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Sample records for alkali metal vapors

  1. Alkali metal vapors - Laser spectroscopy and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stwalley, W. C.; Koch, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the rapidly expanding use of lasers for spectroscopic studies of alkali metal vapors. Since the alkali metals (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium) are theoretically simple ('visible hydrogen'), readily ionized, and strongly interacting with laser light, they represent ideal systems for quantitative understanding of microscopic interconversion mechanisms between photon (e.g., solar or laser), chemical, electrical and thermal energy. The possible implications of such understanding for a wide variety of practical applications (sodium lamps, thermionic converters, magnetohydrodynamic devices, new lasers, 'lithium waterfall' inertial confinement fusion reactors, etc.) are also discussed.

  2. Alkali metal vapors - Laser spectroscopy and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stwalley, W. C.; Koch, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the rapidly expanding use of lasers for spectroscopic studies of alkali metal vapors. Since the alkali metals (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium) are theoretically simple ('visible hydrogen'), readily ionized, and strongly interacting with laser light, they represent ideal systems for quantitative understanding of microscopic interconversion mechanisms between photon (e.g., solar or laser), chemical, electrical and thermal energy. The possible implications of such understanding for a wide variety of practical applications (sodium lamps, thermionic converters, magnetohydrodynamic devices, new lasers, 'lithium waterfall' inertial confinement fusion reactors, etc.) are also discussed.

  3. Lithium and Sodium Resistance of Alkali Metal Vapor Resistant Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishinevski, Anatoly; Hall, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    A common challenge in atomic physics is that of containing an alkali metal vapor at an elevated temperature and concurrently being able to excite and probe atomic transitions within. Typically glass is used as the material to construct the container, as it is easy to manipulate into any geometry and offers thermal, mechanical, and optical properties that no other material is capable. Unfortunately it has been well established that alkali metal gasses/vapors react readily with silica containing glass and results in a progressive darkening of the material. As the darkening reaction progresses, the optical transmission properties of the glass progressively degrade to an eventual point of uselessness. Alkali metals have been used extensively in frequency standards and magnetometers. The finite life of these alkali metal vapor-containing devices has been accepted despite varying attempts by different teams to solve this problem. As a viable solution, it has been identified there exist a family of glass compositions that contain a marginal amount of silica, may be lampworked using traditional glassblowing techniques, and that offer substantially better alkali vapor resistance. The evaluation of these glasses and their resistance to sodium and lithium vapor at varying pressures and temperatures are discussed.

  4. Spill-Resistant Alkali-Metal-Vapor Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, William

    2005-01-01

    A spill-resistant vessel has been developed for dispensing an alkali-metal vapor. Vapors of alkali metals (most commonly, cesium or rubidium, both of which melt at temperatures slightly above room temperature) are needed for atomic frequency standards, experiments in spectroscopy, and experiments in laser cooling. Although the present spill-resistant alkali-metal dispenser was originally intended for use in the low-gravity environment of outer space, it can also be used in normal Earth gravitation: indeed, its utility as a vapor source was confirmed by use of cesium in a ground apparatus. The vessel is made of copper. It consists of an assembly of cylinders and flanges, shown in the figure. The uppermost cylinder is a fill tube. Initially, the vessel is evacuated, the alkali metal charge is distilled into the bottom of the vessel, and then the fill tube is pinched closed to form a vacuum seal. The innermost cylinder serves as the outlet for the vapor, yet prevents spilling by protruding above the surface of the alkali metal, no matter which way or how far the vessel is tilted. In the event (unlikely in normal Earth gravitation) that any drops of molten alkali metal have been shaken loose by vibration and are floating freely, a mesh cap on top of the inner cylinder prevents the drops from drifting out with the vapor. Liquid containment of the equivalent of 1.2 grams of cesium was confirmed for all orientations with rubbing alcohol in one of the prototypes later used with cesium.

  5. Solar-powered alkali metal vapor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blount, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    The emission spectrum of the A(1 Sigma u +) - X(1 Sigma g +) band of Na2 has been recorded following excitation by monochromatic radiation in the region of X-A and X-B absorption. The spectral profile has been investigated as a function of excitation wavelength, sodium vapor temperature and buffer gas pressure. Additionally, gain measurements were made for the satellite of the A-X band as a function of the sodium vapor temperature and buffer gas pressure.

  6. On-chip fabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, K.; Ban, K.; Hirai, Y.; Sugano, K.; Tsuchiya, T.; Mizutani, N.; Tabata, O.

    2013-11-01

    We describe a novel on-chip microfabrication technique for the alkali-metal vapor cell of an optically pumped atomic magnetometer (OPAM), utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet (AMST). The newly proposed AMST is a millimeter-sized piece of porous alumina whose considerable surface area holds deposited alkali-metal chloride (KCl) and barium azide (BaN6), source materials that effectively produce alkali-metal vapor at less than 400 °C. Our experiments indicated that the most effective pore size of the AMST is between 60 and 170 µm. The thickness of an insulating glass spacer holding the AMST was designed to confine generated alkali metal to the interior of the vapor cell during its production, and an integrated silicon heater was designed to seal the device using a glass frit, melted at an optimum temperature range of 460-490 °C that was determined by finite element method thermal simulation. The proposed design and AMST were used to successfully fabricate a K cell that was then operated as an OPAM with a measured sensitivity of 50 pT. These results demonstrate that the proposed concept for on-chip microfabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells may lead to effective replacement of conventional glassworking approaches.

  7. (abstract) Fundamental Mechanisms of Electrode Kinetics and Alkali Metal Atom Transport at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kisor, A.; Kikkert, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of electrode kinetics and mass transport of alkali metal oxidation and alkali metal cation reduction at the solid electrolyte/porous electrode boundary as well as alkali metal transport through porous metal electrodes has important applications in optimizing device performance in alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) cells which are high temperature, high current density electrochemical cells. Basic studies of these processes also affords the opportunity to investigate a very basic electrochemical reaction over a wide range of conditions; and a variety of mass transport modes at high temperatures via electrochemical techniques. The temperature range of these investigations covers 700K to 1240K; the alkali metal vapor pressures range from about 10(sup -2) to 10(sup 2) Pa; and electrodes studied have included Mo, W, Mo/Na(sub 2)MoO(sub 4), W/Na(sub 2)WO(sub 4), WPt(sub x), and WRh(sub x) (1.0 < x < 6.0 ) with Na at Na-beta'-alumina, and Mo with K at K-beta'-alumina. Both liquid metal/solid electrolyte/alkali metal vapor and alkali metal vapor/solid electrolyte/vapor cells have been used to characterize the reaction and transport processes. We have previously reported evidence of ionic, free molecular flow, and surface transport of sodium in several types of AMTEC electrodes.

  8. (abstract) Fundamental Mechanisms of Electrode Kinetics and Alkali Metal Atom Transport at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kisor, A.; Kikkert, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of electrode kinetics and mass transport of alkali metal oxidation and alkali metal cation reduction at the solid electrolyte/porous electrode boundary as well as alkali metal transport through porous metal electrodes has important applications in optimizing device performance in alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) cells which are high temperature, high current density electrochemical cells. Basic studies of these processes also affords the opportunity to investigate a very basic electrochemical reaction over a wide range of conditions; and a variety of mass transport modes at high temperatures via electrochemical techniques. The temperature range of these investigations covers 700K to 1240K; the alkali metal vapor pressures range from about 10(sup -2) to 10(sup 2) Pa; and electrodes studied have included Mo, W, Mo/Na(sub 2)MoO(sub 4), W/Na(sub 2)WO(sub 4), WPt(sub x), and WRh(sub x) (1.0 < x < 6.0 ) with Na at Na-beta'-alumina, and Mo with K at K-beta'-alumina. Both liquid metal/solid electrolyte/alkali metal vapor and alkali metal vapor/solid electrolyte/vapor cells have been used to characterize the reaction and transport processes. We have previously reported evidence of ionic, free molecular flow, and surface transport of sodium in several types of AMTEC electrodes.

  9. Saturated vapor pressure above the amalgam of alkali metals in discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrish, S. V.

    2011-12-01

    A theoretical and numerical analysis of the evaporation process of two-component compounds in vapors of alkali metals in discharge lamps is presented. Based on the developed mathematical model of calculation of saturated vapor pressure of the metal above the amalgam, dependences of mass fractions of the components in the discharge volume on design parameters and thermophysical characteristics of the lamp are obtained.

  10. Laboratory measurements of alkali metal containing vapors released during biomass combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A.

    1996-12-31

    Alkali metals, in particular potassium, have been implicated as key ingredients for enhancing fouling and slagging of heat transfer surfaces in power generating facilities that convert biomass to electricity. When biomass is used as a fuel in boilers, the deposits formed reduce efficiency, and in the worst case lead to unscheduled plant downtime. Blending biomass with other fuels is often used as a strategy to control fouling and slagging problems. Depending on the combustor, sorbents can be added to the fuel mixture to sequester alkali metals. Another possibility is to develop methods of hot gas cleanup that reduce the amount of alkali vapor to acceptable levels. These solutions to fouling and slagging, however, would greatly benefit from a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of alkali release during biomass combustion. Identifying these alkali vapor species and understanding how these vapors enhance deposit formation would also be beneficial. The approach is to directly sample the hot gases liberated from the combustion of small biomass samples in a variable-temperature quartz-tube reactor employing a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) system. The authors have successfully used this experimental technique to identify alkali species released during the combustion of selected biomass feedstocks used in larger scale combustion facilities. Fuels investigated include lodgepole pine, eucalyptus, poplar, corn stover, switchgrass, wheat straw, rice straw, pistachio shells, almond shells and hulls, wood wastes, waste paper, alfalfa stems, and willow tops.

  11. Hyperfine frequency shift and Zeeman relaxation in alkali-metal-vapor cells with antirelaxation alkene coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, Eric P.; Karaulanov, Todor; Balabas, Mikhail; Budker, Dmitry

    2013-02-01

    An alkene-based antirelaxation coating for alkali-metal vapor cells exhibiting Zeeman relaxation times up to 77 s was recently identified by Balabas The long relaxation times, two orders of magnitude longer than in paraffin- (alkane-) coated cells, motivate revisiting the question of what the mechanism is underlying wall-collision-induced relaxation and renew interest in applications of alkali-metal vapor cells to secondary frequency standards. We measure the width and frequency shift of the ground-state hyperfine mF=0→mF'=0 transition (clock resonance) in vapor cells with 85Rb and 87Rb atoms, with an alkene antirelaxation coating. We find that the frequency shift is slightly larger than for paraffin-coated cells and that the Zeeman linewidth scales linearly with the hyperfine frequency shift.

  12. Elliptical polarization of near-resonant linearly polarized probe light in optically pumped alkali metal vapor.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingying; Wang, Zhiguo; Jin, Shilong; Yuan, Jie; Luo, Hui

    2017-02-20

    Optically pumped alkali metal atoms currently provide a sensitive solution for magnetic microscopic measurements. As the most practicable plan, Faraday rotation of linearly polarized light is extensively used in spin polarization measurements of alkali metal atoms. In some cases, near-resonant Faraday rotation is applied to improve the sensitivity. However, the near-resonant linearly polarized probe light is elliptically polarized after passing through optically pumped alkali metal vapor. The ellipticity of transmitted near-resonant probe light is numerically calculated and experimentally measured. In addition, we also analyze the negative impact of elliptical polarization on Faraday rotation measurements. From our theoretical estimate and experimental results, the elliptical polarization forms an inevitable error in spin polarization measurements.

  13. Elliptical polarization of near-resonant linearly polarized probe light in optically pumped alkali metal vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingying; Wang, Zhiguo; Jin, Shilong; Yuan, Jie; Luo, Hui

    2017-02-01

    Optically pumped alkali metal atoms currently provide a sensitive solution for magnetic microscopic measurements. As the most practicable plan, Faraday rotation of linearly polarized light is extensively used in spin polarization measurements of alkali metal atoms. In some cases, near-resonant Faraday rotation is applied to improve the sensitivity. However, the near-resonant linearly polarized probe light is elliptically polarized after passing through optically pumped alkali metal vapor. The ellipticity of transmitted near-resonant probe light is numerically calculated and experimentally measured. In addition, we also analyze the negative impact of elliptical polarization on Faraday rotation measurements. From our theoretical estimate and experimental results, the elliptical polarization forms an inevitable error in spin polarization measurements.

  14. Elliptical polarization of near-resonant linearly polarized probe light in optically pumped alkali metal vapor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingying; Wang, Zhiguo; Jin, Shilong; Yuan, Jie; Luo, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Optically pumped alkali metal atoms currently provide a sensitive solution for magnetic microscopic measurements. As the most practicable plan, Faraday rotation of linearly polarized light is extensively used in spin polarization measurements of alkali metal atoms. In some cases, near-resonant Faraday rotation is applied to improve the sensitivity. However, the near-resonant linearly polarized probe light is elliptically polarized after passing through optically pumped alkali metal vapor. The ellipticity of transmitted near-resonant probe light is numerically calculated and experimentally measured. In addition, we also analyze the negative impact of elliptical polarization on Faraday rotation measurements. From our theoretical estimate and experimental results, the elliptical polarization forms an inevitable error in spin polarization measurements. PMID:28216649

  15. Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics of Dimerization and Clustering in Alkali Metal Vapors.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2016-06-30

    Alkali metals are known to form dimers, trimers, and tetramers in their vapors. The mechanism and regularities of this phenomenon characterize the chemical behavior of the first group elements. We report ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of the alkali metal vapors and characterize their structural properties, including radial distribution functions and atomic cluster size distributions. AIMD confirms formation of Men, where n ranges from 2 to 4. High pressure sharply favors larger structures, whereas high temperature decreases their fraction. Heavier alkali metals maintain somewhat larger fractions of Me2, Me3, and Me4, relative to isolated atoms. A single atom is the most frequently observed structure in vapors, irrespective of the element and temperature. Due to technical difficulties of working with high temperatures and pressures in experiments, AIMD is the most affordable method of research. It provides valuable understanding of the chemical behavior of Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs, which can lead to development of new chemical reactions involving these metals.

  16. Polarized Alkali-Metal Vapor with Minute-Long Transverse Spin-Relaxation Time

    SciTech Connect

    Balabas, M. V.; Karaulanov, T.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Budker, D.

    2010-08-13

    We demonstrate lifetimes of Zeeman populations and coherences in excess of 60 sec in alkali-metal vapor cells with inner walls coated with an alkene material. This represents 2 orders of magnitude improvement over the best paraffin coatings. We explore the temperature dependence of cells coated with this material and investigate spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometry in a room-temperature environment, a regime previously inaccessible with conventional coating materials.

  17. Third harmonic generation in phase-matched alkali metal vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, D. M.; Young, J. F.; Harris, S. E.; Bekkers, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    We report improvements in conversion efficiency for third harmonic generation in sodium and rubidium vapor. 30-psec pulses of radiation at 1.064 micron have been converted to 0.3547 micron with an energy conversion efficiency of 10%. Factors limiting conversion efficiency are discussed.

  18. Impurity detection in alkali-metal vapor cells via nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Ishikawa, K.

    2016-11-01

    We use nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of alkali metals sealed in glass vapor cells to perform in situ identification of chemical contaminants. The alkali Knight shift varies with the concentration of the impurity, which in turn varies with temperature as the alloy composition changes along the liquidus curve. Intentional addition of a known impurity validates this approach and reveals that sodium is often an intrinsic contaminant in cells filled with distilled, high-purity rubidium or cesium. Measurements of the Knight shift of the binary Rb-Na alloy confirm prior measurements of the shift's linear dependence on Na concentration, but similar measurements for the Cs-Na system demonstrate an unexpected nonlinear dependence of the Knight shift on the molar ratio. This non-destructive approach allows monitoring and quantification of ongoing chemical processes within the kind of vapor cells which form the basis for precise sensors and atomic frequency standards.

  19. (abstract) Experimental and Modeling Studies of the Exchange Current at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    The microscopic mechanism of the alkali ion-electron recombination reaction at the three phase boundary zone formed by a porous metal electrode in the alkali vapor on the surface of an alkali beta'-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) ceramic has been studied by comparison of the expected rates for the three simplest reaction mechanisms with known temperature dependent rate data; and the physical parameters of typical porous metal electrode/BASE/alkali metal vapor reaction zones. The three simplest reactions are tunneling of electrons from the alkali coated electrode to a surface bound alkali metal ion; emission of an electron from the electrode with subsequent capture by a surface bound alkali metal ion; and thermal emission of an alkali cation from the BASE and its capture on the porous metal electrode surface where it may recombine with an electron. Only the first reaction adequately accounts for both the high observed rate and its temperature dependence. New results include crude modeling of simple, one step, three phase, solid/solid/gas electrochemical reaction.

  20. (abstract) Experimental and Modeling Studies of the Exchange Current at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    The microscopic mechanism of the alkali ion-electron recombination reaction at the three phase boundary zone formed by a porous metal electrode in the alkali vapor on the surface of an alkali beta'-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) ceramic has been studied by comparison of the expected rates for the three simplest reaction mechanisms with known temperature dependent rate data; and the physical parameters of typical porous metal electrode/BASE/alkali metal vapor reaction zones. The three simplest reactions are tunneling of electrons from the alkali coated electrode to a surface bound alkali metal ion; emission of an electron from the electrode with subsequent capture by a surface bound alkali metal ion; and thermal emission of an alkali cation from the BASE and its capture on the porous metal electrode surface where it may recombine with an electron. Only the first reaction adequately accounts for both the high observed rate and its temperature dependence. New results include crude modeling of simple, one step, three phase, solid/solid/gas electrochemical reaction.

  1. PROCESS OF RECOVERING ALKALI METALS

    DOEpatents

    Wolkoff, J.

    1961-08-15

    A process is described of recovering alkali metal vapor by sorption on activated alumina, activated carbon, dehydrated zeolite, activated magnesia, or Fuller's earth preheated above the vaporization temperature of the alkali metal and subsequent desorption by heating the solvent under vacuum. (AEC)

  2. Spin-exchange frequency shift in alkali-metal-vapor cell frequency standards

    SciTech Connect

    Micalizio, Salvatore; Godone, Aldo; Levi, Filippo; Vanier, Jacques

    2006-03-15

    In this paper we calculate the effect of spin-exchange collisions in alkali-metal vapors. In the framework of the high-energy approximation, we evaluate the spin-exchange cross sections related to the line broadening and to the frequency shift of the ground state hyperfine transition. We do the calculation for the four isotopes, {sup 23}Na, {sup 39}K, {sup 87}Rb, and {sup 133}Cs. The results are used in particular to evaluate the spin-exchange frequency shift in Rb vapor cell frequency standards used in many applications. It turns out that, due to possible fluctuations in the atomic density, spin exchange may affect significantly the medium and long term frequency stability of the frequency standard.

  3. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  4. Investigation of anti-Relaxation coatings for alkali-metal vapor cells using surface science techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Seltzer, S. J.; Michalak, D. J.; Donaldson, M. H.; Balabas, M. V.; Barber, S. K.; Bernasek, S. L.; Bouchiat, M.-A.; Hexemer, A.; Hibberd, A. M.; Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Jaye, C.; Karaulanov, T.; Narducci, F. A.; Rangwala, S. A.; Robinson, H. G.; Shmakov, A. K.; Voronov, D. L.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Pines, A.; Budker, D.

    2010-10-11

    Many technologies based on cells containing alkali-metal atomic vapor benefit from the use of antirelaxation surface coatings in order to preserve atomic spin polarization. In particular, paraffin has been used for this purpose for several decades and has been demonstrated to allow an atom to experience up to 10?000 collisions with the walls of its container without depolarizing, but the details of its operation remain poorly understood. We apply modern surface and bulk techniques to the study of paraffin coatings in order to characterize the properties that enable the effective preservation of alkali spin polarization. These methods include Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, atomic force microscopy, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also compare the light-induced atomic desorption yields of several different paraffin materials. Experimental results include the determination that crystallinity of the coating material is unnecessary, and the detection of C=C double bonds present within a particular class of effective paraffin coatings. Further study should lead to the development of more robust paraffin antirelaxation coatings, as well as the design and synthesis of new classes of coating materials.

  5. Observation of Raman self-focusing in an alkali-metal vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proite, N. A.; Unks, B. E.; Green, J. T.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2008-02-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of Raman self-focusing and self-defocusing in a far-off resonant alkali-metal atomic system. The key idea is to drive a hyperfine transition in an alkali-metal atom to a maximally coherent state with two laser beams. In this regime, the two-photon detuning from the Raman resonance controls the nonlinear index of the medium.

  6. Alkali metal vapor removal from pressurized fluidized-bed combustor flue gas. Annual report, October 1982-September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Myles, K.M.; Jonke, A.A.

    1984-06-01

    Under the auspices of US Department of Energy, this work supports the program to develop sorbents for the cleanup of gases from pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion (PFBC) so that these cleaned hot gases can be used to power downstream gas turbines without causing corrosion. A laboratory-scale pressurized test unit was used to continue the alkali-vapor characterization of activated bauxite and Emathlite at a bed temperature of 850/sup 0/C and a system pressure of 10 atm absolute in a simulated PFBC flue gas stream containing <10 ppMV NaCl vapor. Under the test conditions, preliminary results show a comparable NaCl-vapor capture capability for both activated bauxite and Emathlite. Emathlite was found to capture NaCl vapor essentially by chemical reactions with the vapor to form water-insoluble compounds, probably sodium aluminosilicates, whereas activated bauxite captures the vapor mainly by physical adsorption as sodium sulfate. The test unit was modified and tested to improve the control of NaCl vaporization in the unit required for the source of alkali vapor in the simulated flue gas. Experimental results are also presented on (1) water leachability of both metallic and nonmetallic ions present in activated bauxite when it is cyclically heat-treated in a simulated PFBC flue gas environment and then leached with distilled water, and (2) the effect of heat-treatment of Emathlite in the simulated PFBC flue gas on the changes of its physical and chemical properties.

  7. Alkali metal vapor removal from pressurized fluidized-bed combustor flue gas. Quarterly report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, I.; Swift, W.M.; Lee, S.H.D.; Boyd, W.A.

    1980-07-01

    In the application of pressurized fluidized-bed combustors (PFBC) to the generation of electricity, hot corrosion of gas turbine components by alkali metal compounds is a potential problem. The objective of this investigation is to develop a method for removing these gaseous alkali metal compounds from the high-pressure high-temperature gas from a PFBC before the gas enters the gas turbine. A granular-bed filter, using either diatomaceous earth or activated bauxite as the bed material, is the concept currently being studied. Results are presented for the testing of diatomaceous earth for alkali vapor sorption at 800/sup 0/C and 9-atm pressure, using a simulated flue gas. Activated bauxite sorbent can be regenerated by leaching with water, and the kinetics of the leaching is under study.

  8. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  9. Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of alkali metal vapor interaction with alkene-based anti-relaxation coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiak, O. Yu.; Blanchard, J. W.; Budker, D.; Olshin, P. K.; Smirnov, S. N.; Balabas, M. V.

    2016-03-01

    The use of anti-relaxation coatings in alkali vapor cells yields substantial performance improvements compared to a bare glass surface by reducing the probability of spin relaxation in wall collisions by several orders of magnitude. Some of the most effective anti-relaxation coating materials are alpha-olefins, which (as in the case of more traditional paraffin coatings) must undergo a curing period after cell manufacturing in order to achieve the desired behavior. Until now, however, it has been unclear what physicochemical processes occur during cell curing, and how they may affect relevant cell properties. We present the results of nondestructive Raman-spectroscopy and magnetic-resonance investigations of the influence of alkali metal vapor (Cs or K) on an alpha-olefin, 1-nonadecene coating the inner surface of a glass cell. It was found that during the curing process, the alkali metal catalyzes migration of the carbon-carbon double bond, yielding a mixture of cis- and trans-2-nonadecene.

  10. Sub-Shot-Noise Magnetometry with a Correlated Spin-Relaxation Dominated Alkali-Metal Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Kominis, I. K.

    2008-02-22

    Spin noise sets fundamental limits to the precision of measurements using spin-polarized atomic vapors, such as performed with sensitive atomic magnetometers. Spin squeezing offers the possibility to extend the measurement precision beyond the standard quantum limit of uncorrelated atoms. Contrary to current understanding, we show that, even in the presence of spin relaxation, spin squeezing can lead to a significant reduction of spin noise, and hence an increase in magnetometric sensitivity, for a long measurement time. This is the case when correlated spin relaxation due to binary alkali-atom collisions dominates independently acting decoherence processes, a situation realized in thermal high atom-density magnetometers and clocks.

  11. New studies of optical pumping, spin resonances, and spin exchange in mixtures of inert gases and alkali-metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu

    In this thesis, we present new studies of alkali-hyperfine resonances, new optical pumping of alkali-metal atoms, and the new measurements of binary spin-exchange cross-section between alkali-metal atoms and xenon atoms. We report a large light narrowing effect of the hyperfine end-resonance signals, which was predicted from our theory and observed in our experiments. By increasing the intensity of the circularly polarized pumping beam, alkali-metal atoms are optically pumped into a state of static polarization, and trapped into the hyperfine end-state. Spin exchange between alkali-metal atoms has minimal effect on the end-resonance of the highly spin-polarized atoms. This new result will possibly benefit the design of atomic clocks and magnetometer. We also studied the pressure dependence of the atomic-clock resonance linewidth and pointed out that the linewidth was overestimated by people in the community of atomic clock. Next, we present a series study of coherent population trapping (CPT), which is a promising technique with the same or better performance compared to the traditional microwave spectroscopy. For miniature atomic clocks, CPT method is thought to be particularly advantages. From our studies, we invented a new optical-pumping method, push-pull optical pumping, which can pump atoms into nearly pure 0-0 superposition state, the superposition state of the two ground-state hyperfine sublevels with azimuthal quantum number m = 0. We believe this new invention will bring a big advantage to CPT frequency standards, the quantum state preparation for cold atoms or hot vapor, etc. We also investigated the pressure dependence of CPT excitation and the line shape of the CPT resonance theoretically and experimentally. These two properties are important for CPT applications. A theoretical study of "photon cost" of optical pumping is also presented. Finally, we switch our attention to the problem of spin exchange between alkali-metal atoms and xenon gas. This

  12. Alkali-vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.; Krupke, W. F.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the results from several of our alkali laser systems. We show highly efficient performance from an alexandrite-pumped rubidium laser. Using a laser diode stack as a pump source, we demonstrate up to 145 W of average power from a CW system. We present a design for a transversely pumped demonstration system that will show all of the required laser physics for a high power system.

  13. Alkali metal for ultraviolet band-pass filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick (Inventor); Fraschetti, George A. (Inventor); Mccann, Timothy A. (Inventor); Mayall, Sherwood D. (Inventor); Dunn, Donald E. (Inventor); Trauger, John T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An alkali metal filter having a layer of metallic bismuth deposited onto the alkali metal is provided. The metallic bismuth acts to stabilize the surface of the alkali metal to prevent substantial surface migration from occurring on the alkali metal, which may degrade optical characteristics of the filter. To this end, a layer of metallic bismuth is deposited by vapor deposition over the alkali metal to a depth of approximately 5 to 10 A. A complete alkali metal filter is described along with a method for fabricating the alkali metal filter.

  14. Alkali-metal-vapor removal from pressurized fluidized-bed combustor flue gas. Annual report, October 1980-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, I.; Lee, S.H.D.

    1982-01-01

    This work supports the program to develop methods for the cleanup of high-temperature, high-pressure combustion gases from pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustors so that the cleaned gases can be used to power downstream gas turbines. Data are presented in this report on the use of activated bauxite in a granular bed filter for the removal of gaseous NaCl from hot (800/sup 0/C), pressurized (less than or equal to 8 atm), wet simulated PFBC flue gas. Also, the sorption mechanisms are discussed. Greater than 99.9% NaCl vapor capture was achieved. Also reported are (1) the effects of several operating variables on the rate of leaching of NaCl that had been adsorbed on activated bauxite and (2) the volatility of alkali metal compounds present as impurities in activated bauxite. Finally, the preliminary estimate of the cost of using activated bauxite as a filter medium for the control of alkali vapors from PFBC flue gas was updated; a conceptual design of a fixed granular-bed filter was presented; and the energy needs and their costs for operating the filter in (a) the once-through and (b) the sorbent-regeneration modes were compared.

  15. Alkali metal vapor removal from pressurized fluidized-bed combustor flue gas. Quarterly report, January-March 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, I.; Lee, S.H.D.

    1981-06-01

    In the application of pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) to the generation of electricity, hot corrosion of the gas turbine (downstream from the combustor) by alkali metal compounds in the combustion gas is a potential problem. The objective of this investigation is to develop a method for the removal of gaseous alkali metal compounds from the high-pressure high-temperature gas from a PFBC before the gas enters the turbine. The use of a granular-bed filter for gas cleanup, utilizing activated bauxite as the bed material, is under study. Data are reported on the removal of gaseous NaCl from hot (800/sup 0/C), pessurized (5 atm), wet (3.4% H/sub 2/O) simulated flue gas using activated bauxite. Greater than 99.9% NaCl vapor capture was achieved. The energy needed for the operation of a fixed granular-bed filter has been estimated. The energy needs and cost of using activated bauxite in the once-through and regeneration modes of operation are compared.

  16. Alkali metal vapor removal from pressurized fluidized-bed combustor flue gas. Annual report, October 1983-September 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Henry, R.F.; Smith, S.D.; Teats, F.G.; Wilson, W.I.; Myles, K.M.

    1985-08-01

    Under the auspices of the US Department of Energy, this work supports a program to develop sorbents for the cleanup of alkali corrodents from the flue gas produced by pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion (PFBC) so that the cleaned hot gas is able to power downstream gas turbines without causing corrosion. This effort for FY 1984 involved two parts. In the first part, a laboratory-scale pressurized test unit was used to measure the rate of alkali (Na + K) evolution from beds of activated bauxite and Emathlite at a bed temperature of 850/sup 0/C and a system pressure of 10 atm absolute in a gas stream closely simulating the actual PFBC flue gas. The evaluation of the measured rates showed that (1) a spent activated bauxite bed, regenerated by water leaching and replenished with a small amount of fresh activated bauxite, contributes significantly less alkali vapor to the flue gas than the currently accepted alkali tolerance (0.024 ppM) of an industrial gas turbine and (2) the Emathlite bed contributes more alkali vapor than the turbine tolerance limit if the bed is exposed to a flue gas for a space time greater than 0.5 seconds. In the second part, a laboratory-scale demonstration of a fixed granular-bed sorber for the control of alkali vapor from PFBC flue gas was initiated. A detailed engineering design of this sorber system is described, and initial test results are presented and discussed. 26 refs., 16 figs.; 14 tabs.

  17. Alkali metal intercalates of molybdenum disulfide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.

    1973-01-01

    Study of some of the physicochemical properties of compounds obtained by subjecting natural molybdenite and single crystals of molybdenum disulfide grown by chemical vapor transport to intercalation with the alkali group of metals (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) by means of the liquid ammonia technique. Reported data and results include: (1) the intercalation of the entire alkali metal group, (2) stoichiometries and X-ray data on all of the compounds, and (3) superconductivity data for all the intercalation compounds.

  18. Investigation of Anti-Relaxation Coatings for Alkali-Metal Vapor Cells using Surface Science Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    cess used in the production of microfabricated vapor cells. Surface coatings with superior temperature stability are therefore required for use with...face, many aspects of which are not yet fully understood. Indeed, the production of high-quality paraffin cells re- mains more of an art than a...before the waxes were rub-coated onto the warmed surface, giving a layer with thickness of hundreds of nm to several µm. To mini- mize baseline drift

  19. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  20. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    DOEpatents

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  1. Solar pumped, alkali vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, David; Defaccio, Mark A.

    1987-09-01

    High power lasers based in space have been considered as sources for power transmission, laser propulsion, materials processing and space defense. The feasibility of such systems is based on the cost per unit power delivered, with detailed studies indicating that light weight has a greater impact on cost than laser efficiency. Solar radiation is a natural source of power for these devices and two methods for conversion of solar radiation to laser radiation can be considered. An indirectly solar pumped laser would first convert the solar radiation to electricity or longer wavelength blackbody radiation which is then used to power the laser. A directly longer wavelength blackbody radiation which is then used to power the laser. A directly pumped solar laser would utilize a portion of te solar spectrum to directly pump the laser medium, eliminating the intervening step and substantially reducing the systems weight and complexity. Detailed comparisons showed a directly pumped laser with an overall efficiency of only 1.5 percent can compete with an indirectly energized solar laser with an overall efficiency of ten percent. With this in mind, a concept for a directly solar pumped laser was developed based on an alkali vapor (sodium) as the laser medium.

  2. NONLINEAR OPTICS: Stimulated resonant hyper-Raman scattering of light by polaritons in alkali metal vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galaĭchuk, Yu A.; Yashkir, Yu N.

    1989-12-01

    A theory is developed for the calculation of the gain g due to stimulated resonant hyper-Raman scattering of light by polaritons in gaseous media. It is shown that throughout the tuning range of the pump frequency (including one- and two-photon resonances) a maximum of g corresponds to a dispersion curve of polaritons plotted ignoring attenuation. Theoretical results are used to analyze characteristics of hyper-Raman scattering in sodium vapor. It is shown that under normal experimental conditions the splitting of polariton branches is considerable (amounting to tens of reciprocal centimeters on the frequency scale and several angular degrees). The value of g is estimated for two-photon resonances in the case when the pump frequency is tunable in a wide range. The optimal conditions for stimulated hyper-Raman scattering are identified.

  3. Alkali metal vapor removal from pressurized fluidized-bed combustor flue gas. Quarterly report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, I.; Swift, W.M.; Lee, S.H.D.; Jonke, A.A.

    1980-07-01

    This work supports the program to develop methods for the cleanup of combustion gases from pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustors so that the cleaned gases can be used for downstream gas turbines. This report presents the results of studies to develop granular sorbents for removing gaseous alkali metal compounds from high-temperature high-pressure combustion gases. Activated bauxite, one of the sorbents found to be effective, can be reused after removal of the alkali compound by a water-leaching process. Results of testing of this leaching process are reported. An experimental appartus for testing sorbents at high pressure has been built; results of preliminary tests are reported.

  4. Magnetometry with millimeter-scale antirelaxation-coated alkali-metal vapor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Balabas, M.V.; Budker, D.; Kitching, J.; Schwindt, P.D.D.; Stalnaker, J.E.

    2006-06-15

    Dynamic nonlinear magneto-optical-rotation signals with frequency- and amplitude-modulated laser light have been observed and investigated with a spherical glass cell of 3 mm diameter containing Cs metal with inner walls coated with paraffin. Intrinsic Zeeman relaxation rates of {gamma}/(2{pi}){approx_equal}20 Hz and lower have been observed. Favorable prospects of using millimeter-scale coated cells in portable magnetometers and secondary frequency references are discussed.

  5. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Wolfs, Denise Y.; Clavenna, Le Roy R.; Eakman, James M.; Kalina, Theodore

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  6. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  7. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  8. Alkali metal vapor removal from pressurized fluidized-bed combustor flue gas. Annual report, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, I.; Swift, W.M.; Lee, S.H.D.

    1980-10-01

    In the application of pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) to the generation of electricity, hot corrosion of the gas turbine (downstream from the combustor) by alkali metal compounds is a potential problem. The objective of this investigation is to develop a method for the removal of gaseous alkali metal compounds from the high-pressure high-temperature gas from a PFBC before the gas enters the gas turbine. The use of a granular bed filter, with either diatomaceous earth or activated bauxite as the bed material, is under study. Breakthrough data are reported on the sorption of gaseous NaCl by activated bauxite. Results are reported for the regeneration of activated bauxite using water leaching and a thermal swing method.

  9. Numerical modeling of alkali vapor lasers.

    PubMed

    Shu, Hong; Chen, Ying; Bass, Michael; Monjardin, J Fernando; Deile, Jochen

    2011-10-10

    Detailed numerical analyses are presented of a continuous wave (cw), single spatial mode alkali vapor laser pumped by a diffraction-limited Ti: Sapphire laser. These analyses provide insight into the operation of alkali vapor lasers to aid in the development of high power, diode laser pumped alkali vapor lasers. It is demonstrated that in the laser considered the laser spatial pattern is significantly changed after each pass through the gain medium, and the laser spatial pattern in steady state operation is also very different from that of the passive cavity mode. According to the calculation, lasing significantly improves the pump absorption efficiency and changes the absorbed pump distribution. The effect of varying the transverse size of the pumped region is also analyzed and an optimum pump beam waist radius is demonstrated. In addition, the shift of the pump beam waist location is also studied. The computation method and its convergence behavior are also described in detail.

  10. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  11. Preparation of alkali metal dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Landel, R. F. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for producing alkali metal dispersions of high purity. The dispersions are prepared by varying the equilibrium solubility of the alkali metal in a suitable organic solvent in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The equilibrium variation is produced by temperature change. The size of the particles is controlled by controlling the rate of temperature change.

  12. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-05-12

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization.

  13. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard

    2017-01-17

    A method for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock. The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  14. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  15. Apparatus enables accurate determination of alkali oxides in alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupraw, W. A.; Gahn, R. F.; Graab, J. W.; Maple, W. E.; Rosenblum, L.

    1966-01-01

    Evacuated apparatus determines the alkali oxide content of an alkali metal by separating the metal from the oxide by amalgamation with mercury. The apparatus prevents oxygen and moisture from inadvertently entering the system during the sampling and analytical procedure.

  16. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  17. Rock Degradation by Alkali Metals: A Possible Lunar Erosion Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Naughton, J J; Barnes, I L; Hammond, D A

    1965-08-06

    When rocks melt under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions, their alkali components volatilize as metals. These metal vapors act to comminute polycrystalline rocks to their component minerals. The resultant powder is porous and loosely packed and its characteristics may be compatible with the lunar surface as revealed by the Ranger photographs. If meteorite impact or lunar volcanism has produced vaporization or areas of molten lava, alkali erosion may have given dust of this character in adjacent solid areas.

  18. Critical points of metal vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Khomkin, A. L. Shumikhin, A. S.

    2015-09-15

    A new method is proposed for calculating the parameters of critical points and binodals for the vapor–liquid (insulator–metal) phase transition in vapors of metals with multielectron valence shells. The method is based on a model developed earlier for the vapors of alkali metals, atomic hydrogen, and exciton gas, proceeding from the assumption that the cohesion determining the basic characteristics of metals under normal conditions is also responsible for their properties in the vicinity of the critical point. It is proposed to calculate the cohesion of multielectron atoms using well-known scaling relations for the binding energy, which are constructed for most metals in the periodic table by processing the results of many numerical calculations. The adopted model allows the parameters of critical points and binodals for the vapor–liquid phase transition in metal vapors to be calculated using published data on the properties of metals under normal conditions. The parameters of critical points have been calculated for a large number of metals and show satisfactory agreement with experimental data for alkali metals and with available estimates for all other metals. Binodals of metals have been calculated for the first time.

  19. Alkali Metal Cluster Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. In this thesis, we apply the tight-binding Hubbard model to alkali metal clusters with Hartree-Fock self-consistent methods and perturbation methods for the numerical calculations. We have studied the relation between the equilibrium structures and the range of the hopping matrix elements in the Hubbard Hamiltonian. The results show that the structures are not sensitive to the interaction range but are determined by the number of valence electrons each atom has. Inertia tensors are used to analyse the symmetries of the clusters. The principal axes of the clusters are determined and they are the axes of rotational symmetries of clusters if the clusters have any. The eigenvalues of inertia tensors which are the indication of the deformation of clusters are compared between our model and the ellipsoidal jellium model. The agreement is good for large clusters. At a finite temperature, the thermal motion fluctuates the structures. We defined a fluctuation function with the distance matrix of a cluster. The fluctuation has been studied with the Monte-Carlo simulation method. Our studies show that the clusters remain in the solid state when temperature is low. The small values of fluctuation functions indicates the thermal vibration of atoms around their equilibrium positions. If the temperature is high, the atoms are delocalized. The cluster melts and enters the liquid region. The cluster melting is simulated by the Monte-Carlo simulation with the fluctuation function we defined. Energy levels of clusters are calculated from the Hubbard model. Ionization potentials and magic numbers are also obtained from these energy levels. The results confirm that the Hubbard model is a good approximation for a small cluster. The excitation energy is presented by the difference between the original level and excited level, and the electron-hole interactions. We also have studied cooling of clusters

  20. Influence of alkali metals (Na, Li, Rb) on the performance of electrostatic spray-assisted vapor deposited Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cells.

    PubMed

    Altamura, Giovanni; Wang, Mingqing; Choy, Kwang-Leong

    2016-02-26

    Electrostatic Spray-Assisted Vapor Deposition (ESAVD) is a non-vacuum and cost-effective method to deposit metal oxide, various sulphide and chalcogenide at large scale. In this work, ESAVD was used to deposit Cu2ZnSn(S1-xSex)4 (CZTSSe) absorber. Different alkali metals like Na, Li and Rb were incorporated in CZTSSe compounds to further improve the photovoltaic performances of related devices. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, no experimental study has been carried out to test the effect of Li and Rb incorporation in CZTSSe solar cells. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and glow discharge spectroscopy have been used to characterize the phase purity, morphology and composition of as-deposited CZTSSe thin films. Photovoltaic properties of the resulting devices were determined by completing the solar cells as follows: Mo/CZTSSe/CdS/i-ZnO/Al:ZnO/Ni/Al. The results showed that Li, Na and Rb incorporation can increase power conversion efficiency of CZTS devices up to 5.5%. The introduction of a thiourea treatment, has improved the quality of the absorber(|)buffer interface, pushed the device efficiency up to 6.3% which is at the moment the best reported result for ESAVD deposited CZTSSe solar cells.

  1. Influence of alkali metals (Na, Li, Rb) on the performance of electrostatic spray-assisted vapor deposited Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamura, Giovanni; Wang, Mingqing; Choy, Kwang-Leong

    2016-02-01

    Electrostatic Spray-Assisted Vapor Deposition (ESAVD) is a non-vacuum and cost-effective method to deposit metal oxide, various sulphide and chalcogenide at large scale. In this work, ESAVD was used to deposit Cu2ZnSn(S1‑xSex)4 (CZTSSe) absorber. Different alkali metals like Na, Li and Rb were incorporated in CZTSSe compounds to further improve the photovoltaic performances of related devices. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, no experimental study has been carried out to test the effect of Li and Rb incorporation in CZTSSe solar cells. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and glow discharge spectroscopy have been used to characterize the phase purity, morphology and composition of as-deposited CZTSSe thin films. Photovoltaic properties of the resulting devices were determined by completing the solar cells as follows: Mo/CZTSSe/CdS/i-ZnO/Al:ZnO/Ni/Al. The results showed that Li, Na and Rb incorporation can increase power conversion efficiency of CZTS devices up to 5.5%. The introduction of a thiourea treatment, has improved the quality of the absorber|buffer interface, pushed the device efficiency up to 6.3% which is at the moment the best reported result for ESAVD deposited CZTSSe solar cells.

  2. Influence of alkali metals (Na, Li, Rb) on the performance of electrostatic spray-assisted vapor deposited Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Altamura, Giovanni; Wang, Mingqing; Choy, Kwang-Leong

    2016-01-01

    Electrostatic Spray-Assisted Vapor Deposition (ESAVD) is a non-vacuum and cost-effective method to deposit metal oxide, various sulphide and chalcogenide at large scale. In this work, ESAVD was used to deposit Cu2ZnSn(S1−xSex)4 (CZTSSe) absorber. Different alkali metals like Na, Li and Rb were incorporated in CZTSSe compounds to further improve the photovoltaic performances of related devices. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, no experimental study has been carried out to test the effect of Li and Rb incorporation in CZTSSe solar cells. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and glow discharge spectroscopy have been used to characterize the phase purity, morphology and composition of as-deposited CZTSSe thin films. Photovoltaic properties of the resulting devices were determined by completing the solar cells as follows: Mo/CZTSSe/CdS/i-ZnO/Al:ZnO/Ni/Al. The results showed that Li, Na and Rb incorporation can increase power conversion efficiency of CZTS devices up to 5.5%. The introduction of a thiourea treatment, has improved the quality of the absorber|buffer interface, pushed the device efficiency up to 6.3% which is at the moment the best reported result for ESAVD deposited CZTSSe solar cells. PMID:26916212

  3. Hydrothermal alkali metal catalyst recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Eakman, James M.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.

    1979-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles primarily in the form of water soluble alkali metal formates by treating the particles with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of added carbon monoxide. During the treating process the water insoluble alkali metal compounds comprising the insoluble alkali metal residues are converted into water soluble alkali metal formates. The resultant aqueous solution containing water soluble alkali metal formates is then separated from the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment process, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal formates serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. This process permits increased recovery of alkali metal constituents, thereby decreasing the overall cost of the gasification process by reducing the amount of makeup alkali metal compounds necessary.

  4. Alkali-metal-vapor removal from pressurized fluidized-bed-combustor flue gas. Annual report, October 1981-September 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Myles, K.M.; Jonke, A.A.

    1983-03-01

    This work supports the program to develop sorbents for the cleanup of gases from pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion (PFBC) so that the cleaned hot gases can be used to power downstream gas turbines without causing corrosion. A simulated PFBC flue gas containing NaCl vapor was used to characterize activated bauxite and diatomaceous earth at a bed temperature of 905/sup 0/C and a system pressure of 10 atm absolute. The NaCl vapor was found to be captured by activated bauxite essentially as sodium sulfate, with a small fraction captured as sodium chloride. In contrast, diatomaceous earth captured NaCl vapor by a combined result of (1) a chemical reaction that converts the vapor into condensed sodium sulfate and (2) chemical reactions that transform the captured sodium into water-insoluble silicate compounds. In NaCl-vapor sorption efficiency studies, a 12.7-cm-long activated bauxite bed was tested for 12 h in a gas stream containing 4 to 8 ppmV NaCl-vapor concentration, and >99.8% NaCl-vapor sorption efficiency was achieved. This efficiency compared with 99.1 and 95.3% obtained by a diatomaceous earth bed of the same length tested for 8 h in gas streams containing 28 and 2 ppmV NaCl-vapor concentration, respectively. The addition of HCl to the simulated flue gas had an insignificant effect on the NaCl-vapor sorption behavior and efficiency of activated bauxite. Experimental results are also presented on (1) the water leachability of the sodium captured on activated bauxite, (2) the partial conversion to sodium sulfate of the NaCl sample used as the vapor source for the sorption tests, and (3) the changes in the chemical and physical properties of both sorbents as a result of exposure to the simulated flue gas.

  5. Method of making alkali metal hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Gupta, Shalabh; Pruski, Marek; Hlova, Ihor; Castle, Andra

    2017-05-30

    A method is provided for making alkali metal hydrides by mechanochemically reacting alkali metal and hydrogen gas under mild temperature (e.g room temperature) and hydrogen pressure conditions without the need for catalyst, solvent, and intentional heating or cooling.

  6. Process for preparing dispersions of alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landel, R. F.; Rembaum, A.

    1966-01-01

    Finely divided particles of alkali metals are produced by combining alkali metals with certain aromatic compounds in selected solvents to form low-temperature soluble complexes from which the pure alkali metals precipitate quantitatively when the solutions are warmed. All operations must be carried out in an inert gas atmosphere.

  7. Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Converter (AMTEC) Technology Development for Potential Deep Space Scientific Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondt, J.; Sievers, R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) technology development effort over the past year. The vapor-vapor AMTEC cell technology is being developed for use with either a solar or nuclear heat sources for space.

  8. Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Converter (AMTEC) Technology Development for Potential Deep Space Scientific Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondt, J.; Sievers, R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) technology development effort over the past year. The vapor-vapor AMTEC cell technology is being developed for use with either a solar or nuclear heat sources for space.

  9. Alkali metal vapor removal from pressurized fluidized-bed combustor flue gas: activated bauxite sorbent regeneration. Quarterly report, October-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, I.; Lee, S.H.D.

    1981-05-01

    This work supports the program to develop methods for the cleanup of combustion gases from pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustors so that the cleaned gases can be used to power downstream gas turbines. Presented here are the results of studies to develop granular sorbents for removing gaseous alkali metal compounds from these combustion gases in a granular-bed filter. Activated bauxite bed material can be reused after the alkali compound is removed by a water-leaching process. In experiments to study the kinetics of leaching, the effects of adsorbed NaCl loading, leaching temperature, and the leaching water to sorbent ratio on the rate of leaching are reported. Also reported are water retention in bauxite after leaching and the effect of volatile alkalis in makeup activated bauxite on the alkali level in flue gas expanded in the gas turbine.

  10. Alkali metal vapor removal from pressurized fluidized-bed combustor flue gas. Quarterly report, January-March 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Myles, K.M.; Jonke, A.A.

