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Sample records for alkali-doped iron selenides

  1. Evidence of superconductivity-induced phonon spectra renormalization in alkali-doped iron selenides

    SciTech Connect

    Opačić, M.; Lazarević, N.; Šćepanović, M.; Ryu, Hyejin; Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.; Popović, Z. V.

    2015-11-16

    Polarized Raman scattering spectra of superconducting KxFe2-ySe2 and nonsuperconducting K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2 single crystals were measured in a temperature range from 10 K up to 300 K. Two Raman active modes from the I4/mmm phase and seven from the I4/m phase are observed in frequency range from 150 to 325 cm -1 in both compounds, suggesting that K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2 single crystal also has two-phase nature. Temperature dependence of Raman mode energy is analyzed in terms of lattice thermal expansion and phonon-phonon interaction. Temperature dependence of Raman mode linewidth is considered as temperature-induced anharmonic effects. It is shown that change of Raman mode energy with temperature is dominantly driven by thermal expansion of the crystal lattice. Abrupt change of the A1g mode energy near TC was observed in KxFe2-ySe2 , whereas it is absent in K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2. Phonon energy hardening at low temperatures in the superconducting sample is a consequence of superconductivity-induced redistribution of the electronic states below critical temperature.

  2. Evidence of superconductivity-induced phonon spectra renormalization in alkali-doped iron selenides

    DOE PAGES

    Opačić, M.; Lazarević, N.; Šćepanović, M.; Ryu, Hyejin; Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.; Popović, Z. V.

    2015-11-16

    Polarized Raman scattering spectra of superconducting KxFe2-ySe2 and nonsuperconducting K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2 single crystals were measured in a temperature range from 10 K up to 300 K. Two Raman active modes from the I4/mmm phase and seven from the I4/m phase are observed in frequency range from 150 to 325 cm -1 in both compounds, suggesting that K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2 single crystal also has two-phase nature. Temperature dependence of Raman mode energy is analyzed in terms of lattice thermal expansion and phonon-phonon interaction. Temperature dependence of Raman mode linewidth is considered as temperature-induced anharmonic effects. It is shown that change of Raman mode energymore » with temperature is dominantly driven by thermal expansion of the crystal lattice. Abrupt change of the A1g mode energy near TC was observed in KxFe2-ySe2 , whereas it is absent in K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2. Phonon energy hardening at low temperatures in the superconducting sample is a consequence of superconductivity-induced redistribution of the electronic states below critical temperature.« less

  3. Evidence of superconductivity-induced phonon spectra renormalization in alkali-doped iron selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opačić, M.; Lazarević, N.; Šćepanović, M.; Ryu, Hyejin; Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.; Popović, Z. V.

    2015-12-01

    Polarized Raman scattering spectra of superconducting K x Fe2-y Se2 and non-superconducting K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2 single crystals were measured in the temperature range from 10 K up to 300 K. Two Raman active modes from the I4/mmm phase and seven from the I4/m phase are observed in the frequency range from 150 to 325 cm-1 in both compounds, suggesting that the K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2 single crystal also has a two-phase nature. The temperature dependence of the Raman mode energy is analyzed in terms of lattice thermal expansion and phonon-phonon interaction. The temperature dependence of the Raman mode linewidth is dominated by temperature-induced anharmonic effects. It is shown that the change in Raman mode energy with temperature is dominantly driven by thermal expansion of the crystal lattice. An abrupt change of the A1g mode energy near {{T}\\text{C}} was observed in K x Fe2-y Se2, whereas it is absent in non-superconducting K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2. Phonon energy hardening at low temperatures in the superconducting sample is a consequence of superconductivity-induced redistribution of the electronic states below the critical temperature.

  4. Evidence of superconductivity-induced phonon spectra renormalization in alkali-doped iron selenides.

    PubMed

    Opačić, M; Lazarević, N; Šćepanović, M; Ryu, Hyejin; Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C; Popović, Z V

    2015-12-01

    Polarized Raman scattering spectra of superconducting K(x)Fe(2-y)Se2 and non-superconducting K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2 single crystals were measured in the temperature range from 10 K up to 300 K. Two Raman active modes from the I4/mmm phase and seven from the I4/m phase are observed in the frequency range from 150 to 325 cm(-1) in both compounds, suggesting that the K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2 single crystal also has a two-phase nature. The temperature dependence of the Raman mode energy is analyzed in terms of lattice thermal expansion and phonon-phonon interaction. The temperature dependence of the Raman mode linewidth is dominated by temperature-induced anharmonic effects. It is shown that the change in Raman mode energy with temperature is dominantly driven by thermal expansion of the crystal lattice. An abrupt change of the A1g mode energy near T(C) was observed in K(x)Fe(2-y) Se2, whereas it is absent in non-superconducting K0.8Fe1.8Co0.2Se2. Phonon energy hardening at low temperatures in the superconducting sample is a consequence of superconductivity-induced redistribution of the electronic states below the critical temperature. PMID:26569081

  5. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides.

    PubMed

    Krzton-Maziopa, A; Svitlyk, V; Pomjakushina, E; Puzniak, R; Conder, K

    2016-07-27

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations. PMID:27248118

  6. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides.

    PubMed

    Krzton-Maziopa, A; Svitlyk, V; Pomjakushina, E; Puzniak, R; Conder, K

    2016-07-27

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  7. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Svitlyk, V.; Pomjakushina, E.; Puzniak, R.; Conder, K.

    2016-07-01

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  8. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Svitlyk, V.; Pomjakushina, E.; Puzniak, R.; Conder, K.

    2016-07-01

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2‑y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  9. The unexpected properties of alkali metal iron selenide superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dagotto, Elbio R

    2013-01-01

    The iron-based superconductors that contain FeAs layers as the fundamental building block in the crystal structures have been rationalized in the past using ideas based on the Fermi surface nesting of hole and electron pockets when in the presence of weak Hubbard U interactions. This approach seemed appropriate considering the small values of the magnetic moments in the parent compounds and the clear evidence based on photoemission experiments of the required electron and hole pockets. However, recent results in the context of alkali metal iron selenides, with generic chemical composition AxFe2ySe2 (A alkali metal element), have challenged those previous ideas since at particular compositions y the low-temperature ground states are insulating and display antiferromagnetic order with large iron magnetic moments. Moreover, angle-resolved photoemission studies have revealed the absence of hole pockets at the Fermi level in these materials. The present status of this exciting area of research, with the potential to alter conceptually our understanding of the ironbased superconductors, is here reviewed, covering both experimental and theoretical investigations. Other recent related developments are also briefly reviewed, such as the study of selenide two-leg ladders and the discovery of superconductivity in a single layer of FeSe. The conceptual issues considered established for the alkali metal iron selenides, as well as several issues that still require further work, are discussed.

  10. Electrochemical synthesis of alkali-intercalated iron selenide superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shi-Jie; Ying, Tian-Ping; Wang, Gang; Jin, Shi-Feng; Zhang, Han; Lin, Zhi-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Long

    2015-11-01

    Electrochemical method has been used to insert K/Na into FeSe lattice to prepare alkali-intercalated iron selenides at room temperature. Magnetization measurement reveals that KxFe2Se2 and NaxFe2Se2 are superconductive at 31 K and 46 K, respectively. This is the first successful report of obtaining metal-intercalated FeSe-based high-temperature superconductors using electrochemical method. It provides an effective route to synthesize metal-intercalated layered compounds for new superconductor exploration. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51322211and 91422303), the Strategic Priority Research Program (B) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07020100), Beijing Nova Program of China (Grant No. 2011096), and K. C. Wong Education Foundation, Hong Kong, China.

  11. Power scaling of ultrafast laser inscribed waveguide lasers in chromium and iron doped zinc selenide.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Sean A; Lancaster, Adam; Evans, Jonathan W; Kar, Ajoy K; Cook, Gary

    2016-02-22

    We report demonstration of Watt level waveguide lasers fabricated using Ultrafast Laser Inscription (ULI). The waveguides were fabricated in bulk chromium and iron doped zinc selenide crystals with a chirped pulse Yb fiber laser. The depressed cladding structure in Fe:ZnSe produced output powers of 1 W with a threshold of 50 mW and a slope efficiency of 58%, while a similar structure produced 5.1 W of output in Cr:ZnSe with a laser threshold of 350 mW and a slope efficiency of 41%. These results represent the current state-of-the-art for ULI waveguides in zinc based chalcogenides.

  12. First-principles theory of electron-spin fluctuation coupling and superconducting instabilities in iron selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischner, Johannes; Bazhirov, Timur; MacDonald, Allan H.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    We present first-principles calculations of the coupling of quasiparticles to spin fluctuations in iron selenide and discuss which types of superconducting instabilities this coupling gives rise to. We find that strong antiferromagnetic stripe-phase spin fluctuations lead to large coupling constants for superconducting gaps with s± symmetry, but these coupling constants are significantly reduced by other spin fluctuations with small wave vectors. An accurate description of this competition and an inclusion of band-structure and Stoner parameter renormalization effects lead to a value of the coupling constant for an s±-symmetric gap which can produce a superconducting transition temperature consistent with experimental measurements.

