroscopic coherent spin oscillations. As a consequence of the former we report observation of spectral profiles free from collisional broadening. Nonlinear dynamics is studied through exploring its effect on radio frequency as well as spin noise spectra.

  11. Cu lability and bioavailability in an urban stream during baseflow versus stormflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, T.; Luan, H.

    2012-12-01

    Urban streams are dynamic systems with many anthropogenic inputs and stressors. Existing contaminant inputs are regulated through total maximum daily loads. Techniques for assessing that load are based on a combination of acute and chronic water quality criteria, biotic ligand models, and physical, chemical and biological assessments. In addition, the apportionment of reduction in load to different sources is based on total mass and not, for example, on bioavailable fraction. Our understanding of the impact of different metal inputs to stream impairment is limited. Free metal ions are understood to play a role in direct cellular uptake, but metal speciation (e.g. free metal, labile metals, or size fractionated) is relevant to more complex stream food webs. As part of an ongoing study, this work examines dissolved and particulate Cu concentrations in the Hockanum River, Vernon, CT situated in a developed watershed. Stream samples were taken during baseflow as well as stormflow upstream and downstream of wastewater treatment plant and stormwater runoff inputs. In addition, diffusive gradient in thin-film (DGT) devices which measure labile metal concentrations and cultured periphyton were used to examine bioavailable fractions. Total and filtered Cu concentrations ranged from about 1.3 to 10.7 μg/L, and 0.9 to 5.1 μg/L, respectively. Cu concentrations always increased downstream of the wastewater treatment plant by about 1.1-2 times, and effluent accounted for about 30% of baseflow. Generally, small increases (<10%) in concentration were observed in metals directly downstream of stormwater inlets, likely due to low volumes of runoff contributed from stormwater outfalls during these sampling periods. However, Cu concentrations were elevated (about 2-5 times higher) at all sites downstream from the wastewater treatment plant downstream sampling point, suggesting contributions from sediment resuspension. DGT measured concentrations represented 30 to 70% of dissolved Cu

  12. Labile neurotoxin in serum of calves with "nervous" coccidiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Isler, C M; Bellamy, J E; Wobeser, G A

    1987-01-01

    Mouse inoculation was used to test for the presence of a toxin in the serum, cerebrospinal fluid, and intestinal contents collected from cases of bovine enteric coccidiosis, with and without neurological signs, and from control calves. Intravenous inoculation of mice with 10 mL/kg of serum from calves showing nervous signs caused effects significantly different from those caused by the inoculation of serum from calves not showing nervous signs and from control calves. The effect was particularly evident in female mice. At this dosage severe neurological signs such as loss of righting reflex, seizures and death occurred only with serum from calves with "nervous coccidiosis". The results suggest that serum from the calves with neurological signs contains a neurotoxin. This toxin appears to be highly labile. It was not present in the cerebrospinal fluid at levels comparable to those in the serum. The significance of this labile neurotoxin with respect to the pathogenesis of the neurological signs associated with bovine enteric coccidiosis is unknown. PMID:2955865

  13. An ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry index to estimate natural organic matter lability

    PubMed Central

    D'Andrilli, Juliana; Cooper, William T; Foreman, Christine M; Marshall, Alan G

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Determining the chemical constituents of natural organic matter (NOM) by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FTICRMS) remains the ultimate measure for probing its source material, evolution, and transport; however, lability and the fate of organic matter (OM) in the environment remain controversial. FTICRMS-derived elemental compositions are presented in this study to validate a new interpretative method to determine the extent of NOM lability from various environments. Methods FTICRMS data collected over the last decade from the same 9.4 tesla instrument using negative electrospray ionization at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, Florida, was used to validate the application of a NOM lability index. Solid-phase extraction cartridges were used to isolate the NOM prior to FTICRMS; mass spectral peaks were calibrated internally by commonly identified NOM homologous series, and molecular formulae were determined for NOM composition and lability analysis. Results A molecular lability boundary (MLB) was developed from the FTICRMS molecular data, visualized from van Krevelen diagrams, dividing the data into more and less labile constituents. NOM constituents above the MLB at H/C ≥1.5 correspond to more labile material, whereas NOM constituents below the MLB, H/C <1.5, exhibit less labile, more recalcitrant character. Of all marine, freshwater, and glacial environments considered for this study, glacial ecosystems were calculated to contain the most labile OM. Conclusions The MLB extends our interpretation of FTICRMS NOM molecular data to include a metric of lability, and generally ranked the OM environments from most to least labile as glacial > marine > freshwater. Applying the MLB is useful not only for individual NOM FTICRMS studies, but also provides a lability threshold to compare and contrast molecular data with other FTICRMS instruments that survey NOM from around the world. Copyright © 2015

  14. Process for the disposal of alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Leroy C.

    1977-01-01

    Large quantities of alkali metals may be safely reacted for ultimate disposal by contact with a hot concentrated caustic solution. The alkali metals react with water in the caustic solution in a controlled reaction while steam dilutes the hydrogen formed by the reaction to a safe level.

  15. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C.

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  16. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, Raymond D.; McPheeters, Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  17. Dog paw preference shows lability and sex differences.

    PubMed

    Poyser, Fay; Caldwell, Christine; Cobb, Matthew

    2006-09-01

    Paw preferences in domestic dogs were studied using three different behavioural tests, recording frequency, duration and latency of paw use. No overall population tendency to right- or left-paw preference was seen on any of the tests, nor could a sub-population of handed dogs be detected. This failure to replicate previous reports that male dogs tend to use their left paws while females use their right was counterbalanced by a significant tendency for male dogs to use their left paw when initially presented with one test, and for the latency of left paw use to be significantly shorter than that for right paw use on these initial presentations. This significant effect disappeared with repeated presentation of the test, and was not present in females. We conclude that behavioural lateralisation appears to be a labile category in dogs, and may be related to brain hemispheric effects in responding to novel stimuli.

  18. The role of labile sulfur compounds in thermochemical sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrani, Alon; Zhang, Tongwei; Ma, Qisheng; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Tang, Yongchun

    2008-06-01

    The reduction of sulfate to sulfide coupled with the oxidation of hydrocarbons to carbon dioxide, commonly referred to as thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), is an important abiotic alteration process that most commonly occurs in hot carbonate petroleum reservoirs. In the present study we focus on the role that organic labile sulfur compounds play in increasing the rate of TSR. A series of gold-tube hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted with n-octane and CaSO4 in the presence of reduced sulfur (e.g. H2S, S°, organic S) at temperatures of 330 and 356 °C under a constant confining pressure. The in-situ pH was buffered to 3.5 (∼6.3 at room temperature) with talc and silica. For comparison, three types of oil with different total S and labile S contents were reacted under similar conditions. The results show that the initial presence of organic or inorganic sulfur compounds increases the rate of TSR. However, organic sulfur compounds, such as 1-pentanethiol or diethyldisulfide, were significantly more effective in increasing the rate of TSR than H2S or elemental sulfur (on a mole S basis). The increase in rate is achieved at relatively low concentrations of 1-pentanethiol, less than 1 wt% of the total n-octane, which is comparable to the concentration of organic S that is common in many oils (∼0.3 wt%). We examined several potential reaction mechanisms to explain the observed reactivity of organic LSC. First, the release of H2S from the thermal degradation of thiols was discounted as an important mechanism due to the significantly greater reactivity of thiol compared to an equivalent amount of H2S. Second, we considered the generation of olefines in association with the elimination of H2S during thermal degradation of thiols because olefines are much more reactive than n-alkanes during TSR. In our experiments, olefines increased the rate of TSR, but were less effective than 1-pentanethiol and other organic LSC. Third, the thermal decomposition of

  19. The role of labile sulfur compounds in thermochemical sulfate reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amrani, A.; Zhang, T.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Tang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The reduction of sulfate to sulfide coupled with the oxidation of hydrocarbons to carbon dioxide, commonly referred to as thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), is an important abiotic alteration process that most commonly occurs in hot carbonate petroleum reservoirs. In the present study we focus on the role that organic labile sulfur compounds play in increasing the rate of TSR. A series of gold-tube hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted with n-octane and CaSO4 in the presence of reduced sulfur (e.g. H2S, S??, organic S) at temperatures of 330 and 356 ??C under a constant confining pressure. The in-situ pH was buffered to 3.5 (???6.3 at room temperature) with talc and silica. For comparison, three types of oil with different total S and labile S contents were reacted under similar conditions. The results show that the initial presence of organic or inorganic sulfur compounds increases the rate of TSR. However, organic sulfur compounds, such as 1-pentanethiol or diethyldisulfide, were significantly more effective in increasing the rate of TSR than H2S or elemental sulfur (on a mole S basis). The increase in rate is achieved at relatively low concentrations of 1-pentanethiol, less than 1 wt% of the total n-octane, which is comparable to the concentration of organic S that is common in many oils (???0.3 wt%). We examined several potential reaction mechanisms to explain the observed reactivity of organic LSC. First, the release of H2S from the thermal degradation of thiols was discounted as an important mechanism due to the significantly greater reactivity of thiol compared to an equivalent amount of H2S. Second, we considered the generation of olefines in association with the elimination of H2S during thermal degradation of thiols because olefines are much more reactive than n-alkanes during TSR. In our experiments, olefines increased the rate of TSR, but were less effective than 1-pentanethiol and other organic LSC. Third, the thermal decomposition of

  20. Lability of renal papillary tissue composition in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, J C

    1978-01-01

    1. The acute effects of (a) a minor operative procedure using ether as the anaesthetic, and (b) the administration of 0.9% saline as a single I.V. injection in the conscious rat, on renal tissue composition were studied in hydropenic and normally hydrated rats. 2. The operative procedure and anaesthesia induced a rapid and transient decrease in papillary osmolality in both hydropenic and normally hydrated animals, the important contributing factor being a significant decrease in urea content. 3. Administration of a small volume of saline caused a rapid decrease in urea content, and an increase in water content. 4. It is concluded that papillary composition is extremely labile, large changes being produced by relatively minor experimental procedures. PMID:624997

  1. Chemical leaching methods and measurements of marine labile particulate Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revels, B. N.; John, S.

    2012-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential nutrient for life. Yet its low solubility and concentration in the ocean limits marine phytoplankton productivity in many regions of the world. Dissolved phase Fe (<0.4μm) has traditionally been considered the most biologically accessible form, however, the particulate phase (>0.4μm) may contain an important, labile reservoir of Fe that may also be available to phytoplankton. However, concentration data alone cannot elucidate the sources of particulate Fe to the ocean and to what extent particulate iron may support phytoplankton growth. Isotopic analysis of natural particles may help to elucidate the biogeochemical cycling of Fe, though it is important to find a leaching method which accesses bioavailable Fe. Thirty-three different chemical leaches were performed on a marine sediment reference material, MESS-3. The combinations included four different acids (25% acetic acid, 0.01M HCl, 0.5M HCl, 0.1M H2SO4 at pH2), various redox conditions (0.02M hydroxylamine hydrochloride or 0.02M H2O2), three temperatures (25°C, 60°C, 90°C), and three time points (10 minutes, 2 hours, 24 hours). Leached Fe concentrations varied from 1mg/g to 35mg/g, with longer treatment times, stronger acids, and hotter temperatures generally associated with an increase in leached Fe. δ56Fe in these leaches varied from -1.0‰ to +0.2‰. Interestingly, regardless of leaching method used, there was a very similar relationship between the amount of Fe leached from the particles and the δ56Fe of this iron. Isotopically lighter δ56Fe values were associated with smaller amounts of leached Fe whereas isotopically heavier δ56Fe values were associated with larger amounts of leached Fe. Two alternate hypotheses could explain these data. Either, the particles may contain pools of isotopically light Fe that are easily accessed early in dissolution, or isotopically light Fe may be preferentially leached from the particle due to a kinetic isotope effect during dissolution

  2. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-11-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of PFBC technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an altemative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. As shown in Fig. 1, the RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no HTHP sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-leaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6M-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite [8]. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed.

  3. Measurement of alkali in PFBC exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    This project supports the DOE/METC Fossil Energy Program for the development of PFBC technology. Based on the analytical activated-bauxite sorber-bed technique, we are developing the RABSAM as an altemative to the on-line alkali analyzer for field application. As shown in Fig. 1, the RABSAM is a sampling probe containing a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA). It can be inserted directly into the PFBC exhaust duct and requires no HTHP sampling line. Alkali vapors are captured by the adsorbent purely through physical adsorption. The adsorbent is regenerated by a simple water-leaching process, which also recovers the adsorbed alkalis. The alkali analysis of the leachate by atomic absorption (AA) provides a basis for calculating the time-averaged alkali-vapor concentration in the PFBC exhaust. If the RABA is to use commercial grade activated bauxite, the clay impurities in activated bauxite can react with alkali vapors and, therefore, need to be either removed or deactivated. In earlier work, a 6M-LiCl-solution impregnation technique was shown to deactivate these impurities in fresh activated bauxite [8]. During this year, RABA prepared by this technique was tested in a pressurized alkali-vapor sorption test unit to determine its NaCl-vapor capture efficiency and the regenerability of the sorbent by water extraction. Results of this study are presented and discussed.

  4. Feasibility of labile Zn phytoextraction using enhanced tobacco and sunflower: results of five- and one-year field-scale experiments in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Herzig, Rolf; Nehnevajova, Erika; Pfistner, Charlotte; Schwitzguebel, Jean-Paul; Ricci, Arturo; Keller, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Phytoextraction with somaclonal variants of tobacco and sunflower mutant lines (non-GMs) with enhanced metal uptake and tolerance can be a sustainable alternative to conventional destructive decontamination methods, especially for stripping bioavailable zinc excess in topsoil. The overall results of a 5-year time series experiment at field scale in north-eastern Switzerland confirm that the labile Zn pool in soil can be lowered by 45-70%, whereas subplots without phytoextraction treatment maintained labile Zn concentrations. In 2011, the phytoextraction experiment site was enlarged by a factor of 3, and the labile 0.1 M NaNO3 extractable Zn concentration in the soil was reduced up to 58% one period after harvest. A Mass Balance Analysis confirmed soil Zn decontamination in line with plant Zn uptake. The plants partially take Zn from the non-labile pool of the totaL The sustainability of Zn phytoextraction in subplots that no longer exceed the Swiss trigger value is now assessed over time. In contrary to the phytoextraction of total soil Zn which needs a long cleaning up time, the bioavailable Zn stripping is feasible within a few years period. PMID:24933882

  5. Alkali-stable high-pI isoelectric membranes for isoelectric trapping separations.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, Sanjiv; Shave, Evan; Fleisher, Helen C; Nzeadibe, Kingsley; Busby, M Brent; Vigh, Gyula

    2004-07-01

    Alkali-stable, high-pI isoelectric membranes have been synthesized from quaternary ammonium derivatives of cyclodextrins and poly(vinyl alcohol), and bifunctional cross-linkers, such as glycerol-1,3-diglycidyl ether. The new, high-pI isoelectric membranes were successfully applied as cathodic membranes in isoelectric trapping separations in place of the hydrolytically more labile, polyacrylamide-based cathodic isoelectric membranes, and permitted the use of catholytes as alkaline as 1 M NaOH. The new high-pI isoelectric membranes have shown excellent mechanical stability, low electric resistance and long life times, even when subjected to electrophoresis with current densities as high as 80 mA/cm2.

  6. Alkali-stable high-pI isoelectric membranes for isoelectric trapping separations.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, Sanjiv; Shave, Evan; Fleisher, Helen C; Nzeadibe, Kingsley; Busby, M Brent; Vigh, Gyula

    2004-07-01

    Alkali-stable, high-pI isoelectric membranes have been synthesized from quaternary ammonium derivatives of cyclodextrins and poly(vinyl alcohol), and bifunctional cross-linkers, such as glycerol-1,3-diglycidyl ether. The new, high-pI isoelectric membranes were successfully applied as cathodic membranes in isoelectric trapping separations in place of the hydrolytically more labile, polyacrylamide-based cathodic isoelectric membranes, and permitted the use of catholytes as alkaline as 1 M NaOH. The new high-pI isoelectric membranes have shown excellent mechanical stability, low electric resistance and long life times, even when subjected to electrophoresis with current densities as high as 80 mA/cm2. PMID:15273996

  7. Design strategies for development of SCR catalyst: improvement of alkali poisoning resistance and novel regeneration method.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yue; Li, Junhua; Shi, Wenbo; Xu, Jiayu; Hao, Jiming

    2012-11-20

    Based on the ideas of the additives modification and regeneration method update, two different strategies were designed to deal with the traditional SCR catalyst poisoned by alkali metals. First, ceria doping on the V(2)O(5)-WO(3)/TiO(2) catalyst could promote the SCR performance even reducing the V loading, which resulted in the enhancement of the catalyst's alkali poisoning resistance. Then, a novel method, electrophoresis treatment, was employed to regenerate the alkali poisoned V(2)O(5)-WO(3)/TiO(2) catalyst. This novel technique could dramatically enhance the SCR activities of the alkali poisoned catalysts by removing approximately 95% K or Na ions from the catalyst and showed less hazardous to the environment. Finally, the deactivation mechanisms by the alkali metals were extensively studied by employing both the experimental and DFT theoretical approaches. Alkali atom mainly influences the active site V species rather than W oxides. The decrease of catalyst surface acidity might directly reduce the catalytic activity, while the reducibility of catalysts could be another important factor.

  8. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  9. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  10. Alkali Silicate Vehicle Forms Durable, Fireproof Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John B.; Seindenberg, Benjamin

    1964-01-01

    The problem: To develop a paint for use on satellites or space vehicles that exhibits high resistance to cracking, peeling, or flaking when subjected to a wide range of temperatures. Organic coatings will partially meet the required specifications but have the inherent disadvantage of combustibility. Alkali-silicate binders, used in some industrial coatings and adhesives, show evidence of forming a fireproof paint, but the problem of high surface-tension, a characteristic of alkali silicates, has not been resolved. The solution: Use of a suitable non-ionic wetting agent combined with a paint incorporating alkali silicate as the binder.

  11. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  12. Electronic properties of metal-induced gap states formed at alkali-halide/metal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiguchi, Manabu; Yoshikawa, Genki; Ikeda, Susumu; Saiki, Koichiro

    2005-04-01

    The spatial distribution and site distribution of metal-induced gap states (MIGS) are studied by thickness-dependent near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and by comparing the cation and anion-edge NEXAFS. The thickness-dependent NEXAFS shows that the decay length of MIGS depends on an alkali-halide rather than a metal, and it is larger for alkali-halides with smaller band gap energies. By comparing the Cl-edge and K-edge NEXAFS for KCl/Cu (001) , MIGS are found to be states localizing at anion sites.

  13. Substitution mechanism of alkali metals for strontium in strontium hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Naddari, Thouraya; Hamdi, Besma; Savariault, Jean Michel; El Feki, Hafed; Ben Salah, Abdelhamid

    2003-01-25

    Strontium hydroxyapatites substituted by alkali metals are synthesized by double decomposition method in basic medium. Structures of Sr{sub 9.50}Na{sub 0.30}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 1.30} (SrNaHAp) and Sr{sub 9.81}K{sub 0.12}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 1.74} (SrKHAp) are determined by X-ray powder diffraction. Both compounds are isotypic and crystallize in hexagonal system (space group P63/m) with the following cells: a=9.751(3) A and c=7.279(3) A for SrNaHAp and a=9.755(4) A and c=7.284(3) A for SrKHAp. Results are compared to those of Sr{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}. According to the site occupancy factors, in SrNaHAp sodium is localized in site (I) and in SrKHAp potassium in site (II). Both structures contain vacancies in hydroxyl and metal sites. The mechanism of alkali metals substitution for strontium proposed explains the vacancies formation.

  14. Modifier interaction and mixed-alkali effect in bond constraint theory applied to ternary alkali metaphosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletto Rodrigues, Bruno; Deubener, Joachim; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2016-05-01

    Introducing an interaction parameter γ, we implement modifier interaction and the mixed-alkali effect into bond constraint theory, and apply this extension for simplistic property prediction on ternary phosphate glasses. The severity of the mixed alkali effect results from the interplay of two simultaneous contributions: Bond constraints on the modifier species soften or stiffen with decreasing or increasing γ, respectively. When the modifier size is not too dissimilar the decrease in γ reflects that the alkali ions can easily migrate between different sites, forcing the network to continuously re-accommodate for any subsequent distortions. With increasing size difference, migration becomes increasingly difficult without considerable network deformation. This holds even for smaller ions, where the sluggish dynamics of the larger constituent result in blocking of the fast ion movement, leading to the subsequent increase in γ. Beyond a certain size difference in the modifier pair, a value of γ exceeding unity may indicate the presence of steric hindrance due to the large surrounding modifiers impeding the phosphate network to re-accommodate deformation.

  15. Alkali metal for ultraviolet band-pass filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick (Inventor); Fraschetti, George A. (Inventor); Mccann, Timothy A. (Inventor); Mayall, Sherwood D. (Inventor); Dunn, Donald E. (Inventor); Trauger, John T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An alkali metal filter having a layer of metallic bismuth deposited onto the alkali metal is provided. The metallic bismuth acts to stabilize the surface of the alkali metal to prevent substantial surface migration from occurring on the alkali metal, which may degrade optical characteristics of the filter. To this end, a layer of metallic bismuth is deposited by vapor deposition over the alkali metal to a depth of approximately 5 to 10 A. A complete alkali metal filter is described along with a method for fabricating the alkali metal filter.

  16. Alkali Metal Salts with Designable Aryltrifluoroborate Anions.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kazuki; Yoshii, Kazuki; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Matsumoto, Hajime; Tsuda, Tetsuya; Kuwabata, Susumu

    2016-09-01

    Aryltrifluoroborate ([ArBF3](-)) has a designable basic anion structure. Various [ArBF3](-)-based anions were synthesized to create novel alkali metal salts using a simple and safe process. Nearly 40 novel alkali metal salts were successfully obtained, and their physicochemical characteristics, particularly their thermal properties, were elucidated. These salts have lower melting points than those of simple inorganic alkali halide salts, such as KCl and LiCl, because of the weaker interactions between the alkali metal cations and the [ArBF3](-) anions and the anions' larger entropy. Moreover, interestingly, potassium cations were electrochemically reduced in the potassium (meta-ethoxyphenyl)trifluoroborate (K[m-OEtC6H4BF3]) molten salt at 433 K. These findings contribute substantially to furthering molten salt chemistry, ionic liquid chemistry, and electrochemistry. PMID:27510799

  17. Alkali Metal Handling Practices at NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvail, Patrick G.; Carter, Robert R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is NASA s principle propulsion development center. Research and development is coordinated and carried out on not only the existing transportation systems, but also those that may be flown in the near future. Heat pipe cooled fast fission cores are among several concepts being considered for the Nuclear Systems Initiative. Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a capability to handle high-purity alkali metals for use in heat pipes or liquid metal heat transfer loops. This capability is a low budget prototype of an alkali metal handling system that would allow the production of flight qualified heat pipe modules or alkali metal loops. The processing approach used to introduce pure alkali metal into heat pipe modules and other test articles are described in this paper.

  18. Management plan for an alkali sink and its endangered plant Cordylanthus palmatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, Robert; Showers, Mary Ann; Pavlik, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Cordylanthus palmatus is a hemiparasitic annual of the family Scrophulareacae. It is on both the federal and state lists of endangered species. Only four widely separated populations remain, all of them in alkali sinks, where the plant thrives in saline-sodic soils. The largest population is at Springtown, Alameda County, California. This article reports on efforts to develop a management plan for both the plant and the alkali sink ecosystem. The plan is based on: (1) characterization of hydrology, soils and geomorphology of the site; (2) characterization of the land use impacts to the site; (3) analysis of plant distribution in relation to gradients of elevation and soil chemistry; (4) studies on water potential and water stress in Cordylanthus palmatus and associated species. On the basis of this plan, both the State of California and private groups are cooperating to create, restore, and manage a preserve in the Springtown Alkali Sink.

  19. Desulfurizing Coal With an Alkali Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravindram, M.; Kalvinskas, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental coal-desulfurization process uses alkalies and steam in fluidized-bed reactor. With highly volatile, high-sulfur bituminous coal, process removed 98 percent of pyritic sulfur and 47 percent of organic sulfur. Used in coal liquefaction and in production of clean solid fuels and synthetic liquid fuels. Nitrogen or steam flows through bed of coal in reactor. Alkalies react with sulfur, removing it from coal. Nitrogen flow fluidizes bed while heating or cooling; steam is fluidizing medium during reaction.

  20. NH3-promoted ligand lability in eleven-vertex rhodathiaboranes.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Beatriz; Roy, Beatriz; Macías, Ramón; Artigas, Maria Jose; Lahoz, Fernando J; Oro, Luis A

    2014-12-01

    The reaction of the 11-vertex rhodathiaborane, [8,8-(PPh3)2-nido-8,7-RhSB9H10] (1), with NH3 affords inmediately the adduct, [8,8,8-(NH3)(PPh3)2-nido-8,7-RhSB9H10] (4). The NH3-Rh interaction induces the labilization of the PPh3 ligands leading to the dissociation product, [8,8-(NH3)(PPh3)-nido-8,7-RhSB9H10] (5), which can then react with another molecule of NH3 to give [8,8,8-(NH3)2(PPh3)-nido-8,7-RhSB9H10] (6). These clusters have been characterized in situ by multielement NMR spectroscopy at different temeperatures. The variable temperature behavior of the system demonstrates that the intermediates 4-6 are in equilibrium, involving ligand exchange processes. On the basis of low intensity signals present in the (1)H NMR spectra of the reaction mixture, some species are tentatively proposed to be the bis- and tris-NH3 ligated clusters, [8,8-(NH3)2-nido-8,7-RhSB9H10] (7) and [8,8,8-(NH3)3-nido-8,7-RhSB9H10] (8). After evaporation of the solvent and the excess of NH3, the system containing species 4-8 regenerates the starting reactant, 1, thus closing a stoichiometric cycle of ammonia addition and loss. After 40 h at room temperature, the reaction of 1 with NH3 gives the hydridorhodathiaborane, [8,8,8-(H)(PPh3)2-nido-8,7-RhSB9H9] (2), as a single product. The reported rhodathiaboranes show reversible H3N-promoted ligand lability, which implies weak Rh-N interactions, leading to a rare case of metal complexes that circumvent "classical" Werner chemistry.

  1. Evolutionarily labile responses to a signal of aggressive intent.

    PubMed Central

    Moretz, Jason A; Morris, Molly R

    2003-01-01

    Males of many swordtail species possess vertical bar pigment patterns that are used both in courtship and agonistic interactions. Expression of the bars may function as a conventional threat signal during conflicts with rival males; bars intensify at the onset of aggression and fade in the subordinate male at contest's end. We used mirror image stimulation and bar manipulations to compare the aggressive responses of the males of four swordtail species to their barred and barless images. We found that having a response to the bars is tightly linked to having genes for bars, while the nature of the response the bars evoked varied across species. Specifically, we report the first known instance where closely related species exhibited differing and contradictory responses to a signal of aggressive motivation. Demonstrating that a signal conveys the same information across species (aggressive intent) while the response to that information has changed among species suggests that the nature of the responses are more evolutionarily labile than the signal. PMID:14613614

  2. Wheat-germ aspartate transcarbamoylase. Purification and cold-lability.

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, J E; Yon, R J; Butterworth, P J

    1979-01-01

    1. Aspartate transcarbamoylase was purified approx. 3000-fold from wheat (Triticum vulgare) germ in 15-20% yield. The product has a specific activity of 14 mumol/min per mg of protein and is approx. 90% pure. The purification scheme includes the use of biospecific "imphilyte" chromatography as described by Yon [Biochem.J.(1977) 161, 233-237]. The enzyme was passed successively through columns of CPAD [N-(3-carboxypropionyl)aminodecyl]-Sepharose in the absence and presence respectively of the ligands UMP and L-aspartate. In the second passage the enzyme was specifically displaced away from impurities with which it co-migrated in the first passage. These two steps contributed a factor of 80 to the overall purification. 2. The enzyme is slowly inactivated on dilution at 0 degrees C and pH 7.0, the inactivation being partially reversible. A detailed investigation of the temperature- and pH-dependence of the cold-inactivation suggested that it was initiated by the perturbation of the pKa values of groups with a moderately high and positive heat of ionization, which were tentatively identified as histidine residues. These findings support a new concept of cold-lability proposed by Bock, Gilbert & Frieden [Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. (1975) 66, 564-569]. PMID:43131

  3. Comparison of Outcomes in Patients With Nonobstructive, Labile-Obstructive, and Chronically Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pozios, Iraklis; Corona-Villalobos, Celia; Sorensen, Lars L; Bravo, Paco E; Canepa, Marco; Pisanello, Chiara; Pinheiro, Aurelio; Dimaano, Veronica L; Luo, Hongchang; Dardari, Zeina; Zhou, Xun; Kamel, Ihab; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Bluemke, David A; Abraham, M Roselle; Abraham, Theodore P

    2015-09-15

    Patients with nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) are considered low risk, generally not requiring aggressive intervention. However, nonobstructive and labile-obstructive HC have been traditionally classified together, and it is unknown if these 2 subgroups have distinct risk profiles. We compared cardiovascular outcomes in 293 patients HC (96 nonobstructive, 114 labile-obstructive, and 83 obstructive) referred for exercise echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging and followed for 3.3 ± 3.6 years. A subgroup (34 nonobstructive, 28 labile-obstructive, 21 obstructive) underwent positron emission tomography. The mean number of sudden cardiac death risk factors was similar among groups (nonobstructive: 1.4 vs labile-obstructive: 1.2 vs obstructive: 1.4 risk factors, p = 0.2). Prevalence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was similar across groups but more non-obstructive patients had late gadolinium enhancement ≥20% of myocardial mass (23 [30%] vs 19 [18%] labile-obstructive and 8 [11%] obstructive, p = 0.01]. Fewer labile-obstructive patients had regional positron emission tomography perfusion abnormalities (12 [46%] vs nonobstructive 30 [81%] and obstructive 17 [85%], p = 0.003]. During follow-up, 60 events were recorded (36 ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation, including 30 defibrillator discharges, 12 heart failure worsening, and 2 deaths). Nonobstructive patients were at greater risk of VT/VF at follow-up, compared to labile obstructive (hazed ratio 0.18, 95% confidence interval 0.04 to 0.84, p = 0.03) and the risk persisted after adjusting for age, gender, syncope, family history of sudden cardiac death, abnormal blood pressure response, and septum ≥3 cm (p = 0.04). Appropriate defibrillator discharges were more frequent in nonobstructive (8 [18%]) compared to labile-obstructive (0 [0%], p = 0.02) patients. In conclusion, nonobstructive hemodynamics is associated with more pronounced fibrosis and ischemia than labile

  4. DIET of alkali atoms from mineral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakshinskiy, B. V.; Madey, T. E.

    2003-03-01

    To investigate mechanisms for the origin of alkalis in the atmosphere of the Moon, we are studying the electron- and photon-stimulated desorption (ESD and PSD) of K atoms from model mineral surfaces (SiO 2 films), and ESD and PSD of Na atoms from a lunar basalt sample. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates the existence of traces of Na in the lunar sample. To obtain an increased signal for detailed measurements of desorption parameters (appearance thresholds, yields), a fractional monolayer of Na is deposited onto the lunar sample surface. An alkali atom detector based on surface ionization and a time-of-flight technique are used for DIET measurements, together with a pulsed electron gun, and a mechanically chopped and filtered mercury arc light source. We find that bombardment of the alkali covered surfaces by UV photons or by electrons with energies E>4 eV causes desorption of "hot" alkali atoms. The results are consistent with the model based on charge transfer from the substrate to adsorbate which was developed to explain our previous measurements of sodium desorption from a silica surface and desorption of K atoms from water ice. The data support the suggestion that PSD by UV solar photons is a dominant source process for alkalis in the tenuous lunar atmosphere.

  5. DETERMINATION OF APPARENT QUANTUM YIELD SPECTRA FOR THE FORMATION OF BIOLOGICALLY LABILE PHOTOPRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantum yield spectra for the photochemical formation of biologically labile photoproducts from dissolved organic matter (DOM) have not been available previously, although they would greatly facilitate attempts to model photoproduct formation rates across latitudinal, seasonal, a...

  6. Rapid and nondestructive measurement of labile Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb and As in DGT by using field portable-XRF.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng; Williams, Paul N; Zhang, Hao

    2013-09-01

    The technique of diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) is often employed to quantify labile metals in situ; however, it is a challenge to perform the measurements in-field. This study evaluated the capability of field-portable X-ray fluorescence (FP-XRF) to swiftly generate elemental speciation information with DGT. Biologically available metal ions in environmental samples passively preconcentrate in the thin films of DGT devices, providing an ideal and uniform matrix for XRF nondestructive detection. Strong correlation coefficients (r > 0.992 for Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb and As) were obtained for all elements during calibration. The limits of quantitation (LOQ) for the investigated elements of FP-XRF on DGT devices are 2.74 for Mn, 4.89 for Cu, 2.89 for Zn, 2.55 for Pb, and 0.48 for As (unit: μg cm(-2)). When Pb and As co-existed in the solution trials, As did not interfere with Pb detection when using Chelex-DGT. However, there was a significant enhancement of the Pb reading attributed to As when ferrihydrite binding gels were tested, consistent with Fe-oxyhydroxide surfaces absorbing large quantities of As. This study demonstrates the value of the FP-XRF technique to rapidly and nondestructively detect the metals accumulated in DGT devices, providing a new and simple diagnostic tool for on-site environmental monitoring of labile metals/metalloids.

  7. An intermetallic Au24Ag20 superatom nanocluster stabilized by labile ligands.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Su, Haifeng; Xu, Chaofa; Li, Gang; Gell, Lars; Lin, Shuichao; Tang, Zichao; Häkkinen, Hannu; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2015-04-01

    An intermetallic nanocluster containing 44 metal atoms, Au24Ag20(2-SPy)4(PhC≡C)20Cl2, was successfully synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal analysis and density funtional theory computations. The 44 metal atoms in the cluster are arranged as a concentric three-shell Au12@Ag20@Au12 Keplerate structure having a high symmetry. For the first time, the co-presence of three different types of anionic ligands (i.e., phenylalkynyl, 2-pyridylthiolate, and chloride) was revealed on the surface of metal nanoclusters. Similar to thiolates, alkynyls bind linearly to surface Au atoms using their σ-bonds, leading to the formation of two types of surface staple units (PhC≡C-Au-L, L = PhC≡C(-) or 2-pyridylthiolate) on the cluster. The co-presence of three different surface ligands allows the site-specific surface and functional modification of the cluster. The lability of PhC≡C(-) ligands on the cluster was demonstrated, making it possible to keep the metal core intact while removing partial surface capping. Moreover, it was found that ligand exchange on the cluster occurs easily to offer various derivatives with the same metal core but different surface functionality and thus different solubility. PMID:25803406

  8. Isolation and evolution of labile sulfur allotropes via kinetic encapsulation in interactive porous networks

    PubMed Central

    Kitagawa, Hakuba; Ohtsu, Hiroyoshi; Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J.; Kawano, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of small sulfur allotropes have long remained unachievable because of their extreme lability. This study reports the first direct observation of disulfur (S2) with X-ray crystallography. Sulfur gas was kinetically trapped and frozen into the pores of two Cu-based porous coordination networks containing interactive iodide sites. Stabilization of S2 was achieved either through physisorption or chemisorption on iodide anions. One of the networks displayed shape selectivity for linear molecules only, therefore S2 was trapped and remained stable within the material at room temperature and higher. In the second network, however, the S2 molecules reacted further to produce bent-S3 species as the temperature was increased. Following the thermal evolution of the S2 species in this network using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy unveiled the generation of a new reaction intermediate never observed before, the cyclo-tri­sulfur dication (cyclo-S3 2+). It is envisaged that kinetic guest trapping in interactive crystalline porous networks will be a promising method to investigate transient chemical species. PMID:27437110

  9. An intermetallic Au24Ag20 superatom nanocluster stabilized by labile ligands.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Su, Haifeng; Xu, Chaofa; Li, Gang; Gell, Lars; Lin, Shuichao; Tang, Zichao; Häkkinen, Hannu; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2015-04-01

    An intermetallic nanocluster containing 44 metal atoms, Au24Ag20(2-SPy)4(PhC≡C)20Cl2, was successfully synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal analysis and density funtional theory computations. The 44 metal atoms in the cluster are arranged as a concentric three-shell Au12@Ag20@Au12 Keplerate structure having a high symmetry. For the first time, the co-presence of three different types of anionic ligands (i.e., phenylalkynyl, 2-pyridylthiolate, and chloride) was revealed on the surface of metal nanoclusters. Similar to thiolates, alkynyls bind linearly to surface Au atoms using their σ-bonds, leading to the formation of two types of surface staple units (PhC≡C-Au-L, L = PhC≡C(-) or 2-pyridylthiolate) on the cluster. The co-presence of three different surface ligands allows the site-specific surface and functional modification of the cluster. The lability of PhC≡C(-) ligands on the cluster was demonstrated, making it possible to keep the metal core intact while removing partial surface capping. Moreover, it was found that ligand exchange on the cluster occurs easily to offer various derivatives with the same metal core but different surface functionality and thus different solubility.

  10. Refractories for high-alkali environments

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, A.W.; Cloer, F.

    1996-01-01

    There are two reliable and cost-effective tests for evaluating refractory materials. They are used to determine which refractory products allow greater variance in fuel type with respect to alkali environment for coal-fired applications. Preselection of a particular refractory is important because of down-time cost for premature failure. One test is a variation of the standard alkali cup test. The second involves reacting test specimens with the contaminant, followed by physical properties testing to determine degree of degradation and properties affected. The alkali cup test rates products using a relative numerical scale based upon visual appearance. This test indicates the presence and relative degree of chemical attack to the refractory. The physical properties test determines the specific properties affected by the given contaminant.

  11. Mineralization of organic-matter labile fragments in the humus-accumulative horizon of soddy-podzolic soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, S. Ya.; Lazarev, A. S.; Fokin, A. D.

    2012-12-01

    The mineralization rate of the 14C-labeled organic matter (OM) in the humus-accumulative AE horizon of a soddy-podzolic soil was determined in a laboratory experiment. The labeling was performed in a field experiment when microamounts of 14C-labeled glucose, glycine, and uracil were added to tree waste in sacks embedded in the upper layer of the forest litter. Samples containing 14C were taken from the AE horizon (above which the sacks with the labeled material were placed) 7 and 20 months after the beginning of the experiment. The soil samples were wetted to a water content corresponding to ˜80% of the total water capacity and placed in hermetic vessels containing vials with a periodically renewed alkali solution. The incubation was performed at room temperature for 3.5 months; the alkali solutions in the vials were replaced and titrated 12 times during this period. Mineralization curves were plotted from the amounts of carbon dioxide absorbed by a 0.3 N NaOH solution, which were calculated for each time interval; its 14C content was determined by the scintillation method. The experimental treatments also included the determination of the OM mineralization rate in material from the AE horizon pretreated with a heavy liquid or a heavy liquid and a 0.1 N NaOH solution. The differences between the mineralization rates of the labeled organic matter applied to the soil in the form of glucose, glycine, and uracil under the field conditions after the interaction for 7 and 20 months were revealed. The changes in the mineralization rate after the successive extraction of the labile organic matter with a heavy liquid and a 0.1 N NaOH solution were studied. It was shown that the transformation of the labeled low-molecular-weight organic compounds in the soil over 20 months included their strong inclusion into the humus composition, which was confirmed by the similar values of the mineralization constants of the native and 14C-labeled OM. In addition, the treatments with the

  12. Maternal emotion socialization differentially predicts third-grade children's emotion regulation and lability.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Megan L; Halberstadt, Amy G; Castro, Vanessa L; MacCormack, Jennifer K; Garrett-Peters, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    Numerous parental emotion socialization factors have been implicated as direct and indirect contributors to the development of children's emotional competence. To date, however, no study has combined parents' emotion-related beliefs, behaviors, and regulation strategies in one model to assess their cumulative-as well as unique-contributions to children's emotion regulation. We considered the 2 components that have recently been distinguished: emotion regulation and emotional lability. We predicted that mothers' beliefs about the value of and contempt for children's emotions, mothers' supportive and nonsupportive reactions to their children's emotions, as well as mothers' use of cognitive reappraisal and suppression of their own emotions would each contribute unique variance to their children's emotion regulation and lability, as assessed by children's teachers. The study sample consisted of an ethnically and socioeconomically diverse group of 165 mothers and their third-grade children. Different patterns emerged for regulation and lability: Controlling for family income, child gender, and ethnicity, only mothers' lack of suppression as a regulatory strategy predicted greater emotion regulation in children, whereas mothers' valuing of children's emotions, mothers' lack of contempt for children's emotions, mothers' use of cognitive reappraisal to reinterpret events, and mothers' lack of emotional suppression predicted less lability in children. These findings support the divergence of emotion regulation and lability as constructs and indicate that, during middle childhood, children's lability may be substantially and uniquely affected by multiple forms of parental socialization.

  13. Cation-network interactions in binary alkali metal borate glasses. A far-infrared study

    SciTech Connect

    Kamitsos, E.I.; Karakassides, M.A.; Chryssikos, G.D.

    1987-10-22

    The far-infrared spectra of compositions probing the glass-forming regions of all five binary alkali metal borate systems chi M/sub 2/O x (1 - chi)B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (0 < chi less than or equal to 0.40, M = Na; and 0 < chi less than or equal to 0.35, M = K, Rb, Cs) have been measured and analyzed to systematically study the alkali metal cation-network interactions and their compositional dependence. Band deconvolution of the measured spectra showed the presence of two distinct distributions of alkali metal cation sites in Li, Na, and K glasses. Similar results have been obtained for rubidium and cesium borate glasses of compositions chi > 0.25. One distribution of cation sites has been observed for the lower alkali metal content Rb and Cs glasses. The fractions of cations in the two different network sites have also been evaluated. The squares of the frequencies of the cation-motion bands were found to vary linearly with composition, and exhibit kinks at chi similarly ordered 20, for all but the Cs glasses. This behavior was explained on the basis of the network structural changes known to occur at this composition.

  14. Alkali metal vapors - Laser spectroscopy and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stwalley, W. C.; Koch, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the rapidly expanding use of lasers for spectroscopic studies of alkali metal vapors. Since the alkali metals (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium) are theoretically simple ('visible hydrogen'), readily ionized, and strongly interacting with laser light, they represent ideal systems for quantitative understanding of microscopic interconversion mechanisms between photon (e.g., solar or laser), chemical, electrical and thermal energy. The possible implications of such understanding for a wide variety of practical applications (sodium lamps, thermionic converters, magnetohydrodynamic devices, new lasers, 'lithium waterfall' inertial confinement fusion reactors, etc.) are also discussed.

  15. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, W.Y.

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased, preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  16. Low bacterial diversity and high labile organic matter concentrations in the sediments of the Medee deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basin.

    PubMed

    Akoumianaki, Ioanna; Nomaki, Hidetaka; Pachiadaki, Maria; Kormas, Konstantinos Ar; Kitazato, Hiroshi; Tokuyama, Hidekazu

    2012-01-01

    Studies in the center and margin of the Medee Basin, a Mediterranean deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basin, and at a reference site during Penelope cruise (2007), revealed the existence of a 7 m-thick halocline, with high salinity (328 psu), and high sedimentary organic carbon and biopolymer concentrations. The 194 16S rRNA sequences retrieved were grouped into 118 unique phylotypes. Pseudomonas gessardii, dominated in the center, while 33 phylotypes were detected at the margin and 73 at the reference site. The study suggested conditions hostile to bacteria in the sediments of the Medee Basin and preservation of sedimentary labile organic matter. PMID:22504432

  17. Salts of alkali metal anions and process of preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Dye, James L.; Ceraso, Joseph M.; Tehan, Frederick J.; Lok, Mei Tak

    1978-01-01

    Compounds of alkali metal anion salts of alkali metal cations in bicyclic polyoxadiamines are disclosed. The salts are prepared by contacting an excess of alkali metal with an alkali metal dissolving solution consisting of a bicyclic polyoxadiamine in a suitable solvent, and recovered by precipitation. The salts have a gold-color crystalline appearance and are stable in a vacuum at -10.degree. C. and below.

  18. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  19. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  9. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  10. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  11. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  12. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  13. 40 CFR 721.5278 - Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.5278 Section 721.5278 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5278 Substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as a substituted naphthalenesulfonic acid, alkali salt (PMN P-95-85) is subject to reporting...

  14. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  15. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali salt. 721.8900 Section 721.8900 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical... as substituted halogenated pyridinols, alkali salts (PMNs P-88-1271 and P-88-1272) are subject...

  17. Alkali resistant optical coatings for alkali lasers and methods of production thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Soules, Thomas F; Beach, Raymond J; Mitchell, Scott C

    2014-11-18

    In one embodiment, a multilayer dielectric coating for use in an alkali laser includes two or more alternating layers of high and low refractive index materials, wherein an innermost layer includes a thicker, >500 nm, and dense, >97% of theoretical, layer of at least one of: alumina, zirconia, and hafnia for protecting subsequent layers of the two or more alternating layers of high and low index dielectric materials from alkali attack. In another embodiment, a method for forming an alkali resistant coating includes forming a first oxide material above a substrate and forming a second oxide material above the first oxide material to form a multilayer dielectric coating, wherein the second oxide material is on a side of the multilayer dielectric coating for contacting an alkali.

  18. Computational studies of solid-state alkali conduction in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Zhi; Mo, Yifei; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-03-25

    The facile conduction of alkali ions in a crystal host is of crucial importance in rechargeable alkali-ion batteries, the dominant form of energy storage today. In this review, we provide a comprehensive survey of computational approaches to study solid-state alkali diffusion. We demonstrate how these methods have provided useful insights into the design of materials that form the main components of a rechargeable alkali-ion battery, namely the electrodes, superionic conductor solid electrolytes and interfaces. We will also provide a perspective on future challenges and directions. Here, the scope of this review includes the monovalent lithium- and sodium-ion chemistries that aremore » currently of the most commercial interest.« less

  19. Ingestion of caustic alkali farm products.

    PubMed

    Neidich, G

    1993-01-01

    Since the Poison Prevention Packaging Act took effect, the number of ingestions of caustic alkali from household products has been significantly reduced. Commercial caustic alkalis used on farms, however, were not included in this legislation. Fourteen children over a 5 year period were seen after ingestion of commercial caustic alkalis used on farms. Seven of the children had ingested liquid pipeline cleaners and seven had ingested solid agents used for a variety of reasons. Six of seven children ingesting liquid agents did so from nonoriginal containers into which the caustic had been transferred for convenience. All seven children ingesting solid agents did so from the original container. Eight of the 14 children were found to have second-degree or worse esophageal involvement. Both solid and liquid caustic agents used commercially on farms can cause significant morbidity. Development of a child-resistant container for daily transfer of liquid pipeline agents could be helpful in preventing injuries from liquid pipeline cleaners. Pediatric gastroenterologists as well as primary care physicians in rural areas should be familiar with this type of injury and should take an active role in instructing parents of children living on farms to prevent such injuries. Extension of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act to caustic alkalis used on farms needs to be considered. PMID:8433244

  20. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-05-12

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization.