    1982-07-01

    This work supports the program to develop methods for achieving sufficient cleanup of combustion gases from pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustors (PFBC) so that the cleaned gases can be used to power downstream gas turbines without causing corrosion. A simulated PFBC flue gas was used to characterize the NaCl-vapor sorption behavior of activated bauxite at a bed temperature of 905/sup 0/C and a system pressure of 10 atm absolute. Although the addition of HCl to simulated PFBC flue gas tends to promote the capture of NaCl vapor by activated bauxite as NaCl rather than Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, overall, its effect on the activated bauxite's NaCl-vapor sorption behavior was found to be insignificant. Experimental results are also presented on: (1) the partial conversion to Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ of the NaCl sample used as the source of NaCl vapor for the test system; and (2) the water leachability of the sodium captured on activated bauxite.

  11. Examination of Organic Vapor Adsorption onto Alkali Metal and Halide Atomic Ions by using Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maiβer, Anne; Hogan, Christopher J

    2017-08-18

    We utilize ion mobility mass spectrometry with an atmospheric pressure differential mobility analyzer coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (DMA-MS) to examine the formation of ion-vapor molecule complexes with seed ions of K(+) , Rb(+) , Cs(+) , Br(-) , and I(-) exposed to n-butanol and n-nonane vapor under subsaturated conditions. Ion-vapor molecule complex formation is indicated by a shift in the apparent mobility of each ion. Measurement results are compared to predicted mobility shifts based upon the Kelvin-Thomson equation, which is commonly used in predicting rates of ion-induced nucleation. We find that n-butanol at saturation ratios as low as 0.03 readily binds to all seed ions, leading to mobility shifts in excess of 35 %. Conversely, the binding of n-nonane is not detectable for any ion for saturation ratios in the 0-0.27 range. An inverse correlation between the ionic radius of the initial seed and the extent of n-butanol uptake is observed, such that at elevated n-butanol concentrations, the smallest ion (K(+) ) has the smallest apparent mobility and the largest (I(-) ) has the largest apparent mobility. Though the differences in behavior of the two vapor molecules types examined and the observed effect of ionic seed radius are not accounted for by the Kelvin-Thomson equation, its predictions are in good agreement with measured mobility shifts for Rb(+) , Cs(+) , and Br(-) in the presence of n-butanol (typically within 10 % of measurements). © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  12. Alkali metal/sulfur battery

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Joginder N.

    1978-01-01

    Alkali metal/sulfur batteries in which the electrolyte-separator is a relatively fragile membrane are improved by providing means for separating the molten sulfur/sulfide catholyte from contact with the membrane prior to cooling the cell to temperatures at which the catholyte will solidify. If the catholyte is permitted to solidify while in contact with the membrane, the latter may be damaged. The improvement permits such batteries to be prefilled with catholyte and shipped, at ordinary temperatures.

  13. Process for recovering alkali metals and sulfur from alkali metal sulfides and polysulfides

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier

    2016-10-25

    Alkali metals and sulfur may be recovered from alkali monosulfide and polysulfides in an electrolytic process that utilizes an electrolytic cell having an alkali ion conductive membrane. An anolyte solution includes an alkali monosulfide, an alkali polysulfide, or a mixture thereof and a solvent that dissolves elemental sulfur. A catholyte includes molten alkali metal. Applying an electric current oxidizes sulfide and polysulfide in the anolyte compartment, causes alkali metal ions to pass through the alkali ion conductive membrane to the catholyte compartment, and reduces the alkali metal ions in the catholyte compartment. Liquid sulfur separates from the anolyte solution and may be recovered. The electrolytic cell is operated at a temperature where the formed alkali metal and sulfur are molten.

  14. Phonon spectra of alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeković, S.; Vukajlović, F.; Veljković, V.

    1982-10-01

    In this work we used a simple local model pseudopotential which includes screening for the phonon spectra calculations of alkali metals. The results obtained are in very good agreement with experimental data. In some branches of phonon spectra the differences between theoretical and experimental results are within 1-2%, while the maximum error is about 6%. The suggested form of the pseudopotential allows us to describe the phonon spectra of Na, K and Rb with only one, and, at the same time, a unique, parameter. In this case, the maximum disagreements from experiment are 9% for Na, 8% for K and 7% for Rb.

  15. The alkali metals: 200 years of surprises.

    PubMed

    Dye, James L

    2015-03-13

    Alkali metal compounds have been known since antiquity. In 1807, Sir Humphry Davy surprised everyone by electrolytically preparing (and naming) potassium and sodium metals. In 1808, he noted their interaction with ammonia, which, 100 years later, was attributed to solvated electrons. After 1960, pulse radiolysis of nearly any solvent produced solvated electrons, which became one of the most studied species in chemistry. In 1968, alkali metal solutions in amines and ethers were shown to contain alkali metal anions in addition to solvated electrons. The advent of crown ethers and cryptands as complexants for alkali cations greatly enhanced alkali metal solubilities. This permitted us to prepare a crystalline salt of Na(-) in 1974, followed by 30 other alkalides with Na(-), K(-), Rb(-) and Cs(-) anions. This firmly established the -1 oxidation state of alkali metals. The synthesis of alkalides led to the crystallization of electrides, with trapped electrons as the anions. Electrides have a variety of electronic and magnetic properties, depending on the geometries and connectivities of the trapping sites. In 2009, the final surprise was the experimental demonstration that alkali metals under high pressure lose their metallic character as the electrons are localized in voids between the alkali cations to become high-pressure electrides! © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Process for the disposal of alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Leroy C.

    1977-01-01

    Large quantities of alkali metals may be safely reacted for ultimate disposal by contact with a hot concentrated caustic solution. The alkali metals react with water in the caustic solution in a controlled reaction while steam dilutes the hydrogen formed by the reaction to a safe level.

  17. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, R.D.; McPheeters, C.C.

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  18. Method of handling radioactive alkali metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Wolson, Raymond D.; McPheeters, Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive alkali metal is mixed with particulate silica in a rotary drum reactor in which the alkali metal is converted to the monoxide during rotation of the reactor to produce particulate silica coated with the alkali metal monoxide suitable as a feed material to make a glass for storing radioactive material. Silica particles, the majority of which pass through a 95 mesh screen or preferably through a 200 mesh screen, are employed in this process, and the preferred weight ratio of silica to alkali metal is 7 to 1 in order to produce a feed material for the final glass product having a silica to alkali metal monoxide ratio of about 5 to 1.

  19. A Three Level Analytic Model for Alkali Vapor Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, Gordon D.; Perram, Glen P.

    2010-10-08

    A three level analytic model for optically pumped alkali metal vapor lasers is developed considering the steady-state rate equations for the longitudinally averaged number densities of the ground {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} and first excited {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} and {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} states. The threshold pump intensity includes both the requirements to fully bleach the pump transition and exceed optical losses, typically about 200 W/cm{sup 2}. Slope efficiency depends critically on the fraction of incident photons absorbed and the overlap of pump and resonator modes, approaching the quantum efficiency of 0.95-0.98, depending on alkali atom. For efficient operation, the collisional relaxation between the two upper levels should be fast relative to stimulated emission. By assuming a statistical distribution between the upper levels, the limiting analytic solution for the quasi-two level system is achieved. Application of the model and comparisons to recent laser demonstrations is presented.

  20. Process to separate alkali metal salts from alkali metal reacted hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier; Larsen, Dennis; Killpack, Jeff

    2017-06-27

    A process to facilitate gravimetric separation of alkali metal salts, such as alkali metal sulfides and polysulfides, from alkali metal reacted hydrocarbons. The disclosed process is part of a method of upgrading a hydrocarbon feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the hydrocarbon feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase containing alkali metal salts and reduced heavy metals, and an upgraded hydrocarbon feedstock. The inorganic phase may be gravimetrically separated from the upgraded hydrocarbon feedstock after mixing at a temperature between about 350.degree. C. to 400.degree. C. for a time period between about 15 minutes and 2 hours.

  1. Alkali-vapor emission from PFBC of Illinois coals.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. H. D.; Teats, F. G.; Swift, W. M.; Banerjee, D. D.; Chemical Engineering; Center for Research on Sulfur in Coal

    1992-01-01

    Two Illinois Herrin No. 6 coals and one Illinois Springfield No. 5 coal were combusted in a laboratory-scale PFBC/alkali sorber facility with a bed of Tymochtee dolomite at temperatures ranging from 910 to 950oC and a system pressure of 9.2 atm absolute. Alkali vapor emission (Na and K) from combustion was determined by analytical activated-bauxite sorber bed technique. The test results showed that sodium is the major alkali-vapor species present in the PFBC flue gas of these coals and that there is a positive linear relationship between the level of sodium-vapor emission with both Na and Cl contents in the coals.

  2. Alkali metal Rankine cycles for utility and space power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, R. S.

    1985-12-01

    The alkali metal Rankine cycle has potential for application to both electric utility and space power plants. A topping cycle in which an alkali metal vapor cycle is superimposed on a steam cycle would yield a thermal efficiency of about 50 percent for a fossil fuel-fired electric utility plant. Preliminary design studies have been carried out for utility power plants of 200 to 600 MW(e) output for potassium and cesium vapor topping cycles with both natural gas and fluidized bed coal firing. A full-scale potassium boiler tube bundle module was tested at 1088-1116 K with gas firing. Efficient, lightweight space power systems could be achieved with a potassium Rankine cycle employing a compact nuclear reactor. Studies have been made of both direct cycles with boiling potassium-cooled reactors and indirect cycles with liquid metal-cooled reactors, coupled to a boiler and turbine for turbine inlet temperatures up to 1450 K.

  3. Reactions of ultracold alkali-metal dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Zuchowski, Piotr S.; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2010-06-15

    We investigate the energetics of reactions involving pairs of alkali-metal dimers. Atom exchange reactions to form homonuclear dimers are energetically allowed for some but not all of the heteronuclear dimers. We carry out high-level electronic structure calculations on the potential energy surfaces of all the heteronuclear alkali-metal trimers and show that trimer formation reactions are always energetically forbidden for low-lying singlet states of the dimers. The results have important implications for the stability of quantum gases of alkali-metal dimers.

  4. Control of alkali vapors by a granular-bed filter

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Myles, K.M.; Jonke, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    Control of alkali vapors in the pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) of coal is being studied in a laboratory-scale fixed granular-bed filter. The potential sorbents identified earlier were tested for their alkali vapor sorption in a gas stream with temperature (greater than or equal to 850/sup 0/C), pressure (10 atm absolute), and composition closely simulating actual PFBC flue gas. The NaCl-vapor sorption efficiency of activated bauxite is > 99.8% and was found not to be diminished by HCl in flue gas. Diatomaceous earth has lower sorption efficiencies than activated bauxite. Emathlite, a fuller's earth, has a capability for NaCl-vapor capture. Its sorption behavior and preliminary sorption efficiencies are presented and discussed.

  5. Alkali Metal Handling Practices at NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvail, Patrick G.; Carter, Robert R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is NASA s principle propulsion development center. Research and development is coordinated and carried out on not only the existing transportation systems, but also those that may be flown in the near future. Heat pipe cooled fast fission cores are among several concepts being considered for the Nuclear Systems Initiative. Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a capability to handle high-purity alkali metals for use in heat pipes or liquid metal heat transfer loops. This capability is a low budget prototype of an alkali metal handling system that would allow the production of flight qualified heat pipe modules or alkali metal loops. The processing approach used to introduce pure alkali metal into heat pipe modules and other test articles are described in this paper.

  6. Alkali Metal Handling Practices at NASA MSFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvail, Patrick G.; Carter, Robert R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is NASA's principle propulsion development center. Research and development is coordinated and carried out on not only the existing transportation systems, but also those that may be flown in the near future. Heat pipe cooled fast fission cores are among several concepts being considered for the Nuclear Systems Initiative. Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a capability to handle high-purity alkali metals for use in heat pipes or liquid metal heat transfer loops. This capability is a low budget prototype of an alkali metal handling system that would allow the production of flight qualified heat pipe modules or alkali metal loops. The processing approach used to introduce pure alkali metal into heat pipe modules and other test articles are described in this paper.

  7. Improved alkali-metal/silicate binders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, J.

    1978-01-01

    Family of inorganic binders utilizes potassium or sodium oxide/silicate dispersion and employs high mole ratio of silicon dioxide to alkali-metal binder. Binders are stable, inexpensive, extremely water resistant, and easy to apply.

  8. Alkali metal propellants for MPD thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, J. E.; Pivirotto, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments performed in the United States in the 1960s and early 1970s and in the Soviet Union with alkali metal-fuelled MPD thrusters indicate performance levels substantially better than those achieved with gaseous propellants. Cathode wear appears to be less in engines with alkali metal propellants also. A critical review of the available data indicates that the data are consistent and reliable. An analysis of testing and systems-level considerations shows that pumping requirements for testing are substantially decreased and reductions in tankage fraction can be expected. In addition, while care must be exercised in handling the alkali metals, it is not prohibitively difficult or hazardous. The greatest disadvantage seems to be the potential for spacecraft contamination, but there appear to be viable strategies for minimizing the impact of propellant deposition on spacecraft surfaces. Renewed examination of alkali metal-fuelled MPD thrusters for ambitious SEI missions is recommended.

  9. Alkali metal propellants for MPD thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, J. E.; Pivirotto, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments performed in the United States in the 1960s and early 1970s and in the Soviet Union with alkali metal-fuelled MPD thrusters indicate performance levels substantially better than those achieved with gaseous propellants. Cathode wear appears to be less in engines with alkali metal propellants also. A critical review of the available data indicates that the data are consistent and reliable. An analysis of testing and systems-level considerations shows that pumping requirements for testing are substantially decreased and reductions in tankage fraction can be expected. In addition, while care must be exercised in handling the alkali metals, it is not prohibitively difficult or hazardous. The greatest disadvantage seems to be the potential for spacecraft contamination, but there appear to be viable strategies for minimizing the impact of propellant deposition on spacecraft surfaces. Renewed examination of alkali metal-fuelled MPD thrusters for ambitious SEI missions is recommended.

  10. An electron diffraction study of alkali chloride vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mawhorter, R. J.; Fink, M.; Hartley, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    A study of monomers and dimers of the four alkali chlorides NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl in the vapor phase using the counting method of high energy electron diffraction is reported. Nozzle temperatures from 850-960 K were required to achieve the necessary vapor pressures of approximately 0.01 torr. Using harmonic calculations for the monomer and dimer 1 values, a consistent set of structures for all four molecules was obained. The corrected monomer distances reproduce the microwave values very well. The experiment yields information on the amount of dimer present in the vapor, and these results are compared with thermodynamic values.

  11. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  12. An analytical equation of state for molten alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatee, M.H.; Boushehri, A.

    1995-11-01

    The paper brings the molten alkali metals into the scope of a new statistical mechanical equation of state that is known to satisfy normal fluids over the whole range. As for normal fluids, the latent heat of vaporization and density at freezing temperature are the only inputs (scaling factors). The corresponding-states correlation of normal fluids is used to calculate the second virial coefficient, B{sub 2}(T), of alkali metals, which is scarce experimentally and its calculation is complicated by dimer formation. Calculations of the other two temperature-dependent constants, {alpha}(T) and b (T), follow by scaling. The virial coefficients of alkali metals cannot be expected to obey a law of corresponding states for normal fluids. The fact that two potentials are involved may be the reason for this. Thus, alkali metals have the characteristics of interacting through singlet and triple potentials so that the treatment by a single potential here is fortuitous. The adjustable parameter of the equation of state, {Gamma}, compensates for the uncertainties in B{sub 2}(T). The procedure used to calculate the density of liquids Li through Cs from the freezing line up to several hundred degrees above the boiling temperatures. The results are within 5%.

  13. Measurement of alkali vapors in PFBC exhaust. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1994-01-01

    Under the auspices of the US Department of Energy through Morgantown Energy Technology Center, laboratory-scale studies were conducted to develop a regenerable activated-bauxite adsorbent (RABA) for use in an in situ regenerable activated-bauxite sorber alkali monitor (RABSAM). The RABSAM is a sampling probe that does not require a high-temperature/high-pressure sampling line for reliable measurement of alkali vapor in the exhaust of pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC). The RABA can be generated from the commercial grade activated bauxite by deactivating (or reacting) clay impurities in activated bauxite with NaCl or LiCl vapor. Under the atmospheric deactivation process, however, only a partial deactivation of clay impurities is achieved, probably due to limited access of NaCl or LiCl vapor into micropores of activated bauxite. Because LiCl vapor chemically reacts with alumina substrate of activated bauxite, resulting in pore enlargement, loss of pore surface area, and a decrease in the subsequent NaCl-vapor sorption capacity of the RABA, NaCl is a more suitable deactivation agent than LiCl vapor. In a simulated PFBC exhaust environment, the RABA behaves similarly to fresh activated bauxite in capturing NaCl vapor from the simulated PFBC exhaust. Based on results of this work, we recommend generating chemically and thermally stable RABA by deactivating clay impurities of commercial grade activated bauxite with NaCl or KCl vapor under simulated PFBC exhaust environment, that is, high-temperature, high-pressure, and high concentrations of NaCl or KCl vapor in simulated PFBC exhaust compositions.

  14. Diode pumped alkali vapor lasers for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.; Komashko, A.

    2008-02-01

    General Atomics has been engaged in the development of diode pumped alkali vapor lasers. We have been examining the design space looking for designs that are both efficient and easily scalable to high powers. Computationally, we have looked at the effect of pump bandwidth on laser performance. We have also looked at different lasing species. We have used an alexandrite laser to study the relative merits of different designs. We report on the results of our experimental and computational studies.

  15. Alkali metal adsorbates on W(110): Ionic, covalent, or metallic

    SciTech Connect

    Riffe, D.M.; Wertheim, G.K.; Citrin, P.H. )

    1990-01-29

    The photoemission signal from the first atomic layer of W(110) is used to assess the nature of the interaction between the surface atoms of the metal substrate and the adsorbates Na, K, and Cs for coverages up to 1 atomic layer. Our results indicate that there is little or no charge transfer from the alkali metal to the W surface, even in the limit of low coverage. The satellite structure of the photoemission lines of the outermost {ital p} shell of the alkali metals confirms this conclusion. While contrary to the conventional picture of alkali-metal-charge donation, these findings fully support recent theoretical calculations.

  16. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, W.Y.

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased, preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  17. Salts of alkali metal anions and process of preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Dye, James L.; Ceraso, Joseph M.; Tehan, Frederick J.; Lok, Mei Tak

    1978-01-01

    Compounds of alkali metal anion salts of alkali metal cations in bicyclic polyoxadiamines are disclosed. The salts are prepared by contacting an excess of alkali metal with an alkali metal dissolving solution consisting of a bicyclic polyoxadiamine in a suitable solvent, and recovered by precipitation. The salts have a gold-color crystalline appearance and are stable in a vacuum at -10.degree. C. and below.

  18. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151) is...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151) is...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151) is...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151) is...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151) is...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in...

  4. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in...

  9. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  11. 40 CFR 721.4740 - Alkali metal nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal nitrites. 721.4740... Substances § 721.4740 Alkali metal nitrites. (a) Chemical substances and significant new use subject to reporting. (1) The category of chemical substances which are nitrites of the alkali metals (Group IA in...

  12. 40 CFR 721.1878 - Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal alkyl borohydride... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1878 Alkali metal alkyl borohydride (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkali metal alkyl borohydride (PMN P-00-1089) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  13. Cohesive Energy of the Alkali Metals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a method, considered appropriate for presentation to undergraduate students in materials science and related courses, for the calculation of cohesive energies of the alkali metals. Uses a description based on the free electron model and gives results to within 0.1 eV of the experimental values. (Author/GS)

  14. Cohesive Energy of the Alkali Metals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a method, considered appropriate for presentation to undergraduate students in materials science and related courses, for the calculation of cohesive energies of the alkali metals. Uses a description based on the free electron model and gives results to within 0.1 eV of the experimental values. (Author/GS)

  15. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  16. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    BREHM, W.F.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  17. Measurement of alkali vapors in PFBC flue gas and their removal with a fixed granular-bed sorber, October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Myles, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    Alkali-metal compounds, such as chlorides and sulfates of sodium and potassium, present in the flue gas of coal combustion could cause hot corrosion of a gas turbine. The current industrial gas-turbine specification limit for alkali-metal compounds in the combustion gas entering a turbine is equivalent to 0.024 ppmW. Spacil and Luthra predict that the quantity of alkali vapor in the flue gas from PFBC could be up to two orders of magnitude greater than this allowable level. In contrast, the recent calculations by Scandrett and Clift suggest that, if the aerosol alkali particulate could be removed, the residual alkali vapor in the flue gas would be less than the limit. Measurements of the alkali vapor in PFBC flue gas have been made by several institutions. The measured alkali vapor concentration in the flue gas is in the order of 0.1 to 10 ppmW. Normally, a conventional batch-type extraction of the flue gas, followed by the analysis of the condensate, has been used in these measurements. It was not until recently that a real-time, on-line alkali analyzer was developed and tested in the gas stream of both coal gasification and combustion. A fixed granular-bed sorber is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the control of the alkali vapor in PFBC flue gas. After an extensive screening study, activated bauxite was found to be the most effective sorbent in capturing the NaCl, KCl, and K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ vapors that were doped into a simulated PFBC flue gas. Activated bauxite was also demonstrated to be easily and effectively regenerated for reuse by a simple water-leaching process. A capture efficiency of greater than 99.8% CaCl vapor has been achieved. The effectiveness of activated bauxite for alkali-vapor capture has been confirmed by others. 21 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Alkali element depletion by core formation and vaporization on the early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lodders, K.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The depletion of Na, K, Rb, and Cs in the Earth's upper mantle and crust relative to their abundances in chondrites is a long standing problem in geochemistry. Here we consider two commonly invoked mechanisms, namely core formation, and vaporization, for producing the observed depletions. Our models predict that a significant percentage of the Earth's bulk alkali element inventory is in the core (30 percent for Na, 52 percent for K, 74 percent for Rb, and 92 percent for Cs). These predictions agree with independent estimates from nebular volatility trends and (for K) from terrestrial heat flow data. Our models also predict that vaporization and thermal escape during planetary accretion are unlikely to produce the observed alkali element depletion pattern. However, loss during the putative giant impact which formed the Moon cannot be ruled out. Experimental, observational, and theoretical tests of our predictions are also described. Alkali element partitioning into the Earth's core was modeled by assuming that alkali element partitioning during core formation on the aubrite parent body (APB) is analogous to that on the early Earth. The analogy is reasonable for three reasons. First, the enstatite meteorites are the only known meteorites with the same oxygen isotope systematics as the Earth-Moon system. Second, the large core size of the Earth and the V depletion in the mantle requires accretion from planetesimals as reduced as the enstatite chondrites. Third, experimental studies of K partitioning between silicate and metal plus sulfide show that more K goes into the metal plus sulfide at higher pressures than at one atmosphere pressure. Thus partitioning in the relatively low pressure natural laboratory of the APB is a good guide to alkali elemental partitioning during the growth of the Earth.

  19. Alkali metal recovery from carbonaceous material conversion process

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.; Gorbaty, Martin L.; Tsou, Joe M.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced in the gasifier or similar reaction zone, alkali metal constitutents are recovered from the particles by withdrawing and passing the particles from the reaction zone to an alkali metal recovery zone in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen and treating the particles in the recovery zone with water or an aqueous solution in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen. The solution formed by treating the particles in the recovery zone will contain water-soluble alkali metal constituents and is recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preventing contact of the particles with oxygen as they are withdrawn from the reaction zone and during treatment in the recovery zone avoids the formation of undesirable alkali metal constituents in the aqueous solution produced in the recovery zone and insures maximum recovery of water-soluble alkali metal constituents from the alkali metal residues.

  20. The behaviour of alkali metals in biomass conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hald, P.

    1995-12-31

    Alkali metals present in biomass contribute to problems as agglomeration, deposition and corrosion. In order to reduce the problems. It is of interest to describe the behavior of alkali metals in the conversion systems. Useful tools for die description are equilibrium calculations combined with measurements of gaseous alkali metal and analyses of solid materials. A comprehensive equilibrium study has been conducted and the results organized in tables, showing which alkali metal components can be present, dependent on the temperature and the ratios alkali metal to sulphur and alkali metal to chlorine. The tables presented can be used as a catalogue, giving easy access to equilibrium results. A sampling method for die measurement of gaseous alkali metal is described and the sampling efficiency is given. The developed tools are demonstrated for a straw gasifier and a fluidized bed combustor using a coal/straw mixture as a fuel.

  1. Alkali metal protective garment and composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Ballif, J.L.; Yuan, W.W.

    1980-09-16

    A protective garment and composite material providing satisfactory heat resistance and physical protection for articles and personnel exposed to hot molten alkali metals, such as sodium are described. Physical protection is provided by a continuous layer of nickel foil. Heat resistance is provided by an underlying backing layer of thermal insulation. Overlying outer layers of fireproof woven ceramic fibers are used to protect the foil during storage and handling.

  2. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-07-01

    One approach to fission power system design uses alkali metal heat pipes for the core primary heat-transfer system. Heat pipes may also be used as radiator elements or auxiliary thermal control elements. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where information that is more detailed can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstration purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Nasa Project Prometheus point designs. (author)

  3. Alkali Metal Heat Pipe Life Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    One approach to space fission power system design is predicated on the use of alkali metal heat pipes, either as radiator elements, thermal management components, or as part of the core primary heat-transfer system. This synopsis characterizes long-life core heat pipes. References are included where more detailed information can be found. Specifics shown here are for demonstrational purposes and do not necessarily reflect current Project Prometheus point designs.

  4. Alkali metal protective garment and composite material

    DOEpatents

    Ballif, III, John L.; Yuan, Wei W.

    1980-01-01

    A protective garment and composite material providing satisfactory heat resistance and physical protection for articles and personnel exposed to hot molten alkali metals, such as sodium. Physical protection is provided by a continuous layer of nickel foil. Heat resistance is provided by an underlying backing layer of thermal insulation. Overlying outer layers of fireproof woven ceramic fibers are used to protect the foil during storage and handling.

  5. Method for the safe disposal of alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Terry R.

    1977-01-01

    Alkali metals such as those employed in liquid metal coolant systems can be safely reacted to form hydroxides by first dissolving the alkali metal in relatively inert metals such as lead or bismuth. The alloy thus formed is contacted with a molten salt including the alkali metal hydroxide and possibly the alkali metal carbonate in the presence of oxygen. This oxidizes the alkali metal to an oxide which is soluble within the molten salt. The salt is separated and contacted with steam or steam-CO.sub.2 mixture to convert the alkali metal oxide to the hydroxide. These reactions can be conducted with minimal hydrogen evolution and with the heat of reaction distributed between the several reaction steps.

  6. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, D.C.; Mailhe, C.C.; De Jonghe, L.C.

    1985-07-10

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  7. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, David C.; Mailhe, Catherine C.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    1986-01-01

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  8. Application of Electric Fields to Alkali Vapor Cells with Alkene-based Antirelaxation Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruidl, Brandon; Wang, Li; Chen, Cheng-Kai; Longnickel, Maryna; Jackson Kimball, Derek

    2013-05-01

    Recently, a new alkene-based antirelaxation coating has been discovered [Balabas et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 070801 (2010)] which enables spin-polarized alkali atoms to bounce off vapor cell walls more than a million times before the spin polarization relaxes, yielding electron spin relaxation times on the order of a minute. This new technology may open the possibility of conducting a search for the parity- and time-reversal violating permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron using a cesium vapor contained in an alkene-coated cell. Previous antirelaxation coatings have demonstrated dramatic vapor density variations upon application and reversal of the large electric fields required for an EDM experiment [Jackson Kimball et al., Phys. Rev. A 79, 032901 (2009)]. We have found that in the new alkene-coated cells these electric-field-induced vapor density variations can be mitigated for particular choices of cell and alkali metal reservoir temperatures. Future work will involve demonstrating the long spin-relaxation times during application and reversal of electric fields and direct measurement of the electric field using the Stark shift of excited states in Cs. Supported by the National Science Foundation under grant PHY-0969666.

  9. Excitation-wavelength scaling of terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shijing; Zhang, Liangliang; Zhao, Hang; Wu, Tong; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhao, Yuejin

    2017-09-01

    By using a wavelength-tunable near-infrared femtosecond laser, we demonstrate a wavelength scaling mechanism in which the efficiency of terahertz (THz) radiation production by Rb and Cs vapor plasmas increases with increasing excitation laser wavelength. Due to the low ionization energies of alkali metals, the THz radiation energy generated by Cs is an order of magnitude higher than that produced N2 at a wavelength of 1500 nm. The experimental results are well explained by the model of photocurrent as being induced by electron tunneling ionization.

  10. Vibrations of alkali metal overlayers on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusina, G. G.; Eremeev, S. V.; Echenique, P. M.; Benedek, G.; Borisova, S. D.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2008-06-01

    We review the current progress in the understanding of vibrations of alkalis adsorbed on metal surfaces. The analysis of alkali vibrations was made on the basis of available theoretical and experimental results. We also include in this discussion our recent calculations of vibrations in K/Pt(111) and Li(Na)/Cu(001) systems. The dependence of alkali adlayer localized modes on atomic mass, adsorption position and coverage as well as the dependence of vertical vibration frequency on the substrate orientation is discussed. The square root of atomic mass dependence of the vertical vibration energy has been confirmed by using computational data for alkalis on the Al(111) and Cu(001) substrates. We have confirmed that in a wide range of submonolayer coverages the stretch mode energy remains nearly constant while the energy of in-plane polarized modes increases with the increase of alkali coverage. It was shown that the spectrum of both stretch and in-plane vibrations can be very sensitive to the adsorption position of alkali atoms and substrate orientation.

  11. Electrodes For Alkali-Metal Thermoelectric Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Wheeler, Bob L.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Lamb, James L.; Bankston, C. Perry; Cole, Terry

    1989-01-01

    Combination of thin, porous electrode and overlying collector grid reduces internal resistance of alkali-metal thermoelectric converter cell. Low resistance of new electrode and grid boosts power density nearly to 1 W/cm2 of electrode area at typical operating temperatures of 1,000 to 1,300 K. Conductive grid encircles electrode film on alumina tube. Bus wire runs along tube to collect electrical current from grid. Such converters used to transform solar, nuclear, and waste heat into electric power.

  12. Electrodes For Alkali-Metal Thermoelectric Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Wheeler, Bob L.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Lamb, James L.; Bankston, C. Perry; Cole, Terry

    1989-01-01

    Combination of thin, porous electrode and overlying collector grid reduces internal resistance of alkali-metal thermoelectric converter cell. Low resistance of new electrode and grid boosts power density nearly to 1 W/cm2 of electrode area at typical operating temperatures of 1,000 to 1,300 K. Conductive grid encircles electrode film on alumina tube. Bus wire runs along tube to collect electrical current from grid. Such converters used to transform solar, nuclear, and waste heat into electric power.

  13. Lidar Studies of the Alkali Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemesha, B. R.

    1984-01-01

    The development of the lidar technique in the early sixties, and the subsequent introduction of tunable lasers, made accurate measurements of the vertical distribution of the alkali metals in the atmosphere possible for the first time. Over the last decade a great deal of information was obtained on the spatial and temporal variations of sodium, and rather less information was obtained about potassium and lithium. The possibility of making continuous observations of the vertical distribution of sodium, coupled with temperature measurements via the determination of the Doppler spectrum of the returned lidar signal, offers a potentially useful technique for studying the dynamics of the 80 to 100 km region of the atmosphere.

  14. Cathode architectures for alkali metal / oxygen batteries

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J; Nimon, Vitaliy; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Volfkovich, Yury; Bograchev, Daniil

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical energy storage devices, such as alkali metal-oxygen battery cells (e.g., non-aqueous lithium-air cells), have a cathode architecture with a porous structure and pore composition that is tailored to improve cell performance, especially as it pertains to one or more of the discharge/charge rate, cycle life, and delivered ampere-hour capacity. A porous cathode architecture having a pore volume that is derived from pores of varying radii wherein the pore size distribution is tailored as a function of the architecture thickness is one way to achieve one or more of the aforementioned cell performance improvements.

  15. Wavelength diversity in optically pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perram, Glen P.

    2017-01-01

    Alternative wavelengths for optically pumped alkali vapor lasers have been developed using single photon excitation of higher lying P-states, stimulated Raman processes, two-photon excitation of S and D states, and electric quadruple excitation on S-D transitions. Two photon excitation of Cs 72D leads to competing and cascade lasing producing red and infrared lasers operating on the D-P transitions, followed by ultraviolet, blue, the standard near infrared DPAL transitions operating on P-S transitions. The S-D pump transitions are fully bleached at pump intensities exceeding 1 MW/cm2, allowing for lasing transitions that terminate on the ground state. The kinetics of these systems are complex due to competition for population inversion among the many optical transitions. An optically pumped mid-infrared rubidium pulsed, mirrorless laser has also been demonstrated in a heat pipe along both the 62P3/2 - 62S1/2 transition at 2.73 μm and the 62P1/2 - 62S1/2 transition at 2.79 μm with a maximum energy of 100 nJ. Performance improves dramatically as the rubidium vapor density is increased, in direct contradiction with the prior work. No scaling limitations associated with energy pooling or ionization kinetics have been observed. Practical application for infrared counter measures depends on the further development of blue diode pump sources. Finally, stimulated electronic Raman scattering and hyper-Raman processes in potassium vapor near the D1 and D2 lines have been observed using a stable resonator and pulsed laser excitation. First and second order Stokes and anti-Stokes lines were observed simultaneously and independently for a pump laser tuning range exceeding 70 cm-1. When the pump is tuned between the K D1 and D2 lines, an efficient hyper-Raman process dominates with a slope efficiency that exceeds 10%. Raman shifted laser may be useful as a target illuminator or atmospheric compensation beacon for a high power diode pumped alkali laser.

  16. A reactor system for studying the interactions between alkali vapors and ceramic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Shadman, F.; Punjak, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of interaction between alkali vapors and several ceramic compounds are studied. A unique micro-gravimetric reactor is designed and utilized for this study. Bauxite and kaolin are very good adsorbents for alkali chlorides and are potentially good additives for control of alkali during coal combustion and gasification. The experimental data shows that the alkali capturing process is a combination of physisorption, chemisorption and chemical reaction. An analytical model is developed assuming a multi-layer adsorption of alkali on substrate followed by a rate-controlling rection on the surface. The experimental results and model predictions are in good agreement.

  17. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Svitlyk, V.; Pomjakushina, E.; Puzniak, R.; Conder, K.

    2016-07-01

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  18. Optimization of metal vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanov, V. V.; Molodykh, E. I.; Tykotskii, V. V.

    1983-03-01

    The method proposed here for performing numerical calculations on a computer in order to predict and optimize the characteristics of metal vapor lasers is based on the use of a universal program for numerical experiments designed expressly for metal vapor lasers and on a simultaneous application of an algorithm for multifactor optimization of the output parameters. The latter, in turn, is based on the complex Boks method (Himmelblau, 1970) and on the Gel'fand-Tsetlin ravine method (Himmelblau, 1970). Calculations carried out for a metal with a copper vapor in neon reveal that for optimization with respect to the geometry of the active zone and the parameters of the electrical circuits (including the voltage pulses and excitation frequency) it is sufficient to use the Boks method. The objective function optimum regarding the concentration of the metal particles and the buffer gas found using this algorithm calls for further refinement; this can be performed efficiently with the Gel'fand-Tsetlin ravine method.

  19. Heat pipes containing alkali metal working fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A technique for improving high temperature evaporation-condensation heat-transfer devices which have important and unique advantage in terrestrial and space energy processing is described. The device is in the form of a heat pipe comprising a sealed container or envelope which contains a capillary wick. The temperature of one end of the heat pipe is raised by the input of heat from an external heat source which is extremely hot and corrosive. A working fluid of a corrosive alkali metal, such as lithium, sodium, or potassium transfers this heat to a heat receiver remote from the heat source. The container and wick are fabricated from a superalloy containing a small percentage of a corrosion inhibiting or gettering element. Lanthanum, scandium, yttrium, thorium, and hafnium are utilized as the alloying metal.

  20. Measurement of alkali-vapor emission from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion of Illinois coals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Teats, F.G.; Swift, W.M.; Banerjee, D.D.

    1993-04-01

    Two Illinois Herrin No. 6 coals and one Illinois Springfield No. 5 coal were separately combusted in a laboratory-scale (15-cm dia) pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) combined with an alkali sorber. These coals were combusted in a fluidized bed of Tymochtee dolomite at temperatures ranging from 910 to 950{degree}C and a system pressure of 9.2 atm absolute. Alkali-vapor emission (Na and K) in the PFBC flue gas was determined by the analytical activated-bauxite sorber bed technique developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The test results showed that sodium is the major alkali-vapor species present in the PFBC flue gas, and that the level of sodium-vapor emission increases linearly with both Na and Cl contents in the coals. This suggests that the sodium-vapor emission results from direct vaporization of NaCl present in the coals. The measured alkali-vapor concentration (Na + K), 67 to 190 ppbW, is more than 2.5 times greater than the allowable alkali limit of 24 ppb for an industrial gas turbine. Combusting these coals in a PFBC for power generation may require developing a method to control alkali vapors.

  1. Measurement of alkali-vapor emission from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion of Illinois coals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Teats, F.G.; Swift, W.M. ); Banerjee, D.D. )

    1993-01-01

    Two Illinois Herrin No. 6 coals and one Illinois Springfield No. 5 coal were separately combusted in a laboratory-scale (15-cm dia) pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) combined with an alkali sorber. These coals were combusted in a fluidized bed of Tymochtee dolomite at temperatures ranging from 910 to 950[degree]C and a system pressure of 9.2 atm absolute. Alkali-vapor emission (Na and K) in the PFBC flue gas was determined by the analytical activated-bauxite sorber bed technique developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The test results showed that sodium is the major alkali-vapor species present in the PFBC flue gas, and that the level of sodium-vapor emission increases linearly with both Na and Cl contents in the coals. This suggests that the sodium-vapor emission results from direct vaporization of NaCl present in the coals. The measured alkali-vapor concentration (Na + K), 67 to 190 ppbW, is more than 2.5 times greater than the allowable alkali limit of 24 ppb for an industrial gas turbine. Combusting these coals in a PFBC for power generation may require developing a method to control alkali vapors.

  2. COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-08-01

    A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

  3. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOEpatents

    Soung, Wen Y.

    1984-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them (46, 53, 61, 69) with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide (63) to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased (81), preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated (84) to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process (86, 18, 17) where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  4. Self-discharge in bimetallic cells containing alkali metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, M. S.; Hesson, J. C.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of thermally regenerative bimetallic cells with alkali metal anodes shows a relation between the current drawn and the rate of discharge under open-circuit conditions. The self-discharge rate of the cell is due to the dissolution and ionization of alkali metal atoms in the fused-salt electrolyte

  5. High-temperature interactions of alkali vapors with solids during coal combustion and gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Punjak, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    A temperature and concentration programmed reaction method is used to investigate the mechanism by which organically bound alkali is released from carbonaceous substrates. Vaporization of the alkali is preceded by reduction of oxygen-bearing groups during which CO is generated. A residual amount of alkali remains after complete reduction. This residual level is greater for potassium, indicating that potassium has stronger interactions with graphitic substrates that sodium. Other mineral substrates were exposed to high temperature alkali chloride vapors under both nitrogen and simulated flue gas atmospheres to investigate their potential application as sorbents for the removal of alkali from coal conversion flue gases. The compounds containing alumina and silica are found to readily adsorb alkali vapors and the minerals kaolinite, bauxite and emathlite are identified as promising alkali sorbents. The fundamentals of alkali adsorption on kaolinite, bauxite and emathlite are compared and analyzed both experimentally and through theoretical modeling. The experiments were performed in a microgravimetric reactor system; the sorbents were characterized before and after alkali adsorption using scanning Auger microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, mercury porosimetry and atomic emission spectrophotometry. The results show that the process is not a simple physical condensation, but a complex combination of several diffusion steps and reactions.

  6. Superconductivity in the alkali metal intercalates of molybdenum disulphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.

    1972-01-01

    The complete series of alkali metals, lithium through cesium, have been intercalated into molybdenum disulphide, using both the liquid ammonia and vapor techniques. All the intercalates with the exception of lithium yielded full superconducting transitions with onset temperatures of 6 K for AxMoS2(Ax=K,Rb,Cs) and 4 K for BxMoS2(Bx=Li,Na). The superconducting transition for lithium was incomplete down to 1.5 K. Stoichiometries and unit cell parameters have been determined for the intercalation compounds. Both rhombohedral and hexagonal polymorphs of MoS2 have been intercalated and found to exhibit the same superconductivity behavior. The nature of the extraneous superconducting transition of some intercalated samples on exposure to air was elucidated.

  7. Superconductivity in the alkali metal intercalates of molybdenum disulphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.

    1972-01-01

    The complete series of alkali metals, lithium through cesium, have been intercalated into molybdenum disulphide, using both the liquid ammonia and vapor techniques. All the intercalates with the exception of lithium yielded full superconducting transitions with onset temperatures of 6 K for AxMoS2(Ax=K,Rb,Cs) and 4 K for BxMoS2(Bx=Li,Na). The superconducting transition for lithium was incomplete down to 1.5 K. Stoichiometries and unit cell parameters have been determined for the intercalation compounds. Both rhombohedral and hexagonal polymorphs of MoS2 have been intercalated and found to exhibit the same superconductivity behavior. The nature of the extraneous superconducting transition of some intercalated samples on exposure to air was elucidated.

  8. Microfabricated alkali vapor cell with anti-relaxation wall coating

    SciTech Connect

    Straessle, R.; Pétremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Rooij, N. F. de; Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G.

    2014-07-28

    We present a microfabricated alkali vapor cell equipped with an anti-relaxation wall coating. The anti-relaxation coating used is octadecyltrichlorosilane and the cell was sealed by thin-film indium-bonding at a low temperature of 140 °C. The cell body is made of silicon and Pyrex and features a double-chamber design. Depolarizing properties due to liquid Rb droplets are avoided by confining the Rb droplets to one chamber only. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on this wall-coated cell are used to evaluate the cell's relaxation properties and a potential gas contamination. Double-resonance signals obtained from the cell show an intrinsic linewidth that is significantly lower than the linewidth that would be expected in case the cell had no wall coating but only contained a buffer-gas contamination on the level measured by optical spectroscopy. Combined with further experimental evidence this proves the presence of a working anti-relaxation wall coating in the cell. Such cells are of interest for applications in miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and other quantum sensors.

  9. Advances in high temperature components for AMTEC (alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Underwood, M.L.; Ryan, M.A.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1991-01-01

    Long lifetimes are required for AMTEC (or sodium heat engine) components for aerospace and terrestrial applications, and the high heat input temperature as well as the alkali metal liquid and vapor environment places unusual demands on the materials used to construct AMTEC devices. In addition, it is important to maximize device efficiency and power density, while maintaining a long life capability. In addition to the electrode, which must provide both efficient electrode kinetics, transport of the alkali metal, and low electrical resistance, other high temperature components of the cell face equally demanding requirements. The beta{double prime} alumina solid electrolyte (BASE), the seal between the BASE ceramic and its metallic transition to the hot alkali metal (liquid or vapor) source, and metallic components of the device are exposed to hot liquid alkali metal. Modification of AMTEC components may also be useful in optimizing the device for particular operating conditions. In particular, a potassium AMTEC may be expected to operate more efficiently at lower temperatures.

  10. Advances in high temperature components for AMTEC (alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Underwood, M.L.; Ryan, M.A.; O`Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1991-12-31

    Long lifetimes are required for AMTEC (or sodium heat engine) components for aerospace and terrestrial applications, and the high heat input temperature as well as the alkali metal liquid and vapor environment places unusual demands on the materials used to construct AMTEC devices. In addition, it is important to maximize device efficiency and power density, while maintaining a long life capability. In addition to the electrode, which must provide both efficient electrode kinetics, transport of the alkali metal, and low electrical resistance, other high temperature components of the cell face equally demanding requirements. The beta{double_prime} alumina solid electrolyte (BASE), the seal between the BASE ceramic and its metallic transition to the hot alkali metal (liquid or vapor) source, and metallic components of the device are exposed to hot liquid alkali metal. Modification of AMTEC components may also be useful in optimizing the device for particular operating conditions. In particular, a potassium AMTEC may be expected to operate more efficiently at lower temperatures.

  11. Electrochemical cell utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Virkar, Anil V.; Miller, Gerald R.

    1983-11-04

    An improved electrochemical cell comprising an additive-modified molten alkali metal electrode-reactant and/or electrolyte is disclosed. Various electrochemical cells employing a molten alkali metal, e.g., sodium, electrode in contact with a cationically conductive ceramic membrane experience a lower resistance and a lower temperature coefficient of resistance whenever small amounts of selenium are present at the interface of the electrolyte and the molten alkali metal. Further, cells having small amounts of selenium present at the electrolyte-molten metal interface exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte under long term cycling conditions.

  12. Role of alkali metal promoter in enhancing lateral growth of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun; Han, Gang Hee; Yun, Seok Joon; Zhao, Jiong; Keum, Dong Hoon; Jeong, Hye Yun; Hue Ly, Thuc; Jin, Youngjo; Park, Ji-Hoon; Moon, Byoung Hee; Kim, Sung-Wng; Lee, Young Hee

    2017-09-01

    Synthesis of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) via chemical vapor deposition relies on several factors such as precursor, promoter, substrate, and surface treatment of substrate. Among them, the use of promoter is crucial for obtaining uniform and large-area monolayer TMDs. Although promoters have been speculated to enhance adhesion of precursors to the substrate, their precise role in the growth mechanism has rarely been discussed. Here, we report the role of alkali metal promoter in growing monolayer TMDs. The growth occurred via the formation of sodium metal oxides which prevent the evaporation of metal precursor. Furthermore, the silicon oxide substrate helped to decrease the Gibbs free energy by forming sodium silicon oxide compounds. The resulting sodium metal oxide was anchored within such concavities created by corrosion of silicon oxide. Consequently, the wettability of the precursors to silicon oxide was improved, leading to enhance lateral growth of monolayer TMDs.

  13. Role of alkali metal promoter in enhancing lateral growth of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun; Han, Gang Hee; Yun, Seok Joon; Zhao, Jiong; Keum, Dong Hoon; Jeong, Hye Yun; Ly, Thuc Hue; Jin, Youngjo; Park, Ji-Hoon; Moon, Byoung Hee; Kim, Sung-Wng; Lee, Young Hee

    2017-09-08

    Synthesis of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) via chemical vapor deposition relies on several factors such as precursor, promoter, substrate, and surface treatment of substrate. Among them, the use of promoter is crucial for obtaining uniform and large-area monolayer TMDs. Although promoters have been speculated to enhance adhesion of precursors to the substrate, their precise role in the growth mechanism has rarely been discussed. Here, we report the role of alkali metal promoter in growing monolayer TMDs. The growth occurred via the formation of sodium metal oxides which prevent the evaporation of metal precursor. Furthermore, the silicon oxide substrate helped to decrease the Gibbs free energy by forming sodium silicon oxide compounds. The resulting sodium metal oxide was anchored within such concavities created by corrosion of silicon oxide. Consequently, the wettability of the precursors to silicon oxide was improved, leading to enhance lateral growth of monolayer TMDs.

  14. Alkali metal-refractory metal biphase electrode for AMTEC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M. (Inventor); Bankston, Clyde P. (Inventor); Cole, Terry (Inventor); Khanna, Satish K. (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Wheeler, Bob L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An electrode having increased output with slower degradation is formed of a film applied to a beta-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE). The film comprises a refractory first metal M.sup.1 such as a platinum group metal, suitably platinum or rhodium, capable of forming a liquid or a strong surface adsorption phase with sodium at the operating temperature of an alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) and a second refractory metal insoluble in sodium or the NaM.sup.1 liquid phase such as a Group IVB, VB or VIB metal, suitably tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum or niobium. The liquid phase or surface film provides fast transport through the electrode while the insoluble refractory metal provides a structural matrix for the electrode during operation. A trilayer structure that is stable and not subject to deadhesion comprises a first, thin layer of tungsten, an intermediate co-deposited layer of tungsten-platinum and a thin surface layer of platinum.

  15. Superconductivity in alkali-metal-doped picene.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Ryoji; Suzuki, Yuta; Yamanari, Yusuke; Mitamura, Hiroki; Kambe, Takashi; Ikeda, Naoshi; Okamoto, Hideki; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Yamaji, Minoru; Kawasaki, Naoko; Maniwa, Yutaka; Kubozono, Yoshihiro

    2010-03-04

    Efforts to identify and develop new superconducting materials continue apace, motivated by both fundamental science and the prospects for application. For example, several new superconducting material systems have been developed in the recent past, including calcium-intercalated graphite compounds, boron-doped diamond and-most prominently-iron arsenides such as LaO(1-x)F(x)FeAs (ref. 3). In the case of organic superconductors, however, no new material system with a high superconducting transition temperature (T(c)) has been discovered in the past decade. Here we report that intercalating an alkali metal into picene, a wide-bandgap semiconducting solid hydrocarbon, produces metallic behaviour and superconductivity. Solid potassium-intercalated picene (K(x)picene) shows T(c) values of 7 K and 18 K, depending on the metal content. The drop of magnetization in K(x)picene solids at the transition temperature is sharp (<2 K), similar to the behaviour of Ca-intercalated graphite. The T(c) of 18 K is comparable to that of K-intercalated C(60) (ref. 4). This discovery of superconductivity in K(x)picene shows that organic hydrocarbons are promising candidates for improved T(c) values.