  13. Characterization of nanostructured iron selenide thin films grown by chemical route at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ubale, A.U.; Sakhare, Y.S.; Belkedkar, M.R.; Singh, Arvind

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Nanostructured FeSe thin films were successfully synthesized at room temperature by CBD method. ► The XRD and EDAX characterization confirms nanocrystalline nature of FeSe. ► The SEM and AFM show microporous morphology with nanorods and nanoplates of FeSe. -- Abstract: Iron selenide thin films have been deposited onto glass substrates by using chemical bath deposition technique. Structural characterization of iron selenide thin films was carried out by means of X-ray diffraction and Fourier transforms infrared spectrum. The morphological characterization of FeSe thin film was carried out using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, which revealed porous grain morphology of FeSe with some nano rectangular rods and plates grown on it. The as-deposited thin films exhibited optical band gap energy 2.60 eV. The as deposited FeSe thin films are semiconducting in nature with p-type electrical conductivity. The room temperature electrical resistivity is of the order of 1.1 × 10{sup 5} Ω-cm with activation energy 0.26 and 0.95 eV, respectively, in low and high temperature region.

  14. Porous Nickel-Iron Selenide Nanosheets as Highly Efficient Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoyang; Li, Jiantao; Tian, Xiaocong; Wang, Xuanpeng; Yu, Yang; Owusu, Kwadwo Asare; He, Liang; Mai, Liqiang

    2016-08-01

    Exploring non-noble and high-efficiency electrocatalysts is critical to large-scale industrial applications of electrochemical water splitting. Currently, nickel-based selenide materials are promising candidates for oxygen evolution reaction due to their low cost and excellent performance. In this work, we report the porous nickel-iron bimetallic selenide nanosheets ((Ni0.75Fe0.25)Se2) on carbon fiber cloth (CFC) by selenization of the ultrathin NiFe-based nanosheet precursor. The as-prepared three-dimensional oxygen evolution electrode exhibits a small overpotential of 255 mV at 35 mA cm(-2) and a low Tafel slope of 47.2 mV dec(-1) and keeps high stability during a 28 h measurement in alkaline solution. The outstanding catalytic performance and strong durability, in comparison to the advanced non-noble metal catalysts, are derived from the porous nanostructure fabrication, Fe incorporation, and selenization, which result in fast charge transportation and large electrochemically active surface area and enhance the release of oxygen bubbles from the electrode surface. PMID:27400679

  15. First-principles theory of electron-spin fluctuation coupling and superconducting instabilities in iron selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischner, Johannes; Bazhirov, Timur; MacDonald, Allan H.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-03-01

    We present first-principles calculations of the coupling of quasiparticles to spin fluctuations in iron selenide and discuss which types of superconducting instabilities this coupling gives rise to. We find that strong antiferromagnetic stripe-phase spin fluctuations lead to large coupling constants for superconducting gaps with s +/- -symmetry, but these coupling constants are significantly reduced by other spin fluctuations with small wave vectors. An accurate description of this competition and an inclusion of band structure and Stoner parameter renormalization effects lead to a value of the coupling constant for an s +/- symmetric gap which can produce a superconducting transition temperature consistent with experimental measurements. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR10-1006184 and by DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by the DOE at NERSC.

  16. Soft chemical control of superconductivity in lithium iron selenide hydroxides Li(1-x)Fe(x)(OH)Fe(1-y)Se.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hualei; Woodruff, Daniel N; Cassidy, Simon J; Allcroft, Genevieve M; Sedlmaier, Stefan J; Thompson, Amber L; Bingham, Paul A; Forder, Susan D; Cartenet, Simon; Mary, Nicolas; Ramos, Silvia; Foronda, Francesca R; Williams, Benjamin H; Li, Xiaodong; Blundell, Stephen J; Clarke, Simon J

    2015-02-16

    Hydrothermal synthesis is described of layered lithium iron selenide hydroxides Li(1-x)Fe(x)(OH)Fe(1-y)Se (x ∼ 0.2; 0.02 < y < 0.15) with a wide range of iron site vacancy concentrations in the iron selenide layers. This iron vacancy concentration is revealed as the only significant compositional variable and as the key parameter controlling the crystal structure and the electronic properties. Single crystal X-ray diffraction, neutron powder diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements are used to demonstrate that superconductivity at temperatures as high as 40 K is observed in the hydrothermally synthesized samples when the iron vacancy concentration is low (y < 0.05) and when the iron oxidation state is reduced slightly below +2, while samples with a higher vacancy concentration and a correspondingly higher iron oxidation state are not superconducting. The importance of combining a low iron oxidation state with a low vacancy concentration in the iron selenide layers is emphasized by the demonstration that reductive postsynthetic lithiation of the samples turns on superconductivity with critical temperatures exceeding 40 K by displacing iron atoms from the Li(1-x)Fe(x)(OH) reservoir layer to fill vacancies in the selenide layer.

  17. Exotic s-wave superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerides.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yusuke; Sakai, Shiro; Capone, Massimo; Arita, Ryotaro

    2016-04-20

    Alkali-doped fullerides (A3C60 with A = K, Rb, Cs) show a surprising phase diagram, in which a high transition-temperature (Tc) s-wave superconducting state emerges next to a Mott insulating phase as a function of the lattice spacing. This is in contrast with the common belief that Mott physics and phonon-driven s-wave superconductivity are incompatible, raising a fundamental question on the mechanism of the high-Tc superconductivity. This article reviews recent ab initio calculations, which have succeeded in reproducing comprehensively the experimental phase diagram with high accuracy and elucidated an unusual cooperation between the electron-phonon coupling and the electron-electron interactions leading to Mott localization to realize an unconventional s-wave superconductivity in the alkali-doped fullerides. A driving force behind the exotic physics is unusual intramolecular interactions, characterized by the coexistence of a strongly repulsive Coulomb interaction and a small effectively negative exchange interaction. This is realized by a subtle energy balance between the coupling with the Jahn-Teller phonons and Hund's coupling within the C60 molecule. The unusual form of the interaction leads to a formation of pairs of up- and down-spin electrons on the molecules, which enables the s-wave pairing. The emergent superconductivity crucially relies on the presence of the Jahn-Teller phonons, but surprisingly benefits from the strong correlations because the correlations suppress the kinetic energy of the electrons and help the formation of the electron pairs, in agreement with previous model calculations. This confirms that the alkali-doped fullerides are a new type of unconventional superconductors, where the unusual synergy between the phonons and Coulomb interactions drives the high-Tc superconductivity.

  18. Exotic s-wave superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yusuke; Sakai, Shiro; Capone, Massimo; Arita, Ryotaro

    2016-04-01

    Alkali-doped fullerides ({{A}3}{{\\text{C}}60} with A  =  K, Rb, Cs) show a surprising phase diagram, in which a high transition-temperature ({{T}\\text{c}} ) s-wave superconducting state emerges next to a Mott insulating phase as a function of the lattice spacing. This is in contrast with the common belief that Mott physics and phonon-driven s-wave superconductivity are incompatible, raising a fundamental question on the mechanism of the high-{{T}\\text{c}} superconductivity. This article reviews recent ab initio calculations, which have succeeded in reproducing comprehensively the experimental phase diagram with high accuracy and elucidated an unusual cooperation between the electron-phonon coupling and the electron-electron interactions leading to Mott localization to realize an unconventional s-wave superconductivity in the alkali-doped fullerides. A driving force behind the exotic physics is unusual intramolecular interactions, characterized by the coexistence of a strongly repulsive Coulomb interaction and a small effectively negative exchange interaction. This is realized by a subtle energy balance between the coupling with the Jahn-Teller phonons and Hund’s coupling within the {{\\text{C}}60} molecule. The unusual form of the interaction leads to a formation of pairs of up- and down-spin electrons on the molecules, which enables the s-wave pairing. The emergent superconductivity crucially relies on the presence of the Jahn-Teller phonons, but surprisingly benefits from the strong correlations because the correlations suppress the kinetic energy of the electrons and help the formation of the electron pairs, in agreement with previous model calculations. This confirms that the alkali-doped fullerides are a new type of unconventional superconductors, where the unusual synergy between the phonons and Coulomb interactions drives the high-{{T}\\text{c}} superconductivity.

  19. Phase diagram of (Li(1-x)Fe(x))OHFeSe: a bridge between iron selenide and arsenide superconductors.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoli; Zhou, Huaxue; Yang, Huaixin; Yuan, Jie; Jin, Kui; Zhou, Fang; Yuan, Dongna; Wei, Linlin; Li, Jianqi; Wang, Xinqiang; Zhang, Guangming; Zhao, Zhongxian

    2015-01-14

    Previous experimental results have shown important differences between iron selenide and arsenide superconductors which seem to suggest that the high-temperature superconductivity in these two subgroups of iron-based families may arise from different electronic ground states. Here we report the complete phase diagram of a newly synthesized superconducting (SC) system, (Li1-xFex)OHFeSe, with a structure similar to that of FeAs-based superconductors. In the non-SC samples, an antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin-density-wave (SDW) transition occurs at ∼127 K. This is the first example to demonstrate such an SDW phase in an FeSe-based superconductor system. Transmission electron microscopy shows that a well-known √5×√5 iron vacancy ordered state, resulting in an AFM order at ∼500 K in AyFe2-xSe2 (A = metal ions) superconductor systems, is absent in both non-SC and SC samples, but a unique superstructure with a modulation wave vector q = (1)/2(1,1,0), identical to that seen in the SC phase of KyFe2-xSe2, is dominant in the optimal SC sample (with an SC transition temperature Tc = 40 K). Hence, we conclude that the high-Tc superconductivity in (Li1-xFex)OHFeSe stems from the similarly weak AFM fluctuations as FeAs-based superconductors, suggesting a universal physical picture for both iron selenide and arsenide superconductors.