  1. Ingestion of caustic alkali farm products.

    PubMed

    Neidich, G

    1993-01-01

    Since the Poison Prevention Packaging Act took effect, the number of ingestions of caustic alkali from household products has been significantly reduced. Commercial caustic alkalis used on farms, however, were not included in this legislation. Fourteen children over a 5 year period were seen after ingestion of commercial caustic alkalis used on farms. Seven of the children had ingested liquid pipeline cleaners and seven had ingested solid agents used for a variety of reasons. Six of seven children ingesting liquid agents did so from nonoriginal containers into which the caustic had been transferred for convenience. All seven children ingesting solid agents did so from the original container. Eight of the 14 children were found to have second-degree or worse esophageal involvement. Both solid and liquid caustic agents used commercially on farms can cause significant morbidity. Development of a child-resistant container for daily transfer of liquid pipeline agents could be helpful in preventing injuries from liquid pipeline cleaners. Pediatric gastroenterologists as well as primary care physicians in rural areas should be familiar with this type of injury and should take an active role in instructing parents of children living on farms to prevent such injuries. Extension of the Poison Prevention Packaging Act to caustic alkalis used on farms needs to be considered.

  2. The Additive Coloration of Alkali Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jirgal, G. H.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an inexpensive, vacuum furnace designed to produce F-centers in alkali halide crystals by additive coloration. The method described avoids corrosion or contamination during the coloration process. Examination of the resultant crystals is discussed and several experiments using additively colored crystals are…

  3. Cohesive Energy of the Alkali Metals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a method, considered appropriate for presentation to undergraduate students in materials science and related courses, for the calculation of cohesive energies of the alkali metals. Uses a description based on the free electron model and gives results to within 0.1 eV of the experimental values. (Author/GS)

  4. Soil Microbial and Enzymatic Responses to Complex and Labile Nutrient Inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, S. D.; Vitousek, P. M.

    2003-12-01

    Microbial extracellular enzymes are essential for converting complex organic compounds into smaller molecules that are available for plant and microbial uptake. However, enzyme production represents a substantial resource cost for microbes, and microbes may be under selection to produce enzymes only when benefits exceed costs. We predicted that soil enzyme activities would be highest when complex substrates were abundant, but available nutrients were scarce (large potential benefit from enzyme production). We also predicted that rates of nutrient and carbon mineralization would correspond to observed shifts in enzyme activities. To test these predictions, we added insoluble and available carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus substrates to soil incubations and measured enzyme activities, CO2 respiration, microbial biomass, and nutrient mineralization. Labile carbon additions increased respiration rates and microbial biomass, while labile nutrient additions were taken up by microbes but did not increase respiration rates. Labile carbon + nitrogen additions increased acid phosphatase activity, while labile nitrogen additions suppressed aminopeptidase activity. Insoluble nutrients caused major increases in enzyme and microbial activities only when added in combination with complementary labile nutrients (e.g. insoluble carbon + available nitrogen and phosphorus). These results indicate that microbes respond to soil nutrient status by changing patterns of extracellular enzyme production. Such changes can allow microbes to access nutrients in complex molecules, but may be limited by the availability of resources to build enzymes.

  5. Hard Exercise, Affect Lability, and Personality Among Individuals with Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Brownstone, Lisa M.; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Joiner, Thomas E.; Le Grange, Daniel; Mitchell, James E.; Crow, Scott J.; Peterson, Carol B.; Crosby, Ross D.; Klein, Marjorie H.; Bardone-Cone, Anna M.

    2013-01-01

    The current study explores the personality traits of compulsivity (e.g., sense of orderliness and duty to perform tasks completely) and restricted expression (e.g., emotion expression difficulties) as potential moderators of the relation between affect lability and frequency of hard exercise episodes in a sample of individuals with bulimic pathology. Participants were 204 adult females recruited in five Midwestern cities who met criteria for threshold or subthreshold bulimia nervosa (BN). Compulsivity was found to significantly moderate the relation between affect lability and number of hard exercise episodes over the past 28 days, such that among those with high compulsivity, level of affect lability was associated with the number of hard exercise episodes; whereas, among those with low compulsivity, affect lability was not associated with the number of hard exercise episodes. The same pattern of findings emerged for restricted expression; however, this finding approached, but did not reach statistical significance. As such, it appears that affect lability is differentially related to hard exercise among individuals with BN depending upon the level of compulsivity and, to a more limited extent, restricted expression. These results suggest that, for individuals with BN with either compulsivity or restricted expression, focusing treatment on increasing flexibility and/or verbal expression of emotions may help them in the context of intense, fluctuating affect. PMID:24183126

  6. Alkali metal recovery from carbonaceous material conversion process

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.; Gorbaty, Martin L.; Tsou, Joe M.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced in the gasifier or similar reaction zone, alkali metal constitutents are recovered from the particles by withdrawing and passing the particles from the reaction zone to an alkali metal recovery zone in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen and treating the particles in the recovery zone with water or an aqueous solution in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen. The solution formed by treating the particles in the recovery zone will contain water-soluble alkali metal constituents and is recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preventing contact of the particles with oxygen as they are withdrawn from the reaction zone and during treatment in the recovery zone avoids the formation of undesirable alkali metal constituents in the aqueous solution produced in the recovery zone and insures maximum recovery of water-soluble alkali metal constituents from the alkali metal residues.

  7. Infrared and Raman spectroscopic studies on alkali borate glasses: evidence of mixed alkali effect.

    PubMed

    Padmaja, G; Kistaiah, P

    2009-03-19

    A lithium-potassium-borate glass system containing manganese and iron cations has been thoroughly investigated in order to obtain information about the mixed alkali effect and the structural role of both the manganese and iron in such glass hosts. Mixed alkali borate glasses of the (30 - x)Li(2)O - xK(2)O - 10CdO/ZnO - 59B(2)O(3) (x = 0, 10, 15, 20, and 30) doped with 1MnO(2)/1Fe(2)O(3) system were prepared by a melt quench technique. The amorphous phase of the prepared glass samples was confirmed from their X-ray diffraction. The spectroscopic properties of glass samples were studied using infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopic techniques. The density of all the prepared glasses was measured using Archimedes principle. Molar volumes were estimated from the density data. IR spectra of these glasses revealed a dramatic variation of three- and four-coordinated boron structures as a function of mixed alkali concentration. The vibrations due to Li-O, K-O, and MnO(4)/FeO(4) arrangements are consistent in all the compositions and show a nonlinear variation in the intensity with alkali content. Raman spectra of different alkali combinations with CdO and ZnO present drastic changes in the intensity of various Raman bands. The observation of disappearance and reappearance of IR and Raman bands as a function of various alkali concentrations is an important result pertaining to the mixed alkali effect in borate glasses. Acting as complementary spectroscopic techniques, both types of measurements, IR and Raman, revealed that the network structure of the studied glasses is mainly based on BO(3) and BO(4) units placed in different structural groups, the BO(3) units being dominant. The measured IR and Raman spectra of different glasses are used to clarify the optical properties of the present glasses correlating them with their structure and composition. PMID:19235995

  8. Kinetics characterization of c-Src binding to lipid membranes: Switching from labile to persistent binding.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Anabel-Lise; Busquets, Maria Antònia; Sagués, Francesc; Pons, Miquel

    2016-02-01

    Cell signaling by the c-Src proto-oncogen requires the attachment of the protein to the inner side of the plasma membrane through the myristoylated N-terminal region, known as the SH4 domain. Additional binding regions of lower affinity are located in the neighbor intrinsically disordered Unique domain and the structured SH3 domain. Here we present a surface plasmon resonance study of the binding of a myristoylated protein including the SH4, Unique and SH3 domains of c-Src to immobilized liposomes. Two distinct binding processes were observed: a fast and a slow one. The second process lead to a persistently bound form (PB) with a slower binding and a much slower dissociation rate than the first one. The association and dissociation of the PB form could be detected using an anti-SH4 antibody. The kinetic analysis revealed that binding of the PB form follows a second order rate law suggesting that it involves the formation of c-Src dimers on the membrane surface. A kinetically equivalent PB form is observed in a myristoylated peptide containing only the SH4 domain but not in a construct including the three domains but with a 12-carbon lauroyl substituent instead of the 14-carbon myristoyl group. The PB form is observed with neutral lipids but its population increases when the immobilized liposomes contain negatively charged lipids. We suggest that the PB form may represent the active signaling form of c-Src while the labile form provides the capacity for fast 2D search of the target signaling site on the membrane surface. PMID:26638178

  9. Kinetics characterization of c-Src binding to lipid membranes: Switching from labile to persistent binding.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Anabel-Lise; Busquets, Maria Antònia; Sagués, Francesc; Pons, Miquel

    2016-02-01

    Cell signaling by the c-Src proto-oncogen requires the attachment of the protein to the inner side of the plasma membrane through the myristoylated N-terminal region, known as the SH4 domain. Additional binding regions of lower affinity are located in the neighbor intrinsically disordered Unique domain and the structured SH3 domain. Here we present a surface plasmon resonance study of the binding of a myristoylated protein including the SH4, Unique and SH3 domains of c-Src to immobilized liposomes. Two distinct binding processes were observed: a fast and a slow one. The second process lead to a persistently bound form (PB) with a slower binding and a much slower dissociation rate than the first one. The association and dissociation of the PB form could be detected using an anti-SH4 antibody. The kinetic analysis revealed that binding of the PB form follows a second order rate law suggesting that it involves the formation of c-Src dimers on the membrane surface. A kinetically equivalent PB form is observed in a myristoylated peptide containing only the SH4 domain but not in a construct including the three domains but with a 12-carbon lauroyl substituent instead of the 14-carbon myristoyl group. The PB form is observed with neutral lipids but its population increases when the immobilized liposomes contain negatively charged lipids. We suggest that the PB form may represent the active signaling form of c-Src while the labile form provides the capacity for fast 2D search of the target signaling site on the membrane surface.

  10. Comparison of metal lability in air-dried and fresh dewatered drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Pei, Yuansheng; Zhao, Yaqian

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the labilities of Al, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sr, V and Zn in air-dried (for 60 days) and fresh dewatered WTRs were compared using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), fractionation, in vitro digestion and a plant enrichment test. The results showed that the air-dried and fresh dewatered WTRs had different properties, e.g., organic matter composition and available nutrients. The air-dried and fresh dewatered WTRs were non-haf zardous according to the TCLP assessment method used in the United States; however, the metals in the two types of WTRs had different lability. Compared with the metals in the fresh dewatered WTRs, those in the air-dried WTRs tended to be in more stable fractions and also exhibited lower bioaccessibility and bioavailability. Therefore, air-drying can decrease the metal lability and thereby reduce the potential metal pollution risk of WTRs.

  11. Radio-frequency dressed lattices for ultracold alkali atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinuco-León, German A.; Garraway, Barry M.

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold atomic gases in periodic potentials are powerful platforms for exploring quantum physics in regimes dominated by many-body effects as well as for developing applications that benefit from quantum mechanical effects. Further advances face a range of challenges including the realization of potentials with lattice constants smaller than optical wavelengths as well as creating schemes for effective addressing and manipulation of single sites. In this paper we propose a dressed-based scheme for creating periodic potential landscapes for ultracold alkali atoms with the capability of overcoming such difficulties. The dressed approach has the advantage of operating in a low-frequency regime where decoherence and heating effects due to spontaneous emission do not take place. These results highlight the possibilities of atom-chip technology in the future development of quantum simulations and quantum technologies, and provide a realistic scheme for starting such an exploration.

  12. Charge transfer during alkali-surface adsorbate collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye

    The study of charge transfer process between atomic particles and surface adsorbates is important, from both fundamental and practical points of view. Resonant charge transfer (RCT) process during the scattering of low-energy alkali ions from surfaces is proven to depend on the surface local electrostatic potential (LEP). This dissertation investigates the surface electronic environment around halogen and hydrogen adatoms on transition metal and silicon surfaces by using alkali ion scattering. Charge transfer in 7Li+ scattering from clean Si surfaces was shown to involve RCT between the Li 2s level and the Si dangling bonds. Hydrogen adsorption decreases the neutralization because it ties up the dangling bonds. The neutral fractions in 7Li + scattering from Cs/Si are also determined primarily by the dangling bond states, so that the surface LEP cannot be directly probed. Hydrogen adsorption on Cs/Si ties up the dangling bonds, thereby revealing the local potentials. The neutralization probabilities of Li+ backscattered from the hydrogen- and iodine-covered Ni(100) surface were measured. The neutral fraction does not change significantly on H-adsorbed surface. For iodine adsorption, however, unexpected high neutralization probabilities were found for Li scattered directly from iodine sites. Similar behavior were observed for Li+ scattering from I- and Br-covered Fe(100) and Fe(110). The neutralization of Li+ was measured as a function of the incident energy, adatom charge and coverage, and exit angle. It was found that the larger neutral fractions of Li scattered from the halogen sites are caused by a lower potential directly above the adatoms due to internal polarization. As the exit beam moves off-normal, the neutral fraction of Li scattered from iodine decreases. This is in contrast to Cs and Ag adsorbates where the neutral fractions increase for glancing exit trajectories. These angular-dependences are verified by a semi-quantitative theoretical analysis. To

  13. Biotic and abiotic controls on diurnal fluctuations in labile soil phosphorus of a wet tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Vandecar, Karen L; Lawrence, Deborah; Wood, Tana; Oberbauer, Steven F; Das, Rishiraj; Tully, Katherine; Schwendenmann, Luitgard

    2009-09-01

    The productivity of many tropical wet forests is generally limited by bioavailable phosphorus (P). Microbial activity is a key regulator of P availability in that it determines both the supply of P through organic matter decomposition and the depletion of bioavailable P through microbial uptake. Both microbial uptake and mineralization occur rapidly, and their net effect on P availability varies with soil moisture, temperature, and soil organic matter quantity and quality. Exploring the mechanisms driving P availability at fine temporal scales can provide insight into the coupling of carbon, water, and nutrient cycles, and ultimately, the response of tropical forests to climate change. Despite the recognized importance of P cycling to the dynamics of wet tropical forests and their potential sensitivity to short-term fluctuations in bioavailable P, the diurnal pattern of P remains poorly understood. This study quantifies diurnal fluctuations in labile soil P and evaluates the importance of biotic and abiotic factors in driving these patterns. To this end, measurements of labile P were made every other hour in a Costa Rican wet tropical forest oxisol. Spatial and temporal variation in Bray-extractable P were investigated in relation to ecosystem carbon flux, soil CO2 efflux, soil moisture, soil temperature, solar radiation, and sap-flow velocity. Spatially averaged bi-hourly (every two hours) labile P ranged from 0.88 to 2.48 microg/g across days. The amplitude in labile P throughout the day was 0.61-0.82 microg/g (41-54% of mean P concentrations) and was characterized by a bimodal pattern with a decrease at midday. Labile P increased with soil CO2 efflux and soil temperature and declined with increasing sap flow and solar radiation. Together, soil CO2 efflux, soil temperature, and sap flow explained 86% of variation in labile P.

  14. Infrared spectra of FHF - in alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunnilall, C. J.; Sherman, W. F.

    1982-03-01

    The bifluoride ion, FHF -, has been substitutionally isolated within single crystal samples of several different alkali halides. Infrared spectra of these crystals have been studied for sample temperatures down to 8K when half-bandwidths of less than 1 cm -1 have been observed. (Note that at room temperature ν 3 is observed to have a half-bandwidth of about 40 cm -1). The frequency shifts and half-bandwidth changes caused by cooling are considered together with the frequency shifts caused by pressures up to 10 k bar. The low temperature spectra clearly indicate that FHF - is a linear symmetrical ion when substitutionally isolated within alkali halides of either the NaCl or CsCl structure.

  15. Geopolymers and Related Alkali-Activated Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provis, John L.; Bernal, Susan A.

    2014-07-01

    The development of new, sustainable, low-CO2 construction materials is essential if the global construction industry is to reduce the environmental footprint of its activities, which is incurred particularly through the production of Portland cement. One type of non-Portland cement that is attracting particular attention is based on alkali-aluminosilicate chemistry, including the class of binders that have become known as geopolymers. These materials offer technical properties comparable to those of Portland cement, but with a much lower CO2 footprint and with the potential for performance advantages over traditional cements in certain niche applications. This review discusses the synthesis of alkali-activated binders from blast furnace slag, calcined clay (metakaolin), and fly ash, including analysis of the chemical reaction mechanisms and binder phase assemblages that control the early-age and hardened properties of these materials, in particular initial setting and long-term durability. Perspectives for future research developments are also explored.

  16. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    One approach to space fission power system design is predicated on the use of alkali metal heat pipes, either as radiator elements, thermal management components, or as part of the core primary heat-transfer system. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where more detailed information can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstrational purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Project Prometheus point designs.

  17. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-07-01

    One approach to fission power system design uses alkali metal heat pipes for the core primary heat-transfer system. Heat pipes may also be used as radiator elements or auxiliary thermal control elements. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where information that is more detailed can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstration purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Nasa Project Prometheus point designs. (author)

  18. Ion Pairing in Alkali Nitrate Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-10

    In this study, we investigate the thermodynamics of alkali nitrate salt solutions, especially the formation of contact ion pairs between alkali cation and nitrate anion. The ion-pairing propensity shows an order of LiNO3 < NaNO3 < KNO3. Such results explain the salt activity coefficients and suggest that the empirical "law of matching water affinity" is followed by these alkali nitrate salt solutions. The spatial patterns of contact ion pairs are different in the three salt solutions studied here: Li(+) forms the contact ion pair with only one oxygen of the nitrate while Na(+) and K(+) can also be shared by two oxygens of the nitrate. In reproducing the salt activity coefficient using Kirkwood-Buff theory, we find that it is essential to include electronic polarization for Li(+) which has a high charge density. The electronic continuum correction for nonpolarizable force field significantly improves the agreement between the calculated activity coefficients and their experimental values. This approach also improves the performance of the force field on salt solubility. From these two aspects, this study suggests that electronic continuum correction can be a promising approach to force-field development for ions with high charge densities. PMID:26901167

  19. Ion Pairing in Alkali Nitrate Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-10

    In this study, we investigate the thermodynamics of alkali nitrate salt solutions, especially the formation of contact ion pairs between alkali cation and nitrate anion. The ion-pairing propensity shows an order of LiNO3 < NaNO3 < KNO3. Such results explain the salt activity coefficients and suggest that the empirical "law of matching water affinity" is followed by these alkali nitrate salt solutions. The spatial patterns of contact ion pairs are different in the three salt solutions studied here: Li(+) forms the contact ion pair with only one oxygen of the nitrate while Na(+) and K(+) can also be shared by two oxygens of the nitrate. In reproducing the salt activity coefficient using Kirkwood-Buff theory, we find that it is essential to include electronic polarization for Li(+) which has a high charge density. The electronic continuum correction for nonpolarizable force field significantly improves the agreement between the calculated activity coefficients and their experimental values. This approach also improves the performance of the force field on salt solubility. From these two aspects, this study suggests that electronic continuum correction can be a promising approach to force-field development for ions with high charge densities.

  20. Transport properties of alkali metal doped fullerides

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Daluram Yadav, Nishchhal

    2015-07-31

    We have studied the intercage interactions between the adjacent C{sub 60} cages and expansion of lattice due to the intercalation of alkali atoms based on the spring model to estimate phonon frequencies from the dynamical matrix for the intermolecular alkali-C{sub 60} phonons. We considered a two-peak model for the phonon density of states to investigate the nature of electron pairing mechanism for superconducting state in fullerides. Coulomb repulsive parameter and the electron phonon coupling strength are obtained within the random phase approximation. Transition temperature, T{sub c}, is obtained in a situation when the free electrons in lowest molecular orbital are coupled with alkali-C{sub 60} phonons as 5 K, which is much lower as compared to reported T{sub c} (20 K). The superconducting pairing is mainly driven by the high frequency intramolecular phonons and their effects enhance it to 22 K. The importance of the present study, the pressure effect and normal state transport properties are calculated within the same model leading superconductivity.

  1. Using High Performance Computing to Understand Roles of Labile and Nonlabile U(VI) on Hanford 300 Area Plume Longevity

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtner, Peter C.; Hammond, Glenn E.

    2012-07-28

    Evolution of a hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] plume at the Hanford 300 Area bordering the Columbia River is investigated to evaluate the roles of labile and nonlabile forms of U(VI) on the longevity of the plume. A high fidelity, three-dimensional, field-scale, reactive flow and transport model is used to represent the system. Richards equation coupled to multicomponent reactive transport equations are solved for times up to 100 years taking into account rapid fluctuations in the Columbia River stage resulting in pulse releases of U(VI) into the river. The peta-scale computer code PFLOTRAN developed under a DOE SciDAC-2 project is employed in the simulations and executed on ORNL's Cray XT5 supercomputer Jaguar. Labile U(VI) is represented in the model through surface complexation reactions and its nonlabile form through dissolution of metatorbernite used as a surrogate mineral. Initial conditions are constructed corresponding to the U(VI) plume already in place to avoid uncertainties associated with the lack of historical data for the waste stream. The cumulative U(VI) flux into the river is compared for cases of equilibrium and multirate sorption models and for no sorption. The sensitivity of the U(VI) flux into the river on the initial plume configuration is investigated. The presence of nonlabile U(VI) was found to be essential in explaining the longevity of the U(VI) plume and the prolonged high U(VI) concentrations at the site exceeding the EPA MCL for uranium.

  2. Alteration of alkali reactive aggregates autoclaved in different alkali solutions and application to alkali-aggregate reaction in concrete (II) expansion and microstructure of concrete microbar

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Duyou . E-mail: duyoulu@njut.edu.cn; Mei Laibao; Xu Zhongzi; Tang Mingshu; Mo Xiangyin; Fournier, Benoit

    2006-06-15

    The effect of the type of alkalis on the expansion behavior of concrete microbars containing typical aggregate with alkali-silica reactivity and alkali-carbonate reactivity was studied. The results verified that: (1) at the same molar concentration, sodium has the strongest contribution to expansion due to both ASR and ACR, followed by potassium and lithium; (2) sufficient LiOH can completely suppress expansion due to ASR whereas it can induce expansion due to ACR. It is possible to use the duplex effect of LiOH on ASR and ACR to clarify the ACR contribution when ASR and ACR may coexist. It has been shown that a small amount of dolomite in the fine-grained siliceous Spratt limestone, which has always been used as a reference aggregate for high alkali-silica reactivity, might dedolomitize in alkaline environment and contribute to the expansion. That is to say, Spratt limestone may exhibit both alkali-silica and alkali-carbonate reactivity, although alkali-silica reactivity is predominant. Microstructural study suggested that the mechanism in which lithium controls ASR expansion is mainly due to the favorable formation of lithium-containing less-expansive product around aggregate particles and the protection of the reactive aggregate from further attack by alkalis by the lithium-containing product layer.

  3. Method for the safe disposal of alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Terry R.

    1977-01-01

    Alkali metals such as those employed in liquid metal coolant systems can be safely reacted to form hydroxides by first dissolving the alkali metal in relatively inert metals such as lead or bismuth. The alloy thus formed is contacted with a molten salt including the alkali metal hydroxide and possibly the alkali metal carbonate in the presence of oxygen. This oxidizes the alkali metal to an oxide which is soluble within the molten salt. The salt is separated and contacted with steam or steam-CO.sub.2 mixture to convert the alkali metal oxide to the hydroxide. These reactions can be conducted with minimal hydrogen evolution and with the heat of reaction distributed between the several reaction steps.

  4. Non-labile silver species in biosolids remain stable throughout 50 years of weathering and ageing.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasing commercial use of nanosilver has focussed attention on the fate of silver (Ag) in the wastewater release pathway. This paper reports the speciation and lability of Ag in archived, stockpiled, and contemporary biosolids from the UK, USA and Australia, and indicates that...

  5. Measurement of labile copper in wine by medium exchange stripping potentiometry utilising screen printed carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew C; Kontoudakis, Nikolaos; Barril, Celia; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Scollary, Geoffrey R

    2016-07-01

    The presence of copper in wine is known to impact the reductive, oxidative and colloidal stability of wine, and techniques enabling measurement of different forms of copper in wine are of particular interest in understanding these spoilage processes. Electrochemical stripping techniques developed to date require significant pretreatment of wine, potentially disturbing the copper binding equilibria. A thin mercury film on a screen printed carbon electrode was utilised in a flow system for the direct analysis of labile copper in red and white wine by constant current stripping potentiometry with medium exchange. Under the optimised conditions, including an enrichment time of 500s and constant current of 1.0μA, the response range was linear from 0.015 to 0.200mg/L. The analysis of 52 red and white wines showed that this technique generally provided lower labile copper concentrations than reported for batch measurement by related techniques. Studies in a model system and in finished wines showed that the copper sulfide was not measured as labile copper, and that loss of hydrogen sulfide via volatilisation induced an increase in labile copper within the model wine system.

  6. Occurrence and abundance of carbohydrates and amino compounds in sequentially extracted labile soil organic matter fractions.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aimed to investigate the content of carbohydrates and amino compounds in three labile fraction of soil organic matter (SOM). Soil samples were collected from two agricultural fields in southern Italy and the light fraction (LF), the 500–53-µm particulate organic matter (POM) and the mobil...

  7. Non-labile silver species in biosolids remain stable throughout 50 years of weathering and ageing.

    PubMed

    Donner, E; Scheckel, K; Sekine, R; Popelka-Filcoff, R S; Bennett, J W; Brunetti, G; Naidu, R; McGrath, S P; Lombi, E

    2015-10-01

    Increasing commercial use of nanosilver has focussed attention on the fate of silver (Ag) in the wastewater release pathway. This paper reports the speciation and lability of Ag in archived, stockpiled, and contemporary biosolids from the UK, USA and Australia, and indicates that biosolids Ag concentrations have decreased significantly over recent decades. XANES revealed the importance of reduced-sulfur binding environments for Ag speciation in materials ranging from freshly produced sludge to biosolids weathered under ambient environmental conditions for more than 50 years. Isotopic dilution with (110 m)Ag showed that Ag was predominantly non-labile in both fresh and aged biosolids (13.7% mean lability), with E-values ranging from 0.3 to 60 mg/kg and 5 mM CaNO3 extractable Ag from 1.2 to 609 μg/kg (0.002-3.4% of the total Ag). This study indicates that at the time of soil application, biosolids Ag will be predominantly Ag-sulfides and characterised by low isotopic lability.

  8. Labile compounds in plant litter reduce the sensitivity of decomposition to warming and altered precipitation.

    PubMed

    Suseela, Vidya; Tharayil, Nishanth; Xing, Baoshan; Dukes, Jeffrey S

    2013-10-01

    Together, climate and litter quality strongly regulate decomposition rates. Although these two factors and their interaction have been studied across species in continent-scale experiments, few researchers have studied how labile and recalcitrant compounds interact to influence decomposition, or the climate sensitivity of decomposition, within a litter type. Over a period of 3 yr, we studied the effects of warming and altered precipitation on mass loss and compound-specific decomposition using two litter types that possessed similar heteropolymer chemistry, but different proportions of labile and recalcitrant compounds. Climate treatments immediately affected the mass loss of the more recalcitrant litter, but affected the more labile litter only after 2 yr. After 3 yr, although both litter types had lost similar amounts of mass, warming (c. 4°C) and supplemental precipitation (150% of ambient) together accelerated the degradation of alkyl-carbon and lignin only in the more recalcitrant litter, highlighting the role of initial litter quality in determining whether the chemistry of litter residues converges or diverges under different climates. Our finding that labile compounds in litter reduce the climate sensitivity of mass loss and the decomposition of recalcitrant matrix is novel. Our results highlight the potential for litter quality to regulate the effect of climatic changes on the sequestration of litter-derived carbon. PMID:23822593

  9. Determination of the common and rare alkalies in mineral analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.C.; Stevens, R.E.

    1934-01-01

    Methods are described which afford a determination of each member of the alkali group and are successful in dealing with the quantities of the rare alkalies found in rocks and minerals. The procedures are relatively rapid and based chiefly on the use of chloroplatinic acid, absolute alcohol and ether, and ammonium sulfate. The percentages of all the alkalies found in a number of minerals are given.

  10. Environmental mercury contamination around a chlor-alkali plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lodenius, M.; Tulisalo, E.

    1984-04-01

    The chlor-alkali industry is one of the most important emitters of mercury. This metal is effectively spread from chlor-alkali plants into the atmosphere and it has been reported that only a few percent of the mercury emissions are deposited locally the major part spreading over very large areas. The purpose of this investigation was to study the spreading of mercury up to 100 km from a chlor-alkali plant using three different biological indicators.

  11. Solvation at nanoscale: Alkali-halides in water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Partanen, Leena; Mikkelae, Mikko-Heikki; Huttula, Marko; Tchaplyguine, Maxim; Zhang Chaofan; Andersson, Tomas; Bjoerneholm, Olle

    2013-01-28

    The solvation of alkali-halides in water clusters at nanoscale is studied by photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The Na 2p, K 3p, Cl 2p, Br 3d, and I 4d core level binding energies have been measured for salt-containing water clusters. The results have been compared to those of alkali halide clusters and the dilute aqueous salt solutions. It is found that the alkali halides dissolve in small water clusters as ions.

  12. Changes in lead and zinc lability during weathering-induced acidification of desert mine tailings: Coupling chemical and micro-scale analyses.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Sarah M; White, Scott A; Thompson, Thomas L; Maier, Raina M; Chorover, Jon

    2009-12-01

    Desert mine tailings may accumulate toxic metals in the near surface centimeters because of low water through-flux rates. Along with other constraints, metal toxicity precludes natural plant colonization even over decadal time scales. Since unconsolidated particles can be subjected to transport by wind and water erosion, potentially resulting in direct human and ecosystem exposure, there is a need to know how the lability and form of metals change in the tailings weathering environment. A combination of chemical extractions, X-ray diffraction, micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy were employed to study Pb and Zn contamination in surficial arid mine tailings from the Arizona Klondyke State Superfund Site. Initial site characterization indicated a wide range in pH (2.5 to 8.0) in the surficial tailings pile. Ligand-promoted (DTPA) extractions, used to assess plant-available metal pools, showed decreasing available Zn and Mn with progressive tailings acidification. Aluminum shows the inverse trend, and Pb and Fe show more complex pH dependence. Since the tailings derive from a common source and parent mineralogy, it is presumed that variations in pH and "bioavailable" metal concentrations result from associated variation in particle-scale geochemistry. Four sub-samples, ranging in pH from 2.6 to 5.4, were subjected to further characterization to elucidate micro-scale controls on metal mobility. With acidification, total Pb (ranging from 5 - 13 g kg(-1)) was increasingly associated with Fe and S in plumbojarosite aggregates. For Zn, both total (0.4 - 6 g kg(-1)) and labile fractions decreased with decreasing pH. Zinc was found to be primarily associated with the secondary Mn phases manjiroite and chalcophanite. The results suggest that progressive tailings acidification diminishes the overall lability of the total Pb and Zn pools.

  13. Changes in lead and zinc lability during weathering-induced acidification of desert mine tailings: Coupling chemical and micro-scale analyses

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sarah M.; White, Scott A.; Thompson, Thomas L.; Maier, Raina M.; Chorover, Jon

    2009-01-01

    Desert mine tailings may accumulate toxic metals in the near surface centimeters because of low water through-flux rates. Along with other constraints, metal toxicity precludes natural plant colonization even over decadal time scales. Since unconsolidated particles can be subjected to transport by wind and water erosion, potentially resulting in direct human and ecosystem exposure, there is a need to know how the lability and form of metals change in the tailings weathering environment. A combination of chemical extractions, X-ray diffraction, micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy were employed to study Pb and Zn contamination in surficial arid mine tailings from the Arizona Klondyke State Superfund Site. Initial site characterization indicated a wide range in pH (2.5 to 8.0) in the surficial tailings pile. Ligand-promoted (DTPA) extractions, used to assess plant-available metal pools, showed decreasing available Zn and Mn with progressive tailings acidification. Aluminum shows the inverse trend, and Pb and Fe show more complex pH dependence. Since the tailings derive from a common source and parent mineralogy, it is presumed that variations in pH and “bioavailable” metal concentrations result from associated variation in particle-scale geochemistry. Four sub-samples, ranging in pH from 2.6 to 5.4, were subjected to further characterization to elucidate micro-scale controls on metal mobility. With acidification, total Pb (ranging from 5 – 13 g kg−1) was increasingly associated with Fe and S in plumbojarosite aggregates. For Zn, both total (0.4 – 6 g kg−1) and labile fractions decreased with decreasing pH. Zinc was found to be primarily associated with the secondary Mn phases manjiroite and chalcophanite. The results suggest that progressive tailings acidification diminishes the overall lability of the total Pb and Zn pools. PMID:20161492

  14. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

    1992-05-27

    High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this research is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, zirconia, and fireclay glass. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products (phase equilibria) and the kinetics of the alkali reactions as a function of temperature and time.

  15. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

    1991-11-30

    High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this program is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, zirconia, and fireclay glass. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products (phase equilibria) and the kinetics of the alkali reactions as a function of temperature and time.

  16. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

    1992-08-29

    High temperature alkali corrosion has been known to cause premature failure of ceramic components used in advanced high temperature coal combustion systems such as coal gasification and clean-up, coal fired gas turbines, and high efficiency heat engines. The objective of this research is to systematically evaluate the alkali corrosion resistance of the most commonly used structural ceramics including silicon carbide, silicon nitride, cordierite, mullite, alumina, aluminum titanate, zirconia, and fireclay glass. The study consists of identification of the alkali reaction products (phase equilibria) and the kinetics of the alkali reactions as a function of temperature and time.

  17. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, D.C.; Mailhe, C.C.; De Jonghe, L.C.

    1985-07-10

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  18. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, David C.; Mailhe, Catherine C.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    1986-01-01

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  19. Glaciers as a source of ancient and labile organic matter to the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Hood, Eran; Fellman, Jason; Spencer, Robert G M; Hernes, Peter J; Edwards, Rick; D'Amore, David; Scott, Durelle

    2009-12-24

    Riverine organic matter supports of the order of one-fifth of estuarine metabolism. Coastal ecosystems are therefore sensitive to alteration of both the quantity and lability of terrigenous dissolved organic matter (DOM) delivered by rivers. The lability of DOM is thought to vary with age, with younger, relatively unaltered organic matter being more easily metabolized by aquatic heterotrophs than older, heavily modified material. This view is developed exclusively from work in watersheds where terrestrial plant and soil sources dominate streamwater DOM. Here we characterize streamwater DOM from 11 coastal watersheds on the Gulf of Alaska that vary widely in glacier coverage (0-64 per cent). In contrast to non-glacial rivers, we find that the bioavailability of DOM to marine microorganisms is significantly correlated with increasing (14)C age. Moreover, the most heavily glaciated watersheds are the source of the oldest ( approximately 4 kyr (14)C age) and most labile (66 per cent bioavailable) DOM. These glacial watersheds have extreme runoff rates, in part because they are subject to some of the highest rates of glacier volume loss on Earth. We estimate the cumulative flux of dissolved organic carbon derived from glaciers contributing runoff to the Gulf of Alaska at 0.13 +/- 0.01 Tg yr(-1) (1 Tg = 10(12) g), of which approximately 0.10 Tg is highly labile. This indicates that glacial runoff is a quantitatively important source of labile reduced carbon to marine ecosystems. Moreover, because glaciers and ice sheets represent the second largest reservoir of water in the global hydrologic system, our findings indicate that climatically driven changes in glacier volume could alter the age, quantity and reactivity of DOM entering coastal oceans.

  20. Fast labile carbon turnover obscures sensitivity of heterotrophic respiration from soil to temperature: A model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Lianhong; Post, Wilfred M.; King, Anthony W.

    2004-03-01

    Labile carbon, although often a small fraction of soil organic carbon (SOC), significantly affects heterotrophic respiration at short timescales because of its rapid decomposition. However, in the current literature, most soil respiration measurements are interpreted without simultaneous information on labile carbon pool dynamics. Sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature is routinely derived directly from field observations, and such relationships have been used to extrapolate effects of global change (e.g., warming) on carbon emission from SOC. Here we use a multipool SOC model to demonstrate the impacts of seasonal fluctuations of labile carbon pools on interpretation of soil respiration measurements. We find that labile carbon pool sizes vary widely in response to seasonal changes in representative plant material inputs and temperature even though the model is operating at equilibrium in terms of annual means. Convolution of the dynamics of fast turnover carbon pools and temporal progression in temperature lead to misrepresentation and misinterpretation of the heterotrophic respiration-temperature relationships estimated from bulk soil CO2 exchanges. Temperature sensitivity is overestimated when the variations of labile carbon pools and temperature are in phase and underestimated when they are out of phase. Furthermore, with normally used observation time windows (weeks to a year), temperature sensitivity is more likely to be underestimated. A distortion of temperature sensitivity (Q10) from 2 (actual, sensitive dependence on temperature) to nearly 1 (false, no dependence on temperature) is shown. Applying estimated temperature sensitivity parameter back into the model considerably overestimates soil carbon storage at equilibrium. Our findings indicate that caution must be taken when soil respiration-temperature relationships are evaluated based on bulk soil observations and when sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature estimated directly under field

  1. The interactions of sorbates with gallosilicates and alkali-metal exchanged gallosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limtrakul, J.; Kuno, M.; Treesukol, P.

    1999-11-01

    Structures, energetics and vibrational frequencies of the interaction of adsorbates with H-aluminosilicates (H-AlZ), H-gallosilicates (H-GaZ), alkali-metal exchanged aluminosilicates (X-AlZ) and alkali-metal exchanged gallosilicates (X-GaZ), where X being Li, Na, or K, have been carried out at B3LYP and HF levels of theory with 6-31G(d) as the basis set. The charge compensating alkali-metal ions can affect the catalytically active site (Si-O-T where T=Al or Ga) by weakening the Si-O, Al-O, and Ga-O bonds as compared to their anionic frameworks. Comparing the net stabilization energies, Δ ENSE, of the naked alkali-metal/H 2O adducts with those of the alkali-metal exchanged zeolite/H 2O systems, the latter amounts only to about 50% of the former, which is partly due to the destabilizing role of the negative zeolitic oxygen frameworks surrounding the cations. The interaction of sorbates with the alkali-metal exchanged gallosilicates can be employed to probe the field strength inside the catalytic frameworks as indicated by the plot of the binding energy, Δ E, versus 1/ RX-O w2, with R(X-O w) being the distance between the cationic nucleus and the oxygen atom of the adsorbate. The IR spectra of H 2O adsorbed on Na-AlZ are calculated to be 3584, 3651, and 1686 cm -1. The obtained results are in excellent agreement with the very recent experimental IR spectra of water adsorbed on Na-ZSM-5 of Zecchina et al. (J. Phys. Chem., 100 (1996) 16 484). Other important features, i.e. the correlation between Δ νOH and, Δ E, R(X-O w) , and 1/ RX-O w2, cationic size, demonstrate that the interactions of sorbates with alkali-metal exchanged gallosilicates are well approximated by electrostatic contribution.

  2. Cathode architectures for alkali metal / oxygen batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Steven J; Nimon, Vitaliy; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Volfkovich, Yury; Bograchev, Daniil

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical energy storage devices, such as alkali metal-oxygen battery cells (e.g., non-aqueous lithium-air cells), have a cathode architecture with a porous structure and pore composition that is tailored to improve cell performance, especially as it pertains to one or more of the discharge/charge rate, cycle life, and delivered ampere-hour capacity. A porous cathode architecture having a pore volume that is derived from pores of varying radii wherein the pore size distribution is tailored as a function of the architecture thickness is one way to achieve one or more of the aforementioned cell performance improvements.

  3. Electrodes For Alkali-Metal Thermoelectric Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Wheeler, Bob L.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Lamb, James L.; Bankston, C. Perry; Cole, Terry

    1989-01-01

    Combination of thin, porous electrode and overlying collector grid reduces internal resistance of alkali-metal thermoelectric converter cell. Low resistance of new electrode and grid boosts power density nearly to 1 W/cm2 of electrode area at typical operating temperatures of 1,000 to 1,300 K. Conductive grid encircles electrode film on alumina tube. Bus wire runs along tube to collect electrical current from grid. Such converters used to transform solar, nuclear, and waste heat into electric power.

  4. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  5. (abstract) Fundamental Mechanisms of Electrode Kinetics and Alkali Metal Atom Transport at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kisor, A.; Kikkert, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of electrode kinetics and mass transport of alkali metal oxidation and alkali metal cation reduction at the solid electrolyte/porous electrode boundary as well as alkali metal transport through porous metal electrodes has important applications in optimizing device performance in alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) cells which are high temperature, high current density electrochemical cells. Basic studies of these processes also affords the opportunity to investigate a very basic electrochemical reaction over a wide range of conditions; and a variety of mass transport modes at high temperatures via electrochemical techniques. The temperature range of these investigations covers 700K to 1240K; the alkali metal vapor pressures range from about 10(sup -2) to 10(sup 2) Pa; and electrodes studied have included Mo, W, Mo/Na(sub 2)MoO(sub 4), W/Na(sub 2)WO(sub 4), WPt(sub x), and WRh(sub x) (1.0 < x < 6.0 ) with Na at Na-beta'-alumina, and Mo with K at K-beta'-alumina. Both liquid metal/solid electrolyte/alkali metal vapor and alkali metal vapor/solid electrolyte/vapor cells have been used to characterize the reaction and transport processes. We have previously reported evidence of ionic, free molecular flow, and surface transport of sodium in several types of AMTEC electrodes.

  6. Elucidation of transport mechanism and enhanced alkali ion transference numbers in mixed alkali metal-organic ionic molten salts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Forsyth, Maria

    2016-07-28

    Mixed salts of Ionic Liquids (ILs) and alkali metal salts, developed as electrolytes for lithium and sodium batteries, have shown a remarkable ability to facilitate high rate capability for lithium and sodium electrochemical cycling. It has been suggested that this may be due to a high alkali metal ion transference number at concentrations approaching 50 mol% Li(+) or Na(+), relative to lower concentrations. Computational investigations for two IL systems illustrate the formation of extended alkali-anion aggregates as the alkali metal ion concentration increases. This tends to favor the diffusion of alkali metal ions compared with other ionic species in electrolyte solutions; behavior that has recently been reported for Li(+) in a phosphonium ionic liquid, thus an increasing alkali transference number. The mechanism of alkali metal ion diffusion via this extended coordination environment present at high concentrations is explained and compared to the dynamics at lower concentrations. Heterogeneous alkali metal ion dynamics are also evident and, somewhat counter-intuitively, it appears that the faster ions are those that are generally found clustered with the anions. Furthermore these fast alkali metal ions appear to correlate with fastest ionic liquid solvent ions. PMID:27375042

  7. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides.

    PubMed

    Krzton-Maziopa, A; Svitlyk, V; Pomjakushina, E; Puzniak, R; Conder, K

    2016-07-27

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations. PMID:27248118

  8. Durability of Alkali Activated Blast Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, K.; Alharbi, N.; Matheu, P. S.; Varela, B.; Hailstone, R.

    2015-11-01

    The alkali activation of blast furnace slag has the potential to reduce the environmental impact of cementitious materials and to be applied in geographic zones where weather is a factor that negatively affects performance of materials based on Ordinary Portland Cement. The scientific literature provides many examples of alkali activated slag with high compressive strengths; however research into the durability and resistance to aggressive environments is still necessary for applications in harsh weather conditions. In this study two design mixes of blast furnace slag with mine tailings were activated with a potassium based solution. The design mixes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, BET analysis and compressive strength testing. Freeze-thaw testing up to 100 freeze-thaw cycles was performed in 10% road salt solution. Our findings included compressive strength of up to 100 MPa after 28 days of curing and 120 MPa after freeze-thaw testing. The relationship between pore size, compressive strength, and compressive strength after freeze-thaw was explored.

  9. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides.

    PubMed

    Krzton-Maziopa, A; Svitlyk, V; Pomjakushina, E; Puzniak, R; Conder, K

    2016-07-27

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  10. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Svitlyk, V.; Pomjakushina, E.; Puzniak, R.; Conder, K.

    2016-07-01

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  11. Packing transition in alkali metallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, R.; Sung, Ming Wen; Weare, John H.

    1996-03-01

    Small metallic clusters form a local geometric configuration quite different from the bulk crystals. As the cluster size increases, several transitions in the local coordination take place before the bulk structure appears. These transitions involve change in the nature of chemical bonds. We have systematically investigated the structural transition of various alkali metal clusters including binary compounds using an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. Among them, Li clusters exhibit unusual transition in their packing pattern. Small lithium clusters (N <= 21) form open structures based on a ``solvation shell''.(M. Sung, R. Kawai, and J. Weare, Phys. Rev. Lett. 73) (1994) 3552., which is quite different from other alkali metal clusters. The bonding of these small clusters is partially ionic. Above N=25, a close-packed structure is established. However, the local configuration still differ from that of the bulk crystal. As the size further increases, the ionic nature decreases and the system reaches another close-packed structure based on the Mackay icosahedron, which is similar to the bulk crystal structure.

  12. Decalcification resistance of alkali-activated slag.

    PubMed

    Komljenović, Miroslav M; Baščarević, Zvezdana; Marjanović, Nataša; Nikolić, Violeta

    2012-09-30

    This paper analyses the effects of decalcification in concentrated 6M NH(4)NO(3) solution on mechanical and microstructural properties of alkali-activated slag (AAS). Portland-slag cement (CEM II/A-S 42.5 N) was used as a benchmark material. Decalcification process led to a decrease in strength, both in AAS and in CEM II, and this effect was more pronounced in CEM II. The decrease in strength was explicitly related to the decrease in Ca/Si atomic ratio of C-S-H gel. A very low ratio of Ca/Si ~0.3 in AAS was the consequence of coexistence of C-S-H(I) gel and silica gel. During decalcification of AAS almost complete leaching of sodium and tetrahedral aluminum from C-S-H(I) gel also took place. AAS showed significantly higher resistance to decalcification in relation to the benchmark CEM II due to the absence of portlandite, high level of polymerization of silicate chains, low level of aluminum for silicon substitution in the structure of C-S-H(I), and the formation of protective layer of polymerized silica gel during decalcification process. In stabilization/solidification processes alkali-activated slag represents a more promising solution than Portland-slag cement due to significantly higher resistance to decalcification. PMID:22818592

  13. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Svitlyk, V.; Pomjakushina, E.; Puzniak, R.; Conder, K.

