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Sample records for alkali olivine basalts

  1. Ultramafic inclusions and host alkali olivine basalts of the southern coastal plain of the Red Sea, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ghent, Edward D.; Coleman, Robert Griffin; Hadley, Donald G.

    1979-01-01

    A variety of mafic and ultramafic inclusions occur within the pyroclastic components of the Al Birk basalt, erupted on the southern Red Sea coastal plain of Saudi Arabia from Pleistocene time to the present. Depleted harzburgites are the only inclusions contained within the basalts that were erupted through Miocene oceanic crust (15 km thick) in the vicinity of Jizan, whereas to the north in the vicinity of Al Birk, alkali basalts that were erupted through a thicker Precambrian crust (48 km thick) contain mixtures of harzburgites, cumulate gabbro, and websterite inclusions accompanied by large (> 2 cm) megacrysts of glassy alumina-rich clinopyroxene, plagioclase, and spinel. Microprobe analyses of individual minerals from the harzburgites, websterites, and cumulate gabbros reveal variations in composition that can be related to a complex mantle history during the evolution of the alkali basalts. Clinopyroxene and plagioclase megacrysts may represent early phases that crystallized from the alkali olivine basalt magma at depths less than 35 km. Layered websterites and gabbros with cumulate plagioclase and clinopyroxene may represent continuing crystallization of the alkali olivine basalt magma in the lower crust when basaltic magma was not rapidly ascending. It is significant that the megacrysts and cumulate inclusions apparently form only where the magmas have traversed the Precambrian crust, whereas the harzburgite-bearing basalts that penetrated a much thinner Miocene oceanic crust reveal no evidence of mantle fractionation. These alkali olivine basalts and their contained inclusions are related in time to present-day rifting in the Red Sea axial trough. The onshore, deep-seated, undersaturated magmas are separated from the shallow Red Sea rift subalkaline basalts by only 170 km. The contemporaneity of alkaline olivine and subalkaline basalts requires that they must relate directly to the separation of the Arabian plate from the African plate.

  2. Petrochemistry of a xenolith-bearing Neogene alkali olivine basalt from northeastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Saeed; Stern, Charles R.

    2012-05-01

    A small isolated Neogene, possibly Quaternary, monogenetic alkali olivine basalt cone in northeastern Iran contains both mantle peridotite and crustal gabbroic xenoliths, as well as plagioclase megacrysts. The basaltic magma rose to the surface along pathways associated with local extension at the junction between the N-S right-lateral and E-W left-lateral strike slip faults that form the northeastern boundary of the Lut microcontinental block. This basalt is enriched in LREE relative to HREE, and has trace-element ratios similar to that of oceanic island basalts (OIB). Its 87Sr/86Sr (0.705013 to 0.705252), 143Nd/144Nd (0.512735 to 0.512738), and Pb isotopic compositions all fall in the field of OIB derived from enriched (EM-2) mantle. It formed by mixing of small melt fractions from both garnet-bearing asthenospheric and spinel-facies lithospheric mantle. Plagioclase (An26-32) megacrysts, up to 4 cm in length, have euhedral crystal faces and show no evidence of reaction with the host basalt. Their trace-element concentrations suggest that these megacrysts are co-genetic with the basalt host, although their 87Sr/86Sr (0.704796) and 143Nd/144Nd (0.512687) ratios are different than this basalt. Round to angular, medium-grained granoblastic meta-igneous gabbroic xenoliths, ranging from ~ 1 to 6 cm in dimension, are derived from the lower continental crust. Spinel-peridotite xenoliths equilibrated in the subcontinental lithosphere at depths of 30 to 60 km and temperatures of 965 °C to 1065 °C. These xenoliths do not preserve evidence of extensive metasomatic enrichment as has been inferred for the mantle below the Damavand volcano further to the west in north-central Iran, and clinopyroxenes separated from two different mantle xenoliths have 87Sr/86Sr (0.704309 and 0.704593) and 143Nd/144Nd (0.512798) ratios which are less radiogenic than either their host alkali basalt or Damavand basalts, implying significant regional variations in the composition and extent of

  3. The solubility of olivine in basaltic liquids - An ionic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzberg, C. T.

    1979-01-01

    A model is presented which enables the temperature at which olivine is in equilibrium with any alkali-depleted basaltic compound to be calculated to within + or - 30 C. It is noted that the error increases substantially when applied to terrestrial basalts which contain several weight percent alkalis. In addition the model predicts and quantifies the reduced activity of SiO4(4-) monomers due to increasing SiO2 concentrations in the melt. It is shown that the coordination of alumina in melts which precipitate olivine only appears to be dominantly octahedral, while titanium acts as a polmerizing agent by interconnecting previously isolated SiO4(4-) monomers. It is concluded that the model is sufficiently sensitive to show that there are small repulsive forces between Mg(2+) and calcium ions which are in association with normative diopside in the melt.

  4. Systematics of Vanadium in Olivine from Planetary Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karner, J. M.; Papike, J. J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    The systematics of vanadium in olivines from the Earth, Moon and Mars allows for the comparison of planetary basalt origin and igneous setting and process. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Carbon Sequestration in Olivine and Basalt Powder Packed Beds.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Wells, Rachel K; Giammar, Daniel E

    2017-02-21

    Fractures and pores in basalt could provide substantial pore volume and surface area of reactive minerals for carbonate mineral formation in geologic carbon sequestration. In many fractures solute transport will be limited to diffusion, and opposing chemical gradients that form as a result of concentration differences can lead to spatial distribution of silicate mineral dissolution and carbonate mineral precipitation. Glass tubes packed with grains of olivine or basalt with different grain sizes and compositions were used to explore the identity and spatial distribution of carbonate minerals that form in dead-end one-dimensional diffusion-limited zones that are connected to a larger reservoir of water in equilibrium with 100 bar CO2 at 100 °C. Magnesite formed in experiments with olivine, and Mg- and Ca-bearing siderite formed in experiments with flood basalt. The spatial distribution of carbonates varied between powder packed beds with different powder sizes. Packed beds of basalt powder with large specific surface areas sequestered more carbon per unit basalt mass than powder with low surface area. The spatial location and extent of carbonate mineral formation can influence the overall ability of fractured basalt to sequester carbon.

  6. Plagioclase mineralogy of olivine alkaline basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    A geological and mineralogical study of the Potrillo volcanics is reported. The investigation consisted first of field mapping to establish and identify the different rock types and volcanic features in order to determine the geological history. Next, samples were collected and analyzed petrographically to determine suitable rocks from the various stratigraphic units for study of plagioclase. Samples selected for further study were crushed and the plagioclase extracted for the determination of composition and structural state. These results were then related to the petrology and crystallization of the basalt.

  7. Petrogenesis of Late Cenozoic basalts from North Hainan Island: Constraints from melt inclusions and their host olivines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Qiang; Ren, Zhong-Yuan; Nichols, Alexander R. L.; Song, Mao-Shuang; Qian, Sheng-Ping; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Pei-Pei

    2015-03-01

    Melt inclusions and their host olivines in basaltic lavas provide important information about the nature of their mantle source. We present the first analyzed chemical data of olivine-hosted melt inclusions in Cenozoic basalts from the North Hainan Island and report the discovery of both tholeiitic and alkalic melt inclusions in a single rock sample. Cenozoic basalts from the Hainan Island are predominantly tholeiites with only small amounts of alkali basalts. There is a much broader compositional variation in melt inclusions than whole rocks. Compared to partial melts of mantle peridotite, the Hainan basalts have lower CaO, Na2O/TiO2, CaO/Al2O3 and Co/Fe, and higher TiO2, FeO∗, Fe/Mn, Zn/Fe and Zn/Mn. The olivine phenocrysts from the Hainan basalts contain lower Ca and Mn, and higher Ni and Fe/Mn than those of olivines crystallized from partial melts of peridotite. Projections from or towards olivine into the plane CS-MS-A for melt inclusions and whole rocks with MgO >7.5 wt% imply that the residual minerals in the source of the tholeiites are mainly clinopyroxene and garnet, possibly with some orthopyroxene, while in the source of the alkali basalts they are dominated by clinopyroxene and garnet. This indicates that a pyroxenite component could serve as the source lithology of the Hainan basalts. The OIB-like trace element compositions, with Ba, Sr, Nb and Ta positive anomalies, and Th and U negative anomalies, of the Hainan basalts suggest that a recycled oceanic crust component was involved in the source of the Hainan basalts. Based on a CMAS projection of primary magma compositions of the whole rocks and melt inclusions, we infer that a stage-2 silica-deficient pyroxenite derived from melt-peridotite reaction or mechanical mixing between recycled oceanic crust and peridotite can serve as the source lithology. Partial melts derived from such a source can match the overall compositions of the Hainan basalts better than those of MORB-eclogite and fertile

  8. Atmospheric argon contamination of ocean island basalt olivine phenocrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parley, K. A.; Craig, H.

    1994-06-01

    40Ar/ 36Ar and helium and argon concentrations have been repeatedly measured on olivine phenocrysts in a single tholeiitic basalt (PIN-12) from the Juan Fernandez hotspot. Forty olivine splits were analyzed by crushing of bulk samples or laser fusion of single crystals. The measured 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios span a very large range (400-7700) and are consistent with binary mixing of two argon components. Unlike argon, helium in repeated measurements of this single basalt flow has a reproducible isotopic ratio, 17 times the air 3He/ 4He value. It is unlikely that such large variations in 40Ar/ 36Ar represent microscale mantle heterogeneity. Rather the results indicate highly variable mixing proportions of a mantle-derived radiogenic argon component ( 40Ar/ 36Ar ≫ 7700) and an isotopically air-like endmember that is almost certainly an atmospheric contaminant. This air-like constituent cannot be removed by physical and chemical treatments of the olivines. Analysis of individual crystals by laser fusion shows that both the radiogenic and the contaminant components are in fluid inclusions. Siting of the contaminant in inclusions requires the addition of airderived noble gases to hotspot magmas prior to or during emplacement, a process that may occur by assimilation of altered crust during crustal storage or, alternatively, by direct addition of air or seawater to the magma. In either case the olivines must continue to trap argon, presumably by fracture annealing and/or bubble enclosure, after the contaminating event. If atmospheric contamination is a general phenomenon, the 40Ar/ 36Ar composition of olivines (and possibly of basalt glasses as well) must be only a lower limit for the mantle source ratio. With the exception of helium, the other noble gases may be similarly compromised. Our results support contentions that lavas with near-atmospheric noble gas compositions reflect severe atmospheric contamination, rather than the air-like signature of an undegassed primitive

  9. Alkali basalts and enclosed ultramafic xenoliths near Ushuaia, Tierra Del Fuego, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Rogelio Daniel

    2016-01-01

    At the southernmost part of Tierra del Fuego a few outcrops and erratic boulders of alkali basaltic rocks with ultramafic enclaves have been studied. Alkali basalt plugs or pipes hitherto identified are scarce, and host rocks are constituted by slates that belong to Mesozoic deposition. The petrography, texture and composition of the basalt and xenoliths were investigated by petrographic microscope and electron microprobe analysis. Xenocrysts of amphibole and alkali feldspar, phenocrysts of nepheline, olivine, spinel, phlogopite and Fe-Ti minerals (10 %) and a diversity of xenoliths, mainly lherzolitic, pyroxenite and wehrlitic nodules (15 %), but also from metamorphic rocks provenance, are contained in the basalt groundmass (75 %). This finer-grained material is made up of laths or needles of plagioclase, pyroxene, opaque minerals, apatite and glass, with intersertal, hyalopilitic and pilotaxitic. Locally, rock has an even granoblastic texture. Former amygdules are filled by analcite, zeolites, sodalite and calcite. The normative classification, based on nepheline content, conclude that this rock is an alkali basalt. The chemical classification, considering immobile elements as Zr/TiO2 versus Nb/Y indicate an alkali basalt too and plots over the TAS diagram fall in the foidite (Na-rich or nephelinite) and basanite fields. The REE patterns are fractionated (La/Yb primitive mantle normalized is approximately 30). The K-Ar isotopic technique on individual macrocrysts gave ages of 146 ± 5 Ma (amphibole) and 127 ± 4 Ma (alkali feldspar); and K-Ar whole rock datum reported 8.3 ± 0.3 Ma. Nevertheless, fertile samples show geochemical features typical of deep derived material thus, based on the position in the actual tectonic setting, indicate that the basalt is older than its isotopic age.

  10. Cotectic proportions of olivine and spinel in olivine-tholeiitic basalt and evaluation of pre-eruptive processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roeder, Peter; Gofton, Emma; Thornber, Carl

    2006-01-01

    The volume %, distribution, texture and composition of coexisting olivine, Cr-spinel and glass has been determined in quenched lava samples from Hawaii, Iceland and mid-oceanic ridges. The volume ratio of olivine to spinel varies from 60 to 2800 and samples with >0·02% spinel have a volume ratio of olivine to spinel of approximately 100. A plot of wt % MgO vs ppm Cr for natural and experimental basaltic glasses suggests that the general trend of the glasses can be explained by the crystallization of a cotectic ratio of olivine to spinel of about 100. One group of samples has an olivine to spinel ratio of approximately 100, with skeletal olivine phenocrysts and small (<50 μm) spinel crystals that tend to be spatially associated with the olivine phenocrysts. The large number of spinel crystals included within olivine phenocrysts is thought to be due to skeletal olivine phenocrysts coming into physical contact with spinel by synneusis during the chaotic conditions of ascent and extrusion. A second group of samples tend to have large olivine phenocrysts relatively free of included spinel, a few large (>100 μm) spinel crystals that show evidence of two stages of growth, and a volume ratio of olivine to spinel of 100 to well over 1000. The olivine and spinel in this group have crystallized more slowly with little physical interaction, and show evidence that they have accumulated in a magma chamber.

  11. Nickeliferous sulfides in xenoliths, olivine megacrysts and basaltic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleet, Michael E.; Stone, William E.

    1990-11-01

    The composition of olivine and nickeliferous sulfide inclusions from a selection of mafic and ultramafre rocks, xenoliths and megacrysts, including picritic basalts from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, kimberlite from Fayette County, Pennsylvania, and megacrysts from Mount Shasta, California are compared with the mean experimental value of the distribution coefficient for Ni/Fe exchange (KD3=32). Only nine of the forty five olivipe/bulk-sulfide pairs investigated have compositions consistent with equilibration at high temperature, yielding calculated KD3 values in the range 22 to 41. The remaining pairs have calculated KD3 values which range from 0 to 19. Bulk-sulfides in disequilibrated assem-blages are consistently depleted in nickel and within both indivudual associations and individual petrographic sections they exhibit a wide variation in NiS content. The bulk copper contents of olivine-and groundmass-hosted sulfides from Kilauea Volcano range from 0.5 to 43 at%, and samples from the Kilauea Iki lava lake are more Fe-and Cu-rich and generally have lower KD3 values than those from the eruption itself. As with magmatic Ni-Cu sulfide deposits, most nickeliferous sulfide inclusions in mantle-related rocks and xenoliths and in volcanic rocks do not have pristine early-magmatic bulk compositions, and it would seem to be premature to attribute these sulfides solely to either a mantle or an early-magnatic origin.

  12. Olivine and melt inclusion chemical constraints on the source of intracontinental basalts from the eastern North China Craton: Discrimination of contributions from the subducted Pacific slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-Yan; Xu, Yi-Gang; Ryan, Jeffrey G.; Huang, Xiao-Long; Ren, Zhong-Yuan; Guo, Hua; Ning, Zhen-Guo

    2016-04-01

    Contributions from fluid and melt inputs from the subducting Pacific slab to the chemical makeup of intraplate basalts erupted on the eastern Eurasian continent have long been suggested but have not thus far been geochemically constrained. To attempt to address this question, we have investigated Cenozoic basaltic rocks from the western Shandong and Bohai Bay Basin, eastern North China Craton (NCC), which preserve coherent relationships among the chemistries of their melt inclusions, their hosting olivines and their bulk rock compositions. Three groups of samples are distinguished: (1) high-Si and (2) moderate-Si basalts (tholeiites, alkali basalts and basanites) which were erupted at ∼23-20 Ma, and (3) low-Si basalts (nephelinites) which were erupted at <9 Ma. The high-Si basalts have lower alkalies, CaO and FeOT contents, lower trace element concentrations, lower La/Yb, Sm/Yb and Ce/Pb but higher Ba/Th ratios, and lower εNd and εHf values than the low-Si basalts. The olivines in the high-Si basalts have higher Ni and lower Mn and Ca at a given Fo value than those crystallizing from peridotite melts, and their corresponding melt inclusions have lower CaO contents than peridotite melts, suggesting a garnet pyroxenitic source. The magmatic olivines from low-Si basalts have lower Ni but higher Mn at a given Fo value than that of the high-Si basalts, suggesting more olivine in its source. The olivine-hosted melt inclusions of the low-Si basalts have major elemental signatures different from melts of normal peridotitic or garnet pyroxenitic mantle sources, pointing to their derivation from a carbonated mantle source consisting of peridotite and garnet pyroxenite. We propose a model involving the differential melting of a subduction-modified mantle source to account for the generation of these three suites of basalts. Asthenospheric mantle beneath the eastern NCC, which entrains garnet pyroxenite with an EM1 isotopic signature, was metasomatized by carbonatitic

  13. Understanding highly explosive basaltic eruptions: Evidence from olivine-hosted melt inclusions from Sunset Crater, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, C. M.; Roggensack, K.; Clarke, A. B.; Alfano, F.

    2013-12-01

    Basaltic scoria cone volcanoes are the most abundant volcanic landform on Earth and occur in all tectonic settings. Basaltic magmas have lower viscosities, higher temperatures, and lower volatile contents than silicic magmas, and therefore generally have a lower potential for explosive activity. However, basaltic eruptions display great variability, from mild lava flows to more energetic explosions with large plumes. The mechanism controlling highly explosive basaltic eruptions, such as the ca. 1085 AD eruption of Sunset Crater, is poorly understood. Processes or conditions such as high volatile content in the source magma, injection of a compositionally distinct magma at depth, interaction with shallow magma reservoirs, or rapid crystallization and/or bubble nucleation in the shallow subsurface could increase explosivity of basaltic magmas. One method to test these hypotheses is melt inclusion analysis in order to constrain initial melt composition, volatile content and minimum storage depth. The San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) in northern Arizona, active from 6 Ma-present, consists of over 600 volcanoes - mainly alkali basalt scoria cones along with five silicic centers. The eruption of Sunset Crater in the SFVF during the Holocene was an anomalously large basaltic explosive eruption, consisting of >8 explosive phases and 3 lava flows. Typical scoria cone-forming eruptions produce <0.1 km3 DRE of material, while the Sunset Crater tephra deposit is on the order of ~0.3 km3 DRE, with each phase characterized by volumes of 0.02-0.08 km3 DRE. The phases vary in size and style; the beginning stages of explosive activity (phases 1-2) were considerably smaller than phases 3-5, classified as subplinian. Because of the young age and desert setting of the volcano, the eruptive material is fresh and the deposit is well preserved. The bulk composition is an alkali basalt with Mg# 74. We studied 40 primary melt inclusions (MIs) hosted in 36 olivine crystals 0.5-2 mm in

  14. Spinel from Apollo 12 Olivine Mare Basalts: Chemical Systematics of Selected Major, Minor, and Trace Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papike, J. J.; Karner, J. M.; Shearer, C. K.; Spilde, M. N.

    2002-01-01

    Spinels from Apollo 12 Olivine basalts have been studied by Electron and Ion microprobe techniques. The zoning trends of major, minor and trace elements provide new insights into the conditions under which planetary basalts form. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Assesment of Alkali Resistance of Basalt Used as Concrete Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    al-Swaidani, Aref M.; Baddoura, Mohammad K.; Aliyan, Samira D.; Choeb, Walid

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to report a part of an ongoing research on the influence of using crushed basalt as aggregates on one of durability-related properties of concrete (i.e. alkali-silica reaction which is the most common form of Alkali-Aggregate Reaction). Alkali resistance has been assessed through several methods specified in the American Standards. Results of petrographic examination, chemical test (ASTM C289) and accelerated mortar bar test (ASTM C1260) have particularly been reported. In addition, the weight change and compressive strength of 28 days cured concrete containing basaltic aggregates were also reported after 90 days of exposure to 10% NaOH solution. Dolomite aggregate were used in the latter test for comparison. The experimental results revealed that basaltic rocks quarried from As-Swaida'a region were suitable for production of aggregates for concrete. According to the test results, the studied basalt aggregates can be classified as innocuous with regard to alkali-silica reaction. Further, the 10% sodium hydroxide attack did not affect the compressive strength of concrete.

  16. Characterization and Petrologic Interpretation of Olivine-Rich Basalts at Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McSween, H. Y.; Wyatt, M. B.; Gellert, R.; Bell, J. F., III; Morris, R. V.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Crumpler, L. S.; Milam, K. A.; Stockstill, K. R.; Tornabene, L. L.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bartlett, P.; Blaney, D.; Cabrol, N. A.; Christensen, P. R.; Clark, B. C.; Crisp, A.; DesMarais, D. J.; Economou, T.; Farmer, J. D.; Farrand, W.; Ghosh, A.; Golombek, M.; Gorevan, S.; Greeley, R.

    2006-01-01

    Rocks on the floor of Gusev crater are basalts of uniform composition and mineralogy. Olivine, the only mineral to have been identified or inferred from data by all instruments on the Spirit rover, is especially abundant in these rocks. These picritic basalts are similar in many respects to certain Martian meteorites (olivine-phyric shergottites). The olivine megacrysts in both have intermediate compositions, with modal abundances ranging up to 20-30%. Associated minerals in both include low-calcium and high-calcium pyroxenes, plagioclase of intermediate composition, iron-titanium-chromium oxides, and phosphate. These rocks also share minor element trends, reflected in their nickel-magnesium and chromium-magnesium ratios. Gusev basalts and shergottites appear to have formed from primitive magmas produced by melting an undepleted mantle at depth and erupted without significant fractionation. However, apparent differences between Gusev rocks and shergottites in their ages, plagioclase abundances, and volatile contents preclude direct correlation. Orbital determinations of global olivine distribution and compositions by thermal emission spectroscopy suggest that olivine-rich rocks may be widespread. Because weathering under acidic conditions preferentially attacks olivine and disguises such rocks beneath alteration rinds, picritic basalts formed from primitive magmas may even be a common component of the Martian crust formed during ancient and recent times.

  17. Characterization and petrologic interpretation of olivine-rich basalts at Gusev Crater, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSween, H.Y.; Wyatt, M.B.; Gellert, Ralf; Bell, J.F.; Morris, R.V.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Crumpler, L.S.; Milam, K.A.; Stockstill, K.R.; Tornabene, L.L.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bartlett, P.; Blaney, D.; Cabrol, N.A.; Christensen, P.R.; Clark, B. C.; Crisp, J.A.; Des Marais, D.J.; Economou, T.; Farmer, J.D.; Farrand, W.; Ghosh, A.; Golombek, M.; Gorevan, S.; Greeley, R.; Hamilton, V.E.; Johnson, J. R.; Joliff, B.L.; Klingelhofer, G.; Knudson, A.T.; McLennan, S.; Ming, D.; Moersch, J.E.; Rieder, R.; Ruff, S.W.; Schrorder, C.; de Souza, P.A.; Squyres, S. W.; Wanke, H.; Wang, A.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.

    2006-01-01

    Rocks on the floor of Gusev crater are basalts of uniform composition and mineralogy. Olivine, the only mineral to have been identified or inferred from data by all instruments on the Spirit rover, is especially abundant in these rocks. These picritic basalts are similar in many respects to certain Martian meteorites (olivine-phyric shergottites). The olivine megacrysts in both have intermediate compositions, with modal abundances ranging up to 20-30%. Associated minerals in both include low-calcium and high-calcium pyroxenes, plagioclase of intermediate composition, iron-titanium-chromium oxides, and phosphate. These rocks also share minor element trends, reflected in their nickel-magnesium and chromium-magnesium ratios. Gusev basalts and shergottites appear to have formed from primitive magmas produced by melting an undepleted mantle at depth and erupted without significant fractionation. However, apparent differences between Gusev rocks and shergottites in their ages, plagioclase abundances, and volatile contents preclude direct correlation. Orbital determinations of global olivine distribution and compositions by thermal emission spectroscopy suggest that olivine-rich rocks may be widespread. Because weathering under acidic conditions preferentially attacks olivine and disguises such rocks beneath alteration rinds, picritic basalts formed from primitive magmas may even be a common component of the Martian crust formed during ancient and recent times. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Calculated diffusion coefficients and the growth rate of olivine in a basalt magma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    Concentration gradients in glass adjacent to skeletal olivines in a basalt have been examined by electron probe. The glass is depleted in Mg, Fe, and Cr and enriched in Si, Al, Na, and Ca relative to that far from olivine. Ionic diffusion coefficients for the glass compositions are calculated from temperature, ionic radius and melt viscosity, using the Stokes-Einstein relation. At 1170 C, the diffusion coefficient of Mg(2+) ions in the basalt is 4.5 billionths sq cm per sec. Comparison with measured diffusion coefficients in a mugearite suggests this value may be 16 times too small. The concentration gradient data and the diffusion coefficients are used to calculate instantaneous olivine growth rates. Growth necessarily preceded emplacement such that the composition of the crystals plus the enclosing glass need not be that of a melt. The computed olivine growth rates are compatible with the rate of crystallization deduced for the Skaegaard intrusion.

  19. Geochemical insights into the role of metasomatic hornblendite in generating alkali basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Li-Qun; Zhao, Zi-Fu; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2014-10-01

    petrology suggested the role of hornblendite in generating alkali basalt. This mechanism is confirmed by an integrated study of major-trace elements and radiogenic isotopes for Mesozoic alkali basalts from the Qinling orogen in China. The alkali basalts have high contents of MgO (4.8-11.1 wt %, Mg# = 47-69), Na2O + K2O (2.9-5.4 wt %), TiO2 (2.0-3.1 wt %) but low content of SiO2 (41.4-49.6 wt %), which are generally silica-undersaturated with normative minerals of nepheline and olivine. They exhibit OIB-like trace element distribution patterns, with enrichment of LILE and LREE but no depletion of HFSE relative to the primitive mantle. They also show relatively depleted Sr-Nd-Hf isotope compositions, with low initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7028-0.7058, positive ɛNd(t) values of 4.0-9.8 and ɛHf(t) values of 8.8-13.5 for whole-rock, and positive ɛHf(t) values of 5.2-16.4 for zircon. Such element and isotope features indicate their origination from the juvenile subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) source with involvement of crustal components. The alkali basalts generally have high K2O/Na2O ratios, and high K2O and TiO2 contents, suggesting their derivation from partial melting of hornblendite-rich mantle lithology. They also exhibit variable K/La and Ti/La ratios that are correlated with (La/Yb)N ratios, indicating a geochemical heterogeneity of the SCLM source. Taken together, all the above geochemical features can be accounted for by partial melting of a hornblendite-rich SCLM source. The hornblendite would be generated by reaction of the juvenile SCLM wedge peridotite with hydrous felsic melts derived from subducted Palaeotethyan oceanic crust at the slab-mantle interface in the subduction channel. Therefore, orogenic alkali basalts record recycling of the subducted fossil oceanic crust, and the metasomatic hornblendite is an important lithology in local SCLM domains above fossil subduction channels.

  20. An olivine-free mantle source of Hawaiian shield basalts.

    PubMed

    Sobolev, Alexander V; Hofmann, Albrecht W; Sobolev, Stephan V; Nikogosian, Igor K

    2005-03-31

    More than 50 per cent of the Earth's upper mantle consists of olivine and it is generally thought that mantle-derived melts are generated in equilibrium with this mineral. Here, however, we show that the unusually high nickel and silicon contents of most parental Hawaiian magmas are inconsistent with a deep olivine-bearing source, because this mineral together with pyroxene buffers both nickel and silicon at lower levels. This can be resolved if the olivine of the mantle peridotite is consumed by reaction with melts derived from recycled oceanic crust, to form a secondary pyroxenitic source. Our modelling shows that more than half of Hawaiian magmas formed during the past 1 Myr came from this source. In addition, we estimate that the proportion of recycled (oceanic) crust varies from 30 per cent near the plume centre to insignificant levels at the plume edge. These results are also consistent with volcano volumes, magma volume flux and seismological observations.

  1. Petrochemistry, age and isotopic composition of alkali basalts from Ponape Island, Western Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, T.H.; Batiza, Rodey; Futa, K.; Martin, D.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven analyzed lava samples from Ponape Island are alkali olivine basalt, basanite and basanitoid. Most lavas are aphyric or sparsely phyric (< 10% phenocrysts) and have phenocrysts of olivine (Fo77-80), clinopyroxene and titanomagnetite, and microphenocrysts of plagioclase (An53-68) in a fine-grained groundmass of olivine, clinopyroxene, plagioclase, opaques, potassic oligoclase, ?? nepheline and accessary phases. Oxygen isotope and Fe2O3 FeO data suggest that most samples are fresh, although H2O contents are high. Xenoliths of chromite-bearing harzburgites and dunites, both with cumulate textures occur in one locality. Major- and trace-element concentrations are similar to other oceanic volcanic islands. Most major elements and compatible trace elements vary systematically with respect to the Mg number [ 100Mg (Mg + Fe2+)]. In contrast, the incompatible trace elements do not correlate with the Mg number, but do covary with other incompatible elements. Simple closed-system shallow fractionation cannot be invoked to explain the observed chemical variation in the lavas. Derivation of the fractionated lavas (Mg number = 66-48) probably involved polybaric crystal fractionation from a high-Mg-number parental liquid. In addition, variable-source concentration of a trace-element-rich minor phase is postulated. However, the mantle was homogeneous with respect to the ratio of 87Sr 86Sr. New KAr age data are not consistent with the hypothesis that Ponape and the Caroline Ridge represent a simple "hot spot". ?? 1984.

  2. The carbon dioxide solubility in alkali basalts: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesne, Priscille; Scaillet, Bruno; Pichavant, Michel; Beny, Jean-Michel

    2011-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine CO2 solubilities in alkali basalts from Vesuvius, Etna and Stromboli volcanoes. The basaltic melts were equilibrated with nearly pure CO2 at 1,200°C under oxidizing conditions and at pressures ranging from 269 to 2,060 bars. CO2 solubility was determined by FTIR measurements. The results show that alkalis have a strong effect on the CO2 solubility and confirm and refine the relationship between the compositional parameter Π devised by Dixon (Am Mineral 82:368-378, 1997) and the CO2 solubility. A general thermodynamic model for CO2 solubility in basaltic melts is defined for pressures up to 2 kbars. Based on the assumption that O2- and CO{3/2-} mix ideally, we have: begin{gathered} K(P,T) = {{X_{{{{CO}}3^{2 - } }}m (P,T)}/{X_{{{{O}^{2 - } }}m × f_{{{{CO}}2 }} (P,T)}}} \\ K(P,T) = {{X_{{{{CO}}3^{2 - } }}m (P,T)} {/ {{{X_{{{{CO}}3^{2 - } }}m (P,T)} {( {X_{{{{O}}^{2 - } }}m × f_{{{{CO}}2 }} (P,T)} ).}}} . kern-νlldelimiterspace} {( {X_{{{{O}}^{2 - } }}m × f_{{{{CO}}2 }} (P,T)} ).}} \\ Then, from the thermodynamic model, we obtain ln K 0 = 0.893 Π - 15.247. The new CO2 solubility model yields saturation pressures lower by as much as 50% relative to some existing models when applied to volatile-rich alkali basalts.

  3. Geochemistry of Kauai volcanics and a mixing model for the origin of Hawaiian alkali basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigenson, Mark D.

    1984-09-01

    A comprehensive model is developed to explain the major, trace element and strontium and neodymium isotopic characteristics of alkali basalts from Hawaii. The model is similar to that of Chen and Frey (1983) in that it requires mixing of a small melt fraction of MORB-source material with another component to generate the alkalic suite of a particular Hawaiian volcano. It differs from the Chen and Frey model in that the other end-member must be different from primitive mantle if it is to be consistent with both trace element and isotopic data. Alkali basalts and tholeiites from Kauai analyzed in this study show a nearly complete transition in Sr and Nd isotopes. There is a relatively well-constrained array on a Nd-Sr isotope correlation plot that can be explained by two-component mixing of Kauai tholeiite magma and a small amount of melt of East Pacific Rise source rock. After corrections are made for fractional crystallization (involving primarily clinopyroxene and olivine), the Sr and Ba concentrations of Kauai lavas plot along mixing curves defined by the above sources, providing positive tests of the mixing hypothesis. Implications of this model are: (1) the main source of Hawaiian shield-building tholeiites is a mixture of subducted crust, primitive mantle and depleted asthenosphere that has been homogenized prior to melting, (2) early alkalic volcanism (as at Loihi seamount) will be characterized by greater isotopic heterogeneity than will late-stage alkali basalt production, and (3) there are two fundamentally distinct types of alkalic lavas erupted towards the end of magmatism at a given Hawaiian volcano. One represents smaller degrees of melting of the same source that generated shield-building tholeiites (Kohala-type); the other derives from the mixed source discussed in this paper (Haleakala-, Kauai-type).

  4. The x ray microprobe determination of chromium oxidation state in olivine from lunar basalt and kimberlitic diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Bajt, S.; Rivers, M. L.; Smith, J. V.

    1993-01-01

    The synchrotron x-ray microprobe is being used to obtain oxidation state information on planetary materials with high spatial resolution. Initial results on chromium in olivine from various sources including laboratory experiments, lunar basalt, and kimberlitic diamonds are reported. The lunar olivine was dominated by Cr(2+) whereas the diamond inclusions had Cr(2+/Cr(3+) ratios up to about 0.3. The simpliest interpretation is that the terrestrial olivine crystallized in a more oxidizing environment than the lunar olivine.

  5. Thermobarometry for spinel lherzolite xenoliths in alkali basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Kazuhito; Youbi, Nasrrddine; Boumehdi, Moulay Ahmed; Nagahara, Hiroko

    2016-04-01

    geothermobarometry based on reactions with large and distinct volume changes, is necessary. Specification of mineral domains and their components representing the thermal state of the mantle just before xenolith extraction is one of the major tasks for the establishment of reliable geothermobarometry for spinel lherzolite xenoliths. Systematic variations of such mineralogical information among xenoliths transported by a single volcanic eruption guarantees proper estimation of a mantle geotherm. For the development of such geobarometry, it is important to choose appropriate xenolith locality, where previous studies provide enough information and where many xenolith samples are available for extending a range of derivation depth. Spinel lherzolite xenoliths in alkali basalts from Bou Ibalhatene maars in the Middle Atlas in Morocco are suitable study target. Geochemical, geochronological, petrological, and rheological aspects of the spinel lherzolite xenoliths have been studied (Raffone et al. 2009; El Messbahi et al., 2015; Witting et al., 2010; El Azzouzi et al., 2010), which show that they represent fragments of the lithospheric mantle formed and modified since 1.7Ga before their extraction from Miocene to recent. We have pinpointed portions of minerals in the xenolith samples and their components representing condition just before their entrapment in magmas, on which appropriate geothermobarometers are applied and detected ~0.5GPa pressure difference (1.5-2.0GPa) for ~100°C variation in temperatures (950-1050°C).

  6. Distinguishing between Apollo 14 impact melt and pristine mare basalt samples by geochemical and textural analyses of olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, A. L.; Neal, C. R.; Simonetti, A.; Donohue, P. H.; O'Sullivan, K. M.

    2013-04-01

    Apollo 14 (A-14) impact melt olivine vitrophyres (OVs), composed of olivine phenocrysts in an opaque glass matrix with minor amounts of pyroxene and plagioclase, are petrographically similar to pristine quenched A-14 high-alumina (high-Al) and Apollo 12 (A-12) basalts. Textural and chemical analyses have been conducted on olivines within impact melt and pristine mare basalt clasts from A-14 breccia 14321 as well as various olivine-phyric Apollo 12 and 17 basalts to be able to distinguish between the petrographically similar samples. The A-14 high-Al basalts examined here represent samples from each of the three chemical groups (A, B, C). Examples from the three A-12 basalt suites (Ilmenite, Olivine, Pigeonite) and olivine-rich Apollo 17 (A-17) Type C basalt, 74275, have also been analyzed. As a complement to the chemical analyses, crystal size distributions (CSDs) were determined for approximately half of the samples investigated here (due to a small number of olivine crystals that did not produce statistically meaningful CSDs on half of the samples), and confirm that although similar, the basalts and impact melts are texturally distinct. Olivines from A-14 impact melts have the highest average forsterite contents (average Fo ˜0.82) and generally the lowest average Co (37 ppm) and Mn (1544 ppm) abundances, thus chemically distinguishing them from the pristine basalts. In addition, chemical compositions obtained for olivine from 14321,1486 are most likely representative of an impact melt and thus contradict its previous classification as a high-Al basalt (Neal et al., 1988); olivine from, 1486 have similar average forsterite (average Fo ˜0.82) and Ti/V-ratio to the OVs. Furthermore, on the basis of their chemical compositions, olivines have been identified within the impact melts that are likely inherited from basalts; these olivines are chemically distinct from the rest of the impact melt olivine population with lower forsterite (0.67-0.80) and low Ti/V (˜10

  7. Petrology and geochemistry of olivine-normative and quartz-normative basalts from regolith breccia 15498 - New diversity in Apollo 15 mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vetter, Scott K.; Shervais, John W.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of mare basalt clasts from Apollo 15 shows a greater diversity than previously recognized and provides new constraints on the petrogenesis of these basalts. The quartz-normative basalts (QNB) from 15498 are divided into four groups based on chemical variations: primitive, intermediate/1, intermediate/2, and evolved. The olivine-normative basalts (ONB) are divided into three groups: low-SiO2, high-SiO2, and olivine-pyroxene cumulates. Least-squares mixing calculations show that the high SiO2 ONBs may be parental to the QNB suite. Variations within the low-SiO2 ONBs are explained by olivine factionation. It is suggested that the presence of these basalt types may result from the position of breccia 15498 near the edge of the mare plain where normal ONBs are scarce, and from its presumed origin as ejecta from Dune Crater.

  8. Enhanced olivine carbonation within a basalt as compared to single-phase experiments: the impact of redox and bulk composition on the dissolution kinetics of olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sissmann, O.; Brunet, F.; Martinez, I.; Guyot, F. J.; Verlaguet, A.; Pinquier, Y.; Garcia, B.; Chardin, M.; Kohler, E.; Daval, D.

    2014-12-01

    Olivine (Mg,Fe)2SiO4, which is one of the major mineral constituents of mafic and ultramafic rocks, has an attractive potential for CO2 mineral sequestration, as it possesses a high content of carbonate-forming divalent cations and exhibits one of the highest dissolution rate amongst rock-forming minerals. This study reports drastic differences in carbonation yields between experiments performed on olivine-rich basalt samples and on olivine separates (a more restricted chemical system). Batch experiments were conducted in water at 150°C and pCO2 = 280 bars on a Mg-rich tholeiitic basalt (9.3 wt.% MgO and 12.2 wt.% CaO), composed of olivine, Ti-magnetite, plagioclase and clinopyroxene. After 45 days of reaction, 56 wt.% of the initial MgO has reacted with CO2 to form Fe-bearing magnesite (Mg0.8Fe0.2)CO3 along with minor calcium carbonates. The substantial decrease of olivine content upon carbonation supports the idea that ferroan magnesite formation mainly follows from olivine dissolution. In contrast, in experiments performed under similar run durations and P/T conditions with a San Carlos olivine separate (47.8 wt.% MgO) of similar grain size, only 5 wt.% of the initial MgO content reacted to form Fe-bearing magnesite. The overall carbonation kinetics of the basalt is enhanced by a factor of 40. It could be accounted for by differences in chemical and textural properties of the secondary-silica layer which covers reacted olivine grains in both types of sample. A TEM inspection of mineral surfaces shows that the thin amorphous silica layer (~100 nm) is porous in the case of the basalt sample and that it contains significant amounts of iron and aluminum. Thus, we propose that the composition of the olivine environment itself can strongly influence the olivine dissolution-carbonation process. Consequently, laboratory data obtained on olivine separates might yield a conservative estimate of the true carbonation potential of olivine-bearing basaltic rocks. More

  9. XANES Measurements of Cr Valence in Olivine and their Applications to Planetary Basalts (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, A. S.; Burger, P.; Le, L.; Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J.; Sutton, S. R.; Newville, M.; Jones, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    The oxidation state and partitioning behavior of trace Cr in terrestrial and planetary basaltic magmas has long been a subject of petrologic inquiry. We have performed a series of experiments designed to examine the relationship between oxygen fugacity and the ratio of divalent to trivalent Cr present in olivine crystals grown from a basaltic liquid. The experimental olivine crystals were grown at fO2 values ranging from IW-1 to IW+3.4. The melt composition used in this work was modeled after the bulk composition of the primitive, basaltic martian meteorite Yamato 980459 (Y-98). Chromium valence in the olivine crystals was measured with X-ray-Absorption-Near-Edge-Spectroscopy (XANES) at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Chromium K-edge XANES data were acquired with the x-ray microprobe of GSECARS beamline 13-ID-E. Beam focusing was accomplished with dynamically-figured Kirkpatrick-Baez focusing mirrors; this configuration yielded a beam focused to a final spot size of ~ 4 μm2. Results from the XANES measurements indicate that the ratio of divalent to trivalent Cr in the olivine is systematically correlated with fO2 in a manner that is consistent with the expected redox systematics for Cr2+- Cr3+ in the melt. In this way, measurements of the Cr2+/Cr3+ in olivine phenocrysts can indirectly reveal information about the Cr valence ratio and fO2 the liquid from which it grew even in the absence of a quenched melt phase. Although the results from the experiments presented in this work specifically apply to the Yamato 98 parental liquid, the concepts and XANES analytical techniques used in this study present a novel, generalized methodology that may be applicable to any olivine-bearing basalt. Furthermore, the XANES based measurements are made on a micron-scale, thus potential changes of the Cr2+/Cr3+ in the melt occurring during crystallization may be recorded in detail.

  10. Experimental partitioning of rare earth elements and scandium among armalcolite, ilmenite, olivine and mare basalt liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irving, A. J.; Merrill, R. B.; Singleton, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to measure partition coefficients for two rare-earth elements (Sm and Tm) and Sc among armalcolite, ilmenite, olivine and liquid coexisting in a system modeled on high-Ti mare basalt 74275. This 'primitive' sample was chosen for study because its major and trace element chemistry as well as its equilibrium phase relations at atmospheric pressure are known from previous studies. Beta-track analytical techniques were used so that partition coefficients could be measured in an environment whose bulk trace element composition is similar to that of the natural basalt. Partition coefficients for Cr and Mn were determined in the same experiments by microprobe analysis. The only equilibrium partial melting model appears to be one in which ilmenite is initially present in the source region but is consumed by melting before segregation of the high-Ti mare basalt liquid from the residue.

  11. Helium Isotopes in Basalt-Hosted Olivines From the Yellowstone Plateau: Implications on Volcanic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedini, A. A.; van Soest, M.; Hurwitz, S.; Kennedy, B. M.

    2006-12-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field is the youngest part of a magmatic system that began its northeastward propagation along the path of the eastern Snake River Plain in the mid-Miocene. Previous noble gas isotopic studies in Yellowstone have focused on samples from hydrothermal features. Such samples are often subject to shallow crustal contamination that may mask a deeper magmatic component. Most of the reported He-isotope ratios within the Yellowstone caldera perimeter are ~7 ± 1 RA, with peaks occurring around Mud Volcano (~16 RA) and Gibbon Geyser Basin (~13 RA). Outside the caldera, the He-isotope ratios generally drop to <3 RA. The elevated helium isotope data from Mud Volcano and Gibbon Geyser Basin was interpreted as unequivocal evidence for the presence of a deep mantle plume underlying the Yellowstone volcanic field (Craig et al., 1978; Kennedy et al., 1985). However, in an attempt to reconcile the available geochemical and geophysical data some researchers argue solely for a shallow mantle source for the magmatism related to Yellowstone (Christiansen et al., 2002). To gain a better understanding of the helium isotope composition of the mantle source below Yellowstone and its possible changes in time, we have started a study of helium isotopes in basalt-hosted olivines from the Yellowstone volcanic field. A total of 28 samples representing most basalt units from Yellowstone's three eruptive cycles were collected. All of the exposed basalts are located outside the Yellowstone caldera, mainly near Mammoth Hot Springs and Tower Junction to the north and in the Island Park area to the southwest. Most basalts contain 46-52 wt% SIO2, 8-12 wt% FeO, and 0.16-0.23 wt% MgO. Helium was released from aliquots of ~1.5 g olivine by crushing in vacuo, and initial helium isotope results, corrected for 10-15% procedural blank include: 1. The Gerrit basalt from Island Park, with a ratio of 15.7 ± 2.2 RA; 2. Falls River basalt from Island Park, 15.1 ± 0.8 RA; 3. Warm

  12. A New Spinel-Olivine Oxybarometer: Near-Liquidus Partitioning of V between Olivine-Melt, Spinel-Melt, and Spinel-Olivine in Martian Basalt Composition Y980459 as a Function of Oxygen Fugacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papike, J. J.; Le, L.; Burger, P. V.; Shearer, C. K.; Bell, A. S.; Jones, J.

    2013-01-01

    Our research on valence state partitioning began in 2005 with a review of Cr, Fe, Ti, and V partitioning among crystallographic sites in olivine, pyroxene, and spinel [1]. That paper was followed by several on QUE94201 melt composition and specifically on Cr, V, and Eu partitioning between pyroxene and melt [2-5]. This paper represents the continuation of our examination of the partitioning of multivalent V between olivine, spinel, and melt in martian olivine-phyric basalts of Y980459 composition [6, 7]. Here we introduce a new, potentially powerful oxybarometer, V partitioning between spinel and olivine, which can be used when no melt is preserved in the meteorite. The bulk composition of QUE94201 was ideal for our study of martian pyroxene-phyric basalts and specifically the partitioning between pyroxene-melt for Cr, V, and Eu. Likewise, bulk composition Y980459 is ideal for the study of martian olivine-phyric basalts and specifically for olivine-melt, spinel-melt, and spinel-olivine partitioning of V as a function of oxygen fugacity.

  13. Heterogeneity in small aliquots of Apolllo 15 olivine-normative basalt: Implications for breccia clast studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, Marilyn M.; Shervais, John W.; Vetter, Scott K.

    1993-01-01

    Most of the recent advances in lunar petrology are the direct result of breccia pull-apart studies, which have identified a wide array of new highland and mare basalt rock types that occur only as clasts within the breccias. These rocks show that the lunar crust is far more complex than suspected previously, and that processes such as magma mixing and wall-rock assimilation were important in its petrogenesis. These studies are based on the implicit assumption that the breccia clasts, which range in size from a few mm to several cm across, are representative of the parent rock from which they were derived. In many cases, the aliquot allocated for analysis may be only a few grain diameters across. While this problem is most acute for coarse-grained highland rocks, it can also cause considerable uncertainty in the analysis of mare basalt clasts. Similar problems arise with small aliquots of individual hand samples. Our study of sample heterogeneity in 9 samples of Apollo 15 olivine normative basalt (ONB) which exhibit a range in average grain size from coarse to fine are reported. Seven of these samples have not been analyzed previously, one has been analyzed by INAA only, and one has been analyzed by XRF+INAA. Our goal is to assess the effects of small aliquot size on the bulk chemistry of large mare basalt samples, and to extend this assessment to analyses of small breccia clasts.

  14. Volatile degassing of basaltic achondrite parent bodies Evidence from alkali elements and phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.

    1987-01-01

    The Na, K, Rb, Cs, and P abundances in eucrites, diogenites, basaltic clasts from polymict eucrite, howardites, and mesosiderites are examined, and compared with an average of highly incompatible refractory (AHIR) elements normalized to cosmic abundances. It is observed that basaltic eucrites and basaltic clasts show a positive correlation between K, Rb, and Cs, and alkali element/AHIR ratios; the volatile loss of the alkali elements from the basalt affects the parent body inventory of volatile elements. The data reveal that for diogenites, the alkali /AHIR ratios are 1.4-2 times greater than in basaltic eucrites and are more variable; and the negative relation between K, Rb, Cs, and the alkali/AHIR ratio correlate with progressive alkali loss through volatile outgassing during crystallization of one or more magmas resulting in a greater than 90 percent loss of the volatile element inventory from the parent body. It is also detected that P displays volatile loss from the basaltic eucrites and elevated P/AHIR ratios in diogenites.

  15. Reduced chromium in olivine grains from lunar basalt 15555 - X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Jones, K. W.; Gordon, B.; Rivers, M. L.; Bajt, S.; Smith, J. V.

    1993-01-01

    The oxidation state of Cr in 200-micron regions within individual lunar olivine and pyroxene grains from lunar basalt 15555 was inferred using X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). Reference materials had previously been studied by optical absorption spectroscopy and included Cr-bearing borosilicate glasses synthesized under controlled oxygen fugacity and Cr-doped olivines. The energy dependence of XANES spectral features defined by these reference materials indicated that Cr is predominantly divalent in the lunar olivine and trivalent in the pyroxene. These results, coupled with the apparent f(02)-independence of partitioning coefficients for Cr into olivine, imply that the source magma was dominated by divalent Cr at the time of olivine crystallization.

  16. Crystal preferred orientations of minerals from mantle xenoliths in alkali basaltic rocks form the Catalan Volcanic Zone (NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Roig, Mercè; Galán, Gumer; Mariani, Elisabetta

    2015-04-01

    Mantle xenoliths in alkali basaltic rocks from the Catalan Volcanic Zone, associated with the Neogene-Quaternary rift system in NE Spain, are formed of anhydrous spinel lherzolites and harzburgites with minor olivine websterites. Both peridotites are considered residues of variable degrees of partial melting, later affected by metasomatism, especially the harzburgites. These and the websterites display protogranular microstructures, whereas lherzolites show continuous variation between protogranular, porphyroclastic and equigranular forms. Thermometric data of new xenoliths indicate that protogranular harzburgites, lherzolites and websterites were equilibrated at higher temperatures than porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites. Mineral chemistry also indicates lower equilibrium pressure for porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites than for the protogranular ones. Crystal preferred orientations (CPOs) of olivine and pyroxenes from these new xenoliths were determined with the EBSD-SEM technique to identify the deformation stages affecting the lithospheric mantle in this zone and to assess the relationships between the deformation fabrics, processes and microstructures. Olivine CPOs in protogranular harzburgites, lherzolites and a pyroxenite display [010]-fiber patterns characterized by a strong point concentration of the [010] axis normal to the foliation and girdle distribution of [100] and [001] axes within the foliation plane. Olivine CPO symmetry in porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites varies continuously from [010]-fiber to orthorhombic and [100]-fiber types. The orthorhombic patterns are characterized by scattered maxima of the three axes, which are normal between them. The rare [100]-fiber patterns display strong point concentration of [100] axis, with normal girdle distribution of the other two axes, which are aligned with each other. The patterns of pyroxene CPOs are more dispersed than those of olivine, especially for clinopyroxene, but

  17. Natural fumarolic alteration of fluorapatite, olivine, and basaltic glass, and implications for habitable environments on Mars.

    PubMed

    Hausrath, Elisabeth M; Tschauner, Oliver

    2013-11-01

    Fumaroles represent a very important potential habitat on Mars because they contain water and nutrients. Global deposition of volcanic sulfate aerosols may also have been an important soil-forming process affecting large areas of Mars. Here we identify alteration from the Senator fumarole, northwest Nevada, USA, and in low-temperature environments near the fumarole to help interpret fumarolic and acid vapor alteration of rocks and soils on Mars. We analyzed soil samples and fluorapatite, olivine, and basaltic glass placed at and near the fumarole in in situ mineral alteration experiments designed to measure weathering under natural field conditions. Using synchrotron X-ray diffraction, we clearly observe hydroxyl-carbonate-bearing fluorapatite as a fumarolic alteration product of the original material, fluorapatite. The composition of apatites as well as secondary phosphates has been previously used to infer magmatic conditions as well as fumarolic conditions on Mars. To our knowledge, the observations reported here represent the first documented instance of formation of hydroxyl-carbonate-bearing apatite from fluorapatite in a field experiment. Retreat of olivine surfaces, as well as abundant NH4-containing minerals, was also characteristic of fumarolic alteration. In contrast, alteration in the nearby low-temperature environment resulted in formation of large pits on olivine surfaces, which were clearly distinguishable from the fumarolic alteration. Raman signatures of some fumarolically impacted surfaces are consistent with detection of the biological molecules chlorophyll and scytenomin, potentially useful biosignatures. Observations of altered minerals on Mars may therefore help identify the environment of formation and understand the aqueous history and potential habitability of that planet.

  18. Natural Fumarolic Alteration of Fluorapatite, Olivine, and Basaltic Glass, and Implications for Habitable Environments on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Tschauner, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Fumaroles represent a very important potential habitat on Mars because they contain water and nutrients. Global deposition of volcanic sulfate aerosols may also have been an important soil-forming process affecting large areas of Mars. Here we identify alteration from the Senator fumarole, northwest Nevada, USA, and in low-temperature environments near the fumarole to help interpret fumarolic and acid vapor alteration of rocks and soils on Mars. We analyzed soil samples and fluorapatite, olivine, and basaltic glass placed at and near the fumarole in in situ mineral alteration experiments designed to measure weathering under natural field conditions. Using synchrotron X-ray diffraction, we clearly observe hydroxyl-carbonate-bearing fluorapatite as a fumarolic alteration product of the original material, fluorapatite. The composition of apatites as well as secondary phosphates has been previously used to infer magmatic conditions as well as fumarolic conditions on Mars. To our knowledge, the observations reported here represent the first documented instance of formation of hydroxyl-carbonate-bearing apatite from fluorapatite in a field experiment. Retreat of olivine surfaces, as well as abundant NH4-containing minerals, was also characteristic of fumarolic alteration. In contrast, alteration in the nearby low-temperature environment resulted in formation of large pits on olivine surfaces, which were clearly distinguishable from the fumarolic alteration. Raman signatures of some fumarolically impacted surfaces are consistent with detection of the biological molecules chlorophyll and scytenomin, potentially useful biosignatures. Observations of altered minerals on Mars may therefore help identify the environment of formation and understand the aqueous history and potential habitability of that planet. Key Words: Fumaroles—Mars—Olivine—Acidophile—Geothermal—Search for life (biosignatures)—Synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Astrobiology 13, 1049–1064

  19. Oxygen isotope studies on placer sapphire and ruby in the Chanthaburi-Trat alkali basaltic gemfield, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yui, Tzen-Fu; Wu, Chao-Ming; Limtrakun, Phisit; Sricharn, Weerapan; Boonsoong, Apichet

    2006-02-01

    Placer sapphire and ruby are common in the western zone and the central/eastern zone, respectively, of the Chanthaburi-Trat (C-T) alkali basaltic gemfield in southeastern Thailand. Sapphires have O-isotope composition in the range from + 5.1‰ to + 6.2‰, while rubies, from + 1.3‰ to + 4.2‰. These data clearly show that the C-T placer sapphires and rubies should have a different primary genesis. Olivine in the nearby alkali basalts exhibits a narrow range of O-isotope composition, i.e., from + 4.8‰ to + 5.0‰, demonstrating that the C-T placer gem corundums cannot be phenocrysts of these basalts. The homogeneous O-isotope compositions of sapphires, combined with other available data, strongly suggest that these sapphires most probably have originally crystallized from evolved mantle magmas at lower crust/upper mantle depths. The varied O-isotope compositions of rubies are consistent with the previous suggestion that these rubies originally formed in mafic metamorphic rocks under upper mantle conditions, although the O-isotope data also require that the mafic rocks would have experienced an earlier surface (sea) water-rock interaction history. Consistent with the available data, a suggestion with garnet pyroxenite in the sub-continental mantle as the primary source for these placer gem corundums is tentatively proposed. The surface distribution of sapphire or ruby in the studied area may be a sign of composition variation of garnet pyroxenite underneath.

  20. Sr isotope variations in olivine-hosted melt inclusions from continetal basalts: evaluating primary vs secondary signatures of melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, F. C.; Wolff, J. A.; Reid, M. R.

    2003-04-01

    Melt inclusions have become the focus of intense study in constraining the sources involved in magma production in MORB and OIB. Such inclusions retain a wide variety of major and trace element signatures that have been typically attributed to various mantle sources without significant inputs from secondary magmatic processes such as crustal contamination. Sr isotopes of melt inclusions from continental basalts affected by crustal contamination suggest that highly variable major and trace element signatures in melt inclusions result from crustal contamination, not heterogeneous mantle sources. This may result from the inherent ability of melt inclusions to capture melt from regions in which rapid cooling and rapid olivine growth can occur. More specifically, rapid olivine growth, and subsequent melt capture, may be more likely to occur along wallrock/magma interfaces where a wide variety of crustally modified liquids may be present. Accordingly, melt inclusions captured in olivine phenocrysts from crustally contaminated basalts which retain elevated MgO contents (6 to 8 weight percent) reflect the widest range of Sr isotope signatures found in all phenocrysts and groundmass samples. In effect, the largest overall range of Sr isotopes is observed in olivine-hosted melt inclusions suggesting that melt inclusions are more likely to record the effects of secondary processes, rather than primary magmatic signatures. As such, caution should be exercised when using melt inclusions to identify mantle signatures, and Sr isotopes offer an excellent opportunity in which to evaluate the modifying effects of open-system processes affecting basalts.

  1. Mineralogy, geochemistry and expansion testing of an alkali-reactive basalt from western Anatolia, Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Copuroglu, Oguzhan; Andic-Cakir, Ozge; Broekmans, Maarten A.T.M.; Kuehnel, Radko

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, the alkali-silica reaction performance of a basalt rock from western Anatolia, Turkey is reported. It is observed that the rock causes severe gel formation in the concrete microbar test. It appears that the main source of expansion is the reactive glassy phase of the basalt matrix having approximately 70% of SiO{sub 2}. The study presents the microstructural characteristics of unreacted and reacted basalt aggregate by optical and electron microscopy and discusses the possible reaction mechanism. Microstructural analysis revealed that the dissolution of silica is overwhelming in the matrix of the basalt and it eventually generates four consequences: (1) Formation of alkali-silica reaction gel at the aggregate perimeter, (2) increased porosity and permeability of the basalt matrix, (3) reduction of mechanical properties of the aggregate and (4) additional gel formation within the aggregate. It is concluded that the basalt rock is highly prone to alkali-silica reaction. As an aggregate, this rock is not suitable for concrete production.

  2. A dynamic melting model for the origin of Apollo 15 olivine-normative and quartz-normative mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vetter, Scott K.; Shervais, John W.

    1993-01-01

    Early studies of mare basalts from the Apollo 15 site established that two distinct groups are represented: the olivine-normative basalts (ONB) and the quartz-normative basalts (QNB). The ONB and QNB suites are distinguished petrographically by their phenocryst assemblages (the ONB's are olivine-phyric, the QNB's are generally pyroxene-phyric) and chemically by their major element compositions: the QNB's are higher in SiO2 and MgO/FeO, and lower in FeO and TiO2 than ONB's with similar MgO contents. Experimental data show that the QNB suite is derived from a more magnesian, olivine-normative parent magma, a conclusion which is supported by the recent discovery of high-SiO2 olivine-normative basalt clasts in breccia 15498. The high-SiO2 ONB's fall on olivine control lines with primitive QNB's, and least-squares mixing calculations are consistent with the high-SiO2 ONB's being parental to the more evolved QNB suite. These high-SiO2 ONB's are included as part of the 'QNB suite'. Our major element modeling results also are consistent with the conclusions of earlier studies which showed that the ONB and QNB suites cannot be related to one another by low pressure crystal fractionation. The combination of high Mg#, high SiO2, and low TiO2 in the QNB suite precludes a relationship to the ONB suite by simple removal of liquidus minerals (olivine and pigeonite). Despite these significant differences in petrography and major element composition, both groups have nearly identical trace element concentrations and chondrite-normalized abundance patterns. The major question to be addressed by any petrogenetic model for Apollo 15 mare basalts is how to form mare basalt suites with distinctly different major element characteristics but nearly identical trace element compositions. The similarity in trace element concentrations imply compositionally similar source regions and similar percent melting, but these conclusions are not easily reconciled with the observed differences in

  3. Alkaline melt - peridotite reaction as a potential mechanism for the nephelinite-alkali basalt transition observed in intraplate volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilet, S.; Rochat, L. L.; Baker, M. B.; Stolper, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Melt-peridotite reaction is a process that can significantly modify the compositions of melts as they transit the mantle. Depending on the silica activity of the liquid such interaction can cause either the dissolution of olivine (ol) with associated precipitation of orthopyroxene (opx), or opx dissolution and ol precipitation. Here we show that the reaction between alkaline melts and peridotite at pressures of 1.5-3 GPa can reproduce the range of mafic compositions seen in intraplate volcanoes. Alkaline lavas from continental volcanoes or oceanic islands underlain by thick lithosphere (>50 km) are characterized by a compositional continuum from nephelinites to alkali olivine basalts (and sometimes to tholeiites). This continuum is associated with a decrease in incompatible trace-element concentrations from nephelinitic to less alkaline magmas. This continuum is classically interpreted as reflecting an increase in the degree of partial melting of a common source. However, no experiments on mantle lithologies (peridotite, pyroxenite) have reproduced the observed compositional spectrum (or even the observed range of silica contents: ~40 to 48 wt. % SiO2). Further, the decreases in HREE concentrations in lavas along the continuum (i.e., nephelinites to alkali olivine basalts/tholeiites) seem difficult to explain by increasing degrees of partial melting of a common source. Alternatively, this continuum could be explained by reaction between nephelinitic/basanitic liquid and peridotite [1, 2]. To test this hypothesis, we performed 'sandwich' experiments in which a layer of hornblendite (producing nephelinitic liquids upon melting [2]) was packed between layers of moderately depleted peridotite. Experiments were performed at 1.5, 2.5, and 3 GPa and temperatures of 1225-1450°C. The melts produced by the reaction are significantly richer in SiO2 (~4-5 wt. %) than the initial alkaline liquid; this increase is explained by the dissolution of opx at all three pressures and

  4. Flow in the western Mediterranean shallow mantle: Insights from xenoliths in Pliocene alkali basalts from SE Iberia (eastern Betics, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidas, Károly; Konc, Zoltán.; Garrido, Carlos J.; Tommasi, Andréa.; Vauchez, Alain; Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Marchesi, Claudio; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Acosta-Vigil, Antonio; Szabó, Csaba; Varas-Reus, María. Isabel; Gervilla, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Mantle xenoliths in Pliocene alkali basalts of the eastern Betics (SE Iberia, Spain) are spinel ± plagioclase lherzolite, with minor harzburgite and wehrlite, displaying porphyroclastic or equigranular textures. Equigranular peridotites have olivine crystal preferred orientation (CPO) patterns similar to those of porphyroclastic xenoliths but slightly more dispersed. Olivine CPO shows [100]-fiber patterns characterized by strong alignment of [100]-axes subparallel to the stretching lineation and a girdle distribution of [010]-axes normal to it. This pattern is consistent with simple shear or transtensional deformation accommodated by dislocation creep. One xenolith provides evidence for synkinematic reactive percolation of subduction-related Si-rich melts/fluids that resulted in oriented crystallization of orthopyroxene. Despite a seemingly undeformed microstructure, the CPO in orthopyroxenite veins in composite xenoliths is identical to those of pyroxenes in the host peridotite, suggesting late-kinematic crystallization. Based on these observations, we propose that the annealing producing the equigranular microstructures was triggered by melt percolation in the shallow subcontinental lithospheric mantle coeval to the late Neogene formation of veins in composite xenoliths. Calculated seismic properties are characterized by fast propagation of P waves and polarization of fast S waves parallel to olivine [100]-axis (stretching lineation). These data are compatible with present-day seismic anisotropy observations in SE Iberia if the foliations in the lithospheric mantle are steeply dipping and lineations are subhorizontal with ENE strike, implying dominantly horizontal mantle flow in the ENE-WSW direction within vertical planes, that is, subparallel to the paleo-Iberian margin. The measured anisotropy could thus reflect a lithospheric fabric due to strike-slip deformation in the late Miocene in the context of WSW tearing of the subducted south Iberian margin

  5. From olivine nephelinite, basanite and basalt to peralkaline trachyphonolite and comendite in the Ankaratra volcanic complex, Madagascar: 40Ar/39Ar ages, phase compositions and bulk-rock geochemical and isotopic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciniello, Ciro; Melluso, Leone; le Roex, Anton P.; Jourdan, Fred; Morra, Vincenzo; de'Gennaro, Roberto; Grifa, Celestino

    2017-03-01

    The Ankaratra volcanic field covers an area of 3800 km2 in central Madagascar and comprises of lava flows, lava domes, scoria cones, tuff rings and maars emplaced at different ages (Miocene to Recent). The volcanic products include ultramafic-mafic (olivine-leucite nephelinite, basanite, alkali basalt, hawaiite and tholeiitic basalt), intermediate (mugearite and benmoreite) and felsic rocks (trachyphonolite, quartz trachyte and rhyolite), the latter often peralkaline. The 40Ar/39Ar determinations for mafic lavas yield ages of 17.45 ± 0.12 Ma, 16.63 ± 0.08 Ma and 8.62 ± 0.09 Ma, indicating a prolonged magmatic activity. The mineralogical and geochemical variations suggest that the magmatic evolution of the alkali basalt-hawaiite-mugearite-benmoreite-trachyte series can be accounted for by removal of olivine, feldspars, clinopyroxene, Fe-Ti oxides and accessory phases, producing residual trachytic and trachyphonolitic compositions mineralogically very similar to those of other volcanic areas and tectonic settings. The Ankaratra olivine leucite nephelinites, basanites and tholeiitic basalts do not seem to be associated with significant amounts of evolved comagmatic rocks. The 87Sr/86Sr (0.70504-0.71012), 143Nd/144Nd (0.51259-0.51244) and 206Pb/204Pb (17.705-18.563) isotopic ratios of trachytes and comendite are consistent with open-system processes. However, other trachyphonolites have 143Nd/144Nd (0.51280), 206Pb/204Pb (18.648), 207Pb/204Pb (15.582) and 208Pb/204Pb (38.795) similar to those of mafic rocks, suggesting differentiation processes without appreciable interaction with crustal materials. The Ankaratra volcanism is to be directly linked to a broadly E-W-trending intracontinental extension. A large-scale thermal anomaly, associated with an anomalously hot source region, is not required to explain the Cenozoic magmatism of Madagascar.

  6. Deep mixing of mantle melts beneath continental flood basalt provinces: Constraints from olivine-hosted melt inclusions in primitive magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Eleanor S.; Gibson, Sally A.; Maclennan, John; Heinonen, Jussi S.

    2017-01-01

    We present major and trace element compositions of 154 re-homogenised olivine-hosted melt inclusions found in primitive rocks (picrites and ferropicrites) from the Mesozoic Paraná-Etendeka and Karoo Continental Flood Basalt (CFB) provinces. The major element compositions of the melt inclusions, especially their Fe/Mg ratios, are variable and erratic, and attributed to the re-homogenisation process during sample preparation. In contrast, the trace element compositions of both the picrite and ferropicrite olivine-hosted melt inclusions are remarkably uniform and closely reflect those of the host whole-rocks, except in a small subset affected by hydrothermal alteration. The Paraná-Etendeka picrites and ferropicrites are petrogenetically related to the more evolved and voluminous flood basalts, and so we propose that compositional homogeneity at the melt inclusion scale implies that the CFB parental mantle melts were well mixed prior to extensive crystallisation. The incompatible trace element homogeneity of olivine-hosted melt inclusions in Paraná-Etendeka and Karoo primitive magmatic rocks has also been identified in other CFB provinces and contrasts with findings from studies of basalts from mid-ocean ridges (e.g. Iceland and FAMOUS on the Mid Atlantic Ridge), where heterogeneity of incompatible trace elements in olivine-hosted melt inclusions is more pronounced. We suggest that the low variability in incompatible trace element contents of olivine-hosted melt inclusions in near-primitive CFB rocks, and also ocean island basalts associated with moderately thick lithosphere (e.g. Hawaii, Galápagos, Samoa), may reflect mixing along their longer transport pathways during ascent and/or a temperature contrast between the liquidus and the liquid when it arrives in the crust. These thermal paths promote mixing of mantle melts prior to their entrapment by growing olivine crystals in crustal magma chambers. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions of ferropicrites from the Paran

  7. Evolution of carbonated melt to alkali basalt in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Liang; Chen, Li-Hui; Jackson, Matthew G.; Hofmann, Albrecht W.

    2017-01-01

    CO2 is considered to play a key role in the melting of the deep upper mantle, and carbonated silicate melts have been widely predicted by partial melting experiments to exist at mantle depths of greater than 80 km. However, such melts have not been shown to exist in nature. Thus, the relationship between CO2 and the origin of silicate melts is highly speculative. Here we present geochemical analyses of rocks sampled from the South China Sea, at the Integrated Ocean Discovery Program Site U1431. We identify natural carbonated silicate melts, which are enriched in light rare earth elements and depleted in Nb and Ta, and show that they were continuously transformed to alkali basalts that are less enriched in light rare earth elements and enriched in Nb and Ta. This shows that carbonated silicate melts can survive in the shallow mantle and penetrate through the hot asthenosphere. Carbonated silicate melts were converted to alkali basaltic melts through reactions with the lithospheric mantle, during which precipitation of apatite accounts for reduction of light rare earth elements and genesis of positive Nb-Ta anomalies. We propose that an extremely thin lithosphere (less than 20 km in the South China Sea) facilitates extrusion of the carbonated silicate melts, whereas a thickened lithosphere tends to modify carbonated silicate melt to alkali basalt.

  8. Noble gas systematics for coexisting glass and olivine crystals in basalts and dunite xenoliths from Loihi Seamount

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaneoka, I.; Takaoka, N.; Clague, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Noble gas isotopes including 3He 4He, 40Ar 36Ar and Xe isotope ratios were determined for coexisting glass and olivine crystals in tholeiitic and alkalic basalts and dunite xenoliths from Loihi Seamount. Glass and coexisting olivine crystals have similar 3He 4He ratios (2.8-3.4) ?? 10-5, 20 to 24 times the atmospheric ratio (RA), but different 40Ar 36Ar ratios (400-1000). Based on the results of noble gas isotope ratios and microscopic observation, some olivine crystals are xenocrysts. We conclude that He is equilibrated between glass and olivine xenocrysts, but Ar is not. The apparent high 3He 4He ratio (3 ?? 10-5; = 21 RA) coupled with a relatively high 40Ar 36Ar ratio (4200) for dunite xenoliths (KK 17-5) may be explained by equilibration of He between MORB-type cumulates and the host magma. Except for the dunite xenoliths, noble gas data for these Loihi samples are compatible with a model in which samples from hot spot areas may be explained by mixing between P (plume)-type and M (MORB)-type components with the addition of A (atmosphere)-type component. Excess 129Xe has not been observed due to apparent large mass fractionation among Xe isotopes. ?? 1983.

  9. Minéralogie et bilan de matière de l'altération supergène d'un basalte alcalin du Moyen Atlas MarocainMineralogy and geochemistry of supergene alteration of an alkali basalt from the Middle Atlas, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekayir, A.; El-Maâtaoui, M.

    2001-05-01

    In the Middle Atlas of Morocco, alkali basaltic flows record successive weathering phases during the Quaternary. In fresh basalt interior and intermediate external zones, the first weathering stage is characterised by glass dissolution and the formation of a Si-Al poorly-crystallised product. Advanced weathering phases are characterised by 10 Å halloysite, kaolinite and goethite, located within the primary minerals or as secondary products in fissures. Olivine and iddingsite are transformed into Si-rich goethite, plagioclase into halloysite and pyroxene into a mixture of halloysite + geothite. Dissolution of Ti-magnetite and ilmenite yielded Ti-rich products. In these conditions, the weathering of basalts and development of a soil matrix are accompanied by the elimination of certain chemical elements, such as Si, Ca, Na and K, and the concentration of Fe and Al. In the soil, clay minerals such as illite and vermiculite, do not have any genetic relationship with weathered basalt and were probably introduced externally.

  10. Enhanced olivine carbonation within a basalt as compared to single-phase experiments: reevaluating the potential of CO2 mineral sequestration.

    PubMed

    Sissmann, Olivier; Brunet, Fabrice; Martinez, Isabelle; Guyot, François; Verlaguet, Anne; Pinquier, Yves; Daval, Damien

    2014-05-20

    Batch experiments were conducted in water at 150 °C and PCO2 = 280 bar on a Mg-rich tholeiitic basalt (9.3 wt % MgO and 12.2 wt % CaO) composed of olivine, Ti-magnetite, plagioclase, and clinopyroxene. After 45 days of reaction, 56 wt % of the initial MgO had reacted with CO2 to form Fe-bearing magnesite, (Mg0.8Fe0.2)CO3, along with minor calcium carbonates. The substantial decrease in olivine content upon carbonation supports the idea that ferroan magnesite formation mainly follows from olivine dissolution. In contrast, in experiments performed under similar run durations and P/T conditions with a San Carlos olivine separate (47.8 wt % MgO) of similar grain size, only 5 wt % of the initial MgO content reacted to form Fe-bearing magnesite. The overall carbonation kinetics of the basalt was enhanced by a factor of ca. 40. This could be explained by differences in the chemical and textural properties of the secondary silica layer that covers reacted olivine grains in both types of sample. Consequently, laboratory data obtained on olivine separates might yield a conservative estimate of the true carbonation potential of olivine-bearing basaltic rocks.

  11. The geologic history of quartz-normative and olivine-normative basalts in the vicinity of Hadley Rille (Apollo 15)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    The geologic history of the quartz normative (QNB) and olivine normative (ONB) basalt types at Hadley Rille are discussed. A model for the geology of the mare basalts was constructed from a combination of field observations, sample chemistry, sample petrology and personal bias from terrestrial experience. The model proposes that the QNBs are the only mare lava type that is present as outcrop in the area traversed by the astronauts during the Apollo 15 mission. The returned QNB samples formed during a single eruptive phase of the Hadley Rille lava tube system. The ONB lavas are an exotic component transported to the site by a cratering event, or the ONBs are samples excavated from older are bedrock that was partly covered by the QNB lavas.

  12. Spectroscopy of olivine basalts using FieldSpec and ASTER data: A case study from Wadi Natash volcanic field, south Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    This paper aims at revealing the spectral characteristics of the olivine basalts exposed at Wadi Natash area, Egypt, using FieldSpec spectroradiometer. It also evaluates band ratios and fusion techniques for mapping purposes using ASTER data. Several volcanic episodes occurred during Early- to Late-Cretaceous are recorded in the study area. Early-Cretaceous olivine basalts are highly carbonated. Late-Cretaceous eruptions took place throughout several volcanic cones aligned in NW direction. Based on FieldSpec measurements and petrographic data, two groups of olivine basalt namely `A' and `B' are recognized. Fresh olivine basalt (group A) is characterized by low flat spectral profile with overall low reflectance values (˜20%). Spectral profile of altered olivine basalt (group B) shows moderate reflectance values (˜37%) with four little absorption features around the 1.10, 1.40, 2.00 and 2.35 μm wavelength regions. These absorption features are attributed mainly to the presence of chlorite and carbonate alteration products as indicated by petrographic examination. ASTER false colour composite band ratio image (3/2:R, 8/1:G and 8/5:B) discriminates easily the fresh and altered basalts by deep blue and reddish blue colours respectively. Image fusion between previously mentioned FCC ratios image and high spatial resolution ASTER panchromatic image are carried out using brovey and HSV transformation methods. Visual and statistical assessment methods proved that HSV fusion image yields better image interpretability results compared to brovey image. It improves the spatial resolution of original FCC ratios image with acceptable spectral preservation. The present study proved the usefulness of FieldSpec spectral profiles and the processed ASTER data for discriminating different olivine basalt groups exposed at the study area.