  20. Phase diagram of (Li(1-x)Fe(x))OHFeSe: a bridge between iron selenide and arsenide superconductors.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoli; Zhou, Huaxue; Yang, Huaixin; Yuan, Jie; Jin, Kui; Zhou, Fang; Yuan, Dongna; Wei, Linlin; Li, Jianqi; Wang, Xinqiang; Zhang, Guangming; Zhao, Zhongxian

    2015-01-14

    Previous experimental results have shown important differences between iron selenide and arsenide superconductors which seem to suggest that the high-temperature superconductivity in these two subgroups of iron-based families may arise from different electronic ground states. Here we report the complete phase diagram of a newly synthesized superconducting (SC) system, (Li1-xFex)OHFeSe, with a structure similar to that of FeAs-based superconductors. In the non-SC samples, an antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin-density-wave (SDW) transition occurs at ∼127 K. This is the first example to demonstrate such an SDW phase in an FeSe-based superconductor system. Transmission electron microscopy shows that a well-known √5×√5 iron vacancy ordered state, resulting in an AFM order at ∼500 K in AyFe2-xSe2 (A = metal ions) superconductor systems, is absent in both non-SC and SC samples, but a unique superstructure with a modulation wave vector q = (1)/2(1,1,0), identical to that seen in the SC phase of KyFe2-xSe2, is dominant in the optimal SC sample (with an SC transition temperature Tc = 40 K). Hence, we conclude that the high-Tc superconductivity in (Li1-xFex)OHFeSe stems from the similarly weak AFM fluctuations as FeAs-based superconductors, suggesting a universal physical picture for both iron selenide and arsenide superconductors. PMID:25532066

  1. Alkali-Doped Lithium Orthosilicate Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinwei; Liu, Wenqiang; Sun, Jian; Hu, Yingchao; Wang, Wenyu; Chen, Hongqiang; Zhang, Yang; Li, Xian; Xu, Minghou

    2016-09-01

    New alkali-doped (Na2 CO3 and K2 CO3 ) Li4 SiO4 sorbents with excellent performance at low CO2 concentrations were synthesized. We speculate that alkali doping breaks the orderly arrangement of the Li4 SiO4 crystals, hence increasing its specific surface area and the number of pores. It was shown that 10 wt % Na2 CO3 and 5 wt % K2 CO3 are the optimal additive ratios for doped sorbents to attain the highest conversions. Moreover, under 15 vol % CO2 , the doped sorbents present clearly faster absorption rates and exhibit stable cyclic durability with impressive conversions of about 90 %, at least 20 % higher than that of non-doped Li4 SiO4 . The attained conversions are also 10 % higher than the reported highest conversion of 80 % on doped Li4 SiO4 . The performance of Li4 SiO4 is believed to be enhanced by the eutectic melt, and it is the first time that the existence of eutectic Li/Na or Li/K carbonate on doped sorbents when absorbing CO2 at high temperature is confirmed; this was done using systematical analysis combining differential scanning calorimetry with in situ powder X-ray diffraction. PMID:27531239

  2. Acid and alkali doped PBI electrolyte in electrochemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Baozhong

    In this work the conductivity of blank PBI membrane, acid doped PBI and alkaline doped PBI was systematically studied. A new methodology for sorption kinetics study in electrolyte solution has been established by monitoring the conductivity change during the sorption process. The model of the doping process and mechanism of conductivity are proposed. The performance of PBI (doped under optimum conditions) in fuel cell as PEM was evaluated. The experimental results show that the blank PBI in acid solution is an ionic insulator. It clarified the long time confusion in this area. The acid doped PBI membrane is an ionic conductor. The conductivity increases with the concentration of the acid solution. In high concentration acid solution, the conductivity increases with the type of acid in the order: H2SO 4 > H3PO4 > HClO4 > HNO3 > HCl. The kinetics of the doping process was studied, by a continuous method. The ionic conductivity mechanism was established. The PBI membranes doped with H2SO4 and H3PO4 exhibit better performance than NafionRTM. The doped FBI has more resistance to CO poison. 3% CO in H2 has little effect on the H3PO 4 doped PBI membrane at 185°C. The conductivity of the alkali doped PBI membrane changes with the concentration of the alkaline solution and the type of the alkalis. The conductivity has a maximum in KOH and NaOH solution. The maximum conductivity in KOH is higher than in NaOH and LiOH. It is about 5 times of that of NafionRTM in alkaline solution. The two-step sorption process in alkaline solution was observed. The first step is the permeation process of the alkalis in the PBI membrane. The permeation is the results of diffusion and interaction. It is concluded that the permeation process is controlled by the rate of interaction between the alkali and PBI molecule. The second step is the relaxation process in the membrane. This step contributes more to the conductivity for the membrane than the first step. The ionic conductivity mechanism

  3. Electric double-layer transistor using layered iron selenide Mott insulator TlFe1.6Se2.

    PubMed

    Katase, Takayoshi; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Kamiya, Toshio; Hosono, Hideo

    2014-03-18

    A(1-x)Fe(2-y)Se2 (A = K, Cs, Rb, Tl) are recently discovered iron-based superconductors with critical temperatures (Tc) ranging up to 32 K. Their parent phases have unique properties compared with other iron-based superconductors; e.g., their crystal structures include ordered Fe vacancies, their normal states are antiferromagnetic (AFM) insulating phases, and they have extremely high Néel transition temperatures. However, control of carrier doping into the parent AFM insulators has been difficult due to their intrinsic phase separation. Here, we fabricated an Fe-vacancy-ordered TlFe1.6Se2 insulating epitaxial film with an atomically flat surface and examined its electrostatic carrier doping using an electric double-layer transistor (EDLT) structure with an ionic liquid gate. The positive gate voltage gave a conductance modulation of three orders of magnitude at 25 K, and further induced and manipulated a phase transition; i.e., delocalized carrier generation by electrostatic doping is the origin of the phase transition. This is the first demonstration, to the authors' knowledge, of an EDLT using a Mott insulator iron selenide channel and opens a way to explore high Tc superconductivity in iron-based layered materials, where carrier doping by conventional chemical means is difficult.

  4. Transition from Sign-Reversed to Sign-Preserved Cooper-Pairing Symmetry in Sulfur-Doped Iron Selenide Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qisi; Park, J. T.; Feng, Yu; Shen, Yao; Hao, Yiqing; Pan, Bingying; Lynn, J. W.; Ivanov, A.; Chi, Songxue; Matsuda, M.; Cao, Huibo; Birgeneau, R. J.; Efremov, D. V.; Zhao, Jun

    2016-05-01

    An essential step toward elucidating the mechanism of superconductivity is to determine the sign or phase of the superconducting order parameter, as it is closely related to the pairing interaction. In conventional superconductors, the electron-phonon interaction induces attraction between electrons near the Fermi energy and results in a sign-preserved s -wave pairing. For high-temperature superconductors, including cuprates and iron-based superconductors, prevalent weak coupling theories suggest that the electron pairing is mediated by spin fluctuations which lead to repulsive interactions, and therefore that a sign-reversed pairing with an s± or d -wave symmetry is favored. Here, by using magnetic neutron scattering, a phase sensitive probe of the superconducting gap, we report the observation of a transition from the sign-reversed to sign-preserved Cooper-pairing symmetry with insignificant changes in Tc in the S-doped iron selenide superconductors KxFe2 -y(Se1-zSz) 2 . We show that a rather sharp magnetic resonant mode well below the superconducting gap (2 Δ ) in the undoped sample (z =0 ) is replaced by a broad hump structure above 2 Δ under 50% S doping. These results cannot be readily explained by simple spin fluctuation-exchange pairing theories and, therefore, multiple pairing channels are required to describe superconductivity in this system. Our findings may also yield a simple explanation for the sometimes contradictory data on the sign of the superconducting order parameter in iron-based materials.

  5. An in vitro assessment of the interaction of cadmium selenide quantum dots with DNA, iron, and blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Dunpall, Rekha; Nejo, Adeola Ayodeji; Pullabhotla, Viswanadha Srirama Rajasekhar; Opoku, Andy R; Revaprasadu, Neerish; Shonhai, Addmore

    2012-12-01

    Cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots have gained increased attention for their potential use in biomedical applications. This has raised interest in assessing their toxicity. In this study, water-soluble, cysteine-capped CdSe nanocrystals with an average size of 15 nm were prepared through a one-pot solution-based method. The CdSe nanoparticles were synthesized in batches in which the concentration of the capping agent was varied with the aim of stabilizing the quantum dot core. The effects of the CdSe quantum dots on DNA stability, aggregation of blood platelets, and reducing activity of iron were evaluated in vitro . DNA damage was observed at a concentration of 200 μg/mL of CdSe quantum dots. Furthermore, the CdSe nanocrystals exhibited high reducing power and chelating activity, suggesting that they may impair the function of haemoglobin by interacting with iron. In addition, the CdSe quantum dots promoted aggregation of blood platelets in a dose dependent manner.