    2016-07-01

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2‑y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  14. Formation of lysinoalanine in egg white under alkali treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Luo, Xuying; Li, Jianke; Xu, Mingsheng; Tu, Yonggang

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the formation mechanism of lysinoalanine (LAL) in eggs during the alkali treatment process, NaOH was used for the direct alkali treatment of egg white, ovalbumin, and amino acids; in addition, the amount of LAL formed during the alkali treatment process was measured. The results showed that the alkali treatment resulted in the formation of LAL in the egg white. The LAL content increased with increasing pH and temperature, with the LAL content first increasing and then leveling off with increasing time. The amount of LAL formed in the ovalbumin under the alkali treatment condition accounted for approximately 50.51% to 58.68% of the amount of LAL formed in the egg white. Thus, the LAL formed in the ovalbumin was the main source for the LAL in the egg white during the alkali treatment process. Under the alkali treatment condition, free L-serine, L-cysteine, and L-cystine reacted with L-lysine to form LAL; therefore, they are the precursor amino acids of LAL formed in eggs during the alkali treatment process. PMID:26772660

  15. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  18. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 721.3) containing amines. (b) ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject...

  19. Self-discharge in bimetallic cells containing alkali metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, M. S.; Hesson, J. C.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of thermally regenerative bimetallic cells with alkali metal anodes shows a relation between the current drawn and the rate of discharge under open-circuit conditions. The self-discharge rate of the cell is due to the dissolution and ionization of alkali metal atoms in the fused-salt electrolyte

  20. COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-08-01

    A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

  1. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, Wen Y.

    1984-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them (46, 53, 61, 69) with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide (63) to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased (81), preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated (84) to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process (86, 18, 17) where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  2. Electronic states of alkali metal-NTCDA complexes: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    Structures and electronic states of organic-inorganic compound of 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (NTCDA) with alkali metals, Mn(NTCDA) (Mdbnd Li and Na, n = 0-2), have been investigated by means of hybrid density functional theory (DFT) calculations. From the DFT calculations, it was found that the electronic state of the complex at the ground state is characterized by a charge-transfer state expressed by (M)+(NTCDA)-. The alkali metals were bound equivalently to the carbonyl oxygen and ether oxygen atoms of NTCDA. The Cdbnd O double bond character of NTCDA was changed to a C-O single bond like character by the strong interaction of M to the Cdbnd O and O sites. This change was the origin of the red-shift of the IR spectrum. The UV-vis absorption spectra of Mn(NTCDA) were theoretically predicted on the basis of theoretical results.

  3. Petrography study on altered flint aggregate by alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bulteel, D. . E-mail: bulteel@ensm-douai.fr; Rafai, N.; Degrugilliers, P.; Garcia-Diaz, E.

    2004-11-15

    The aim of our study is to improve our understanding of an alkali-silica reaction (ASR) via petrography. We used a chemical concrete subsystem: flint aggregate, portlandite and KOH. The altered flint aggregate is followed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after acid treatment at different intervals. After acid treatment, the observations showed an increase in aggregate porosity and revealed internal degradation of the aggregate. This degradation created amorphous zones. Before acid treatment, the analyses on polished sections by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) enabled visualization of K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} penetration into the aggregate. The appearance of amorphous zones and penetration of positive ions into the aggregate are correlated with the increase in the molar fraction of silanol sites. This degradation is specific to the alkali-silica reaction.

  4. Performance of Straight Steel Fibres Reinforced Alkali Activated Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faris, Meor Ahmad; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Nizar Ismail, Khairul; Muniandy, Ratnasamy; Putra Jaya, Ramadhansyah

    2016-06-01

    This paper focus on the performance of alkali activated concrete produced by using fly ash activated by sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. These alkali activated concrete were reinforced with straight steel fibres with different weight percentage starting from 0 % up to 5 %. Chemical composition of raw material in the production alkali activated concrete which is fly ash was first identified by using X-ray fluorescence. Results reveal there have an effect of straight steel fibres inclusion to the alkali activated concrete. Highest compressive strength of alkali activated concrete which is 67.72 MPa was obtained when 3 % of straight fibres were added. As well as flexural strength, highest flexural strength which is 6.78 MPa was obtained at 3 % of straight steel fibres inclusions.

  5. Effects of alkali treatments on Ag nanowire transparent conductive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunho; Kang, Jun-gu; Eom, Tae-yil; Moon, Bongjin; Lee, Hoo-Jeong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we employ various alkali materials (alkali metals with different base strengths, and ammonia gas and solution) to improve the conductivity of silver nanowire (Ag NW)-networked films. The alkali treatment appears to remove the surface oxide and improve the conductivity. When applied with TiO2 nanoparticles, the treatment appears more effective as the alkalis gather around wire junctions and help them weld to each other via heat emitted from the reduction reaction. The ammonia solution treatment is found to be quick and aggressive, damaging the wires severely in the case of excessive treatment. On the other hand, the ammonia gas treatment seems much less aggressive and does not damage the wires even after a long exposure. The results of this study highlight the effectiveness of the alkali treatment in improving of the conductivity of Ag NW-networked transparent conductive films.

  6. a Theory of the Metallization of Semiconductor Surfaces by Alkali Atoms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Te, Ronald Lim

    Experimental evidence suggest that alkali metal atoms adsorbed on a semiconductor substrate undergo a transition from insulating to metallic at low coverage. The electrons in the adlayer initially occupy isolated exponentially localized atomic orbitals, and become metallic with increasing coverage. Several investigations have shown that the onset of metallization occurs at less than a quarter of a monolayer. Interpretation of second-harmonic data, where the signal increases sharply at 1/6 monolayer, suggests a metallization transition due to the delocalization of surface electrons. This dissertation provides a theoretical framework for understanding the metallization of alkali overlayers. The adlayer is simulated using a rectangular lattice with more than 80,000 sites that are randomly occupied by atomic-like orbitals up to densities commensurate with the different coverages. A new computational technique called dynamic recursion was developed to handle calculations with large numbers of basis orbitals. Each alkali orbital is taken to have the same on-site energy; however, the orbital interactions involve several nearest neighbors and are an exponentially decreasing function of the orbitals' separation. This model gives a tight-binding Hamiltonian with random off-diagonal disorder. An investigation of states at the Fermi level shows a sharp transition between strongly and weakly localized states as a function of coverage. This numerically observed transition is indicative of an Anderson-type metal-insulator transition where disorder causes states of different degrees of localization to cross the Fermi level. The Hamiltonian studied exhibits a delocalization transition for states at the Fermi level, and is proposed as a model for the metallization of the alkali metal atoms adsorbed on a semiconductor substrate. These results are consistent with other work which show the existence of a mobility edge that separates exponentially localized from power-law localized

  7. Characterization of hydrology and water quality of Piceance Creek in the Alkali Flat area, Rio Blanco County, Colorado, March 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Judith C.

    2015-12-07

    Instantaneous streamflow was measured from sites PC20133 to PC23721 during field reconnaissance (February 2012) and during synoptic sampling (March 2012). During both February and March, the study reach from sites PC20133 to PC23721 was a losing reach with net losses that ranged from 0.5 ft3/s (February) to 3 ft3/s (March). Observed changes in streamflow along the study reach helped to depict interactions between groundwater and surface water in the Alkali Flat are

  8. Flocculated meltwater particles control Arctic land-sea fluxes of labile iron.

    PubMed

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Elberling, Bo; Winter, Christian; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2016-01-01

    Glacial meltwater systems supply the Arctic coastal ocean with large volumes of sediment and potentially bioavailable forms of iron, nitrogen and carbon. The particulate fraction of this supply is significant but estuarine losses have been thought to limit the iron supply from land. Here, our results reveal how flocculation (particle aggregation) involving labile iron may increase horizontal transport rather than enhance deposition close to the source. This is shown by combining field observations in Disko Fjord, West Greenland, and laboratory experiments. Our data show how labile iron affects floc sizes, shapes and densities and consequently yields low settling velocities and extended sediment plumes. We highlight the importance of understanding the flocculation mechanisms when examining fluxes of meltwater transported iron in polar regions today and in the future, and we underline the influence of terrestrial hotspots on the nutrient and solute cycles in Arctic coastal waters. PMID:27050673

  9. Flocculated meltwater particles control Arctic land-sea fluxes of labile iron

    PubMed Central

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Elberling, Bo; Winter, Christian; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2016-01-01

    Glacial meltwater systems supply the Arctic coastal ocean with large volumes of sediment and potentially bioavailable forms of iron, nitrogen and carbon. The particulate fraction of this supply is significant but estuarine losses have been thought to limit the iron supply from land. Here, our results reveal how flocculation (particle aggregation) involving labile iron may increase horizontal transport rather than enhance deposition close to the source. This is shown by combining field observations in Disko Fjord, West Greenland, and laboratory experiments. Our data show how labile iron affects floc sizes, shapes and densities and consequently yields low settling velocities and extended sediment plumes. We highlight the importance of understanding the flocculation mechanisms when examining fluxes of meltwater transported iron in polar regions today and in the future, and we underline the influence of terrestrial hotspots on the nutrient and solute cycles in Arctic coastal waters. PMID:27050673

  10. Effect of hydrogen sulfide on phosphorus lability in lake sediments amended with drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Liu, Juanfeng; Pei, Yuansheng

    2013-05-01

    The use of drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) to immobilize P in sediments is a novel approach for lake restoration. However, the lability of P in WTRs-amended sediments may vary with many factors, e.g., hydrogen sulfide content. Earlier works in our laboratory have demonstrated that WTRs are effective sorbents for hydrogen sulfide in water. Thus, we hypothesized that the lability of P in WTRs-amended sediments would not be increased by hydrogen sulfide. The results of this work suggested that this hypothesis was tenable. Compared to the raw sediments, the amended sediments had significantly lower P desorption potential in the presence of hydrogen sulfide at different times, pH and concentrations. Moreover, the amended sediments were also better able to adsorb hydrogen sulfide. In the amended sediments, the P, which was easily desorbed due to the effect of hydrogen sulfide, was transformed into the Fe/Al bound P.

  11. Lability of potentially toxic elements in soils affected by smelting activities.

    PubMed

    Popescu, I; Biasioli, M; Ajmone-Marsan, F; Stănescu, R

    2013-01-01

    Determination of total concentration of potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in soil is not a reliable tool for evaluating potential exposure risk for humans. PTE lability (EDTA, SBET and solution extraction) and chemical speciation (BCR sequential extraction) were investigated for Pb, Cd, Cu, and Zn, as well as how these could be affected by flooding in soils polluted by smelting activities. The flooding experiment was performed in pots from which soil solution was extracted at different time intervals using Rhizon Moisture Samplers. After experiments, the soil was again subjected to the previous extractions (EDTA, SBET, and BCR) in order to reveal the changes which occurred during anoxia. From the results we can conclude that PTE lability is very high and flooding caused the increase in their mobility up to 100% (for bioaccessible Pb). The experiment demonstrated that temporary reducing conditions can increase the risk of contaminants passing to other environmental compartments and the food chain.

  12. Lability of potentially toxic elements in soils affected by smelting activities.

    PubMed

    Popescu, I; Biasioli, M; Ajmone-Marsan, F; Stănescu, R

    2013-01-01

    Determination of total concentration of potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in soil is not a reliable tool for evaluating potential exposure risk for humans. PTE lability (EDTA, SBET and solution extraction) and chemical speciation (BCR sequential extraction) were investigated for Pb, Cd, Cu, and Zn, as well as how these could be affected by flooding in soils polluted by smelting activities. The flooding experiment was performed in pots from which soil solution was extracted at different time intervals using Rhizon Moisture Samplers. After experiments, the soil was again subjected to the previous extractions (EDTA, SBET, and BCR) in order to reveal the changes which occurred during anoxia. From the results we can conclude that PTE lability is very high and flooding caused the increase in their mobility up to 100% (for bioaccessible Pb). The experiment demonstrated that temporary reducing conditions can increase the risk of contaminants passing to other environmental compartments and the food chain. PMID:23127724

  13. Flocculated meltwater particles control Arctic land-sea fluxes of labile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Elberling, Bo; Winter, Christian; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2016-04-01

    Glacial meltwater systems supply the Arctic coastal ocean with large volumes of sediment and potentially bioavailable forms of iron, nitrogen and carbon. The particulate fraction of this supply is significant but estuarine losses have been thought to limit the iron supply from land. Here, our results reveal how flocculation (particle aggregation) involving labile iron may increase horizontal transport rather than enhance deposition close to the source. This is shown by combining field observations in Disko Fjord, West Greenland, and laboratory experiments. Our data show how labile iron affects floc sizes, shapes and densities and consequently yields low settling velocities and extended sediment plumes. We highlight the importance of understanding the flocculation mechanisms when examining fluxes of meltwater transported iron in polar regions today and in the future, and we underline the influence of terrestrial hotspots on the nutrient and solute cycles in Arctic coastal waters.

  14. Biosolids-amended soils: Part II. Chemical lability as a measure of contaminant bioaccessability.

    PubMed

    Schwab, A P; Lewis, K; Banks, M K

    2006-10-01

    Biosolids recycling by amending agricultural soils has increased significantly over the last few decades. The presence of contaminants in small, bioavailable quantities has generated concerns about health threats resulting from accumulation of potential toxins in the food chain. In this study, land application of biosolids was evaluated for environmental risk. Chemical lability tests for metals were used for the test soils and included analyses for water soluble, exchangeable, and metals extractable by the physiologically based extraction test. Chemical extractions detected slight increases in labile metal concentrations for many of the treated soils, particularly those receiving long-term applications of 5 years or more. Significantly higher metal concentrations were observed in the soils that had been exposed to biosolids before the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Washington, D.C.) 503 Rule (U.S. EPA, 2004) was implemented. PMID:17120442

  15. Adhesin degradation accelerates delivery of heat-labile toxin by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Roy, Koushik; Kansal, Rita; Bartels, Scott R; Hamilton, David J; Shaaban, Salwa; Fleckenstein, James M

    2011-08-26

    Many enteric pathogens, including enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), produce one or more serine proteases that are secreted via the autotransporter (or type V) bacterial secretion pathway. These molecules have collectively been referred to as SPATE proteins (serine protease autotransporter of the Enterobacteriaceae). EatA, an autotransporter previously identified in ETEC, possesses a functional serine protease motif within its secreted amino-terminal passenger domain. Although this protein is expressed by many ETEC strains and is highly immunogenic, its precise function is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that EatA degrades a recently characterized adhesin, EtpA, resulting in modulation of bacterial adhesion and accelerated delivery of the heat-labile toxin, a principal ETEC virulence determinant. Antibodies raised against the passenger domain of EatA impair ETEC delivery of labile toxin to epithelial cells suggesting that EatA may be an effective target for vaccine development. PMID:21757737

  16. Relationship between the lability of sediment-bound Cd and its bioaccumulation in edible oyster.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Ramteke, Darwin; Chakraborty, Sucharita; Chennuri, Kartheek; Bardhan, Pratirupa

    2015-11-15

    A linkage between Cd speciation in sediments and its bioaccumulation in edible oyster (Crassostrea sp.) from a tropical estuarine system was established. Bioaccumulation of Cd in edible oyster increased with the increasing lability and dissociation rate constants of Cd-sediment complexes in the bottom sediments. Total Cd concentration in sediment was not a good indicator of Cd-bioavailability. Increasing trace metal competition in sediments increased lability and bioavailability of Cd in the tropical estuarine sediment. Low thermodynamic stability and high bioavailability of Cd in the estuarine sediment were responsible for high bioaccumulation of Cd in edible oysters (3.2-12.2mgkg(-1)) even though the total concentration of Cd in the bottom sediment was low (0.17-0.49mgkg(-1)).

  17. Glycosylation efficiencies on different solid supports using a hydrogenolysis-labile linker

    PubMed Central

    Collot, Mayeul; Eller, Steffen; Weishaupt, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Summary Automated oligosaccharide assembly requires suitable linkers to connect the first monosaccharide to a solid support. A new hydrogenolysis-labile linker that is stable under both acidic and basic conditions was designed, synthesized and coupled to different resins. Glycosylation and cleavage efficiencies on these functionalized solid supports were investigated, and restrictions for the choice of solid support for oligosaccharide synthesis were found. PMID:23400514

  18. Protein degradation by ubiquitin–proteasome system in formation and labilization of contextual conditioning memory

    PubMed Central

    Sol Fustiñana, María; de la Fuente, Verónica; Federman, Noel; Freudenthal, Ramiro

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) of protein degradation has been evaluated in different forms of neural plasticity and memory. The role of UPS in such processes is controversial. Several results support the idea that the activation of this system in memory consolidation is necessary to overcome negative constrains for plasticity. In this case, the inhibition of the UPS during consolidation impairs memory. Similar results were reported for memory reconsolidation. However, in other cases, the inhibition of UPS had no effect on memory consolidation and reconsolidation but impedes the amnesic action of protein synthesis inhibition after retrieval. The last finding suggests a specific action of the UPS inhibitor on memory labilization. However, another interpretation is possible in terms of the synthesis/degradation balance of positive and negative elements in neural plasticity, as was found in the case of long-term potentiation. To evaluate these alternative interpretations, other reconsolidation-interfering drugs than translation inhibitors should be tested. Here we analyzed initially the UPS inhibitor effect in contextual conditioning in crabs. We found that UPS inhibition during consolidation impaired long-term memory. In contrast, UPS inhibition did not affect memory reconsolidation after contextual retrieval but, in fact, impeded memory labilization, blocking the action of drugs that does not affect directly the protein synthesis. To extend these finding to vertebrates, we performed similar experiments in contextual fear memory in mice. We found that the UPS inhibitor in hippocampus affected memory consolidation and blocked memory labilization after retrieval. These findings exclude alternative interpretations to the requirement of UPS in memory labilization and give evidence of this mechanism in both vertebrates and invertebrates. PMID:25135196

  19. Labile and stabilised fractions of soil organic carbon in some intensively cultivated alluvial soils.

    PubMed

    Verma, B C; Datta, S P; Rattan, R K; Singh, A K

    2013-11-01

    The present investigation was undertaken in view of the limited information on the relative proportion of labile and stabilized fractions of soil organic carbon (SOC) in intensively cultivated lands, particularly under tropics. The specific objectives were i) to study the comparative recovery of SOC by different methods of labile carbon estimation under intensively cultivated lands and ii) to evaluate the impact of agricultural practices on carbon management index. For this purpose, in all, 105 surface soil samples were collected from intensively cultivated tube well and sewage irrigated agricultural lands. These samples were analysed for total as well as labile pools of SOC. Results indicated that Walkley and Black, KMnO4-oxidizable and microbial biomass carbon constituted the total SOC to the extent of 10.2 to 47.4, 1.66 to 23.2 and 0.30 to 5.49%, respectively with the corresponding mean values of 26.2, 9.16 and 2.15%. Lability of SOC was considerably higher in sewage irrigated soils than tube well irrigated soils under intensive cropping. Under soybean-wheat, the higher values of carbon management index (CMI) (279 and 286) were associated with the treatments where entire amount of nitrogen was supplied through FYM. Similar results were obtained under rice-wheat, whereas in case of maize-wheat the highest value of CMI was recorded under treatment receiving NPK through chemical fertilizer along with green manure. There was also a significant improvement in CMI under integrated (chemical fertilizer + organics) and chemical fertilizer-treated plots. The values of CMI ranged from 220 to 272 under cultivated lands receiving irrigation through sewage and industrial effluents. PMID:24555339

  20. Bis(haloBODIPYs) with Labile Helicity: Valuable Simple Organic Molecules That Enable Circularly Polarized Luminescence.

    PubMed

    Ray, César; Sánchez-Carnerero, Esther M; Moreno, Florencio; Maroto, Beatriz L; Agarrabeitia, Antonia R; Ortiz, María J; López-Arbeloa, Íñigo; Bañuelos, Jorge; Cohovi, Komlan D; Lunkley, Jamie L; Muller, Gilles; de la Moya, Santiago

    2016-06-20

    Simple organic molecules (SOM) based on bis(haloBODIPY) are shown to enable circularly polarized luminescence (CPL), giving rise to a new structural design for technologically valuable CPL-SOMs. The established design comprises together synthetic accessibility, labile helicity, possibility of reversing the handedness of the circularly polarized emission, and reactive functional groups, making it unique and attractive as advantageous platform for the development of smart CPL-SOMs.

  1. Protein degradation by ubiquitin-proteasome system in formation and labilization of contextual conditioning memory.

    PubMed

    Sol Fustiñana, María; de la Fuente, Verónica; Federman, Noel; Freudenthal, Ramiro; Romano, Arturo

    2014-09-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) of protein degradation has been evaluated in different forms of neural plasticity and memory. The role of UPS in such processes is controversial. Several results support the idea that the activation of this system in memory consolidation is necessary to overcome negative constrains for plasticity. In this case, the inhibition of the UPS during consolidation impairs memory. Similar results were reported for memory reconsolidation. However, in other cases, the inhibition of UPS had no effect on memory consolidation and reconsolidation but impedes the amnesic action of protein synthesis inhibition after retrieval. The last finding suggests a specific action of the UPS inhibitor on memory labilization. However, another interpretation is possible in terms of the synthesis/degradation balance of positive and negative elements in neural plasticity, as was found in the case of long-term potentiation. To evaluate these alternative interpretations, other reconsolidation-interfering drugs than translation inhibitors should be tested. Here we analyzed initially the UPS inhibitor effect in contextual conditioning in crabs. We found that UPS inhibition during consolidation impaired long-term memory. In contrast, UPS inhibition did not affect memory reconsolidation after contextual retrieval but, in fact, impeded memory labilization, blocking the action of drugs that does not affect directly the protein synthesis. To extend these finding to vertebrates, we performed similar experiments in contextual fear memory in mice. We found that the UPS inhibitor in hippocampus affected memory consolidation and blocked memory labilization after retrieval. These findings exclude alternative interpretations to the requirement of UPS in memory labilization and give evidence of this mechanism in both vertebrates and invertebrates.

  2. Elastic properties of alkali-feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waeselmann, N.; Brown, J.; Angel, R. J.; Ross, N.; Kaminsky, W.

    2013-12-01

    New measurements of single crystal elastic moduli for a suite of the alkali feldspars are reported. In order to interpret Earth's seismic structure, knowledge of the elastic properties of constituent minerals is essential. The elasticity of feldspar minerals, despite being the most abundant phase in Earth's crust (estimated to be more than 60%), were previously poorly characterized. All prior seismic and petrologic studies have utilized 50-year-old results, of questionable quality, based on 1-bar measurements on pseudo-single crystals. Alkali-feldspars present a large experimental challenge associated with their structural complexity. In the K-end member (KAlSi3O8) the symmetry is governed by Al/Si ordering, in the Na-end member (NaAlSi3O8) the symmetry is governed by whether or not there is a displacive collapse of the framework independent of the Al/Si ordering. K-feldspars exhibit monoclinic (C2/m) symmetry (necessitating determination of 13 elastic moduli) if disordered and triclinic (C-1) symmetry (21 elastic moduli) if ordered. Exsolution of Na-rich and K-rich phases is ubiquitous in natural samples, making it difficult to find suitable single phase and untwinned samples for study. The small single domain samples selected for this study were previously characterized by x-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis to ensure adequate sample quality. Surface wave velocities were measured on oriented surfaces of natural and synthetic single crystals using impulsively stimulated light scattering. A surface corrugation with a spacing of about 2 microns was impulsively created by the overlap of 100 ps infrared light pulses. The time evolution of the stimulated standing elastic waves was detected by measuring the intensity of diffraction from the surface corrugation of a variably delayed probe pulse. This method allows accurate (better than 0.2%) determination of velocities on samples smaller than 100 microns. The combination of measured surface wave velocities and

  3. Consolidated and labile odor memory are separately encoded within the Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Scheunemann, Lisa; Jost, Eva; Richlitzki, Antje; Day, Jonathan P; Sebastian, Sujith; Thum, Andreas S; Efetova, Marina; Davies, Shireen-A; Schwärzel, Martin

    2012-11-28

    Memories are classified as consolidated (stable) or labile according to whether they withstand amnestic treatment, or not. In contrast to the general prevalence of this classification, its neuronal and molecular basis is poorly understood. Here, we focused on consolidated and labile memories induced after a single cycle training in the Drosophila aversive olfactory conditioning paradigm and we used mutants to define the impact of cAMP signals. At the biochemical level we report that cAMP signals misrelated in either rutabaga (rut) or dunce (dnc) mutants separate between consolidated anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM) and labile anesthesia-sensitive memory (ASM). Those functionally distinct cAMP signals act within different neuronal populations: while rut-dependent cAMP signals act within Kenyon cells (KCs) of the mushroom bodies to support ASM, dnc-sensitive cAMP signals support ARM within antennal lobe local neurons (LNs) and KCs. Collectively, different key positions along the olfactory circuitry seem to get modified during storage of ARM or ASM independently. A precise separation between those functionally distinct cAMP signals seems mandatory to allocate how they support appropriate memories.

  4. Substrate lability and plant activity controls greenhouse gas release from Neotropical peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjogersten, Sofie; Hoyos, Jorge; Lomax, Barry; Turner, Ben; Wright, Emma

    2014-05-01

    Almost one third of global CO2 emissions resulting from land use change and substantial CH4 emissions originate from tropical peatlands. However, our understanding of the controls of CO2 and CH4 release from tropical peatlands are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of peat lability and the activity of the vegetation on gas release using a combination of field and laboratory experiments. We demonstrated that peat lability constrained CH4 production to the surface peat under anaerobic conditions. The presence of plants shifted the C balance from a C source to a C sink with respect to CO2 while the activity of the root system strongly influenced CH4 emissions through its impact on soil O2 inputs. Both field and laboratory data suggest a coupling between the photosynthetic activity of the vegetation and the release of both CO2 and CH4 following the circadian rhythm of the dominant plant functional types. Forest clearance for agriculture resulted in elevated CH4 release, which we attribute in part to the cessation of root O2 inputs to the peat. We conclude that high emissions of CO2 and CH4 from forested tropical peatlands are likely driven by labile C inputs from the vegetation but that root O2 release may limit CH4 emissions.

  5. Evolution of phenotypic plasticity and environmental tolerance of a labile quantitative character in a fluctuating environment.

    PubMed

    Lande, R

    2014-05-01

    Quantitative genetic models of evolution of phenotypic plasticity are used to derive environmental tolerance curves for a population in a changing environment, providing a theoretical foundation for integrating physiological and community ecology with evolutionary genetics of plasticity and norms of reaction. Plasticity is modelled for a labile quantitative character undergoing continuous reversible development and selection in a fluctuating environment. If there is no cost of plasticity, a labile character evolves expected plasticity equalling the slope of the optimal phenotype as a function of the environment. This contrasts with previous theory for plasticity influenced by the environment at a critical stage of early development determining a constant adult phenotype on which selection acts, for which the expected plasticity is reduced by the environmental predictability over the discrete time lag between development and selection. With a cost of plasticity in a labile character, the expected plasticity depends on the cost and on the environmental variance and predictability averaged over the continuous developmental time lag. Environmental tolerance curves derived from this model confirm traditional assumptions in physiological ecology and provide new insights. Tolerance curve width increases with larger environmental variance, but can only evolve within a limited range. The strength of the trade-off between tolerance curve height and width depends on the cost of plasticity. Asymmetric tolerance curves caused by male sterility at high temperature are illustrated. A simple condition is given for a large transient increase in plasticity and tolerance curve width following a sudden change in average environment.

  6. Labile soil carbon inputs mediate the soil microbial community composition and plant residue decomposition rates

    SciTech Connect

    De Graaff, Marie-Anne; Classen, Aimee T; Castro Gonzalez, Hector F; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2010-01-01

    Root carbon (C) inputs may regulate decomposition rates in soil, and in this study we ask: how do labile C inputs regulate decomposition of plant residues, and soil microbial communities? In a 14 d laboratory incubation, we added C compounds often found in root exudates in seven different concentrations (0, 0.7, 1.4, 3.6, 7.2, 14.4 and 21.7 mg C g{sup -1} soil) to soils amended with and without {sup 13}C-labeled plant residue. We measured CO{sub 2} respiration and shifts in relative fungal and bacterial rRNA gene copy numbers using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Increased labile C input enhanced total C respiration, but only addition of C at low concentrations (0.7 mg C g{sup -1}) stimulated plant residue decomposition (+2%). Intermediate concentrations (1.4, 3.6 mg C g{sup -1}) had no impact on plant residue decomposition, while greater concentrations of C (> 7.2 mg C g{sup -1}) reduced decomposition (-50%). Concurrently, high exudate concentrations (> 3.6 mg C g{sup -1}) increased fungal and bacterial gene copy numbers, whereas low exudate concentrations (< 3.6 mg C g{sup -1}) increased metabolic activity rather than gene copy numbers. These results underscore that labile soil C inputs can regulate decomposition of more recalcitrant soil C by controlling the activity and relative abundance of fungi and bacteria.

  7. Alkali oxide-tantalum oxide and alkali oxide-niobium oxide ionic conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R. S.; Parker, H. S.; Brower, W. S.; Minor, D.

    1974-01-01

    A search was made for new cationic conducting phases in alkali-tantalate and niobate systems. The phase equilibrium diagrams were constructed for the six binary systems Nb2O5-LiNbO3, Nb2O5-NaNbO3, Nb2O5-KNbO3, Ta2O5-NaTaO3, Ta2O5-LiTaO3, and Ta2O5-KTaO3. Various other binary and ternary systems were also examined. Pellets of nineteen phases were evaluated (by the sponsoring agency) by dielectric loss measurements. Attempts were made to grow large crystals of eight different phases. The system Ta2O5-KTaO3 contains at least three phases which showed peaks in dielectric loss vs. temperature. All three contain structures related to the tungsten bronzes with alkali ions in non-stoichiometric crystallographic positions.

  8. Interaction between fine-scale landforms and vegetation patterns in alkali landscapes - case study based on remotely sensed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deák, Balázs; Valkó, Orsolya; Tóthmérész, Béla; Alexander, Cici; Mücke, Werner; Kania, Adam; Tamás, János; Heilmeier, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Vertical position is an important driver of vegetation zonation at multiple scales, via determining abiotic environmental parameters like climate, soil properties and water balance. Despite small-scale elevation differences are proven to significantly influence soil salt content and water balance; relationships between elevation and vegetation types are rarely studied in inland alkali landscapes. Alkali landscapes of the Pannonian biogeographical region comprise the most connected salt-affected landscape in continental Europe which provides unique opportunities for studying elevation-vegetation relationships. For linking elevation data with vegetation patterns, remote sensing techniques offer a vital solution. Application of airborne laser scanning is a feasible tool for providing an elevation model of extent areas. Our goal was to test the correlation between fine-scale differences in vertical position and vegetation patterns in inland alkali landscapes by using field vegetation data and elevation data generated using airborne laser scanning. We studied whether the vertical position influences vegetation patterns at the level of main vegetation categories or even at the level of associations. Our study sites were situated in a lowland alkali landscape in Hortobágy National Park (East-Hungary). Associations of the study site can be grouped into four main vegetation categories: (i) loess grasslands, (ii) alkali steppes, (iii) open alkali swards and (iv) alkali meadows. Even though we detected a very limited range in the vertical position (121 cm) of the main vegetation categories; they were well separated along their vertical positions. The detected elevation gradient likely corresponds to environmental gradients (soil type, salt accumulation and water balance). At the level of association types, a more detailed elevation-based distinction was also possible in many cases. Based on the digital terrain model, we revealed a fine-scale vertical vegetation gradient. Our

  9. Heat pipes containing alkali metal working fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A technique for improving high temperature evaporation-condensation heat-transfer devices which have important and unique advantage in terrestrial and space energy processing is described. The device is in the form of a heat pipe comprising a sealed container or envelope which contains a capillary wick. The temperature of one end of the heat pipe is raised by the input of heat from an external heat source which is extremely hot and corrosive. A working fluid of a corrosive alkali metal, such as lithium, sodium, or potassium transfers this heat to a heat receiver remote from the heat source. The container and wick are fabricated from a superalloy containing a small percentage of a corrosion inhibiting or gettering element. Lanthanum, scandium, yttrium, thorium, and hafnium are utilized as the alloying metal.

  10. Volcanic Origin of Alkali Halides on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, L.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The recent observation of NaCl (gas) on Io confirms our earlier prediction that NaCl is produced volcanically. Here we extend our calculations by modeling thermochemical equilibrium of O, S, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, F, Cl, Br, and I as a function of temperature and pressure in a Pele-like volcanic gas with O/S/Na/Cl/K = 1.518/1/0.05/0.04/0.005 and CI chondritic ratios of the other (as yet unobserved) alkalis and halogens. For reference, the nominal temperature and pressure for Pele is 1760 plus or minus 210 K and 0.01 bars based on Galileo data and modeling.

  11. Ionic alkali halide XUV laser feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.T.; Gylys, V.T.; Bower, R.D.; Harris, D.G.; Blauer, J.A.; Turner, C.E.; Hindy, R.N.

    1989-11-10

    The objective of this work is to assess the feasibility of a select set of ionic alkali halide XUV laser concepts by obtaining the relevant kinetic and spectroscopic parameters required for a proof-of-principle and conceptual design. The proposed lasers operate in the 80--200 nm spectral region and do not require input from outside radiation sources for their operation. Frequency up-conversion and frequency mixing techniques and therefore not considered in the work to be described. An experimental and theoretical study of a new type of laser operating in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength region has been conducted. The lasing species are singly ionized alkali halide molecules such as Rb{sup 2+}F{sub {minus}}, Rb{sup 2+}Br{sup {minus}} and Cs{sup 2+}F{sup {minus}}. These species are similar in electronic structure to the rare gas halide excimers, such as XeF and Krf, except that the ionic molecules emit at wavelengths of 80--200 nm, much shorter than the conventional rare-gas halide excimer laser. The radiative lifetime of these molecules are typically near 1 ns, which is about an order of magnitude shorter than that for rare-gas halide systems. The values of the cross section for stimulated emission are on the order of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}16}cm{sup 2}. Because of the fundamental similarity to existing UV lasers, these systems show promise as a high power, efficient XUV lasers. 55 refs., 50 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Impact of Alkali Source on Vitrification of SRS High Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    LAMBERT, D. P.; MILLER, D. H.; PEELER, D. K.; SMITH, M. E.; STONE, M. E.

    2005-09-08

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Savannah River Site is currently immobilizing high level nuclear waste sludge by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The processing strategy involves blending a large batch of sludge into a feed tank, washing the sludge to reduce the amount of soluble species, then processing the large ''sludge batch'' through the DWPF. Each sludge batch is tested by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using simulants and tests with samples of the radioactive waste to ''qualify'' the batch prior to processing in the DWPF. The DWPF pretreats the sludge by first acidifying the sludge with nitric and formic acid. The ratio of nitric to formic acid is adjusted as required to target a final glass composition that is slightly reducing (the target is for {approx}20% of the iron to have a valence of two in the glass). The formic acid reduces the mercury in the feed to elemental mercury which is steam stripped from the feed. After a concentration step, the glass former (glass frit) is added as a 50 wt% slurry and the batch is concentrated to approximately 50 wt% solids. The feed slurry is then fed to a joule heated melter maintained at 1150 C. The glass must meet both processing (e.g., viscosity and liquidus temperature) and product performance (e.g., durability) constraints The alkali content of the final waste glass is a critical parameter that affects key glass properties (such as durability) as well as the processing characteristics of the waste sludge during the pretreatment and vitrification processes. Increasing the alkali content of the glass has been shown to improve the production rate of the DWPF, but the total alkali in the final glass is limited by constraints on glass durability and viscosity. Two sources of alkali contribute to the final alkali content of the glass: sodium salts in the waste supernate and sodium and lithium oxides in the glass frit added during pretreatment processes. Sodium salts in the waste supernate

  13. Molecular insights into the microbial formation of marine dissolved organic matter: recalcitrant or labile?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, B. P.; Kattner, G.; Witt, M.; Passow, U.

    2014-08-01

    The degradation of marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important control variable in the global carbon cycle. For our understanding of the kinetics of organic matter cycling in the ocean, it is crucial to achieve a mechanistic and molecular understanding of its transformation processes. A long-term microbial experiment was performed to follow the production of non-labile DOM by marine bacteria. Two different glucose concentrations and dissolved algal exudates were used as substrates. We monitored the bacterial abundance, concentrations of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), nutrients, amino acids and transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) for 2 years. The molecular characterization of extracted DOM was performed by ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) after 70 days and after ∼2 years of incubation. Although glucose quickly degraded, a non-labile DOC background (5-9% of the initial DOC) was generated in the glucose incubations. Only 20% of the organic carbon from the algal exudate degraded within the 2 years of incubation. The degradation rates for the non-labile DOC background in the different treatments varied between 1 and 11 μmol DOC L-1 year-1. Transparent exopolymer particles, which are released by microorganisms, were produced during glucose degradation but decreased back to half of the maximum concentration within less than 3 weeks (degradation rate: 25 μg xanthan gum equivalents L-1 d-1) and were below detection in all treatments after 2 years. Additional glucose was added after 2 years to test whether labile substrate can promote the degradation of background DOC (co-metabolism; priming effect). A priming effect was not observed but the glucose addition led to a slight increase of background DOC. The molecular analysis demonstrated that DOM generated during glucose degradation differed appreciably from DOM transformed during the degradation of the algal exudates. Our

  14. Assessing the Selectivity of Extractant Solutions for Recovering Labile Arsenic Associated with Iron (Hydr)oxides and Sulfides in Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequential extractions can provide analytical constraints on the identification of mineral phases that control arsenic speciation in sediments. Model solids were used in this study to evaluate different solutions designed to extract arsenic from relatively labile solid phases. ...

  15. Ultrasonic coal washing to leach alkali elements from coals.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, S; Reddy, V Midhun; Nagarajan, R

    2015-11-01

    Deposition of fly ash particles onto heat-transfer surfaces is often one of the reasons for unscheduled shut-downs of coal-fired boilers. Fouling deposits encountered in convective sections of a boiler are characterized by arrival of ash particles in solidified (solid) state. Fouling is most frequently caused by condensation and chemical reaction of alkali vapors with the deposited ash particles creating a wet surface conducive to collect impacting ash particles. Hence, the amount of alkali elements present in coals, which, in turn, is available in the flue gas as condensable vapors, determines the formation and growth of fouling deposits. In this context, removal of alkali elements becomes vital when inferior coals having high-ash content are utilized for power generation. With the concept of reducing alkali elements present in a coal entering the combustor, whereby the fouling deposits can either be minimized or be weakened due to absence of alkali gluing effect, the ultrasonic leaching of alkali elements from coals is investigated in this study. Ultrasonic water-washing and chemical-washing, in comparison with agitation, are studied in order to estimate the intensification of the alkali removal process by sonication. PMID:26186840

  16. Alkali-activated cementitious materials: Mechanisms, microstructure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weimin

    The goal of this study was to examine the activation reaction, microstructure, properties, identify the mechanisms of activation, and achieve an enhanced understanding of activation processes occurring during the synthesis of alkali activated cementitious materials (AAC). The discussions classify the following categories. (1) alkali activated slag cement; (2) alkali activated portland-slag cement; (3) alkali activated fly ash-slag cement; (4) alkali activated pozzolana-lime cement; (5) alkali activated pozzolana cement. The activators involved are NaOH, KOH; Nasb2SOsb4;\\ Nasb2COsb3;\\ CaSOsb4, and soluble silicate of sodium and potassium. The effect of alkali activation on the microstructure of these materials were analyzed at the micro-nanometer scale by SEM, EDS, ESEM, and TEM. Also sp{29}Si and sp{27}Al MAS-NMR, IR, Raman, TGA, and DTA were performed to characterize the phase in these systems. Slag, fly ash, silica fume, as well as blended cements containing mixtures of these and other components were characterized. A set of ordinary portland cement paste samples served as a control. This study confirmed that AAC materials have great potential because they could generate very early high strength, greater durability and high performance. Among the benefits to be derived from this research is a better understanding of the factors that control concrete properties when using AAC materials, and by controlling the chemistry and processing to produce desired microstructures and properties, as well as their durability.

  17. Controlled in-situ dissolution of an alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jeffrey Donald; Dooley, Kirk John; Tolman, David Donald

    2012-09-11

    A method for the controllable dissolution of one or more alkali metals from a vessel containing a one or more alkali metals and/or one or more partially passivated alkali metals. The vessel preferably comprising a sodium, NaK or other alkali metal-cooled nuclear reactor that has been used. The alkali metal, preferably sodium, potassium or a combination thereof, in the vessel is exposed to a treatment liquid, preferably an acidic liquid, more preferably citric acid. Preferably, the treatment liquid is maintained in continuous motion relative to any surface of unreacted alkali metal with which the treatment liquid is in contact. The treatment liquid is preferably pumped into the vessel containing the one or more alkali metals and the resulting fluid is extracted and optionally further processed. Preferably, the resulting off-gases are processed by an off-gas treatment system and the resulting liquids are processed by a liquid disposal system. In one preferred embodiment, an inert gas is pumped into the vessel along with the treatment liquid.

  18. Alkali elemental and potassium isotopic compositions of Semarkona chondrules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, C.M. O'D.; Grossman, J.N.

    2005-01-01

    We report measurements of K isotope ratios in 28 Semarkona chondrules with a wide range of petrologic types and bulk compositions as well as the compositions of CPX-mesostasis pairs in 17 type I Semarkona chondrules, including two chondrules with radial alkali zonation and 19 type II chondrules. Despite the wide range in K/Al ratios, no systematic variations in K isotopic compositions were found. Semarkona chondrules do not record a simple history of Rayleigh-type loss of K. Experimentally determined evaporation rates suggest that considerable alkali evaporation would have occurred during chondrule formation. Nevertheless, based on Na CPX-mesostasis distribution coefficients, the alkali contents of the cores of most chondrules in Semarkona were probably established at the time of final crystallization. However, Na CPX-mesostasis distribution coefficients also show that alkali zonation in type I Semarkona chondrules was produced by entry of alkalis after solidification, probably during parent body alteration. This alkali metasomatism may have gone to completion in some chondrules. Our preferred explanation for the lack of systematic isotopic enrichments, even in alkali depleted type I chondrule cores, is that they exchanged with the ambient gas as they cooled. ?? The Meteoritical Society, 2005.

  19. Treatment of PCR products with exonuclease I and heat-labile alkaline phosphatase improves the visibility of combined bisulfite restriction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Kousuke; Emoto, Noriko; Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Kawakami, Masanori; Kage, Hidenori; Nagase, Takahide; Ohishi, Nobuya; Takai, Daiya

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Incubating PCR products at a high temperature causes smears in gel electrophoresis. {yields} Smears interfere with the interpretation of methylation analysis using COBRA. {yields} Treatment with exonuclease I and heat-labile alkaline phosphatase eliminates smears. {yields} The elimination of smears improves the visibility of COBRA. -- Abstract: DNA methylation plays a vital role in the regulation of gene expression. Abnormal promoter hypermethylation is an important mechanism of inactivating tumor suppressor genes in human cancers. Combined bisulfite restriction analysis (COBRA) is a widely used method for identifying the DNA methylation of specific CpG sites. Here, we report that exonuclease I and heat-labile alkaline phosphatase can be used for PCR purification for COBRA, improving the visibility of gel electrophoresis after restriction digestion. This improvement is observed when restriction digestion is performed at a high temperature, such as 60 {sup o}C or 65 {sup o}C, with BstUI and TaqI, respectively. This simple method can be applied instead of DNA purification using spin columns or phenol/chloroform extraction. It can also be applied to other situations when PCR products are digested by thermophile-derived restriction enzymes, such as PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis.

  20. Contact-facilitated drug delivery with Sn2 lipase labile prodrugs optimize targeted lipid nanoparticle drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pham, Christine T N; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Tomasson, Michael H; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Sn2 lipase labile phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery offer an important advancement in Nanomedicine. Many drugs incorporated into nanosystems, targeted or not, are substantially lost during circulation to the target. However, favorably altering the pharmacokinetics and volume of distribution of systemic drug delivery can offer greater efficacy with lower toxicity, leading to new prolonged-release nanoexcipients. However, the concept of achieving Paul Erhlich's inspired vision of a 'magic bullet' to treat disease has been largely unrealized due to unstable nanomedicines, nanosystems achieving low drug delivery to target cells, poor intracellular bioavailability of endocytosed nanoparticle payloads, and the substantial biological barriers of extravascular particle penetration into pathological sites. As shown here, Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery prevent premature drug diffusional loss during circulation and increase target cell bioavailability. The Sn2 phospholipid prodrug approach applies equally well for vascular constrained lipid-encapsulated particles and micelles the size of proteins that penetrate through naturally fenestrated endothelium in the bone marrow or thin-walled venules of an inflamed microcirculation. At one time Nanomedicine was considered a 'Grail Quest' by its loyal opposition and even many in the field adsorbing the pains of a long-learning curve about human biology and particles. However, Nanomedicine with innovations like Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs has finally made 'made the turn' toward meaningful translational success.

  1. Contact-facilitated drug delivery with Sn2 lipase labile prodrugs optimize targeted lipid nanoparticle drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pham, Christine TN; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Tomasson, Michael H; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Sn2 lipase labile phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery offer an important advancement in Nanomedicine. Many drugs incorporated into nanosystems, targeted or not, are substantially lost during circulation to the target. However, favorably altering the pharmacokinetics and volume of distribution of systemic drug delivery can offer greater efficacy with lower toxicity, leading to new prolonged-release nanoexcipients. However, the concept of achieving Paul Erhlich's inspired vision of a ‘magic bullet’ to treat disease has been largely unrealized due to unstable nanomedicines, nanosystems achieving low drug delivery to target cells, poor intracellular bioavailability of endocytosed nanoparticle payloads, and the substantial biological barriers of extravascular particle penetration into pathological sites. As shown here, Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery prevent premature drug diffusional loss during circulation and increase target cell bioavailability. The Sn2 phospholipid prodrug approach applies equally well for vascular constrained lipid-encapsulated particles and micelles the size of proteins that penetrate through naturally fenestrated endothelium in the bone marrow or thin-walled venules of an inflamed microcirculation. At one time Nanomedicine was considered a ‘Grail Quest’ by its loyal opposition and even many in the field adsorbing the pains of a long-learning curve about human biology and particles. However, Nanomedicine with innovations like Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs has finally made ‘made the turn’ toward meaningful translational success. PMID:26296541

  2. Contact-facilitated drug delivery with Sn2 lipase labile prodrugs optimize targeted lipid nanoparticle drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pham, Christine T N; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Tomasson, Michael H; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Sn2 lipase labile phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery offer an important advancement in Nanomedicine. Many drugs incorporated into nanosystems, targeted or not, are substantially lost during circulation to the target. However, favorably altering the pharmacokinetics and volume of distribution of systemic drug delivery can offer greater efficacy with lower toxicity, leading to new prolonged-release nanoexcipients. However, the concept of achieving Paul Erhlich's inspired vision of a 'magic bullet' to treat disease has been largely unrealized due to unstable nanomedicines, nanosystems achieving low drug delivery to target cells, poor intracellular bioavailability of endocytosed nanoparticle payloads, and the substantial biological barriers of extravascular particle penetration into pathological sites. As shown here, Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery prevent premature drug diffusional loss during circulation and increase target cell bioavailability. The Sn2 phospholipid prodrug approach applies equally well for vascular constrained lipid-encapsulated particles and micelles the size of proteins that penetrate through naturally fenestrated endothelium in the bone marrow or thin-walled venules of an inflamed microcirculation. At one time Nanomedicine was considered a 'Grail Quest' by its loyal opposition and even many in the field adsorbing the pains of a long-learning curve about human biology and particles. However, Nanomedicine with innovations like Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs has finally made 'made the turn' toward meaningful translational success. PMID:26296541

  3. Narrowband Angular Reflectance Properties of the Alkali Flats at White Sands, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, Charles H.; LeCroy, Stuart R.; Wheeler, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    Results from helicopter measurements of the angular properties of surface reflectance for the alkali flats regions of the White Sands Missile Range are presented for the wavelength interval of 0.4 to 0.85 microns. This work was performed to allow accurate radiative transfer calculations over the region. Detailed tables and interpolation equations are given that permit other investigators to perform satellite calibrations over the alkali flats site. The effects of wavelength and soil moisture on narrowband angular reflectance are also investigated. Although there is a spectral variation in surface albedo, there is little spectral effect in Anisotropic Factor except in the forward scattering peak at solar zenith angles greater than 60 deg. The magnitude of the forward-scattering peak is also sensitive to soil moisture, with wet conditions causing a larger peak. The significance of this result is that angular reflectance properties at the center of the alkali flats usually will be different than those at the flats edge because moisture differences typically exist.