  16. Controlled in-situ dissolution of an alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jeffrey Donald; Dooley, Kirk John; Tolman, David Donald

    2012-09-11

    A method for the controllable dissolution of one or more alkali metals from a vessel containing a one or more alkali metals and/or one or more partially passivated alkali metals. The vessel preferably comprising a sodium, NaK or other alkali metal-cooled nuclear reactor that has been used. The alkali metal, preferably sodium, potassium or a combination thereof, in the vessel is exposed to a treatment liquid, preferably an acidic liquid, more preferably citric acid. Preferably, the treatment liquid is maintained in continuous motion relative to any surface of unreacted alkali metal with which the treatment liquid is in contact. The treatment liquid is preferably pumped into the vessel containing the one or more alkali metals and the resulting fluid is extracted and optionally further processed. Preferably, the resulting off-gases are processed by an off-gas treatment system and the resulting liquids are processed by a liquid disposal system. In one preferred embodiment, an inert gas is pumped into the vessel along with the treatment liquid.

  17. Progress in High-Field Optical Pumping of Alkali Metal Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Ishikawa, K.; Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2006-05-01

    We present preliminary results of an attempt to polarize alkali metal nuclei via optical pumping in a large (9.4-tesla) magnetic field. NMR measurements of ^87Rb and ^133Cs films in optical cells will be reported. Depopulation pumping of alkalis can easily produce electron polarizations of order unity, as measured during spin-exchange optical pumping of noble gases [1]. At low magnetic fields (< ˜1 kG), the strong hyperfine coupling between the alkali electron and nucleus allows angular momentum exchange from one to the other, resulting in nuclear polarization enhancement through optical pumping. In the high magnetic fields required for NMR, however, this interaction is largely decoupled and electron-nuclear spin exchange must rely upon the δA I .S interaction induced by buffer gas collisions (also called the ``Carver rate''). High-field optical pumping experiments may allow for a more precise measurement of this rate, as well as yielding insight into the transfer of angular momentum from the polarized alkali vapor to the bulk alkali metal on the cell walls. The technical challenges of high-resolution NMR of alkali metals at 9.4 tesla will be discussed. 1. E. Babcock, I. Nelson, S. Kadlecek, et al., Physical Review Letters 91, 123003 (2003).

  18. Alkali cation specific adsorption onto fcc(111) transition metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mills, J N; McCrum, I T; Janik, M J

    2014-07-21

    The presence of alkali cations in electrolyte solutions is known to impact the rate of electrocatalytic reactions, though the mechanism of such impact is not conclusively determined. We use density functional theory (DFT) to examine the specific adsorption of alkali cations to fcc(111) electrode surfaces, as specific adsorption may block catalyst sites or otherwise impact surface catalytic chemistry. Solvation of the cation-metal surface structure was investigated using explicit water models. Computed equilibrium potentials for alkali cation adsorption suggest that alkali and alkaline earth cations will specifically adsorb onto Pt(111) and Pd(111) surfaces in the potential range of hydrogen oxidation and hydrogen evolution catalysis in alkaline solutions.

  19. Recent materials compatibility studies in refractory metal-alkali metal systems for space power applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, R. W.; Hoffman, E. E.; Davies, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced Rankine and other proposed space power systems utilize refractory metals in contact with both single-phase and two-phase alkali metals at elevated temperatures. A number of recent compatibility experiments are described which emphasize the excellent compatibility of refractory metals with the alkali metals, lithium, sodium, and potassium, under a variety of environmental conditions. The alkali metal compatibilities of tantalum-, columbium-, molybdenum-, and tungsten-base alloys are discussed.

  20. The 4843 Alkali Metal Storage Facility Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The 4843 AMSF has been used primarily to provide a centralized building to receive and store dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste, including sodium and lithium, which has been generated at the Fast Flux Test Facility and at various other Hanford Site operations that used alkali metals. Most of the dangerous and mixed alkali metal waste received consists of retired equipment from liquid sodium processes. The unit continues to store material. In general, only solid alkali metal waste that is water reactive is stored at the 4843 AMSF. The 4843 AMSF will be closed in a manner consistent with Ecology guidelines and regulations (WAC 173-303-610). The general closure procedure is detailed as follows.

  1. Hall Determination of Atomic Radii of Alkali Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    I will propose here an alternative method for determining atomic radii of alkali metals based on the Hall measurements of their free electron densities and the knowledge of their crystal structure. (Contains 2 figures.)

  2. Hall Determination of Atomic Radii of Alkali Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houari, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    I will propose here an alternative method for determining atomic radii of alkali metals based on the Hall measurements of their free electron densities and the knowledge of their crystal structure. (Contains 2 figures.)

  3. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, M.M.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.

    1995-08-22

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  4. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, Marca M.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard

    1995-01-01

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  5. Ternary alkali-metal and transition metal or metalloid acetylides as alkali-metal intercalation electrodes for batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, Karoly; Srajer, George; Harkay, Katherine C; Terdik, Joseph Z

    2015-02-10

    Novel intercalation electrode materials including ternary acetylides of chemical formula: A.sub.nMC.sub.2 where A is alkali or alkaline-earth element; M is transition metal or metalloid element; C.sub.2 is reference to the acetylide ion; n is an integer that is 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4 when A is alkali element and 0, 1, or 2 when A is alkaline-earth element. The alkali elements are Lithium (Li), Sodium (Na), Potassium (K), Rubidium (Rb), Cesium (Cs) and Francium (Fr). The alkaline-earth elements are Berilium (Be), Magnesium (Mg), Calcium (Ca), Strontium (Sr), Barium (Ba), and Radium (Ra). M is a transition metal that is any element in groups 3 through 12 inclusive on the Periodic Table of Elements (elements 21 (Sc) to element 30 (Zn)). In another exemplary embodiment, M is a metalloid element.

  6. Electrochemical cell having an alkali-metal-nitrate electrode

    DOEpatents

    Roche, M.F.; Preto, S.K.

    1982-06-04

    A power-producing secondary electrochemical cell includes a molten alkali metal as the negative-electrode material and a molten-nitrate salt as the positive-electrode material. The molten material in the respective electrodes are separated by a solid barrier of alkali-metal-ion conducting material. A typical cell includes active materials of molten sodium separated from molten sodium nitrate and other nitrates in mixture by a layer of sodium ..beta..'' alumina.

  7. A Vaporizing Liquid-Metal Anode for High-Power Hall Thrusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-14

    Lithium and Other Alkali Metal Atoms for Ionization by Electrons," Phys. Rev. 137(4A), p.A1058, 15 February 1965 (APS) 19 29 Hayes, T.R., et. al...14-06-2007J Final January 2003 - December 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Vaporizing Liquid- Metal Anode for High-power Hall... metal -vapor plasma discharge using only waste heat from the thruster. Thermal failure of stainless-steel porous propellant diffusers is documented

  8. Bioinorganic Chemistry of the Alkali Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsam; Nguyen, Thuy-Tien T; Churchill, David G

    2016-01-01

    The common Group 1 alkali metals are indeed ubiquitous on earth, in the oceans and in biological systems. In this introductory chapter, concepts involving aqueous chemistry and aspects of general coordination chemistry and oxygen atom donor chemistry are introduced. Also, there are nuclear isotopes of importance. A general discussion of Group 1 begins from the prevalence of the ions, and from a comparison of their ionic radii and ionization energies. While oxygen and water molecule binding have the most relevance to biology and in forming a detailed understanding between the elements, there is a wide range of basic chemistry that is potentially important, especially with respect to biological chelation and synthetic multi-dentate ligand design. The elements are widely distributed in life forms, in the terrestrial environment and in the oceans. The details about the workings in animal, as well as plant life are presented in this volume. Important biometallic aspects of human health and medicine are introduced as well. Seeing as the elements are widely present in biology, various particular endogenous molecules and enzymatic systems can be studied. Sodium and potassium are by far the most important and central elements for consideration. Aspects of lithium, rubidium, cesium and francium chemistry are also included; they help in making important comparisons related to the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+). Physical methods are also introduced.

  9. Two-phase alkali-metal experiments in reduced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-06-01

    Future space missions envision the use of large nuclear reactors utilizing either a single or a two-phase alkali-metal working fluid. The design and analysis of such reactors require state-of-the-art computer codes that can properly treat alkali-metal flow and heat transfer in a reduced-gravity environment. A literature search of relevant experiments in reduced gravity is reported on here, and reveals a paucity of data for such correlations. The few ongoing experiments in reduced gravity are noted. General plans are put forth for the reduced-gravity experiments which will have to be performed, at NASA facilities, with benign fluids. A similar situation exists regarding two-phase alkali-metal flow and heat transfer, even in normal gravity. Existing data are conflicting and indequate for the task of modeling a space reactor using a two-phase alkali-metal coolant. The major features of past experiments are described here. Data from the reduced-gravity experiments with innocuous fluids are to be combined with normal gravity data from the two-phase alkali-metal experiments. Analyses undertaken here give every expectation that the correlations developed from this data base will provide a valid representation of alkali-metal heat transfer and pressure drop in reduced gravity.

  10. Theory of Magnetotransport Anomalies in Alkali Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaodong

    The galvanomagnetic properties of alkali metals, especially those of potassium, are studied taking into account the existence of an incommensurate change-density wave (CDW) structure. Occurrence of the CDW broken symmetry truncates the Fermi surface with a large number of energy gaps. Furthermore, any macroscopic crystal is likely divided into CDW (')Q-domains. An orientational (')Q-texture leads to a preferred direction in the crystal. For such an exotic system the effective magnetoresistivity tensor is anomalous and is derived for various magnetic fields. The residual (zero-field) resistance is also anisotropic. For fields 0.5 - 3T, Hall coefficients are found to be anisotropic, and a longitudinal-transverse mixing effect is discovered. The diagonal elements of the magnetoresistivity tensor are found to have a linear magnetoresistance. When the field is increased above 4T sharp open-orbit magnetoresistance spectrum develops. From the theoretical magnetoresistivity tensor, the induced-torque amplitude and phase patterns for potassium spheres are calculated. The theory quantitatively explains all of the induced-torque anomalies found experimentally in the last fourteen years. An interacting electron system, which is free of the CDW instabilities, is also studied by considering its spin response to a weak sinusoidal magnetic field. The many-body correction G(,-)((')q,(omega)) caused by exchange and correlation is introduced to describe the correct wave -vector- and frequency-dependent spin susceptibility. The exact behavior of G(,-)((')q,(omega)) in the large-q limit is shown to be related to the pair distribution function g((')r) at r = 0. G(,-)((')q,(omega)) (--->) 4g(0)-1 /3, as q (--->) (INFIN).At metallic densities this value is negative, opposite in sign to the limit at small wave vectors. Thus the spin susceptibility for large wave vectors is suppressed, rather than enhanced, by many-body effects.

  11. Method of treating alkali metal sulfide and carbonate mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Kohl, Arthur L.; Rennick, Robert D.; Savinsky, Martin W.

    1978-01-01

    A method of removing and preferably recovering sulfur values from an alkali metal sulfide and carbonate mixture comprising the steps of (1) introducing the mixture in an aqueous medium into a first carbonation zone and reacting the mixture with a gas containing a major amount of CO.sub.2 and a minor amount of H.sub.2 S; (2) introducing the resultant product from step 1 into a stripping zone maintained at subatmospheric pressure, and contacting this product with steam to produce a gaseous mixture, comprising H.sub.2 S and water vapor, and a liquor of reduced sulfide content; (3) introducing the liquor of reduced sulfide content into a second carbonation zone, and reacting the liquor with substantially pure gaseous CO.sub.2 in an amount sufficient to precipitate bicarbonate crystals and produce an offgas containing CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 S for use in step 1; (4) recovering the bicarbonate crystals from step 3, and thermally decomposing the crystals to produce an alkaline metal carbonate product and a substantially pure CO.sub.2 offgas for use in step 3.

  12. Alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide double alkoxide precursors to alkali metal yttrium oxide nanomaterials

    DOE PAGES

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Neville, Michael L.; Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; ...

    2016-03-15

    In this study, a series of alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide ([AY(ONep)4]) compounds were developed as precursors to alkali yttrium oxide (AYO2) nanomaterials. The reaction of yttrium amide ([Y(NR2)3] where R=Si(CH3)3) with four equivalents of H-ONep followed by addition of [A(NR2)] (A=Li, Na, K) or Ao (Ao=Rb, Cs) led to the formation of a complex series of AnY(ONep)3+n species, crystallographically identified as [Y2Li3(μ3-ONep)(μ3-HONep)(μ-ONep)5(ONep)3(HONep)2] (1), [YNa2(μ3-ONep)4(ONep)]2 (2), {[Y2K3(μ3-ONep)3(μ-ONep)4(ONep)2(ηξ-tol)2][Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4]•ηx-tol]} (3), [Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4] (3a), [Y2Rb3(μ4-ONep)3(μ-ONep)6] (4), and [Y2Cs4(μ6-O)(μ3-ONep)6(μ3-HONep)2(ONep)2(ηx-tol)4]•tol (5). Compounds 1–5 were investigated as single source precursors to AYOx nanomaterials following solvothermal routes (pyridine, 185 °C for 24h). The final products after thermal processing weremore » found by powder X-ray diffraction experiments to be Y2O3 with variable sized particles based on transmission electron diffraction. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy studies indicated that the heavier alkali metal species were present in the isolated nanomaterials.« less

  13. Upgrading of petroleum oil feedstocks using alkali metals and hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A method of upgrading an oil feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the oil feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase separable from the organic oil feedstock material. The upgradant hydrocarbon bonds to the oil feedstock material and increases the number of carbon atoms in the product. This increase in the number of carbon atoms of the product increases the energy value of the resulting oil feedstock.

  14. High Pressure Noble Gas Alkali Vapor Mixtures and Their Visible and Infrared Excimer Bands.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    0AA629-77--015 UNCLASSIFIED AR0-1A223.A-P NL -Y IGH PRESSURE NOBLE GAS ALKALI VAPOR MIXTURES AND THEIR VISIBLE AND INFRARED EXCIMER BANDS, FINAL REPORT...Final Report 4. TITLE (and $ubtItze) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED HIGH PRESSURF NOBLE GAS ALKALI VAPOR MIXTURES Final 11/15/76 - 11/14/79 AND...emission bands from transitions between excited states of cesium- noble gas molecules," J. Chem. Phys. 71, 4052 (1979). N. D. Bhaskar, E. Zouboulis, R

  15. Modeling of a diode four-side symmetrically pumped alkali vapor amplifier.

    PubMed

    Shen, Binglin; Pan, Bailiang; Jiao, Jian; Xia, Chunsheng

    2015-03-09

    Considering the amplified spontaneous emission, the saturation effect and the energy distributions of the incident pump and seed lasers, a physical model is established to describe the kinetic process and the output performance of a four sided diode pumped alkali vapor laser amplifier. According to the experimental parameters of a single-side pumped configuration with a diffuse type hollow cylinder cavity, energy distributions in the cell and influences of several important factors are simulated and analyzed. The model is validated by comparing the simulation result with the experimental data, which shows the model can provide an effective way for designing an efficient diode four-side symmetrically pumped alkali vapor laser amplifier.

  16. Modeling of an optically side-pumped alkali vapor amplifier with consideration of amplified spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zining; Wang, Hongyan; Lu, Qisheng; Hua, Weihong; Xu, Xiaojun

    2011-11-07

    Diode pumped alkali vapor amplifier (DPAA) is a potential candidate in high power laser field. In this paper, we set up a model for the diode double-side-pumped alkali vapor amplifier. For the three-dimensional volumetric gain medium, both the longitudinal and transverse amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) effects are considered and coupled into the rate equations. An iterative numerical approach is proposed to solve the model. Some important influencing factors are simulated and discussed. The results show that in the case of saturated amplification, the ASE effect can be well suppressed rather than a limitation in power scaling of a DPAA.

  17. A Quantitative Tunneling/Desorption Model for the Exchange Current at the Porous Electrode/Beta - Alumina/Alkali Metal Gas Three Phase Zone at 700-1300K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Ryan, M. A.; Saipetch, C.; LeDuc, H. G.

    1996-01-01

    The exchange current observed at porous metal electrodes on sodium or potassium beta -alumina solid electrolytes in alkali metal vapor is quantitatively modeled with a multi-step process with good agreement with experimental results.

  18. A Quantitative Tunneling/Desorption Model for the Exchange Current at the Porous Electrode/Beta - Alumina/Alkali Metal Gas Three Phase Zone at 700-1300K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Ryan, M. A.; Saipetch, C.; LeDuc, H. G.

    1996-01-01

    The exchange current observed at porous metal electrodes on sodium or potassium beta -alumina solid electrolytes in alkali metal vapor is quantitatively modeled with a multi-step process with good agreement with experimental results.

  19. Theoretical analysis of the semi-ring and trapezoid LD side-pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Binglin; Xu, Xingqi; Xia, Chunsheng; Pan, Bailiang

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of two new pump-couplings: semi-ring and trapezoid LD side-pumped configurations in alkali vapor lasers is reported, which mainly includes the numerical approaches for evaluation of the pump intensity and temperature distribution in the cell of these two configurations. Comparison between the simulated results of the semi-ring and trapezoid LD side-pumped Cs vapor lasers and the experimental results of the single-side pumped Cs vapor lasers with a cylindrical white diffuse reflector and a stable or unstable resonator is made. Dependencies of laser power on pump power and flowed velocity for semi-ring, trapezoid, single and double side-pumped configurations are calculated, demonstrating the advantages of the semi-ring and trapezoid LD side-pumped configurations. Thus the model is very helpful for designing high-power side-pumped alkali vapor lasers.

  20. Alkali Metal/Salt Thermal-Energy-Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Wayne W.; Stearns, John W.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed thermal-energy-storage system based on mixture of alkali metal and one of its halide salts; metal and salt form slurry of two immiscible melts. Use of slurry expected to prevent incrustations of solidified salts on heat-transfer surfaces that occur where salts alone used. Since incrustations impede heat transfer, system performance improved. In system, charging heat-exchanger surface immersed in lower liquid, rich in halide-salt, phase-charge material. Discharging heat exchanger surface immersed in upper liquid, rich in alkali metal.

  1. Spin Transfer from an Optically Pumped Alkali Vapor to a Solid

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, K.; Patton, B.; Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2007-05-04

    We report enhancement of the spin polarization of {sup 133}Cs nuclei in CsH salt by spin transfer from an optically pumped cesium vapor. The nuclear polarization was 4.0 times the equilibrium polarization at 9.4 T and 137 deg. C, with larger enhancements at lower fields. This work is the first demonstration of spin transfer from a polarized alkali vapor to the nuclei of a solid, opening up new possibilities for research in hyperpolarized materials.

  2. Coupling apparatus for a metal vapor laser

    DOEpatents

    Ball, D.G.; Miller, J.L.

    1993-02-23

    Coupling apparatus for a large bore metal vapor laser is disclosed. The coupling apparatus provides for coupling high voltage pulses (approximately 40 KV) to a metal vapor laser with a high repetition rate (approximately 5 KHz). The coupling apparatus utilizes existing thyratron circuits and provides suitable power input to a large bore metal vapor laser while maintaining satisfactory operating lifetimes for the existing thyratron circuits.

  3. High-energy transversely pumped alkali vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.

    2011-03-01

    We report on the results from our transversely pumped alkali laser. This system uses an Alexandrite laser to pump a stainless steel laser head. The system uses methane and helium as buffer gasses. Using rubidium, the system produced up to 40 mJ of output energy when pumped with 63 mJ. Slope efficiency was 75%. Using potassium as the lasing species the system produced 32 mJ and a 53% slope efficiency.

  4. Elucidation of transport mechanism and enhanced alkali ion transference numbers in mixed alkali metal-organic ionic molten salts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Forsyth, Maria

    2016-07-28

    Mixed salts of Ionic Liquids (ILs) and alkali metal salts, developed as electrolytes for lithium and sodium batteries, have shown a remarkable ability to facilitate high rate capability for lithium and sodium electrochemical cycling. It has been suggested that this may be due to a high alkali metal ion transference number at concentrations approaching 50 mol% Li(+) or Na(+), relative to lower concentrations. Computational investigations for two IL systems illustrate the formation of extended alkali-anion aggregates as the alkali metal ion concentration increases. This tends to favor the diffusion of alkali metal ions compared with other ionic species in electrolyte solutions; behavior that has recently been reported for Li(+) in a phosphonium ionic liquid, thus an increasing alkali transference number. The mechanism of alkali metal ion diffusion via this extended coordination environment present at high concentrations is explained and compared to the dynamics at lower concentrations. Heterogeneous alkali metal ion dynamics are also evident and, somewhat counter-intuitively, it appears that the faster ions are those that are generally found clustered with the anions. Furthermore these fast alkali metal ions appear to correlate with fastest ionic liquid solvent ions.

  5. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of alkali metal deficiency and excess

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, C.Y.

    1984-01-01

    The alkali metals from the Group IA of the periodic table (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium and francium) are reviewed. The neuropsychiatric aspects of alkali metal deficiencies and excesses (intoxications) are described. Emphasis was placed on lithium due to its clinical uses. The signs and symptoms of these conditions are characterized by features of an organic brain syndrome with delirium and encephalopathy prevailing. There are no clinically distinctive features that could be reliably used for diagnoses. Sodium and potassium are two essential alkali metals in man. Lithium is used as therapeutic agent in bipolar affective disorders. Rubidium has been investigated for its antidepressant effect in a group of psychiatric disorders. Cesium is under laboratory investigation for its role in carcinogenesis and in depressive illness. Very little is known of francium due to its great instability for experimental study.

  6. Spectroscopic and theoretical study on alkali metal phenylacetates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regulska, E.; Świsłocka, R.; Samsonowicz, M.; Lewandowski, W.

    2013-07-01

    The influence of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium cations on the electronic system of phenylacetic acid was studied. The FT-IR, FT-Raman and 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded for studied compounds. Characteristic shifts in IR and NMR spectra along alkali metal phenylacetates were observed. Good correlations between the wavenumbers of the vibrational bands in the IR spectra of phenylacetates and some alkali metal parameters such as ionic potential, electronegativity, inverse of atomic mass, atomic radius and ionization energy were found. The density functional hybrid method B3LYP with 6-311++G** basis set was used to calculate optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds. Aromaticity indices, atomic charges, dipole moments and energies were calculated as well as the wavenumbers and intensities of IR spectra and chemical shifts in NMR spectra. The theoretical parameters were compared to experimental characteristic of alkali metal phenylacetates.

  7. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of alkali metal deficiency and excess.

    PubMed

    Yung, C Y

    1984-01-01

    The alkali metals from the Group IA of the periodic table (lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium and francium) are reviewed. The neuropsychiatric aspects of alkali metal deficiencies and excesses (intoxications) are described. Emphasis was placed on lithium due to its clinical uses. The signs and symptoms of these conditions are characterized by features of an organic brain syndrome with delirium and encephalopathy prevailing. There are no clinically distinctive features that could be reliably used for diagnoses. Sodium and potassium are two essential alkali metals in man. Lithium is used as therapeutic agent in bipolar affective disorders. Rubidium has been investigated for its antidepressant effect in a group of psychiatric disorders. Cesium is under laboratory investigation for its role in carcinogenesis and in depressive illness. Very little is known of francium due to its great instability for experimental study.

  8. Optimization of power of alkali metal thermo electric convertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodhi, M. A. K.; Ahmad, Nadeem

    2015-02-01

    Alkali Metal Thermo Electric Convertor (AMTEC) uses infrared radiation to knock out electrons from some alkali metal acting as the working material. In the present paper sodium is chosen as the alkali metal. The freed electrons after going through a circuit and having done the prescribed work meet the sodium ions. A solid electrolyte, called beta" alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) is used for diffusing the working material ions. The system is closed and continues working as long as the heat source is kept turned on. The longevity, power and efficiency of the device depend inversely to some extent on the thickness of the electrolyte and electrodes. In this work we have optimized the thickness of electrodes. This optimization improved the efficiency and power output by 28 and 14.8% points respectively.

  9. Experimental study of alkali-metal collisional line broadening for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindo, Francois

    2005-05-01

    The visible and near infrared spectra of L- and T-type brown dwarfs exhibit prominent resonance lines of alkali-metal atoms [1]. It is expected that such features are present in the spectra of extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) [2,3]. In the cool dwarfs, the most prominent alkali-features are due to the resonance lines of Na at 590 nm and of K at 770 nm, significantly broadened by collisions with H2 and He at temperatures around 1000 K. As this broadening is pressure and temperature sensitive, the resonance line profile can be used as a diagnostic of the atmospheric conditions of cool brown dwarfs and EGPs. To improve the data available for modeling, we have set up a spectroscopic experiment to measure absolute absorption coefficients of alkali vapors colliding with H2 and He at relevant temperatures. Our apparatus allows us to use the ``hook'' method to determine the atom number density of the alkali element. We will discuss our first spectroscopic measurements on the absorption of potassium vapors mixed with He buffer gas. This work is supported in part by NASA grant NAG5-12751. References: [1] ^ A. Burrows et al. 2002, ApJ, 573, 394 [2] S. Seager and D. D. Sasselov 2000, ApJ, 537, 916 [3] A. Sudarsky et al. 2003, ApJ, 588, 1121

  10. Computation of three-dimensional temperature distribution in diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Binglin; Xu, Xingqi; Xia, Chunsheng; Pan, Bailiang

    2016-06-01

    Combining the kinetic and fluid dynamic processes in static and flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers, a comprehensive physical model with a cyclic iterative approach for calculating the three-dimensional temperature distribution of the vapor cell is established. Taking into account heat generation, thermal conductivity and convection, the excitation of the alkali atoms to high electronic levels, and their losses due to ionization in the gain medium, the thermal features and output characteristics have been simultaneously obtained. The results are in good agreement with those of the measurement in a static rubidium vapor amplifier. Influences of gas velocity on radial and axial temperature profiles are simulated and analyzed. The results have demonstrated that thermal problems in gaseous gain medium can be significantly reduced by flowing the gain medium with sufficiently high velocity.

  11. The direct observation of alkali vapor species in biomass combustion and gasification

    SciTech Connect

    French, R J; Dayton, D C; Milne, T A

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes new data from screening various feedstocks for alkali vapor release under combustion conditions. The successful development of a laboratory flow reactor and molecular beam, mass spectrometer interface is detailed. Its application to several herbaceous and woody feedstocks, as well as a fast-pyrolysis oil, under 800 and 1,100{degrees}C batch combustion, is documented. Chlorine seems to play a large role in the facile mobilization of potassium. Included in the report is a discussion of relevant literature on the alkali problem in combustors and turbines. Highlighted are the phenomena identified in studies on coal and methods that have been applied to alkali speciation. The nature of binding of alkali in coal versus biomass is discussed, together with the implications for the ease of release. Herbaceous species and many agricultural residues appear to pose significant problems in release of alkali species to the vapor at typical combustor temperatures. These problems could be especially acute in direct combustion fired turbines, but may be ameliorated in integrated gasification combined cycles.

  12. Transport properties of alkali metal doped fullerides

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Daluram Yadav, Nishchhal

    2015-07-31

    We have studied the intercage interactions between the adjacent C{sub 60} cages and expansion of lattice due to the intercalation of alkali atoms based on the spring model to estimate phonon frequencies from the dynamical matrix for the intermolecular alkali-C{sub 60} phonons. We considered a two-peak model for the phonon density of states to investigate the nature of electron pairing mechanism for superconducting state in fullerides. Coulomb repulsive parameter and the electron phonon coupling strength are obtained within the random phase approximation. Transition temperature, T{sub c}, is obtained in a situation when the free electrons in lowest molecular orbital are coupled with alkali-C{sub 60} phonons as 5 K, which is much lower as compared to reported T{sub c} (20 K). The superconducting pairing is mainly driven by the high frequency intramolecular phonons and their effects enhance it to 22 K. The importance of the present study, the pressure effect and normal state transport properties are calculated within the same model leading superconductivity.

  13. Risk assessment of metal vapor arcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Monika C. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for assessing metal vapor arcing risk for a component is provided. The method comprises acquiring a current variable value associated with an operation of the component; comparing the current variable value with a threshold value for the variable; evaluating compared variable data to determine the metal vapor arcing risk in the component; and generating a risk assessment status for the component.

  14. Maternal exposure to alkali, alkali earth, transition and other metals: Concentrations and predictors of exposure.

    PubMed

    Hinwood, A L; Stasinska, A; Callan, A C; Heyworth, J; Ramalingam, M; Boyce, M; McCafferty, P; Odland, J Ø

    2015-09-01

    Most studies of metals exposure focus on the heavy metals. There are many other metals (the transition, alkali and alkaline earth metals in particular) in common use in electronics, defense industries, emitted via combustion and which are naturally present in the environment, that have received limited attention in terms of human exposure. We analysed samples of whole blood (172), urine (173) and drinking water (172) for antimony, beryllium, bismuth, cesium, gallium, rubidium, silver, strontium, thallium, thorium and vanadium using ICPMS. In general most metals concentrations were low and below the analytical limit of detection with some high concentrations observed. Few factors examined in regression models were shown to influence biological metals concentrations and explained little of the variation. Further study is required to establish the source of metals exposures at the high end of the ranges of concentrations measured and the potential for any adverse health impacts in children.

  15. Dynamic Control over the Optical Transmission of Nanoscale Dielectric Metasurface by Alkali Vapors.

    PubMed

    Bar-David, Jonathan; Stern, Liron; Levy, Uriel

    2017-02-08

    In recent years, dielectric and metallic nanoscale metasurfaces are attracting growing attention and are being used for variety of applications. Resulting from the ability to introduce abrupt changes in optical properties at nanoscale dimensions, metasurfaces enable unprecedented control over light's different degrees of freedom, in an essentially two-dimensional configuration. Yet, the dynamic control over metasurface properties still remains one of the ultimate goals of this field. Here, we demonstrate the optical resonant interaction between a form birefringent dielectric metasurface made of silicon and alkali atomic vapor to control and effectively tune the optical transmission pattern initially generated by the nanoscale dielectric metasurface. By doing so, we present a controllable metasurface system, the output of which may be altered by applying magnetic fields, changing input polarization, or shifting the optical frequency. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the nonlinear behavior of our system taking advantage of the saturation effect of atomic transition. The demonstrated approach paves the way for using metasurfaces in applications where dynamic tunability of the metasurface is in need, for example, for scanning systems, tunable focusing, real time displays, and more.

  16. Photocathode transfer and storage techniques using alkali vapor feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, R. W.; Cameron, B. J.

    1991-12-01

    Photocathodes of quantum efficiency above 1 percent at the doubled YAG frequency of 532 nM are very sensitive to the local vacuum environment. These cathodes must have a band gap of less than 2.3 eV, and a work function that is also on the order of approximately 2 volts or less. As such, these surfaces are very reactive as they provide many surface states for the residual gases that have positive electron affinities such as oxygen and omnipotent water. Attendant to this problem is that the optimal operating point for some of these cesium based cathodes is unstable. Three of the cesium series were tried, the Cs-Ag-Bi-O, the Cs3Sb and the K2CsSb. The most stable material found is the K2CsSb. The vacuum conditions can be met by a variety of pumping schemes. The vacuum is achieved by using sputter ion diode pumps, and baking at 250 C or less for whatever time is required to reduce the pump currents to below 1 uA at room temperature. To obtain the required partial pressure of cesium, a simple very sensitive diagnostic gauge has been developed that can discriminate between free alkali and other gases present. This Pressure Alkali Monitor (PAM) can be used on cesium sources to provide a low partial pressure using standard feedback techniques. Photocathodes of arbitrary composition have been transferred to a separate vacuum system and preserved for over 10 days with less than a 25 percent loss to the QE at 543.5 nM.

  17. Photocathode transfer and storage techniques using alkali vapor feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, R.W.; Cameron, B.J.

    1991-12-20

    Photocathodes of quantum efficiency above 1% at the doubled YAG frequency of 532 nM are very sensitive to the local vacuum environment. These cathodes must have a band gap of less than 2.3 eV, and a work function that is also on the order of {approximately}2 volts or less. As such, these surfaces are very reactive as they provide many surface states for the residual gases that have positive electron affinities such as oxygen and omnipotent water. Attendant to this problem is that the optimal operating point for some of these cesium based cathodes is unstable. Three of the cesium series were tried, the Cs-Ag-Bi-O, the Cs{sub 3}Sb and the K{sub 2}CsSb. The most stable material found is the K{sub 2}CsSb. The vacuum conditions can be met by a variety of pumping schemes. The vacuum is achieved by using sputter ion diode pumps, and baking at 250{degrees}C or less for whatever time is required to reduce the pump currents to below 1 uA at room temperature. To obtain the required partial pressure of cesium, a simple very sensitive diagnostic gauge has been developed that can discriminate between free alkali and other gases present. This Pressure Alkali Monitor (PAM) can be used cesium sources to provide a low partial pressure using standard feedback techniques. Photocathodes of arbitrary composition have been transferred to a separate vacuum system and preserved for over 10 days with less than a 25% loss to the QE at 543.5 nM.

  18. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under this...

  19. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting under...

  20. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting under...

  1. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under this...

  2. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting under...

  3. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting under...

  4. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under this...

  5. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under this...

  6. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under this...

  7. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting under...

  8. Diode Pumped Alkali Vapor Lasers - A New Pathway to High Beam Quality at High Average Power

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R H; Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M; Beach, R J

    2005-05-06

    Resonance-transition alkali-vapor lasers have only recently been demonstrated [1] but are already attracting considerable attention. Alkali-atom-vapor gain media are among the simplest possible systems known, so there is much laboratory data upon which to base performance predictions. Therefore, accurate modeling is possible, as shown by the zero- free-parameter fits [2] to experimental data on alkali-vapor lasers pumped with Ti:sapphire lasers. The practical advantages of two of the alkali systems--Rb and Cs--are enormous, since they are amenable to diode-pumping [3,4]. Even without circulating the gas mixture, these lasers can have adequate cooling built-in owing to the presence of He in their vapor cells. The high predicted (up to 70%) optical-to-optical efficiency of the alkali laser, the superb (potentially 70% or better) wall-plug efficiency of the diode pumps, and the ability to exhaust heat at high temperature (100 C) combine to give a power-scalable architecture that is lightweight. A recent design exercise [5] at LLNL estimated that the system ''weight-to-power ratio'' figure of merit could be on the order of 7 kg/kW, an unprecedented value for a laser of the 100 kW class. Beam quality is expected to be excellent, owing to the small dn/dT value of the gain medium. There is obviously a long way to go, to get from a small laser pumped with a Ti:sapphire or injection-seeded diode system (of near-perfect beam quality, and narrow linewidth) [1, 4] to a large system pumped with broadband, multimode diode- laser arrays. We have a vision for this technology-development program, and have already built diode-array-pumped Rb lasers at the 1 Watt level. A setup for demonstrating Diode-array-Pumped Alkali vapor Lasers (DPALs) is shown in Figure 1. In general, use of a highly-multimode, broadband pump source renders diode-array-based experiments much more difficult than the previous ones done with Ti:sapphire pumping. High-NA optics, short focal distances, and short

  9. High capacity nickel battery material doped with alkali metal cations

    DOEpatents

    Jackovitz, John F.; Pantier, Earl A.

    1982-05-18

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  10. Stabilized Alkali-Metal Ultraviolet-Band-Pass Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick; Fraschetti, George A.; Mccann, Timothy; Mayall, Sherwood D.; Dunn, Donald E.; Trauger, John T.

    1995-01-01

    Layers of bismuth 5 to 10 angstrom thick incorporated into alkali-metal ultraviolet-band-pass optical filters by use of advanced fabrication techniques. In new filters layer of bismuth helps to reduce surface migration of sodium. Sodium layer made more stable and decreased tendency to form pinholes by migration.

  11. Outer-core emission spectra of heavy alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, R. L.; First, P. N.; Flynn, C. P.

    1988-09-01

    We report np5(n+1)s2-->np6(n+1)s emission spectra of K (n=3), Rb (n=4), and Cs (n=5), and compare emission-band characteristics through the series Na-Cs using earlier data for Na. The normalized band profiles of the different alkali metals are remarkably similar when scaled by the Fermi energy EF. However, the spin-orbit partner intensity ratios are far from the ideal value 2, reaching approximately 60 for Rb and above 65 for Cs, mainly owing to Coster-Kronig decays from higher levels. We confirm that the Mahan-Nozières-De Dominicis ``anomaly'' at EF is generally weaker in emission than in absorption. It decreases through the series to become undetectable for emission from Cs. A systematic increase of the core-hole-lifetime width occurs through the column of alkali metals from a reported estimate of 10 meV for Na to a value of 50 meV for Cs. A study of the Fermi-edge shape between 20 and 300 K reveals temperature-dependent phonon broadening in generally good agreement with theoretical predictions. Incomplete relaxation plays only a minor role in the edge processes of the heavy alkali metals. Additional Fermi-edge broadening and the shifted emission edges of surface atoms are observed for alkali-metal films 10-100 Å thick.

  12. Stabilized Alkali-Metal Ultraviolet-Band-Pass Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick; Fraschetti, George A.; Mccann, Timothy; Mayall, Sherwood D.; Dunn, Donald E.; Trauger, John T.

    1995-01-01

    Layers of bismuth 5 to 10 angstrom thick incorporated into alkali-metal ultraviolet-band-pass optical filters by use of advanced fabrication techniques. In new filters layer of bismuth helps to reduce surface migration of sodium. Sodium layer made more stable and decreased tendency to form pinholes by migration.

  13. Method of assembling and sealing an alkali metal battery

    DOEpatents

    Elkins, P.E.; Bell, J.E.; Harlow, R.A.; Chase, G.G.

    1983-03-01

    A method of initially assembling and then subsequently hermetically sealing a container portion of an alkali metal battery to a ceramic portion of such a battery is disclosed. Sealing surfaces are formed respectively on a container portion and a ceramic portion of an alkali metal battery. These sealing surfaces are brought into juxtaposition and a material is interposed there between. This interposed material is one which will diffuse into sealing relationship with both the container portion and the ceramic portion of the alkali metal battery at operational temperatures of such a battery. A pressure is applied between these sealing surfaces to cause the interposed material to be brought into intimate physical contact with such juxtaposed surfaces. A temporary sealing material which will provide a seal against a flow of alkali metal battery reactants there through at room temperatures and is applied over the juxtaposed sealing surfaces and material interposed there between. The entire assembly is heated to an operational temperature so that the interposed material diffuses into the container portion and the ceramic portion to form a hermetic seal there between. The pressure applied to the juxtaposed sealing surfaces is maintained in order to ensure the continuation of the hermetic seal. 4 figs.

  14. Method of assembling and sealing an alkali metal battery

    DOEpatents

    Elkins, Perry E.; Bell, Jerry E.; Harlow, Richard A.; Chase, Gordon G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of initially assembling and then subsequently hermetically sealing a container portion of an alkali metal battery to a ceramic portion of such a battery is disclosed. Sealing surfaces are formed respectively on a container portion and a ceramic portion of an alkali metal battery. These sealing surfaces are brought into juxtaposition and a material is interposed therebetween. This interposed material is one which will diffuse into sealing relationship with both the container portion and the ceramic portion of the alkali metal battery at operational temperatures of such a battery. A pressure is applied between these sealing surfaces to cause the interposed material to be brought into intimate physical contact with such juxtaposed surfaces. A temporary sealing material which will provide a seal against a flow of alkali metal battery reactants therethrough at room temperatures and is applied over the juxtaposed sealing surfaces and material interposed therebetween. The entire assembly is heated to an operational temperature so that the interposed material diffuses into the container portion and the ceramic portion to form a hermetic seal therebetween. The pressure applied to the juxtaposed sealing surfaces is maintained in order to ensure the continuation of the hermetic seal.

  15. Aqueous alkali metal hydroxide insoluble cellulose ether membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1969-01-01

    A membrane that is insoluble in an aqueous alkali metal hydroxide medium is described. The membrane is a resin which is a water-soluble C2-C4 hydroxyalkyl cellulose ether polymer and an insolubilizing agent for controlled water sorption, a dialytic and electrodialytic membrane. It is particularly useful as a separator between electrodes or plates in an alkaline storage battery.

  16. Multimode-diode-pumped gas (alkali-vapor) laser

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R H; Beach, R J; Kanz, V K

    2005-08-22

    We report the first demonstration of a multimode-diode-pumped gas laser--Rb vapor operating on the 795 nm resonance transition. Peak output of {approx}1 Watt was obtained using a volume-Bragg-grating stabilized pump diode array. The laser's output radiance exceeded the pump radiance by a factor greater than 2000. Power scaling (by pumping with larger diode arrays) is therefore possible.

  17. Multimode-diode-pumped gas (alkali-vapor) laser.

    PubMed

    Page, Ralph H; Beach, Raymond J; Kanz, V Keith; Krupke, William F

    2006-02-01

    We report what we believe to be the first demonstration of a multimode-diode-pumped gas laser: Rb vapor operating on the 795 nm D1 resonance transition. Peak output of approximately 1 W was obtained using a volume-Bragg-grating stabilized pump diode array. The laser's output radiance exceeded the pump radiance by a factor greater than 2000. Power scaling (by pumping with larger diode arrays) is therefore possible.

  18. Alkali Metal Suboxometalates-Structural Chemistry between Salts and Metals.

    PubMed

    Wörsching, Matthias; Hoch, Constantin

    2015-07-20

    The crystal structures of the new cesium-poor alkali metal suboxometalates Cs10MO5 (M = Al, Ga, Fe) show both metallic and ionic bonding following the formal description (Cs(+))10(MO4(5-))(O(2-))·3e(-). Comparable to the cesium-rich suboxometalates Cs9MO4 (M = Al, Ga, In, Fe, Sc) with ionic subdivision (Cs(+))9(MO4(5-))·4e(-), they contain an oxometalate anion [M(III)O4](5-) embedded in a metallic matrix of cesium atoms. Columnlike building units form with prevalent ionic bonding inside and metallic bonding on the outer surface. In the cesium-rich suboxometalates Cs9MO4, additional cesium atoms with no contact to any anion are inserted between columns of the formal composition [Cs8MO4]. In the cesium-poor suboxometalates Cs10MO5, the same columns are extended by face-sharing [Cs6O] units, and no additional cesium atoms are present. The terms "cesium-rich" and "cesium-poor" here refer to the Cs:O ratio. The new suboxometalates Cs10MO5 crystallize in two modifications with new structure types. The orthorhombic modification adopts a structure with four formula units per unit cell in space group Pnnm with a = 11.158(3) Å, b = 23.693(15) Å, and c = 12.229(3) Å for Cs10AlO5. The monoclinic modification crystallizes with eight formula units per unit cell in space group C2/c with a = 21.195(3) Å, b = 12.480(1) Å, c = 24.120(4) Å, and β = 98.06(1)° for Cs10AlO5. Limits to phase formation are given by the restriction that the M atoms must be trivalent and by geometric size restrictions for the insertion of [Cs6O] blocks in Cs10MO5. All of the suboxometalate structures show similar structural details and form mixed crystal series with statistical occupation for the M elements following the patterns Cs9(M(1)xM(2)1-x)O4 and Cs10(M(1)xM(2)1-x)O5. The suboxometalates are a new example of ordered intergrowth of ionic and metallic structure elements, allowing for the combination of properties related to both ionic and metallic materials.

  19. Testing of candidate materials for their resistance to alkali-vapor adsorption in PFBC and gasification environments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Natesan, K.; Swift, W.M.

    1995-08-01

    Laboratory-scale studies were performed to identify metallic material(s) having no, or limited, affinity for alkali vapors in an environment of either the off-gas from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) or the fuel gas from coal gasification. Such materials would be potential candidates for use as components in advanced coal-utilization systems. The following materials were tested for adsorption of NaCl vapor at 870--875 C and atmospheric pressure in a simulated PFBC off-gas (oxidizing) doped with 80 ppmW NaCl vapor: iron-based Type 304 stainless steel (304 SS), nickel-based Hastelloy C-276 and Hastelloy X alloys, cobalt-based Haynes No. 188 alloy, noble-metal-coated 304 SS, aluminized 304 SS, and ZrO{sub 2}-coated 304 SS. The Haynes No. 188 alloy and the aluminized 304 SS were also tested for their NaCl-vapor adsorption in a simulated gasification fuel gas (reducing) under the same test conditions as in the PFBC off-gas test. After 100 h of testing, the specimens were analyzed with a SEM equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer, and by an AES. The aluminized 304 SS had the least tendency to adsorb NaCl vapor, as well as an excellent resistance to corrosion as a result of the formation of a protective layer of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on its surface. In the reducing environment, however, the aluminized 304 SS was badly corroded by H{sub 2}S attack. The Haynes No. 188 showed virtually no NaCl-vapor adsorption and only limited H{sub 2}S attack. The authors recommend further long-term parametric studies to quantitate alkali-vapor adsorption as a function of operating variables for (1) the aluminized 304 SS in the PFBC off-gas environment and (2) the Haynes No. 188 in the gasification fuel gas environment.

  20. Silicon halide-alkali metal flames as a source of solar grade silicon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.B.; Miller, W.J.; Gould, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    The object of this program was to determine the feasibility of using continuous high-temperature reactions of alkali metals and silicon halides to produce silicon in large quantities and of suitable purity for use in the production of photovoltaic solar cells. Equilibrium calculations showed that a range of conditions were available where silicon was produced as a condensed phase but the byproduct alkali metal salt was a vapor. A process was proposed using the vapor phase reaction of Na with SiCl/sub 4/. Low pressure experiments were performed demonstrating that free silicon was produced and providing experience with the construction of reactant vapor generators. Further experiments at higher reagent flow rates were performed in a low temperature flow tube configuration with co-axial injection of reagents. Relatively pure silicon was produced in these experiments. A high temperature graphite flow tube was built and continuous separation of Si from NaCl was demonstrated. A larger-scaled well-stirred reactor was built. Experiments were performed to investigate the compatibility of graphite-based reactor materials of construction with sodium. At 1100 to 1200 K none of these materials were found to be suitable. At 1700 K the graphites performed well with little damage except to coatings of pyrolytic graphite and silicon carbide which were damaged.

  1. Energy transfer from PO excited states to alkali metal atoms in the phosphorus chemiluminescence flame

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ahsan U.

    1980-01-01

    Phosphorus chemiluminescence under ambient conditions of a phosphorus oxidation flame is found to offer an efficient electronic energy transferring system to alkali metal atoms. The lowest resonance lines, 2P3 / 2,½→2S½, of potassium and sodium are excited by energy transfer when an argon stream at 80°C carrying potassium or sodium atoms intersects a phosphorus vapor stream, either at the flame or in the postflame region. The lowest electronically excited metastable 4IIi state of PO or the (PO[unk]PO)* excimer is considered to be the probable energy donor. The (PO[unk]PO)* excimer results from the interaction of the 4IIi state of one PO molecule with the ground 2IIr state of another. Metastability of the donor state is strongly indicated by the observation of intense sensitized alkali atom fluorescence in the postflame region. PMID:16592925

  2. Studies of the regeneration of activated bauxite used as granular sorbent for the control of alkali vapors from hot flue gas of coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S H.D.; Smith, S D; Swift, W M; Johnson, I

    1981-05-01

    Regeneration of activated bauxite was studied by water-leaching and thermal swing (high-temperature desorption) methods. Granular activated bauxite has been identified to be very effective when used as a filter medium (i.e., sorbent) in granular-bed filters to remove gaseous alkali metal compounds from simulated hot flue gas of PFBC. Activated bauxite that had captured alkali chloride vapors was demonstrated to be easily and effectively regenerated for reuse by a simple water-leaching method. Data were obtained on (1) the leaching rate of the adsorbed NaCl, (2) effects on the leaching rate of adsorbed NaCl loading, leaching temperature, and the amount of water, and (3) water retention in activated bauxite after leaching. Observed physical changes and particle attrition of activated bauxite as a result of regeneration are discussed. The sorption mechanisms of activated bauxite toward alkali chloride vapors are interpreted on the basis of (1) the chemical compositions of the leachates from alkali chloride-sorbed activated bauxite and (2) the desorption of adsorbed NaCl vapor from activated bauxite at high temperature.

  3. Removal of alkali vapors by a fixed granular-bed sorber using activated bauxite as a sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Henry, R.F.; Myles, K.M.

    1985-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to develop a fixed granular-bed sorber for the removal of alkali vapors in a pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) combined-cycle system. A laboratory-scale pressurized alkali vapor sorption test unit was used to characterize activated bauxite, the most effective sorbent identified earlier, for its alkali vapor sorption capability in a gas stream with temperature (less than or equal to 900/sup 0/C), pressure (10 atm absolute), and composition closely simulating the actual PFBC flue gas. A scale-up of laboratory tests is being conducted in a 15.2-cm-dia (6-in.-dia) PFBC system to demonstrate the granular-bed sorber concept. The NaCl-vapor sorption chemistry of activated bauxite is described. The extent of alkali-vapor evolution from the activated bauxite bed itself is discussed, along with an evaluation of the significance of its alkali vapor contribution to a downstream gas turbine. Details of the design of a high-temperature/high-pressure alkali sorber system for the demonstration of the sorber are presented. 15 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Measurement of alkali vapor in PFBC flue gas and its control by a fixed granular bed of activated bauxite

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Myles, K.M.