  6. Transition from Sign-Reversed to Sign-Preserved Cooper-Pairing Symmetry in Sulfur-Doped Iron Selenide Superconductors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qisi; Park, J T; Feng, Yu; Shen, Yao; Hao, Yiqing; Pan, Bingying; Lynn, J W; Ivanov, A; Chi, Songxue; Matsuda, M; Cao, Huibo; Birgeneau, R J; Efremov, D V; Zhao, Jun

    2016-05-13

    An essential step toward elucidating the mechanism of superconductivity is to determine the sign or phase of the superconducting order parameter, as it is closely related to the pairing interaction. In conventional superconductors, the electron-phonon interaction induces attraction between electrons near the Fermi energy and results in a sign-preserved s-wave pairing. For high-temperature superconductors, including cuprates and iron-based superconductors, prevalent weak coupling theories suggest that the electron pairing is mediated by spin fluctuations which lead to repulsive interactions, and therefore that a sign-reversed pairing with an s_{±} or d-wave symmetry is favored. Here, by using magnetic neutron scattering, a phase sensitive probe of the superconducting gap, we report the observation of a transition from the sign-reversed to sign-preserved Cooper-pairing symmetry with insignificant changes in T_{c} in the S-doped iron selenide superconductors K_{x}Fe_{2-y}(Se_{1-z}S_{z})_{2}. We show that a rather sharp magnetic resonant mode well below the superconducting gap (2Δ) in the undoped sample (z=0) is replaced by a broad hump structure above 2Δ under 50% S doping. These results cannot be readily explained by simple spin fluctuation-exchange pairing theories and, therefore, multiple pairing channels are required to describe superconductivity in this system. Our findings may also yield a simple explanation for the sometimes contradictory data on the sign of the superconducting order parameter in iron-based materials. PMID:27232038

  7. Transition from Sign-Reversed to Sign-Preserved Cooper-Pairing Symmetry in Sulfur-Doped Iron Selenide Superconductors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qisi; Park, J T; Feng, Yu; Shen, Yao; Hao, Yiqing; Pan, Bingying; Lynn, J W; Ivanov, A; Chi, Songxue; Matsuda, M; Cao, Huibo; Birgeneau, R J; Efremov, D V; Zhao, Jun

    2016-05-13

    An essential step toward elucidating the mechanism of superconductivity is to determine the sign or phase of the superconducting order parameter, as it is closely related to the pairing interaction. In conventional superconductors, the electron-phonon interaction induces attraction between electrons near the Fermi energy and results in a sign-preserved s-wave pairing. For high-temperature superconductors, including cuprates and iron-based superconductors, prevalent weak coupling theories suggest that the electron pairing is mediated by spin fluctuations which lead to repulsive interactions, and therefore that a sign-reversed pairing with an s_{±} or d-wave symmetry is favored. Here, by using magnetic neutron scattering, a phase sensitive probe of the superconducting gap, we report the observation of a transition from the sign-reversed to sign-preserved Cooper-pairing symmetry with insignificant changes in T_{c} in the S-doped iron selenide superconductors K_{x}Fe_{2-y}(Se_{1-z}S_{z})_{2}. We show that a rather sharp magnetic resonant mode well below the superconducting gap (2Δ) in the undoped sample (z=0) is replaced by a broad hump structure above 2Δ under 50% S doping. These results cannot be readily explained by simple spin fluctuation-exchange pairing theories and, therefore, multiple pairing channels are required to describe superconductivity in this system. Our findings may also yield a simple explanation for the sometimes contradictory data on the sign of the superconducting order parameter in iron-based materials.

  8. Orbital disproportionation of electronic density is a universal feature of alkali-doped fullerides

    PubMed Central

    Iwahara, Naoya; Chibotaru, Liviu F.

    2016-01-01

    Alkali-doped fullerides show a wide range of electronic phases in function of alkali atoms and the degree of doping. Although the presence of strong electron correlations is well established, recent investigations also give evidence for dynamical Jahn–Teller instability in the insulating and the metallic trivalent fullerides. In this work, to reveal the interplay of these interactions in fullerides with even electrons, we address the electronic phase of tetravalent fulleride with accurate many-body calculations within a realistic electronic model including all basic interactions extracted from first principles. We find that the Jahn–Teller instability is always realized in these materials too. In sharp contrast to the correlated metals, tetravalent system displays uncorrelated band-insulating state despite similar interactions present in both fullerides. Our results show that the Jahn–Teller instability and the accompanying orbital disproportionation of electronic density in the degenerate lowest unoccupied molecular orbital band is a universal feature of fullerides. PMID:27713426

  9. Synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of quaternary iron selenides: Ba2FePnSe5 (Pn=Sb, Bi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Greenfield, Joshua T.; Kovnir, Kirill

    2016-10-01

    Two new barium iron pnictide-selenides, Ba2FeSbSe5 and Ba2FeBiSe5, were synthesized by a high-temperature solid-state route and their crystal structures were determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction. Both compounds are isomorphic to the high pressure phase Ba3FeS5 and crystallize in the orthorhombic space group Pnma (No. 62) with cell parameters of a=12.603(2)/12.619(2) Å, b=9.106(1)/9.183(1) Å, c=9.145(1)/9.123(1) Å and Z=4 for Ba2FeSbSe5 and Ba2FeBiSe5, respectively. According to differential scanning calorimetry, Ba2FePnSe5 compounds exhibit high thermal stability and melt congruently at 1055(5) K (Pn=Sb) and 1105(5) K (Pn=Bi). Magnetic characterizations reveal strong antiferromagnetic nearest-neighbor interactions in both compounds resulting in an antiferromagnetic ordering at 58(1) K for Ba2FeSbSe5 and 79(2) K for Ba2FeBiSe5. The magnetic interactions between Fe3+ centers, which are at least 6 Å apart from each other, are mediated by superexchange interactions.

  10. Formation of copper-indium-selenide and/or copper-indium-gallium-selenide films from indium selenide and copper selenide precursors

    DOEpatents

    Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S.; Nekuda, Jennifer A.

    2011-11-15

    Liquid-based indium selenide and copper selenide precursors, including copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent, are used to form crystalline copper-indium-selenide, and/or copper indium gallium selenide films (66) on substrates (52).

  11. Synthesis, crystal structure and electronic properties of the new iron selenide Ba{sub 9}Fe{sub 4}Se{sub 16}

    SciTech Connect

    Berthebaud, David Preethi Meher, K.R.S.; Pelloquin, Denis; Maignan, Antoine

    2014-03-15

    The new ternary selenide Ba{sub 9}Fe{sub 4}Se{sub 16} has been synthesized from the reaction of appropriate amounts of elements at high temperature in a silica sealed tube. The compound crystallizes in the tetragonal space group I4{sub 1}/a with a=10.0068(3) Å and c=35.6415(9) Å, Z=4. It is an isostructural compound to the sulfide α-Ba{sub 9}Fe{sub 4}S{sub 15}, which is a high temperature polymorph of β-Ba{sub 9}Fe{sub 4}Se{sub 15} that belongs to the indefinitely adaptive phases series Ba{sub 3}Fe{sub 1+x}S{sub 5}, 0≤x≤1. X-ray powder diffraction and TEM analyses of the synthesized compound were used to determine the phase composition and the structure. The crystal structure can be viewed as overlapping sections along the c axis. Those sections are formed by the coordination polyhedra around barium atoms which can be described as trigonal prisms and bidisphenoids. Within the sections formed by barium polyhedra, isolated pairs of edge sharing FeSe{sub 4} tetrahedra are found. Magnetic measurements performed on Ba{sub 9}Fe{sub 4}Se{sub 16} indicate an antiferromagnetic behavior with Néel temperature of ∼13 K. Possible influence of air exposure on the magnetic properties is also discussed here. The electric measurements show an insulating behavior below 160 K and the dielectric permittivity and loss tangent at the lowest frequency measured reveal a change of slope very close to T{sub N}. However no magneto dielectric effect was evidenced for magnetic fields of up to 3 T. Activation energy, E{sub A}=0.18 eV, was extracted from the AC conductivity plot in the temperature range of 160–300 K. -- Graphical abstract: Experimental electron diffraction (ED) patterns of Ba{sub 9}Fe{sub 4}Se{sub 16} recorded along a-[010]. Highlights: • A new iron selenide material. • A structure resolution by combination of XRD and TEM. • Magnetic properties of the new compound Ba{sub 9}Fe{sub 4}Se{sub 16} are discussed.

  12. Synthesis, crystal structure and electronic properties of the new iron selenide Ba9Fe4Se16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthebaud, David; Preethi Meher, K. R. S.; Pelloquin, Denis; Maignan, Antoine

    2014-03-01

    The new ternary selenide Ba9Fe4Se16 has been synthesized from the reaction of appropriate amounts of elements at high temperature in a silica sealed tube. The compound crystallizes in the tetragonal space group I41/a with a=10.0068(3) Å and c=35.6415(9) Å, Z=4. It is an isostructural compound to the sulfide α-Ba9Fe4S15, which is a high temperature polymorph of β-Ba9Fe4Se15 that belongs to the indefinitely adaptive phases series Ba3Fe1+xS5, 0≤x≤1. X-ray powder diffraction and TEM analyses of the synthesized compound were used to determine the phase composition and the structure. The crystal structure can be viewed as overlapping sections along the c axis. Those sections are formed by the coordination polyhedra around barium atoms which can be described as trigonal prisms and bidisphenoids. Within the sections formed by barium polyhedra, isolated pairs of edge sharing FeSe4 tetrahedra are found. Magnetic measurements performed on Ba9Fe4Se16 indicate an antiferromagnetic behavior with Néel temperature of ~13 K. Possible influence of air exposure on the magnetic properties is also discussed here. The electric measurements show an insulating behavior below 160 K and the dielectric permittivity and loss tangent at the lowest frequency measured reveal a change of slope very close to TN. However no magneto dielectric effect was evidenced for magnetic fields of up to 3 T. Activation energy, EA=0.18 eV, was extracted from the AC conductivity plot in the temperature range of 160-300 K.