  4. Alkali Cation Chelation in Cold β-O-4 Tetralignol Complexes.

    PubMed

    DeBlase, Andrew F; Dziekonski, Eric T; Hopkins, John R; Burke, Nicole L; Sheng, Huaming; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I; McLuckey, Scott A; Zwier, Timothy S

    2016-09-15

    We employ cold ion spectroscopy (UV action and IR-UV double resonance) in the gas phase to unravel the qualitative structural elements of G-type alkali metal cationized (X = Li(+), Na(+), K(+)) tetralignol complexes connected by β-O-4 linkages. The conformation-specific spectroscopy reveals a variety of conformers, each containing distinct infrared spectra in the OH stretching region, building on recent studies of the neutral and alkali metal cationized β-O-4 dimers. The alkali metal ion is discovered to bind in penta-coordinate pockets to ether and OH groups involving at least two of the three β-O-4 linkages. Different binding sites are distinguished from one another by the number of M(+)···OH···O interactions present in the binding pocket, leading to characteristic IR transitions appearing below 3550 cm(-1). This interaction is mitigated in the major conformer of the K(+) adduct, demonstrating a clear impact of the size of the charge center on the three-dimensional structure of the tetramer. PMID:27539533

  5. Electrochemical cell utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Virkar, Anil V.; Miller, Gerald R.

    1983-11-04

    An improved electrochemical cell comprising an additive-modified molten alkali metal electrode-reactant and/or electrolyte is disclosed. Various electrochemical cells employing a molten alkali metal, e.g., sodium, electrode in contact with a cationically conductive ceramic membrane experience a lower resistance and a lower temperature coefficient of resistance whenever small amounts of selenium are present at the interface of the electrolyte and the molten alkali metal. Further, cells having small amounts of selenium present at the electrolyte-molten metal interface exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte under long term cycling conditions.

  6. Bilayer resist system utilizing alkali-developable organosilicon positive photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nate, Kazuo; Mizushima, Akiko; Sugiyama, Hisashi

    1991-06-01

    A bi-layer resist system utilizing an alkali-developable organosilicon positive photoresist (OSPR) has been developed. The composite prepared from an alkali-soluble organosilicon polymer, poly(p- hydroxybenzylsilsesquioxane) and naphthoquinone diazide becomes a alkali-developable positive photoresist which is sensitive to UV (i line - g line) region, and exhibited high oxygen reactive ion etching (O2 RIE) resistance. The sensitivity and the resolution of OSPR are almost the same as those of conventional novolac-based positive photoresists. The bi-layer resist system utilizing OSPR as the top imaging layer gave fine patterns of underlayers with high aspect ratio easily.

  7. High temperature alkali corrosion of ceramics in coal gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, G.R.; Sun, T.; Brown, J.J.

    1992-02-24

    The high temperature alkali corrosion kinetics of SiC have been systematically investigated from 950 to 1100[degrees]C at 0.63 vol % alkali vapor concentration. The corrosion rate in the presence of alkaliis approximately 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 5] times faster than the oxidation rate of SiC in air. The activation energy associated with the alkali corrosion is 406 kJ/mol, indicating a highly temperature-dependent reaction rate. The rate-controlling step of the overall reaction is likely to be the dissolution of silica in the sodium silicate liquid, based on the oxygen diffusivity data.

  8. Increasing Class C fly ash reduces alkali silica reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, J.K.

    2007-07-01

    Contrary to earlier studies, it has been found that incremental additions of Class C fly ash do reduce alkali silica reactivity (ASR), in highly reactive, high alkali concrete mixes. AST can be further reduced by substituting 5% metakaolin or silica fume for the aggregate in concrete mixes with high (more than 30%) Class C fly ash substitution. The paper reports results of studies using Class C fly ash from the Labadie Station plant in Missouri which typically has between 1.3 and 1.45% available alkalis by ASTM C311. 7 figs.

  9. Structures and thermodynamics of the mixed alkali alanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graetz, J.; Lee, Y.; Reilly, J. J.; Park, S.; Vogt, T.

    2005-05-01

    The thermodynamics and structural properties of the hexahydride alanates (M2M'AlH6) with the elpasolite structure have been investigated. A series of mixed alkali alanates ( Na2LiAlH6, K2LiAlH6 , and K2NaAlH6 ) were synthesized and found to reversibly absorb and desorb hydrogen without the need for a catalyst. Pressure-composition isotherms were measured to investigate the thermodynamics of the absorption and desorption reactions with hydrogen. Isotherms for catalyzed (4 mol% TiCl3 ) and uncatalyzed Na2LiAlH6 exhibited an increase in kinetics, but no change in the bulk thermodynamics with the addition of a dopant. A structural analysis using synchrotron x-ray diffraction showed that these compounds favor the Fm3¯m space group with the smaller ion (M') occupying an octahedral site. These results demonstrate that appropriate cation substitutions can be used to stabilize or destabilize the material and may provide an avenue to improving the unfavorable thermodynamics of a number of materials with promising gravimetric hydrogen densities.

  10. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, and 3d transition metal atoms on silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, H.; Peeters, F. M.

    2013-02-01

    The adsorption characteristics of alkali, alkaline-earth, and transition metal adatoms on silicene, a graphene-like monolayer structure of silicon are analyzed by means of first-principles calculations. In contrast to graphene, interaction between the metal atoms and the silicene surface is quite strong due to its highly reactive buckled hexagonal structure. In addition to structural properties, we also calculate the electronic band dispersion, net magnetic moment, charge transfer, work function, and dipole moment of the metal adsorbed silicene sheets. Alkali metals, Li, Na, and K, adsorb to hollow sites without any lattice distortion. As a consequence of the significant charge transfer from alkalis to silicene, metalization of silicene takes place. Trends directly related to atomic size, adsorption height, work function, and dipole moment of the silicene/alkali adatom system are also revealed. We found that the adsorption of alkaline-earth metals on silicene is entirely different from their adsorption on graphene. The adsorption of Be, Mg, and Ca turns silicene into a narrow gap semiconductor. Adsorption characteristics of eight transition metals Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Mo, and W are also investigated. As a result of their partially occupied d orbital, transition metals show diverse structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. Upon the adsorption of transition metals, depending on the adatom type and atomic radius, the system can exhibit metal, half-metal, and semiconducting behavior. For all metal adsorbates, the direction of the charge transfer is from adsorbate to silicene, because of its high surface reactivity. Our results indicate that the reactive crystal structure of silicene provides a rich playground for functionalization at nanoscale.

  11. Warming Alters the Routing of Labile and Slower-Turnover Carbon Through Distinct Microbial Groups in Boreal Forest Organic Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, S. E.; Billings, S. A.; Lane, C. S.; Li, J.; Fogel, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Increased temperature has been linked to greater losses of soil organic carbon (SOC) via microbial respiration and potentially greater relative increases in mineralization of more complex, slow-turnover SOC pools. Though critical for predicting climate feedbacks, our mechanistic understanding of these temperature responses remains limited. Here we report results from a warming experiment using organic horizon soils from two mesic, boreal forest sites with contrasting climate regimes. We replaced extant Oi soil sub-horizons with another coniferous Oi possessing a distinct δ13C signature, and tracked incorporation of the replaced Oi-C and, by difference, the more humified Oea sub-horizon C into microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) following 120 day incubations at 15C and 20C. We demonstrate how regional climate (site effects) and experimental warming (temperature effects) influence microbial incorporation of Oi versus slower-turnover Oea SOC pools. Congruent with increased mineralization in these soils, the quantity of total PLFA, a proxy for microbial biomass, increased by 32-60% with experimental warming and was 20-42% higher within soils from the warmer versus cooler site. The proportion of Gram-positive bacterial PLFA-C derived from Oi-C more than doubled and coincided with a reduction in the incorporation of Oi-C into fungal relative to bacterial PLFA with laboratory warming and in soils from the warmer site. In conjunction with the relative decrease in fungal incorporation of Oi-C, warming led to an increase of 22-31% in the proportion of fungal PLFA-C derived from the Oea-C. This is consistent with site effects and an increased incorporation of this slower-turnover SOC pool in soils from the warmer site. The increase in microbial biomass and shift in routing of Oi and Oea pools through PLFA indicate that warming increases fungal mineralization of more slow-turnover C pools in these boreal organic soils. This increased exploitation of low C:N Oea by fungi

  12. The Stable and Radio- Carbon Isotopic Content of Labile and Refractory Carbon in Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNichol, A. P.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Gerlach, D. S.; Hayes, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    Studies of the isotopic content of atmospheric particulate matter are hampered by difficulties in chemically defining the pools of carbon and analytically isolating the different pools. We are conducting studies on reference materials and atmospheric aerosol samples to develop a method to measure stable and radio- carbon isotopes on the labile and refractory carbon. We are using a flow-through combustion system that allows us to combust, collect and measure the isotopic content of the gases produced at all stages of heating/oxidizing. We compare our results to those measured using a chemothermal oxidation method (CTO) (Gustafsson et al., 2001). In this method, refractory carbon is defined as the material remaining after pre- combusting a sample at 375°C in the presence of oxygen for 24 hours. The reference materials are diesel soot, apple leaves and a hybrid of the two (DiesApple), all from NIST. These provide carbon with two well-defined fractions -- the soot provides refractory carbon that is radiocarbon dead and the apple leaves provide organic carbon that is radiocarbon modern. Radiocarbon results from DiesApple indicate that the "refractory" carbon defined by the CTO method is actually a mixture of old and modern carbon that contains over 25% modern carbon. This suggests that charred material formed from the apples leaves during the pre-combustion step is contributing to the fraction we identify as refractory carbon. We are studying this by analyzing the individual materials and the mixture using our flow-through system. First results with this system indicate that the refractory fraction trapped from the DiesApple contains much less modern carbon than the CTO method, less than 7%. We will present detailed concentration and isotopic results of the generation of carbon dioxide during programmed combustion of each of the reference materials. We studied the radiocarbon content of both the total carbon (TC) and refractory carbon in the fine particulate matter (PM

  13. Electric field-induced softening of alkali silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, C.; Heffner, W.; Jain, H.; Tessarollo, R.; Raj, R.

    2015-11-02

    Motivated by the advantages of two-electrode flash sintering over normal sintering, we have investigated the effect of an external electric field on the viscosity of glass. The results show remarkable electric field-induced softening (EFIS), as application of DC field significantly lowers the softening temperature of glass. To establish the origin of EFIS, the effect is compared for single vs. mixed-alkali silicate glasses with fixed mole percentage of the alkali ions such that the mobility of alkali ions is greatly reduced while the basic network structure does not change much. The sodium silicate and lithium-sodium mixed alkali silicate glasses were tested mechanically in situ under compression in external electric field ranging from 0 to 250 V/cm in specially designed equipment. A comparison of data for different compositions indicates a complex mechanical response, which is observed as field-induced viscous flow due to a combination of Joule heating, electrolysis and dielectric breakdown.

  14. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, M.M.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.

    1995-08-22

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  15. Alkali activation of halloysite for adsorption and release of ofloxacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Junping; Wang, Aiqin

    2013-12-01

    Halloysite nanotubes are promising vehicles for the controlled release of drug molecules. Here, we systematically investigated the effects of alkali activation on the physicochemical properties, structure and morphology of halloysite nanotubes by XRD, FTIR, SEM and TEM, etc. Afterwards, the adsorption and in vitro release properties of halloysite for cationic ofloxacin (OFL) were evaluated. The results indicate that alkali activation dissolves amorphous aluminosilicate, free silica and alumina, which results in the increase in pore volume and pore size. OFL is adsorbed onto halloysite via electrostatic interaction and complexation. Alkali activation could increase the adsorption capacity of halloysite for OFL and prolong release of the adsorbed OFL compared with the natural halloysite. Thus, alkali activation of halloysite is an effective protocol to improve the adsorption and prolong release for cationic drug molecules.

  16. Hall Determination of Atomic Radii of Alkali Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    I will propose here an alternative method for determining atomic radii of alkali metals based on the Hall measurements of their free electron densities and the knowledge of their crystal structure. (Contains 2 figures.)

  17. Effect of cavitation on removal of alkali elements from coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivalli, H.; Nirmal, L.; Nagarajan, R.

    2015-12-01

    The main impurities in coal are sulphur, ash and alkali. On combustion, the volatile forms of these impurities are either condensed on the boilers, or emitted in the form of potentially hazardous gases. The alkali elements present in coal help the fly ash particles adhere to boiler surfaces by providing a wet surface on which collection of these particles can take place. Use of ultrasonic techniques in cleaning of coal has stirred interest among researchers in recent times. Extraction of alkali elements by cavitation effect using low-frequency ultrasound, in the presence of reagents (HNO3 and H2O2) is reported in this paper. Powdered coal was dissolved with the reagent and exposed to ultrasonic fields of various frequencies at different time intervals. The treated solution is filtered and tested for alkali levels.

  18. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, Marca M.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard

    1995-01-01

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  19. Alkali absorption and citrate excretion in calcium nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakhaee, K.; Williams, R. H.; Oh, M. S.; Padalino, P.; Adams-Huet, B.; Whitson, P.; Pak, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The role of net gastrointestinal (GI) alkali absorption in the development of hypocitraturia was investigated. The net GI absorption of alkali was estimated from the difference between simple urinary cations (Ca, Mg, Na, and K) and anions (Cl and P). In 131 normal subjects, the 24 h urinary citrate was positively correlated with the net GI absorption of alkali (r = 0.49, p < 0.001). In 11 patients with distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA), urinary citrate excretion was subnormal relative to net GI alkali absorption, with data from most patients residing outside the 95% confidence ellipse described for normal subjects. However, the normal relationship between urinary citrate and net absorbed alkali was maintained in 11 patients with chronic diarrheal syndrome (CDS) and in 124 stone-forming patients devoid of RTA or CDS, half of whom had "idiopathic" hypocitraturia. The 18 stone-forming patients without RTA or CDS received potassium citrate (30-60 mEq/day). Both urinary citrate and net GI alkali absorption increased, yielding a significantly positive correlation (r = 0.62, p < 0.0001), with the slope indistinguishable from that of normal subjects. Thus, urinary citrate was normally dependent on the net GI absorption of alkali. This dependence was less marked in RTA, confirming the renal origin of hypocitraturia. However, the normal dependence was maintained in CDS and in idiopathic hypocitraturia, suggesting that reduced citrate excretion was largely dietary in origin as a result of low net alkali absorption (from a probable relative deficiency of vegetables and fruits or a relative excess of animal proteins).

  20. Electrochemical cell having an alkali-metal-nitrate electrode

    DOEpatents

    Roche, M.F.; Preto, S.K.

    1982-06-04

    A power-producing secondary electrochemical cell includes a molten alkali metal as the negative-electrode material and a molten-nitrate salt as the positive-electrode material. The molten material in the respective electrodes are separated by a solid barrier of alkali-metal-ion conducting material. A typical cell includes active materials of molten sodium separated from molten sodium nitrate and other nitrates in mixture by a layer of sodium ..beta..'' alumina.

  1. Labile Low-Molecular-Mass Metal Complexes in Mitochondria: Trials and Tribulations of a Burgeoning Field.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Paul A; Moore, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    Iron, copper, zinc, manganese, cobalt, and molybdenum play important roles in mitochondrial biochemistry, serving to help catalyze reactions in numerous metalloenzymes. These metals are also found in labile "pools" within mitochondria. Although the composition and cellular function of these pools are largely unknown, they are thought to be comprised of nonproteinaceous low-molecular-mass (LMM) metal complexes. Many problems must be solved before these pools can be fully defined, especially problems stemming from the lability of such complexes. This lability arises from inherently weak coordinate bonds between ligands and metals. This is an advantage for catalysis and trafficking, but it makes characterization difficult. The most popular strategy for investigating such pools is to detect them using chelator probes with fluorescent properties that change upon metal coordination. Characterization is limited because of the inevitable destruction of the complexes during their detection. Moreover, probes likely react with more than one type of metal complex, confusing analyses. An alternative approach is to use liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). With help from a previous lab member, the authors recently developed an LC-ICP-MS approach to analyze LMM extracts from yeast and mammalian mitochondria. They detected several metal complexes, including Fe580, Fe1100, Fe1500, Cu5000, Zn1200, Zn1500, Mn1100, Mn2000, Co1200, Co1500, and Mo780 (numbers refer to approximate masses in daltons). Many of these may be used to metalate apo-metalloproteins as they fold inside the organelle. The LC-based approach also has challenges, e.g., in distinguishing artifactual metal complexes from endogenous ones, due to the fact that cells must be disrupted to form extracts before they are passed through chromatography columns prior to analysis. Ultimately, both approaches will be needed to characterize these intriguing complexes and to

  2. Interactions between recalcitrant and labile organic carbon in streams - Can stream biofilms mediate a priming effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, M. M.; Wagner, K.; Herberg, E. R.; Burns, N. R.; Wanek, W.; Battin, T. J.

    2012-04-01

    Inland waters - such as streams, rivers and lakes - are increasingly recognized as important components in the global carbon cycle. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in these systems is diverse in structure, origin and reactivity, and a fraction of it is regarded as recalcitrant to microbial degradation. In soils, degradation of recalcitrant carbon is often controlled by the availability of labile carbon sources. This is linked to the priming effect (PE). Mounting evidence suggests that PE is also important in aquatic ecosystems but there are so far very few studies addressing this topic. Biofilms are vital components of aquatic ecosystems. In stream biofilms, heterotrophic bacteria and algae coexist in close proximity, exposing the bacteria to both recalcitrant DOC of terrestrial origin and labile organic carbon from the algae. We hypothesize that this makes stream biofilms hotspots for PE. We used plug-flow bioreactors inoculated with natural stream biofilm bacterial communities to test the potential of a priming effect in aquatic ecosystems. The bioreactors were amended with an isotope-labeled plant extract serving as a model of recalcitrant DOC in streams. Labile carbon sources, in the form of glucose and an algal extract were added to induce PE. Nitrate and phosphate were also added to assess the role of these inorganic nutrients on carbon uptake. Microbial uptake of the different carbon sources was monitored by measuring the concentrations and isotopic ratios of respired CO2, biomass and DOC. Our results suggest that the priming effect plays a role in stream carbon cycling and that it is potentially an important process in other aquatic ecosystems.

  3. Core-Shell Hydrogel Particles Harvest, Concentrate and Preserve Labile Low Abundance Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Caterina; Patanarut, Alexis; George, Tony; Bishop, Barney; Zhou, Weidong; Fredolini, Claudia; Ross, Mark M.; Espina, Virginia; Pellacani, Giovanni; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Liotta, Lance A.; Luchini, Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    Background The blood proteome is thought to represent a rich source of biomarkers for early stage disease detection. Nevertheless, three major challenges have hindered biomarker discovery: a) candidate biomarkers exist at extremely low concentrations in blood; b) high abundance resident proteins such as albumin mask the rare biomarkers; c) biomarkers are rapidly degraded by endogenous and exogenous proteinases. Methodology and Principal Findings Hydrogel nanoparticles created with a N-isopropylacrylamide based core (365 nm)-shell (167 nm) and functionalized with a charged based bait (acrylic acid) were studied as a technology for addressing all these biomarker discovery problems, in one step, in solution. These harvesting core-shell nanoparticles are designed to simultaneously conduct size exclusion and affinity chromatography in solution. Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), a clinically relevant, highly labile, and very low abundance biomarker, was chosen as a model. PDGF, spiked in human serum, was completely sequestered from its carrier protein albumin, concentrated, and fully preserved, within minutes by the particles. Particle sequestered PDGF was fully protected from exogenously added tryptic degradation. When the nanoparticles were added to a 1 mL dilute solution of PDGF at non detectable levels (less than 20 picograms per mL) the concentration of the PDGF released from the polymeric matrix of the particles increased within the detection range of ELISA and mass spectrometry. Beyond PDGF, the sequestration and protection from degradation for a series of additional very low abundance and very labile cytokines were verified. Conclusions and Significance We envision the application of harvesting core-shell nanoparticles to whole blood for concentration and immediate preservation of low abundance and labile analytes at the time of venipuncture. PMID:19274087

  4. Alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide double alkoxide precursors to alkali metal yttrium oxide nanomaterials

    DOE PAGES

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Neville, Michael L.; Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; Cramer, Roger

    2016-03-15

    In this study, a series of alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide ([AY(ONep)4]) compounds were developed as precursors to alkali yttrium oxide (AYO2) nanomaterials. The reaction of yttrium amide ([Y(NR2)3] where R=Si(CH3)3) with four equivalents of H-ONep followed by addition of [A(NR2)] (A=Li, Na, K) or Ao (Ao=Rb, Cs) led to the formation of a complex series of AnY(ONep)3+n species, crystallographically identified as [Y2Li3(μ3-ONep)(μ3-HONep)(μ-ONep)5(ONep)3(HONep)2] (1), [YNa2(μ3-ONep)4(ONep)]2 (2), {[Y2K3(μ3-ONep)3(μ-ONep)4(ONep)2(ηξ-tol)2][Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4]•ηx-tol]} (3), [Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4] (3a), [Y2Rb3(μ4-ONep)3(μ-ONep)6] (4), and [Y2Cs4(μ6-O)(μ3-ONep)6(μ3-HONep)2(ONep)2(ηx-tol)4]•tol (5). Compounds 1–5 were investigated as single source precursors to AYOx nanomaterials following solvothermal routes (pyridine, 185 °C for 24h). The final products after thermal processing weremore » found by powder X-ray diffraction experiments to be Y2O3 with variable sized particles based on transmission electron diffraction. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy studies indicated that the heavier alkali metal species were present in the isolated nanomaterials.« less

  5. Reduction of phosphorus and alkali levels in coking coals

    SciTech Connect

    Hoare, I.C.; Waugh, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    A number of coals, though exhibiting desirable coking properties, can have undesirable levels of alkalis and phosphorus. All the phosphorus in the coal will report to the coke, eventually to the iron and thence to the steel, with adverse effects on its metallurgical properties. Alkalis have damaging effects on the blast furnace operation and can be responsible for loss of heat, loss of production, efficiency loss and reduced furnace life. Buyers of coking coal commonly specify such parameters as phosphorus in coal and alkalis in ash, with penalties and rejection over certain limits. With the introduction of new direct reduction technologies such as COREX and HISMELT, and others such as PCI, it is anticipated that coal producers will have even tighter phosphorus and alkali specifications imposed on their products. Phosphorus is predominantly inorganic in origin occurring in a wide variety of minerals in coal, but its main source is apatite. It can be found mainly in the lower density fractions of the coal and intimately bound, so that conventional physical beneficiation techniques are relatively ineffective. CSIRO has developed a cost effective, selective chemical demineralization treatment, which can be applied to the problem of high alkali, high phosphorus coals. This particular technique makes use of unrefined organic acid, which also has the advantage of being low in cost and environmentally benign. In this paper, the effectiveness of acid demineralization of a number of coals is discussed, within the context of their phosphorus and alkali distributions throughout various size/density fractions.

  6. Two-phase alkali-metal experiments in reduced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-06-01

    Future space missions envision the use of large nuclear reactors utilizing either a single or a two-phase alkali-metal working fluid. The design and analysis of such reactors require state-of-the-art computer codes that can properly treat alkali-metal flow and heat transfer in a reduced-gravity environment. A literature search of relevant experiments in reduced gravity is reported on here, and reveals a paucity of data for such correlations. The few ongoing experiments in reduced gravity are noted. General plans are put forth for the reduced-gravity experiments which will have to be performed, at NASA facilities, with benign fluids. A similar situation exists regarding two-phase alkali-metal flow and heat transfer, even in normal gravity. Existing data are conflicting and indequate for the task of modeling a space reactor using a two-phase alkali-metal coolant. The major features of past experiments are described here. Data from the reduced-gravity experiments with innocuous fluids are to be combined with normal gravity data from the two-phase alkali-metal experiments. Analyses undertaken here give every expectation that the correlations developed from this data base will provide a valid representation of alkali-metal heat transfer and pressure drop in reduced gravity.

  7. Enantiomeric Excesses of Acid Labile Amino Acid Precursors of the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzarello, Sandra

    1998-01-01

    Amino acids present in carbonaceous chondrite are extracted in water in part as free compounds and in approximately equal part as acid labile precursors. On the assumption that they would be free of contamination, the precursors of two Murchison amino acids that have terrestrial occurrence, alanine and glutamic acid, have been targeted for analysis of their enantiomeric ratios. Pyroglutamic acid, the precursor of glutamic acid, was found with an L-enantiomeric excess comparable to that of the free acid, while alanine's precursor, N-acetyl alanine, appears approximately racemic. Also alpha-imino propioacetic acid, a proposed end product of alanine synthesis in the meteorite, was analyzed and found racemic.

  8. Labile Compounds in Plant Litter Reduce the Sensitivity of Decomposition to Warming and Altered Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suseela, V.; Tharayil, N.; Xing, B.; Dukes, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Together, climate and litter quality strongly regulate decomposition rates. While these two factors and their interaction have been studied across species in continent-scale experiments, few researchers have studied how labile and recalcitrant compounds interact to influence decomposition, or the climate sensitivity of decomposition, within a litter type. Over a period of three years, we studied the effects climate change on mass loss and compound-specific decomposition using two litter types that differed in the relative proportions of labile and recalcitrant compounds, but that had heteropolymers with similar molecular structure. We examined how warming and altered precipitation affected the decomposition of two types of Polygonum cuspidatum (Japanese knotweed) litter (stem litter that was either newly senesced or one year old), at the Boston-Area Climate Experiment (BACE), in Massachusetts, USA. We placed litter bags in an old-field ecosystem exposed to four levels of warming (up to 4oC) and three levels of precipitation (ambient, drought (-50%) and wet (+50%) treatments. The compound-specific degradation of litter was assessed using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Climate treatments immediately affected mass loss of the more recalcitrant litter, but affected the more labile litter only after two years. After three years, although both litter types had lost similar amounts of mass, warming (~4oC) and supplemental precipitation (150% of ambient) together accelerated degradation of alkyl-carbon and lignin only in the more recalcitrant litter, highlighting the role of initial litter quality in determining whether the chemistry of litter residues converges or diverges under different climates. The results from this study indicate that the effect of climate on litter decomposition depends on the quality of litter; litter with a greater initial proportion of labile compounds was less

  9. Organic chemistry of basal ice - presence of labile, low molecular weight compounds available for microbial metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lis, Grzegorz P.; Wadham, Jemma L.; Lawson, Emily; Stibal, Marek; Telling, Jon

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies show that subglacial environments previously thought to be devoid of life contain a host of active microbial organisms. Presence of liquid water due to overburden pressure, the release of nutrients from chemical erosion of bedrock, and the potential carbon sources in overridden sediments facilitate life in this extreme environment. However, little is still known of concentrations and diversity of labile organic compounds essential for sustaining microbial metabolism in subglacial environments. Three subglacial ecosystems that considerably differ in range and amount of available organic compounds were selected for this study 1-Engabreen, northern Norway, overlying high-grade metamorphic rocks with low organic carbon content; 2-Finsterwalderbreen, Svalbard, overriding ancient black shales with a relatively high carbon content yet recalcitrant to microbiological consumption; and 3-Russell Glacier in western Greenland with recently overridden quaternary organic rich paleosols. Basal and pressure ridge ice samples were collected and subsequently analysed for low molecular weight organic compounds, with the emphasis on volatile fatty acids, carbohydrates and amino acids. The highest concentration of labile organic compounds in Greenland basal ice suggest that recently overridden paleosols have the greatest potential for sustaining microbial populations present within and underneath basal ice. The high concentration of "ancient" organic carbon in basal ice from Finsterwalderbreen, Svalbard, doesn't correlate with the presence of labile organic compounds. This indicates the inability of microbes to digest recalcitrant kerogen carbon in cold temperatures. In all three investigated environments, concentrations of labile organic compounds are elevated in basal ice with a high debris content. Until recently, most models of the global carbon cycle tend to neglect the pool of subglacial organic carbon as little is known about the range and concentrations of

  10. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced. PMID:26860297

  11. Superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerene nanowhiskers.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Toshio; Hirata, Chika; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Miyazawa, Kun'ichi; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2016-09-01

    Superconductivity in alkali metal-doped fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs) was observed in K3.3C60NWs, Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs with transition temperatures at 17, 25 and 26 K, respectively. Almost full shielding volume fraction (~80%) was observed in K3.3C60NWs when subjected to thermal treatment at 200 °C for a duration of 24 h. In contrast, the shielding fraction of Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs were calculated to be 8% and 6%, respectively. Here we report on an extensive investigation of the superconducting properties of these AC60NWs (A  =  K3.3, Rb3.0 and Cs2.0Rb1.0). These properties are compared to the ones reported on the corresponding conventional (single-crystal or powder) K-doped fullerene. We also evaluated the critical current densities of these C60NWs using the Bean model under an applied magnetic field up to 50 kOe. PMID:27385220

  12. Superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerene nanowhiskers.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Toshio; Hirata, Chika; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Miyazawa, Kun'ichi; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2016-09-01

    Superconductivity in alkali metal-doped fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs) was observed in K3.3C60NWs, Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs with transition temperatures at 17, 25 and 26 K, respectively. Almost full shielding volume fraction (~80%) was observed in K3.3C60NWs when subjected to thermal treatment at 200 °C for a duration of 24 h. In contrast, the shielding fraction of Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs were calculated to be 8% and 6%, respectively. Here we report on an extensive investigation of the superconducting properties of these AC60NWs (A  =  K3.3, Rb3.0 and Cs2.0Rb1.0). These properties are compared to the ones reported on the corresponding conventional (single-crystal or powder) K-doped fullerene. We also evaluated the critical current densities of these C60NWs using the Bean model under an applied magnetic field up to 50 kOe.

  13. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced.

  14. Superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerene nanowhiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Toshio; Hirata, Chika; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Miyazawa, Kun'ichi; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2016-09-01

    Superconductivity in alkali metal-doped fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs) was observed in K3.3C60NWs, Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs with transition temperatures at 17, 25 and 26 K, respectively. Almost full shielding volume fraction (~80%) was observed in K3.3C60NWs when subjected to thermal treatment at 200 °C for a duration of 24 h. In contrast, the shielding fraction of Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs were calculated to be 8% and 6%, respectively. Here we report on an extensive investigation of the superconducting properties of these AC60NWs (A  =  K3.3, Rb3.0 and Cs2.0Rb1.0). These properties are compared to the ones reported on the corresponding conventional (single-crystal or powder) K-doped fullerene. We also evaluated the critical current densities of these C60NWs using the Bean model under an applied magnetic field up to 50 kOe.

  15. Dissolved organic carbon lability increases with water residence time in the alluvial aquifer of a river floodplain ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helton, Ashley M.; Wright, Meredith S.; Bernhardt, Emily S.; Poole, Geoffrey C.; Cory, Rose M.; Stanford, Jack A.

    2015-04-01

    We assessed spatial and temporal patterns of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) lability and composition throughout the alluvial aquifer of the 16 km2 Nyack Floodplain in northwest Montana, USA. Water influx to the aquifer derives almost exclusively from the Middle Fork of the Flathead River, and water residence times within the aquifer range from days to months. Across seasons and channel discharge conditions, we measured DOC concentration, lability, and optical properties of aquifer water sampled from 12 wells, both near and ~3 m below the water table. Concentrations of DOC were typically low (542 ± 22.7 µg L-1; mean ± se), and the percentage of labile DOC averaged 18 ± 12% during 3 day laboratory assays. Parallel factor analysis of fluorescence excitation-emission matrices revealed two humic-like and two amino acid-like fluorescence groups. Total DOC, humic-like components, and specific UV absorbance decreased with water residence time, consistent with sorption to aquifer sediments. However, labile DOC (both concentration and fraction) increased with water residence time, suggesting a concurrent influx or production of labile DOC. Thus, although the carbon-poor, oxygen-rich aquifer is a net sink for DOC, recalcitrant DOC appears to be replaced with more labile DOC along aquifer flow paths. Our observation of DOC production in long flow paths contrasts with studies of hyporheic DOC consumption along short (centimeters to meters) flow paths and highlights the importance of understanding the role of labile organic matter production and/or influx in alluvial aquifer carbon cycling.

  16. DuraLith Alkali-Aluminosilicate Geopolymer Waste Form Testing for Hanford Secondary Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, W. L.; Lutz, Werner; Pegg, Ian L.

    2011-07-21

    The primary objective of the work reported here was to develop additional information regarding the DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer as a waste form for liquid secondary waste to support selection of a final waste form for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant secondary liquid wastes to be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility on the Hanford Site. Testing focused on optimizing waste loading, improving waste form performance, and evaluating the robustness of the waste form with respect to waste variability.

  17. Relation between the electroforming voltage in alkali halide-polymer diodes and the bandgap of the alkali halide

    SciTech Connect

    Bory, Benjamin F.; Wang, Jingxin; Janssen, René A. J.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Gomes, Henrique L.; De Leeuw, Dago M.

    2014-12-08

    Electroforming of indium-tin-oxide/alkali halide/poly(spirofluorene)/Ba/Al diodes has been investigated by bias dependent reflectivity measurements. The threshold voltages for electrocoloration and electroforming are independent of layer thickness and correlate with the bandgap of the alkali halide. We argue that the origin is voltage induced defect formation. Frenkel defect pairs are formed by electron–hole recombination in the alkali halide. This self-accelerating process mitigates injection barriers. The dynamic junction formation is compared to that of a light emitting electrochemical cell. A critical defect density for electroforming is 10{sup 25}/m{sup 3}. The electroformed alkali halide layer can be considered as a highly doped semiconductor with metallic transport characteristics.

  18. Performance of a biogas upgrading process based on alkali absorption with regeneration using air pollution control residues.

    PubMed

    Baciocchi, Renato; Carnevale, Ennio; Costa, Giulia; Gavasci, Renato; Lombardi, Lidia; Olivieri, Tommaso; Zanchi, Laura; Zingaretti, Daniela

    2013-12-01

    This work analyzes the performance of an innovative biogas upgrading method, Alkali absorption with Regeneration (AwR) that employs industrial residues and allows to permanently store the separated CO2. This process consists in a first stage in which CO2 is removed from the biogas by means of chemical absorption with KOH or NaOH solutions followed by a second stage in which the spent absorption solution is contacted with waste incineration Air Pollution Control (APC) residues. The latter reaction leads to the regeneration of the alkali reagent in the solution and to the precipitation of calcium carbonate and hence allows to reuse the regenerated solution in the absorption process and to permanently store the separated CO2 in solid form. In addition, the final solid product is characterized by an improved environmental behavior compared to the untreated residues. In this paper the results obtained by AwR tests carried out in purposely designed demonstrative units installed in a landfill site are presented and discussed with the aim of verifying the feasibility of this process at pilot-scale and of identifying the conditions that allow to achieve all of the goals targeted by the proposed treatment. Specifically, the CO2 removal efficiency achieved in the absorption stage, the yield of alkali regeneration and CO2 uptake resulting for the regeneration stage, as well as the leaching behavior of the solid product are analyzed as a function of the type and concentration of the alkali reagent employed for the absorption reaction.

  19. X-ray-absorption spectroscopic investigation of alkali and alkaline earth catalysts in coal gasification. Final report, January 1987-September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, F.E.; Shah, N.; Huffman, G.P.

    1990-04-01

    The structures of alkali and alkaline-earth metal catalyst species in lignite and polymer chars and during pyrolysis pretreatment and char gasification have been investigated using ambient and newly-developed, in situ XAFS spectroscopic techniques. The XAFS data, which were obtained at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, were supplemented by char characterization and reactivity measurements made at the Pennsylvania State University. The findings of the investigation are as follows: (i) the catalytic species, as introduced to the char or lignite, is an atomically-dispersed, metal-ion-oxygen-anion complex, and remains a metal-oxygen complex throughout pyrolysis and gasification; (ii) the catalyst species transforms to a bulk oxide species during pyrolysis pretreatment; (iii) during gasification, the catalyst species rapidly transforms to bulk alkali carbonate in the case of the alkali-metal species and slowly to calcium oxide in the case of the calcium species; (iv) higher catalyst loadings results in an increased number of catalytic sites, rather than any structural variation of the catalyst site due to concentration effects; and (v) reaction of alkali with aluminosilicates (from clays) or silica is the major catalyst poisoning reaction, unless the coal is demineralized in which case the alkali may react with residual halide from HCl or HF used to clean the coal. Such poisoning reactions were not demonstrated for calcium-oxygen species.

  20. Efficient destruction of CF4 through in situ generation of alkali metals from heated alkali halide reducing mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Churl; Choi, Wonyong

    2002-03-15

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are the most potent green house gases that are very recalcitrant at destruction. An effective way of converting PFCs using hot solid reagents into safe products has been recently introduced. By investigating the thermal reductive destruction of tetrafluoromethane (CF4) we provided new insight and more physicochemical consideration on this novel process. The complete destruction of CF4was successfully achieved by flowing the gas through a heated reagent bed (400-950 degrees C) that contained powder mixtures of alkali halides, CaO, and Si. The silicon acted as a reducing agent of alkali halides for the in-situ production of alkali metals, and the calcium oxide played the role of a halide ion acceptor. The absence of any single component in this ternary mixture drastically reduced the destruction efficiency of CF4. The CF4 destruction efficiencies with the solid reagent containing the alkali halide, MX, increased in the order of Li approximately Na < K < Cs for alkali cations and I < Br < Cl < F for halide anions. This trend agreed with the endothermicity of the alkali metal generation reaction: the higher the endothermicity, the lower the destruction efficiency. Alkali metal generation was indirectly detected by monitoring H2 production from its reaction with water. The production of alkali metals increased with NaF, KF, and CsF in this order. The CsF/CaO/Si system exhibited the complete destruction of CF4 at as low as 600 degrees C. The solid product analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the formation of CaF2 and the depletion of Si with black carbon particles formed in the solid reagent residue. No CO/CO2 and toxic HF and SiF4 formation were detected in the exhaust gas.

  1. Alkali-aggregate reactivity of typical siliceious glass and carbonate rocks in alkali-activated fly ash based geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Duyou; Liu, Yongdao; Zheng, Yanzeng; Xu, Zhongzi; Shen, Xiaodong

    2013-08-01

    For exploring the behaviour of alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR) in alkali-activated geopolymeric materials and assessing the procedures for testing AAR in geopolymers, the expansion behaviour of fly ash based geopolymer mortars with pure silica glass and typical carbonate rocks were studied respectively by curing at various conditions, i.e. 23°C and 38°C with relative humidity over 95%, immersed in 1M NaOH solution at 80°C. Results show that, at various curing conditions, neither harmful ASR nor harmful ACR was observed in geopolymers with the criteria specified for OPC system. However, with the change of curing conditions, the geopolymer binder and reactive aggregates may experience different reaction processes leading to quite different dimensional changes, especially with additional alkalis and elevated temperatures. It suggests that high temperature with additional alkali for accelerating AAR in traditional OPC system may not appropriate for assessing the alkali-aggregate reactivity behaviour in geopolymers designed for normal conditions. On the other hand, it is hopeful to control the dimensional change of geopolymer mortar or concrete by selecting the type of aggregates and the appropriate curing conditions, thus changing the harmful AAR in OPC into beneficial AAR in geopolymers and other alkali-activated cementitious systems.

  2. Mixed alkali effect on the spectroscopic properties of alkali-alkaline earth oxide borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, G.; Ramesh, B.; Shareefuddin, Md.; Chary, M. N.; Sayanna, R.

    2016-05-01

    The mixed alkali and alkaline earth oxide borate glass with the composition xK2O - (25-x) Li2O-12.5BaO-12.5MgO-50B2O3 (x = 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25mol %) and doped with 1mol% CuO were prepared by the melt quenching technique. From the optical absorption spectra the optical band gap, electronic polarizability(α02-), interaction parameter (A), theoretical and experimental optical basicity (Λ) values were evaluated. From the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectral data the number of spins (N) and susceptibility (χ) were evaluated. The values of (α02-), and (Λ) increases with increasing of K2O content and electronic polarizability and interaction parameter show opposite behaviuor which may be due to the creation of non-bridging oxygens and expansion of borate network. The reciprocal of susceptibility (1/χ) and spin concentration (N) as a function of K2O content, varied nonlinearly which may be due to creation of non-bridging oxygens in the present glass system. This may be attributed to mixed alkali effect (MAE).

  3. Novel diffusive gradients in thin films technique to assess labile sulfate in soil.

    PubMed

    Hanousek, Ondrej; Mason, Sean; Santner, Jakob; Chowdhury, Md Mobaroqul Ahsan; Berger, Torsten W; Prohaska, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A novel diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique for sampling labile soil sulfate was developed, based on a strong basic anion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400) for sulfate immobilization on the binding gel. For reducing the sulfate background on the resin gels, photopolymerization was applied instead of ammonium persulfate-induced polymerization. Agarose cross-linked polyacrylamide (APA) hydrogels were used as diffusive layer. The sulfate diffusion coefficient in APA gel was determined as 9.83 × 10(-6) ± 0.35 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) at 25 °C. The accumulated sulfate was eluted in 1 mol L(-1) HNO3 with a recovery of 90.9 ± 1.6 %. The developed method was tested against two standard extraction methods for soil sulfate measurement. The obtained low correlation coefficients indicate that DGT and conventional soil test methods assess differential soil sulfate pools, rendering DGT a potentially important tool for measuring labile soil sulfate.

  4. Structure and function of cholera toxin and the related Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Spangler, B D

    1992-01-01

    Cholera and the related Escherichia coli-associated diarrheal disease are important problems confronting Third World nations and any area where water supplies can become contaminated. The disease is extremely debilitating and may be fatal in the absence of treatment. Symptoms are caused by the action of cholera toxin, secreted by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, or by a closely related heat-labile enterotoxin, produced by Escherichia coli, that causes a milder, more common traveler's diarrhea. Both toxins bind receptors in intestinal epithelial cells and insert an enzymatic subunit that modifies a G protein associated with the adenylate cyclase complex. The consequent stimulated production of cyclic AMP, or other factors such as increased synthesis of prostaglandins by intoxicated cells, initiates a metabolic cascade that results in the excessive secretion of fluid and electrolytes characteristic of the disease. The toxins have a very high degree of structural and functional homology and may be evolutionarily related. Several effective new vaccine formulations have been developed and tested, and a growing family of endogenous cofactors is being discovered in eukaryotic cells. The recent elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of the heat-labile enterotoxin has provided an opportunity to examine and compare the correlations between structure and function of the two toxins. This information may improve our understanding of the disease process itself, as well as illuminate the role of the toxin in studies of signal transduction and G-protein function. Images PMID:1480112

  5. Effects of lability of metal complex on free ion measurement using DMT.

    PubMed

    Weng, Liping; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H; Temminghoff, Erwin J M

    2010-04-01

    Very low concentrations of free metal ion in natural samples can be measured using the Donnan membrane technique (DMT) based on ion transport kinetics. In this paper, the possible effects of slow dissociation of metal complexes on the interpretation of kinetic DMT are investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The expressions of the lability parameter, Lgrangian , were derived for DMT. Analysis of new experimental studies using synthetic solution containing NTA as the ligand and Cu(2+) ions shows that when the ionic strength is low (labile species measured using other dynamic sensors (DGT, GIME) in several freshwaters, it is concluded that in most waters ion transport in DMT is controlled by diffusion in the membrane. Only in very soft waters (<0.7 mM Ca+Mg), the dissociation rate of natural metal complex may influence ion transport in DMT. In this case, neglecting this effect may lead to an underestimation of the free metal ion concentration measured.

  6. Novel diffusive gradients in thin films technique to assess labile sulfate in soil.

    PubMed

    Hanousek, Ondrej; Mason, Sean; Santner, Jakob; Chowdhury, Md Mobaroqul Ahsan; Berger, Torsten W; Prohaska, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A novel diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique for sampling labile soil sulfate was developed, based on a strong basic anion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400) for sulfate immobilization on the binding gel. For reducing the sulfate background on the resin gels, photopolymerization was applied instead of ammonium persulfate-induced polymerization. Agarose cross-linked polyacrylamide (APA) hydrogels were used as diffusive layer. The sulfate diffusion coefficient in APA gel was determined as 9.83 × 10(-6) ± 0.35 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) at 25 °C. The accumulated sulfate was eluted in 1 mol L(-1) HNO3 with a recovery of 90.9 ± 1.6 %. The developed method was tested against two standard extraction methods for soil sulfate measurement. The obtained low correlation coefficients indicate that DGT and conventional soil test methods assess differential soil sulfate pools, rendering DGT a potentially important tool for measuring labile soil sulfate. PMID:27491301

  7. Windows of embryonic sexual lability in two lizard species with environmental sex determination.

    PubMed

    Shine, Richard; Warner, Daniel A; Radder, Rajkumar

    2007-07-01

    Temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) occurs in all major reptile lineages, but the selective forces and physiological mechanisms that link sex to incubation temperature may differ among and within those groups. Different models for TSD evolution make different predictions about when offspring sex will respond to environmental cues. Although TSD has evolved in several lizard lineages, there is less detailed information on these taxa than in turtles and crocodilians with TSD. We incubated eggs of an agamid lizard (Amphibolurus muricatus) and a scincid lizard (Bassiana duperreyi), two species with TSD. Rather than manipulate incubation temperature to identify periods of sexual lability (as in most previous studies of this topic), we topically applied the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole to eggs at a variety of times through the incubation period. Fadrozole application sex-reversed the resultant hatchlings if applied from the time of oviposition until at least 60% of the way through incubation. In all of the TSD lizard species studied so far, offspring sex is determined either while the eggs are held inside the mother's body or soon after oviposition, providing substantial maternal control over incubation temperatures at this critical period. Hence, the hypothesis that TSD evolves because it enables offspring sex to be matched to conditions that are unpredictable at the time of laying is less likely to apply to squamates than to turtles, sphenodontians, and (especially) crocodiles, in which the period of sexual lability is delayed until long after oviposition.