    1985-01-01

    A fixed granular-bed sorber, with regenerable activated bauxite as the sorbent, for the control of the alkali vapor in the flue gas produced during pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) of coal is being developed. In a gas stream closely simulating the actual PFBC flue gas, activated bauxite is shown to capture NaCl vapor by (1) chemical fixation of the vapor with the intrinsic clay minerals, probably to form thermally stable, water-insoluble sodium aluminosilicates and (2) chemical conversion of NaCl vapor into a condensed-phase sodium sulfate, which has a much lower vapor pressure than does NaCl. The latter predominates the capture process, and the captured sodium sulfate can be easily removed by simple water-leaching to restore the porosity of activated bauxite for reuse. A high-temperature (less than or equal to 900/sup 0/C) and high-pressure (less than or equal to 10 atm) laboratory-scale, fixed, granular-bed alkali sorber has been operated with the Argonne National Laboratory PFBC combustor to (1) measure the alkali vapor concentration in the PFBC flue gas on a real-time, on-line basis, and (2) demonstrate the alkali sorber for the control of alkali vapor from an actual PFBC flue gas. The alkali (Na + K) vapor concentration in particulate filtered hot flue gas was measured to be <10 ppbW with the Ames analyzer. The same measurement with the APST was higher between 90 to 170 ppbW. Therefore, the possibility of sink for sodium vapor in the PFBC/alkali sorber system must be considered. 32 refs.

  5. Interactions of alkali metal chlorides with phosphatidylcholine vesicles.

    PubMed

    Klasczyk, Benjamin; Knecht, Volker; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Dimova, Rumiana

    2010-12-21

    We study the interaction of alkali metal chlorides with lipid vesicles made of palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC). An elaborate set of techniques is used to investigate the binding process at physiological conditions. The alkali cation binding to POPC is characterized thermodynamically using isothermal titration calorimetry. The isotherms show that for all ions in the alkali group the binding process is endothermic, counterintuitively to what is expected for Coulomb interactions between the slightly negatively charged POPC liposomes and the cations. The process is entropy driven and presumably related to the liberation of water molecules from the hydration shells of the ions and the lipid headgroups. The measured molar enthalpies of the binding of the ions follows the Hofmeister series. The binding constants were also estimated, whereby lithium shows the strongest affinity to POPC membranes, followed by the rest of the ions according to the Hofmeister series. Cation adsorption increases the net surface potential of the vesicles as observed from electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential measurements. While lithium adsorption leads to slightly positive zeta potentials above a concentration of 100 mM, the adsorption of the rest of the ions mainly causes neutralization of the membrane. This is the first study characterizing the binding equilibrium of alkali metal chlorides to phosphatidylcholine membranes at physiological salt concentrations.

  6. Direct observation of the release of alkali vapor species in biofuel combustion and gasification

    SciTech Connect

    French, R.J.; Milne, T.A.

    1993-12-31

    The largest present use of biomass for energy is in combustion for steam and electrical power. Biofuels have an acknowledged advantage over coal as a solid fuel because of their low sulfur and ash content. However, some forms of biomass have substantial quantities of alkali metals and chlorine. In addition, evidence indicates that the alkali in biomass is largely atomically dispersed, resulting in its facile mobilization into the gas-phase. Gaseous alkali compounds aggravate problems of slagging, fouling, and corrosion on heat transfer surfaces in present-day boilers. These problems can be particularly severe when mixed and variable agricultural residues are burned. Furthermore, the next generation of biomass-to-power systems will likely involve combined cycle gas turbines, where alkali tolerances are especially restrictive. In this paper, we report on laboratory studies in which biofuels are combusted under simulated turbine or boiler-firing conditions. Gaseous alkali, sulfur, nitrogen, and halogen-containing species are measured by direct extraction from the hot gases through molecular-beam mass spectrometry (MBMS). The experimental apparatus will be described and its capability illustrated with results of time-resolved evolution of species like K, KCl, KOH, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from small samples of biomass in combustion environments. The nature and release of such species will be explicated by referring to thermodynamic equilibrium predictions and the form of alkali in solid, gaseous, and liquid biofuels.

  7. 40 CFR 721.10097 - Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali metal salt (generic). 721.10097 Section 721.10097 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10097 Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10097 - Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali metal salt (generic). 721.10097 Section 721.10097 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10097 Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4663 - Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4663 Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts. (a) Chemical... fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts (PMNs P-95-979/980/981) are subject to reporting under this... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10097 - Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkali metal salt (generic). 721.10097 Section 721.10097 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10097 Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt... identified generically as disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P-03-643) is subject to... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali...

  12. 40 CFR 721.4663 - Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4663 Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts. (a) Chemical... fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts (PMNs P-95-979/980/981) are subject to reporting under this... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10097 - Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali metal salt (generic). 721.10097 Section 721.10097 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10097 Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali...

  14. 40 CFR 721.4663 - Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4663 Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts. (a) Chemical... fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts (PMNs P-95-979/980/981) are subject to reporting under this... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt... identified generically as disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P-03-643) is subject to... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4663 - Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4663 Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts. (a) Chemical... fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts (PMNs P-95-979/980/981) are subject to reporting under this... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4663 - Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4663 Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts. (a) Chemical... fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts (PMNs P-95-979/980/981) are subject to reporting under this... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10097 - Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali metal salt (generic). 721.10097 Section 721.10097 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10097 Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt... identified generically as disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P-03-643) is subject to... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt... identified generically as disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P-03-643) is subject to... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt... identified generically as disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P-03-643) is subject to... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali...

  2. Superconductivity at 5 K in alkali-metal-doped phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    Wang, X F; Liu, R H; Gui, Z; Xie, Y L; Yan, Y J; Ying, J J; Luo, X G; Chen, X H

    2011-10-18

    Organic superconductors have π-molecular orbitals, from which electrons can become delocalized, giving rise to metallic conductivity due to orbital overlap between adjacent molecules. Here we report the discovery of superconductivity at a transition temperature (T(c)) of ~5 K in alkali-metal-doped phenanthrene. A 1-GPa pressure leads to a 20% increase of T(c), suggesting that alkali-metal-doped phenanthrene shows unconventional superconductivity. Raman spectra indicate that alkali-metal doping injects charge into the system to realize the superconductivity. The discovery of superconductivity in A(3)phenanthrene (where A can be either K or Rb) produces a novel broad class of superconductors consisting of fused hydrocarbon benzene rings with π-electron networks. An increase of T(c) with increasing number of benzene rings from three to five suggests that organic hydrocarbons with long chains of benzene rings are potential superconductors with high T(c). © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  3. Chemical compatibility of structural materials in alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Rink, D.L.; Haglund, R.

    1995-04-01

    The objectives of this task are to (a) evaluate the chemical compatibility of structural alloys such as V-5 wt.%Cr-5 wt.%Ti alloy and Type 316 stainless steel for application in liquid alkali metals such as lithium and sodium-78 wt.% potassium (NaK) at temperatures in the range that are of interest for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER); (b) evaluate the transfer of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen between structural materials and liquid metals; and (c) evaluate the effects of such transfers on the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the materials for long-term service in liquid-metal-environments.

  4. Metal Vapor Arcing Risk Assessment Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Monika C.; Leidecker, Henning W.

    2010-01-01

    The Tin Whisker Metal Vapor Arcing Risk Assessment Tool has been designed to evaluate the risk of metal vapor arcing and to help facilitate a decision toward a researched risk disposition. Users can evaluate a system without having to open up the hardware. This process allows for investigating components at risk rather than spending time and money analyzing every component. The tool points to a risk level and provides direction for appropriate action and documentation.

  5. On the homology of lattice vibrations of alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthy, V.; Satishkumar, M.

    1980-02-01

    Investigations of the dependence of lattice vibrations of alkali metals on their interatomic distance, r reveal that they satisfy an empirical relation, Mv 2 r α=δ(q), a constant which depends on α, with q=2·48 ± 0·19 at all wave vectors and hence are homologous. It is shown that the observed crossover of [ζ00] branches of lithium is not an anomalous property, but only manifests itself in alkali metals with smaller interatomic distance due to small variations of α. The role played by interatomic distance which is closely related to that of the electron gas constant C' in producing a crossover and a possible reason for the observed homology are discussed.

  6. Electrospray droplet exposure to organic vapors: metal ion removal from proteins and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    DeMuth, J Corinne; McLuckey, Scott A

    2015-01-20

    The exposure of aqueous nanoelectrospray droplets to various organic vapors can dramatically reduce sodium adduction on protein ions in positive ion mass spectra. Volatile alcohols, such as methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol lead to a significant reduction in sodium ion adduction but are not as effective as acetonitrile, acetone, and ethyl acetate. Organic vapor exposure in the negative ion mode, on the other hand, has essentially no effect on alkali ion adduction. Evidence is presented to suggest that the mechanism by which organic vapor exposure reduces alkali ion adduction in the positive mode involves the depletion of alkali metal ions via ion evaporation of metal ions solvated with organic molecules. The early generation of metal/organic cluster ions during the droplet desolvation process results in fewer metal ions available to condense on the protein ions formed via the charged residue mechanism. These effects are demonstrated with holomyoglobin ions to illustrate that the metal ion reduction takes place without detectable protein denaturation, which might be revealed by heme loss or an increase in charge state distribution. No evidence is observed for denaturation with exposure to any of the organic vapors evaluated in this work.

  7. Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, David W.

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  8. Radioisotope powered alkali metal thermoelectric converter design for space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, R. K.; Bankston, C. P.

    1988-01-01

    The design concept of an alkali-metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) for 15-30-percent-efficient conversion of heat from the General Purpose (radioisotope) Heat Source (GPHS) on spacecraft is presented. The basic physical principles of the conversion cycle are outlined; a theoretical model is derived; a modular design is described and illustrated with drawings; and the overall AMTEC/GPHS system design is characterized. Predicted performance data are presented in extensive tables and graphs and discussed in detail.

  9. Transversely diode-pumped alkali metal vapour laser

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomenko, A I; Shalagin, A M

    2015-09-30

    We have studied theoretically the operation of a transversely diode-pumped alkali metal vapour laser. For the case of high-intensity laser radiation, we have obtained an analytical solution to a complex system of differential equations describing the laser. This solution allows one to exhaustively determine all the energy characteristics of the laser and to find optimal parameters of the working medium and pump radiation (temperature, buffer gas pressure, and intensity and width of the pump spectrum). (lasers)

  10. Pair potential trend of alkali metals under external pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, S. M. Mujibur

    1987-09-01

    Structural phase stability of certain alkali metals under external pressure is investigated by looking at their pair potential trend. The effective pair potentials occurring in the real space representation of the band structure contribution relevant to a second-order theory are calculated by using an appropriate dielectric function and a simple empty-core pseudopotential. The relative positions of the neighboring atoms with respect to the minima in the pair potentials uphold a qualitative picture of the phase stability in these systems.

  11. Alkali Metal Cation Transport and Homeostasis in Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Ariño, Joaquín; Ramos, José; Sychrová, Hana

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The maintenance of appropriate intracellular concentrations of alkali metal cations, principally K+ and Na+, is of utmost importance for living cells, since they determine cell volume, intracellular pH, and potential across the plasma membrane, among other important cellular parameters. Yeasts have developed a number of strategies to adapt to large variations in the concentrations of these cations in the environment, basically by controlling transport processes. Plasma membrane high-affinity K+ transporters allow intracellular accumulation of this cation even when it is scarce in the environment. Exposure to high concentrations of Na+ can be tolerated due to the existence of an Na+, K+-ATPase and an Na+, K+/H+-antiporter, which contribute to the potassium balance as well. Cations can also be sequestered through various antiporters into intracellular organelles, such as the vacuole. Although some uncertainties still persist, the nature of the major structural components responsible for alkali metal cation fluxes across yeast membranes has been defined within the last 20 years. In contrast, the regulatory components and their interactions are, in many cases, still unclear. Conserved signaling pathways (e.g., calcineurin and HOG) are known to participate in the regulation of influx and efflux processes at the plasma membrane level, even though the molecular details are obscure. Similarly, very little is known about the regulation of organellar transport and homeostasis of alkali metal cations. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date vision of the mechanisms responsible for alkali metal cation transport and their regulation in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to establish, when possible, comparisons with other yeasts and higher plants. PMID:20197501

  12. The unexpected properties of alkali metal iron selenide superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dagotto, Elbio R

    2013-01-01

    The iron-based superconductors that contain FeAs layers as the fundamental building block in the crystal structures have been rationalized in the past using ideas based on the Fermi surface nesting of hole and electron pockets when in the presence of weak Hubbard U interactions. This approach seemed appropriate considering the small values of the magnetic moments in the parent compounds and the clear evidence based on photoemission experiments of the required electron and hole pockets. However, recent results in the context of alkali metal iron selenides, with generic chemical composition AxFe2ySe2 (A alkali metal element), have challenged those previous ideas since at particular compositions y the low-temperature ground states are insulating and display antiferromagnetic order with large iron magnetic moments. Moreover, angle-resolved photoemission studies have revealed the absence of hole pockets at the Fermi level in these materials. The present status of this exciting area of research, with the potential to alter conceptually our understanding of the ironbased superconductors, is here reviewed, covering both experimental and theoretical investigations. Other recent related developments are also briefly reviewed, such as the study of selenide two-leg ladders and the discovery of superconductivity in a single layer of FeSe. The conceptual issues considered established for the alkali metal iron selenides, as well as several issues that still require further work, are discussed.

  13. Generation and characterization of alkali metal clusters in Y-FAU zeolites. An ESR and MAS NMR spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannus, István; Béres, Attila; Nagy, János B.; Halász, János; Kiricsi, Imre

    1997-06-01

    Charged and neutral metal clusters of various compositions and sizes can be prepared by controlling the alkali metal content by the decomposition of alkali azides and the composition of the host zeolite by ion-exchange. ESR signals show that electron transfer from alkali metal atoms to alkali metal cations does occur, but in a direction opposite to that predicted by the gas-phase thermochemistry. Alkali metal clusters proved to be very active basic catalytic centers.

  14. Neutron Imaging of Alkali Metal Heat Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihm, K.; Kirchoff, E.; Golden, M.; Rosenfeld, J.; Rawal, S.; Pratt, D.; Swanson, A.; Bilheux, H.; Walker, L.; Voisin, S.; Hussey, D. S.; Jacobson, D. L.

    High-temperature heat pipes are two-phase, capillary driven heat transfer devices capable of passively providing high thermal fluxes. Such a device using a liquid-metal coolant can be used as a solution for successful thermal management on hypersonic flight vehicles. Imaging of the liquid-metal coolant inside will provide valuable information in characterizing the detailed heat and mass transport. Neutron imaging possesses an inherent advantage from the fact that neutrons penetrate the heat pipe metal walls with very little attenuation, but are significantly attenuated by the liquid metal contained inside. Using the BT-2 beam line at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, preliminary efforts have been conducted on a nickel-sodium heat pipe. The contrast between the attenuated beam and the background is calculated to be approximately 3%. This low contrast requires sacrifice in spatial or temporal resolution so efforts have since been concentrated on lithium (Li) which has a substantially larger neutron attenuation cross section. Using the CG-1D beam line at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the first neutron images of high-temperature molybdenum (Mo)-Li heat pipes have been achieved. The relatively high neutron cross section of Li allows for the visualization of the Li working fluid inside the heat pipes. The evaporator region of a gravity assisted cylindrical heat pipe prototype 25 cm long was imaged from start-up to steady state operation up to approximately 900 °C. In each corner of the square bore inside, the capillary action raises the Li meniscus above the bulk Li pool in the evaporator region. As the operational temperature changes, the meniscus shapes and the bulk meniscus height also changes. Furthermore, a three-dimensional tomographic image is also reconstructed from the total of 128 projection images taken 1.4o apart in which the Li had

  15. Neutron imaging of alkali metal heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Kihm, Ken; Kirchoff, Eric; Golden, Matt; Rosenfeld, J.; Rawal, S.; Pratt, D.; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Walker, Lakeisha MH; Voisin, Sophie; Hussey, Dan

    2013-01-01

    High-temperature heat pipes are two-phase, capillary driven heat transfer devices capable of passively providing high thermal fluxes. Such a device using a liquid-metal coolant can be used as a solution for successful thermal management on hypersonic flight vehicles. Imaging of the liquid-metal coolant inside will provide valuable information in characterizing the detailed heat and mass transport. Neutron imaging possesses an inherent advantage from the fact that neutrons penetrate the heat pipe metal walls with very little attenuation, but are significantly attenuated by the liquid metal contained inside. Using the BT-2 beam line at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, preliminary efforts have been conducted on a nickel-sodium heat pipe. The contrast between the attenuated beam and the background is calculated to be approximately 3%. This low contrast requires sacrifice in spatial or temporal resolution so efforts have since been concentrated on lithium (Li) which has a substantially larger neutron attenuation cross section. Using the CG-1D beam line at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the first neutron images of high-temperature molybdenum (Mo)-Li heat pipes have been achieved. The relatively high neutron cross section of Li allows for the visualization of the Li working fluid inside the heat pipes. The evaporator region of a gravity assisted cylindrical heat pipe prototype 25 cm long was imaged from start-up to steady state operation up to approximately 900 C. In each corner of the square bore inside, the capillary action raises the Li meniscus above the bulk Li pool in the evaporator region. As the operational temperature changes, the meniscus shapes and the bulk meniscus height also changes. Furthermore, a three-dimensional tomographic image is also reconstructed from the total of 128 projection images taken 1.4o apart in which the Li had

  16. Alkali metal cation-hexacyclen complexes: effects of alkali metal cation size on the structure and binding energy.

    PubMed

    Austin, C A; Rodgers, M T

    2014-07-24

    Threshold collision-induced dissociation (CID) of alkali metal cation-hexacyclen (ha18C6) complexes, M(+)(ha18C6), with xenon is studied using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry techniques. The alkali metal cations examined here include: Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). In all cases, M(+) is the only product observed, corresponding to endothermic loss of the intact ha18C6 ligand. The cross-section thresholds are analyzed to extract zero and 298 K M(+)-ha18C6 bond dissociation energies (BDEs) after properly accounting for the effects of multiple M(+)(ha18C6)-Xe collisions, the kinetic and internal energy distributions of the M(+)(ha18C6) and Xe reactants, and the lifetimes for dissociation of the activated M(+)(ha18C6) complexes. Ab initio and density functional theory calculations are used to determine the structures of ha18C6 and the M(+)(ha18C6) complexes, provide molecular constants necessary for the thermodynamic analysis of the energy-resolved CID data, and theoretical estimates for the M(+)-ha18C6 BDEs. Calculations using a polarizable continuum model are also performed to examine solvent effects on the binding. In the absence of solvent, the M(+)-ha18C6 BDEs decrease as the size of the alkali metal cation increases, consistent with the noncovalent nature of the binding in these complexes. However, in the presence of solvent, the ha18C6 ligand exhibits selectivity for K(+) over the other alkali metal cations. The M(+)(ha18C6) structures and BDEs are compared to those previously reported for the analogous M(+)(18-crown-6) and M(+)(cyclen) complexes to examine the effects of the nature of the donor atom (N versus O) and the number donor atoms (six vs four) on the nature and strength of binding.

  17. Alkali Metal Backup Cooling for Stirling Systems - Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwendeman, Carl; Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Cornell, Peggy A.

    2013-01-01

    In a Stirling Radioisotope Power System (RPS), heat must be continuously removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. The Stirling convertor normally provides this cooling. If the Stirling convertor stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS at the cost of an early termination of the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) can be used to passively allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor. In a previous NASA SBIR Program, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) developed a series of sodium VCHPs as backup cooling systems for Stirling RPS. The operation of these VCHPs was demonstrated using Stirling heater head simulators and GPHS simulators. In the most recent effort, a sodium VCHP with a stainless steel envelope was designed, fabricated and tested at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) with a Stirling convertor for two concepts; one for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) back up cooling system and one for the Long-lived Venus Lander thermal management system. The VCHP is designed to activate and remove heat from the stopped convertor at a 19 degC temperature increase from the nominal vapor temperature. The 19 degC temperature increase from nominal is low enough to avoid risking standard ASRG operation and spoiling of the Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI). In addition, the same backup cooling system can be applied to the Stirling convertor used for the refrigeration system of the Long-lived Venus Lander. The VCHP will allow the refrigeration system to: 1) rest during transit at a lower temperature than nominal; 2) pre-cool the modules to an even lower temperature before the entry in Venus atmosphere; 3) work at nominal temperature on Venus surface; 4) briefly stop multiple times on the Venus surface to allow scientific measurements. This paper presents the experimental

  18. Alkali Metal Backup Cooling for Stirling Systems - Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwendeman, Carl; Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Cornell, Peggy A.

    2013-01-01

    In a Stirling Radioisotope Power System (RPS), heat must be continuously removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. The Stirling convertor normally provides this cooling. If the Stirling convertor stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS at the cost of an early termination of the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) can be used to passively allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor. In a previous NASA SBIR Program, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) developed a series of sodium VCHPs as backup cooling systems for Stirling RPS. The operation of these VCHPs was demonstrated using Stirling heater head simulators and GPHS simulators. In the most recent effort, a sodium VCHP with a stainless steel envelope was designed, fabricated and tested at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) with a Stirling convertor for two concepts; one for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) back up cooling system and one for the Long-lived Venus Lander thermal management system. The VCHP is designed to activate and remove heat from the stopped convertor at a 19 C temperature increase from the nominal vapor temperature. The 19 C temperature increase from nominal is low enough to avoid risking standard ASRG operation and spoiling of the Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI). In addition, the same backup cooling system can be applied to the Stirling convertor used for the refrigeration system of the Long-lived Venus Lander. The VCHP will allow the refrigeration system to: 1) rest during transit at a lower temperature than nominal; 2) pre-cool the modules to an even lower temperature before the entry in Venus atmosphere; 3) work at nominal temperature on Venus surface; 4) briefly stop multiple times on the Venus surface to allow scientific measurements. This paper presents the experimental

  19. Formation of alkali-metal nanoparticles in alkali-silicate glasses under electron irradiation and thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkareva, E. S.; Sidorov, A. I.; Ignat'ev, A. I.; Nikonorov, N. V.; Podsvirov, O. A.

    2017-02-01

    Experiments and numerical simulation show that the irradiation of alkali-containing glasses using electrons at an energy of 35 keV and the subsequent thermal processing at a temperature above the vitrification point lead to the formation of spherical metal (lithium, sodium, and potassium) nanoparticles with oxide sheaths that exhibit plasmon resonances in the visible spectral range. Glasses containing two alkali metals exhibit mutual effect of metals on the formation of nanoparticles with two compositions due to the difference of ion radii and mobilities of metal ions.

  20. Solvent effects and alkali metal ion catalysis in phosphodiester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Tagle, Paola; Vargas-Zúñiga, Idania; Taran, Olga; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K

    2006-12-22

    The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP) have been studied in aqueous DMSO, dioxane, and MeCN. In all solvent mixtures the reaction rate steadily decreases to half of its value in pure water in the range of 0-70 vol % of organic cosolvent and sharply increases in mixtures with lower water content. Correlations based on different scales of solvent empirical parameters failed to describe the solvent effect in this system, but it can be satisfactorily treated in terms of a simplified stepwise solvent-exchange model. Alkali metal ions catalyze the BNPP hydrolysis but do not affect the rate of hydrolysis of neutral phosphotriester p-nitrophenyl diphenyl phosphate in DMSO-rich mixtures. The catalytic activity decreases in the order Li+ > Na+ > K+ > Rb+ > Cs+. For all cations except Na+, the reaction rate is first-order in metal ion. With Na+, both first- and second-order kinetics in metal ions are observed. Binding constants of cations to the dianionic transition state of BNPP alkaline hydrolysis are of the same order of magnitude and show a similar trend as their binding constants to p-nitrophenyl phosphate dianion employed as a transition-state model. The appearance of alkali metal ion catalysis in a medium, which solvates metal ions stronger than water, is attributed to the increased affinity of cations to dianions, which undergo a strong destabilization in the presence of an aprotic dipolar cosolvent.

  1. Focusing of alkali earth metals in ligand step gradient.

    PubMed

    Sišperová, Eliška; Glovinová, Eliška; Budilová, Jana; Pospíchal, Jan

    2011-05-20

    A capillary electroseparation technique for focusing and selective pre-concentration of metal chelates with subsequent on-line isotachophoresis (ITP) analysis was developed and verified. The ions of alkali earth metals (Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba) were pre-concentrated from the mixture and analyzed. The focusing of the metals was carried out in a ligand step gradient, which was created by the addition of a convenient ligand agent to the regular stationary pH step gradient. The analytical procedure consisted of three steps. During the first step, the metal ions were electrokinetically continuously dosed into the column where they were selectively trapped on the stationary ligand step gradient in the form of unmoving zones of chelate complexes with effectively zero charge. After a detectable amount of analyte was accumulated, the dosing was stopped. The accumulated zones were mobilized to the analytical column, where they were analyzed by the ITP method with conductivity or photometric detection. The proper electrolyte systems for dosing, mobilizing, and analyzing in isoelectric focusing (IEF), moving boundary electrophoresis (MBE), and ITP modes were consequently developed and put into practice. The trapping selectivity can be regulated by the choice of pH and convenient complexing agents. A mixture of alkali earth metals were used as model analytes. Using a 3000 s dosing time, the proposed method improved the detection limit by 5-29 times in comparison to analysis by ITP with classical injection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Removal of toxic and alkali/alkaline earth metals during co-thermal treatment of two types of MSWI fly ashes in China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Qiao, Yu; Jin, Limei; Ma, Chuan; Paterson, Nigel; Sun, Lushi

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to vaporize heavy metals and alkali/alkaline earth metals from two different types of fly ashes by thermal treatment method. Fly ash from a fluidized bed incinerator (HK fly ash) was mixed with one from a grate incinerator (HS fly ash) in various proportions and thermally treated under different temperatures. The melting of HS fly ash was avoided when treated with HK fly ash. Alkali/alkaline earth metals in HS fly ash served as Cl-donors to promote the vaporization of heavy metals during thermal treatment. With temperature increasing from 800 to 900°C, significant amounts of Cl, Na and K were vaporized. Up to 1000°C in air, less than 3% of Cl and Na and less than 5% of K were retained in ash. Under all conditions, Cd can be vaporized effectively. The vaporization of Pb was mildly improved when treated with HS fly ash, while the effect became less pronounced above 900°C. Alkali/alkaline earth metals can promote Cu vaporization by forming copper chlorides. Comparatively, Zn vaporization was low and only slightly improved by HS fly ash. The low vaporization of Zn could be caused by the formation of Zn2SiO4, ZnFe2O4 and ZnAl2O4. Under all conditions, less than 20% of Cr was vaporized. In a reductive atmosphere, the vaporization of Cd and Pb were as high as that in oxidative atmosphere. However, the vaporization of Zn was accelerated and that of Cu was hindered because the formation of Zn2SiO4, ZnFe2O4 and ZnAl2O4 and copper chloride was depressed in reductive atmosphere.

  3. Diffusion with chemical reaction: An attempt to explain number density anomalies in experiments involving alkali vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    The mutual diffusion of two reacting gases is examined which takes place in a bath of inert gas atoms. Solutions are obtained between concentric spheres, each sphere acting as a source for one of the reactants. The calculational model is used to illustrate severe number density gradients observed in absorption experiments with alkali vapor. Severe gradients result when sq root k/D R is approximately 5 where k, D, and R are respectively the second order rate constant, the multicomponent diffusion constant, and the geometrical dimension of the experiment.

  4. Revisiting the Zintl-Klemm concept: alkali metal trielides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Miller, Gordon J

    2011-08-15

    To enhance understanding of the Zintl-Klemm concept, which is useful for characterizing chemical bonding in semimetallic and semiconducting valence compounds, and to more effectively rationalize the structures of Zintl phases, we present a partitioning scheme of the total energy calculated on numerous possible structures of the alkali metal trielides, LiAl, LiTl, NaTl, and KTl, using first-principles quantum mechanical calculations. This assessment of the total energy considers the relative effects of covalent, ionic, and metallic interactions, all of which are important to understand the complete structural behavior of Zintl phases. In particular, valence electron transfer and anisotropic covalent interactions, explicitly employed by the Zintl-Klemm concept, are often in competition with isotropic, volume-dependent metallic and ionic interaction terms. Furthermore, factors including relativistic effects, electronegativity differences, and atomic size ratios between the alkali metal and triel atoms can affect the competition by enhancing or weakening one of the three energetic contributors and thus cause structural variations. This partitioning of the total energy, coupled with analysis of the electronic density of states curves, correctly predicts and rationalizes the structures of LiAl, LiTl, NaTl, and KTl, as well as identifies a pressure-induced phase transition in KTl from its structure, based on [Tl(6)](6-) distorted octahedra, to the double diamond NaTl-type. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  5. Dirac Node Lines in Pure Alkali Earth Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ronghan; Ma, Hui; Cheng, Xiyue; Wang, Shoulong; Li, Dianzhong; Zhang, Zhengyu; Li, Yiyi; Chen, Xing-Qiu

    2016-08-01

    Beryllium is a simple alkali earth metal, but has been the target of intensive studies for decades because of its unusual electron behavior at surfaces. The puzzling aspects include (i) severe deviations from the description of the nearly free-electron picture, (ii) an anomalously large electron-phonon coupling effect, and (iii) giant Friedel oscillations. The underlying origins for such anomalous surface electron behavior have been under active debate, but with no consensus. Here, by means of first-principles calculations, we discover that this pure metal system, surprisingly, harbors the Dirac node line (DNL) that in turn helps to rationalize many of the existing puzzles. The DNL is featured by a closed line consisting of linear band crossings, and its induced topological surface band agrees well with previous photoemission spectroscopy observations on the Be (0001) surface. We further reveal that each of the elemental alkali earth metals of Mg, Ca, and Sr also harbors the DNL and speculate that the fascinating topological property of the DNL might naturally exist in other elemental metals as well.

  6. Dirac Node Lines in Pure Alkali Earth Metals.

    PubMed

    Li, Ronghan; Ma, Hui; Cheng, Xiyue; Wang, Shoulong; Li, Dianzhong; Zhang, Zhengyu; Li, Yiyi; Chen, Xing-Qiu

    2016-08-26

    Beryllium is a simple alkali earth metal, but has been the target of intensive studies for decades because of its unusual electron behavior at surfaces. The puzzling aspects include (i) severe deviations from the description of the nearly free-electron picture, (ii) an anomalously large electron-phonon coupling effect, and (iii) giant Friedel oscillations. The underlying origins for such anomalous surface electron behavior have been under active debate, but with no consensus. Here, by means of first-principles calculations, we discover that this pure metal system, surprisingly, harbors the Dirac node line (DNL) that in turn helps to rationalize many of the existing puzzles. The DNL is featured by a closed line consisting of linear band crossings, and its induced topological surface band agrees well with previous photoemission spectroscopy observations on the Be (0001) surface. We further reveal that each of the elemental alkali earth metals of Mg, Ca, and Sr also harbors the DNL and speculate that the fascinating topological property of the DNL might naturally exist in other elemental metals as well.

  7. Potential Energy Curves and Associated Line Shape of Alkali-Metal and Noble-Gas Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-20

    Potential Energy Curves and Associated Line Shape of Alkali - Metal and Noble-Gas Interactions DISSERTATION Larry Aaron Blank, Civ AFIT-ENP-DS-14-D-51...OF ALKALI - METAL AND NOBLE-GAS INTERACTIONS DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of...ENP-DS-14-D-51 POTENTIAL ENERGY CURVES AND ASSOCIATED LINE SHAPE OF ALKALI - METAL AND NOBLE-GAS INTERACTIONS Larry Aaron Blank, B.S., M.S. Civ Approved

  8. A Simple Model for Fine Structure Transitions in Alkali-Metal Noble-Gas Collisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    A SIMPLE MODEL FOR FINE STRUCTURE TRANSITIONS IN ALKALI - METAL NOBLE-GAS COLLISIONS THESIS Joseph A. Cardoza, Captain, USAF AFIT-ENP-MS-15-M-079... ALKALI - METAL NOBLE-GAS COLLISIONS THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Engineering Physics Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air...AFIT-ENP-MS-15-M-079 A SIMPLE MODEL FOR FINE STRUCTURE TRANSITIONS IN ALKALI - METAL NOBLE-GAS COLLISIONS Joseph A. Cardoza, BS Captain, USAF Committee

  9. Absorption Spectroscopy of Rubidium in an Alkali Metal Dispenser Cell and Bleached Wave Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF RUBIDIUM IN AN ALKALI METAL DISPENSER CELL AND BLEACHED WAVE ANALYSIS THESIS JAMES M. ROSENTHAL, 2 nd Lt...102 ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF RUBIDIUM IN AN ALKALI METAL DISPENSER CELL AND BLEACHED WAVE ANALYSIS THESIS Presented to the Faculty...SPECTROSCOPY OF RUBIDIUM IN AN ALKALI METAL DISPENSER CELL AND BLEACHED WAVE ANALYSIS James M. Rosenthal, BA 2 nd Lt, USAF Committee Membership

  10. Efficient destruction of CF4 through in situ generation of alkali metals from heated alkali halide reducing mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Churl; Choi, Wonyong

    2002-03-15

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are the most potent green house gases that are very recalcitrant at destruction. An effective way of converting PFCs using hot solid reagents into safe products has been recently introduced. By investigating the thermal reductive destruction of tetrafluoromethane (CF4) we provided new insight and more physicochemical consideration on this novel process. The complete destruction of CF4was successfully achieved by flowing the gas through a heated reagent bed (400-950 degrees C) that contained powder mixtures of alkali halides, CaO, and Si. The silicon acted as a reducing agent of alkali halides for the in-situ production of alkali metals, and the calcium oxide played the role of a halide ion acceptor. The absence of any single component in this ternary mixture drastically reduced the destruction efficiency of CF4. The CF4 destruction efficiencies with the solid reagent containing the alkali halide, MX, increased in the order of Li approximately Na < K < Cs for alkali cations and I < Br < Cl < F for halide anions. This trend agreed with the endothermicity of the alkali metal generation reaction: the higher the endothermicity, the lower the destruction efficiency. Alkali metal generation was indirectly detected by monitoring H2 production from its reaction with water. The production of alkali metals increased with NaF, KF, and CsF in this order. The CsF/CaO/Si system exhibited the complete destruction of CF4 at as low as 600 degrees C. The solid product analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the formation of CaF2 and the depletion of Si with black carbon particles formed in the solid reagent residue. No CO/CO2 and toxic HF and SiF4 formation were detected in the exhaust gas.

  11. Metal vapor arc switch electromagnetic accelerator technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mongeau, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    A multielectrode device housed in an insulator vacuum vessel, the metal vapor vacuum switch has high power capability and can hold off voltages up to the 100 kilovolt level. Such switches can be electronically triggered and can interrupt or commutate at a zero current crossing. The physics of arc initiation, arc conduction, and interruption are examined, including material considerations; inefficiencies; arc modes; magnetic field effects; passive and forced extinction; and voltage recovery. Heating, electrode lifetime, device configuration, and external circuit configuration are discussed. The metal vapor vacuum switch is compared with SCRs, GTOs, spark gaps, ignitrons, and mechanical breakers.

  12. Intercalation of heavy alkali metals (K, Rb and Cs) in the bundles of single wall nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclaux, L.; Méténier, K.; Lauginie, P.; Salvetat, J. P.; Bonnamy, S.; Beguin, F.

    2000-11-01

    The electric-arc discharge carbon deposits (collaret) containing Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) were heat treated at 1600 °C during 2 days under N2 flow in order to eliminate the Ni catalyst by sublimation, without modifications of the SWNTs ropes. Sorting this deposit by gravity enabled to obtain in the coarsest particles higher amount of SWNTs ropes than in other particle sizes. The coarser particles of the carbon deposits were reacted with the alkali metals vapor giving intercalated samples with a MC8 composition. The intercalation led to an expansion of the 2D lattice of the SWNTs so that the alkali metals were intercalated in between the tubes within the bundles. Disordered lattices were observed after intercalation of Rb and Cs. The simulations of the X-ray diffractograms of SWNTs reacted with K, gave the best fit for three K ions occupying the inter-tubes triangular cavities. The investigations by EPR, and 13C NMR, showed that doped carbon deposits are metallic.

  13. Theoretical determination of the alkali-metal superoxide bond energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Sodupe, Mariona; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    The bond dissociation energies for the alkali-metal superoxides have been computed using extensive Gaussian basis sets and treating electron correlation at the modified coupled-pair functional level. Our computed D0 values are 61.4, 37.2, 40.6, and 38.4 kcal/mol for LiO2, NaO2, KO2, and RbO2, respectively. These values, which are expected to be lower bounds and accurate to 2 kcal/mol, agree well with some of the older flame data, but rule out several recent experimental measurements.

  14. Nuclear alkali metal Rankine power systems for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Moyers, J.C.; Holcomb, R.S.

    1986-08-01

    Nucler power systems utilizing alkali metal Rankine power conversion cycles offer the potential for high efficiency, lightweight space power plants. Conceptual design studies are being carried out for both direct and indirect cycle systems for steady state space power applications. A computational model has been developed for calculating the performance, size, and weight of these systems over a wide range of design parameters. The model is described briefly and results from parametric design studies, with descriptions of typical point designs, are presented in this paper.

  15. Optical response of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass

    SciTech Connect

    Burchianti, A; Marinelli, C; Mariotti, E; Bogi, A; Marmugi, L; Giomi, S; Maccari, M; Veronesi, S; Moi, L

    2014-03-28

    We study the influence of optical radiation on adsorption and desorption processes of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass matrices. Exposure of the sample to near-IR or visible light changes the atomic distribution inside the glass nanopores, forcing the entire system to evolve towards a different state. This effect, due to both atomic photodesorption and confinement, causes the growth and evaporation of metastable nanoparticles. It is shown that, by a proper choice of light characteristics and pore size, these processes can be controlled and tailored, thus opening new perspectives for fabrication of nanostructured surfaces. (nanoobjects)

  16. Laser synthesis of ultracold alkali metal dimers: optimization and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazyuk, E. A.; Zaitsevskii, A. V.; Stolyarov, A. V.; Tamanis, M.; Ferber, R.

    2015-10-01

    The review concerns the potential of modern high-resolution laser spectroscopy and state-of-the-art ab initio electronic structure calculations used to obtain comprehensive information on the energy and radiative properties of strongly coupled rovibronic diatomic states. The possibility of deperturbation treatment of the intermediate electronically excited states at the experimental (spectroscopic) level of accuracy is demonstrated taking alkali metal dimers as examples. The deperturbation analysis is of crucial importance to optimize multistep laser synthesis and stabilization of ultracold molecular ensembles in their absolute ground level. The bibliography includes 227 references.

  17. Theoretical determination of the alkali-metal superoxide bond energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Sodupe, Mariona; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    The bond dissociation energies for the alkali-metal superoxides have been computed using extensive Gaussian basis sets and treating electron correlation at the modified coupled-pair functional level. Our computed D0 values are 61.4, 37.2, 40.6, and 38.4 kcal/mol for LiO2, NaO2, KO2, and RbO2, respectively. These values, which are expected to be lower bounds and accurate to 2 kcal/mol, agree well with some of the older flame data, but rule out several recent experimental measurements.

  18. Alkali metal/halide thermal energy storage systems performance evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.; Stearns, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    A pseudoheat-pipe heat transfer mechanism has been demonstrated effective in terms of both total heat removal efficiency and rate, on the one hand, and system isothermal characteristics, on the other, for solar thermal energy storage systems of the kind being contemplated for spacecraft. The selection of appropriate salt and alkali metal substances for the system renders it applicable to a wide temperature range. The rapid heat transfer rate obtainable makes possible the placing of the thermal energy storage system around the solar receiver canister, and the immersing of heat transfer fluid tubes in the phase change salt to obtain an isothermal heat source.

  19. Integrated oil production and upgrading using molten alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard

    2016-10-04

    A method that combines the oil retorting process (or other process needed to obtain/extract heavy oil or bitumen) with the process for upgrading these materials using sodium or other alkali metals. Specifically, the shale gas or other gases that are obtained from the retorting/extraction process may be introduced into the upgrading reactor and used to upgrade the oil feedstock. Also, the solid materials obtained from the reactor may be used as a fuel source, thereby providing the heat necessary for the retorting/extraction process. Other forms of integration are also disclosed.

  20. On strain energy and constitutive relations for alkali metals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eftis, J.; Arkilic, G. M.; Macdonald, D. E.

    1971-01-01

    An expression for the strain energy as a continuous differentiable function of the Green-Cauchy deformation tensor is obtained for the alkali metals at absolute zero temperature. The development is based on well established quantum and classical calculations of the various contributions to the crystal energy. Stress-deformation relations are next obtained. As a check on the accuracy of the strain energy, theoretical calculations of the values of the second-order elastic coefficients are obtained and compared to known experimental data. The predicted values are shown to compare quite well with the experimental values.

  1. Alkali-metal silicate binders and methods of manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, J. B. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A paint binder is described which uses a potassium or sodium silicate dispersion having a silicon dioxide to alkali-metal oxide mol ratio of from 4.8:1 to 6.0:1. The binder exhibits stability during both manufacture and storage. The process of making the binder is predictable and repeatable and the binder may be made with inexpensive components. The high mol ratio is achieved with the inclusion of a silicon dioxide hydrogel. The binder, which also employs a silicone, is in the final form of a hydrogel sol.

  2. High power density alkali metal thermal to electric converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievers, R. K.; Wright, R. F.

    A description is given of the alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter (AMTEC), an emerging technology for static power conversion that has the potential of matching dynamic system efficiency. This high efficiency is produced when cells of beta double prime alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) are series connected, packed in a space-efficient manner, and designed to minimize parasitic heat loss. Design studies have shown that power densities of up to 400 W/kg and efficiencies of up to 35 percent are feasible. This is higher than power densities and efficiencies reported for other AMTEC designs, but continued design studies are necessary to assess applications.

  3. On strain energy and constitutive relations for alkali metals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eftis, J.; Arkilic, G. M.; Macdonald, D. E.

    1971-01-01

    An expression for the strain energy as a continuous differentiable function of the Green-Cauchy deformation tensor is obtained for the alkali metals at absolute zero temperature. The development is based on well established quantum and classical calculations of the various contributions to the crystal energy. Stress-deformation relations are next obtained. As a check on the accuracy of the strain energy, theoretical calculations of the values of the second-order elastic coefficients are obtained and compared to known experimental data. The predicted values are shown to compare quite well with the experimental values.

  4. Theoretical investigation on exciplex pumped alkali vapor lasers with sonic-level gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xingqi; Shen, Binglin; Huang, Jinghua; Xia, Chunsheng; Pan, Bailiang

    2017-07-01

    Considering the effects of higher excited and ion energy states and utilizing the methodology in the fluid mechanics, a modified model of exciplex pumped alkali vapor lasers with sonic-level flowing gas is established. A comparison of output characters between subsonic flow and supersonic flow is made. In this model, higher excited and ion energy states are included as well, which modifies the analysis of the kinetic process and introduces larger heat loading in an operating CW exciplex-pumped alkali vapor laser. The results of our calculations predict that subsonic flow has an advantage over supersonic flow under the same fluid parameters, and stimulated emission in the supersonic flow would be quenched while the pump power reaching a threshold value of the fluid choking effect. However, by eliminating the influence of fluid characters, better thermal management and higher optical conversion efficiency can be obtained in supersonic flow. In addition, we make use of the "nozzle-diffuser" to build up the closed-circle flowing experimental device and gather some useful simulated results.

  5. Old acid, new chemistry. Negative metal anions generated from alkali metal oxalates and others.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Sharon; Renaud, Justin; Holmes, John L; Mayer, Paul M

    2010-11-01

    A brief search in Sci Finder for oxalic acid and oxalates will reward the researcher with a staggering 129,280 hits. However, the generation of alkali metal and silver anions via collision-induced dissociation of the metal oxalate anion has not been previously been reported, though Tian and coworkers recently investigated the dissociation of lithium oxalate. The exothermic decomposition of alkali metal oxalate anion to carbon dioxide in the collision cell of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer leaves no place for the electron to reside, resulting in a double electron-transfer reaction to produce an alkali metal anion. This reaction is facilitated by the negative electron affinity of carbon dioxide and, as such, the authors believe that metal oxalates are potentially unique in this respect. The observed dissociation reactions for collision with argon gas (1.7-1.8 × 10(-3) mbar) for oxalic acid and various alkali metal oxalates are discussed and summarized. Silver oxalate is also included to demonstrate the propensity of this system to generate transition-metal anions, as well.

  6. Tunable Optical Delay in Doppler-Broadened Cesium Vapor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    optical buffer system. Alkali - metal elements offer well-documented relatively simple atomic systems with physical properties , such as large vapor...Kramers-Kronig delay model is developed using complete hyperfine structure treatment with Voigt profile lineshapes in a Doppler-broadened alkali - metal ... alkali -laser is a gas-phase three-level laser using the ground state (S1/2) and the first two excited states (P1/2 and P3/2) of the alkali - metal vapor

  7. Avant-garde metalating agents: structural basis of alkali-metal-mediated metalation.

    PubMed

    Mulvey, Robert E

    2009-06-16

    Metalation, one of the most useful and widely used synthetic methodologies, transforms a relatively inert carbon-hydrogen bond to a more labile carbon-metal bond. Until recently, most organometallic reagents that facilitate this process have combined strongly electropositive metals, such as lithium, with organic reagents to form highly polar and, by implication, highly reactive carbon-metal bonds. For example, the alkyllithium reagents and bulky lithium amides that are commonly employed for this purpose can suffer from low functional group tolerance. Lithio-products of these reactions generally have low kinetic stabilities. More recently, several groups around the world have pioneered alternative metalation reagents, complex metalators, which can be interpreted as composite molecules or mixtures made up of two or more distinct compound types. Several examples include magnesiate complexes, Lochmann-Schlosser superbases, Kondo and Uchiyama's 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidide (TMP)-zincate complexes, and Knochel's turbo-Grignard and related salt-supported reagents. This Account describes our rational development of novel complex metalators based on existing structural templates and designed to execute alkali-metal-mediated metalations (AMMMs). By changing the nonalkali metal in these structures, we have produced tailor-made dianionic-dicationic structures such as [(TMEDA).Na(mu-TMP)(mu-(n)Bu)Mg(TMP)], [(TMEDA).Na(mu-TMP)(mu-(t)Bu)Zn((t)Bu)], and [(TMEDA).Li(mu-TMP)Mn(CH(2)SiMe(3))(2)] (TMEDA = N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine). These compounds can perform unprecedented magnesiations, zincations, or manganations on aromatic substrates that are generally inert toward conventional Mg, Zn, or Mn(II) reagents. Although the alkali metal is an essential component of these new complex metalators, interestingly, the less electropositive, less polar nonalkali metal [Mg, Zn, or Mn(II)] actually carries out the deprotonation. We view this unique behavior as a mixed-metal synergic

  8. New Medical Applications Of Metal Vapor Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Robert S.; McIntosh, Alexander I.

    1989-06-01

    The first medical application for metal vapor lasers has been granted marketing approval by the FDA. This represents a major milestone for this technology. Metalaser Technologies recently received this approval for its Vasculase unit in the treatment of vascular lesions such as port wine stains, facial telangiectasia and strawberry hemangiomas.

  9. Universality of the shear viscosity of alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, N.; Xu, H.; Wax, J.-F.

    2017-09-01

    The universality of the shear viscosity of alkali metals is studied up to high pressure. Equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are used to calculate the stress autocorrelation function, which allows us to obtain the value of shear viscosity using the Green-Kubo formula. Atomic interactions are computed from Fiolhais pseudopotential and are validated by comparison between pair distribution functions and mean-squared displacements obtained from classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The description of the interactions is accurate at least up to 12 GPa, 9.4 GPa, 6.6 GPa, and 3 GPa for Na, K, Rb, and Cs, respectively, and to a lesser extent up to 4.8 GPa for Li. A good agreement between simulation and experimental viscosity results along the liquid-gas coexistence curve is found. The viscosity appears to be a universal property over a wide range of the liquid phase of the phase diagram, between 0.85 and 1.5 times the ambient melting density and up to seven times the ambient melting temperature. Scaling laws are proposed following relations formulated in [Meyer, Xu, and Wax, Phys. Rev. B 93, 214203 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.214203] so that it is possible to predict the viscosity value of any alkali metal with an accuracy better than 10% over the corresponding density and temperature range.