  13. Unified understanding of superconductivity and Mott transition in alkali-doped fullerides from first principles.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yusuke; Sakai, Shiro; Capone, Massimo; Arita, Ryotaro

    2015-08-01

    Alkali-doped fullerides A 3C60 (A = K, Rb, Cs) are surprising materials where conventional phonon-mediated superconductivity and unconventional Mott physics meet, leading to a remarkable phase diagram as a function of volume per C60 molecule. We address these materials with a state-of-the-art calculation, where we construct a realistic low-energy model from first principles without using a priori information other than the crystal structure and solve it with an accurate many-body theory. Remarkably, our scheme comprehensively reproduces the experimental phase diagram including the low-spin Mott-insulating phase next to the superconducting phase. More remarkably, the critical temperatures T c's calculated from first principles quantitatively reproduce the experimental values. The driving force behind the surprising phase diagram of A 3C60 is a subtle competition between Hund's coupling and Jahn-Teller phonons, which leads to an effectively inverted Hund's coupling. Our results establish that the fullerides are the first members of a novel class of molecular superconductors in which the multiorbital electronic correlations and phonons cooperate to reach high T c s-wave superconductivity.

  14. Unified understanding of superconductivity and Mott transition in alkali-doped fullerides from first principles

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Yusuke; Sakai, Shiro; Capone, Massimo; Arita, Ryotaro

    2015-01-01

    Alkali-doped fullerides A3C60 (A = K, Rb, Cs) are surprising materials where conventional phonon-mediated superconductivity and unconventional Mott physics meet, leading to a remarkable phase diagram as a function of volume per C60 molecule. We address these materials with a state-of-the-art calculation, where we construct a realistic low-energy model from first principles without using a priori information other than the crystal structure and solve it with an accurate many-body theory. Remarkably, our scheme comprehensively reproduces the experimental phase diagram including the low-spin Mott-insulating phase next to the superconducting phase. More remarkably, the critical temperatures Tc’s calculated from first principles quantitatively reproduce the experimental values. The driving force behind the surprising phase diagram of A3C60 is a subtle competition between Hund’s coupling and Jahn-Teller phonons, which leads to an effectively inverted Hund’s coupling. Our results establish that the fullerides are the first members of a novel class of molecular superconductors in which the multiorbital electronic correlations and phonons cooperate to reach high Tc s-wave superconductivity. PMID:26601242

  15. Well-ordered monolayers of alkali-doped coronene and picene: Molecular arrangements and electronic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, M.; Endo, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Okada, R.; Yamada, Y. Sasaki, M.

    2014-07-21

    Adsorptions of alkali metals (such as K and Li) on monolayers of coronene and picene realize the formation of ordered phases, which serve as well-defined model systems for metal-intercalated aromatic superconductors. Upon alkali-doping of the monolayers of coronene and picene, scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed the rearrangement of the entire molecular layer. The K-induced reconstruction of both monolayers resulted in the formation of a structure with a herringbone-like arrangement of molecules, suggesting the intercalation of alkali metals between molecular planes. Upon reconstruction, a shift in both the vacuum level and core levels of coronene was observed as a result of a charge transfer from alkali metals to coronene. In addition, a new density of states near the Fermi level was formed in both the doped coronene and the doped picene monolayers. This characteristic electronic feature of the ordered monolayer has been also reported in the multilayer picene films, ensuring that the present monolayer can model the properties of the metal-intercalated aromatic hydrocarbons. It is suggested that the electronic structure near the Fermi level is sensitive to the molecular arrangement, and that both the strict control and determinations of the molecular structure in the doped phase should be important for the determination of the electronic structure of these materials.

  16. Observation of a Hidden Hole-Like Band Approaching the Fermi Level in K-Doped Iron Selenide Superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunagawa, Masanori; Terashima, Kensei; Hamada, Takahiro; Fujiwara, Hirokazu; Fukura, Tetsushi; Takeda, Aya; Tanaka, Masashi; Takeya, Hiroyuki; Takano, Yoshihiko; Arita, Masashi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Suzuki, Katsuhiro; Usui, Hidetomo; Kuroki, Kazuhiko; Wakita, Takanori; Muraoka, Yuji; Yokoya, Takayoshi

    2016-07-01

    One of the ultimate goals of the study of iron-based superconductors is to identify the common feature that produces the high critical temperature (Tc). In the early days, based on a weak-coupling viewpoint, the nesting between hole- and electron-like Fermi surfaces (FSs) leading to the so-called s± state was considered to be one such key feature. However, this theory has faced a serious challenge ever since the discovery of alkali-metal-doped FeSe (AFS) superconductors, in which only electron-like FSs with a nodeless superconducting gap are observed. Several theories have been proposed, but a consistent understanding is yet to be achieved. Here we show experimentally that a hole-like band exists in KxFe2-ySe2, which presumably forms a hole-like Fermi surface. The present study suggests that AFS can be categorized in the same group as iron arsenides with both hole- and electron-like FSs present. This result provides a foundation for a comprehensive understanding of the superconductivity in iron-based superconductors.

  17. Crystal and electronic structures of two new iron selenides: Ba{sub 4}Fe{sub 3}Se{sub 10} and BaFe{sub 2}Se{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Berthebaud, David; Perez, Olivier; Tobola, Janusz; Pelloquin, Denis; Maignan, Antoine

    2015-10-15

    The new ternary selenides, Ba{sub 4}Fe{sub 3}Se{sub 10} and BaFe{sub 2}Se{sub 4,} were synthesized from a reaction of appropriate amounts of elements at high temperature in a silica sealed tube, and their structures were resolved using X-ray single crystal diffraction. BaFe{sub 2}Se{sub 4} crystallizes in the tetragonal space group I4/m with a=8.008(9) Å and c=5.483(3) Å as cell parameters. It is a new compound with a structure isotypical to the sulfide BaFe{sub 2}S{sub 4} which belongs to the infinitely adaptive structures series Ba{sub 1+x}Fe{sub 2}S{sub 4}. The second compound, Ba{sub 4}Fe{sub 3}Se{sub 10}, crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/n with a=8.8593(1) Å, b=8.8073(1) Å, c=12.2724(1) Å and β=109.037(6)° as cell parameters. It exhibits an original structure with a new type of iron selenide polyhedra. These data were consistent with the powder X-ray diffraction and TEM analyses. Their electronic structures point towards metallicity and electronic correlations for both selenides. - Graphical abstract: Experimental [010] oriented ED pattern and corresponding HREM image of Ba{sub 4}Fe{sub 3}Se{sub 10}. Image calculated with a focus and thickness to 15nm and 8 nm respectively is inserted. Bright contrasts are correlated to Se rows belonging to FeSe{sub 3}(Se{sub 2}){sup 2−}–FeSe{sub 6}–FeSe{sub 3}(Se{sub 2}){sup 2−} trimers. The corresponding structure projection is also shown. - Highlights: • Two new barium iron selenide compounds. • An original structure type Ba4Fe3Se10. • Electronic structure calculations.

  18. Precursors for formation of copper selenide, indium selenide, copper indium diselenide, and/or copper indium gallium diselenide films

    DOEpatents

    Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S

    2014-11-04

    Liquid-based precursors for formation of Copper Selenide, Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Diselenide, and/or copper Indium Galium Diselenide include copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent. These liquid-based precursors can be deposited in liquid form onto substrates and treated by rapid thermal processing to form crystalline copper selenide and indium selenide films.

  19. Structural, magnetic, and electronic properties of iron selenide Fe{sub 6-7}Se{sub 8} nanoparticles obtained by thermal decomposition in high-temperature organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubutin, I. S. E-mail: crlin@mail.npue.edu.tw; Funtov, K. O.; Dmitrieva, T. V.; Starchikov, S. S.; Lin, Chun-Rong E-mail: crlin@mail.npue.edu.tw; Siao, Yu-Jhan; Chen, Mei-Li

    2014-07-28

    Iron selenide nanoparticles with the NiAs-like crystal structure were synthesized by thermal decomposition of iron chloride and selenium powder in a high-temperature organic solvent. Depending on the time of the compound processing at 340 °C, the nanocrystals with monoclinic (M)-Fe{sub 3}Se{sub 4} or hexagonal (H)-Fe{sub 7}Se{sub 8} structures as well as a mixture of these two phases can be obtained. The magnetic behavior of the monoclinic and hexagonal phases is very different. The applied-field and temperature dependences of magnetization reveal a complicated transformation between ferrimagnetic (FRM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) structures, which can be related to the spin rotation process connected with the redistribution of cation vacancies. From XRD and Mössbauer data, the 3c type superstructure of vacancy ordering was found in the hexagonal Fe{sub 7}Se{sub 8}. Redistribution of vacancies in Fe{sub 7}Se{sub 8} from random to ordered leads to the transformation of the magnetic structure from FRM to AFM. The Mössbauer data indicate that vacancies in the monoclinic Fe{sub 3}Se{sub 4} prefer to appear near the Fe{sup 3+} ions and stimulate the magnetic transition with the rotation of the Fe{sup 3+} magnetic moments. Unusually high coercive force H{sub c} was found in both (H) and (M) nanocrystals with the highest (“giant”) value of about 25 kOe in monoclinic Fe{sub 3}Se{sub 4}. This is explained by the strong surface magnetic anisotropy which is essentially larger than the core anisotropy. Such a large coercivity is rare for materials without rare earth or noble metal elements, and the Fe{sub 3}Se{sub 4}-based compounds can be the low-cost, nontoxic alternative materials for advanced magnets. In addition, an unusual effect of “switching” of magnetization in a field of 10 kOe was found in the Fe{sub 3}Se{sub 4} nanoparticles below 280 K, which can be important for applications.