  13. Understanding Magma Storage Conditions that Produce Highly Explosive Monogenetic Basaltic Eruptions Using Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions from Sunset Crater, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, C. M.; Roggensack, K.; Clarke, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    To investigate mechanisms of explosive basaltic volcanism, we studied the ca. 1085 AD Sunset Crater eruption in the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) of northern Arizona. This eruption, the youngest in the SFVF, first featured fissure eruptions (explosive phases 1-2) and a small lava flow, and then activity narrowed to a central vent producing explosive phases 3-8 and two additional lava flows. While the first two phases were Strombolian-style explosions, middle phases (3-5) were subplinian in character and produced an anomalously large tephra deposit. The final phases (6-8) are poorly characterized at this stage. The total erupted volume of lava and tephra is >0.7 km3 DRE of alkali olivine basalt with a large proportion of crystal-free glass and low phenocryst content. We studied 82 primary melt inclusions (MIs) in the largest tephra units (explosive phases 3, 4) to investigate magma volatiles and storage conditions. To prioritize primary volatile contents, we picked rapidly quenched free olivine crystals (Fo 81-85; 0.5-2 mm) and selected large volume MIs (50-180 μm) located near crystal cores for analysis. We observed vapor bubbles in all MIs and also noted rare occurrences of CO2-rich gas inclusions. MIs show little major element variability suggesting little crystal fractionation (K2O 0.8-1.1 wt.%). Post-entrapment crystallization is also minor (2-9%). The MI compositions from the two phases largely overlap, with phase 4 skewed to slightly higher K2O. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the MIs are relatively dry and CO2-rich. Water abundances vary 0.8-1.6 wt.% with a median of 1.25 wt.%, while most MIs have CO2 abundances 1,600-3,400 ppm. Phases 3 and 4 are essentially identical in water content. CO2 contents of phases 3 and 4 show considerable overlap, however the phase 4 MIs are skewed toward high CO2 (>2,500 ppm). These results require a minimum MI entrapment depth of ~11 km from fluid saturation constraints. Overall, the MIs indicate a largely homogeneous

  14. Petrochemistry and genesis of olivine basalts from small monogenetic parasitic cones of Bazman stratovolcano, Makran arc, southeastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Saeed; Stern, Charles R.

    2011-07-01

    Small monogenetic Quaternary parasitic cones around Bazman stratovolcano, located at the western edge of the Makran arc, southeastern Iran, erupted low-Ti subalkaline olivine basalts with MgO (3.8-8.6 wt.%) and Al2O3 (16.5-18.6 wt.%). Positive correlation of decreasing MgO, Ni and Cr indicates that formation of low MgO basalts involved limited crystal-liquid fractionation of olivine and clinopyroxene, the common phenocrysts. The basalts have variable 87Sr/86Sr (0.704177-0.705139) and 143Nd/144Nd (0.512689-0.512830) ratios, within the range of OIB-like intra-plate alkaline basalts erupted in eastern Iran north of the Makran arc. This, and the lack of correlation between Sr content and Sr-isotopic ratio, suggest that upper crustal contamination was not significant in their formation, consistent with the relatively thin crust (≤ 40 km) in the area. Enrichment of large-ion-lithophile elements (LILE) relative to light rare-earth-elements (LREE; Ba/La = 9-25), and depletions in Nb relatively to LILE (Ba/Nb = 12-35; La/Nb = 0.8-2.1), are similar in most cases to other convergent plate boundary arc basalts, suggesting that the Bazman basalts formed by melting of subcontinental mantle modified by dehydration of subducted Oman Sea oceanic lithosphere. Pb isotopic ratios of the basalts define a linear trend above the Northern Hemisphere Line, consistent with their derivation from mantle contaminated by Pb derived from subducted sediment. Trace element contents and ratios (LaN = 10-25; YbN = 3-6; (La/Yb)N = 3-8) suggest that these basalts formed as a result of low (~ 10%) degrees of partial melting of subarc mantle modified only moderately by subducted components. Relatively low Ba/Nb < 15, La/Nb < 1.5 and Ba/La < 15 ratios for some basalts confirm only limited contamination of the source of these samples, consistent with observations in other arcs that parasitic cones tap sources less affected by slab-derived fluids than the larger stratovolcanoes they surround. Comparison

  15. Basalt and olivine dissolution under cold, salty, and acidic conditions: What can we learn about recent aqueous weathering on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausrath, E. M.; Brantley, S. L.

    2010-12-01

    To test which variables may be important for weathering on Mars, the effects of temperature (22°C, 6°C, and -19°C), high ionic strength, and oxygen concentrations were investigated in batch dissolution experiments containing forsterite, fayalite, and basalt glass. CaCl2-NaCl-H2O brine can remain liquid to temperatures of -55°C and thus may be liquid in the cold, dry climate that currently characterizes Mars. To understand weathering under such conditions, dissolution rates were measured in experiments in distilled water with and without CaCl2 and NaCl. As observed by others, dissolution rates increased with temperature, and only fayalite dissolution was significantly affected by the presence or absence of oxygen. Enhanced fayalite dissolution under anoxic conditions suggests that Fe-rich olivine would dissolve more rapidly than Mg-rich olivine on Mars. Dissolution in the two most dilute experimental solutions (deionized water and CaCl2-NaCl-H2O solution of ionic strength = 0.7 m) were the same within uncertainty, but apparent dissolution rate constants in CaCl2-NaCl-H2O brines were significantly slower. Steady silica concentrations are decreased in the brines, consistent with other work, and precipitation rates of silica decrease with decreasing temperatures. These results suggest that enhanced silica precipitation could be an indicator of high ionic strength solutions on Mars. Consistent with these observations, weathering of basalt has been observed to sometimes be accompanied by precipitated layers of silica in cold, dry environments on Earth. If dissolution on Mars occurs or occurred under conditions similar to our experiments, cation leaching would be expected to be accompanied by silica precipitates on weathering surfaces.

  16. Tracking the Martian Mantle Signature in Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions of Basaltic Shergottites Yamato 980459 and Tissint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, T. J.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.; Usui, T.; Moriwaki, R.; Economos, R.; Schmitt, A.; McKeegan, K.

    2014-01-01

    The Martian shergottite meteorites are basaltic to lherzolitic igneous rocks that represent a period of relatively young mantle melting and volcanism, approximately 600-150 Ma (e.g. [1,2]). Their isotopic and elemental composition has provided important constraints on the accretion, evolution, structure and bulk composition of Mars. Measurements of the radiogenic isotope and trace element concentrations of the shergottite meteorite suite have identified two end-members; (1) incompatible trace element enriched, with radiogenic Sr and negative epsilon Nd-143, and (2) incompatible traceelement depleted, with non-radiogenic Sr and positive epsilon 143-Nd(e.g. [3-5]). The depleted component represents the shergottite martian mantle. The identity of the enriched component is subject to debate, and has been proposed to be either assimilated ancient martian crust [3] or from enriched domains in the martian mantle that may represent a late-stage magma ocean crystallization residue [4,5]. Olivine-phyric shergottites typically have the highest Mg# of the shergottite group and represent near-primitive melts having experienced minimal fractional crystallization or crystal accumulation [6]. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) in these shergottites represent the most chemically primitive components available to understand the nature of their source(s), melting processes in the martian mantle, and origin of enriched components. We present trace element compositions of olivine hosted melt inclusions in two depleted olivinephyric shergottites, Yamato 980459 (Y98) and Tissint (Fig. 1), and the mesostasis glass of Y98, using Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). We discuss our data in the context of understanding the nature and origin of the depleted martian mantle and the emergence of the enriched component.

  17. Valence State Partitioning of Cr and V Between Olivine-Melt and Pyroxene-Melt in Experimental Basalts of a Eucritic Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karner, J. M.; Jones, J. H.; Le, L.

    2017-01-01

    The partitioning of multivalent elements in basaltic systems can elucidate the oxygen fugacity (fO2) conditions under which basalts formed on planetary bodies (Earth, Moon, Mars, asteroids). Chromium and V are minor and trace elements in basaltic melts, partition into several minerals that crystallize from basaltic melts, exist in multiple valence states at differing fO2 conditions, and can therefore be used as oxybarometers for basaltic melts. Chromium is mostly 3+ in terrestrial basaltic melts at relatively high fO2 values (= IW+3.5), and mostly 2+ in melts at low fO2 values (= IW-1), such as those on the Moon and some asteroids. At intermediate fO2s, (i.e., IW-1 to IW+3.5), basaltic melts contain both Cr3+ and Cr2+. Vanadium in basaltic melts is mostly 4+ at high fO2, mostly 3+ at low fO2, and a mix of V3+ and V4+ at intermediate fO2 con-ditions. Understanding the partitioning of Cr and V into silicate phases with changing fO2 is therefore critical to the employment of Cr and V oxybarometers. In this abstract we examine the equilibrium partitioning of Cr and V between olivine/melt and pyroxene/melt in experimental charges of a eucritic composition produced at differing fO2 conditions. This study will add to the experimental data on DCr and DV (i.e., olivine/melt, pyroxene/melt) at differing fO2, and in turn these D values will be used to assess the fO2 of eucrite basalts and perhaps other compositionally similar planetary basalts.

  18. The alkali basaltic and picritic Magmatism in Minusa and Kusnetsk basin, geochemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firsov, Andrei; Ashchepkov, Igor; Rikhvanov, Leonid; Wald, Alexandr

    2015-04-01

    The alkali basalts and picrites are widely distributed within the Minusa depressions. They manifest quite different episodes of the magmatic activity and plumes. Some of them relate to late Devonian which are parallel to magmatism in Vilyui rift and Tungus basin as well as to Agul basaltic plateau in Sayan Foothills and in Kuznetsk Alatau (385 -360 Ma) and are mainly represented by the alkali basalts (Rikhvanov et al., 1991). The others are close in time to the Late Devonian kimberlitic basaltic magmatism and camptonite dykes in West Sayan. The Early stage of the Permian -Triassic super plume in Minusa and Kusnetsk basin 250 -254 Ma (Rikhvanov et al., 1991). The major pulse of magmatic activity at 248 -245 MA was not appeared in southern margin. But the latest which is represented in Meimecha province Northern Siberia But the late or new Early Triassic stage at 230 -240 Ma was again manifested by the appearance of the alkali picrite ankaratrite dykes. The later alkaline magmatism in Late Jurassic - Cretaceaus stages which was appeared in the Northern Siberian provinces appeared in Southern Siberia were much less pronounced. The Latest episode of the Mezo- Cenozoic activity (Kutolin, Frolova, 1970; Ashchepkov et al., 1995) in the Kopiev uplift with the abundant mantle xenoliths in magma manifest another stages which possibly is related to the hydrous plumes. The trace elements of the magmas in the Minusa depression show rather high concentration if the incompatible elements in all stages which suggest primary enrichment in the metasomatic components probably due to the ancient subducted related magmatism starting from the Devonian stage (Vorontsov et al., 2013) which had the model ages of about 0.9 Ga (Vrublevskii et al., 2014 ). The high melting stages which should be followed by the depletion and homogenization of the source mantle at the Superplume stage and the erupted volcanic still demonstrated rather high La/Yb rations. An thus the alkali picrite volcanic of

  19. Geochemistry of the Quaternary alkali basalts of Garrotxa (NE Volcanic Province, Spain): a case of double enrichment of the mantle lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebriá, J. M.; López-Ruiz, J.; Doblas, M.; Oyarzun, R.; Hertogen, J.; Benito, R.

    2000-11-01

    The area of Garrotxa (also known as the Olot area) represents the most recent (700,000-11,500 y) and better preserved area of magmatic activity in the NE Volcanic Province of Spain (NEVP). This region comprises a suite of intracontinental leucite basanites, nepheline basanites and alkali olivine basalts, which in most cases represent primary or nearly primary liquids. The geochemical characteristics of these lavas are very similar to the analogous petrologic types of other Cenozoic volcanics of Europe, which are intermediate between HIMU, DM and EM1. Quantitative trace element modeling, suggests derivation from an enriched mantle source by degrees of melting that progressively increased from the leucite basanites (˜4%) to the olivine basalts (˜16%). However, the relatively more variable Sr-Nd-Pb isotope signature of the magmas suggests the participation of at least two distinct components in the mantle source: (1) a sublithospheric one with a geochemical signature similar to the magmas of Calatrava (Central Spain) and other basalts of Europe; and (2) an enriched lithospheric component with a K-bearing phase present. The geochemical model proposed here involves the generation of a hybrid mantle lithosphere source produced by the infiltration of the sublithospheric liquids into enriched domains of the mantle lithosphere, shortly before the melting event that generated the Garrotxa lavas. The available geological data suggest that the first enrichment event of the mantle lithosphere under the NEVP could be the result of Late Variscan mantle upwelling triggered by the extensional collapse of the Variscan orogen during the Permo-Carboniferous. By Jurassic/Cretaceous time, large-scale NNE-directed sublithospheric mantle channeling of thermally and chemically anomalous plume material was placed under the Iberian Peninsula and Central Europe. However, the geodynamic conditions in the NEVP did not favor magmatism, which could not take place until the Cenozoic after

  20. NanoSIMS results from olivine-hosted melt embayments: Magma ascent rate during explosive basaltic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Alexander S.; Ruprecht, Philipp; Hauri, Erik H.; Rose, William; Gonnermann, Helge M.; Plank, Terry

    2014-08-01

    The explosivity of volcanic eruptions is governed in part by the rate at which magma ascends and degasses. Because the time scales of eruptive processes can be exceptionally fast relative to standard geochronometers, magma ascent rate remains difficult to quantify. Here we use as a chronometer concentration gradients of volatile species along open melt embayments within olivine crystals. Continuous degassing of the external melt during magma ascent results in diffusion of volatile species from embayment interiors to the bubble located at their outlets. The novel aspect of this study is the measurement of concentration gradients in five volatile elements (CO2, H2O, S, Cl, F) at fine-scale (5-10 μm) using the NanoSIMS. The wide range in diffusivity and solubility of these different volatiles provides multiple constraints on ascent timescales over a range of depths. We focus on four 100-200 μm, olivine-hosted embayments erupted on October 17, 1974 during the sub-Plinian eruption of Volcán de Fuego. H2O, CO2, and S all decrease toward the embayment outlet bubble, while F and Cl increase or remain roughly constant. Compared to an extensive melt inclusion suite from the same day of the eruption, the embayments have lost both H2O and CO2 throughout the entire length of the embayment. We fit the profiles with a 1-D numerical diffusion model that allows varying diffusivities and external melt concentrations as a function of pressure. Assuming a constant decompression rate from the magma storage region at approximately 220 MPa to the surface, H2O, CO2 and S profiles for all embayments can be fit with a relatively narrow range in decompression rates of 0.3-0.5 MPa/s, equivalent to 11-17 m/s ascent velocity and an 8 to 12 minute duration of magma ascent from ~ 10 km depth. A two stage decompression model takes advantage of the different depth ranges over which CO2 and H2O degas, and produces good fits given an initial stage of slow decompression (0.05-0.3 MPa/s) at high

  1. Comparative Planetary Mineralogy: Valence State Partitioning of Cr, Fe, Ti, and V Among Crystallographic Sites in Olivine, Pyroxene, and Spinel from Planetary Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papike, J. J.; Karner, J. M.; Shearer, C. K.

    2005-01-01

    We have considered the valence-state partitioning of Cr, Fe, Ti, and V over crystallographic sites in olivine, pyroxene, and spinel from planetary basalts. The sites that accommodate these cations are the M2 site (6-8 coordinated) and M1 site (6 coordinated) in pyroxene, the M2 site (6-8 coordinated) and M1 site (6 coordinated) in olivine, and the tetrahedral and octahedral sites in spinel. The samples we studied are basalts from Earth, Moon, and Mars, which have fO2 conditions that range from IW-2 (Moon) to IW+6 (Earth) with Mars somewhere between at IW to IW+2. In this range of fO2 the significant elemental valences are (from low to high fO2) Ti4+, V3+, Fe2+, Cr2+, Cr3+, V3+, V4+, and Fe3+. V2+ and Ti3+ play a minor role in the phases considered for the Moon, and are probably in very low concentrations. V5+ plays a minor role in these phases in terrestrial basalts because it is probably in lower abundance than V4+ and it has an ionic radii that is so small (0.054 nm, 6- coordinated,[1]) that it is almost at the lower limit for octahedral coordination. The role of Cr2+ in the Moon is significant, as Sutton et al. [2] found that lunar olivine contains mostly Cr2+ while coexisting pyroxene contains mostly Cr3+. Hanson one vacancy only accommodates one V4+. Thus more vacancies are required in V4+ substitutions into olivine. In the Moon V3+ is much more abundant than V4+ [7, 8]. Thus in lunar chromite V3+ follows Cr3+, whereas in Earth V4+ (which is much greater in abundance than V3+) follows Ti4+ (eg in ulv spinel). We could go on in this vein for some time but space limitations do not permit us to do so.

  2. Melt inclusions hosted in olivine and plagioclase phenocrysts from the Antarctic-Phoenix Ridge basalts: Implications for origins of N- and E-type MORB parent magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Schiano, P.; Chen, Y.; Devidal, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Antarctic-Phoenix Ridge (APR) is a fossil spreading center in the Drake Passage, Antarctic Ocean. Extinction of spreading occurred at the time of chron C2A (ca. 3.3 Ma). Enriched (E-type) mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) coexist with normal (N-type) MORB in the axial region of the APR, which is far from any known hotspots. The E-type basalts are relatively young (<3.1 Ma) compared to the N-type ones (>3.5 Ma). The E-type basalts are characterized by elevated K2O/TiO2 and (La/Sm)N ratios (K2O/TiO2 = 0.4 - 0.7; (La/Sm)N = 2.2 - 3.4) compared with the N-type basalts (K2O/TiO2 = 0.1 - 0.2; (La/Sm)N = 0.7 - 0.8). The E-type basalts are considered to have been generated by low-degree of partial melting of an enriched mantle source. In order to understand the spaciotemporal primitive melt diversity, we used silicate melt inclusions hosted in primitive olivine (Fo87-89) and plagioclase (An85-89) phenocrysts from the N-type APR basalts. Rehomogenized melt inclusions have been analyzed by electron and LA-ICPMS for major and trace elements. The homogenization temperature varies from 1205 to 1237oC for olivine hosts, and 1206 to 1247oC for plagioclase hosts. Melt inclusions have more primitive compositions than the host lavas. Melt inclusions hosted in olivine display Mg#s ranging from 67.7 to 71.9, and those in plagioclase from 67.5 to 74.1. All melt inclusions from the N-type APR basalts exhibit light rare earth element depleted patterns. They have K2O/TiO2 and (La/Sm)N ratios ranging from 0.1 to 0.3, and 0.4 to 0.9, respectively, which are overlapping with the values for N-type APR basalts. Furthermore, the melt inclusions have elevated (Lu/Hf)N and (Sm/Nd)N ratios compared with the E-type APR basalts. It should be pointed out that the N-type APR basalts do not contain any of enriched melt inclusions. These observations indicate that the N- and E-type APR basalts were produced at different depths. The chemistry of melt inclusions with N-type basalts is consistent with a

  3. First data on magma ascent and residence times retrieved from Fe-Mg and trace element zonation in olivine phenocrysts from Kamchatka basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeychik, Boris; Churikova, Tatiana; Kronz, Andreas; Simakin, Alexander; Wörner, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    Compositional zonation in olivine phenocrysts and diffusion modelling have been used in the last ten years to estimate magma residence times and the duration of magma ascent. The fundamental assumption is that mixing with newly injected magma into a reservoir triggers diffusional exchange between mafic olivine crystals and more evolved magma and that this magma mixing eventually triggers eruption. If depth of mixing is known, this translates to ascent rates of magmas to the surface. We applied this approach to a series of different arc basalt lavas from Kamchatka to constrain the rates of magma ascent and magma resident in what is one of the most active subduction zones in the world that is also dominated by an abundance of unusually mafic magmas. Our sample collection cover the principal modes of arc magmatism in Kamchatka: from different volcanic complexes (stratovolcano, dikes, summit eruptions, monogenetic cones), of different age (from Late-Pleistocene to Holocene and recent eruptions), from different magmatic regimes (long-lived volcanoes vs. monogenetic eruptions) and different major element composition (from basalt to basaltic andesite of different geochemical character including LILE enrichments). We analyzed and modelled zonation profiles for a range of elements with different diffusivities (e.g. Mg-Fe, Ca, Ni, Mn, Cr) to assess the role of variable diffusivities as a function of major and trace elements in the olivines from different P-T conditions. First data were obtained on samples from the Klyuchevskoy, Shiveluch and Tolbachik, including recent most eruption in 2012/2013. These data show that for some samples the zonation patterns are much more complex than is usually observed: high-Mg olivines at different volcanoes have very different zonation patterns, including normally, reversely zoned grains or even show highly complex repetitive zonation that indicate large compositional changes in the surrounding magma at very short time scales (years). Thus

  4. Crystal fractionation of the basalt comendite series of the mount Edziza volcanic complex, British Columbia: Major and trace elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souther, J. G.; Hickson, C. J.

    1984-06-01

    The Mount Edziza Volcanic Complex in north-central British Columbia includes a group of overlapping basaltic shields, salic composite volcanoes, domes and small calderas that range in age from 7.5 Ma to less than 2000 years B.P. The volcanic assemblage is chemically bimodal, comprising voluminous alkali olivine basalt and hawaiite, a salic suite of mainly peralkaline trachyte and comendite, plus a relatively small volume of intermediate rocks (trachybasalt, tristanite, mugearite, benmoreite). The complex is the product of five cycles of magmatic activity, each of which began with alkali olivine basalt and culminated with the eruption of salic magma. The regular chemical variation shown by almost 100 major- and trace-element analyses suggests a genetic lineage between the basic and salic members of each cycle. Least-squares mathematical modelling, indicates that the salic rocks (trachyte and comendite) have formed by fractionation of observed phenocryst and cumulate nodule mineral phases from a common alkali olivine basalt parent magma. Hawaiite is thought to be a cumulate rock, formed by partial fractionation and feldspar accumulation within rising columns of primary alkali olivine basalt. Fractionation leading from alkali olivine basalt through trachybasalt and trachyte to comendite is believed to have taken place where primary basalt became trapped in large crustal reservoirs. The early removal of olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase, leading to a trachytic residuum, and subsequent fractionation of mainly alkali feldspar, leading to the peralkaline end members, is consistent with major- and trace-element variation and with isotopic and REE data. The chemical diversity of the complex is attributed to its location over a zone of crustal extension where mantle-derived basalt, trapped in large high-level reservoirs, underwent prolonged fractionation.

  5. NanoSIMS results from olivine-hosted melt embayments: Modeling ascent rate in explosive basaltic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, A. S.; Plank, T.; Ruprecht, P.; Hauri, E. H.; Gonnermann, H. M.; Rose, W. I.

    2012-12-01

    A critical parameter governing the explosivity of volcanic eruptions is the rate at which magma ascends and degases, because this affects bubble nucleation, coalescence, and ultimately fragmentation. Although several methods have been used to determine magma ascent rates, it remains a poorly constrained parameter for most eruptions. One promising method employs diffusion modeling of H2O and CO2 concentration gradients in melt embayments/open melt inclusions [1,2]. Here we utilize the fine spatial resolution of the nanoSIMS to obtain concentration gradients for five volatile species, improving upon previous efforts that were more limited in spatial resolution (FTIR, [1]) and in number of volatile analytes (H2O only by BSE, [2]). Focusing on explosive basaltic eruptions, for which very little is known about ascent rates, we chose ash and lapilli samples from the Oct 1974 sub-plinian eruption of Volcán de Fuego. Glassy, olivine-hosted embayments with evidence of outlet bubbles were analyzed by nanoSIMS at a minimum distance between spots of 15 μm. Major element zonation in the embayments was investigated by EMP, and high resolution BSE images were captured to complement the nanoSIMS spot measurements for H2O (as in [2]). We report analyses for 5 embayments that vary in length from 100 to 350 μm. Low-solubility volatiles (CO2, H2O, S) decrease towards the embayment outlet, consistent with diffusive reequilibration with the more-degassed surrounding melt. High-solubility volatiles (Cl, F) increase towards the outlet, apparently behaving as magmaphile elements. Major elements exhibit constant concentrations along the embayment, except for a 20-50 μm wide zone near the embayment outlet, perhaps representing a boundary layer at the outlet bubble, where concentrations vary consistent with olivine and clinopyroxene microlite growth. BSE grayscale values are thus affected by both H2O diffusion and major element zonation at the embayment outlet, and cannot be used to

  6. Moessbauer Mineralogy of Rock, Soil, and Dust at Gusev Crater, Mars: Spirit's Journey through Weakly Altered Olivine Basalt on the Plains and Pervasively Altered Basalt in the Columbia Hills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. V.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Schroeder, C.; Rodionov, D. S.; Yen, A.; Ming, D. W.; deSouza, P. A., Jr.; Fleischer, I.; Wdowiak, T.; Gellert, R.; Bernhardt, B.; Evlanov, E. N.; Zubkov, B.; Foh, J.; Bonnes, U.; Kankeleit, E.; Guetlich, P.; Renz, F.; Squyres, S. W.; Arvidson, R. E.

    2006-01-01

    The Moessbauer spectrometer on Spirit measured the oxidation state of Fe, identified Fe-bearing phases, and measured relative abundances of Fe among those phases for surface materials on the plains and in the Columbia Hills of Gusev crater. Eight Fe-bearing phases were identified: olivine, pyroxene, ilmenite, magnetite, nanophase ferric oxide (npOx), hematite, goethite, and a Fe(3+)-sulfate. Adirondack basaltic rocks on the plains are nearly unaltered (Fe(3+)/Fe(sub T)<0.2) with Fe from olivine, pyroxene (Ol>Px), and minor npOx and magnetite. Columbia Hills basaltic rocks are nearly unaltered (Peace and Backstay), moderately altered (WoolyPatch, Wishstone, and Keystone), and pervasively altered (e.g., Clovis, Uchben, Watchtower, Keel, and Paros with Fe(3+)/Fe(sub T) approx.0.6-0.9). Fe from pyroxene is greater than Fe from olivine (Ol sometimes absent), and Fe(2+) from Ol+Px is 40-49% and 9-24% for moderately and pervasively altered materials, respectively. Ilmenite (Fe from Ilm approx.3-6%) is present in Backstay, Wishstone, Keystone, and related rocks along with magnetite (Fe from Mt approx. 10-15%). Remaining Fe is present as npOx, hematite, and goethite in variable proportions. Clovis has the highest goethite content (Fe from Gt=40%). Goethite (alpha-FeOOH) is mineralogical evidence for aqueous processes because it has structural hydroxide and is formed under aqueous conditions. Relatively unaltered basaltic soils (Fe(3+)/Fe(sub T) approx. 0.3) occur throughout Gusev crater (approx. 60-80% Fe from Ol+Px, approx. 10-30% from npOx, and approx. 10% from Mt). PasoRobles soil in the Columbia Hills has a unique occurrence of high concentrations of Fe(3+)-sulfate (approx. 65% of Fe). Magnetite is identified as a strongly magnetic phase in Martian soil and dust.

  7. Melt inclusions in olivine and plagioclase phenocrysts from Antarctic-Phoenix Ridge basalts: Implications for origins of N- and E-type MORB parent magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sung Hi; Schiano, Pierre; Chen, Yang; Devidal, Jean-Luc; Choo, Mi Kyung; Lee, Jong-Ik

    2013-03-01

    The Antarctic-Phoenix Ridge (APR) is a fossil spreading center in the Drake Passage, Antarctic Ocean. Spreading ceased in chron C2A (ca. 3.3 Ma). Although the APR is a normal ridge that is not influenced by a hotspot, enriched (E-type) mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) coexists with normal (N-type) MORB in the ridge's axial region. The E-type APR basalt is relatively young (< 3.1 Ma) compared to the N-type basalt (> 3.5 Ma). The E-type basalt is characterized by elevated K2O/TiO2 (= 0.4-0.8) and (La/Sm)N (= 2.2-3.4) ratios, relative to the N-type basalt (K2O/TiO2 = 0.1-0.3; (La/Sm)N = 0.7-0.8). To better understand the compositional variation in the APR basalts and their mantle source regions through time, silicate melt inclusions in primitive olivine (Fo87-89) and plagioclase (An85-89) phenocrysts from the N-type APR basalt were studied. Rehomogenized melt inclusions were analyzed by electron microprobe and LA-ICPMS for major and trace elements. The melt inclusions are more primitive than the host basalt, with Mg#s from 67.5 to 74.1. All inclusions exhibit patterns that are depleted in the light rare earth elements. The inclusions have K2O/TiO2 from 0.1 to 0.3 and (La/Sm)N ratios from 0.4 to 0.9; these values overlap with those of the N-type APR basalt. Furthermore, the melt inclusions have elevated (Lu/Hf)N and (Sm/Nd)N ratios compared to the E-type basalts. The N-type APR basalts do not contain any melt inclusions that are enriched in incompatible elements. The E-type basalt was generated by a low degree of partial melting of a relatively incompatible-element-enriched mantle source. In contrast, chemistries of melt inclusions and N-type basalts are compatible with high degrees of partial melting of an increasingly depleted mantle source. Assuming a veined or otherwise heterogeneous mantle, the absence of E-type inclusions from the N-type host has implications for cyclic magmatic activity beneath the APR. Multi-stage mantle melting and melt extraction from a

  8. Alkali basalts and leucitites in an extensional intracontinental plate setting: The late Cenozoic Calatrava Volcanic Province (central Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebriá, J.-M.; López-Ruiz, J.

    1995-04-01

    The Calatrava Volcanic Province (CVP) of central Spain is characterised by a intracontinental plate magmatic association of leucitites, melilitites, nephelinites and olivine basalts extruded during the late Miocene to Quaternary. Most of the rocks represent relatively primitive magmas and less than 45% have experienced small degrees ( < 25%) of crystal fractionation. Melilitites, nephelinites and olivine basalts form a suite generated by variable degrees of partial melting ( F = 5-17%) of a nearly homogeneous enriched (up to x18 chondritic values for the highly incompatible elements and × 3 for the moderately incompatible) mantle source, composed of Ol+Opx+Cpx+Gt+Phl. The leucitites appear to be derived by low degrees of partial melting ( ~ 4%) from a different mantle source, characterized by higher Rb, Ba, K and 87Sr enrichment and the presence of residual apatite. Phlogopite contributed to the leucititic liquids in a higher proportion than in the basaltic suite whereas clinopyroxene participated in lower amounts. The geochemical characteristics of the primary liquids suggest a contribution from two source components: (1) a subcontinental lithospheric component which appears to be a strongly enriched garnet-lherzolite with phlogopite ± apatite and (2) an asthenospheric diapir component with characteristics similar to the HIMU reservoir. These conclusions combined with geophysical observations indicate that the CVP magmatism could develop in two stages. In a first stage, a HIMU-like mantle diapir would trigger magma generation in the overlying subcontinental lithosphere by melting of pervasive enriched streaks or veins with phlogopite + apatite, giving rise to small amounts of leucititic liquids and to initial extension of the upper crust. In subsequent steps the extension developed, the lithosphere becomes stripped of its enriched components and the asthenospheric diapir starts to melt giving rise to the basaltic liquids which are virtually OIB-like magmas. This

  9. Determining olivine composition of basaltic dunes in Gale Crater, Mars, from orbit: Awaiting ground truth from Curiosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Melissa D.; Christensen, Philip R.

    2013-07-01

    successful landing of the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover in Gale Crater, Mars, presents a rare opportunity for validation of a spectral index developed for determining olivine chemistry from orbital midinfrared remote-sensing data. Here, a spectral index is developed using laboratory emissivity data of 13 synthetic Mg-Fe olivines. Utilizing this spectral index, a prediction of olivine composition (~Fo55 ± 5) is made from orbital data for a NE-SW trending dune field near the Curiosity rover. This dune field will be crossed during the mission as the rover travels toward a ~5 km-high sediment stack (Mount Sharp) that contains orbitally detected clays and sulfates. Curiosity can use its instrument suite (ChemMin, Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer, ChemCam) when it reaches the dunes to verify or refute the olivine-chemistry prediction presented here. The ability to validate the developed spectral index using the rover's ground-truth instruments will strengthen olivine-chemistry mapping across the Martian surface using this spectral index.

  10. Igneous Rocks of the East Pacific Rise: The alkali volcanic suite appear to be differentiated from a tholeiitic basalt extruded from the mantle.

    PubMed

    Engel, A E; Engel, C G

    1964-10-23

    The apical parts of large volcanoes along the East Pacific Rise (islands and seamounts) are encrusted with rocks of the alkali volcanic suite (alkali basalt, andesine- and oligoclase-andesite, and trachyte). In contrast, the more submerged parts of the Rise are largely composed of a tholeiitic basalt which has low concentrations of K, P, U, Th, Pb, and Ti. This tholeiitic basalt is either the predominant or the only magma generated in the earth's mantle under oceanic ridges and rises. It is at least 1000-fold more abundant than the alkali suite, which is probably derived from tholeiitic basalt by magmatic differentiation in and immediately below the larger volcanoes. Distinction of oceanic tholeiites from almost all continental tholeiites is possible on the simple basis of total potassium content, with the discontinuity at 0.3 to 0.5 percent K(2)O by weight. Oceanic tholeiites also are readily distinguished from some 19 out of 20 basalts of oceanic islands and seamount cappings by having less than 0.3 percent K(2)O by weight and more than 48 percent SiO(2). Deep drilling into oceanic volcanoes should, however, core basalts transitional between the oceanic tholeiites and the presumed derivative alkali basalts. The composition of the oceanic tholeiites suggests that the mantle under the East Pacific Rise contains less than 0.10 percent potassium oxide by weight; 0.1 part per million of uranium and 0.4 part of thorium; a potassium:rubidium ratio of about 1200 and a potassium: uranium ratio of about 10(4).

  11. Tracking timescales of short-term precursors to large basaltic fissure eruptions through Fe-Mg diffusion in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Margaret E.; Morgan, Daniel J.; Maclennan, John; Edmonds, Marie; Thordarson, Thor

    2016-04-01

    Petrological constraints on the timescales of pre-eruptive crystal storage and magma degassing provide an important framework for the interpretation of seismic, geodetic and gas monitoring data in volcanically active regions. We have used Fe-Mg diffusion chronometry in 86 olivine macrocrysts from the AD 1783-1784 Laki eruption on Iceland's Eastern Volcanic Zone to characterise timescales of crystal storage and transport in the lead-up to this eruption. The majority of these olivines have core compositions of Fo < 76, and rim compositions in the range Fo69-Fo74 that are close to equilibrium with the Laki melt. Diffusion modelling using the greyscale intensity of backscattered electron images as a proxy for olivine composition reveals that the most probable Fe-Mg diffusion timescale for Laki olivines is 7.8 days, which reflects the characteristic olivine residence time in the carrier melt prior to eruption. A small population of Fo > 81 olivines record Fe-Mg diffusion timescales of ∼124 days; these crystals are likely to have formed in mid-crustal magma chambers, been transferred to storage at shallower levels and then entrained into the Laki melt prior to eruption. Typical Fe-Mg diffusion timescales of 6-10 days are shorter than the average time interval between discrete episodes of the Laki eruption, indicating variable or pulsed disaggregation of stored crystals into the carrier liquid prior to the onset of each episode. The diffusion timescales coincide with historical accounts of strong and frequent earthquakes in southeast Iceland, which we interpret as being associated with mush disaggregation related to melt withdrawal and the initiation of dyke propagation from a crustal magma reservoir at ∼6 ± 3 km depth to the surface. We calculate pre-eruptive CO2 fluxes of 2-6 Mt d-1, assuming a pre-eruptive CO2 outgassing budget of 189.6 Mt for the Laki eruption and a constant rate of CO2 release in the 6-10 days preceding each eruptive episode. Our dataset

  12. Evidence from Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions that the Martian Mantle has a Chondritic D/H Ratio and that Some Young Basalts have Assimilated Old Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, Tomohiro; Alexander, O'D.; Wang, J.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Magmatic degassing of volatile elements affects the climate and near-surface environment of Mars. Telescopic and meteorite studies have revealed that the Martian atmosphere and near-surface materials have D/H ratios 5-6 times terrestrial values [e.g., 1, 2]. Such high D/H ratios are interpreted to result from the preferential loss of H relative to heavier D from the Martian atmosphere, assuming that the original Martian water inventory had a D/H ratio similar to terrestrial values and to H in primitive meteorites [e.g., 1, 3]. However, the primordial Martian D/H ratio has, until now, not been well constrained. The uncertainty over the Martian primordial D/H ratio has arisen both from the scarcity of primitive Martian meteorites and as a result of contamination by terrestrial and, perhaps, Martian surface waters that obscure the signature of the Martian mantle. This study reports a comprehensive dataset of magmatic volatiles and D/H ratios in Martian primary magmas based on low-contamination, in situ ion microprobe analyses of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from both depleted [Yamato 980459 (Y98)] and enriched [Larkman Nunatak 06319 (LAR06)] Martian basaltic meteorites. Analyses of these primitive melts provide definitive evidence that the Martian mantle has retained a primordial D/H ratio and that young Martian basalts have assimilated old Martian crust.

  13. Complex subvolcanic magma plumbing system of an alkali basaltic maar-diatreme volcano (Elie Ness, Fife, Scotland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernon, T. M.; Upton, B. G. J.; Ugra, R.; Yücel, C.; Taylor, R. N.; Elliott, H.

    2016-11-01

    Alkali basaltic diatremes such as Elie Ness (Fife, Scotland) expose a range of volcanic lithofacies that points to a complex, multi-stage emplacement history. Here, basanites contain phenocrysts including pyrope garnet and sub-calcic augites from depths of 60 km. Volcanic rocks from all units, pyroclastic and hypabyssal, are characterised by rare earth element (REE) patterns that show continuous enrichment from heavy REE (HREE) to light REE (LREE), and high Zr/Y that are consistent with retention of garnet in the mantle source during melting of peridotite in a garnet lherzolite facies. Erupted garnets are euhedral and unresorbed, signifying rapid ascent through the lithosphere. The magmas also transported abundant pyroxenitic clasts, cognate with the basanite host, from shallower depths ( 35-40 km). These clasts exhibit wide variation in texture, mode and mineralogy, consistent with growth from a range of compositionally diverse melts. Further, clinopyroxene phenocrysts from both the hypabyssal and pyroclastic units exhibit a very wide compositional range, indicative of polybaric fractionation and magma mixing. This is attributed to stalling of earlier magmas in the lower crust - principally from 22 to 28 km - as indicated by pyroxene thermobarometry. Many clinopyroxenes display chemical zoning profiles, occasionally with mantles and rims of higher magnesium number (Mg#) suggesting the magmas were mobilised by juvenile basanite magma. The tuffs also contain alkali feldspar megacrysts together with Fe-clinopyroxene, zircon and related salic xenoliths, of the 'anorthoclasite suite' - inferred to have crystallised at upper mantle to lower crustal depths from salic magma in advance of the mafic host magmas. Despite evidence for entrainment of heterogeneous crystal mushes, the rapidly ascending melts experienced negligible crustal contamination. The complex association of phenocrysts, megacrysts and autoliths at Elie Ness indicates thorough mixing in a dynamic system

  14. Trace-element and Sr, Nd, Pb, and O isotopic composition of Pliocene and Quaternary alkali basalts of the Patagonian Plateau lavas of southernmost South America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, C.R.; Frey, F.A.; Futa, K.; Zartman, R.E.; Peng, Z.; Kurtis, Kyser T.

    1990-01-01

    The Pliocene and Quaternary Patagonian alkali basalts of southernmost South America can be divided into two groups. The "cratonic" basalts erupted in areas of Cenozoic plateau volcanism and continental sedimentation and show considerable variation in 87Sr/86Sr (0.70316 to 0.70512), 143Nd/144Nd (e{open}Nd) and 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb ratios (18.26 to 19.38, 15.53 to 15.68, and 38.30 to 39.23, respectively). These isotopic values are within the range of oceanic island basalts, as are the Ba/La, Ba/Nb, La/Nb, K/Rb, and Cs/Rb ratios of the "cratonic" basalts. In contrast, the "transitional" basalts, erupted along the western edge of the outcrop belt of the Pliocene and Quaternary plateau lavas in areas that were the locus of earlier Cenozoic Andean orogenic arc colcanism, have a much more restricted range of isotopic composition which can be approximated by 87Sr/86Sr=0.7039??0.0004, e{open}Nd, 206Pb/204Pb=18.60??0.08, 207Pb/204Pb=15.60??0.01, and 208Pb/204Pb=38.50??0.10. These isotopic values are similar to those of Andean orogenic are basalts and, compared to the "cratonic" basalts, are displaced to higher 87Sr/86Sr at a given 143Nd/144Nd and to higher 207Pb/204Pb at a given 208Pb/204Pb. The "transitional" basalts also have Ba/La, Ba/Nb, La/Nb, and Cs/Rb ratios higher than the "cratonic" and oceanic island basalts, although not as high as Andean orogenic are basalts. In contrast to the radiogenic isotopes, ??18O values for both groups of the Patagonian alkali basalts are indistinguishable and are more restricted than the range reported for Andean orogenic are basalts. Whole rock ??18O values calculated from mineral separates for both groups range from 5.3 to 6.5, while measured whole rock ??18O values range from 5.1 to 7.8. The trace element and isotopic data suggest that decreasing degrees of partial melting in association with lessened significance of subducted slabderived components are fundamental factors in the west to east transition from arc

  15. Crustal accretion along the global mid-ocean ridge system based on basaltic glass and olivine-hosted melt inclusion compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanless, V. D.; Behn, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The depth and distribution of crystallization at mid-ocean ridges controls the overall architecture of the oceanic crust, influences hydrothermal circulation, and determines geothermal gradients in the crust and uppermost mantle. Despite this, there is no overall consensus on how crystallization is distributed within the crust/upper mantle or how this varies with spreading rate. Here, we examine crustal accretion at mid-ocean ridges by combining crystallization pressures calculated from major element barometers on mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) glasses with vapor-saturation pressures from melt inclusions to produce a detailed map of crystallization depths and distributions along the global ridge system. We calculate pressures of crystallization from >11,500 MORB glasses from the global ridge system using two established major element barometers (1,2). Additionally, we use vapor-saturation pressures from >400 olivine-hosted melt inclusions from five ridges with variable spreading rates to constrain pressures and distributions of crystallization along the global ridge system. We show that (i) crystallization depths from MORB glasses increase and become less focused with decreasing spreading rate, (ii) maximum glass pressures are greater than the maximum melt inclusion pressure, which indicates that the melt inclusions do not record the deepest crystallization at mid-ocean ridges, and (iii) crystallization occurs in the lower crust/upper mantle at all ridges, indicating accretion is distributed throughout the crust at all spreading rates, including those with a steady-state magma lens. Finally, we suggest that the remarkably similar maximum vapor-saturation pressures (~ 3000 bars) in melt inclusion from all spreading rates reflects the CO2 content of the depleted upper mantle feeding the global mid-ocean ridge system. (1) Michael, P. & W. Cornell (1998), Journal of Geophysical Research, 103(B8), 18325-18356; (2) Herzberg, C. (2004), Journal of Petrology, 45(12), 2389.

  16. One atmosphere experimental study on the partitioning of the HFSE between olivine, pyroxene and lunar basaltic melts in the CMAS + Fe + Ti system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilha Leitzke, Felipe; Fonseca, Raúl O. C.; Michely, Lina T.

    2016-04-01

    behaviour observed in olivine for DUopx/melt. The most striking feature is the DHFSEcpx/melt which varies by almost one order of magnitude from low-Ti to high-Ti glasses. This behaviour is observed for DZrcpx/melt, DHfcpx/melt, DTacpx/melt and DThcpx/melt and is surprisingly less pronounced for DNbcpx/melt. For the DUcpx/melt, this trend is much more pronounced on the experiments where U4+ predominates than U6+. The TiO2 in the silicate glass is proportional to the TiO2 in the cpx, which reaches concentrations up to 3.1 wt.% and substitutes both into the M1 and the T site. The IV Al on the experiments is in agreement with lunar pyroxene data, with values lower than 0.07 apfu, indicating that Ca-Tschermak component was seldom present. Charge balance mechanism is defined by the substitution of Ti4+ - 2Al3+. Our data represent an improvement on the understanding of the fractionation of the HFSE in conditions similar to the ones that may have prevailed during generation of high-Ti lunar mare basalts.

  17. Enriched asthenosphere melting beneath the nascent North African margin: trace element and Nd isotope evidence in middle-late Triassic alkali basalts from central Sicily (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrincione, Rosolino; Fiannacca, Patrizia; Lustrino, Michele; Romano, Vanessa; Tranchina, Annunziata; Villa, Igor M.

    2016-03-01

    During the dismembering of the Pangea supercontinent, middle-late Triassic sub-volcanic alkaline rocks were emplaced in central Sicily. These rocks have an alkali basaltic composition and show OIB-like incompatible element patterns in primitive mantle-normalized diagrams (e.g., enrichments in HFSE and LREE coupled with high HFSE/LILE ratios), as well as slightly positive \\varepsilon_{Nd} values. Only subtle effects of crustal contamination at shallow depths emerge from geochemical data. These characteristics are very different compared with the Permian calcalkaline magmas from elsewhere in SW Europe still carrying the geochemical signature of modifications related to the Variscan orogeny. The mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic compositions of the investigated samples from central Sicily are also different from the coeval shoshonitic volcano-plutonic formations of Southern Alps (Dolomites). The incompatible element composition and Nd isotopic ratios are consistent with low-degree partial melting of a moderately depleted asthenospheric mantle source, with a negligible involvement of the thinned continental crust. The studied alkaline basalts represent the only known evidence of a segment of the Triassic rift system associated with early Pangea breakup in central Sicily. The close similarity of the central Sicily Triassic alkali basalts with coeval basalts emplaced along former orogenic sutures across the peri-Mediterranean area suggests a common origin related, at least partly, to asthenospheric passive upwelling following the tectonic collapse of the Variscan Belt. These rocks provide new constraints on the spatial-temporal distribution, magma source evolution and geodynamic meaning of the widespread Permo-Triassic basic magmatism developed after the end of the Variscan Orogeny in southwestern Europe.

  18. Major element chemistry of Apollo 14 mare basalt clasts and highland plutonic clasts from lunar breccia 14321: Comparison with neutron activation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, John W.; Vetter, Scott K.

    1993-01-01

    Studies of lithic components in lunar breccias have documented a wide variety of rock types and magma suites which are not found among large, discrete lunar samples. Rock types found exclusively or dominantly as clasts in breccias include KREEP basalts, VHK mare basalts, high-alumina mare basalts, olivine vitrophyres, alkali anorthosites, and magnesian anorthosites and troctolites. These miniature samples are crucial in petrogenetic studies of ancient mare basalts and the highlands crust of the western nearside, both of which have been battered by basin-forming impacts and no longer exist as distinct rock units.

  19. Modern analogues for Miocene to Pleistocene alkali basaltic phreatomagmatic fields in the Pannonian Basin: "soft-substrate" to "combined" aquifer controlled phreatomagmatism in intraplate volcanic fields Research Article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Károly; Cronin, Shane; Haller, Miguel; Brenna, Marco; Csillag, Gabor

    2010-09-01

    The Pannonian Basin (Central Europe) hosts numerous alkali basaltic volcanic fields in an area similar to 200 000 km2. These volcanic fields were formed in an approximate time span of 8 million years producing smallvolume volcanoes typically considered to be monogenetic. Polycyclic monogenetic volcanic complexes are also common in each field however. The original morphology of volcanic landforms, especially phreatomagmatic volcanoes, is commonly modified. by erosion, commonly aided by tectonic uplift. The phreatomagmatic volcanoes eroded to the level of their sub-surface architecture expose crater to conduit filling as well as diatreme facies of pyroclastic rock assemblages. Uncertainties due to the strong erosion influenced by tectonic uplifts, fast and broad climatic changes, vegetation cover variations, and rapidly changing fluvio-lacustrine events in the past 8 million years in the Pannonian Basin have created a need to reconstruct and visualise the paleoenvironment into which the monogenetic volcanoes erupted. Here phreatomagmatic volcanic fields of the Miocene to Pleistocene western Hungarian alkali basaltic province have been selected and compared with modern phreatomagmatic fields. It has been concluded that the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF) in New Zealand could be viewed as a prime modern analogue for the western Hungarian phreatomagmatic fields by sharing similarities in their pyroclastic successions textures such as pyroclast morphology, type, juvenile particle ratio to accidental lithics. Beside the AVF two other, morphologically more modified volcanic fields (Pali Aike, Argentina and Jeju, Korea) show similar features to the western Hungarian examples, highlighting issues such as preservation potential of pyroclastic successions of phreatomagmatic volcanoes.

  20. Dissolution of Olivine, Siderite, and Basalt at 80 Deg C in 0.1 M H2SO4 in a Flow Through Process: Insights into Acidic Weathering on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Hausrath, E. M.; Morris, R. V.; Niles, P. B.; Achilles, C. N.; Ross, D. K.; Cooper, B. L.; Gonzalex, C. P.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of jarosite, other sulfates (e.g., Mg-and Ca-sulfates), and hematite along with silicic-lastic materials in outcrops of sedimentary materials at Meridiani Planum (MP) and detection of silica rich deposits in Gusev crater, Mars, are strong indicators of local acidic aqueous processes [1,2,3,4,5]. The formation of sediments at Meridiani Planum may have involved the evaporation of fluids derived from acid weathering of Martian basalts and subsequent diagenesis [6,7]. Also, our previous work on acid weathering of basaltic materials in a closed hydro-thermal system was focused on the mineralogy of the acid weathering products including the formation of jarosite and gray hematite spherules [8,9,10]. The object of this re-search is to extend our earlier qualitative work on acidic weathering of rocks to determine acidic dissolution rates of Mars analog basaltic materials at 80 C using a flow-thru reactor. We also characterized residual phases, including poorly crystalline or amorphous phases and precipitates, that remained after the treatments of olivine, siderite, and basalt which represent likely MP source rocks. This study is a stepping stone for a future simulation of the formation of MP rocks under a range of T and P.

  1. Occurrence and mineral chemistry of high pressure phases, Portrillo basalt, southcentral New Mexico. M.S. Thesis. Final Technical Report, 1 Jun. 1978 - 31 May 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, J. M.; Ortiz, T. S.

    1980-01-01

    Inclusions of clinopyroxenite, kaersutiteclinopyroxenite, kaersutite-rich inclusions, wehrlite and olivine-clinopyroxenite together with megacrysts of feldspar, kaersutite and spinel are found loose on the flanks of cinder cones, as inclusions within lava flows and within the cores of volcanic bombs in the Quaternary alkali-olivine basalt of the West Potrillo Mountains, southcentral New Mexico. Based on petrological and geochemical evidence the megacysts are interpreted to be phenocrysts which formed at great depth rather that xenocrysts of larger crystal aggregates. These large crystals are believed to have formed as stable phases at high temperature and pressure and have partially reacted with the basalt to produce subhedral to anhedral crystal boundaries. It can be demonstrated that the mafic and ultramafic crystal aggregates were derived from an alkali-basalt source rock generated in the mantle. The inclusions are believed to represent a cumulus body or bodies injected within the lower crust or upper mantle.

  2. Martian Dunite NWA 2737: Petrographic Constraints on Geological History, Shock Events, and Olivine Color

    SciTech Connect

    Treiman,A.; Dyar, M.; McCanta, M.; Noble, S.; Pieters, C.

    2007-01-01

    Meteorite Northwest Africa (NWA) 2737 is the second known chassignite, an olivine-rich igneous rock with mineral compositions and isotopic ratios that suggest it formed on Mars. NWA 2737 consists of ?85% vol. olivine (Mg, molar Mg/(Mg + Fe), of 78.3 {+-} 0.4%), which is notable because it is black in hand sample and brown in thin section. Other minerals include chromite, pyroxenes (augite, pigeonite, orthopyroxene), and diaplectic glass of alkali-feldspar composition. Aqueous alteration is minimal and appears only as slight dissolution of glass. NWA 2737 formed by accumulation of olivine and chromite from a basaltic magma; the other minerals represent magma trapped among the cumulus grains. Minerals are compositionally homogeneous, consistent with chemical equilibration in late and postigneous cooling. Two-pyroxene thermometry gives equilibration temperatures 1150 C, implying a significant time spent at the basalt solidus. Olivine-spinel-pyroxene equilibria give ?825 C (possibly the T of mesostasis crystallization) at an oxidation state of QMF-1. This oxidation state is consistent with low Fe3+ in olivine (determined by EMP, Moessbauer spectra, and synchrotron micro-XANES spectroscopy) and with {approx}10% of the iron in pyroxene being Fe3+. NWA 2737 experienced two shock events. The first shock, to stage S5-S6, affected the olivine by producing in it planar deformation features, intense mosaicism and lattice strain, and abundant droplets of iron-nickel metal, 5-15 nm in diameter. At this stage the olivine became deeply colored, i.e., strongly absorbing at visible and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. This shock event and its thermal pulse probably occurred at {approx}170 Ma, the Ar-Ar age of NWA 2737. The colored olivine is cut by ribbons of coarser, uncolored olivine with long axes along [100] and shorter axes on {l_brace}021{r_brace} planes: These are consistent with the easy slip law for olivine [100]{l_brace}021{r_brace}, which is activated at moderate strain

  3. Petrological processes in mantle plume heads: Evidence from study of mantle xenoliths in the late Cenozoic alkali Fe-Ti basalts in Western Syria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, Evgenii

    2015-04-01

    It is consensus now that within-plate magmatism is considered with ascending of mantle plumes and adiabatic melting of their head. At the same time composition of the plumes' matter and conditions of its adiabatic melting are unclear yet. The major source of objective information about it can be mantle xenoliths in alkali basalts and basanites which represent fragments of material of the plume heads above magma-generation zone. They are not represent material in melting zone, however, carry important information about material of modern mantle plumes, its phase composition and components, involved in melting. Populations of mantle xenoliths in basalts are characterized by surprising sameness in the world and represented by two major types: (1) dominated rocks of ``green'' series, and (2) more rare rocks of ``black'' series, which formed veins in the ``green'' series matrix. It can evidence about common composition of plume material in global scale. In other words, the both series of xenoliths represent two types of material of thermochemical mantle plumes, ascended from core-mantle boundary (Maruyama, 1994; Dobretsov et al., 2001). The same types of xenoliths are found in basalts and basanites of Western Syria (Sharkov et al., 1996). Rocks of ``green'' series are represented by Sp peridotites with cataclastic and protogranular structures and vary in composition from dominated spinel lherzolites to spinel harzburgites and rare spinel pyroxenites (websterites). It is probably evidence about incomplete homogenizing of the plume head matter, where material, underwent by partial melting, adjoins with more fertile material. Such heterogeneity was survived due to quick cooling of upper rim of the plume head in contact with relatively cold lithosphere. Essential role among xenoliths of the ``black'' series play Al-Ti-augite and water-bearing phases like hornblende (kaersutute) and Ti-phlogopite. Rocks of this series are represented by wehrlite, clinopyroxenite, amphibole

  4. Immiscible separation of metalliferous Fe/ Ti-oxide melts from fractionating alkali basalt: P-T-fO2 conditions and two-liquid elemental partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurai, Vratislav; Simon, Klaus; Wiechert, Uwe; Hoefs, Jochen; Konečný, Patrik; Huraiová, Monika; Pironon, Jacques; Lipka, Jozef

    Globules of iron-dominated (59-69 wt% FeOtot) and titanium-dominated (43.5 wt% TiO2) oxide melts have been detected in igneous xenoliths from Pliocene-to-Pleistocene alkali basalts of the Western Carpathians. Fluid inclusion and mineral composition data indicate immiscible separation of the high-iron-oxide melt (HIM) at magmatic temperatures. The HIM separation occurred during clinopyroxene (augite) accumulation in an alkali trachybasalt and continued during crystallization of amphibole (kaersutite) and K-feldspar (anorthoclase), the latter coexisting with trachyte and alkalic rhyolite residual melts. Some HIM was also expelled from sub-alkalic rhyolite (70-77% SiO2), coexisting with An27-45 plagioclase and quartz in granitic (tonalite-trondhjemite) xenoliths. Oxygen fugacities during HIM separation range from -1.4to +0.6log units around the QFM buffer. A close genetic relationship between HIM-hosted xenoliths and mantle-derived basaltic magma is documented by mineral 18O values ranging from 4.9 to 5.9‰ V-SMOW. δD values of gabbroic kaersutite between -61 and -86‰ V-SMOW are in agreement with a presumed primary magmatic water source. Most trace elements, except Li, Rb and Cs, have preferentially partitioned into the HIM. The HIM/Si-melt partition coefficients for transition elements (Sc, V, Cr, Co, Ni) and base metals (Zn, Cu, Mo) are between 2-160, resulting in extreme enrichment in the HIM. La and Ce also concentrate in the silicic melt, whereas Tb-Tm in the HIM. Hence, the immiscible separation causes REE fractionation and produces residual silicic melt enriched in LREE and depleted in HREE. The weak fractionation among Tb-Tm and Yb, Lu can be attributed to recurrent extraction of the HIM from the magmatic system, while flat HREE chondrite-normalized patterns are interpreted to indicate no or little loss of the HIM.

  5. Geochemical and oxygen isotope signatures of mantle corundum megacrysts from the Mbuji-Mayi kimberlite, Democratic Republic of Congo, and the Changle alkali basalt, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Gaston; Pivin, Marjorie; Fallick, Anthony E.; Ohnenstetter, Daniel; Song, Yucai; Demaiffe, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen isotope signatures of ruby and sapphire megacrysts, combined with trace-element analysis, from the Mbuji-Mayi kimberlite, Democratic Republic of Congo, and the Changle alkali basalt, China, provide clues to specify their origin in the deep Earth. At Mbuji-Mayi, pink sapphires have δ18O values in the range 4.3 to 5.4‰ (N = 10) with a mean of 4.9 ± 0.4‰, and rubies from 5.5 to 5.6‰ (N = 3). The Ga/Mg ratio of pink sapphires is between 1.9 and 3.9, and in rubies, between 0.6 and 2.6. The blue or yellow sapphires from Changle have δ18O values from 4.6 to 5.2 ‰, with a mean of 4.9 ± 0.2‰ (N = 9). The Ga/Mg ratio is between 5.7 and 11.3. The homogenous isotopic composition of ruby suggests a derivation from upper mantle xenoliths (garnet lherzolite, pyroxenite) or metagabbros and/or lower crustal garnet clinopyroxenite eclogite-type xenoliths included in kimberlites. Data from the pink sapphires from Mbuji-Mayi suggest a mantle origin, but different probable protoliths: either subducted oceanic protolith transformed into eclogite with δ18O values buffered to the mantle value, or clinopyroxenite protoliths in peridotite. The Changle sapphires have a mantle O-isotope signature. They probably formed in syenitic magmas produced by low degree partial melting of a spinel lherzolite source. The kimberlite and the alkali basalt acted as gem conveyors from the upper mantle up to the surface.

  6. Composition and origin of basaltic magma of the Hawaiian Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, H.A.

    1955-01-01

    Silica-saturated basaltic magma is the source of the voluminous lava flows, erupted frequently and rapidly in the primitive shield-building stage of activity, that form the bulk of each Hawaiian volcano. This magma may be available in batches that differ slightly in free silica content from batch to batch both at the same and at different volcanoes; differentiation by fractionation of olivine does not occur within this primitive magma. Silica-deficient basaltic magma, enriched in alkali, is the source of commonly porphyritic lava flows erupted less frequently and in relatively negligible volume during a declining and decadent stage of activity at some Hawaiian volcanoes. Differentiation by fractionation of olivine, plagioclase and augite is evident among these lavas, but does not account for the silica deficiency or the alkali enrichment. Most of the data of Hawaiian volcanism and petrology can be explained by a hypothesis that batches of magma are melted from crystalline paridotite by a recurrent process (distortion of the equatorial bulge by forced and free nutational stresses) that accomplishes the melting only of the plagioclase and pyroxene component but not the excess olivine and more refractory components within a zone of fixed and limited depth. Eruption exhausts the supply of meltable magma under a given locality and, in the absence of more violent melting processes, leaves a stratum of crystalline refractory components. ?? 1955.

  7. Recycled oceanic crust and marine sediment in the source of alkali basalts in Shandong, eastern China: Evidence from magma water content and oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Xia, Qun-Ke; Deloule, Etienne; Chen, Huan; Feng, Min

    2015-12-01

    The magma water contents and cpx δ18O values in alkali basalts from the Fuyanyshan (FYS) volcano in Shandong, eastern China, were investigated by an inverse calculation based on the water content of clinopyroxene (cpx) phenocrysts, the ivAlcpx-dependent water partitioning coefficient Dwatercpx>/melt, and secondary ion mass spectrometer, respectively. The calculated water content (H2O wt.) of magma ranges from 0.58% to 3.89%. It positively correlates with heavy rare earth element concentrations and bulk rock 87Sr/86Sr ratios, and it negatively correlates with Nb/U ratios. However, it is not correlated with bulk Mg# (Mg# = 100 × Mg / (Mg + Fe)) and (La/Yb)n (n represents primitive mantle normalization). Combined with the rather homogenous distribution of water content within cpx grains, these correlations indicate that the water variations among different samples represent the original magma signature, rather than results of a shallow process, such as degassing and diffusion. The δ18O of cpx phenocrysts varies from 3.6‰ to 6.3‰ (±0.5‰, 2SD), which may be best explained by the involvement of components from the lower and upper oceanic crust with marine sediments within the mantle source. The H2O/Ce ratios of the calculated melts range from 113 to 696 and form a positive trend with bulk rock 87Sr/86Sr, which cannot be explained by the recycled Sulu eclogite or by the metasomatized lithospheric mantle. Our modeling calculation shows that the decoupling of ɛHf and ɛNd could be caused by the involvement of marine sediments. Combing the high Ba/Th ratios, positive Sr spikes, and low Ce/Pb ratios for the Fuyanshan basalts, we suggest that the hydrous nature of the FYS basalts was derived from the hydrous mantle transition zone with ancient sediments.

  8. Mg-Fe2+ Exchange Between Olivine and Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, E. D.; Kelley, D. F.; Barton, M.

    2005-05-01

    Knowledge of exchange of Mg and Fe2+ (Kd) between olivine and melt is crucial for understanding the origin and evolution of magmas. It is essential to use accurate and precise values for Kd for quantitative studies of melting and crystallization. However, values of Kd derived from experimental studies are associated with relatively large uncertainties. Moreover, there is disagreement about the dependence of Kd on fO2, T, and melt composition. To obtain accurate and precise values of Kd as a function of fO2, T, and melt composition, electron microprobe data for equilibrium olivine-glass pairs were compiled from published experimental studies of natural samples at 0.1 MPa with controlled oxygen fugacity. The melt compositions in these experiments include tholeiitic and alkali-olivine basalts, picrites, andesites, and highly alkaline lavas (nephelinite, leucitites, ugandites). These data confirm that Kd is independent of fO2 and T as concluded by many previous workers. However, Kd is strongly dependent on melt composition, in particular on the molar alkalis and silica contents of the melt. These results are consistent with those obtained by Longhi et al (1978), and suggest that variations in Kd correlate with the degree of polymerization of the melts. Taking into account the non-ideal behavior of Mg-Fe2+ olivines does not affect this conclusion. An expression that describes lnKd in terms of molar alkalis and silica recovers experimental values with an accuracy of ±0.0001 and a precision of ±0.007. Comparable accuracy and precision is obtained using the expression given by Gee and Sack (1988) describing variations in Kd in terms of melt alkalinity. It is not presently clear that these expressions are applicable to Fe-rich melts (Mg# less than about 0.25) or MgO-rich melts such as komatiites. However, they provide a rigorous test for equilibrium between olivine and melt in the most abundant terrestrial magmas. In addition, accurate values of Kd allow melt redox state

  9. Early and Late Alkali Igneous Pulses and a High-3He Plume Origin for the Deccan Flood Basalts.

    PubMed

    Basu, A R; Renne, P R; Dasgupta, D K; Teichmann, F; Poreda, R J

    1993-08-13

    Several alkalic igneous complexes of nephelinite-carbonatite affinities occur in extensional zones around a region of high heat flow and positive gravity anomaly within the continental flood basalt (CFB) province of Deccan, India. Biotites from two of the complexes yield (40)Ar/(39)Ar dates of 68.53 +/- 0.16 and 68.57 +/- 0.08 million years. Biotite from a third complex, which intrudes the flood basalts, yields an (40)Ar/(39)Ar date of 64.96 +/- 0.1 1 million years. The complexes thus represent early and late magmatism with respect to the main pulse of CFB volcanism 65 million years ago. Rocks from the older complexes show a (3)He/(4)He ratio of 14.0 times the air ratio, an initial (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio of 0.70483, and other geochemical characteristics similar to ocean island basalts; the later alkalic pulse shows isotopic evidence of crustal contamination. The data document 3.5 million years of incubation of a primitive, high-(3)He mantle plume before the rapid eruption of the Deccan CFB.

  10. Cathodoluminescence Characterization of Maskelynite and Alkali Feldspar in Shergottite (Dhofar 019)

    SciTech Connect

    Kayama, M.; Nakazato, T.; Nishido, H.; Ninagawa, K.; Gucsik, A.

    2009-08-17

    Dhofar 019 is classified as an olivine-bearing basaltic shergottite and consists of subhedral grains of pyroxene, olivine, feldspar mostly converted to maskelynite and minor alkali feldspar. The CL spectrum of its maskelynite exhibits an emission band at around 380 nm. Similar UV-blue emission has been observed in the plagioclase experimentally shocked at 30 and 40 GPa, but not in terrestrial plagioclase. This UV-blue emission is a notable characteristic of maskelynite. CL spectrum of alkali feldspar in Dhofar 019 has an emission bands at around 420 nm with no red emission. Terrestrial alkali feldspar actually consists of blue and red emission at 420 and 710 nm assigned to Al-O{sup -}-Al and Fe{sup 3+} centers, respectively. Maskelynite shows weak and broad Raman spectral peaks at around 500 and 580 cm{sup -1}. The Raman spectrum of alkali feldspar has a weak peak at 520 cm{sup -1}, whereas terrestrial counterpart shows the emission bands at 280, 400, 470, 520 and 1120 cm{sup -1}. Shock pressure on this meteorite transformed plagioclase and alkali feldspar into maskelynite and almost glass phase, respectively. It eliminates their luminescence centers, responsible for disappearance of yellow and/or red emission in CL of maskelynite and alkali feldspar. The absence of the red emission band in alkali feldspar can also be due to the lack of Fe{sup 3+} in the feldspar as it was reported for some lunar feldspars.

  11. The petrology of the Apollo 12 pigeonite basalt suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldridge, W. S.; Beaty, D. W.; Hill, S. M. R.; Albee, A. L.

    1979-01-01

    A study of the petrology of the Apollo 12 pigeonite basalt samples 12011, 12043, and 12007 is presented. In this suite, the abundances of olivine and Cr-spinel decrease with increasing grain size, while the abundances of plagioclase and ilmenite increase. The petrochemical and textural variations indicate that the pigeonite basalts were derived from the olivine basalts, but the compositional gap between the olivine and pigeonite basalts indicates that they could not have crystallized together from a single, initially homogeneous magma body.

  12. Apollo 15 yellow-brown volcanic glass: Chemistry and petrogenetic relations to green volcanic glass and olivine-normative mare basalts

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, S.S.; Schmitt, R.A.; ); Delano, J.W. )

    1988-10-01

    Apollo 15 yellow-brown glass is one of twenty-five, high Mg, primary magmas emplaced on the lunar surface in pyroclastic eruptions. Forty spherules of this glass were individually analyzed by electron microprobe and INAA for major- and trace-elements. The abundances demonstrate that this primary magma was produced by partial melting of differentiated cumulates in the lunar mantle. Models are developed to explain the possible source-regions of several Apollo 15 and Apollo 12 low-Ti mare magmas as being products of hybridization involving three ancient differentiated components of a primordial lunar magma ocean: (a) early olivine {plus minus} orthopyroxene cumulates; (b) late-stage clinopyroxene + pigeonite + ilmenite + plagioclase cumulates; and (c) late-stage inter-cumulus liquid.

  13. Evidence for equilibrium conditions during the partitioning of nickel between olivine and komatiite liquids.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Budahn, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Olivine-liquid partition coefficients for Ni(DNi), calculated from Ni vs MgO abundance variations in komatiite series basalts, compare favourably with experimentally determined values, if Ni variations in olivine-controlled basalts can be modelled with an equation that assumes equilibrium between the entire olivine crystal and its coexisting liquid.-J.A.Z.

  14. Rare earth element contents and multiple mantle sources of the transform-related Mount Edgecumbe basalts, southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riehle, J.R.; Budahn, J.R.; Lanphere, M.A.; Brew, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    Pleistocene basalt of the Mount Edgecumbe volcanic field (MEF) is subdivided into a plagioclase type and an olivine type. Th/La ratios of plagioclase basalt are similar to those of mid-ocean-ridge basalt (MORB), whereas those of olivine basalt are of continental affinity. Rare earth element (REE) contents of the olivine basalt, which resemble those of transitional MORB, are modelled by 10-15% partial melting of fertile spinel-plagioclase lherzolite followed by removal of 8-13% olivine. It is concluded that olivine basalt originated in subcontinental spinel lherzolite and that plagioclase basalt may have originated in suboceanic lithosphere of the Pacific plate. -from Authors

  15. Pillow basalts of the Angayucham terrane: Oceanic plateau and island crust accreted to the Brooks Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallister, John S.; Budahn, James R.; Murchey, Benita L.

    1989-11-01

    The Angayucham Mountains (north margin of the Yukon-Koyukuk province) are made up of an imbricate stack of four to eight east-west trending, steeply dipping, fault slabs composed of Paleozoic (Devonian to Mississippean), Middle to Late Triassic, and Early Jurassic oceanic upper crustal rocks (pillow basalt, subordinate diabase, basaltic tuff, and radiolarian chert). Field relations and geochemical characteristics of the basaltic rocks suggest that the fault slabs were derived from an oceanic plateau or island setting and were emplaced onto the Brooks Range continental margin. The basalts are variably metamorphosed to prehnite-pumpellyite and low-greenschist facies. Major element analyses suggest that many are hypersthene-normative olivine tholeiites. Classification based on immobile trace elements confirms the tholeiitic character of most of the basalts but suggests that some had primary compositions transitional to alkali basalt. Although field and petrographic features of the basalts are similar, trace element characteristics allow definition of geographically distinct suites. A central outcrop belt along the crest of the mountains is made up of basalt with relatively flat rare earth element (REE) patterns. This belt is flanked to the north and south by LREE (light rare earth element)-enriched basalts. Radiolarian and conodont ages from interpillow and interlayered chert and limestone indicate that the central belt of basalts is Triassic in age, the southern belt is Jurassic in age, and the northern belt contains a mixture of Paleozoic and Mesozoic ages. Data for most of the basalts cluster in the "within-plate basalt" fields of trace element discriminant diagrams; none have trace-element characteristics of island arc basalt. The Triassic and Jurassic basalts are geochemically most akin to modern oceanic plateau and island basalts. Field evidence also favors an oceanic plateau or island setting. The great composite thickness of pillow basalt probably resulted

  16. Acid sulfate alteration of fluorapatite, basaltic glass and olivine by hydrothermal vapors and fluids: Implications for fumarolic activity and secondary phosphate phases in sulfate-rich Paso Robles soil at Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausrath, E. M.; Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Agresti, D. G.; Ming, D. W.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphate-rich rocks and a nearby phosphate-rich soil, Paso Robles, were analyzed in Gusev Crater, Mars, by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit and interpreted to be highly altered, possibly by hydrothermal or fumarolic alteration of primary, phosphate-rich material. To test mineral phases resulting from such alteration, we performed hydrothermal acid-vapor and acid-fluid experiments on olivine (Ol), fluorapatite (Ap), and basaltic glass (Gl) as single phases and a mixture of phases. Minerals formed include Ca-, Al-, Fe- and Mg-sulfates with different hydration states (anhydrite, bassanite, gypsum; alunogen; hexahydrite, and pentahydrite). Phosphate-bearing minerals formed included monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCP) (acid-vapor and acid-fluid alteration of fluorapatite only) and ferrian giniite (acid-fluid alteration of the Ol + Gl + Ap mixture). MCP is likely present in Paso Robles if primary Ca-phosphate minerals reacted with sulfuric acid with little transport of phosphate. Under fluid:rock ratios allowing transport of phosphate, a ferric phosphate phase such as ferrian giniite might form instead. Mössbauer measurements of ferrian giniite-bearing alteration products and synthetic ferrian giniite are consistent with Spirit's Mössbauer measurements of the ferric-bearing phase in Paso Robes soil, but are also consistent with ferric sulfate phases in the low-P soil Arad_Samra. Therefore, Mössbauer data alone do not constrain the fluid:rock ratio. However, the excess iron (hematite) in Paso Robles soil, which implies aqueous transport, combined with our laboratory experiments, suggest acid-sulfate alteration in a hydrothermal (fumarolic) environment at fluid:rock ratios sufficient to allow dissolution, transport, and precipitation of secondary chemical components including a ferric phosphate such as ferrian giniite.

  17. Crystallization kinetics of olivine-phyric shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennis, Megan E.; McSween, Harry Y.

    2014-08-01

    Crystal size distribution (CSD) and spatial distribution pattern (SDP) analyses are applied to the early crystallizing phases, olivine and pyroxene, in olivine-phyric shergottites (Elephant moraine [EET] 79001A, Dar al Gani [DaG] 476, and dhofar [Dho] 019) from each sampling locality inferred from Mars ejection ages. Trace element zonation patterns (P and Cr) in olivine are also used to characterize the crystallization history of these Martian basalts. Previously reported 2-D CSDs for these meteorites are re-evaluated using a newer stereographically corrected methodology. Kinks in the olivine CSD plots suggest several populations that crystallized under different conditions. CSDs for pyroxene in DaG 476 and EET 79001A reveal single populations that grew under steady-state conditions; pyroxenes in Dho 019 were too intergrown for CSD analysis. Magma chamber residence times of several days for small grains to several months for olivine megacrysts are calculated using the CSD slopes and growth rates inferred from previous experimental data. Phosphorus imaging in olivines in DaG 476 and Dho 019 indicate rapid growth of skeletal, sector-zoned, or patchy cores, probably in response to delayed nucleation, followed by slow growth, and finally rapid dendritic growth with back-filling to form oscillatory zoning in rims. SPD analyses indicate that olivine and pyroxene crystals grew or accumulated in clusters rather than as randomly distributed grains. These data reveal complex solidification histories for Martian basalts, and are generally consistent with the formation at depth of olivine megacryst cores, which were entrained in ascending magmas that crystallized pyroxenes, small olivines, and oscillatory rims on megacrysts.

  18. Trace elements in olivine and the petrogenesis of the intermediate, olivine-phyric shergottite NWA 10170

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Udry, Arya

    2017-02-01

    Olivine-phyric shergottites represent primitive basaltic to picritic rocks, spanning a large range of Mg# and olivine abundances. As primitive olivine-bearing magmas are commonly representative of their mantle source on Earth, understanding the petrology and evolution of olivine-phyric shergottites is critical in our understanding of Martian mantle compositions. We present data for the olivine-phyric shergottite Northwest Africa (NWA) 10170 to constrain the petrology with specific implications for magma plumbing-system dynamics. The calculated oxygen fugacity and bulk-rock REE concentrations (based on modal abundance) are consistent with a geochemically intermediate classification for NWA 10170, and overall similarity with NWA 6234. In addition, we present trace element data using laser ablation ICP-MS for coarse-grained olivine cores, and compare these data with terrestrial and Martian data sets. The olivines in NWA 10170 contain cores with compositions of Fo77 that evolve to rims with composition of Fo58, and are characterized by cores with low Ni contents (400-600 ppm). Nickel is compatible in olivine and such low Ni content for olivine cores in NWA 10170 suggests either early-stage fractionation and loss of olivine from the magma in a staging chamber at depth, or that Martian magmas have lower Ni than terrestrial magmas. We suggest that both are true in this case. Therefore, the magma does not represent a primary mantle melt, but rather has undergone 10-15% fractionation in a staging chamber prior to extrusion/intrusion at the surface of Mars. This further implies that careful evaluation of not only the Mg# but also the trace element concentrations of olivine needs to be conducted to evaluate pristine mantle melts versus those that have fractionated olivine (±pyroxene and oxide minerals) in staging chambers.

  19. Transmission electron microscopy of subsolidus oxidation and weathering of olivine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banfield, J.F.; Veblen, D.R.; Jones, B.F.