  10. Nonlinear pressure shifts of alkali-metal atoms in xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuyer, Bart; Xia, Tian; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2011-05-01

    Compact, portable atomic frequency standards are based on the microwave resonance frequencies of alkali-metal atoms in inert buffer gases. The frequency shift of these resonances due to collisions with the buffer gas is known as the pressure shift. We demonstrate that the microwave resonance frequencies of ground-state 87Rb and 133Cs atoms have a nonlinear dependence on the pressure of the buffer gas Xe. Previous work has demonstrated a nonlinear dependence in Ar and Kr, but not He and N2, which is thought to be due to the loosely-bound van der Waals molecules that are known to form between alkali-metal and buffer-gas atoms in Ar, Kr, and Xe, but not He and N2. Surprisingly, we find that the nonlinearities in Xe are of the opposite sign to those in Ar and Kr, even though the overall shifts for each of these gases are negative. This discrepancy suggests that though the shifts due to the molecules in Ar and Kr are positive, the shifts due to the molecules in Xe are negative. No nonlinearities were observed in the buffer gas Ne to within our experimental accuracy, which suggests that molecules do not form in Ne. Additionally, we present improved measurements of the shifts of Rb and Cs in He and N2 and of Rb in Ar and Kr. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the Department of Defense through the NDSEG program.

  11. Alkali-metalated forms of thiacalix[4]arenes.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Jürgen; Radius, Udo

    2006-11-13

    The alkali metal salts [TCALi4] (1), [TCANa4] (2), and [TCALK4] (3) of fully deprotonated p-tert-butyltetrathiacalix[4]arene (H(4)TCA) are readily available from the reactions of thiacalix[4]arene and n-BuLi, NaH, or KH as deprotonating reagents. Crystals of the sodium salts 2 and the potassium salt 3 suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained in the form of the pyridine solvates [(TCA)2Na8.8py] (2.8py) and [(TCA)2K(8).8py] (3.8py). These molecules are dimers in the solid state but are structurally not related. In addition, the reaction of H(4)TCA and lithium hydroxide afforded the structurally characterized complex [(TCA)Li5(OH).4THF] (4). The molecular structure of 4 as well as the structures of 2.8py and 3.8py reveal a close relationship to the corresponding alkali metal salts of the calix[4]arenes.

  12. Band gap opening in bilayer silicene by alkali metal intercalation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongsheng; Han, Nannan; Zhao, Jijun

    2014-11-01

    Recently, bilayer and multilayer silicene have attracted increased attention following the boom of silicene, which holds great promise for future applications in microelectronic devices. Herein we systematically investigate all stacking configurations of bilayer silicene and the corresponding electronic properties. Strong coupling is found between two silicene layers, which destroys the Dirac cones in the band structures of pristine silicene and makes bilayer silicene sheets metallic. However, intercalation of alkali metal (especially potassium) can effectively decouple the interaction between two silicene layers. In the K-intercalated bilayer silicene (KSi4), the Dirac cones are recovered with a small band gap of 0.27 eV located about 0.55 eV below the Fermi level. Furthermore, intercalation of K+ cations in bilayer silicene (K+Si4) results in a semiconductor with a moderate band gap of 0.43 eV, making it ideal for microelectronic applications.

  13. Difficulties in Interpreting Alkali Metal Trends at the Senior Chemistry Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Berg, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    Explores the reasons for the differences in alkali metal reactivity in water in terms of thermodynamics rather than ionization trends. Shows that differences in alkali metal reactivity with water are more appropriately explained in terms of the kinetics of the reactions. (MM)

  14. Difficulties in Interpreting Alkali Metal Trends at the Senior Chemistry Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Berg, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    Explores the reasons for the differences in alkali metal reactivity in water in terms of thermodynamics rather than ionization trends. Shows that differences in alkali metal reactivity with water are more appropriately explained in terms of the kinetics of the reactions. (MM)

  15. Low-temperature fabrication of alkali metal-organic charge transfer complexes on cotton textile for optoelectronics and gas sensing.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Walia, Sumeet; Kandjani, Ahmad Esmaielzadeh; Balendran, Sivacarendran; Mohammadtaheri, Mahsa; Bhargava, Suresh Kumar; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh; Bansal, Vipul

    2015-02-03

    A generalized low-temperature approach for fabricating high aspect ratio nanorod arrays of alkali metal-TCNQ (7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) charge transfer complexes at 140 °C is demonstrated. This facile approach overcomes the current limitation associated with fabrication of alkali metal-TCNQ complexes that are based on physical vapor deposition processes and typically require an excess of 800 °C. The compatibility of soft substrates with the proposed low-temperature route allows direct fabrication of NaTCNQ and LiTCNQ nanoarrays on individual cotton threads interwoven within the 3D matrix of textiles. The applicability of these textile-supported TCNQ-based organic charge transfer complexes toward optoelectronics and gas sensing applications is established.

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW: State dependent particle dynamics in liquid alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilgrim, W.-C.; Morkel, Chr

    2006-09-01

    This paper gives a survey of the particle dynamics in the liquid alkali metals observed with inelastic x-ray and neutron scattering experiments. Liquid rubidium and sodium are chosen as model fluids to represent the behaviour of this group of fluids. In the dense metallic monatomic melt the microscopic dynamics is characterized by collective excitations similar to those in the corresponding solids. The collective particle behaviour is appropriately described using a memory function formalism with two relaxation channels for the density correlation. A similar behaviour is found for the single particle motion where again two relaxation mechanisms are needed to accurately reproduce the experimental findings. Special emphasis is given to the density dependence of the particle dynamics. An interesting issue in liquid metals is the metal to non-metal transition, which is observed if the fluid is sufficiently expanded with increasing temperature and pressure. This causes distinct variations in the interparticle interactions, which feed back onto the motional behaviour. The associated variations in structure and dynamics are reflected in the shape of the scattering laws. The experimentally observed features are discussed and compared with simple models and with the results from computer simulations.

  17. X-Ray Study of the Structures of Polyacetylene and Alkali-Metal Doped Polyacetylene Derivatives.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jingfei

    As a prototype example of conducting polymers, polyacetylene and doped polyacetylene derivatives are the simplest and the most widely studied of their class. A detailed knowledge of their structures and the interactions that stabilize them is very important but still lacking. In this work we studied the structural features of the polyacetylene system by using the x-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. For pristine polyacetylene, our low and high temperature results showed large thermal expansion coefficients along with an increase of the setting angle with temperature, and a large anisotropy between the a and b axes. These results showed that the underlying interchain rectangular lattice of polyacetylene was approaching triangular with increasing temperature. By comparison with results from other polymers and oligomers, we concluded that this triangularity at high temperatures is a direct consequence of 2D close-packing of projected polymer chains rounded by thermally-activated rotations. Behavior complementary to that at low temperature was demonstrated in the high pressure data: large anisotropy between the a and b axes and deviation away from the interchain packing of the triangular limit. In addition, we found evidence that the centered rectangular cell of polyacetylene at ambient conditions was transformed into an oblique cell at certain slightly elevated pressures. Measurements on polyacetylene doped with different alkali-metals, prepared by vapor phase, electrochemical, and chemical solution methods, were also systematically undertaken. For both alkali-metal dopants and polymer chains, our intensity analyses showed a substantial difference in ordering between the chain direction and the ab-plane. Furthermore, despite the general agreement of our data with previously -reported findings, significant discrepancies were revealed through detailed intensity analyses. In particular, we found that both the tetragonal structures for larger alkali -metal doped (CH

  18. Alkali metal derivatives of an ortho-phenylene diamine.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sarah; Davies, E Stephen; Lewis, William; Blake, Alexander J; Liddle, Stephen T

    2014-03-21

    Treatment of the ortho-phenylene diamine C6H4-1,2-{N(H)Tripp}2 (1, PDAH2, Tripp = 2,4,6-triisopropylphenyl) with two equivalents of MR (M = Li, R = Bu(n); M = Na or K, R = CH2C6H5) afforded the dimetallated alkali metal ortho-phenylene diamide dianion complexes [(PDALi2)(THF)3] (2), [{(PDANa2)(THF)2}2] (3), and [{(PDAK2)(THF)3}2] (4). In contrast, treatment of 2 with two equivalents of rubidium or cesium 2-ethylhexoxide, or treatment of 1 with two equivalents of MR (M = Rb or Cs, R = CH2C6H5) did not afford the anticipated dialkali metal ortho-phenylene diamide dianion derivatives and instead formally afforded the monometallic ortho-diiminosemiquinonate radical anion species [PDAM] (M = Rb, 5; M = Cs, 6). The structure of 2 is monomeric with one lithium coordinated to the two nitrogen centres and the other lithium η(4)-coordinated to the diazabutadiene portion of the PDA scaffold. Similar structural cores are observed for 3 and 4, except that the larger sodium and potassium ions give dimeric structures linked by multi-hapto interactions from the PDA backbone phenyl ring to an alkali metal centre. Complex 5 was not characterised in the solid state, but the structure of 6 reveals coordination of cesium ions to both PDA amide centres and multi-hapto interactions to a PDA backbone phenyl ring in the next unit to generate a one-dimensional polymer. Complexes 2-6 have been variously characterised by X-ray crystallography, multi-nuclear NMR, FTIR, and EPR spectroscopies, and CHN microanalyses.

  19. Removal of alkali vapors by a fixed granular-bed sorber using activated bauxite as a sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Henry, R.F.; Myles, K.M.

    1985-03-01

    Studies have been conducted to develop a fixed granular-bed sorber for the removal of alkali vapors in a pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) combinedcycle system. A laboratory-scale pressurized alkalivapor sorption test unit was used to characterize activated bauxite, the most effective sorbent identified earlier, for its alkali vapor sorption capability in a gas stream with temperature (less than or equal to900/sup 0/C), pressure (10 atm absolute), and composition closely simulating the actual PFBC flue gas. A scale-up of laboratory tests is being conducted in a 15.2-cm-dia (6-in.-dia) PFBC system to demonstrate the granular-bed sorber concept. The NaCl-vapor sorption chemistry of activated bauxite is described. The extent of alkalivapor evolution from the activated bauxite bed itself is discussed, along with an evaluation of the significance of its alkali vapor contribution to a downstream gas turbine. Details of the design of a high-temperature/high-pressure alkali sorber system for the demonstration of the sorber are presented.

  20. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 3, Appendix B: NO{sub x} and alkali vapor control strategies: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    CRS Sirrine (CRSS) is evaluating a novel IGCC process in which gases exiting the gasifier are burned in a gas turbine combustion system. The turbine exhaust gas is used to generate additional power in a conventional steam generator. This results in a significant increase in efficiency. However, the IGCC process requires development of novel approaches to control SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions and alkali vapors which can damage downstream turbine components. Ammonia is produced from the reaction of coal-bound nitrogen with steam in the reducing zone of any fixed bed coal gasifier. This ammonia can be partially oxidized to NO{sub x} when the product gas is oxidized in a gas turbine combustor. Alkali metals vaporize in the high-temperature combustion zone of the gasifier and laser condense on the surface of small char or ash particles or on cooled metal surfaces. It these alkali-coated materials reach the gas turbine combustor, the alkali will revaporize condense on turbine blades and cause rapid high temperature corrosion. Efficiency reduction will result. PSI Technology Company (PSIT) was contracted by CRSS to evaluate and recommend solutions for NO{sub x} emissions and for alkali metals deposition. Various methods for NO{sub x} emission control and the potential process and economic impacts were evaluated. This included estimates of process performance, heat and mass balances around the combustion and heat transfer units and a preliminary economic evaluation. The potential for alkali metal vaporization and condensation at various points in the system was also estimated. Several control processes and evaluated, including an order of magnitude cost for the control process.

  1. Hydride encapsulation by molecular alkali-metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Joanna; Wheatley, Andrew E H

    2008-07-14

    The sequential treatment of group 12 and 13 Lewis acids with alkali-metal organometallics is well established to yield so-called ''ate' complexes, whereby the Lewis-acid metal undergoes nucleophilic attack to give an anion, at least one group 1 metal acting to counter this charge. However, an alternative, less well recognised, reaction pathway involves the Lewis acid abstracting hydride from the organolithium reagent via a beta-elimination mechanism. It has recently been shown that in the presence of N,N'-bidentate ligands this chemistry can be harnessed to yield a new type of molecular main-group metal cluster in which the abstracted LiH is effectively trapped, with the hydride ion occupying an interstitial site in the cluster core. Discussion focuses on the development of this field, detailing advances in our understanding of the roles of Lewis acid, organolithium, and amine substrates in the syntheses of these compounds. Structure-types are discussed, as are efforts to manipulate cluster geometry and composition as well as hydride-coordination. Embryonic mechanistic studies are reported, as well as attempts to generate hydride-encapsulation clusters under catalytic control.

  2. Assessment of alkali metal coolants for the ITER blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Reed, C.B.; Mattas, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    The blanket system is one of the most important components of a fusion reactor because it has a major impact on both the economics and safety of fusion energy. The primary functions of the blanket in a deuterium/tritium-fueled fusion reactor are to convert the fusion energy into sensible heat and to breed tritium for the fuel cycle. The Blanket Comparison and Selection Study, conducted earlier, described the overall comparative performance of different blanket concepts, including liquid metal, molten salt, water, and helium. This paper will discuss the ITER requirements for a self-cooled blanket concept with liquid lithium and for indirectly cooled concepts that use other alkali metals such as NaK. The paper will address the thermodynamics of interactions between the liquid metals (i.e., lithium and NaK) and structural materials (e.g., V-base alloys), together with associated corrosion/compatibility issues. Available experimental data will be used to assess the long-term performance of the first wall in a liquid metal environment.

  3. A fixed granular-bed sorber for measurement and control of alkali vapors in PFBC (pressurized fluidized-bed combustion)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Swift, W.M.

    1990-01-01

    Alkali vapors (Na and K) in the hot flue gas from the pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) of coal could cause corrosion problems with the gas turbine blades. In a laboratory-scale PFBC test with Beulah lignite, a fixed granular bed of activated bauxite sorbent was used to demonstrate its capability for measuring and controlling alkali vapors in the PFBC flue gas. The Beulah lignite was combusted in a bed of Tymochtee dolomite at bed temperatures ranging from 850 to 875{degrees}C and a system pressure of 9.2 atm absolute. The time-averaged concentration of sodium vapor in the PFBC flue gas was determined from the analysis of two identical beds of activated bauxite and found to be 1.42 and 1.50 ppmW. The potassium vapor concentration was determined to be 0.10 ppmW. The sodium material balance showed that only 0.24% of the total sodium in the lignite was released as vapor species in the PFBC flue gas. This results in an average of 1.56 ppmW alkali vapors in the PFBC flue gas. This average is more than 1.5 orders of magnitude greater than the currently suggested alkali specification limit of 0.024 ppm for an industrial gas turbine. The adsorption data obtained with the activated bauxite beds were also analyzed mathematically by use of a LUB (length of unused bed)/equilibrium section concept. Analytical results showed that the length of the bed, L{sub o} in centimeters, relates to the break through time, {theta}{sub b} in hours, for the alkali vapor to break through the bed as follows: L{sub o} = 33.02 + 1.99 {theta}{sub b}. This formula provides useful information for the engineering design of fixed-bed activated bauxite sorbers for the measurement and control of alkali vapors in PFBC flue gas. 26 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-01

    Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. The closure plan consists of a Part A Dangerous waste Permit Application and a RCRA Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Revision (Revision 1) submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The closure plan consists of 9 chapters and 5 appendices. The chapters cover: introduction; facility description; process information; waste characteristics; groundwater; closure strategy and performance standards; closure activities; postclosure; and references.

  5. Alkali Metal Thermoelectric Conversion (AMTEC) for space nuclear power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, C. P.; Cole, T.; Khanna, S. K.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    Performance parameters of the Alkali Metal Thermoelectric Converter (AMTEC) for a 100 kW electric power system have been calculated at four technological levels assuming a heat pipe-cooled nuclear reactor heat source. The most advanced level considered would operate between 1180 K converter temperature and 711 K radiator temperature at 16 percent efficiency, and would weigh 1850 kg with a radiator area of 43 sq m. In addition, electrode research studies for the AMTEC systems have been conducted utilizing an experimental test cell of Bankston et al. (1983) and Mo and several Mo-Ti electrodes. It was found that the Mo-Ti electrodes offered no improvement in lifetime characteristics over the pure Mo electrodes, however, oxygen treatment of a degraded Mo electrode restored its specific power output to 90 percent of its original specific power and maintained this level for 60 hr, thus offering a potential for lifetime stability.

  6. Ion-exchange behavior of alkali metals on treated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiuddin, G.; Hata, W.Y.; Tolan, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    The ion-exchange behavior of trace quantities of the alkali-metal ions sodium and cesium, on activated carbon impregnated with zirconium phosphate (referred to here as ZrP), was studied. Impregnated carbon had twice as much ion-exchange activity as unimpregnated, oxidized carbon, and 10 times as much as commercial activated carbons. The distribution coefficient of sodium increased with increasing pH; the distribution coefficient of cesium decreased with increasing pH. Sodium and cesium were separated with an electrolytic solution of 0.1 M HCl. Preliminary studies indicated that 0.2 M potassium and cesium can also be separated. Distribution coefficients of the supported ZrP were determined by the elution technique and agreed within 20% of the values for pure ZrP calculated from the literature.

  7. Alkali metal cation binding affinities of cytosine in the gas phase: revisited.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M T

    2014-08-14

    Binding of metal cations to the nucleobases can influence base pairing, base stacking and nucleobase tautomerism. Gas-phase condensation of dc discharge generated alkali metal cations and thermally vaporized cytosine (DC/FT) has been found to produce kinetically trapped excited tautomeric conformations of the M(+)(cytosine) complexes, which influences the threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) behavior. In order to elucidate the effects of the size of alkali metal cation on the strength of binding to the canonical form of cytosine, the binding affinities of Na(+) and K(+) to cytosine are re-examined here, and studies are extended to include Rb(+) and Cs(+) again using TCID techniques. The M(+)(cytosine) complexes are generated in an electrospray ionization source, which has been shown to produce ground-state tautomeric conformations of M(+)(cytosine). The energy-dependent cross sections are interpreted to yield bond dissociation energies (BDEs) using an analysis that includes consideration of unimolecular decay rates, the kinetic and internal energy distributions of the reactants, and multiple M(+)(cytosine)-Xe collisions. Revised BDEs for the Na(+)(cytosine) and K(+)(cytosine) complexes exceed those previously measured by 31.9 and 25.5 kJ mol(-1), respectively, consistent with the hypothesis proposed by Yang and Rodgers that excited tautomeric conformations are accessed when the complexes are generated by DC/FT ionization. Experimentally measured BDEs are compared to theoretical values calculated at the B3LYP and MP2(full) levels of theory using the 6-311+G(2d,2p)_HW* and def2-TZVPPD basis sets. The B3LYP/def2-TZVPPD level of theory is found to provide the best agreement with the measured BDEs, suggesting that this level of theory can be employed to provide reliable energetics for similar metal-ligand systems.

  8. Assessment of alkali metal coolants for the ITER blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Reed, C.B.; Mattas, R.F.

    1994-06-01

    The blanket system is one of the most important components of a fusion reactor because it has a major impact on both the economics and safety of fusion energy. The primary functions of the blanket in a deuterium/tritium-fueled fusion reactor are to convert the fusion energy into sensible heat and to breed tritium for the fuel cycle. The Blanket Comparison and Selection Study, conducted earlier, described the overall comparative performance of different blanket concepts, including liquid metal, molten salt, water and helium. This paper will discuss the ITER requirements for a self-cooled blanket concept with liquid lithium and for indirectly cooled concepts that use other alkali metals such as NaK. The paper addresses the thermodynamics of interactions between the liquid metals (e.g., lithium and NaK) and structural materials (e.g., V-base alloys), together with associated corrosion/compatibility issues. Available experimental data are used to assess the long-term performance of the first wall in a liquid metal environment. Other key issues include development of electrical insulator coatings on the first-wall structural material to MHD pressure drop, and tritium permeation/inventory in self-cooled and indirectly cooled concepts. Acceptable types of coatings (based on their chemical compatibility and physical properties) are identified, and surface-modification avenues to achieve these coatings on the first wall are discussed. The assessment examines the extent of our knowledge on structural materials performance in liquid metals and identifies needed research and development in several of the areas in order to establish performance envelopes for the first wall in a liquid-metal environment.

  9. Release characteristics of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species during biomass pyrolysis and steam gasification process.

    PubMed

    Long, Jiang; Song, Hu; Jun, Xiang; Sheng, Su; Lun-Shi, Sun; Kai, Xu; Yao, Yao

    2012-07-01

    Investigating the release characteristics of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) is of potential interest because of AAEM's possible useful service as catalysts in biomass thermal conversion. In this study, three kinds of typical Chinese biomass were selected to pyrolyse and their chars were subsequently steam gasified in a designed quartz fixed-bed reactor to investigate the release characteristics of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs). The results indicate that 53-76% of alkali metal and 27-40% of alkaline earth metal release in pyrolysis process, as well as 12-34% of alkali metal and 12-16% of alkaline earth metal evaporate in char gasification process, and temperature is not the only factor to impact AAEMs emission. The releasing characteristics of AAEMs during pyrolysis and char gasification process of three kinds of biomass were discussed in this paper. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Kinetic and fluid dynamic modeling, numerical approaches of flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Shen, Binglin; Pan, Bailiang; Jiao, Jian; Xia, Chunsheng

    2015-07-27

    Comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid dynamic processes in flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers is reported. Taking into account effects of the temperature, the amplified spontaneous emission, the saturation power, the excitation of the alkali atoms to high electronic levels and the ionization, a detailed physical model is established to simulate the output performance of flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers. Influences of the flow velocity and the pump power on the amplified power are calculated and analyzed. Comparisons between single and double amplifier, longitudinal and transverse flow are made. Results show that end-pumped cascaded amplifier can provide higher output power under the same total pump power and the cell length, while output powers achieved by single- and double-end pumped, double-side pumped amplifiers with longitudinal or transverse flow have a complicated but valuable relation. Thus the model is extremely helpful for designing high-power flowing-gas diode-pumped alkali vapor amplifiers.

  11. Muon spin rotation studies of the metallic alkali fullerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, William Andrew

    1998-11-01

    Results of muon spin rotation (/mu[/cal SR]) in the metallic intercalated C60 compounds (AnC60, where An are n alkali metal atoms) are presented. Except for the case of K1C60, the metallic state of these systems is unstable at low temperature (to a superconducting transition in A3C60 and a magnetic metal insulator transition in A1C60). In A3C60, the properties of the metallic and superconducting states are investigated using (i) diamagnetic muons to probe the distribution of internal magnetic field and (ii) paramagnetic muonium (Mu) trapped within the C60 cage to probe the electronic excitations. Mu is found to exhibit strong T1 relaxation due to its interaction with the conduction electrons. In the superconducting state this relaxation rate exhibits a small enhancement (Hebel-Slichter coherence peak) which possesses an anomalously strong magnetic field suppression. Exponential temperature dependence of the relaxation rate at low reduced temperature is observed, and from this estimates of the superconducting energy gap are obtained. At very low reduced temperature, deviations from this behaviour are found. Estimates of the magnetic penetration depth from broadening of the diamagnetic precession signal in the vortex state are also presented and discussed. In A1C60 (A = Rb and Cs), the magnetic state is investigated with zero field /mu[/cal SR]. Observation of a small rapidly damped oscillation below 2K in Cs1C60 is the first evidence from /mu[/cal SR] of magnetic order in these materials. The relaxation at higher temperature indicates that the internal fields are static and possess a broad distribution, indicating a highly disordered static magnetic structure. From the magnitude of the zero field relaxation rates, estimates of the magnitude of the internal field are made.

  12. Metal vapor laser including hot electrodes and integral wick

    DOEpatents

    Ault, E.R.; Alger, T.W.

    1995-03-07

    A metal vapor laser, specifically one utilizing copper vapor, is disclosed herein. This laser utilizes a plasma tube assembly including a thermally insulated plasma tube containing a specific metal, e.g., copper, and a buffer gas therein. The laser also utilizes means including hot electrodes located at opposite ends of the plasma tube for electrically exciting the metal vapor and heating its interior to a sufficiently high temperature to cause the metal contained therein to vaporize and for subjecting the vapor to an electrical discharge excitation in order to lase. The laser also utilizes external wicking arrangements, that is, wicking arrangements located outside the plasma tube. 5 figs.

  13. Metal vapor laser including hot electrodes and integral wick

    DOEpatents

    Ault, Earl R.; Alger, Terry W.

    1995-01-01

    A metal vapor laser, specifically one utilizing copper vapor, is disclosed herein. This laser utilizes a plasma tube assembly including a thermally insulated plasma tube containing a specific metal, e.g., copper, and a buffer gas therein. The laser also utilizes means including hot electrodes located at opposite ends of the plasma tube for electrically exciting the metal vapor and heating its interior to a sufficiently high temperature to cause the metal contained therein to vaporize and for subjecting the vapor to an electrical discharge excitation in order to lase. The laser also utilizes external wicking arrangements, that is, wicking arrangements located outside the plasma tube.

  14. Alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide double alkoxide precursors to alkali metal yttrium oxide nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Neville, Michael L.; Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; Cramer, Roger

    2016-03-15

    In this study, a series of alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide ([AY(ONep)4]) compounds were developed as precursors to alkali yttrium oxide (AYO2) nanomaterials. The reaction of yttrium amide ([Y(NR2)3] where R=Si(CH3)3) with four equivalents of H-ONep followed by addition of [A(NR2)] (A=Li, Na, K) or Ao (Ao=Rb, Cs) led to the formation of a complex series of AnY(ONep)3+n species, crystallographically identified as [Y2Li33-ONep)(μ3-HONep)(μ-ONep)5(ONep)3(HONep)2] (1), [YNa23-ONep)4(ONep)]2 (2), {[Y2K33-ONep)3(μ-ONep)4(ONep)2(ηξ-tol)2][Y4K24-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4]•ηx-tol]} (3), [Y4K24-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4] (3a), [Y2Rb34-ONep)3(μ-ONep)6] (4), and [Y2Cs46-O)(μ3-ONep)63-HONep)2(ONep)2x-tol)4]•tol (5). Compounds 1–5 were investigated as single source precursors to AYOx nanomaterials following solvothermal routes (pyridine, 185 °C for 24h). The final products after thermal processing were found by powder X-ray diffraction experiments to be Y2O3 with variable sized particles based on transmission electron diffraction. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy studies indicated that the heavier alkali metal species were present in the isolated nanomaterials.

  15. Alkali vapor pressure modulation on the 100 ms scale in a single-cell vacuum system for cold atom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugrain, Vincent; Rosenbusch, Peter; Reichel, Jakob

    2014-08-01

    We describe and characterize a device for alkali vapor pressure modulation on the 100 ms timescale in a single-cell cold atom experiment. Its mechanism is based on optimized heat conduction between a current-modulated alkali dispenser and a heat sink at room temperature. We have studied both the short-term behavior during individual pulses and the long-term pressure evolution in the cell. The device combines fast trap loading and relatively long trap lifetime, enabling high repetition rates in a very simple setup. These features make it particularly suitable for portable atomic sensors.

  16. (abstract) Alkali Metal Diffusion Through Porous Metal Electrodes in AMTEC Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kisor, A.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of mass transport of an alkali metal through porous metal electrodes in alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter AMTEC cells is important in optimizing these high current density devices, but also affords the opportunity to investigate a variety of simple mass transport modes at high temperatures via electrochemical techniques. We have previously reported evidence of ionic, free molecular flow, and surface transport of sodium in several types of AMTEC electrodes. Quantitative investigations of Na transport through WPt(sub 3.5) via surface or grain boundary diffusion, and K transport through porous Mo electrodes by free molecular flow, over large ranges of temperature have been performed. WPt(sub 3.5) has especially low transport impedance over the 950 to 1200K temperature range. New results are the Na through porous WPt(sub 3.5) and K through porous Mo diffusion rates and mechanisms.

  17. (abstract) Alkali Metal Diffusion Through Porous Metal Electrodes in AMTEC Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kisor, A.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of mass transport of an alkali metal through porous metal electrodes in alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter AMTEC cells is important in optimizing these high current density devices, but also affords the opportunity to investigate a variety of simple mass transport modes at high temperatures via electrochemical techniques. We have previously reported evidence of ionic, free molecular flow, and surface transport of sodium in several types of AMTEC electrodes. Quantitative investigations of Na transport through WPt(sub 3.5) via surface or grain boundary diffusion, and K transport through porous Mo electrodes by free molecular flow, over large ranges of temperature have been performed. WPt(sub 3.5) has especially low transport impedance over the 950 to 1200K temperature range. New results are the Na through porous WPt(sub 3.5) and K through porous Mo diffusion rates and mechanisms.

  18. Welding, bonding, and sealing of refractory metals by vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Plating process welds, bonds, and seals refractory metals without weakening or changing the structure of the base metals. A metal halide compound in the vapor phase is decomposed to deposit filler metal on the base metal. The resulting bond is a true metal-to-metal bond.

  19. Modeling the charge transfer between alkali metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using electronic structure methods.

    PubMed

    Baker, Thomas A; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2010-09-23

    The interaction of alkali metals-specifically, lithium-with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was studied using a variety of electronic structure methods. Electron transfer from lithium to a PAH depends on the size and structure of the PAH and the electronic structure method used. In some cases, we observe an artificial transfer when using density functional theory (DFT) due to the self-interaction error, whereas Hartree-Fock underestimates the amount of charge transfer due to overlocalization. Our results have interesting implications for the validity of DFT calculations on the alkali metal-PAH interaction in Li batteries, hydrogen storage devices, and alkali-metal-doped superconductors.

  20. Calculation of radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements in the neutral alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J.; Cheng, K.T.

    2005-02-01

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali-metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkali metals but significantly larger for the heavier alkali metals, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  1. Method and composition for testing for the presence of an alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Guon, Jerold

    1981-01-01

    A method and composition for detecting the presence of an alkali metal on the surface of a body such as a metal plate, tank, pipe or the like is provided. The method comprises contacting the surface with a thin film of a liquid composition comprising a light-colored pigment, an acid-base indicator, and a nonionic wetting agent dispersed in a liquid carrier comprising a minor amount of water and a major amount of an organic solvent selected from the group consisting of the lower aliphatic alcohols, ketones and ethers. Any alkali metal present on the surface in elemental form or as an alkali metal hydroxide or alkali metal carbonate will react with the acid-base indicator to produce a contrasting color change in the thin film, which is readily discernible by visual observation or automatic techniques.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, Ahmet

    1989-01-01

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula (I) ##STR1## where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula I is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula I and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  3. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  4. [Measurement of atomic number of alkali vapor and pressure of buffer gas based on atomic absorption].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui-jie; Quan, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Chen, Yao; Lu, Ji-xi

    2015-02-01

    High sensitivitymagnetic measurementscanbe achieved by utilizing atomic spinmanipulation in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) regime, which uses an alkali cell as a sensing element. The atomic number density of the alkali vapor and the pressure of the buffer gasare among the most important parameters of the cell andrequire accurate measurement. A method has been proposed and developedto measure the atomic number density and the pressure based on absorption spectroscopy, by sweeping the absorption line and fittingthe experiment data with a Lorentzian profile to obtainboth parameters. Due to Doppler broadening and pressure broadening, which is mainly dominated by the temperature of the cell and the pressure of buffer gas respectively, this work demonstrates a simulation of the errorbetween the peaks of the Lorentzian profile and the Voigt profile caused by bothfactors. The results indicates that the Doppler broadening contribution is insignificant with an error less than 0.015% at 313-513 K for a 4He density of 2 amg, and an error of 0.1% in the presence of 0.6-5 amg at 393 K. We conclude that the Doppler broadening could be ignored under above conditions, and that the Lorentzianprofile is suitably applied to fit the absorption spectrumobtainingboth parameters simultaneously. In addition we discuss the resolution and the instability due to thelight source, wavelength and the temperature of the cell. We find that the cell temperature, whose uncertainty is two orders of magnitude larger than the instability of the light source and the wavelength, is one of the main factors which contributes to the error.

  5. Laboratory studies of the deposition of alkali sulfate vapors from combustion gases using a flash-evaporation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.; Liang, Baishen

    1986-01-01

    A relatively simple experimental technique is proposed and demonstrated for making measurements of absolute dewpoints and relative deposition rates from flowing combustion gases containing condensible inorganic vapors. The method involves first accumulating condensate on a Pt ribbon target maintained below the dewpoint and then flash-evaporating the condensate into the filament wake, where its alkali content is monitored by alkali-atom emission spectroscopy. The advantages of the method over others are demonstrated; in particular, the method can detect liquid condensate inventories which are small enough to be negligibly influenced by surface runoff produced by gas-side shear stress and liquid condensate surface tension gradients. Illustrative Na2SO4 and K2SO4 deposition rate data and corresponding dewpoint data obtained in a series of alkali-seeded propane/air atmospheric flames are presented and discussed.

  6. Zintl cluster chemistry in the alkali-metal-gallium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, Robert

    1998-03-27

    Previous research into the alkali-metal-gallium systems has revealed a large variety of networked gallium deltahedra. The clusters are analogues to borane clusters and follow the same electronic requirements of 2n+2 skeletal electrons for closo-deltahedra. This work has focused on compounds that do not follow the typical electron counting rules. The first isolated gallium cluster was found in Cs8Ga11. The geometry of the Ga117- unit is not deltahedral but can be described as a penta-capped trigonal prism. The reduction of the charge from a closo-Ga1113- to Ga117- is believed to be the driving force of the distortion. The compound is paramagnetic because of an extra electron but incorporation of a halide atom into the structure captures the unpaired electron and forms a diamagnetic compound. A second isolated cluster has been found in Na10Ga10Ni where the tetra-capped trigonal prismatic gallium is centered by nickel. Stabilization of the cluster occurs through Ni-Ga bonding. A simple two-dimensional network occurs in the binary K2Ga3 Octahedra are connected through four waist atoms to form a layered structure with the potassium atoms sitting between the layers. Na30.5Ga60-xAgx is nonstoichiometric and needs only a small amount of silver to form (x ~ 2-6). The structure is composed of three different clusters which are interconnected to form a three-dimensional structure. The RbGa3-xAux system is also nonstoichiometric with a three-dimensional structure composed of Ga8 dodecahedra and four-bonded gallium atoms. Unlike Na30.5Ga60-xAgx, the RbGa3 binary is also stable. The binary is formally a Zintl phase but the ternary is not. Some chemistry in the alkali-metal-indium system also has been explored. A new potassium-indium binary

  7. Is Electronegativity a Useful Descriptor for the "Pseudo-Alkali-Metal" NH4?

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteside, Alexander; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Gutowski, Maciej S.

    2011-11-18

    Molecular ions in the form of "pseudo-atoms" are common structural motifs in chemistry, with properties that are transferrable between different compounds. We have determined the electronegativity of the "pseudo-alkali metal" ammonium (NH4) and evaluated its reliability as a descriptor in comparison to the electronegativities of the alkali metals. The computed properties of its binary complexes with astatine and of selected borohydrides confirm the similarity of NH4 to the alkali metal atoms, although the electronegativity of NH4 is relatively large in comparison to its cationic radius. We paid particular attention to the molecular properties of ammonium (angular anisotropy, geometric relaxation, and reactivity), which can cause deviations from the behaviour expected of a conceptual "true alkali metal" with this electronegativity. These deviations allow for the discrimination of effects associated with the polyatomic nature of NH4.

  8. Ab initio study of NMR shielding of alkali earth metal ions in water complexes and magnetic moments of alkali earth metal nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antušek, Andrej; Rodziewicz, Pawel; Keḑziera, Dariusz; Kaczmarek-Keḑziera, Anna; Jaszuński, Michał

    2013-11-01

    Ab initio calculations of NMR shielding constants of alkali earth metal ions in the series of water clusters are presented. The shielding constants for systems modeling the structure of the solvation layer of these ions are determined by adding to the coupled cluster singles-and-doubles (CCSD) results the calculated relativistic corrections. The relative magnitude of the dynamical effects, estimated for a typical solvated ion from Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics, is very small. The computed shielding constants are used next to obtain new values of the nuclear magnetic dipole moments of alkali earth metal nuclei.

  9. The effect of different alkali metal hydroxides on nickel electrode life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.; Clement, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    An accelerated cycle-life test (100-percent depth of discharge) of a sintered-type Ni electrode has been carried out in a flooded cell containing different alkali metal hydroxide electrolytes such as LiOH, NaOH, KOH, RbOH, and CsOH. Decrease in Ni electrode capacity with cycling was reduced as the radius of the alkali metal ions, with possible exception of CsOH.

  10. In situ formation of coal gasification catalysts from low cost alkali metal salts

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Bernard J.; Brittain, Robert D.; Sancier, Kenneth M.

    1985-01-01

    A carbonaceous material, such as crushed coal, is admixed or impregnated with an inexpensive alkali metal compound, such as sodium chloride, and then pretreated with a stream containing steam at a temperature of 350.degree. to 650.degree. C. to enhance the catalytic activity of the mixture in a subsequent gasification of the mixture. The treatment may result in the transformation of the alkali metal compound into another, more catalytically active, form.

  11. The effect of different alkali metal hydroxides on nickel electrode life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.; Clement, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    An accelerated cycle-life test (100-percent depth of discharge) of a sintered-type Ni electrode has been carried out in a flooded cell containing different alkali metal hydroxide electrolytes such as LiOH, NaOH, KOH, RbOH, and CsOH. Decrease in Ni electrode capacity with cycling was reduced as the radius of the alkali metal ions, with possible exception of CsOH.

  12. Process for preparing higher oxides of the alkali and alkaline earth metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhukhan, P.; Bell, A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    High purity inorganic higher oxides of the alkali and alkaline earth metals are prepared by subjecting the hydroxide of the alkali and alkaline earth metal to a radio frequency discharge sustained in oxygen. The process is particulary adaptable to the production of high purity potassium superoxide by subjecting potassium hydroxide to glow discharge sustained in oxygen under the pressure of about 0.75 to 1.00 torr.

  13. Buffer gas-assisted four-wave mixing resonances in alkali vapor excited by a single cw laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmavonyan, Svetlana; Khanbekyan, Aleksandr; Khanbekyan, Alen; Mariotti, Emilio; Papoyan, Aram V.

    2016-12-01

    We report the observation of a fluorescence peak appearing in dilute alkali (Rb, Cs) vapor in the presence of a buffer gas when the cw laser radiation frequency is tuned between the Doppler-broadened hyperfine transition groups of an atomic D2 line. Based on steep laser radiation intensity dependence above the threshold and spectral composition of the observed features corresponding to atomic resonance transitions, we have attributed these features to the buffer gas-assisted four-wave mixing process.

  14. Stable alkali metal ion intercalation compounds as optimized metal oxide nanowire cathodes for lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunlong; Han, Chunhua; Yang, Junwei; Su, Jie; Xu, Xiaoming; Li, Shuo; Xu, Lin; Fang, Ruopian; Jiang, Hong; Zou, Xiaodong; Song, Bo; Mai, Liqiang; Zhang, Qingjie

    2015-03-11

    Intercalation of ions in electrode materials has been explored to improve the rate capability in lithium batteries and supercapacitors, due to the enhanced diffusion of Li(+) or electrolyte cations. Here, we describe a synergistic effect between crystal structure and intercalated ion by experimental characterization and ab initio calculations, based on more than 20 nanomaterials: five typical cathode materials together with their alkali metal ion intercalation compounds A-M-O (A = Li, Na, K, Rb; M = V, Mo, Co, Mn, Fe-P). Our focus on nanowires is motivated by general enhancements afforded by nanoscale structures that better sustain lattice distortions associated with charge/discharge cycles. We show that preintercalation of alkali metal ions in V-O and Mo-O yields substantial improvement in the Li ion charge/discharge cycling and rate, compared to A-Co-O, A-Mn-O, and A-Fe-P-O. Diffraction and modeling studies reveal that preintercalation with K and Rb ions yields a more stable interlayer expansion, which prevents destructive collapse of layers and allow Li ions to diffuse more freely. This study demonstrates that appropriate alkali metal ion intercalation in admissible structure can overcome the limitation of cyclability as well as rate capability of cathode materials, besides, the preintercalation strategy provides an effective method to enlarge diffusion channel at the technical level, and more generally, it suggests that the optimized design of stable intercalation compounds could lead to substantial improvements for applications in energy storage.

  15. Quantum magnetism with polar alkali-metal dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Gorshkov, Alexey V.; Manmana, Salvatore R.; Chen Gang; Demler, Eugene; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Rey, Ana Maria

    2011-09-15

    We show that dipolar interactions between ultracold polar alkali-metal dimers in optical lattices can be used to realize a highly tunable generalization of the t-J model, which we refer to as the t-J-V-W model. The model features long-range spin-spin interactions J{sub z} and J{sub perpendicular} of XXZ type, long-range density-density interaction V, and long-range density-spin interaction W, all of which can be controlled in both magnitude and sign independently of each other and of the tunneling t. The spin's is encoded in the rotational degree of freedom of the molecules, while the interactions are controlled by applied static electric and continuous-wave microwave fields. Furthermore, we show that nuclear spins of the molecules can be used to implement an additional (orbital) degree of freedom that is coupled to the original rotational degree of freedom in a tunable way. The presented system is expected to exhibit exotic physics and to provide insights into strongly correlated phenomena in condensed-matter systems. Realistic experimental imperfections are discussed.

  16. Corrosion in alkali metal/molybdenum heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.; Feber, R.C. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Molybdenum/sodium (Mo/Na) and molybdenum/lithium (Mo/Li) heat pipes have been operated for long periods of time in a study of their resistance to failure by alkali metal corrosion. Some Mo/Na heat pipes have operated over 20,600 h at 1400 K without failure, while at least one similar heat pipe failed in less than 14 hours at 1435 K. Detailed post-mortem analyses which have been performed on three failed Mo/Na heat pipes all indicated impurity controlled corrosion of their evaporators. Impurities observed to be transported included carbon, oxygen, and silicon. A Mo/Li heat pipe that failed after 25,216 h of operation at 1700 K was also examined in detail. This failure was due to nickel impurities being transported to the evaporator resulting in perforation of the container tube by the formation of a low melting Mo-Ni alloy. Theoretical thermochemical calculations were conducted for these systems with the objective of corroborating the corrosion mechanisms in both types of heat pipes. The results of these calculations are in general agreement with the observed corrosion a phenomena.

  17. Antiferromagnetic resonance in alkali-metal clusters in sodalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Takehito; Tsugeno, Hajime; Hanazawa, Atsufumi; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Nozue, Yasuo; Hagiwara, Masayuki

    2013-11-01

    We have performed electron spin resonance (ESR) studies of K43+ and (K3Rb)3+ nanoclusters incorporated in powder specimens of aluminosilicate sodalite at several microwave frequencies between 9 and 34 GHz. The K43+ and (K3Rb)3+ clusters are arrayed in a bcc structure and are known to show antiferromagnetic ordering below the Néel temperatures of TN ≃72 and ≃80 K, respectively, due to the exchange coupling between s electrons confined in the clusters. We have found sudden broadenings of ESR spectra in both samples below TN. The line shape of the spectra below TN is analyzed by powder pattern simulations of antiferromagnetic resonance (AFMR) spectra. The calculated line shapes well reproduce the experimental ones at all the frequencies by assuming a biaxial magnetic anisotropy. We have evaluated extremely small anisotropy fields of approximately 1 Oe indicating that these materials are ideal Heisenberg antiferromagnets. We have also found that the magnetic anisotropy changes from easy-plane type to uniaxial type by changing into a heavier alkali-metal cluster and that the g value shifts to a large value beyond two below TN for K43+ and (K3Rb)3+ nanoclusters. These novel features of K43+ and (K3Rb)3+ nanoclusters incorporated in sodalite are discussed.

  18. Removal of oxides from alkali metal melts by reductive titration to electrical resistance-change end points

    DOEpatents

    Tsang, Floris Y.

    1980-01-01

    Alkali metal oxides dissolved in alkali metal melts are reduced with soluble metals which are converted to insoluble oxides. The end points of the reduction is detected as an increase in electrical resistance across an alkali metal ion-conductive membrane interposed between the oxide-containing melt and a material capable of accepting the alkali metal ions from the membrane when a difference in electrical potential, of the appropriate polarity, is established across it. The resistance increase results from blocking of the membrane face by ions of the excess reductant metal, to which the membrane is essentially non-conductive.

  19. Alkali Metal Variation and Twisting of the FeNNFe Core in Bridging Diiron Dinitrogen Complexes.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Sean F; Rodgers, Kenton R; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun; Mercado, Brandon Q; Grubel, Katarzyna; Holland, Patrick L

    2016-03-21

    Alkali metal cations can interact with Fe-N2 complexes, potentially enhancing back-bonding or influencing the geometry of the iron atom. These influences are relevant to large-scale N2 reduction by iron, such as in the FeMoco of nitrogenase and the alkali-promoted Haber-Bosch process. However, to our knowledge there have been no systematic studies of a large range of alkali metals regarding their influence on transition metal-dinitrogen complexes. In this work, we varied the alkali metal in [alkali cation]2[LFeNNFeL] complexes (L = bulky β-diketiminate ligand) through the size range from Na(+) to K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). The FeNNFe cores have similar Fe-N and N-N distances and N-N stretching frequencies despite the drastic change in alkali metal cation size. The two diketiminates twist relative to one another, with larger dihedral angles accommodating the larger cations. In order to explain why the twisting has so little influence on the core, we performed density functional theory calculations on a simplified LFeNNFeL model, which show that the two metals surprisingly do not compete for back-bonding to the same π* orbital of N2, even when the ligand planes are parallel. This diiron system can tolerate distortion of the ligand planes through compensating orbital energy changes, and thus, a range of ligand orientations can give very similar energies.

  20. On the origin of alkali metals in Europa exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgurel, Ozge; Pauzat, Françoise; Ellinger, Yves; Markovits, Alexis; Mousis, Olivier; LCT, LAM

    2016-10-01

    At a time when Europa is considered as a plausible habitat for the development of an early form of life, of particular concern is the origin of neutral sodium and potassium atoms already detected in its exosphere (together with magnesium though in smaller abundance), since these atoms are known to be crucial for building the necessary bricks of prebiotic species. However their origin and history are still poorly understood. The most likely sources could be exogenous and result from the contamination produced by Io's intense volcanism and/or by meteoritic bombardment. These sources could also be endogenous if these volatile elements originate directly from Europa's icy mantle. Here we explore the possibility that neutral sodium and potassium atoms were delivered to the satellite's surface via the upwelling of ices formed in contact with the hidden ocean. These metallic elements would have been transferred as ions to the ocean at early epochs after Europa's formation, by direct contact of water with the rocky core. During Europa's subsequent cooling, the icy layers formed at the top of the ocean would have kept trapped the sodium and potassium, allowing their future progression to the surface and final identification in the exosphere of the satellite. To support this scenario, we have used chemistry numerical models based on first principle periodic density functional theory (DFT). These models are shown to be well adapted to the description of compact ice and are capable to describe the trapping and neutralization of the initial ions in the ice matrix. The process is found relevant for all the elements considered, alkali metals like Na and K, as well as for Mg and probably for Ca, their respective abundances depending essentially of their solubility and chemical capabilities to blend with water ices.

  1. Coulomb explosion during the early stages of the reaction of alkali metals with water.

    PubMed

    Mason, Philip E; Uhlig, Frank; Vaněk, Václav; Buttersack, Tillmann; Bauerecker, Sigurd; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2015-03-01

    Alkali metals can react explosively with water and it is textbook knowledge that this vigorous behaviour results from heat release, steam formation and ignition of the hydrogen gas that is produced. Here we suggest that the initial process enabling the alkali metal explosion in water is, however, of a completely different nature. High-speed camera imaging of liquid drops of a sodium/potassium alloy in water reveals submillisecond formation of metal spikes that protrude from the surface of the drop. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that on immersion in water there is an almost immediate release of electrons from the metal surface. The system thus quickly reaches the Rayleigh instability limit, which leads to a 'coulomb explosion' of the alkali metal drop. Consequently, a new metal surface in contact with water is formed, which explains why the reaction does not become self-quenched by its products, but can rather lead to explosive behaviour.

  2. Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy of Alkali Metal Hydrosulfides: Detection of Ksh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, P. M.; Binns, M. K. L.; Young, J. P.; Bucchino, M. P.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2012-06-01

    Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) techniques have been used to record pure rotational spectra of potassium hydrosulfide and its deuterium isotopologue in their ground electronic states. This study represents the first gas phase spectroscopic observation of KSH. FTMW spectra of NaSH were also recorded. The metal hydrosulfides were produced by discharge assisted laser ablation of the solid alkali metal in the presence of hydrogen sulfide or deuterated hydrogen sulfide. Rotational transitions in the 5-20 GHz range were measured and hyperfine splittings due to the alkali metals and deuterium were resolved. Rotational as well as metal and deuterium quadrupole coupling constants have been determined from the data. The hyperfine parameters will be interpreted in terms of metal-ligand bonding character. Geometric parameters of the alkali metal hydrosulfides will be compared.