  20. Low-Resistivity Zinc Selenide for Heterojunctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetron reactive sputtering enables doping of this semiconductor. Proposed method of reactive sputtering combined with doping shows potential for yielding low-resistivity zinc selenide films. Zinc selenide attractive material for forming heterojunctions with other semiconductor compounds as zinc phosphide, cadmium telluride, and gallium arsenide. Semiconductor junctions promising for future optoelectronic devices, including solar cells and electroluminescent displays. Resistivities of zinc selenide layers deposited by evaporation or chemical vapor deposition too high to form practical heterojunctions.

  1. Superconductivity of Iron Selenide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yuefeng; Brahimi, Erind; Budnick, Joseph; Hines, William; Jain, Menka; Wells, Barrett

    2009-03-01

    Near stoichiometry FeSe films were successfully grown on MgO, SrTiO3, and LaAlO3 single crystal substrates using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the FeSe films have a tetragonal structure on SrTiO3 and LaAlO3 substrates. A mixture of tetragonal and hexagonal structures was observed on MgO substrates due to the larger lattice constant misfit. The superconductivity of films exhibited a strong dependence on epitaxial strain and thickness. Thicker films (˜ 100 nm and ˜ 200 nm) are fully relaxed and have a clear superconducting transition near that of the bulk FeSe. Thinner films (˜ 50 nm) are strained. Films on nearly lattice-matched LaAlO3 are superconducting, while films under tension on SrTiO3 or MgO are metallic but not superconducting down to 5K. The onset temperature for superconductivity have a near linear magnetic field dependence with dH/dT = - 2.8 T/K for fields up to 9T.

  2. Fabrication, characterization and applications of iron selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Raja Azadar; Badshah, Amin; Lal, Bhajan

    2016-11-01

    This review article presents fabrication of FeSe by solid state reactions, solution chemistry routes, chemical vapor deposition, spray pyrolysis and chemical vapor transport. Different properties and applications such as crystal structure and phase transition, band structure, spectroscopy, superconductivity, photocatalytic activity, electrochemical sensing, and fuel cell activity of FeSe have been discussed.

  3. Oxidation Mechanism of Copper Selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskinen, Pekka; Patana, Sonja; Kobylin, Petri; Latostenmaa, Petri

    2014-09-01

    The oxidation mechanism of copper selenide was investigated at deselenization temperatures of copper refining anode slimes. The isothermal roasting of synthetic, massive copper selenide in flowing oxygen and oxygen - 20% sulfur dioxide mixtures at 450-550 °C indicate that in both atmospheres the mass of Cu2Se increases as a function of time, due to formation of copper selenite as an intermediate product. Copper selenide oxidises to copper oxides without formation of thick copper selenite scales, and a significant fraction of selenium is vaporized as SeO2(g). The oxidation product scales on Cu2Se are porous which allows transport of atmospheric oxygen to the reaction zone and selenium dioxide vapor to the surrounding gas. Predominance area diagrams of the copper-selenium system, constructed for selenium roasting conditions, indicate that the stable phase of copper in a selenium roaster gas with SO2 is the sulfate CuSO4. The cuprous oxide formed in decomposition of Cu2Se is further sulfated to CuSO4.

  4. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN...

  7. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    ... cereals and breads. White beans, lentils, spinach, kidney beans, and peas. Nuts and some dried fruits, such as raisins. Iron in food comes in two forms: heme iron and nonheme iron. Nonheme iron is found in plant foods and iron-fortified food products. Meat, seafood, ...

  8. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  9. Formation of selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide-sulfide films on metal or metal coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Eser, Erten; Fields, Shannon

    2012-05-01

    A process and composition for preventing cracking in composite structures comprising a metal coated substrate and a selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide sulfide film. Specifically, cracking is prevented in the coating of molybdenum coated substrates upon which a copper, indium-gallium diselenide (CIGS) film is deposited. Cracking is inhibited by adding a Se passivating amount of oxygen to the Mo and limiting the amount of Se deposited on the Mo coating.

  10. A nickel iron diselenide-derived efficient oxygen-evolution catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Song, Fang; Hu, Xile

    2016-08-01

    Efficient oxygen-evolution reaction catalysts are required for the cost-effective generation of solar fuels. Metal selenides have been reported as promising oxygen-evolution catalysts; however, their active forms are yet to be elucidated. Here we show that a representative selenide catalyst, nickel selenide, is entirely converted into nickel hydroxide under oxygen-evolution conditions. This result indicates that metal selenides are unstable during oxygen evolution, and the in situ generated metal oxides are responsible for their activity. This knowledge inspired us to synthesize nanostructured nickel iron diselenide, a hitherto unknown metal selenide, and to use it as a templating precursor to a highly active nickel iron oxide catalyst. This selenide-derived oxide catalyses oxygen evolution with an overpotential of only 195 mV for 10 mA cm-2. Our work underscores the importance of identifying the active species of oxygen-evolution catalysts, and demonstrates how such knowledge can be applied to develop better catalysts.

  11. High-temperature superconductivity: Electron mirages in an iron salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaanen, Jan

    2014-11-01

    The detection of unusual 'mirage' energy bands in photoemission spectra of single-atom layers of iron selenide reveals the probable cause of high-temperature superconductivity in these artificial structures. See Letter p.245

  12. Lattice vibrational properties of americium selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, B. S.; Aynyas, Mahendra; Sanyal, S. P.

    2016-05-01

    Lattice vibrational properties of AmSe have been studied by using breathing shell models (BSM) which includes breathing motion of electrons of the Am atoms due to f-d hybridization. The phonon dispersion curves, specific heat calculated from present model. The calculated phonon dispersion curves of AmSe are presented follow the same trend as observed in uranium selenide. We discuss the significance of this approach in predicting the phonon dispersion curves of these compounds and examine the role of electron-phonon interaction.

  13. Limiting pump intensity for sulfur-doped gallium selenide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; Li, D.-J.; Xie, J.-J.; Zhang, L.-M.; Feng, Z.-S.; Andreev, Yu M.; Kokh, K. A.; Lanskii, G. V.; Potekaev, A. I.; Shaiduko, A. V.; Svetlichnyi, V. A.

    2014-05-01

    High optical quality undoped and sulfur-doped gallium selenide crystals were grown from melts by the modified vertical Bridgman method. Detailed study of the damage produced under femtosecond pulse exposure has shown that evaluation of the damage threshold by visual control is unfounded. Black matter spots produced on crystal surfaces do not noticeably decrease either its transparency or its frequency conversion efficiency as opposed to real damage identified as caked well-cohesive gallium structures. For the first time it was demonstrated that optimally sulfur-doped gallium selenide crystal possesses the highest resistivity to optical emission (about four times higher in comparison with undoped gallium selenide).

  14. Copper selenide nanocrystals for photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Hessel, Colin M; Pattani, Varun P; Rasch, Michael; Panthani, Matthew G; Koo, Bonil; Tunnell, James W; Korgel, Brian A

    2011-06-01

    Ligand-stabilized copper selenide (Cu(2-x)Se) nanocrystals, approximately 16 nm in diameter, were synthesized by a colloidal hot injection method and coated with amphiphilic polymer. The nanocrystals readily disperse in water and exhibit strong near-infrared (NIR) optical absorption with a high molar extinction coefficient of 7.7 × 10(7) cm(-1) M(-1) at 980 nm. When excited with 800 nm light, the Cu(2-x)Se nanocrystals produce significant photothermal heating with a photothermal transduction efficiency of 22%, comparable to nanorods and nanoshells of gold (Au). In vitro photothermal heating of Cu(2-x)Se nanocrystals in the presence of human colorectal cancer cell (HCT-116) led to cell destruction after 5 min of laser irradiation at 33 W/cm(2), demonstrating the viabilitiy of Cu(2-x)Se nanocrystals for photothermal therapy applications. PMID:21553924

  15. Copper Selenide Nanocrystals for Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hessel, Colin M.; Pattani, Varun; Rasch, Michael; Panthani, Matthew G.; Koo, Bonil; Tunnell, James W.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    Ligand-stabilized copper selenide (Cu2−xSe) nanocrystals, approximately 16 nm in diameter, were synthesized by a colloidal hot injection method and coated with amphiphilic polymer. The nanocrystals readily disperse in water and exhibit strong near infrared (NIR) optical absorption with a high molar extinction coefficient of 7.7 × 107 cm−1 M−1 at 980 nm. When excited with 800 nm light, the Cu2−xSe nanocrystals produce significant photothermal heating with a photothermal transduction efficiency of 22%, comparable to nanorods and nanoshells of gold (Au). In vitro photothermal heating of Cu2−xSe nanocrystals in the presence of human colorectal cancer cell (HCT-116) led to cell destruction after 5 minutes of laser irradiation at 33 W/cm2, demonstrating the viabilitiy of Cu2−xSe nanocrystals for photothermal therapy applications. PMID:21553924

  16. Neutralization by metal ions of the toxicity of sodium selenide.

    PubMed

    Dauplais, Marc; Lazard, Myriam; Blanquet, Sylvain; Plateau, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inert metal-selenide colloids are found in animals. They are believed to afford cross-protection against the toxicities of both metals and selenocompounds. Here, the toxicities of metal salt and sodium selenide mixtures were systematically studied using the death rate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells as an indicator. In parallel, the abilities of these mixtures to produce colloids were assessed. Studied metal cations could be classified in three groups: (i) metal ions that protect cells against selenium toxicity and form insoluble colloids with selenide (Ag⁺, Cd²⁺, Cu²⁺, Hg²⁺, Pb²⁺ and Zn²⁺), (ii) metal ions which protect cells by producing insoluble metal-selenide complexes and by catalyzing hydrogen selenide oxidation in the presence of dioxygen (Co²⁺ and Ni²⁺) and, finally, (iii) metal ions which do not afford protection and do not interact (Ca²⁺, Mg²⁺, Mn²⁺) or weakly interact (Fe²⁺) with selenide under the assayed conditions. When occurring, the insoluble complexes formed from divalent metal ions and selenide contained equimolar amounts of metal and selenium atoms. With the monovalent silver ion, the complex contained two silver atoms per selenium atom. Next, because selenides are compounds prone to oxidation, the stabilities of the above colloids were evaluated under oxidizing conditions. 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB), the reduction of which can be optically followed, was used to promote selenide oxidation. Complexes with cadmium, copper, lead, mercury or silver resisted dissolution by DTNB treatment over several hours. With nickel and cobalt, partial oxidation by DTNB occurred. On the other hand, when starting from ZnSe or FeSe complexes, full decompositions were obtained within a few tens of minutes. The above properties possibly explain why ZnSe and FeSe nanoparticles were not detected in animals exposed to selenocompounds.