    1990-01-01

    Olivine crystals in basaltic andesites which crop out in the Abert Rim, south-central Oregon have been studied by high-resolution and analytical transmission electron microscopy. The observations reveal three distinct assemblages of alteration products that seem to correspond to three episodes of olivine oxidation. The olivine crystals contain rare, dense arrays of coherently intergrown Ti-free magnetite and inclusions of a phase inferred to be amorphous silica. We interpret this first assemblage to be the product of an early subsolidus oxidation event in the lava. The second olivine alteration assemblage contains complex ordered intergrowths on (001) of forsterite-rich olivine and laihunite (distorted olivine structure with Fe3+ charge balanced by vacancies). Based on experimental results for laihunite synthesis (Kondoh et al. 1985), these intergrowths probably formed by olivine oxidation between 400 and 800??C. The third episode of alteration involves the destruction of olivine by low-temperature hydrothermal alteration and weathering. Elongate etch-pits and channels in the margins of fresh olivine crystals contain semi-oriented bands of smectite. Olivine weathers to smectite and hematite, and subsequently to arrays of oriented hematite crystals. The textures resemble those reported by Eggleton (1984) and Smith et al. (1987). We find no evidence for a metastable phase intermediate between olivine and smectite ("M" - Eggleton 1984). The presence of laihunite exerts a strong control on the geometry of olivine weathering. Single laihunite layers and laihunite-forsteritic olivine intergrowths increase the resistance of crystals to weathering. Preferential development of channels between laihunite layers occurs where growth of laihunite produced compositional variations in olivine, rather than where coherency-strain is associated with laihunite-olivine interfaces. ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag.

  20. Partitioning coefficients between olivine and silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bédard, J. H.

    2005-08-01

    Variation of Nernst partition coefficients ( D) between olivine and silicate melts cannot be neglected when modeling partial melting and fractional crystallization. Published natural and experimental olivine/liquidD data were examined for covariation with pressure, temperature, olivine forsterite content, and melt SiO 2, H 2O, MgO and MgO/MgO + FeO total. Values of olivine/liquidD generally increase with decreasing temperature and melt MgO content, and with increasing melt SiO 2 content, but generally show poor correlations with other variables. Multi-element olivine/liquidD profiles calculated from regressions of D REE-Sc-Y vs. melt MgO content are compared to results of the Lattice Strain Model to link melt MgO and: D0 (the strain compensated partition coefficient), EM3+ (Young's Modulus), and r0 (the size of the M site). Ln D0 varies linearly with Ln MgO in the melt; EM3+ varies linearly with melt MgO, with a dog-leg at ca. 1.5% MgO; and r0 remains constant at 0.807 Å. These equations are then used to calculate olivine/liquidD for these elements using the Lattice Strain Model. These empirical parameterizations of olivine/liquidD variations yield results comparable to experimental or natural partitioning data, and can easily be integrated into existing trace element modeling algorithms. The olivine/liquidD data suggest that basaltic melts in equilibrium with pure olivine may acquire small negative Ta-Hf-Zr-Ti anomalies, but that negative Nb anomalies are unlikely to develop. Misfits between results of the Lattice Strain Model and most light rare earth and large ion lithophile partitioning data suggest that kinetic effects may limit the lower value of D for extremely incompatible elements in natural situations characterized by high cooling/crystallization rates.

  1. Geochemical characteristics of the "Mid-Alkaline Basalts" from the "adventive cones" of Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion Island)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valer, Marina; Bachèlery, Patrick; Schiano, Pierre; Upton, Brian G. J.

    2016-04-01

    Piton de la Fournaise, the youngest volcano of La Réunion Island, is renowned for being frequently active. Its lavas (younger than ~450 ka) have been subdivided into three compositional groups (see Lénat et al. 2012 for a review). Almost all recent and historical lavas belong to two of these groups: "cotectic basalts" and "olivine-rich basalts", marked by a constant CaO/Al2O3 ratio of ~0.8, and MgO content ranging from 5 to 30 wt % reflecting different degrees of olivine accumulation. Whereas that current activity is mainly located within the "Enclos Fouqué" caldera, ~100 strombolian cones lie on the volcano's flanks, thought to date from ~300 years to a few thousand years. Our study focuses on these "adventive cones", by studying bulk-rock major and trace element compositions, isotopic compositions, mineral phases and olivine-hosted melt inclusions. The bulk-rock compositions correspond to the third group of the Piton de la Fournaise lavas (see above), called the "mid-alkaline basalts". They mainly consist of magnesian basalts at 7.55 - 10.24 wt% MgO and CaO/Al2O3 values down to 0.55. At constant MgO content, this group shows higher alkali content and a relative deficiency in Ca compared to the historic basalts. The "adventive cones" lavas usually contain magnesian olivine crystals (Fo > 86). Such crystals are not at the equilibrium with their host lava, raising thus the question of the recycling processes. The volatile contents of these olivine-hosted melt inclusions (work in progress) will allow to determine if such magnesian olivine crystals come from deep storage levels, as previously proposed by Bureau et al. (1998; 1999). The specific geochemistry the "adventive cones" lavas is attributed either to a high-pressure fractionation of a clinopyroxene-rich assemblage (Albarède et al. 1997), or to an assimilation process involving wehrlite-gabbro cumulates (e.g. Salaün et al. 2010). Although the trace element data show that the source of these magmas is

  2. New Insights to the Mid Miocene Calc-alkaline Lavas of the Strawberry Volcanics, NE Oregon Surrounded by the Coeval Tholeiitic Columbia River Basalt Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, A. R.; Streck, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Strawberry Volcanics (SV) of NE Oregon were distributed over 3,400 km2 during the mid-Miocene and comprise a diverse volcanic suite, which span the range of compositions from basalt to rhyolite. The predominant composition of this volcanic suite is calc-alkaline (CA) basaltic andesite and andesite, although tholeiitic (TH) lavas of basalt to andesite occur as well. The coeval flood basalts of the Columbia River province surround the SV. Here we will discuss new ages and geochemical data, and present a new geologic map and stratigraphy of the SV. The SV are emplaced on top of pre-Tertiary accreted terranes of the Blue Mountain Province, Mesozoic plutonic rocks, and older Tertiary volcanic rocks thought to be mostly Oligocene of age. Massive rhyolites (~300 m thick) are exposed mainly along the western flank and underlie the intermediate composition lavas. In the southern portion of this study area, alkali basaltic lavas, thought to be late Miocene to early Pliocene in age, erupted and overlie the SV. In addition, several regional ignimbrites reach into the area. The 9.7 Ma Devine Canyon Tuff and the 7.1 Ma Rattlesnake Tuff also overlie the SV. The 15.9-15.4 Ma Dinner Creek Tuff is mid-Miocene, and clear stratigraphic relationships are found in areas where the tuff is intercalated between thick SV lava flows. All of the basalts of the SV are TH and are dominated by phenocryst-poor (≤2%) lithologies. These basalts have an ophitic texture dominated by plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine (often weathered to iddingsite). Basalts and basaltic andesites have olivine Fo #'s ranging from 44 at the rims (where weathered to iddingsite) and as high as 88 at cores. Pyroxene Mg #'s range from 65 to 85. Andesites of the SV are sub-alkaline, and like the basalts, are exceedingly phenocryst-poor (≤3%) with microphenocrysts of plagioclase and lesser pyroxene and olivine, which occasionally occur as crystal clots of ~1-3 mm instead of single crystals. In addition, minimal

  3. Phase equilibria along a basalt-rhyolite mixing line: implications for the origin of calc-alkaline intermediate magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ussler, William; Glazner, Allen F.

    1989-02-01

    One-atmosphere, anhydrous phase equilibria determined for alkali basalt/high-silica rhyolite mixtures provide a model for crystallization of natural calc-alkaline mixed magmas. The compositional trend defined by these mixtures mimics the trends of many continental calc-alkaline volcanic suites. As with many naturally occurring suites, the mixtures studied straddle the low-pressure olivine-plagioclase-augite thermal divide. Magma mixing provides a convenient method for magmas to cross this thermal divide in the absence of magnetite crystallization. For the mixtures, Mg-rich olivine (Fo82 87) coexists alone with liquid over an exceptionally large range of temperature and silica content (up to 63 wt% SiO2). This indicates that the Mg-rich olivines found in many andesites and dacites are not necessarily out of equilibrium with the host magma, as is commonly assumed. Such crystals may be either primary phenocrysts, or inherited phenocrysts derived from a mafic magma that mixed with a silicic magma. For the bulk compositions studied, the distribution of Fe and Mg between olivine and liquid ( K D ) is equal to 0.3 and is independent of temperature and composition. This result extends to silicic andesites the applicability of K D arguments for tests of equilibrium between olivine and groundmass and for modeling of fractional crystallization. In contrast, the distribution of calcium and sodium between plagioclase and liquid varies significantly with temperature and composition. Therefore, plagioclase-liquid K D s cannot be used for fractional crystallization modeling or as a test of equilibrium. Calcic plagioclase from a basalt will be close to equilibrium with andesitic mixtures, but sodic plagioclase from a rhyolite will be greatly out of equilibrium. This explains the common observation that calcic plagioclase crystals in hybrid andesites are generally close to textural equilibrium with the surrounding groundmass, but sodic plagioclase crystals generally show remelting

  4. Variations in chemical composition of Apollo 15 mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Chemical analyses of 30 different Apollo 15 mare basalts were examined to evaluate the effects of closure on the pearson moment correlation coefficient. It is shown possible to describe the Apollo 15 mare basalts in terms of an opaque, an olivine/pyroxene, an anorthite, and a KREEP component, if significant correlations are identified using the expected correlations as null values. Using Q-mode cluster analysis and nonlinear mapping, it is possible to recognize three groups of the mare basalts, groups 1 and 2 belonging to the olivine normative basalt cluster and group 3 to the quartz normative cluster.

  5. Space-Time-Isotopic Trends of Snake River Plain Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, M. M.; Hanan, B. B.; Shervais, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    The Snake River Plain (SRP) volcanic province is an 800 km track of basalt extending from the Owyhee Plateau to its current terminus, the Yellowstone Plateau. It is one of several late-Tertiary magmatic terranes that also include the Cascades magmatic arc, the Columbia River basalts, and the Oregon Plateau basalts; all of which are adjacent to the Basin and Range Province extensional system (Hughes and McCurry, 2002). This province represents the track of the Yellowstone plume and consists of basalt that is compositionally similar to ocean-island basalt. This basalt overlies a series of rhyolitic eruptive centers (overlapping caldera complexes, ignimbrites, and caldera-filling eruptions) that signal the arrival of the plume head (Christiansen, 2001) and herald the onset of plume-related rhyolitic and basaltic volcanism (Pierce et al., 2002). Observed within the SRP are two basalt types: the dominant low-K olivine tholeiites and less common high-K alkaline basalts. We report new Sr-, Nd-, and Pb-isotopic analyses of these two basalt types from all three SRP provinces: eastern, central, and western. Low-K tholeiites are enriched in 143Nd/144Nd and 86Sr/87Sr and forms a quasi-linear array in Pb-isotope space, along with Craters of the Moon and eastern SRP basalts. High-K lavas are found largely in the western plain, and have a uniquely different isotopic signature. They are depleted in 143Nd/144Nd and 86Sr/87Sr, relative to the low-K tholeiites, and plot closer to the BSE component of Zindler and Hart (1986). They also share the same Pb-isotopic space with high-K basalts from Smith Prairie (Boise River Group 2 of Vetter and Shervais, 1992). One low-K tholeiite - Eureka North, plots with these high alkali basalts. Mass balance models have demonstrated an increasing plume component from the Yellowstone caldera in the east to the craton edge in the west. The lavas analyzed in this study conform remarkably to this model. The mass fraction of plume component in western

  6. Very high potassium (VHK) basalt - Complications in mare basalt petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, J. W.; Taylor, L. A.; Laul, J. C.; Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The first comprehensive report on the petrology and geochemistry of Apollo 14 VHK (Very High Potassium) basalts and their implications for lunar evolution is presented. The reported data are most consistent with the hypothesis that VHK basalts formed through the partial assimilation of granite by a normal low-Ti, high-Al mare basalt magma. Assimilation was preceded by the diffusion-controlled exchange of alkalis and Ba between basalt magma and the low-temperature melt fraction of the granite. Hypotheses involving volatile/nonvolatile fractionations or long-term enrichment of the source regions in K are inconsistent with the suprachondritic Ba/La ratios and low initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios of VHK basalt. An important implication of this conclusion is that granite should be a significant component of the lunar crust at the Apollo 14 site.

  7. Phase relations of a simulated lunar basalt as a function of oxygen fugacity, and their bearing on the petrogenesis of the Apollo 11 basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuthill, R.L.; Sato, M.

    1970-01-01

    A glass of Apollo 11 basalt composition crystallizing at 1 atm at low f{hook}02 showed the following crystallization sequence; ferropseudobrookite at 1210??C, olivine at 1200??C, ilmenite and plagioclase at 1140??C, clinopyroxene at 1113??C. Ferropseudobrookite and olivine have a reaction relation to the melt. This sequence agrees with that assumed on textural grounds for some Apollo 11 basalts. It also indicates that the Apollo 11 basalts cannot have been modified by low-pressure fractionation. ?? 1970.

  8. Mineralogical variation of the late stage mare basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xunyu; Wu, Yunzhao; Ouyang, Ziyuan; Bugiolacchi, Roberto; Chen, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Cai, Wei; Xu, Aoao; Tang, Zesheng

    2016-10-01

    The last major phases of lunar volcanism occurred mainly in Oceanus Procellarum and Mare Imbrium and produced spectrally unique medium- and high-titanium basalts. The composition and distribution of these basalts provide a record of the late stage thermal evolution of the Moon. To study the spectral and mineralogical variations of the late stage mare basalts, 31 distinct units were mapped employing a range of remote sensing data. Their inferred mineralogical characteristics were studied by analyzing the spectral features of small, fresh craters derived from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) data. The strongest olivine spectral signatures were found around Lichtenberg crater, while the units with the lowest olivine/pyroxene ratio occurred mainly in the southern Kepler crater and some local areas. In Oceanus Procellarum, the olivine/pyroxene ratio decreases progressively from the Lichtenberg crater to the southern units. The northern and southern units within Mare Imbrium have higher olivine/pyroxene ratios than the central ones. The inferred abundance of olivine appears to vary stratigraphically, with the younger flows being more olivine rich. However, the stratigraphically younger units around Euler crater in Mare Imbrium, which present as dark red hues in the integrated band depth image of M3, were found to have lower olivine/pyroxene ratios than the units around Lichtenberg crater (shown as light red hues) in Oceanus Procellarum. It could be interpreted that the late stage mare basalts around Lichtenberg crater originated from a more olivine-rich source than those around Euler crater.

  9. Chemical and isotopic constraints on the petrogenesis of the large mare basalt clast in breccia 15459

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L.; Lindstrom, M.; Bansal, B.; Mittlefehldt, D.; Shih, C.-Y.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented that demonstrate that the large mare basalt clast in Apollo 15 breccia 15459 may represent one or more independent magma types. The complex nonequilibrium pyroxene and plagioclase compositions and relatively abundant mesostasis suggest that the 15459 clast is not a slowly cooled crystal cumulate. The addition of about 40 percent olivine to an olivine-normative basalt parental magma is found to be necessary to explain the high MgO abundances of picritic basalts by the accumulation of olivine in the magma. The present clast has a slightly younger age and a slightly higher Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio than most Apollo 15 basalts.

  10. Basaltic Soil of Gale Crater: Crystalline Component Compared to Martian Basalts and Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.; Bish, D. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Schmidt, M.; Downs, R. T.; Stolper, E. M.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Achilles, C. N.; Chipera, S. J.; Bristow, T. F.; Crisp, J. A.; Farmer, J. A.; Morookian, J. M.; Morrison, S. M.; Rampe, E. B.; Sarrazin, P.; Yen, A. S.; Anderosn, R. C.; DesMarais, D. J.; Spanovich, N.

    2013-01-01

    A significant portion of the soil of the Rocknest dune is crystalline and is consistent with derivation from unweathered basalt. Minerals and their compositions are identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) data from the CheMin instrument on MSL Curiosity. Basalt minerals in the soil include plagioclase, olivine, low- and high-calcium pyroxenes, magnetite, ilmenite, and quartz. The only minerals unlikely to have formed in an unaltered basalt are hematite and anhydrite. The mineral proportions and compositions of the Rocknest soil are nearly identical to those of the Adirondack-class basalts of Gusev Crater, Mars, inferred from their bulk composition as analyzed by the MER Spirit rover.

  11. One atmosphere melting experiments on ilmenite basalt 12008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, J. M.; Lofgren, G. E.; Smith, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    An evaluation of a crystal-fractionation model for Apollo 12 ilmenite basalts with melting experiments under controlled oxygen fugacities is reported. The crystallization sequence including olivine, chromium spinel, and pigeonite phases was determined, showing that the changes in melt composition are dominated by olivine crystallization and the decrease in MgO with a corresponding increase in CaO, Al2O3, and TiO2. It is concluded that the bulk composition of the ilmenite basalts was established by crystallization of olivine and minor spinel prior to the onset of pyroxene and plagioclase.

  12. Petrogenesis of a basalt-comendite-pantellerite rock suite: the Boseti Volcanic Complex (Main Ethiopian Rift)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronga, Fiorenzo; Lustrino, Michele; Marzoli, Andrea; Melluso, Leone

    2010-03-01

    Petrological and geochemical data for basic (alkali basalts and hawaiites) and silicic peralkaline rocks, plus rare intermediate products (mugearites and benmoreites) from the Pleistocene Boseti volcanic complex (Main Ethiopian Rift, East Africa) are reported in this work. The basalts are slightly alkaline or transitional, have peaks at Ba and Nb in the mantle-normalized diagrams and relatively low 87Sr/86Sr (0.7039-0.7044). The silicic rocks (pantellerites and comendites) are rich in sanidine and anorthoclase, with mafic phases being represented by fayalite-rich olivine, opaque oxides, aenigmatite and slightly Na-rich ferroaugite (ferrohedenbergite). These rocks were generated after prolonged fractional crystallization process (up to 90-95 %) starting from basaltic parent magmas at shallow depths and fO2 conditions near the QFM buffer. The apparent Daly Gap between mafic and evolved Boseti rocks is explained with a model involving the silicic products filling upper crustal magma chambers and erupted preferentially with respect to basic and intermediate products. Evolved liquids could have been the only magmas which filled the uppermost magma reservoirs in the crust, thus giving time to evolve towards Rb-, Zr- and Nb-rich peralkaline rhyolites in broadly closed systems.

  13. Apollo 12 feldspathic basalts 12031, 12038 and 12072 - Petrology, comparison and interpretations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaty, D. W.; Hill, S. M. R.; Albee, A. L.; Baldridge, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents the petrology of Apollo 12 feldspathic basalts. Modal and chemical data indicate that basalts 12072, 12038, and 12031 cannot be related to the other Apollo rock types; 12072 contains phenocrysts of olivine and pigeonite, 12038 is a multiply saturated equigranular basalt, and 12031 is a coarse-grained rock with granular to graphic intergrowths of pyroxene and plagioclase. The bulk compositions indicate that these basalts could not have been derived from the Apollo 12 olivine or ilmenite basalts by crystal-liquid fractionation, and their petrologic similarities suggest that they were produced in the same or similar source regions.

  14. Petrologic models of 15388, a unique Apollo 15 mare basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, S. S.; Dasch, E. J.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1993-01-01

    Mare basalt 15388, a feldspathic microgabbro from the Apennine Front, is chemically and petrographically distinct from Apollo 15 picritic, olivine-normative (ON), and quartz-normative basalts. The evolved chemistry, coarse texture, lack of olivine, and occurrence of cristobalite in 15388 argue for derivation by a late-stage magmatic process that is significantly removed from parental magma. It either crystallized from a magma evolved from the more mafic Apollo 15 basalts, or it crystallized from a currently unrepresented magma. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic systematics yield isochron ages of 3.391 plus or minus 0.036 and 3.42 plus or minus 0.07 Ga, respectively, and epsilon(sub Nd) = 8.6 plus or minus 2.4, which is relatively high for Apollo 15 mare basalts. In contrast to chemical patterns of average Apollo 15 ON basalts and Apollo 15 picritic basalt, 15388 has a strongly positive LREE slope, high Ti, shallower HREE slope and a slightly positive Eu anomaly. These features argue against 15388 evolution by simple olivine fractionation of a parental ON or picritic basalt magma, although olivine is a dominant liquidus phase in both potential parents.

  15. Mare basalt magma source region and mare basalt magma genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, A.B.

    1982-11-15

    Given the available data, we find that the wide range of mare basaltic material characteristics can be explained by a model in which: (1) The mare basalt magma source region lies between the crust-mantle boundary and a maximum depth of 200 km and consists of a relatively uniform peridotite containing 73--80% olivine, 11--14% pyroxene, 4--8% plagioclase, 0.2--9% ilmenite and 1--1.5% chromite. (2) The source region consists of two or more density-graded rhythmic bands, whose compositions grade from that of the very low TiO/sub 2/ magma source regions (0.2% ilmenite) to that of the very high TiO/sub 2/ magma source regions (9% ilmenite). These density-graded bands are proposed to have formed as co-crystallizing olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase, ilmenite, and chromite settled out of a convecting magma (which was also parental to the crust) in which these crystals were suspended. Since the settling rates of the different minerals were governed by Stoke's law, the heavier minerals settled out more rapidly and therefore earlier than the lighter minerals. Thus the crystal assemblages deposited nearest the descending side of each convection cell were enriched in heavy ilmenite and chromite with respect to lighter olivine and pyroxene and very much lighter plagioclase. The reverse being the case for those units deposited near the ascending sides of the convection cells.

  16. Water in Olivine, Clinopyroxenen and Plagioclase of Lunar Meteorites of the NWA 773 Clan by IR Micro-Spectrosocpy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayama, M.; Nakashima, S.; Tomioka, N.; Ohtani, E.; Seto, Y.; Nagaoka, H.; Ozawa, S.; Sekine, T.; Miyahara, M.; Miyake, A.; Götze, J.; Tomeoka, K.

    2016-08-01

    Water in olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase of gabbroic lunar meteorites of Northwest Africa 2977 and 6950 and gabbroic/basaltic brecciated lunar meteorite of NWA 2727 were characterized by in-situ Fourier-transform infrared micro-spectroscopy.

  17. Reaction between MORB-eclogite derived melts and fertile peridotite and generation of ocean island basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, Ananya; Dasgupta, Rajdeep

    2012-05-01

    We performed reaction experiments between partial melt of volatile-free MORB-eclogite and volatile-free fertile peridotite at 2.5-3 GPa, 1375 °C and 1440 °C. The fraction of added basaltic andesite melt was varied from ~ 8 to 50 wt.%. Melt was introduced either as a separate layer or mixed homogeneously with peridotite to simulate channelized and porous flow, respectively. Layered experiments produced a zone of orthopyroxene-rich garnet-websterite separating the reacted melt pool from a residual four phase lherzolite while mixed experiments produced a residual assemblage of orthopyroxene ± clinopyroxene ± olivine ± garnet co-existing with reacted melt where residual olivine was absent only in the experiments with 50 wt.% added melt. It is observed that the reacted melts display a continuous spectrum from tholeiitic to alkalic melts with increasing extent of wall-rock reaction for the layered runs and decreasing melt:rock ratio for the mixed experiments. The reacted melts at ~ 10-16 wt.% MgO match better with natural alkali basalts and basanite from intraplate ocean islands in terms of SiO2 (44-48 wt.%), TiO2 (2.2-4.1 wt.%), Al2O3 (12.6-14.3 wt.%), CaO (~ 8-11 wt.%), Na2O (~ 2-4 wt.%), and CaO/Al2O3 (0.52-0.81) as compared to partial melts of volatile-free peridotite and MORB-eclogite. FeO* content (~ 9-11 wt.%) of the reacted melts, however, remains poorer compared to most ocean island basalts (OIBs). We demonstrate that both alkalic and tholeiitic melts are produced in the process of MORB-eclogite partial melt and fertile peridotite reaction. We also demonstrate that near-primary alkali basalt can form at a temperature distinctly below the peridotite solidus and mantle potential temperature (TP) of ~ 1350 °C may be sufficient to generate near-primary alkalic OIBs. Our study obviates the necessity for exotic lithologies, such as silica-deficient garnet pyroxenites, in the solid state mantle to explain the genesis of alkalic OIBs.

  18. Artificial meteor ablation studies: Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Cunningham, G. G.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on a Mg-rich olivine sample using an arc-heated plasma of ionized air. Experimental conditions simulated a meteor traveling about 12 km/sec at an altitude of 70 km. The mineral content of the original olivine sample was 98% olivine (including traces of olivine alteration products) and 2% chromite. Forsterite content of the original olivine was Fo-89. After ablation, the forsterite content had increased to Fo-94 in the recrystallized olivine. In addition, lamella-like intergrowths of magnetite were prevalent constituents. Wherever magnetite occurred, there was an increase in Mg and a corresponding decrease in Fe for the recrystallized olivine. The Allende fusion crust consisted of a recrystallized olivine, which was more Mg-rich and Fe-deficient than the original meteorite's olivine, and abundant magnetite grains. Although troilite and pentlandite were the common opaque mineral constituents in this meteorite, magnetite was the principal opaque mineral found in the fusion crust.

  19. Deciphering magma histories through phosphorus zoning in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersoy, Ö.; Nikogosian, I.; Mason, P. R. D.; van Bergen, M.

    2015-12-01

    Since olivine is usually the first major phase to crystallize from basaltic magma, its primary chemistry is a sensitive tracer of the early evolution of volcanic systems. However, fast diffusion and homogenization under magmatic conditions frequently modifies the original composition of olivine, which hampers the reconstruction of cooling histories and magma evolution from the chemistry and zoning patterns of phenocrysts in erupted products. Phosphorous is a notable exception due to its sluggish diffusion in olivine crystals and silicate melts, as igneous olivines almost always display complex zoning patterns. Phosphorus zoning in olivine has been linked either to crystallization rate variations and diffusion controlled growth or to strong compositional controls on melt-mineral partitioning. We illuminate the versatility of P-in-olivine with a comprehensive EPMA and LA-ICPMS dataset on olivines from Italian potassium rich mafic lavas and the primitive melt inclusions (MI) that they host. The olivines are characterized by P concentrations from limit of quantification (22 ppm) to 435 ppm P with MIs containing up to 2.2 wt.% P2O5. High resolution (1-2 μm per pixel) element maps show both fine oscillatory and large scale sector zoning in P, which is uncorrelated with zoning in any other element. The MIs are virtually always surrounded by P-depleted zones that are also depleted in Cr and enriched in Al and Ti, which we attribute to a combination of supply-limited slow growth and melt compositional controls on partitioning behavior imposed by the boundary layer. We demonstrate that P zoning carries valuable information on the nature and timing of magmatic events such as mingling/mixing, wall-rock assimilation and subsequent re-equilibration processes. P-in-olivine is most promising to distinguish multiple generations of MIs, as a guide to study their mode of entrapment and to disclose the origin of primary heterogeneities.

  20. Composition of basalts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, A.E.J.; Engel, C.G.

    1964-01-01

    Studies of volcanic rocks in dredge hauls from the submerged parts of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge suggest that it consists largely of tholeiitic basalt with low values of K, Ti, and P. In contrast, the volcanic islands which form the elevated caps on the Ridge are built of alkali basalt with high values of Ti, Fe3+, P, Na, and K. This distinct correlation between the form of the volcanic structures, elevation above the sea floor, and composition suggests that the islands of alkali basalt are derived from a parent tholeiitic magma by differentiation in shallow reservoirs. The volume of low-potassium tholeiites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and elsewhere in the oceans appears to be many times that of the alkali basalts exposed on oceanic islands. Tholeiitic basalts with about 0.2 K2O appear to be the primary and predominant magma erupted on the oceanic floor.

  1. Extraction of in situ cosmogenic 14C from olivine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, J.S.; Lifton, N.A.; Timothy, Jull A.J.; Quade, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Chemical pretreatment and extraction techniques have been developed previously to extract in situ cosmogenic radiocarbon (in situ 14C) from quartz and carbonate. These minerals can be found in most environments on Earth, but are usually absent from mafic terrains. To fill this gap, we conducted numerous experiments aimed at extracting in situ 14C from olivine ((Fe,Mg)2SiO4). We were able to extract a stable and reproducible in situ 14C component from olivine using stepped heating and a lithium metaborate (LiBO2) flux, following treatment with dilute HNO3 over a variety of experimental conditions. However, measured concentrations for samples from the Tabernacle Hill basalt flow (17.3 ?? 0.3 ka4) in central Utah and the McCarty's basalt flow (3.0 ?? 0.2 ka) in western New Mexico were significantly lower than expected based on exposure of olivine in our samples to cosmic rays at each site. The source of the discrepancy is not clear. We speculate that in situ 14C atoms may not have been released from Mg-rich crystal lattices (the olivine composition at both sites was ~Fo65Fa35). Alternatively, a portion of the 14C atoms released from the olivine grains may have become trapped in synthetic spinel-like minerals that were created in the olivine-flux mixture during the extraction process, or were simply retained in the mixture itself. Regardless, the magnitude of the discrepancy appears to be inversely proportional to the Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratio of the olivine separates. If we apply a simple correction factor based on the chemical composition of the separates, then corrected in situ 14C concentrations are similar to theoretical values at both sites. At this time, we do not know if this agreement is fortuitous or real. Future research should include measurement of in situ 14C concentrations in olivine from known-age basalt flows with different chemical compositions (i.e. more Fe-rich) to determine if this correction is robust for all olivine-bearing rocks. ?? 2010 by the Arizona

  2. Experimental evidence for melt partitioning between olivine and orthopyroxene in partially molten harzburgite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kevin J.; Zhu, Wen-lu; Montési, Laurent G. J.; Gaetani, Glenn A.; Le Roux, Véronique; Xiao, Xianghui

    2016-08-01

    Observations of dunite channels in ophiolites and uranium series disequilibria in mid-ocean ridge basalt suggest that melt transport in the upper mantle beneath mid-ocean ridges is strongly channelized. We present experimental evidence that spatial variations in mineralogy can also focus melt on the grain scale. This lithologic melt partitioning, which results from differences in the interfacial energies associated with olivine-melt and orthopyroxene-melt boundaries, may complement other melt focusing mechanisms in the upper mantle such as mechanical shear and pyroxene dissolution. We document here lithologic melt partitioning in olivine-/orthopyroxene-basaltic melt samples containing nominal olivine to orthopyroxene ratio of 3 to 2 and melt fractions of 0.02 to 0.20. Experimental samples were imaged using synchrotron-based X-ray microcomputed tomography at a resolution of 700 nm per voxel. By analyzing the local melt fraction distributions associated with olivine and orthopyroxene grains in each sample, we found that the melt partitioning coefficient, i.e., the ratio of melt fraction around olivine to that around orthopyroxene grains, varies between 1.1 and 1.6. The permeability and electrical conductivity of our digital samples were estimated using numerical models and compared to those of samples containing only olivine and basaltic melt. Our results suggest that lithologic melt partitioning and preferential localization of melt around olivine grains might play a role in melt focusing, potentially enhancing average melt ascent velocities.

  3. Rapid growth of phosphorus-rich olivine in mantle xenolith from Middle Atlas Mountains (Morocco, Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baziotis, Ioannis; Mavrogonatos, Konstantinos; Flemetakis, Stamatios; Papoutsa, Angeliki; Klemme, Stephan; Berndt, Jasper; Asimow, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus(P)-rich zones in olivine may reflect incorporation of P in excess of equilibrium partitioning during rapid growth (e.g. Milman-Barris et al. 2008). We investigated a mantle xenolith from Middle Atlas Mountains (Morocco) by optical microscopy and electron microprobe. It contains spinel-bearing lherzolite and orthopyroxenite layers, cross-cut by veins dominated by glass and secondary phases including P-rich olivines. The host lava, presumed to be alkali basalt (El Messbahi et al. 2015), is present on the margins of the hand sample but not included in our thin section. The studied melt veins (MV) generally contain Ol+Gl+Cpx+Pl+Spl±Ap. Olivines in the MV have (Fo72.1-83.4) with 0.02-0.3 wt.% P2O5; olivines with P2O5 >0.1 wt.% are Fo75.3 -82.8. Some olivine grains are inclusion-free; others contain rounded glass inclusions or subhedral spinel or ilmenite inclusions. Olivines is generally found in contact with plagioclase and glass. Glass (5-15 vol%) has variable composition with P2O5 up to 1.52 wt.%, K2O 1.65-2.37 wt%, CaO 6.39-9.55 wt%, Na2O 0.78-6.70 wt% and SiO2 45.2-49.6 wt%. Where glass is in contact with matrix olivine, Fe-rich outer rims on olivine indicate mineral-melt reaction. In MgO variation diagrams, glass compositions display a coherent single trend for all oxides, with the exception of a discrete low-Na group. Clinopyroxene is present both as isolated subhedral to euhedral crystals within the MV and as replacive rims on matrix minerals. Very fine-grained dendritic clinopyroxene quench crystals up to 10 μm long are also present. Plagioclase occurs as prismatic, flow-oriented crystals parallel or sub-parallel to the layering. Spinel shows anhedral and euhedral shapes and occurs both as inclusions in olivine and as discrete grains associated with plagioclase and glass. Spinel in contact with glass shows a spongy outer rim and normal zonation towards Fe-rich rim compositions. Apatite is found mostly as very small crystals embedded in glass. High

  4. Microbial Weathering of Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, D. S.; Longazo, T. G.; Wentworth, S. J.; Southam, G.

    2002-01-01

    Controlled microbial weathering of olivine experiments displays a unique style of nanoetching caused by biofilm attachment to mineral surfaces. We are investigating whether the morphology of biotic nanoetching can be used as a biosignature. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. An Apollo 15 Mare Basalt Fragment and Lunar Mare Provinces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Graham; Burling, Trina Cox

    1996-01-01

    Lunar sample 15474,4 is a tiny fragment of olivine-augite vitrophyre that is a mare basalt. Although petroraphically distinct from all other Apollo 15 samples, it has been ignored since its first brief description. Our new petrographic and mineral chemical data show that the olivines and pyroxenes are distinct from those in other basalts. The basalt cooled and solidified extremely rapidly; some of the olivine might be cumulate or crystallized prior to extrusion. Bulk-chemical data show that the sample is probably similar to an evolved Apollo 15 olivine-normative basalt in major elements but is distinct in its rare earth element pattern. Its chemical composition and petrography both show that 15474,4 cannot be derived from other Apollo 15 mare basalts by shallow-level crystal fractionation. It represents a distinct extrusion of magma. Nonetheless, the chemical features that 15474,4 has in common with other Apollo 15 mare basalts, including the high FeO/Sc, the general similarity of the rare earth element pattern, and the common (and chondritic) TiO2/Sm ratio, emphasize the concept of a geochemical province at the Apollo 15 site that is distinct from basalts and provinces elsewhere. In making a consistent picture for the derivation of all of the Apollo 15 basalts, both the commonalities and the differences among the basalts must be explained. The Apollo 15 commonalities and differences suggest that the sources must have consisted of major silicate phases with the same composition but with varied amounts of a magma trapped from a contemporary magma ocean. They probably had a high olivine/pyroxene ratio and underwent small and reasonably consistent degrees of partial melting to produce the basalts. These inferences may be inconsistent with models that suggest greatly different depths of melting among basalts, primitive sources for the green glasses, or extensive olivine fractionation during ascent. An integrated approach to lunar mare provinces, of which the Apollo 15

  6. Temporal helium isotopic variations within Hawaiian volcanoes: Basalts from Mauna Loa and Haleakala

    SciTech Connect

    Kurz, M.D.; O'Brien, P.A. ); Garcia, M.O. ); Frey, F.A. )

    1987-11-01

    Helium isotope ratios in basalts spanning the subaerial eruptive history of Mauna Loa and Haleakala vary systematically with eruption age. In both volcanoes, olivine mineral separates from the oldest samples have the highest {sup 3}He/{sup 4}he ratios. The Haleakala samples studied range in age from roughly one million years to historic time, while the Mauna Loa samples are radiocarbon dated flows younger than 30,000 years old. The Honomanu tholeiites are the oldest samples from Haleakala and have {sup 3}He/{sup 4}he ratios that range from 13 to 16.8X atmospheric, while the younger Kula and Hana series alkali basalts all have {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He close to 8X atmospheric. A similar range is observed on Manua Loa; the oldest samples have {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios of 15 to 20X atmospheric, with a relatively smooth decrease to 8X atmospheric with decreasing age. The consistent trend of decreasing {sup 3}He/{sup 4}he ratio with time in both volcanoes, coherence between the helium and Sr and Nd isotopes (for Haleakala), and the similarity of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He in the late stage basalts to depleted mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) helium, argue against the decrease being the result of radiogenic ingrowth of {sup 4}He. The data strongly suggest an undegassed mantle source for the early shield building stages of Hawaiian volcanism, and are consistent with the hotspot/mantle plume model. The data are difficult to reconcile with models for Hawaiian volcanism that require recycled oceanic crust or derivation from a MORB-related upper mantle source. The authors interpret the decrease in {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He with volcano evolution to result from an increasing involvement of depleted mantle and/or lithosphere during the late stages of Hawaiian volcanism.

  7. Phase relations of a high-Mg basalt from the Aleutian Island arc - Implications for primary island arc basalts and high-Al basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gust, D. A.; Perfit, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a primitive high-Mg basalt, MK-15, collected from lava flows of the Unalaska Island in the Aleutian Island arc has been conducted in order to study primary and parental island arc basalts and the development of island arc magmas. The results suggest a model in which high-Al basalts are generated by moderate amounts of crystal fractionation from more primitive (high Mg/Mg + Fe, lower Al2O3) basaltic magmas near the arc crust-mantle boundary. Somewhere between 20-30 depth, significant amounts of clinopyroxene and olivine, with lesser amounts of spinel and possibly amphibole, fractionate, forming layer of olivine-clinopyroxenite at the base of the arc crust.

  8. Petrology and geochemistry of alkali gabbronorites from Lunar Breccia 67975

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Odette B.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.; Flohr, Marta K.

    Clasts of an unusual type of lunar highlands igneous rock, alkali gabbronorite, have been found in Apollo 16 breccia 67975. The alkali gabbronorites form two distinct subgroups, magnesian and ferroan. Modes and bulk compositions are highly varied. The magnesian alkali gabbronorites are composed of bytownitic plagioclase (Or2-5An82-89), hypersthene (Wo3-5En49-62), augite (Wo39-42En36-44), a silica mineral, and trace Ba-rich K-feldspar. The ferroan alkali gabbronorites are composed of ternary plagioclase (Or11-22An65-74), pigeonite (Wo6-9En35-47), augite (Wo38-40En29-35), Ba-rich K-feldspar, and a silica mineral. Trace minerals in both subgroups are apatite, REE-rich whitlockite, and zircon. The magnesian and ferroan alkali gabbronorites appear to have formed by progressive differentiation of the same, or closely related, parent magmas; the compositional data indicate that these magmas were REE-rich. The ternary plagioclase is probably a high-temperature metastable phase formed during crystallization. In composition and mineralogy, the 67975 alkali gabbronorites show many similarities to Apollo 12 and 14 alkali norites, alkali gabbronorites, and alkali anorthosites, and all these rocks together constitute a distinctive alkali suite. In addition, the alkali gabbronorites show some similarities to KREEP basalts, Mg-norites, and some felsites. These data suggest genetic links between some or all of these types of pristine rocks. Two types of relationships are possible. The first is that alkali-suite rocks crystallized in plutons of KREEP basalt magma, and KREEP basalts are their extrusive equivalents. The second is that the alkali-suite rocks and some felsites all crystallized in plutons of Mg-norite parent magmas, and KREEP basalt magmas formed by remelting of these plutons. Additional studies are needed to resolve which of these hypotheses is correct.

  9. Petrology and geochemistry of alkali gabbronorites from lunar breccia 67975

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Odette B.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.; Flohr, Marta K.

    1987-09-01

    Clasts of an unusual type of lunar highlands igneous rock, alkali gabbronorite, have been found in Apollo 16 breccia 67975. The alkali gabbronorites form two distinct subgroups, magnesian and ferroan. Modes and bulk compositions are highly varied. The magnesian alkali gabbronorites are composed of bytownitic plagioclase (Or2-5An82-89), hypersthene (Wo3-5En49-62), augite (Wo39-42En36-44), a silica mineral, and trace Ba-rich K-feldspar. The ferroan alkali gabbronorites are composed of ternary plagioclase (Or11-22An65-74), pigeonite (Wo6-9En35-47), augite (Wo38-40En29-35), Ba-rich K-feldspar, and a silica mineral. Trace minerals in both subgroups are apatite, REE-rich whitlockite, and zircon. The magnesian and ferroan alkali gabbronorites appear to have formed by progressive differentiation of the same, or closely related, parent magmas; the compositional data indicate that these magmas were REE-rich. The ternary plagioclase is probably a high-temperature metastable phase formed during crystallization. In composition and mineralogy, the 67975 alkali gabbronorites show many similarities to Appllo 12 and 14 alkali norites, alkali gabbronorites, and alkali anorthosites, and all these rocks together constitute a distinctive alkali suite. In addition, the alkali gabbronorites, show some similarities to KREEP basalts, Mg-norites, and some felsites. These data suggest genetic links between some or all of these types of pristine rocks. Two types of relationships are possible. The first is that alkali-suite rocks crystallized in plutons of KREEP basalt magma, and KREEP basalts are their extrusive equivalents. The second is that the alkali-suite rocks and some felsites all crystallized in plutons of Mg-norite parent magmas, and KREEP basalt magmas formed by remelting of these plutons. Additional studies are needed to resolve which of these hypotheses is correct.

  10. Petrological characteristics of mantle xenoliths from the Azrou-Timahdite quaternary basalts, middle atlas, Morocco: A mineral chemistry perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanouan, Lhoussaine; Ikenne, Moha; Gahlan, Hisham A.; Arai, Shoji; Youbi, Nasrrddine

    2017-03-01

    Quaternary alkali basalts of the Azrou-Timahdite area contain a wide variety of ultramafic mantle xenoliths (e.g. lherzolites, wehrlites, pyroxenites and amphibolites). A comprehensive mineral chemistry studies using electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) allows us to propose a petrogenetic history of these ultramafic rocks. The studied mantle xenoliths contain spinel, which attests for their derivation from depths from 30 to 70 km, i.e. the intermediate zone of continental lithospheric upper mantle. The olivine forsterite (Fo) content is higher in lherzolites than in wehrlite, Fo88-91 and Fo80-83, respectively. The orthopyroxene is enstatite with relatively high Mg number (Mg#) (0.88-0.91). The clinopyroxene displays Mg# (0.88-0.92) similar to or slightly higher than that of olivine and orthopyroxene, indicating equilibrium between these phases. Progressive depletion of this ratio in lherzolite clinopyroxene suggests the generation of peridotitic rocks through a series of partial melting processes at different degrees. LREE enrichment in clinopyroxene combined with decoupling of Ti and Na (Fusible major elements) indicates mantle metasomatic processes, which possibly resulted in recrystallization of clinopyroxene. The wehrlitic lithologies are possibly the end product of the metasomatism. The LaN/YbN and Ti/Eu ratios of spine-bearing lherzolites and non-spongy clinopyroxenes combined with the low Ti contents and the Zr and Nb negative anomalies argue for an alkali-silicate metasomatism. Given the above scenario, we conclude that the mineralogical variations in the upper mantle beneath this part of the Middle Atlas Mountains can be attributed to a combination of mantle processes including partial melting that occurs in response of a mantle upwelling, and an alkali-silicate metasomatism.

  11. A Study of Olivine Alteration to Iddingsite Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuebler, K. E.; Wang, Alian; Haskin, L. A.; Jolliff, B. L.

    2003-01-01

    A crucial task of Mars surface science is to determine past environmental conditions, especially aqueous environments and their nature. Identification of mineral alteration by water is one way to do this. Recent work interprets TES spectra as indicating altered basalt on Mars. Olivine, a primary basaltic mineral, is easily altered by aqueous solutions. Alteration assemblages of olivine may be specific to deuteric, hydrothermal, surface water, or metamorphic environments. Raman spectra are produced by molecular vibrations and provide direct means for studying and identifying alteration products. Here, we present a combined study of changes in the chemical composition and Raman spectra of an olivine as it alters to iddingsite. Iddingsite is found in some SNC meteorites and is presumably present on Mars. The term 'iddingsite' has been used as a catch-all term to describe reddish alteration products of olivine, although some authors ascribe a narrower definition: an angstrom-scale intergrowth of goethite and smectite (presumably saponite) formed in an oxidizing and fluid-rich environment. Alteration conserves Fe (albeit oxidized) but requires addition of Al and H2O and removal of Mg and Si. The smectite that forms may be removed by continued alteration. Dehydration of the goethite forms hematite. Our purpose is to study the mineral assemblage, determine the structural and chemical variability of the components with respect to the degree of alteration, and to find spectral indicators of alteration that will be useful during in-situ analyses on Mars.

  12. Geochemical diversity of shergottite basalts: Mixing and fractionation, and their relation to Mars surface basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Filiberto, Justin

    2015-04-01

    The chemical compositions of shergottite meteorites, basaltic rocks from Mars, provide a broad view of the origins and differentiation of these Martian magmas. The shergottite basalts are subdivided based on their Al contents: high-Al basalts (Al > 5% wt) are distinct from low-Al basalts and olivine-phyric basalts (both with Al < 4.5% wt). Abundance ratios of highly incompatible elements (e.g., Th, La) are comparable in all the shergottites. Abundances of less incompatible elements (e.g., Ti, Lu, Hf) in olivine-phyric and low-Al basalts correlate well with each other, but the element abundance ratios are not constant; this suggests mixing between components, both depleted and enriched. High-Al shergottites deviate from these trends consistent with silicate mineral fractionation. The "depleted" component is similar to the Yamato-980459 magma; approximately, 67% crystal fractionation of this magma would yield a melt with trace element abundances like QUE 94201. The "enriched" component is like the parent magma for NWA 1068; approximately, 30% crystal fractionation from it would yield a melt with trace element abundances like the Los Angeles shergottite. This component mixing is consistent with radiogenic isotope and oxygen fugacity data. These mixing relations are consistent with the compositions of many of the Gusev crater basalts analyzed on Mars by the Spirit rover (although with only a few elements to compare). Other Mars basalts fall off the mixing relations (e.g., Wishstone at Gusev, Gale crater rocks). Their compositions imply that basalt source areas in Mars include significant complexities that are not present in the source areas for the shergottite basalts.

  13. "Black-colored olivines" in peridotites: dehydrogenation from hydrous olivines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Shoji; Hoshikawa, Chihiro; Miura, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Fresh olivines that are black to the naked eye are found in some dunites. Peridotites are easily converted to be black in color, when serpentinized, due to production of secondary fine magnetite particles. The dunites that contain fresh but black-colored olivines are usually coarse-grained. These coarse olivine grains are sometimes very heterogeneous in color; the blackish part grades to whitish parts in single grains. The black color is due to homegeneous distribution of minute (< 10 microns) black particles in olivine. They are rod-like or plate-like in shape in thin section, sometimes being aligned under crystallographic control of the host olivine. Olivines are clear and free of these inclusions around primary chromian spinel inclusions or chromian spinel lamellae (Arai, 1978). Raman spectroscopy indicates the minute black particles are magnetite always associated with diopside. It is interesting to note that olivine in mantle peridotites accompanied by the black-colored dunites is totally free of the black inclusions, giving the ordinary colors (pale yellow to whitish) of Mg-rich olivine. It is not likely that the magnetite inclusions formed through secondary oxidation of olivine by invasion of oxygen, which is possible along cracks or grain boundaries. They most probably formed due to dehydrogenation from primary OH-bearing olivines upon cooling. Hydrogen was quickly diffused out from the olivines to leave magnetite and excess silica. The excess silica was possibly combined with a monticellite component to form diopside. The OH-bearing (hydrous) olivines can be precipitated from hydrous magmas, and the hydrous nature of the magma can promote an increase in grain size due to faster diffusion of elements. The minute inclusions of magnetite + diopside is thus an indicator of primary hydrous character of host olivine.

  14. Water in Basaltic Melts: an Experimental and Thermodynamic Study of the Effect of H2O on Liquidus Temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medard, E.; Grove, T. L.

    2006-12-01

    We present a thermodynamic model for the influence of H2O on liquidus temperatures of olivine-saturated primitive basaltic and andesitic melts. The thermodynamic model has been fitted to a suite of H2O-saturated liquidus experiments carried out on a primitive high-alumina basalt from Medicine Lake Volcano (82-72f) over a pressure range of 10 to 1000 MPa. The model of Silver and Stolper (S+S, 1985, J.Geol. 93:161) has been applied to the experimental data. This model uses the assumption of simple ideal mixing between water species and the anionic matrix in the melt. Water in the melt dissolves as molecular H2O, or dissociates to hydroxyl groups and an oxygen atomic network. For 82-72f, the liquidus olivine shows little compositional variability (Fo87.4 to Fo88.4) over the broad range of pressures and temperatures investigated that is not correlated with H2O content of the melt. This observation supports our assumption that major effect of H2O is on the anionic species in the melt and not on the cation equilibria (e.g. Mg and Si). The model reproduces the experimental data well. We find that there is a large influence of H2O addition on melting point for small amounts of H2O, resulting in a concave-down curvature when liquidus depression is plotted against the amount of H2O added. For addition of 0.8 and 5 wt% H2O to 82-72f, the liquidus is depressed by 35 K and 130 K, respectively. The best fits are obtained by assuming partial water dissociation to OH and H2O species, using the equilibrium constant measured by Stolper (1982). S+S applied their model to simple systems (diopside/H2O, albite/H2O, silica/H2O), and recovered the melting behavior extremely well. They also suggested that melt structure/composition influences the amount of liquidus depression caused by H2O addition. We have investigated the influence of bulk composition by performing complementary experiments on a high-magnesian andesite from Mount Shasta, and on a K, Na, and P rich alkali basalt from

  15. Effect of Sulfur on Siderophile Element Partitioning Between Olivine and Martian Primary Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, T.; Shearer, C. K.; Righter, K.; Jones, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Since olivine is a common early crystallizing phase in basaltic magmas that have produced planetary and asteroidal crusts, a number of experimental studies have investigated elemental partitioning between olivine and silicate melt [e.g., 1, 2, 3]. In particular, olivine/melt partition coefficients of Ni and Co (DNi and DCo) have been intensively studied because these elements are preferentially partitioned into olivine and thus provide a uniquely useful insight into the basalt petrogenesis [e.g., 4, 5]. However, none of these experimental studies are consistent with incompatible signatures of Co [e.g., 6, 7, 8] and Ni [7] in olivines from Martian meteorites. Chemical analyses of undegassed MORB samples suggest that S dissolved in silicate melts can reduce DNi up to 50 % compared to S-free experimental systems [9]. High S solubility (up to 4000 ppm) for primitive shergottite melts [10] implies that S might have significantly influenced the Ni and Co partitioning into shergottite olivines. This study conducts melting experiments on Martian magmatic conditions to investigate the effect of S on the partitioning of siderophile elements between olivine and Martian primary melt.

  16. Olivine Crystallization and Mantle Potential Temperatures Beneath Yellowstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonderly, A.; Putirka, K. D.; Atosa, A.; Hurwitz, S.

    2007-12-01

    New basalt samples from the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field provide evidence for some of the most primitive liquids yet recovered for the region, and yield clues regarding mantle processes. The sample distribution covers a large area and an extended period, and one sample in particular (basalt of Warm River) contains 11% MgO, with olivines that are in equilibrium with the host whole rock. Using olivine thermometry, we calculate both olivine crystallization and mantle potential temperatures (Tp, the temperature a parcel of mantle would have if it rose adiabatically to Earth's surface without melting) to test whether the alleged Yellowstone hot spot is truly hot. These tests make use of thermometers from (1) and (2), and we compare temperatures at Yellowstone with estimates from the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project, HSDP-2 (2, 3) and the Siqueiros Transform, near the East Pacific Rise (4). Assessment of olivine-liquid equilibrium is based on the Fe-Mg exchange coefficient between olivine and liquid, which is assumed to be 0.30+/-0.03 (5). In total, the Yellowstone lavas have mean crystallization temperatures of 1251+/-41°C (n=79) with a maximum of 1327°C. The mean temperature is similar to crystallization temperatures of basalts from Siqueiros (1264+/-21°C), but lower than the mean temperature for HDSP samples (1343+/-50°C). Mantle potential temperatures appear to approach an olivine-control line, which if valid, yields a mantle potential temperature of 1610°C, slightly higher than most Snake River Plain (SRP) lavas (Tp =1540°C). Applying the same model to lavas from the Siqueiros Transform yields a Tp of 1400°C, and so excess temperatures (relative to MORB) along the SRP are in the range of 140-209°C, consistent with a mantle plume interpretation for the Yellowstone hot spot track. These calculations presume that primitive melts have equilibrated with mantle olivine of Fo90 in composition; given the FeO contents of SRP lavas, parental liquids should

  17. Submarine basalt from the Revillagigedo Islands region, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.

    1970-01-01

    Ocean-floor dredging and submarine photography in the Revillagigedo region off the west coast of Mexico reveal that the dominant exposed rock of the submarine part of the large island-forming volcanoes (Roca Partida and San Benedicto) is a uniform alkali pillow basalt; more siliceous rocks are exposed on the upper, subaerial parts of the volcanoes. Basalts dredged from smaller seamounts along the Clarion fracture zone south of the Revillagigedo Islands are tholeiitic pillow basalts. Pillows of alkali basalts are more vesicular than Hawaiian tholeiitic pillows collected from the same depths. This difference probably reflects a higher original volatile content of the alkali basalts. Manganese-iron oxide nodules common in several dredge hauls generally contain nucleii of rhyolitic pumice or basalt pillow fragments. The pumice floated to its present site from subaerial eruptions, became waterlogged and sank, and was then coated with manganese-iron oxides. The thickness of palagonite rinds on the glassy pillow fragments is proportional to the thickness of manganese-iron oxide layers, and both are a measure of the age of the nodule. Both oldest basalts (10-100 m.y.) and youngest (less than 1 m.y.) are along the Clarion fracture zone, whereas basalts from Roca Partida and San Benedicto volcanoes are of intermediate age. ?? 1970.

  18. The Plumbing System of a Highly Explosive Basaltic Volcano: Sunset Crater, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, C. M.; Roggensack, K.; Clarke, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    We seek to better understand highly explosive basaltic eruptions with specific focus on magmatic volatile solubility in alkali basalts and the magma plumbing system. Sunset Crater, an alkali basalt (~3.7 wt.% alkalis) scoria cone volcano, erupted explosively in 1085 AD. We analyzed 125 primary melt inclusions (MIs) from Sunset Crater tephra deposited by 2 subplinian phases and 1 Strombolian explosion to compare magma volatiles and storage conditions. We picked rapidly quenched free olivine crystals and selected large volume MIs (50-180 μm) located toward crystal cores. MIs are faceted and exhibit little major element composition variability with minor post entrapment crystallization (2-10%). MIs are relatively dry but CO2-rich. Water content varies from 0.4 wt.% to 1.5 wt.% while carbon dioxide abundance ranges between 1,150 ppm and 3,250 ppm. Most MIs contain >1 wt.% H2O and >2,150 ppm CO2. All observed MIs contain a vapor bubble, so we are evaluating MI vapor bubbles with Raman spectroscopy and re-homogenization experiments to determine the full volatile budget. Because knowledge of volatile solubility is critical to accurately interpret results from MI analyses, we measured H2O-CO2 solubility in the Sunset Crater bulk composition. Fluid-saturated experiments at 4 and 6 kbar indicate shallower entrapment pressures for these MIs than values calculated for this composition using existing models. Assuming fluid saturation, MIs record depths from 6 km to 14 km, including groupings suggesting two pauses for longer-term storage at ~6 km and ~10.5 km. We do not observe any significant differences in MIs from phases exhibiting different eruptive styles, suggesting that while a high CO2 content may drive rapid magma ascent and be partly responsible for highly explosive eruptions, shallower processes may govern the final eruptive character. To track shallow processes during magma ascent from depth of MI-entrapment up to the surface, we are examining MI re-entrants.

  19. Chlorine in Lunar Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. J.; Anand, M.; Franchi, I. A.

    2017-01-01

    In the context of the lunar magma ocean (LMO) model, it is anticipated that chlorine (and other volatiles) should have been concentrated in the late-stage LMO residual melts (i.e., the dregs enriched in incompatible elements such as K, REEs, and P, collectively called KREEP, and in its primitive form - urKREEP, [1]), given its incompatibility in mafic minerals like olivine and pyroxene, which were the dominant phases that crystallized early in the cumulate pile of the LMO (e.g., [2]). When compared to chondritic meteorites and terrestrial rocks (e.g., [3-4]), lunar samples often display heavy chlorine isotope compositions [5-9]. Boyce et al. [8] found a correlation between delta Cl-37 (sub Ap) and bulk-rock incompatible trace elements (ITEs) in lunar basalts, and used this to propose that early degassing of Cl (likely as metal chlorides) from the LMO led to progressive enrichment in remaining LMO melt in Cl-37over Cl-35- the early degassing model. Barnes et al. [9] suggested that relatively late degassing of chlorine from urKREEP (to yield delta Cl-37 (sub urKREEP greater than +25 per mille) followed by variable mixing between KREEPy melts and mantle cumulates (characterized by delta Cl-370 per mille) could explain the majority of Cl isotope data from igneous lunar samples. In order to better understand the processes involved in giving rise to the heavy chlorine isotope compositions of lunar samples, we have performed an in situ study of chlorine isotopes and abundances of volatiles in lunar apatite from a diverse suite of lunar basalts spanning a range of geochemical types.

  20. Lunar mare versus terrestrial mid-ocean ridge basalts - Planetary constraints on basaltic volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papike, J. J.; Bence, A. E.

    1978-01-01

    Major differences which exist between terrestrial midocean ridge basalts (MORBs) and lunar mare basalts reflect the different planetary characteristics of earth and moon. MORBs are enriched in aluminum and have higher Mg/(Mg + Fe(2+)). These features reflect a more aluminum- and magnesium-rich mantle source for MORBs. Mare basalts are depleted in sodium and potassium relative to MORBs and, consequently, mare feldspars are depleted in the albite component relative to MORB feldspars; these features are a reflection of the alkali-depleted nature of the moon relative to earth. The oxygen fugacities that obtained during MORB petrogenesis follow the quartz-magnetite-fayalite buffer curve very closely, while those of mare basalts are several orders of magnitude lower. This results in reduced valence states for Fe, Cr, and Ti in mare basalts, which, in turn, has a significant effect on mineral-melt partitioning.

  1. Geochemistry of apollo 15 basalt 15555 and soil 15531.

    PubMed

    Schnetzler, C C; Philpotts, J A; Nava, D F; Schuhmann, S; Thomas, H H

    1972-01-28

    Major and trace element concentrations have been determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, colorimetry, and isotope dilution in Apollo 15 mare basalt 15555 from the Hadley Rille area; trace element concentrations have also been determined in plagioclase and pyroxene separates from basalt 15555 and in soil 15531 from the same area. Basalt 15555 most closely resembles in composition the Apollo 12 olivine-rich basalts. The concentrations of lithium, potassium, rubidium, barium, rare-earth elements, and zirconium in basalt 15555 are the lowest, and the negative europium anomaly is the smallest, reported for lunar basalts; this basalt might be the least differentiated material yet returned from the moon. Crystallization and removal of about 6 percent of plagioclase similar to that contained in the basalt would account for the observed europium anomaly; if plagioclase is not on the liquidus of this basalt, a multistage origin is indicated. Mineral data indicate that plagioclase and pyroxene approached quasi-equilibrium. Most of the chemical differences between basalt 15555 and soil 15531 would be accounted for if the soil were a mixture of 88 percent basalt, 6 percent KREEP (a component, identified in other Apollo soils, rich in potassium, rare-earth elements, and phosphorus) and 6 percent plagioclase (anorthosite?).

  2. A new olivine-melt thermometer/hygrometer based on Ni partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, X.; Lange, R. A.; Moore, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature and H2O content are key to understanding the origin and evolution of arc basalts. Here we propose that the strong temperature dependence on DNi (olivine-melt), quantified by Li & Ripley (2010), can be used as a thermometer that is largely independent of melt H2O concentration. Currently, the most widely used olivine-melt thermometers (based on partitioning of Mg) are strongly dependent on melt H2O content, and application to hydrous basalts requires that melt H2O contents already be known. If an H2O-independent olivine-melt thermometer could be developed, then application to hydrous basalts will lead to accurate temperatures at the time of olivine crystallization. These temperatures can then be combined with Mg-based olivine-melt thermometers to obtain the magnitude of ∆T, the depression of the olivine liquidus due to melt H2O concentration. In turn, hydrous phase equilibrium data from the literature allow melt H2O concentration to be derived from ∆T (e.g., Medard &Grove, 2008; Almeev et al., 2007). Thus, an H2O-independent olivine-melt thermometer can be used to calculate melt H2O concentrations at the onset of olivine crystallization. To test this approach in hydrous systems, we obtained new Ni concentration data for the H2O-saturated basaltic andesite phase equilibrium experiments of Moore and Carmichael (1998). The predicted temperatures from the inverted L&R'10 model are within 25° C of the measured experimental temperatures. This approach was also tested on 192 olivine-liquid pairs from 18 experimental studies that reported Ni content in both olivine and melt. The average residuals between the calculated and experimental T is -16 °C. We also calibrated a new model based on the same format above, but with an additional pressure term (average residual of -2 °C). Application of this approach to lavas for which H2O in olivine-hosted melt inclusions have been analyzed in the literature shows excellent agreement.

  3. Determination of Planetary Basalt Parentage: A Simple Technique Using the Electron Microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papike, J. J.; Karner, J. M.; Shearer, C. K.

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the usefulness of major and minor elements in silicate phases to understand differences among basaltic systems and the influence of different planetary environments on basalt chemistry (e.g., Papike [1]). Intriguing data displays presented by Papike [1] include a plot of Mn vs. Fe (atoms per formula unit, afu) for pyroxene and olivine and a plot showing the anorthite content of plagioclase from different planetary basalts. Here we combine portions of these plots (Fig. 4) and provide all new data for olivine and plagioclase.

  4. Composition, mineralogy, and petrology of 28 mare basalts from Apollo 15 rake samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowty, E.; Prinz, M.; Keil, K.

    1973-01-01

    Twenty-eight mare basalts from three Apollo 15 rake sample sections are divided into five rock groups which are considered to represent at least five rock units. Three of these groups (pyroxene-phyric basalt, olivine-phyric basalt, and olivine microgabbro) are from the mare area and are probably near-surface local mare rock units. The remaining groups (feldspathic peridotite and feldspathic microgabbro) are found outside the mare, in Spur Crater at the foot of the Apennines; they may come from deeper levels of the local mare or from a more distant source.

  5. Iddingzitized olivine in mantle xenoliths: evidence for (really) early alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, P. C.; Schultz, L.; Stier, N.

    2011-12-01

    olivine. Some of the partially altered olivine crystals exhibiting the later texture contain deformational kink bands that, given that the young eruption age of the host basalt, post-dates any crustal activity that could be responsible for such a fabric at this location, much have occurred in the lithospheric mantle. Textural evidence that the iddingzitized areas of these olivine crystals pre-date the kink banding suggests that the alteration of these olivines occurred in the mantle. Post-entrainment alteration is unlikely particularly given the close proximity of altered and unaltered samples with similar post-entrainment history and the fact that the host basalts are not particularly hydrous. The variety of alteration in xenoliths at this location suggest that the entraining flows are either sampling small regions of the mantle that contains very high gradients with regard to water content or oxygen fugacity or are sampling relatively large areas. Quantitative analysis of volatiles in altered and unaltered olivine crystals planned in order to better constrain these gradients.

  6. Th-230 - U-238 series disequilibrium of the Olkaria basalts Gregory Rift Valley, Kenya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, S.; Macdonald, R.; Kelly, M.

    1993-01-01

    U-Th disequilibrium analyses of the Naivasha basalts show a very small (U-238/Th-230) ratios which are lower than any previously analyzed basalts. The broadly positive internal isochron trend from one sample indicates that the basalts may have source heterogeneities, this is supported by earlier work. The Naivasha complex comprises a bimodal suite of basalts and rhyolites. The basalts are divided into two stratigraphic groups each of a transitional nature. The early basalt series (EBS) which were erupted prior to the Group 1 comendites and, the late basalt series (LBS) which erupted temporally between the Broad Acres and the Ololbutot centers. The basalts represent a very small percentage of the overall eruptive volume of material at Naivasha (less than 2 percent). The analyzed samples come from four stratigraphic units in close proximity around Ndabibi, Hell's Gate and Akira areas. The earliest units occur as vesicular flows from the Ndabibi plain. These basalts are olivine-plagioclase phyric with the associated hawaiites being sparsely plagioclase phyric. An absolute age of 0.5Ma was estimated for these basalts. The next youngest basalts flows occur as younger tuft cones in the Ndabibi area and are mainly olivine-plagioclase-clinopyroxcene phyric with one purely plagioclase phyric sample. The final phase of activity at Ndabibi resulted in much younger tuft cones consisting of air fall ashes and lapilli tufts. Many of these contain resorbed plagioclase phenocrysts with sample number 120c also being clinopyroxene phyric. The isotopic evidence for the basalt formation is summarized.

  7. Olivine-gabbros and olivine-rich troctolites genesis through melt-rock reactions in oceanic spreading lithosphere: an experimental study up to 0.7 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francomme, Justine E.; Fumagalli, Patrizia; Borghini, Giulio

    2016-04-01

    Extensive melt-rock reaction and melt impregnation significantly affect not only the physical and chemical properties at mantle-crust transition, but also control the evolution of migrating melts. We performed reactive dissolution and crystallization experiments at pressure ≤ 0.7 GPa in a piston-cylinder apparatus to provide experimental constraints on genesis of olivine-rich troctolites and olivine-gabbros at mantle-crust transition in oceanic spreading lithosphere by melt-rock reaction. Our experiments are carried out by using Salt-Pyrex-Graphite-Magnesium assemblies and graphite-lined platinum capsules. Experimental charges are prepared with three layers: (1) basalt powder, (2) fine powder (1-10μm) of San Carlos olivine (Fo90.1), and (3) carbon spheres used as a melt trap. Three synthetic MORB-type melts have been used, two tholeiitic basalts (Mg#: 0.62, SiO2: 47.70 wt%, Na2O: 2.28 wt% and Mg#: 0.58, SiO2: 49.25 wt%, Na2O: 2.49 wt%) and a primitive one (Mg#: 0.74, SiO2: 48.25 wt%, Na2O: 1.80 wt%), in order to investigate the effect of melt composition. A rock/melt ratio of 0.7 has been kept fixed. Experiments have been conducted at temperatures from 1200 to 1300°C, at both step cooling and isothermal conditions for different run durations (from 12 to 72 hrs). They resulted in layered samples in which all the initial San Carlos olivine powder, analog of a dunitic pluton infiltrated by basaltic melt, is replaced by different lithologies from olivine-rich troctolite to olivine gabbro. In isothermal experiments, reacted melts have been successfully trapped in the carbon spheres allowing their chemical analysis; as expected the reacted melt has a higher Mg# than the initial one (e.g. from Mg#=0.62 to 0.73). Across the different lithologies Mg# of olivine is decreasing from the olivine-rich troctolite to the gabbro. Replacive olivine-rich troctolite has a poikilitic texture with rounded euhedral olivine and interstitial poikilitic plagioclase and clinopyroxene

  8. Thermochemistry and melting properties of basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhifd, M. A.; Besson, P.; Courtial, P.; Gérardin, C.; Navrotsky, A.; Richet, P.

    2007-06-01

    The heat capacities of the liquid, glassy and crystalline phases of an alkali basalt have been determined from relative enthalpies measured between 400 and 1,800 K. Values given by available models of calculation generally agree to within 2% of these results. As derived from the new data and the enthalpy of vitrification measured at 973 K by oxide-melt drop solution calorimetry for the same sample, the enthalpy of fusion of this basalt increases from 15.4 kJ/mol at 1,000 K to 33.6 kJ/mol at 1,800 K. Comparisons between the enthalpies of fusion of basalt and model compositions confirm the small magnitude of the enthalpy of mixing between the molten mineral components of the liquids. Minor variations in the chemical composition have only a small effect in the heat capacity and the enthalpy of melting of basalt. The enthalpies of formation at 298 K from the oxides of the crystallized and glass phases of this alkali basalt are -112.2 and -98.5 kJ/mol, respectively, for a gram formula weight based on one mole of oxide components.

  9. Mineralogy of the last lunar basalts: Results from Clementine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staid, M.I.; Pieters, C.M.

    2001-01-01

    The last major phase of lunar volcanism produced extensive high-titanium mare deposits on the western nearside which remain unsampled by landing missions. The visible and near-infrared reflectance properties of these basalts are examined using Clementine multispectral images to better constrain their mineralogy. A much stronger 1 ??m ferrous absorption was observed for the western high-titanium basalts than within earlier maria, suggesting that these last major mare eruptions also may have been the most iron-rich. These western basalts also have a distinctly long-wavelength, 1 ??m ferrous absorption which was found to be similar for both surface soils and materials excavated from depth, supporting the interpretation of abundant olivine within these deposits. Spectral variation along flows within the Imbrium basin also suggests variations in ilmenite content along previously mapped lava flows as well as increasing olivine content within subsequent eruptions. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Constraining Open-System Processes in the Generation of Basaltic Magma Using 87Sr/86Sr of Individual Minerals and Melt Inclusions, Pisgah Crater, Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, F. C.; Wolff, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    Basaltic magmas have been extensively used to infer the geochemical nature of mantle sources. Studies which make such inferences typically focus on basalts that are characterized by assumed primary magma characteristics such as high MgO contents. Such characteristics are typically used as justification to discount or suggest only a minimal influence of open-system modifications, such as those resulting from crustal assimilation. Often, very little effort is made to more thoroughly eliminate this possibility because it is very difficult to identify and constrain such effects especially if the assimilated crust is mafic in character. Alkali basalts and hawaiities erupted at Pisgah Crater in the Mojave Desert of California result from open-system processes yet still retain high MgO (6-8%) contents. The specific processes responsible for extensive trace element and isotopic variations in these basalts, however, are in dispute. Glazner et al. (1991) suggest that Pisgah Crater trace element and isotopic variations originate from assimilation of mafic crust while Reiners (2002) suggests that such variations result from mixing of mantle-derived garnet peridotite and garnet pyroxenite magmas. Large 87Sr/86Sr variations among and within individual plagioclase, clinopyroxene, amphibole, groundmass, and melt inclusions in olivine attest to the effects of open-system processes and indicate a complex mixing process (i.e., not two-component mixing) that occurred up to the time of eruption (Ramos et al, in prep). 87Sr/86Sr of minerals indicate that early and intermediate erupted lavas retain relatively uncontaminated signatures while the latest erupted lavas reflect much higher 87Sr/86Sr, consistent with contamination at crustal pressures (i.e., within the plagioclase stability field). Major element compositions of melt inclusions hosted in olivine confirm the presence of highly evolved magmas (e.g., MgO: 0.5 to 3%, SiO2: 52-57%) in later erupted lavas. Whole grain olivine

  11. Preliminary data on mantle xenoliths from the Feldstein basalt (Thuringia, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukuła, Anna; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Milke, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Feldstein is an isolated outcrop of columnar basaltic rock nearby Themar, located 60 km south-west of Erfurt (Thuringia, Germany). The Feldstein alkali basalt (ca. 16.3 Ma) belongs to the Heldburger Gangschar subset of the Central European Volcanic Province (Abratis et al. 2007). The Feldstein alkali basalt contains peridotitic xenoliths, which were the subject of our study. Two groups of spinel peridotite xenoliths occur in the Feldstein basalt. Group A spinel peridotite (2 xenoliths) is characterized by protogranular texture with typical grain size of 2 - 3 mm (max 8 mm). It consists of olivine (90.28 - 91.36 % Fo, 0.35 - 0.45 wt. % NiO), orthopyroxene (mg# 0.91 - 0.92, Al 0.09 - 0.18 a pfu), clinopyroxene (mg# 0.93 - 0.95, Al 0.06 - 0.21 a pfu) and spinel (cr# 0.20 - 0.41, mg# 0.66 - 0.78). The mg# and Al content in clinopyroxene are negatively correlated following the depletion trend after variable degrees of partial melting of the same source. One of the studied samples contains clinopyroxene that does not plot on the general depletion trend but has significantly higher Al (0.15 - 0.21 a pfu) for similar mg # 0.93 - 0.94 with clinopyroxenes from this trend. However the primitive mantle normalized clinopyroxene REE patterns (concave upwards with LaN/YbN=0.11) indicate that they are the residues after elevated degrees of partial melting. The most magnesian clinopyroxene that is Ca-rich and Al-poor has REE abundances, typical for strongly depleted spinel peridotites. It has concave upwards primitive mantle normalized pattern and LaN/YbN=0.61. A slight increase of LaN and CeN with inflection point at PrN has been observed as well. The group B spinel peridotites have protogranular texture (3-4 mm, max 7 mm grains) and some of them contain several melt pockets of basaltic composition. It consists of olivine (88.95 - 91.32 % Fo, 0.34 - 0.47 wt.% NiO), orthopyroxene (mg# 0.90 - 0.93, Al 0.04 - 0.16 apfu) and clinopyroxene (mg# 0.90 - 0.93, Al 0.10 - 0.20 a pfu). The

  12. Trace Element Distribution Between Olivine and Kirschsteinite in Angra Dos Reis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fittipaldo, M. M.; Jones, R. H.; Shearer, C. K.

    2003-01-01

    The angrites are a small and enigmatic group of basaltic achondrites that possess unique mineralogical and chemical properties. The dominant mineralogy of the seven angrite members (Angra dos Reis, LEW 86010, LEW 87051, Asuka 881371, Sahara 99555, D Orbigny, and a new Moroccan member) is fassaite, olivine, and plagioclase. Angrites display a wide range of thermal histories, with Angra dos Reis (AdoR) exhibiting a cooling history different from that of the rapidly cooled members and from LEW86010, a more slowly cooled member. AdoR could represent either a cumulate or a porphyritic igneous rock that was later altered by metamorphism. We are re-examining the thermal history of AdoR in light of the more recently described angrite members. Our emphasis is a trace element study of low-Ca olivine, which we refer to as olivine, and high-Ca olivine, which we refer to as kirschsteinite, in AdoR.

  13. Megacrystic Clinopyroxene Basalts Sample A Deep Crustal Underplate To The Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Schrader, C. M.; Crumpler, L. S.; Wolff, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The alkaline and compositionally diverse (basanite to high-Si rhyolite) Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF), New Mexico comprises 4 regions that cover ~75 x 40 km2: (1) Mount Taylor, a large composite volcano and a surrounding field of basaltic vents; (2) Grants Ridge, constructed of topaz rhyolitic ignimbrite and coulees; (3) Mesa Chivato, a plateau of alkali basalts and mugearitic to trachytic domes; and (4) the Rio Puero basaltic necks. Distributed throughout its history (~3.6 to 1.26 Ma; Crumpler and Goff, 2012) and area (excepting Rio Puerco Necks) is a texturally distinct family of differentiated basalts (Mg# 43.2-53.4). These basalts contain resorbed and moth-eaten megacrysts (up to 2 cm) of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and olivine ±Ti-magnetite ±ilmenite ±rare orthopyroxene. Some megacrystic lava flows have gabbroic cumulate inclusions with mineral compositions similar to the megacrysts, suggesting a common origin. For instance, gabbroic and megacrystic clinopyroxenes form linear positive arrays in TiO2 (0.2-2.3 wt%) with respect to Al2O3 (0.7-9.3 wt%). The lowest Al clinopyroxenes are found in a gabbroic inclusion and are associated with partially melted intercumulus orthopyroxene. Megacrystic and gabbroic plagioclase (An 41-80) in 4 representative thin sections were analyzed for 87Sr/86Sr by Laser Ablation ICP-MS. 87Sr/86Sr values for the suite range from 0.7036 to 0.7047. The low 87Sr/86Sr plagioclases (0.7036 to 0.7037) are associated with high Ti-Al clinopyroxenes. Likewise, the higher 87Sr/86Sr plagioclases (0.7043 to 0.7047) are associated with the low-Al clinopyroxenes. Taken together, these megacrysts track the differentiation of an intrusive body (or related bodies) from alkaline to Si-saturated conditions by fractional crystallization and crustal assimilation. The intrusive body likely underplates portions of the MTVF that have generated silicic magmas (Mount Taylor, Grants Ridge, Mesa Chivato). Although disequilibrium is implied by resorbed

  14. Basalt generation at the Apollo 12 site. Part 2: Source heterogeneity, multiple melts, and crustal contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Clive R.; Hacker, Matthew D.; Snyder, Gregory A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Liu, Yun-Gang; Schmitt, Roman A.