  3. Half metallic ferromagnetism in alkali metal nitrides MN (M = Rb, Cs): A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Murugan, A. Rajeswarapalanichamy, R. Santhosh, M. Sudhapriyanga, G.; Kanagaprabha, S.

    2014-04-24

    The structural, electronic and elastic properties of two alkali metal nitrides (MN: M= Rb, Cs) are investigated by the first principles calculations based on density functional theory using the Vienna ab-initio simulation package. At ambient pressure the two nitrides are stable in ferromagnetic state with CsCl structure. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available results. The electronic structure reveals that these materials are half metallic in nature. A pressure-induced structural phase transition from CsCl to ZB phase is observed in RbN and CsN.

  4. Bimolecular gas-phase exchange of alkali metals between cationized biomolecules and neutral crown ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, M.; Dearden, D.V.; Hofstadler, S.

    1995-12-31

    Electrospray ionization of polypeptides and nucleic acids often yields ions containing sodium or potassium charge carriers. These alkali adducts are frequently the residue of ionic buffers used to preserve protein conformation in solution or artifacts of a natural matrix such as blood plasma. Measures taken in solution to desalinate these samples are hindered by the desire to maintain native conformation. The authors here show that ion-molecule chemistry is an alternate means of removing alkali metal ions from multiply-charged biomolecules. Ion-molecule reactions of multiply charged polypeptides with crown ethers result in adduction of the crown if protons are the only charge bearing species, or desalting if alkali metals are among the charge carriers. Both product ions, the desalted peptide and the crown/alkali metal complex, are observed in the latter case.

  5. Method for inhibiting alkali metal corrosion of nickel-containing alloys

    DOEpatents

    DeVan, Jackson H.; Selle, James E.

    1983-01-01

    Structural components of nickel-containing alloys within molten alkali metal systems are protected against corrosion during the course of service by dissolving therein sufficient aluminum, silicon, or manganese to cause the formation and maintenance of a corrosion-resistant intermetallic reaction layer created by the interaction of the molten metal, selected metal, and alloy.

  6. DFT study of the interaction between DOTA chelator and competitive alkali metal ions.

    PubMed

    Frimpong, E; Skelton, A A; Honarparvar, B

    2017-09-01

    1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetracetic acid (DOTA) is an important chelator for radiolabeling of pharmaceuticals. The ability of alkali metals found in the body to complex with DOTA and compete with radio metal ions can alter the radiolabeling process. Non-covalent interactions between DOTA complexed with alkali metals Li(+), Na(+), K(+) and Rb(+), are investigated with density functional theory using B3LYP and ωB97XD functionals. Conformational possibilities of DOTA were explored with a varying number of carboxylic pendant arms of DOTA in close proximity to the ions. It is found that the case in which four arms of DOTA are interacting with ions is more stable than other conformations. The objective of this study is to explore the electronic structure properties upon complexation of alkali metals Li(+) Na(+), K(+) and Rb(+) with a DOTA chelator. Interaction energies, relaxation energies, entropies, Gibbs free energies and enthalpies show that the stability of DOTA, complexed with alkali metals decreases down the group of the periodic table. Implicit water solvation affects the complexation of DOTA-ions leading to decreases in the stability of the complexes. NBO analysis through the natural population charges and the second order perturbation theory, revealed a charge transfer between DOTA and alkali metals. Conceptual DFT-based properties such as HOMO/LUMO energies, ΔEHOMO-LUMO and chemical hardness and softness indicated a decrease in the chemical stability of DOTA-alkali metal complexes down the alkali metal series. This study serves as a guide to researchers in the field of organometallic chelators, particularly, radiopharmaceuticals in finding the efficient optimal match between chelators and various metal ions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparative first-principles study of structural and optical properties of alkali metal azides.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weihua; Xiao, Jijun; Xiao, Heming

    2006-05-25

    A comparative first-principles study of the structural and optical properties of the alkali metal azides has been performed with density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation. The crystal structures of the alkali azides compare well with experimental data. Their ionic character is manifested by the closeness of their internitrogen distances to the calculated N-N bond length for the free azide ion. An analysis of electronic structure, charge transfer, and bond order shows that the alkali azides are all wide-gap insulators and ionic compounds. The energy band and density of states for lithium azide and alpha-sodium azide are very similar, while these for potassium azide, alpha-rubidium azide, and alpha-cesium azide are alike, but some modifications are observed with the increment of alkali metals' electropositivity. These changes are closely related to the differences of the crystal structures. The general shapes of the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric function, adsorption coefficient, and electron energy-loss spectra are quite similar. The peaks originate from the electron transitions from the alkali metal s and p states to the conduction band. Our calculated optical properties for the alkali azides are found to be in good agreement with available experimental data. The absorption spectra of the alkali azides show a number of absorption peaks, which are believed to be associated with different exciton states, in the fundamental absorption region. In general, the electron energy-loss spectra have two plasma frequencies.

  8. Note: An ion source for alkali metal implantation beneath graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers on transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, L. H. de; Cun, H. Y.; Hemmi, A.; Kälin, T.; Greber, T.

    2013-12-15

    The construction of an alkali-metal ion source is presented. It allows the acceleration of rubidium ions to an energy that enables the penetration through monolayers of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. Rb atoms are sublimated from an alkali-metal dispenser. The ionization is obtained by surface ionization and desorption from a hot high work function surface. The ion current is easily controlled by the temperature of ionizer. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy measurements confirm ion implantation.

  9. Alkali Metal Variation and Twisting of the FeNNFe Core in Bridging Diiron Dinitrogen Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Alkali metal cations can interact with Fe–N2 complexes, potentially enhancing back-bonding or influencing the geometry of the iron atom. These influences are relevant to large-scale N2 reduction by iron, such as in the FeMoco of nitrogenase and the alkali-promoted Haber–Bosch process. However, to our knowledge there have been no systematic studies of a large range of alkali metals regarding their influence on transition metal–dinitrogen complexes. In this work, we varied the alkali metal in [alkali cation]2[LFeNNFeL] complexes (L = bulky β-diketiminate ligand) through the size range from Na+ to K+, Rb+, and Cs+. The FeNNFe cores have similar Fe–N and N–N distances and N–N stretching frequencies despite the drastic change in alkali metal cation size. The two diketiminates twist relative to one another, with larger dihedral angles accommodating the larger cations. In order to explain why the twisting has so little influence on the core, we performed density functional theory calculations on a simplified LFeNNFeL model, which show that the two metals surprisingly do not compete for back-bonding to the same π* orbital of N2, even when the ligand planes are parallel. This diiron system can tolerate distortion of the ligand planes through compensating orbital energy changes, and thus, a range of ligand orientations can give very similar energies. PMID:26925968

  10. Review of alkali metal and refractory alloy compatibility for Rankine cycle applications

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R. )

    1989-01-01

    The principal corrosion mechanisms in refractory metal-alkali systems are dissolution, mass transfer, and impurity reactions. In general, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten have low solubilities in the alkali metals, even to very high temperatures, and static corrosion studies have verified that the systems are basically compatible. Loop studies with niobium and tantalum based alloys do not indicate any serious problems due to temperature gradient mass transfer. Above 1000 K, dissimilar metal mass transfer is noted between the refractory metals and iron or nickel based alloys. The most serious corrosion problems encountered are related to impurity reactions associated with oxygen.

  11. Hydrogen Adsorption by Alkali Metal Graphite Intercalation Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purewal, Justin

    Adsorption occurs whenever a solid surface is exposed to a gas or liquid, and is characterized by an increase in fluid density near the interface. Adsorbents have drawn attention in the current effort to engineer materials that store hydrogen at high densities within moderate temperature and pressure regimes. Carbon adsorbents are a logical choice as a storage material due to their low costs and large surface areas. Unfortunately, carbon adsorbents suffer from a low binding enthalpy for H2 (about 5 kJ mol-1), well below the 15 to 18 kJ mol-1) that is considered optimal for hydrogen storage systems. Binding interactions can be increased by the following methods: (1) adjusting the graphite interplanar separation with a pillared structure, and (2) introducing dopant species that interact with H2 molecules by strong electrostatic forces. Graphite intercalation compounds are a class of materials that contain both pillared structures and chemical dopants, making them an excellent model system for studying the fundamentals of hydrogen adsorption in nanostructured carbons. Pressure-composition-temperature diagrams of the MC24(H 2)x graphite intercalation compounds were measured for M = (K, Rb, Cs). Adsorption enthalpies were measured as a function of H2 concentration. Notably, CsC24 had an average adsorption enthalpy of 14.9 kJ mol-1), nearly three times larger than that of pristine graphite. The adsorption enthalpies were found to be positively correlated with the alkali metal size. Adsorption capacities were negatively correlated with the size of the alkali metal. The rate of adsorption is reduced at large H2 compositions, due to the effects of site-blocking and correlation on the H2 diffusion. The strong binding interaction and pronounced molecular-sieving behavior of KC24 is likely to obstruct the translational diffusion of adsorbed H2 molecules. In this work, the diffusion of H2 adsorbed in KC24 was studied by quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular

  12. Metal-Vapor Deposition Modulation on Soft Polymer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujioka, Tsuyoshi; Tsuji, Kosuke

    2012-02-01

    Metal-vapor deposition modulation on soft polymer surfaces and its applications are reported. A soft viscous surface of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) with a glass transition temperature (Tg) of -123 °C showed perfect desorption at room temperature for many kinds of metal vapor. Metal-vapor deposition modulation on PDMS surfaces was applied to the Ca-cathode patterning of an organic light-emitting device, the preparation of thin-film Pb fuse, and the Mg vapor transportation by a pipeline, indicating great potential in various fields of basic research, engineering, and industry.

  13. Physical model of the vapor-liquid (insulator-metal) transition in an exciton gas

    SciTech Connect

    Khomkin, A. L. Shumikhin, A. S.

    2015-04-15

    We propose a simple physical model describing the transition of an exciton gas to a conducting exciton liquid. The transition occurs due to cohesive coupling of excitons in the vicinity of the critical point, which is associated with transformation of the exciton ground state to the conduction band and the emergence of conduction electrons. We calculate the cohesion binding energy for the exciton gas and, using it, derive the equations of state, critical parameters, and binodal. The computational method is analogous to that used by us earlier [5] for predicting the vapor-liquid (insulator-metal) phase transition in atomic (hypothetical, free of molecules) hydrogen and alkali metal vapors. The similarity of the methods used for hydrogen and excitons makes it possible to clarify the physical nature of the transition in the exciton gas and to predict more confidently the existence of a new phase transition in atomic hydrogen.

  14. Ultrasonic Absorption Rate Studies of Crown Ether and 222 Cryptate Complexes of Alkali Metal Cations in Nonaqueous Solutions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-30

    Studies of Crown Ether and 222 Cryptate Complexes of Alkali Metal Cations in Nonaqueous Solutions * by Sergio Petrucci and Edward M. Eyring Prepared...STUDIES OF CROWN ETHER AND 222 CRYPTATE COMPLEXES OF ALKALI METAL CATIONS IN NONAQUEOUS SOLUTIONS 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Sergio Petrucci and Edward M...of Crown Ether and 222 Cryptate Complexes of Alkali Metal Cations in Nonaqueous Solutions Sergio Petrucci and Edward M. Eyring Department of

  15. Heat transfer by condensation of low pressure metal vapors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Y. S.; Lyman, F. A.; Lick, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The film condensation of low pressure metal vapors on isothermal vertical flat plates or tubes is considered. The liquid film is treated as a thin layer in which the acceleration and pressure forces are negligible and across which the temperature distribution is linear. The average behavior of the vapor is found from the linearized one-dimensional vapor flow equations. In order to calculate the rate of condensation, a consistent distribution function for the vapor particles at the liquid-vapor interface is necessary and is determined. The result of the analysis is a set of algebraic equations from which one can predict the condensation rate of low pressure metal vapors. A large but continuous temperature decrease in the vapor is predicted and calculated.

  16. Gas phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange of arginine and arginine dipeptides complexed with alkali metals.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Laura A; Marzluff, Elaine M

    2011-08-25

    The hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of protonated and alkali-metal cationized Arg-Gly and Gly-Arg peptides with D(2)O in the gas phase was studied using electrospray ionization quadropole ion trap mass spectrometry. The Arg-Gly and Gly-Arg alkali metal complexes exchange significantly more hydrogens than protonated Arg-Gly and Gly-Arg. We propose a mechanism where the peptide shifts between a zwitterionic salt bridge and nonzwitterionic charge solvated conformations. The increased rate of H/D exchange of the alkali metal complexes is attributed to the peptide metal complexes' small energy difference between the salt-bridge conformation and the nonzwitterionic charge-solvated conformation. Implications for the applicability of this mechanism to other zwitterionic systems are discussed. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  17. Coordination chemistry insights into the role of alkali metal promoters in dinitrogen reduction.

    PubMed

    Connor, Gannon P; Holland, Patrick L

    2017-05-15

    The Haber-Bosch process is a major contributor to fixed nitrogen that supports the world's nutritional needs and is one of the largest-scale industrial processes known. It has also served as a testing ground for chemists' understanding of surface chemistry. Thus, it is significant that the most thoroughly developed catalysts for N2 reduction use potassium as an electronic promoter. In this review, we discuss the literature on alkali metal cations as promoters for N2 reduction, in the context of the growing knowledge about cooperative interactions between N2, transition metals, and alkali metals in coordination compounds. Because the structures and properties are easier to characterize in these compounds, they give useful information on alkali metal interactions with N2. Here, we review a variety of interactions, with emphasis on recent work on iron complexes by the authors. Finally, we draw conclusions about the nature of these interactions and areas for future research.

  18. Advances in high temperature components for AMTEC (Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Underwood, M. L.; Ryan, M. A.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1991-01-01

    The basic performance of Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) cells is well understood, and quantitative modeling of the electrode performance has been carried out. Tests have been carried out to evaluate the high temperature performance of critical AMTEC components. Progress made in understanding the relative performance of AMTEC components, such as electrodes, electrolytes, working fluids, and seals, as device operating temperature is varied is discussed. Most metallic components are especially subject to corrosion in hot liquid alkali metals containing dissolved oxides. Stability issues of AMTEC components may be addressed by life testing, accelerated testing, and modeling based on known kinetic and thermochemical data.

  19. Advances in high temperature components for AMTEC (Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Underwood, M. L.; Ryan, M. A.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1991-01-01

    The basic performance of Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) cells is well understood, and quantitative modeling of the electrode performance has been carried out. Tests have been carried out to evaluate the high temperature performance of critical AMTEC components. Progress made in understanding the relative performance of AMTEC components, such as electrodes, electrolytes, working fluids, and seals, as device operating temperature is varied is discussed. Most metallic components are especially subject to corrosion in hot liquid alkali metals containing dissolved oxides. Stability issues of AMTEC components may be addressed by life testing, accelerated testing, and modeling based on known kinetic and thermochemical data.

  20. Algorithm for evaluation of temperature distribution of a vapor cell in a diode-pumped alkali laser system (part II).

    PubMed

    Han, Juhong; Wang, You; Cai, He; An, Guofei; Zhang, Wei; Xue, Liangping; Wang, Hongyuan; Zhou, Jie; Jiang, Zhigang; Gao, Ming

    2015-04-06

    With high efficiency and small thermally-induced effects in the near-infrared wavelength region, a diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) is regarded as combining the major advantages of solid-state lasers and gas-state lasers and obviating their main disadvantages at the same time. Studying the temperature distribution in the cross-section of an alkali-vapor cell is critical to realize high-powered DPAL systems for both static and flowing states. In this report, a theoretical algorithm has been built to investigate the features of a flowing-gas DPAL system by uniting procedures in kinetics, heat transfer, and fluid dynamic together. The thermal features and output characteristics have been simultaneously obtained for different gas velocities. The results have demonstrated the great potential of DPALs in the extremely high-powered laser operation.

  1. Fluorescent probes and bioimaging: alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and pH.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Hu, Ying; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-07-21

    All living species and life forms have an absolute requirement for bio-functional metals and acid-base equilibrium chemistry owing to the critical roles they play in biological processes. Hence, a great need exists for efficient methods to detect and monitor biometals and acids. In the last few years, great attention has been paid to the development of organic molecule based fluorescent chemosensors. The availability of new synthetic fluorescent probes has made fluorescence microscopy an indispensable tool for tracing biologically important molecules and in the area of clinical diagnostics. This review highlights the recent advances that have been made in the design and bioimaging applications of fluorescent probes for alkali metals and alkaline earth metal cations, including lithium, sodium and potassium, magnesium and calcium, and for pH determination within biological systems.

  2. Super low work function of alkali-metal-adsorbed transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sol; Lee, Man Young; Lee, Seong; Jhi, Seung-Hoon

    2017-08-01

    Discovering the materials that have work functions less than 1 eV is essential for efficient thermionic energy converter (TEC). The lowest work function of materials reported so far is in a range of about 1 eV. Here, to design low work function materials, we perform first-principles calculations on selected materials of transition metal dichalcogenide as substrates and alkali metals as adsorbates. The work function of our selected materials has a dip ubiquitously independent of the true binding distances of the adsorbates and exhibits contrasting behavior between empty d-shell elements (K, Rb, and Cs) and the others (Li and Na). We show that the interaction of empty d-orbitals of alkali metals and lone pair electrons of chalcogen is a key to the behavior of the work function. From calculated key parameters that determine the work function, we find that, regardless of the amount of charge transfer, K on WTe2 induces the largest surface dipole moment, which consequently makes the surface work function of as small as 0.8 eV, the smallest reported to date, and that the work function is lowered further to 0.7 eV by lattice strains. We demonstrate that the thermal efficiency of TEC using the low work function material exceeds that of thermoelectric materials with figure of merit of 5-10 in temperature range of 880-1200 K.

  3. Dissolution Process of Palladium in Hydrochloric Acid: A Route via Alkali Metal Palladates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasuya, Ryo; Miki, Takeshi; Morikawa, Hisashi; Tai, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    To improve the safety of the Pd recovery processes that use toxic oxidizers, dissolution of Pd in hydrochloric acid with alkali metal palladates was investigated. Alkali metal palladates were prepared by calcining a mixture of Pd black and alkali metal (Li, Na, and K) carbonates in air. Almost the entire amount of Pd was converted into Li2PdO2 after calcination at 1073 K (800 °C) using Li2CO3. In contrast, PdO was obtained by calcination at 1073 K (800 °C) using Na and K carbonates. Our results indicated that Li2CO3 is the most active reagent among the examined alkali metal carbonates for the formation of palladates. In addition, dissolution of the resulting Li2PdO2 in HCl solutions was evaluated under various conditions. In particular, Li2PdO2 rapidly dissolved in diluted (0.1 M) HCl at ambient temperature. Solubility of Pd of Li2PdO2 was found to be 99 pct or larger after dissolution treatment at 353 K (80 °C) for 5 minutes; in contrast, PdO hardly dissolved in 0.1 M HCl. The dissolution mechanism of Li2PdO2 in HCl was also elucidated by analysis of crystal structures and particulate properties. Since our process is completely free from toxic oxidizers, the dissolution process via alkali metal palladates is much safer than currently employed methods.

  4. Recent advances in Alkali Metal Thermoelectric Converter (AMTEC) electrode performance and modeling. [for space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, C. P.; Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Loveland, M. E.; Underwood, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    The Alkali Metal Thermoelectric Converter (AMTEC) is a direct energy conversion device, utilizing a high sodium vapor pressure or activity ratio across a beta-double prime-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE). This paper describes progress on the remaining scientific issue which must be resolved to demonstrate AMTEC feasibility for space power systems: a stable, high power density electrode. Two electrode systems have recently been discovered at JPL that now have the potential to meet space power requirements. One of these is a very thin sputtered molybdenum film, less than 0.5 micron thick, with overlying current collection grids. This electrode has experimentally demonstrated stable performance at 0.4-0.5 W/sq cm for hundreds of hours. Recent modeling results show that at least 0.7 W/sq cm can be achieved. The model of electrode performance now includes all loss mechanisms, including charge transfer resistances at the electrode/electrolyte interface. A second electrode composition, cosputtered platinum/tungsten, has demonstrated 0.8 W/sq cm for 160 hours. Systems studies show that a stable electrode performance of 0.6 W/sq cm will enable high efficiency space power systems.

  5. Silicon halide-alkali metal flames as a source of solar grade silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D. B.; Miller, W. J.; Gould, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using continuous high-temperature reactions of alkali metals and silicon halides to produce silicon in large quantities and of suitable purity for use in the production of photovoltaic solar cells was demonstrated. Low pressure experiments were performed demonstrating the production of free silicon and providing experience with the construction of reactant vapor generators. Further experiments at higher reagent flow rates were performed in a low temperature flow tube configuration with co-axial injection of reagents and relatively pure silicon was produced. A high temperature graphite flow tube was built and continuous separation of Si from NaCl was demonstrated. A larger scaled well stirred reactor was built. Experiments were performed to investigate the compatability of graphite based reactor materials of construction with sodium. At 1100 to 1200 K none of these materials were found to be suitable. At 1700 K the graphites performed well with little damage except to coatings of pyrolytic graphite and silicon carbide which were damaged.

  6. Electrospray ionization of alkali and alkaline earth metal species. Electrochemical oxidation and pH effects

    PubMed

    Ross; Ikonomou; Orians

    2000-08-01

    The utility of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for characterizing dissolved metal species has generated considerable interest in the use of this technique for metal speciation. However, the development of accurate speciation methods based on ESI-MS requires a detailed understanding of the mechanisms by which dissolved metal species are ionized during electrospray. We report how the analysis of alkali and alkaline earth metal species provides new information about some of the processes that affect electrospray ion yield. Selected metal ions and organic ligands were combined in 50 : 50 water-acetonitrile buffered with acetic acid or ammonium acetate and analyzed by flow injection ESI-MS using mild electrospray conditions. Species formed by alkali metal ions with thiol and oxygen-donating ligands were detected in acidic and neutral pH solutions. Electrochemical oxidation of N, N-diethyldithiocarbamate and glutathione during electrospray was indicated by detection of the corresponding disulfides as protonated or alkali metal species. The extent of ligand oxidation depended on solution pH and the dissociation constant of the thiol group. Tandem mass spectrometric experiments suggested that radical cations such as [NaL](+.) (where L=N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate) can be generated by in-source fragmentation of disulfide species. Greater complexation of alkali metals at neutral pH was indicated by a corresponding decrease in the relative abundance of the free metal ion. The number of alkali metal ions bound by glutathione and phthalic acid also increased with increasing pH, in accordance with thermodynamic equilibrium theory. Alkaline earth metal species were detected only in acidic solutions, the absence of 8-hydroxyquinoline complexes being attributed to their relative instability and subsequent dissociation during electrospray. Hence, accurate speciation by ESI-MS depends on experimental conditions and the intrinsic properties of each analyte. Copyright

  7. Structures and Properties of Alkali Metal Intercalated CARBON(60)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qing

    Studies of new phases, structural transitions, superconducting properties and phase diagrams of alkali metal (K, Rb and Cs) intercalated solid C_ {60} are presented. The primary experimental probes are synchrotron powder x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and DC magnetic susceptibility. High-temperature site-ordered rocksalt phases of composition M_1C_{60} (M=K,Rb,Cs) were discovered for the first time. Temperature -dependent x-ray and DSC studies reveal different thermal stabilities for different choices of M. The rocksalt phase of K_1C_{60} phase separates into K_{~0}C _{60} (alpha-C_ {60}) and K_3C_ {60} below 423K with slow kinetics, while Rb_1C_{60} and Cs_1C_{60} both distort into orthorhombic structures below 350K. Rapid quenching of rocksalt K_1C_{60 } also yields a metastable orthorhombic phase at low-T. The fcc-orthorhombic transition appears to be a diffusionless (displacive) phenomenon. No superconductivity is observed above 2K in either slow-cooled or quenched M_1C_{60} phases. Rietveld refinement of single-phase nominal K _3C_{60} suggests nonstoichiometric behavior in the superconducting compound. The refined stoichiometry is K_{3-delta}C _{60}, delta = 0.15 +/- 0.02. Merohedral disorder of C_{60 } molecules (1) persists at temperatures below the superconducting T_{c}. Anisotropic crystallite microstructure or strain is identified to be a dominant feature associated with M_3C _{60} (M = K,Rb) superconducting compounds. High-pressure studies of the superconducting ternary compounds Rb_2CsC_{60} and Na_2RbC_{60} were carried out, and the results compared with those from other fulleride superconductors. Na _2RbC_{60} undergoes a structural distortion, reminiscent of the low-T M_1C _{60} transitions, at ~6 kbar pressure. This unique structural distortion might be responsible for the anomalously low T_{c} in this compound, for example, through "phonon softening". Binary phase diagrams of K_{x }C_{60} and Rb_ {x}C_{60} are presented

  8. Conductivity of metal vapors at the critical point

    SciTech Connect

    Khomkin, A. L. Shumikhin, A. S.

    2016-11-15

    The conductivity of metal vapors at the critical point and near it has been considered. The liquid-metal conductivity originates in this region. The thermodynamic parameters of the critical point, the density of conduction electrons, and the conductivities of various metal vapors have been calculated within the unified approach. It has been proposed to consider the conductivity at the critical point—critical conductivity—as the fourth critical parameter in addition to the density, temperature, and pressure.

  9. Structural resolution of 4-substituted proline diastereomers with ion mobility spectrometry via alkali metal ion cationization.

    PubMed

    Flick, Tawnya G; Campuzano, Iain D G; Bartberger, Michael D

    2015-03-17

    The chirality of substituents on an amino acid can significantly change its mode of binding to a metal ion, as shown here experimentally by traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS) of different proline isomeric molecules complexed with alkali metal ions. Baseline separation of the cis- and trans- forms of both hydroxyproline and fluoroproline was achieved using TWIMS-MS via metal ion cationization (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Cs(+)). Density functional theory calculations indicate that differentiation of these diastereomers is a result of the stabilization of differing metal-complexed forms adopted by the diastereomers when cationized by an alkali metal cation, [M + X](+) where X = Li, Na, K, and Cs, versus the topologically similar structures of the protonated molecules, [M + H](+). Metal-cationized trans-proline variants exist in a linear salt-bridge form where the metal ion interacts with a deprotonated carboxylic acid and the proton is displaced onto the nitrogen atom of the pyrrolidine ring. In contrast, metal-cationized cis-proline variants adopt a compact structure where the carbonyl of the carboxylic acid, nitrogen atom, and if available, the hydroxyl and fluorine substituent solvate the metal ion. Experimentally, it was observed that the resolution between alkali metal-cationized cis- and trans-proline variants decreases as the size of the metal ion increases. Density functional theory demonstrates that this is due to the decreasing stability of the compact charge-solvated cis-proline structure with increased metal ion radius, likely a result of steric hindrance and/or weaker binding to the larger metal ion. Furthermore, the unique structures adopted by the alkali metal-cationized cis- and trans-proline variants results in these molecules having significantly different quantum mechanically calculated dipole moments, a factor that can be further exploited to improve the diastereomeric resolution when utilizing a drift gas with a

  10. Seeing is believing: weak phonon scattering from nanostructures in alkali metal-doped lead telluride.

    PubMed

    He, Jiaqing; Androulakis, John; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Dravid, Vinayak P

    2012-01-11

    Alkali metal doped p-type PbTe is a canonical thermoelectric material studied extensively for heat-to-power generation at high temperature. Most reports have indirectly indicated alkali metals to be conventional with PbTe forming homogeneous solid solutions. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we show the presence of platelet-like nanostructures in these systems containing Na and/or K. By combining further TEM and semiclassical theoretical calculations based on a modified Debye model of the lattice thermal conductivity, we explain the lack of efficacy of these nanostructures for strong phonon scattering. These findings are important in the understanding of alkali metals as carriers in p-type lead chalcogenides. These results also underscore that not all nanostructures favorably scatter phonons in a matrix; an insight that may help in further improvements of the power factor and the overall figure of merit. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  11. Enhancing Skin Permeation of Biphenylacetic Acid (BPA) Using Salt Formation with Organic and Alkali Metal Bases

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Vijay; Naik, Prashant; Giridhar, Rajani; Yadav, Mange Ram

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a series of organic and alkali metal salts of biphenylacetic acid (BPA) have been prepared and evaluated in vitro for percutaneous drug delivery. The physicochemical properties of BPA salts were determined using solubility measurements, DSC, and IR. The DSC thermogram and FTIR spectra confirmed the salt formation with organic and alkali metal bases. Among the series, salts with organic amines (ethanolamine, diethanolamine, triethanolamine, and diethylamine) had lowered melting points while the alkali metal salt (sodium) had a higher melting point than BPA. The in vitro study showed that salt formation improves the physicochemical properties of BPA, leading to improved permeability through the skin. Amongst all the prepared salts, ethanolamine salt (1b) showed 7.2- and 5.4-fold higher skin permeation than the parent drug at pH 7.4 and 5.0, respectively, using rat skin. PMID:26839810

  12. Structural and Magnetic Diversity in Alkali-Metal Manganate Chemistry: Evaluating Donor and Alkali-Metal Effects in Co-complexation Processes.

    PubMed

    Uzelac, Marina; Borilovic, Ivana; Amores, Marco; Cadenbach, Thomas; Kennedy, Alan R; Aromí, Guillem; Hevia, Eva

    2016-03-24

    By exploring co-complexation reactions between the manganese alkyl Mn(CH2SiMe3)2 and the heavier alkali-metal alkyls M(CH2SiMe3) (M=Na, K) in a benzene/hexane solvent mixture and in some cases adding Lewis donors (bidentate TMEDA, 1,4-dioxane, and 1,4-diazabicyclo[2,2,2] octane (DABCO)) has produced a new family of alkali-metal tris(alkyl) manganates. The influences that the alkali metal and the donor solvent impose on the structures and magnetic properties of these ates have been assessed by a combination of X-ray, SQUID magnetization measurements, and EPR spectroscopy. These studies uncover a diverse structural chemistry ranging from discrete monomers [(TMEDA)2 MMn(CH2SiMe3)3] (M=Na, 3; M=K, 4) to dimers [{KMn(CH2SiMe3)3 ⋅C6 H6}2] (2) and [{NaMn(CH2SiMe3)3}2 (dioxane)7] (5); and to more complex supramolecular networks [{NaMn(CH2SiMe3)3}∞] (1) and [{Na2Mn2 (CH2SiMe3)6 (DABCO)2}∞] (7)). Interestingly, the identity of the alkali metal exerts a significant effect in the reactions of 1 and 2 with 1,4-dioxane, as 1 produces coordination adduct 5, while 2 forms heteroleptic [{(dioxane)6K2Mn2 (CH2SiMe3)4(O(CH2)2OCH=CH2)2}∞] (6) containing two alkoxide-vinyl anions resulting from α-metalation and ring opening of dioxane. Compounds 6 and 7, containing two spin carriers, exhibit antiferromagnetic coupling of their S=5/2 moments with varying intensity depending on the nature of the exchange pathways.

  13. Structural Diversity in Alkali Metal and Alkali Metal Magnesiate Chemistry of the Bulky 2,6-Diisopropyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)anilino Ligand.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, M Ángeles; Zabala, Andoni; Kennedy, Alan R; Mulvey, Robert E

    2016-10-10

    Bulky amido ligands are precious in s-block chemistry, since they can implant complementary strong basic and weak nucleophilic properties within compounds. Recent work has shown the pivotal importance of the base structure with enhancement of basicity and extraordinary regioselectivities possible for cyclic alkali metal magnesiates containing mixed n-butyl/amido ligand sets. This work advances alkali metal and alkali metal magnesiate chemistry of the bulky arylsilyl amido ligand [N(SiMe3 )(Dipp)](-) (Dipp=2,6-iPr2 -C6 H3 ). Infinite chain structures of the parent sodium and potassium amides are disclosed, adding to the few known crystallographically characterised unsolvated s-block metal amides. Solvation by N,N,N',N'',N''-pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (PMDETA) or N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA) gives molecular variants of the lithium and sodium amides; whereas for potassium, PMDETA gives a molecular structure, TMEDA affords a novel, hemi-solvated infinite chain. Crystal structures of the first magnesiate examples of this amide in [MMg{N(SiMe3 )(Dipp)}2 (μ-nBu)]∞ (M=Na or K) are also revealed, though these breakdown to their homometallic components in donor solvents as revealed through NMR and DOSY studies. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  14. Structural Diversity in Alkali Metal and Alkali Metal Magnesiate Chemistry of the Bulky 2,6‐Diisopropyl‐N‐(trimethylsilyl)anilino Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, M. Ángeles; Zabala, Andoni; Kennedy, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bulky amido ligands are precious in s‐block chemistry, since they can implant complementary strong basic and weak nucleophilic properties within compounds. Recent work has shown the pivotal importance of the base structure with enhancement of basicity and extraordinary regioselectivities possible for cyclic alkali metal magnesiates containing mixed n‐butyl/amido ligand sets. This work advances alkali metal and alkali metal magnesiate chemistry of the bulky arylsilyl amido ligand [N(SiMe3)(Dipp)]− (Dipp=2,6‐iPr2‐C6H3). Infinite chain structures of the parent sodium and potassium amides are disclosed, adding to the few known crystallographically characterised unsolvated s‐block metal amides. Solvation by N,N,N′,N′′,N′′‐pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (PMDETA) or N,N,N′,N′‐tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA) gives molecular variants of the lithium and sodium amides; whereas for potassium, PMDETA gives a molecular structure, TMEDA affords a novel, hemi‐solvated infinite chain. Crystal structures of the first magnesiate examples of this amide in [MMg{N(SiMe3)(Dipp)}2(μ‐nBu)]∞ (M=Na or K) are also revealed, though these breakdown to their homometallic components in donor solvents as revealed through NMR and DOSY studies. PMID:27573676

  15. Study of Ion Dynamics by Electron Transfer Dissociation: Alkali Metals as Targets

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Shigeo

    2017-01-01

    High energy collision processes for singly charged positive ions using an alkali metal target are confirmed, as a charge inversion mass spectrometry, to occur by electron transfers in successive collisions and the dissociation processes involve the formation of energy-selected neutral species from near-resonant neutralization with alkali metal targets. A doubly charged thermometer molecule was made to collide with alkali metal targets to give singly and doubly charged positive ions. The internal energy resulting from the electron transfer with the alkali metal target was very narrow and centered at a particular energy. This narrow internal energy distribution can be attributed to electron transfer by Landau–Zener potential crossing between the precursor ion and an alkali metal atom, and the coulombic repulsion between singly charged ions in the exit channel. A large cross section of more than 10−14 cm2 was estimated for high-energy electron transfer dissociation (HE-ETD). Doubly protonated phosphorylated peptides obtained by electrospray ionization were collided with Xe and Cs targets to give singly and doubly charged positive ions. Whereas doubly charged fragment ions resulting from CAD were dominant in the case of the Xe target, singly charged fragment ions resulting from ETD were dominant with the Cs target. HE-ETD using the Cs target provided all of the z-type ions by N–Cα bond cleavage without the loss of the phosphate groups. The results demonstrate that HE-ETD with an alkali metal target allowed the position of phosphorylation and the amino acid sequence of peptides with post translational modifications (PTM) to be determined. PMID:28966899

  16. Study of Ion Dynamics by Electron Transfer Dissociation: Alkali Metals as Targets.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Shigeo

    2017-01-01

    High energy collision processes for singly charged positive ions using an alkali metal target are confirmed, as a charge inversion mass spectrometry, to occur by electron transfers in successive collisions and the dissociation processes involve the formation of energy-selected neutral species from near-resonant neutralization with alkali metal targets. A doubly charged thermometer molecule was made to collide with alkali metal targets to give singly and doubly charged positive ions. The internal energy resulting from the electron transfer with the alkali metal target was very narrow and centered at a particular energy. This narrow internal energy distribution can be attributed to electron transfer by Landau-Zener potential crossing between the precursor ion and an alkali metal atom, and the coulombic repulsion between singly charged ions in the exit channel. A large cross section of more than 10(-14) cm(2) was estimated for high-energy electron transfer dissociation (HE-ETD). Doubly protonated phosphorylated peptides obtained by electrospray ionization were collided with Xe and Cs targets to give singly and doubly charged positive ions. Whereas doubly charged fragment ions resulting from CAD were dominant in the case of the Xe target, singly charged fragment ions resulting from ETD were dominant with the Cs target. HE-ETD using the Cs target provided all of the z-type ions by N-Cα bond cleavage without the loss of the phosphate groups. The results demonstrate that HE-ETD with an alkali metal target allowed the position of phosphorylation and the amino acid sequence of peptides with post translational modifications (PTM) to be determined.

  17. Ternary Amides Containing Transition Metals for Hydrogen Storage: A Case Study with Alkali Metal Amidozincates.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hujun; Richter, Theresia M M; Pistidda, Claudio; Chaudhary, Anna-Lisa; Santoru, Antonio; Gizer, Gökhan; Niewa, Rainer; Chen, Ping; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The alkali metal amidozincates Li4 [Zn(NH2)4](NH2)2 and K2[Zn(NH2)4] were, to the best of our knowledge, studied for the first time as hydrogen storage media. Compared with the LiNH2-2 LiH system, both Li4 [Zn(NH2)4](NH2)2-12 LiH and K2[Zn(NH2)4]-8 LiH systems showed improved rehydrogenation performance, especially K2[Zn(NH2)4]-8 LiH, which can be fully hydrogenated within 30 s at approximately 230 °C. The absorption properties are stable upon cycling. This work shows that ternary amides containing transition metals have great potential as hydrogen storage materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Studying the influence of operation parameters on heavy and alkali metals partitioning in flue gases.

    PubMed

    Han, Jun; He, Xuanming; Wang, Guanghui; Furuuchi, Masami; Hata, Mitsuhiko

    2010-02-01

    In order to study the distribution and partitioning of heavy and alkali metals in the flue gases of a sewage sludge incinerator, an experiment was carried out in a pilot scale combustor. The results indicated that it was feasible to separate part of metals from flue gases by collecting fly ash at different temperatures. On the basis of their separation temperature, heavy and alkali metals could be divided into three groups: group A included Zn, K and P, which converted from gaseous phase to liquid or solid when temperature was above 600 degrees C. Pb and Cu were the metals of group B, with optimum transformation temperature of 400 degrees C. Na and As belonged to group C, with conversion temperatures of 300 degrees C. Moreover, the effect of temperature gradient on heavy and alkali metal gas-solid transformation was also experimentally investigated. It was observed that the temperature gradient could promote the gas-solid conversion of heavy and alkali metals. However, too high a temperature gradient would suppress the formation of fine particles. The peak of conversion rate for K, Pb and Na occurred at 434 degrees C s(-1), while that of P and Cu was 487 degrees C s(-1).

  19. Tune-out wavelengths of alkali-metal atoms and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, Bindiya; Safronova, M. S.; Clark, Charles W.

    2011-10-15

    Using first-principles calculations, we identify ''tune-out'' optical wavelengths, {lambda}{sub zero}, for which the ground-state frequency-dependent polarizabilities of alkali-metal atoms vanish. Our approach uses high-precision, relativistic all-order method in which all single, double, and partial triple excitations of the Dirac-Fock wave functions are included to all orders of perturbation theory. We discuss the use of tune-out wavelengths for sympathetic cooling in two-species mixtures of alkali metals with group II and other elements of interest. Special cases in which these wavelengths coincide with strong resonance transitions in a target system are identified.

  20. Ion conducting polymers and polymer blends for alkali metal ion batteries

    DOEpatents

    DeSimone, Joseph M.; Pandya, Ashish; Wong, Dominica; Vitale, Alessandra

    2017-08-29

    Electrolyte compositions for batteries such as lithium ion and lithium air batteries are described. In some embodiments the compositions are liquid compositions comprising (a) a homogeneous solvent system, said solvent system comprising a perfluropolyether (PFPE) and polyethylene oxide (PEO); and (b) an alkali metal salt dissolved in said solvent system. In other embodiments the compositions are solid electrolyte compositions comprising: (a) a solid polymer, said polymer comprising a crosslinked product of a crosslinkable perfluropolyether (PFPE) and a crosslinkable polyethylene oxide (PEO); and (b) an alkali metal ion salt dissolved in said polymer. Batteries containing such compositions as electrolytes are also described.

  1. Algorithm for evaluation of temperature distribution of a vapor cell in a diode-pumped alkali laser system: part I.

    PubMed

    Han, Juhong; Wang, You; Cai, He; Zhang, Wei; Xue, Liangping; Wang, Hongyuan

    2014-06-02

    A diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) is one of the most hopeful candidates to achieve high power performances. As the laser medium is in a gas-state, populations of energy-levels of a DPAL are strongly dependent on the vapor temperature. Thus, the temperature distribution directly determines the output characteristics of a DPAL. In this report, we developed a systematic model by combining the procedures of heat transfer and laser kinetics together to explore the radial temperature distribution in the transverse section of a cesium vapor cell. A cyclic iterative approach is adopted to calculate the population densities. The corresponding temperature distributions have been obtained for different beam waists and pump powers. The conclusion is thought to be useful for realizing a DPAL with high output power.

  2. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, and 3d transition metal atoms on silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, H.; Peeters, F. M.

    2013-02-01

    The adsorption characteristics of alkali, alkaline-earth, and transition metal adatoms on silicene, a graphene-like monolayer structure of silicon are analyzed by means of first-principles calculations. In contrast to graphene, interaction between the metal atoms and the silicene surface is quite strong due to its highly reactive buckled hexagonal structure. In addition to structural properties, we also calculate the electronic band dispersion, net magnetic moment, charge transfer, work function, and dipole moment of the metal adsorbed silicene sheets. Alkali metals, Li, Na, and K, adsorb to hollow sites without any lattice distortion. As a consequence of the significant charge transfer from alkalis to silicene, metalization of silicene takes place. Trends directly related to atomic size, adsorption height, work function, and dipole moment of the silicene/alkali adatom system are also revealed. We found that the adsorption of alkaline-earth metals on silicene is entirely different from their adsorption on graphene. The adsorption of Be, Mg, and Ca turns silicene into a narrow gap semiconductor. Adsorption characteristics of eight transition metals Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Mo, and W are also investigated. As a result of their partially occupied d orbital, transition metals show diverse structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. Upon the adsorption of transition metals, depending on the adatom type and atomic radius, the system can exhibit metal, half-metal, and semiconducting behavior. For all metal adsorbates, the direction of the charge transfer is from adsorbate to silicene, because of its high surface reactivity. Our results indicate that the reactive crystal structure of silicene provides a rich playground for functionalization at nanoscale.

  3. Adsorption of alkali metals and their effect on electronic properties of grain boundaries in bulk of polycrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Olimov, L. O.

    2010-05-15

    The adsorption of alkali metals and their effect on the electronic properties of grain boundaries in bulk of polycrystalline silicon has been studied experimentally. The results obtained show that the potential barrier grows during diffusion and adsorption of alkali metal atoms along grain boundaries.

  4. Structural differences of metal biphenylenebisphosphonate with change in the alkali metal

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnibrugh, Tiffany L.; Garcia, Nancy; Clearfield, Abraham

    2012-03-15

    A series of monovalent biphenylenebisphosphonates have been prepared using hydrothermal synthesis resulting in a composition M[HO{sub 3}PC{sub 12}H{sub 8}PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}] where M=Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, and Cs{sup +}. Three of the original four phosphonic acid protons are retained, making the compounds Broensted acids. A synthesis using microwave irradiation results in a new compound, Na{sub 2}(HO{sub 3}PC{sub 12}H{sub 8}PO{sub 3}H), where only two protons are retained. Two structural types were found for the three-dimensional compounds where one type has a continuous inorganic layer. In the other structural type, the inorganic layer is formed by hydrogen bonding between neighboring chains. These structural variations arise as the coordination number changes from 4 for lithium to 8 for cesium without change in composition. The dense packing of the biphenylenebisphosphonate restricts the access to the protons, thus these compounds cannot be used as Broensted acid catalysts. Alternatively, addition of N,N-dimethylformamide to the reaction mixture results in inclusion of ammonium ions in the cavities. - Graphical abstract: Two of five metal biphenylenebisphosphonate structures (lithium (a) and cesium (b)) are presented. Each compound is a potential Bronsted acid catalyst, where three of the original four protons are retained from the biphenylenebisphosphonic acid. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkali phosphonates are Broensted acids with the retention of three protons per alkali cation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These compounds are thermally stable to approximately 300 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new structure was formed from the in situ synthesis with dimethylformamide as a reactant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With lack of access to the protons the alkali phosphonates cannot function as a Bronsted acid catalysts.

  5. Solvent- and catalyst-free mechanochemical synthesis of alkali metal monohydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Hlova, Ihor Z.; Castle, Andra; Goldston, Jennifer F.; Gupta, Shalabh; Prost, Timothy; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Scott Chumbley, L.; Pruski, Marek; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2016-07-06

    Alkali metal monohydrides, AH (A = Li–Cs) have been synthesized in quantitative yields at room temperature by reactive milling of alkali metals in the presence of hydrogen gas at 200 bar or less. The mechanochemical approach reported here eliminates problems associated with the malleability of alkali metals — especially Li, Na, and K — and promotes effective solid–gas reactions, ensuring their completion. This is achieved by incorporating a certain volume fraction of the corresponding hydride powder as a process control agent, which allows continuous and efficient milling primarily by coating the surface of metal particles, effectively blocking cold welding. Formation of high-purity crystalline monohydrides has been confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and volumetric analyses of reactively desorbed H2 from as-milled samples. The proposed synthesis method is scalable and particularly effective for extremely air-sensitive materials, such as alkali and alkaline earth metal hydrides. Furthermore, the technique may also be favorable for production in continuous reactors operating at room temperature, thereby reducing the total processing time, energy consumption and, hence, the cost of production of these hydrides or their derivatives and composites.

  6. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, Marca M.; Peng, Marcus Y.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    1996-01-01

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M.sub.x Z.sub.y Mn.sub.(1-y) O.sub.2, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell.

  7. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, M.M.; Peng, M.Y.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.C.

    1996-09-24

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M{sub x}Z{sub y}Mn{sub (1{minus}y)}O{sub 2}, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell. 11 figs.

  8. Solvent- and catalyst-free mechanochemical synthesis of alkali metal monohydrides

    DOE PAGES

    Hlova, Ihor Z.; Castle, Andra; Goldston, Jennifer F.; ...

    2016-07-06

    Alkali metal monohydrides, AH (A = Li–Cs) have been synthesized in quantitative yields at room temperature by reactive milling of alkali metals in the presence of hydrogen gas at 200 bar or less. The mechanochemical approach reported here eliminates problems associated with the malleability of alkali metals — especially Li, Na, and K — and promotes effective solid–gas reactions, ensuring their completion. This is achieved by incorporating a certain volume fraction of the corresponding hydride powder as a process control agent, which allows continuous and efficient milling primarily by coating the surface of metal particles, effectively blocking cold welding. Formationmore » of high-purity crystalline monohydrides has been confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and volumetric analyses of reactively desorbed H2 from as-milled samples. The proposed synthesis method is scalable and particularly effective for extremely air-sensitive materials, such as alkali and alkaline earth metal hydrides. Furthermore, the technique may also be favorable for production in continuous reactors operating at room temperature, thereby reducing the total processing time, energy consumption and, hence, the cost of production of these hydrides or their derivatives and composites.« less

  9. Effect of the alkali metal activator on the properties of fly ash-based geopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Jaarsveld, J.G.S. van; Deventer, J.S.J. van

    1999-10-01

    The alkali and alkali earth metal cations present during the formation of most known aluminosilicate structures have a very significant effect on both the physical and chemical properties of the final product. Geopolymers are no exception, although this effect has not been thoroughly quantified and in the case of waste-based geopolymers it has not received any significant attention. The present study investigates the effect of mainly Na{sup +} and K{sup +} on the physical and chemical properties of fly ash-based geopolymeric binders both before and after setting has occurred. A variety of tests were conducted, including rheological measurements, various leaching tests, compressive strength testing, specific surface area determinations, and infrared spectroscopy (IR). It is concluded that the alkali metal cation controls and affects almost all stages of geopolymerization, from the ordering of ions and soluble species during the dissolution process to playing a structure-directing role during gel hardening and eventual crystal formation.

  10. Injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Ault, Earl R.

    1988-01-01

    An injection locked oscillator system for pulsed metal vapor lasers is disclosed. The invention includes the combination of a seeding oscillator with an injection locked oscillator (ILO) for improving the quality, particularly the intensity, of an output laser beam pulse. The present invention includes means for matching the first seeder laser pulses from the seeding oscillator to second laser pulses of a metal vapor laser to improve the quality, and particularly the intensity, of the output laser beam pulse.

  11. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 79. Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metal Pseudohalides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hála, Jiri

    2004-03-01

    This volume presents solubility data of azides, cyanides, cyanates, and thiocyanates of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, and ammonium. Covered are binary and ternary systems in all solvents. No solubility data have been found for some of the compounds of alkali metals, alkaline metals, and ammonium. These include beryllium and magnesium azides, lithium, rubidium cesium, ammonium, and alkaline earth cyanates and cyanides, and beryllium thiocyanate. Likewise, no solubility data seem to exist for selenocyanates of the mentioned metals and ammonium. The literature has been covered up to the middle of 2001, and there was a great effort to have the literature survey as complete as possible. The few documents which remained unavailable to the editor, and could not be included in the volume, are listed in the Appendix. For some compounds it was not possible to show the Chemical Abstracts registry numbers since these have not been assigned. For this reason, the registry number index is incomplete.