  17. The Diorganoselenium and Selenides Compounds Electrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Tepecik, Abdulkadir; Altin, Zehra; Erturan, Seyfettin

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of Ar2SeCl2, and Ar2Se2, (Ar:CH3OC6H5; C2H5OC6H5) in acetonitrile (AN) containing tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborat (TBAFB) as supporting electrolyte was studied on a stationary electrode (spe). In order to elucidate the electrode reactions linear potential scan, cyclic voltammetry and controlled-potential coulometry were employed using a platinum electrode. It is shown that Ar2SeCl2 and Ar2Se2 are reduced and oxidized to Ar2Se, Ar2Se2Ar2, Se, and Ar2Se(BF4)2. It is generally accepted that as final electrochemical reduction products, the corresponding Ar2Se, Ar4Se2, and Se were formed. The disappearance of the diorganoselenium and selenide in the course of the coulometric experiments was validated by measuring the limiting current of the voltammetric waves at spe and UV spectrometry. PMID:19255626

  18. Nonlinear optical properties of bismuth selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bas, Derek; Babakiray, Sercan; Stanescu, Tudor; Lederman, David; Bristow, Alan

    Bismuth selenide (Bi2Se3) is a topological insulator with many interesting photonic properties. Much research has been done involving various types of photocurrents in an attempt to highlight the differences between the bulk electronic states and massless conducting surface states. Here, Bi2Se3 films varying in thickness from 6 to 40 quintuple layers have been produced via molecular beam epitaxy as a means to vary the relative contributions of bulk and surface. On these samples, optical measurements were performed at around 1.6 eV, which is enough energy to stimulate transitions from the Fermi level to a region near the second Dirac cone. Z-scan was used to measure saturable absorption, time-resolved two-color pump-probe was used to measure two-photon absorption, and a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer was used to measure linear absorption. Results were examined and analyzed with respect to thickness. Thickness-dependent band structures were produced using a tight-binding model and used to compare with experimental results.

  19. Ex Situ Formation of Metal Selenide Quantum Dots Using Bacterially Derived Selenide Precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Fellowes, Jonathan W.; Pattrick, Richard; Lloyd, Jon; Charnock, John M.; Coker, Victoria S.; Mosselmans, JFW; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Pearce, Carolyn I.

    2013-04-12

    Luminescent quantum dots were synthesized using bacterially derived selenide (SeII-) as the precursor. Biogenic SeII- was produced by the reduction of Se-IV by Veillonella atypica and compared directly against borohydride-reduced Se-IV for the production of glutathione-stabilized CdSe and beta-mercaptoethanol-stabilized ZnSe nanoparticles by aqueous synthesis. Biological SeII- formed smaller, narrower size distributed QDs under the same conditions. The growth kinetics of biologically sourced CdSe phases were slower. The proteins isolated from filter sterilized biogenic SeII- included a methylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylase previously characterized in the closely related Veillonella parvula. XAS analysis of the glutathione-capped CdSe at the S K-edge suggested that sulfur from the glutathione was structurally incorporated within the CdSe. A novel synchrotron based XAS technique was also developed to follow the nucleation of biological and inorganic selenide phases, and showed that biogenic SeII- is more stable and more resistant to beam-induced oxidative damage than its inorganic counterpart. The bacterial production of quantum dot precursors offers an alternative, 'green' synthesis technique that negates the requirement of expensive, toxic chemicals and suggests a possible link to the exploitation of selenium contaminated waste streams.

  20. Superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerene nanowhiskers.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Toshio; Hirata, Chika; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Miyazawa, Kun'ichi; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2016-09-01

    Superconductivity in alkali metal-doped fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs) was observed in K3.3C60NWs, Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs with transition temperatures at 17, 25 and 26 K, respectively. Almost full shielding volume fraction (~80%) was observed in K3.3C60NWs when subjected to thermal treatment at 200 °C for a duration of 24 h. In contrast, the shielding fraction of Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs were calculated to be 8% and 6%, respectively. Here we report on an extensive investigation of the superconducting properties of these AC60NWs (A  =  K3.3, Rb3.0 and Cs2.0Rb1.0). These properties are compared to the ones reported on the corresponding conventional (single-crystal or powder) K-doped fullerene. We also evaluated the critical current densities of these C60NWs using the Bean model under an applied magnetic field up to 50 kOe. PMID:27385220

  1. Superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerene nanowhiskers.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Toshio; Hirata, Chika; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Miyazawa, Kun'ichi; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2016-09-01

    Superconductivity in alkali metal-doped fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs) was observed in K3.3C60NWs, Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs with transition temperatures at 17, 25 and 26 K, respectively. Almost full shielding volume fraction (~80%) was observed in K3.3C60NWs when subjected to thermal treatment at 200 °C for a duration of 24 h. In contrast, the shielding fraction of Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs were calculated to be 8% and 6%, respectively. Here we report on an extensive investigation of the superconducting properties of these AC60NWs (A  =  K3.3, Rb3.0 and Cs2.0Rb1.0). These properties are compared to the ones reported on the corresponding conventional (single-crystal or powder) K-doped fullerene. We also evaluated the critical current densities of these C60NWs using the Bean model under an applied magnetic field up to 50 kOe.

  2. Superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerene nanowhiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeya, Hiroyuki; Konno, Toshio; Hirata, Chika; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Miyazawa, Kun'ichi; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2016-09-01

    Superconductivity in alkali metal-doped fullerene nanowhiskers (C60NWs) was observed in K3.3C60NWs, Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs with transition temperatures at 17, 25 and 26 K, respectively. Almost full shielding volume fraction (~80%) was observed in K3.3C60NWs when subjected to thermal treatment at 200 °C for a duration of 24 h. In contrast, the shielding fraction of Rb3.0C60NWs and Cs2.0Rb1.0C60NWs were calculated to be 8% and 6%, respectively. Here we report on an extensive investigation of the superconducting properties of these AC60NWs (A  =  K3.3, Rb3.0 and Cs2.0Rb1.0). These properties are compared to the ones reported on the corresponding conventional (single-crystal or powder) K-doped fullerene. We also evaluated the critical current densities of these C60NWs using the Bean model under an applied magnetic field up to 50 kOe.

  3. Keeping Track of the Selenide zoo. A Combined Optical Microscopy - EPMA Study of Complex Selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlothauer, T.; Renno, A. D.; Heide, G.

    2007-12-01

    Hunting for new mineral phases is a fascinating scientific activity. This kind of research not only serves the replenishment of mineralogy textbooks with new mineral names but also the industry with new potential semiconductors, laser crystals and other 'high-tech phases'. Chemical analyses using the electron microprobe are an essential intermediate step in the course of the description of a new mineral. The study of a great number of different Cu-Pb-Ag-As-Hg-Tl-Sb-Bi-Cd selenides from the former uranium deposit Schlema-Alberode (Saxony) in the German part of the Erzgebirge represented a twofold challenge to us. The complex genetic and age relations of the ore minerals and gangue minerals entailed the development of very complex microstructures in a tight space. Typical features are symplectitic intergrowths, exsolutions, fine lamellae, zoned crystals and the development of pseudo- and paramorphs. Altogether we found 34 different selenide, sulfide and arsenide minerals, including 6 dimorpheous phases. Many of these minerals are indistinguishable by electron-optical methods used during different stages of the study. Dimorpheous minerals like bellidoite and berzelianite are as much indistinguishable like intergrowths of the minerals berzelianite, mgriite and lollingite using backscattered and secondary electron images. Optical microscopy is the key to overcome these problems. We show that the step-by-step combination of polarized light microscopy, phase contrast microscopy and differential interference contrast microscopy using transmitted and reflected light allowed a secure discrimination of the different minerals and unknown phases. 16 elements are incorporated into these phases either as main, minor or trace elements. A multitude of overlapping peaks, potenzial fluorescence effects caused by adjacent phases and different matrices in the minerals demanded the development of several specific methods optimized for the analysis of Pb-Se-, Cu-Tl-Se-, Cu

  4. A nickel iron diselenide-derived efficient oxygen-evolution catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiang; Song, Fang; Hu, Xile