    1994-01-01

    The petrogenesis of Apollo 12 mare basalts has been examined with emphasis on trace-element ratios and abundances. Vitrophyric basalts were used as parental compositions for the modeling, and proportions of fractionating phases were determined using the MAGFOX prograqm of Longhi (1991). Crystal fractionation processes within crustal and sub-crustal magma chambers are evaluated as a function of pressure. Knowledge of the fractionating phases allows trace-element variations to be considered as either source related or as a product of post-magma-generation processes. For the ilmenite and olivine basalts, trace-element variations are inherited from the source, but the pigeonite basalt data have been interpreted with open-system evolution processes through crustal assimilation. Three groups of basalts have been examined: (1) Pigeonite basalts-produced by the assimilation of lunar crustal material by a parental melt (up to 3% assimilation and 10% crystal fractionation, with an 'r' value of 0.3). (2) Ilmenite basalts-produced by variable degrees of partial melting (4-8%) of a source of olivine, pigeonite, augite, and plagioclase, brought together by overturn of the Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) cumulate pile. After generation, which did not exhaust any of the minerals in the source, these melts experienced closed-system crystal fractionation/accumulation. (3) Olivine basalts-produced by variable degrees of partial melting (5-10%) of a source of olivine, pigeonite, and augite. After generation, again without exhausting any of the minerals in the source, these melts evolved through crystal accumulation. The evolved liquid counterparts of these cumulates have not been sampled. The source compositions for the ilmenite and olivine basalts were calculated by assuming that the vitrophyric compositions were primary and the magmas were produced by non-modal batch melting. Although the magnitude is unclear, evaluation of these source regions indicates that both be composed of early- and

  15. Dredged trachyte and basalt from kodiak seamount and the adjacent aleutian trench, alaska.

    PubMed

    Forbes, R B; Hoskin, C M

    1969-10-24

    Blocky fragments of aegirine-augite trachyte (with accompanying icerafted gravels.) were recovered from the upper slopes of Kodiak Seamount in several dredge hauls. An alkali basalt pillow segment was also dredged from a moatlike depression, at a depth of 5000 meters, near the west base of the seamount. These retrievals confirm the volcanic origin of Kodiak Seamount and further support the view of Engel, Engel, and Havens that the higher elevations of seamounts are composed of alkali basalts or related variants.

  16. Basalt generation at the Apollo 12 site. Part 1: New data, classification, and re-evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Clive R.; Hacker, Matthew D.; Snyder, Gregory A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Liu, Yun-Gang; Schmitt, Roman A.

    1994-01-01

    New data are reported from five previously unanalyzed Apollo 12 mare basalts that are incorporated into an evaluation of previous petrogenetic models and classification schemes for these basalts. This paper proposes a classification for Apollo 12 mare basalts on the basis of whole-rock Mg# (molar 100*(Mg/(Mg+Fe))) and Rb/Sr ratio (analyzed by isotope dilution), whereby the ilmenite, olivine, and pigeonite basalt groups are readily distinguished from each other. Scrutiny of the Apollo 12 feldspathic 'suite' demonstrates that two of the three basalts previously assigned to this group (12031, 12038, 12072) can be reclassified: 12031 is a plagioclase-rich pigeonite basalt; and 12072 is an olivine basalt. Only basalt 12038 stands out as a unique sample to the Apollo 12 site, but whether this represents a single sample from another flow at the Apollo 12 site or is exotic to this site is equivocal. The question of whether the olivine and pigeonite basalt suites are co-magmatic is addressed by incompatible trace-element chemistry: the trends defined by these two suites when Co/Sm and Sm/Eu ratios are plotted against Rb/Sr ratio demonstrate that these two basaltic types cannot be co-magmatic. Crystal fractionation/accumulation paths have been calculated and show that neither the pigeonite, olivine, or ilmenite basalts are related by this process. Each suite requires a distinct and separate source region. This study also examines sample heterogeneity and the degree to which whole-rock analyses are representative, which is critical when petrogenetic interpretation is undertaken. Sample heterogeneity has been investigated petrographically (inhomogeneous mineral distribution) with consideration of duplicate analyses, and whether a specific sample (using average data) plots consistently upon a fractionation trend when a number of different compostional parameters are considered. Using these criteria, four basalts have been identified where reported analyses are not

  17. Oxygen Fugacity of the Upper Mantle of Mars. Evidence from the Partitioning Behavior of Vanadium in Y980459 (Y98) and other Olivine-Phyric Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; McKay, G. A.; Papike, J. J.; Karner, J.

    2006-01-01

    Using partitioning behavior of V between olivine and basaltic liquid precisely calibrated for martian basalts, we determined the redox state of primitive (olivine-rich, high Mg#) martian basalts near their liquidus. The combination of oxidation state and incompatible element characteristics determined from early olivine indicates that correlations between fO2 and other geochemical characteristics observed in many martian basalts is also a fundamental characteristic of these primitive magmas. However, our data does not exhibit the range of fO2 observed in these previous studies.. We conclude that the fO2 for the martian upper mantle is approximately IW+1 and is incompatible-element depleted. It seems most likely (although clearly open to interpretation) that these mantle-derived magmas assimilated a more oxidizing (>IW+3), incompatible-element enriched, lower crustal component as they ponded at the base of the martian crust.

  18. Experimental Petrology of the Basaltic Shergottite Yamato 980459: Implications for the Thermal Structure of the Martian Mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, H. A.; Musselwhite, D. S.; Kiefer, W.; Treiman, A. H.

    2005-01-01

    Yamato 980459 (Y98) is an olivine-phyric basaltic shergottite composed of 48% pyroxene, 26% olivine, 25% mesostasis, and 1% other minerals. Unlike the other Martian basalts, it contains no plagioclase. Olivine in Y98 is the most magnesian of all Martian meteorites. Thus Y98 is believed to be the most primitive and its composition may be the closest to a primary or direct melt of the Martian mantle. As such, it provides a very useful probe of the mineralogy and depth of its mantle source region. Toward this end, we are conducting crystallization experiments on a synthetic Y98 composition at Martian mantle pressures and temperatures.

  19. Applicability of Henry's Law to helium solubility in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Parman, S. W.; Kelley, S. P.; Cooper, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    Applicability of Henry's Law to helium solubility in olivine We have experimentally determined helium solubility in San Carlos olivine across a range of helium partial pressures (PHe) with the goal of quantifying how noble gases behave during partial melting of peridotite. Helium solubility in olivine correlates linearly with PHe between 55 and 1680 bar. This linear relationship suggests Henry's Law is applicable to helium dissolution into olivine up to 1680 bar PHe, providing a basis for extrapolation of solubility relationships determined at high PHe to natural systems. This is the first demonstration of Henry's Law for helium dissolution into olivine. Averaging all the data of the PHe series yields a Henry's coefficient of 3.8(×3.1)×10-12 mol g-1 bar-1. However, the population of Henry's coefficients shows a positive skew (skewness = 1.17), i.e. the data are skewed to higher values. This skew is reflected in the large standard deviation of the population of Henry's coefficients. Averaging the median values from each experiment yields a lower Henry's coefficient and standard deviation: 3.2(× 2.3)×10-12 mol g-1 bar-1. Combining the presently determined helium Henry's coefficient for olivine with previous determinations of helium Henry's coefficients for basaltic melts (e.g. 1) yields a partition coefficient of ~10-4. This value is similar to previous determinations obtained at higher PHe (2). The applicability of Henry's Law here suggests helium is incorporated onto relatively abundant sites within olivine that are not saturated by 1680 bar PHe or ~5×10-9 mol g-1. Large radius vacancies, i.e. oxygen vacancies, are energetically favorable sites for noble gas dissolution (3). However, oxygen vacancies are not abundant enough in San Carlos olivine to account for this solubility (e.g. 4), suggesting the 3x10-12 mol g-1 bar-1 Henry's coefficient is associated with interstitial dissolution of helium. Helium was dissolved into olivine using an externally heated

  20. The consanguinity of the oldest Apollo 11 mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, R. P.; Coish, R. A.; Taylor, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    The textural, mineralogical, and chemical relationships between three of the oldest dates lunar mare basalt samples returned by Apollo 11 (10003, 10029 and 10062) were investigated. Very strong resemblances were noted between the modal minerologies of 10003 and 10029. Significantly more modal olivine and cristobalite was observed in 10062 than in the other basalt samples. A detailed examination of mineral-chemical relationships among the samples revealed similarities between 10003 and 10062 and differences between these two rocks and 10029, the most significant of which is the presence of akaganeite in 10029, implying that lawrencite was present in the pristine sample of 10029 but not in 10003 and 10062. Results of a Wright-Doherty mixing program used to test various fractional crystallization schemes show that 10062 can be derived from a liquid with the composition of either 10003 or 10029 by removing 2-5% ilmenite and 5% olivine. By removing about 6% plagioclase, 10003 can be derived from a liquid with the bulk composition of 10062. It is concluded that 10003 and 10029 may have come from different basaltic flows, whereas it is possible that 10003 and 10062 were derived from the same parental magma by near-surface fractionation of olivine plus ilmenite or of plagioclase plus or minus olivine.

  1. New insights into the Aeolian Islands and other arc source compositions from high-precision olivine chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamboni, Denis; Trela, Jarek; Gazel, Esteban; Sobolev, Alexander V.; Cannatelli, Claudia; Lucchi, Federico; Batanova, Valentina G.; De Vivo, Benedetto

    2017-02-01

    The Aeolian arc (Italy) is characterized by some of the strongest along-the-arc geochemical variations in the planet, making it an ideal location to study the effect of subducting components in modifying the mantle source of island arc melts. Here, we use high-precision element concentrations in primitive phenocrystic olivine from basalts along the arc to elucidate the effects of mantle source modification by the subduction process. Olivines from this arc have Ni concentrations and Fe/Mn ratios that show similarity to peridotite sources that melted to produce mid-ocean ridge basalts. Nevertheless, they also have systematically lower Ca concentrations and Fe/Mn ratios that broadly overlap with olivines from the available global arc array. These phenocrysts also do not show significant variations in Ca as a function of olivine forsterite content. The global data suggest that all olivines crystallizing from island-arc melts have suppressed Ca concentrations and Fe/Mn ratios, relative to olivines derived from melts at intraplate and mid-ocean ridge settings suggesting elevated H2O concentrations and higher oxidation state of the equilibrium melts. Based on olivine chemistry, we interpret a predominantly peridotite source (fluxed by subduction fluids) beneath the Aeolian Arc and also for other examples of arc-related lavas.

  2. A new lunar high-Ti basalt type defined from clasts in Apollo 16 breccia 60639

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, A. L.; Neal, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the detailed examination of three basalt clasts from Apollo 16 breccia 60639 that represent a new variant of high-Ti basalt returned from the Moon by the Apollo 16 mission. Mineral chemistry and whole-rock analyses were conducted on aliquots from three clasts (breccia matrix, basalt, and basalt + breccia matrix). The basalt clasts, which are not overtly porphyritic, contain compositionally zoned pyroxene, olivine, and plagioclase crystals that represent the evolution of the magma during crystallization; ilmenite does not exhibit major-element compositional zoning within individual crystals. Mineral compositions are distinct between the basalt and breccia matrix lithologies. In addition, whole-rock analyses identify clear compositional differences between the basalt and breccia matrix lithologies in both major and trace element concentrations. The composition of the mixed lithology aliquots (i.e., basalt + breccia matrix) do not indicate simple two component mixing (i.e., compositions are not intermediate to the basalt and breccia end-members); this apparent incongruity can be accounted for by adding ∼19-40% plagioclase to an amalgamation of the average basalt and individual breccia clast compositions via impact mixing. Whole-rock analyses are consistent with previous analyses of one 60639 basalt clast, which were interpreted to indicate chemical similarity with Apollo 11 and 17 basalts. However, both major and trace elements suggest that the 60639 basalt clasts examined here have compositions that are distinct from Apollo 11 and 17 high-Ti basalts. Although the 60639 basalt clasts have similar characteristics to a variety of previously identified basalt types, the more extensive whole-rock analyses reported here indicate that they represent a type of Apollo high-Ti basalt heretofore unrecognized in the Apollo and lunar meteorite collections. By placing these new analyses in the context of other mare basalt compositions, a petrogenetic model for

  3. Origin of olivine at Copernicus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, C. M.; Wilhelms, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The central peaks of Copernicus are among the few lunar areas where near-infrared telescopic reflectance spectra indicate extensive exposures of olivine. Other parts of Copernicus crater and ejecta, which were derived from highland units in the upper parts of the target site, contain only low-Ca pyroxene as a mafic mineral. The exposure of compositionally distinct layers including the presence of extensive olivine may result from penetration to an anomalously deep layer of the crust or to the lunar mantle. It is suggested that the Procellarum basin and the younger, superposed Insularum basin have provided access to these normally deep-seated crustal or mantle materials by thinning the upper crustal material early in lunar history. The occurrences of olivine in portions of the compositionally heterogeneous Aristarchus Region, in a related geologic setting, may be due to the same sequence of early events.

  4. Chemical zonation in olivine-hosted melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcombe, M. E.; Fabbrizio, A.; Zhang, Youxue; Ma, C.; Le Voyer, M.; Guan, Y.; Eiler, J. M.; Saal, A. E.; Stolper, E. M.

    2014-07-01

    basaltic glasses; compositional trends with melt inclusion size observed in the Siqueiros melt inclusions are described well by this simple single-stage linear cooling model. Despite the overall success of the modeling of MgO concentration profiles using a single-stage cooling history, MgO concentration profiles in some melt inclusions are better fit by a two-stage cooling history with a slower-cooling first stage followed by a faster-cooling second stage; the inferred total duration of cooling from the liquidus down to ~1,000 °C ranges from 40 s to just over 1 h. Based on our observations and models, compositions of zoned melt inclusions (even if measured at the centers of the inclusions) will typically have been diffusively fractionated relative to the initially trapped melt; for such inclusions, the initial composition cannot be simply reconstructed based on olivine-addition calculations, so caution should be exercised in application of such reconstructions to correct for post-entrapment crystallization of olivine on inclusion walls. Off-center analyses of a melt inclusion can also give results significantly fractionated relative to simple olivine crystallization. All melt inclusions from the Siqueiros and Galapagos sample suites exhibit zoning profiles, and this feature may be nearly universal in glassy, olivine-hosted inclusions. If so, zoning profiles in melt inclusions could be widely useful to constrain late-stage syneruptive processes and as natural diffusion experiments.

  5. Basaltic diversity examined through chemical analysis of mineral phases in Apollo 12 soil sample 12023,155.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, L.; Snape, J. F.; Crawford, I. A.; Joy, K. H.; Downes, H.

    2013-09-01

    We use major, minor and trace element chemistry in mineral phases to compare 12 basaltic grains in the Apollo 12 soil sample 12023,155 to known basalt groups at the Apollo 12 site. Most samples are identified as Olivine, Pigeonite or Ilmenite basalt fragments, with five exceptions: sample 155_1A has distinct mineral compositions from other samples; samples 155_4A and 5A are believed to represent new additions to the Feldspathic basalt group; sample 155_7A is identified as an exotic fragment (i.e., sourced from a distal lava flow) and sample 155_11A is from a highly fractionated basaltic melt.

  6. Ibitira: A basaltic achondrite from a distinct parent asteroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2004-01-01

    I have done detailed petrologic study of Ibitira, nominally classified as a basaltic eucrite. The Fe/Mn ratio of Ibitira pyroxenes with <10 mole % wollastonite component is 36.4 0.4, and is well-resolved from those of five basaltic eucrites studied for comparison; 31.2-32.2. Data for the latter completely overlap. Ibitira pyroxenes have lower Fe/Mg than the basaltic eucrite pyroxenes. Thus, the higher Fe/Mn ratio does not reflect a simple difference in oxidation state. Ibitira also has an oxygen isotopic composition, alkali element contents and a Ti/Hf ratio that distinguish it from basaltic eucrites. These differences support derivation from a distinct parent asteroid. Ibitira is the first recognized representative of the fifth known asteroidal basaltic crust.

  7. Hydrogen isotope systematics of submarine basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kyser, T.K.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The D/H ratios and water contents in fresh submarine basalts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the East Pacific Rise, and Hawaii indicate that the primary D/H ratios of many submarine lavas have been altered by processes including (1) outgassing, (2) addition of seawater at magmatic temperature, and (3) low-temperature hydration of glass. Decreases in ??D and H2O+ from exteriors to interiors of pillows are explained by outgassing of water whereas inverse relations between ??D and H2O+ in basalts from the Galapagos Rise and the FAMOUS Area are attributed to outgassing of CH4 and H2. A good correlation between ??D values and H2O is observed in a suite of submarine tholeiites dredged from the Kilauea East Rift Zone where seawater (added directly to the magma), affected only the isotopic compositions of hydrogen and argon. Analyses of some glassy rims indicate that the outer millimeter of the glass can undergo lowtemperature hydration by hydroxyl groups having ??D values as low as -100. ??D values vary with H2O contents of subaerial transitional basalts from Molokai, Hawaii, and subaerial alkali basalts from the Society Islands, indicating that the primary ??D values were similar to those of submarine lavas. Extrapolations to possible unaltered ??D values and H2O contents indicate that the primary ??D values of most thoteiite and alkali basalts are near -80 ?? 5: the weight percentages of water are variable, 0.15-0.35 for MOR tholeiites, about 0.25 for Hawaiian tholeiites, and up to 1.1 for alkali basalts. The primary ??D values of -80 for most basalts are comparable to those measured for deep-seated phlogopites. These results indicate that hydrogen, in marked contrast to other elements such as Sr, Nd, Pb, and O, has a uniform isotopic composition in the mantle. This uniformity is best explained by the presence of a homogeneous reservoir of hydrogen that has existed in the mantle since the very early history of the Earth. ?? 1984.

  8. Genetic relations of oceanic basalts as indicated by lead isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatsumoto, M.

    1966-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of lead and the concentrations of lead, uranium, and thorium in samples of oceanic tholeiite and alkali suites are determined, and the genetic relations of the oceanic basalts are discussed. Lead of the oceanic tholeiites has a varying lead-206 : lead-204 ratio between 17.8 and 18.8, while leads of the alkali basalt suites from Easter Island and Guadalupe Island are very radiogenic with lead-206 : lead-204 ratios between 19.3 and 20.4. It is concluded that (i) the isotopic composition of lead in oceanic tholeiite suggests that the upper mantle source region of the tholeiite was differentiated from an original mantle material more than 1 billion years ago and that the upper mantle is not homogeneous at the present time, (ii) less than 20 million years was required for the crystal differentiation within the alkali suite from Easter Island, (iii) no crustal contamination was involved in the course of differentiation of rocks from Easter Island; however, some crustal contamination may have affected Guadalupe Island rocks, and (iv) alkali basalt may be produced from the tholeiite in the oceanic region by crystal differentiation. Alternatively the difference in the isotopic composition of lead in oceanic basalts may be produced by partial melting at different depths of a differentiated upper mantle.

  9. Crystal Stratigraphy of Two Basalts from Apollo 16: Unique Crystallization of Picritic Basalt 606063,10-16 and Very-Low-Titanium Basalt 65703,9-13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, P. H.; Neal, C. R.; Stevens, R. E.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    A geochemical survey of Apollo 16 regolith fragments found five basaltic samples from among hundreds of 2-4 mm regolith fragments of the Apollo 16 site. These included a high-Ti vitrophyric basalt (60603,10-16) and one very-low-titanium (VLT) crystalline basalt (65703,9-13). Apollo 16 was the only highlands sample return mission distant from the maria (approx. 200 km). Identification of basaltic samples at the site not from the ancient regolith breccia indicates input of material via lateral transport by post-basin impacts. The presence of basaltic rocklets and glass at the site is not unprecedented and is required to satisfy mass-balance constraints of regolith compositions. However, preliminary characterization of olivine and plagioclase crystal size distributions indicated the sample textures were distinct from other known mare basalts, and instead had affinities to impact melt textures. Impact melt textures can appear qualitatively similar to pristine basalts, and quantitative analysis is required to distinguish between the two in thin section. The crystal stratigraphy method is a powerful tool in studying of igneous systems, utilizing geochemical analyses across minerals and textural analyses of phases. In particular, trace element signatures can aid in determining the ultimate origin of these samples and variations document subtle changes occurring during their petrogenesis.

  10. An estimate of the juvenile sulfur content of basalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Fabbi, Brent P.

    1971-01-01

    Sulfur analyses by X-ray fluorescence give an average content of 107 ppm for 9 samples of fresh subaerially-erupted oceanic basalt and 680 ppm for 38 samples of submarine erupted basalt. This difference is the result of retention of sulfur in basalt quenched on the sea floor and loss of sulfur in basalt by degassing at the surface. The outer glassy part of submarine erupted basalt contains 800??150 ppm sulfur, and this amount is regarded as an estimate of the juvenile sulfur content of the basalt melt from the mantle. The slower cooled interiors of basalt pillows are depleted relative to the rims owing to degassing and escape through surface fractures. Available samples of deep-sea basalts do not indicate a difference in original sulfur content between low-K tholeiite, Hawaiian tholeiite, and alkali basalt. The H2O/S ratio of analyzed volcanic gases is generally lower than the H2O/S ratio of gases presumed lost from surface lavas as determined by chemical differences between pillow rims and surface lavas. This enrichment of volcanic gases in sulfur relative to water may result from a greater degassing of sulfur relative to water from shallow intrusive bodies beneath the volcano. ?? 1971 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Lunar Mare Basalts as Analogues for Martian Volcanic Compositions: Evidence from Visible, Near-IR, and Thermal Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, T. G.; Morris, R. V.; Christensen, P. R.

    2003-01-01

    The lunar mare basalts potentially provide a unique sample suite for understanding the nature of basalts on the martian surface. Our current knowledge of the mineralogical and chemical composition of the basaltic material on Mars comes from studies of the basaltic martian meteorites and from orbital and surface remote sensing observations. Petrographic observations of basaltic martian meteorites (e.g., Shergotty, Zagami, and EETA79001) show that the dominant phases are pyroxene (primarily pigeonite and augite), maskelynite (a diaplectic glass formed from plagioclase by shock), and olivine [1,2]. Pigeonite, a low calcium pyroxene, is generally not found in abundance in terrestrial basalts, but does often occur on the Moon [3]. Lunar samples thus provide a means to examine a variety of pigeonite-rich basalts that also have bulk elemental compositions (particularly low-Ti Apollo 15 mare basalts) that are comparable to basaltic SNC meteorites [4,5]. Furthermore, lunar basalts may be mineralogically better suited as analogues of the martian surface basalts than the basaltic martian meteorites because the plagioclase feldspar in the basaltic Martian meteorites, but not in the lunar surface basalts, is largely present as maskelynite [1,2]. Analysis of lunar mare basalts my also lead to additional endmember spectra for spectral libraries. This is particularly important analysis of martian thermal emission spectra, because the spectral library apparently contains a single pigeonite spectrum derived from a synthetic sample [6].

  12. Petrological, magnetic and chemical properties of basalt dredged from an abyssal hill in the North-east pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luyendyk, B.P.; Engel, C.G.

    1969-01-01

    OVER the years, samples of basalt from the oceanic crust have been taken mainly from seamounts, fracture zones and ridge and rise crests1-6, and rarely from the vast fields of abyssal hills which cover a large part of the deep-sea floor. The basalt sampled from the deeper regions of the oceanic crust (for example, on fault scarps) is a distinct variety of tholeiitic basalt, while alkali basalt is restricted to the volcanic edifices4. Oceanic tholeiitic basalt differs from alkali basalt and continental tholeiite chiefly in having a relatively low percentage of K2O (0.2 weight per cent)4. Some authors have speculated that this type of tholeiitic basalt is the major extrusion from the upper mantle and constitutes the predominant rock type in the upper oceanic crust. ?? 1969 Nature Publishing Group.

  13. Near-Primary Oxidized Basalts from the Submarine Vanuatu Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentes, Z.; Kelley, K. A.; Cottrell, E.; Arculus, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Near-primary melt compositions (i.e., in equilibrium with >Fo89 olivine) are rare in arc systems. Yet, such melts provide essential views of mantle-derived melts, without further modification by fractional crystallization or other crustal processes, and reveal the diversity of melt compositions that exist in the arc mantle wedge. Here, we present new measurements of naturally glassy, near-primary olivine-hosted melt inclusions from one dredge of Evita seamount (SS07/2008 NLD-02) in the southern Vanuatu arc system. Two distinct basalt types were identified in hand sample upon collection, based on contrasting phenocryst assemblage (Type 1: 1% phenocrysts; Type 2: 15% phenocrysts). We selected melt inclusions from each type and determined major elements, S, and Cl by EMP, H2O and CO2 by FTIR, trace elements by LA-ICP-MS, and Fe3+/∑Fe ratios by XANES. Melt inclusions from both lava types show equilibrium with ≥Fo90 olivine, consistent with host olivine compositions, and thus are near-primary melt compositions that have escaped major modification since departing the mantle wedge. Both have similar maximum dissolved H2O (~2.3 wt.%), high Mg# (48-75), and are basalt to basaltic andesite (SiO2 49-55 wt.%). However, the two lava types have very different major and trace element compositions. Inclusions from Type 1 show relatively flat REE patterns and classic negative anomalies in Nb and Ta, and positive anomalies in Pb and Sr typical of normal arc basalts, and have Fe3+/∑Fe ratios similar to global arc basalts (~0.24). In contrast, melt inclusions from Type 2 exhibit steeply sloped REE patterns with strong depletions in the HREE that suggest garnet in the source lithology for these magmas, either in the subducting slab or the mantle wedge. Moreover, the Type 2 inclusions have high La/Yb (29.5-43) and Sr/Y (50-58), which are classically attributed to partial melting of the basaltic slab, although these inclusions are basaltic, not andesitic. Type 2 inclusions also

  14. Cr, Mn, and Ca distributions for olivine in angritic systems: Constraints on the origins of Cr-rich and Ca-poor core olivine in angrite LEW87051

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; Mckay, G.; Le, L.

    1994-01-01

    Angrite meteorites are a type of basaltic achondrites that are noted for their very old cyrstallization ages (4.55 b.y.) and unusual chemical and mineralogical properties. In spite of great interest, only four angrites have been found. LEW87051 is the smallest one which weighs 0.6 g. It is a porphyritic rock with coarse subhedral to euhedral olivines set in a fine-grained groundmass which clearly represents a crystallized melt. The largest uncertainty about the petrogenesis of LEW87051 is the relationship between the large olivine crystals and the groundmass. Prinz et al. suggests that olivines are xenocrysts, while McKay et al. proposed a fractional cyrstallization model based on experimental studies. However, the crystals have Cr-rich and Ca-poor cores which do not match experimental olivines. Although Jurewicz and McKay tried to explaine the zoning of the rim by diffusion, some features are not explained. There also exists a definite composition boundary of Fe(2+) and MnO between the core and the rim. To clarify the origin of these olivines, we have performed experiments using LEW87051 analogs to measure the effects of oxygen fugacity on distribution coefficients of various elements in an angritic system.

  15. Al-augite and Cr-diopside ultramafic xenoliths in basaltic rocks from western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilshire, H.G.; Shervais, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    Ultramafic xenoliths in basalts from the western United States are divided into Al-augite and Cr-diopside groups. The Al-augite group is characterized by Al, Ti-rich augites, comparatively Fe-rich olivine and orthopyroxene, and Al-rich spinel, the Cr-diopside group by Cr-rich clinopyroxene and spinel and by Mg-rich olivine and pyroxenes. Both groups have a wide range of subtypes, but the Al-augite group is dominated by augite-rich varieties, and the Cr-diopside group by olivine-rich lherzolites. ?? 1975.

  16. Basaltic rocks analyzed by the Spirit rover in Gusev crater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSween, H.Y.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J.F.; Blaney, D.; Cabrol, N.A.; Christensen, P.R.; Clark, B. C.; Crisp, J.A.; Crumpler, L.S.; Des Marias, D.J.; Farmer, J.D.; Gellert, Ralf; Ghosh, A.; Gorevan, S.; Graff, T.; Grant, J.; Haskin, L.A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Jolliff, B.L.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Knudson, A.T.; McLennan, S.; Milam, K.A.; Moersch, J.E.; Morris, R.V.; Rieder, R.; Ruff, S.W.; De Souza, P.A.; Squyres, S. W.; Wanke, H.; Wang, A.; Wyatt, M.B.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Spirit landing site in Gusev Crater on Mars contains dark, fine-grained, vesicular rocks interpreted as lavas. Pancam and Mini-Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) spectra suggest that all of these rocks are similar but have variable coatings and dust mantles. Magnified images of brushed and abraded rock surfaces show alteration rinds and veins. Rock interiors contain ???25% megacrysts. Chemical analyses of rocks by the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer are consistent with picritic basalts, containing normative olivine, pyroxenes, plagioclase, and accessory FeTi oxides. Mo??ssbauer, Pancam, and Mini-TES spectra confirm the presence of olivine, magnetite, and probably pyroxene. These basalts extend the known range of rock compositions composing the martian crust.

  17. Basaltic rocks analyzed by the Spirit Rover in Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McSween, H. Y.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J. F., III; Blaney, D.; Cabrol, N. A.; Christensen, P. R.; Clark, B. C.; Crisp, J. A.; Crumpler, L. S.; DesMarais, D. J.; Farmer, J. D.; Gellert, R.; Ghosh, A.; Gorevan, S.; Graff, T.; Grant, J.; Haskin, L. A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Jolliff, B. L.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Morris, R. V.; Yen, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Spirit landing site in Gusev Crater on Mars contains dark, fine-grained, vesicular rocks interpreted as lavas. Pancam and Mini-Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) spectra suggest that all of these rocks are similar but have variable coatings and dust mantles. Magnified images of brushed and abraded rock surfaces show alteration rinds and veins. Rock interiors contain basalts, containing normative olivine, pyroxenes, plagioclase, and accessory FeTi oxides. Mossbauer, Pancam, and Mini-TES spectra confirm the presence of olivine, magnetite, and probably pyroxene. These basalts extend the known range of rock compositions composing the martian crust.

  18. Basaltic rocks analyzed by the Spirit Rover in Gusev Crater.

    PubMed

    McSween, H Y; Arvidson, R E; Bell, J F; Blaney, D; Cabrol, N A; Christensen, P R; Clark, B C; Crisp, J A; Crumpler, L S; Des Marais, D J; Farmer, J D; Gellert, R; Ghosh, A; Gorevan, S; Graff, T; Grant, J; Haskin, L A; Herkenhoff, K E; Johnson, J R; Jolliff, B L; Klingelhoefer, G; Knudson, A T; McLennan, S; Milam, K A; Moersch, J E; Morris, R V; Rieder, R; Ruff, S W; De Souza, P A; Squyres, S W; Wänke, H; Wang, A; Wyatt, M B; Yen, A; Zipfel, J

    2004-08-06

    The Spirit landing site in Gusev Crater on Mars contains dark, fine-grained, vesicular rocks interpreted as lavas. Pancam and Mini-Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) spectra suggest that all of these rocks are similar but have variable coatings and dust mantles. Magnified images of brushed and abraded rock surfaces show alteration rinds and veins. Rock interiors contain basalts, containing normative olivine, pyroxenes, plagioclase, and accessory FeTi oxides. Mössbauer, Pancam, and Mini-TES spectra confirm the presence of olivine, magnetite, and probably pyroxene. These basalts extend the known range of rock compositions composing the martian crust.

  19. First Row Transition Metals in Olivine - Petrogenetic Tracers for the Evolution of Mantle-Derived Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locmelis, M.; Arevalo, R. D., Jr.; Puchtel, I. S.; Barnes, S. J.; Fiorentini, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Olivine is the most abundant mineral in the upper mantle and a major constituent of most mantle-derived rocks. However, despite its abundance, studies on the trace element chemistry of olivine are underrepresented in the literature. We present the results of a comprehensive study on the contents of first-row transition metals (FRTM: Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn), Ga and Ge in olivines from 2.7-3.5 Ga old Munro- and Barberton-type komatiites from the Kapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons in southern Africa, the Yilgarn Craton in Australia, and the Superior Craton in Canada. Komatiitic olivines are compared to olivines from a Devonian-Carboniferous mantle peridotite (Finero, Italy) and contemporary ocean Island basalts (OIB, from St. Helena, South Atlantic Ocean). The olivine major element chemistry was determined using a JEOL JXA-8900 Superprobe at the University of Maryland. Trace element contents were determined using a Photon Machines Analyte G2 193 nm Excimer laser ablation system coupled to a Nu Instruments AttoM single collector ICP-MS at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Medium resolution mass discrimination (m/Δm = 2500, at 5% peak intensity) was leveraged to separate isobaric interferences and support accurate quantitation of elemental abundances. The results show that olivines from komatiites are largely depleted in FRTM, Ga and Ge relative to the composition of the primitive mantle (FRTMPM-norm = ~0.01 - 1). All komatiitic olivines have similar mantle-normalized trace element patterns, regardless of age and/or locality. Olivines from the Finero mantle peridotite and the St. Helena OIB are similarly depleted. However, compared to komatiites, grains from Finero are enriched in Ge and distinctly depleted in Ti, V, Cr, and Ga, whereas olivines from St. Helena have overall flatter normalized trace element patterns. The distinct patterns show that olivine chemistry can be used to identify and understand the source and evolution of mantle-derived rocks

  20. Dissolution-precipitation reactions and permeability evolution from reactions of CO2-rich aqueous solutions with fractured basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, R. K.; Xiong, W.; Bae, Y.; Sesti, E.; Skemer, P. A.; Giammar, D.; Conradi, M.; Ellis, B. R.; Hayes, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    The injection of CO2 into fractured basalts is one of several possible solutions to mitigate global climate change; however, research on carbonation in natural basalts in relation to carbon sequestration is limited, which impedes our understanding of the processes that may influence the viability of this strategy. We are conducting bench-scale experiments to characterize the mineral dissolution and precipitation and the evolution of permeability in synthetic and natural basalts exposed to CO2-rich fluids. Analytical methods include optical and electron microscopy, electron microprobe, Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and micro X-ray computed tomography (μCT) with variable flow rates. Reactive rock and mineral samples consist of 1) packed powders of olivine or natural basalt, and 2) sintered cores of olivine or a synthetic basalt mixture. Each sample was reacted in a batch reactor at 100 °C, and 100 bars CO2. Magnesite is detected within one day in olivine packed beds, and within 15 days in olivine sintered cores. Forsterite and synthetic basalt sinters were also reacted in an NMR apparatus at 102 °C and 65 bars CO2. Carbonate signatures are observed within 72 days of reaction. Longer reaction times are needed for carbonate precipitation in natural basalt samples. Cores from the Columbia River flood basalt flows that contain Mg-rich olivine and a serpentinized basalt from Colorado were cut lengthwise, the interface mechanically roughened or milled, and edges sealed with epoxy to simulate a fractured interface. The cores were reacted in a batch reactor at 50-150 °C and 100 bars CO2. At lower temperatures, calcite precipitation is rare within the fracture after 4 weeks. At higher temperatures, numerous calcite and aragonite crystals are observed within 1 mm of the fracture entrance along the roughened fracture surface. In flow-through experiments, permeability decreased along the fracture paths within a few hours to several days of flow.

  1. Crystallographic orientations of olivine inclusions in diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, S.; Nestola, F.; Angel, R. J.; Nimis, P.; Harris, J. W.

    2016-11-01

    In this work we report for the first time the crystallographic orientations of olivine inclusions trapped in diamonds from the Kaapvaal craton (South Africa) determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and analyze them together with all available data in the literature. The overall data set indicates no preferred orientation of the olivine inclusions with respect to their diamond hosts. However, diamonds containing multiple olivine inclusions sometimes show clusters of olivines with the same orientation in the same diamond host. We conclude that such clusters can only be interpreted as the remnants of single olivine crystals pre-dating the growth of the host diamonds.

  2. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  3. Naming Lunar Mare Basalts: Quo Vadimus Redux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, G.

    1999-01-01

    Nearly a decade ago, I noted that the nomenclature of lunar mare basalts was inconsistent, complicated, and arcane. I suggested that this reflected both the limitations of our understanding of the basalts, and the piecemeal progression made in lunar science by the nature of the Apollo missions. Although the word "classification" is commonly attached to various schemes of mare basalt nomenclature, there is still no classification of mare basalts that has any fundamental grounding. We remain basically at a classification of the first kind in the terms of Shand; that is, things have names. Quoting John Stuart Mill, Shand discussed classification of the second kind: "The ends of scientific classification are best answered when the objects are formed into groups respecting which a greater number of propositions can be made, and those propositions more important than could be made respecting any other groups into which the same things could be distributed." Here I repeat some of the main contents of my discussion from a decade ago, and add a further discussion based on events of the last decade. A necessary first step of sample studies that aims to understand lunar mare basalt processes is to associate samples with one another as members of the same igneous event, such as a single eruption lava flow, or differentiation event. This has been fairly successful, and discrete suites have been identified at all mare sites, members that are eruptively related to each other but not to members of other suites. These eruptive members have been given site-specific labels, e.g., Luna24 VLT, Apollo 11 hi-K, A12 olivine basalts, and Apollo 15 Green Glass C. This is classification of the first kind, but is not a useful classification of any other kind. At a minimum, a classification is inclusive (all objects have a place) and exclusive (all objects have only one place). The answer to "How should rocks be classified?" is far from trivial, for it demands a fundamental choice about nature

  4. Supernova olivine from cometary dust.

    PubMed

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay P; Lauretta, Dante S

    2005-07-29

    An interplanetary dust particle contains a submicrometer crystalline silicate aggregate of probable supernova origin. The grain has a pronounced enrichment in 18O/16O (13 times the solar value) and depletions in 17O/16O (one-third solar) and 29Si/28Si (<0.8 times solar), indicative of formation from a type II supernova. The aggregate contains olivine (forsterite 83) grains <100 nanometers in size, with microstructures that are consistent with minimal thermal alteration. This unusually iron-rich olivine grain could have formed by equilibrium condensation from cooling supernova ejecta if several different nucleosynthetic zones mixed in the proper proportions. The supernova grain is also partially encased in nitrogen-15-rich organic matter that likely formed in a presolar cold molecular cloud.

  5. Supernova olivine from cometary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay P.; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2005-01-01

    An interplanetary dust particle contains a submicrometer crystalline silicate aggregate of probable supernova origin. The grain has a pronounced enrichment in 18O/16O (13 times the solar value) and depletions in 17O/16O (one-third solar) and 29Si/28Si (<0.8 times solar), indicative of formation from a type II supernova. The aggregate contains olivine (forsterite 83) grains <100 nanometers in size, with microstructures that are consistent with minimal thermal alteration. This unusually iron-rich olivine grain could have formed by equilibrium condensation from cooling supernova ejecta if several different nucleosynthetic zones mixed in the proper proportions. The supernova grain is also partially encased in nitrogen-15-rich organic matter that likely formed in a presolar cold molecular cloud.

  6. Valence State Partitioning of Cr and V Between Pyroxene - Melt: Estimates of Oxygen Fugacity for Martian Basalt QUE 94201

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karner, J. M.; Papike, J. J.; Shearer, C. K.; McKay, G.; Le, L.; Burger, P.

    2007-01-01

    Several studies, using different oxybarometers, have suggested that the variation of fO2 in martian basalts spans about 3 log units from approx. IW-1 to IW+2. The relatively oxidized basalts (e.g., pyroxene-phyric Shergotty) are enriched in incompatible elements, while the relatively reduced basalts (e.g., olivine-phyric Y980459) are depleted in incompatible elements. A popular interpretation of the above observations is that the martian mantle contains two reservoirs; 1) oxidized and enriched, and 2) reduced and depleted. The basalts are thus thought to represent mixing between these two reservoirs. Recently, Shearer et al. determined the fO2 of primitive olivine-phyric basalt Y980459 to be IW+0.9 using the partitioning of V between olivine and melt. In applying this technique to other basalts, Shearer et al. concluded that the martian mantle shergottite source was depleted and varied only slightly in fO2 (IW to IW+1). Thus the more oxidized, enriched basalts had assimilated a crustal component on their path to the martian surface. In this study we attempt to address the above debate on martian mantle fO2 using the partitioning of Cr and V into pyroxene in pyroxene-phyric basalt QUE 94201.

  7. Mineralogy of young lunar mare basalts: Assessment of temporal and spatial heterogeneity using M3 data from Chandrayaan-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varatharajan, Indhu; Srivastava, Neeraj; Murty, Sripada V. S.

    2014-07-01

    A comparative assessment of the mineralogy of young basalts (∼1.2 Ga to ∼2.8 Ga) from the western nearside, Moscoviense basin, and the Orientale basin of the Moon has been made using Level 2 Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) data from the Chandrayaan-1 mission. Spectral data characteristics of the individual units have been generated from fresh small craters to minimize the complications due to space weathering. Representative spectra for individual units and the derived spectral parameters (band centers and integrated band depth ratio) have been used to study composition of these young basalts. A modified approach of Gaffey et al. (Gaffey, M.J., Cloutis, E.A., Kelley, M.S., Reed, K.L. [2002]. Mineralogy of asteroids. In: Asteroids III. The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, pp. 183-204) (for olivine-pyroxene mixtures) and the methodology of Adams (Adams, J.B. [1974]. J. Geophys. Res. 79, 4829-4836. http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/JB079i032p04829) (for interpreting pyroxene type) have been used to improve our understanding of the spectral behavior of these basalts. Most of the young basalts of Oceanus Procellarum are characterized by abundant olivines and they show complex volcanic history. Vast exposures of olivine concentrated units having higher abundance of olivine content than high-Ca pyroxenes are emplaced in the northern Oceanus Procellarum region. Mostly, they show distinct stratigraphic gradation with the immediately underlying units of relatively lower olivine content. The Moscoviense unit shows signatures of Fe-rich glasses along with clinopyroxenes. The basalts of Orientale basin are typically devoid of olivine and are rich in high-Ca pyroxene. Thus, mineralogy of these mare basalts which erupted during the late stage volcanism vary across the Moon’s surface; however, broader observations reveal apparently higher FeO content in the younger basalts of western nearside and Orientale region.

  8. Zircon U-Pb dating, geochemistry and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopes of the Wajilitag alkali mafic dikes, and associated diorite and syenitic rocks: Implications for magmatic evolution of the Tarim large igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Si-Yuan; Li, Zi-Long; Song, Biao; Ernst, Richard E.; Li, Yin-Qi; Ren, Zhong-Yuan; Yang, Shu-Feng; Chen, Han-Lin; Xu, Yi-Gang; Song, Xie-Yan

    2015-01-01

    The Early Permian Tarim large igneous province (Tarim LIP) consists mainly of basaltic lavas, mafic-ultramafic intrusions including dikes and, syenite bodies in the Tarim Basin, NW China. A major unit of the Tarim LIP, the Wajilitag intrusive complex, consists of olivine pyroxenite, clinopyroxenite and gabbro units (from bottom to top), diorite and syenite rocks occurred in the upper part of the complex and alkali mafic dikes intrude the clinopyroxenite phase. Here we report the zircon U-Pb age and Hf isotopes, geochemical characteristics and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data of the alkali mafic dikes, and diorite, aegirine-nepheline syenite and syenite porphyry units in the Wajilitag intrusive complex. Zircons from the diorite and alkali mafic rocks yield concordant crystallization ages of 275.2 ± 1.2 Ma and 281.4 ± 1.7 Ma, respectively. The diorite and syenitic rocks in Wajilitag area have a narrow range of SiO2 contents (51.9-57.3 wt.%), and are enriched in total alkalis (Na2O + K2O = 8.3-14.3 wt.%), among which the aegirine-nepheline syenite and syenite porphyry have the geochemical affinity of A-type granites. The alkali mafic rocks and syenitic rocks have high Al2O3 (19.4-21.1 wt.%), Zr, Hf, Ba contents, total rare earth element abundances and LREE/HREE ratios and low Mg# value, K, P and Ti contents. Diorites have lower Al2O3 contents, total REE abundances and LREE/HREE ratios and higher Mg# values than the alkali mafic rocks and syenitic rocks. The diorites and syenitic rocks have low initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7034-0.7046), and high εNd(t) values (0.1-4.1) and zircon εHf(t) values (- 0.9-4.4). All the diorites and syenitic rocks show the 206Pb/204Pb ratios ranging of 18.0-19.5, 207Pb/204Pb of 15.4-15.6 and 208Pb/204Pb of 38.0-39.9. Sr-Nd isotopic ratios indicate a FOZO-like mantle source for the diorite and syenitic rocks, similar to that of the mafic-ultramafic rocks in the Wajilitag complex. In contrast, zircon Hf isotopes of basalt and syenite elsewhere in the

  9. Very low Ti /VLT/ basalts - A new mare rock type from the Apollo 17 drill core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Papike, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Phaneritic fragments, vitrophyres, and glass beads of a new very low Ti (VLT) mare basalt are found in the Apollo 17 drill core. VLT lithic fragments are characterized by TiO2 content of approximately 0.5%, Mg/(Mg + Fe) of approximately 0.52, CaO/Al2O3 of approximately 0.9, and low alkali content. Although mineral systematics and modal composition of VLT basalt are similar to Apollo 12 and 15 low Ti basalts, VLT basalts cannot be related to these mare basalts by crystal fractionation. Since VLT basalt is isochemical with some of the less mafic green glasses, fractionation of VLT magma from a liquid of green-glass composition is a possibility. Spectral reflectance studies suggest that VLT-type basalts may be relatively common in mare basins.

  10. Using 40Ar/39Ar ages of intercalated silicic tuffs to date flood basalts: Precise ages for Steens Basalt Member of the Columbia River Basalt Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahood, Gail A.; Benson, Thomas R.

    2017-02-01

    To establish causality between flood basalt eruptions and extinction events and global environmental effects recorded by isotopic excursions in marine sediments, highly accurate and precise ages for the flood basalts are required. But flood basalts are intrinsically difficult to date. We illustrate how 40Ar/39Ar feldspar ages for silicic tuffs intercalated with and overlying sections of Steens Basalt, the earliest lavas of the Middle Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group in the northwestern United States, provide high-precision ages that, for the first time, make it possible to resolve age differences with stratigraphic position within a section of these flood lavas. The stratigraphically lowest rhyolitic tuff, a fall deposit, yielded an age of 16.592 ± ± 0.028 Ma (FCs = 28.02 Ma), and the uppermost, the alkali rhyolite ignimbrite Tuff of Oregon Canyon, is 16.468 ± ± 0.014 Ma. The argon and stratigraphic data indicate that Steens Basalt eruptions occurred from ∼16.64 to 16.43 Ma in the southern end of its distribution. We estimate that the Steens Mountain geomagnetic reversal occurred at 16.496 ± ± 0.028 Ma (±0.18 Ma total error). Our estimates of the timing for initiation of volcanism and volumetric eruptive rates do not seem to support volcanic forcing by the initial stages of Columbia River Basalt Group eruptions as an explanation for the abrupt warming and carbonate dissolution at the beginning of the Miocene Climatic Optimum.

  11. Milk-alkali syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000332.htm Milk-alkali syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Milk-alkali syndrome is a condition in which there ...

  12. Occurrence and Mineral Chemistry of High Pressure Phases, Potrillo Basalt, Southcentral New Mexico. M.S. Thesis Final Technical Report, 1 Jun. 1980 - 31 May 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffield, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    The presence of an older plagioclase-rich basalt and a younger olivine-rich basalt were confirmed by modal and chemical analysis. Chemical analysis also confirmed the presence of flows that are tholeiitic in composition and could be remnants of an original tholeittic parent magma. Eruptions from different levels of a differentiated magma chamber are proposed to account for the two members.

  13. Petrology of basaltic sills from ocean drilling program sites 794 and 797 in the Yamato Basin of the Japan Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thy, P.

    1992-01-01

    The basaltic sills from ocean drilling program sites 794 and 797 in the Yamato Basin of the Japan Sea are characterized petrographically on the basis of a detailed study of the composition of relict phenocryst and groundmass phases. The systematic variation in the rock compositions is discussed. Results of 1-atm melting experiments on a relatively primitive basalt from site 797 are reported. The sills are found to constitute two distinct groups of suites: primitive, olivine-bearing suites with low potassium and primitive olivine-bearing to evolved, olivine-free suites with relatively high potassium. A pseudoinvariant reaction relationship between olivine and augite and magnetite is inferred. Complex magmatic and tectonic evolutions in the region, perhaps reflecting a transitional stage between subduction zone activity and back arc spreading, are suggested.

  14. Lunar basalt meteorite EET 87521: Petrology of the clast population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semenova, A. S.; Nazarov, M. A.; Kononkova, N. N.

    1993-01-01

    The Elephant Moraine meteorite EET 87521 was classified as a lunar mare basalt breccia which is composed mainly of VLT basalt clasts. Here we report on our petrological study of lithic clasts and monomineralic fragments in the thin sections EET 87521,54 and EET 87521,47,1, which were prepared from the meteorite. The results of the study show that EET 87521 consists mainly of Al-rich ferrobasalt clasts and olivine pyroxenite clasts. The bulk composition of the meteorite can be well modelled by the mixing of these lithic components which appear to be differentiates of the Luna 25 basalt melt. KREEP and Mg-rich gabbro components are minor constituents of EET 87521.

  15. Role of olivine cumulates in destabilizing the flanks of Hawaiian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Denlinger, R.P.

    1994-01-01

    The south flank of Kilauea Volcano is unstable and has the structure of a huge landslide; it is one of at least 17 enormous catastrophic landslides shed from the Hawaiian Islands. Mechanisms previously proposed for movement of the south flank invoke slip of the volcanic pile over seafloor sediments. Slip on a low friction de??collement alone cannot explain why the thickest and widest sector of the flank moves more rapidly than the rest, or why this section contains a 300 km3 aseismic volume above the seismically defined de??collement. It is proposed that this aseismic volume, adjacent to the caldera in the direction of flank slip, consists of olivine cumulates that creep outward, pushing the south flank seawards. Average primary Kilauea tholeiitic magma contains about 16.5 wt.% MgO compared with an average 10 wt.% MgO for erupted subaerial and submarine basalts. This difference requires fractionation of 17 wt.% (14 vol.%) olivine phenocrysts that accumulate near the base of the magma reservoir where they form cumulates. Submarine-erupted Kilauea lavas contain abundant deformed olivine xenocrysts derived from these cumulates. Deformed dunite formed during the tholeiitic shield stage is also erupted as xenoliths in subsequent alkalic lavas. The deformation structures in olivine xenocrysts suggest that the cumulus olivine was densely packed, probably with as little as 5-10 vol.% intercumulus liquid, before entrainment of the xenocrysts. The olivine cumulates were at magmatic temperatures (>1100??C) when the xenocrysts were entrained. Olivine at 1100??C has a rheology similar to ice, and the olivine cumulates should flow down and away from the summit of the volcano. Flow of the olivine cumulates places constant pressure on the unbuttressed seaward flank, leading to an extensional region that localizes deep intrusions behind the flank; these intrusions add to the seaward push. This mechanism ties the source of gravitational instability to the caldera complex and deep

  16. Trace-element modelling of mare basalt parental melts: Implications for a heterogeneous lunar mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallis, L. J.; Anand, M.; Strekopytov, S.

    2014-06-01

    The heterogeneous-source model of mare basalt formation indicates that Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) overturn produced an uneven mixture of early-formed olivine and pyroxene, and late-formed, ilmenite-rich cumulates, which subsequently partially melted to give rise to mare magmas. These heterogeneous cumulate source regions would not only have been characterised by different mineral modal abundances, but also by different trace element compositions. The aim of this work was to investigate the petrology and geochemistry of a diverse suite of Apollo mare basalts, and utilise trace-element modelling in order to understand their petrogenetic history. Chemical modelling confirms that the mare basalts were produced by relatively small degrees of partial melting (<10%) of the LMO cumulates, and that the dominant melting type (batch vs. fractional) varies among different basalt groups. Similarly, single-source mineralogy cannot be applied to all mare basalt types, confirming that the lunar mantle was heterogeneous at the time of generation of mare magmas. Plagioclase is not required in the source of most mare basalts, with the notable exception of the Apollo 14 high-Al basalts. Addition of more than 1% plagioclase to the source of other basalts produces weaker negative Eu anomalies than those observed in the samples. AFC calculations demonstrate the compositional differences between materials assimilated into the Apollo 14 high-Al and Apollo 11 high-K mare basalt partial melts, highlighting the complexities of mare basalt petrogenesis.

  17. Petrogenesis of basaltic volcanic rocks from the Pribilof Islands, Alaska, by melting of metasomatically enriched depleted lithosphere, crystallization differentiation, and magma mixing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, J.M.; Feeley, T.C.; Deraps, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    The Pribilof Islands, Alaska, are located in the Bering Sea in a continental intraplate setting. In this study we examine the petrology and geochemistry of volcanic rocks from St. Paul (0??54-0??003 Ma) and St. George (2??8-1??4 Ma) Islands, the two largest Pribilof Islands. Rocks from St. George can be divided into three groups: group 1 is a high-MgO, low-SiO. 2 suite composed primarily of basanites; group 2 is a high-MgO, high-SiO 2 suite consisting predominantly of alkali basalts; group 3 is an intermediate- to low-MgO suite that includes plagioclase-phyric subalkali basalts and hawaiites. Major and trace element geochemistry suggests that groups 1 and 2 formed by small-degree partial melting of amphibole-bearing to amphibole-free garnet peridotite. Group 1 rocks were the earliest melts produced from the most hydrous parts of the mantle, as they show the strongest geochemical signature of amphibole in their source. The suite of rocks from St. Paul ranges from 14??4 to 4??2 wt % MgO at relatively constant SiO 2 contents (43??1-47??3 wt %). The most primitive St. Paul rocks are modeled as mixtures between magmas with compositions similar to groups 1 and 2 from St. George Island, which subsequently fractionated olivine, clinopyroxene, and spinel to form more evolved rocks. Plagioclase-phyric group 3 rocks from St. George are modeled as mixtures between an evolved melt similar to the evolved magmas on St. Paul and a fractionated group 2 end-member from St. George. Mantle potential temperatures estimated for primitive basanites and alkali basalts are ???1400??C and are similar to those of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). Similarly, 87Sr/. 86Sr and 143Nd/. 144Nd values for all rocks are MORB-like, in the range of 0??702704-0??703035 and 0??513026-0??513109, respectively. 208Pb/. 204Pb vs 206Pb/. 204Pb values lie near the MORB end-member but show a linear trend towards HIMU (high time-integrated 238U/. 204Pb). Despite isotopic similarities to MORB, many of the major and

  18. Basalts and gabbros from Mare Crisium - Evidence for extreme fractional crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, F.; Taylor, L. A.; Jin, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Petrographic and electron microprobe techniques were used to examine igneous fragments in Luna 24 samples 24088 and 24105. It is the complex chemistry of the pyroxenes that distinguishes the different rock types. Basaltic pyroxenes exhibit an Fe-enrichment trend; the evolutionary trends are more complex in the gabbros, with enrichments in both Fe and Ti and a depletion in Cr. These chemical evolutionary trends are displayed by a progressive variation in rock types from Mg-rich olivine-gabbro to olivine-gabbro, and to ferrogabbro and ferrotroctolite. The low TiO2 content of the primary melt, possibly represented by the least-evolved Mg-rich olivine-gabbro, retarded the formation of early ilmenite and spinel, such that 'Fenner Trend' Fe enrichment occurred. The ferrotroctolite is probably the end product of chemical evolution by extreme fractional crystallization, controlled primarily by olivine and pyroxene crystallization.

  19. The ascent of kimberlite: Insights from olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, R. C.; Russell, J. K.; Andrews, G. D. M.; Jones, T. J.

    2015-08-01

    Olivine xenocrysts are ubiquitous in kimberlite deposits worldwide and derive from the disaggregation of mantle-derived peridotitic xenoliths. Here, we provide descriptions of textural features in xenocrystic olivine from kimberlite deposits at the Diavik Diamond Mine, Canada and at Igwisi Hills volcano, Tanzania. We establish a relative sequence of textural events recorded by olivine during magma ascent through the cratonic mantle lithosphere, including: xenolith disaggregation, decompression fracturing expressed as mineral- and fluid-inclusion-rich sealed and healed cracks, grain size and shape modification by chemical dissolution and abrasion, late-stage crystallization of overgrowths on olivine xenocrysts, and lastly, mechanical milling and rounding of the olivine cargo prior to emplacement. Ascent through the lithosphere operates as a "kimberlite factory" wherein progressive upward dyke propagation of the initial carbonatitic melt fractures the overlying mantle to entrain and disaggregate mantle xenoliths. Preferential assimilation of orthopyroxene (Opx) xenocrysts by the silica-undersaturated carbonatitic melt leads to deep-seated exsolution of CO2-rich fluid generating buoyancy and supporting rapid ascent. Concomitant dissolution of olivine produces irregular-shaped relict grains preserved as cores to most kimberlitic olivine. Multiple generations of decompression cracks in olivine provide evidence for a progression in ambient fluid compositions (e.g., from carbonatitic to silicic) during ascent. Numerical modelling predicts tensile failure of xenoliths (disaggregation) and olivine (cracks) over ascent distances of 2-7 km and 15-25 km, respectively, at velocities of 0.1 to >4 m s-1. Efficient assimilation of Opx during ascent results in a silica-enriched, olivine-saturated kimberlitic melt (i.e. SiO2 >20 wt.%) that crystallizes overgrowths on partially digested and abraded olivine xenocrysts. Olivine saturation is constrained to occur at pressures <1 GPa; an

  20. Searching for nonlocal lithologies in the Apollo 12 regolith: A geochemical and petrological study of basaltic coarse fines from the Apollo lunar soil sample 12023,155

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Louise; Snape, Joshua F.; Crawford, Ian A.; Joy, Katherine H.; Downes, Hilary

    2014-07-01

    New data from a petrological and geochemical examination of 12 coarse basaltic fines from the Apollo 12 soil sample 12023,155 provide evidence of additional geochemical diversity at the landing site. In addition to the bulk chemical composition, major, minor, and trace element analyses of mineral phases are employed to ascertain how these samples relate to the Apollo 12 lithological basalt groups, thereby overcoming the problems of representativeness of small samples. All of the samples studied are low-Ti basalts (0.9-5.7 wt% TiO2), and many fall into the established olivine, pigeonite, and ilmenite classification of Apollo 12 basaltic suites. There are five exceptions: sample 12023,155_1A is mineralogically and compositionally distinct from other Apollo 12 basalt types, with low pigeonite REE concentrations and low Ni (41-55 ppm) and Mn (2400-2556 ppm) concentrations in olivine. Sample 12023,155_11A is also unique, with Fe-rich mineral compositions and low bulk Mg# (=100 × atomic Mg/[Mg+Fe]) of 21.6. Sample 12023,155_7A has different plagioclase chemistry and crystallization trends as well as a wider range of olivine Mg# (34-55) compared with other Apollo 12 basalts, and shows greater similarities to Apollo 14 high-Al basalts. Two other samples (12023,155_4A, and _5A) are similar to the Apollo 12 feldspathic basalt 12038, providing additional evidence that feldspathic basalts represent a lava flow proximal to the Apollo 12 site rather than material introduced by impacts. We suggest that at least one parent magma, and possibly as many as four separate parent magmas, are required in addition to the previously identified olivine, pigeonite, and ilmenite basaltic suites to account for the observed chemical diversity of basalts found in this study.

  1. Aligned olivine in the Springwater pallasite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler-Gerace, Neva A.; Tait, Kimberly T.; Moser, Desmond E.; Barker, Ivan; Tian, Bob Y.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism by which olivine grains became embedded within iron-nickel alloy in pallasite meteorites continues to be a matter of scientific debate. Geochemical and textural observations have failed to fully elucidate the origin and history of the olivine crystals; however, little research attention has been devoted to their crystallographic orientations within the metal matrix. Using electron backscatter diffraction, we have collected crystallographic orientation data for 296 crystals within ˜65 cm2 sample surface from Springwater. Though no global crystallographic preferred orientation exists, very low misorientations are observed among [100] axes of olivine crystals within specific texturally defined domains. Combined with a thorough characterization of large-scale Springwater textures, the definitively nonrandom spatial distribution of olivine orientations provides clues regarding the nature of the olivine's initial formation environment as well as the sequence of events subsequent to metal incorporation.

  2. Petrogenesis of Late Cenozoic basaltic rocks from southern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, A.-Rim; Choi, Sung Hi; Yu, Yongjae; Lee, Der-Chuen

    2017-02-01

    Major and trace element concentrations, and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic compositions of Late Cenozoic (4.1 to 13.8 Ma) basaltic rocks from southern Vietnam have been determined to understand the nature of their mantle source. The volcanic rocks are composed of tholeiite basalt, alkaline basanite, trachybasalt, basaltic trachyandesite, and trachyandesite. The alkaline rocks show light rare earth element (LREE) enrichment, with (La/Yb)N = 10.3-29.8. The tholeiite basalts are distinguished by much lower values (8.8-9.5) of (La/Yb)N. On a primitive mantle-normalized trace element distribution diagram, they show oceanic island basalt (OIB)-like large-ion lithophile element enrichment without high field strength element depletion. However, some samples exhibit positive anomalies in K and Pb and negative anomalies in Sm, suggesting K-rich residual amphibole in the source. The samples contain Sr (87Sr/86Sr = 0.703794-0.704672), Nd (ɛNd = + 1.7-5.7), Hf (ɛHf = + 4.0-10.9), and Pb (206Pb/204Pb = 18.23-18.75; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.53-15.59; 208Pb/204Pb = 38.32-38.88) isotopes, plotting among OIBs, with depleted mid-ocean ridge basalt mantle-enriched mantle type 2 (DMM-EM2) characteristics. There are no discernible isotopic differences between tholeiite and the alkaline series, reflecting the same source. The Nd and Hf isotopic compositions are coupled, and plot along the mantle-crust array, ruling out the possibility of lithospheric mantle in the source. Plots of NiO against the Fo numbers of olivines from the basaltic rocks are within the range of Hainan and Hawaiian basalt olivines, implying that hybrid pyroxenite is present in the source. Also note that the estimated primary melt compositions fall within the experimental field defined by partial melting of silica-poor eclogite and peridotite. The effective melting pressure (Pf) and melting temperature (T) of the primary melts are Pf = 29.6-32.8 kbar and T = 1470-1480 °C. We suggest that Vietnamese basaltic rocks may be produced by

  3. Magma mixing at mid-ocean ridges - Evidence from legs 45 and 46-DSDP. [petrologic and geochemical study of basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dungan, M. A.; Long, P. E.; Rhodes, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    An integrated petrologic and geochemical study of basalts recovered in Legs 45 and 46 (DSDP) has indicated, on the basis of disequilibrium mineralogy, that these moderately evolved basalts are mixtures of primitive mantle-derived tholeiites with more evolved magmas. Plagioclase phenocrysts are characterized by substantial diversity in composition and zoning pattern. Many olivine and plagioclase phenocrysts are too refractory to be in equilibrium with liquids of the host basalt composition but possess a composition consistent with crystallization from a primitive mantle-derived basalt liquid. On the basis of melt inclusions trapped in the olivine phenocrysts, features of the primitive melt are estimated. It is suggested that subvolcanic magma chambers beneath midocean ridges receive periodic injections of this primitive melt and its attendant phenocrysts which mix with fractionated chamber-bound magmas, resulting in observed moderately evolved lavas.

  4. Petrological and Geochemical characterization of central Chihuahua basalts: a possible local sign of rifting activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espejel-Garcia, V. V.; Garcia-Rascon, M.; Villalobos-Aragon, A.; Morton-Bermea, O.

    2012-12-01

    The central part of the mexican state, Chihuahua, is the oriental border of the Sierra Madre Occidental (silicic large igneous province), which consist of series of ignimbrites divided into two volcanic groups of andesites and rhyolites. In the central region of Chihuahua, the volcanic rocks are now part of the Basin and Range, allowing the presence of mafic rocks in the lower areas. The study area is located approximately 200 km to the NW of Chihuahua city near to La Guajolota town, in the Namiquipa County. There are at least 5 outcrops of basalts to the west of the road, named Puerto de Lopez, Malpaises, El Tascate, Quebrada Honda, and Carrizalio, respectively. These outcrops have only been previously described by the Mexican Geologic Survey (SGM) as thin basaltic flows, with vesicles filled with quartz, and phenocrystals of labradorite, andesine, oligoclase and olivine. Petrologically, the basalts present different textures, from small phenocrysts of plagioclase in a very fine matrix to large, zoned and sometimes broken phenocrysts of plagioclase in a coarser matrix. All samples have olivine in an advanced state of alteration, iddingsite. The geochemical analyses report that these basaltic flows contain characteristics of rift basalts. The rocks have a normative olivine values from 5.78 to 27.26 and nepheline values from 0 to 2.34. In the TAS diagram the samples straddle the join between basalt and trachy-basalt, reflecting a high K2O content. The Mg# average is 0.297, a value that suggests that the basalts do not come from a primitive magma. The basalts have high values of Ba (945-1334 ppm), Cu (54-147 ppm), and Zn (123-615 ppm). The contents of Rb (23-57 ppm), Sr (659-810 ppm), Y (26-33 ppm), Zr (148-217 ppm) and Cr (79-98 ppm) are characteristics of rift basalts. Using discrimination diagrams, the basalts plot in the field of within plate, supporting the rifting origin. Outcrops of other basalts, at about 80 to 100 km to the east of the study area, Lomas El

  5. Laboratory Simulated Acid-Sulfate Weathering of Basaltic Materials: Implications for Formation of Sulfates at Meridiani Planum and Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Mertzman, A.

    2006-01-01

    Acid-sulfate weathering of basaltic materials is a candidate formation process for the sulfate-rich outcrops and rocks at the MER rover Opportunity and Spirit landing sites. To determine the style of acid-sulfate weathering on Mars, we weathered basaltic materials (olivine-rich glassy basaltic sand and plagioclase feldspar-rich basaltic tephra) in the laboratory under different oxidative, acid-sulfate conditions and characterized the alteration products. We investigated alteration by (1) sulfuric-acid vapor (acid fog), (2) three-step hydrothermal leaching treatment approximating an open system and (3) single-step hydrothermal batch treatment approximating a "closed system." In acid fog experiments, Al, Fe, and Ca sulfates and amorphous silica formed from plagioclase-rich tephra, and Mg and Ca sulfates and amorphous silica formed from the olivine-rich sands. In three-step leaching experiments, only amorphous Si formed from the plagioclase-rich basaltic tephra, and jarosite, Mg and Ca sulfates and amorphous silica formed from olivine-rich basaltic sand. Amorphous silica formed under single-step experiments for both starting materials. Based upon our experiments, jarosite formation in Meridiani outcrop is potential evidence for an open system acid-sulfate weathering regime. Waters rich in sulfuric acid percolated through basaltic sediment, dissolving basaltic phases (e.g., olivine) and forming jarosite, other sulfates, and iron oxides. Aqueous alteration of outcrops and rocks on the West Spur of the Columbia Hills may have occurred when vapors rich in SO2 from volcanic sources reacted with basaltic materials. Soluble ions from the host rock (e.g., olivine) reacted with S to form Ca-, Mg-, and other sulfates along with iron oxides and oxyhydroxides.

  6. Argon Diffusion in Shocked Pyroxene, Feldspar, and Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, J.; Isachsen, C. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Swindle, T.

    2010-12-01

    Background: The diffusion rate of argon (Ar) in unshocked feldspar has been well studied, but studies on pyroxene and olivine are limited or non-existent. Likewise, the effects of shock on these mineral groups is also limited or non-existent. Understanding how shock affects these mineral groups is important for determining the thermal history of shocked meteorites and collisional impact craters. We have analyzed the Ar diffusion rate of an albitite and a pyroxenite at various experimental shock pressures up to ~60GPa, unshocked high-Ca pyroxene, and an olivine mineral separate from the Springwater meteorite. A previous study of shocked feldspar has shown that Ar diffusion in plagioclase (An67) is unaffected by experimental shock [1]. Re-reduction of data from another study [2] suggests naturally shocked K-rich feldspar is affected, though experimentally shocked oligoclase feldspar (An10-30) is not affected. However, previous shock experiments on feldspar were performed with low temperature resolution and only a single extraction at each temperature. This makes determining the diffusion parameters difficult because the presence of multiple grain sizes can compromise the data. By performing our experiments with a higher temperature resolution and with two extractions at each temperature, we can attain higher quality and more reliable data. The effects of shock on pyroxene and olivine have never been studied. Results: We have found that experimental shock undoubtedly raises the diffusivity of albite (Ab97), and lowers the activation energy required for diffusion. Comparison with previous data indicates that the Ca content may be controlling the response to shock. Pyroxene seems to be somewhat variable regardless of shock pressure, even within the same sample. Shock may have an effect on the diffusion rate of pyroxene, but given the variability it is difficult to delineate. The range of pyroxene diffusion rates is similar to previous studies. Olivine is found to have a

  7. Olivine and chromian spinel in primitive calc-alkaline and tholeiitic lavas from the southernmost cascade range, California: A reflection of relative fertility of the source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clynne, M.A.; Borg, L.E.

    1997-01-01

    Chromian spinel and coexisting olivine phenocrysts from a geochemically diverse suite of primitive tholeiitic and calc-alkaline basalts and magnesian andesites from the Lassen region, in the southernmost Cascade Range, in California, show that the sub-arc mantle is zoned. Depleted calc-alkaline basalts and magnesian andesites erupt in the forearc region, and calc-alkaline basalts contain increasing abundances of incompatible elements toward the backarc. High-alumina olivine tholeiites erupt from the arc and backarc areas. Olivine from all these lavas displays a limited compositional range, from Fo86 to Fo91, and crystallized at high temperature, generally 1225-1275??C. Chromian spinel trapped in the olivine phenocrysts displays a large range of composition: Cr# values span the range 9-76. Excess Al in the spinel relative to that in 1-atm spinel suggests that it crystallized at elevated pressure. The phenocrysts in these lavas are in equilibrium with their host liquids. The full range of Cr# of the spinel compositions cannot be explained by differentiation or variable pressure, variations in f(O2), subsolidus equilibration or variations in degree of partial melting of a single peridotitic source. Rather, the systematic compositional differences among phenocrysts in these primitive lavas result from bulk chemical variability in their mantle sources. Correlations between spinel and host-rock compositions support the assertion that the geochemical diversity of Lassen basalts reflects the relative fertility of their mantle sources.

  8. Geologic Mapping of Basalt Flows: Implications for Petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Grove, T. L.; Champion, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    in TiO2-Mg# (0.85% TiO2 with Mg# 66 to 1.45% TiO2 with Mg# 50); among the mapped basalts, only this one shows an observable range of paleomagnetic secular variation. Among the four compositionally-zoned basalts, only the Giant Crater unit displays petrographic variation with early higher-SiO2 lava being porphyritic in plag and olivine. At Newberry Volcano in central OR, the basalt of Badlands/Lava Top Butte, with its distinctive transitional paleomagnetic direction covers two separate 150-sq-km areas. The eruption progressed from early-erupted lava with 48.5% SiO2 at 310 ppm Sr to 51.5% SiO2 at 480 ppm Sr. Three other big basalt flows show more limited ranges in SiO2 content, but noticeable ranges in trace element composition. Each flow is characterized by an individually singular paleomagnetic direction. Geologic mapping and stratigraphy of basalt flows, where compositionally zoned, can provide petrologists with tools to help decipher both magmatic sources and processes.

  9. Understanding cratonic flood basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Paul G.; Behn, Mark D.; Kelley, Katherine; Schmitz, Mark; Savage, Brian

    2006-05-01

    The origin of continental flood basalts has been debated for decades. These eruptions often produce millions of cubic kilometers of basalt on timescales of only a million years. Although flood basalts are found in a variety of settings, no locale is more puzzling than cratonic areas such as southern Africa or the Siberian craton, where strong, thick lithosphere is breached by these large basaltic outpourings. Conventionally, flood basalts have been interpreted as melting events produced by one of two processes: 1) elevated temperatures associated with mantle plumes and/or 2) adiabatic-decompression melting associated with lithospheric thinning. In southern Africa, however, there are severe problems with both of these mechanisms. First, the rifting circumstances of several well-known basaltic outpourings clearly reflect lithospheric control rather than the influence of a deep-seated plume. Specifically, rift timing and magmatism are correlated with stress perturbations to the lithosphere associated with the formation of collisional rifts. Second, the substantial lithospheric thinning required for adiabatic decompression melting is inconsistent with xenolith evidence for the continued survival of thick lithosphere beneath flood basalt domains. As an alternative to these models, we propose a new two-stage model that interprets cratonic flood basalts not as melting events, but as short-duration drainage events that tap previously created sublithospheric reservoirs of molten basalt formed over a longer time scale. Reservoir creation/existence (Stage I) requires long-term (e.g. ≫ 1 Ma) supersolidus conditions in the sublithospheric mantle that could be maintained by an elevated equilibrium geotherm (appropriate for the Archean), a slow thermal perturbation (e.g. thermal blanketing or large-scale mantle upwelling), or a subduction-related increase in volatile content. The drainage event (Stage II) occurs in response to an abrupt stress change in the lithosphere, which

  10. Melt rock components in KREEPy breccia 15205: Petrography and mineral chemistry of KREEP basalts and quartz-normative mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, John W.; Vetter, Scott K.

    1993-01-01

    Many current models for the origin of lunar highland rocks feature as an essential component the assimilation of KREEPy material by primitive magmas parental to the Mg-rich suite and alkali suite plutonic rocks. Similar models have also been proposed for the origin of various mare basalt suites. However, any model which considers assimilation of KREEP an important petrologic process must sooner-or-later deal with the question: what is KREEP? Because pristine KREEP basalts are rare, and most known samples are small (e.g., 15382/15386), the geochemical variability of KREEP basalts is poorly known. Other KREEP compositions which are commonly used in these models include the hypothetical 'high-K KREEP' component of Warren and Wasson, which is derived from Apollo 14 soil data, and the 'superKREEP' quartz-monzodiorite 15405. Lunar breccia 15205 is a polymict regolith breccia that consists of approximately 20% KREEP basalt clasts and 20% quartz-normative basalt clasts in a KREEP-rich matrix. Bulk rock mixing calculations show that this sample comprises about 84% KREEP. The clasts range up to 1 cm in size, but most are considerably smaller. The primary aim is to characterize pristine KREEP basalts petrographically, to establish the range in chemical compositions of KREEP basalts, and to test models that were proposed for their origin. In addition, we may be able to extend the compositional range recognized in the quartz-normative basalt suite and cast some light on its origin as well. Preliminary whole rock geochemical data on the KREEP basalts are presented in a companion paper by M.M. Lindstrom and co-workers. Concentration is on petrography and mineral chemistry of these clasts, and the implications these data have for the origin of the different melt rock suites.

  11. Chromium valences in ureilite olivine and implications for ureilite petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, C. A.; Sutton, S. R.; Wirick, S.; Jercinovic, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    basaltic melt composition), consistent with fO2 values obtained by assuming olivine-silica-iron metal (OSI) equilibrium. For the primary chromite-bearing-ureilites, the corresponding fO2 were estimated (again, assuming basaltic melt composition) to be ∼IW to IW+1.0, i.e., several orders of magnitude more oxidizing than the conditions estimated for the chromite-free ureilites. In terms of Fo and Cr valence properties, ureilites appear to form two groups rather than a single “Cr-valence (or fO2) vs. Fo” trend. The chromite-bearing ureilites show little variation in Fo (∼74-76) but significant variation in Cr valence, while the non-chromite-bearing ureilites show significant variation in Fo (∼77-95) and little variation in Cr valence. These groups are unrelated to petrologic type (i.e., olivine-pigeonite, olivine-orthopyroxene, or augite-bearing). The chromite-bearing ureilites also have lower contents of Cr in olivine than most non-chromite-bearing ureilites, consistent with predictions based on Cr olivine/melt partitioning in spinel saturated vs. non-spinel-saturated systems. Under the assumption that at magmatic temperatures graphite-gas equilibria controlled fO2 at all depths on the ureilite parent body, we conclude: (1) that ureilite precursor materials having the Fo and Cr valence properties now observed in ureilites are unlikely to have been preserved during planetary processing; and (2) that the Fo and Cr valence properties now observed in ureilites are consistent with having been established by high-temperature carbon redox control over a range of depths on a plausible-sized ureilite parent body. The apparent limit on ureilite Fo values around 74-76 suggests that the precursor material(s) had bulk mg# ⩾ that of LL chondrites.