  12. Theoretical study on the adsorption of carbon dioxide on individual and alkali-metal doped MOF-5s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Nguyen Thi Thu; Lefedova, O. V.; Ha, Nguyen Ngoc

    2016-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to investigate the adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) on metal-organic framework (MOF-5) and alkali-metal (Li, K, Na) doped MOF-5s. The adsorption energy calculation showed that metal atom adsorption is exothermic in MOF-5 system. Moreover, alkali-metal doping can significantly improve the adsorption ability of carbon dioxide on MOF-5. The best influence is observed for Li-doping.

  13. Synthetic, structural, and theoretical investigations of alkali metal germanium hydrides--contact molecules and separated ions.

    PubMed

    Teng, Weijie; Allis, Damian G; Ruhlandt-Senge, Karin

    2007-01-01

    The preparation of a series of crown ether ligated alkali metal (M=K, Rb, Cs) germyl derivatives M(crown ether)nGeH3 through the hydrolysis of the respective tris(trimethylsilyl)germanides is reported. Depending on the alkali metal and the crown ether diameter, the hydrides display either contact molecules or separated ions in the solid state, providing a unique structural insight into the geometry of the obscure GeH3- ion. Germyl derivatives displaying M--Ge bonds in the solid state are of the general formula [M([18]crown-6)(thf)GeH3] with M=K (1) and M=Rb (4). The compounds display an unexpected geometry with two of the GeH3 hydrogen atoms closely approaching the metal center, resulting in a partially inverted structure. Interestingly, the lone pair at germanium is not pointed towards the alkali metal, rather two of the three hydrides are approaching the alkali metal center to display M--H interactions. Separated ions display alkali metal cations bound to two crown ethers in a sandwich-type arrangement and non-coordinated GeH3- ions to afford complexes of the type [M(crown ether)2][GeH3] with M=K, crown ether=[15]crown-5 (2); M=K, crown ether=[12]crown-4 (3); and M=Cs, crown ether=[18]crown-6 (5). The highly reactive germyl derivatives were characterized by using X-ray crystallography, 1H and 13C NMR, and IR spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) calculations were performed to analyze the geometry of the GeH3- ion in the contact molecules 1 and 4.

  14. Surface phonons on Al(111) surface covered by alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusina, G. G.; Eremeev, S. V.; Borisova, S. D.; Sklyadneva, I. Yu.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2005-06-01

    We investigated the vibrational and structural properties of the Al(111)-(3×3)R30°-AM (AM=Na,K,Li) adsorbed systems using interaction potentials from the embedded-atom method. The surface relaxation, surface phonon dispersion, and polarization of vibrational modes for the alkali adatoms and the substrate atoms as well as the local density of states are discussed. Our calculated structural parameters are in close agreement with experimental and ab initio results. The obtained vibrational frequencies compare fairly well with the available experimental data.

  15. Vapor pressure and thermodynamics of actinide metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.W.; Kleinschmidt, P.D.; Haire, R.G.; Brown, D.

    1980-01-01

    Precise vapor pressure measurements by target collection/mass spectrometric Knudsen effusion techniques were combined with crystal entropy estimates to produce self-consistent free-enrgy functions, permitting calculation of heats, entropies and free energies from 298/sup 0/K to the highest temperatures of measurement. The vapor pressures and thermodyamics of vaporization of americium, curium, berkelium, and californium are compared in terms of electronic structure and bonding trends in the trans-plutonium elements. These resuslts are contrasted with the behavior of the early actinides, with attention to energy states and possible effects of f-electron bonding. 9 figures, 4 tables.

  16. The Alkali Metal Thermal-To-Electric Converter for Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, M.

    1999-01-01

    AMTEC, the Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Converter, is a direct thermal to electric energy conversion device; it has been demostrated to perform at high power densities, with open circuit voltages in single electrochemical cells up to 1.6 V and current desities up to 2.0 A/cm(sup 2).

  17. Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles

    DOEpatents

    Cassano, Anthony A.

    1985-01-01

    A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs.

  18. Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles

    DOEpatents

    Cassano, A.A.

    1985-07-02

    A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs. 3 figs.

  19. Right-Leduc Effect and Mutual Drag Effect of the Alkali Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara, Ko

    1980-09-01

    Detailed measurements of the thermomagnetic, thermoelectric and galvanomagnetic properties of alkali metals were made by Fletcher and his colleague. Among these measurements the Right-Leduc coefficient Am does not behave as expected but AmT reveals a characteristic peak at 0.1

  20. The Alkali Metal Thermal-To-Electric Converter for Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, M.

    1999-01-01

    AMTEC, the Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Converter, is a direct thermal to electric energy conversion device; it has been demostrated to perform at high power densities, with open circuit voltages in single electrochemical cells up to 1.6 V and current desities up to 2.0 A/cm(sup 2).

  1. Enhancing electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution by nickel salicylaldimine complexes with alkali metal cations in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Shao, Haiyan; Muduli, Subas K; Tran, Phong D; Soo, Han Sen

    2016-02-18

    New salicylaldimine nickel complexes, comprising only earth-abundant elements, have been developed for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution in aqueous media. The second-sphere ether functionalities on the periphery of the complexes enhance the electrocatalytic activity in the presence of alkali metal cations. The electrocatalysts demonstrate improved performances especially in the economical and sustainable seawater reaction medium.

  2. The interactions of sorbates with gallosilicates and alkali-metal exchanged gallosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limtrakul, J.; Kuno, M.; Treesukol, P.

    1999-11-01

    Structures, energetics and vibrational frequencies of the interaction of adsorbates with H-aluminosilicates (H-AlZ), H-gallosilicates (H-GaZ), alkali-metal exchanged aluminosilicates (X-AlZ) and alkali-metal exchanged gallosilicates (X-GaZ), where X being Li, Na, or K, have been carried out at B3LYP and HF levels of theory with 6-31G(d) as the basis set. The charge compensating alkali-metal ions can affect the catalytically active site (Si-O-T where T=Al or Ga) by weakening the Si-O, Al-O, and Ga-O bonds as compared to their anionic frameworks. Comparing the net stabilization energies, Δ ENSE, of the naked alkali-metal/H 2O adducts with those of the alkali-metal exchanged zeolite/H 2O systems, the latter amounts only to about 50% of the former, which is partly due to the destabilizing role of the negative zeolitic oxygen frameworks surrounding the cations. The interaction of sorbates with the alkali-metal exchanged gallosilicates can be employed to probe the field strength inside the catalytic frameworks as indicated by the plot of the binding energy, Δ E, versus 1/ RX-O w2, with R(X-O w) being the distance between the cationic nucleus and the oxygen atom of the adsorbate. The IR spectra of H 2O adsorbed on Na-AlZ are calculated to be 3584, 3651, and 1686 cm -1. The obtained results are in excellent agreement with the very recent experimental IR spectra of water adsorbed on Na-ZSM-5 of Zecchina et al. (J. Phys. Chem., 100 (1996) 16 484). Other important features, i.e. the correlation between Δ νOH and, Δ E, R(X-O w) , and 1/ RX-O w2, cationic size, demonstrate that the interactions of sorbates with alkali-metal exchanged gallosilicates are well approximated by electrostatic contribution.

  3. Alkali Metal Carbenoids: A Case of Higher Stability of the Heavier Congeners.

    PubMed

    Molitor, Sebastian; Gessner, Viktoria H

    2016-06-27

    As a result of the increased polarity of the metal-carbon bond when going down the group of the periodic table, the heavier alkali metal organyl compounds are generally more reactive and less stable than their lithium congeners. We now report a reverse trend for alkali metal carbenoids. Simple substitution of lithium by the heavier metals (Na, K) results in a significant stabilization of these usually highly reactive compounds. This allows their isolation and handling at room temperature and the first structure elucidation of sodium and potassium carbenoids. The control of stability was used to control reactivity and selectivity. Hence, the Na and K carbenoids act as selective carbene-transfer reagents, whereas the more labile lithium systems give rise to product mixtures. Additional fine tuning of the M-C interaction by means of crown ether addition further allows for control of the stability and reactivity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Adsorption of radiostrontium by soil treated with alkali metal hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, B.P.

    1980-07-01

    Twelve soils from areas used for the disposal of low-level radioactive solid waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory were examined for their ability to adsorb trace levels of Sr. Radiostrontium adsorption, in the presence of normal soil Ca levels, was determined following the addition of LiOH, NaOH, KOH, NaCl, and Na-polyacrylate. With soils from C horizons, the average thermodynamic equilibrium constant for the Na-Ca(Sr) exchange reaction decreased from 0.063 to 0.00041 after treatment with 0.4 meq/g of NaOH, indicating a large increase in the selectivity for Ca(Sr) adsorption. With samples from A or B horizons, this effect was not observed due to the dissolution of soil organic matter; Na-polyacrylate interfered with the adsorption of Ca(Sr) in the same manner as the NaOH-solubilized soil organic matter. Selectivity differences between trace levels of Sr and the macroamounts of soil Ca were quite small (<5%) in both the treated and untreated soils. A multiple regression analysis indicated that three soil properties (percent organic matter, exchangeable Ca + Mg, and exchangeable acidity) explained 77% of the variation in Sr adsorption by alkali-treated soils. In untreated soils, the exchangeable Ca + Mg and exchangeable acidity explained 70% of the variation in the adsorption of Sr. The response of the soils to alkali treatment generally followed the lyotropic series: Li > Na > K.

  5. Magnetic and Optical Studies in Alkali-Metal Doped Fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Pak-Tak Patrick

    We report the observation of a new phase of superconducting K_3C_{60} and Rb_3C_{60} with anomalous magnetic properties which suggest the presence of p-state superconductivity. The samples are prepared by mixing stoichiometric amounts of the alkali -metal with C_{60} powder and then vacuum sealed in quartz tubes. These samples are then annealed at 500^circC for a few days before being quenched to room temperature. SQUID magnetometer measurements of the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility _ {X}(T) of these samples at magnetic fields below ~1000 gauss show that both the field-cooled-cooling (FC-C) and the field-cooled-warming (FC-W) curves are more diamagnetic than the zero-field -cooled-warming (ZFC-W) curve. This observation is in contrast to the conventional flux pinning pattern of a typical type -II superconductor, where the ZFC-W curve is more diamagnetic than the FC-C and FC-W curves. We also observe three distinct superconducting transition temperature (T_ {c}) onsets corresponding to the ZFC-W, FC-C and FC-W curves. These T_{c} onsets are different from one another to within a few degrees Kelvin, but they are close to 19.6 and 30.6 K for K_3C_{60} and Rb_3C_{60 } respectively. In addition, a temperature hysteresis loop formed by the FC-C and the FC-W curves is observed in the _{X}(T) relationship of each sample. Also, a ferromagnetic ordering is found at magnetic fields very close to zero gauss. The Curie temperature is within 0.5 K from the superconducting transition temperature. Differential thermal analysis of pristine C _{60} in an argon atmosphere shows an energy liberation reaction starting off at 500 ^circC, suggesting that the C _{60} molecules may have become polymerized during the annealing at 500^ circC. Subsequent X-ray diffraction measurements of K_3rm C_{60} samples which have the anomalous magnetic properties indicate that the samples are a mixture of several potassium-doped C_{60} polymer phases. Raman scattering and

  6. Theory of magic optical traps for Zeeman-insensitive clock transitions in alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2010-05-15

    Precision measurements and quantum-information processing with cold atoms may benefit from trapping atoms with specially engineered, 'magic' optical fields. At the magic trapping conditions, the relevant atomic properties remain immune to strong perturbations by the trapping fields. Here we develop a theoretical analysis of magic trapping for especially valuable Zeeman-insensitive clock transitions in alkali-metal atoms. The involved mechanism relies on applying a magic bias B field along a circularly polarized trapping laser field. We map out these B fields as a function of trapping laser wavelength for all commonly used alkalis. We also highlight a common error in evaluating Stark shifts of hyperfine manifolds.

  7. Tuning aromaticity in trigonal alkaline earth metal clusters and their alkali metal salts.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Halla, J Oscar C; Matito, Eduard; Blancafort, Lluís; Robles, Juvencio; Solà, Miquel

    2009-12-01

    In this work, we analyze the geometry and electronic structure of the [X(n)M(3)](n-2) species (M = Be, Mg, and Ca; X = Li, Na, and K; n = 0, 1, and 2), with special emphasis on the electron delocalization properties and aromaticity of the cyclo-[M(3)](2-) unit. The cyclo-[M(3)](2-) ring is held together through a three-center two-electron bond of sigma-character. Interestingly, the interaction of these small clusters with alkali metals stabilizes the cyclo-[M(3)](2-) ring and leads to a change from sigma-aromaticity in the bound state of the cyclo-[M(3)](2-) to pi-aromaticity in the XM(3) (-) and X(2)M(3) metallic clusters. Our results also show that the aromaticity of the cyclo-[M(3)](2-) unit in the X(2)M(3) metallic clusters depends on the nature of X and M. Moreover, we explored the possibility for tuning the aromaticity by simply moving X perpendicularly to the center of the M(3) ring. The Na(2)Mg(3), Li(2)Mg(3), and X(2)Ca(3) clusters undergo drastic aromaticity alterations when changing the distance from X to the center of the M(3) ring, whereas X(2)Be(3) and K(2)Mg(3) keep its aromaticity relatively constant along this process. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Shape Evolution of Metal Nanoparticles in Water Vapor Environment.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Beien; Xu, Zhen; Wang, Chunlei; Gao, Yi

    2016-04-13

    The structures of the metal nanoparticles are crucial for their catalytic activities. How to understand and even control the shape evolution of nanoparticles under reaction condition is a big challenge in heterogeneous catalysis. It has been proved that many reactive gases hold the capability of changing the structures and properties of metal nanoparticles. One interesting question is whether water vapor, such a ubiquitous environment, could induce the shape evolution of metal nanoparticles. So far this question has not received enough attention yet. In this work, we developed a model based on the density functional theory, the Wulff construction, and the Langmuir adsorption isotherm to explore the shape of metal nanoparticle at given temperature and water vapor pressure. By this model, we show clearly that water vapor could notably increase the fraction of (110) facets and decrease that of (111) facets for 3-8 nm Cu nanoparticles, which is perfectly consistent with the experimental observations. Further investigations indicate the water vapor has different effects on the different metal species (Cu, Au, Pt, and Pd). This work not only helps to understand the water vapor effect on the structures of metal nanoparticles but also proposes a simple but effective model to predict the shape of nanoparticles in certain environment.

  9. Device and method for upgrading petroleum feedstocks and petroleum refinery streams using an alkali metal conductive membrane

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier

    2016-09-13

    A reactor has two chambers, namely an oil feedstock chamber and a source chamber. An ion separator separates the oil feedstock chamber from the source chamber, wherein the ion separator allows alkali metal ions to pass from the source chamber, through the ion separator, and into the oil feedstock chamber. A cathode is at least partially housed within the oil feedstock chamber and an anode is at least partially housed within the source chamber. A quantity of an oil feedstock is within the oil feedstock chamber, the oil feedstock comprising at least one carbon atom and a heteroatom and/or one or more heavy metals, the oil feedstock further comprising naphthenic acid. When the alkali metal ion enters the oil feedstock chamber, the alkali metal reacts with the heteroatom, the heavy metals and/or the naphthenic acid, wherein the reaction with the alkali metal forms inorganic products.

  10. Role of adiabaticity in controlling alkali-metal fine-structure mixing induced by rare gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshel, Ben; Cardoza, Joseph A.; Weeks, David E.; Perram, Glen P.

    2017-04-01

    The collision cross sections for alkali-metal-rare-gas spin orbit mixing between the n2P3 /2→n2P1 /2 levels trend strongly with the Massey parameter, or adiabaticity of the collisions. The strength of the interaction, as characterized by the C6 dispersion coefficient, is a secondary influence on the rates. An analytic expression for the probability of energy transfer in alkali-metal-rare-gas collisions is derived using time-dependent perturbation theory. The model agrees well with a broad literature survey of the observed temperature-dependent cross sections. A simple interaction potential successfully organizes the alkali-metal-rare-gas database. The rates become very large for high-lying states, as the collisions are quite sudden and the radius of the valence electron is large. In contrast, the highly adiabatic cesium 62P mixing rates are six to eight orders of magnitude smaller. The mixing rate for the Rb-He diode pumped alkali laser system varies from 0.20 -1.53 ×10-11cm 3/at .s for T =279 -893 K .

  11. Fractionation of families of major, minor, and trace metals across the melt-vapor interface in volcanic exhalations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkley, T.K.; Le Cloarec, M.-F.; Lambert, G.

    1994-01-01

    Chemical families of metals fractionate systematically as they pass from a silicate melt across the interface with the vapor phase and on into a cooled volcanic plume. We measured three groups of metals in a small suite of samples collected on filters from the plumes of Kilauea (Hawaii, USA), Etna (Sicily), and Merapi (Java) volcanoes. These were the major, minor, and trace metals of the alkali and alkaline earth families (K, Rb, Cs, Ca, Sr, Ba), a group of ordinarily rare metals (Cd, Cu, In, Pb, Tl) that are related by their chalcophile affinities, and the radon daughter nuclides 210Po, 210Bi, and 210Pb. The measurements show the range and some details of systematic melt-vapor fractionation within and between these groups of metals. In the plumes of all three volcanoes, the alkali metals are much more abundant than the alkaline earth metals. In the Kilauea plume, the alkali metals are at least six times more abundant than the alkaline earth metals, relative to abundances in the melt; at Etna, the factor is at least 300. Fractionations within each family are, commonly, also distinctive; in the Kilauea plume, in addition to the whole alkaline earth family being depleted, the heaviest metals of the family (Sr, Ba) are progressively more depleted than the light metal Ca. In plumes of fumaroles at Merapi, K/Cs ratios were approximately three orders of magnitude smaller than found in other earth materials. This may represent the largest observed enrichment of the "light ion lithophile" (LIL) metals. Changes in metal ratios were seen through the time of eruption in the plumes of Kilauea and Etna. This may reflect degree of degassing of volatiles, with which metals complex, from the magma bodies. At Kilauea, the changes in fractionation were seen over about three years; fractionation within the alkaline earth family increased, and that between the two families decreased, over that time. All of the ordinarily rare chalcophile metals measured are extremely abundant in

  12. Electronic and structural ground state of heavy alkali metals at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Fabbris, G.; Lim, J.; Veiga, L. S. I.; Haskel, D.; Schilling, J. S.

    2015-02-17

    Here, alkali metals display unexpected properties at high pressure, including emergence of low symmetry crystal structures, that appear to occur due to enhanced electronic correlations among the otherwise nearly-free conduction electrons. We investigate the high pressure electronic and structural ground state of K, Rb, and Cs using x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction measurements together with ab initio theoretical calculations. The sequence of phase transitions under pressure observed at low temperature is similar in all three heavy alkalis except for the absence of the oC84 phase in Cs. Both the experimental and theoretical results point to pressure-enhanced localization of the valence electrons characterized by pseudo-gap formation near the Fermi level and strong spd hybridization. Although the crystal structures predicted to host magnetic order in K are not observed, the localization process appears to drive these alkalis closer to a strongly correlated electron state.

  13. A lattice-gas model for alkali-metal fullerides: body-centred-cubic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, György; Udvardi, László

    1998-05-01

    A Coulomb lattice-gas model with a host-lattice screening mechanism is adapted to describe the ordering phenomena in alkali-metal fullerides of body-centred-cubic structure. It is assumed that the electric charge of an alkali ion residing at a tetrahedral interstitial site is completely screened by its first-neighbour 0953-8984/10/19/009/img5 molecules. The electronic energy of the 0953-8984/10/19/009/img6 ion is also taken into consideration as a charged spherical shell. By means of these assumptions an effective (short-range) pair interaction between two alkali ions is obtained. The resultant lattice-gas model is analysed by using two- and six-sublattice mean-field approximations. The thermodynamic properties are summarized in phase diagrams for different shell radii.

  14. Electronic and structural ground state of heavy alkali metals at high pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Fabbris, G.; Lim, J.; Veiga, L. S. I.; ...

    2015-02-17

    Here, alkali metals display unexpected properties at high pressure, including emergence of low symmetry crystal structures, that appear to occur due to enhanced electronic correlations among the otherwise nearly-free conduction electrons. We investigate the high pressure electronic and structural ground state of K, Rb, and Cs using x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction measurements together with ab initio theoretical calculations. The sequence of phase transitions under pressure observed at low temperature is similar in all three heavy alkalis except for the absence of the oC84 phase in Cs. Both the experimental and theoretical results point to pressure-enhanced localization of themore » valence electrons characterized by pseudo-gap formation near the Fermi level and strong spd hybridization. Although the crystal structures predicted to host magnetic order in K are not observed, the localization process appears to drive these alkalis closer to a strongly correlated electron state.« less

  15. The different poisoning behaviors of various alkali metal containing compounds on SCR catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xuesen; Yang, Guangpeng; Chen, Yanrong; Ran, Jingyu; Zhang, Li

    2017-01-01

    Alkali metals are poisonous to the metal oxide catalyst for NO removal. The chemical configuration of alkali containing substance and interacting temperature can affect the poisoning profile. A computational method based on Frontier Molecular Orbital analysis was proposed to determine the reacting behavior of various alkali-containing substances with SCR catalyst. The results reveal that the poisoning reactivities of various substances can be ranked as: E (MOH) > E (M2SO4) > E(MCl) > E(MNO3) > E(MHSO4). The experimental activity tests of the catalysts calcined at stepped temperatures show that NaOH can react with the catalyst below 200 °C. NaCl and NaNO3 start to react with the catalyst at a temperature between 300 and 400 °C. Unlike MOH, MCl and MNO3, which can produce volatile or decomposable species for the anions after reacting with the catalyst, M2SO4 and MHSO4 will leave both cations and anions on the catalyst surface. The sulfate ions left on the catalyst can generate active acid sites for NH3 adsorption. The experimental results also show that Na2SO4 and NaHSO4 will not lower the NO conversion. The after-reaction influences of various alkali metals were studied using theoretical and experimental methods. The theoretical results show that the acidity decreases with doping of alkali metal. Experiments show a consistent result that the NO conversion decreases as undoped >LiCl > NaCl > KCl.

  16. High-pressure phase transition of alkali metal-transition metal deuteride Li2PdD2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yansun; Stavrou, Elissaios; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Majumdar, Arnab; Wang, Hui; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Epshteyn, Albert; Purdy, Andrew P.

    2017-06-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of lithium palladium deuteride (Li2PdD2) subjected to pressures up to 50 GPa reveals one structural phase transition near 10 GPa, detected by synchrotron powder x-ray diffraction, and metadynamics simulations. The ambient-pressure tetragonal phase of Li2PdD2 transforms into a monoclinic C2/m phase that is distinct from all known structures of alkali metal-transition metal hydrides/deuterides. The structure of the high-pressure phase was characterized using ab initio computational techniques and from refinement of the powder x-ray diffraction data. In the high-pressure phase, the PdD2 complexes lose molecular integrity and are fused to extended [PdD2]∞ chains. The discovered phase transition and new structure are relevant to the possible hydrogen storage application of Li2PdD2 and alkali metal-transition metal hydrides in general.

  17. High-pressure phase transition of alkali metal-transition metal deuteride Li2PdD2.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yansun; Stavrou, Elissaios; Goncharov, Alexander F; Majumdar, Arnab; Wang, Hui; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Epshteyn, Albert; Purdy, Andrew P

    2017-06-21

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of lithium palladium deuteride (Li2PdD2) subjected to pressures up to 50 GPa reveals one structural phase transition near 10 GPa, detected by synchrotron powder x-ray diffraction, and metadynamics simulations. The ambient-pressure tetragonal phase of Li2PdD2 transforms into a monoclinic C2/m phase that is distinct from all known structures of alkali metal-transition metal hydrides/deuterides. The structure of the high-pressure phase was characterized using ab initio computational techniques and from refinement of the powder x-ray diffraction data. In the high-pressure phase, the PdD2 complexes lose molecular integrity and are fused to extended [PdD2]∞ chains. The discovered phase transition and new structure are relevant to the possible hydrogen storage application of Li2PdD2 and alkali metal-transition metal hydrides in general.

  18. Superconductivity in room-temperature stable electride and high-pressure phases of alkali metals.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Hideo; Kim, Sung-Wng; Matsuishi, Satoru; Tanaka, Shigeki; Miyake, Atsushi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya

    2015-03-13

    S-band metals such as alkali and alkaline earth metals do not undergo a superconducting transition (SCT) at ambient pressure, but their high-pressure phases do. By contrast, room-temperature stable electride [Ca(24)Al(28)O(64)](4+)⋅4e(-) (C12A7:e(-)) in which anionic electrons in the crystallographic sub-nanometer-size cages have high s-character exhibits SCT at 0.2-0.4 K at ambient pressure. In this paper, we report that crystal and electronic structures of C12A7:e(-) are close to those of the high-pressure superconducting phase of alkali and alkaline earth metals and the SCT of both materials is induced when electron nature at Fermi energy (EF) switches from s- to sd-hybridized state. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Jiang, Long; Wang, Yi; Su, Sheng; Sun, Lushi; Xu, Boyang; He, Limo; Xiang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to investigate effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures. The yield of CO, H2 and C2H4 was increased and that of CO2 was suppressed with increasing temperature. Increasing temperature could also promote depolymerization and aromatization reactions of active tars, forming heavier polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, leading to decrease of tar yields and species diversity. Diverse performance of inherent AAEMs at different temperatures significantly affected the distribution of pyrolysis products. The presence of inherent AAEMs promoted water-gas shift reaction, and enhanced the yield of H2 and CO2. Additionally, inherent AAEMs not only promoted breakage and decarboxylation/decarbonylation reaction of thermally labile hetero atoms of the tar but also enhanced thermal decomposing of heavier aromatics. Inherent AAEMs could also significantly enhance the decomposition of levoglucosan, and alkaline earth metals showed greater effect than alkali metals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. On-sun test results from second-generation and advanced-concepts alkali-metal pool-boiler receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.B.; Andraka, C.E.; Moss, T.A.; Cordeiro, P.G.; Dudley, V.E.; Rawlinson, K.S.

    1994-05-01

    Two 75-kW{sub t} alkali-metal pool-boiler solar receivers have been successfully tested at Sandia National Laboratories` National Solar Thermal Test Facility. The first one, Sandia`s `` second-generation pool-boiler receiver,`` was designed to address commercialization issues identified during post-test assessment of Sandia`s first-generation pool-boiler receiver. It was constructed from Haynes alloy 230 and contained the alkali-metal alloy NaK-78. The absorber`s wetted side had a brazed-on powder-metal coating to stabilize boiling. This receiver was evaluated for boiling stability, hot- and warm-restart behavior, and thermal efficiency. Boiling was stable under all conditions. All of the hot restarts were successful. Mild transient hot spots observed during some hot restarts were eliminated by the addition of 1/3 torr of xenon to the vapor space. All of the warm restarts were also successful. The heat-transfer crisis that damaged the first receiver did not recur. Thermal efficiency was 92.3% at 750{degrees}C with 69.6 kW{sub t} solar input. The second receiver tested, Sandia`s ``advanced-concepts receiver,`` was a replica of the first-generation receiver except that the cavities, which were electric-discharge-machined in the absorber for boiling stability, were eliminated. This step was motivated by bench-scale test results that showed that boiling stability improved with increased heated-surface area, tilt of the heated surface from vertical, and added xenon. The bench-scale results suggested that stable boiling might be possible without heated-surface modification in a 75-kW{sub t} receiver. Boiling in the advanced-concepts receiver with 1/3 torr of xenon added has been stable under all conditions, confirming the bench-scale tests.

  1. Structure and properties of alizarin complex formed with alkali metal hydroxides in methanol solution.

    PubMed

    Jeliński, Tomasz; Cysewski, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    Quantum chemical computations were used for prediction of the structure and color of alizarin complex with alkali metal hydroxides in methanolic solutions. The color prediction relying on the single Gaussian-like band once again proved the usefulness of the PBE0 density functional due to the observed smallest color difference between computed and experimentally derived values. It was found that the alkali metal hydroxide molecules can bind to the two oxygen atoms of both hydroxyl groups of alizarin or to one of these atoms and the oxygen atom from the keto group in a complex with three methanol molecules. This means that two electronic transitions need to be taken into account when considering the spectra of the studied complexes. The resulting bond lengths and angles are correlated with the properties of the alkali metal atoms. The molar mass, the atomic radius, and the Pauling electronegativity of studied metals are quite accurate predictors of the geometric properties of hydroxide complexes with alizarin in methanol solution. Graphical abstract The spectra of the neutral and monoanionic form of alizarin together with color changes resulting from addition of different metal hydroxides and represented in CIE color space.

  2. Method for the generation of variable density metal vapors which bypasses the liquidus phase

    DOEpatents

    Kunnmann, Walter; Larese, John Z.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing a metal vapor that includes the steps of combining a metal and graphite in a vessel to form a mixture; heating the mixture to a first temperature in an argon gas atmosphere to form a metal carbide; maintaining the first temperature for a period of time; heating the metal carbide to a second temperature to form a metal vapor; withdrawing the metal vapor and the argon gas from the vessel; and separating the metal vapor from the argon gas. Metal vapors made using this method can be used to produce uniform powders of the metal oxide that have narrow size distribution and high purity.

  3. Alkali and alkaline-earth-metalated forms of calix[4]arenes: synthons in the synthesis of transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Guillemot, Geoffroy; Solari, Euro; Rizzoli, Corrado; Floriani, Carlo

    2002-05-03

    This is the first coherent report on the metalation of calix[4]arene by alkali and alkaline-earth metals, thus providing a high-yield production of appropriate synthons for the synthesis of transition metal calix[4]arenes. In addition, various facets of the coordination chemistry by calix[4]arene anions of alkali and alkaline-earth metal ions have been singled out. Among them: 1) the exo and endo coordination of metal ions by the calix[4]arene skeleton; 2) the pi solvation of the ions by the phenyl rings; 3) the ion-carrier properties of metallacalix[4]arenes; 4) the simulation of the kinetically labile coordination sphere of alkali and alkaline-earth metal ions by a polyoxo rigid skeleton. The peculiarities of the complexation of alkali and alkaline-earth metal ions by calix[4]arenes outlined are deduced from the synthesis and the structural characterization both in solution ((1)H NMR) and in the solid state (X-ray structure analysis) of the following classes of compounds: 1) [p-tBu-calix[4](OMS(n))(4)](2) (M=Li, Na, K); 2) [p-tBu-calix[4](OR)(2)(O)(2)ML] (M=Mg, L=THF, R=C(5)H(9); M=Ca, L=TMEDA (tetramethylethylenediamine), R=C(5)H(9); M=Ca, L=DME (dimethoxyethane), R=C(5)H(9); M=Ba, L=TMEDA, R=C(5)H(9); M=Ba, L=none, R=C(5)H(9)); 3) [p-tBu-calix[4](OC(5)H(9))(2)(O)(2)Ca(2)I(2)(MeCN)(2)]; 4) [(p-tBu-calix[4](OR)(2)(O)(2))(2)BaNa(2)].

  4. Tuning the work function of ultrathin oxide films on metals by adsorption of alkali atoms.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Umberto; Giordano, Livia; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2008-04-28

    We report a theoretical investigation of the adsorption of alkali metal atoms deposited on ultrathin oxide films. The properties of Li, Na, and K atoms adsorbed on SiO(2)/Mo(112) and of K on MgO / Ag(100) and TiO(2)/Pt(111) have been analyzed with particular attention to the induced changes in the work function of the system, Phi. On the nonreducible SiO(2) and MgO oxide films there is a net transfer of the outer ns electron of the alkali atom to the metal substrate conduction band; the resulting surface dipole substantially lowers Phi. The change in Phi depends (a) on the adsorption site (above the oxide film or at the interface) and (b) on the alkali metal coverage. Deposition of K on reducible TiO(2) oxide films results in adsorbed K(+) ions and in the formation of Ti(3+) ions. No charge transfer to the metal substrate is observed but also in this case the surface dipole resulting from the K-TiO(2) charge transfer has the effect to considerably reduce the work function of the system.

  5. Hofmeister series and ionic effects of alkali metal ions on DNA conformation transition in normal and less polarised water solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jing; Shen, Xin; Shen, Hao; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2014-10-01

    Normal and less polarised water models are used as the solvent to investigate Hofmeister effects and alkali metal ionic effects on dodecamer d(CGCGAATTCGCG) B-DNA with atomic dynamics simulations. As normal water solvent is replaced by less polarised water, the Hofmeister series of alkali metal ions is changed from Li+ > Na+ ≃ K+ ≃ Cs+ ≃ Rb+ to Li+ > Na+ > K+ > Rb+ > Cs+. In less polarised water, DNA experiences the B→A conformational transition for the lighter alkali metal counterions (Li+, Na+ and K+). However, it keeps B form for the heavier ions (Rb+ and Cs+). We find that the underlying cause of the conformation transition for these alkali metal ions except K+ is the competition between water molecules and counterions coupling to the free oxygen atoms of the phosphate groups. For K+ ions, the 'economics' of phosphate hydration and 'spine of hydration' are both concerned with the DNA helixes changing.

  6. Reactions between cold methyl halide molecules and alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Jesse J.; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-07

    We investigate the potential energy surfaces and activation energies for reactions between methyl halide molecules CH{sub 3}X (X = F, Cl, Br, I) and alkali-metal atoms A (A = Li, Na, K, Rb) using high-level ab initio calculations. We examine the anisotropy of each intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) and the mechanism and energetics of the only available exothermic reaction pathway, CH{sub 3}X + A → CH{sub 3} + AX. The region of the transition state is explored using two-dimensional PES cuts and estimates of the activation energies are inferred. Nearly all combinations of methyl halide and alkali-metal atom have positive barrier heights, indicating that reactions at low temperatures will be slow.

  7. An Aqueous Redox Flow Battery Based on Neutral Alkali Metal Ferri/ferrocyanide and Polysulfide Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Xia, Gordon; Kirby, Brent W.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Graff, Gordon L.; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-11-13

    Aiming to explore low-cost redox flow battery systems, a novel iron-polysulfide (Fe/S) flow battery has been demonstrated in a laboratory cell. This system employs alkali metal ferri/ferrocyanide and alkali metal polysulfides as the redox electrolytes. When proper electrodes, such as pretreated graphite felts, are used, 78% energy efficiency and 99% columbic efficiency are achieved. The remarkable advantages of this system over current state-of-the-art redox flow batteries include: 1) less corrosive and relatively environmentally benign redox solutions used; 2) excellent energy and utilization efficiencies; 3) low cost for redox electrolytes and cell components. These attributes can lead to significantly reduced capital cost and make the Fe/S flow battery system a promising low-cost energy storage technology. The major drawbacks of the present cell design are relatively low power density and possible sulfur species crossover. Further work is underway to address these concerns.

  8. Interaction of alkali metal cations and short chain alcohols: effect of core size on theoretical affinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, N. L.; Siu, F. M.; Tsang, C. W.

    2000-05-01

    The effect of core size on the calculated binding energies of alkali metal cations (Li +, Na +, K +) to methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, i-propanol, n-butanol, i-butanol, s-butanol, and t-butanol are evaluated using G2(MP2,SVP) protocol. The K + affinities, reported for the first time, were found to be negative if a core size larger than that of neon (2s 22p 6) was used. Given this, we suggest that the 1s 2, 2s 22p 6, and 3s 23p 6 electrons have to be included in the electron correlation treatment for Li +, Na + and K + containing species, respectively. With these core sizes, our G2(MP2,SVP) Li + and Na + affinities are in excellent agreement with values obtained from the newly developed G3 protocol. The nature of alkali metal cation-alcohol interaction is also discussed.

  9. Three-body recombination in cold helium-helium-alkali-metal-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Suno, Hiroya; Esry, B. D.

    2009-12-15

    Three-body recombination in helium-helium-alkali-metal collisions at cold temperatures is studied using the adiabatic hyperspherical representation. The rates for the three-body recombination processes {sup 4}He+{sup 4}He+X->{sup 4}He+{sup 4}HeX and {sup 4}He+{sup 4}He+X->{sup 4}He{sub 2}+X, with X={sup 7}Li, {sup 23}Na, {sup 39}K, {sup 85}Rb, and {sup 133}Cs, are calculated at nonzero collision energies by including not only zero total angular momentum, J=0, states but also J>0 states. The three-body recombination rates show a relatively weak dependence on the alkali-metal species, differing from each other only by about one order of magnitude, except for the {sup 4}He-{sup 4}He-{sup 23}Na system.

  10. Reactions between cold methyl halide molecules and alkali-metal atoms.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Jesse J; Hutson, Jeremy M

    2014-01-07

    We investigate the potential energy surfaces and activation energies for reactions between methyl halide molecules CH3X (X = F, Cl, Br, I) and alkali-metal atoms A (A = Li, Na, K, Rb) using high-level ab initio calculations. We examine the anisotropy of each intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) and the mechanism and energetics of the only available exothermic reaction pathway, CH3X + A → CH3 + AX. The region of the transition state is explored using two-dimensional PES cuts and estimates of the activation energies are inferred. Nearly all combinations of methyl halide and alkali-metal atom have positive barrier heights, indicating that reactions at low temperatures will be slow.

  11. X-ray Compton scattering experiments for fluid alkali metals at high temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, K. Fukumaru, T.; Kimura, K.; Yao, M.; Tamura, K.; Katoh, M.; Kajihara, Y.; Inui, M.; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.

    2015-08-17

    We have developed a high-pressure vessel and a cell for x-ray Compton scattering measurements of fluid alkali metals. Measurements have been successfully carried out for alkali metal rubidium at elevated temperatures and pressures using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8. The width of Compton profiles (CPs) of fluid rubidium becomes narrow with decreasing fluid density, which indicates that the CPs sensitively detect the effect of reduction in the valence electron density. At the request of all authors of the paper, and with the agreement of the Proceedings Editor, an updated version of this article was published on 10 September 2015. The original article supplied to AIP Publishing was not the final version and contained PDF conversion errors in Formulas (1) and (2). The errors have been corrected in the updated and re-published article.

  12. 'Doubly Magic' Conditions in Magic-Wavelength Trapping of Ultracold Alkali-Metal Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2010-07-16

    In experiments with trapped atoms, atomic energy levels are shifted by the trapping optical and magnetic fields. Regardless of this strong perturbation, precision spectroscopy may be still carried out using specially crafted, 'magic' trapping fields. Finding these conditions for particularly valuable microwave transitions in alkali-metal atoms has so far remained an open challenge. Here I demonstrate that the microwave transitions in alkali-metal atoms may be indeed made impervious to both trapping laser intensity and fluctuations of magnetic fields. I consider driving multiphoton transitions between the clock levels and show that these 'doubly magic' conditions are realized at special values of trapping laser wavelengths and fixed values of relatively weak magnetic fields. This finding has implications for precision measurements and quantum information processing with qubits stored in hyperfine manifolds.

  13. Theory of metal atom-water interactions and alkali halide dimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, K. D.; Kurtz, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the interactions of metal atoms with water and some of its isoelectronic analogs, and of the properties of alkali halides and their aggregates are discussed. Results are presented of ab initio calculations of the heats of reaction of the metal-water adducts and hydroxyhydrides of Li, Be, B, Na, Mg, and Al, and of the bond lengths and angles an; the heats of reaction for the insertion of Al into HF, H2O, NH3, H2S and CH3OH, and Be and Mg into H2O. Calculations of the electron affinities and dipole moments and polarizabilities of selected gas phase alkali halide monomers and dimers are discussed, with particular attention given to results of calculations of the polarizability of LiF taking into account electron correlation effects, and the polarizability of the dimer (LiF)2.

  14. Calculation of radiative corrections to hyperfine splittings in the neutral alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J.; Cheng, K.T.

    2003-02-01

    The radiative correction to hyperfine splitting in hydrogen is dominated by the Schwinger term, {alpha}/2{pi} E{sub F}, where E{sub F} is the lowest-order hyperfine splitting. Binding corrections to this term, which enter as powers and logarithms of Z{alpha}, can be expected to be increasingly important in atoms with higher nuclear charge Z. Methods that include all orders of Z{alpha}, developed first to study highly charged ions, are adapted to the study of the neutral alkali metals, lithium through francium. It is shown that the use of the Schwinger term alone to account for radiative corrections to hyperfine splittings becomes qualitatively incorrect for the heavier alkali metals.0.

  15. Emission spectra of alkali-metal (K,Na,Li)-He exciplexes in cold helium gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, K.; Hirano, K.; Kumakura, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Yabuzaki, T.

    2004-01-01

    We have observed emission spectra of excimers and exciplexes composed of a light alkali-metal atom in the first excited state and 4He atoms [K*Hen (n=1-6), Na*Hen (n=1-4), and Li*Hen (n=1,2)] in cryogenic He gas (the temperature 2 Kalkali-metal atoms, the spectra for the different number of He atoms were well separated, so that their assignment could be made experimentally. Comparing with the spectra of K*Hen, we found that the infrared emission spectrum of the K atom excited in liquid He was from K*He6. To confirm the assignment, we have also carried out ab initio calculation of adiabatic potential curves and peak positions of the emission spectra of the exciplexes.

  16. Electronic states of alkali metal-NTCDA complexes: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    Structures and electronic states of organic-inorganic compound of 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (NTCDA) with alkali metals, Mn(NTCDA) (Mdbnd Li and Na, n = 0-2), have been investigated by means of hybrid density functional theory (DFT) calculations. From the DFT calculations, it was found that the electronic state of the complex at the ground state is characterized by a charge-transfer state expressed by (M)+(NTCDA)-. The alkali metals were bound equivalently to the carbonyl oxygen and ether oxygen atoms of NTCDA. The Cdbnd O double bond character of NTCDA was changed to a C-O single bond like character by the strong interaction of M to the Cdbnd O and O sites. This change was the origin of the red-shift of the IR spectrum. The UV-vis absorption spectra of Mn(NTCDA) were theoretically predicted on the basis of theoretical results.

  17. X-ray Compton scattering experiments for fluid alkali metals at high temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, K.; Fukumaru, T.; Kimura, K.; Tamura, K.; Katoh, M.; Kajihara, Y.; Inui, M.; Yao, M.; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a high-pressure vessel and a cell for x-ray Compton scattering measurements of fluid alkali metals. Measurements have been successfully carried out for alkali metal rubidium at elevated temperatures and pressures using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8. The width of Compton profiles (CPs) of fluid rubidium becomes narrow with decreasing fluid density, which indicates that the CPs sensitively detect the effect of reduction in the valence electron density. At the request of all authors of the paper, and with the agreement of the Proceedings Editor, an updated version of this article was published on 10 September 2015. The original article supplied to AIP Publishing was not the final version and contained PDF conversion errors in Formulas (1) and (2). The errors have been corrected in the updated and re-published article.

  18. Cavitation luminescence of argon-saturated alkali-metal solutions from a conical bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ha; Jie He, Shou; Fang, Wang; Min, Song Jian

    2008-10-01

    In 1,2-propanediol solutions containing sodium chloride, spectra of luminescence from a collapsed conical bubble have been detected. Results show that the spectra consist of a broad continuum background, on which a resonance line arising from de-excitation of sodium atom at 589 nm and two satellite diffuse bands at ~554 nm and 620 nm respectively are superimposed. These are confirmed to be the emission from alkali-metal-argon exciplexes and are suggested to occur when the mixtures of alkali metal vapour and argon are rapidly compressed. The intracavity density of argon deduced from the line shift of Na resonance line data is estimated to be about 2 × 1026 m-3.

  19. Argon plasma contact ionization of alkali metal element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Tatsuya; Kato, Masaaki; Kochi, Kenji; Okamoto, Makoto; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    1996-05-01

    The secondary ionization of lithium metal and lithium iodide by contact with an argon ECR plasma was studied. Lithium and argon ion densities in the lithium - argon mixture plasma were diagnosed by using double probes, a photospectrometer and a mass spectrometer. According to plasma diagnostics, the apparent ionization cross sections were 0963-0252/5/2/030/img8 for lithium metal and 0963-0252/5/2/030/img9 for lithium iodide. This ionization method produces a low-temperature plasma which would be appropriate for ion cyclotron resonance isotope separation.

  20. An embedded-atom-method model for alkali-metal vibrations.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R B; Riffe, D M

    2012-08-22

    We present an embedded-atom-method (EAM) model that accurately describes the vibrational dynamics in the alkali metals Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs. The bulk dispersion curves, frequency-moment Debye temperatures and temperature-dependent entropy Debye temperatures are all in excellent agreement with experimental results. The model is also well suited for studying surface vibrational dynamics in these materials, as illustrated by calculations for the Na(110) surface.

  1. Development of processes for the production of solar grade silicon from halides and alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickson, C. R.; Gould, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    High temperature reactions of silicon halides with alkali metals for the production of solar grade silicon in volume at low cost were studied. Experiments were performed to evaluate product separation and collection processes, measure heat release parameters for scaling purposes, determine the effects of reactants and/or products on materials of reactor construction, and make preliminary engineering and economic analyses of a scaled-up process.

  2. High field superconductivity in alkali metal intercalates of MoS2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Flood, D. J.; Wagoner, D. E.; Somoano, R. B.; Rembaum, A.

    1973-01-01

    In the search for better high temperature, high critical field superconductors, a class of materials was found which have layered structures and can be intercalated with various elements and compounds. Since a large number of compounds can be formed, intercalation provides a method of control of superconducting properties. They also provide the possible medium for excitonic superconductivity. Results of magnetic field studies are presented on alkali metal (Na, K, Rb, and Cs) intercalated MoS2 (2H polymorph).

  3. ALKACYCL: a basic computer program for the analysis of alkali metal Rankine power cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Moyers, J.C.

    1985-08-01

    ALKACYCL is a computer program that analyzes Rankine power cycles utilizing an alkali metal as the cycle working fluid. Cycles may have from zero to three stages of regenerative feed heating. The program is written in BASICA language and can be used on an IBM-PC or PC-compatible computer with 128 kbytes of RAM. Output results include mass and energy balance information, cycle efficiency, and sizes and weights for piping and feed heaters. Listing and sample program output are included.

  4. Using fume silica as heavy metals' stabilizer for high alkali and porous MSWI baghouse ash.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wu-Jang; Huang, Hung-Shao

    2008-03-21

    In this study, we have proved that heavy metals in high porous and alkali baghouse ash could be fixed effectively by fume silica powder alone, or with the incorporation of colloidal aluminum oxide (CAO). The optimum amount is about 100g of fume silica per kilogram of baghouse ash. Results have indicated that fume silica has a better fixation efficiency of lead in high porous baghouse ash. In addition, the reaction mechanism of fume silica is also discussed.

  5. Metal vapor lasers with increased reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Sabotinov, N. V.; Polunin, Yu. P.; Shumeiko, A. S.; Kostadinov, I. K.; Vasilieva, A. V.; Reimer, I. V.

    2015-12-01

    Results of investigation and development of an excitation pulse generator with magnetic pulse compression by saturation chokes for pumping of active media of CuBr, Sr, and Ca vapor lasers are presented. A high-power IGBT transistor is used as a commutator. The generator can operate at excitation pulse repetition frequencies up to 20 kHz. The total average power for all laser lines of the CuBr laser pumped by this generator is ~6.0 W; it is ~1.3-1.7 W for the Sr and Ca lasers.

  6. Alkali vapor pressure modulation on the 100 ms scale in a single-cell vacuum system for cold atom experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dugrain, Vincent; Reichel, Jakob; Rosenbusch, Peter

    2014-08-15

    We describe and characterize a device for alkali vapor pressure modulation on the 100 ms timescale in a single-cell cold atom experiment. Its mechanism is based on optimized heat conduction between a current-modulated alkali dispenser and a heat sink at room temperature. We have studied both the short-term behavior during individual pulses and the long-term pressure evolution in the cell. The device combines fast trap loading and relatively long trap lifetime, enabling high repetition rates in a very simple setup. These features make it particularly suitable for portable atomic sensors.

  7. A review of flexible lithium-sulfur and analogous alkali metal-chalcogen rechargeable batteries.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong-Jie; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhang, Qiang

    2017-08-29

    Flexible energy storage systems are imperative for emerging flexible devices that are revolutionizing our life. Lithium-ion batteries, the current main power sources, are gradually approaching their theoretical limitation in terms of energy density. Therefore, alternative battery chemistries are urgently required for next-generation flexible power sources with high energy densities, low cost, and inherent safety. Flexible lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries and analogous flexible alkali metal-chalcogen batteries are of paramount interest owing to their high energy densities endowed by multielectron chemistry. In this review, we summarized the recent progress of flexible Li-S and analogous batteries. A brief introduction to flexible energy storage systems and general Li-S batteries has been provided first. Progress in flexible materials for flexible Li-S batteries are reviewed subsequently, with a detailed classification of flexible sulfur cathodes as those based on carbonaceous (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene, and carbonized polymers) and composite (polymers and inorganics) materials and an overview of flexible lithium anodes and flexible solid-state electrolytes. Advancements in other flexible alkali metal-chalcogen batteries are then introduced. In the next part, we emphasize the importance of cell packaging and flexibility evaluation, and two special flexible battery prototypes of foldable and cable-type Li-S batteries are highlighted. In the end, existing challenges and future development of flexible Li-S and analogous alkali metal-chalcogen batteries are summarized and prospected.