  8. [Effects of land use change on soil labile organic carbon in Central Jiangxi of China].

    PubMed

    Du, Man-Yi; Fan, Shao-Hui; Liu, Guang-Lu; Qi, Liang-Hua; Guo, Bao-Hu; Tang, Xiao-Lu; Xiao, Fu-Ming

    2013-10-01

    Selecting the 15-year abandoned land (AL) and three forest lands [Phyllostachys edulis plantation (PE), Schima superba secondary forest (SS), and Cunninghamia Lanceolata plantation (CL)] in Anfu County of Jiangxi Province as test objects, this paper studied the effects of land use change on the soil organic carbon (SOC) pool and soil labile organic carbon (SLOC) contents. The soil organic carbon (SOC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), hot- water extractable carbon (HWC), and readily oxidizable carbon (ROC) contents in the test lands were all in the order of PE>CL>SS>AL. As compared with those in AL, the SOC content, soil carbon stock, and soil labile organic carbon (SLOC) contents in the three forest lands all decreased with increasing soil depth, and had an obvious accumulation in surface soil. The proportions of different kinds of SLOC to soil total organic carbon differed markedly, among which, ROC had the highest proportion, while MBC had the smallest one. There existed significant relationships between SOC, MBC, HWC, and ROC. The MBC, HWC, and ROC contained higher content of active carbon, and were more sensitive to the land use change, being able to be used as the indicators for evaluating the soil quality and fertility in central Jiangxi Province. PMID:24483085

  9. [Effects of land use change on soil labile organic carbon in Central Jiangxi of China].

    PubMed

    Du, Man-Yi; Fan, Shao-Hui; Liu, Guang-Lu; Qi, Liang-Hua; Guo, Bao-Hu; Tang, Xiao-Lu; Xiao, Fu-Ming

    2013-10-01

    Selecting the 15-year abandoned land (AL) and three forest lands [Phyllostachys edulis plantation (PE), Schima superba secondary forest (SS), and Cunninghamia Lanceolata plantation (CL)] in Anfu County of Jiangxi Province as test objects, this paper studied the effects of land use change on the soil organic carbon (SOC) pool and soil labile organic carbon (SLOC) contents. The soil organic carbon (SOC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), hot- water extractable carbon (HWC), and readily oxidizable carbon (ROC) contents in the test lands were all in the order of PE>CL>SS>AL. As compared with those in AL, the SOC content, soil carbon stock, and soil labile organic carbon (SLOC) contents in the three forest lands all decreased with increasing soil depth, and had an obvious accumulation in surface soil. The proportions of different kinds of SLOC to soil total organic carbon differed markedly, among which, ROC had the highest proportion, while MBC had the smallest one. There existed significant relationships between SOC, MBC, HWC, and ROC. The MBC, HWC, and ROC contained higher content of active carbon, and were more sensitive to the land use change, being able to be used as the indicators for evaluating the soil quality and fertility in central Jiangxi Province.

  10. [Effects of stand structure regulation on soil labile organic carbon in Pinus elliottii plantation].

    PubMed

    Tan, Gui-Xia; Liu, Yuan-Qiu; Li, Lian-Lian; Liu, Wu; Zan, Yu-Ting; Huo, Bing-Nan; He, Mu-Jiao

    2014-05-01

    Taking 21-year-old Pinus elliottii pure plantation as the control, effects of enrichment planting with broadleaf trees (Liquidambar fornosana) after thinning the conifer trees (P. elliottii) on soil labile organic carbon of different plantations, including 3-year-old, 6-year-old, 9-year-old P. elliottii and 21-year-old P. elliottii-L. fornosana mixed plantations, were investigated. The results showed that the contents of soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC), readily oxidizable organic carbon (ROC), and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) significantly increased in the 6-year-old and 9-year-old plantations compared with those in the 21-year-old P. elliottii pure plantation. Soil labile organic carbon contents in the 21-year-old P. elliottii-L. fornosana mixed plantation increased significantly than those in 3-year-old, 6-year-old, 9-year-old stands, and the DOC, ROC and MBC contents increased by 113.1%, 53.3% and 54.6%, respectively, compared with those in the 21-year-old P. elliottii pure plantation. The results suggested that replanting with broadleaf trees are an effective measure to improve the soil ecological function in pure P. elliottii plantation.

  11. Total spontaneous resolution of chiral covalent networks from stereochemically labile metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anna; Håkansson, Mikael; Jagner, Susan

    2005-09-01

    Stereochemically labile copper and zinc complexes with the N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine ligand (dmeda) have been shown to be promising precursors for the total spontaneous resolution of chiral covalent networks. (N,N')-[Cu(NO3)2(dmeda)]infinity crystallises as a conglomerate and yields either enantiopure (R,R)-1 or enantiopure (S,S)-1. A mixed-valence copper(I/II) complex, [{Cu(II)Br2(dmeda)}3(Cu(I)Br)2]infinity (2), which crystallises as a pair of interpenetrating chiral (10,3)-a nets, is formed from CuBr, CuBr2 and dmeda. One net contains ligands with solely (R,R) configuration and exhibits helices with (P) configuration while the other has solely (S,S)-dmeda ligands and gives rise to a net in which the helices have (M) configuration. The whole crystalline arrangement is racemic, because the interpenetrating chiral nets are of opposite handedness. With zinc chloride (R,S)-[ZnCl(dmeda)2]2[ZnCl4] (3) is obtained, which is a network structure, although not chiral. Total spontaneous resolution of stereochemically labile metal complexes formed from achiral or racemic building blocks is suggested as a viable route for the preparation of covalent chiral networks. Once the absolute structure of the compound has been determined by X-ray crystallography, a quantitative determination of the enantiomeric excess of the bulk product can be undertaken by means of solid-state CD spectroscopy.

  12. Heterotrophic activity and biodegradation of labile and refractory compounds by groundwater and stream microbial populations.

    PubMed Central

    Ladd, T I; Ventullo, R M; Wallis, P M; Costerton, J W

    1982-01-01

    The bacteriology and heterotrophic activity of a stream and of nearby groundwater in Marmot Basin, Alberta, Canada, were studied. Acridine orange direct counts indicated that bacterial populations in the groundwater were greater than in the stream. Bacteria that were isolated from the groundwater were similar to species associated with soils. Utilization of labile dissolved organic material as measured by the heterotrophic potential technique with glutamic acid, phenylalanine, and glycolic acid as substrates was generally greater in the groundwater. In addition, specific activity indices for the populations suggested greater metabolic activity per bacterium in the groundwater. 14C-labeled lignocellulose, preferentially labeled in the lignin fraction by feeding Picea engelmannii [14C]phenylalanine, was mineralized by microorganisms in both the groundwater and the stream, but no more than 4% of the added radioactivity was lost as 14CO2 within 960 h. Up to 20% of [3'-14C]cinnamic acid was mineralized by microorganisms in both environments within 500 h. Both microbial populations appear to influence the levels of labile and recalcitrant dissolved organic material in mountain streams. PMID:7125651

  13. Novel diffusive gradients in thin films technique to assess labile sulfate in soil

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan Chowdhury, Md Mobaroqul; Berger, Torsten W.; Prohaska, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A novel diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique for sampling labile soil sulfate was developed, based on a strong basic anion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400) for sulfate immobilization on the binding gel. For reducing the sulfate background on the resin gels, photopolymerization was applied instead of ammonium persulfate-induced polymerization. Agarose cross-linked polyacrylamide (APA) hydrogels were used as diffusive layer. The sulfate diffusion coefficient in APA gel was determined as 9.83 × 10−6 ± 0.35 × 10-6 cm2 s−1 at 25 °C. The accumulated sulfate was eluted in 1 mol L−1 HNO3 with a recovery of 90.9 ± 1.6 %. The developed method was tested against two standard extraction methods for soil sulfate measurement. The obtained low correlation coefficients indicate that DGT and conventional soil test methods assess differential soil sulfate pools, rendering DGT a potentially important tool for measuring labile soil sulfate. PMID:27491301

  14. Constraints on Transport and Emplacement Mechanisms of Labile Fractions in Lunar Cold Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, D.; Gertsch, L.

    2014-01-01

    Sustaining the scientific exploration of the Solar System will require a significant proportion of the necessary fuels and propellants, as well as other bulk commodities, to be produced from local raw materials [1]. The viability of mineral production depends on the ability to locate and characterize mineable deposits of the necessary feedstocks. This requires, among other things, a workable understanding of the mechanisms by which such deposits form, which is the subject of Economic Geology. Multiple deposition scenarios are possible for labile materials on the Moon. This paper suggests labile fractions moved diffusely through space; deposits may grow richer with depth until low porosity rock; lateral transport is likely to have occurred with the regolith, at least for short distances; crystalline ice may not exist; the constituent phases could be extremely complex. At present we can constrain the sources only mildly; once on the Moon, the transport mechanisms inherently mix and therefore obscure the origins. However, the importance of expanding our understanding of ore-forming processes on the Moon behooves us to make the attempt. Thus begins a time of new inquiry for Economic Geology.

  15. Water Content of Lunar Alkali Fedlspar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, R. D.; Simon, J. I.; Wang, J.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of indigenous hydrogen in a diversity of lunar materials, including volcanic glass, melt inclusions, apatite, and plagioclase suggests water may have played a role in the chemical differentiation of the Moon. Spectroscopic data from the Moon indicate a positive correlation between water and Th. Modeling of lunar magma ocean crystallization predicts a similar chemical differentiation with the highest levels of water in the K- and Th-rich melt residuum of the magma ocean (i.e. urKREEP). Until now, the only sample-based estimates of water content of KREEP-rich magmas come from measurements of OH, F, and Cl in lunar apatites, which suggest a water concentration of < 1 ppm in urKREEP. Using these data, predict that the bulk water content of the magma ocean would have <10 ppm. In contrast, estimate water contents of 320 ppm for the bulk Moon and 1.4 wt % for urKREEP from plagioclase in ferroan anorthosites. Results and interpretation: NanoSIMS data from granitic clasts from Apollo sample 15405,78 show that alkali feldspar, a common mineral in K-enriched rocks, can have approx. 20 ppm of water, which implies magmatic water contents of approx. 1 wt % in the high-silica magmas. This estimate is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that estimated from apatite in similar rocks. However, the Cl and F contents of apatite in chemically similar rocks suggest that these melts also had high Cl/F ratios, which leads to spuriously low water estimates from the apatite. We can only estimate the minimum water content of urKREEP (+ bulk Moon) from our alkali feldspar data because of the unknown amount of degassing that led to the formation of the granites. Assuming a reasonable 10 to 100 times enrichment of water from urKREEP into the granites produces an estimate of 100-1000 ppm of water for the urKREEP reservoir. Using the modeling of and the 100-1000 ppm of water in urKREEP suggests a minimum bulk silicate Moon water content between 2 and 20 ppm. However, hydrogen loss was

  16. Metal contents of phytoplankton and labile particulate material in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twining, Benjamin S.; Rauschenberg, Sara; Morton, Peter L.; Vogt, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Phytoplankton contribute significantly to global C cycling and serve as the base of ocean food webs. Phytoplankton require trace metals for growth and also mediate the vertical distributions of many metals in the ocean. We collected bulk particulate material and individual phytoplankton cells from the upper water column (<150 m) of the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the US GEOTRACES North Atlantic Zonal Transect cruise (GEOTRACES GA03). Particulate material was first leached to extract biogenic and potentially-bioavailable elements, and the remaining refractory material was digested in strong acids. The cruise track spanned several ocean biomes and geochemical regions. Particulate concentrations of metals associated primarily with lithogenic phases (Fe, Al, Ti) were elevated in surface waters nearest North America, Africa and Europe, and elements associated primarily with biogenic material (P, Cd, Zn, Ni) were also found at higher concentrations near the coasts. However metal/P ratios of labile particulate material were also elevated in the middle of the transect for Fe, Ni, Co, Cu, and V. P-normalized cellular metal quotas measured with synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) were generally comparable to ratios in bulk labile particles but did not show mid-basin increases. Manganese and Fe ratios and cell quotas were higher in the western part of the section, nearest North America, and both elements were more enriched in bulk particles, relative to P, than in cells, suggesting the presence of labile oxyhydroxide particulate phases. Cellular Fe quotas thus did not increase in step with aeolian dust inputs, which are highest near Africa; these data suggest that the dust inputs have low bioavailability. Copper and Ni cell quotas were notably higher nearest the continental margins. Overall mean cellular metal quotas were similar to those measured in the Pacific and Southern Oceans except for Fe, which was approximately 3-fold higher in North Atlantic cells. Cellular Fe

  17. Mercury accumulation in transplanted Hypogymnia physodes lichens downwind of Wisconsin chlor-alkali plant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Makholm, M.M.; Bennett, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Emissions of mercury from a chlor-alkali plant in central Wisconsin have raised concern about possible effects on biota in the area. Samples of the lichen Hypogymnia physodes, which no longer grows in the area, were transplanted from a site in northeastern Wisconsin and positioned on plastic stands at varying distances up to 1250 m from the plant and sampled for Hg quarterly for one year to test the hypothesis that Hg would be taken up by the lichens and would decline with distance. Average tissue concentrations were elevated when first sampled at three months and continued to increase at the nearest sites until the study ended after one year. Average concentrations after a year of exposure ranged from 4418 ppb at 250 m from the plant to 403 ppb at 1250 m from the plant. The decrease over distance followed a negative exponential pattern. Background concentrations at a control site in northern Wisconsin averaged 155 ppb.

  18. Alkali content of alpine ultramafic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, W.; Mountjoy, W.

    1965-01-01

    The lower limit of abundance of sodium and potassium in ultramafic rocks is less than the threshold amount detectable by conventional analytical methods. By a dilutionaddition modification of the flame-spectrophotometric method, sodium and potassium have been determined in 40 specimens of alpine ultramafic rocks. Samples represent six regions in the United States and one in Australia, and include dunite, peridotite, pyroxenite, and their variably serpentinized and metamorphosed derivatives. The median value found for Na2O is 0.004 per cent, and the range of Na2O is 0.001-0.19. The median value for K2O is 0.0034 per cent and the range is 0.001-0.031 per cent. Alkali concentrations are below 0.01 per cent Na2O in 28 samples and below 0.01 per cent K2O in 35. Derivation of basalt magma from upper-mantle material similar to such ultramafic rocks, as has been postulated, is precluded by the relative amounts of sodium and potassium, which are from 200 to 600 times more abundant in basalt than in the ultramafic rocks. Similar factors apply to a number of other elements. No reasonable process could produce such concentrations in, for example, tens of thousands of cubic miles of uniform tholeiitic basalt. The ultramafic rocks might have originated either as magmatic crystal precipitates or as mantle residues left after fusion and removal of basaltic magma. Injection of ultramafic rocks to exposed positions is tectonic rather than magmatic. ?? 1965.

  19. A simple and inexpensive enteric-coated capsule for delivery of acid-labile macromolecules to the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Miller, Darren S; Parsons, Anne Michelle; Bresland, John; Herde, Paul; Pham, Duc Minh; Tan, Angel; Hsu, Hung-yao; Prestidge, Clive A; Kuchel, Tim; Begg, Rezaul; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Butler, Ross N

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the ecology of the gastrointestinal tract and the impact of the contents on the host mucosa is emerging as an important area for defining both wellness and susceptibility to disease. Targeted delivery of drugs to treat specific small intestinal disorders such as small bowel bacterial overgrowth and targeting molecules to interrogate or to deliver vaccines to the remote regions of the small intestine has proven difficult. There is an unmet need for methodologies to release probes/drugs to remote regions of the gastrointestinal tract in furthering our understanding of gut health and pathogenesis. In order to address this concern, we need to know how the regional delivery of a surrogate labeled test compound is handled and in turn, if delivered locally as a liquid or powder, the dynamics of its subsequent handling and metabolism. In the studies we report on in this paper, we chose (13)C sodium acetate ((13)C-acetate), which is a stable isotope probe that once absorbed in the small intestine can be readily measured non-invasively by collection and analysis of (13)CO2 in the breath. This would provide information of gastric emptying rates and an indication of the site of release and absorptive capacity. In a series of in vitro and in vivo pig experiments, we assessed the enteric-protective properties of a commercially available polymer EUDRAGIT(®) L100-55 on gelatin capsules and also on DRcaps(®). Test results demonstrated that DRcaps(®) coated with EUDRAGIT(®) L100-55 possessed enhanced enteric-protective properties, particularly in vivo. These studies add to the body of knowledge regarding gastric emptying in pigs and also begin the process of gathering specifications for the design of a simple and cost-effective enteric-coated capsule for delivery of acid-labile macromolecules to the small intestine.

  20. A simple and inexpensive enteric-coated capsule for delivery of acid-labile macromolecules to the small intestine*

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Darren S.; Parsons, Anne Michelle; Bresland, John; Herde, Paul; Pham, Duc Minh; Tan, Angel; Hsu, Hung-yao; Prestidge, Clive A.; Kuchel, Tim; Begg, Rezaul; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Butler, Ross N.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the ecology of the gastrointestinal tract and the impact of the contents on the host mucosa is emerging as an important area for defining both wellness and susceptibility to disease. Targeted delivery of drugs to treat specific small intestinal disorders such as small bowel bacterial overgrowth and targeting molecules to interrogate or to deliver vaccines to the remote regions of the small intestine has proven difficult. There is an unmet need for methodologies to release probes/drugs to remote regions of the gastrointestinal tract in furthering our understanding of gut health and pathogenesis. In order to address this concern, we need to know how the regional delivery of a surrogate labeled test compound is handled and in turn, if delivered locally as a liquid or powder, the dynamics of its subsequent handling and metabolism. In the studies we report on in this paper, we chose 13C sodium acetate (13C-acetate), which is a stable isotope probe that once absorbed in the small intestine can be readily measured non-invasively by collection and analysis of 13CO2 in the breath. This would provide information of gastric emptying rates and an indication of the site of release and absorptive capacity. In a series of in vitro and in vivo pig experiments, we assessed the enteric-protective properties of a commercially available polymer EUDRAGIT®L100-55 on gelatin capsules and also on DRcaps®. Test results demonstrated that DRcaps®coated with EUDRAGIT®L100-55 possessed enhanced enteric-protective properties, particularly in vivo. These studies add to the body of knowledge regarding gastric emptying in pigs and also begin the process of gathering specifications for the design of a simple and cost-effective enteric-coated capsule for delivery of acid-labile macromolecules to the small intestine. PMID:26160716

  1. Cerium-doped mixed-alkali rare-earth double-phosphate scintillators for thermal neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, John S.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Spurrier, Merry; Szupryczynski, Piotr; Melcher, Charles L.

    2007-08-01

    Previous measurements of the scintillation properties of members of the single-alkali, rare-earth double-phosphate family have demonstrated high light output and fast decay times when exposed to ionizing radiation. Because of the ease with which the alkali constituents (Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) of the crystal matrix may be interchanged (e.g. K 2CsLu(PO 4) 2 and CsLi 2Lu(PO 4) 2), the rare-earth double-phosphate family of scintillators provides an ideal system for the study of matrix effects on scintillation efficiency and kinetics. New members of the rare-earth double-phosphate family have been synthesized by high-temperature flux growth. These new samples, represented by the general formula (A,B) 3Lu(PO 4) 2:Ce where A and B are alkali elements, incorporate lithium as one of the components and varying levels of Ce doping. Characteristics important to gamma-ray and thermal neutron excitation are calculated for three model systems which incorporate total lithium-ion substitution. Light output, scintillation decay times, and photoluminescence measurements for the most promising of the samples to date are reported. Future work includes (1) synthesis of mixed-alkali scandium and yttrium double-phosphates in which Li ions are substitutional in the structure with varying lithium-ion content up to and including total lithium-ion substitution on the alkali ion site and (2) measurements of light output and pulse shape using thermal neutron excitation.

  2. Development and Lability in the Parent-Child Relationship During Adolescence: Associations With Pubertal Timing and Tempo

    PubMed Central

    Marceau, Kristine; Ram, Nilam; Susman, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents' and parents' reactions to pubertal development are hypothesized to contribute to changes in family dynamics. Using 7-year longitudinal data from the NICHD-SECCYD (488 boys, 475 girls) we examined relations between pubertal development (timing, tempo) and trajectories (developmental change and year-to-year lability) of parent-child conflict and closeness from age 8.5 to 15.5 years. Changes were mostly characterized by year-to-year fluctuations – lability. Parent-child conflict increased and closeness decreased some with age. Pubertal timing and tempo were more consistently associated with lability in parent-child relationships than with long-term trends, although faster tempo was associated with steeper decreases in parent-child closeness. Findings provide a platform for examining how puberty contributes to both long-term and transient changes in adolescents' relationships and adjustment. PMID:26321856

  3. Infrared Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Alkali Metal Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ei; Hommerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton; Trivedi, Sudhir; Samuels, Alan; Snyder, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. LIBS is a relatively simple technique and has been successfully employed in applications such as environmental monitoring, materials analysis, medical diagnostics, industrial process control, and homeland security. Most LIBS applications are limited to emission features in the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-VIS-NIR) region arising from atoms and simple molecular fragments. In the present work, we report on the observation of mid- infrared emission lines from alkali metal halides due to laser-induced breakdown processes. The studied alkali metal halides included LiCl, NaCl, NaBr, KCl, KBr, KF, RbCl, and RbBr. The laser-induced plasma was produced by focusing a 16 mJ pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) on the target. The LIBS infrared emission from alkali halides showed intense and narrow bands located in the region from 2-8 μm. The observed emission features were assigned to atomic transitions between higher-lying Rydberg states of neutral alkali atoms. More detailed results of the performed IR LIBS studies on alkali metal halides will be discussed at the conference.

  4. Multi-photon processes in alkali metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Baodong; Hu, Shu; Li, Hui; Shi, Zhe; Cai, Xianglong; Guo, Jingwei; Tan, Yannan; Liu, Wanfa; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2015-02-01

    Achieving population inversion through multi-photon cascade pumping is almost always difficult, and most laser medium work under 1-photon excitation mechanism. But for alkali atoms such as cesium, relatively large absorption cross sections of several low, cascading energy levels enable them properties such as up conversion. Here we carried out research on two-photon excitation alkali fluorescence. Two photons of near infrared region are used to excite alkali atoms to n 2 D5/2, n 2 D3/2 or higher energy levels, then the blue fluorescence of (n+1) 2 P3/2,(n+1) 2 P1/2-->n 2 S1/2 are observed. Different pumping paths are tried and by the recorded spectra, transition routes of cesium are deducted and concluded. Finally the possibility of two-photon style DPALs (diode pumped alkali laser) are discussed, such alkali lasers can give output wavelengths in the shorter end of visual spectroscopy (400-460 nm) and are expected to get application in underwater communication and material laser processing.

  5. Labile trace elements in basaltic achondrites: Can they distinguish between meteorites from the Moon, Mars, and V-type asteroids?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Stephen F.; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Lipschutz, Michael E.

    2009-06-01

    We report data for 14 mainly labile trace elements (Ag, Au, Bi, Cd, Cs, Ga, In, Rb, Sb, Se, Te, Tl, U, and Zn) in eight whole-rock lunar meteorites (Asuka [A-] 881757, Dar al Gani [DaG] 262, Elephant Moraine [EET] 87521, Queen Alexandra Range [QUE] 93069, QUE 94269, QUE 94281, Yamato [Y-] 793169, and Y-981031), and Martian meteorite (DaG 476) and incorporate these into a comparative study of basaltic meteorites from the Moon, Mars, and V-type asteroids. Multivariate cluster analysis of data for these elements in 14 lunar, 13 Martian, and 34 howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites demonstrate that materials from these three parents are distinguishable using these markers of late, low-temperature episodes. This distinguishability is essentially as complete as that based on markers of high-temperature igneous processes. Concentrations of these elements in 14 lunar meteorites are essentially lognormally distributed and generally more homogeneous than in Martian and HED meteorites. Mean siderophile and labile element concentrations in the 14 lunar meteorites indicate the presence of a CI-equivalent micrometeorite admixture of 2.6% When only feldspathic samples are considered, our data show a slightly higher value of 3.4% consistent with an increasing micrometeorite content in regolith samples of higher maturity. Concentrations of labile elements in the 8 feldspathic samples hint at the presence of a fractionated highly labile element component, possibly volcanic in origin, at a level comparable to the micrometeorite component. Apparently, the process(es) that contributed to establishing lunar meteorite siderophile and labile trace element contents occurred in a system open to highly labile element transport.

  6. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1992-11-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, as well as for activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 300 Area of the Hanford Site contains reactor fuel manufacturing facilities and several research and development laboratories. The 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility (3718-F Facility), located in the 300 Area, was used to store and treat alkali metal wastes. Therefore, it is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous wastes. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 (Ecology 1989) and 40 CFR 270.1. Closure also will satisfy the thermal treatment facility closure requirements of 40 CFR 265.381. This closure plan presents a description of the 3718-F Facility, the history of wastes managed, and the approach that will be followed to close the facility. Only hazardous constituents derived from 3718-F Facility operations will be addressed.

  7. Maternal exposure to alkali, alkali earth, transition and other metals: Concentrations and predictors of exposure.

    PubMed

    Hinwood, A L; Stasinska, A; Callan, A C; Heyworth, J; Ramalingam, M; Boyce, M; McCafferty, P; Odland, J Ø

    2015-09-01

    Most studies of metals exposure focus on the heavy metals. There are many other metals (the transition, alkali and alkaline earth metals in particular) in common use in electronics, defense industries, emitted via combustion and which are naturally present in the environment, that have received limited attention in terms of human exposure. We analysed samples of whole blood (172), urine (173) and drinking water (172) for antimony, beryllium, bismuth, cesium, gallium, rubidium, silver, strontium, thallium, thorium and vanadium using ICPMS. In general most metals concentrations were low and below the analytical limit of detection with some high concentrations observed. Few factors examined in regression models were shown to influence biological metals concentrations and explained little of the variation. Further study is required to establish the source of metals exposures at the high end of the ranges of concentrations measured and the potential for any adverse health impacts in children. PMID:25984984

  8. Maternal exposure to alkali, alkali earth, transition and other metals: Concentrations and predictors of exposure.

    PubMed

    Hinwood, A L; Stasinska, A; Callan, A C; Heyworth, J; Ramalingam, M; Boyce, M; McCafferty, P; Odland, J Ø

    2015-09-01

    Most studies of metals exposure focus on the heavy metals. There are many other metals (the transition, alkali and alkaline earth metals in particular) in common use in electronics, defense industries, emitted via combustion and which are naturally present in the environment, that have received limited attention in terms of human exposure. We analysed samples of whole blood (172), urine (173) and drinking water (172) for antimony, beryllium, bismuth, cesium, gallium, rubidium, silver, strontium, thallium, thorium and vanadium using ICPMS. In general most metals concentrations were low and below the analytical limit of detection with some high concentrations observed. Few factors examined in regression models were shown to influence biological metals concentrations and explained little of the variation. Further study is required to establish the source of metals exposures at the high end of the ranges of concentrations measured and the potential for any adverse health impacts in children.

  9. Merwinite-structured phases as a potential host of alkalis in the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindi, Luca; Safonov, Oleg G.; Zedgenizov, Dmitriy A.

    2015-08-01

    Two previously unknown Na- and K-rich phases were synthesized near the solidus of the model CMAS lherzolite interacted with the CaCO3 + Na2CO3 + KCl melt at 7 GPa. They coexist with forsterite, garnet and chloride-carbonate melt. Stoichiometry and unit-cell parameters measured by means of powder diffraction indicate that one of the phases corresponds to (K,Na)2Ca4Mg2Si4O15 (with about 0.1 a.p.f.u. Al). Although single-crystal X-ray measurements of this phase did not allow the solution of the crystal structure, we suggest that the structure of this phase includes mixed SiO4 and Si2O7 units. Single-crystal diffraction experiments of the other alkali-rich phase with composition (Ca2.06Na0.86K0.08)Σ=3.00(Mg0.53Si0.45Al0.03)Σ=1.01Si2.00O8 showed that it exhibits the merwinite structure, space group P21/ a, with lattice parameters a = 12.987(2), b = 5.101(1), c = 9.130(2) Å, β = 92.36(1)°, V = 604.3(2) Å3, and Z = 4. The structure was refined to R 1 = 0.031 using 2619 independent reflections. In the structure, Na is hosted at the large Ca sites, whereas Si replaces Mg at the octahedral site and occurs in the usual tetrahedral coordination. Ordering-induced distortion provokes a change in coordination of the (Ca, Na) atoms with respect to pure merwinite. Merwinite phases with lower K + Na contents (0.08-0.18 a.p.f.u.) coexist with forsterite, clinopyroxene and immiscible carbonate-chloride and silicate melts at higher temperatures (up to 1510 °C) at 7 and 5.5 GPa. These phases (including alkali-rich ones at solidus) show a general formula [Ca3-2 x (Na,K)2 x ][Mg1- x Si x ]Si2O8 (with x up to 0.45), where the Na + K content negatively correlates with Ca and positively correlates with Si. The present experimental and crystal-chemical data prove that merwinite-structured phases may be efficient hosts for alkalis in the upper mantle. They are mineralogical indicators of either the interaction of mantle peridotites with alkaline carbonatitic liquids or high

  10. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of alkali metal deficiency and excess.

    PubMed

    Yung, C Y

    1984-01-01

    The alkali metals from the Group IA of the periodic table (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium and francium) are reviewed. The neuropsychiatric aspects of alkali metal deficiencies and excesses (intoxications) are described. Emphasis was placed on lithium due to its clinical uses. The signs and symptoms of these conditions are characterized by features of an organic brain syndrome with delirium and encephalopathy prevailing. There are no clinically distinctive features that could be reliably used for diagnoses. Sodium and potassium are two essential alkali metals in man. Lithium is used as therapeutic agent in bipolar affective disorders. Rubidium has been investigated for its antidepressant effect in a group of psychiatric disorders. Cesium is under laboratory investigation for its role in carcinogenesis and in depressive illness. Very little is known of francium due to its great instability for experimental study. PMID:6395136

  11. C-CAMP, A closed cycle alkali metal power system

    SciTech Connect

    Wichner, R.P.; Hoffman, H.W.

    1988-01-01

    A concept is presented for a Closed-Cycle Alkali Metal (C-CAMP) power systems which utilizes the heat of reaction of an alkali metal and halogen compound to vaporize an alkali metal turbine fluid for a Rankine cycle. Unique features of the concept are (1) direct contact (heat exchange) between the reaction products and turbine fluid, and (2) a flow-through chemical reactor/boiler. The principal feasibility issues of the concept relate to the degree of cross-mixing of product and turbine fluid streams within the reactor-boiler. If proven feasible, the concept may be adapted to a range of fuel and turbine fluids and ultimately lead to thermal efficiencies in excess of 35%.

  12. Alkali-induced enhancement of surface electronic polarizibility.

    PubMed

    Stolbov, Sergey; Rahman, Talat S

    2006-05-12

    From results of ab initio electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory for a set of prototype systems, we find alkali adsorbates to cause a dramatic enhancement of the electronic polarizability of the metal surface extending it several angstroms into the vacuum. This phenomenon is traceable to an unusual feature induced in the surface potential on alkali adsorption. The effect appears to be general, as we find it to be present on metals as varied as Pd and Cu, and helps explain the observed substantial decrease in the vibrational frequency of molecules when coadsorbed with alkalis on metal surfaces. Specifically, for two dissimilar molecules CO and O(2), we trace the softening of the frequencies of their stretching mode when coadsorbed with K on Pd(111) to the enhanced electronic polarizability.

  13. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of alkali metal deficiency and excess

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, C.Y.

    1984-01-01

    The alkali metals from the Group IA of the periodic table (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium and francium) are reviewed. The neuropsychiatric aspects of alkali metal deficiencies and excesses (intoxications) are described. Emphasis was placed on lithium due to its clinical uses. The signs and symptoms of these conditions are characterized by features of an organic brain syndrome with delirium and encephalopathy prevailing. There are no clinically distinctive features that could be reliably used for diagnoses. Sodium and potassium are two essential alkali metals in man. Lithium is used as therapeutic agent in bipolar affective disorders. Rubidium has been investigated for its antidepressant effect in a group of psychiatric disorders. Cesium is under laboratory investigation for its role in carcinogenesis and in depressive illness. Very little is known of francium due to its great instability for experimental study.

  14. Theoretical study of the alkali and alkaline-earth monosulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Ab initio calculations have been used to obtain accurate spectroscopic constants for the X2Pi and A2Sigma(+) states of the alkali sulfides and the X1Sigma(+), a3Pi, and A1Pi states of the alkaline-earth sulfides. In contrast to the alkali oxides, the alkali sulfides are found to have X2Pi ground states, due to the larger electrostatic interaction. Dissociation energies of 3.27 eV for BeS, 2.32 eV for MgS, 3.29 eV for CaS, and 3.41 eV for SrS have been obtained for the X1Sigma(+) states of the alkaline-earth sulfides, in good agreement with experimental results. Core correlation is shown to increase the Te values for the a3Pi and A1Pi states of MgS, CaS, and SrS.

  15. Hereditary heat-labile hexosaminidase B: its implication for recognizing Tay-Sachs genotypes.

    PubMed

    Navon, R; Nutman, J; Kopel, R; Gaber, L; Gadoth, N; Goldman, B; Nitzan, M

    1981-11-01

    Two pairs of alleles, at the two loci of hexosaminidase (HEX), were found to segregate in an Arab inbred family: the normal and the mutant Tay-Sachs (TSD) alleles of HEX A, and the normal and a mutant allele of HEX B. Since the mutant HEX B is heat labile, no reliable identification of TSD genotypes can be obtained in its presence, as long as the proportions of HEX A and B are estimated by the routinely used heat-inactivation method. The genotypes may be correctly identified in such cases by separation of the two isoenzymes on ion-exchange chromatography, estimating their individual activities, and calculating the ratio between them. Of the nine genotype combinations possible with these two pairs of alleles, five have been identified in the reported family by this procedure. PMID:6459736

  16. Heat-labile enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and intestinal protozoa in asymptomatic travellers.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, P; Cross, J H

    1977-12-01

    Thirty-two asymptomatic travellers who had recently journeyed in the Near, Middle, and Far East and had experienced a high incidence of diarrhoeal disease were screened for heat-labile enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ent+ E. coli) and other bacterial and parasitic pathogens. Six percent were colonized with ent+ E. coli and while other bacterial pathogens were not found, the intestinal protozoa Giardia lamblia (13%), Entamoeba histolytica (6%), Entamoeba coli (6%), Endolimax nana (6%), and Entamoeba hartmanni (3%) were detected in the stools. Ent+ E. coli, G. lamblia and E. histolytica should be considered in the differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease in travellers returning from the Orient. Furthermore, these travellers may be a potential source for the introduction of ent+ E. coli into communities where such organisms are relatively rare. PMID:351820

  17. Significance of Isotopically Labile Organic Hydrogen in Thermal Maturation of Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Arndt Schimmelmann; Maria Mastalerz

    2010-03-30

    Isotopically labile organic hydrogen in fossil fuels occupies chemical positions that participate in isotopic exchange and in chemical reactions during thermal maturation from kerogen to bitumen, oil and gas. Carbon-bound organic hydrogen is isotopically far less exchangeable than hydrogen bound to nitrogen, oxygen, or sulfur. We explore why organic hydrogen isotope ratios express a relationship with organic nitrogen isotope ratios in kerogen at low to moderate maturity. We develop and apply new techniques to utilize organic D/H ratios in organic matter fractions and on a molecular level as tools for exploration for fossil fuels and for paleoenvironmental research. The scope of our samples includes naturally and artificially matured substrates, such as coal, shale, oil and gas.

  18. Hydrothermal chemistry, structures, and luminescence studies of alkali hafnium fluorides.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Christopher C; McMillen, Colin D; Chen, Hongyu; Anker, Jeffery N; Kolis, Joseph W

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the hydrothermal chemistry of alkali hafnium fluorides, including the synthesis and structural characterization of five new alkali hafnium fluorides. Two ternary alkali hafnium fluorides are described: Li(2)HfF(6) in space group P31m with a = 4.9748(7) Å and c = 4.6449(9) Å and Na(5)Hf(2)F(13) in space group C2/m with a = 11.627(2) Å, b = 5.5159(11) Å, and c = 8.4317(17) Å. Three new alkali hafnium oxyfluorides are also described: two fluoroelpasolites, K(3)HfOF(5) and (NH(4))(3)HfOF(5), in space group Fm3m with a = 8.9766(10) and 9.4144(11) Å, respectively, and K(2)Hf(3)OF(12) in space group R3m with a = 7.6486(11) Å and c = 28.802(6) Å. Infrared (IR) spectra were obtained for the title solids to confirm the structure solutions. Comparison of these materials was made based on their structures and synthesis conditions. The formation of these species in hydrothermal fluids appears to be dependent upon both the concentration of the alkali fluoride mineralizer solution and the reaction temperature. Both X-ray and visible fluorescence studies were conducted on compounds synthesized in this study and showed that fluorescence was affected by a variety of factors, such as alkali metal size, the presence/absence of oxygen in the compound, and the coordination environment of Hf(4+).

  19. Spill-Resistant Alkali-Metal-Vapor Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, William

    2005-01-01

    A spill-resistant vessel has been developed for dispensing an alkali-metal vapor. Vapors of alkali metals (most commonly, cesium or rubidium, both of which melt at temperatures slightly above room temperature) are needed for atomic frequency standards, experiments in spectroscopy, and experiments in laser cooling. Although the present spill-resistant alkali-metal dispenser was originally intended for use in the low-gravity environment of outer space, it can also be used in normal Earth gravitation: indeed, its utility as a vapor source was confirmed by use of cesium in a ground apparatus. The vessel is made of copper. It consists of an assembly of cylinders and flanges, shown in the figure. The uppermost cylinder is a fill tube. Initially, the vessel is evacuated, the alkali metal charge is distilled into the bottom of the vessel, and then the fill tube is pinched closed to form a vacuum seal. The innermost cylinder serves as the outlet for the vapor, yet prevents spilling by protruding above the surface of the alkali metal, no matter which way or how far the vessel is tilted. In the event (unlikely in normal Earth gravitation) that any drops of molten alkali metal have been shaken loose by vibration and are floating freely, a mesh cap on top of the inner cylinder prevents the drops from drifting out with the vapor. Liquid containment of the equivalent of 1.2 grams of cesium was confirmed for all orientations with rubbing alcohol in one of the prototypes later used with cesium.

  20. Effect of temperature on the decomposition rate of labile and stable organic matter in an agrochernozem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionova, A. A.; Kvitkina, A. K.; Yevdokimov, I. V.; Bykhovets, S. S.; Stulin, A. F.

    2014-05-01

    An hypothesis about the different temperature dependences of the decomposition of the labile and stable organic carbon pools has been tested using an agrochernozem sampled from an experimental plot of 42-year-old continuous corn in Voronezh oblast. The partitioning of the CO2 loss during the decomposition of the labile and stable soil organic matter (SOM) at 2, 12, and 22°C in a long-term incubation experiment was performed using the method of 13C natural abundance by C3-C4 transition. On the basis of the determined decomposition constants, the SOM pools have been arranged in an order according to their increasing stability: plant residues < new (C4) SOM < old (C3) SOM. The tested hypothesis has been found valid only for a limited temperature interval. The temperature coefficient Q 10 increases in the stability order from 1.2 to 4.3 in the interval of 12-22°C. At low temperatures (2-12°C), the values of Q 10 insignificantly vary among the SOM pools and lie in the range of 2.2-2.8. Along with the decomposition constants of the SOM, the new-to-old carbon ratio in the CO2 efflux from the soil and the magnitude of the negative priming effect for the old SOM caused by the input of new organic matter depend on the temperature. In the soil under continuous corn fertilized with NPK, the increased decomposition of C3 SOM is observed compared to the unfertilized control; the temperature dependences of the SOM decomposition are similar in both agrochernozem treatments.

  1. Labile and recalcitrant organic matter utilization by river biofilm under increasing water temperature.

    PubMed

    Ylla, Irene; Romaní, Anna M; Sabater, Sergi

    2012-10-01

    Microbial biofilms in rivers contribute to the decomposition of the available organic matter which typically shows changes in composition and bioavailability due to their origin, seasonality, and watershed characteristics. In the context of global warming, enhanced biofilm organic matter decomposition would be expected but this effect could be specific when either a labile or a recalcitrant organic matter source would be available. A laboratory experiment was performed to mimic the effect of the predicted increase in river water temperature (+4 °C above an ambient temperature) on the microbial biofilm under differential organic matter sources. The biofilm microbial community responded to higher water temperature by increasing bacterial cell number, respiratory activity (electron transport system) and microbial extracellular enzymes (extracellular enzyme activity). At higher temperature, the phenol oxidase enzyme explained a large fraction of respiratory activity variation suggesting an enhanced microbial use of degradation products from humic substances. The decomposition of hemicellulose (β-xylosidase activity) seemed to be also favored by warmer conditions. However, at ambient temperature, the enzymes highly responsible for respiration activity variation were β-glucosidase and leu-aminopeptidase, suggesting an enhanced microbial use of polysaccharides and peptides degradation products. The addition of labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC; dipeptide plus cellobiose) caused a further augmentation of heterotrophic biomass and respiratory activity. The changes in the fluorescence index and the ratio Abs(250)/total DOC indicated that higher temperature accelerated the rates of DOC degradation. The experiment showed that the more bioavailable organic matter was rapidly cycled irrespective of higher temperature while degradation of recalcitrant substances was enhanced by warming. Thus, pulses of carbon at higher water temperature might have consequences for DOC

  2. Oxidative stress and labile plasmatic iron in anemic patients following blood therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marília Sabo; Rissi, Tatiana Tamborena; Zuravski, Luisa; Mezzomo, Juliana; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Folmer, Vanderlei; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; Manfredini, Vanusa; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Puntel, Robson Luiz

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the plasmatic iron content and evaluate the oxidative stress (OS) markers in subjects receiving blood therapy. METHODS: Thirty-nine individuals with unspecified anemia receiving blood transfusions and 15 healthy subjects were included in the study. Anemic subjects were divided into three subgrouP: (1) those that received up to five blood transfusions (n = 14); (2) those that received from five to ten transfusions (n = 11); and (3) those that received more than ten transfusions (n = 14). Blood samples were collected by venous arm puncture and stored in tubes containing heparin. The plasma and cells were separated by centrifugation and subsequently used for analyses. Statistical analyses were performed using Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance followed by Dunn’s multiple comparison tests when appropriate. RESULTS: The eletrophoretic hemoglobin profiles of the subjects included in this study indicated that no patients presented with hemoglobinopathy. Labile plasmatic iron, ferritin, protein carbonyl, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and dichlorofluorescein diacetate oxidation were significantly higher (P < 0.05), whereas total thiol levels were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in transfused subjects compared to controls. Additionally, the activity of catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were significantly lower in the transfused subjects (P < 0.05). Antioxidant enzyme activities and total thiol levels were positively correlated (P < 0.05), and negatively correlated with the levels of protein carbonyl and TBARS (P < 0.05). In contrast, protein carbonyl and TBARS were positively correlated (P < 0.05). Altogether, these data confirm the involvement of OS in patients following therapy with repeated blood transfusions. CONCLUSION: Our data reveal that changes in OS markers are correlated with levels of labile plasmatic iron and ferritin and the number of transfusions. PMID:25254188

  3. Labile and recalcitrant organic matter utilization by river biofilm under increasing water temperature.

    PubMed

    Ylla, Irene; Romaní, Anna M; Sabater, Sergi

    2012-10-01

    Microbial biofilms in rivers contribute to the decomposition of the available organic matter which typically shows changes in composition and bioavailability due to their origin, seasonality, and watershed characteristics. In the context of global warming, enhanced biofilm organic matter decomposition would be expected but this effect could be specific when either a labile or a recalcitrant organic matter source would be available. A laboratory experiment was performed to mimic the effect of the predicted increase in river water temperature (+4 °C above an ambient temperature) on the microbial biofilm under differential organic matter sources. The biofilm microbial community responded to higher water temperature by increasing bacterial cell number, respiratory activity (electron transport system) and microbial extracellular enzymes (extracellular enzyme activity). At higher temperature, the phenol oxidase enzyme explained a large fraction of respiratory activity variation suggesting an enhanced microbial use of degradation products from humic substances. The decomposition of hemicellulose (β-xylosidase activity) seemed to be also favored by warmer conditions. However, at ambient temperature, the enzymes highly responsible for respiration activity variation were β-glucosidase and leu-aminopeptidase, suggesting an enhanced microbial use of polysaccharides and peptides degradation products. The addition of labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC; dipeptide plus cellobiose) caused a further augmentation of heterotrophic biomass and respiratory activity. The changes in the fluorescence index and the ratio Abs(250)/total DOC indicated that higher temperature accelerated the rates of DOC degradation. The experiment showed that the more bioavailable organic matter was rapidly cycled irrespective of higher temperature while degradation of recalcitrant substances was enhanced by warming. Thus, pulses of carbon at higher water temperature might have consequences for DOC

  4. Poly(ortho ester amides): Acid-labile Temperature-responsive Copolymers for Potential Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rupei; Palumbo, R. Noelle; Ji, Weihang; Wang, Chun

    2009-01-01

    A new, convenient pathway is developed to synthesize highly hydrolytically labile poly(ortho ester amide) (POEA) copolymers that overcomes some of the major weaknesses of the traditional methods of synthesizing poly(ortho esters) and their derivatives. A diamine monomer containing a built-in, stabilized ortho ester group was synthesized and was used for polycondensation with diacid esters, giving rise to a series of POEA copolymers with unique stimuli-responsive properties. The POEA undergoes temperature-responsive, reversible sol-gel phase transition in water. Phase diagrams of the POEA/H2O mixture reveal the concentration-dependent existence of different phases, including hydrogel and opaque or clear solution. Such behavior may be attributed to the temperature-dependent hydrogen-bonding involving the amide groups in the POEA backbone and hydrophobic interactions between POEA chains, and it is tunable by selecting diacid monomers with different chemical structures. The kinetics of POEA mass loss in physiological aqueous buffers and release of a model macromolecular drug, fluorescently labeled dextran, are nearly zero-order, suggesting predominantly surface-restricted polymer erosion. The rates of polymer erosion and drug release are much faster at pH 5.0 than pH 7.4. No cytotoxicity was found for the polymer extracts and the polymer degradation products at concentrations as high as 1 mg/ml. The normal morphology of fibroblasts cultured directly in contact with POEA films was not altered. These novel acid-labile temperature-responsive POEA copolymers may be potentially useful for a wide range of biomedical applications such as minimal invasive delivery of controlled-release drug formulations that respond to biological temperature and acidic-pH environments in cells and tissues. PMID:19281150

  5. Molecular insights into the microbial formation of marine dissolved organic matter: recalcitrant or labile?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, B. P.; Kattner, G.; Witt, M.; Passow, U.