  12. Temperature and composition dependencies of trace element partitioning - Olivine/melt and low-Ca pyroxene/melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, R. O.; Mckay, G. A.; Taylor, L. A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic thermodynamic analysis of the effects of temperature and composition on olivine/melt and low-Ca pyroxene/melt partitioning. Experiments were conducted in several synthetic basalts with a wide range of Fe/Mg, determining partition coefficients for Eu, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Sm, Cd, Y, Yb, Sc, Al, Zr, and Ti and modeling accurately the changes in free energy for trace element exchange between crystal and melt as functions of the trace element size and charge. On the basis of this model, partition coefficients for olivine/melt and low-Ca pyroxene/melt can be predicted for a wide range of elements over a variety of basaltic bulk compositions and temperatures. Moreover, variations in partition coeffeicients during crystallization or melting can be modeled on the basis of changes in temperature and major element chemistry.

  13. Surface exposure dating of Holocene basalt flows and cinder cones in the Kula volcanic field (western Turkey) using cosmogenic 3He and 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heineke, Caroline; Niedermann, Samuel; Hetzel, Ralf; Akal, Cüneyt

    2015-04-01

    The Kula volcanic field is the youngest volcanic province in western Anatolia and covers an area of about 600 km2 around the town Kula (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996). Its alkali basalts formed by melting of an isotopically depleted mantle in a region of long-lived continental extension and asthenospheric upwelling (Prelevic et al., 2012). Based on morphological criteria and 40Ar/39Ar dating, four phases of Quaternary activity have been distinguished in the Kula volcanic field (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996; Westaway et al., 2006). The youngest lava flows are thought to be Holocene in age, but so far only one sample from this group was dated by 40Ar/39Ar at 7±2 ka (Westaway et al., 2006). In this study, we analysed cosmogenic 3He in olivine phenocrysts from three basalt flows and one cinder cone to resolve the Holocene history of volcanic eruptions in more detail. In addition, we applied 10Be exposure dating to two quartz-bearing xenoliths found at the surface of one flow and at the top of one cinder cone. The exposure ages fall in the range between ~500 and ~3000 years, demonstrating that the youngest volcanic activity is Late Holocene in age and therefore distinctly younger than previously envisaged. Our results show that the Late Holocene lava flows are not coeval but formed over a period of a few thousand years. We conclude that surface exposure dating of very young volcanic rocks provides a powerful alternative to 40Ar/39Ar dating. References Prelevic, D., Akal, C. Foley, S.F., Romer, R.L., Stracke, A. and van den Bogaard, P. (2012). Ultrapotassic mafic rocks as geochemical proxies for post-collisional dynamics of orogenic lithospheric mantle: the case of southwestern Anatolia, Turkey. Journal of Petrology, 53, 1019-1055. Richardson-Bunbury, J.M. (1996). The Kula Volcanic Field, western Turkey: the development of a Holocene alkali basalt province and the adjacent normal-faulting graben. Geological Magazine, 133, 275-283. Westaway, R., Guillou, H., Yurtmen, S., Beck, A

  14. Basaltic diversity at the Apollo 12 landing site: Inferences from petrologic examinations of the soil sample 12003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snape, Joshua F.; Joy, Katherine H.; Crawford, Ian A.; Alexander, Louise

    2014-05-01

    A detailed petrologic survey has been made of 17 basaltic chips (sized between 1 and 10 mm) from the 12003 soil sample as part of an ongoing study of basaltic diversity at the Apollo 12 landing site. An attempt has been made to classify these samples according to the well-established grouping of olivine, pigeonite, ilmenite, and feldspathic basalts. Particular attention has been paid to variations in major, minor, and trace element mineral chemistry (determined by electron microprobe analysis and laser ablation ICP-MS), which may be indicative of particular basaltic suites and less susceptible to sampling bias than bulk sample characteristics. Examples of all three main (olivine, pigeonite, and ilmenite) basaltic suites have been identified within the 12003 soil. One sample is identified as a possible new addition to the feldspathic suite, which currently consists of only one other confirmed sample. Identification of additional feldspathic basalts strengthens the argument that they represent a poorly sampled basaltic flow local to the Apollo 12 site, rather than exotic material introduced to the site by impact mixing processes. Three samples are identified as representing members of one or two previously unrecognized basaltic suites.

  15. Pyroxenes and olivines from a Galapagos spreading center (GSC) rhyodacite record crystal fractionation and magma mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Mattson, S.R.; Byerly, G.R.; Carpenter, P.

    1985-01-01

    Phenocrysts and xenocrysts of augite, subcalcic augite, pigeonite, orthopyroxene, and olivine in two glassy rhyodacite dredge samples from 95/sup 0/W on the GSC reflect a complex history of fractional crystallization and magma mixing. The pyroxene compositions can be grouped into clusters reflecting three major sources: a) Fenumber approx. 0.2 from basalt, b) Fenumber approx. 0.5 from rhyodacite, and c) Fenumber approx. 0.6 from rhyolite. Pyroxene Ti/Al ratios of 1:14, 1:7 and 1:3 have Fenumbers suggesting original crystallization from basalt, rhyodacite, and rhyolite melts respectively. These general compositional groups are typical of those produced during fractional crystallization of basalt to rhyolite. At relatively constant Fenumber the augites in any group display a wide spectrum of variation in Wo, Al, and Ti. Basaltic augite core to rim variations exhibit both increases and decreases in Ti at nearly constant Fenumber. A continuous variation in subcalcic augites is present from Fe-augite to Fe-pigeonite. These effects are likely kinetic, perhaps due to rapid cooling rates, but possibly due to supersaturation produced during mixing. Magma mixing may have played an important role in bringing together these contrasting components. The abundance of very-fine-grained basaltic xenoliths and xenocrysts, the glassy rhyolitic inclusions and associated xenocrysts, along with major reverse zoning in Fenumber or major discontinuities in Fenumber in the ferromagnesian phases all point to coexisting melts of radically differing composition.

  16. Melt Segregation & LPO in Anorthite-Basalt Deformed in Torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, M. E.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2003-12-01

    Deformation in the middle and lower crust is in large part controlled by the rheology of feldspar. Seismic studies have shown that the middle crust of orogenic belts is partially molten. Structural studies of mylonites and migmatites from these terrains record large strain deformation. Therefore, we performed torsional shear deformation experiments on fine grained (10 μ m) samples of Beaver Bay anorthite (An70) +/- 10 vol% basalt to shear strains γ = 2-6 to investigate the development of lattice preferred orientation (LPO) and melt segregation at large shear strains. We performed experiments in a gas medium apparatus equipped with an internal torque cell at T = 1450 K, P = 300 MPa, and constant twist rate. Melt segregated in the An70 + basalt samples into melt-rich bands oriented at ˜20° to the shear plane and antithetic to the shear direction. The spacing between bands is ˜0.5 mm. Distortion of the iron jacket demonstrates that strain localized in the melt-rich bands. We determined the LPO of An70 with scanning electron microscopy using electron back scatter diffraction (SEM-EBSD). In patterns from an An70+ basalt sample deformed to γ ≈ 2.5, (001) planes are aligned subparallel to the shear plane and [100] axes are concentrated close to the shear direction. Both the (001) and the [100] are rotated counter clockwise from the shear direction by 20-25° . The formation of melt-rich bands is consistent with results from simple shear experiments on olivine + chromite + basalt and olivine + FeS +/- basalt, as well as An70 + basalt and indicates that deformation can drive melt segregation. Deformation drives the self organization of melt-rich bands and decreases the effective viscosity of the rock. The LPO is consistent with results from experiments on albite in shear and anorthite in compression and compatible with slip dominantly on (001) with [100] as the slip direction. A similar back rotation, attributed to partitioning of the strain between melt-rich and

  17. Olivine-dominated asteroids: Mineralogy and origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Juan A.; Reddy, Vishnu; Kelley, Michael S.; Cloutis, Edward A.; Bottke, William F.; Nesvorný, David; Lucas, Michael P.; Hardersen, Paul S.; Gaffey, Michael J.; Abell, Paul A.; Corre, Lucille Le

    2014-01-01

    Olivine-dominated asteroids are a rare type of objects formed either in nebular processes or through magmatic differentiation. The analysis of meteorite samples suggest that at least 100 parent bodies in the main belt experienced partial or complete melting and differentiation before being disrupted. However, only a few olivine-dominated asteroids, representative of the mantle of disrupted differentiated bodies, are known to exist. Due to the paucity of these objects in the main belt their origin and evolution have been a matter of great debate over the years. In this work we present a detailed mineralogical analysis of twelve olivine-dominated asteroids. We have obtained near-infrared (NIR) spectra (0.7-2.4 μm) of asteroids (246) Asporina, (289) Nenetta, (446) Aeternitas, (863) Benkoela, (4125) Lew Allen and (4490) Bamberry. Observations were conducted with the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawai'i. This sample was complemented with spectra of six other olivine-dominated asteroids including (354) Eleonora, (984) Gretia, (1951) Lick, (2501) Lohja, (3819) Robinson and (5261) Eureka obtained by previous workers. Within our sample we distinguish two classes, one that we call monomineralic-olivine asteroids, which are those whose spectra only exhibit the 1 μm feature, and another referred to as olivine-rich asteroids, whose spectra exhibit the 1 μm feature and a weak (Band II depth ˜4%) 2 μm feature. For the monomineralic-olivine asteroids the olivine chemistry was found to range from ˜Fo49 to Fo70, consistent with the values measured for brachinites and R chondrites. In the case of the olivine-rich asteroids we determined their olivine and low-Ca pyroxene abundance using a new set of spectral calibrations derived from the analysis of R chondrites spectra. We found that the olivine abundance for these asteroids varies from 0.68 to 0.93, while the fraction of low-Ca pyroxene to total pyroxene ranges from 0.6 to 0.9. A search for dynamical

  18. A More Reduced Mantle Source for Enriched Shergottites; Insights from the Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Lar 06319

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, A. H.; Hnatyshin, D.; Herd, C. D. K.; Walton, E. L.; Brandon, A. D.; Lapen, T. J.; Shafer, J.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed petrographic study of melt inclusions and Cr-Fe-Ti oxides of LAR 06319 leads to two main conclusions: 1) this enriched oxidized olivine- phyric shergottite represents nearly continuous crystallization of a basaltic shergottite melt, 2) the melt became more oxidized during differentiation. The first crystallized mineral assemblages record the oxygen fugacity which is closest to that of the melt s mantle source, and which is lower than generally attributed to the enriched shergottite group.

  19. The role of melt-rock interaction in the formation of Quaternary high-MgO potassic basalt from the Greater Khingan Range, northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Qiang; Chen, Li-Hui; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Zhong, Yuan; Yu, Xun; Zeng, Gang; Erdmann, Saskia

    2017-01-01

    Melt-rock interaction between ascending melt and peridotite results in mantle metasomatism and also leads to compositional modification of the primary melt. While this process is known to occur, it is less well understood how the reactions and the composition of the resulting magma temporally evolve. Here whole-rock major and trace element, Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopes, and olivine major element composition of Quaternary Nuominhe basalts in the Greater Khingan Range of northeast China are presented to unravel how melt-rock interaction modified the composition of the high-MgO potassic basalts as time progressed. The Nuominhe basalts are predominantly basanite with high MgO (8.1-16.8 wt %) and high total alkali content (K2O + Na2O = 6.0-9.2 wt %). They have high K2O/Na2O ratios (K2O/Na2O = 0.77-1.24) and low SiO2 and Al2O3 content (SiO2 = 44.4-48.7 wt %, Al2O3 = 10.5-13.2 wt %). They are characterized by enrichment in strongly incompatible elements, positive Ba, K, and Sr and negative Th, U, Zr, Hf, and Ti anomalies, similar to the composition of enriched mantle (EM1)-type oceanic island basalts (OIBs). Their isotopic composition also compares to that of EM1-type OIBs (i.e., with 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70467-0.70483, ɛNd = -4.1 to -1.5, ɛHf = -0.3 to 2.3, 206Pb/204Pb = 17.03-17.36). These elemental and isotopic characteristics are consistent with the interpretation that the potassium-rich melts were derived from recycled crustal materials with EM1 signature. Phlogopite-bearing mantle xenoliths and zoned olivine xenocrysts with high Fo89-92 and low CaO (<0.1 wt %) core and low Fo75-86 and high CaO (>0.1 wt %) rim composition record interaction between the ascending melt and mantle peridotite. Basalts erupted during late stages (Late Pleistocene and Holocene) of activity at the Nuominhe volcanic field show notably higher SiO2 content, Rb/Nb, Ba/Nb, K/La, and Ba/La, and lower MgO content than early-stage basalts (Early and Middle Pleistocene), which we infer to reflect a temporally

  20. Nanoparticulate mineral matter from basalt dust wastes.

    PubMed

    Dalmora, Adilson C; Ramos, Claudete G; Querol, Xavier; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Taffarel, Silvio R; Moreno, Teresa; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-02-01

    Ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during "stonemeal" soil fertilizer application have been the subject of some concern recently around the world for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the mining district of Nova Prata in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/(Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) EDS/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM)/EDS and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, Zn that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and could so present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical composition in typical BDW samples highlights the need to develop cleaning procedures to minimise exposure to these natural fertilizing basalt dust wastes and is thus of direct relevance to both the industrial sector of basalt mining and to agriculture in the region.

  1. The Sr and Nd isotopic record of Apollo 12 basalts - Implications for lunar geochemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Wooden, J. L.; Bansal, B. M.; Wiesmann, H.

    1979-01-01

    Alkali, alkaline earth, and rare earth element data are reported for several Apollo 12 basalts which are representative of the four Apollo 12 magma types. Results confirm the heterogeneity of the lunar mantle and show that the Sm/Nd ratio of at least the Apollo 12 ilmenite basalts was decreased by 13-24% during magma genesis. In addition, whole mare basalt Sm-Nd data are not collinear on an isochron diagram; thus it is no longer possible to explain these data via mixing of 'primitive material' and 'early differentiates' as in the hybridization and assimilation models.

  2. Diffusion-driven magnesium and iron isotope fractionation in Hawaiian olivine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teng, F.-Z.; Dauphas, N.; Helz, R.T.; Gao, S.; Huang, S.

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion plays an important role in Earth sciences to estimate the timescales of geological processes such as erosion, sediment burial, and magma cooling. In igneous systems, these diffusive processes are recorded in the form of crystal zoning. However, meaningful interpretation of these signatures is often hampered by the fact that they cannot be unambiguously ascribed to a single process (e.g., magmatic fractionation, diffusion limited transport in the crystal or in the liquid). Here we show that Mg and Fe isotope fractionations in olivine crystals can be used to trace diffusive processes in magmatic systems. Over sixty olivine fragments from Hawaiian basalts show isotopically fractionated Mg and Fe relative to basalts worldwide, with up to 0.4??? variation in 26Mg/24Mg ratios and 1.6??? variation in 56Fe/54Fe ratios. The linearly and negatively correlated Mg and Fe isotopic compositions [i.e., ??56Fe=(??3.3??0.3)????26Mg], co-variations of Mg and Fe isotopic compositions with Fe/Mg ratios of olivine fragments, and modeling results based on Mg and Fe elemental profiles demonstrate the coupled Mg and Fe isotope fractionation to be a manifestation of Mg-Fe inter-diffusion in zoned olivines during magmatic differentiation. This characteristic can be used to constrain the nature of mineral zoning in igneous and metamorphic rocks, and hence determine the residence times of crystals in magmas, the composition of primary melts, and the duration of metamorphic events. With improvements in methodology, in situ isotope mapping will become an essential tool of petrology to identify diffusion in crystals. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Shock and thermal metamorphism of basalt by nuclear explosion, nevada test site.

    PubMed

    James, O B

    1969-12-26

    Olivine trachybasalt metamorphosed by nuclear explosion is classified into categories of progressive metamorphism: (i) Weak. Plagioclase is microfracruree, and augite contains twin lamellae. (ii) Moderate. Plagioclase is converted to glass, amd mafic minerals show intragranular deformation (undulatory extinction, twin lamellae, and, possibly, defomation lamellae), but rock texture is preserved. (iii) Moderately strong. Plagioclase glass shows small-scale flow, mafic minerals are fractured and show intragranular deformation, and rocks contain tension fractures. (iv) Strong. Plagioclase glass is vesicular, augite is minutely fractured, and olivine is coarsely fragmented, shows moscaic extinction, distinctive lamellar structures, and is locally recrystallized. (v) Intense. Rocks are converted to inhomogeneous basaltic glass.

  4. An Amoeboid Olivine Aggregate in LEW 85300

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komatsu, M. D.; Yamaguchi, A.; Fagan, T. J.; Zolensky, M. E.; Shiran, N.; Mikouchi, T.

    2016-01-01

    Amoeboid Olivine aggregates (AOAs) are irregularly shaped objects commonly observed in carbonaceous chondrites. Because they are composed of fine-grained olivine and Ca-Al-rich minerals, they are sensitive indicators for nebular process and parent body alteration of their parent bodies. Recently an AOA was found in a carbonaceous clast in polymict eucrite LEW 85300. The bulk major element composition of the clast matrix in LEW 85300 suggests a relation to CM, CO and CV chondrites, whereas bulk clast trace and major element compositions do not match any carbonaceous chondrite, suggesting they have a unique origin. Here we characterize the mineralogy of AOA in LEW 85300 and discuss the origin of the carbonaceous clasts. Results and Discussion: The AOA is located in an impact melt vein. Half of the aggregate shows recrystallization textures (euhedral pyroxene and molten metal/FeS) due to impact melting, but the remaining part preserves the original texture. The AOA is composed of olivine, FeS and Mg,Al-phyllosilicate. Individual olivine grains measure 1-8 microns, with Fe-rich rims, probably due to impact heating. Olivines in the AOA are highly forsteritic (Fo95-99), indicating that the AOA escaped thermal metamorphism [4]. Although no LIME (Low-Fe, Mn-Enriched) olivine is observed, forsterite composition and the coexistence of Mg,Al-phyllosilicate suggest that the AOA is similar to those in the Bali-type oxidized CV (CVoxB) and CR chondrites. However, it should be noted that fayalitic olivine, which commonly occurs in CVoxB AOA, is not observed in this AOA. Also, the smaller grain size (<8 microns) of olivine suggests they may be related to CM or CO chondrites. Therefore, we cannot exclude the possibility that the AOA originated from a unique carbonaceous chondrite.

  5. A record of lower crustal chamber sizes from Icelandic olivine-hosted melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclennan, J.

    2014-12-01

    Melt inclusions hosted in olivines from single Icelandic eruptions of basalt have highly variable compositions, particularly in terms of their incompatible element concentrations, concentration ratios and Pb-isotopes. This compositional diversity reflects variation in the composition of mantle melts supplied to individual volcanic plumbing systems. The variance of inclusion compositions decreases as the forsterite content of the host olivine decreases: a relationship that is readily understood in terms of concurrent mixing and crystallisation of primitive melts. The availability of a large number of melt inclusion analyses from Icelandic olivines (>500) allows for robust quantification of the relative rates of melt cooling and passive tracer mixing in the lower crustal chambers where inclusion entrapment occurred. This coupling of cooling and mixing is likely to reflect convection in the melt layer of the chambers. The fact that the Icelandic observations preserve a record of both mixing and cooling indicates that the characteristic timescales of these processes are similar. A simple 1D model of convection in a basaltic sill was developed, with the cooling either controlled by temperature dependence of viscosity of the melt or by the rate of conduction of heat through the rocks of the chamber roof. The timescales of cooling of melt and mixing of passive tracers are proportional to different powers of the Rayleigh number of the sill. Therefore, models that match the Icelandic observations involve sills with a surprisingly small range of thicknesses: the model timescales of mixing and cooling are similar only if the thickness of the sill is <10 m. These sill thicknesses are similar to those proposed for the lower oceanic crust based on observations from ophiolites, and may indicate that small sills play a dominant role in the evolution of basaltic melts.

  6. Phosphorus zoning in olivine of Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbrizio, Alessandro; Beckett, John R.; Baker, Michael B.; Stolper, Edward M.

    2010-05-01

    Kilauea Iki lava lake was formed when the lavas of the 1959 summit eruption of Kilauea volcano ponded in Kilauea Iki pit crater, as described by [1]. The main chamber of this lake has been drilled repeatedly from 1960 to 1981 as the lake has cooled and crystallized and partial descriptions of core can be found in [2-7]. The bulk of the core consists of a gray, olivine-phyric basalt matrix [3]. Rapid diffusion of divalent cations through olivine at magmatic temperatures can delete information on early-formed zoning and thus information on early magmatic history, recorded in olivine during its growth, is often largely lost [8-11]. In the last years many studies [8-11] have shown that natural olivine, terrestrial and extraterrestrial, from several localities and rock types can preserve a complex zoning in P (sometimes associated with Cr and Al). Simple crystallization experiments conducted by [10] and [11] were able to replicate these features (i.e., sector and oscillatory zoning). Here, we describe P, Cr and Al zoning in olivine from the 1981 drilling of Kilauea Iki lava lake hole #1 (KI81-1) [6]. Kα X-ray intensity maps and major and minor element quantitative analyses were obtained using the Caltech JEOL JXA-8200 electron microprobe. We acquired P, Cr, Al, Fe and Ti X-ray maps simultaneously at 15 kV and 400 nA, a beam diameter of 1 μm, pixel spacing of 1-2 μm, and count times of 420-1500 msec/step were used depending on the dimension of the crystal. 15 kV and 40 nA with a beam diameter of 1 μm were used to collect quantitative analyses. P2O5 contents of the Iki olivines range from below detection limit to 0.30 wt%. Zoning in phosphorus, based on X-ray intensity maps, was observed in all olivines we examined. The P zoning patterns of the olivines display several styles. P shows oscillatory zoning comparable to that seen in terrestrial and extraterrestrial igneous olivines and in experimentally grown olivine [8-11]; high P regions, inside the crystals, outline

  7. An experimental investigation of olivine morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, C. H.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for a morphological study of olivine and an experimental investigation performed to determine the degrees of supercooling and the cooling rates necessary to crystallize particular morphologies. Ten arbitrary categories of three-dimensional olivine crystal shape are identified: polyhedral, granular, hopper, chain, lattice, plate, branching, radiate, feather, and swallow-tail. The morphological study establishes that equant and tabular crystals are the common shapes of olivine, nonequant crystals are elongate parallel to the a or c axis, and skeletal crystals result when a particular form is missing or only partially developed. In the experiment, olivine crystals were grown by melting rock samples above their liquidus temperatures before initiating crystallization. The results show that olivine morphology changes systematically as a function of the degree of melt supercooling, the melt cooling rate, and the normative olivine and water contents of the melt. It is also found that each shape has a specific range of temperature stability which is essentially independent of melt composition.

  8. The geochemical effects of olivine slurry replenishment and dolostone assimilation in the plumbing system of the Franklin Large Igneous Province, Victoria Island, Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Ben; Lissenberg, C. Johan; Bédard, Jean H.; Beard, Charlie

    2015-02-01

    The Neoproterozoic (~723-716 Ma) Franklin Large Igneous Province exposed on Victoria Island in the Canadian Arctic is comprised of a sill-dominated magma plumbing system overlain by the coeval Natkusiak flood basalts. We have investigated three sections, separated by a total of >50 km of distance, of a sill (the Fort Collinson Sill Complex) emplaced just above a prominent sedimentary marker unit. The sill is characterized by a basal olivine-enriched layer (OZ: up to 55 % olivine) and an upper gabbroic unit. The observed diversity of olivine compositions in the OZ implies that bulk-rock MgO versus FeO arrays reflect accumulation of a heterogeneous olivine crystal cargo. We suggest that the OZ was formed as a late olivine slurry replenishment in a partially crystallized gabbroic sill, propagating for over 50 km along strike. This interpretation is consistent with Pb-isotope data, which show that at least three geochemically distinct magmas were emplaced into the Fort Collinson Sill Complex. The OZs exhibit a gradual westward evolution toward more Fe-rich bulk compositions. This is best explained by progressive mixing of the replenishing olivine slurry with a resident gabbroic mush during westward flow. Pb-isotopic signatures suggest that magmas near the inferred conduit feeder assimilated small amounts (<10 %) of dolostone country rock, which may have locally buffered olivine compositions to high-Fo contents.

  9. Atom Probe Tomography of Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parman, S. W.; Gorman, B.; Jackson, C.; Cooper, R. F.; Jaeger, D.

    2010-12-01

    Here we present atom probe tomographic (APT) analyses of natural olivine. APT provides three-dimensional trace element and isotopic analysis with sub-nanometer spatial resolution. It has been used for many years in engineering and materials science, but has not been applied to geological materials because traditional APT can only be used on conducting (usually metal) samples. The recent development of laser assisted APT has changed this situation, and now semi-conductors and insulators can be analyzed (Marquis et al., 2009, Kelly et al 2007). Potentially, this opens APT to extensive use in geoscience as many Fe-bearing silicates are semi-conductors. In this study, we explore the capability of the new class of APT instrumentation to analyze geological materials. APT involves the controlled evaporation of small, cylindrical specimens (100's nm in diameter) within an electric field. Specimens are typically prepared using in-situ focused-ion-beam (FIB) liftout and shaping techniques. Evaporated atoms are accelerated to a detector plate that records the position of the atom with sub-nm precision. Evaporated atoms are measured using time-of-flight mass spectrometry, allowing both elemental and isotopic determination. Since the method progressively ablates into the needle, the final analytical result is a nm-scale 3-dimensional image in which the position and identity of each detected atom is known. Typical mass resolution is between 200 and 1200 (full-width at half maximum) and typical concentration detection limits are 10 ppm. The number of potential applications of APT to igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary materials is large, ranging from studies of mineral and melt inclusions, to fine scale layering in minerals, to reaction surfaces and diffusion profiles. Much recent progress in the geochemical and petrologic fields has been driven by the increasing spatial resolution of the ion probe and laser ablation ICPMS. The ability of APT to provide atom-scale mass

  10. Stereochemically constrained complex organic molecules extracted from olivine crystal matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimenko, I.; Freund, F. T.; Imanaka, H.; Rodgers, R.

    2011-12-01

    Paradoxically, the dense solid state of magmatic minerals is a medium, in which organic synthesis can take place. The reason is that gas-fluid components such as H2O, CO/CO2/N2 and H2S are omnipresent in terrestrial magmatic environments. Any silicate mineral that crystallizes from such magmas will incorporate small quantities of the fluid-phase components in the form of structurally incompatible low-z impurities. During cooling the solute species undergo a redox conversion, resulting in chemically reduced low-z elements. To the extent that these low-z impurities are diffusively mobile, they will exsolve to the surface and/or to major structural defects inside the crystal matrix such as dislocations. Dislocations provide a 3-D structured environment, where the low-z impurities will tend to form stereochemically constrained polyatomic Cn-H-O-N-S entities, which we call organic protomolecules. In Nature, during weathering, such protomolecules will be released into the environment in the form of complex organic molecules. In our study we crush samples under clean conditions as a way to expose Cn-H-O-N-S entities at the fracture surfaces. We conduct identical experiments with selected large olivine single crystals, mm-sized olivine from peridiotite nodules from the San Carlos Volcanic Field, Arizona, and the vesiculated basalt that had carried the nodules upward in the volcanic conduit. We Soxhlet-extract the crushed powders with water, THF and ethyl acetate. The extracts are analyzed at the FTICR-MS facility at Florida State University using ultrahigh resolution Mass Spectrometry techniques capable of determining the chemical composition of the organic molecules up to 600 amu and more. So far we have found several analog sequences of oxygen-rich aliphatic hydrocarbons, families with up to 34 carbon atoms, probably poly-carboxylic acids, and some families containing sulfur.

  11. Comparative Planetary Mineralogy: Co, Ni Systematics in Chromite from Planetary Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karner, J. M.; Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.; Righter,K.

    2005-01-01

    Spinel is a minor but important phase in planetary basalts because its variable composition often reflects basalt petrogenesis. For example, complicated zoning trends in spinel can give clues to melt evolution [1], and V concentrations in chromite lend insight into magma oxygen fugacity (fO2) conditions [2]. Nickel and Co are two elements that are commonly used as a measure of melt fractionation, and their partitioning between olivine and melt is fairly well understood. Less clear is their partitioning into spinel, although [3] has explored Ni and Co systematics in experimental charges. This study documents Ni and Co behavior in early crystallizing spinel (chromite) from several planetary basalts in an attempt to compare our results with [3], and also gain insight into basalt evolution on the three planets.

  12. Enrichment of basalt and mixing of dacite in the rootzone of a large rhyolite chamber: inclusions and pumices from the Rattlesnake Tuff, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streck, Martin J.; Grunder, Anita L.

    A variety of cognate basalt to basaltic andesite inclusions and dacite pumices occur in the 7-Ma Rattlesnake Tuff of eastern Oregon. The tuff represents 280km3 of high-silica rhyolite magma zoned from highly differentiated rhyolite near the roof to less evolved rhyolite at deeper levels. The mafic inclusions provide a window into the processes acting beneath a large silicic chamber. Quenched basaltic andesite inclusions are substantially enriched in incompatible trace elements compared to regional primitive high-alumina olivine tholeiite (HAOT) lavas, but continuous chemical and mineralogical trends indicate a genetic relationship between them. Basaltic andesite evolved from primitive basalt mainly through protracted crystal fractionation and multiple cycles (>=10) of mafic recharge, which enriched incompatible elements while maintaining a mafic bulk composition. The crystal fractionation history is partially preserved in the mineralogy of crystal-rich inclusions (olivine, plagioclase+/-clinopyroxene) and the recharge history is supported by the presence of mafic inclusions containing olivines of Fo80. Small amounts of assimilation ( 2%) of high-silica rhyolite magma improves the calculated fit between observed and modeled enrichments in basaltic andesite and reduces the number of fractionation and recharge cycles needed. The composition of dacite pumices is consistent with mixing of equal proportions of basaltic andesite and least-evolved, high-silica rhyolite. In support of the mixing model, most dacite pumices have a bimodal mineral assemblage with crystals of rhyolitic and basaltic parentage. Equilibrium dacite phenocrysts are rare. Dacites are mainly the product of mingling of basaltic andesite and rhyolite before or during eruption and to a lesser extent of equilibration between the two. The Rattlesnake magma column illustrates the feedback between mafic and silicic magmas that drives differentiation in both. Low-density rhyolite traps basalts and induces

  13. Cannibalism of olivine-rich cumulate xenoliths during the 1998 eruption of Piton de la Fournaise (La Réunion hotspot): Implications for the generation of magma diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salaün, A.; Villemant, B.; Semet, M. P.; Staudacher, T.

    2010-12-01

    Contrasting with its unusual isotopic homogeneity compared to other hotspot volcanoes, Piton de la Fournaise has produced a large diversity of basaltic magmas over its 0.5 Ma history: picrites and two types of transitional basalts with distinct petrological and chemical compositions. A minor group of evolved basalts (anomalous group of basalts or AGB) is enriched in both compatible (Mg, Fe, Ti, Cr, and Ni) and incompatible (K, Th, and La) elements and depleted in Ca and Si relative to the dominant group of evolved basalts. The 1998 eruption simultaneously produced the two basaltic types at two distinct vents (Hudson vent: AGB, Kapor vent: common basalt) but from the same feeding conduit. Glasses of both magmas are close in composition and belong to the single differentiation trend defined by all 1998-2007 glass compositions. Thermodynamic model (MELTS code) shows that AGB-type magmas cannot be produced by high pressure (> 1 GPa) clinopyroxene fractionation as previously proposed and that all melts of the 1998-2007 activity period are produced by low pressure (< 800 MPa) crystal fractionation from the most primitive basalt (MgO ~ 9%). Modal composition of 1998 lavas (mass balance calculation and SEM image analysis) and olivine crystal composition show that Hudson lavas have assimilated significant fractions of olivine xenocrysts contrary to Kapor lavas. In addition, the higher incompatible element contents of Hudson lavas suggest contamination by a differentiated (trachytic) melt. All AGB share the following characteristics: (i) evolved glass compositions, (ii) 5-10% olivine xenocrysts, and (iii) vents located in a narrow region at the summit of the edifice. They are interpreted as the result of the assimilation of olivine-rich xenoliths either by evolved melts or by basaltic melts contaminated by low fractions of differentiated melts produced from interstitial glass frequently coating cumulates minerals or resulting from partial melting of cumulates bearing

  14. How do olivines record magmatic events? Insights from major and trace element zoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Maisonneuve, C. Bouvet; Costa, F.; Huber, C.; Vonlanthen, P.; Bachmann, O.; Dungan, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Reconciling the diverse records of magmatic events preserved by multiple crystals and minerals in the same sample is often challenging. In the case of basaltic-andesites from Volcán Llaima (Chile), Mg zoning in olivine is always simpler than Ca zoning in plagioclase. A model that explains a number of chemical patterns is that Llaima magmas stall in the upper crust, where they undergo decompression crystallization and form crystal-mush bodies. Frequent magma inputs from deeper reservoirs provide the potential for remobilization and eruption. The records of multiple recharge events in Llaima plagioclase versus an apparent maximum of one such event in coexisting olivine are addressed by using trace element zoning in olivine phenocrysts. We have integrated elements that (1) respond to changes in magma composition due to recharge or mixing (Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, ±Ca), with (2) elements that are incorporated during rapid, disequilibrium crystal growth (P, Ti, Sc, V, Al). A more complex history is obtained when these elements are evaluated considering their partition coefficients, diffusivities, and crystal growth rates. The olivine archive can then be reconciled with the plagioclase archive of magma reservoir processes. Olivine (and plagioclase) phenocrysts may experience up to three or more recharge events between nucleation and eruption. Diffusion modeling of major and trace element zoning in two dimensions using a new lattice Boltzmann model suggests that recharge events occur on the order of months to a couple of years prior to eruption, whereas crystal residence times are more likely to be on the order of a few years to decades.

  15. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  16. Key new pieces of the HIMU puzzle from olivines and diamond inclusions.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Yaakov; Class, Cornelia; Goldstein, Steven L; Hanyu, Takeshi

    2016-09-29

    Mantle melting, which leads to the formation of oceanic and continental crust, together with crust recycling through plate tectonics, are the primary processes that drive the chemical differentiation of the silicate Earth. The present-day mantle, as sampled by oceanic basalts, shows large chemical and isotopic variability bounded by a few end-member compositions. Among these, the HIMU end-member (having a high U/Pb ratio, μ) has been generally considered to represent subducted/recycled basaltic oceanic crust. However, this concept has been challenged by recent studies of the mantle source of HIMU magmas. For example, analyses of olivine phenocrysts in HIMU lavas indicate derivation from the partial melting of peridotite, rather than from the pyroxenitic remnants of recycled oceanic basalt. Here we report data that elucidate the source of these lavas: high-precision trace-element analyses of olivine phenocrysts point to peridotite that has been metasomatized by carbonatite fluids. Moreover, similarities in the trace-element patterns of carbonatitic melt inclusions in diamonds and HIMU lavas indicate that the metasomatism occurred in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle, fused to the base of the continental crust and isolated from mantle convection. Taking into account evidence from sulfur isotope data for Archean to early Proterozoic surface material in the deep HIMU mantle source, a multi-stage evolution is revealed for the HIMU end-member, spanning more than half of Earth's history. Before entrainment in the convecting mantle, storage in a boundary layer, upwelling as a mantle plume and partial melting to become ocean island basalt, the HIMU source formed as Archean-early Proterozoic subduction-related carbonatite-metasomatized subcontinental lithospheric mantle.

  17. Key new pieces of the HIMU puzzle from olivines and diamond inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Yaakov; Class, Cornelia; Goldstein, Steven L.; Hanyu, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    Mantle melting, which leads to the formation of oceanic and continental crust, together with crust recycling through plate tectonics, are the primary processes that drive the chemical differentiation of the silicate Earth. The present-day mantle, as sampled by oceanic basalts, shows large chemical and isotopic variability bounded by a few end-member compositions. Among these, the HIMU end-member (having a high U/Pb ratio, μ) has been generally considered to represent subducted/recycled basaltic oceanic crust. However, this concept has been challenged by recent studies of the mantle source of HIMU magmas. For example, analyses of olivine phenocrysts in HIMU lavas indicate derivation from the partial melting of peridotite, rather than from the pyroxenitic remnants of recycled oceanic basalt. Here we report data that elucidate the source of these lavas: high-precision trace-element analyses of olivine phenocrysts point to peridotite that has been metasomatized by carbonatite fluids. Moreover, similarities in the trace-element patterns of carbonatitic melt inclusions in diamonds and HIMU lavas indicate that the metasomatism occurred in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle, fused to the base of the continental crust and isolated from mantle convection. Taking into account evidence from sulfur isotope data for Archean to early Proterozoic surface material in the deep HIMU mantle source, a multi-stage evolution is revealed for the HIMU end-member, spanning more than half of Earth’s history. Before entrainment in the convecting mantle, storage in a boundary layer, upwelling as a mantle plume and partial melting to become ocean island basalt, the HIMU source formed as Archean-early Proterozoic subduction-related carbonatite-metasomatized subcontinental lithospheric mantle.

  18. P-V-T-X Evolution of Olivine-hosted Melt Inclusions and Implications for Interpretation of Homogenization Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavi, F.; Provost, A.; Schiano, P.; Cluzel, N.

    2015-12-01

    Olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MIs) provide unique insights into physico-chemical conditions of magma at depth. MIs are often rehomogenized in laboratory to bring them back (or close) to the original state. At homogenization temperature (Th), the last bubble disappears and MI becomes a homogeneous liquid phase. However, during 1-atm experiments in heating stages, homogenization is usually achieved at Th higher than expected entrapment T and systematic increase of Th with time is observed. This reveals occurrence of physico-chemical processes that irreversibly lower internal pressure (Pint) (relative to entrapment P) during magma ascent and laboratory treatments. We combined theoretical modeling with experimental observations on H2O-poor and H2O-rich basaltic MIs in order to: a) identify the reversible (olivine elastic deformation and olivine dissolution-crystallization on MI walls) and irreversible (water loss from MIs and olivine plastic deformation) processes responsible for evolution of MI volume, Pint and composition upon heating, and b) examine how these processes affect the results of typical homogenization experiments. Due to Pint drop caused by olivine elastic deformation, performing experiments at 1 atm prevents achievement of homogenization at Th equal to entrapment T. Predicted increase of Th ranges from some to tens of degrees depending on entrapment conditions, melt composition and volatile contents. Presence of a gas bubble must be considered for the correct prediction of P-volume evolution. In H2O-rich MIs, faster increase of Th with time shown by small MIs is consistent with increase of Th mainly driven by water loss. In H2O-poor MIs, occurrence of olivine elastoplastic deformation is mainly responsible for the increase of Th with time. Distance from MI wall to olivine rim is a critical parameter to take into account, as short distances enhance depressurization related with both elastoplastic deformation and water loss and contribute to increase Th.

  19. Diary of a flood basalt: A stratigraphic tour of two sections within the Oligocene Ethiopian Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, T. O.; Bradley, B. L.; Krans, S. R.; Kappelman, J. W.; Yirgu, G.; Ayalew, D.

    2015-12-01

    Flood basalts are the most significant magmatic events on the planet, influencing our environment by modifying the lithosphere and atmosphere. Our understanding of flood basalt processes comes almost entirely from within the rock record - typically a vast pile of basaltic lavas, hiatuses, and sedimentary horizons. Stratigraphic continuity is thus a critical characteristic to constrain the processes associated with the formation of flood basalt provinces. Oceanic flood basalts are difficult to access in situ, leaving continental equivalents our primary target. The Oligocene Ethiopian Traps is among the youngest and most intact flood basalt provinces, making this a premier region to examine flood basalt stratigraphy. Leveraging recent road building, we have constructed a flow by flow stratigraphy for two ~1500m independent sections of the Low-Ti region of the Ethiopian traps, separated by ~70 km. These sections lie towards the edge of the modern exposure of the Ethiopian flood basalts, however the remarkable parallelism of flows and the lack of evidence of pinching suggests that the province was significantly more aerially extensive towards the west. For the most continuous ~1200m section, median flow thickness is about ~15m in the lower ~400m and upper ~400m of the flood basalt sequence, but flows thin significantly to a median of 4m in the central portion of this sequence. The petrography shows distinctive patterns through the pile: largely aphyric and clinopyroxene/olivine phyric flows are more common towards the base of the sequence and transition to largely plagioclase phyric basalts. At the top of the flood basalt pile a further transition from plagioclase phyric to largely aphyric flows is observed. Paleosols become more frequent and are thicker towards the top of the sequence. These observations point to a gradual temporal shift in the differentiation depths and flux of magmas entering the Ethiopian lithosphere.

  20. Earliest Silicic Volcanism Associated with Mid-Miocene Flood Basalts: Tuffs Interbedded with Steens Basalt, Nevada and Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckett, M.; Mahood, G. A.; Benson, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    During the main phase of Steens and Columbia River flood basalt eruptions between ~16.7 and 15.0 Ma, spatially associated silicic volcanism was widespread, ~4,000 km3 of silicic magma erupting at calderas and smaller centers dispersed across ~25,000 km2 in eastern Oregon and northern Nevada (Coble and Mahood, 2012). The oldest flood basalts erupted from a focus at Steens Mountain in eastern Oregon, where the section of lavas is ~1 km thick. The Steens Basalt thins southward to only a few flows thick in northern Nevada, either because fewer flows were emplaced this far from the focus or because fewer dikes propagated to the surface on encountering thicker continental crust and/or were intercepted by growing bodies of silicic magma that ultimately erupted in McDermitt Caldera Field (Rytuba and McKee, 1984), High Rock Caldera Complex, and the Lone Mountain/Hawks Valley center (Wypych et al., 2011). Rhyolitic tuffs have not been recognized interbedded with the basalt lavas in the type section, but we have identified several silicic tuffs interbedded with Steens Basalt in the southern Pueblo Mountains and in the Trout Creek Mountains. Although noted by previous workers (e.g., Avent, 1965; Minor, 1986; Hart et al., 1989), they have not been studied. We identified six tuffaceous intervals 20 cm to 15 m thick in the escarpment of the southern Pueblo Mountains near the Oregon-Nevada border where the Steens basalt section is ~250 m thick, with the base unexposed. Two intervals are lithic-rich, reworked volcaniclastic sediments, but four are primary or only slightly reworked sequences of fall deposits that range from fine ash to lapilli in grain size. The heat and weight of the overlying basaltic lava flows has fused the tuffs so that the upper parts of thicker tuffaceous intervals and entire thinner ones are converted to vitrophyres, with crystals of alkali feldspar × quartz × biotite typically 1-2 mm in diameter set in a dense, black, variably hydrated, glassy matrix. We

  1. Elemental Abundance Distributions in Basalt Clays and Meteorites: Is It a Biosignature?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, M. R.; Storrie-Lombardi, M. C.; Joseph, J.

    2005-01-01

    Volcanic glass altered by microorganisms exhibits distinctive textures differing significantly from abiotic alteration [1-4]. We have previously presented morphological evidence of bioweathering in sub-oceanic basalt glass [5] and olivine [6], and noted similar alterations in Nakhla [7]. We have also introduced an autonomous Bayesian probabilistic classification methodology to identify biotic and abiotic alteration in sub-oceanic basalts using elemental abundance data [8]. We now present data from multiple sub-oceanic sites addressing the more general question of utilizing elemental abundance distribution in clays as a valid biosignature for the exploration of putative clay alteration products in meteorites.

  2. Amoeboid olivine aggregates in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, L.; Steele, I. M.

    1976-01-01

    Greyish-brown irregularly-shaped aggregates composed predominantly of olivine make up nearly 2% of the Allende meteorite by volume. Many of the aggregates are constructed of subspherical lumps of micron-sized crystals of olivine, pyroxene, nepheline and sodalite surrounded by coarser-grained olivine. Rarely, anorthite, spinel and perovskite are also present. The olivine ranges in composition from Fo64 to Fo99. Pyroxenes range from aluminous diopside to hedenbergite to very Al-rich and Ti-Al-rich varieties. The nepheline contains 1.6-2.4% K2O and 1.6-5.2% CaO but the sodalite is significantly poorer in these elements. The spinel contains 2.1-13.4% FeO. Textural information and oxygen isotopic data suggest that the aggregates are composed of primary, solid condensates from the solar nebula. The perovskite, spinel and Ti-Al-rich pyroxenes are the remains of high-temperature condensates, but the olivine compositions and the presence of feldspathoids indicate that some of the grains continued to react with the solar nebular vapor in the temperature range 500-900 K.

  3. Contrasting behavior of noble-metal elements during magmatic differentiation in basalts from the Cook Islands, Polynesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki; Oguri, Kiwamu; Shimoda, Gen; Kogiso, Tetsu; Barsczus, Hans G.

    2000-02-01

    Concentrations of noble metals (Ir, Ru, Rh, Pt, Pd, and Au) in ocean-island basalts from the Cook Islands, Polynesia, were determined by improved fire-assay and tellurium coprecipitation techniques with an inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectrometer. Isotope, major element, and trace element compositions of these basalts indicate that the present samples include distinctive HIMU (high μ = high 238U/204Pb) and normal non-HIMU basalts. Examination based on Ni-Mg-Fe partitioning between olivine and liquid suggests an only minor effect of accumulation of phenocrysts in governing the compositional variations of the present samples. The fractionation trends obtained show monotonic decrease and increase in noble-metal elements with decreasing MgO content in HIMU and non-HIMU basalts, respectively. These characteristic trends indicate that HIMU magmas are differentiated by fractional crystallization and have higher sulfide/silicate ratios than non-HIMU basalts.

  4. Alkali content of alpine ultramafic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, W.; Mountjoy, W.

    1965-01-01

    The lower limit of abundance of sodium and potassium in ultramafic rocks is less than the threshold amount detectable by conventional analytical methods. By a dilutionaddition modification of the flame-spectrophotometric method, sodium and potassium have been determined in 40 specimens of alpine ultramafic rocks. Samples represent six regions in the United States and one in Australia, and include dunite, peridotite, pyroxenite, and their variably serpentinized and metamorphosed derivatives. The median value found for Na2O is 0.004 per cent, and the range of Na2O is 0.001-0.19. The median value for K2O is 0.0034 per cent and the range is 0.001-0.031 per cent. Alkali concentrations are below 0.01 per cent Na2O in 28 samples and below 0.01 per cent K2O in 35. Derivation of basalt magma from upper-mantle material similar to such ultramafic rocks, as has been postulated, is precluded by the relative amounts of sodium and potassium, which are from 200 to 600 times more abundant in basalt than in the ultramafic rocks. Similar factors apply to a number of other elements. No reasonable process could produce such concentrations in, for example, tens of thousands of cubic miles of uniform tholeiitic basalt. The ultramafic rocks might have originated either as magmatic crystal precipitates or as mantle residues left after fusion and removal of basaltic magma. Injection of ultramafic rocks to exposed positions is tectonic rather than magmatic. ?? 1965.

  5. Geobarometry of ultramafic xenoliths from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii, on the basis of CO2 inclusions in olivine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.

    1983-01-01

    Abundant fluid inclusions in olivine of dunite xenoliths (???1-3 cm) in basalt dredged from the young Loihi Seamount, 30 km southeast of Hawaii, are evidence for three coexisting immiscible fluid phases-silicate melt (now glass), sulfide melt (now solid), and dense supercritical CO2 (now liquid + gas)-during growth and later fracturing of some of these olivine crystals. Some olivine xenocrysts, probably from disaggregation of xenoliths, contain similar inclusions. Most of the inclusions (2-10 ??m) are on secondary planes, trapped during healing of fractures after the original crystal growth. Some such planes end abruptly within single crystals and are termed pseudosecondary, because they formed during the growth of the host olivine crystals. The "vapor" bubble in a few large (20-60 ??m), isolated, and hence primary, silicate melt inclusions is too large to be the result of simple differential shrinkage. Under correct viewing conditions, these bubbles are seen to consist of CO2 liquid and gas, with an aggregate ??{variant} = ??? 0.5-0.75 g cm-3, and represent trapped globules of dense supercritical CO2 (i.e., incipient "vesiculation" at depth). Some spinel crystals enclosed within olivine have attached CO2 blebs. Spherical sulfide blebs having widely variable volume ratios to CO2 and silicate glass are found in both primary and pseudosecondary inclusions, demonstrating that an immiscible sulfide melt was also present. Assuming olivine growth at ??? 1200??C and hydrostatic pressure from a liquid lava column, extrapolation of CO2 P-V-T data indicates that the primary inclusions were trapped at ??? 220-470 MPa (2200-4700 bars), or ??? 8-17 km depth in basalt magma of ??{variant} = 2.7 g cm-3. Because the temperature cannot change much during the rise to eruption, the range of CO2 densities reveals the change in pressure from that during original olivine growth to later deformation and rise to eruption on the sea floor. The presence of numerous decrepitated inclusions

  6. Albedo and Christiansen Feature Relationships among Remotely Sensed Extreme Lunar Compositions: Olivine and Silica Rich Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, E.; Lucey, P. G.; Ohtake, M.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Glotch, T. D.

    2012-12-01

    Data from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer experiment is sensitive to the ratio of mafic minerals and plagioclase, as well as the presence of significant quantities of silicic mineral such as alkali feldspar or quartz through the position of the Christiansen Feature (CF) that is sensitive to these minerals [1]. Recently [2] reported widespread occurrences of abundant olivine, and suggested that these locations were plagioclase poor, and hence may expose portions of the lunar mantle. We have extracted CF positions from several of the locations of [2] and find that some of them have extreme CF positions indicating high olivine abundances and low plagioclase abundances. The CF is also sensitive to space weathering, where maturity moves the CF position to longer wavelengths, complicating the compositional interpretation. To mitigate this we also examine the 750nm albedo of the locations and compare these to several types of controls. Albedo is derived from a 500-m resolution mosaic of Kaguya Multiband Imager data that has been corrected for topographic shading to a uniform unit of radiance factor illuminated at 30 degrees. We find that the Apollo landing sites form a linear trend when CF is plotted against albedo, consistent with their relative iron contents and plagioclase contents. However, the olivine-rich locations often fall very significantly off this trend, with only a minority falling on the Apollo trend defined principally by pyroxene-plagioclase ratio. The locations with the most extreme CF values form a parallel trend that is consistent with olivine-plagioclase variation. Using CF values for pure minerals from [3], the most extreme values of CF correspond to an olivine content of 80%, close to the dunite composition reported by [2]. Silica rich regions from [4] also fall well off the trend, toward low CF values. This is consistent with the presence of silica-rich minerals, and the only moderate albedo of these locations (between the albedos of Apollo 14 and 16

  7. High alumina (HA) and very high potassium (VHK) basalt clasts from Apollo 14 breccias. I - Mineralogy and Petrology - Evidence of crystallization from evolving magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, C. R.; Taylor, L. A.; Patchen, A. D.

    1989-01-01

    The mineralogy and petrography of very high potassium (VHK) and high alumina (HA) basalts from the Apollo 14 site provide an insight into their magmatic evolution. Generally, their parageneses are similar, with olivine and chromite the early liquidus phases, followed by plagioclase and pyroxene, which crystallized together. Although late-stage ilmenite and FeNi metal occur in both VHK and HA samples, the VHKs also crystallize K-feldspar and Fa-rich olivine. Zoning of constituent minerals is similar for both basalt types, demonstrating that the parental magmas for both HA and VHK basalts became enriched in K, Na, Ca, Fe, and Ti and depleted in Mg and Al as crystallization proceeded. Enrichment of K in the VHK basalts is above that expected from normal fractional crystallization.

  8. High Melt Porosity in the Lower Oceanic Crust Inferred from Phosphorus Zoning in Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellebrand, E.; Welsch, B. T.; Hammer, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    The canonical view that the lower oceanic crust is composed of cumulates of fractional crystallization has been intensely debated in recent years. Migrating melts, reacting with previously crystallized minerals in the crystal mush, can modify the mineralogy and phase proportions inside the lower crust, as well as the composition of erupted MORB [1]. An extreme product of reactive melt migration was discovered during IODP Legs 304/305 at Atlantis Massif (MAR 30N). In this 1.5 km deep drillhole, there are several sequences of olivine-rich troctolite with ';textbook cumulate texture', which may be associated with the contact of a gabbroic pluton into peridotite [2,3]. While there is little ambiguity about the geological relationships, the exact mechanism for the in-situ reactive transformation of mantle peridotites into lower crustal gabbroic lithologies is still poorly understood. One widespread textural feature in support of the dominant role of reactive melt migration is the occurrence of interstitial and vermicular high-Mg# cpx, which form post-compaction at very low melt porosities. The rare screens of opx-bearing mantle peridotites in this drillhole also preserve evidence for low-porosity replacement of mantle opx by gabbroic cpx [4], with minimal volume change. However, we will show that a significant and possibly the main mass of the olivine crystals in the olivine-rich troctolites do not form at low melt porosities, but instead in a melt-rich local environment. Initially, olivines crystallize as rapidly grown dendrites, which is marked by distinct enrichments of the slowly diffusing element phosphorus. Subsequent slow growth produces the main mass of the otherwise P-free olivine crystal. Our observations on natural basalt-hosted and experimentally grown olivines indicate that strong undercooling in a crystal-poor environment is required for dendrite formation. By extrapolation, this would require a crystal-poor melt lens at the top of an evolving gabbroic

  9. Platinum-Group Elements in Basalts Derived From the Icelandic Mantle Plume -Past and Present.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momme, P.; Oskarsson, N.; Gronvold, K.; Tegner, C.; Brooks, K.; Keays, R.

    2001-12-01

    Paleogene basalts ( ~55Ma) derived from the ancestral Iceland mantle plume and extruded during continental rifting are exposed along the Blosseville Kyst in central East Greenland. These basalts comprise three intercalated series, viz: a low-Ti, high-Ti and a very high-Ti series. The two Ti-rich series are interpreted to represent continental flood basalts formed by low degrees of partial melting (degree of melting F=3-9%) while the low-Ti series are believed to have formed by higher degrees of partial melting (F:15-25%). All three of the East Greenland basalt series are enriched in the PGE, relative to normal MORB. During differentiation of the low-Ti series, Pd increase from 11 to 24 ppb whereas Pt and Ir decrease from 12 and 0.6 ppb to 3 and <0.05 ppb respectively. The primitive basalts (molar Mg#60) of the dominant high-Ti series contain ~6-10 ppb Pd, ~7-10 ppb Pt and ~0.2 ppb Ir whereas the most evolved basalts (Mg#43) contain 25 ppb Pd, 5 ppb Pt and <0.05 ppb Ir. The PGE-rich nature of these basalts is surprising because low degree partial melts are generally S-saturated and hence strongly depleted in the PGE (cf, Keays, 1995). However, our data indicates that all of the East Greenland magmas were S-undersaturated and as they underwent differentiation, Pd behaved incompatibly while Ir and Pt behaved compatibly. Primitive Holocene Icelandic olivine tholeiites contain 120 ppm Cu, 6 ppb Pd, 4 ppb Pt and 0.2 ppb Ir while their picritic counterparts contain 74 ppm Cu, 17 ppb Pd, 7 ppb Pt and 0.3 ppb Ir. Both the olivine tholeiites and the picrites are believed to have formed by high degrees of partial melting (15-25%) which would have exhausted all of the sulphides in the mantle source region and produced S-undersaturated magmas. In Icelandic samples with 10-14wt% MgO, Cu and the PGEs vary systematically between the primitive picrite and olivine tholeiite compositions given above i.e there is an inverse correlation between Cu and the PGEs. This is best explained

  10. Recent volcanism in the Siqueiros transform fault: Picritic basalts and implications for MORB magma genesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perfit, M.R.; Fornari, D.J.; Ridley, W.I.; Kirk, P.D.; Casey, J.; Kastens, K.A.; Reynolds, J.R.; Edwards, M.; Desonie, D.; Shuster, R.; Paradis, S.

    1996-01-01

    Small constructional volcanic landforms and very fresh-looking lava flows are present along one of the inferred active strike-slip faults that connect two small spreading centers (A and B) in the western portion of the Siqueiros transform domain. The most primitive lavas (picritic and olivine-phyric basalts), exclusively recovered from the young-looking flows within the A-B strike-slip fault, contain millimeter-sized olivine phenocrysts (up to 20 modal%) that have a limited compositional range (Fo91.5-Fo89.5) and complexly zoned Cr-Al spinels. High-MgO (9.5-10.6 wt%) glasses sampled from the young lava flows contain 1-7% olivine phenocrysts (Fo90.5-Fo89) that could have formed by equilibrium crystallization from basaltic melts with Mg# values between 71 and 74. These high MgO (and high Al2O3) glasses may be near-primary melts from incompatible-element depleted oceanic mantle and little modified by crustal mixing and/or fractionation processes. Phase chemistry and major element systematics indicate that the picritic basalts are not primary liquids and formed by the accumulation of olivine and minor spinel from high-MgO melts (10% < MgO < 14%). Compared to typical N-MORB from the East Pacific Rise, the Siqueiros lavas are more primitive and depleted in incompatible elements. Phase equilibria calculations and comparisons with experimental data and trace element modeling support this hypothesis. They indicate such primary mid-ocean ridge basalt magmas formed by 10-18% accumulative decompression melting in the spinel peridotite field (but small amounts of melting in the garnet peridotite field are not precluded). The compositional variations of the primitive magmas may result from the accumulation of different small batch melt fractions from a polybaric melting column.

  11. Manganese olivine I: Electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Quan; Wang, Z.-C.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    1995-12-01

    To investigate the point defect chemistry and the kinetic properties of manganese olivine Mn2SiO4, electrical conductivity ( ’) of single crystals was measured along either the [100] or the [010] direction. The experiments were carried out at temperatures T=850 1200 °C and oxygen fugacities f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } = 10^{ - 11} - 10^2 atm under both Mn oxide ( MO) buffered and MnSiO3 ( MS) buffered conditions. Under the same thermodynamic conditions, charge transport along [100] is 2.5 3.0 times faster than along [010]. At high oxygen fugacities, the electrical conductivity of samples buffered against MS is ˜1.6 times larger than that of samples buffered against MO; while at low oxygen fugacities, the electrical conductivity is nearly identical for the two buffer cases. The dependencies of electrical conductivity on oxygen fugacity and temperature are essentially the same for conduction along the [100] and [010] directions, as well as for samples coexisting with a solid-state buffer of either MO or MS. Hence, it is proposed that the same conduction mechanisms operate for samples of either orientation in contact with either solid-state buffer. The electrical conductivity data lie on concave upward curves on a log-log plot of σ vs f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } , giving rise to two f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } = 10^{ - 11} - 10^2 regimes with different oxygen fugacity exponents. In the low-f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } = 10^{ - 11} - 10^2 regime left( {f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } < 10^{ - 7} {text{atm}}} right), the f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } = 10^{ - 11} - 10^2 exponent, m, is 0, the MnSiO3-activity exponent, q, is ˜0, and the activation energy, Q, is 45 kJ/mol. In the high f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } = 10^{ - 11} - 10^2 regime left( {f_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } > 10^{ - 7} {text{atm}}} right), m=1/6, q=1/4 1/3, and Q=45 and 200 kJ/mol for T<1100 °C and T>1100 °C, respectively. Based on a comparison of experimental data with results from point defect chemistry calculations, it is

  12. Water in Pyroxene and Olivine from Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, A. H.

    2012-01-01

    Water in the interior of terrestrial planets can be dissolved in fluids or melts and hydrous phases, but can also be locked as protons attached to structural oxygen in lattice defects in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAM) like olivine, pyroxene, or feldspar [1-3]. Although these minerals contain only tens to hundreds of ppm H2O, this water can amount to at least one ocean in mass when added at planetary scales because of the modal dominance of NAM in the mantle and crust [4]. Moreover these trace amounts of water can have drastic effects on melting temperature, rheology, electrical and heat conductivity, and seismic wave attenuation [5]. There is presently a debate on how much water is present in the martian mantle. Secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS) studies of NAM [6], amphiboles and glass in melt inclusions [7-10], and apatites [11, 12] from Martian meteorites report finding as much water as in the same phases from Earth's igneous rocks. Most martian hydrous minerals, however, generally have the relevant sites filled with Cl and F instead of H [13, 14], and experiments using Cl [15] in parent melts can reproduce Martian basalt compositions as well as those with water [16]. We are in the process of analyzing Martian meteorite minerals by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) in order to constrain the role of water in this planet s formation and magmatic evolution

  13. Apparatus enables accurate determination of alkali oxides in alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupraw, W. A.; Gahn, R. F.; Graab, J. W.; Maple, W. E.; Rosenblum, L.

    1966-01-01

    Evacuated apparatus determines the alkali oxide content of an alkali metal by separating the metal from the oxide by amalgamation with mercury. The apparatus prevents oxygen and moisture from inadvertently entering the system during the sampling and analytical procedure.

  14. Extracting Olivine (Fo-Fa) Compositions from Raman Spectral Peak Positions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuebler, K.; Jolliff, B. J.; Wang, Alian; Haskin, L. A.

    2005-01-01

    Olivine and pyroxene are two major basaltic minerals that have been identified at Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum by the Mars Exploration Rovers. Full petrologic characterization of a sample (rock or soil), however, requires determining the range of mineral compositions, extent of zoning, range of grain sizes, mineral associations, presence of xenocrysts, etc. Information of this sort will aid the interpretation of sample crystallization and differentiation histories and help discriminate between lithologies. In Raman spectroscopic experiments, minerals are identified by their spectral patterns and mineral compositions can be inferred from the peak positions. Instruments currently in use or slated for impending surface exploration missions provide only average elemental compositions for relatively large rock or soil targets or bulk mineral analysis. No techniques currently in use or scheduled for flight can characterize both structure and composition of individual mineral grains, in-situ, like the Mars Microbeam Raman Spectrometer (MMRS). The MMRS is designed to take 100 spectra along a 1 cm linear traverse on the surface of a sample, with contributions from one or a few mineral phases per spectrum. We presented a method to extract structural and compositional information from the Raman spectra of quadrilateral pyroxenes. The pyroxene calibration was applied to a Raman spectroscopic study of Martian meteorite EETA79001 along with a preliminary olivine calibration, where we demonstrated the capability to discriminate related lithologies using Raman point counts. This paper presents an improved olivine calibration that will further aid sample characterization and the study of alteration processes.

  15. Pressure conditions for the solidification of the Skaergaard intrusion: Eruption of East Greenland flood basalts in less than 300,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Rune B.; Tegner, Christian

    2006-11-01

    Primary granophyres are differentiated from olivine tholeiitic magma and occur interstitially throughout the cumulus stratigraphy of the Skaergaard intrusion, East Greenland. Samples from the Lower Zones a-c (LZa-c), the Middle Zone (MZ) and the Sandwich Horizon (SH) are included in the present study together with granophyric accumulations in gabbroic pegmatite from LZa-c. Fluid inclusions in quartz and the mineral assemblage in the granophyres record the pressure under which the Skaergaard intrusion crystallised. Pegmatitic granophyre from LZa-c consists mainly of quartz, plagioclase (An 4-7) and alkali feldspar (Or 40-80) enclosing an earlier formed assemblage of ferrohastingsitic and ferroedenitic hornblende, fayalite (Fo 4-5), titanite, biotite and fluor-apatite. Granophyric quartz, albite and alkali feldspar crystallised from water-saturated granitic melts near eutectic minimum conditions between 680 and 660 °C. The pressure of granophyre crystallisation was modelled by the intercept between fluid inclusion isochores and the minimum melt solidus for granitic compositions. Pressures, recalculated to the roof pendant of the intrusion, are 0.7 ± 0.5 for LZa, 2.0 ± 0.2 for LZb-c, 2.3 ± 0.8 for MZ (the Triple Group level) and 3.3 ± 1.3 kb for SH. Amphibole geobarometry, independently, confirm the pressure estimates for pegmatitic granophyres in LZa-c. The granophyres formed as the intrusion cooled through the minimum melt solidus in LZa, LZb, LZc, MZ and SH, respectively. The pressure increase from LZa to SH granophyres is explained by progressive burial during cooling of the intrusion and contemporaneous outpouring of 5.3-6.3 ± 2.7 km of flood basalts during the initial opening of the Northeast Atlantic Ocean. Accordingly, the Skaergaard intrusion evolved from a subvolcanic magma chamber at emplacement to a more deep-seated igneous system during terminal crystallization when the majority of the intercumulus phases formed. The present cooling history suggests

  16. Back-arc basalts from the Loncopue graben (Province of Neuquen, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varekamp, J. C.; Hesse, A.; Mandeville, C. W.

    2010-11-01

    Young basaltic back-arc volcanoes occur east of the main Andes chain at about 37.5°-39°S in the Loncopue graben, Province of Neuquen, Argentina. These olivine-rich basalts and trachybasalts have up to 8% MgO, with high Ni and Cr contents, but highly variable incompatible element concentrations. Mafic lava flows and cinder cones at the southern end of the graben lack phenocrystic plagioclase. The northern samples have relative Ta-Nb depletions and K, Pb and LREE enrichment. These samples strongly resemble rocks of the nearby arc volcanoes Copahue and Caviahue, including their Fe-Ti enrichment relative to the main Andes arc rocks. The Sr, Nd and Pb isotope ratios show that the source regions of these back-arc basalts are enriched in subducted components that were depleted in the aqueous mobile elements such as Cs, Sr and Ba as a result of prior extractions from the subducted complex below the main arc. Some mafic flows show slightly low 206Pb/ 204Pb and 143Nd/ 144Nd values as well as incompatible trace element ratios similar to southern Patagonia plateau back-arc basalts, suggesting contributions from an EM1 mantle source. Geothermometry and barometry suggest that the basalts crystallized and fractionated small amounts of olivine and spinel at ˜ 35 km depth at temperatures of 1170-1220 °C, at about QFM + 0.5 to QFM + 1 with 1-2% H 2O, and then rose rapidly to the surface. The Loncopue graben back-arc basalts are transitional in composition between the South Patagonia back-arc plateau basalts and the Caviahue and Copahue arc volcanoes to the northwest. The EM1 source endmember is possibly the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Strong variations in incompatible element enrichment and isotopic compositions between closely spaced cinder cones and lava flows suggest a heterogeneous mantle source for the Loncopue graben volcanics.

  17. Evolution of Olivine Composition in the Meteorite Fusion Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittarello, L.; McKibbin, S.; Debaille, V.; Claeys, Ph.

    2016-08-01

    The change in composition in olivine overgrowth (multiple zoning) and in the newly crystallized olivine in the fusion crust of ureilite and H-chondrites can be explained by oxidation reactions, due to interaction between melt and atmosphere.

  18. The origin of ferrous zoning in Allende chondrule olivines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, Julia A.; Wood, John A.

    1987-01-01

    Very similar major and minor element compositions are noted in the ferrous olivine occurring in chondrules at olivine grain boundaries, along cracks in olivine grains, interleaved with enstatite, and in the inner portions of exposed olivine grain surface rims; simultaneous formation by a single process is therefore suggested. The ferrous chondrule olivine probably formed by the reaction of chondrules with very hot nebular vapors over a period of several hours, followed by the condensation of residual metal vapors onto those olivine surfaces that were in direct contact with the gas as the system cooled. The ferrous chondrule olivine that occurs interleaved with enstatite in Allende does not have a composition idendical to, and is not the precursor of, matrix olivine.

  19. Alkali metal ion battery with bimetallic electrode

    DOEpatents

    Boysen, Dane A; Bradwell, David J; Jiang, Kai; Kim, Hojong; Ortiz, Luis A; Sadoway, Donald R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Wei, Weifeng; Wang, Kangli

    2015-04-07

    Electrochemical cells having molten electrodes having an alkali metal provide receipt and delivery of power by transporting atoms of the alkali metal between electrode environments of disparate chemical potentials through an electrochemical pathway comprising a salt of the alkali metal. The chemical potential of the alkali metal is decreased when combined with one or more non-alkali metals, thus producing a voltage between an electrode comprising the molten the alkali metal and the electrode comprising the combined alkali/non-alkali metals.

  20. Ideas about Acids and Alkalis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toplis, Rob

    1998-01-01

    Investigates students' ideas, conceptions, and misconceptions about acids and alkalis before and after a teaching sequence in a small-scale research project. Concludes that student understanding of acids and alkalis is lacking. (DDR)

  1. Petrogenesis of the Northwest Africa 4898 high-Al mare basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaolin; Hsu, Weibiao; Guan, Yunbin; Wang, Linyan; Wang, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 4898 is the only low-Ti, high-Al basaltic lunar meteorite yet recognized. It predominantly consists of pyroxene (53.8 vol%) and plagioclase (38.6 vol%). Pyroxene has a wide range of compositions (En12-62Fs25-62Wo11-36), which display a continuous trend from Mg-rich cores toward Ca-rich mantles and then to Fe-rich rims. Plagioclase has relatively restricted compositions (An87-96Or0-1Ab4-13), and was transformed to maskelynite. The REE zoning of all silicate minerals was not significantly modified by shock metamorphism and weathering. Relatively large (up to 1 mm) olivine phenocrysts have homogenous inner parts with Fo ~74 and sharply decrease to 64 within the thin out rims (~30 μm in width). Four types of inclusions with a variety of textures and modal mineralogy were identified in olivine phenocrysts. The contrasting morphologies of these inclusions and the chemical zoning of olivine phenocrysts suggest NWA 4898 underwent at least two stages of crystallization. The aluminous chromite in NWA 4898 reveals that its high alumina character was inherited from the parental magma, rather than by fractional crystallization. The mineral chemistry and major element compositions of NWA 4898 are different from those of 12038 and Luna 16 basalts, but resemble those of Apollo 14 high-Al basalts. However, the trace element compositions demonstrate that NWA 4898 and Apollo 14 high-Al basalts could not have been derived from the same mantle source. REE compositions of its parental magma indicate that NWA 4898 probably originated from a unique depleted mantle source that has not been sampled yet. Unlike Apollo 14 high-Al basalts, which assimilated KREEPy materials during their formation, NWA 4898 could have formed by closed-system fractional crystallization.

  2. The Oxidation State of Terrestrial Basalts and its Link with the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallmann, G.; O'Neill, H. S.; Berry, A. J.; Norman, M. D.; Eggins, S. M.; Kamenetsky, V.; Turner, S.; Smith, I. E.; Ballhaus, C.

    2011-12-01

    The prevailing paradigm is that the Earth's mantle is both laterally and vertically heterogeneous in regards to its oxidation state. This view has been motivated by the observation that, on average, primitive island arc basalts (IAB) preserve Fe3+/Fe2+ higher than ocean island (OIB) and, particularly, mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB), and reinforced by the higher oxygen fugacities (fO2) determined in lithospheric (mantle wedge) arc peridotites. fO2 measurements in peridotites equilibrated over a range of pressures have also led to the notion that the mantle becomes more reduced with depth. V and Sc behave very similarly during partial melting of the mantle, but while V is redox-sensitive Sc is not. Their ratio in basalts has therefore a memory of the redox conditions during partial melting. Within the many assumptions involved in forward trace-element modeling, the bulk-rock V/Sc of MORBs, OIBs and IABs indicate that the partial melting events responsible for their genesis occurred at a relatively narrow range of fO2s between QFM and QFM-1. V olivine-liquid partition coefficients are also sensitive to oxidation state (normalization to Sc is useful to minimize the effect of variables other than fO2), and the values determined between olivine phenocrysts (Fo76-90) and quenched basaltic melts suggest that, at the time of olivine crystallization, terrestrial basalts have already oxidized about 1 log fO2 unit (IABs even more so, approximately 2 log fO2 units). The results reveal no statistically significant distinction between the oxidation states of MORBs and OIBs. This has been confirmed by Fe3+/Fe2+ determined by XANES.

  3. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  4. Helium isotope ratios in Ethiopian Rift basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarsi, P.; Craig, H.

    1996-11-01

    Helium isotope ratios were measured in olivine and pyroxene phenocrysts from basalts of the Ethiopian Rift Valley and Afar Depression between 6° and 15°N and 37° and 43°E. 3He/4He ratios range from 6 to 17 times the atmospheric value (RA = 1.4 × 10-6), that is, from ratios less than typical MORB (depleted mantle) helium (R/RA= 8 ± 1) to ratios similar to high-3He hotspots and to the Yellowstone hotspot (R/RA= 16.5). The high 3He/4He ratios occur all along the Ethiopian Rift and well up into the Afar Depression, with a maximum value of 17.0 RA at 8°N in the Rift Axis and a high value of 14.2 RA in the central Tat'Ali sector of the Afar Depression. The ratios decrease to MORB-like values near the edge of the Red Sea, and to sub-MORB ratios (5-6 RA) at the northern end of the Rift (Zula Peninsula) and at the southern end, at lakes Abaya and Chamo. The Ethiopian Rift provides the only continental hotspot terrain in which helium isotope ratios can be compared in detail between volcanic lavas and associated geothermal and volcanic gases, a primary motivation for this work. Comparison with our previously measured ratios in fluids and gases (range 2-15 RA) shows excellent agreement in the areas sampled for both lavas and fluids, and indicates that high-temperature volcanic fluids can be used for establishing helium isotope signatures in such terrains. The high-3He values in both fluids and basalts show that a Primitive Mantle (PM) component is required and that a Lower Mantle High-3He plume is strongly involved as a driving force in the rifting process of the East African Rift System.