  8. Anharmonic surface vibrations in photoemission from alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wertheim, G.K.; Riffe, D.M.; Citrin, P.H. )

    1994-01-15

    The phonon widths of outermost core-electron photoemission spectra from (110)-oriented overlayers of Na, K, and Rb metals show the expected Debye behavior for the bulk atoms, but significant deviations for the surface atoms. The data indicate a softening of the surface vibrational mode above 200 K. This effect, which is weak in Na but strong in K and Rb, demonstrates that the vibrational mode normal to the surface is anharmonic.

  9. Isotopic fractionation of alkali earth metals during carbonate precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yotsuya, T.; Ohno, T.; Muramatsu, Y.; Shimoda, G.; Goto, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    The alkaline earth metals such as magnesium, calcium and strontium play an important role in a variety of geochemical and biological processes. The element ratios (Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) in marine carbonates have been used as proxies for reconstruction of the past environment. Recently several studies suggested that the study for the isotopic fractionation of the alkaline earth metals in marine carbonates has a potentially significant influence in geochemical research fields (e.g. Eisenhauer et al., 2009). The aim of this study is to explore the influence of carbonate polymorphs (Calcite and Aragonite) and environmental factors (e.g., temperature, precipitation rate) on the level of isotopic fractionation of the alkaline earth metals. We also examined possible correlations between the level of isotopic fractionation of Ca and that of other alkaline earth metals during carbonate precipitation. In order to determine the isotope fractionation factor of Mg, Ca and Sr during carbonate precipitation, calcite and aragonite were synthesized from calcium bicarbonate solution in which the amount of magnesium was controlled based on Kitano method. Calcium carbonates were also prepared from the mixture of calcium chlorite and sodium hydrogen carbonate solutions. The isotope fractionation factors were measured by MC-ICPMS. Results suggested that the level of isotopic fractionation of Mg during carbonate precipitation was correlated with that of Sr and that the change of the carbonate crystal structure could make differences of isotopic fractionations of Mg and Ca, however no difference was found in the case of Sr. In this presentation, the possible mechanism will be discussed.

  10. Metal-to-insulator crossover in alkali doped zeolite

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Mutsuo; Jeglič, Peter; Krajnc, Andraž; Žitko, Rok; Nakano, Takehito; Nozue, Yasuo; Arčon, Denis

    2016-01-01

    We report a systematic nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of the 23Na spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, in sodium loaded low-silica X (LSX) zeolite, Nan/Na12-LSX, for various loading levels of sodium atoms n across the metal-to-insulator crossover. For high loading levels of n ≥ 14.2, 1/T1T shows nearly temperature-independent behaviour between 10 K and 25 K consistent with the Korringa relaxation mechanism and the metallic ground state. As the loading levels decrease below n ≤ 11.6, the extracted density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level sharply decreases, although a residual DOS at Fermi level is still observed even in the samples that lack the metallic Drude-peak in the optical reflectance. The observed crossover is a result of a complex loading-level dependence of electric potential felt by the electrons confined to zeolite cages, where the electronic correlations and disorder both play an important role. PMID:26725368

  11. Metal-to-insulator crossover in alkali doped zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Mutsuo; Jeglič, Peter; Krajnc, Andraž; Žitko, Rok; Nakano, Takehito; Nozue, Yasuo; Arčon, Denis

    2016-01-01

    We report a systematic nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of the 23Na spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, in sodium loaded low-silica X (LSX) zeolite, Nan/Na12-LSX, for various loading levels of sodium atoms n across the metal-to-insulator crossover. For high loading levels of n ≥ 14.2, 1/T1T shows nearly temperature-independent behaviour between 10 K and 25 K consistent with the Korringa relaxation mechanism and the metallic ground state. As the loading levels decrease below n ≤ 11.6, the extracted density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level sharply decreases, although a residual DOS at Fermi level is still observed even in the samples that lack the metallic Drude-peak in the optical reflectance. The observed crossover is a result of a complex loading-level dependence of electric potential felt by the electrons confined to zeolite cages, where the electronic correlations and disorder both play an important role.

  12. IRMPD Spectroscopy of Metalated Flavins: Structure and Bonding of Lumiflavin Complexes with Alkali and Coinage Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Pablo; Günther, Alan; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Dopfer, Otto

    2016-10-01

    Flavins are a fundamental class of biomolecules, whose photochemical properties strongly depend on their environment and their redox and metalation state. Infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectra of mass selected isolated metal-lumiflavin ionic complexes (M+LF) are analyzed in the fingerprint range (800-1830 cm-1) to determine the bonding of lumiflavin with alkali (M=Li, Na, K, Cs) and coinage (M=Cu, Ag) metal ions. The complexes are generated in an electrospray ionization source coupled to an ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer and the IR free electron laser FELIX. Vibrational and isomer assignments of the IRMPD spectra are accomplished by comparison to quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP/cc-pVDZ level, yielding structure, binding energy, bonding mechanism, and spectral properties of the complexes. The most stable binding sites identified in the experiments involve metal bonding to the oxygen atoms of the two available CO groups of LF. Hence, CO stretching frequencies are a sensitive indicator of both the metal binding site and the metal bond strength. More than one isomer is observed for M=Li, Na, and K, and the preferred CO binding site changes with the size of the alkali ion. For Cs+LF only one isomer is identified although the energies of the two most stable structures differ by less than 7 kJ/mol. While the M+-LF bonds for alkali ions are mainly based on electrostatic forces, substantial covalent contributions lead to stronger bonds for the coinage metal ions. Comparison between lumiflavin and lumichrome reveals substantial differences in the metal binding motifs and interactions due to the different flavin structures.

  13. Surface Characterization of Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metals on Single Crystal Refractory Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magera, Gerald Glenn

    1995-11-01

    The experiments were conducted on the clean surfaces of W(110), Mo(110) and Nb(110) under ultrahigh vacuum conditions using techniques of line-of-sight thermal desorption mass spectrometry, Auger electron spectroscopy and retarding potential work function measurement. The clean work functions for W(110), Mo(110) and Nb(110) were found to be 5.38 eV, 5.08 eV and 4.62 eV, respectively. The behavior of the work function was characteristic of alkali and alkaline earth metal adsorption onto refractory metal surfaces with the minimum work function for the three surfaces of approximately 1.50 eV for cesium and 2.20 eV for barium. The results of the change in work function versus adsorption of cesium onto the bariated surfaces of W(110), Mo(110) and Nb(110) were similar. The energies of desorption for the different binding states were calculated for the various adsorbate-metal systems using first order desorption kinetics, that is, the adsorbates desorb at a rate linearly dependent on coverage. The desorption spectra for cesium from the various metal surfaces showed three distinct desorption sites, while barium had a more continuous decrease in activation energy of desorption up to a monolayer of coverage. The main difference between the desorption of the two adsorbates was the temperature of the terminal (lowest coverage) desorption energy site. The highest terminal desorption energy for cesium occurred on the W(110) surface at a temperature of 1200 K, while barium does not start to desorb from the W(110) surface until the temperature reaches approximately 1700 K. The temperature difference between the binding states of cesium and barium on all three of the substrates allowed for the adsorption and desorption of cesium without altering the barium adlayer. The desorption behavior of cesium from the various barium/substrate surfaces, like the work function change, was also very similar. As the coverage of pre -adsorbed barium increased, the activation energy of the cesium

  14. Efficiency of charging circuit for metal vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatur, V. V.; Vybornov, P. V.

    2004-05-01

    Results are presented of investigation of characteristics of charging circuit for metal vapor lasers that is used for stabilization of power contribution into gas discharge tube. The circuit is shown for voltage stabilization on a reservoir capacitor that is used in transistor laser excitation source. The technical and exploitation advantages of this circuit are described.

  15. Corrosion processes of physical vapor deposition-coated metallic implants.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Renato Altobelli; de Oliveira, Mara Cristina Lopes

    2009-01-01

    Protecting metallic implants from the harsh environment of physiological fluids is essential to guaranteeing successful long-term use in a patient's body. Chemical degradation may lead to the failure of an implant device in two different ways. First, metal ions may cause inflammatory reactions in the tissues surrounding the implant and, in extreme cases, these reactions may inflict acute pain on the patient and lead to loosening of the device. Therefore, increasing wear strength is beneficial to the performance of the metallic implant. Second, localized corrosion processes contribute to the nucleation of fatigue cracks, and corrosion fatigue is the main reason for the mechanical failure of metallic implants. Common biomedical alloys such as stainless steel, cobalt-chrome alloys, and titanium alloys are prone to at least one of these problems. Vapor-deposited hard coatings act directly to improve corrosion, wear, and fatigue resistances of metallic materials. The effectiveness of the corrosion protection is strongly related to the structure of the physical vapor deposition layer. The aim of this paper is to present a comprehensive review of the correlation between the structure of physical vapor deposition layers and the corrosion properties of metallic implants.

  16. Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters

    DOEpatents

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

    1995-01-31

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  17. Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters

    DOEpatents

    Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving; Palekar, Vishwesh M.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  18. Electronic structure and stability of clusters, especially of alkali metals and carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, N. H.

    1993-12-01

    The electronic structure of alkali metal atom clusters of various sizes is first discussed, using a spherically averaged pseudopotential model. The main technique employed is density functional theory, and a connection is established with predictions about dissociation energy from the theory of the inhomogeneous electron gas. This latter theory is then invoked explicitly to discuss the barrier to fission for doubly charged alkali metal atom clusters. In the case of asymmetric fission, comparison is made with experiment following the study of Garcias [F. Garcias, J.A. Alonso, J.M. Lopez and M. Barranco, Phys. Rev. B, 43 (1991) 9459], while for symmetric fission a connection is again made between fission barrier and concepts which follow from the general theory of the inhomogeneous electron gas. Finally, and more briefly, both density functional calculations and quantum-chemical studies of carbon clusters are referred to. After a summary of the work of Adamowicz on small linear C clusters [L. Adamowicz, J. Chem. Phys., 94 (1991) 1241], results on C 60 and its singly and doubly charged anions, and on (C 60) 2, are summarized, the potential relevance to alkali doped buckminsterfullerene superconductivity being emphasized as an important direction for future work.

  19. Effects of Alkali Metal Ion Cationization on Fragmentation Pathways of Triazole-Epothilone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiyan; Luo, Guoan; Chen, Yue; Kong, Xianglei

    2012-06-01

    The collisionally activated dissociation mass spectra of the protonated and alkali metal cationized ions of a triazole-epothilone analogue were studied in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. The fragmentation pathway of the protonated ion was characterized by the loss of the unit of C3H4O3. However, another fragmentation pathway with the loss of C3H2O2 was identified for the complex ions with Na+, K+, Rb+, and Cs+. The branching ratio of the second pathway increases with the increment of the size of alkali metal ions. Theoretical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) method show the difference in the binding position of the proton and the metal ions. With the increase of the radii of the metal ions, progressive changes in the macrocycle of the compound are induced, which cause the corresponding change in their fragmentation pathways. It has also been found that the interaction energy between the compound and the metal ion decreases with increase in the size of the latter. This is consistent with the experimental results, which show that cesiated complexes readily eject Cs+ when subject to collisions.

  20. Alkali metal mediated C–C bond coupling reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2015-02-14

    Metal catalyzed carbon-carbon (C–C) bond formation is one of the important reactions in pharmacy and in organic chemistry. In the present study, the electron and hole capture dynamics of a lithium-benzene sandwich complex, expressed by Li(Bz){sub 2}, have been investigated by means of direct ab-initio molecular dynamics method. Following the electron capture of Li(Bz){sub 2}, the structure of [Li(Bz){sub 2}]{sup −} was drastically changed: Bz–Bz parallel form was rapidly fluctuated as a function of time, and a new C–C single bond was formed in the C{sub 1}–C{sub 1}′ position of Bz–Bz interaction system. In the hole capture, the intermolecular vibration between Bz–Bz rings was only enhanced. The mechanism of C–C bond formation in the electron capture was discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  1. Alkali metal mediated C-C bond coupling reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2015-02-01

    Metal catalyzed carbon-carbon (C-C) bond formation is one of the important reactions in pharmacy and in organic chemistry. In the present study, the electron and hole capture dynamics of a lithium-benzene sandwich complex, expressed by Li(Bz)2, have been investigated by means of direct ab-initio molecular dynamics method. Following the electron capture of Li(Bz)2, the structure of [Li(Bz)2]- was drastically changed: Bz-Bz parallel form was rapidly fluctuated as a function of time, and a new C-C single bond was formed in the C1-C1' position of Bz-Bz interaction system. In the hole capture, the intermolecular vibration between Bz-Bz rings was only enhanced. The mechanism of C-C bond formation in the electron capture was discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  2. Alkali metal mediated C-C bond coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2015-02-14

    Metal catalyzed carbon-carbon (C-C) bond formation is one of the important reactions in pharmacy and in organic chemistry. In the present study, the electron and hole capture dynamics of a lithium-benzene sandwich complex, expressed by Li(Bz)2, have been investigated by means of direct ab-initio molecular dynamics method. Following the electron capture of Li(Bz)2, the structure of [Li(Bz)2](-) was drastically changed: Bz-Bz parallel form was rapidly fluctuated as a function of time, and a new C-C single bond was formed in the C1-C1' position of Bz-Bz interaction system. In the hole capture, the intermolecular vibration between Bz-Bz rings was only enhanced. The mechanism of C-C bond formation in the electron capture was discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  3. Metal Organic-Chemical Vapor Deposition fabrication of semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.

    1980-08-01

    The metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MO-CVD) process was studied and implemented in detail. Single crystal GaAs, and Ga(x)Al(1-x)As films were grown on GaAs by depositing metal organic alkyl gallium compounds in the presence of an arsine mixture. The metal organic chemical vapor deposition process allowed formation of the semiconductor compound directly on the heated substrate in only one hot temperature zone. With MO-CVD, semiconductor films can be efficiently produced by a more economical, less complicated process which will lend itself more easily than past fabrication procedures, to high quantity, high quality reproduction techniques of semiconductor lasers. Clearly MO-CVD is of interest to the communication industry where semiconductor lasers are used extensively in fiber optic communication systems, and similarly to the solar energy business where GaAs substrates are used as photoelectric cells.

  4. A lattice-gas model for alkali-metal fullerides: face-centred-cubic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udvardi, László; Szabó, György

    1996-12-01

    A lattice-gas model is suggested for describing the ordering phenomena in alkali-metal fullerides of face-centred-cubic structure assuming that the electric charge of alkali ions residing in either octahedral or tetrahedral sites is completely screened by the first-neighbour 0953-8984/8/50/022/img5 molecules. This approximation allows us to derive an effective ion - ion interaction. The van der Waals interaction between the ion and 0953-8984/8/50/022/img5 molecule is characterized by introducing an additional site energy at the tetrahedral sites. This model is investigated by using a three-sublattice mean-field approximation and a simple cluster-variation method. The analysis shows a large variety of phase diagrams as the site energy parameter is changed.

  5. Post-Harvest Processing Methods for Reduction of Silica and Alkali Metals in Wheat Straw

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David Neal; Lacey, Jeffrey Alan; Shaw, Peter Gordon

    2002-04-01

    Silica and alkali metals in wheat straw limit its use for bioenergy and gasification. Slag deposits occur via the eutectic melting of SiO2 with K2O, trapping chlorides at surfaces and causing corrosion. A minimum melting point of 950°C is desirable, corresponding to SiO2:K2O of about 3:1. Mild chemical treatments were used to reduce Si, K, and Cl, while varying temperature, concentration, %-solids, and time. Dilute acid was more effective at removing K and Cl, while dilute alkali was more effective for Si. Reduction of minerals in this manner may prove economical for increasing utilization of the straw for combustion or gasification.

  6. A simple method to estimate relative stabilities of polyethers cationized by alkali metal ions.

    PubMed

    Kuki, Ákos; Nagy, Lajos; Shemirani, Ghazaleh; Memboeuf, Antony; Drahos, László; Vékey, Károly; Zsuga, Miklós; Kéki, Sándor

    2012-02-15

    Dissociation of doubly cationized polyethers, namely [P + 2X](2+) into [P + X](+) and X(+), where P = polyethylene glycol (PEG), polypropylene glycol (PPG) and polytetrahydrofuran (PTHF) and X = Na, K and Cs, was studied by means of energy-dependent collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. It was observed that the collision voltage necessary to obtain 50% fragmentation (CV(50)) determined for the doubly cationized polyethers of higher degree of polymerization varied linearly with the number of degrees of freedom (DOF) values. This observation allowed us to correlate these slopes with the corresponding relative gas-phase dissociation energies for binding of alkali ions to polyethers. The relative dissociation energies determined from the corresponding slopes were found to decrease in the order Na(+)  > K(+)  > Cs(+) for each polyether studied, and an order PPG ≈ PEG > PTHF can be established for each alkali metal ion.

  7. Post-harvest processing methods for reduction of silica and alkali metals in wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Thompson, David N; Shaw, Peter G; Lacey, Jeffrey A

    2003-01-01

    Silica and alkali metals in wheat straw limit its use for bioenergy and gasification. Slag deposits occur via the eutectic melting of SiO2 with K2O, trapping chlorides at surfaces and causing corrosion. A minimum melting point of 950 degrees C is desirable, corresponding to an SiO2:K2O weight ratio of about 3:1. Mild chemical treatments were used to reduce Si, K, and Cl, while varying temperature, concentration, % solids, and time. Dilute acid was more effective at removing K and Cl, while dilute alkali was more effective for Si. Reduction of minerals in this manner may prove economical for increasing utilization of the straw for combustion or gasification.

  8. Method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Im, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    A process for cleaning an inert gas contaminated with a metallic vapor, such as cadmium, involves withdrawing gas containing the metallic contaminant from a gas atmosphere of high purity argon; passing the gas containing the metallic contaminant to a mass transfer unit having a plurality of hot gas channels separated by a plurality of coolant gas channels; cooling the contaminated gas as it flows upward through the mass transfer unit to cause contaminated gas vapor to condense on the gas channel walls; regenerating the gas channels of the mass transfer unit; and, returning the cleaned gas to the gas atmosphere of high purity argon. The condensing of the contaminant-containing vapor occurs while suppressing contaminant particulate formation, and is promoted by providing a sufficient amount of surface area in the mass transfer unit to cause the vapor to condense and relieve supersaturation buildup such that contaminant particulates are not formed. Condensation of the contaminant is prevented on supply and return lines in which the contaminant containing gas is withdrawn and returned from and to the electrorefiner and mass transfer unit by heating and insulating the supply and return lines.

  9. Method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1996-04-02

    A process for cleaning an inert gas contaminated with a metallic vapor, such as cadmium, involves withdrawing gas containing the metallic contaminant from a gas atmosphere of high purity argon; passing the gas containing the metallic contaminant to a mass transfer unit having a plurality of hot gas channels separated by a plurality of coolant gas channels; cooling the contaminated gas as it flows upward through the mass transfer unit to cause contaminated gas vapor to condense on the gas channel walls; regenerating the gas channels of the mass transfer unit; and, returning the cleaned gas to the gas atmosphere of high purity argon. The condensing of the contaminant-containing vapor occurs while suppressing contaminant particulate formation, and is promoted by providing a sufficient amount of surface area in the mass transfer unit to cause the vapor to condense and relieve supersaturation buildup such that contaminant particulates are not formed. Condensation of the contaminant is prevented on supply and return lines in which the contaminant containing gas is withdrawn and returned from and to the electrorefiner and mass transfer unit by heating and insulating the supply and return lines. 13 figs.

  10. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jerome P.; Sawvel, Robert M.; Draggoo, Vaughn G.

    1994-01-01

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior.

  11. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, J.P.; Sawvel, R.M.; Draggoo, V.G.

    1994-06-28

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior. 8 figures.

  12. Influence of alkaline earth metals on molecular structure of 3-nitrobenzoic acid in comparison with alkali metals effect.

    PubMed

    Samsonowicz, M; Regulska, E; Lewandowski, W

    2011-11-01

    The influence of beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium cations on the electronic system of 3-nitrobenzoic acid was studied in comparison with studied earlier alkali metal ions. The vibrational FT-IR (in KBr and ATR techniques) and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra were recorded for 3-nitrobenzoic acid and its salts. Characteristic shifts in IR and NMR spectra along 3-nitrobenzoates of divalent metal series Mg→Ba were compared with series of univalent metal Li→Cs salts. Good correlations between the wavenumbers of the vibrational bands in the IR spectra for 3-nitrobenzoates and ionic potential, electronegativity, inverse of atomic mass, atomic radius and ionization energy of metals were found for alkaline earth metals as well as for alkali metals. The density functional (DFT) hybrid method B3LYP with two basis sets: 6-311++G** and LANL2DZ were used to calculate optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds. The theoretical wavenumbers and intensities of IR spectra as well as chemical shifts in NMR spectra were obtained. Geometric aromaticity indices, atomic charges, dipole moments and energies were also calculated. The calculated parameters were compared to experimental characteristic of studied compounds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. AMTEC vapor-vapor series connected cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Mark L. (Inventor); Williams, Roger M. (Inventor); Ryan, Margaret A. (Inventor); Nakamura, Barbara J. (Inventor); Oconnor, Dennis E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) having a plurality of cells structurally connected in series to form a septum dividing a plenum into two chambers, and electrically connected in series, is provided with porous metal anodes and porous metal cathodes in the cells. The cells may be planar or annular, and in either case a metal alkali vapor at a high temperature is provided to the plenum through one chamber on one side of the wall and returned to a vapor boiler after condensation at a chamber on the other side of the wall in the plenum. If the cells are annular, a heating core may be placed along the axis of the stacked cells. This arrangement of series-connected cells allows efficient generation of power at high voltage and low current.

  14. Structural and dynamical trends in alkali-metal silanides characterized by neutron-scattering methods

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, Wan Si; Dimitrievska, Mirjana; Chotard, Jean -Noel; ...

    2016-09-02

    Structural, vibrational, and dynamical properties of the mono- and mixed-alkali silanides (MSiH3, where M = K, Rb, Cs, K0.5Rb0.5, K0.5Cs0.5, and Rb0.5Cs0.5) were investigated by various neutron experiments, including neutron powder diffraction (NPD), neutron vibrational spectroscopy (NVS), neutron-scattering fixed-window scans (FWSs), and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements. Structural characterization showed that the mixed compounds exhibit disordered (α) and ordered (β) phases for temperatures above and below about 200–250 K, respectively, in agreement with their monoalkali correspondents. Vibrational and dynamical properties are strongly influenced by the cation environment; in particular, there is a red shift in the band energies of themore » librational and bending modes with increasing lattice size as a result of changes in the bond lengths and force constants. Additionally, slightly broader spectral features are observed in the case of the mixed compounds, indicating the presence of structural disorder caused by the random distribution of the alkali-metal cations within the lattice. FWS measurements upon heating showed that there is a large increase in reorientational mobility as the systems go through the order–disorder (β–α) phase transition, and measurements upon cooling of the α-phase revealed the known strong hysteresis for reversion back to the β-phase. Interestingly, at a given temperature, among the different alkali silanide compounds, the relative reorientational mobilities of the SiH3– anions in the α- and β-phases tended to decrease and increase, respectively, with increasing alkali-metal mass. Lastly, this dynamical result might provide some insights concerning the enthalpy–entropy compensation effect previously observed for these potentially promising hydrogen storage materials.« less

  15. Structural and dynamical trends in alkali-metal silanides characterized by neutron-scattering methods

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wan Si; Dimitrievska, Mirjana; Chotard, Jean -Noel; Zhou, Wei; Janot, Raphael; Skripov, Alexander V.; Udovic, Terrence J.

    2016-09-02

    Structural, vibrational, and dynamical properties of the mono- and mixed-alkali silanides (MSiH3, where M = K, Rb, Cs, K0.5Rb0.5, K0.5Cs0.5, and Rb0.5Cs0.5) were investigated by various neutron experiments, including neutron powder diffraction (NPD), neutron vibrational spectroscopy (NVS), neutron-scattering fixed-window scans (FWSs), and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements. Structural characterization showed that the mixed compounds exhibit disordered (α) and ordered (β) phases for temperatures above and below about 200–250 K, respectively, in agreement with their monoalkali correspondents. Vibrational and dynamical properties are strongly influenced by the cation environment; in particular, there is a red shift in the band energies of the librational and bending modes with increasing lattice size as a result of changes in the bond lengths and force constants. Additionally, slightly broader spectral features are observed in the case of the mixed compounds, indicating the presence of structural disorder caused by the random distribution of the alkali-metal cations within the lattice. FWS measurements upon heating showed that there is a large increase in reorientational mobility as the systems go through the order–disorder (β–α) phase transition, and measurements upon cooling of the α-phase revealed the known strong hysteresis for reversion back to the β-phase. Interestingly, at a given temperature, among the different alkali silanide compounds, the relative reorientational mobilities of the SiH3 anions in the α- and β-phases tended to decrease and increase, respectively, with increasing alkali-metal mass. Lastly, this dynamical result might provide some insights concerning the enthalpy–entropy compensation effect previously observed for these potentially promising hydrogen storage materials.

  16. Structural and Dynamical Trends in Alkali-Metal Silanides Characterized by Neutron-Scattering Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wan Si; Dimitrievska, Mirjana; Chotard, Jean-Noël; Zhou, Wei; Janot, Raphaël; Skripov, Alexander V.; Udovic, Terrence J.

    2016-09-29

    Structural, vibrational, and dynamical properties of the mono- and mixed-alkali silanides (MSiH3, where M = K, Rb, Cs, K0.5Rb0.5, K0.5Cs0.5, and Rb0.5Cs0.5) were investigated by various neutron experiments, including neutron powder diffraction (NPD), neutron vibrational spectroscopy (NVS), neutron-scattering fixed-window scans (FWSs), and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements. Structural characterization showed that the mixed compounds exhibit disordered (..alpha..) and ordered (..beta..) phases for temperatures above and below about 200-250 K, respectively, in agreement with their monoalkali correspondents. Vibrational and dynamical properties are strongly influenced by the cation environment; in particular, there is a red shift in the band energies of the librational and bending modes with increasing lattice size as a result of changes in the bond lengths and force constants. Additionally, slightly broader spectral features are observed in the case of the mixed compounds, indicating the presence of structural disorder caused by the random distribution of the alkali-metal cations within the lattice. FWS measurements upon heating showed that there is a large increase in reorientational mobility as the systems go through the order-disorder (..beta..-..alpha..) phase transition, and measurements upon cooling of the ..alpha..-phase revealed the known strong hysteresis for reversion back to the ..beta..-phase. Interestingly, at a given temperature, among the different alkali silanide compounds, the relative reorientational mobilities of the SiH3- anions in the ..alpha..- and ..beta..-phases tended to decrease and increase, respectively, with increasing alkali-metal mass. This dynamical result might provide some insights concerning the enthalpy-entropy compensation effect previously observed for these potentially promising hydrogen storage materials.

  17. Electronic states of monatomic layers of alkali and rare earth metals adsorbed on graphene surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alisultanov, Z. Z.

    2013-02-01

    The electronic states of ordered layers of alkali and rare earth metals adsorbed on graphene surfaces are examined using an Anderson model. The behavior of the density of states of these systems is analyzed. The case of an adsorbed metallic nanolayer with a discrete energy spectrum is discussed. A system whose electronic states can be controlled by an applied electric field is proposed and is of great practical interest. The qualitative difference between the existing theoretical approach to this problem and the present paper is that the former uses a "single adatom" formalism that does not deal with the band structure of the metallic adlayer. A way of describing the electronic states of an adsorbed layer of Gd and other metallic layers which form a fractal structure on a graphene surface is also examined.

  18. Speciation of phytate ion in aqueous solution. Alkali metal complex formation in different ionic media.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, Concetta; Milea, Demetrio; Pettignano, Alberto; Sammartano, Silvio

    2003-08-01

    The acid-base properties of phytic acid [ myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakis(dihydrogen phosphate)] (H(12)Phy; Phy(12-)=phytate anion) were studied in aqueous solution by potentiometric measurements ([H+]-glass electrode) in lithium and potassium chloride aqueous media at different ionic strengths (0< I mol L(-1)< or =3) and at t=25 degrees C. The protonation of phytate proved strongly dependent on both ionic medium and ionic strength. The protonation constants obtained in alkali metal chlorides are considerably lower than the corresponding ones obtained in a previous paper in tetraethylammonium iodide (Et(4)NI; e.g., at I=0.5 mol L(-1), log K(3)(H)=11.7, 8.0, 9.1, and 9.1 in Et(4)NI, LiCl, NaCl and KCl, respectively; the protonation constants in Et(4)NI and NaCl were already reported), owing to the strong interactions occurring between the phytate and alkaline cations present in the background salt. We explained this in terms of complex formation between phytate and alkali metal ions. Experimental evidence allows us to consider the formation of 13 mixed proton-metal-ligand complexes, M(j)H(i)Phy((12-i-j)-), (M+ =Li+, Na+, K+), with j< or =7 and i< or =6, in the range 2.5< or =pH< or =10 (some measurements, at low ionic strength, were extended to pH=11). In particular, all the species formed are negatively charged: i+j-12=-5, -6. Very high formation percentages of M+-phytate species are observed in all the pH ranges investigated. The stability of alkali metal complexes follows the trend Li+ > or =Na+K+. Some measurements were also performed at constant ionic strength (I=0.5 mol L(-1)), using different mixtures of Et(4)NI and alkali metal chlorides, in order to confirm the formation of hypothesized and calculated metal-proton-ligand complex species and to obtain conditional protonation constants in these multi-component ionic media.

  19. Algorithm for Evaluation of Temperature 3D-Distribution of a Vapor Cell in a Diode End-pumped Alkali Laser System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J. H.; Wang, Y.; Cai, H.; An, G. F.; Rong, K. P.; Yu, H.; Wang, S. Y.; Wang, H. Y.; Zhang, W.; Xue, L. P.; Zhou, J.

    2017-06-01

    We develop a new 3D-model to evaluate the light characteristics and the thermal features of a cesium-vapor laser end-pumped by a laser diode. The theoretical model is based on the principles of both heat transfer and laser kinetics. The 3-dimensional population density distribution and temperature distribution are both systematically obtained and analyzed. The methodology is thought to be useful for realization of a high-powered diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) in the future.

  20. Building a Chemical Intuition Under Pressure: Prediction of Alkali Metal Polyhydrides and Subhydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Eva

    2013-06-01

    Stabilization of solid phases with unusual combinations or stoichiometries, and unexpected electronic structures may be achieved by applying external pressure. The prediction of these structures using our chemical intuition (developed at 1 atmosphere) would be exceedingly difficult, making automated structure search techniques prudent. For this reason, we have written XtalOpt, an open-source evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction. Whereas at 1 atmosphere the classic alkali hydrides combine in a one-to-one ratio, M+H-, under pressure non-classic stoichiometries MHn(n > 1) and MmH (m > 1) are preferred. For example, theoretical work has predicted that LiH6 and NaH9 become particularly stable phases at about 100 and 25 GPa, respectively. And the potassium, rubidium and cesium polyhydrides all contain the H3-anion, the simplest exaple of a three centered four electron bond. The alkaline-earth polyhydrides are considered as well. Chemical trends relating the stabilization pressure to the ionization potential, and the nature of the hydrogenic sublattice to the strength of the metal-hydride interaction can be made. These hydrogen-rich materials with nontraditional stoichiometries are computed to undergo an insulator to metal transition at pressures attainable in diamond anvil cells. It may be that these systems are superconductors at experimentally achievable pressures. The metal-rich region of the alkali/hydrogen phase diagram under pressure shows that alkali-metal subhydrides may also be stabilized under pressure. We acknowledge the NSF (DMR-1005413) for financial support.

  1. Subtask 12E1: Compatibility of structural materials in liquid alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Rink, D.L.; Haglund, R.; Clark, R.W.

    1995-03-01

    The objectives of this task are to (a) evaluate the chemical compatibility of structural alloys such as V-5 wt.%Cr-5 wt.%Ti alloy and Type 316 stainless steel for application in liquid alkali metals such as lithium and sodium-78 wt.% potassium (NaK) at temperatures that are in the range of interest for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER); (b) evaluate the transfer of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen between structural materials and liquid metals; and (c) evaluate the effects of such transfers on the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the materials for long-term service in liquid-metal environments. Candidate structural materials are being evaluated for their compatibility, interstitial-element transfer, and corrosion in liquid alkali-metal systems such as lithium and NaK. Type 316 stainless steel and V-5Cr-5Ti coupon specimens with and without prealuminizing treatment have been exposed to NaK and lithium environments of commercial purity for times up to 3768 h at temperatures between 300 and 400{degrees}C. 13 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. The Moment Analysis Method as Applied to the 2S-2P Transition in Cryogenic Alkali Metal/Rare Gas Matrices (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-05

    spectroscopy of alkali metal atoms trapped in cryogenic noble gas matrices. Master’s thesis, Eastern New Mexico University, 1993. [31] J. W...Cryogenic Alkali Metal/Rare Gas Matrices (PREPRINT) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Heidi A. Terrill Vosbein (Stennis...the case of 2 S→2P ([core]ns1→[core]np1) transitions of alkali metal atoms (M) doped into cryogenic rare gas (Rg) matrices using theoretically

  3. The Moment Analysis Method as Applied to the (2)S yields (2)P Transition in Cryogenic Alkali Metal/Rare Gas Matrices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-14

    dichroism spectroscopy of alkali metal atoms trapped in cryogenic noble gas matrices. Master’s thesis, Eastern New Mexico University, 1993. (31...Cryogenic Alkali Metal/Rare Gas Matrices (POSTPRINT) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Heidi A. Terrill Vosbein (Stennis...been tested for the case of 2 S→2P ([core]ns1→[core]np1) transitions of alkali metal atoms (M) doped into cryogenic rare gas (Rg) matrices using

  4. Discriminating Properties of Alkali Metal Ions Towards the Constituents of Proteins and Nucleic Acids. Conclusions from Gas-Phase and Theoretical Studies.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Mary T; Armentrout, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative insight into the structures and thermodynamics of alkali metal cations interacting with biological molecules can be obtained from studies in the gas phase combined with theoretical work. In this chapter, the fundamentals of the experimental and theoretical techniques are first summarized and results for such work on complexes of alkali metal cations with amino acids, small peptides, and nucleobases are reviewed. Periodic trends in how these interactions vary as the alkali metal cations get heavier are highlighted.

  5. Thermochemical Ablation Therapy of VX2 Tumor Using a Permeable Oil-Packed Liquid Alkali Metal

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ziyi; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective Alkali metal appears to be a promising tool in thermochemical ablation, but, it requires additional data on safety is required. The objective of this study was to explore the effectiveness of permeable oil-packed liquid alkali metal in the thermochemical ablation of tumors. Methods Permeable oil-packed sodium–potassium (NaK) was prepared using ultrasonic mixing of different ratios of metal to oil. The thermal effect of the mixture during ablation of muscle tissue ex vivo was evaluated using the Fluke Ti400 Thermal Imager. The thermochemical effect of the NaK-oil mixture on VX2 tumors was evaluated by performing perfusion CT scans both before and after treatment in 10 VX2 rabbit model tumors. VX2 tumors were harvested from two rabbits immediately after treatment to assess their viability using trypan blue and hematoxylin and eosin (H.E.) staining. Results The injection of the NaK–oil mixture resulted in significantly higher heat in the ablation areas. The permeable oil controlled the rate of heat released during the NaK reaction with water in the living tissue. Perfusion computed tomography and its parameter map confirmed that the NaK–oil mixture had curative effects on VX2 tumors. Both trypan blue and H.E. staining showed partial necrosis of the VX2 tumors. Conclusions The NaK–oil mixture may be used successfully to ablate tumor tissue in vivo. With reference to the controlled thermal and chemical lethal injury to tumors, using a liquid alkali in ablation is potentially an effective and safe method to treat malignant tumors. PMID:25885926

  6. Thermochemical ablation therapy of VX2 tumor using a permeable oil-packed liquid alkali metal.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ziyi; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Xiaoguang; Jing, Zhengyu

    2015-01-01

    Alkali metal appears to be a promising tool in thermochemical ablation, but, it requires additional data on safety is required. The objective of this study was to explore the effectiveness of permeable oil-packed liquid alkali metal in the thermochemical ablation of tumors. Permeable oil-packed sodium-potassium (NaK) was prepared using ultrasonic mixing of different ratios of metal to oil. The thermal effect of the mixture during ablation of muscle tissue ex vivo was evaluated using the Fluke Ti400 Thermal Imager. The thermochemical effect of the NaK-oil mixture on VX2 tumors was evaluated by performing perfusion CT scans both before and after treatment in 10 VX2 rabbit model tumors. VX2 tumors were harvested from two rabbits immediately after treatment to assess their viability using trypan blue and hematoxylin and eosin (H.E.) staining. The injection of the NaK-oil mixture resulted in significantly higher heat in the ablation areas. The permeable oil controlled the rate of heat released during the NaK reaction with water in the living tissue. Perfusion computed tomography and its parameter map confirmed that the NaK-oil mixture had curative effects on VX2 tumors. Both trypan blue and H.E. staining showed partial necrosis of the VX2 tumors. The NaK-oil mixture may be used successfully to ablate tumor tissue in vivo. With reference to the controlled thermal and chemical lethal injury to tumors, using a liquid alkali in ablation is potentially an effective and safe method to treat malignant tumors.

  7. Vapor Deposition Of Metal From Gas/Tungsten Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, Jack L.; Poorman, Richard M.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum gas/tungsten-arc vapor-deposition process yields highly reflective, smooth films reproducing contours of surfaces on which deposited. Rate of deposition controlled precisely, and surface texture varied. Capable of deposition at rates double those of standard sputtering. Useful in making thin metallic coats to serve as electrical conductors, radio reflectors or antenna elements, or optical mirrors of partial or ultrahigh reflectivity, and in making semiconductor devices.

  8. Vapor Deposition Of Metal From Gas/Tungsten Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, Jack L.; Poorman, Richard M.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum gas/tungsten-arc vapor-deposition process yields highly reflective, smooth films reproducing contours of surfaces on which deposited. Rate of deposition controlled precisely, and surface texture varied. Capable of deposition at rates double those of standard sputtering. Useful in making thin metallic coats to serve as electrical conductors, radio reflectors or antenna elements, or optical mirrors of partial or ultrahigh reflectivity, and in making semiconductor devices.

  9. Promoter Effects of Alkali Metal Cations on the Electrochemical Reduction of Carbon Dioxide

    DOE PAGES

    Resasco, Joaquin; Chen, Leanne D.; Clark, Ezra; ...

    2017-07-24

    The electrochemical reduction of CO2 is known to be influenced by the identity of the alkali metal cation in the electrolyte; however, a satisfactory explanation for this phenomenon has not been developed. Here we present the results of experimental and theoretical studies aimed at elucidating the effects of electrolyte cation size on the intrinsic activity and selectivity of metal catalysts for the reduction of CO2. Experiments were conducted under conditions where the influence of electrolyte polarization is minimal in order to show that cation size affects the intrinsic rates of formation of certain reaction products, most notably for HCOO–, C2H4,more » and C2H5OH over Cu(100)- and Cu(111)-oriented thin films, and for CO and HCOO– over polycrystalline Ag and Sn. Interpretation of the findings for CO2 reduction was informed by studies of the reduction of glyoxal and CO, key intermediates along the reaction pathway to final products. Density functional theory calculations show that the alkali metal cations influence the distribution of products formed as a consequence of electrostatic interactions between solvated cations present at the outer Helmholtz plane and adsorbed species having large dipole moments. As a result, the observed trends in activity with cation size are attributed to an increase in the concentration of cations at the outer Helmholtz plane with increasing cation size.« less

  10. Table salt and other alkali metal chloride oligomers: structure, stability, and bonding.

    PubMed

    Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Solà, Miquel; Guerra, Célia Fonseca

    2007-06-25

    We have investigated table salt and other alkali metal chloride monomers, ClM, and (distorted) cubic tetramers, (ClM)(4), with M = Li, Na, K, and Rb, using density functional theory (DFT) at the BP86/TZ2P level. Our objectives are to determine how the structure and thermochemistry (e.g., Cl-M bond lengths and strengths, oligomerization energies, etc.) of alkali metal chlorides depend on the metal atom and to understand the emerging trends in terms of quantitative Kohn-Sham molecular orbital (KS-MO) theory. The analyses confirm the high polarity of the Cl-M bond (dipole moment, VDD, and Hirshfeld atomic charges). They also reveal that bond overlap derived stabilization (approximately -26, -20, and -8 kcal/mol), although clearly larger than in the corresponding F-M bonds, contributes relatively little to the (trend in) bond strengths (-105, -90, and -94 kcal/mol) along M = Li, Na, and K. Thus, the Cl-M bonding mechanism resembles more closely that of the even more ionic F-M bond than that of the more covalent C-M or H-M bonds. Tetramerization causes the Cl-M bond to expand, and it reduces its polarity.

  11. High power density performance of WPt and WRh electrodes in the alkali metal thermoelectric converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Underwood, M. L.; Wheeler, B. L.; Loveland, M. E.; Kikkert, S. J.; Lamb, J. L.; Cole, T.; Kummer, J. T.; Bankston, C. P.

    1989-01-01

    The properties of the alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) are discussed together with those of an efficient AMTEC electrode. Three groups of electrodes were prepared and tested for their performance as AMTEC electrodes, including WPt-T3, WRh-B1, and WRh-B2. The best electrodes of both WPt and WRh types typically exhibited low porosity, and thickness greater than 0.8 micron, which indicated that transport in these electrodes does not occur by a purely free-molecular flow mode. The observed values of the exchange current were found to be within the range of those observed for oxide-free Mo electrodes under similar conditions.

  12. Positron binding to alkali-metal hydrides: The role of molecular vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Gianturco, Franco A.; Franz, Jan; Buenker, Robert J.; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Pichl, Lukas; Rost, Jan-Michael; Tachikawa, Masanori; Kimura, Mineo

    2006-02-15

    The bound vibrational levels for J=0 have been computed for the series of alkali-metal hydride molecules from LiH to RbH, including NaH and KH. For all four molecules the corresponding potential-energy curves have been obtained for each isolated species and for its positron-bound complex (e{sup +}XH). It is found that the calculated positron affinity values strongly depend on the molecular vibrational state for which they are obtained and invariably increase as the molecular vibrational energy content increases. The consequences of our findings on the likelihood of possibly detecting such weakly bound species are briefly discussed.

  13. Analytical model of a transversely diode-pumped alkali metal vapour laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhomenko, A. I.; Shalagin, A. M.

    2017-08-01

    The previously presented analytical model of a transversely diode-pumped alkali metal vapour laser (A.I. Parkhomenko, A.M. Shalagin, Quantum Electronics, 2015, Vol. 45, No. 9, pp 797–806) is refined and expanded. Analytical formulas are derived describing the operation of a high-intensity laser at an almost arbitrary buffer gas pressure and taking into account radiation losses in the resonator. Comparison of the results of calculations of the laser energy characteristics by analytical formulas with the results of numerical calculations of other authors shows very good agreement.

  14. High power density performance of WPt and WRh electrodes in the alkali metal thermoelectric converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Underwood, M. L.; Wheeler, B. L.; Loveland, M. E.; Kikkert, S. J.; Lamb, J. L.; Cole, T.; Kummer, J. T.; Bankston, C. P.

    1989-01-01

    The properties of the alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) are discussed together with those of an efficient AMTEC electrode. Three groups of electrodes were prepared and tested for their performance as AMTEC electrodes, including WPt-T3, WRh-B1, and WRh-B2. The best electrodes of both WPt and WRh types typically exhibited low porosity, and thickness greater than 0.8 micron, which indicated that transport in these electrodes does not occur by a purely free-molecular flow mode. The observed values of the exchange current were found to be within the range of those observed for oxide-free Mo electrodes under similar conditions.

  15. Inosine octamer stabilized by alkali earth metal cations - as studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Frańska, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    By using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, inosine was found to be able to form an octamer stabilized by alkali earth metal cation, namely Ca(2+), Sr(2+) and Ba(2+), of which the most stable is that stabilized by Ca(2+) (ion [I8+Ca](2+)). It was established that 9-methylhypoxanthine (M) did not form an analogical octamer, since ion [M8+Ca](2+) was not detected. On the other hand, 9-methylhypoxanthine can form "mixed" octamers together with inosine (ions [InMm+Ca](2+), n + m = 8, were detected).

  16. A theoretical study of alkali metal atomic clusters: From Lin to Csn (n = 2-8)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez, Elizabeth; Fuentealba, Patricio

    A theoretical study of the electronic structure of the first members of the alkali metal atomic clusters series Lin to Csn (n = 2-8) has been done. The geometries of some isomers of the neutral, positive, and negative charged clusters have been determined. Some important properties have also been calculated: atomic binding energies, vertical and adiabatic ionization potentials, vertical and adiabatic electron affinities, static dipole polarizabilities, and energy gaps. Whenever possible they have been compared with experimental values yielding a reasonable agreement which supports some new values as reliable predictions. The data have been discussed in light of the periodic table of elements trends.

  17. Influence of alkali metal sulfates on contact properties of vanadium-containing catalyst for naphthalene oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Glukhovskii, N.G.; Vorob'eva, G.F.

    1988-10-10

    A study was of the influence of partial replacement of potassium sulfates with sulfates of other alkali metals in the active mass of a vanadium-containing catalyst. Catalyst selectivity for phthalic anhydride increased and optimum operating temperature decreased as the atomic mass of the element added became greater. The composition of the naphthalene oxidation products formed was investigated during progressive replacement of the potassium sulfates in the catalyst by cesium sulfates. Catalysts in which 30 at. % of the potassium was replaced by cesium were found to be most selective with respect to phthalic anhydride.

  18. Metal Hydride and Alkali Halide Opacities in Extrasolar Giant Planets and Cool Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weck, Philippe F.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Kirby, Kate; Schweitzer, Andreas; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2006-01-01

    The lack of accurate and complete molecular line and continuum opacity data has been a serious limitation to developing atmospheric models of cool stars and Extrasolar Giant Planets (EGPs). We report our recent calculations of molecular opacities resulting from the presence of metal hydrides and alkali halides. The resulting data have been included in the PHOENIX stellar atmosphere code (Hauschildt & Baron 1999). The new models, calculated using spherical geometry for all gravities considered, also incorporate our latest database of nearly 670 million molecular lines, and updated equations of state.

  19. Structures of alkali metals in silica gel nanopores: new materials for chemical reductions and hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Shatnawi, Mouath; Paglia, Gianluca; Dye, James L; Cram, Kevin C; Lefenfeld, Michael; Billinge, Simon J L

    2007-02-07

    Alkali metals and their alloys can be protected from spontaneous reaction with dry air by intercalation (with subsequent heating) into the pores of silica gel (SG) at loadings up to 40 wt %. The resulting loose, black powders are convenient materials for chemical reduction of organic compounds and the production of clean hydrogen. The problem addressed in this paper is the nature of the reducing species present in these amorphous materials. The atomic pair distribution function (PDF), which considers both Bragg and diffuse scattering components, was used to examine their structures. Liquid Na-K alloys added to silica gel at room temperature (stage 0) or heated to 150 degrees C (stage I) as well as stage I Na-SG, retain the overall pattern of pure silica gel. Broad oscillations in the PDF show that added alkali metals remain in the pores as nanoscale metal clusters. 23Na MAS NMR studies confirm the presence of Na(0) and demonstrate that Na+ ions are formed as well. The relative amounts of Na(0) and Na(+) depend on both the overall metal loading and the average pore size. The results suggest that ionization occurs near or in the SiO2 walls, with neutral metal present in the larger cavities. The fate of the electrons released by ionization is uncertain, but they may add to the silica gel lattice, or form an "electride-like plasma" near the silica gel walls. A remaining mystery is why the stage I material does not show a melting endotherm of the encapsulated metal and does not react with dry oxygen. Na-SG when heated to 400 degrees C (stage II) yields a dual-phase reaction product that consists of Na(4)Si(4) and Na(2)SiO(3).

  20. The Corrosion Protection of Metals by Ion Vapor Deposited Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    A study of the corrosion protection of substrate metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD Al) coats has been carried out. Corrosion protection by both anodized and unanodized IVD Al coats has been investigated. Base metals included in the study were 2219-T87 Al, 7075-T6 Al, Titanium-6 Al-4 Vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V), 4130 steel, D6AC steel, and 4340 steel. Results reveal that the anodized IVD Al coats provide excellent corrosion protection, but good protection is also achieved by IVD Al coats that have not been anodized.