    2014-02-01

    The degradation of marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important control variable in the global carbon cycle and dependent on the DOM composition. For our understanding of the kinetics of organic matter cycling in the ocean, it is therefore crucial to achieve a mechanistic and molecular understanding of its transformation processes. A long-term microbial experiment was performed to follow the production of non-labile DOM by marine bacteria. Two different glucose concentrations and dissolved algal exudates were used as substrates. We monitored the bacterial abundance, concentrations of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), nutrients, amino acids, and transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) for two years. Ultrahigh resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) allowed the molecular characterization of extracted DOM after 70 days and after ∼2 years of incubation. Although glucose was quickly degraded, a DOC background was generated in glucose incubations. Only 20% of the organic carbon from algal exudate was degraded within the 2 years of incubation. TEP, which are released by micro-organisms, were produced during glucose degradation but decreased within less than three weeks back to half of the maximum concentration and were below detection in all treatments after 2 years. The molecular analysis demonstrated that DOM generated during glucose degradation differed appreciably from DOM produced during the degradation of the algal exudates. Our results led to several conclusions: (i) Higher substrate levels result in a higher level of non-labile DOC which is an important prerequisite for carbon sequestration in the ocean; (ii) TEP are generated by bacteria but are also degraded rapidly, thus limiting their potential contribution to carbon sequestration; (iii) The molecular signatures of DOM derived from algal exudates or glucose after 70 days of incubation differed strongly from refractory DOM. After 2 years

  6. Upgrading of petroleum oil feedstocks using alkali metals and hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A method of upgrading an oil feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the oil feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase separable from the organic oil feedstock material. The upgradant hydrocarbon bonds to the oil feedstock material and increases the number of carbon atoms in the product. This increase in the number of carbon atoms of the product increases the energy value of the resulting oil feedstock.

  7. Alkali Metal/Salt Thermal-Energy-Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Wayne W.; Stearns, John W.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed thermal-energy-storage system based on mixture of alkali metal and one of its halide salts; metal and salt form slurry of two immiscible melts. Use of slurry expected to prevent incrustations of solidified salts on heat-transfer surfaces that occur where salts alone used. Since incrustations impede heat transfer, system performance improved. In system, charging heat-exchanger surface immersed in lower liquid, rich in halide-salt, phase-charge material. Discharging heat exchanger surface immersed in upper liquid, rich in alkali metal.

  8. Metal induced gap states at alkali halide/metal interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiguchi, Manabu; Yoshikawa, Genki; Ikeda, Susumu; Saiki, Koichiro

    2004-10-01

    The electronic state of a KCl/Cu(0 0 1) interface was investigated using the Cl K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). A pre-peak observed on the bulk edge onset of thin KCl films has a similar feature to the peak at a LiCl/Cu(0 0 1) interface, which originates from the metal induced gap state (MIGS). The present result indicates that the MIGS is formed universally at alkali halide/metal interfaces. The decay length of MIGS to an insulator differs from each other, mainly due to the difference in the band gap energy of alkali halide.

  9. Feasibility of supersonic diode pumped alkali lasers: Model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2013-04-08

    The feasibility of supersonic operation of diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) is studied for Cs and K atoms applying model calculations, based on a semi-analytical model previously used for studying static and subsonic flow DPALs. The operation of supersonic lasers is compared with that measured and modeled in subsonic lasers. The maximum power of supersonic Cs and K lasers is found to be higher than that of subsonic lasers with the same resonator and alkali density at the laser inlet by 25% and 70%, respectively. These results indicate that for scaling-up the power of DPALs, supersonic expansion should be considered.

  10. Interfacial tension in immiscible mixtures of alkali halides.

    PubMed

    Lockett, Vera; Rukavishnikova, Irina V; Stepanov, Victor P; Tkachev, Nikolai K

    2010-02-01

    The interfacial tension of the liquid-phase interface in seven immiscible reciprocal ternary mixtures of lithium fluoride with the following alkali halides: CsCl, KBr, RbBr, CsBr, KI, RbI, and CsI was measured using the cylinder weighing method over a wide temperature range. It was shown that for all mixtures the interfacial tension gradually decreases with growing temperature. The interfacial tension of the reciprocal ternary mixtures at a given temperature increases both with the alkali cation radius (K(+) < Rb(+) < Cs(+)) and with the radius of the halogen anion (Cl(-) < Br(-) < I(-)). PMID:20094678

  11. Alkali Cation Chelation in Cold β-O-4 Tetralignol Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBlase, Andrew F.; Dziekonski, Eric T.; Hopkins, John R.; Burke, Nicole L.; Kenttamaa, Hilkka I.; McLuckey, Scott A.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2016-06-01

    Lignins are the second most abundant naturally occurring polymer class, contributing to about 30% of the organic carbon in the biosphere. Their primary function is to provide the structural integrity of plant cell walls and have recently come under consideration as a potential source of biofuels because they have an energy content similar to coal. Herein, we employ cold ion spectroscopy (UV action and IR-UV double resonance) to unravel the spectroscopic signatures of G-type alkali metal cationized (X = Li+, Na+, K+) lignin tetramers connected by β-O-4 linkages. The conformation-specific spectroscopy reveals a variety of conformers, each containing distinct infrared spectra in the OH stretching region building on recent studies on the neutral and alkali metal cationized β-O-4 dimers. Based on comparisons of our infrared spectra to density functional theory [M05-2X/6-31+G*] harmonic level calculations for structures derived from a Monte Carlo conformational search, the alkali metal ion is discovered to engage in M+-OH-O interactions as important motifs that determine the secondary structures of these complexes. This interaction disappears in the major conformer of the K+ adduct, suggesting a reemergence of a neutral dimer segment as the metal binding energy decreases. Chelation of the metal cation by oxygen lone pair(s) of nearby oxygens in the β-O-4 linkage is observed to be the predominant driving force for 3D structure around the charge site, relegating OH-O H-bonds as secondary stabilizing elements.

  12. Ternary alkali-metal and transition metal or metalloid acetylides as alkali-metal intercalation electrodes for batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, Karoly; Srajer, George; Harkay, Katherine C; Terdik, Joseph Z

    2015-02-10

    Novel intercalation electrode materials including ternary acetylides of chemical formula: A.sub.nMC.sub.2 where A is alkali or alkaline-earth element; M is transition metal or metalloid element; C.sub.2 is reference to the acetylide ion; n is an integer that is 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4 when A is alkali element and 0, 1, or 2 when A is alkaline-earth element. The alkali elements are Lithium (Li), Sodium (Na), Potassium (K), Rubidium (Rb), Cesium (Cs) and Francium (Fr). The alkaline-earth elements are Berilium (Be), Magnesium (Mg), Calcium (Ca), Strontium (Sr), Barium (Ba), and Radium (Ra). M is a transition metal that is any element in groups 3 through 12 inclusive on the Periodic Table of Elements (elements 21 (Sc) to element 30 (Zn)). In another exemplary embodiment, M is a metalloid element.

  13. Tillage and rotational effects on exchangeable and enzyme-labile phosphorus forms in conventional and organic cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transformations of crop residues and bio-fertilizers used as primary sources of nutrients for organic grain and forage production are influenced by soil management practices. The effects of management of the near-surface zone on labile phosphorus (P) forms were studied in soil under three organ...

  14. Plant-Soil Relationships of Bromus tectorum L.: Interactions among Labile Carbon Additions, Soil Invasion Status, and Fertilizer.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasion of western North America by the annual exotic grass Bromus tectorum L. (cheatgrass) has been an ecological disaster. High soil bioavailability of nitrogen is a contributing factor in the invasive potential of B. tectorum. Application of labile carbon sources to the soil can immobilize soil ...

  15. On the Labile Memory Buffer in the Attentional Blink: Masking the T2 Representation by Onset Transients Mediates the AB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jannati, Ali; Spalek, Thomas M.; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Report of a second target (T2) is impaired when presented within 500 ms of the first (T1). This attentional blink (AB) is known to cause a delay in T2 processing during which T2 must be stored in a labile memory buffer. We explored the buffer's characteristics using different types of masks after T2. These characteristics were inferred by…

  16. Thermal Analysis of Labile Trace Elements in CM and CV Carbonaceous Chondrites Using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauretta, D. S.; Klaue, B.; Blum, J. D.; Buseck, P. R.

    2001-01-01

    We developed a technique to measure the thermal release profiles of a suite of labile elements (Zn, As, Se, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, Pt, Hg, Au, Tl, Pb, Bi). Conclusions are reached about the behavior of each element during parent-body alteration. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. A Longitudinal Study of Emotion Regulation, Emotion Lability-Negativity, and Internalizing Symptomatology in Maltreated and Nonmaltreated Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim-Spoon, Jungmeen; Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2013-01-01

    The longitudinal contributions of emotion regulation and emotion lability-negativity to internalizing symptomatology were examined in a low-income sample (171 maltreated and 151 nonmaltreated children, from age 7 to 10 years). Latent difference score models indicated that for both maltreated and nonmaltreated children, emotion regulation was a…

  18. An anaerobic incubation study of metal lability in drinking water treatment residue with implications for practical reuse.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Yuan, Nannan; Pei, Yuansheng

    2014-06-15

    Drinking water treatment residue (WTR) is an inevitable by-product generated during the treatment of drinking water with coagulating agents. The beneficial reuse of WTR as an amendment for environmental remediation has attracted growing interest. In this work, we investigated the lability of Al, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sr, V and Zn in Fe/Al hydroxide-comprised WTR based on a 180-day anaerobic incubation test using fractionation, in vitro digestion and a toxicity characteristic leaching procedure. The results indicated that most metals in the WTR were stable during anaerobic incubation and that the WTR before and after incubation could be considered non-hazardous in terms of leachable metal contents according to US EPA Method 1311. However, the lability of certain metals in the WTR after incubation increased substantially, especially Mn, which may be due to the reduction effect. Therefore, although there is no evidence presented to restrict the use of WTR in the field, the lability of metals (especially Mn) in WTR requires further assessment prior to field application. In addition, fractionation (e.g., BCR) is recommended for use to determine the potential lability of metals under various conditions.

  19. Emotional Lability in Children and Adolescents with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Clinical Correlates and Familial Prevalence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobanski, Esther; Banaschewski, Tobias; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Chen, Wai; Franke, Barbara; Holtmann, Martin; Krumm, Bertram; Sergeant, Joseph; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Stringaris, Argyris; Taylor, Eric; Anney, Richard; Ebstein, Richard P.; Gill, Michael; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Oades, Robert D.; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The goal of this study was to investigate the occurrence, severity and clinical correlates of emotional lability (EL) in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and to examine factors contributing to EL and familiality of EL in youth with ADHD. Methods: One thousand, one hundred and eighty-six children with ADHD…

  20. Oral immunization of mice with attenuated Salmonella enteritidis containing a recombinant plasmid which codes for production of the B subunit of heat-labile Escherichia coli enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Clements, J D; Lyon, F L; Lowe, K L; Farrand, A L; el-Morshidy, S

    1986-01-01

    We used Salmonella enteritidis serotype dublin strain SL1438, a nonreverting, aromatic-dependent, histidine-requiring mutant, as a recipient for a recombinant plasmid coding for production of the nontoxic B subunit of the heat-labile Escherichia coli enterotoxin. The S. enteritidis derivative EL23 produced heat-labile enterotoxin subunit B that was indistinguishable from heat-labile enterotoxin subunit B produced by strains of E. coli or Salmonella typhi harboring the same plasmid. Mice immunized orally with strain EL23 developed progressively increasing mucosal and serum antibody responses to both heat-labile enterotoxin subunit B and to the lipopolysaccharide of the vaccine strain. The mucosal antibody response was shown to be immunoglobulin A specific and to be capable of neutralizing the biological activities of both E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin and cholera enterotoxin in vitro. Images PMID:3527989

  1. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  2. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  3. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  4. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  5. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  6. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  7. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  8. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  9. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  10. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  11. Rapid decomposition of labile soil organic matter inputs obscures sensitivity of heterotrophic respiration to temperature: A model analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, W. M.; Gu, L.; King, A. W.

    2003-12-01

    Labile carbon, although often a small fraction of soil organic matter (SOM), significantly affects heterotrophic respiration at short time scales because of its rapid decomposition. However, in the current literature, most soil respiration measurements are interpreted without simultaneous information on labile carbon pool dynamics. Sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature is routinely derived directly from field observations and such relationships have been used to extrapolate effects of global change (e.g. warming) on the carbon emission from SOM. Here we used a multi-pool SOM model to demonstrate the impacts of seasonal fluctuations in labile carbon pools. Labile carbon pool sizes varied widely in response to seasonal changes in representative plant material inputs and temperature even though the model was operating at an equilibrium state (in terms of annual means). Convolution of the dynamics of fast turnover carbon pools and temporal progression in temperature led to misrepresentation and misinterpretation of the heterotrophic respiration - temperature relationships estimated from bulk soil CO2 exchanges. Temperature sensitivity was overestimated when the variations of labile carbon pools and temperature were in phase and underestimated when they were out of phase. Furthermore, with normally used observation time windows (weeks to a year), temperature sensitivity was more likely to be underestimated. A distortion of temperature sensitivity (Q10) from 2 (actual, sensitive dependence on temperature) to nearly 1 (false, no dependence on temperature) was shown. Our analysis indicates that cautions must be taken when soil respiration - temperature relationships are evaluated based on bulk soil observations and that sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature estimated directly under field conditions should not be used to predict future carbon cycle climate feedbacks.

  12. Assesment of Alkali Resistance of Basalt Used as Concrete Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    al-Swaidani, Aref M.; Baddoura, Mohammad K.; Aliyan, Samira D.; Choeb, Walid

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to report a part of an ongoing research on the influence of using crushed basalt as aggregates on one of durability-related properties of concrete (i.e. alkali-silica reaction which is the most common form of Alkali-Aggregate Reaction). Alkali resistance has been assessed through several methods specified in the American Standards. Results of petrographic examination, chemical test (ASTM C289) and accelerated mortar bar test (ASTM C1260) have particularly been reported. In addition, the weight change and compressive strength of 28 days cured concrete containing basaltic aggregates were also reported after 90 days of exposure to 10% NaOH solution. Dolomite aggregate were used in the latter test for comparison. The experimental results revealed that basaltic rocks quarried from As-Swaida'a region were suitable for production of aggregates for concrete. According to the test results, the studied basalt aggregates can be classified as innocuous with regard to alkali-silica reaction. Further, the 10% sodium hydroxide attack did not affect the compressive strength of concrete.

  13. Chlor-Alkali Industry: A Laboratory Scale Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez-Sanchez, C. M.; Exposito, E.; Frias-Ferrer, A.; Gonzalez-Garaia, J.; Monthiel, V.; Aldaz, A.

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory experiment for students in the last year of degree program in chemical engineering, chemistry, or industrial chemistry is presented. It models the chlor-alkali process, one of the most important industrial applications of electrochemical technology and the second largest industrial consumer of electricity after aluminium industry.

  14. Influence of temperature on alkali stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes cells may induce alkali stress adaptation when exposed to sublethal concentrations of alkaline cleaners and sanitizers that may be frequently used in the food processing environment. In the present study, the effect of temperature on the induction and the stability of such alk...

  15. 40 CFR 721.8900 - Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8900 Substituted halogenated pyridinol, alkali salt. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified...

  16. Stabilized Alkali-Metal Ultraviolet-Band-Pass Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick; Fraschetti, George A.; Mccann, Timothy; Mayall, Sherwood D.; Dunn, Donald E.; Trauger, John T.

    1995-01-01

    Layers of bismuth 5 to 10 angstrom thick incorporated into alkali-metal ultraviolet-band-pass optical filters by use of advanced fabrication techniques. In new filters layer of bismuth helps to reduce surface migration of sodium. Sodium layer made more stable and decreased tendency to form pinholes by migration.

  17. Factors associated with alkali production from arginine in dental biofilms.

    PubMed

    Huang, X; Exterkate, R A M; ten Cate, J M

    2012-12-01

    Alkali production by oral bacteria in the oral cavity has been linked to protection against dental caries. The current study assessed various parameters associated with ammonium produced during arginine catabolism in dental biofilms. Polymicrobial biofilms were formed with saliva as the inoculum. The NH(3) level and the pH of the spent medium were used to monitor and quantitate the bacterial reactions. The presence of sucrose, a low buffer capacity, and a low pH (≤ pH 4.5) were found to hamper alkali production from arginine. The rate of alkali production exhibited an optimum around pH 5.5. Biofilms were found to produce NH(3) also from polypeptides and proteins in the medium. The biofilm age affected these processes. The experimental model proved valuable for the assessment of the collective bacterial reactions determining the overall pH outcome. This experimental approach could bridge the gap in our knowledge between pH-rise phenomena and caries susceptibility from clinical observations and studies performed on alkali-producing bacteria in well- controlled, though simplified, in vitro models. Analysis of our data supports the hypothesis that the initiation and progression of dental caries may be influenced by the relative rates of acid and base formation, which critically depend on the aforementioned parameters. PMID:23010718

  18. Aqueous alkali metal hydroxide insoluble cellulose ether membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1969-01-01

    A membrane that is insoluble in an aqueous alkali metal hydroxide medium is described. The membrane is a resin which is a water-soluble C2-C4 hydroxyalkyl cellulose ether polymer and an insolubilizing agent for controlled water sorption, a dialytic and electrodialytic membrane. It is particularly useful as a separator between electrodes or plates in an alkaline storage battery.

  19. High capacity nickel battery material doped with alkali metal cations

    DOEpatents

    Jackovitz, John F.; Pantier, Earl A.

    1982-05-18

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  20. Method of assembling and sealing an alkali metal battery

    DOEpatents

    Elkins, Perry E.; Bell, Jerry E.; Harlow, Richard A.; Chase, Gordon G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of initially assembling and then subsequently hermetically sealing a container portion of an alkali metal battery to a ceramic portion of such a battery is disclosed. Sealing surfaces are formed respectively on a container portion and a ceramic portion of an alkali metal battery. These sealing surfaces are brought into juxtaposition and a material is interposed therebetween. This interposed material is one which will diffuse into sealing relationship with both the container portion and the ceramic portion of the alkali metal battery at operational temperatures of such a battery. A pressure is applied between these sealing surfaces to cause the interposed material to be brought into intimate physical contact with such juxtaposed surfaces. A temporary sealing material which will provide a seal against a flow of alkali metal battery reactants therethrough at room temperatures and is applied over the juxtaposed sealing surfaces and material interposed therebetween. The entire assembly is heated to an operational temperature so that the interposed material diffuses into the container portion and the ceramic portion to form a hermetic seal therebetween. The pressure applied to the juxtaposed sealing surfaces is maintained in order to ensure the continuation of the hermetic seal.

  1. Method of assembling and sealing an alkali metal battery

    DOEpatents

    Elkins, P.E.; Bell, J.E.; Harlow, R.A.; Chase, G.G.

    1983-03-01

    A method of initially assembling and then subsequently hermetically sealing a container portion of an alkali metal battery to a ceramic portion of such a battery is disclosed. Sealing surfaces are formed respectively on a container portion and a ceramic portion of an alkali metal battery. These sealing surfaces are brought into juxtaposition and a material is interposed there between. This interposed material is one which will diffuse into sealing relationship with both the container portion and the ceramic portion of the alkali metal battery at operational temperatures of such a battery. A pressure is applied between these sealing surfaces to cause the interposed material to be brought into intimate physical contact with such juxtaposed surfaces. A temporary sealing material which will provide a seal against a flow of alkali metal battery reactants there through at room temperatures and is applied over the juxtaposed sealing surfaces and material interposed there between. The entire assembly is heated to an operational temperature so that the interposed material diffuses into the container portion and the ceramic portion to form a hermetic seal there between. The pressure applied to the juxtaposed sealing surfaces is maintained in order to ensure the continuation of the hermetic seal. 4 figs.

  2. Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Labile Trace Elements in H Chondrites: Evidence for Meteoroid Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S. F.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1992-07-01

    Differences have been observed between meteorite populations with vastly different terrestrial ages, i.e. Antarctic and non-Antarctic meteorite populations (Koeberl and Cassidy, 1991 and references therein). Comparisons of labile trace element contents (Wolf and Lipschutz, 1992) and induced TL parameters (Benoit and Sears, 1992) in samples from Victoria Land and Queen Maud Land, populations which also differ in mean terrestrial age (Nishiizumi et al, 1989), show significant differences consistent with different average thermal histories. These differences are consistent with the proposition that the flux of meteoritic material to Earth varied temporally. Variations in the flux of meteoritic material over time scales of 10^5 10^6 y require the existence of undispersed streams of meteoroids of asteroidal origin which were initially disputed by Wetherill ( 1986) but have since been observed (Olsson-Steele, 1988; Oberst, 1989; Halliday et al. 1990). Orbital evidence for meteoroid and asteroid streams has been independently obtained by others, particularly Halliday et al.(1990) and Drummond (1991). A group of H chondrites of various petrographic types and diverse CRE ages that yielded 16 falls from 1855 until 1895 in the month of May has been proposed to be two co-orbital meteoroid streams with a common source (R. T. Dodd, personal communication). Compositional evidence of a preterrestrial association of the proposed stream members, if it exists, might be observed in the most sensitive indicators of genetic thermal history, the labile trace elements. We report RNAA data for the concentrations of 14 trace elements, mostly labile ones, (Ag, Au, Bi, Cd, Cs, Co, Ga, In, Rb, Sb, Se, Te, Tl, and Zn) in H4-6 ordinary chondrites. Variance of elemental concentrations within a subpopulation, the members of a proposed co-orbital meteorite stream for example, could be expected to be smaller than the variance for the entire population. We utilize multivariate linear regression and

  3. Molecular dispersion energy parameters for alkali and halide ions in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, S.; Deublein, S.; Hasse, H.; Vrabec, J.

    2014-01-28

    Thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions containing alkali and halide ions are determined by molecular simulation. The following ions are studied: Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cs{sup +}, F{sup −}, Cl{sup −}, Br{sup −}, and I{sup −}. The employed ion force fields consist of one Lennard-Jones (LJ) site and one concentric point charge with a magnitude of ±1 e. The SPC/E model is used for water. The LJ size parameter of the ion models is taken from Deublein et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 084501 (2012)], while the LJ energy parameter is determined in the present study based on experimental self-diffusion coefficient data of the alkali cations and the halide anions in aqueous solutions as well as the position of the first maximum of the radial distribution function of water around the ions. On the basis of these force field parameters, the electric conductivity, the hydration dynamics of water molecules around the ions, and the enthalpy of hydration is predicted. Considering a wide range of salinity, this study is conducted at temperatures of 293.15 and 298.15 K and a pressure of 1 bar.

  4. Alkali element constraints on Earth-Moon relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, M. D.; Drake, M. J.; Jones, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    Given their range of volatilities, alkali elements are potential tracers of temperature-dependent processes during planetary accretion and formation of the Earth-Moon system. Under the giant impact hypothesis, no direct connection between the composition of the Moon and the Earth is required, and proto-lunar material does not necessarily experience high temperatures. Models calling for multiple collisions with smaller planetesimals derive proto-lunar materials mainly from the Earth's mantle and explicitly invoke vaporization, shock melting and volatility-related fractionation. Na/K, K/Rb, and Rb/Cs should all increase in response to thermal volatization, so theories which derive the Moon substantially from Earth's mantle predict these ratios will be higher in the Moon than in the primitive mantle of the Earth. Despite the overall depletion of volatile elements in the Moon, its Na/K and K/Rb are equal to or less than those of Earth. A new model presented here for the composition of Earth's continental crust, a major repository of the alkali elements, suggests the Rb/Cs of the Moon is also less than that of Earth. Fractionation of the alkali elements between Earth and Moon are in the opposite sense to predictions based on the relative volatilities of these elements, if the Moon formed by high-T processing of Earth's mantle. Earth, rather than the Moon, appears to carry a signature of volatility-related fractionation in the alkali elements. This may reflect an early episode of intense heating on Earth with the Moon's alkali budget accreting from cooler material.

  5. Preservation of labile organic matter in soils of drained thaw lakes in Northern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Carsten W.; Rethemeyer, Janet; Kao-Kniffin, Jenny; Löppmann, Sebastian; Hinkel, Kenneth; Bockheim, James

    2014-05-01

    A large number of studies predict changing organic matter (OM) dynamics in arctic soils due to global warming. In contrast to rather slowly altering bulk soil properties, single soil organic matter (SOM) fractions can provide a more detailed picture of the dynamics of differently preserved SOM pools in climate sensitive arctic regions. By the study of the chemical composition of such distinctive SOM fractions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) together with radiocarbon analyses it is possible to evaluate the stability of the major OM pools. Approximately 50-75% of Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain is covered with thaw lakes and drained thaw lakes that follow a 5,000 yr cycle of development (between creation and final drainage), thus forming a natural soil chronosequence. The drained thaw lakes offer the possibility to study SOM dynamics affected by permafrost processes over millennial timescales. In April 2010 we sampled 16 soil cores (including the active and permanent layer) reaching from young drained lakes (0-50 years since drainage) to ancient drained lakes (3000-5500 years since drainage). Air dried soil samples from soil horizons of the active and permanent layer were subjected to density fractionation in order to differentiate particulate OM and mineral associated OM. The chemical composition of the SOM fractions was analyzed by 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. For a soil core of a young and an ancient drained thaw lake basin we also analyzed the 14C content. For the studied soils we can show that up to over 25 kg OC per square meter are stored mostly as labile, easily degradable organic matter rich in carbohydrates. In contrast only 10 kg OC per square meter were sequestered as presumably more stable mineral associated OC dominated by aliphatic compounds. Comparable to soils of temperate regions, we found small POM (< 20 µm) occluded in aggregated soil structures which differed in the chemical composition from larger organic particles. This was

  6. Fluxes of phytopigments and labile organic matter to the deep ocean in the NE Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiano, M.; Pusceddu, A.; Dell'Anno, A.; Armeni, M.; Vanucci, S.; Lampitt, R. S.; Wolff, G. A.; Danovaro, R.

    Downward fluxes of labile organic matter (phytopigments, proteins and carbohydrates) were measured between September 1996 and August 1998 at three depths 1000 m, 3000 m and 4700 m (c. 100 mab) over the Porcupine Abyssal Plain (PAP, NE Atlantic), to provide detailed information on the biochemical characteristics of organic inputs to the deep sea. Temporal changes in the carbohydrate and protein fluxes were compared to carbohydrate and protein contents of the surficial sediment on the seabed beneath the traps at 4850 m depth. Fluxes of carbohydrate, protein and phytopigments (chlorophylls-a and -b, and phaeophytins-a and -b) displayed strong seasonal variations, but limited interannual variability between the two years of measurement. Fluxes of labile organic matter were characterised by strong pulses which occurred in spring and early summer, suggesting that the deep PAP area experiences relatively predictable patterns of vertical fluxes. No major quantitative differences in organic matter fluxes were observed between traps at different depths, but highest carbohydrate fluxes (time-weighted mean 2.4 mg m -2 d -1) were observed at 4700 m, whereas highest protein fluxes were observed at 1000 m (time-weighted mean 2.1 mg m -2 d -1). Carbohydrate, protein and phytopigment fluxes were correlated significantly, suggesting that settling material was associated with primary organic matter (i.e., phytodetritus) inputs from the photic layer. The contributions of chlorophyll-a and -b, and of phaeophytin-a and -b did not change significantly with increasing depth. Nor did the ratio of total phaeopigments to total chlorophylls did change greatly with depth (0.3-0.4 at both 3000 m and 4700 m depth) suggesting that degradation rates in the sinking particles were low. Protein and carbohydrate concentrations in the sediments at 4850 m depth (collected during 6 cruises between 1996 and 1998) and vertical fluxes at 3000 m depth followed inverse temporal patterns; peak concentrations

  7. Microphytobenthos in the Gulf of Trieste (Northern Adriatic Sea): Relationship with Labile Sedimentary Organic Matter and Nutrients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welker, C.; Sdrigotti, E.; Covelli, S.; Faganeli, J.

    2002-08-01

    Seasonal and inter-annual variations of microphytobenthos and inorganic nutrients were examined in sediments sited at 20 m depth in the Gulf of Trieste (Northern Adriatic Sea). Seasonal changes in water-soluble carbohydrates and proteins were studied in order to obtain information on quality and quantity of labile organic matter and the role of microphytobenthos in producing these compounds. Annual variations in microphytobenthos abundance in the surface sediment layer (0-1 cm) in the months from November 1992 to October 1993 and from July 1995 to June 1996 were similar. The vertical distribution of microphytobenthos abundance revealed a decrease with sediment depth. The depth profiles of water-soluble carbohydrates concentrations revealed a marked decrease with sediment depth. The profiles of protein concentration showed a more irregular pattern than carbohydrates without a progressive decline with sediment depth. In the upper 7 cm of surface sediment, a significant correlation between microphytobenthos abundance and both water-soluble carbohydrates and protein concentration was noticed during the months from July 1995 to March 1996. This positive relationship between the biopolymeric fraction and the microphytobenthos abundance suggest that water-soluble charbohydrates, as exocellular polymeric substances, mostly originate from the metabolic activity of microphytobenthos, whereas the proteins might be a good indicator of the microalgal biomass. Proteins in lower sediment layers could be associated with benthic heterotrophs too. The inorganic nutrient concentration, at the sediment overlying water, evidenced temporal variations with similar annual patterns. Positive correlation between microphytobenthos abundance and ammonium and silicate concentrations, at the water-sediment interface, were found. The lack of correlation between microphytobenthos and nitrite/nitrate concentration can be explained considering that, for their growth, microalgae use ammonium rather

  8. Highly Effective Pt-Based Water–Gas Shift Catalysts by Surface Modification with Alkali Hydroxide Salts

    PubMed Central

    Kusche, Matthias; Bustillo, Karen; Agel, Friederike; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we describe an economical and convenient method to improve the performance of Pt/alumina catalysts for the water–gas shift reaction through surface modification of the catalysts with alkali hydroxides according to the solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer approach. The results are in agreement with our findings reported earlier for methanol steam reforming. This report indicates that alkali doping of the catalyst plays an important role in the observed catalyst activation. In addition, the basic and hygroscopic nature of the salt coating contributes to a significant improvement in the performance of the catalyst. During the reaction, a partly liquid film of alkali hydroxide forms on the alumina surface, which increases the availability of H2O at the catalytically active sites. Kinetic studies reveal a negligible effect of the KOH coating on the rate dependence of CO and H2O partial pressures. TEM studies indicate an agglomeration of the active Pt clusters during catalyst preparation; restructuring of Pt nanoparticles occurs under reaction conditions, which leads to a highly active and stable system over 240 h time on stream. Excessive pore fillings with KOH introduce a mass transfer barrier as indicated in a volcano-shaped curve of activity versus salt loading. The optimum KOH loading was found to be 7.5 wt %. PMID:26413174

  9. Ionic conductivity in gem-quality single-crystal alkali feldspar from the Eifel: temperature, orientation and composition dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Maanaoui, Hamid; Wilangowski, Fabian; Maheshwari, Aditya; Wiemhöfer, Hans-Dieter; Abart, Rainer; Stolwijk, Nicolaas A.

    2016-05-01

    We measured the ion conductivity of single-crystal alkali feldspar originating from two different locations in the Eifel/Germany, named Volkesfeld and Rockeskyller sanidine and having potassium site fractions C_K of 0.83 and 0.71, respectively. The dc conductivities resulting from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy over the temperature range of 300-900°C show a weak composition dependence but pronounced differences between the b-direction [perp (010)] and c^{*}-direction [perp (001)] of the monoclinic feldspar structure. Conductivity activation energies obtained from the observed linear Arrhenius plots are close to 1.2 eV in all cases, which is closely similar to the activation energies of the ^{22}Na tracer diffusivity in the same crystals. Taking into account literature data on K tracer diffusion and diffusion correlation effects, the present results point to a predominance of the interstitialcy mechanism over the vacancy mechanism in mass and charge transport on the alkali sublattice in potassium-rich alkali feldspar.

  10. Highly Effective Pt-Based Water-Gas Shift Catalysts by Surface Modification with Alkali Hydroxide Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Kusche, Matthias; Bustillo, Karen; Agel, Friederike; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2015-01-29

    Here, we describe an economical and convenient method to improve the performance of Pt/alumina catalysts for the water–gas shift reaction through surface modification of the catalysts with alkali hydroxides according to the solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer approach. The results are in agreement with our findings reported earlier for methanol steam reforming. This report indicates that alkali doping of the catalyst plays an important role in the observed catalyst activation. In addition, the basic and hygroscopic nature of the salt coating contributes to a significant improvement in the performance of the catalyst. During the reaction, a partly liquid film of alkali hydroxide forms on the alumina surface, which increases the availability of H2O at the catalytically active sites. Kinetic studies reveal a negligible effect of the KOH coating on the rate dependence of CO and H2O partial pressures. In conclusion, TEM studies indicate an agglomeration of the active Pt clusters during catalyst preparation; restructuring of Pt nanoparticles occurs under reaction conditions, which leads to a highly active and stable system over 240h time on stream. Excessive pore fillings with KOH introduce a mass transfer barrier as indicated in a volcano-shaped curve of activity versus salt loading. The optimum KOH loading was found to be 7.5wt%.

  11. Highly Effective Pt-Based Water-Gas Shift Catalysts by Surface Modification with Alkali Hydroxide Salts

    DOE PAGES

    Kusche, Matthias; Bustillo, Karen; Agel, Friederike; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2015-01-29

    Here, we describe an economical and convenient method to improve the performance of Pt/alumina catalysts for the water–gas shift reaction through surface modification of the catalysts with alkali hydroxides according to the solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer approach. The results are in agreement with our findings reported earlier for methanol steam reforming. This report indicates that alkali doping of the catalyst plays an important role in the observed catalyst activation. In addition, the basic and hygroscopic nature of the salt coating contributes to a significant improvement in the performance of the catalyst. During the reaction, a partly liquid filmmore » of alkali hydroxide forms on the alumina surface, which increases the availability of H2O at the catalytically active sites. Kinetic studies reveal a negligible effect of the KOH coating on the rate dependence of CO and H2O partial pressures. In conclusion, TEM studies indicate an agglomeration of the active Pt clusters during catalyst preparation; restructuring of Pt nanoparticles occurs under reaction conditions, which leads to a highly active and stable system over 240h time on stream. Excessive pore fillings with KOH introduce a mass transfer barrier as indicated in a volcano-shaped curve of activity versus salt loading. The optimum KOH loading was found to be 7.5wt%.« less

  12. Persistent Associative Plasticity at an Identified Synapse Underlying Classical Conditioning Becomes Labile with Short-Term Homosynaptic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Schacher, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Synapses express different forms of plasticity that contribute to different forms of memory, and both memory and plasticity can become labile after reactivation. We previously reported that a persistent form of nonassociative long-term facilitation (PNA-LTF) of the sensorimotor synapses in Aplysia californica, a cellular analog of long-term sensitization, became labile with short-term heterosynaptic reactivation and reversed when the reactivation was followed by incubation with the protein synthesis inhibitor rapamycin. Here we examined the reciprocal impact of different forms of short-term plasticity (reactivations) on a persistent form of associative long-term facilitation (PA-LTF), a cellular analog of classical conditioning, which was expressed at Aplysia sensorimotor synapses when a tetanic stimulation of the sensory neurons was paired with a brief application of serotonin on 2 consecutive days. The expression of short-term homosynaptic plasticity [post-tetanic potentiation or homosynaptic depression (HSD)], or short-term heterosynaptic plasticity [serotonin-induced facilitation or neuropeptide Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2 (FMRFa)-induced depression], at synapses expressing PA-LTF did not affect the maintenance of PA-LTF. The kinetics of HSD was attenuated at synapses expressing PA-LTF, which required activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Both PA-LTF and the attenuated kinetics of HSD were reversed by either a transient blockade of PKC activity or a homosynaptic, but not heterosynaptic, reactivation when paired with rapamycin. These results indicate that two different forms of persistent synaptic plasticity, PA-LTF and PNA-LTF, expressed at the same synapse become labile when reactivated by different stimuli. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Activity-dependent changes in neural circuits mediate long-term memories. Some forms of long-term memories become labile and can be reversed with specific types of reactivations, but the mechanism is complex. At the cellular level

  13. Dissolved organic carbon lability and stable isotope shifts during microbial decomposition in a tropical river system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geeraert, N.; Omengo, F. O.; Govers, G.; Bouillon, S.

    2016-01-01

    A significant amount of carbon is transported to the ocean as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in rivers. During transport, it can be transformed through microbial consumption and photochemical oxidation. In dark incubation experiments with water from the Tana River, Kenya, we examined the consumption of DOC through microbial decomposition and the associated change in its carbon stable isotope composition (δ13C). In 15 of the 18 incubations, DOC concentrations decreased significantly by 10 to 60 %, with most of the decomposition taking place within the first 24-48 h. After 8 days, the remaining DOC was up to 3 ‰ more depleted in 13C compared with the initial pool, and the change in δ13C correlated strongly with the fraction of DOC remaining. We hypothesize that the shift in δ13C is consistent with greater microbial lability of DOC originating from herbaceous C4 vegetation than DOC derived from woody C3 vegetation in the semi-arid lower Tana. The results complement earlier findings that the stable isotope concentration of riverine DOC does not necessarily reflect the proportion of C3 and C4-derived DOC in the catchment: besides spatial distribution patterns of different vegetation types, processing within the river can further influence the δ13C of riverine OC.

  14. An improved high pressure freezing and freeze substitution method to preserve the labile vaccinia virus nucleocapsid.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Desyree Murta; Moussatche, Nissin; Condit, Richard C

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, high pressure freezing and freeze substitution have been widely used for electron microscopy to reveal viral and cellular structures that are difficult to preserve. Vaccinia virus, a member of the Poxviridae family, presents one of the most complex viral structures. The classical view of vaccinia virus structure consists of an envelope surrounding a biconcave core, with a lateral body in each concavity of the core. This classical view was challenged by Peters and Muller (1963), who demonstrated the presence of a folded tubular structure inside the virus core and stated the difficulty in visualizing this structure, possibly because it is labile and cannot be preserved by conventional sample preparation. Therefore, this tubular structure, now called the nucleocapsid, has been mostly neglected over the years. Earlier studies were able to preserve the nucleocapsid, but with low efficiency. In this study, we report the protocol (and troubleshooting) that resulted in preservation of the highest numbers of nucleocapsids in several independent preparations. Using this protocol, we were able to demonstrate an interdependence between the formation of the virus core wall and the nucleocapsid, leading to the hypothesis that an interaction exists between the major protein constituents of these compartments, A3 (core wall) and L4 (nucleocapsid). Our results show that high pressure freezing and freeze substitution can be used in more in-depth studies concerning the nucleocapsid structure and function.

  15. Labile male morphology and intraspecific male polymorphism in the Philotrypesis fig wasps.

    PubMed

    Jousselin, Emmanuelle; van Noort, Simon; Greeff, Jaco M

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the evolution of male morphology in the fig wasps belonging to the genus Philotrypesis (Chalcidoidea, Sycorectinae). We first reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships of Philotrypesis associated with African figs using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. We then determine male morphotypes in the species included in our phylogeny and show that intraspecific polymorphism is common. Most species present two types of males and some species have up to three types. These morphotypes are believed to represent alternative mating tactics: some males show morphological adaptations to fighting, others are winged dispersers and others are small sneakers. Mapping out these variations onto our phylogeny reveals that the combination of morphs changes randomly along the branches of the tree. Both parsimony and likelihood approaches indicate that there has been at least one transition from dimorphism to trimorphism, several gains and losses of the small morph and two independent acquisitions of the winged morph. Using maximum likelihood analyses of character evolution, we estimate transition rates for each morph and show that the evolution of each type of morph are not correlated and that forward and backward transition rates are not significantly different. Our results altogether suggest that male morphology is evolutionary labile, it responds quickly to selection imposed by the mating environment. This study, also suggests that seemingly complex phenotypes, such as winged males, can evolve several times and can even be recreated after having been lost.

  16. Evaluation of a ganglioside immunosorbent assay for detection of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed

    Bäck, E; Svennerholm, A M; Holmgren, J; Möllby, R

    1979-12-01

    The GM1 ganglioside enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (GM1-ELISA), an immunological method for detection of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), was quantitatively and qualitatively compared with the conventional adrenal cell test for the identification of LT-producing strains. A micromodification model of the assay was developed. Enterotoxin preparations from 120 E. coli isolates from individuals with diarrhea, which had been previously shown to be enterotoxigenic by the adrenal cell test, and from 44 control strains of E. coli were compared in parallel by the two methods. Quantitatively the covariation of the enterotoxin titers was highly significant (RS = 0.98, P less than 0.001), the GM1-ELISA being somewhat more sensitive than the adrenal cell test. The methodological error was less than 5% in both tests. Qualitatively the overall agreement for positive and negative reactions for the two methods was 89%. The GM1-ELISA is practical for routine use in the diagnosis of enterotoxigenic E. coli, especially in laboratories without facilities for cell culture.

  17. Stabilized liquid membrane device (SLMD) for the passive, integrative sampling of labile metals in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brumbaugh, W.G.; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Manahan, S.E.

    2002-01-01

    A stabilized liquid membrane device (SLMD) is described for potential use as an in situ, passive, integrative sampler for cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in natural waters. The SLMD (patent pending) consists of a 2.5-cm-wide by 15-cm-long strip of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) layflat tubing containing 1 mL of an equal mixture (v/v) of oleic acid (cis-9-octadecenoic acid) and EMO-8Q (7-[4-ethyl-1-methyloctyl]-8-quinolinol). The reagent mixture continuously diffuses to the exterior surface of the LDPE membrane, and provides for sequestration of several divalent metals for up to several weeks. Depending on sampler configuration, concentration factors of several thousand can be realized for these metal ions after just a few days. In addition to in situ deployment, the SLMD may be useful for laboratory determination of labile metal species in grab samples. Methods for minimizing the effects of water flow on the sampling rate are currently under investigation.

  18. Facile synthesis of acid-labile polymers with pendent ortho esters.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing; Ji, Ran; Gao, Shi-Juan; Du, Fu-Sheng; Li, Zi-Chen

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a facile approach for preparation of acid-labile and biocompatible polymers with pendent cyclic ortho esters, which is based on the efficient and mild reactions between cyclic ketene acetal (CKA) and hydroxyl groups. Three CKAs, 2-ethylidene-1,3-dioxane (EDO), 2-ethylidene-1,3-dioxolane (EDL), and 2-ethylidene-4- methyl-1,3-dioxolane (EMD) were prepared from the corresponding cyclic vinyl acetals by catalytic isomerization of the double bond. The reaction of CKAs with different alcohols and diols was examined using trace of p-toluenesulfonic acid as a catalyst. For the monohydroxyl alcohols, cyclic ortho esters were formed by simple addition of the hydroxyl group toward CKAs with ethanol showing a much greater reactivity than iso-propanol. When 1,2- or 1,3-diols were used to react with the CKAs, we observed the isomerized cyclic ortho esters besides the simple addition products. Biocompatible polyols, that is, poly(2-hydroxyethyl acrylate) (PHEA) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were then modified with CKAs, and the degree of substitution of the pendent ortho esters can be easily tuned by changing feed ratio. Both the small molecule ortho esters and the CKA-modified polymers demonstrate the pH-dependent hydrolysis profiles, which depend also on the chemical structure of the ortho esters as well as the polymer hydrophobicity. PMID:22176024

  19. Uncaria tomentosa (Willd. ex. Roem. & Schult.) DC. and Eucalyptus globulus Labill. interactions when administered with diazepam.

    PubMed

    Quílez, A M; Saenz, M T; García, M D

    2012-03-01

    The safety of natural drugs is defined by their side effects and toxicity as well as any interactions that may occur if taken together with other drugs. In particular, it is essential to identify synergies, antagonisms and other types of interference with other drugs so that the correct choice can be made from the range of phytomedicines available. The aim of this work was to investigate changes in the pharmacological effect of diazepam (2 mg/kg) on the CNS when administered together with a medicinal plant: Eucalyptus globulus Labill. (eucalyptus 6 mg/kg and 3.25 mg/kg) or Uncaria tomentosa (Willd. ex Roem. & Schult). DC. (cat's claw, 7.14 mg/kg and 3.54 mg/kg). Various different psychopharmacological effects were evaluated through assessing exploratory behavior, muscle relaxation and spontaneous motor activity. Both phytodrugs interacted with the benzodiazepine. Eucalyptus had an inhibitory effect at both doses and could be useful at the highest dose in cases where the desired effect of the depressant is moderate anxiolytic activity without marked muscle relaxation. Cat's claw, at both doses, enhanced the action of diazepam on spontaneous motor activity and, at the lowest dose, exploratory ability. These herbal drugs could be useful for their antiinflammatory activity in musculoskeletal pathologies treated with benzodiazepines.

  20. Labile phases and the ocean's strontium cycle: A method of sediment trap sampling for acantharians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Renate E.; Betzer, Peter R.

    Acantharians are abundant marine planktonic protists and are the only marine organisms that use strontium as a major structural component. These organisms incorporate Sr in the form of celestite (SrSO4) into their skeletons and cysts [Odum, 1951]. Because the ocean is undersaturated with respect to SrSO4 [North, 1974], settling skeletons of dead acantharians and acantharian cysts are readily dissolved. After an initial burst of activity following their discovery in the mid-nineteenth century [Haeckel, 1887; Popofsky, 1909; Schewiakoff, 1926], the study of acantharians lagged during the mid-twentieth century. In part, this hiatus was related to the fact that acantharians are not preserved in the sedimentary record. Another contributing factor was the evolution in sampling and preservation techniques that mitigated against the preservation of these labile phases [Beers and Stewart, 1970; Michaels, 1988]. On the other hand, their susceptibility to dissolution implicates them as important mediators of the ocean's Sr budget [Bernstein et al., 1987]. Our short-term and relatively shallow sediment trap deployments, lack of preservatives, and rapid sample processing permitted the collection of the often elusive acantharian specimens.