  5. Rhyolite, dacite, andesite, basaltic andesite, and basalt volcanism on the Alarcon Rise spreading-center, Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, B. M.; Portner, R. A.; Clague, D. A.; Castillo, P. R.; Paduan, J. B.; Martin, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    The Alarcon Rise is a ~50 km long intermediate-rate (~50mm/a) spreading segment at the southern end of the Gulf of California. The Rise is bounded by the Tamayo and Pescadero transforms to the south and north. In Spring 2012, an MBARI-led expedition mapped a ~1.5- 3km wide swath of the ridge axis at 1-m resolution and completed 9 ROV dives (Clague et al., this session). Sampling during the ROV dives was supplemented by use of a wax-tip corer to recover volcanic glass: 194 glassy lava samples were recovered from the Rise. The vast majority of lava flows along the axis are basalt and rare basaltic andesite. More than half the basalts are plagioclase-phyric to ultraphyric (Martin et al., this session), and the rest are aphyric. Rare samples also include olivine or olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts. Analyses of half of the recovered glass basalt rinds range in MgO from 4.3 to 8.5 wt.% and those with MgO > 6 wt % have K2O/TiO2 = 0.07-0.11. The basalts are broadly characterized as normal mid-ocean ridge basalts (N-MORB). E-MORB is also present near the center of the ridge segment, but has been found only as pyroclasts in sediment cores. A much greater range in lava composition is associated with an unusual volcanic dome-like edifice that lies ~9 km south of the Pescadero transform. Two dives in the vicinity of the dome collected lava and volcaniclastic samples consisting of moderately to sparsely phyric light brown to colorless volcanic glass. Feldspar is the dominant phase, but magnetite, fayalitic olivine, light tan and light green clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, zircon, and rare pyrite blebs also occur. Melt-inclusions are common in many phenocrysts, especially of plagioclase. Hydrous mineral phases are not observed. These samples have rhyolitic glass compositions (75.8- 77.4 SiO2 wt %), but their whole-rock compositions will be somewhat less silicic. Pillow flows to the immediate west have dacitic glass compositions (67.4- 68.8 wt % SiO2). Basaltic andesitic

  6. Direct shear of olivine single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tielke, Jacob A.; Zimmerman, Mark E.; Kohlstedt, David L.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the strengths of the individual dislocation slip systems in olivine is fundamental to understanding the flow behavior and the development of lattice-preferred orientation in olivine-rich rocks. The most direct measurements of the strengths of individual slip systems are from triaxial compression experiments on olivine single crystals. However, such experiments only allow for determination of flow laws for two of the four dominant slip systems in olivine. In order to measure the strengths of the (001)[100] and (100)[001] slip systems independently, we performed deformation experiments on single crystals of San Carlos olivine in a direct shear geometry. Experiments were carried out at temperatures of 1000 ° to 1300 °C, a confining pressure of 300 MPa, shear stresses of 60 to 334 MPa, and resultant shear strain rates of 7.4 × 10-6 to 2.1 × 10-3 s-1. At high-temperature (≥1200 °C) and low-stress (≤200 MPa) conditions, the strain rate of crystals oriented for direct shear on either the (001)[100] or the (100)[001] slip system follows a power law relationship with stress, whereas at lower temperatures and higher stresses, strain rate depends exponentially on stress. The flow laws derived from the mechanical data in this study are consistent with a transition from the operation of a climb-controlled dislocation mechanism during power-law creep to the operation of a glide-controlled dislocation mechanism during exponential creep. In the climb-controlled regime, crystals oriented for shear on the (001)[100] slip system are weaker than crystals orientated for shear on the (100)[001] slip system. In contrast, in the glide-controlled regime the opposite is observed. Extrapolation of flow laws determined for crystals sheared in orientations favorable for slip on these two slip systems to upper mantle conditions reveals that the (001)[100] slip system is weaker at temperatures and stresses that are typical of the asthenospheric mantle, whereas the (100

  7. Direct Shear of Olivine Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tielke, Jacob; Zimmerman, Mark; Kohlstedt, David

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the strength of individual dislocation slip systems in olivine is fundamental to understanding the flow behavior and the development of lattice-preferred orientation in olivine-rich rocks. The most direct measurements of the strengths of individual slip systems are from triaxial compression experiments on olivine single crystals. However, such experiments only allow for determination of flow laws for two of the four dominate slip systems in olivine. In order to measure the strengths of the (001)[100] and (100)[001] slip systems independently, we performed deformation experiments on single crystals of San Carlos olivine in a direct shear geometry. Experiments were carried out at temperatures of 1000° to 1300°C, a confining pressure of 300 MPa, shear stresses of 60 to 334 MPa, and resultant shear strain rates of 7.4 x 10-6 to 6.7 x 10-4 s-1. At high-temperature (≥1200°C) and low-stress (≤200 MPa) conditions, the strain rate of crystals oriented for direct shear on either the (001)[100] or the (100)[001] slip system follows a power law relationship with stress, whereas at lower temperatures and higher stresses, strain rate depends exponentially on stress. The flow laws derived from the mechanical data in this study are consistent with a transition from the operation of a climb-controlled dislocation mechanism during power-law creep to the operation of a glide-controlled dislocation mechanism during exponential creep. In the climb-controlled regime, crystals oriented for shear on the (001)[100] slip system are weaker than crystals orientated for shear on the (100)[001] slip system. In contrast, in the glide-controlled regime the opposite is observed. Extrapolation of flow laws determined for crystals sheared in orientations favorable for slip on these two slip systems to upper mantle conditions reveals that the (001)[100] slip system is weaker at temperatures and stresses that are typical of the asthenospheric mantle, whereas the (100)[001] slip

  8. Petrogenesis of the Northwest Africa 4734 basaltic lunar meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Hsu, Weibiao; Guan, Yunbin; Li, Xianhua; Li, Qiuli; Liu, Yu; Tang, Guoqiang

    2012-09-01

    We report the petrography, mineralogy, trace element abundance geochemistry, and Pb-Pb geochronology of the lunar meteorite Northwest Africa (NWA) 4734 and make a comparison with the LaPaz Icefield (LAP) 02205/02224 low-Ti lunar basaltic meteorites. NWA 4734 is an unbrecciated low-Ti mare basalt composed mainly of subophitic-textured pyroxene (60 vol%) and plagioclase (30%). Pyroxene, plagioclase, and olivine exhibit large compositional variations and intra-grain chemical zoning. Pyroxene and plagioclase in NWA 4734 have rare earth element (REE) concentrations and patterns similar to those of the LAPs. The crystallization age of NWA 4734, determined in situ in baddeleyite, is 3073 ± 15 Ma (2σ), nearly identical to that of the LAPs (3039 ± 12 Ma). NWA 4734 and the LAPs have similar textures, modal abundances, mineral chemistry, and crystallization ages, and are most likely source-crater paired on the Moon. One baddeleyite grain in LAP 02224 displays distinctively older and spatially variable ages, from 3349 ± 62 to 3611 ± 62 Ma (2σ), similar to another baddeleyite grain (3109 ± 29 to 3547 ± 21 Ma) reported by Zhang et al. (2010) for the same meteorite. Raman spectra, cathodoluminescence, and stoichiometric studies of the baddeleyite suggest that the two older grains were not endogenic but were trapped by the parental magma. Equilibrium partition calculation shows that the parental melt from which the NWA 4734 plagioclase crystallized has much lower REE contents than its whole rock, indicating an open system during magma evolution. NWA 4734 could have originated from a parental melt with REE concentrations similar to that of the Apollo 12 olivine basalt. The magma likely assimilated a small amount (˜4 wt%) of KREEP-rich material during its ascent through the lunar crust.

  9. Highly impregnated slow-spread lithosphere : microstructure and geochemistry of olivine-rich troctolites from IODP Hole U1309D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ildefonse, B.; Drouin, M.; Godard, M.

    2009-04-01

    IODP Expeditions 304-305 sampled the Atlantis Massif, an oceanic core complex located at 30°N in the inside corner of the intersection of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge with the Atlantis Fracture Zone. IODP Hole U1309D was drilled to 1415.5 meters below seafloor; it is the second deepest hole in slow-spreading crust, after Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 735B on the Southwest Indian Ridge. The recovered rocks are mostly gabbroic. We present a petrostructural (EBSD) and in-situ geochemical (EPMA, LA-ICPMS and LA-HR-ICPMS) study of olivine-rich troctolites (ol > 70%; 5.5 % of recovered section) and associated gabbros. Olivine-rich troctolites from Hole U1309D display poikilitic textures, with olivine ranging from coarse-grained subhedral crystals to medium-grained rounded crystals, embedded in large, undeformed clinopyroxene and plagioclase poikiloblasts. Trace element compositions of clinopyroxene and plagioclase poikiloblasts indicate that they crystallized from the same depleted MORB melt in both olivine-rich troctolites and associated gabbros. Olivine trace element compositions appear too depleted in light REE to be in equilibrium with plagioclase and clinopyroxene. Olivine crystallographic preferred orientations are weak, and misorientations are consistent with deformation by dislocation creep with activation of the high-temperature (010) [100] slip system, commonly described in asthenospheric mantle. The fabrics also display a relatively strong uncommon [001] concentration that we interpret as resulting from abundant melt impregnation. The joint study of geochemical processes and microstructures in these rocks suggest a complex crystallization history in an open system with percolation of large volume of MORB-type melt that postdate olivine crystal-plastic deformation. Although the mantle origin of the olivine is difficult to demonstrate unequivocally, we propose that olivine-rich troctolites represent the ultimate residue of melt-mantle reaction processes. Our

  10. Activity composition relationships in silicate melts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Glazner, A.F.

    1990-12-31

    Equipment progress include furnace construction and electron microprobe installation. The following studies are underway: phase equilibria along basalt-rhyolite mixing line (olivine crystallization from natural silicic andensites, distribution of Fe and Mg between olivine and liquid, dist. of Ca and Na between plagioclase and liquid), enthalpy-composition relations in magmas (bulk heat capacity of alkali basalt), density model for magma ascent and contamination, thermobarometry in igneous systems (olivine/plagioclase phenocryst growth in Quat. basalt), high-pressure phase equilibria of alkali basalt, basalt-quartz mixing experiments, phase equilibria of East African basalts, and granitic minerals in mafic magma. (DLC)

  11. Activity composition relationships in silicate melts

    SciTech Connect

    Glazner, A.F.

    1990-01-01

    Equipment progress include furnace construction and electron microprobe installation. The following studies are underway: phase equilibria along basalt-rhyolite mixing line (olivine crystallization from natural silicic andensites, distribution of Fe and Mg between olivine and liquid, dist. of Ca and Na between plagioclase and liquid), enthalpy-composition relations in magmas (bulk heat capacity of alkali basalt), density model for magma ascent and contamination, thermobarometry in igneous systems (olivine/plagioclase phenocryst growth in Quat. basalt), high-pressure phase equilibria of alkali basalt, basalt-quartz mixing experiments, phase equilibria of East African basalts, and granitic minerals in mafic magma. (DLC)

  12. Petrogenesis of pillow basalts from Baolai in southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Chun; Yang, Huai-Jen

    2016-04-01

    The pillow basalts from Baolai in southwestern Taiwan have been inferred to bear Dupal signautres based on their Th/Ce ratio, linking the Baolai basalts to the South China Sea (SCS) seamounts that are characterized by Dupal Pb isotope signatures (Smith and Lewis, 2007). In this study, thirty-two Baolai basalt samples were analyzed for abundances of major and trace elements as well as Pb and Nd isotope ratios to verify their Dupal characters and to constrain their petrogenesis significance. The Baolai basalts contain 4-10 % L.O.I.. Three stages of alteration are inferred from plots of L.O.I. abundance versus concentrations major oxides as well as mineral textures and compositions. The first alteration stage was characterized by albitization that converted Ca-rich plagioclase to albite. The second alteration stage was dominated by chloritization of olivine and augite, resulting in increases in L.O.I. abundance. The last alteration stage is represented by formation of secondary calcite in vesicles and cracks. These alteration processes reflect interaction with seawater and apparently did not affect the magmatic Pb isotope composition for the low Pb concentration in seawater. Relative to the North Hemisphere Reference Line (NHRL), the Baolai pillow basalts have higher 208Pb/204Pb ratios at a given 206Pb/204Pb value, showing Dupal anomaly. For their relatively higher 208Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 206Pb/204Pb ratios, the Baolai basalts are distinct from majority of the Cenozoic basalts in the Hainan-Leizhou peninsula, the Indochina peninsula, and the SCS seamounts, for which derivation from the Hainan mantle plume has been recently proposed (Wang et al., 2013). In contrast, the Baolai basalts and the Cenozoic basalts from eastern Guangdong at southeastern China have similar Pb and Nd isotope compositions, indicating derivation from similar mantle sources. However, the Baolai basalts have lower abundance ratios of Zr/Hf (40.3-45.6 versus 46.5-50.5), La/Yb (12

  13. Chlor-Alkali Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkatesh, S.; Tilak, B. V.

    1983-01-01

    Chlor-alkali technology is one of the largest electrochemical industries in the world, the main products being chlorine and caustic soda (sodium hydroxide) generated simultaneously by the electrolysis of sodium chloride. This technology is reviewed in terms of electrochemical principles and manufacturing processes involved. (Author/JN)

  14. Chromium Oxidation State in Planetary Basalts: Oxygen Fugacity Indicator and Critical Variable for Cr-Spinel Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, A. S.; Burger, P. V.; Le, Loan; Papike, J. J.; Jone, J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2014-01-01

    Cr is a ubiquitous and relatively abundant minor element in basaltic, planetary magmas. At the reduced oxidation states (basalts Cr is present in melts as both divalent and trivalent forms. The ratio of trivalent to divalent Cr present in the melt has many consequences for the stability and Cr concentration of magmatic phases such as spinel, clinopyroxene, and olivine. However, understanding the Cr valence in quenched melts has historically been plagued with analytical issues, and only recently has reliable methodology for quantifying Cr valence in quenched melts been developed. Despite this substantial difficulty, the pioneering works of Hanson and Jones and Berry and O'Neill provided important insights into the oxidation state of Cr in in silicate melts. Here we present a series of 1-bar gas mixing experiments performed with a Fe-rich basaltic melt in which have determined the Cr redox ratio of the melt at over a range of fO2 values by measuring this quantity in olivine with X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). The measured Cr redox ratio of the olivine phenocrysts can be readily converted to the ratio present in the conjugate melt via the ratio of crystal-liquid partition coefficients for Cr3+ and Cr2+. We have applied these results to modeling Cr spinel stability and Cr redox ratios in a primitive, iron-rich martian basalt.

  15. Petrogenesis of Mt. Baker Basalts and Andesites: Constraints From Mineral Chemistry and Phase Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, E.; McCallum, I. S.

    2009-12-01

    Basalts in continental arcs are volumetrically subordinate to andesites and this is the case for Mt. Baker in the northern Cascade magmatic arc. However, basalts provide indirect evidence on mantle compositions and processes that produce magmas parental to the abundant andesites and dacites of the stratocones. Basalts at Mt. Baker erupted from monogenetic vents peripheral to the andesitic stratocone. Flows are variable in composition; some samples would more appropriately be classified as basaltic andesites. The “basalts” have relatively low Mg/(Mg+Fe) indicating that they have evolved from their original compositions. Samples studied are Park Butte, Tarn Plateau, Lk. Shannon, Sulphur Cr. basalts, and Cathedral Crag, Hogback, and Rankin Ridge basaltic andesites. Mt. Baker lavas belong to the calc-alkaline basalt suite (CAB) defined by Bacon et al. (1997) and preserve arc geochemical features. High alumina olivine tholeiite (HAOT) are absent. Equilibrium mineral pairs and whole rock compositions were used to calculate pre-eruptive temperatures, water contents, and redox states of the “basalts.” All samples have zoned olivine phenocrysts with Fo68 to Fo87 cores and chromite inclusions. Cpx and zoned plagioclase occur in all flows, but opx occurs only in Cathedral Crag, Rankin Ridge, and Tarn Plateau. Ti-magnetite and ilmenite coexist in all flows except for Sulphur Cr., Lk. Shannon and Hogback, which contain a single Fe-Ti oxide. Liquidus temperatures range from 1080 to 1232°C and are negatively correlated with water contents. Water contents estimated using liquidus depression due to H2O (0.8 to 5.4 wt.%) agree well with plag core-whole rock equilibria estimates (1.2 to 3.9 wt.%). Park Butte, Sulphur Cr. and Lk. Shannon had <1.5 wt.% H2O, and Cathedral Crag is most hydrous. Redox states from ol-chr pairs (QFM +0.1 to +2.8) and Fe-Ti oxide pairs (QFM -0.6 to +1.8) indicate that Park Butte and Sulphur Cr. are most oxidized and Cathedral Crag most reduced

  16. Contrasting geochemistry and metamorphism of pillow basalts in metamorphic complexes from Aysén, S. Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, F.; Aguirre, L.; Sepúlveda, V.; Morata, D.

    1999-07-01

    The geochemistry of pillow basalts from the Chonos Metamorphic Complex (CMC) and the Eastern Andes Metamorphic Complex of Aysén (EAMC) indicates contrasting tectonic environments for these basic lavas. They have E-MORB and continental alkaline affinities, respectively. The MORB-like basalts are metamorphosed in the pumpellyite-actinolite metamorphic facies, with mineral associations indicative of relatively high P/T metamorphism. The continental alkali basalts exhibit pumpellyite-chlorite assemblages developed in a low to intermediate P/T regime. These contrasting eruptive and metamorphic settings agree with recently established age differences between the complexes, and invalidate direct correlation between them.

  17. The timing of alkali metasomatism in paleosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacFarlane, A. W.; Holland, H. D.

    1991-01-01

    We have measured the concentrations of rubidium and strontium and 87Sr/86Sr values of whole-rock samples from three paleosols of different ages. The oldest of the three weathering horizons, the 2,760 Ma Mt. Roe #1 paleosol in the Fortescue Group of Western Australia, experienced addition of Rb, and probably Sr, at 2,168 +/- 10 Ma. The intermediate paleosol, developed on the Hekpoort Basalt in South Africa, is estimated to have formed at 2,200 Ma, and yields a Rb-Sr isochron age of 1,925 +/- 32 Ma. The youngest of the three paleosols, developed on the Ongeluk basalt in Griqualand West, South Africa ca. 1,900 Ma, yielded a Rb-Sr age of 1,257 +/- 11 Ma. The Rb-Sr systematics of all three paleosols were reset during post-weathering metasomatism related to local or regional thermal disturbances. The Rb-Sr systematics of the paleosols were not subsequently disturbed. The near-complete removal of the alkali and alkaline earth elements from these paleosols during weathering made them particularly susceptible to resetting of their Rb-Sr systematics. Paleosols of this type are therefore sensitive indicators of the timing of thermal disturbances.

  18. Oriented crystallographic textures of olivine in quenched silicate melt spherules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, H.

    2015-12-01

    Olivine is one of the most common minerals in the planetary materials including solid Earth and chondritic meteorites. Olivine crystals show characteristic textures in chondrules and micrometeorites (MMs) depending on heating and cooling histories, especially in extraordinary quick cooling rates. We have constructed a fine particle free fall apparatus in a high temperature furnace and carried out crystallization experiments of fine particles with quick heating and quenching (Isobe and Gondo, 2013). The falling particles in the furnace can reach 1400 degrees C within 2 seconds, keep above 1400 degrees C more than 1 second, and are quenched within 1 second. Run products from olivine particles show various textures depending on proportions of three kinds of starting materials in the particles. Fayalite particles melt completely and form barred olivine-like spherules with low pyramid structures on the surface. Dendritic olivine crystals with regulated crystallographic orientation are developed in melted particles. Surface texture of melted particles may be affected by the dendritic olivine crystals grown in the spherules. Oriented dendrites of magnetite also occur between olivine crystals. The texture of oriented dendrite of olivine with tiny magnetite is quite similar to natural cosmic spherules (CSs). In the completely melted spherules, barred olivine-like structures can be seen. Due to extraordinary high cooling rate up to 2×10^6 degrees C/hour and degrees of supercooling, olivine bars show chained structure of H-shaped or hourglass shaped units which are distinctive characteristics for quick growth of olivine in quenching. In spite of quite short period of crystal growth processes, chained olivine aligns parallel bars in the almost entire spherule. Nucleation of barred olivine crystals may be initiated at surface of spherules. Starting points of olivine growth can be seen as peaks on surface of the spherules. The crystallographic textures of olivine develop

  19. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Wolfs, Denise Y.; Clavenna, Le Roy R.; Eakman, James M.; Kalina, Theodore

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  20. Water loss from olivine hosted melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Provost, A.; Schiano, P.; Cluzel, N.

    2009-12-01

    Water content in melt inclusions has long been used as an important index for the water content of the hosting magma. However, many studies have shown that post-entrapment diffusive re-equilibration can affect the water content of melt inclusions. This process must be considered when using melt inclusions to infer water content of the hosting magma. Theoretical model on the diffusive re-equilibration between melt inclusions and external melts showed that the re-equilibration rate depends on the diffusivity of the re-equilibrating species in the host mineral, the partition coefficient of this species between the host mineral and melt, and the geometry of the melt inclusion and host mineral. The water diffusivity in olivine and water partition coefficient between melt and olivine have been measured by recent studies, therefore the diffusive re-equilibration model can be tested by experiments. In this study, we carried out in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements on the water content of olivine hosted melt inclusions at high temperatures. Initial water content of the melt inclusions is about 4 wt%. A heating stage system is combined with a microscope FTIR and the absorption spectrum through the olivine and melt inclusion is repeatedly measured. Although the absorption band at around 3540 cm-1 has not be calibrated at high temperatures, it is assumed that the absorbance is linearly related to the total water concentration in the melt inclusion, and the relative water content can be inferred. Cautions have been exercised to maintain a consistent measurement spot such that the thickness of the melt inclusion within the beam path did not change significantly during each experiment. Oxygen fugacity in the heating stage is controlled by Zr purified Ar gas to be about 7 logarithm units below the QFM buffer and about 1 logarithm unit above the QIF buffer at 1473 K. Preliminary results showed that at 1430 and 1581 K, the total water content of the

  1. Mars Crustal Magnetism: Plate Tectonics and Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J.; Acuna, M.; Ness, N.

    2006-12-01

    The crustal magnetic field of Mars, mapped in unprecedented detail by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, bears a record of crustal formation and subsequent evolution. The magnetic field in Meridiani has characteristics (transform faulting, symmetry) associated with crustal spreading in the presence of a reversing dynamo. The detailed erasure of crustal fields in and around filled basins (Utopia, Isidis) and massive volcanic constructs (Tharsis Montes, Oylmpus Mons, Alba Patera, Elysium Mons) suggests that the northern plains were largely demagnetized by emplacement of ~km thick flood basalts in single cooling events. Thermal demagnetization under a few km of flood basalts would require that the pre-existing magnetic imprint be borne in a layer only a few km thick. This in turn implies very intense magnetization (order 100 A/m) if the same layer thickness is applied to the intensely magnetized southern highlands. Icelandic basalts are rarely as intensely magnetized, but some samples - characterized by single domain magnetite formed from high temperature oxidation of olivine - approach this number.

  2. The crystallisation trends of spinels in tertiary basalts from Rhum and Muck and their petrogenetic significance. [chemical composition changes during crystal formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridley, W. I.

    1977-01-01

    Spinels found in transitional olivine basalts from the Islands of Rhum and Muck in the British Tertiary Province are analyzed to determine their chemical variability and their relationship to silicate phases. Chemical zoning of the cores of spinels which spilled into the basaltic liquid may be due to a reaction between the spinel and the liquid resulting in more Fe- and Ti-rich spinels. In addition, a peritectic-type reaction seems to have occurred, causing the transformation of aluminum spinel to chrome spinel with precipitation of plagioclase. Changes in the basaltic liquid are reflected by these transformations in the spinel composition.

  3. First Ion Microprobe Determination Of Water And Sulfur Isotopic Ratios In Melt Inclusions Of Olivines At Mount Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, P.; Metrich, N.; Deloule, E.; Belhadj, O.; Mandeville, C.; Spilliaert, N.

    2006-12-01

    Ion microprobe determination of the isotopic composition of magmatic volatiles preserved in crystal melt inclusions (MI), first applied to Hawaiian volcanoes [1], opens new perspectives to elucidate the source of magmas and their conditions of ascent, degassing and eruption. Here we report on the first ion microprobe isotopic analysis of water and sulfur dissolved in olivine-hosted MIs and glass embayments (40- 200 μm) in primitive alkali basaltic magma erupted from >15 km depth (400 MPa) during the 2002 flank of Mount Etna, in Sicily. The MIs, recovered from rapidly quenched explosive products, were previously analyzed for their content in dissolved H2O, CO2, S, Cl and F [2,3]. Isotopic measurements were performed at CRPG using Cameca IMS3F and IMS1270 microprobes, respectively. Calibration was made against Etna glass samples of similar composition and with known H2O-S concentrations and isotope ratios determined with mass spectrometry. δ34S (±0.7) and δD (±5-12) values are given in per mil deviations with respect to SMOW and CDT standards. The most primitive MIs representing S-undegassed magma contain 0.29-0.34 wt% S with a mean δ34S of +2.4±0.4, comparable to that of 800-1100°C Etna volcanic gases [4]. The δ34S of more evolved, S-poorer inclusions and embayments, trapped at lower pressure, track both the magma degassing process and S-removal by sulfide globule as the melt reaches sulfide-saturation. The results for water are more complex and their interpretation is still preliminary. The most pristine inclusions, trapped at >12 km depth below summit, contain 0.2-0.4 wt% CO2 and 3.2±0.3 wt% H2O with δD clustering at around -20 (range: -90 to 0). However, a second cluster of water- rich but CO2-poorer (<0.13 wt%) inclusions, trapped as magma ponds at 6-8 km depth [2], displays positive δD values of between 0 and +40. Such anomalous δD, coupled with evidence of heterogeneous gas-melt entrapment conditions, suggests deuterium enrichment mainly due to

  4. Cosmogenic He-3 exposure ages of basalts from Ascension Island - implications for evolution of ocean islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammon, K.; Dunai, T. J.; Stuart, F. M.; Meriaux, A.-S.; Gayer, E.

    2009-04-01

    Ascension Island is the emergent top of a volcano situated at 7°56'S and 14°22'W in the South Atlantic Ocean, approximately 90 km west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and 50 km south of the Ascension Fracture Zone [1, 2]. It rises about 860 m above sea level and the base of the volcano covers about 2000 km2 approximately 3200 m beneath sea level [3]. Volcanic activity is associated with the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and commenced at 6-7 Ma [2, 4, 5]. The volcanic rocks of Ascension Island are transitional to mildly-alkaline basalt to rhyolite volcanic suite and are distinguished by trace element ratios (e.g. Zr/Nb) [3]. Whereas the age of the trachyte intrusions are well constrained (0.6 - 1.0 Ma) [e.g. 3] the younger basalt suites have not been dated reliably and the low K concentration make Ar/Ar dating difficult. In order to reconstruct the volcanic history of Ascension Island we have used cosmogenic He-3 in olivine and pyroxene phenocrysts from uneroded basalt flows to date the three basalt lava suites that appear to span the range of volcanism. Ages of co-genetic pyroxene and olivine agree within analytical uncertainties. Implanted radiogenic He-4 tends to lower He-3 derived exposure ages therefore some olivine samples were etched with HF/HNO3 to remove about 30% of the sample mass. The so etched olivine is systematically older (by less than 10%) than the unetched samples. The three basalt suites have exposure ages of 300 to 190 ka. The high and intermediate Zr/Nb basalts seem to have been erupted contemporaneously or at least in overlapping events about 300 ka ago. These suites were previously thought to be separated in time on the basis of K-Ar chronology and stratigraphy [3]. The third suite which seams to be a more local vent is erupted between 260 and 190 ka. Our new data indicate the co-existence of different magma chambers with different geochemical signatures. [1] E. Bourdon, C. Hemond, Mineralogy and Petrology 71(2001) 127-138. [2] D.L. Nielson, B.S. Sibbett

  5. Effect of chlorine on near-liquidus phase equilibria of an Fe-Mg-rich tholeiitic basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filiberto, Justin; Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Gross, Juliane; Treiman, Allan H.

    2014-07-01

    The importance of Cl in basalt petrogenesis has been recognized, yet constraints on its effect on liquidus crystallization of basalts are scarce. In order to quantify the role of Cl in basaltic systems, we have experimentally determined near-liquidus phase relations of a synthetic Fe-Mg-rich basalt, doped with 0.0-2.5 wt% dissolved Cl, at 0.7, 1.1, and 1.5 GPa. Results have been parameterized and compared with previous data from literature. The effect of Cl on mineral chemistry and liquidus depression is dependent on the starting basaltic composition. The liquidus depression measured for a SiO2-rich, Al2O3-poor basalt is smaller than that observed for a basaltic melt depleted in silica and enriched in FeOT and Al2O3. The effect of Cl on depression of the olivine-orthopyroxene-liquid multiple saturation pressure does not seem to vary with the starting composition of the basaltic liquid. This suggests that Cl may significantly promote the generation of silica-poor, Fe-Al-rich magmas in the Earth, Mars, and the Moon.

  6. Viscosity of hydrous Etna basalt: implications for Plinian-style basaltic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, D.; Dingwell, D. B.

    Water dissolved in a silicate melt can strongly influence its physical properties and thus magma behavior during crystallization, degassing, foaming and fragmentation. Etna is a basaltic volcano whose activity is dominated by effusive eruptions which have long represented a threat to the densely populated, surrounding area. Recently, recognition of the products of a Plinian eruption (122 B.C.) has raised further issues for hazard assessment at Etna and other basaltic volcanoes. Constraining the behavior of Etna magma under conditions relevant to both effusive and explosive hazards requires viscosity data under conditions near the glass transition. Here we have investigated the viscosity of hydrous Etna lava in order to better understand eruptive processes which characterize this volcano. The experimental methods which have been used include piston cylinder synthesis of the hydrated melts, micropenetration viscometry for low-temperature viscosity measurements, and near-infrared spectroscopy for the evaluation of sample homogeneity and measurements of water content. Additionally, scanning calorimetric determinations were performed to check whether incipient crystallization had occurred. Sample compositions were determined using electron microprobe analysis and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Results from this study are compared with previous reports of trachytic, phonolitic and model calc-alkaline rhyolite (HPG8) compositions. The viscosity of the basaltic melt (dry and wet) has been parameterized in terms of temperature and water content via the non-Arrhenian equation: log10ɛ=-4.643+(5,812.44- 427.04×H2O)/(T(K)- 499.31+28.74×ln(H2O)) where ɛ is the viscosity in Pa s, H2O is the water content in wt%, and T is the temperature in Kelvin. We observe that the viscosity of alkali basalt (at more than 0.5 wt% H2O) is similar to that of an alkaline trachyte (Agnano-Monte Spina eruption, Phlegrean Fields) and much higher than that of a peralkaline phonolite (Teide

  7. Viscosity of hydrous Etna basalt: implications for Plinian-style basaltic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, D.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2002-07-01

    Water dissolved in a silicate melt can strongly influence its physical properties and thus magma behavior during crystallization, degassing, foaming and fragmentation. Etna is a basaltic volcano whose activity is dominated by effusive eruptions which have long represented a threat to the densely populated, surrounding area. Recently, recognition of the products of a Plinian eruption (122 B.C.) has raised further issues for hazard assessment at Etna and other basaltic volcanoes. Constraining the behavior of Etna magma under conditions relevant to both effusive and explosive hazards requires viscosity data under conditions near the glass transition. Here we have investigated the viscosity of hydrous Etna lava in order to better understand eruptive processes which characterize this volcano. The experimental methods which have been used include piston cylinder synthesis of the hydrated melts, micropenetration viscometry for low-temperature viscosity measurements, and near-infrared spectroscopy for the evaluation of sample homogeneity and measurements of water content. Additionally, scanning calorimetric determinations were performed to check whether incipient crystallization had occurred. Sample compositions were determined using electron microprobe analysis and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Results from this study are compared with previous reports of trachytic, phonolitic and model calc-alkaline rhyolite (HPG8) compositions. The viscosity of the basaltic melt (dry and wet) has been parameterized in terms of temperature and water content via the non-Arrhenian equation: log10ɛ=-4.643+(5,812.44-427.04×H2O)/(T(K)-499.31+28.74×ln(H2O)) where ɛ is the viscosity in Pa s, H2O is the water content in wt%, and T is the temperature in Kelvin. We observe that the viscosity of alkali basalt (at more than 0.5 wt% H2O) is similar to that of an alkaline trachyte (Agnano-Monte Spina eruption, Phlegrean Fields) and much higher than that of a peralkaline phonolite (Teide, Tenerife

  8. Petrogenesis of Mare Basalts, Mg-Rich Suites and SNC Parent Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Paul C.

    2004-01-01

    The successful models for the internal evolution of the Moon must consider the volume, distribution, timing, composition and, ultimately, the petrogenesis of mare basaltic volcanism. Indeed, given the paucity of geophysical data, the internal state of the Moon in the past can be gleaned only be unraveling the petrogenesis of the various igneous products on the Moon and, particularly, the mare basalts. most useful in constraining the depth and composition of their source region [Delano, 1980] despite having undergone a certain degree of shallow level olivine crystallization.The bulk of the lunar volcanic glass suite can be modeled as the partial melting products of an olivine + orthopyroxene source region deep within the lunar mantle. Ti02 contents vary from 0.2 wt % -1 7.0wt [Shearer and Papike, 1993]. Values that extreme would seem to require a Ti- bearing phase such as ilmenite in the source of the high-Ti (but not in the VLT source) because a source region of primitive LMO olivine and orthopyroxene, even when melted in small degrees cannot account for the observed range of Ti02 compositions. The picritic glasses are undersaturated with respect to ilmenite at all pressures investigated therefore ilmenite must have been consumed during melting, leaving an ilmenite free residue and an undersaturated melt [Delano, 1980, Longhi, 1992, Elkins et al, 2000 among others]. Multi- saturation pressures for the glasses potentially represent the last depths at which the liquids equilibrated with a harzburgite residue before ascending to the surface. These occur at great depths within the lunar mantle. Because the liquids have suffered some amount of crystal fractionation, this is at best a minimum depth. If the melts are mixtures, then it is only an average depth of melting. Multisaturation, nevertheless, is still a strong constraint on source mineralogy, revealing that the generation of the lunar basalts was dominated by melting of olivine and orthopyroxene.

  9. Shock-produced olivine glass: First observation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jeanloz, R.; Ahrens, T.J.; Lally, J.S.; Nord, G.L.; Christie, J.M.; Heuer, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations of an experimentally shock-deformed single crystal of natural peridot, (Mg0.88Fe 0.12SiO4 recovered from peak pressures of about 56 ?? 109 pascals revealed the presence of amorphous zones located within crystalline regions with a high density of tangled dislocations. This is the first reported observation ofolivine glass. The shocked sample exhibits a wide variation in the degree of shock deformation on a small scale, and the glass appears to be intimately associated with the highest density of dislocations. This study suggests that olivine glass may be formed as a result of shock at pressures above about 50 to 55 ?? 109 pascals and that further TEM observations of naturally shocked olivines may demonstrate the presence of glass.

  10. Chemical zonation in olivine-hosted melt inclusions: A record of syn-eruptive cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcombe, M. E.; Fabbrizio, A.; Zhang, Y.; Ma, C.; Le Voyer, M.; Guan, Y.; Eiler, J. M.; Saal, A. E.; Stolper, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    During the last few minutes to hours of a volcanic eruption, olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MIs) cool and crystallize olivine on their walls, producing olivine-depleted boundary layers in the melt adjacent to their olivine hosts. Competition between diffusive relaxation of these boundary layers into the centers of the MIs and replenishment of the boundary layers by continued olivine crystallization produces concentration profiles that are preserved in glassy MIs. The concentration profile of a given element in a single MI depends on the diffusion coefficient of the element in the melt, its partition coefficient between melt and olivine, and the growth rate of the olivine. Concentration profiles thus differ from element to element in a single MI, and also from inclusion to inclusion depending on the size of the MI and its thermal history. An implication of this chemical zonation is that analyses of zoned MIs, even if made near the centers of the MIs, will be diffusively fractionated relative to a simple olivine extraction path (i.e., the diffusion of fast-diffusing elements such as Ca can extend to the center of a ~150 μm radius MI). We have developed a model that uses measured MgO concentration profiles across compositionally zoned, naturally glassy, olivine-hosted MIs to constrain the thermal histories of the MIs in the last few minutes to hours of an eruption. We have applied this model to MIs sampled from three different magmatic settings: (1) glassy rims of pillow basalts sampled from the Siqueiros transform fault; (2) a hornito on Santiago Island, (Galapagos); (3) a lava flow on a submarine flank of Fernandina Island (Galapagos). Cooling rates of five MIs from the Siqueiros transform fault range from ~0.08-3 K/s. Most MIs from this sample suite require two-stage, linear cooling histories from liquidus temperatures to ~1000°C with a slower-cooling first stage followed by a faster-cooling second stage, over a time period of a few minutes to just over one hour

  11. Alteration in Hawaiian Drill Core: An analog for Martian basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvin, W. M.; Fraeman, A.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Lautze, N. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Humu'ula Groundwater Research Project (HGRP) drilled their first continuously-cored hole in the saddle region of the big island of Hawaii in March of 2013. Temperatures at the bottom of the hole were unexpectedly high and reached over 100C. The core traverses various lava flows, representing the shield-building phase of the island and the lithology is dominantly basalt with varying amounts of plagioclase and olivine phenocrysts. Logging of the core noted that discontinuous alteration became prevalent starting at ~ 1 km depth. In May of 2015 we collected 780 infrared spectra of the core from depths of 0.97 to 1.76 km using our portable field spectrometer with a contact probe and field of view of 10 mm. Many of the spectra are unaltered, showing mafic mineralogy (augite or augite with olivine). Minerals from aqueous alteration include clinochlore, micaceous minerals likely mixed with other common phyllic alteration products, and three groups of spectral types associated with zeolites. This suite of minerals suggests alteration was initiated from higher temperature and moderate pH fluids. Based on the field reconnaissance spectroscopy, 25 sections were cut that represent the alteration diversity for thin section and subsequent detailed petrologic analyses. Eight of these sections were examined using the Ultra-Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS) prototype instrument at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. UCIS collects spectra at 80 μm / pixel and identifies the same alteration mineralogy as the bulk samples, but clearly shows that the alteration occurs in veins and vugs. Unaltered olivine and pyroxene phenocrysts occur in the groundmass adjacent to highly altered vugs, and are preserved throughout the section surveyed. Given the limited alteration and abundant preservation of olivine to depths of 1.5 km, the core may be representative of alteration in moderate pH environments on Mars, where unaltered basaltic materials occur in close proximity to alteration products

  12. Northwest Africa 773: Lunar Mare Breccia with a Shallow-formed Olivine-Cumulate Component, Very-Low-Ti Heritage, and a KREEP Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolliff, B. L.; Korotev, R. L.; Zeigler, R. A.; Floss, C.; Haskin, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    Northwest Africa 773 is one of the more unusual lunar meteorites found in recent years because it contains a prominent clast lithology, which appears to be an olivine-rich cumulate and because it is a very-low-Ti (VLT) mare breccia with relatively high incompatible-trace-element concentrations and LREE/HREE enrichment. A lunar origin was verified by Fagan and coworkers on the basis of noble-gas contents, oxygen isotopes, and mineral compositions. Fagan et al. described two lithologies: (1) heterolithic impact breccia with a regolith component and (2) cumulus olivine gabbronorite. Here, we refer to these as the breccia (Bx) lithology and the olivine-cumulate (OC) lithology. The impact breccia components are predominantly volcanic (basaltic), and, in this context, the occurrence of the cumulus lithology is especially significant: is it related to the volcanic components or does it represent a deep-seated rock entrained by the basaltic magma as it rose to the surface? Elevated incompatible-element concentrations with more or less KREEP-like inter-element ratios and very-low-Ti concentrations distinguish both lithologies of this meteorite from Apollo mare basalts. Here, we summarize key compositional information (bulk and mineral), especially related to the OC lithology, to show that it formed at shallow depth and comes from a VLT ultramafic precursor that mixed with a KREEP-like trace-element component deep in the crust or upper mantle.

  13. An analysis of Apollo lunar soil samples 12070,889, 12030,187, and 12070,891: Basaltic diversity at the Apollo 12 landing site and implications for classification of small-sized lunar samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Louise; Snape, Joshua F.; Joy, Katherine H.; Downes, Hilary; Crawford, Ian A.

    2016-09-01

    Lunar mare basalts provide insights into the compositional diversity of the Moon's interior. Basalt fragments from the lunar regolith can potentially sample lava flows from regions of the Moon not previously visited, thus, increasing our understanding of lunar geological evolution. As part of a study of basaltic diversity at the Apollo 12 landing site, detailed petrological and geochemical data are provided here for 13 basaltic chips. In addition to bulk chemistry, we have analyzed the major, minor, and trace element chemistry of mineral phases which highlight differences between basalt groups. Where samples contain olivine, the equilibrium parent melt magnesium number (Mg#; atomic Mg/[Mg + Fe]) can be calculated to estimate parent melt composition. Ilmenite and plagioclase chemistry can also determine differences between basalt groups. We conclude that samples of approximately 1-2 mm in size can be categorized provided that appropriate mineral phases (olivine, plagioclase, and ilmenite) are present. Where samples are fine-grained (grain size <0.3 mm), a "paired samples t-test" can provide a statistical comparison between a particular sample and known lunar basalts. Of the fragments analyzed here, three are found to belong to each of the previously identified olivine and ilmenite basalt suites, four to the pigeonite basalt suite, one is an olivine cumulate, and two could not be categorized because of their coarse grain sizes and lack of appropriate mineral phases. Our approach introduces methods that can be used to investigate small sample sizes (i.e., fines) from future sample return missions to investigate lava flow diversity and petrological significance.

  14. Aubrite basalt vitrophyres: The missing basaltic component and high-sulfur silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogel, Robert A.

    2005-03-01

    Aubrite basalt vitrophyres (ABVs) are clastic inclusions found in enstatite chondrites and aubrites. Three have been discovered so far; PAI from the Parsa EH3 chondrite, KTI from the Khor Temiki aubrite and L87I from the LEW 87007 aubrite. Their significance stems from the fact that their parental melts were formed from source materials similar to E chondrites; therefore, they provide an opportunity to study the process of aubrite formation from an E chondrite-like protolith. KTI, PAI and L87I contain the FeO-poor highly reduced assemblage: forsterite + enstatite + silicate glass + kamacite + troilite. Additionally, KTI and PAI contain alabandite while L87I contains diopside. ABV glass contents are: 51 vol% for KTI; 30 vol% for PAI and 13 vol% for L87I. The ABVs are, thus, representative of the different stages of crystallization of a reduced precursor basalt similar to that which gave rise to the aubrites. The chemistry of all three ABVs can be projected onto the system forsterite-albite-silica. This system is where the bulk compositions of E chondrites fall. The melting relations in this system outline the melting of aubrite parental liquids. ABV bulk compositions lie along the enstatite-forsterite reaction boundary and are generally distinct from E chondrite bulk compositions. Analysis of the forsterite-albite-silica system, and the loci of ABV bulk compositions relative to that of the enstatite chondrites shows that the ABVs can be derived by partial melting of an E chondrite protolith. The L87I vitrophyre is more oxidizing than KTI and PAI. This was determined by its: higher enstatite and forsterite FeO content, lack of alabandite, low kamacite Si content and low Ti in troilite. Forsterites enclosed in enstatite display a solid trend of anticorrelated MnO and FeO; contrary to the positive correlation found for olivines in most gecochemical settings. This anticorrelation can be explained by an oxidizing or reducing event that occurred to the L87I parental melt

  15. Paleomagnetism of the late Cenozoic basalts from northern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mena, Mabel; Ré, Guillermo H.; Haller, Miguel J.; Singer, Silvia E.; Vilas, Juan F.

    2006-10-01

    Late Cenozoic volcanic rocks outcrop in the northern Patagonia Extrandina. Lava flows, characterized as olivine and alkaline basalts, belong to intraplate volcanism. We report paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic studies carried out on Late Cenozoic basalts belonging to the Cráter, Mojón and Moreniyeu Formations. The paleomagnetic sampling comprised 75 sites in lava flows and dikes from the Cráter Formation, three sites in a lava flow from the Mojón Formation and three sites in a lava flow from the Moreniyeu Formation. Alternating field (AF) and thermal detailed demagnetization techniques were used. Most of the samples have a viscous component. The AF procedure was more effective than thermal demagnetization in destroying viscous components and in defining the characteristic remanent magnetizations. Demagnetization curves and rock-magnetic studies suggest that the main remanence carrier is Ti-poor magnetite. Radiometric K-Ar ages were performed on these basalts. The radiometric ages are 0.8±0.1 Ma from outcrops located at Cerro Fermín and 1.9±0.4 Ma from outcrops at Cerro Negro, both at the Cráter Formation. These ages suggest an early-middle Pleistocene age for the lava flows from Cerro Fermín, and a late Pliocene to early Pleistocene age for the Cerro Negro lava flows. Based on the magnetic polarity temporal scale, the Cerro Fermín lava flows have registered the beginning of the Brunhes Chron, while the Cerro Negro basalts could have been extruded during the Olduvai Subchron. The K-Ar radiometric age of the Moreniyeu Formation (1.6±0.2 Ma) suggests an early Pleistocene age for this lava flow. The reverse polarity of its virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) is in agreement with the predominant one during the Matuyama Chron and suggests that the Moreniyeu Formation constitutes another volcanic event clearly separate from those of the Cráter Formation. The K-Ar radiometric age of the Mojón Formation (3.3±0.4 Ma) locates it in the middle Pliocene. The VGP

  16. Alkalis in alternative biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr.; Bryers, R.W.; Baxter, L.L.; Jenkins, B.M.; Oden, L.L.

    1994-12-31

    The alkali content and behavior of inorganic material of annually produced biofuels severely limits their use for generating electrical power in conventional furnaces. A recent eighteen-month investigation of the chemistry and firing characteristics of 26 different biofuels has been conducted. Firing conditions were simulated in the laboratory for eleven biofuels. This paper describes some results from the investigation including fuel properties, deposits, deposition mechanisms, and implications for biomass boiler design, fuel sampling and characterizations. Urban wood fuel, agricultural residues, energy crops, and other potential alternate fuels are included in the study. Conventional methods for establishing fuel alkali content and determining ash sticky temperatures were deceptive. The crux of the problem was found to be the high concentration of potassium in biofuels and its reactions with other fuel constituents which lower the ``sticky temperature`` of the ash to the 650 C to 760 C (1,200 F-1,400 F).

  17. Evaluation of olivine refractories for TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, B. M.; Cochrane, R. L.; Palmour, H., III; Paisley, M. J.

    1982-02-01

    The principal objectives of this program are to (1) experimentally determine the degree of improvement in thermal and mechanical performance that can be obtained with an olivine thermal storage brick made of domestic materials using advanced processing techniques compared with state-of-the-art as represented by commercial European bricks, (2) conduct an assessment of existing German ceramic process technology and determine its adaptability to domestic raw materials and manufacturing practices, and (3) investigate, on a limited basis, method for further improvement of domestic-olivine brick. To date, accomplishments include (1) installation of improved, computer-based instrumentation, (2) the use of this system to determine performance characteristics of a set of heat storage refractories under cyclic use conditions, (3) acquisition of the services of a knowledgeable European consultant, (4) continued lab-scale process/property optimization studies, and (5) comparative testing of olivine-based and magnesite-based heat storage refractories in the calorimetric test facility at Purdue University.

  18. Alkali-vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.; Krupke, W. F.

    2010-02-01

    We report on the results from several of our alkali laser systems. We show highly efficient performance from an alexandrite-pumped rubidium laser. Using a laser diode stack as a pump source, we demonstrate up to 145 W of average power from a CW system. We present a design for a transversely pumped demonstration system that will show all of the required laser physics for a high power system.

  19. Sulfide Stability of Planetary Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiazza, C. M.; Righter, K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Chesley, J. T.; Ruiz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The isotopic system, 187Re 187Os, can be used to determine the role of crust and mantle in magma genesis. In order to apply the system to natural samples, we must understand variations in Re/Os concentrations. It is thought that low [Os] and [Re] in basalts can be attributed to sulfide (FeS) saturation, as Re behaves incompatibly to high degrees of evolution until sulfide saturation occurs [1]. Previous work has shown that lunar basalts are sulfide under-saturated, and mid-ocean ridge, ocean-island and Martian (shergottites) basalts are saturated [2,3]. However, little is known about arc basalts. In this study, basaltic rocks were analyzed across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt.

  20. Reconstructing magma storage depths from olivine-hosted melt inclusions: Do vapor bubbles matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetani, G. A.; Maclennan, J.; Le Roux, V.; Klein, F.

    2015-12-01

    The depths at which magmas are stored, their pre-eruptive volatile contents, and the rates at which they ascend to the Earth's surface are important controls on the dynamics of volcanic eruptions. Basaltic magmas are likely to be vapor undersaturated as they begin their ascent from the mantle through the crust. Once vapor saturation is achieved and the magma begins to degas, its pre-eruptive volatile content is determined largely by the depth at which it resides within the crust. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions are believed to retain their pre-eruptive volatiles because the strength of the host crystal insulates them from the decompression experienced by the host magma. This suggests that the concentrations of H2O and CO2 in vapor-saturated olivine-hosted melt inclusions can be used as an indicator of entrapment depth [1-3]. The common occurrence of vapor bubbles in melt inclusions adds significant uncertainty to such depth estimates, however, because they contain a significant proportion of the total CO2. We have examined the distribution of volatiles in olivine-hosted melt inclusions from basaltic pillow lavas of two late Pleistocene subglacial eruptions in south Iceland: Miðfell and Skuggafjöll. We reconstructed the H2O and CO2 contents at the time of inclusion entrapment using two different techniques. In the first, a Vernadsky heating stage was used to homogenize the inclusions prior to analysis by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). In the second, we combined X-ray tomography, Raman spectroscopy and SIMS. First, X-ray microtomography is used to quantify the volumes of melt inclusion and vapor bubble. Next, the density of CO2 in each vapor bubble is determined by confocal Raman spectroscopy. Finally, the concentrations of H2O and CO2in the included glass are determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry. We conclude that reconstructing H2O and CO2 concentrations has a significant advantage over the heating stage because the former approach retains

  1. Magma ascent rate and initial water concentration inferred from diffusive water loss from olivine-hosted melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Provost, Ariel; Schiano, Pierre; Cluzel, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    As the water concentration in magma decreases during magma ascent, olivine-hosted melt inclusions will reequilibrate with the host magma through hydrogen diffusion in olivine. Previous models showed that for a single spherical melt inclusion in the center of a spherical olivine, the rate of diffusive reequilibration depends on the partition coefficient and diffusivity of hydrogen in olivine, the radius of the melt inclusion, and the radius of the olivine. This process occurs within a few hours and must be considered when interpreting water concentration in olivine-hosted melt inclusions. A correlation is expected between water concentration and melt inclusion radius, because small melt inclusions are more rapidly reequilibrated than large ones when the other conditions are the same. This study investigates the effect of diffusive water loss in natural samples by exploring such a correlation between water concentration and melt inclusion radius, and shows that the correlation can be used to infer the initial water concentration and magma ascent rate. Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements show that 31 melt inclusions (3.6-63.9 μm in radius) in six olivines from la Sommata, Vulcano Island, Aeolian Islands, have 0.93-5.28 wt% water, and the host glass has 0.17 wt% water. The water concentration in the melt inclusions shows larger variation than the data in previous studies (1.8-4.52 wt%). It correlates positively with the melt inclusion radius, but does not correlate with the major element concentrations in the melt inclusions, which is consistent with the hypothesis that the water concentration has been affected by diffusive water loss. In a simplified hypothetical scenario of magma ascent, the initial water concentration and magma ascent rate are inferred by numerical modeling of the diffusive water loss process. The melt inclusions in each olivine are assumed to have the same initial water concentration and magma ascent rate. The melt

  2. Revisiting the Compositions and Volatile Contents of Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions From the Mount Shasta Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruscitto, D.; Wallace, P.

    2008-12-01

    Recent controversy over the origin of high-Mg andesites from the Mount Shasta region has prompted us to re-examine olivine-hosted melt inclusions from this area. We analyzed olivine-hosted (Fo88-94) melt inclusions from tephra of the S17 cinder cone (N flank Whaleback), north of Mount Shasta, using FTIR and electron microprobe. The melt inclusion compositions (uncorrected for post-entrapment crystallization) range from 54-63 wt% SiO2 and 4.0-6.7 wt% MgO, and they can be divided into high (>12 wt%) and low (<10 wt%) CaO groups with distinct P2O5/K2O ratios. High-CaO inclusions have Fo91-94 host olivines, whereas low-CaO inclusions have Fo87-88 host olivines. S, Cl, and F contents are 700-2300 ppm, 1300-2700 ppm and 0-600 ppm, respectively. H2O contents (uncorrected) vary from 0.5-3.8 wt% and agree with the range of H2O contents determined by Anderson (1974 and unpublished data) using the electron probe H2O-by- difference technique (0-6.4 wt%). CO2 contents range from below detection (~25 ppm) up to 800 ppm. S and Cl contents are generally higher for high-CaO inclusions than for low-CaO inclusions, whereas F, H2O, and CO2 contents are similar for both groups. All volatiles show trends consistent with degassing during crystallization and must be taken as minimum amounts dissolved in the melt. Comparison of melt inclusions with whole rock compositions (Baker et al., 1994) suggest significant Fe-loss from the glasses (~2-4 wt%). Total extents of post-entrapment crystallization were estimated by the addition of olivine to the melt composition (with 8 wt% FeOT) until equilibrium between the melt and host olivine was achieved (13-48 wt% crystallization). Corrected SiO2 and MgO contents of the high-CaO inclusions (Fo91-95 olivine) are 49-52 wt% and 17-19 wt%, respectively. The minimum initial H2O content for inclusions in high-Fo olivines is 2.5-4.7 wt% based on our new data and Anderson's (1974 and unpublished) data. Our data provide strong evidence for the existence of

  3. Paleomagnetic, geochronologic, and petrologic data discriminate tholeiitic basalts of the northern Hat Creek graben, northeastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muffler, L. J.; Champion, D. E.; Calvert, A. T.; Clynne, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Geologic mapping carried out in 2010-2012 under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the U.S. Geological Survey and Pacific Gas and Electric Company provides the framework for geochronologic, paleomagnetic, and petrologic studies of the widespread low-potassium olivine tholeiite (LKOT) basalts that inundate low topography between higher-elevation remnants of >1 Ma calc-alkaline volcanoes in the northern part of the Hat Creek graben. These tholeiitic basalts are monotonously similar in appearance and cannot be distinguished one from another with any confidence in the field or petrographically. They are, however, distinctive in age, paleomagnetic secular directions, and major-element compositions, allowing us to map three major tholeiitic units: the basalt of Rocky Ledge (40Ar/39Ar determinations on 3 different exposures give 203.2 ± 13.7 ka, 186.8 ± 12.5 ka, and 203.9 ± 15.2 ka; weighted average 197 ± 8 ka), the basalt of Rock Spring (545.7 ± 6.7 ka), and the basalt of Sam Wolfin Spring (647.3 ± 21.7 ka). These tholeiitic units are overlain to the east by the calc-alkaline basalt west of Six Mile Hill (53.5 ± 2.0 ka) and to the south by the calc-alkaline basaltic andesite of Cinder Butte (38 ± 7 ka) and the tholeiitic Hat Creek Basalt (24 ± 6 ka). These latter two ages are from Turrin et al. (2007); all other ages are new 40Ar/39Ar determinations from the USGS geochronology laboratory in Menlo Park, California. Paleomagnetic directions of the tholeiitic basalt of Rocky Ledge (16 sites) cluster tightly at inclination and declination of 63° and 349°, respectively. Inclinations and declinations for the tholeiitic basalt of Rock Spring (3 sites) cluster at 43° and 14°, whereas inclinations and declinations for the tholeiitic basalt of Sam Wolfin Spring (7 sites) cluster at 54° and 5°. On Pearce diagrams of the chemical compositions (e.g., Ti vs. Mg; P/K vs. Ti/K), the three units plot in distinct fields with no overlap

  4. Why Hexagonal Basalt Columns?

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Martin; Anderssohn, Robert; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiß, Hans-Jürgen; Nellesen, Jens

    2015-10-09

    Basalt columns with their preferably hexagonal cross sections are a fascinating example of pattern formation by crack propagation. Junctions of three propagating crack faces rearrange such that the initial right angles between them tend to approach 120°, which enables the cracks to form a pattern of regular hexagons. To promote understanding of the path on which the ideal configuration can be reached, two periodically repeatable models are presented here involving linear elastic fracture mechanics and applying the principle of maximum energy release rate. They describe the evolution of the crack pattern as a transition from rectangular start configuration to the hexagonal pattern. This is done analytically and by means of three-dimensional finite element simulation. The latter technique reproduces the curved crack path involved in this transition.

  5. The isotope systematics of a juvenile intraplate volcano: Pb, Nd, and Sr isotope ratios of basalts from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staudigel, H.; Zindler, A.; Hart, S.R.; Leslie, T.; Chen, C.-Y.; Clague, D.

    1984-01-01

    Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios for a representative suite of 15 basanites, alkali basalts, transitional basalts and tholeiites from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii, display unusually large variations for a single volcano, but lie within known ranges for Hawaiian basalts. Nd isotope ratios in alkali basalts show the largest relative variation (0.51291-0.51305), and include the nearly constant tholeiite value ( ??? 0.51297). Pb isotope ratios show similarly large ranges for tholeiites and alkali basalts and continue Tatsumoto's [31] "Loa" trend towards higher 206Pb 204Pb ratios, resulting in a substantial overlap with the "Kea" trend. 206Pb 204Pb ratios for Loihi and other volcanoes along the Loa and Kea trends [31] are observed to correlate with the age of the underlying lithosphere suggesting lithosphere involvement in the formation of Hawaiian tholeiites. Loihi lavas display no correlation of Nd, Sr, or Pb isotope ratios with major element compositions or eruptive age, in contrast with observations of some other Hawaiian volcanoes [38]. Isotope data for Loihi, as well as average values for Hawaiian volcanoes, are not adequately explained by previously proposed two-end-member models; new models for the origin and the development of Hawaiian volcanoes must include mixing of at least three geochemically distinct source regions and allow for the involvement of heterogeneous oceanic lithosphere. ?? 1984.

  6. Exploring exogenic sources for the olivine on Asteroid (4) Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corre, Lucille; Reddy, Vishnu; Sanchez, Juan A.; Dunn, Tasha; Cloutis, Edward A.; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Mann, Paul; Nathues, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    The detection of olivine on Vesta is interesting because it may provide critical insights into planetary differentiation early in our Solar System's history. Ground-based and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of Asteroid (4) Vesta have suggested the presence of olivine on the surface. These observations were reinforced by the discovery of olivine-rich HED meteorites from Vesta in recent years. However, analysis of data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft has shown that this "olivine-bearing unit" is actually impact melt in the ejecta of Oppia crater. The lack of widespread mantle olivine, exposed during the formation of the 19 km deep Rheasilvia basin on Vesta's South Pole, further complicated this picture. Ammannito et al. (Ammannito, E. et al. [2013a]. Nature 504, 122-125) reported the discovery of local scale olivine-rich units in the form of excavated material from the mantle using the Visible and InfraRed spectrometer (VIR) on Dawn. These sites are concentrated in the walls and ejecta of craters Arruntia (10.5 km in diameter) and Bellicia (41.7 km in diameter), located in the northern hemisphere, 350-430 km from Rheasilvia basin's rim. Here we explore alternative sources for the olivine in the northern hemisphere of Vesta by reanalyzing the data from the VIR instrument using laboratory spectral measurements of meteorites. Our rationale for using the published dataset was to bypass calibration issues and ensure a consistent dataset between the two studies. Our analysis of the VIR data shows that while the interpretation of their spectra as an olivine-rich unit is correct, the nature and origin of that olivine could be more complicated. We suggest that these olivine exposures could also be explained by the delivery of olivine-rich exogenic material. This hypothesis is supported by meteoritical evidence in the form of exogenic xenoliths containing significant amount of olivine in some of the HED meteorites from Vesta. Previous laboratory work on HEDs show that

  7. Power law olivine crystal size distributions in lithospheric mantle xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienti, P.; Tarquini, S.

    2002-12-01

    Olivine crystal size distributions (CSDs) have been measured in three suites of spinel- and garnet-bearing harzburgites and lherzolites found as xenoliths in alkaline basalts from Canary Islands, Africa; Victoria Land, Antarctica; and Pali Aike, South America. The xenoliths derive from lithospheric mantle, from depths ranging from 80 to 20 km. Their textures vary from coarse to porphyroclastic and mosaic-porphyroclastic up to cataclastic. Data have been collected by processing digital images acquired optically from standard petrographic thin sections. The acquisition method is based on a high-resolution colour scanner that allows image capturing of a whole thin section. Image processing was performed using the VISILOG 5.2 package, resolving crystals larger than about 150 μm and applying stereological corrections based on the Schwartz-Saltykov algorithm. Taking account of truncation effects due to resolution limits and thin section size, all samples show scale invariance of crystal size distributions over almost three orders of magnitude (0.2-25 mm). Power law relations show fractal dimensions varying between 2.4 and 3.8, a range of values observed for distributions of fragment sizes in a variety of other geological contexts. A fragmentation model can reproduce the fractal dimensions around 2.6, which correspond to well-equilibrated granoblastic textures. Fractal dimensions >3 are typical of porphyroclastic and cataclastic samples. Slight bends in some linear arrays suggest selective tectonic crushing of crystals with size larger than 1 mm. The scale invariance shown by lithospheric mantle xenoliths in a variety of tectonic settings forms distant geographic regions, which indicate that this is a common characteristic of the upper mantle and should be taken into account in rheological models and evaluation of metasomatic models.

  8. Compositional Variations of Primary Basalts in the Poison Lake Chain, Lassen Region of Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, G. T.; Teasdale, R.; Wenner, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple compositional mantle domains are represented by primitive basalts of the Poison Lake chain (PLC), located east of the Lassen Volcanic Center in the southern Cascades and on the western margin of the Basin and Range. Four of the nine compositional groups of PLC basalts include primary basalt samples that represent distinct mantle compositions from which other samples are likely derived. Primitive basalts from two of the groups, the old railroad grade (bg; 102.1 +/- 11.4 ka) and the basalts of Poison Butte (bp; 105.0 +/- 6.0 ka), spatially and chronologically overlap. Both groups are primitive basalts that have phenocrysts of olivine, plagioclase and clinopyroxene. However, bg has larger, more euhedral olivine while bp has fewer, smaller, anhedral and embayed olivine phenocrysts. Compositionally, bg has higher whole-rock MgO (9.2-12.2 %) and Ni (189-238 ppm) and lower Zr (57-89 ppm) than bp (MgO = 5.3-7.8 %; Ni = 35-89 ppm; Zr = 98-153 ppm), suggesting bp has undergone more fractionation than bg. MELTS and REE models predict that the most primitive unit of bg (bg3) could have fractionated to produce the other three bg units. Similarly, MELTS and REE models suggest that four of the six units of bp can be derived by fractional crystallization from bg3. However, those models require that bg3 would need to fractionate between 40-50% in order to generate the bp compositions. Unreasonably high % fractionation suggests that the relationship between bg and bp groups is more complex than simple fractionation allows, but their similar Cr spinel compositions (bg Cr# =32.9-50.9 and bp Cr# = 44.0-56.3) suggest bg and bp are likely derived from a common mantle source. Additional petrogenetic modeling and isotope analyses will help clarify the relationship between PLC primitive basalt groups. The combination of small scale mantle heterogeneities along with detailed examination of magma processing are only recognized in the PLC with high density sampling, which may be

  9. Initial effects of vegetation on Hawaiian basalt weathering rates

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, M.F.; Berner, R.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Weathering of Ca and Mg silicates on land and ensuing precipitation and burial of Ca and Mg carbonates in marine sediments is the principal sink for carbon dioxide from the atmosphere/ocean system on geologic time scales. Model calculations of ancient atmospheric CO[sub 2] partial pressure depend strongly on the authors assumptions about the enhancement of silicate weathering rates first by primitive terrestrial biota, then by the appearance and evolution of the vascular plants. Aa and pahoehoe basalts were collected from Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. Flows ranged in age (one year to several thousand years) and in ambient climate. Where possible, each flow was sampled beneath a suite of current plant covers: none, lichens, and higher plants. Rocks were embedded in epoxy to preserve the plant-rock interface, then sectioned and subjected to electron probe microanalysis. During initial weathering, vascular plants appeared to promote congruent dissolution of minerals (particularly olivine and Ca-rich plagioclase) and glass near the surfaces of underlying basalts. In the neighborhood of roots, primary cracks widened with time into networks of open channels. This effect was observed prior to the formation of measurable leached zones in exterior grains and prior to the appearance of secondary minerals. As a result, initial mass loss from young, plant-covered basalts appeared to be up to one or more orders of magnitude greater than from bare-rock controls. Despite earlier reports of substantial enhancement of Hawaiian basalt weathering rates by the lichen Stereocaulon vulcani, weathering observed beneath this lichen was comparable to that of unvegetated rocks.

  10. Pseudobrookite-group oxide solutions and basaltic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xirouchakis, Dimitrios M.

    2007-04-01

    Orthorhombic, (Bbmm), R2(1-x)3+Rx2+Ti1+xO5 = [R3+,R2+,Ti]M1 [Ti,R2+,R3+]2M2O5 solid solutions were first recognized in lunar rocks and then identified as such on Earth. Even though they are less common than ilmenite and magnetite (s.l.), there is strong field, experimental, and theoretical evidence that they are not geological oddities. Besides, pseudobrookite oxide solutions may have had a critical role in the petrogenesis of the mare basalts and lunar picritic glasses as a source of TiO2, and may be present in other planetary bodies as well. As materials they are of particular theoretical and practical interest because of the cation order disordering phenomena that affect their physical and mechanical properties, and participation in the TiO2-slag smelting process. X-ray crystallography and spectroscopy studies have shown that all the cations are in octahedral coordination occupying two nonequivalent sites with a 1:2 ratio. Evaluation of site fractions, configurational entropy in R2(1-x)3+Rx2+Ti1+xO5 solutions, and of the known properties of pseudobrookite-group MgTi2O5 suggests that R23+TiO5 solutions may reach cation random distribution and thus entropy maxima at lower temperatures than R2+Ti2O5-rich solid solutions. As a result, the entropy contribution to their thermodynamic stability may depend upon the RR ratio. On the basis of computations, experiments, and chemography of mineral equilibria it is inferred that (1) assemblages of pseudobrookite-group Ti oxide, ilmenite, rutile, olivine, and pyroxene(s) should be expected under lower crust and upper mantle conditions in the Earth, and, conceivably, in other planetary bodies including the Earth's Moon; (2) reactions between pseudobrookite-group Ti oxide and olivine, orthopyroxene and pseudobrookite-group Ti oxide or ilmenite can produce ilmenite- or olivine-saturated Ti-enriched liquids; (3) lack of either ilmenite or pseudobrookite-group Ti oxide saturation in melts, which are in equilibrium with

  11. Origin of ultra-nickeliferous olivine in the Kevitsa Ni-Cu-PGE-mineralized intrusion, northern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Hong; Maier, Wolfgang D.; Hanski, Eero J.; Lappalainen, Markku; Santaguida, Frank; Määttä, Sanna

    2013-07-01

    equilibration. These data suggest that the olivine, clinopyroxene, and sulfides all crystallized from a basaltic magma with an unexceptionally high Ni content ranging from 300 to 1,100 ppm. The Ni-PGE ores are spatially associated with ultramafic xenoliths. Olivine in these ultramafic xenoliths have relatively high Fo contents (up to 90 mol %) and high Ni contents (up to 5,200 ppm) suggesting that the xenoliths formed from a komatiitic parental magma. It is proposed that assimilation by the Kevitsa magma of massive or semi-massive sulfides associated with komatiitic rocks elevated the Ni content of the magma and resulted in the formation of Ni-PGE ores and related extremely Ni-rich olivines.

  12. Rock types of South Pole-Aitken basin and extent of basaltic volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pieters, C.M.; Head, J. W.; Gaddis, L.; Jolliff, B.; Duke, M.

    2001-01-01

    The enormous pre-Nectarian South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin represents a geophysically and compositionally unique region on the Moon. We present and analyze the mineralogical diversity across this basin and discuss the implications for basin evolution. Rock types are derived from Clementine multispectral data based on diagnostic characteristics of ferrous absorptions in fresh materials. Individual areas are characterized as noritic (dominated by low-Ca pyroxene), gabbroic/basaltic (dominated by high-Ca pyroxene), feldspathic (<3-6% FeO), and olivine-gabbro (dominated by high-Ca pyroxene and olivine). The anorthositic crust has effectively been removed from the interior of the basin. The style of volcanism within the basin extends over several 100 Myr and includes mare basalt and pyroclastic deposits. Several areas of ancient (pre-Orientale) volcanism, or cryptomaria, have also been identified. The nonmare mafic lithology that occurs across the basin is shown to be noritic in composition and is pervasive laterally and vertically. We interpret this to represent impact melt/breccia deposits derived from the lower crust. A few localized areas are identified within the basin that contain more diverse lithologies (gabbro, olivine-gabbro), some of which may represent material from the deepest part of the lower crust and perhaps uppermost mantle involved in the SPA event. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Crystallization of tholeiitic basalt in Alae Lava Lake, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, D.L.; Wright, T.L.; Moore, J.G.

    1966-01-01

    The eruption of Kilauea Volcano August 21-23, 1963, left 600,000 cubic meters of basaltic lava in a lava lake as much as 15 meters deep in Alae pit crater. Field studies of the lake began August 27 and include repeated core drilling, measurements of temperature in the crust and melt, and precise level surveys of the lake surface. The last interstitial melt in the lake solidified late in September 1964; by mid August 1965 the maximum temperature was 690??C at a depth of 11.5 meters. Pumice air-quenched from about 1140??C contains only 5 percent crystals - clinopyroxene, cuhedral olivine (Fo 80), and a trace of plagioclase, (An 70). Drill cores taken from the zone of crystallization in the lake show that olivine continued crystallizing to about 1070??C; below that it reacts with the melt, becoming corroded and mantled by pyroxene and plagioclase. Below 1070??C, pyroxene and plagioclase crystallized at a constant ratio. Ilmenite first appeared at about 1070??C and was joined by magnetite at about 1050??C; both increased rapidly in abundance to 1000??C. Apatite first appeared as minute needles in interstitial glass at 1000??C. Both the abundance and index of refraction of glass quenched from melt decreased nearly linearly with falling temperature. At 1070??C the quenched lava contains about 65 percent dark-brown glass with an index of 1.61; at 980??C it contains about 8 percent colorless glass with an index of 1.49. Below 980??C, the percentage of glass remained constant. Progressive crystallization forced exsolution of gases from the melt fraction; these formed vesicles and angular pores, causing expansion of the crystallizing lava and lifting the surface of the central part of the lake an average of 19.5 cm. The solidified basalt underwent pneumatolitic alteration, including deposition of cristobalite at 800??C, reddish alteration of olivine at 700??C, tarnishing of ilmenite at 550??C, deposition of anhydrite at 250??C, and deposition of native sulfur at 100??C

  14. Basaltic melt evolution of the Hengill volcanic system, SW Iceland, and evidence for clinopyroxene assimilation in primitive tholeiitic magmas

    SciTech Connect

    Troennes, R.G. )

    1990-09-10

    The thick oceanic crust of Iceland is formed by tholeiitic central volcanoes arranged in en echelon patterns along the 40-50 km wide rift zones. The Hengill central volcano in the southwestern rift zone has produced 25-30 km{sup 3} of hyaloclastites and lava during the last 0.11 m.y., with maximum productivity during the isostatic rebound following the degalciations 0.13 and 0.01 m.y. ago. The petrographic relations of pillow rim and hyaloclastite glass indicate that the basaltic melts were saturated with olivine and plagioclase, except for the most primitive ones that were undersaturated with plagioclase. Saturation with clinopyroxene was reached in some of the intermediate and evolved basaltic melts. Corroded and partly resorbed crystals of clinopyroxene and partly disintegrated gabbro nodules with resorbed clinopyroxene indicate that selective assimilation contributed to the evolution of the most primitive melts. The intermediate and evolved basaltic glass compositions fall along the low-pressure cotectic for mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) compositions saturated with olivine, plagioclase, and clinopyroxene, but the primitive glasses fall well inside the low-pressure olivine + plagioclase primary phase volume. The dense picritic magmas were driven to the surface by magmatic overpressure in the mantle at an early deglaciation stage characterized by the absence of large, trapping magma chambers in the lower crust. The assimilation of clinopyroxene in these melts could proceed by direct contact with the solidified cumulate sequences and gabbro intrusions. Clinopyroxene assimilation in combination with olivine fractionation may also contribute to the chemical evolution of some of the most primitive MORB magmas.

  15. Rb-Sr Isotopic Systematics of Alkali-Rich Fragments in the Yamato-74442 LL-Chondritic Breccia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokoyama, T.; Misawa, K.; Okano, O.; Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Simo, J. I.; Tappa, M. J.; Yoneda, S.

    2012-01-01

    Alkali-rich igneous fragments were identified in the brecciated LL-chondrites, Kr henberg (LL5)], Bhola (LL3-6) and Yamato (Y)-74442 (LL4), and show characteristic fractionation patterns of alkaline elements. The K-Rb-Cs-rich fragments in Kr henberg, Bhola, and Y-74442 are very similar in mineralogy and petrography (olivine + pyroxene + glass), suggesting that they could have come from related precursor materials. We have undertaken Rb-Sr isotopic studies on alkali-rich fragments in Y-74442 to precisely determine their crystallization ages and the isotopic signatures of their precursor material(s).

  16. Search for Olivine Spectral Signatures on the Surface of Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palomba, E.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Farina, M.; Frigeri, A.; Longobardo, A.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; McSween, H. Y.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Sunshine, J.; McCord, T. B.

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of olivines on Vesta were first postulated from traditional petrogenetic models which suggest the formation of olivine as lower crustal cumulates. An indirect confirmation is given by their presence as a minor component in some samples of diogenite meteorites, the harzburgitic diogenites and the dunitic diogenites, and as olivine mineral clasts in howardites. Another indication for this mineral was given by interpretations of groundbased and Hubble Space Telescope observations that suggested the presence of local olivine-bearing units on the surface of Vesta. The VIR instrument onboard the DAWN mission has been mapping Vesta since July 2011. VIR acquired hyperspectral images of Vesta s surface in the wavelength range from 0.25 to 5.1 m during Approach, Survey and High Altitude Mapping (HAMO) orbits that allowed a 2/3 of the entire asteroid surface to be mapped. The VIR operative spectral interval, resolution and coverage is suitable for the detection and mapping of any olivine rich regions that may occur on the Vesta surface. The abundance of olivine in diogenites is typically lower than 10% but some samples richer in olivine are known. However, we do not expect to have extensive exposures of olivine-rich material on Vesta. Moreover, the partial overlap of olivine and pyroxene spectral signatures will make olivine difficult to detect. Different spectral parameters have been used to map olivine on extraterrestrial bodies, and here we discuss the different approaches used, and develop new ones specifically for Vesta. Our new methods are based on combinations of the spectral parameters relative to the 1 and 2 micron bands (the most prominent spectral features of Vesta surface in the visible and the infrared), such as band center locations, band depths, band areas, band area ratios. Before the direct application to the VIR data, the efficiency of each approach is evaluated by means of analysis of laboratory spectra of HED meteorites, pyroxenes, olivines

  17. Water and Carbon Dioxide Adsorption at Olivine Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2013-11-14

    Plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to simulate water and carbon dioxide adsorption at the (010) surface of five olivine minerals, namely, forsterite (Mg2SiO4), calcio-olivine (Ca2SiO4), tephroite (Mn2SiO4), fayalite (Fe2SiO4), and Co-olivine (Co2SiO4). Adsorption energies per water molecule obtained from energy minimizations varied from -78 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -128 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine at sub-monolayer coverage and became less exothermic as coverage increased. In contrast, carbon dioxide adsorption energies at sub-monolayer coverage ranged from -20 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -59 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine. Therefore, the DFT calculations show a strong driving force for carbon dioxide displacement by water at the surface of all olivine minerals in a competitive adsorption scenario. Additionally, adsorption energies for both water and carbon dioxide were found to be more exothermic for the alkaline-earth (AE) olivines than for the transition-metal (TM) olivines and to not correlate with the solvation enthalpies of the corresponding divalent cations. However, a correlation was obtained with the charge of the surface divalent cation indicating that the more ionic character of the AE cations in the olivine structure relative to the TM cations leads to greater interactions with adsorbed water and carbon dioxide molecules at the surface and thus more exothermic adsorption energies for the AE olivines. For calcio-olivine, which exhibits the highest divalent cation charge of the five olivines, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations showed that this effect leads both water and carbon dioxide to react with the surface and form hydroxyl groups and a carbonate-like species, respectively.

  18. Oxidised phase relations of a primitive basalt from Grenada, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamper, C. C.; Melekhova, E.; Blundy, J. D.; Arculus, R. J.; Humphreys, M. C. S.; Brooker, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    A series of liquidus determinations is reported for a primitive arc basalt (15.4 wt % MgO, 45.5 wt % SiO2) from Grenada, Lesser Antilles, at anhydrous, H2O-undersaturated and H2O-saturated conditions in the pressure range 1 atm to 1.7 GPa. of high-pressure experimental glasses as measured by μXANES ranges from 0.44 to 0.86, corresponding to oxygen fugacities ( fO2) between 3.2 and 7.8 log units above the nickel-nickel oxide redox buffer (NNO). 1-atm experiments conducted from NNO - 2.5 to + 3.8 show that increasing fO2 mainly increases the forsterite content (Fo) of olivine and has little effect on phase relations. The crystallisation sequence at lower crustal pressures for all water contents is forsteritic olivine + Cr-rich spinel followed by clinopyroxene. The anhydrous liquidus is depressed by 100 and 120 °C in the presence of 2.9 and 3.8 wt % H2O, respectively. H2O-undersaturated experiments at NNO + 3.2 to + 4.5 produce olivine of equivalent composition to the most primitive olivine phenocrysts in Grenadan picrites (Fo91.4). We conclude that direct mantle melts originating beneath Grenada could be as oxidised as ~NNO + 3, consistent with the uppermost estimates from olivine-spinel oxybarometry of high Mg basalts. μXANES analyses of olivine-bearing experimental glasses are used to develop a semi-empirical oxybarometer based on the value of when all Fe is assumed to be in the Fe2+ state (). The oxybarometer is tested on an independent data set and is able to reproduce experimental fO2 to ≤1.2 log units. Experiments also show that the geochemically and petrographically distinct M- and C-series lavas on the island can be produced from hydrous melting of a common picritic source. Low pressures expand the olivine stability field at the expense of clinopyroxene, enriching an evolving melt in CaO and forcing differentiation to take place along a C-series liquid line of descent. Higher pressure conditions allow early and abundant clinopyroxene crystallisation

  19. Stromboli volcano (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy): An open window on the deep-feeding system of a steady state basaltic volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertagnini, A.; MéTrich, N.; Landi, P.; Rosi, M.