  1. Assessing the labile arsenic pool in contaminated paddy soils by isotopic dilution techniques and simple extractions.

    PubMed

    Stroud, Jacqueline L; Khan, M Asaduzzman; Norton, Gareth J; Islam, M Rafiqul; Dasgupta, Tapash; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Price, Adam H; Meharg, Andrew A; McGrath, Steve P; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2011-05-15

    Arsenic (As) contamination of paddy soils threatens rice cultivation and the health of populations relying on rice as a staple crop. In the present study, isotopic dilution techniques were used to determine the chemically labile (E value) and phytoavailable (L value) pools of As in a range of paddy soils from Bangladesh, India, and China and two arable soils from the UK varying in the degree and sources of As contamination. The E value accounted for 6.2-21.4% of the total As, suggesting that a large proportion of soil As is chemically nonlabile. L values measured with rice grown under anaerobic conditions were generally larger than those under aerobic conditions, indicating increased potentially phytoavailable pool of As in flooded soils. In an incubation study, As was mobilized into soil pore water mainly as arsenite under flooded conditions, with Bangladeshi soils contaminated by irrigation of groundwater showing a greater potential of As mobilization than other soils. Arsenic mobilization was best predicted by phosphate-extractable As in the soils. PMID:21504212

  2. Energy evaluation of forest residues originated from Eucalyptus globulus Labill in Galicia.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Regueira, L; Proupín-Castiñeiras, J; Rodríguez-Añón, J A

    2002-03-01

    The possibility of retrieving the energy contained in forest residues originating from wood exploitation in Galicia (Spain) is evaluated. This study was made on Eucalyptus globulus Labill occupying a forest surface of 240000 ha. This species plays an important role in the economical development of Galicia, as it is the main forest species for production of pulp. Sampling was made over 1999 in seven different zones, three main stations plus four selected for comparison, situated in Galicia. The residues originating from cutting were sorted into three different groups and their calorific values were measured by static bomb calorimetry. These calorific values, close to 7200 kJ kg(-1), make possible the use of this residual biomass as an energy source. Calorific values were measured by static bomb calorimeter in an oxygen atmosphere. Flammability was determined using a standard epiradiator. Simultaneously, some other parameters, elementary chemical composition, heavy metal contents, moisture, density, ash percentage after combustion in the bomb, and main bioclimatic characteristics, were also determined. PMID:11848377

  3. Development and bioorthogonal activation of palladium-labile prodrugs of gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jason T; Dawson, John C; Fraser, Craig; Rybski, Witold; Torres-Sánchez, Carmen; Bradley, Mark; Patton, E Elizabeth; Carragher, Neil O; Unciti-Broceta, Asier

    2014-06-26

    Bioorthogonal chemistry has become one of the main driving forces in current chemical biology, inspiring the search for novel biocompatible chemospecific reactions for the past decade. Alongside the well-established labeling strategies that originated the bioorthogonal paradigm, we have recently proposed the use of heterogeneous palladium chemistry and bioorthogonal Pd(0)-labile prodrugs to develop spatially targeted therapies. Herein, we report the generation of biologically inert precursors of cytotoxic gemcitabine by introducing Pd(0)-cleavable groups in positions that are mechanistically relevant for gemcitabine's pharmacological activity. Cell viability studies in pancreatic cancer cells showed that carbamate functionalization of the 4-amino group of gemcitabine significantly reduced (>23-fold) the prodrugs' cytotoxicity. The N-propargyloxycarbonyl (N-Poc) promoiety displayed the highest sensitivity to heterogeneous palladium catalysis under biocompatible conditions, with a reaction half-life of less than 6 h. Zebrafish studies with allyl, propargyl, and benzyl carbamate-protected rhodamines confirmed N-Poc as the most suitable masking group for implementing in vivo bioorthogonal organometallic chemistry. PMID:24867590

  4. Interaction between environmental factors affects the accumulation of root proteins in hydroponically grown Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.).

    PubMed

    Bedon, Frank; Majada, Juan; Feito, Isabel; Chaumeil, Philippe; Dupuy, Jean-William; Lomenech, Anne-Marie; Barre, Aurélien; Gion, Jean-Marc; Plomion, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.) is used for pulp and paper production worldwide. In this report we studied changes in protein expression in one osmotically stressed elite clone widely used in industrial plantations in Spain. High molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used as an osmoticum in the growing medium. Roots of rooted cuttings were sampled after 3 and 36 h of treatment. Water potential and abscissic acid content were measured in shoot and root apices to characterize the physiological states of the plants. Total soluble proteins from roots were extracted and separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Gels were stained with Coomassie brillant blue for quantitative analysis of protein accumulation. From a total of 406 reproducible spots, 34 were found to be differentially expressed depending on treatment (osmotic versus control condition) and/or stress duration (3 h versus 36 h), and were further characterized by tandem mass spectrometry. Several proteins were reliably identified including adenosine kinase, actin, stress-related proteins as well as proteins associated to cellular processes, among which some residents of the endoplasmic reticulum. This study constitutes the first investigation of the root proteome in this important forest tree genus. PMID:20974537

  5. Nitric oxide is necessary for labilization of a consolidated context memory during reconsolidation in terrestrial snails.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Pavel M; Roshchin, Matvey; Timoshenko, Alia K; Gainutdinov, Khalil L; Bogodvid, Tatiana K; Muranova, Lyudmila N; Zuzina, Alena B; Korshunova, Tatiana A

    2014-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is known to be involved in associative memory formation. We investigated the influence of blocking NO function on the reconsolidation of context memory in terrestrial snails (Helix lucorum L.). After a 10 day session of electric shocks in one context only, context memory in snails was observed in test sessions as the significant difference of amplitudes of withdrawal responses to tactile stimuli in two different contexts. After a 1 day rest, a session of 'reminding' was performed, preceded by injection in different groups of the snails with either vehicle or combination of the protein synthesis blocker anisomycin (ANI) with one of the following drugs: the NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO, the NO-synthase inhibitors N-omega-nitro-L-arginin, nitroindazole and NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride, or the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine. Testing the context memory at different time intervals after the reminder under ANI injection showed that the context memory was impaired at 24 h and later, whereas the reminder under combined injection of ANI and each of the NO-synthase inhibitors used or the NO scavenger showed no impairment of long-term context memory. Injection of the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine with or without reminder had no effect on context memory. The results obtained demonstrated that NO is necessary for labilization of a consolidated context memory.

  6. A novel nanoparticulate system for sustained delivery of acid-labile lansoprazole.

    PubMed

    Alai, Milind Sadashiv; Lin, Wen Jen

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, an effort was made to develop the Eudragit RS100 based nanoparticulate system for sustained delivery of an acid-labile drug, lansoprazole (LPZ). LPZ-loaded Eudragit RS100 nanoparticles (ERSNPs) were prepared by oil-in-water emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The effects of various formulation variables such as polymer concentration, drug amount and solvent composition on physicochemical performance of nanoparticles and in vitro drug release were investigated. All nanoparticles were spherical with particle size 198.9 ± 8.6-376.9 ± 5.6 nm and zeta potential +35.1 ± 1.7 to +40.2 ± 0.8 mV. The yield of nanoparticles was unaffected by change of these three variables. However, the drug loading and encapsulation efficiency were affected by polymer concentration and drug amount. On the other hand, the particle size of nanoparticles was significantly affected by polymer concentration and internal phase composition due to influence of droplet size during emulsification process. All nanoparticles prolonged drug release for 24h which was dominated by a combination of drug diffusion and polymer chain relaxation. The fastest and the slowest release rates were observed in C2-1002-10/0 and C8-4001-10/0, respectively, based on the release rate constant (k). Thus, the developed nanoparticles possessed a potential as a nano-carrier to sustain drug delivery for treatment of acid related disorders.

  7. Heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli promotes intestinal colonization of Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Verbrugghe, Elin; Van Parys, Alexander; Leyman, Bregje; Boyen, Filip; Arnouts, Sven; Lundberg, Urban; Ducatelle, Richard; Van den Broeck, Wim; Yekta, Maryam Atef; Cox, Eric; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank

    2015-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of infantile and travellers' diarrhoea, which poses a serious health burden, especially in developing countries. In addition, ETEC bacteria are a major cause of illness and death in neonatal and recently weaned pigs. The production of a heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) promotes the colonization and pathogenicity of ETEC and may exacerbate co-infections with other enteric pathogens such as Salmonella enterica. We showed that the intraintestinal presence of LT dramatically increased the intestinal Salmonella Typhimurium load in experimentally inoculated pigs. This could not be explained by direct alteration of the invasion or survival capacity of Salmonella in enterocytes, in vitro. However, we demonstrated that LT affects the enteric mucus layer composition in a mucus-secreting goblet cell line by significantly decreasing the expression of mucin 4. The current results show that LT alters the intestinal mucus composition and aggravates a Salmonella Typhimurium infection, which may result in the exacerbation of the diarrhoeal illness. PMID:26616654

  8. Expression of functional pentameric heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit of Escherichia coli in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung-Gu; Kim, Jung-Ae; Chung, Hea-Jong; Kim, Tae-Geum; Kim, Jung-Mi; Lee, Kyung-Ryul; Park, Seung-Moon; Yang, Moon-Sik; Kim, Dae-Hyuk

    2009-05-01

    Although the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) has already been expressed in several different systems, including prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, studies regarding the synthesis of LTB into oligomeric structures of pentameric size in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been limited. Therefore, this study used a functional signal peptide of the amylase 1A protein from rice to direct the yeast-expressed LTB towards the endoplasmic reticulum to oligomerize with the expected pentameric size. The expression and assembly of the recombinant LTB were confirmed in both the cell-free extract and culture media of the recombinant strain using a Western blot analysis. The binding of the LTB pentamers to intestinal epithelial cell membrane glycolipid receptors was further verified using a GM1-ganglioside enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (GM1-ELISA). On the basis of the GM1-ELISA results, pentameric LTB proteins comprised approximately 0.5-2.0% of the total soluble proteins, and the maximum quantity of secreted LTB was estimated to be 3 mg/l after a 3-day cultivation period. Consequently, the synthesis of LTB monomers and their assembly into biologically active oligomers in a recombinant S. cerevisiae strain demonstrated the feasibility of using a GRAS microorganism-based adjuvant, as well as the development of carriers against mucosal disease. PMID:19494699

  9. Lability of GABAA receptor function in human partial epilepsy: possible relationship to hypometabolism.

    PubMed

    Pumain, René; Ahmed, Mounia Sid; Kurcewicz, Irène; Trottier, Suzanne; Louvel, Jacques; Turak, Baris; Devaux, Bertrand; Laschet, Jacques

    2008-11-01

    The function of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) is maintained by endogenous phosphorylation. We have shown that the corresponding kinase is the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), using the locally produced glycolytic ATP. In addition, using cerebral tissue obtained during curative surgery for epilepsy, we showed that both the endogenous phosphorylation and the GABA(A)R function are significantly reduced in the "epileptogenic" cerebral cortex when compared to "control" tissue. This dysfunction likely contributes to seizure generation and/or transition from the interictal to the ictal state. Glucose utilization is decreased in the epileptogenic cortex of patients with partial epilepsy in the interictal state, but the relationship to the disorder remains unclear. We propose that this hypometabolism is related to the deficiency in the endogenous phosphorylation of GABA(A)R and the resulting greater lability of GABAergic inhibition. Several lines of evidences indeed suggest that GABAergic inhibition is costly in terms of metabolic consumption. The deficiency of this glycolysis-dependent mechanism may thus link epileptogenicity to glucose hypometabolism. The antiepileptic effect of ketogenic diets may be mediated by the subsequent rise in the NADH/NAD(+) index, which favors GABA(A)R endogenous phosphorylation and should contribute to restoration of GABAergic inhibition in the epileptogenic zone.

  10. Phospholipase C (heat-labile hemolysin) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: purification and preliminary characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Berka, R M; Vasil, M L

    1982-01-01

    Phospholipase C (heat-labile hemolysin) was purified from Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture supernatants to near homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by a novel application of DEAE-Sephacel chromatography. Enzymatic activity remained associated with DEAE-Sephacel even in the presence of 1 M NaCl, but was eluted with a linear gradient of 0 to 5% tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide. Elution from DEAE-Sephacel was also obtained with 2% lysophosphatidylcholine, and to a lesser extent with 2% phosphorylcholine, but not at all with choline. The enzyme was highly active toward phospholipids possessing substituted ammonium groups (e.g., phosphatidycholine, lysophosphatidylcholine, and sphingomyelin); however, it had little if any activity toward phospholipids lacking substituted ammonium groups (e.g., phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphaditylglycerol). Collectively, these data suggest that phospholipase C from P. aeruginosa exhibits high affinity for substituted ammonium groups, but requires an additional hydrophobic moiety for optimum binding. The specific activity of the purified enzyme preparation increased 1,900-fold compared with that of culture supernatants. The molecular weight of the phospholipase C was estimated to be 78,000 by both sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Sephacryl S-200 column chromatography and was 76,000 by high-performance size exclusion chromatography. The isoelectric point was 5.5. Amino acid analysis showed that phospholipase C was rich in glycine, serine, threonine, aspartyl, glutamyl, and aromatic amino acids, but was cystine free. Images PMID:6811552

  11. Acid-Labile Subunit Deficiency and Growth Failure: Description of Two Novel Cases

    PubMed Central

    David, A; Rose, S.J.; Miraki-Moud, F.; Metherell, L.A.; Savage, M.O.; Clark, A.J.L.; Camacho-Hübner, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Mutations in the acid-labile subunit (ALS) gene (IGFALS) have been associated with circulating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) deficiency and short stature. Whether severe pubertal delay is also part of the phenotype remains controversial due to the small number of cases reported. We report 2 children with a history of growth failure due to novel IGFALS mutations. Methods The growth hormone receptor gene (GHR) and IGFALS were analyzed by direct sequencing. Ternary complex formation was studied by size exclusion chromatography. Results Two boys of 13.3 and 10.6 years, with pubertal stages 2 and 1, had mild short stature (−3.2 and −2.8 SDS, respectively) and a biochemical profile suggestive of growth hormone resistance. No defects were identified in the GHR. Patient 1 was homozygous for the IGFALS missense mutation P73L. Patient 2 was a compound heterozygote for the missense mutation L134Q and a novel GGC to AG substitution at position 546–548 (546–548delGGCinsAG). The latter causes a frameshift and the appearance of a premature stop codon. Size exclusion chromatography showed no peaks corresponding to ternary and binary complexes in either patient. Conclusion Screening of the IGFALS is important in children with short stature associated with low serum IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and ALS. PMID:20389102

  12. Membrane Transport Behavior and the Lability of Chloride on Polyphosphazenes Bearing Bulky Substituents

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart; John R. Klaehn; Christopher J. Orme

    2007-08-01

    Polyphosphazenes are an intriguing class of inorganic polymers where much of their functionality is derived from pendant groups attached to phosphorus. The backbone of the polymer consists of alternating phosphorus and nitrogen atoms where the bonding is conventionally drawn as alternating double and single bonds. Orbital nodes are located at each phosphorus atom resulting in electron delocalization between phosphorus atoms, but not through them. Thus, the polymer backbone has a high degree of flexibility where halogens or other leaving groups can be effectively displaced with nucleophiles. In this paper, the first known example of a polyphosphazene with large quantities of non-labile chloride substituents induced by neighboring group steric effects will be discussed. This example is the result of the substitution of poly[bis-chlorophosphazene] with the sodium salt of 3,5-di-tert-butylphenol where only 60% of the chlorines were displaced. This contrasts with the 100% substitution observed with other phenols (phenol, 4-tert-butylphenol, 3-methylphenol, etc.).

  13. Assessing the labile arsenic pool in contaminated paddy soils by isotopic dilution techniques and simple extractions.

    PubMed

    Stroud, Jacqueline L; Khan, M Asaduzzman; Norton, Gareth J; Islam, M Rafiqul; Dasgupta, Tapash; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Price, Adam H; Meharg, Andrew A; McGrath, Steve P; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2011-05-15

    Arsenic (As) contamination of paddy soils threatens rice cultivation and the health of populations relying on rice as a staple crop. In the present study, isotopic dilution techniques were used to determine the chemically labile (E value) and phytoavailable (L value) pools of As in a range of paddy soils from Bangladesh, India, and China and two arable soils from the UK varying in the degree and sources of As contamination. The E value accounted for 6.2-21.4% of the total As, suggesting that a large proportion of soil As is chemically nonlabile. L values measured with rice grown under anaerobic conditions were generally larger than those under aerobic conditions, indicating increased potentially phytoavailable pool of As in flooded soils. In an incubation study, As was mobilized into soil pore water mainly as arsenite under flooded conditions, with Bangladeshi soils contaminated by irrigation of groundwater showing a greater potential of As mobilization than other soils. Arsenic mobilization was best predicted by phosphate-extractable As in the soils.

  14. Chemical reactivity of labile sulfur of iron-sulfur proteins. The reaction of triphenyl phosphine.

    PubMed

    Manabe, T; Goda, K; Kimura, T

    1976-04-23

    The reaction of triphenyl phosphine to iron-sulfur proteins from adrenal cortex mitochondria, spinach chloroplasts, and Clostridium pasteurianum was investigated. As ethanol concentrations in the reaction mixture increased, the rate of the reaction decreased. In the simultaneous presence of 1 M KC1 and 5 M urea, the reaction rate reached at maximum. Under these conditions the initial rates of the decolorization reaction by the phosphine were found to be 8.7, 0.88, and 1.8 nmol of ferredoxin per min at 25 degrees C for adrenal, spinach, and clostridial ferredoxins, respectively. The kinetic curves for the reaction of the phosphine sulfide formation, the loss of labile sulfur, and the deterioriation of visible absorption showed a similar pattern with a comparable rate. During this reaction, the complete reduction of ferric ions present in ferredoxin was observed with a fast rate under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. These results suggest that the iron atoms in ferredoxin are first reduced by the intramolecular reductants in the presence of triphenyl phosphine with the concomitant formation of S2-2, which then reacts with triphenyl phosphine resulting in the formation of triphenyl phosphine sulfide.

  15. Involvement of intracellular labile zinc in suppression of DEVD-caspase activity in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ho, L H; Ratnaike, R N; Zalewski, P D

    2000-02-01

    Age-related tissue Zn deficiency may contribute to neuronal and glial cell death by apoptosis in Alzheimer's dementia. To investigate this, we studied the effects of increasing or decreasing the levels of intracellular labile Zn on apoptosis of human neuroblastoma BE(2)-C cells in vitro. BE(2)-C cells were primed for 18 h with butyrate (1 mM) before addition of staurosporine (1 microM), an effector enzyme of apoptosis, for a further 3 h to induce DEVD-caspase activity. An increase in intracellular Zn using Zn ionophore pyrithione suppressed DEVD-caspase activity, while a decrease in intracellular Zn induced by Zn chelator TPEN mimicked staurosporine by activating DEVD-caspase in butyrate-primed cells. The distribution of intracellular Zn in the cells was demonstrated with the UV-excitable Zn-specific fluorophore Zinquin. Confocal images showed distinct cytoplasmic and cytoskeletal fluorescence. We propose that Zn decreases the level of apoptosis in neuronal cells exposed to toxins, possibly by stabilizing their cytoskeleton.

  16. Interaction between environmental factors affects the accumulation of root proteins in hydroponically grown Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.).

    PubMed

    Bedon, Frank; Majada, Juan; Feito, Isabel; Chaumeil, Philippe; Dupuy, Jean-William; Lomenech, Anne-Marie; Barre, Aurélien; Gion, Jean-Marc; Plomion, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.) is used for pulp and paper production worldwide. In this report we studied changes in protein expression in one osmotically stressed elite clone widely used in industrial plantations in Spain. High molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used as an osmoticum in the growing medium. Roots of rooted cuttings were sampled after 3 and 36 h of treatment. Water potential and abscissic acid content were measured in shoot and root apices to characterize the physiological states of the plants. Total soluble proteins from roots were extracted and separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Gels were stained with Coomassie brillant blue for quantitative analysis of protein accumulation. From a total of 406 reproducible spots, 34 were found to be differentially expressed depending on treatment (osmotic versus control condition) and/or stress duration (3 h versus 36 h), and were further characterized by tandem mass spectrometry. Several proteins were reliably identified including adenosine kinase, actin, stress-related proteins as well as proteins associated to cellular processes, among which some residents of the endoplasmic reticulum. This study constitutes the first investigation of the root proteome in this important forest tree genus.

  17. Effect of pH on Metal Lability in Drinking Water Treatment Residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Yuan, Nannan; Pei, Yuansheng

    2014-01-01

    Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs), by-products generated during treatment of drinking water, can be reused as environmental amendments to remediate contamination. However, this beneficial reuse may be hampered by the potential release of toxic contaminants (e.g., metals) in the WTRs. In present study, batch tests and then fractionation, in vitro digestion, and the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure were used to investigate the release and extractability of metals in the Fe/Al hydroxides comprised WTRs under differing pH. The results demonstrated that significant release from WTRs for Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Fe, Mg, Mn, Pb, Sr, and Zn occurred under low pH (acid condition); for As, Mo, and V under high pH (alkaline condition); and for Al, Cu, and Ni under both conditions. In comparison, most metals in the WTRs were more easily released under low pH, but the release was stable at a relatively low level between pH 6 and 9, especially under alkaline conditions. Further analysis indicated that the chemical extractability and bioaccessibility of many metals was found to increase in the WTRs after being leached, even though the leached WTRs could still be considered nonhazardous. These results demonstrated that pH had a substantial effect on the lability of metals in WTRs. Overall, caution should be used when considering pH conditions during WTRs reuse to avoid potential metal pollution.

  18. Determination of labile copper, cobalt, and chromium in textile mill wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Crain, J.S.; Essling, A.M.; Kiely, J.T.

    1997-01-01

    Copper, chromium, and cobalt species present in filtered wastewater effluent were separated by cation exchange and reverse phase chromatography. Three sample fractions were obtained: one containing metal cations (i.e., trivalent Cr, divalent Cu, and divalent Co), one containing organic species (including metallized dyes), and one containing other unretained species. The metal content of each fraction was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The sum of the corrected data was compared to the metal content of a filtered effluent aliquot digested totally with fuming sulfuric acid. Other aliquots of the filtered effluent were spiked with the metals of interest and digested to confirm chemical yield and accuracy. Method detection limits were consistently below 20 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Cu, 30 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Co, and 10 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Cr. Spike recoveries for undifferentiated Cu and Cr were statistically indistinguishable from unity; although Co spike recoveries were slightly low ({approximately}95%), its chemical yield was 98%. Copper retention on the sodium sulfonate cation exchange resin was closely correlated with the [EDTA]/[Cu] ratio, suggesting that metals retained upon the cation exchange column were assignable to labile metal species; however, mass balances for all three elements, though reasonable ({approximately}90%), were significantly different from unity. Mechanical factors may have contributed to the material loss, but other data suggest that some metal species reacted irreversibly with the reverse phase column. 3 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Sample storage-induced changes in the quantity and quality of soil labile organic carbon

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shou-Qin; Cai, Hui-Ying; Chang, Scott X.; Bhatti, Jagtar S.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of sample storage methods on the quantity and quality of labile soil organic carbon are not fully understood even though their effects on basic soil properties have been extensively studied. We studied the effects of air-drying and frozen storage on cold and hot water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Cold- and hot-WSOC in air-dried and frozen-stored soils were linearly correlated with those in fresh soils, indicating that storage proportionally altered the extractability of soil organic carbon. Air-drying but not frozen storage increased the concentrations of cold-WSOC and carbohydrate in cold-WSOC, while both increased polyphenol concentrations. In contrast, only polyphenol concentration in hot-WSOC was increased by air-drying and frozen storage, suggesting that hot-WSOC was less affected by sample storage. The biodegradability of cold- but not hot-WSOC was increased by air-drying, while both air-drying and frozen storage increased humification index and changed specific UV absorbance of both cold- and hot-WSOC, indicating shifts in the quality of soil WSOC. Our results suggest that storage methods affect the quantity and quality of WSOC but not comparisons between samples, frozen storage is better than air-drying if samples have to be stored, and storage should be avoided whenever possible when studying the quantity and quality of both cold- and hot-WSOC. PMID:26617054

  20. Thermodynamic N-donor trans influence in labile pseudo-octahedral zinc complexes: a delusion?

    PubMed

    Aboshyan-Sorgho, Lilit; Lathion, Timothée; Guénée, Laure; Besnard, Céline; Piguet, Claude

    2014-12-15

    While the forces responsible for the chelate effect are well-established in coordination chemistry, the origin and implementation of the related thermodynamic trans influence remains debatable. This work illustrates a simple approach for quantifying this effect in labile pseudo-octahedral [Zn(Lk)3](2+) complexes lacking stereochemical preferences (Lk = L1–L4 are unsymmetrical didentate α,α′-diimine ligands). In line with statistics, the triply degenerated meridional isomers mer-[Zn(Lk)3](2+) are stabilized by 0.8 ≤ ΔGexch(mer→fac) ≤ 4.2 kJ/mol over their nondegenerated facial analogues fac-[Zn(Lk)3](2+) and therefore display no apparent trans influence at room temperature. However, the dissection of the free energy terms into opposite enthalpic (favoring the facial isomers) and entropic (favoring the meridional isomers) contributions reveals a trans influence assigned to solvation processes occurring in polar solvents. Altogether, the thermodynamic trans influence operating in [Zn(α,α′-diimine)3](2+) complexes is 1–2 orders of magnitude smaller than the chelate effect. A weak templating effect provided by a noncovalent lanthanide tripod is thus large enough to produce the wanted facial isomer at room temperature. PMID:25407515

  1. Sample storage-induced changes in the quantity and quality of soil labile organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shou-Qin; Cai, Hui-Ying; Chang, Scott X.; Bhatti, Jagtar S.

    2015-11-01

    Effects of sample storage methods on the quantity and quality of labile soil organic carbon are not fully understood even though their effects on basic soil properties have been extensively studied. We studied the effects of air-drying and frozen storage on cold and hot water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Cold- and hot-WSOC in air-dried and frozen-stored soils were linearly correlated with those in fresh soils, indicating that storage proportionally altered the extractability of soil organic carbon. Air-drying but not frozen storage increased the concentrations of cold-WSOC and carbohydrate in cold-WSOC, while both increased polyphenol concentrations. In contrast, only polyphenol concentration in hot-WSOC was increased by air-drying and frozen storage, suggesting that hot-WSOC was less affected by sample storage. The biodegradability of cold- but not hot-WSOC was increased by air-drying, while both air-drying and frozen storage increased humification index and changed specific UV absorbance of both cold- and hot-WSOC, indicating shifts in the quality of soil WSOC. Our results suggest that storage methods affect the quantity and quality of WSOC but not comparisons between samples, frozen storage is better than air-drying if samples have to be stored, and storage should be avoided whenever possible when studying the quantity and quality of both cold- and hot-WSOC.

  2. DGT measurement in low flow conditions: diffusive boundary layer and lability considerations.

    PubMed

    Uher, Emmanuelle; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène; Gourlay-France, Catherine

    2013-07-01

    Recent papers have alerted the scientific community that a diffusive boundary layer (DBL) forming in front of diffusive gradients in thin film (DGT) devices when they are immersed in water might have a significant impact on the results and have suggested a method to assess the DBL. This paper aims at evaluating to what extent the DBL impacts the results of metal measurement in water by DGT and providing new information on the dissociation kinetics of metal complexes in wastewater by using DBL calculation. A careful study of the influence of the water velocity on the measurement with DGTs equipped with restricted gels is presented. Deployments took place in the laboratory with a range of stirring speeds (0-400 rpm) and in a canal receiving treated wastewater with increasing controlled water velocity (0.07-3 cm s(-1)). Even under extreme low flow conditions, the error made in using the equation that does not take into account that the DBL was lower than the analytical error. Nevertheless, the DBL is the seat of dissociation of complexes and increases the lability window beyond the steric constraints of the hydrogel. The capacity of restricted gels to only sample inorganic species under these conditions is questioned. This study also is an opportunity to provide information on metal-ligand interactions in wastewater by creating the kinetic signature of the wastewater. Unlike previous studies which used different types of water, Pb was the more limited metal and interacted strongly with the ligands. PMID:23722876

  3. Unified mechanism of alkali and alkaline earth catalyzed gasification reactions of carbon by CO2 and H2O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, S.G.; Yang, R.T.

    1997-01-01

    From molecular orbital calculations, a unified mechanism is proposed for the gasification reactions of graphite by CO2 and H2O, both uncatalyzed and catalyzed by alkali and alkaline earth catalysts. In this mechanism, there are two types of oxygen intermediates that are bonded to the active edge carbon atoms: an in-plane semiquinone type, Cf(O), and an off-plane oxygen bonded to two saturated carbon atoms that are adjacent to the semiquinone species, C(O)Cf(O). The rate-limiting step is the decomposition of these intermediates by breaking the C-C bonds that are connected to Cf(O). A new rate equation is derived for the uncatalyzed reactions, and that for the catalyzed reactions is readily available from the proposed mechanism. The proposed mechanism can account for several unresolved experimental observations: TPD and TK (transient kinetics) desorption results of the catalyzed systems, the similar activation energies for the uncatalyzed and catalyzed reactions, and the relative activities of the alkali and alkaline earth elements. The net charge of the edge carbon active site is substantially changed by gaining electron density from the alkali or alkaline earth element (by forming C-O-M, where M stands for metal). The relative catalytic activities of these elements can be correlated with their abilities of donating electrons and changing the net charge of the edge carbon atom. As shown previously (Chen, S. G.; Yang, R. T. J. Catal. 1993, 141, 102), only clusters of the alkali compounds are active. This derives from the ability of the clusters to dissociate CO2 and H2O to form O atoms and the mobility of the dissociated O atoms facilitated by the clusters.

  4. Determination of labile inorganic and organic species of Al and Cu in river waters using the diffusive gradients in thin films technique.

    PubMed

    Tonello, Paulo Sergio; Goveia, Danielle; Rosa, André Henrique; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes; Menegário, Amauri Antonio

    2011-03-01

    The diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique, using a diffusive gel or a restrictive gel, was evaluated for the determination of labile inorganic and organic species of Al and Cu in model synthetic solutions and river water samples. Experiments were performed both in situ and in the laboratory. In the solutions containing Al ions, the major labile fraction consisted of inorganic species. The organic complex fractions were mainly kinetically inert. For the model Cu solutions, the most labile fraction consisted of inorganic species; however, significant amounts of labile organic complexes of Cu were also present. A comparison was made between the results obtained using restrictive gel DGT and tangential flow ultrafiltration (TF-UF). The Cu fraction determined by restrictive gel DGT (corresponding to the "free" ions plus the labile fraction of small molecular size complexes) was larger than that determined by TF-UF (corresponding to all small molecular size ions), suggesting that the techniques exhibited different porosities for discrimination of inorganic species. For the river water samples analyzed in the laboratory, less than 45% of the analytes were present in labile forms, with most being organic species. For the in situ measurements, the labile inorganic and organic fractions were larger than those obtained in the laboratory analyses. These differences could have been due to errors incurred during sample collection and storage. All results were consistent with those found using two different methods, namely, solid-phase extraction and the DGT technique employing the apparent diffusion coefficient.

  5. [Enhancement of anaerobic digestion of excess sludge by acid-alkali pretreatment].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Guang-Huan; Zhou, Xing-Qiu; Wu, Jian-Dong

    2012-06-01

    In order to enhance the efficiency of anaerobic digestion of excess sludge, acid-alkali pretreatment method was studied. Three different pretreatment methods (alkali alone,acid-alkali, alkali-acid) were compared to investigate their impacts on hydrolysis and acidification of activated sludge. In addition, their influences on methane-producing in subsequent anaerobic digestion process were also studied. The results showed that the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) of alkaline treatment alone was about 16% higher than the combining of acid and alkali treatment, SCOD concentration increased to 5406.1 mg x L(-1) after 8 d pretreatment. After treated by acid (pH 4.0, 4 d) and alkali (pH 10.0, 4 d), the acetic acid production and its content in short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were higher than other pretreatment methods. And the acetic acid production (as COD/VSS) could reach 74.4 mg x g(-1), accounting for 60.5% of SCFAs. After acid-alkali pretreatment, the C: N ratio of the sludge mixed liquor was about 25, and the C: P ratio was between 35-40, which was more favorable than C: N and C: P ratio of alkali alone and alkali-acid to subsequent anaerobic digestion. The control experiments showed that, after acid-alkali pretreatment, anaerobic digestion cumulative methane yield (CH4/VSS(in)) reached to 136.1 mL x g(-1) at 15 d, which was about 2.5-, 1.6-, and 1.7-fold of the blank (unpretreated), alkali alone pretreatment and alkali-acid pretreatment, respectively. After acid-alkali pretreatment for 8 d and anaerobic digestion for 15 d, the removal efficiency of VSS was about 60.9%, and the sludge reduction effect was better than other pretreatments. It is obvious that the acid-alkali pretreatment method was more favorable to anaerobic digestion and sludge reduction.

  6. Chemistry of alkali cation exchanged faujasite and mesoporous NaX using alkyl halides and phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min-Hong

    The purpose of this work was to increase the reactivity of Faujasite X (NaX) zeolite toward the reactive decontamination of materials subject to nucleophilic attack by means of zeolite cation optimization and by means of the synthesis of mesoporous Faujasite X. Primary alkyl halides and trialkyl phosphates have been the test materials on which the cation-optimized and mesoporous zeolites have been tested. In the alkali cation optimization work, reactions of methyl iodide and 1-chloropropane with alkali metal cation exchanged Faujasite zeolite X were investigated at room temperature. The reactivity of the framework and the product formation were shown to depend on zeolite framework counter-cation. A quantitative study of zeolite product formation has been carried out, primarily using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Large alkali cations showed preference toward substitution chemistry. In contrast, alkyl halide exposed LiX and NaX zeolites underwent both substitution and elimination. Subsequently introduced water molecules led to hydrolysis of framework species that was sensitive to framework counter-cation. The mesoporous NaX zeolites work undertakes to test whether an improvement in surface chemical reactivity can be achieved by introducing mesopores into the already reactive nucleophilic microporous NaX zeolite. Incorporation of the polydiallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (PDADMAC) template and the formation of mesopores in Faujasite X zeolite (NaX) were successful and well-characterized. The mesopores are proposed to have occurred from incorporation of the cationic PDADMAC polymer into the zeolite by compensating zeolite framework charge. Subsequent sodium cation exchange of calcined mesoporous NaX was shown to restore the chemical reactivity characteristic of as-synthesized NaX. Trialkyl organophosphorous compounds underwent substitution reactions. The reactivity of both microporous and mesoporous Faujasite zeolite X and the product formation was shown to depend on

  7. Polymerization reactivity of sulfomethylated alkali lignin modified with horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongjie; Wu, Xiaolei; Qiu, Xueqing; Chang, Yaqi; Lou, Hongming

    2014-03-01

    Alkali lignin (AL) was employed as raw materials in the present study. Sulfomethylation was conducted to improve the solubility of AL, while sulfomethylated alkali lignin (SAL) was further polymerized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). HRP modification caused a significant increase in molecular weight of SAL which was over 20 times. It was also found to increase the amount of sulfonic and carboxyl groups while decrease the amount of phenolic and methoxyl groups in SAL. The adsorption quantity of self-assembled SAL film was improved after HRP modification. Sulfonation and HRP modification were mutually promoted. The polymerization reactivity of SAL in HRP modification was increased with its sulfonation degree. Meanwhile, HRP modification facilitated SAL's radical-sulfonation reaction. PMID:24534439

  8. Polymerization reactivity of sulfomethylated alkali lignin modified with horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongjie; Wu, Xiaolei; Qiu, Xueqing; Chang, Yaqi; Lou, Hongming

    2014-03-01

    Alkali lignin (AL) was employed as raw materials in the present study. Sulfomethylation was conducted to improve the solubility of AL, while sulfomethylated alkali lignin (SAL) was further polymerized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). HRP modification caused a significant increase in molecular weight of SAL which was over 20 times. It was also found to increase the amount of sulfonic and carboxyl groups while decrease the amount of phenolic and methoxyl groups in SAL. The adsorption quantity of self-assembled SAL film was improved after HRP modification. Sulfonation and HRP modification were mutually promoted. The polymerization reactivity of SAL in HRP modification was increased with its sulfonation degree. Meanwhile, HRP modification facilitated SAL's radical-sulfonation reaction.

  9. Alkali dimers on the surface of liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Peter B.; Cole, Milton W.; Cheng, E.

    1995-09-01

    A recent paper by Ancilotto et al. (Zeitschrift für Physik B, in press), presented calculations of adsorption energies and the geometry of a surface dimple for alkali atoms bound to the surfaces of quantum liquids (4He,3He, H2). Here we present a study of the adsorption of two alkali dimers (Li2, Na2) on the surface of liquid helium. The calculations employ a model of an abrupt interface formulated by Ancilotto et al. as well as one using a diffuse interface. Our conclusion its that the dimers are bound to the surface more strongly than their respective monomers. In the case of dimers there is an additional degree of freedom-the orientation of the molecular axis relative to the surface. We study the influence of molecular anisotropy on adsorption by comparing the cases of “erect” and “spinning flat” orientations and conclude that the latter is energetically favored.

  10. Wetting Transitions of Inert Gases on Alkali Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojan, M. J.; McDonald, I. A.; Cole, M. W.; Steele, W. A.

    1996-03-01

    Theoretical and experimental discoveries have been made recently of wetting and prewetting transitions of helium and hydrogen films on alkali metal surfaces [1,2]. New experiments show anomalous nonwetting behavior of Ne on Rb and Cs [3]. Building on earlier work [4], we have done and will describe results from the first Monte Carlo simulations showing wetting transitions for classical gases on alkali metal surfaces. * Research supported by an NSF Materials Research Group grant. 1. R. B.Hallock, J. Low Temp. Phys. 101, 31, 1995 2. M. W. Cole, J. Low Temp. Phys. 101, 25, 1995. 3. G. B. Hess, M. Sabatini, and M. H. W. Chan, unpublished 4. J. E. Finn and P. A. Monson, Phys. Rev. A 39, 6402, 1989.

  11. Valence bond cluster studies of alkali metal/semiconductor bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatar, Robert C.; Messmer, Richard P.

    1986-12-01

    We present results of cluster studies of alkali metal/semiconductor bonding. Using the Generalized Valence Bond (GVB) method, we find a remarkable consistency in the behavoir of bonding orbitals for a variety of systems, including: LiH, CLi4, LiH4 and several hypervalent systems, such as SiH3Li2, SiH4Li2. Our results show that the metal-semiconductor bonding in these systems can be understood in terms of a pairing between McAdon-Goddard type metallic bonding orbitals and a set of equivalent orbitals of the non-metallic species. We propose that the results are relevant to the initial stages of alkali overlayer growth on semiconductor surfaces and lead to a simple picture of the bonding including the transition from a non-conducting to a conducting layer. We have considered numerous proposed hypervalent structures in light of the above results and find that they can be understood.

  12. Dual, differential isotope labeling shows the preferential movement of labile plant constituents into mineral-bonded soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Haddix, Michelle L; Paul, Eldor A; Cotrufo, M Francesca

    2016-06-01

    The formation and stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM) are major concerns in the context of global change for carbon sequestration and soil health. It is presently believed that lignin is not selectively preserved in soil and that chemically labile compounds bonding to minerals comprise a large fraction of the SOM. Labile plant inputs have been suggested to be the main precursor of the mineral-bonded SOM. Litter decomposition and SOM formation are expected to have temperature sensitivity varying with the lability of plant inputs. We tested this framework using dual (13) C and (15) N differentially labeled plant material to distinguish the metabolic and structural components within a single plant material. Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) seedlings were grown in an enriched (13) C and (15) N environment and then prior to harvest, removed from the enriched environment and allowed to incorporate natural abundance (13) C-CO2 and (15) N fertilizer into the metabolic plant components. This enabled us to achieve a greater than one atom % difference in (13) C between the metabolic and structural components within the plant litter. This differentially labeled litter was incubated in soil at 15 and 35 °C, for 386 days with CO2 measured throughout the incubation. After 14, 28, 147, and 386 days of incubation, the soil was subsequently fractionated. There was no difference in temperature sensitivity of the metabolic and structural components with regard to how much was respired or in the amount of litter biomass stabilized. Only the metabolic litter component was found in the sand, silt, or clay fraction while the structural component was exclusively found in the light fraction. These results support the stabilization framework that labile plant components are the main precursor of mineral-associated organic matter. PMID:27142168

  13. Characterization of the extent of Mercury Contamination in the Androscoggin River from a former Chlor-alkali Facility, Berlin, New Hampshire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalmers, A.; Marvin-Dipasquale, M. C.; Rosiu, C.; Luce, D.; Coles, J.; Zimmerman, M.; Smith, T.

    2010-12-01

    From the late 1800s to the 1960s a chlor-alkali plant was used to produce chlorine gas for the papermaking industry in Berlin, New Hampshire. During operation of the chlor-alkali facility, elemental mercury (Hg) was released to the environment, contaminating soils and the underlying fractured rock. Investigations have revealed that elemental Hg continues to seep through bedrock fractures into the adjacent Androscoggin River. This study evaluates the extent and transformation of Hg contamination in the Androscoggin River by comparing a reference site 17 kilometers above the former chlor-alkali facility to 5 sites ranging from 1 to 16 km downstream from the facility. Total and methyl Hg (THg and MeHg, respectively), among other analytes, were characterized in surface water, pore water, sediment and biological tissue samples at each site. Bed sediment was also assessed for bio-available (tin-reducible) inorganic Hg (II) and microbial MeHg production potential rates. Acid extractable ferrous iron, crystalline and amorphous (poorly crystalline) ferric iron, total reduced sulfur, particle size, and organic content in bed sediment was analyzed to help explain spatial differences in MeHg production rates and bio-available Hg (II) among sites. The information provided by this study will help evaluate the extent of Hg contamination in the Androscoggin River, will improve our understanding of the controls on MeHg production in the Androscoggin River system, and will be used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to support remediation of the chlor-alkali facility site.

  14. Na+ and Rb+ tracer diffusion in alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniere, F.; Sen, S. K.

    1991-11-01

    We have undertaken a fundamental study of heterodiffusion of foreign ions in pure single crystals. The present work describes the measurements of the diffusion coefficient of monovalent cations in some alkali halides, namely Na+ and Rb+ into KCl, KBr, NaI and KI. The priority is given to the super-accuracy of the experimental data. The target is to test the validity of the existing theories for calculating the enthalpy and entropy of migration.

  15. Optical Properties of Tm(3+) Ions in Alkali Germanate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.; Barnes, Norman P.; Reichle, Donald J.; Jiang, Shibin

    2006-01-01

    Tm-doped alkali germanate glass is investigated for use as a laser material. Spectroscopic investigations of bulk Tm-doped germanate glass are reported for the absorption, emission and luminescence decay. Tm:germanate shows promise as a fiber laser when pumped with 0.792 m diodes because of low phonon energies. Spectroscopic analysis indicates low nonradiative quenching and pulsed laser performance studies confirm this prediction by showing a quantum efficiency of 1.69.

  16. Radioisotope powered alkali metal thermoelectric converter design for space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, R. K.; Bankston, C. P.

    1988-01-01

    The design concept of an alkali-metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) for 15-30-percent-efficient conversion of heat from the General Purpose (radioisotope) Heat Source (GPHS) on spacecraft is presented. The basic physical principles of the conversion cycle are outlined; a theoretical model is derived; a modular design is described and illustrated with drawings; and the overall AMTEC/GPHS system design is characterized. Predicted performance data are presented in extensive tables and graphs and discussed in detail.

  17. Core thresholds and charge-density waves in alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhwiler, P. A.; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1988-07-01

    We have determined experimental upper limits on any broadening which could be due to a charge-density wave in Na and K metal soft x-ray-absorption and emisssion spectra. The upper limit for absorption in Na is a factor of 4 below the expected theoretical value. These results contradict expectations based on the present theory of charge-density waves in alkali metals.

  18. Antacids, Altered Mental Status, and Milk-Alkali Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Simon C.; Dellinger, Bonnie B.; Jennings, Katie; Scott, Lancer A.

    2012-01-01

    The frequency of milk-alkali syndrome decreased rapidly after the development of histamine-2 antagonists and proton pump inhibitors for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease; however, the availability and overconsumption of antacids and calcium supplements can still place patients at risk (D. P. Beall et al., 2006). Here we describe a patient who presented with altered mental status, hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and acute renal failure in the context of ingesting large amounts of antacids to control dyspepsia. PMID:23431478

  19. Efficient potassium diode pumped alkali laser operating in pulsed mode.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, Boris V; Rotondaro, Matthew D; Shaffer, Michael K; Knize, Randall J

    2014-07-14

    This paper presents the results of our experiments on the development of an efficient hydrocarbon free diode pumped alkali laser based on potassium vapor buffered by He gas at 600 Torr. A slope efficiency of more than 50% was demonstrated with a total optical conversion efficiency of 30%. This result was achieved by using a narrowband diode laser stack as the pump source. The stack was operated in pulsed mode to avoid limiting thermal effects and ionization.

  20. Calculation of the Lamb shift in neutral alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapirstein, J.; Cheng, K. T.

    2002-10-01

    The one-loop Lamb shift is calculated for the ground state of the neutral alkali metals lithium through francium. The method used is Furry representation QED, defined in terms of a variety of local potentials. The method is exact in binding corrections, but is potential dependent. Significant differences with known Lamb shift results for lithium are found, and it is shown that large corrections result from a partial set of screening corrections. Comparison with other calculations is made.

  1. An Atypical Cause of Alkali Chemical Burn: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Boutefnouchet, T.; Moiemen, N.; Papini, R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary It has already been reported that wet ash turns into a strong alkali agent, which can cause full-thickness skin burns. A case is presented which has the particularity of sustained, self-inflicted contact with wet ash. The coal used was the self-igniting type normally used for burning scented weed or for smoking the hubbly bubbly or shisha pipe. PMID:21991229

  2. Diode pumped alkali vapor lasers for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.; Komashko, A.

    2008-02-01

    General Atomics has been engaged in the development of diode pumped alkali vapor lasers. We have been examining the design space looking for designs that are both efficient and easily scalable to high powers. Computationally, we have looked at the effect of pump bandwidth on laser performance. We have also looked at different lasing species. We have used an alexandrite laser to study the relative merits of different designs. We report on the results of our experimental and computational studies.

  3. High-energy transversely pumped alkali vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.

    2011-03-01

    We report on the results from our transversely pumped alkali laser. This system uses an Alexandrite laser to pump a stainless steel laser head. The system uses methane and helium as buffer gasses. Using rubidium, the system produced up to 40 mJ of output energy when pumped with 63 mJ. Slope efficiency was 75%. Using potassium as the lasing species the system produced 32 mJ and a 53% slope efficiency.

  4. Lithological influence of aggregate in the alkali-carbonate reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Buendia, A.M. . E-mail: angel.lopez@aidico.es; Climent, V. . E-mail: vcliment@grupogla.com; Verdu, P.