    2003-07-01

    Paroxysms at Stromboli are the most violent manifestations of the persistent activity and are related to the emission of small volumes (103-105 m3) of nearly aphyric HK-basaltic pumices. They offer the exceptional opportunity to detail the mixing-crystallization-degassing processes that occur in a steady state basaltic arc volcano. We present mineralogy, major, volatile, and trace element geochemistry of olivine-hosted melt inclusions of these pumices. In all the paroxysms, melt inclusions hosted in olivines Fo88-91 have recorded the parental melts rich in CaO (up to 14.5 wt %) but low in FeO (6-7 wt %). They demonstrate recurrent variations in the K2O content (1.6-1.3 wt %) and S/Cl ratios (1.2-0.8) of the melts that entered the deep system. Dynamic magma mixing between melts slightly distinct by their degree of evolution, rapid crystallization, and entrapment of gas-oversaturated melts during decompression are indicated by (1) the high density of irregular, clear melt inclusions, and embayments in homogeneous olivines (Fo87±0.5-Fo83±0.5), (2) the variable ratio between melt and gas bubble, and (3) the variability of melt inclusion compositions in both major (CaO/Al2O3 = 1-0.59) and volatile (3.4-1.8 wt % H2O, 1582-1017 ppm CO2) elements. FeO-rich melt inclusions in patchy, reversely zoned olivines also demonstrate interactions between ascending melt blobs and inherited olivine crystals. We propose a model involving a vertically extended dike-like system, where magmas progress and differentiate. On the basis of olivine growth rate calculations the volatile-rich magma blobs may ascend within few hours to few tenths of hours. Finally, we propose that sulfur degassing is possibly initiated during the early stage of magma differentiation.

  20. Vaporization Studies of Olivine via Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, G. C. C.; Jacobson, N. S.

    2014-01-01

    Olivine is the major mineral in the Earth's upper mantle occurring predominantly in igneous rocks and has been identified in meteorites, asteroids, the Moon and Mars. Among many other important applications in planetary and materials sciences, the thermodynamic properties of vapor species from olivine are crucial as input parameters in computational modelling of the atmospheres of hot, rocky exoplanets (lava planets). There are several weight loss studies of olivine vaporization in the literature and one Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry (KEMS) study. In this study, we examine a forsterite-rich olivine (93% forsterite and 7% fayalite, Fo93Fa7) with KEMS to further understand its vaporization and thermodynamic properties.

  1. Discovery of Olivine in the Nili Fossae Region of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoefen, T.M.; Clark, R.N.; Bandfield, J.L.; Smith, M.D.; Pearl, J.C.; Christensen, P.R.

    2003-01-01

    We have detected a 30,000-square-kilometer area rich in olivine in the Nili Fossae region of Mars. Nili Fossae has been interpreted as a complex of grabens and fractures related to the formation of the Isidis impact basin. We propose that post-impact faulting of this area has exposed subsurface layers rich in olivine. Linear mixture analysis of Thermal Emission Spectrometer spectra shows surface exposures of 30% olivine, where the composition of the olivine ranges from Fo30 to Fo70.

  2. Hanford basalt flow mineralogy

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, L.L.

    1980-09-01

    Mineralogy of the core samples from five core wells was examined in some detail. The primary mineralogy study included an optical examination of polished mounts, photomicrographs, chemical analyses of feldspars, pyroxenes, metallic oxides and microcrystalline groundmasses and determination from the chemical analyses of the varieties of feldspars, pyroxenes and metallic oxides. From the primary mineralogy data, a firm understanding of the average Hanford basalt flow primary mineralogy emerged. The average primary feldspar was a laboradorite, the average pyroxene was an augite and the average metallic oxide was a solid solution of ilmenite and magnetite. Secondary mineralization consisted of vug filling and joint coating, chiefly with a nontronite-beidellite clay, several zeolites, quartz, calcite, and opal. Specific flow units also were examined to determine the possibility of using the mineralogy to trace flows between core wells. These included units of the Pomona, the Umatilla and a high chromium flow just below the Huntzinger. In the Umatilla, or high barium flow, the compositional variation of the feldspars was unique in range. The pyroxenes in the Pomona were relatively highly zoned and accumulated chromium. The high chromium flow contained chromium spinels that graded in chromium content into simple magnetites very low in chromium content. A study of the statistical relationships of flow unit chemical constituents showed that flow unit constituents could be roughly correlated between wells. The probable cause of the correlation was on-going physical-chemical changes in the source magma.

  3. Complex Formation History of Highly Evolved Basaltic Shergottite, Zagami

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niihara, T.; Misawa, K.; Mikouchi, T.; Nyquist, L. E.; Park, J.; Hirata, D.

    2012-01-01

    Zagami, a basaltic shergottite, contains several kinds of lithologies such as Normal Zagami consisting of Fine-grained (FG) and Coarse-grained (CG), Dark Mottled lithology (DML), and Olivine-rich late-stage melt pocket (DN). Treiman and Sutton concluded that Zagami (Normal Zagami) is a fractional crystallization product from a single magma. It has been suggested that there were two igneous stages (deep magma chamber and shallow magma chamber or surface lava flow) on the basis of chemical zoning features of pyroxenes which have homogeneous Mg-rich cores and FeO, CaO zoning at the rims. Nyquist et al. reported that FG has a different initial Sr isotopic ratio than CG and DML, and suggested the possibility of magma mixing on Mars. Here we report new results of petrology and mineralogy for DML and the Olivine-rich lithology (we do not use DN here), the most evolved lithology in this rock, to understand the relationship among lithologies and reveal Zagami s formation history

  4. Rare-earth element geochemistry and the origin of andesites and basalts of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, J.W.; Cashman, K.V.; Rankin, P.C.

    1983-01-01

    Two types of basalt (a high-Al basalt associated with the rhyolitic centres north of Taupo and a "low-Al" basalt erupted from Red Crater, Tongariro Volcanic Centre) and five types of andesite (labradorite andesite, labradorite-pyroxene andesite, hornblende andesite, pyroxene low-Si andesite and olivine andesite/low-Si andesite) occur in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), North Island, New Zealand. Rare-earth abundances for both basalts and andesites are particularly enriched in light rare-earth elements. High-Al basalts are more enriched than the "low-Al" basalt and have values comparable to the andesites. Labradorite and labradorite-pyroxene andesites all have negative Eu anomalies and hornblende andesites all have negative Ce anomalies. The former is probably due to changing plagioclase composition during fractionation and the latter to late-stage hydration of the magma. Least-squares mixing models indicate that neither high-Al nor "low-Al" basalts are likely sources for labradorite/labradorite-pyroxene andesites. High-Al basalts are considered to result from fractionation of olivine and clinopyroxene from a garnet-free peridotite at the top of the mantle wedge. Labradorite/labradorite-pyroxene andesites are mainly associated with an older NW-trending arc. The source is likely to be garnet-free but it is not certain whether the andesites result from partial melting of the top of the subducting plate or a hydrated lower portion of the mantle wedge. Pyroxene low-Si andesites probably result from cumulation of pyroxene and calcic plagioclase within labradorite-pyroxene andesites, and hornblende andesites by late-stage hydration of labradorite-pyroxene andesite magma. Olivine andesites, low-Si andesites and "low-Al" basalts are related to the NNE-trending Taupo-Hikurangi arc structure. Although the initial source material is different for these lavas they have probably undergone a similar history to the labradorite/labradorite-pyroxene andesites. All lavas show evidence

  5. Preparation of alkali metal dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Landel, R. F. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for producing alkali metal dispersions of high purity. The dispersions are prepared by varying the equilibrium solubility of the alkali metal in a suitable organic solvent in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The equilibrium variation is produced by temperature change. The size of the particles is controlled by controlling the rate of temperature change.

  6. PROCESS OF RECOVERING ALKALI METALS

    DOEpatents

    Wolkoff, J.

    1961-08-15

    A process is described of recovering alkali metal vapor by sorption on activated alumina, activated carbon, dehydrated zeolite, activated magnesia, or Fuller's earth preheated above the vaporization temperature of the alkali metal and subsequent desorption by heating the solvent under vacuum. (AEC)

  7. Flood basalts and mass extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, W. Jason

    1988-01-01

    There appears to be a correlation between the times of flood basalts and mass-extinction events. There is a correlation of flood basalts and hotspot tracks--flood basalts appear to mark the beginning of a new hotspot. Perhaps there is an initial instability in the mantle that bursts forth as a flood basalt but then becomes a steady trickle that persists for many tens of millions of years. Suppose that flood basalts and not impacts cause the environmental changes that lead to mass-extinctions. This is a very testable hypothesis: it predicts that the ages of the flows should agree exactly with the times of extinctions. The Deccan and K-T ages agree with this hypothesis; An iridium anomaly at extinction boundaries apparently can be explained by a scaled-up eruption of the Hawaiian type; the occurrence of shocked-quartz is more of a problem. However if the flood basalts are all well dated and their ages indeed agree with extinction times, then surely some mechanism to appropriately produce shocked-quartz will be found.

  8. Thickness of western mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehon, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    An isopach map of the basalt thickness in the western mare basins is constructed from measurements of the exposed external rim height of partially buried craters. The data, although numerically sparse, is sufficiently distributed to yield gross thickness variations. The average basalt thickness in Oceanus Procellarum and adjacent regions is 400 m with local lenses in excess of 1500 m in the circular maria. The total volume of basalt in the western maria is estimated to be in the range of 1.5 x 10 to the 6th power cu km. The chief distinction between the eastern and western maria appears to be one of basalt volumes erupted to the surface. Maximum volumes of basalt are deposited west of the central highlands and flood subjacent terrain to a greater extent than on the east. The surface structures of the western maria reflect the probability of a greater degree of isostatic response to a larger surface loading by the greater accumulation of mare basalt.

  9. Calculation of water-bearing primary basalt and estimation of source mantle conditions beneath arcs: PRIMACALC2 model for WINDOWS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Ariskin, Alexey A.

    2014-04-01

    present a new method for estimating the composition of water-bearing primary arc basalt and its source mantle conditions. The PRIMACALC2 model uses a thermodynamic fractional crystallization model COMAGMAT3.72 and runs with an Excel macro to examine the mantle equilibrium and trace element calculations of a primary basalt. COMAGMAT3.72 calculates magma fractionation in 0-10 kb at various compositions, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and water content, but is only applicable for forward calculations. PRIMACALC2 first calculates the provisional composition of a primary basalt from an observed magma. The basalt composition is then calculated by COMAGMAT3.72 for crystallization. Differences in elemental concentrations between observed and the closest-match calculated magmas are then adjusted in the primary basalt. Further iteration continues until the calculated magma composition converges with the observed magma, resulting in the primary basalt composition. Once the fitting is satisfied, back calculations of trace elements are made using stepwise addition of fractionated minerals. Mantle equilibrium of the primary basalt is tested using the Fo-NiO relationship of olivine in equilibrium with the primary basalt, and thus with the source mantle. Source mantle pressure, temperature, and degree of melting are estimated using petrogenetic grids based on experimental data obtained in anhydrous systems. Mantle melting temperature in a hydrous system is computed by adjusting T with a parameterization for a water-bearing system. PRIMACALC2 can be used either in dry or water-bearing arc magmas and is also applicable to mid-ocean ridge basalts and nonalkalic ocean island basalts.

  10. Pillow basalts of the Angayucham terrane: oceanic plateau and island crust accreted to the Brooks Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pallister, J.S.; Budahn, J.R.; Murchey, B.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Angayucham Mountains (north margin of the Yukon-Koyukuk province) are made up of an imbricate stack of four to eight east-west trending, steeply dipping, fault slabs composed of Paleozoic, Middle to Late Triassic, and Early Jurassic oceanic upper crustal rocks. Field relations and geochemical characteristics of the basaltic rocks suggest that the fault slabs were derived from an oceanic plateau or island setting and were emplaced onto the Brooks Range continental margin. The basalts are variably metamorphosed to prehnite-pumpellyite and low-greenschist facies. Major element analyses suggest that many are hypersthene-normative olivine tholeiites. The Triassic and Jurassic basalts are geochemically most akin to modern oceanic plateau and island basalts. Field evidence also favors an oceanic plateau or island setting. The great composite thickness of pillow basalt probably resulted from obduction faulting, but the lack of fault slabs of gabbro or peridotite suggests that obduction faults did not penetrate below oceanic layer 2, a likely occurrence if layer 2 were anomalously thick, as in the vicinity of an oceanic island. -from Authors

  11. Carbon solubility in olivine and the mode of carbon storage in the Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Keppler, Hans; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Shcheka, Svyatoslav S

    2003-07-24

    The total amount of carbon in the atmosphere, oceans and other near-surface reservoirs is thought to be negligible compared to that stored in the Earth's mantle. Although the mode of carbon storage in the mantle is largely unknown, observations of microbubbles on dislocations in minerals from mantle xenoliths has led to the suggestion that carbon may be soluble in silicates at high pressure. Here we report measurements of carbon solubility in olivine, the major constituent of the upper mantle, at pressures up to 3.5 GPa. We have found that, contrary to previous expectations, carbon solubility in olivine is exceedingly low--of the order of 0.1 to 1 parts per million by weight. Together with similar data for pyroxenes, garnet and spinel, we interpret this to imply that most carbon must be present as a separate phase in the deeper parts of the upper mantle, probably as a carbonate phase. Large-scale volcanic eruptions tapping such a carbonate-bearing mantle reservoir might therefore rapidly transfer large amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, consistent with models that link global mass extinctions to flood basalt eruptions via a sudden increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.

  12. Collision-induced basalt eruptions at Pleiku and Buôn Mê Thuột, south-central Viet Nam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoàng, Nguyễn; Flower, Martin F. J.; Chí, Cung Thu'ọ'ng; Xuân, Phạm Tích; Quý, Hoàng Văn; Sơn, Trần Thanh

    2013-09-01

    Neogene-Quaternary basalts occur as dispersed volcanic clusters in the vicinity of the Tethyan tectonic belt, possibly representing 'far-field' effects of the Early Tertiary collisions of Gondwana fragments with the southern margin of Eurasia. In Indochina, such a 'Diffuse Igneous Province' post-dates the 45-42 Ma 'hard' India-Asia collision and southeastward, collision induced (c. 30-17 Ma.), extrusion of Indochina. Extrusion was accommodated by left-lateral strike-slip shearing on the Ailao Shan-Red River Fault, coeval with seafloor spreading in the East Viet Nam (South China) Sea. The Indochina basalts mostly comprise shield-building tholeiites capped by small-volume undersaturated types, the latter often bearing mantle xenoliths and 'exotic' xenocrysts such as sapphire, zircon. They appeared at c. 17 Ma, more-or-less coinciding with the cessation of both continental extrusion and seafloor spreading. At this point extensional stress appears to have shifted westwards to continental Indochina, with magmatic activity appearing, characteristically, at 'pull-apart' basins. However, the relationship of mantle melting beneath this region to its geodynamic setting is controversial, being variously attributed to mantle plumes, extreme lithospheric stretching, and lateral asthenospheric displacement. There is little or no definitive evidence for regional mantle upwelling while lithosphere stretching alone appears to be insufficient to allow for melting, Here, we present geochemical and Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic (and paleomagnetic data), for cored sections from the Pleiku and Buon Mê Thuột plateaus in south-central Viet Nam, representative in most respects of the Indochina province as a whole. In the Pleiku shield olivine tholeiite flows are intercalated with quartz tholeiites while, in contrast, alkali basalts predominate over olivine tholeiite in the Buon Mê Thuột (BMT) shield. The first of these features (in Pleiku) probably reflects crustal wall-rock reaction while

  13. Mineralogical Comparison of Olivine in Shergottites and A Shocked L Chondrite: Implications for Shock Histories of Brown Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takenouchi, A.; Mikouchi, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Most Martian meteorites are heavily shocked, exhibiting numerous shock features, for example undulatory extinction of olivine and pyroxene, the presence of diaplectic glass ("maskelynite") and the formation of shock melt. Among these shock features, olivine darkening ("brown" olivine) is unique in Martian meteorites because no other meteorite group shows such a feature. Although the presence of brown olivine in shergottites was reported thirty years ago, detailed observation by TEM has not been performed until the NWA 2737 chassignite was discovered, whose olivine is darkened, being completely black in hand specimen. Fe metal nano-particles were found in NWA 2737 olivine which are considered to have been formed by olivine reduction during heavy shock. Subsequently, magnetite nano-particles were also found in other Martian meteorites and the coexistence of Fe metal and magnetite nano-particles was reported in the NWA 1950 shergottite and some Fe metal nano-particles were mantled by magnetite. Therefore, the formation process of nano-particles seems to be complex. Because "brown" olivine is unique to Martian meteorites, they have a potential to constrain their shock conditions. In order to better understand the shock history of Martian meteorites, we compared olivine in several shergottites with that in a highly-shocked L chondrite which contains ringwoodite.

  14. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  15. Anisotropy of electrical conductivity in dry olivine

    SciTech Connect

    Du Frane, W L; Roberts, J J; Toffelmier, D A; Tyburczy, J A

    2005-04-13

    [1] The electrical conductivity ({sigma}) was measured for a single crystal of San Carlos olivine (Fo{sub 89.1}) for all three principal orientations over oxygen fugacities 10{sup -7} < fO{sub 2} < 10{sup 1} Pa at 1100, 1200, and 1300 C. Fe-doped Pt electrodes were used in conjunction with a conservative range of fO{sub 2}, T, and time to reduce Fe loss resulting in data that is {approx}0.15 log units higher in conductivity than previous studies. At 1200 C and fO{sub 2} = 10{sup -1} Pa, {sigma}{sub [100]} = 10{sup -2.27} S/m, {sigma}{sub [010]} = 10{sup -2.49} S/m, {sigma}{sub [001]} = 10{sup -2.40} S/m. The dependences of {sigma} on T and fO{sub 2} have been simultaneously modeled with undifferentiated mixed conduction of small polarons and Mg vacancies to obtain steady-state fO{sub 2}-independent activation energies: Ea{sub [100]} = 0.32 eV, Ea{sub [010]} = 0.56 eV, Ea{sub [001]} = 0.71 eV. A single crystal of dry olivine would provide a maximum of {approx}10{sup 0.4} S/m azimuthal {sigma} contrast for T < 1500 C. The anisotropic results are combined to create an isotropic model with Ea = 0.53 eV.

  16. P-V-T-X evolution of olivine-hosted melt inclusions during high-temperature homogenization treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavi, Federica; Provost, Ariel; Schiano, Pierre; Cluzel, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    During low-high temperature (T) cycles imposed on olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MIs) we observe a systematic increase in homogenization temperature (Th) with time, regardless of their initial major-element and H2O contents. Bubble persistence at high T suggests that inclusion internal pressure (Pint) is lower than its original, trapping pressure. We explore how reversible and irreversible processes modify the composition (X), volume (V) and Pint of heated MIs, and compare the results of theoretical modeling with experimental observations of MIs from FAMOUS Zone (FZ, Mid-Atlantic Ridge) and La Sommata (SOM, Vulcano, Aeolian Islands) basaltic samples. Due to olivine dissolution at inclusion walls and thermoelastic deformation, Pint-V-X conditions change significantly upon heating. Olivine dissolution induces changes in major-element composition (i.e., enrichment in Fe and Mg), morphology and volume (up to +25% at 1500 °C). We provide equations for the thermoelastic deformation of olivine bearing a two-phase, liquid-gas inclusion for the end-member cases of chemical equilibrium and no exchange between gas and liquid. These equations allow Pint-V evolution to be related to variations in bubble volume fraction. Upon heating, both Pint and V variations are smaller in the presence of a gas bubble than for a homogeneous liquid inclusion, at the same T. Dissolution-reprecipitation and thermoelastic deformation of the olivine host are reversible processes, so initial Pint-V-X conditions are restored upon cooling. On the contrary, water loss from MIs and plastic deformation of the olivine host are processes that irreversibly lower Pint, and account for the systematic increase of Th with time. Our theoretical and experimental investigations suggest that the increase of Th in volatile-rich SOM MIs is mainly related to progressive release of water. Compared to larger MIs located at a similar distance from the olivine rim, smaller MIs show a faster increase in Th with time

  17. Pliocene-Quaternary basalts from the Harrat Tufail, western Saudi Arabia: Recycling of ancient oceanic slabs and generation of alkaline intra-plate magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhsh, Rami A.

    2015-12-01

    Harrat Tufail represents a Caenozoic basalt suite at the western margin of the Arabian plate. This rift-related suite includes voluminous Quaternary non-vesicular basalt (with fragments of earlier Pliocene vesicular flow) that forms a cap sheet over Miocene rhyolite and minor vesicular basalt. The contact between rhyolite and the basaltic cap is erosional with remarkable denudations indicating long time gap between the felsic and mafic eruptions. The geochemical data prove alkaline, sodic and low-Ti nature of the olivine basalt cap sheet. The combined whole-rock and mineral spot analyses by the electron microprobe (EMPA) suggest magma generation from low degree of partial melting (∼5%) from spinel- and garnet-lherzolite mantle source. Derivation from a mantle source is supported by low Na content in clinopyroxene (ferroan diopside) whereas high Mg content in ilmenite is an evidence of fractional crystallization trajectory. Accordingly, the Pliocene basaltic cap of Harrat Tufail is a product of mantle melt that originates by recycling in the asthenosphere during subduction of ancient oceanic slab(s). The whole-rock chemistry suggests an ancient ocean island basaltic slab (OIB) whereas the EMPA of Al-rich spinel inclusions in olivine phenocrysts are in favour of a mid-ocean ridge basaltic source (MORB). Calculations of oxygen fugacity based on the composition of co-existing Fe-Ti oxide suggest fluctuation from highly to moderately oxidizing conditions with propagation of crystallization (log10 fO2 from -22.09 to -12.50). Clinopyroxene composition and pressure calculation indicates low-pressure (0.4-2 kbar). Cores of olivine phenocrysts formed at highest temperature (1086-1151 °C) whereas the rims and olivine micro-phenocrysts formed at 712-9-796 °C which is contemporaneous to formation of clinopyroxene at 611-782 °C. Fe-Ti oxides crystallized over a long range (652-992 °C) where it started to form at outer peripheries of olivine phenocrysts and as interstitial

  18. Diverse Primitive Basalts from an Extensional Back-arc Setting, Fort Rock Volcanic Field, Oregon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popoli, F. M., Jr.; Schmidt, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Pleistocene to Pliocene Fort Rock Volcanic Field (FRVF), situated in a back-arc extensional setting ~65 km east of the Central Oregon High Cascades has erupted a diverse array of basaltic magmas, including some primitive compositions with an Mg#>60. Major and trace element concentrations have been determined for 80 mafic bulk lava samples by X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) and selected minerals by electron microprobe. Petrological and geochemical data suggest three primitive basalt end-members similar to basalts in the nearby Oregon Cascade arc and High Lava Plains: high-alumina olivine tholeiite or low-K tholeiites (LKT), calc-alkaline basalts (CAB), ocean island basalts (OIB). Primitive Mg# (61-68) HAOTs are aphyric to phenocryst-poor (~2-5 %) olivine and plagioclase bearing and diktytaxitic. HAOTs are distinguished by low K2O (0.22-0.44 wt%), high Al2O3 (17.19-18.67 wt%) and CaO contents. CABs are the most dominant basalt type in the area with higher large ion lithophile element (LILE) concentrations (e.g., 170-426 ppm Ba) relative to high field strength elements (HFSE; 4.6-10.4 ppm Nb) and lower Mg#s (60-64) than HAOTs. CABs have more abundant (~5-15 %) and larger phenocrysts (~2-4 mm) of olivine and plagioclase than in HAOTs. OIBs contain higher Nb contents ranging from 11.7-18.6 ppm (vs. 3.0-7.2 ppm in HAOTs). OIBs are similar to both HAOTs and CABs, ranging from aphyric to porphyritic and diktytaxitic and may include amphibole phenocrysts. Tectonic extension associated with the Basin and Range in this area likely facilitated eruptions of primitive magmas. A comparison of the most primitive magmas (HAOTs with Mg#>65) found in eastern and western FRVF indicates that the western HAOTs contain higher incompatible element concentrations relative to eastern HAOT (Ba, Sc, Sr, Zr, Nb), which may reflect lower degrees of melting of a more enriched mantle source to the west.

  19. Basaltic Lava Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.; Griffiths, R. W.; Kerr, R. C.

    2004-12-01

    or channel bends that exposes more core lava to cooling than simply that of the shear zones. Thus the channel geometry plays a major role in the thermal history of a flow. As lava flows rarely flow through pre-existing channels of prescribed geometry, we have performed an additional set of analog laboratory experiments to determine the relationship between flow rate, slope, and channel formation in solidifying flows. All flows develop stable uniform channels within solidified levees except when the flow rate is sufficiently low to permit flow front solidification, inflation, and tube formation. On constant slopes, increasing flow rates result in increases in both the rate of flow advance rate and the channel width, and a decrease in levee width. At constant flow rates, both channel width and levee width decrease with increasing slope while flow advance rate increases. Limited data on the geometry of basaltic lava channels indicate that experimental data are consistent with field observations, however, both additional field data and scaling relationships are required to fully utilize the laboratory experiments to predict channel development in basaltic lava flows.

  20. High-3He plume origin and temporal-spatial evolution of the Siberian flood basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basu, A.R.; Poreda, R.J.; Renne, P.R.; Teichmann, F.; Vasiliev, Y.R.; Sobolev, N.V.; Turrin, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    An olivine nephelinite from the lower part of a thick alkalic ultrabasic and mafic sequence of volcanic rocks of the northeastern part of the Siberian flood basalt province (SFBP) yielded a 40ArX39Ar plateau age of 253.3 ?? 2.6 million years, distinctly older than the main tholeiitic pulse of the SFBP at 250.0 million years. Olivine phenocrysts of this rock showed 3He/4He ratios up to 12.7 times the atmospheric ratio; these values suggest a lower mantle plume origin. The neodymium and strontium isotopes, rare earth element concentration patterns, and cerium/lead ratios of the associated rocks were also consistent with their derivation from a near-cnondritic, primitive plume. Geochemical data from the 250-million-year-old volcanic rocks higher up in the sequence indicate interaction of this high-3He SFBP plume with a suboceanic-type upper mantle beneath Siberia.

  1. High-3He Plume Origin and Temporal-Spatial Evolution of the Siberian Flood Basalts.

    PubMed

    Basu, A R; Poreda, R J; Renne, P R; Teichmann, F; Vasiliev, Y R; Sobolev, N V; Turrin, B D

    1995-08-11

    An olivine nephelinite from the lower part of a thick alkalic ultrabasic and mafic sequence of volcanic rocks of the northeastern part of the Siberian flood basalt province (SFBP) yielded a (40)Ar/(39)Ar plateau age of 253.3 +/- 2.6 million years, distinctly older than the main tholeiitic pulse of the SFBP at 250.0 million years. Olivine phenocrysts of this rock showed (3)He/(4)He ratios up to 12.7 times the atmospheric ratio; these values suggest a lower mantle plume origin. The neodymium and strontium isotopes, rare earth element concentration patterns, and cerium/lead ratios of the associated rocks were also consistent with their derivation from a near-chondritic, primitive plume. Geochemical data from the 250-million-year-old volcanic rocks higher up in the sequence indicate interaction of this high-(3)He SFBP plume with a suboceanic-type upper mantle beneath Siberia.

  2. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  3. Ar-40/Ar-39 Ages for Maskelynites and K-Rich Melt from Olivine-Rich Lithology in (Kanagawa) Zagami

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Nyquist, L. E.; Lindsay, F.; Turrin, B.; Swisher, C. C., III; Delaney, J. S.; Shih, C.-Y.; Niihara, T.; Misawa, K.

    2013-01-01

    We report Ar/Ar release patterns for small maskelynite grains and samples of a K-rich phase separated from the basaltic shergottite Zagami. The purpose of the work is to investigate the well-known discrepancy between published Ar/Ar ages of Zagami, >200 Ma, and its age of approx. 170 Ma as determined by other methods [1-6]. Niihara et al. [7] divide less abundant darker material present in Zagami into an olivine-rich lithology (ORL), from which most of our samples came, and a pyroxene-rich one (Dark Mottled-Lithology: DML) [8, 9]. ORL consists of vermicular fayalitic olivine, coarse-grained pyroxene, maskelynite, and a glassy phase exceptionally rich in K (up to 8.5 wt%), Al, and Si, but poor in Fe and Mg. The elemental composition suggests a late-stage melt, i.e., residual material that solidified late in a fractional crystallization sequence. Below we refer to it as "K-rich melt." The K-rich melt contains laths of captured olivine, Ca-rich pyroxene, plagioclase, and opaques. It seemed to offer an especially promising target for Ar-40/Ar-39 dating.

  4. The effect of liquid composition on the partitioning of Ni between olivine and silicate melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzen, Andrew K.; Baker, Michael B.; Beckett, John R.; Wood, Bernard J.; Stolper, Edward M.

    2017-01-01

    We report the results of experiments designed to separate the effects of temperature and pressure from liquid composition on the partitioning of Ni between olivine and liquid, D_{{Ni}}^{{ol/liq}}. Experiments were performed from 1300 to 1600 °C and 1 atm to 3.0 GPa, using mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) glass surrounded by powdered olivine in graphite-Pt double capsules at high pressure and powdered MORB in crucibles fabricated from single crystals of San Carlos olivine at one atmosphere. In these experiments, pressure and temperature were varied in such a way that we produced a series of liquids, each with an approximately constant composition ( 12, 15, and 21 wt% MgO). Previously, we used a similar approach to show that D_{{Ni}}^{{ol/liq}} for a liquid with 18 wt% MgO is a strong function of temperature. Combining the new data presented here with our previous results allows us to separate the effects of temperature from composition. We fit our data based on a Ni-Mg exchange reaction, which yields ln ( {D_{{Ni}}^{{molar}} } ) = { -Δ _{r(1)} H_{{T_{{ref}} ,P_{{ref}} }}°}/RT + {Δ _{r(1)} S_{{T_{{ref}} ,P_{{ref}} }}°}/R - ln ( {{X_{{MgO}}^{{liq}} }/{X_{{{{MgSi}_{ 0. 5} {{O}}_{ 2} }}^{{ol}} }}} ). Each subset of constant composition experiments displays roughly the same temperature dependence of D_{{Ni}}^{{ol/liq}} (i.e.,-Δ _{r(1)} H_{{T_{{ref}} ,P_{{ref}} }}°/R) as previously reported for liquids with 18 wt% MgO. Fitting new data presented here (15 experiments) in conjunction with our 13 previously published experiments (those with 18 wt% MgO in the silicate liquid) to the above expression gives -Δ _{r(1)} H_{{T_{{ref}} ,P_{{ref}} }}°/R = 3641 ± 396 (K) and Δ _{r(1)} S_{{T_{{ref}} ,P_{{ref}} }}° /R = - 1.597 ± 0.229. Adding data from the literature yields -Δ _{r(1)} H_{{T_{{ref}} ,P_{{ref}} }}° /R = 4505 ± 196 (K) and Δ _{r(1)} S_{{T_{{ref}} ,P_{{ref}} }}° /R = - 2.075 ± 0.120, a set of coefficients that leads to a predictive equation for D

  5. The effect of liquid composition on the partitioning of Ni between olivine and silicate melt.

    PubMed

    Matzen, Andrew K; Baker, Michael B; Beckett, John R; Wood, Bernard J; Stolper, Edward M

    2017-01-01

    We report the results of experiments designed to separate the effects of temperature and pressure from liquid composition on the partitioning of Ni between olivine and liquid, [Formula: see text]. Experiments were performed from 1300 to 1600 °C and 1 atm to 3.0 GPa, using mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) glass surrounded by powdered olivine in graphite-Pt double capsules at high pressure and powdered MORB in crucibles fabricated from single crystals of San Carlos olivine at one atmosphere. In these experiments, pressure and temperature were varied in such a way that we produced a series of liquids, each with an approximately constant composition (~12, ~15, and ~21 wt% MgO). Previously, we used a similar approach to show that [Formula: see text] for a liquid with ~18 wt% MgO is a strong function of temperature. Combining the new data presented here with our previous results allows us to separate the effects of temperature from composition. We fit our data based on a Ni-Mg exchange reaction, which yields [Formula: see text] Each subset of constant composition experiments displays roughly the same temperature dependence of [Formula: see text] (i.e.,[Formula: see text]) as previously reported for liquids with ~18 wt% MgO. Fitting new data presented here (15 experiments) in conjunction with our 13 previously published experiments (those with ~18 wt% MgO in the silicate liquid) to the above expression gives [Formula: see text] = 3641 ± 396 (K) and [Formula: see text] = - 1.597 ± 0.229. Adding data from the literature yields [Formula: see text] = 4505 ± 196 (K) and [Formula: see text] = - 2.075 ± 0.120, a set of coefficients that leads to a predictive equation for [Formula: see text] applicable to a wide range of melt compositions. We use the results of our work to model the melting of peridotite beneath lithosphere of varying thickness and show that: (1) a positive correlation between NiO in magnesian olivine phenocrysts and lithospheric

  6. Fe-Ni exchange between olivine and sulphide liquid: implications for oxygen barometry in sulphide-saturated magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenan, J. M.; Caciagli, N. C.

    2000-01-01

    In order to better understand the behaviour of nickel in magmatic processes, we have measured the apparent equilibrium constant ( KD) for the exchange of Fe and Ni between coexisting olivine and sulphide liquid at controlled oxygen and sulphur fugacities ( fO 2 = 10 -8-10 -10 and fS 2 = 10 -2-10 -4) over the temperature range 1200 to 1400°C and with 5 to 50 wt.% nickel in the sulphide liquid. Measured values of KD are independent of temperature and sulphur fugacity, but increase linearly with the nickel content of the sulphide liquid, and follow a power-law increase with oxygen fugacity; behaviour that is consistent with previous measurements of KD under controlled conditions of fO 2 and fS 2. The variation of KD with melt nickel content and fO 2 is most likely the result of nonideal mixing in the sulphide liquid, which results in a decrease in γ NiS/γ FeS with melt metal/sulphur ratio. As a consequence of the systematic dependence of KD on fO 2, a new oxygen barometer is proposed for estimating oxygen fugacity in igneous rocks that were cosaturated in olivine and sulphide liquid. Application of the experimental results to natural samples shows that the relatively large variations that exist in KD values from different olivine + sulphide-saturated rock suites can be interpreted as arising from variations in fO 2 and/or the nickel content of the sulphide liquid. Oxygen fugacities calculated for oceanic basalt samples using the proposed Fe-Ni exchange oxybarometer are found to be relatively high (10 -8.5-10 -10.4) which is in accord with the range of values determined using glass ferric/ferrous ratios. Moreover, the very low fO 2 (˜10 -14) calculated for the mafic dike from Disko Island is consistent with the presence of native iron in these samples and is in quantitative agreement with indicators of fO 2 based on chromite- and olivine-melt partitioning of vanadium. Consideration of the fO 2 exhibited by olivine + sulphide-saturated intrusive suites reveals a

  7. Possible Terrestrial Basaltic Analogs for Highly Magnetized Martian Crustal Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdock, K. J.; Brown, L.

    2008-05-01

    With the discovery of crustal rock with high magnetic remanence by the MAG/ER on the Mars Global Surveyor, two of the prominent questions have been how did these Martian rocks become so magnetized, and, after what is assumed to be billions of years, how do they retain their magnetism? Modeling of the observed anomalies requires remanence values of 20 A/m, an order of magnitude greater than common remanences on earth. Images and spectral data show that basalt is a prevalent rock type on the surface of Mars; andesitic and layered rocks have also been found on Mars, but are much less common. Geochemical plots of alkalis versus silica indicate samples from Gusev Crater area (measured by the SPIRIT Rover) have alkaline compositions, while readings made by Pathfinder and MGS-TES surface measurements indicate subalkaline compositions. While only rare rocks on Earth have been found with a similar high magnetic remanence to those observed on Mars, are there terrestrial basalts with greater remanences, or with the possibility of enhanced composition to provide such remanences? To this end we are investigating the details of magnetic character of terrestrial basalts over a range of compositions. Average natural remanent magnetization for lava flows range from 1 to 4 A/m, with susceptibilities of approximately 0.1 SI, corresponding to roughly 3% magnetite content. We are studying mineralogy, grain size, magnetic remanence, magnetic susceptibility, and magnetic coercivity of basalt samples from different sources with the emphasis on the range of characteristics and the possibility of producing high remanences. Samples include those taken from arrange of tectonic environments on earth including hot spots (Hawaii, Easter Island), continental rift (New Mexico), subduction (Chile), slab window (southern Argentina) and continental platform (Arizona).

  8. Effect of water on the fluorine and chlorine partitioning behavior between olivine and silicate melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachim, Bastian; Stechern, André; Ludwig, Thomas; Konzett, Jürgen; Pawley, Alison; Ruzié-Hamilton, Lorraine; Clay, Patricia L.; Burgess, Ray; Ballentine, Christopher J.

    2017-04-01

    Halogens show a range from moderate (F) to highly (Cl, Br, I) volatile and incompatible behavior, which makes them excellent tracers for volatile transport processes in the Earth's mantle. Experimentally determined fluorine and chlorine partitioning data between mantle minerals and silicate melt enable us to estimate Mid Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB) and Ocean Island Basalt (OIB) source region concentrations for these elements. This study investigates the effect of varying small amounts of water on the fluorine and chlorine partitioning behavior at 1280 °C and 0.3 GPa between olivine and silicate melt in the Fe-free CMAS+F-Cl-Br-I-H2O model system. Results show that, within the uncertainty of the analyses, water has no effect on the chlorine partitioning behavior for bulk water contents ranging from 0.03 (2) wt% H2O (DCl ol/melt = 1.6 ± 0.9 × 10-4) to 0.33 (6) wt% H2O (DCl ol/melt = 2.2 ± 1.1 × 10-4). Consequently, with the effect of pressure being negligible in the uppermost mantle (Joachim et al. Chem Geol 416:65-78, 2015), temperature is the only parameter that needs to be considered for the determination of chlorine partition coefficients between olivine and melt at least in the simplified iron-free CMAS+F-Cl-Br-I-H2O system. In contrast, the fluorine partition coefficient increases linearly in this range and may be described at 1280 °C and 0.3 GPa with ( R 2 = 0.99): DF^{ol/melt} = 3.6± 0.4 × 10^{-3} × X_{H}_{2O}( wt %) + 6 ± 0.4× 10^{-4}. The observed fluorine partitioning behavior supports the theory suggested by Crépisson et al. (Earth Planet Sci Lett 390:287-295, 2014) that fluorine and water are incorporated as clumped OH/F defects in the olivine structure. Results of this study further suggest that fluorine concentration estimates in OIB source regions are at least 10% lower than previously expected (Joachim et al. Chem Geol 416:65-78, 2015), implying that consideration of the effect of water on the fluorine partitioning behavior between Earth

  9. Effect of water on the fluorine and chlorine partitioning behavior between olivine and silicate melt.

    PubMed

    Joachim, Bastian; Stechern, André; Ludwig, Thomas; Konzett, Jürgen; Pawley, Alison; Ruzié-Hamilton, Lorraine; Clay, Patricia L; Burgess, Ray; Ballentine, Christopher J

    2017-01-01

    Halogens show a range from moderate (F) to highly (Cl, Br, I) volatile and incompatible behavior, which makes them excellent tracers for volatile transport processes in the Earth's mantle. Experimentally determined fluorine and chlorine partitioning data between mantle minerals and silicate melt enable us to estimate Mid Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB) and Ocean Island Basalt (OIB) source region concentrations for these elements. This study investigates the effect of varying small amounts of water on the fluorine and chlorine partitioning behavior at 1280 °C and 0.3 GPa between olivine and silicate melt in the Fe-free CMAS+F-Cl-Br-I-H2O model system. Results show that, within the uncertainty of the analyses, water has no effect on the chlorine partitioning behavior for bulk water contents ranging from 0.03 (2) wt% H2O (DCl(ol/melt) = 1.6 ± 0.9 × 10(-4)) to 0.33 (6) wt% H2O (DCl(ol/melt) = 2.2 ± 1.1 × 10(-4)). Consequently, with the effect of pressure being negligible in the uppermost mantle (Joachim et al. Chem Geol 416:65-78, 2015), temperature is the only parameter that needs to be considered for the determination of chlorine partition coefficients between olivine and melt at least in the simplified iron-free CMAS+F-Cl-Br-I-H2O system. In contrast, the fluorine partition coefficient increases linearly in this range and may be described at 1280 °C and 0.3 GPa with (R(2) = 0.99): [Formula: see text]. The observed fluorine partitioning behavior supports the theory suggested by Crépisson et al. (Earth Planet Sci Lett 390:287-295, 2014) that fluorine and water are incorporated as clumped OH/F defects in the olivine structure. Results of this study further suggest that fluorine concentration estimates in OIB source regions are at least 10% lower than previously expected (Joachim et al. Chem Geol 416:65-78, 2015), implying that consideration of the effect of water on the fluorine partitioning behavior between Earth's mantle minerals and silicate melt

  10. Olivine in the Southern Isidis Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) took this observation of the transition region between Libya Montes and the Isidis Basin on Mars at 17:16 UTC (12:16 p.m. EST) on January 2, 2007, near 3.6 degrees north latitude, 84.1 degrees east longitude. The image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 18 meters (60 feet) across. The image is about 11 kilometers (7 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    The Isidis Basin resulted from of a gigantic impact on the surface of Mars early in the planet's history. The southern rim, where this target is located, is a region of complex geology and part of the planetary dichotomy boundary that separates the older southern highlands from the lower, younger northern plains. The image on the left was constructed from three visible wavelengths (RGB: 0.71, 0.60, 0.53 microns) and is a close approximation of how the surface would appear to the human eye. The image on the right was constructed from three infrared wavelengths (RGB: 2.49, 1.52, 1.08 microns) chosen to highlight variations in the mineralogy of the area. Of interest is that features in this image not only differ in color, but also in texture and morphology. The gray areas absorb similarly at all wavelengths used in this image, but display absorptions at other wavelengths related to the iron- and magesium-rich mineral pyroxene. The reddest areas absorb strongly at the wavelengths used for green and blue, which is attributable to another iron- and magesium-rich mineral, olivine. The brownish areas show subdued mineral absorptions and could represent some type of mixture between the other two materials. The presence of the mineral olivine is particularly interesting because olivine easily weathers to other minerals; thus, its presence indicates either the lack of weathering in this region or relatively recent exposure.

    CRISM's mission: Find the spectral fingerprints of aqueous and hydrothermal

  11. Mapping of a Widespread Olivine-Rich Layer on Mars: Identification of a Global Impact Ejecta Deposit?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, C. S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2011-12-01

    Exposures of the most ancient materials on Mars, much like on Earth, have the possibility to illuminate a period of planetary surface evolution that is difficult to constrain. However, these exposures on planetary surfaces are rare and often difficult to positively identify without in situ measurements. Identification of these materials is especially difficult on Mars, as it is a largely volcanic planet dominated by basaltic magmatism and the ability to distinguish ancient materials from more recent deposits is primarily reliant on convincing stratigraphic relationships. Important but relatively minor variations in the basaltic composition of the planet are observed on the global scale; however, the majority of the planet's mineralogical variability and diversity occurs at small scales, for example the identification of in place phyllosilicates, carbonates, olivine-rich basalts, sulfate deposits, and opaline silica. It is these local-scale deposits that have fundamentally refined and shaped our current understanding of the evolutionary history and geology of Mars. Olivine-rich basalts have been characterized and mapped extensively, both globally and locally. These units have been associated with a variety of formation mechanisms, including volcanism, impact ejecta material, and lag deposits. Following the work of Edwards et al. (2008), we have mapped and characterized a compositionally distinct olivine-rich layer using TES, THEMIS, and CRISM spectral data. This thin and flat lying (~200m thick), continuous, rocky (TI >600-800 J K-1m-2s-1/2), olivine-rich (>15% areal abundance of ~Fo58-Fo74) basalt layer extends for a minimum of thousands of kilometers and may be global in scale. Additionally, the composition of this material is consistent with the crystallization of a melt derived from the martian mantle that underwent little fractional crystallization. The stratigraphic location of this layer, which was first identified in the walls of Valles Marineris in Ganges

  12. Petrology and geochemistry of Cenozoic intra-plate basalts in east-central China: Constraints on recycling of an oceanic slab in the source region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Qing; Ma, Chang-Qian; Robinson, Paul T.

    2016-10-01

    Cenozoic mafic rocks in Jiangsu and Anhui Provinces, east-central China are chiefly basanites and alkali olivine basalts with subordinate tholeiites, which were erupted in three stages; Paleogene, Neogene and Quaternary. The rocks become increasingly alkaline as they become younger. On a primitive mantle-normalized multi-element plot, these lavas exhibit typical OIB-like trace element patterns, including enrichment in most incompatible elements (LILE and HFSE) and negative K and Pb anomalies. The compositions of the mafic rocks indicate that they were derived from a mantle source mainly containing clinopyroxene and garnet, most probably a mixture of pyroxenite/eclogite and peridotite. A mineral equilibrium projection shows that all the mafic magmas were produced at pressures of 3-4 GPa, implying an asthenospheric origin. Their positive Ba and Sr anomalies and relatively high 87Sr/86Sr ratios suggest derivation from an EM1-type mantle source. However, poor correlations between 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd indicate an isotopically heterogeneous source for the magmas, including DMM, EM1 and EM2, representing mantle peridotite, recycled ancient oceanic crust and seafloor sedimentary rocks, respectively. Variable correlations between 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios, CaO-MgO contents and Eu/Eu* and Ce/Ce* anomalies with rock type imply that marine sediments (plus variable amounts of oceanic crust) and peridotites were the dominant source lithologies of the basanites, whereas recycled oceanic crust (pyroxenite/eclogite) was the main source of the weakly alkaline basalts. This hypothesis is supported by seismic tomographic images of the mantle beneath the region, which show the presence of a stagnant subducted slab in the mantle transition zone. Thus, we propose a petrological model in which a hybrid magma column originated from the mantle transition zone and assimilated some of the overlying peridotite during upwelling, to become the parental magmas of these mafic rocks

  13. Subduction zone mantle enrichment by fluids and Zr-Hf-depleted crustal melts as indicated by backarc basalts of the Southern Volcanic Zone, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Paul M.; Søager, Nina; Alfastsen, Mads; Bertotto, Gustavo W.

    2016-10-01

    We aim to identify the components metasomatizing the mantle above the subducting Nazca plate under part of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ). We present new major and ICP-MS trace element and Sr, Nd and high-precision Pb isotope analyses of primitive olivine-phyric alkali basalts from the Northern Segment Volcanic Field, part of the Payenia province in the backarc of the Transitional SVZ. One new 40Ar-39Ar age determination confirms the Late Pleistocene age of this most northerly part of the province. All analysed rocks have typical subduction zone type incompatible element enrichment, and the rocks of the Northern Segment, together with the neighbouring Nevado Volcanic Field, have isotopic compositions intermediate between adjacent Transitional SVZ arc rocks and southern Payenia OIB-type basaltic rocks. Modelling the Ba-Th-Sm variation we demonstrate that fluids as well as 1-2% melts of upper continental crust (UCC) enriched their mantle sources, and La-Nb-Sm variations additionally indicate that the pre-metasomatic sources ranged from strongly depleted to undepleted mantle. Low Eu/Eu* and Sr/Nd also show evidence for a UCC component in the source. The contribution of Chile Trench sediments to the magmas seems insignificant. The Zr/Sm and Hf/Sm ratios are relatively low in many of the Northern Segment rocks, ranging down to 17 and 0.45, respectively, which, together with relatively high Th/U, is argued to indicate that the metasomatizing crustal melts were derived by partial melting of subducted UCC that had residual zircon, in contrast to the UCC melts added to Transitional SVZ arc magmas. Mixing between depleted and undepleted mantle, enriched by UCC and fluids, is suggested by Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes of the Northern Segment and Nevado magmas. The metasomatized undepleted mantle south of the Northern Segment is suggested to be part of upwelling OIB-type mantle, whereas the pre-metasomatically depleted mantle also can be found as a component in some arc

  14. Biomass gasification and in-bed contaminants removal: performance of iron enriched olivine and bauxite in a process of steam/O2 gasification.

    PubMed

    Barisano, D; Freda, C; Nanna, F; Fanelli, E; Villone, A

    2012-08-01

    A modified Olivine, enriched in iron content (10% Fe/Olivine), and a natural bauxite, were tested in the in-bed reduction of tar and alkali halides (NaCl and KCl) released in a process of biomass steam/O(2) gasification. The tests were carried out at an ICBFB bench scale reactor under the operating conditions of: 855-890 °C, atmospheric pressure, 0.5 steam/biomass and 0.33 ER ratios. From the use of the two materials, a reduction in the contaminant contents of the fuel gas produced was found. For the alkali halides, a decrease up to 70%(wt) was observed for the potassium concentration, while for sodium, the reduction was found to be quite poor. For the organic content, compared to unmodified Olivine, the chromatographically determined total tar quantity showed a removal efficiency of 38%(wt). Moreover, regarding the particulate content a rough doubling in the fuel gas revealed a certain brittleness of the new bed material.

  15. Bubble Growth in Lunar Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Although Moon is usually said to be volatile-"free", lunar basalts are often vesicular with mm-size bubbles. The vesicular nature of the lunar basalts suggests that they contained some initial gas concentration. A recent publication estimated volatile concentrations in lunar basalts (Saal et al. 2008). This report investigates bubble growth on Moon and compares with that on Earth. Under conditions relevant to lunar basalts, bubble growth in a finite melt shell (i.e., growth of multiple regularly-spaced bubbles) is calculated following Proussevitch and Sahagian (1998) and Liu and Zhang (2000). Initial H2O content of 700 ppm (Saal et al. 2008) or lower is used and the effect of other volatiles (such as carbon dioxide, halogens, and sulfur) is ignored. H2O solubility at low pressures (Liu et al. 2005), concentration-dependent diffusivity in basalt (Zhang and Stolper 1991), and lunar basalt viscosity (Murase and McBirney 1970) are used. Because lunar atmospheric pressure is essentially zero, the confining pressure on bubbles is completely supplied by the overlying magma. Due to low H2O content in lunar basaltic melt (700 ppm H2O corresponds to a saturation pressure of 75 kPa), H2O bubbles only grow in the upper 16 m of a basalt flow or lake. A depth of 20 mm corresponds to a confining pressure of 100 Pa. Hence, vesicular lunar rocks come from very shallow depth. Some findings from the modeling are as follows. (a) Due to low confining pressure as well as low viscosity, even though volatile concentration is very low, bubble growth rate is extremely high, much higher than typical bubble growth rates in terrestrial melts. Hence, mm-size bubbles in lunar basalts are not strange. (b) Because the pertinent pressures are so low, bubble pressure due to surface tension plays a main role in lunar bubble growth, contrary to terrestrial cases. (c) Time scale to reach equilibrium bubble size increases as the confining pressure increases. References: (1) Liu Y, Zhang YX (2000) Earth

  16. Crust recycling induced compositional-temporal-spatial variations of Cenozoic basalts in the Trans-North China Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rong; Liu, Yongsheng; Wang, Xiaohong; Zong, Keqing; Hu, Zhaochu; Chen, Haihong; Zhou, Lian

    2017-03-01

    It has been advocated that the stagnant Pacific slab within the mantle transition zone played a critical role in the genesis of the Cenozoic basalts in the eastern part of the North China Craton (NCC); however, it is not clear whether this recycled oceanic crust contributed to the chemical makeup of the Cenozoic basalts in the Trans-North China Orogen (TNCO, the central zone of the NCC). Here, we show that Cenozoic basalts from the TNCO are featured by low CaO contents, high TiO2 and FeOT contents and high Fe/Mn and Zn/Fe ratios, indicating a mantle source of pyroxenite. Temporally, these basalts evolved from alkali basalts of Late Eocene-Oligocene age to coexisting alkali and tholeiitic basalts of Late Miocene-Quaternary age. Spatially, their isotopic and chemical compositions vary symmetrically from the center to both the north and the south sides along the TNCO, i.e., SiO2 contents and 87Sr/86Sr ratios increase, FeOT contents and 143Nd/144Nd, Sm/Yb and Ce/Pb ratios decrease. The estimated average melting pressure of the TNCO tholeiitic basalts ( 3 GPa) agrees well with the present lithosphere thickness beneath the north region of the TNCO ( 90-120 km). The temporal and spatial chemical variations of Cenozoic basalts in the TNCO suggest that the recycled oceanic crust in the mantle of the TNCO is mainly related to the southward subduction of the Paleo-Asian oceanic plate and the northward subduction of the Tethyan ocean plate. The westward subduction of Pacific slab may not have contributed much than previously thought.

  17. Boron, beryllium, and lithium, partitioning in olivine

    SciTech Connect

    Neroda, Elizabeth

    1996-05-01

    A one atmosphere experimental study was performed to determine the mineral/melt partition coefficients for B, Be, and Li in forsteritic olivine. Two compositions were chosen along the 1350{degrees}C isotherm, 1b (Fo{sub 17.3} Ab{sub 82.7} An{sub 0} by weight) and 8c (Fo{sub 30} Ab{sub 23.3} An{sub 47.8}, by weight) were then combined in equal amounts to form a composition was doped with 25ppm Li, B, Yb, Nb, Zr, Sr, and Hf, 50ppm Sm, and 100ppm Be, Nd, Ce, and Rb. Electron and ion microprobe analyses showed that the olivine crystals and surrounding glasses were homogeneous with respect to major and trace elements. Partition coefficients calculated from these analyses are as follows: 1b: D{sub B} = 4.41 ({+-} 2.3) E-03, D{sub Be} = 2.86 ({+-} 0.45) E-03, D{sub Li} = 1.54 ({+-} 0.21) E-01, 50/50: D{sub B} = 2.86 ({+-} 0.5) E-03, D{sub Be} = 2.07 ({+-} 0.09) E-03, D{sub Li} = 1.51 ({+-} 0.18) E-01, 8c: D{sub B} = 6.05 ({+-} 1.5) E-03, D{sub Be} = 1.81 ({+-} 0.03) E-03, D{sub Li} = 1.31 ({+-} 0.09) E-01. The results of this study will combined with similar data for other minerals as part of a larger study to understand the partitioning behavior of B, Be, and Li in melting of the upper mantle at subduction zones.

  18. Olivine-respiring bacteria isolated from the rock-ice interface in a lava-tube cave, a Mars analog environment.

    PubMed

    Popa, Radu; Smith, Amy R; Popa, Rodica; Boone, Jane; Fisk, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The boundary between ice and basalt on Earth is an analogue for some near-surface environments of Mars. We investigated neutrophilic iron-oxidizing microorganisms from the basalt-ice interface in a lava tube from the Oregon Cascades with perennial ice. One of the isolates (Pseudomonas sp. HerB) can use ferrous iron Fe(II) from the igneous mineral olivine as an electron donor and O(2) as an electron acceptor. The optimum growth temperature is ∼12-14°C, but growth also occurs at 5°C. Bicarbonate is a facultative source of carbon. Growth of Pseudomonas sp. HerB as a chemolithotrophic iron oxidizer with olivine as the source of energy is favored in low O(2) conditions (e.g., 1.6% O(2)). Most likely, microbial oxidation of olivine near pH 7 requires low O(2) to offset the abiotic oxidation of iron. The metabolic capabilities of this bacterium would allow it to live in near-surface, icy, volcanic environments of Mars in the present or recent geological past and make this type of physiology a prime candidate in the search for life on Mars.

  19. Olivine-Respiring Bacteria Isolated from the Rock-Ice Interface in a Lava-Tube Cave, a Mars Analog Environment

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amy R.; Popa, Rodica; Boone, Jane; Fisk, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The boundary between ice and basalt on Earth is an analogue for some near-surface environments of Mars. We investigated neutrophilic iron-oxidizing microorganisms from the basalt-ice interface in a lava tube from the Oregon Cascades with perennial ice. One of the isolates (Pseudomonas sp. HerB) can use ferrous iron Fe(II) from the igneous mineral olivine as an electron donor and O2 as an electron acceptor. The optimum growth temperature is ∼12–14°C, but growth also occurs at 5°C. Bicarbonate is a facultative source of carbon. Growth of Pseudomonas sp. HerB as a chemolithotrophic iron oxidizer with olivine as the source of energy is favored in low O2 conditions (e.g., 1.6% O2). Most likely, microbial oxidation of olivine near pH 7 requires low O2 to offset the abiotic oxidation of iron. The metabolic capabilities of this bacterium would allow it to live in near-surface, icy, volcanic environments of Mars in the present or recent geological past and make this type of physiology a prime candidate in the search for life on Mars. Key Words: Extremophiles—Mars—Olivine—Iron-oxidizing bacteria—Redox. Astrobiology 12, 9–18. PMID:22165996

  20. Neon diffusion kinetics in olivine, pyroxene and feldspar: Retentivity of cosmogenic and nucleogenic neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourbet, Loraine; Shuster, David L.; Balco, Greg; Cassata, William S.; Renne, Paul R.; Rood, Dylan

    2012-06-01

    We performed stepwise degassing experiments by heating single crystals of neutron- or proton-irradiated olivine, pyroxene and feldspar to study diffusion kinetics of neon. This is important in evaluating the utility of these minerals for cosmogenic 21Ne measurements and, potentially, for Ne thermochronometry. Degassing patterns are only partially explained by simple Arrhenius relationships; most samples do not exhibit a precisely-determined activation energy in an individual diffusion domain. Regardless, we find clear differences in diffusion kinetics among these minerals. Based on sub-selected data, our estimates for neon diffusion kinetics (activation energy Ea and pre-exponential factor Do, assuming the analyzed fragments approximate the diffusion domain) in each mineral are as follows: for the feldspars, Ea ranges from ∼65 to 115 kJ/mol and Do from 3.9 × 10-3 to 7.1 × 102 cm2s-1; for the pyroxenes, Ea ranges from ∼292 to 480 kJ/mol and Do from 1.6 × 102 to 2.9 × 1011 cm2s-1; for the olivines, Ea ranges from ∼360 to 370 kJ/mol and Do from 1.5 × 106 to 5.0 × 106 cm2s-1. Differences in these parameters are broadly consistent with the expected effect of structural differences between feldspar, and olivine and pyroxene. These results indicate that cosmogenic 21Ne will be quantitatively retained within olivine and pyroxene at Earth surface temperatures over geological timescales. The diffusion kinetics for feldspars, on the other hand, predicts that 21Ne retention at Earth surface temperatures will vary significantly with domain size, crystal microtexture, surface temperature, and exposure duration. Quantitative retention is expected only in favorable conditions. This conclusion is reinforced by additional measurements of cosmogenic 21Ne in coexisting quartz and feldspar from naturally irradiated surface samples; sanidine from a variety of rhyolitic ignimbrites exhibits quantitative retention, whereas alkali-feldspar from several granites does not.

  1. Oxygen isotopic evolution of amoeboid olivine aggregates in the reduced CV3 chondrites Efremovka, Vigarano, and Leoville

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, T. J.; Krot, A. N.; Keil, K.; Yurimoto, H.

    2004-06-01

    Amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs) from the reduced CV chondrites Efremovka, Vigarano, and Leoville consist of forsteritic olivine, FeNi-metal and a refractory component composed of spinel, Al-diopside, ±anorthite. Secondary ferrous olivine and alkali-rich minerals (nepheline and sodalite), commonly observed in the oxidized CVs, are rare. Mineralogy and chemical compositions of AOAs are similar to those predicted by equilibrium thermodynamic condensation models, suggesting that AOAs formed primarily by gas-solid condensation over a narrow temperature range, slightly below the temperatures over which most Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) formed. AOAs in the reduced CVs preserve a 1 st-generation 16O-rich signal (δ 17,18O ˜ -40‰) similar to that observed in many CAIs, suggesting that these refractory objects originated from a common source in the solar nebula. In fact AOAs and many fine-grained CAIs may have formed by the same processes, but at slightly different temperatures, and can be considered a single class of refractory objects. Alteration of the AOAs is manifested by differing extents of 16O-depletion in original AOA minerals, FeO-enrichment in olivine, and formation of interstitial very fine grained Na-bearing phases. From the six AOAs and one fine-grained, melilite-pyroxene-rich CAI examined in this study, five distinct patterns of alteration were identified. (1) One unaltered AOA from Vigarano is characterized by 16O-rich forsterite without FeO-rich rims and interstitial Na-bearing phases. (2) Weak alteration in the melilite-pyroxene-rich CAI is characterized by incomplete 16O-depletion in some melilite and precipitation of Na-bearing phases near the CAI rim. (3) Oxygen isotopic composition and mineralogy are correlated in two AOAs from Leoville with 16O-rich olivine, 16O-poor anorthite and a range of intermediate compositions in Al-diopside. This pattern is consistent with model diffusion between original grains and a 16O-poor reservoir during a

  2. Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr Isotopic Studies of Meteorite Kalahari 009: An Old VLT Mare Basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Bischoff, A.

    2008-01-01

    Lunar meteorite Kalahari 009 is a fragmental basaltic breccia contain ing various very-low-Ti (VLT) mare basalt clasts embedded in a fine-g rained matrix of similar composition. This meteorite and lunar meteorite Kalahari 008, an anorthositic breccia, were suggested to be paired mainly due to the presence of similar fayalitic olivines in fragment s found in both meteorites. Thus, Kalahari 009 probably represents a VLT basalt that came from a locality near a mare-highland boundary r egion of the Moon, as compared to the typical VLT mare basalt samples collected at Mare Crisium during the Luna-24 mission. The concordant Sm-Nd and Ar-Ar ages of such a VLT basalt (24170) suggest that the extrusion of VLT basalts at Mare Crisium occurred 3.30 +/- 0.05 Ga ag o. Previous age results for Kalahari 009 range from approximately 4.2 Ga by its Lu-Hf isochron age to 1.70?0.04 Ga of its Ar-Ar plateau ag e. However, recent in-situ U-Pb dating of phosphates in Kalahari 009 defined an old crystallization age of 4.35+/- 0.15 Ga. The authors su ggested that Kalahari 009 represents a cryptomaria basalt. In this r eport, we present Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotopic results for Kalahari 009, discuss the relationship of its age and isotopic characteristics to t hose of other L-24 VLT mare basalts and other probable cryptomaria ba salts represented by Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalts, and discuss it s petrogenesis.

  3. The influence of magma degassing on entrapment pressures recorded in olivine-hosted melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetani, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    The concentrations of H2O and CO2 in olivine-hosted melt inclusions provide estimates for the pressures at which they were entrapped, and represent an important source of information on the depths at which basaltic magmas crystallize [1]. Results from recent dehydration experiments demonstrate that diffusive loss of H2O from melt inclusions, driven by degassing of the external magma, leads to significant decreases to pressure within the inclusion [2, 3]. This, in turn, lowers the solubility of CO2 in the included melt causing a vapor to exsolve and form a bubble. This process has the potential to significantly modify estimates of entrapment pressures derived from volatile concentrations in olivine hosted melt inclusions. I have developed a quantitative model that describes this process, allowing the influence of degassing on entrapment pressures to be rigorously evaluated. Diffusive loss of H2O from the inclusions was determined using the model of [3]. An equation of state (EOS) for the silicate melt was taken from the results of [4] and [5], while the EOS for H2O-CO2 vapor was taken from [6]. The solubilities of H2O and CO2 in the silicate melt were derived from VolatileCalc [7]. Modeling results demonstrate that degassing of H2O-rich magma produces significant pressure drops, so that entrapment pressures never exceed crustal values and always represent a minimum. Conversely, degassing of H2O-poor magma does not significantly perturb the H2O content of olivine-hosted melt inclusions. Therefore, these inclusions preserve reliable records of the pressures at which they were entrapped. These results are consistent with a global compilation of olivine-hosted melt inclusion entrapment pressures presented by [3]. References: [1] Wanless, VD, and Shaw, AM, Nature Geosci, 5, 651-655 (2012); [2] Gaetani, GA, et al., Geology, 40, 915-918 (2012); [3] Bucholz, CE, et al., Earth Planet Sci Lett, 374, 145-155 (2013); [4] Lange, R. A., and Carmichael, ISE, Geochim Cosmochim Acta

  4. The effect of silica activity on the diffusion of Ni and Co in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukova, Irina; StC O'Neill, Hugh; Cambell, Ian H.; Kilburn, Matt R.

    2014-08-01

    The diffusion of Ni and Co was measured at atmospheric pressure in synthetic monocrystalline forsterite (Mg2SiO4) from 1,200 to 1,500 °C at the oxygen fugacity of air, along [100], with the activities of SiO2 and MgO defined by either forsterite + periclase (fo + per buffer) or forsterite + protoenstatite (fo + en buffer). Diffusion profiles were measured by three methods: laser-ablation inductively-coupled-plasma mass-spectrometry, nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry and electron microprobe, with good agreement between the methods. For both Ni and Co, the diffusion rates in protoenstatite-buffered experiments are an order of magnitude faster than in the periclase-buffered experiments at a given temperature. The diffusion coefficients D M (M = Ni or Co) for the combined data set can be fitted to the equation: with Ea(Ni) = - 284.3 kJ mol-1 and Ea(Co) = - 275.9 kJ mol-1, with an uncertainty of ±10.2 kJ mol-1. This equation fits the data (24 experiments) to ±0.1 in log D M. The dependence of diffusion on is in agreement with a point-defect model in which Mg-site vacancies are charge-balanced by Si interstitials. Comparative experiments with San Carlos olivine of composition Mg1.8Fe0.2SiO4 at 1,300 °C give a slightly small dependence on , with D (), presumably because the Mg-site vacancies increase with incorporation of Fe3+ in the Fe-bearing olivines. However, the dependence on fO2 is small, with D ( fO2)0.12±0.12. These results show the necessity of constraining the chemical potentials of all the stoichiometric components of a phase when designing diffusion experiments. Similarly, the chemical potentials of the major-element components must be taken into account when applying experimental data to natural minerals to constrain the rates of geological processes. For example, the diffusion of divalent elements in olivine from low SiO2 magmas, such as kimberlites or carbonatites, will be an order of magnitude slower than in olivine from high SiO2 magmas

  5. Melt inclusions in the olivine from the Nantianwan intrusion: Implications for the parental magma of Ni-Cu-(PGE) sulfide-bearing mafic-ultramafic intrusions of the ∼260 Ma Emeishan large igneous province (SW China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Le; Ren, Zhong-Yuan; Wang, Christina Yan

    2017-02-01

    Olivine-hosted melt inclusions provide an archive of the parental magma and early magma history that is unavailable from bulk-rock analyses of cumulates. For those olivine-bearing mafic-ultramafic intrusions, a combined in situ analysis of major elements and Pb isotopic compositions for the melt inclusions and host olivine crystals may provide an effective way to understand the nature of the parental magma of the intrusions. In this study, we take the Nantianwan intrusion in the Emeishan large igneous province (SW China) as an example to analyze the melt inclusions and the host olivine. The Nantianwan intrusion is mainly composed of gabbronorite, with minor olivine gabbro. The olivine crystals in the olivine gabbro have Fo contents varying from 81.1 to 89.2 and Ni from 0.05 to 0.30 wt.%. The melt inclusion hosted in the most Mg-rich olivine has 50.9 wt.% SiO2, 1.0 wt.% TiO2, 15.1 wt.% MgO and 2.9 wt.% Na2O + K2O, indicating that the parental magma of the intrusion was of high-Mg basaltic composition. The melt inclusions overall have 208Pb/206Pb ratios of 2.0567-2.1032 and 207Pb/206Pb of 0.8287-0.8481, similar to the Pb isotopic compositions of the Emeishan flood basalts and consistent with insignificant crustal contamination. Given that the Nantianwan intrusion contains the most Mg-rich olivine among the Ni-Cu-(PGE) sulfide-bearing mafic-ultramafic intrusions in the Emeishan LIP, we infer that the composition of the melt inclusion in the most Mg-rich olivine from the Nantianwan intrusion may represent the least evolved parental magma of the Ni-Cu-(PGE) sulfide-bearing mafic-ultramafic intrusions in the Emeishan LIP. This can be further used to constrain the magma process related to Ni-Cu-(PGE) sulfide mineralization.

  6. Basaltic volcanism on the eucrite parent body - Petrology and chemistry of the polymict eucrite ALHA80102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.; Drake, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The polymict eucrite meteorite ALHA80102 is an unequilibrated breccia of basaltic and gabbroic clasts in a fragmental matrix. Clasts include basalts of many textural types, cumulate gabbro, black 'glass', and ferroan troctolite (plagioclase, silica, Fe-rich olivine, ilmenite, mesostasis). Ferroan troctolite has not been previously reported from eucrites or howardites; it is interpreted as the end-product of fractional crystallization of eucritic magmas. Bulk and trace element compositions (by electron microprobe and INAA) of clasts and matrix from ALHA80102 are similar to those of other eucrites; the meteorite contains clasts similar to Juvinas and to Stannern. A clast of cumulate eucrite gabbro is enriched in the light rare earths (La/Lu = 2XCI). This clast is interpreted as an unrepresentative sample of metamorphically equilibrated gabbro; LREE-enriched magmas need not be invoked. ALHA80102 is similar to other polymict eucrites from the Allan Hills and may be paired with ALHA76005, ALHA77302, and ALHA78040.

  7. Reduction of lunar basalt 70035: Oxygen yield and reaction product analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Michael A.; Knudsen, Christian W.; Bruenemen, David J.; Allen, Carlton C.; Kanamori, Hiroshi; Mckay, David S.

    1994-01-01

    Oxygen production from a lunar rock has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. A 10 g sample of high-Ti basalt 70035 was reduced with hydrogen in seven experiments at temperatures of 900-1050 C and pressures of 14.7-150 psia. In all experiments, water evolution began almost immediately and was essentially complete in tens of minutes. Oxygen yields ranged from 2.93 to 4.61% of the starting sample weight, and showed weak dependence on temperature and pressure. Analysis of the solid samples demonstrated total reduction of Fe(2+) in ilmenite and small degrees of reduction in olivine and pyroxene. Ti O2 was also partially reduced to one or more suboxides. Data from these experiments provide a basis for predicting the yield of oxygen from lunar basalt as well as new constraints on natural reduction in the lunar regolith.

  8. Genetic interpretation of lead-isotopic data from the Columbia River basalt group, Oregon, Washington, and Idaho.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    Lead-isotopic data for the high-alumina olivine plateau basalts and most of the Colombia River basalt group plot within the Cascade Range mixing array. The data for several of the formations form small, tight clusters and the Nd and Sr isotopic data show discrete variation between these basalt groups. The observed isotopic and trace-element data from most of the Columbia River basalt group can be accounted for by a model which calls for partial melting of the convecting oceanic-type mantle and contamination by fluids derived from continental sediments which were subducted along the trench. These sediments were transported in the low-velocity zone at least 400 km behind the active arc into a back-arc environment represented by the Columbia Plateau province. With time, the zone of melting moved up, resulting in the formation of the Saddle Mt basalt by partial melting of a 2600 m.y.-old sub-continental lithosphere characterized by high Th/U, Th/Pb, Rb/Sr and Nd/Sm ratios and LREE enrichment. Partial melting of old sub-continental lithosphere beneath the continental crust may be an important process in the formation of continental tholeiite flood basalt sequences world-wide. -L.di H.

  9. High paleointensities of the geomagnetic field from thermomagnetic studies on rift valley pillow basalts from the Mid- Atlantic Ridge.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prevot, M.; Mankinen, E.A.; Gromme, S.; Lecaille, A.

    1983-01-01

    Nineteen pillow basalts dredged within the rift valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 36.8oN were studied by the Thellier stepwise heating method in order to determine the paleointensity of the geomagnetic field when they erupted on to the sea floor. Previously reported fission track ages are 2000-6000 yr for the youngest rocks (mainly olivine basalts) and 10 000-100 000 yr for the others (mainly plagioclase basalts and pyroxene basalts). All but three pillow basalts meet the conditions commonly considered as indicative of quite reliable paleointensity estimates; stability of the direction of NRM during its thermal demagnetization, constant ratio of NRM/TRM (natural remanent magnetization to thermoremanent magnetization) over 50% or more of the original NRM intensity (80 to 94% for 11 specimens), and reproducibility of low-temperature partial TRM(PTRM). However, strong field thermomagnetic measurements indicate that 11 of these 16 samples display a significant increase in Curie temperature (15 to 80oC) during the paleointensity experiments below 250oC, notwithstanding the linearity of the NRM-TRM plot in this temperature interval. This alteration, probably due to low-temperature oxidation of the specimens, seems typical of young pillow basalts and may result in paleointensity estimates which are too high.-from Authors

  10. The petrology, phase relations and tectonic setting of basalts from the taupo volcanic zone, New Zealand and the Kermadec Island arc - havre trough, SW Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, John A.; Smith, Ian E. M.; Graham, Ian J.; Peter Kokelaar, B.; Cole, James W.; Houghton, Bruce F.; Wilson, Colin J. N.

    1990-10-01

    Volcanism in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) and the Kermadec arc-Havre Trough (KAHT) is related to westward subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the Indo-Australian Plate. The tectonic setting of the TVZ is continental whereas in KAHT it is oceanic and in these two settings the relative volumes of basalt differ markedly. In TVZ, basalts form a minor proportion (< 1%) of a dominant rhyolite (97%)-andesite association while in KAHT, basalts and basaltic andesites are the major rock types. Neither the convergence rate between the Pacific and Indo-Australian Plates nor the extension rates in the back-arc region or the dip of the Pacific Plate Wadati-Benioff zone differ appreciably between the oceanic and continental segments. The distance between the volcanic front and the axis of the back-arc basin decreases from the Kermadec arc to TVZ and the distance between trench and volcanic front increases from around 200 km in the Kermadec arc to 280 km in TVZ. These factors may prove significant in determining the extent to which arc and backarc volcanism in subduction settings are coupled. All basalts from the Kermadec arc are porphyritic (up to 60% phenocrysts) with assemblages generally dominated by plagioclase but with olivine, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene. A single dredge sample from the Havre Trough back arc contains olivine and plagioclase microphenocrysts in glassy pillow rind and is mildly alkaline (< 1% normative nepheline) contrasting with the tholeiitic nature of the other basalts. Basalts from the TVZ contain phenocryst assemblages of olivine + plagioclase ± clinopyroxene; orthopyroxene phenocrysts occur only in the most evolved basalts and basaltic andesites from both TVZ and the Kermadec Arc. Sparsely porphyritic primitive compositions (Mg/(Mg+Fe 2) > 70) are high in Al 2O 3 (>16.5%), and project in the olivine volume of the basalt tetrahedron. They contain olivine (Fo 87) phenocrysts and plagioclase (> An 60) microphenocrysts. These magmas have ratios of

  11. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard

    2017-01-17

    A method for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock. The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  12. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  13. Origin of major element chemical trends in DSDP Leg 37 basalts, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerly, G.R.; Wright, T.L.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper we summarize the major element chemical variation for basalts from the Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 37 and relate it to stratigraphic position in each of five drilling sites. Least-squares techniques are successfully used to quantify the nature and extent of alteration in these basalts, and to correct the major element analysis back to a magmatic, or alteration-free, composition on the assumption that alteration takes place in two ways: (1) secondary minerals are introduced into veins and vesicles, and (2) CO2 and H2O react with components in the rock to form a simple alteration assemblage. A chemical stratigraphy is defined for these basalts by grouping lavas whose chemistries are related by low-pressure phenocryst-liquid differentiation as identified by least-squares calculation. Major chemical-stratigraphic units are as much as 200 m thick; correlations of these units can be made between the holes at site 332 (about 100 m apart), but not between the other sites. Compositions of parental magmas are calculated by extrapolating low-pressure variations to a constant value of 9% MgO. The differences in these extrapolated compositions reflect high-pressure processes, and suggest that clinopyroxene may be an important phase in either intermediate-level fractionation of basaltic liquids, or as a residual phase during the partial melting which produces these basaltic liquids. Several of the basaltic liquids calculated as parental to the Leg 37 basalts have CaO contents greater than 14% and indicate that the oceanic mantle is richer in CaO and Al2O3 than values used in pyrolite models for the upper mantle. A model for magma generation and eruption beneath the Mid-Atlantic Ridge embodies the following characteristics: 1. (1) Separate magma batches are generated in the mantle. 2. (2) Each of these may be erupted directly or stored at shallow depth where significant fractionation takes place. Common fractionation processes are inferred to be gravitative

  14. Effect of Fluorine on Near-Liquidus Phase Equilibria of Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filiberto, Justin; Wood, Justin; Loan, Le; Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Treiman, Allan H.

    2010-01-01

    Volatile species such as H2O, CO2, F, and Cl have significant impact in generation and differentiation of basaltic melts. Thus far experimental work has primarily focused on the effect of water and carbon dioxide on basalt crystallization, liquid-line of descent, and mantle melting [e.g., 1, 2] and the effects of halogens have received far less attention [3-4]. However, melts in the planetary interiors can have non-negligible chlorine and fluorine concentrations. Here, we explore the effects of fluorine on near-liquidus phase equilibria of basalt. We have conducted nominally anhydrous piston cylinder experiments using graphite capsules at 0.6 - 1.5 GPa on an Fe-rich model basalt composition. 1.75 wt% fluorine was added to the starting mix in the form of AgF2. Fluorine in the experimental glass was measured by SIMS and major elements of glass and minerals were analyzed by EPMA. Nominally volatile free experiments yield a liquidus temperature from 1330 C at 0.8GPa to 1400 at 1.6GPa and an olivine(Fo72)-pyroxene(En68)-liquid multiple saturation point at 1.25 GPa and 1375 C. The F-bearing experiments yield a liquiudus temperature from 1260 C at 0.6GPa to 1305 at 1.5GPa and an ol(Fo66)-pyx(En64)-MSP at 1 GPa and 1260 C. This shows that F depresses the basalt liquidus, extends the pyroxene stability field to lower pressure, and forces the liquidus phases to be more Fe-rich. KD(Fe-Mg/mineral-melt) calculated for both pyroxenes and olivines show an increase with increasing F content of the melt. Therefore, we infer that F complexes with Mg in the melt and thus increases the melt s silica activity, depressing the liquidus and changing the composition of the crystallizing minerals. Our study demonstrates that on a weight percent basis, the effect of fluorine is similar to the effect of H2O [1] and Cl [3] on freezing point depression of basalts. But on an atomic fraction basis, the effect of F on liquidus depression of basalts is xxxx compared to the effect of H. Future

  15. Back arc basalts from Patagonia: sediment input in a distal subduction domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, A.; Mandeville, C.; Varekamp, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    Cinder cones and lava flows from the Loncopue graben in N Patagonia (37 S) were sampled over a 180 km N-S transect. These mainly basaltic and trachybasaltic lava flows carry olivine with Cr-Al-rich spinel inclusions, while some more evolved flows carry clinopyroxene and plagioclase. Most of these rocks have between 5-8 percent MgO, and show highly variable K and LIL trace element concentrations. The rocks have up to 180 ppm Ni and 250 ppm Cr. Relative trace element abundance diagrams show negative Ta-Nb anomalies in most rocks, although their depths vary strongly. The REE patterns show LREE enrichment and most rocks have no Eu anomalies, indicating the absence of significant plagioclase fractionation. The basalts have constant U/Th values (~0.25) that are similar to those found in the nearby Copahue-Caviahue arc volcanics. Microprobe analyses of the main phases show olivine with Mg # of 80-87 and up to 2600 ppm Ni. Simulations with the Melts-pMelts programs and application of mineral-melt geothermometers suggest that most olivine phenocrysts crystallized at ~8-10 kbar pressure at temperatures of 1170-1220 oC and with 1-3 percent H2O in the melt. The Sr isotope compositions of 9 samples show a range from 0.7033 - 0.7043, which are negatively correlated with Nd isotope ratios (0.51273- 0.51292). Surprisingly, the most MgO-rich basalt has the most radiogenic Sr isotope ratio. The Pb isotope ratios, well outside the DMM range, correlate very poorly with either Sr isotope ratios or in Pb-Pb isotope graphs. The lack of correlation between degree of evolution and Sr isotope ratios as well as the primitive nature of the rocks and crystals suggest that crustal assimilation was not a major process impacting the composition of these small magma volumes. Incompatible trace element patterns of several samples resemble those of detrital sediment samples from the Pacific, which together with the isotopic data suggest that these magmas may carry a subducted sediment component

  16. Formation of orthopyroxenite by reaction between peridotite and hydrous basaltic melt: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunguang; Liang, Yan; Dygert, Nick; Xu, Wenliang

    2016-09-01

    The consequences of hydrous basaltic melts and peridotite interaction were examined experimentally in Au-Pd, Pt, and graphite capsules using the reaction couple method. Reactions between a hydrous basaltic andesite (4 wt% H2O) and dunite or lherzolite in an Au-Pd capsule at 1 GPa and 1200 °C produce a melt-bearing orthopyroxenite-dunite sequence. Reactions between a hydrous ferro-basalt and lherzolite in Pt or Au-Pd capsules at 0.8-2 GPa and 1250-1385 °C produce a melt-bearing orthopyroxenite-harzburgite sequence. Reactions between the ferro-basalt and lherzolite in graphite capsules (not designed to retain water) result in a melt-bearing dunite-harzburgite sequence at 1 GPa and a melt-bearing harzburgite-lherzolite sequence at 2 GPa. The orthopyroxenite from the hydrous reaction experiments has a high porosity, and it is separated by a sharp lithological interface from the dunite or harzburgite. Orthopyroxenes in the orthopyroxenite are large in size with resorbed olivine inclusions. Formation of the high-porosity orthopyroxenite in the hydrous melt-rock reaction experiments is determined by the liquidus phase relation of the interface reacting melt and reaction kinetics. Reaction between orthopyroxene-saturated hydrous melt and olivine at melt-rock interface produces orthopyroxenite. Water infiltration induces hydrous melting of the lherzolite, producing a dunite or an orthopyroxene-depleted harzburgite. Efficient diffusive exchange between the partial melt and the hydrous reacting melt promotes orthopyroxene-oversaturation around the melt-rock interfacial region. The simplified experiments reveal end-member processes for understanding the formation of orthopyroxenite in the upper mantle. The presence of orthopyroxenites in mantle samples is a strong indication of hydrous melt and peridotite interaction.

  17. Immiscible silicate liquids and phosphoran olivine in Netschaëvo IIE silicate: Analogue for planetesimal core-mantle boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Roosbroek, Nadia; Hamann, Christopher; McKibbin, Seann; Greshake, Ansgar; Wirth, Richard; Pittarello, Lidia; Hecht, Lutz; Claeys, Philippe; Debaille, Vinciane

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated a piece of the Netschaëvo IIE iron meteorite containing a silicate inclusion by means of electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Netschaëvo contains chondrule-bearing clasts and impact melt rock clasts were also recently found. The examined inclusion belongs to the latter and is characterized by a porphyritic texture dominated by clusters of coarse-grained olivine and pyroxene, set in a fine-grained groundmass that consists of new crystals of olivine and a hyaline matrix. This matrix material has a quasi-basaltic composition in the inner part of the inclusion, whereas the edge of the inclusion has a lower SiO2 concentration and is enriched in MgO, P2O5, CaO, and FeO. Close to the metal host, the inclusion also contains euhedral Mg-chromite crystals and small (<2 μm), Si-rich globules. A TEM foil was cut from this glassy, silico-phosphate material. It shows that the material consists of elongated olivine crystallites containing up to 14 wt% P2O5, amorphous material, and interstitial Cl-apatite crystals. The Si-rich silicate glass globules show a second population of Fe-rich silicate glass droplets, indicating they formed by silicate liquid immiscibility. Together with the presence of phosphoran olivine and quenched Cl-apatite, these textures suggest rapid cooling and quenching as a consequence of an impact event. Moreover, the enrichment of phosphorus in the silicate inclusion close to the metal host (phosphoran olivine and Cl-apatite) indicates that phosphorus re-partitioned from the metal into the silicate phase upon cooling. This probably also took place in pallasite meteorites that contain late-crystallizing phases rich in phosphorus. Accordingly, our findings suggest that oxidation of phosphorus might be a general process in core-mantle environments, bearing on our understanding of planetesimal evolution. Thus, the Netschaëvo sample serves as a natural planetesimal core-mantle boundary experiment

  18. The olivine macrocryst problem: New insights from minor and trace element compositions of olivine from Lac de Gras kimberlites, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussweiler, Yannick; Foley, Stephen F.; Prelević, Dejan; Jacob, Dorrit E.

    2015-04-01

    This study presents detailed petrographical and geochemical investigations on remarkably fresh olivines in kimberlites from the EKATI Diamond Mine™ located in the Tertiary/Cretaceous Lac de Gras kimberlite field within the Slave craton of Canada. Olivine, constituting about 42 vol.% of the analyzed samples, can be divided into two textural groups: (i) macrocrystic olivines, > 100 μm sub-rounded crystals and (ii) groundmass olivines, < 100 μm subhedral crystals. Olivines from both populations define two distinct chemical trends; a "mantle trend" with angular cores, showing low Ca (< 0.1 wt.% CaO) and high Ni (0.3-0.4 wt.% NiO) at varying Mg# (0.86-0.93), contrasts with a "melt trend" typified by thin (< 100 μm) rims with increasing Ca (up to 1.0 wt.% CaO) and decreasing Ni (down to 0.1 wt.% NiO) contents at constant Mg# (~ 0.915). These findings are in agreement with recent studies suggesting that virtually all olivine is composed of xenocrystic (i.e. mantle-related) cores with phenocrystic (i.e. melt-related) overgrowths, thereby challenging the traditional view that the origin of kimberlitic olivine can be distinguished based on size and morphology. The two main trends can be further resolved into sub-groups refining the crystallization history of olivine; the mantle trend indicates a multi-source origin that samples the layered lithosphere below the Slave craton, whereas the melt trend represents multi-stage crystallization comprising a differentiation trend starting at mantle conditions and a second trend controlled by the crystallization of additional phases (e.g. chromite) and changing magma conditions (e.g. oxidation). These trends are also seen in the concentrations of trace elements not routinely measured in olivine (e.g. Na, P, Ti, Co, Sc, Zr). Trace element mapping with LA-ICP-MS reveals the distribution of these elements within olivine grains. The trace element distribution between the two trends appears to be consistent with phenocrystic olivine

  19. Experimental Reproduction of Olivine rich Type-I Chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert K.

    2005-01-01

    Ordinary chondritic meteorites are an abundant type of stony meteorite characterized by the presence of chondrules. Chondrules are small spheres consisting of silicate, metal, and sulfide minerals that experienced melting in the nebula before incorporation into chondritic meteorite parent bodies. Therefore, chondrules record a variety of processes that occurred in the early solar nebula. Two common types of unequilibrated chondrules with porphyritic textures include FeO-poor (type I) and FeO-rich (type II) each subdivided into an A (SiO2-poor) and B (SiO2-rich) series. Type IA chondrules include those with high proportions of olivine phenocrysts (>80% olivine) and type IB chondrules include those with high proportions of pyroxene phenocrysts (<20% olivine). An intermediate composition, type IAB chondrules include those chondrules in which the proportion of olivine phenocrysts is between 20-80%. We conducted high-temperature laboratory experiments (melting at 1550 C) to produce type I chondrules from average unequilibrated ordinary chondrite (UOC) material mixed with small amounts of additional olivine. The experiments were conducted by adding forsteritic rich olivine (San Carlos olivine, Fo 91) to UOC material (GRO 95544) in a 30/70 ratio, respectively. Results of these high temperature experiments suggest that we have replicated type IA chondrule textures and compositions with dynamic crystallization experiments in which a heterogeneous mixture of UOC (GRO 95544) and olivine (San Carlos olivine) were melted at 1550 C for 1 hr. and cooled at 5-1000 C/hr using graphite crucibles in evacuated silica tubes to provide a reducing environment.

  20. Field and petrographic characteristics of Cenozoic basaltic rocks, Northwestern Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saif, S. I.; Shah, S. M. A.

    Cenozoic volcanism has produced 13, vast, basaltic fields in western saudi Arabia, covering a total area of about 100,000 sq.km. The volcanism started in the late Cretaceous time and continued periodically into the Holocene. The basaltic field presently investigated is known as Harrat Al-Hamad (or Harrat As-Shamah) which lies in northwestern Saudi Arabia, and continues northwards into Jordan. On the basis of field exposures, five distinct volcanic episodes have been recognized, three of which are represented by basaltic layers interstratified with underformed flat-lying post-Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. The fourth phase is represented by vast veneers of volcanic rubbles that intermittently cover Paleogene and Neogene sedimentary rocks. Numerous fresh cinder-cones, tuff rings, etc. represent the fifth and last volcanic episode. The outcropping volcanic rocks in this area clearly indicate that such activity began around the Middle Miocene, and continued intermittently until about few hundred years ago, but drilled subsurface sections present older basaltic layers as well. Tectonic features such as grabens, fault scarps, fissures and fractures are common in the area, and the linear trend of both the volcanic dykes and the cinder cones suggests that the eruptions did take place along such lines. The petrographic investigation revealed the alkali oiivine basaltic nature of the rocks.

  1. Th-230 - U-238 series disequilibrium of the Olkaria basalts Gregory Rift Valley, Kenya: Petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, S.; Macdonald, R.; Kelly, M.

    1993-01-01

    Strong mixing trends on a (Th-230/Th-232) versus Th diagram show that the basalts are mixed magmas which have undergone interaction with the crust. Instantaneous Th/U ratios are less than time integrated ones but these exceed the Th/U ratios in the MORB and OIB sources. This indicates that the mantle may have undergone some metasomatic fluxing, crustal contamination of the basalts will also enhance these ratios. Early activity on the Akira plain is represented by early basalts and hawaiites. The early basalt samples are known to predate the earliest comendites. The most recent phase of activity is represented by another cinder cone 40-50 m high being feldspar and clinopyroxene phyric. Inclusions which occur in the comendites vary in size and distribution. The largest and most porphyritic are the trachytes (up to 40 cm) with alkali feldspar phases up to 6 mm and small pyroxenes in the ground mass. The second set of inclusions are smaller (up to 10 cm) and are largely aphyric. The distribution of the inclusions are not uniform, the Broad Acres (C5) lavas contain 2-5 percent. The size of the inclusions decrease from south to north, as does the abundance of the trachytic inclusions. The major element variations in the Naivasha basalts, hawaiites and magmatic inclusions are discussed.

  2. Surface chemistry associated with the cooling and subaerial weathering of recent basalt flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Hochella, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    The surface chemistry of fresh and weathered historical basalt flows was characterized using surface-sensitive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Surfaces of unweathered 1987-1990 flows from the Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, exhibited variable enrichment in Al, Mg, Ca, and F due to the formation of refractory fluoride compounds and pronounced depletion in Si and Fe from the volatilization of SiF4 and FeF3 during cooling. These reactions, as predicted from shifts in thermodynamic equilibrium with temperature, are induced by diffusion of HF from the flow interiors to the cooling surface. The lack of Si loss and solid fluoride formation for recent basalts from the Krafla Volcano, Iceland, suggest HF degassing at higher temperatures. Subsequent short-term subaerial weathering reactions are strongly influenced by the initial surface composition of the flow and therefore its cooling history. Successive samples collected from the 1987 Kilauea flow demonstrated that the fluoridated flow surfaces leached to a predominantly SiO2 composition by natural weathering within one year. These chemically depleted surfaces were also observed on Hawaiian basalt flows dating back to 1801 AD. Solubility and kinetic models, based on thermodynamic and kinetic data for crystalline AlF3, MgF2, and CaF2, support observed elemental depletion rates due to chemical weathering. Additional loss of alkalis from the Hawaiian basalt occurs from incongruent dissolution of the basalt glass substrate during weathering. ?? 1992.

  3. Temperature dependence of basalt weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaojun; Hartmann, Jens; Derry, Louis A.; West, A. Joshua; You, Chen-Feng; Long, Xiaoyong; Zhan, Tao; Li, Laifeng; Li, Gen; Qiu, Wenhong; Li, Tao; Liu, Lianwen; Chen, Yang; Ji, Junfeng; Zhao, Liang; Chen, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The homeostatic balance of Earth's long-term carbon cycle and the equable state of Earth's climate are maintained by negative feedbacks between the levels of atmospheric CO2 and the chemical weathering rate of silicate rocks. Though clearly demonstrated by well-controlled laboratory dissolution experiments, the temperature dependence of silicate weathering rates, hypothesized to play a central role in these weathering feedbacks, has been difficult to quantify clearly in natural settings at landscape scale. By compiling data from basaltic catchments worldwide and considering only inactive volcanic fields (IVFs), here we show that the rate of CO2 consumption associated with the weathering of basaltic rocks is strongly correlated with mean annual temperature (MAT) as predicted by chemical kinetics. Relations between temperature and CO2 consumption rate for active volcanic fields (AVFs) are complicated by other factors such as eruption age, hydrothermal activity, and hydrological complexities. On the basis of this updated data compilation we are not able to distinguish whether or not there is a significant runoff control on basalt weathering rates. Nonetheless, the simple temperature control as observed in this global dataset implies that basalt weathering could be an effective mechanism for Earth to modulate long-term carbon cycle perturbations.

  4. Radiation shielding concrete made of Basalt aggregates.

    PubMed

    Alhajali, S; Yousef, S; Kanbour, M; Naoum, B

    2013-04-01

    In spite of the fact that Basalt is a widespread type of rock, there is very little available information on using it as aggregates for concrete radiation shielding. This paper investigates the possibility of using Basalt for the aforementioned purpose. The results have shown that Basalt could be used successfully for preparing radiation shielding concrete, but some attention should be paid to the choice of the suitable types of Basalt and for the neutron activation problem that could arise in the concrete shield.

  5. Diverse, Alkali-Rich Igneous and Volcaniclastic Rocks Reflect a Metasomatised Mantle Beneath Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Baker, M. B.; Berger, J. A.; Fisk, M. R.; Gellert, R.; McLennan, S. M.; Newcombe, M. E.; Stolper, E. M.; Thompson, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Although Curiosity landed in a sedimentary setting, geochemical compositions determined by Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and ChemCam suggest that major element concentrations of some rocks were little modified by chemical weathering, and in these cases, the bulk (>70%) of the crystalline components determined by ChemMin are igneous. Gale rocks can therefore largely preserve the composition of their igneous protoliths and provide insight into the crystalline basement exposed in the north crater rim. Four end-member compositions are recognized on the basis of APXS analyses. (1) The diverse, evolved Jake M class (n=12) of inferred igneous origin includes float blocks and cobbles. Jake M rocks are phonotephritic/mugearitic to trachyandesitic and characterized by low MgO contents (3.0-5.7 wt%) and high Al and alkalis, particularly Na2O (up to 7.35 wt%). (2) The Bathurst class of siltstones to coarse sandstones (n=13) occurs as dark-toned float and bedded outcrop and is basaltic to trachybasaltic, ranging to high K2O (up to 3.8 wt%). Alteration of the protolith(s) or during diagenesis may have affected this class. (3) The Darwin class of conglomerates to coarse sandstones (n=10) has high Na and Al, likely reflecting a sodic plagioclase-rich mineralogy, but with higher Fe than Jake M class (13.0-17.1 vs. 6.0-12.5 wt%). (4) The low alkali "normal" Mars basaltic composition is typified by the Portage soils (n=6) and the John Klein class (n=13; includes the Sheepbed mudstone). Some degree of mixing and/or contamination with this low alkali basaltic compositon has affected all APXS analyses. Overall, Gale rocks are strongly enriched in total alkalis (at the same MgO) relative to basaltic shergottites and many have higher K2O than igneous rocks analyzed by Spirit and Opportunity, suggesting that the mantle beneath Gale is alkali-rich (likely as a result of a metasomatic event) and that alkalis are heterogeneously distributed in the planet's interior.

  6. Mantle potential temperature estimates of basalt from the surface of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, J. Gregory

    2016-10-01

    The crater density and distribution of Venus indicates the average surface age is younger (≤1 Ga) than most terrestrial planets and satellites in the Solar System. The type and rate (i.e. equilibrium, catastrophic or differential) of volcanism associated with the stagnant lid tectonic system of Venus is a first order problem that has yet to be resolved but is directly related to the thermal conditions of the mantle. The calculated primary melt composition of basalt at the Venera 14 landing site is high-Mg basalt to picrite with a mantle potential temperature estimate similar to terrestrial ambient mantle (1370 ± 70 °C). The calculated accumulated fractional melting curves indicate the olivine compositions from the melt have Mg# of 89-91. The results show that the thermal regime required to generate the primary melt composition of the Venera 14 basalt was not anomalously high (i.e. mantle-plume system) but rather consistent with a lithospheric tensional rift system. The juxtaposition of high thermal regime structures (e.g. Beta Regio) and 'ambient' mantle potential temperature estimates of the Venera 14 basalt suggests that the relatively young surface of Venus is the result of volcanism from a combination of thermal systems that resurfaced the planet at variable rates.

  7. The fate of olivine in the lower crust: Pseudomorphs after olivine in coronitic metagabbro from the Grenville Orogen, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, J. L.; Jamieson, R. A.

    2016-09-01

    Orthopyroxene-oxide symplectites after olivine are among the most enigmatic features of corona assemblages in metagabbros. Two coronitic metagabbro bodies from the Algonquin suite in the Grenville Orogen, Ontario, contain exceptionally well preserved orthopyroxene + Fe-Ti oxide symplectite formed during prograde Ottawan (ca. 1060 Ma) granulite-facies metamorphism. Based on textural evidence, we propose a new hypothesis for the formation of these symplectites. Under oxidising conditions associated with fluid infiltration, magmatic olivine and ilmenite underwent a coupled reaction whereby magnetite produced by oxidation of olivine replaced adjacent igneous ilmenite. Ilmenite was re-precipitated as a fine-grained intergrowth with orthopyroxene and some magnetite in the former olivine sites. This hypothesis is supported by textural evidence showing partial replacement of magmatic ilmenite by magnetite and a close spatial association between magmatic oxides and orthopyroxene + Fe-Ti oxide symplectite, which locally radiates from ilmenite into olivine. Measured orthopyroxene/oxide ratios in the symplectite (20-35% oxides) agree with the ratio predicted from the proposed reaction (ca. 30%). Coronas and pseudomorphs formed during high-grade metamorphism, with increasing fO2 interpreted to result from fluid infiltration at near-peak conditions of ca. 13 kbar, 800 °C. The same samples contain red-brown fine-grained aggregates interpreted as iddingsite pseudomorphs after olivine. Raman spectroscopy suggests that the iddingsite consists largely of amorphous silica and Fe-hydroxide; textural evidence indicates that it formed by late-stage oxidation and hydration of olivine that survived earlier metamorphism. The unusual co-occurrence of granulite-facies pseudomorphs after olivine with an alteration product formed at near-surface conditions indicates that some olivine may survive protracted high-grade metamorphism in environments where fluid access is limited.

  8. Petrological characterization of the seismic low-velocity anomaly beneath the Eifel volcanic field (West Germany) using major and trace element compositions of olivine macrocrysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejan, Prelevic; Dieter, Mertz; Regina, Mertz-Kraus; Stephan, Buhre

    2014-05-01

    The Eifel volcanic field is part of the Central European Cenozoic Magmatic Province and was periodically active from the mid-Cretaceous until the latest Pleistocene. Two contrasting models are used to explain sources and magma generation mechanisms of the Pleistocene Eifel volcanism: i) decompressional partial melting at the base of the subcontinental lithosphere as a consequence of extension caused by lithospheric flexuring from emplacement of Alpine nappes (Wilson & Downes, 1991); ii) plume-type thermal upwelling in the asthenosphere on the basis of seismic tomography indicating a low-velocity anomaly beneath the Eifel probably caused by temperatures higher than the normal asthenosphere adiabat (e.g., Ritter et al. 2001). We present high-precision electron microprobe data for major and minor elements as well as laser ablation ICP-MS data for trace elements of olivine from the Eifel in order to put new constraints on the origin of Pleistocene Eifel volcanism. Being an early liquidus phase in the crystallization of basaltic melts, olivine composition may be used to characterize the composition of primary mantle melts and their source region in terms of major and trace elements. Moreover, it is useful for T estimation providing a snapshot of the liquid equilibria at early magmatic stage. In addition, important petrological parameters can be constrained, like the extent of prior melt extraction of their mantle source, the presence of different geochemical components in the source, olivine residence times etc. Olivine macrocrysts occur in most of the Eifel Mg-rich lavas, forming up to 10 vol% of the rocks. We studied olivines from 10 representative lava flows of basanitic composition. Based on compositional and textural differences, three genetic groups are recognized: i) volumetrically dominant igneous olivines or phenocrysts (melt related); they are equilibrated with their host melt showing normal zonation (core-rim Fo89-80) and NiO contents up to 0.3 wt%, whereas

  9. The Microstructure of a Micrometeorite Impact into Lunar Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, S. K.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z.

    2015-11-01

    Through TEM analysis of the cross-section of a ~20 µm diameter crater into an olivine single crystal we can see first-hand the effects of a single impact, including the creation of nanophase iron in the melt.

  10. Nondestructive Method for Bulk Chemical Characterization of Barred Olivine Chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya-Perez, M. A.; Cervantes-de la Cruz, K. E.; Ruvalcaba-Sil, J. L.

    2017-02-01

    This work develops a bulk chemical characterization of barred olivine chondrules based on the XRF analysis using a portable equipment at the National Research and Conservation Science Laboratory of Cultural Heritage (LANCIC-IF) in Mexico City.

  11. Olivine Deposits Associated with Impact Basins and Craters on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ody, A.; Poulet, F.; Langevin, Y.; Gondet, B.; Bibring, J.; Carter, J.

    2011-12-01

    An analysis of the 1μm olivine spectral signature applied to the entire and final OMEGA dataset [1] shows numerous olivine-bearing deposits in the 3 main basins of Mars (Argyre, Isidis and Hellas). These signatures are among the strongest of Mars, which suggests compositions with higher iron content and/or larger grain size and/or larger abundance than the ones of widespread olivine-bearing deposits observed on large parts of the southern highlands [1]. A spectral modeling based on a radiative transfer model [2] indicates that their compositions are still close to the forsterite one with abundance in the range of [15,40%] and grain sizes of a few hundreds of μm. These deposits are exclusively localized on Noachian terrains. Distribution of these deposits around Argyre basin clearly takes the form of discontinuous patches of olivine-bearing rocks on the basin terrace, which strongly suggest that their formation is related to the basin formation event. Recent numerical simulations of basin formation show that impact that formed the Argyre basin could have excavated upper mantle materials and emplaced discontinuous patches of melted mantle on the basin terraces [3]. The observed olivine deposits in Argyre are thus interpreted as olivine-bearing material excavated from the upper mantle during the impact. Olivine deposits distribution around the Hellas basin is not as clear as for Argyre because of young resurfacing processes that strongly affected its region. Olivine deposits are fewer and mainly localized on the northern terrace of Hellas. Most of them are detected in crater ejecta, while a few similar to Argyre olivine discontinuous patches are also observed suggesting that a mantle origin as for Argyre is possible. Olivine has been detected by several datasets in the Nili Fossae region and in the south of Isidis basin. The spectral modeling of OMEGA spectra indicates an olivine abundance of about 40% and megacrysts of several millimeters for the region of Nili

  12. Thermo-Reflectance Spectra of Eros: Unambiguous Detection of Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucey, P. G.; Hinrichs, J. L.; Urquhart-Kelly, M.; Wellnitz, D.; Bell, J. F., III; Clark, B. E.

    2001-01-01

    Olivine is readily detected on 433 Eros using the new thermo-reflectance spectral technique applied to near-IR spectra obtained at Eros by the NEAR spacecraft. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Aluminum speeds up the hydrothermal alteration of olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreani, Muriel; Daniel, Isabelle; Pollet-Villard, Marion

    2014-05-01

    The reactivity of ultramafic rocks toward hydrothermal fluids controls chemical fluxes at the interface between the internal and external reservoirs of silicate planets. On Earth, hydration of ultramafic rocks is ubiquitous and operates from deep subduction zones to shallow lithospheric environments where it considerably affects the physical and chemical properties of rocks and can interact with the biosphere. This process also has key emerging societal implications, such as the production of hydrogen as a source of carbon-free energy. To date, the chemical model systems used to reproduce olivine hydrothermal alteration lead to the formation of serpentine with sluggish reaction rates. Although aluminum is common in geological environments and in hydrothermal systems in particular, its role in serpentinization or olivine dissolution has not been investigated under hydrothermal conditions. Nevertheless, abundant Al supply is expected in fluids released from dehydration of metapelites in subduction zones as well as during the hydrothermal alteration of gabbros at mid-ocean ridges. Aluminum was also abundant in primitive environments of both the Earth and Mars, stored in either Al-rich minerals like plagioclase or Al-enriched ultramafic lavas. We have investigated the role of Al on the hydrothermal alteration of olivine in a series of experiments performed in a low-pressure diamond anvil cell while following the reaction progress in situ by optical imaging and Raman spectroscopy. Experiments were run for 4.5 to 7.5 days with two olivine grains reacted in saline water (0.5 molal NaCl) at 200°C and 300°C, and P=200 MPa. After two days, olivine crystals were fully transformed to an aluminous serpentine, also enriched in iron. The presence of Al in the hydrothermal fluid increases the rate of olivine serpentinization by more than one order of magnitude by enhancing olivine solubility and serpentine precipitation. The mechanism responsible for this increased solubility

  14. Space Weathering of Olivine: Samples, Experiments and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Berger, E. L.; Christoffersen, R.

    2016-01-01

    Olivine is a major constituent of chondritic bodies and its response to space weathering processes likely dominates the optical properties of asteroid regoliths (e.g. S- and many C-type asteroids). Analyses of olivine in returned samples and laboratory experiments provide details and insights regarding the mechanisms and rates of space weathering. Analyses of olivine grains from lunar soils and asteroid Itokawa reveal that they display solar wind damaged rims that are typically not amorphized despite long surface exposure ages, which are inferred from solar flare track densities (up to 10 (sup 7 y)). The olivine damaged rim width rapidly approaches approximately 120 nm in approximately 10 (sup 6 y) and then reaches steady-state with longer exposure times. The damaged rims are nanocrystalline with high dislocation densities, but crystalline order exists up to the outermost exposed surface. Sparse nanophase Fe metal inclusions occur in the damaged rims and are believed to be produced during irradiation through preferential sputtering of oxygen from the rims. The observed space weathering effects in lunar and Itokawa olivine grains are difficult to reconcile with laboratory irradiation studies and our numerical models that indicate that olivine surfaces should readily blister and amorphize on relatively short time scales (less than 10 (sup 3 y)). These results suggest that it is not just the ion fluence alone, but other variable, the ion flux that controls the type and extent of irradiation damage that develops in olivine. This flux dependence argues for caution in extrapolating between high flux laboratory experiments and the natural case. Additional measurements, experiments, and modeling are required to resolve the discrepancies among the observations and calculations involving solar wind processing of olivine.

  15. Basalt weathering in an Arctic Mars-analog site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesavage, Tiffany; Thompson, Aaron; Hausrath, Elisabeth M.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2015-07-01

    possible that cyclic adsorption of water onto basaltic rocks in this dry climate may result in high physical spalling rates that in turn promote chemical leaching. Many observations at Sverrefjell are similar to inferences from Mars: the presence of SRO phases, Si-rich coatings, and/or Si-rich allophane, as well as the persistence of olivine. Given these similarities, it is inferred that Sverrefjell volcano is a good analog for martian weathering and that other processes operating at Sverrefjell may also have occurred on Mars, including Na leaching, surface spalling, and precipitation of Si-rich layers. Such processes could have occurred on Mars wherever basalts were exposed to water at circumneutral pH for thousands to tens of thousands of years.

  16. Mantle source provinces beneath the Northwestern USA delimited by helium isotopes in young basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, D. W.; Reid, M. R.; Jordan, B. T.; Grunder, A. L.; Leeman, W. P.; Lupton, J. E.

    2009-11-01

    We report new He, Nd and Sr isotope results for basalts from the northwestern United States. The new 3He/ 4He results for olivine phenocrysts in basalts from the eastern Snake River Plain (SRP), the Owyhee Plateau (OP) and the Oregon High Lava Plains (HLP), together with published He isotope data for Yellowstone and the Cascades volcanic arc, delineate distinct mantle sources for each of these sub-provinces. All basalts from the eastern SRP (8 Quaternary localities plus 1 Miocene locality) have 3He/ 4He ratios higher than observed in normal mid-ocean ridge basalts, but overlapping with ranges observed in hotspot-related oceanic islands. For a lateral distance of some 400 km along the SRP, 3He/ 4He ranges from ~ 11 RA in the west to > 19 RA adjacent to Yellowstone. Such high ratios have not been observed elsewhere in the western U.S., and are consistent with the presence of a mantle plume. The lateral gradient in 3He/ 4He suggests that the proportion of plume-derived He decreases westward, but this interpretation is complicated by possible addition of crustal helium during open-system crystal fractionation in some SRP basaltic magmas. Although crustal contamination may modulate 3He/ 4He in basalts along the SRP, the effect is not strong and it does not obscure the elevated 3He/ 4He mantle source signature. In contrast, young basalts from the HLP and the OP have 3He/ 4He values of 8.8-9.3 RA, within the range for mid-ocean ridge basalts; these data reflect a shallow asthenospheric source with no discernible influence from the Yellowstone hotspot. Basalts from Newberry volcano have slightly lower 3He/ 4He (7.6-8.3 RA), within the range for other Cascades arc lavas (7.0-8.4 RA). Three alternative explanations are possible for the origin of the high 3He/ 4He signature along the SRP: (1) multi-component mixing of (a) magmas and/or CO 2-rich fluids derived from plume mantle having high 3He/ 4He, (b) continental lithosphere having low 3He/ 4He, and (c) shallow

  17. Ages and stratigraphy of lunar mare basalts in Mare Frigoris and other nearside maria based on crater size-frequency distribution measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesinger, H.; Head, J. W.; Wolf, U.; Jaumann, R.; Neukum, G.

    2010-03-01

    We report on ages derived from impact crater counts for exposed mare basalt units in the northern part of the lunar nearside hemisphere (Mare Frigoris), the eastern and northeastern part of the nearside hemisphere (Lacus Temporis, Joliot, Hubble, Goddard, Mare Marginis, and Mare Smythii), the central part of the nearside hemisphere (Palus Putredinis, Mare Vaporum, and Sinus Medii), and the southwestern part of the nearside hemisphere (Grimaldi, Crüger, Rocca A, Lacus Aestatis, and Schickard). In Mare Frigoris, we dated 37 basalt units, showing ages from 2.61 to 3.77 Gyr, with most units being formed in the late Imbrian period between 3.4 and 3.8 Gyr ago. In Mare Vaporum we dated six spectrally homogeneous units that show model ages of 3.10 to 3.61 Gyr. Our model ages of basalts in Mare Marginis range from 3.38 to 3.88 Gyr and are mostly older than basalts in Mare Smythii (3.14-3.48 Gyr). The model ages of four units in Sinus Medii indicate that the basalts in this region formed 3.63 to 3.79 Gyr ago. We find an excellent agreement of our crater size-frequency model ages of the Palus Putredinis area, which contains the Apollo 15 landing site, with the radiometric ages of Apollo 15 samples. According to our crater counts, basalts in Palus Putredinis are 3.34 Gyr old and this compares favorably with the radiometric ages of 3.30-3.35 Gyr of the olivine-normative and quartz-normative basalts of the Apollo 15 landing site. Lacus Aestatis is a small irregular-shaped mare patch in the southwestern nearside and shows an Imbrian age of 3.50 Gyr; basalts in Lacus Temporis in the northeastern nearside formed between 3.62 and 3.74 Gyr ago and are, therefore, older than the basalts in Lacus Aestatis. We found that basalts in craters of the southwestern nearside (Schickard, Grimaldi, Crüger, and Rocca A) are also mostly younger than basalts in craters of the northeastern nearside (Hubble, Joliot, and Goddard). While basalt ages vary between 3.16 and 3.75 Gyr in the southwest

  18. H2O storage capacity of olivine at 5-8 GPa and consequences for dehydration partial melting of the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardia, P.; Hirschmann, M. M.; Withers, A. C.; Tenner, T. J.

    2012-09-01

    The H2O storage capacities of peridotitic minerals place crucial constraints on the onset of hydrous partial melting in the mantle. The storage capacities of minerals in equilibrium with a peridotite mineral assemblage (“peridotite-saturated” minerals) are lower than when the minerals coexist only with fluid because hydrous partial melt is stabilized at a lower activity of H2O. Here, we determine peridotite-saturated olivine H2O storage capacities from 5 to 8 GPa and 1400-1500 °C in layered experiments designed to grow large (∼100-150 μm) olivine crystals in equilibrium with the full hydrous peridotite assemblage (melt+ol+opx+gar+cpx). The peridotite-saturated H2O storage capacity of olivine at 1450 °C rises from 57±26 ppm (by wt.) at 5 GPa to 254±60 ppm at 8 GPa. Combining these with results of a parallel study at 10-13 GPa (Tenner et al., 2011, CMP) yields a linear relation applicable from 5 to 13 GPa for peridotite-saturated H2O storage capacity of olivine at 1450 °C, CH2Oolivine(ppm)=57.6(±16)×P(GPa)-169(±18). Storage capacity diminishes with increasing temperature, but is unaffected by variable total H2O concentration between 0.47 and 1.0 wt%. Both of these are as predicted for the condition in which the water activity in the melt is governed principally by the cryoscopic requirement of melt stability for a given temperature below the dry solidus. Measured olivine storage capacities are in agreement or slightly greater than those predicted by a model that combines data from experimental freezing point depression and olivine/melt partition coefficients of H2O (Hirschmann et al., 2009). Considering the temperature along the mantle geotherm, as well as available constraints on garnet/olivine and pyroxene/olivine partitioning of H2O (DH2Ogar/ol,DH2Opx/ol), we estimate the peridotite H2O storage capacity in the low velocity zone. The CH2O required to initiate melting between 150 and 250 km depth is between 270 and 855 ppm. We conclude that hydrous

  19. Frozen melt-rock reaction in a peridotite xenolith from sub-arc mantle recorded by diffusion of trace elements and water in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollan, P. M. E.; O'Neill, H. St. C.; Hermann, J.; Benedictus, A.; Arculus, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    Inferring the ambient state of the lithospheric mantle from xenoliths may be misleading if the magmatic activity responsible for the exhumation has modified the xenolith. Changes due to melt-xenolith interactions during exhumation are usually identifiable because of the short timescales involved, but changes due to earlier pulses of magma passing through the lithosphere may be more insidious because the longer timescales allow extensive overprinting of the ambient petrography. Here we describe an intermediate stage of melt-rock reaction recorded in a porphyroclastic peridotite xenolith from the upper mantle wedge adjacent to the West Bismarck Island Arc. The texture and chemistry, frozen during rapid exhumation, reflects the progressive change from harzburgite to clinopyroxene-bearing dunite caused by the infiltration of hydrous basaltic melt into the xenolith. The unusually low equilibration temperature of the xenolith (∼650 °C) prior to this event is reflected in very low concentrations of incompatible elements in the olivine, enhancing the diffusion profiles of these elements into the olivine from the interaction with the melt. The Ca concentration profiles correspond to a timescale of approximately three months, which we interpret as the time between the first infiltration of melt into the lithospheric mantle at this locality and the subsequent exhumation of the xenolith by a second pulse of magma. The diffusion profiles of other trace elements (Li, Na, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Y) and major elements (Fe-Mg) confirm that all these elements diffuse through olivine at rates that differ from each other by less than one order of magnitude. Infrared spectroscopy reveals OH- ("water") contents and incorporation mechanisms typical of other arc mantle peridotites in the olivine cores. Water contents increase towards the crystal rims, similarly to the profiles of other measured trace elements. The increase in water concentration is accompanied by subtle changes in

  20. Chemical trends in the Ice Springs basalt, Black Rock Desert, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, W.C.; Nash, W.P.

    1980-06-01

    The Holocene Ice Springs volcanic field of west-central Utah consists of 0.53 km/sup 3/ of tholeiitic basalts erupted as a sequence of nested cinder cones and associated lava flows. Whole rock x-ray fluorescence and atomic absorption analysis of ninety-six samples of known relative age document statistically significant inter- and intra-eruption chemical variations. Elemental trends include increases in Ti, Fe, Ca, P, and Sr and decreases in Si, K, Rb, Ni, Cr, and Zr with decreasing age. Microprobe analyses of microphenocrysts of olivine, plagioclase, and Fe-Ti oxides and of groundmass olivine, plagioclase, and clinopyroxene indicate limited chemical variation between mineral assemblages of the eruptive events. Petrographic analyses have identified the presence of minor amounts of silicic xenoliths, orthopyroxene megacrysts, and plagioclase xenocrysts. Potassium-argon determinations establish the existence of excess argon in the basaltic cinder (30.05 x 10/sup -12/ moles/gm) and in distal lava flows (8.29 x 10/sup -12/ moles/gm) which suggest apparent ages of 16 and 4.3 million years respectively. Strontium isotopic data (Puskar and Condie, 1973) show systematic variations from oldest eruptions (87Sr/86Sr=0.7052) to youngest eruptions (87Sr/86Sr=0.7059).

  1. Bulk rock composition and geochemistry of olivine-hosted melt inclusions in the Grey Porri Tuff and selected lavas of the Monte dei Porri volcano, Salina, Aeolian Islands, southern Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doherty, Angela L.; Bodnar, Robert J.; De Vivo, Benedetto; Bohrson, Wendy A.; Belkin, Harvey E.; Messina, Antonia; Tracy, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The Aeolian Islands are an arcuate chain of submarine seamounts and volcanic islands, lying just north of Sicily in southern Italy. The second largest of the islands, Salina, exhibits a wide range of compositional variation in its erupted products, from basaltic lavas to rhyolitic pumice. The Monte dei Porri eruptions occurred between 60 ka and 30 ka, following a period of approximately 60,000 years of repose. The bulk rock composition of the Monte dei Porri products range from basaltic-andesite scoria to andesitic pumice in the Grey Porri Tuff (GPT), with the Monte dei Porri lavas having basaltic-andesite compositions. The typical mineral assemblage of the GPT is calcic plagioclase, clinopyroxene (augite), olivine (Fo72−84) and orthopyroxene (enstatite) ± amphibole and Ti-Fe oxides. The lava units show a similar mineral assemblage, but contain lower Fo olivines (Fo57−78). The lava units also contain numerous glomerocrysts, including an unusual variety that contains quartz, K-feldspar and mica. Melt inclusions (MI) are ubiquitous in all mineral phases from all units of the Monte dei Porri eruptions; however, only data from olivine-hosted MI in the GPT are reported here. Compositions of MI in the GPT are typically basaltic (average SiO2 of 49.8 wt %) in the pumices and basaltic-andesite (average SiO2 of 55.6 wt %) in the scoriae and show a bimodal distribution in most compositional discrimination plots. The compositions of most of the MI in the scoriae overlap with bulk rock compositions of the lavas. Petrological and geochemical evidence suggest that mixing of one or more magmas and/or crustal assimilation played a role in the evolution of the Monte dei Porri magmatic system, especially the GPT. Analyses of the more evolved mineral phases are required to better constrain the evolution of the magma.

  2. Hydrothermal alkali metal catalyst recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Eakman, James M.; Clavenna, LeRoy R.

    1979-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles primarily in the form of water soluble alkali metal formates by treating the particles with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of added carbon monoxide. During the treating process the water insoluble alkali metal compounds comprising the insoluble alkali metal residues are converted into water soluble alkali metal formates. The resultant aqueous solution containing water soluble alkali metal formates is then separated from the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment process, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal formates serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. This process permits increased recovery of alkali metal constituents, thereby decreasing the overall cost of the gasification process by reducing the amount of makeup alkali metal compounds necessary.

  3. A record of high-temperature embrittlement of periodotite in CO/sub 2/ permeated xenoliths from basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Rovetta, M.R.; Delaney, J.R.; Blacic, J.D.

    1986-03-10

    Four ultramafic xenoliths recovered from Hawaiian basalts contain CO/sub 2/-fluid inclusion arrays which originated as healed microcracks. These healed microcracks have been used to study the microcracking mechanisms in the xenolith source region. Fluid inclusion arrays in olivine have a preferred crystallographic orientation which is consistent with a hypothesis of microcrack nucleation upon dislocation pileups by the Stroh mechanism on the following olivine slip systems: (0kl)(100), (110)(001), and (010)(001). Previous investigators have shown that all these slip systems of olivine are active at high stress or low temperature. Olivine neoblasts occur as small grains in local shear zones (0.04 mm diameter and less than 3% of total volume) and larger grains which embay porphyroclasts throughout the specimens (0.22-mm diameter and approximately 30% percent of total volume). Olivine neoblast diameters provides estimates of the deviatoric stress of 160--200 MPa using the smaller grains and 50--75 MPa using the larger grains. The absence of clinopyroxene mechanical twinning in the xenoliths provides an independent paleopiezometer that limits the maximum deviatoric stress in the peridotite source region to 200 MPa. Fluid inclusion arrays are parallel to each other, are perpendicular to penetrative foliation planes produced by intragranular plasticity, and have an average spacing between arrays of 0.5--2.0 mm. Recrystallized olivine grains (neoblasts) are free of fluid inclusions. Estimates of the contribution of Stroh cracks to the deformation of the xenolith source region indicate a maximum decrease of a few percent in the net energy required to produce an increment of strain, dependent upon confining pressure.

  4. Indigenous nitrogen in the Moon: Constraints from coupled nitrogen-noble gas analyses of mare basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füri, Evelyn; Barry, Peter H.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Marty, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen and noble gas (Ne-Ar) abundances and isotope ratios, determined by step-wise CO2 laser-extraction, static-mass spectrometry analysis, are reported for bulk fragments and mineral separates of ten lunar mare basalts (10020, 10057, 12008, 14053, 15555, 70255, 71557, 71576, 74255, 74275), one highland breccia (14321), and one ferroan anorthosite (15414). The mare basalt sub-samples 10057,183 and 71576,12 contain a large amount of solar noble gases, whereas neon and argon in all other samples are purely cosmogenic, as shown by their 21Ne/22Ne ratios of ≈0.85 and 36Ar/38Ar ratios of ≈0.65. The solar-gas-free basalts contain a two-component mixture of cosmogenic 15N and indigenous nitrogen (<0.5 ppm). Mare basalt 74255 and the olivine fraction of 15555,876 record the smallest proportion of 15Ncosm; therefore, their δ15 N values of -0.2 to + 26.7 ‰ (observed at the low-temperature steps) are thought to well represent the isotopic composition of indigenous lunar nitrogen. However, δ15 N values ≤ - 30 ‰ are found in several basalts, overlapping with the isotopic signature of Earth's primordial mantle or an enstatite chondrite-like impactor. While the lowest δ15 N values allow for nitrogen trapped in the Moon's interior to be inherited from the proto-Earth and/or the impactor, the more 15N-enriched compositions require that carbonaceous chondrites provided nitrogen to the lunar magma ocean prior to the solidification of the crust. Since nitrogen can efficiently be incorporated into mafic minerals (olivine, pyroxene) under oxygen fugacities close to or below the iron-wustite buffer (Li et al., 2013), the mare basalt source region is likely characterized by a high nitrogen storage capacity. In contrast, anorthosite 15414 shows no traces of indigenous nitrogen, suggesting that nitrogen was not efficiently incorporated into the lunar crust during magma ocean differentiation.

  5. Alkali Metal Cluster Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. In this thesis, we apply the tight-binding Hubbard model to alkali metal clusters with Hartree-Fock self-consistent methods and perturbation methods for the numerical calculations. We have studied the relation between the equilibrium structures and the range of the hopping matrix elements in the Hubbard Hamiltonian. The results show that the structures are not sensitive to the interaction range but are determined by the number of valence electrons each atom has. Inertia tensors are used to analyse the symmetries of the clusters. The principal axes of the clusters are determined and they are the axes of rotational symmetries of clusters if the clusters have any. The eigenvalues of inertia tensors which are the indication of the deformation of clusters are compared between our model and the ellipsoidal jellium model. The agreement is good for large clusters. At a finite temperature, the thermal motion fluctuates the structures. We defined a fluctuation function with the distance matrix of a cluster. The fluctuation has been studied with the Monte-Carlo simulation method. Our studies show that the clusters remain in the solid state when temperature is low. The small values of fluctuation functions indicates the thermal vibration of atoms around their equilibrium positions. If the temperature is high, the atoms are delocalized. The cluster melts and enters the liquid region. The cluster melting is simulated by the Monte-Carlo simulation with the fluctuation function we defined. Energy levels of clusters are calculated from the Hubbard model. Ionization potentials and magic numbers are also obtained from these energy levels. The results confirm that the Hubbard model is a good approximation for a small cluster. The excitation energy is presented by the difference between the original level and excited level, and the electron-hole interactions. We also have studied cooling of clusters

  6. The Mantle and Basalt-Crust Interaction Below the Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Crumpler, Larry S.; Schmidt, Marick E.

    2010-01-01

    The Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF) lies on the Jemez Lineament on the southeastern margin of the Colorado Plateau. The field is centered on the Mt. Taylor composite volcano and includes Mesa Chivato to the NE and Grants Ridge to the WSW. MTVF magmatism spans approximately 3.8-1.5 Ma (K-Ar). Magmas are dominantly alkaline with mafic compositions ranging from basanite to hy-basalt and felsic compositions ranging from ne-trachyte to rhyolite. We are investigating the state of the mantle and the spatial and temporal variation in basalt-crustal interaction below the MTVF by examining mantle xenoliths and basalts in the context of new mapping and future Ar-Ar dating. The earliest dated magmatism in the field is a basanite flow south of Mt. Taylor. Mantle xenolith-bearing alkali basalts and basanites occur on Mesa Chivato and in the region of Mt. Taylor, though most basalts are peripheral to the main cone. Xenolith-bearing magmatism persists at least into the early stages of conebuilding. Preliminary examination of the mantle xenolith suite suggests it is dominantly lherzolitic but contains likely examples of both melt-depleted (harzburgitic) and melt-enriched (clinopyroxenitic) mantle. There are aphyric and crystal-poor hawaiites, some of which are hy-normative, on and near Mt. Taylor, but many of the more evolved MTVF basalts show evidence of complex histories. Mt. Taylor basalts higher in the cone-building sequence contain >40% zoned plagioclase pheno- and megacrysts. Other basalts peripheral to Mt. Taylor and at Grants Ridge contain clinopyroxene and plagioclase megacrysts and cumulate-textured xenoliths, suggesting they interacted with lower crustal cumulates. Among the questions we are addressing: What was the chemical and thermal state of the mantle recorded by the basaltic suites and xenoliths and how did it change with time? Are multiple parental basalts (Si-saturated vs. undersaturated) represented and, if so, what changes in the mantle or in the tectonic

  7. Resistivity logging of fractured basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Stefansson, V.; Axelsson, G.; Sigurdsson, O.

    1982-01-01

    A lumped double porosity model was studied in order to estimate the effect of fractures on resistivity - porosity relations. It is found that the relationship between resistivity and porosity for fractured rock is in general not simple and depends both on the amounts of matrix porosity as well as the fracture orientation. However, when fractures dominate over matrix porosity the exponent is close to 1.0. Resistivity-porosity relations have been determined for large amounts of basaltic formations in Iceland. An exponent close to 1.0 is found in all cases investigated. This is interpreted as fractures constitute a considerable part of the porosity of the basalts. In the IRDP-hole in Eastern Iceland it is found that the ratio of fracture porosity to total porosity decreases with depth.

  8. Bubble formation and decrepitation control the CO2 content of olivine-hosted melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclennan, J.

    2017-02-01

    The CO2 contents of olivine-hosted melt inclusions have previously been used to constrain the depth of magma chambers in basaltic systems. However, the vast majority of inclusions have CO2 contents which imply entrapment pressures that are significantly lower than those obtained from independent petrological barometers. Furthermore, a global database of melt inclusion compositions from low H2O settings, indicates that the distribution of saturation pressures varies surprisingly little between mid-ocean ridges, ocean islands, and continental rift zones. 95% of the inclusions in the database have saturation pressures of 200 MPa or less, indicating that melt inclusion CO2 does not generally provide an accurate estimate of magma chamber depths. A model of the P-V-T-X evolution of olivine-hosted melt inclusions was developed so that the properties of the inclusion system could be tracked as the hosts follow a model P-T path. The models indicate that the principal control on the saturation of CO2 in the inclusion and the formation of vapor bubbles is the effect of postentrapment crystallization on the major element composition of the inclusions and how this translates into variation in CO2 solubility. The pressure difference between external melt and the inclusion is likely to be sufficiently high to cause decrepitation of inclusions in most settings. Decrepitation can account for the apparent mismatch between CO2-based barometry and other petrological barometers, and can also account for the observed global distribution of saturation pressures. Only when substantial postentrapment crystallization occurs can reconstructed inclusion compositions provide an accurate estimate of magma chamber depth.

  9. Flood basalts and extinction events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1993-01-01

    The largest known effusive eruptions during the Cenozoic and Mesozoic Eras, the voluminous flood basalts, have long been suspected as being associated with major extinctions of biotic species. Despite the possible errors attached to the dates in both time series of events, the significance level of the suspected correlation is found here to be 1 percent to 4 percent. Statistically, extinctions lag eruptions by a mean time interval that is indistinguishable from zero, being much less than the average residual derived from the correlation analysis. Oceanic flood basalts, however, must have had a different biological impact, which is still uncertain owing to the small number of known examples and differing physical factors. Although not all continental flood basalts can have produced major extinction events, the noncorrelating eruptions may have led to smaller marine extinction events that terminated at least some of the less catastrophically ending geologic stages. Consequently, the 26 Myr quasi-periodicity seen in major marine extinctions may be only a sampling effect, rather than a manifestation of underlying periodicity.

  10. Mars Crust: Made of Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2009-05-01

    By combining data from several sources, Harry Y. (Hap) McSween (University of Tennessee), G. Jeffrey Taylor (University of Hawaii) and Michael B. Wyatt (Brown University) show that the surface of Mars is composed mostly of basalt not unlike those that make up the Earth's oceanic crust. McSween and his colleagues used data from Martian meteorites, analyses of soils and rocks at robotic landing sites, and chemical and mineralogical information from orbiting spacecraft. The data show that Mars is composed mostly of rocks similar to terrestrial basalts called tholeiites, which make up most oceanic islands, mid-ocean ridges, and the seafloor beneath sediments. The Martian samples differ in some respects that reflect differences in the compositions of the Martian and terrestrial interiors, but in general are a lot like Earth basalts. Cosmochemistst have used the compositions of Martian meteorites to discriminate bulk properties of Mars and Earth, but McSween and coworkers' synthesis shows that the meteorites differ from most of the Martian crust (the meteorites have lower aluminum, for example), calling into question how diagnostic the meteorites are for understanding the Martian interior.

  11. Thermoluminescence dating of Hawaiian basalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Rodd James

    1979-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of plagioclase separates from 11 independently dated alkalic basalts 4,500 years to 3.3 million years old and 17 tholeiitic basalts 16 years to 450,000 years old from the Hawaiian Islands were investigated for the purpose of developing a TL dating method for young volcanic rocks. Ratios of natural to artificial TL intensity, when normalized for natural radiation dose rates, were used to quantify the thermoluminescence response of individual samples for age-determination purposes. The TL ratios for the alkalic basalt plagioclase were found to increase with age at a predictable exponential rate that permits the use of the equation for the best-fit line through a plot of the TL ratios relative to known age as a TL age equation. The equation is applicable to rocks ranging in composition from basaltic andesite to trachyte over the age range from about 2,000 to at least 250,000 years before present (B.P.). The TL ages for samples older than 50,000 years have a calculated precision of less than :t 10 percent and a potential estimated accuracy relative to potassium-argon ages of approximately :t 10 percent. An attempt to develop a similar dating curve for the tholeiitic basalts was not as successful, primarily because the dose rates are on the average lower than those for the alkalic basalts by a factor of 6, resulting in lower TL intensities in the tholeiitic basalts for samples of equivalent age, and also because the age distribution of dated material is inadequate. The basic TL properties of the plagioclase from the two rock types are similar, however, and TL dating of tholeiitic basalts should eventually be feasible over the age range 10,000 to at least 200,000 years B.P. The average composition of the plagioclase separates from the alkalic basalts ranges from oligoclase to andesine; compositional variations within this range have no apparent effect on the TL ratios. The average composition of the plagioclase from the tholeiitic

  12. Investigation of magnesium isotope fractionation during basalt differentiation: Implications for a chondritic composition of the terrestrial mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teng, F.-Z.; Wadhwa, M.; Helz, R.T.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate whether magnesium isotopes are fractionated during basalt differentiation, we have performed high-precision Mg isotopic analyses by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) on a set of well-characterized samples from Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii, USA. Samples from the Kilauea Iki lava lake, produced by closed-system crystal-melt fractionation, range from olivine-rich cumulates to highly differentiated basalts with MgO content ranging from 2.37 to 26.87??wt.%. Our results demonstrate that although these basalts have diverse chemical compositions, mineralogies, crystallization temperatures and degrees of differentiation, their Mg isotopic compositions display no measurable variation within the limits of our external precision (average ??26Mg = - 0.36 ?? 0.10 and ??25Mg = - 0.20 ?? 0.07; uncertainties are 2SD). This indicates that Mg isotopic fractionation during crystal-melt fractionation at temperatures of ??? 1055????C is undetectable at the level of precision of the current investigation. Calculations based on our data suggest that at near-magmatic temperatures the maximum fractionation in the 26Mg/24Mg ratio between olivine and melt is 0.07???. Two additional oceanic basalts, two continental basalts (BCR-1 and BCR-2), and two primitive carbonaceous chondrites (Allende and Murchison) analyzed in this study have Mg isotopic compositions similar to the Kilauea Iki lava lake samples. In contrast to a recent report [U. Wiechert, A.N. Halliday, Non-chondritic magnesium and the origins of the inner terrestrial planets, Earth and Planetary Science Letters 256 (2007) 360-371], the results presented here suggest that the Bulk Silicate Earth has a chondritic Mg isotopic composition. ?? 2007.

  13. A distinct variant of high-titanium mare basalt from the Van Serg core, Apollo 17 landing site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Graham

    1990-01-01

    A fragment of basalt picked from the drive tube collected at Van Serg crater at the Apollo 17 landing site has a bulk chemistry more primitive than that of other high-titanium mare basalt groups collected at the site. The sample has a fine-grained olivine phyric, subophitic texture that is distinct from that of other high-titanium basalt samples. The grain size and texture suggest that the sample has a composition close to that of a magma. The crystallization sequence, with appearance of oxide minerals later than in other groups, and other petrographic features such as more-calcic plagioclase and early pigeonite rather than augite, are consistent with this sample representing a distinct variant of Apollo 17 high-titanium basalts. It is not related through closed-system igneous processes to any of the other mare basalt groups identified among Apollo 17 samples. Its characters emphasize the complexity of contemporaneous magma processes on the moon and the heterogeneity of that part of the mantle that was melted.

  14. Minor elements in relict olivine grains of deep-sea spheres: Match with Mg-rich olivines from C2 meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. V.; Steele, I. M.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    The bulk composition and relict minerals of meteoroid ablation spheres from deep sea sediments can be related to the parental material, and bulk compositions and elemental ratios favor a CI/CM affinity for most spheres. Although largely melted, some deep sea spheres (DSS) have retained rare grains apparently unmodified chemically by ablation heating or seawater alteration. Minor elements in relict olivines for comparison with compositions of olivines in known meteorites were analyzed. All relict olivines are very Mg rich. No terrestrial olivines match the chemical features which reinforces other evidence for an extraterrestrial origin. There is no match with achondritic olivines. Mg rich olivines occur in all types of carbonaceous meteorites, but the minor elements of most DSS olivines do not match with those for Allende (C3) olivines, and fit poorly with those of Murchison (C2) olivines. There is a good fit for Fe and Cr with those of the olivines in the unusual Belgica 7904 (C2) meteorite (3). It seems likely that the relict olivines of at least many deep sea spheres are chemically related to olivines in at least one C2 meteorite.

  15. Flood Basalts and Neoproterozoic Glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, G. P.; Cox, G. M.; Kunzmann, M.; Strauss, J. V.; Macdonald, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIPs), which are commonly associated with supercontinental break-up, are the product of the emplacement of >106 km3 of mafic rocks in less than a few million years. LIP magmatism, in particular continental flood basalt (CFB) volcanism, perturbs global climate on shorter time scales through the radiative effects of degassed SO2 and CO2. On longer time scales, CFBs alter climate through the effect of the high weatherabilty of mafic rocks (5-10 times greater than average continental crust) on global silicate weathering. A link between flood basalt weathering, Rodinia break-up, and Neoproterozoic snowball glaciation has been postulated. Here we present a new compilation of Nd isotope data on Neoproterozoic mudstones from Laurentia, Australia, and South China along with a new seawater strontium isotope record from well preserved carbonates that support this hypothesis. These datasets are consistent with an outsized role of basalt weathering on the global silicate weathering budget during the second half of the Tonian period (~850 to 725 Ma). Along with Os isotope data, they also suggest that an additional pulse of basalt weathering at the end of the Tonian may have initiated the Sturtian snowball glaciation. CFBs have relatively high concentrations of phosphorous. Hence, the drawdown in atmospheric CO2 required to trigger the Sturtian snowball Earth was likely accomplished through a combination of increased silicate weathering rates and enhanced biological productivity driven by greater nutrient supply to the oceans. CFBs were also the likely source of the iron in Neoproterozoic iron formation (IF), all significant occurrences of which are restricted to Sturtian-aged glacial successions. Dramatic declines in ɛNd following the Cryogenian snowball glaciations are mirrored by stepwise increases in 87Sr/86Sr, reflecting the scouring of the continents by global ice sheets. This continental resurfacing removed the extensive basalt carapace as well as

  16. Electrolytic method to make alkali alcoholates using ion conducting alkali electrolyte/separator

    DOEpatents

    Joshi, Ashok V [Salt Lake City, UT; Balagopal, Shekar [Sandy, UT; Pendelton, Justin [Salt Lake City, UT

    2011-12-13

    Alkali alcoholates, also called alkali alkoxides, are produced from alkali metal salt solutions and alcohol using a three-compartment electrolytic cell. The electrolytic cell includes an anolyte compartment configured with an anode, a buffer compartment, and a catholyte compartment configured with a cathode. An alkali ion conducting solid electrolyte configured to selectively transport alkali ions is positioned between the anolyte compartment and the buffer compartment. An alkali ion permeable separator is positioned between the buffer compartment and the catholyte compartment. The catholyte solution may include an alkali alcoholate and alcohol. The anolyte solution may include at least one alkali salt. The buffer compartment solution may include a soluble alkali salt and an alkali alcoholate in alcohol.

  17. Process for recovering alkali metals and sulfur from alkali metal sulfides and polysulfides

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard; Alvare, Javier

    2016-10-25

    Alkali metals and sulfur may be recovered from alkali monosulfide and polysulfides in an electrolytic process that utilizes an electrolytic cell having an alkali ion conductive membrane. An anolyte solution includes an alkali monosulfide, an alkali polysulfide, or a mixture thereof and a solvent that dissolves elemental sulfur. A catholyte includes molten alkali metal. Applying an electric current oxidizes sulfide and polysulfide in the anolyte compartment, causes alkali metal ions to pass through the alkali ion conductive membrane to the catholyte compartment, and reduces the alkali metal ions in the catholyte compartment. Liquid sulfur separates from the anolyte solution and may be recovered. The electrolytic cell is operated at a temperature where the formed alkali metal and sulfur are molten.

  18. Formation of iddingsite veins in the martian crust by centripetal replacement of olivine: Evidence from the nakhlite meteorite Lafayette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. R.; Tomkinson, T.; Hallis, L. J.; Mark, D. F.

    2015-04-01

    The Lafayette meteorite is an olivine clinopyroxenite that crystallized on Mars ∼1300 million years ago within a lava flow or shallow sill. Liquid water entered this igneous rock ∼700 million years later to produce a suite of secondary minerals, collectively called 'iddingsite', that occur as veins within grains of augite and olivine. The deuterium/hydrogen ratio of water within these secondary minerals shows that the aqueous solutions were sourced from one or more near-surface reservoirs. Several petrographically distinct types of veins can be recognised by differences in their width, shape, and crystallographic orientation. Augite and olivine both contain veins of a very fine grained hydrous Fe- and Mg-rich silicate that are ∼1-2 μm in width and lack any preferred crystallographic orientation. These narrow veins formed by cementation of pore spaces that had been opened by fracturing and probably in response to shock. The subset of olivine-hosted veins whose axes lie parallel to (0 0 1) have serrated walls, and formed by widening of the narrow veins by interface coupled dissolution-precipitation. Widening started by replacement of the walls of the narrow precursor veins by Fe-Mg silicate, and a crystallographic control on the trajectory of the dissolution-precipitation front created micrometre-scale {1 1 1} serrations. The walls of many of the finely serrated veins were subsequently replaced by siderite, and the solutions responsible for carbonation of olivine also partially recrystallized the Fe-Mg silicate. Smectite was the last mineral to form and grew by replacement of siderite. This mineralization sequence shows that Lafayette was exposed to two discrete pulses of aqueous solutions, the first of which formed the Fe-Mg silicate, and the second mediated replacement of vein walls by siderite and smectite. The similarity in size, shape and crystallographic orientation of iddingsite veins in the Lafayette meteorite and in terrestrial basalts demonstrates a

  19. Pb isotope variations in olivine-hosted melt inclusions from South Tyrrhenian volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose-Koga, E. F.; Koga, K. T.; Schiano, P.; Shimizu, N.; Whitehouse, M.; Clocchiatti, R.

    2009-12-01

    Melt inclusions in primitive olivine crystals isolate the instantaneous composition of primitive magmas. Recent studies have reported a very large range of isotope ratios among olivine-hosted melt inclusions from some single volcanoes even though the erupted lavas from these volcanoes are isotopically homogeneous. This implies that magmas with different isotopic compositions exist in the volcanic plumbing system before melt aggregation, reflecting a range of source compositions. Volcanoes in the South Italy region (Stromboli, Vulcano islands, Mount Etna including Aci Castello, the oldest Etnean volcanics, as well as present-day Etnean basalts, Marsili seamount and Ustica Island) shows a wide spectrum of magma-types where predominantly calc-alkaline magmatism is found in the Aeolian Islands and a magmatism of Na-alkaline nature dominates the nearby Eastern Sicily volcanoes (Mount Etna) and Ustica Island. The complex geodynamic evolution of this region is the probable cause of this diverse magma composition produced from the Pliocene to recent times. We analyzed 12 olivine-hosted melt inclusions from those six volcanoes for Pb isotopes by a multicollection SIMS 1280 (NMNH Stockholm, Sweden) and volatiles by a monocollection SIMS 1280 (WHOI, USA). The repeated 207Pb/206Pb measurements of the GOR132 glass standard (20 ppm Pb) yielded a 0.15% relative variation (1 sigma of the distribution). For the modern Etna (2002 lava), the 207Pb/206Pb isotope variations of the melt inclusions overlap and extend that of the whole rocks (from 0.788±0.002 to 0.820±0.002 (MI) relative to 0.7863 to 0.8037 (WR)). The melt inclusions from Aci Costello display more clustered and intermediate 207Pb/206Pb values between 0.801±0.003 and 0.811±0.005. The Pb isotope variations of the melt inclusions from the other volcanoes displays value similar to that of their whole rock data, up to 207Pb/206Pb of 0.828 for Marsili melt inclusions. There are no obvious correlations between Pb isotopes

  20. The Poisoned Chalice? Understanding carbon in olivine-hosted melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclennan, John

    2016-04-01

    The solubility of CO2 in basaltic liquids is dependent on pressure. The CO2 content of olivine-hosted melt inclusions therefore provides a potential source of information about the depths of magma storage. Such petrological constraints on magmatic histories provide context for the interpretation of geophysical volcano monitoring data. However, when multiple petrological barometers are available for the magmatic suites, pressure estimates from melt inclusion CO2 contents appear to be systematically low, even when saturation has occurred. In this contribution I will explore the role of the post-entrapment pressure-temperature-time (P-T-t) path of the host crystal in controlling the relationship between observed melt inclusion CO2 contents and entrapment pressures. A global compilation of 2878 melt inclusions from mafic volcanics of mid-ocean ridges, ocean islands and continental rift zones reveals some unexpected features. First, the distribution of estimated saturation pressures is not strongly dependent on the methods of correction of measured inclusion compositions for post-entrapment crystallisation and bubble growth. Second, the different tectono-magmatic settings show similar distributions of estimated saturation pressures. Third, 80% of the recovered saturation pressures are <100 MPa and much more than half correspond to pressures that are lower than those of the shallowest reservoir in the system as constrained by geophysical observations. Finally, in all settings, 5-10% of the inclusions record saturation pressures >200 MPa, with an upper limit at ˜500 MPa. A model was developed of the evolution of the pressure and distribution of CO2 inside inclusions as their olivine hosts travel through an imposed P-T-t history. Model results indicate that the dominance of low saturation pressures in the melt inclusions and the systematic difference between these pressures and the independent estimates of magma storage depths are likely to be caused by decrepitation

  1. Evidence for melt partitioning between olivine and orthopyroxene in partially molten harzburgite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K.; Zhu, W.; Montesi, L. G.; Le Roux, V.; Gaetani, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    During melting at mid-ocean ridges, melt is driven into an equilibrium, minimum-energy configuration by surface energy gradients between solid-solid and solid-liquid phase boundaries. Such a configuration, where melt is mostly restricted to three and four-grain junctions, acts as a porous medium through which melt can percolate to the surface. For a monomineralic system, melt is distributed evenly among all grains. However, in mineralogical heterogeneous systems, melt partitions unevenly between the various solid phases to minimize the total energy of the system. In a ocean ridge melting environment, where olivine is often juxtaposed against orthopyroxene (opx), lithologic partitioning is expected to turn olivine-rich regions into high-permeability conduits, through which melt can be quickly extracted, drastically increasing the permeability of the mantle [Zhu and Hirth, 2003]. Lithologic partitioning has been demonstrated in experiments using analogue systems [Watson, 1999]; however, to date, no experiment has confirmed its existence in partially molten mantle systems. We present experimental results that determine the degree of melt partitioning between olivine and opx in partially molten harzburgites. Samples were prepared from a powdered mixture of oxides and carbonates and then hot-pressed in a solid-media piston-cylinder apparatus at 1350°C and 1.5GPa [Zhu et al., 2011] to achieve an 82/18 vol. % ratio of olivine to opx. Prior to hot-pressing, basalt was added to the powdered mixtures in various proportions to test for lithologic partitioning across a range of melt fractions. Three-dimensional, 700nm-resolution images of our samples were obtained using synchrotron X-ray microtomography on the 2BM station of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Labs. Image data were filtered using an anisotropic diffusion filter to enhance phase contrast and then segmented to produce binary representations of each phase. In order to quantitatively demonstrate

  2. What Factors Control Platinum-Group Element (PGE) Abundances in Basalts From the Ontong Java Plateau?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazey, W. J.; Neal, C. R.

    2002-12-01

    Eleven samples encompassing four sites drilled by Ocean Drilling Program Leg 192 to the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) were analyzed for major, trace and platinum-group (PGEs: Ir, Ru, Rh, Pt, and Pd) elements. Based on major and trace element chemistry, these are divided into two groups: a primitive group, which was newly discovered on Leg 192, and Kwaimbaita-type basalts, which are ubiquitous on the OJP (cf. Tejada et al., 2002, J. Pet. 43:449). The primitive group is relatively enriched in MgO, Ni, and Cr and relatively depleted in incompatible elements compared to the Kwaimbaita-type basalts. Petrography indicates that the fractionating phases during emplacement of both types of basalts were olivine and Cr-spinel +/- plagioclase +/- cpx. Normalized PGE profiles are fractionated, but exhibit a flattening between Ru and Ir and occasionally an enrichment in Ir. It has been shown that chromite can preferentially incorporate Os and Ru (Kd ?150) over Ir (Kd ?100), which may account for the Ir and Ru systematics. We do not consider sulfide to be a factor in fractionating the PGEs because it is either absent or present as a trace phase in these basalts and the OJP basalts are sulfur undersaturated (Michael and Cornell, 1996, EOS 77:714). Additionally, the primitive samples from the OJP also have Cu/Pd ratios (4500-8000) that are roughly similar to primitive mantle (7300), and have a generally flat transition from Pd to Y on a primitive mantle-normalized plot. It is unlikely that these samples reached sulfur saturation. The Kwaimbaita-type basalts have slightly elevated Cu/Pd ratios (9000-14000). While there are subtle differences between the PGE profiles of basalts from the Leg 192 drill cores compared to OJP basalts from subaerial outcrops in the Solomon Islands (e.g., the former have general lower Pt/Rh and higher Rh/Ru ratios), it is apparent that silicate and oxide phases are controlling the PGE profiles and abundances. For example, the six samples analyzed from Site

  3. Electron- and Photon-stimulated Desorption of Alkali Atoms from Lunar Sample and a Model Mineral Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakshinskiy, B. V.; Madey, T. E.

    2003-01-01

    We report recent results on an investigation of source mechanisms for the origin of alkali atoms in the tenuous planetary atmospheres, with focus on non-thermal processes (photon stimulated desorption (PSD), electron stimulated desorption (ESD), and ion sputtering). Whereas alkaline earth oxides (MgO, CaO) are far more abundant in lunar samples than alkali oxides (Na2O, K2O), the atmosphere of the Moon contains easily measurable concentrations of Na and K, while Ca and Mg are undetected there; traces of Ca have recently been seen in the Moon's atmosphere (10-3 of Na). The experiments have included ESD, PSD and ion sputtering of alkali atoms from model mineral surface (amorphous SiO2) and from a lunar basalt sample obtained from NASA. The comparison is made between ESD and PSD efficiency of monovalent alkalis (Na, K) and divalent alkaline earths (Ba, Ca).The ultrahigh vacuum measurement scheme for ESD and PSD of Na atoms includes a highly sensitive alkali metal detector based on surface ionization, and a time-of-flight technique. For PSD measurements, a mercury arc light source (filtered and chopped) is used. We find that bombardment of the alkali covered surfaces by ultraviolet photons or by low energy electrons (E>4 eV) causes desorption of hot alkali atoms. This results are consistent with the model developed to explain our previous measurements of sodium desorption from a silica surface and from water ice: electron- or photon-induced charge transfer from the substrate to the ionic adsorbate causes formation of a neutral alkali atom in a repulsive configuration, from which desorption occurs. The two-electron charge transfer to cause desorption of divalent alkaline eath ions is a less likely process.The data support the suggestion that PSD by UV solar photons is a dominant source process for alkalis in the tenuous lunar atmosphere.

  4. Tabulation and evaluation of ion exchange data on smectites, certain zeolites and basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, L.V.

    1980-05-01

    An extensive search of the literature has been made for ion exchange data on smectites, certain zeolites and basalt. The data are in the form of thermodynamic equilibrium constants, corrected selectivity coefficients, and distribution coefficients. Room temperature alkali and alkaline earth metal cation ion exchange data for smectites are extensive. Correlation between the exchange free energies of alkali metal cations on Camp Berteau montmorillonite values with their Debeye-Hueckel parameter was found. Significant differences in values of exchange constants for the same reaction on different smectites were noted. While this in part may be attributable to differences in experimental procedures, much of the variance is probably due to differences in charge densities and the effective field strengths of the smectites. Differences in field strength are related to the type and amount of substitution on intercrystalline octahedral and tetrahedral sites. Data on smectites suggest that cation exchange selectivities are very strong functions of temperature. Experiments on the exchange properties of clinoptilolite and mordenite have been generally confined to alkali and alkaline earth cations although data for certain transition