    2006-08-15

    The reactivity of carbonate rock with the alkali content of cement, commonly called alkali-carbonate reaction (ACR), has been investigated. Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) can also contribute in the alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR) in carbonate rock, mainly due to micro- and crypto-crystalline quartz or clay content in carbonate aggregate. Both ACR and ASR can occur in the same system, as has been also evidenced on this paper. Carbonate aggregate samples were selected using lithological reactivity criteria, taking into account the presence of dedolomitization, partial dolomitization, micro- and crypto-crystalline quartz. Selected rocks include calcitic dolostone with chert (CDX), calcitic dolostone with dedolomitization (CDD), limestone with chert (LX), marly calcitic dolostone with partial dolomitization (CD), high-porosity ferric dolostone with clays (FD). To evaluate the reactivity, aggregates were studied using expansion tests following RILEM AAR-2, AAR-5, a modification using LiOH AAR-5Li was also tested. A complementary study was done using petrographic monitoring with polarised light microscopy on aggregates immersed in NaOH and LiOH solutions after different ages. SEM-EDAX has been used to identify the presence of brucite as a product of dedolomitization. An ACR reaction showed shrinkage of the mortar bars in alkaline solutions explained by induced dedolomitization, while an ASR process typically displayed expansion. Neither shrinkage nor expansion was observed when mortar bars were immersed in solutions of lithium hydroxide. Carbonate aggregate classification with AAR pathology risk has been elaborated based on mechanical behaviours by expansion and shrinkage. It is proposed to be used as a petrographic method for AAR diagnosis to complement the RILEM AAR1 specifically for carbonate aggregate. Aggregate materials can be classified as I (non-reactive), II (potentially reactive), and III (probably reactive), considering induced dedolomitization ACR

  5. Hourly Fluctuations in Labile Soil Phosphorus in Response to Climate Variability in a Wet Tropical Forest, La Selva, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecar, K. L.; Lawrence, D. C.; Das, R.; Clark, D. A.; Oberbauer, S. F.; Schwendenmann, L.

    2007-05-01

    Tropical rain forests are one of the most productive ecosystems in the world and play a significant role in the global carbon budget. Changes in phosphorus cycling dynamics as a result of on-going climate change have the potential to limit productivity in this ecosystem. Our objective was to determine hourly patterns in labile soil phosphorus throughout the day and explore possible mechanisms driving these patterns. We conducted an in situ experiment on soils from a wet tropical forest at La Selva Biological Station located in N.E. Costa Rica. A variety of climatic and biotic variables including temperature, precipitation, PAR, soil temperature, soil moisture and soil respiration were measured in order to determine their effect on labile phosphorus. Our results indicate that labile phosphorus does vary significantly throughout the day in response to a combination of climatic variables. An understanding of the mechanisms driving phosphorus availability at fine temporal scales can provide a valuable indicator of long term trends in phosphorus cycling dynamics.

  6. Effect of alkali treatment on surface morphology of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, K. J.; Wahab, M. A. A.; Mahmod, S.; Idris, M. I.; Abdullah, H. Z.

    2015-07-01

    Alkali and heat treatments were first introduced by Kim et al. to prepare a bioactive surface on titanium. This method has been proven very effective and widely used in other studies to promote titanium osteointegration. This study aims to investigate further the effect of alkali treatment on surface morphology of high purity titanium. High purity titanium foils were immersed in NaOH aqueous solutions of 0.5 M, 5 M and 15 M at 60°C and 80 °C for 1, 3 and 7 days. The surface morphology was examined using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). The obtained phases were analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) in the spectra range of 4000-600 cm-1 at 4 cm-1 resolution and 50 scans. At the same soaking temperature and soaking time, a thicker porous network was observed with increasing concentration of NaOH. At the same soaking temperature, a much porous structure was observed with increasing soaking time. At constant alkali concentration, more homogenously distributed porous surface structure was observed with increasing soaking temperature.

  7. Electron densities and alkali atoms in exoplanet atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Lavvas, P.; Koskinen, T.; Yelle, R. V.

    2014-11-20

    We describe a detailed study on the properties of alkali atoms in extrasolar giant planets, and specifically focus on their role in generating the atmospheric free electron densities, as well as their impact on the transit depth observations. We focus our study on the case of HD 209458b, and we show that photoionization produces a large electron density in the middle atmosphere that is about two orders of magnitude larger than the density anticipated from thermal ionization. Our purely photochemical calculations, though, result in a much larger transit depth for K than observed for this planet. This result does not change even if the roles of molecular chemistry and excited state chemistry are considered for the alkali atoms. In contrast, the model results for the case of exoplanet XO-2b are in good agreement with the available observations. Given these results we discuss other possible scenarios, such as changes in the elemental abundances, changes in the temperature profiles, and the possible presence of clouds, which could potentially explain the observed HD 209458b alkali properties. We find that most of these scenarios cannot explain the observations, with the exception of a heterogeneous source (i.e., clouds or aerosols) under specific conditions, but we also note the discrepancies among the available observations.

  8. A Case of Severe Airbag Related Ocular Alkali Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wong, William; Affeldt, John C

    2012-01-01

    While airbags have saved many lives and are clearly beneficial overall, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) powder produced by the inflation reaction can cause significant alkali ocular injury if not irrigated promptly. Here we report a case of severe airbag related ocular alkali injury as a way to bring attention to the need for prompt ocular irrigation following motor vehicle accidents (MVA) with airbag deployment. A 47-year-old man was involved in a MVA with airbag deployment in a rural setting. Attention was paid to several other life-threatening traumatic injuries, however, ocular irrigation was not performed until some 6–7 hours after the MVA. Over the course of 6 months, airbag related alkali injury caused severe limbal ischemia, conjunctivalization of the cornea, corneal epithelial defects, cicatricial scarring, haze, and corneal/limbal vascularization despite amniotic membrane graft. Awareness of the importance of ocular irrigation following airbag deployment must be raised both in the ophthalmology and emergency medicine communities. PMID:22900239

  9. Alkali-related ocular burns: a case series and review.

    PubMed

    Bunker, Daniel J L; George, Robert J; Kleinschmidt, Andrew; Kumar, Rohit J; Maitz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Alkali burns are known to possess high pathological potential because of their inherent ability to lyse cell membranes and penetrate intraocular structures with devastating results. The authors aimed to evaluate the most common cause of this presentation, the current treatment approaches to injury, and eventual outcome as related to severity. The authors performed a retrospective review of all patients who sustained chemical-related ocular injuries seen at the Concord Hospital Burns Unit, Australia between January 2005 and March 2012. Management was based on cooperation between ophthalmic staff and the burns unit, with emphasis on early aggressive intervention and rigorous follow-up. The records of 39 patients who presented with chemical-related injury were assessed, 12 of whom had confirmed alkali burns involving the cornea. The most commonly implicated agent was sodium hydroxide, usually in the context of otherwise trivial domestic accidents. Acute medical management included copious irrigation and the use of analgesics, cycloplegics, and topical antibiotics. In half the cases, steroid drops and oral vitamin C were also used. Ten of the 12 patients (83%) had return to premorbid visual acuity. Complications included cicatrical ectropion (n = 1), pseudoexfoliative syndrome (n = 1), and symblepharon (n = 1). Surgical correction was needed in the one patient with cicatrical ectropion. This case series shows that appropriate acute management minimizes the potentially devastating sequelae of ocular alkali burns. Emphasis should be placed on prevention of domestic and workplace injuries when using alkaline products.

  10. Effect of alkali treatment on surface morphology of titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K. J. Wahab, M. A. A. Mahmod, S. Idris, M. I. Abdullah, H. Z.

    2015-07-22

    Alkali and heat treatments were first introduced by Kim et al. to prepare a bioactive surface on titanium. This method has been proven very effective and widely used in other studies to promote titanium osteointegration. This study aims to investigate further the effect of alkali treatment on surface morphology of high purity titanium. High purity titanium foils were immersed in NaOH aqueous solutions of 0.5 M, 5 M and 15 M at 60°C and 80 °C for 1, 3 and 7 days. The surface morphology was examined using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). The obtained phases were analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) in the spectra range of 4000-600 cm{sup −1} at 4 cm{sup −1} resolution and 50 scans. At the same soaking temperature and soaking time, a thicker porous network was observed with increasing concentration of NaOH. At the same soaking temperature, a much porous structure was observed with increasing soaking time. At constant alkali concentration, more homogenously distributed porous surface structure was observed with increasing soaking temperature.

  11. Thermal inactivation of alkali phosphatases under various conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atyaksheva, L. F.; Tarasevich, B. N.; Chukhrai, E. S.; Poltorak, O. M.

    2009-02-01

    The thermal inactivation of alkali phosphatases from bacteria Escherichia coli (ECAP), bovine intestines (bovine IAP), and chicken intestines (chicken IAP) was studied in different buffer solutions and in the solid state. The conclusion was made that these enzymes had maximum stability in the solid state, and, in a carbonate buffer solution, their activity decreased most rapidly. It was found that the bacterial enzyme was more stable than animal phosphatases. It was noted that, for ECAP, four intermediate stages preceded the loss of enzyme activity, and, for bovine and chicken IAPs, three intermediate stages were observed. The activation energy of thermal inactivation of ECAP over the range 25-70°C was determined to be 80 kJ/mol; it corresponded to the dissociation of active dimers into inactive monomers. Higher activation energies (˜200 kJ/mol) observed at the initial stage of thermal inactivation of animal phosphatases resulted from the simultaneous loss of enzyme activity caused by dimer dissociation and denaturation. It was shown that the activation energy of denaturation of monomeric animal alkali phosphatases ranged from 330 to 380 kJ/mol depending on buffer media. It was concluded that the inactivation of solid samples of alkali phosphatases at 95°C was accompanied by an about twofold decrease in the content of β structures in protein molecules.

  12. Antimicrobial potency of alkali ion substituted calcium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Gbureck, Uwe; Knappe, Oliver; Grover, Liam M; Barralet, Jake E

    2005-12-01

    Potassium and sodium containing nanoapatite cements were produced by the reaction of mechanically activated CaNaPO(4) (CSP), CaKPO(4) (CPP) and Ca(2)KNa(PO(4))(2) (CPCP) with a 2.5% Na(2)HPO(4) solution. The cements exhibited clinically acceptable setting times of approximately 5 min and compressive strengths of 5-10 MPa. The antimicrobial properties of the cements were tested with the agar diffusion test using Streptococcus salvarius, Staphylococcus epidermis and Candida albicans. All types of alkali ion containing cements showed a significantly higher antimicrobial potency with inhibition zones of approx. 4-11 mm than a commercial calcium hydroxide cement which resulted in small inhibition zones around the cement samples of a maximum of 1.5 mm. The antimicrobial properties of all the cements were not found to diminish even after longer incubation times. This behaviour was attributed to the formation of soluble alkaline metal phosphates during setting which increased the pH value in the agar gel around the alkali containing calcium phosphate cement to 8.5-10.7 compared to 6.5-8.0 for the Ca(OH)(2) product. The high antimicrobial potency of alkali-calcium phosphate cements may find an application in dentistry as pulp capping agents, root fillers or cavity liners. PMID:16005511

  13. The unexpected properties of alkali metal iron selenide superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dagotto, Elbio R

    2013-01-01

    The iron-based superconductors that contain FeAs layers as the fundamental building block in the crystal structures have been rationalized in the past using ideas based on the Fermi surface nesting of hole and electron pockets when in the presence of weak Hubbard U interactions. This approach seemed appropriate considering the small values of the magnetic moments in the parent compounds and the clear evidence based on photoemission experiments of the required electron and hole pockets. However, recent results in the context of alkali metal iron selenides, with generic chemical composition AxFe2ySe2 (A alkali metal element), have challenged those previous ideas since at particular compositions y the low-temperature ground states are insulating and display antiferromagnetic order with large iron magnetic moments. Moreover, angle-resolved photoemission studies have revealed the absence of hole pockets at the Fermi level in these materials. The present status of this exciting area of research, with the potential to alter conceptually our understanding of the ironbased superconductors, is here reviewed, covering both experimental and theoretical investigations. Other recent related developments are also briefly reviewed, such as the study of selenide two-leg ladders and the discovery of superconductivity in a single layer of FeSe. The conceptual issues considered established for the alkali metal iron selenides, as well as several issues that still require further work, are discussed.

  14. High temperature corrosion by deposits of alkali salts

    SciTech Connect

    Kloewer, J.

    1996-12-01

    In order to understand and predict how corrosion behavior of metallic high temperature materials is affected by deposits of alkali salts, eight commercial high temperature alloys (AISI 314, alloy 800H, alloy 31, AC66, alloy 45-TM, alloy 625, alloy 59 and alloy C-4) coated with alkali sulfates and chlorides (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/KCl) were investigated in both air and in HCl/SO{sub 2}-containing waste incineration environments. The corrosion rates were found to depend sensitively on the alloy composition, especially on the concentration of molybdenum and silicon. Both stainless steels and nickel base alloys without molybdenum were resistant to dissolution by sulfates in air. Molybdenum-containing steels and nickel base alloys, on the other hand, were extremely susceptible to acidic dissolution in sodium sulfate. These high corrosion rates can be attributed to an increase in salt acidity caused by dissolution of MoO{sub 3}. The effect of HCI in the gas atmosphere was contradictory. All alloys without molybdenum suffered severe internal oxidation, when chlorine was present in the gas atmosphere. The corrosion rates of the nickel-molybdenum alloys, however, were decreased when chlorine was added to the gas phase. The highest corrosion resistance to synthetic waste incineration gas in combination with deposits of alkali sulfates and chlorides was found in the nickel base alloys 45 TM and alloy 625.

  15. Scattering of positrons and electrons by alkali atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. S.; Kauppila, W. E.; Kwan, C. K.; Lukaszew, R. A.; Parikh, S. P.; Wan, Y. J.; Zhou, S.; Dababneh, M. S.

    1990-01-01

    Absolute total scattering cross sections (Q sub T's) were measured for positrons and electrons colliding with sodium, potassium, and rubidium in the 1 to 102 eV range, using the same apparatus and experimental approach (a beam transmission technique) for both projectiles. The present results for positron-sodium and -rubidium collisions represent the first Q sub T measurements reported for these collision systems. Features which distinguish the present comparisons between positron- and electron-alkali atom Q sub T's from those for other atoms and molecules (room-temperature gases) which have been used as targets for positrons and electrons are the proximity of the corresponding positron- and electron-alkali atom Q sub T's over the entire energy range of overlap, with an indication of a merging or near-merging of the corresponding positron and electron Q sub T's near (and above) the relatively low energy of about 40 eV, and a general tendency for the positron-alkali atom Q sub T's to be higher than the corresponding electron values as the projectile energy is decreased below about 40 eV.

  16. Chlor-alkali producers evaluate safer alternatives to asbestos

    SciTech Connect

    Stadig, W.

    1993-03-01

    Until recently, 75% of all US capacity for producing chlor-alkali - more than 40% of the world's capacity - has used asbestos diaphragm-cell technology. Although the Environmental Protection Agency continues to exempt asbestos use in diaphragms from restrictions, producers are considering alternatives. In Germany, stringent regulations will ban asbestos in chlor-alkali production after 1994. Heavy fines were levied recently against some chlor-alkali producers in the United States when EPA inspectors found asbestos fibers in cell renewal areas. Restrictions on the mining of asbestos raise the cost of obtaining adequate amounts of high-quality asbestos and gradually raise the cost of transporting and discarding spent diaphragms. Two alternatives are to use newly developed, non-asbestos diaphragms or to convert to existing ion-exchange membrane-cell technology. Only the former seems economical in the United States. The non-asbestos diaphragm is based on an inorganic polymer composite developed in 1988 as an asbestos substitute. The composite received Du Pont's Plunkett Award for Innovation with Teflon[trademark], landed on the National Development Association's 1991 Honor Roll and became a 1991 R D 100 Award winner. 6 figs.

  17. Understanding sodium versus lithium intercalation potentials of electrode materials for alkali-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo-de Dompablo, M. Elena

    2014-08-01

    Differences in average voltages for the alkali ion intercalation (Li, Na) in a variety of electrode materials are investigated. The average Li and Na insertion potentials in the cavities of ◻ReO3-perovskite, ramsdellite-◻Ti2O4, layered-◻2A2Ti3O7 (A = Li, Na) and NASICON-◻Na3Ti2(PO4)3 have been calculated by first principles calculations at the density functional theory level. The results identify the type of site occupied by the inserted ion as the relevant structural parameter. Occupation of large sites (c.n. = 12, 8) might yield Na insertion voltages higher than Li ones. On the other extreme, occupation of tetrahedral sites raises the Li insertion voltage as much as 0.8 V above the Na one. For octahedral sites the higher polarizing character of Li ions vs. Na ions acts as a key-factor to bring the Li intercalation voltage above that of Na intercalation.

  18. Solid State Structures of Alkali Metal Ion Complexes Formed by Low-Molecular-Weight Ligands of Biological Relevance.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Katsuyuki; Murayama, Kazutaka; Hu, Ning-Hai

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides structural data, mainly metal binding sites/modes, observed in crystal structures of alkali metal ion complexes containing low-molecular-weight ligands of biological relevance, mostly obtained from the Cambridge Structural Database (the CSD version 5.35 updated to February 2014). These ligands include (i) amino acids and small peptides, (ii) nucleic acid constituents (excluding quadruplexes and other oligonucleotides), (iii) simple carbohydrates, and (iv) naturally occurring antibiotic ionophores. For some representative complexes of these ligands, some details on the environment of the metal coordination and structural characteristics are described. PMID:26860299

  19. Electronic properties of metal-induced gap states at insulator/metal interfaces: Dependence on the alkali halide and the possibility of excitonic mechanism of superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Ryotaro; Tanida, Yoshiaki; Kuroki, Kazuhiko; Aoki, Hideo

    2004-03-01

    Motivated from the experimental observation of metal-induced gap states (MIGS) at insulator/metal interfaces by Kiguchi et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 196803 (2003)], we have theoretically investigated the electronic properties of MIGS at interfaces between various alkali halides and a metal represented by a jellium with the first-principles density-functional method. We have found that, on top of the usual evanescent state, MIGS generally have appreciable amplitudes on halogen sites with a pz-like character, whose penetration depth (λ) is as large as half the lattice constant of bulk alkali halides. This implies that λ, while little dependent on the carrier density in the jellium, is dominated by the energy gap of the alkali halide, and is scaled by the lattice constant, where λLiF<λLiCl<λLiI. We also propose a possibility of the MIGS working favorably for the exciton-mediated superconductivity, especially in a system where ˜10 Å of metal is sandwiched by alkali halide substrates.

  20. Alkali metal poisoning of a CeO2-WO3 catalyst used in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3: an experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yue; Li, Junhua; Chen, Liang; Chen, Jinghuan; Han, Jian; Zhang, He; Han, Wei

    2012-03-01

    The alkali metal-induced deactivation of a novel CeO(2)-WO(3) (CeW) catalyst used for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) was investigated. The CeW catalyst could resist greater amounts of alkali metals than V(2)O(5)-WO(3)/TiO(2). At the same molar concentration, the K-poisoned catalyst exhibited a greater loss in activity compared with the Na-poisoned catalyst below 200 °C. A combination of experimental and theoretical methods, including NH(3)-TPD, DRIFTS, H(2)-TPR, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, were used to elucidate the mechanism of the alkali metal deactivation of the CeW catalyst in SCR reaction. Experiments results indicated that decreases in the reduction activity and the quantity of Brønsted acid sites rather than the acid strength were responsible for the catalyst deactivation. The DFT calculations revealed that Na and K could easily adsorb on the CeW (110) surface and that the surface oxygen could migrate to cover the active tungsten, and then inhibit the SCR of NO(x) with ammonia. Hot water washing is a convenient and effective method to regenerate alkali metal-poisoned CeW catalysts, and the catalytic activity could be recovered 90% of the fresh catalyst.

  1. Labile sleep promotes awareness of abstract knowledge in a serial reaction time task

    PubMed Central

    Kirov, Roumen; Kolev, Vasil; Verleger, Rolf; Yordanova, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Sleep has been identified as a critical brain state enhancing the probability of gaining insight into covert task regularities. Both non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep have been implicated with offline re-activation and reorganization of memories supporting explicit knowledge generation. According to two-stage models of sleep function, offline processing of information during sleep is sequential requiring multiple cycles of NREM and REM sleep stages. However, the role of overnight dynamic sleep macrostructure for insightfulness has not been studied so far. In the present study, we test the hypothesis that the frequency of interactions between NREM and REM sleep stages might be critical for awareness after sleep. For that aim, the rate of sleep stage transitions was evaluated in 53 participants who learned implicitly a serial reaction time task (SRTT) in which a determined sequence was inserted. The amount of explicit knowledge about the sequence was established by verbal recall after a night of sleep following SRTT learning. Polysomnography was recorded in this night and in a control night before and was analyzed to compare the rate of sleep-stage transitions between participants who did or did not gain awareness of task regularity after sleep. Indeed, individual ability of explicit knowledge generation was strongly associated with increased rate of transitions between NREM and REM sleep stages and between light sleep stages and slow wave sleep. However, the rate of NREM–REM transitions specifically predicted the amount of explicit knowledge after sleep in a trait-dependent way. These results demonstrate that enhanced lability of sleep goes along with individual ability of knowledge awareness. Observations suggest that facilitated dynamic interactions between sleep stages, particularly between NREM and REM sleep stages play a role for offline processing which promotes rule extraction and awareness. PMID:26441730

  2. Profiling of structurally labile oxylipins in plants by in situ derivatization with pentafluorobenzyl hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Birgit; Lauchli, Ryan; Sonwa, Mesmin Mekem; Schmidt, Annika; Boland, Wilhelm

    2006-01-15

    A GC-MS-based method for the simultaneous quantification of common oxylipins along with labile and highly reactive compounds based on in situ derivatization with pentafluorobenzyl hydroxylamine to the corresponding O-2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl oximes (PFB oximes) is presented. The approach covers oxo derivatives such as jasmonic acid (JA), 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA), certain phytoprostanes, unsaturated oxo-acids, oxo-hydroxy acids, and aldehyde fragments from the polar head of fatty acids. In the positive electron impact-MS mode, the PFB oximes display characteristic fragment ions that greatly facilitate the identification of oxylipins in complex matrices. In addition, the fluorinated derivatives allow a highly selective and low-background analysis by negative chemical ionization. Besides showing the general value of the method for the identification of a broad range of oxylipins (18 examples), we also demonstrate sensitivity, linearity, and reproducibility for the quantification of JA, OPDA, 11-oxo-9-undecenoic acid, and 13-oxo-9,11-tridecadienoic acid. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by differential profiling of these four oxylipins in lima bean leaves after mechanical wounding and feeding by the herbivore Spodoptera littoralis. Caterpillar feeding induced several oxylipins, whereas after wounding only the level of JA increased. The rapid in situ derivatization prevents the isomerization of cis-JA to trans-JA. The resting level of JA in lima beans showed an isomer ratio of 80:20 for trans/cis-JA. After wounding, de novo synthesis of JA alters the ratio to 20:80 in favor of the cis isomer.

  3. Controls on the composition and lability of dissolved organic matter in Siberia's Kolyma River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, P. J.; Davydova, A.; Zimov, N.; Spencer, R. G. M.; Davydov, S.; Bulygina, E.; Zimov, S.; Holmes, R. M.

    2012-03-01

    High-latitude northern rivers export globally significant quantities of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the Arctic Ocean. Climate change, and its associated impacts on hydrology and potential mobilization of ancient organic matter from permafrost, is likely to modify the flux, composition, and thus biogeochemical cycling and fate of exported DOC in the Arctic. This study examined DOC concentration and the composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) across the hydrograph in Siberia's Kolyma River, with a particular focus on the spring freshet period when the majority of the annual DOC load is exported. The composition of DOM within the Kolyma basin was characterized using absorbance-derived measurements (absorbance coefficienta330, specific UV absorbance (SUVA254), and spectral slope ratio SR) and fluorescence spectroscopy (fluorescence index and excitation-emission matrices (EEMs)), including parallel factor analyses of EEMs. Increased surface runoff during the spring freshet led to DOM optical properties indicative of terrestrial soil inputs with high humic-like fluorescence, SUVA254, and low SRand fluorescence index (FI). Under-ice waters, in contrast, displayed opposing trends in optical properties representing less aromatic, lower molecular weight DOM. We demonstrate that substantial losses of DOC can occur via biological (˜30% over 28 days) and photochemical pathways (>29% over 14 days), particularly in samples collected during the spring freshet. The emerging view is therefore that of a more dynamic and labile carbon pool than previously thought, where DOM composition plays a fundamental role in controlling the fate and removal of DOC at a pan-Arctic scale.

  4. [Effects of understory removal on soil labile organic carbon pool in a Cinnamomum camphora plantation].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya-Cong; Li, Zheng-Cai; Cheng, Cai-Fang; Liu, Rong-Jie; Wang, Bin; Geri, Le-Tu

    2013-12-01

    Taking a 48-year-old Cinnamomum camphora plantation in the eastern area of our subtropics as test object, this paper studied the labile organic carbon contents and their ratios to the total organic carbon (TOC) in 0-60 cm soil layer under effects of understory removal (UR). As compared with no understory removal (CK), the soil TOC and easily-oxidized carbon (EOC) contents under UR decreased, with a decrement of 4.8% - 34.1% and 27.1% - 36.2%, respectively, and the TOC and EOC contents had a significant difference in 0-10 cm and 0-20 cm layers, respectively. The water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) (except in 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm layers) and light fraction organic matter (LFOM) under UR increaesd, but the difference was not significant. The ratio of soil WSOC to soil TOC in UR stand was higher than that in CK stand, while the ratio of soil EOC to soil TOC showed an opposite trend. In the two stands, soil WSOC, EOC, and LFOM had significant or extremely significant correlations with soil TOC, and the correlation coefficients of soil EOC and LFOM with soil TOC were higher in UR stand than in CK, but the correlation coefficient between soil WSOC and TOC was in opposite. The soil EOC, LFOM, and TOC in the two stands were significantly or extremely significantly correlated with soil nutrients, but the soil WSOC in UR stand had no significant correlations with soil hydrolyzable N, available P, exchangeable Ca, and exchangeable Mg.

  5. Immunological Study of the Heat-Labile Enterotoxins of Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Gyles, Carlton L.

    1974-01-01

    Immunodiffusion experiments were conducted to associate a precipitin line with Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT). Wild strains of porcine and of human enteropathogenic E. coli as well as laboratory-derived enterotoxigenic variants of E. coli K-12 were used for LT antigen preparations. These were produced mainly by ultrafiltration and ammonium sulfate precipitation of broth culture supernatants. When antisera with anti-LT activity were reacted with antigen preparations from Ent+ and Ent− variants of E. coli K-12, a line “a” was given by Ent+ but not by Ent− preparations. Line “a” was removed by absorption of anti-LT serum with antigen preparation from an Ent+E. coli K-12, but was unaffected when the antigen preparation used to absorb the serum was from an Ent−E. coli K-12. A line identical to “a” was given by antigen preparations from wild strains of porcine enteropathogenic E. coli reacted with homologous or heterologous anti-LT sera. One human strain of enteropathogenic E. coli was shown to possess an antigen identical to that which gave rise to line “a.” To demonstrate this line it was necessary to use high concentrations of gammaglobulin and high concentrations of the crude antigen preparations. LT preparations reacted with anticholera toxin to give a line “c,” which showed a reaction of partial identity with line “b” produced by reaction of pure choleragenoid and anticholera toxin. Lines “a” and “c” gave reactions of identity. Images PMID:4206029

  6. Conformational Switching and Nanoscale Assembly of Human Prion Protein into Polymorphic Amyloids via Structurally Labile Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Vijit; Arya, Shruti; Bhattacharya, Mily; Mukhopadhyay, Samrat

    2015-12-29

    Conformational switching of the prion protein (PrP) from an α-helical normal cellular form (PrP(C)) to an aggregation-prone and self-propagating β-rich scrapie form (PrP(Sc)) underlies the molecular basis of pathogenesis in prion diseases. Anionic lipids play a critical role in the misfolding and conformational conversion of the membrane-anchored PrP into the amyloidogenic pathological form. In this work, we have used a diverse array of techniques to interrogate the early intermediates during amyloid formation from recombinant human PrP in the presence of a membrane mimetic anionic detergent such as sodium dodecyl sulfate. We have been able to detect and characterize two distinct types of interconvertible oligomers. Our results demonstrate that highly ordered large β-oligomers represent benign off-pathway intermediates that lack the ability to mature into amyloid fibrils. On the contrary, structurally labile small oligomers are capable of switching to an ordered amyloid-state that exhibits profound toxicity to mammalian cells. Our fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements revealed that the partially disordered PrP serves as precursors to small amyloid-competent oligomers. These on-pathway oligomers are eventually sequestered into higher order supramolecular assemblies that conformationally mature into polymorphic amyloids possessing varied nanoscale morphology as evident by the atomic force microscopy imaging. The nanoscale diversity of fibril architecture is attributed to the heterogeneous ensemble of early obligatory oligomers and offers a plausible explanation for the existence of multiple prion strains in vivo. PMID:26645611

  7. Parenteral Adjuvant Effects of an Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Natural Heat-Labile Toxin Variant.

    PubMed

    Braga, Catarina J M; Rodrigues, Juliana F; Medina-Armenteros, Yordanka; Farinha-Arcieri, Luís E; Ventura, Armando M; Boscardin, Silvia B; Sbrogio-Almeida, Maria E; Ferreira, Luís C S

    2014-01-01

    Native type I heat-labile toxins (LTs) produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains exert strong adjuvant effects on both antibody and T cell responses to soluble and particulate antigens following co-administration via mucosal routes. However, inherent enterotoxicity and neurotoxicity (following intra-nasal delivery) had reduced the interest in the use of these toxins as mucosal adjuvants. LTs can also behave as powerful and safe adjuvants following delivery via parenteral routes, particularly for activation of cytotoxic lymphocytes. In the present study, we evaluated the adjuvant effects of a new natural LT polymorphic form (LT2), after delivery via intradermal (i.d.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) routes, with regard to both antibody and T cell responses. A recombinant HIV-1 p24 protein was employed as a model antigen for determination of antigen-specific immune responses while the reference LT (LT1), produced by the ETEC H10407 strain, and a non-toxigenic LT form (LTK63) were employed as previously characterized LT types. LT-treated mice submitted to a four dose-base immunization regimen elicited similar p24-specific serum IgG responses and CD4(+) T cell activation. Nonetheless, mice immunized with LT1 or LT2 induced higher numbers of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells and in vivo cytotoxic responses compared to mice immunized with the non-toxic LT derivative. These effects were correlated with stronger activation of local dendritic cell populations. In addition, mice immunized with LT1 and LT2, but not with LTK63, via s.c. or i.d. routes developed local inflammatory reactions. Altogether, the present results confirmed that the two most prevalent natural polymorphic LT variants (LT1 or LT2) display similar and strong adjuvant effects for subunit vaccines administered via i.d. or s.c. routes.

  8. Acid and alkali doped PBI electrolyte in electrochemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Baozhong

    In this work the conductivity of blank PBI membrane, acid doped PBI and alkaline doped PBI was systematically studied. A new methodology for sorption kinetics study in electrolyte solution has been established by monitoring the conductivity change during the sorption process. The model of the doping process and mechanism of conductivity are proposed. The performance of PBI (doped under optimum conditions) in fuel cell as PEM was evaluated. The experimental results show that the blank PBI in acid solution is an ionic insulator. It clarified the long time confusion in this area. The acid doped PBI membrane is an ionic conductor. The conductivity increases with the concentration of the acid solution. In high concentration acid solution, the conductivity increases with the type of acid in the order: H2SO 4 > H3PO4 > HClO4 > HNO3 > HCl. The kinetics of the doping process was studied, by a continuous method. The ionic conductivity mechanism was established. The PBI membranes doped with H2SO4 and H3PO4 exhibit better performance than NafionRTM. The doped FBI has more resistance to CO poison. 3% CO in H2 has little effect on the H3PO 4 doped PBI membrane at 185°C. The conductivity of the alkali doped PBI membrane changes with the concentration of the alkaline solution and the type of the alkalis. The conductivity has a maximum in KOH and NaOH solution. The maximum conductivity in KOH is higher than in NaOH and LiOH. It is about 5 times of that of NafionRTM in alkaline solution. The two-step sorption process in alkaline solution was observed. The first step is the permeation process of the alkalis in the PBI membrane. The permeation is the results of diffusion and interaction. It is concluded that the permeation process is controlled by the rate of interaction between the alkali and PBI molecule. The second step is the relaxation process in the membrane. This step contributes more to the conductivity for the membrane than the first step. The ionic conductivity mechanism

  9. Contents of Highly Labile Trace Elements in H4-6 Chondrite Falls Are Not Affected by Post-Accretionary Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S. F.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1999-03-01

    Contents of volatile trace elements in H4-6 chondrites were established during nebular condensation and accretion and the most thermally labile of these were unaffected by metamorphism of their parent bodies, shock heating or close solar approach.

  10. [Impact of Land Utilization Pattern on Distributing Characters of Labile Organic Carbon in Soil Aggregates in Jinyun Mountain].

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Jiang, Chang-sheng; Hao, Qing-ju

    2015-09-01

    Four land utilization patterns were selected for this study in Jinyun mountain, including subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest (abbreviation: forest), sloping farmland, orchard and abandoned land. Soil samples were taken every 10 cm in the depth of 60 cm soil and proportions of large macroaggregates (> 2 mm), small macroaggregates (0. 25-2 mm), microaggregates (0. 053 - 0. 25 mm) and silt + clay (<0. 053 mm) were obtained by wet sieving method to measure the content of organic carbon and labile organic carbon in each aggregate fraction and analyze impacts of land uses on organic carbon and labile organic carbon of soil aggregates. LOC content of four soil aggregates were significantly reduced with the increase of soil depth; in layers of 0-60 cm soil depth, our results showed that LOC contents of forest and abandoned land were higher than orchard and sloping farmland. Reserves of labile organic carbon were estimated by the same soil quality, it revealed that forest (3. 68 Mg.hm-2) > abandoned land (1. 73 Mg.hm-2) > orchard (1. 43 Mg.hm-2) >sloping farmland (0.54 Mg.hm-2) in large macroaggregates, abandoned land (7.77, 5. 01 Mg.hm-2) > forest (4. 96, 2.71 Mg.hm-2) > orchard (3. 33, 21. 10 Mg.hm-2) > sloping farmland (1. 68, 1. 35 Mg.hm-2) in small macroaggregates and microaggregates, and abandoned land(4. 32 Mg.hm-2) > orchard(4. 00 Mg.hm-2) > forest(3. 22 Mg.hm-2) > sloping farmland (2.37 Mg.hm-2) in silt + clay, forest and abandoned land were higher than orchard and sloping farmland in other three soil aggregates except silt + clay. It was observed that the level of organic carbon and labile organic carbon were decreased when bringing forest under cultivation to orchard or farmland, and augments on organic carbon and labile organic carbon were found after exchanging farmland to abandoned land. The most reverses of forest and abandoned land emerged in small macroaggregates, orchard and sloping farmland were in microaggregates. That was, during the

  11. [Impact of Land Utilization Pattern on Distributing Characters of Labile Organic Carbon in Soil Aggregates in Jinyun Mountain].

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Jiang, Chang-sheng; Hao, Qing-ju

    2015-09-01

    Four land utilization patterns were selected for this study in Jinyun mountain, including subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest (abbreviation: forest), sloping farmland, orchard and abandoned land. Soil samples were taken every 10 cm in the depth of 60 cm soil and proportions of large macroaggregates (> 2 mm), small macroaggregates (0. 25-2 mm), microaggregates (0. 053 - 0. 25 mm) and silt + clay (<0. 053 mm) were obtained by wet sieving method to measure the content of organic carbon and labile organic carbon in each aggregate fraction and analyze impacts of land uses on organic carbon and labile organic carbon of soil aggregates. LOC content of four soil aggregates were significantly reduced with the increase of soil depth; in layers of 0-60 cm soil depth, our results showed that LOC contents of forest and abandoned land were higher than orchard and sloping farmland. Reserves of labile organic carbon were estimated by the same soil quality, it revealed that forest (3. 68 Mg.hm-2) > abandoned land (1. 73 Mg.hm-2) > orchard (1. 43 Mg.hm-2) >sloping farmland (0.54 Mg.hm-2) in large macroaggregates, abandoned land (7.77, 5. 01 Mg.hm-2) > forest (4. 96, 2.71 Mg.hm-2) > orchard (3. 33, 21. 10 Mg.hm-2) > sloping farmland (1. 68, 1. 35 Mg.hm-2) in small macroaggregates and microaggregates, and abandoned land(4. 32 Mg.hm-2) > orchard(4. 00 Mg.hm-2) > forest(3. 22 Mg.hm-2) > sloping farmland (2.37 Mg.hm-2) in silt + clay, forest and abandoned land were higher than orchard and sloping farmland in other three soil aggregates except silt + clay. It was observed that the level of organic carbon and labile organic carbon were decreased when bringing forest under cultivation to orchard or farmland, and augments on organic carbon and labile organic carbon were found after exchanging farmland to abandoned land. The most reverses of forest and abandoned land emerged in small macroaggregates, orchard and sloping farmland were in microaggregates. That was, during the

  12. Experiment and simulation study on alkalis transfer characteristic during direct combustion utilization of bagasse.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yanfen; Cao, Yawen; Chen, Tuo; Ma, Xiaoqian

    2015-10-01

    Bagasse is utilized as fuel in the biggest biomass power plant of China, however, alkalis in the fuel created severe agglomeration and slagging problems. Alkalis transfer characteristic, agglomeration causes in engineering practice, additive improvement effects and mechanism during bagasse combustion were investigated via experiments and simulations. Only slight agglomeration occurs in ash higher than 800°C. Serious agglomeration in practical operation should be attributed to the gaseous alkalis evaporating at high temperature and condensing on the cooler grain surfaces in CFB. It can be speculated that ash caking can be avoided with temperature lower than 750°C and heating surface corrosion caused by alkali metal vapor can be alleviated with temperature lower than 850°C. Kaolin added into the bagasse has an apparent advantage over CaO additive both in enhancing ash fusion point and relieving alkali-chloride corrosion by locking alkalis in dystectic solid compounds over the whole temperature range.

  13. Pretreatment of garden biomass by alkali-assisted ultrasonication: effects on enzymatic hydrolysis and ultrastructural changes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation aims at studying the effectiveness of alkali-assisted ultrasonication on pretreatment of garden biomass (GB). Dry and powdered GB suspended in 1% NaOH was ultrasonicated for 15, 30 and 60 minutes at a frequency of 25 KHZ. The mode of action and effectiveness of alkali-assisted ultrasonication on GB was established through microscopic, scanning electron microscopic and X-ray diffraction studies. A perusal of results showed that alkali-assisted ultrasonication led to fibrillation of GB which ultimately facilitated enzymatic hydrolysis. The results also indicated that alkali-assisted ultrasonication is an efficient means of pretreatment of GB at moderate (45-50°C) working temperature and low (1%) concentration of alkali. The yield of reducing sugar after enzymatic hydrolysis increased almost six times as compared to control due to alkali-assisted ultrasonication. PMID:24843790

  14. Adsorption of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms on the reconstructed graphene-like BN single sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jun-Hua; Wang, Zheng-Jia; Wang, Yu-Fang; Yin, Yu-Hua; Jiang, Run; Jin, Qing-Hua

    2015-12-01

    A graphene-like BN single sheet with absorbed alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms have been investigated by using a first-principles method within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The electronic structure of BN sheet with adsorbed metal atoms is mainly determined by the metal electronic state which is near to the Fermi level owing to the wide band gap of pure BN sheet. So, we calculated the adsorption energy, charge transfer and work function after the metal adsorbed on BN sheet. We found that the interaction between the metal atoms and BN surface was very strong, and the stable adsorption site for all the adsorbed atoms concluded was high-coordination surface site (H-center) rather than the surface dangling bond sites from the perspective of simple bond-counting arguments. Our results indicate that the interaction of BN sheet with metal atoms could help in the development of metallic nanoscale devices.

  15. Calculation of Radiative Corrections to E1 matrix elements in the Neutral Alkalis

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J; Cheng, K T

    2004-09-28

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkalis but significantly larger for the heavier alkalis, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  16. New class of scorpionate: tris(tetrazolyl)-iron complex and its different coordination modes for alkali metal ions.

    PubMed

    Park, Ka Hyun; Lee, Kang Mun; Go, Min Jeong; Choi, Sung Ho; Park, Hyoung-Ryun; Kim, Youngjo; Lee, Junseong

    2014-08-18

    We report formation of a new metallascorpionate ligand, [FeL3](3-) (IPtz), containing a Fe core and three 5-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1H-tetrazole (LH2) ligands. It features two different binding sites, oxygen and nitrogen triangles, which consist of three oxygen or nitrogen donors from tetrazole. The binding affinities of the complex for three alkali metal ions were studied using UV spectrophotometry titrations. All three alkali metal ions show high affinities and binding constants (>3 × 10(6) M(-1)), based on the 1:1 binding isotherms to IPtz. The coordination modes of the alkali metals and IPtz in the solid were studied using X-ray crystallography; two different electron-donor sites show different coordination numbers for Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) ions. The oxygen triangles have the κ(2) coordination mode with Li(+) and κ(3) coordination mode with Na(+) and K(+) ions, whereas the nitrogen triangles show κ(3) coordination with K(+) only. The different binding affinities of IPtz in the solid were manipulated using multiple metal precursors. A Fe-K-Zn trimetallic complex was constructed by assembly of an IPtz ligand, K, and Zn precursors and characterized using X-ray crystallography. Oxygen donors are coordinated with the K ion via the κ(3) coordination mode, and nitrogen donors are coordinated with Zn metal by κ(3) coordination. The solid-state structure was confirmed to be a honeycomb coordination polymer with a one-dimensional infinite metallic array, i.e., -(K-K-Fe-Zn-Fe-K)n-.

  17. Crystallized alkali-silica gel in concrete from the late 1890s

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Karl . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Gress, David . E-mail: dlgress@unh.edu; Van Dam, Tom . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Sutter, Lawrence . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu

    2006-08-15

    The Elon Farnsworth Battery, a concrete structure completed in 1898, is in an advanced state of disrepair. To investigate the potential for rehabilitation, cores were extracted from the battery. Petrographic examination revealed abundant deposits of alkali silica reaction products in cracks associated with the quartz rich metasedimentary coarse aggregate. The products of the alkali silica reaction are variable in composition and morphology, including both amorphous and crystalline phases. The crystalline alkali silica reaction products are characterized by quantitative X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The broad extent of the reactivity is likely due to elevated alkali levels in the cements used.

  18. High-temperature interactions of alkali vapors with solids during coal combustion and gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Punjak, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    A temperature and concentration programmed reaction method is used to investigate the mechanism by which organically bound alkali is released from carbonaceous substrates. Vaporization of the alkali is preceded by reduction of oxygen-bearing groups during which CO is generated. A residual amount of alkali remains after complete reduction. This residual level is greater for potassium, indicating that potassium has stronger interactions with graphitic substrates that sodium. Other mineral substrates were exposed to high temperature alkali chloride vapors under both nitrogen and simulated flue gas atmospheres to investigate their potential application as sorbents for the removal of alkali from coal conversion flue gases. The compounds containing alumina and silica are found to readily adsorb alkali vapors and the minerals kaolinite, bauxite and emathlite are identified as promising alkali sorbents. The fundamentals of alkali adsorption on kaolinite, bauxite and emathlite are compared and analyzed both experimentally and through theoretical modeling. The experiments were performed in a microgravimetric reactor system; the sorbents were characterized before and after alkali adsorption using scanning Auger microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, mercury porosimetry and atomic emission spectrophotometry. The results show that the process is not a simple physical condensation, but a complex combination of several diffusion steps and reactions.

  19. Labile trace metal contribution of the runoff collector to a semi-urban river.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, J D; Granger, D; Binet, G; Litrico, X; Huneau, F; Peyraube, N; Le Coustumer, P

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the distribution of labile trace metals (LTMs; Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in a semi-urban runoff collector was examined to assess its influence to a natural aqueous system (Jalle River, Bordeaux, France). This river is of high importance as it is part of a natural reserve dedicated to conserving aquatic flora and fauna. Two sampling campaigns with a differing precipitation condition (period 1, spring season; and period 2, summer season associated with storms) were considered. Precipitation and water flow were monitored. The collector is active as it is receptive to precipitation changes. It influences the river through discharging water, contributing LTMs, and channeling the mass fluxes. During period 2 where precipitation rate is higher, 25 % of the total water volume of the river was supplied by the collector. LTMs were detected at the collector. Measurements were done by using diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) probes deployed during 1, 7, and 14 days in each period. The results showed that in an instantaneous period (day 1 or D1), most of these trace metals are above the environmental quality standards (Cd, Co, Cr, and Zn). The coefficient of determination (r (2) > 0.50) employed confirmed that the LTM concentrations in the downstream can be explained by the collector. While Co and Cr are from the upstream and the collector, Cd, Cu, and Zn are mostly provided by the collector. Ni, however, is mostly delivered by the upstream. Using the concentrations observed, the river can be affected by the collector in varying ways: (1) adding effect, resulting from the mix of the upstream and the collector (if upstream ˂ downstream); (2) diluted (if upstream ˃ downstream); and (3) conservative or unaffected (upstream ~ downstream). The range of LTM mass fluxes that the collector holds are as follows: (1) limited range or ˂10 g/day, Cd (0.04-1.75 g/day), Co (0.08-05.42 g/day), Ni (0.06-1.45 g/day), and Pb (0.08-9.89 g/day); (2) moderate

  20. Detection of Labile Low-Molecular-Mass Transition Metal Complexes in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Sean P.; Moore, Michael J.; Lindahl, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid chromatography was used with an on-line inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer to detect low-molecular-mass (LMM) transition metal complexes in mitochondria isolated from fermenting yeast cells, human Jurkat cells, and mouse brain and liver. These complexes constituted 20 – 40% of total mitochondrial Mn, Fe, Zn, and Cu ions. The major LMM Mn complex in yeast mitochondria had a mass of ca. 1100 Da and a concentration of ~ 2 μM. Mammalian mitochondria contained a second Mn species with a mass of ca. 2000 Da at a comparable concentration. The major Fe complex in mitochondria isolated from exponentially growing yeast cells had a mass of ca. 580 Da; the concentration of Fe580 in mitochondria was ca. 100 μM. When mitochondria were isolated from fermenting cells in post-exponential phase, the mass of the dominant LMM Fe complex was ca. 1100 Da. Upon incubation, the intensity of Fe1100 declined and Fe580 increased, suggesting that the two are interrelated. Mammalian mitochondria contained Fe580 and 2 other Fe species (Fe2000 and Fe1100) at concentrations of ca. 50 μM each. The dominant LMM Zn species in mitochondria had a mass of ca. 1200 Da and a concentration of ca. 110 μM. Mammalian mitochondria contained a second major LMM Zn species at 1500 Da. The dominant LMM Cu species in yeast mitochondria had a mass of ca. 5000 Da and a concentration in yeast mitochondria of ca. 16 μM; Cu5000 was not observed in mammalian mitochondria. The dominant Co species in mitochondria, Co1200, had a concentration of 20 nM and was probably a cobalamin. Mammalian but not yeast mitochondria contained a LMM Mo species, Mo730, at ca. 1 μM concentration. Increasing Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn concentrations 10 fold in the medium increased the concentration of the same element in the corresponding isolated mitochondria. Treatment with metal chelators confirmed that these LMM species were labile. The dominant S species at 1100 Da was not free GSH or GSSG. PMID:26018429