    2016-01-01

    Efficient oxygen-evolution reaction catalysts are required for the cost-effective generation of solar fuels. Metal selenides have been reported as promising oxygen-evolution catalysts; however, their active forms are yet to be elucidated. Here we show that a representative selenide catalyst, nickel selenide, is entirely converted into nickel hydroxide under oxygen-evolution conditions. This result indicates that metal selenides are unstable during oxygen evolution, and the in situ generated metal oxides are responsible for their activity. This knowledge inspired us to synthesize nanostructured nickel iron diselenide, a hitherto unknown metal selenide, and to use it as a templating precursor to a highly active nickel iron oxide catalyst. This selenide-derived oxide catalyses oxygen evolution with an overpotential of only 195 mV for 10 mA cm−2. Our work underscores the importance of identifying the active species of oxygen-evolution catalysts, and demonstrates how such knowledge can be applied to develop better catalysts. PMID:27503136

  5. Aqueous preparation of surfactant-free copper selenide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinqi; Li, Zhen; Yang, Jianping; Sun, Qiao; Dou, Shixue

    2015-03-15

    Uniform surfactant-free copper selenide (Cu2-xSe) nanowires were prepared via an aqueous route. The effects of reaction parameters such as Cu/Se precursor ratio, Se/NaOH ratio, and reaction time on the formation of nanowires were comprehensively investigated. The results show that Cu2-xSe nanowires were formed through the assembling of CuSe nanoplates, accompanied by their self-redox reactions. The resultant Cu2-xSe nanowires were explored as a potential thermoelectric candidate in comparison with commercial copper selenide powder. Both synthetic and commercial samples have a similar performance and their figures of merit are 0.29 and 0.38 at 750K, respectively.

  6. Isomorphism and solid solutions among Ag- and Au-selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palyanova, Galina A.; Seryotkin, Yurii V.; Kokh, Konstantin A.; Bakakin, Vladimir V.

    2016-09-01

    Au-Ag selenides were synthesized by heating stoichiometric mixtures of elementary substances of initial compositions Ag2-xAuxSe with a step of x=0.25 (0≤x≤2) to 1050 °C and annealing at 500 °C. Scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, electron microprobe analysis and X-ray powder diffraction methods have been applied to study synthesized samples. Results of studies of synthesized products revealed the existence of three solid solutions with limited isomorphism Ag↔Au: naumannite Ag2Se - Ag1.94Au0.06Se, fischesserite Ag3AuSe2 - Ag3.2Au0.8Se2 and gold selenide AuSe - Au0.94Ag0.06Se. Solid solutions and AgAuSe phases were added to the phase diagram of Ag-Au-Se system. Crystal-chemical interpretation of Ag-Au isomorphism in selenides was made on the basis of structural features of fischesserite, naumannite, and AuSe.

  7. Sodium selenide toxicity is mediated by O2-dependent DNA breaks.

    PubMed

    Peyroche, Gérald; Saveanu, Cosmin; Dauplais, Marc; Lazard, Myriam; Beuneu, François; Decourty, Laurence; Malabat, Christophe; Jacquier, Alain; Blanquet, Sylvain; Plateau, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen selenide is a recurrent metabolite of selenium compounds. However, few experiments studied the direct link between this toxic agent and cell death. To address this question, we first screened a systematic collection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid knockout strains for sensitivity to sodium selenide, a donor for hydrogen selenide (H(2)Se/HSe(-/)Se(2-)). Among the genes whose deletion caused hypersensitivity, homologous recombination and DNA damage checkpoint genes were over-represented, suggesting that DNA double-strand breaks are a dominant cause of hydrogen selenide toxicity. Consistent with this hypothesis, treatment of S. cerevisiae cells with sodium selenide triggered G2/M checkpoint activation and induced in vivo chromosome fragmentation. In vitro, sodium selenide directly induced DNA phosphodiester-bond breaks via an O(2)-dependent reaction. The reaction was inhibited by mannitol, a hydroxyl radical quencher, but not by superoxide dismutase or catalase, strongly suggesting the involvement of hydroxyl radicals and ruling out participations of superoxide anions or hydrogen peroxide. The (•)OH signature could indeed be detected by electron spin resonance upon exposure of a solution of sodium selenide to O(2). Finally we showed that, in vivo, toxicity strictly depended on the presence of O(2). Therefore, by combining genome-wide and biochemical approaches, we demonstrated that, in yeast cells, hydrogen selenide induces toxic DNA breaks through an O(2)-dependent radical-based mechanism. PMID:22586468

  8. Transition-metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride laser crystal and lasers

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, W.F.; Page, R.H.; DeLoach, L.D.; Payne, S.A.

    1996-07-30

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed of transition metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride host crystals which have four fold coordinated substitutional sites. The host crystals include II-VI compounds. The host crystal is doped with a transition metal laser ion, e.g., chromium, cobalt or iron. In particular, Cr{sup 2+}-doped ZnS and ZnSe generate laser action near 2.3 {micro}m. Oxide, chloride, fluoride, bromide and iodide crystals with similar structures can also be used. Important aspects of these laser materials are the tetrahedral site symmetry of the host crystal, low excited state absorption losses and high luminescence efficiency, and the d{sup 4} and d{sup 6} electronic configurations of the transition metal ions. The same materials are also useful as saturable absorbers for passive Q-switching applications. The laser materials can be used as gain media in amplifiers and oscillators; these gain media can be incorporated into waveguides and semiconductor lasers. 18 figs.

  9. Transition-metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride laser crystal and lasers

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, William F.; Page, Ralph H.; DeLoach, Laura D.; Payne, Stephen A.

    1996-01-01

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed of transition metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride host crystals which have four fold coordinated substitutional sites. The host crystals include II-VI compounds. The host crystal is doped with a transition metal laser ion, e.g., chromium, cobalt or iron. In particular, Cr.sup.2+ -doped ZnS and ZnSe generate laser action near 2.3 .mu.m. Oxide, chloride, fluoride, bromide and iodide crystals with similar structures can also be used. Important aspects of these laser materials are the tetrahedral site symmetry of the host crystal, low excited state absorption losses and high luminescence efficiency, and the d.sup.4 and d.sup.6 electronic configurations of the transition metal ions. The same materials are also useful as saturable absorbers for passive Q-switching applications. The laser materials can be used as gain media in amplifiers and oscillators; these gain media can be incorporated into waveguides and semiconductor lasers.

  10. Development of the data base for a degradation model of a selenide RTG. [Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapfer, G.; Truscello, V. C.

    1977-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the evaluation of the materials used in a selenide radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). These materials are composed of n-type gadolinium selenide and n-type copper selenide. A three-fold evaluation approach is being used: (1) the study of the rate of change of the thermal conductivity of the material, (2) the investigation of the long-term stability of the material's Seebeck voltage and electrical resistivity under current and temperature gradient conditions, and (3) determination of the physical behavior and compatibility of the material with surrounding insulation at elevated temperatures. Programmatically, the third category of characteristic evaluation is being emphasized.

  11. Synthesis of carbohydrate-based vinyl selenides via Wittig-type reactions.

    PubMed

    Boutureira, Omar; Matheu, M Isabel; Díaz, Yolanda; Castillón, Sergio

    2007-04-01

    Carbohydrate-based vinyl selenides of the arabino, ribo and 2-deoxy-ribo configuration have been prepared by Wittig-type reactions of various protected furanoses. Moderate yields were always obtained due to the nature and reactivity of both carbohydrate lactols and selenium-based olefinating reagents under the conditions tested. A detailed study of the olefination reaction and the behaviour of vinyl selenides towards the electrophilic-induced cyclization will be discussed.

  12. Growth of zinc selenide crystals by physical vapor transport in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1995-01-01

    The growth of single crystals of zinc selenide was carried out by both closed ampoule physical vapor transport and effusive ampoule physical vapor transport (EAPVT). The latter technique was shown to be a much more efficient method for the seeded growth of zinc selenide, resulting in higher transport rates. Furthermore, EAPVT work on CdTe has shown that growth onto /n11/ seeds is advantageous for obtaining reduced twinning and defect densities in II-VI sphalerite materials.

  13. Hierarchically structured porous cadmium selenide polycrystals using polystyrene bilayer templates.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Young; Hendricks, Nicholas R; Carter, Kenneth R

    2012-09-18

    In this study, a novel approach is demonstrated to fabricate hierarchically structured cadmium selenide (CdSe) layers with size-tunable nano/microporous morphologies achieved using polystyrene (PS) bilayered templates (top layer: colloidal template) via potentiostatic electrochemical deposition. The PS bilayer template is made in two steps. First, various PS patterns (stripes, ellipsoids, and circles) are prepared as the bottom layers through imprint lithography. In a second step, a top template is deposited that consists of a self-assembled layer of colloidal 2D packed PS particles. Electrochemical growth of CdSe crystals in the voids and selective removal of the PS bilayered templates give rise to hierarchically patterned 2D hexagonal porous CdSe structures. This simple and facile technique provides various unconventional porous CdSe films, arising from the effect of the PS bottom templates.

  14. Infrared Photoablation Studies of Arsenic Selenide with the Vanderbilt FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adair, Janet; Marka, Zsuzsanna; Albert, Mike; Singh, Shailesh; Tolk, Norman

    2000-03-01

    In recent years arsenic selenide has shown a high potential for application as an infrared fiber material. It transmits in most of the 2-10 micron region, which is available at the Vanderbilt Free Electron Laser (FEL). The ablation threshold was measured for the bulk material at several different wavelengths corresponding to impurity absorption, such as Se-H and C-H vibrational modes. Using a time of flight spectrometer to detect the ablated particles, individual As/Se ions as well as bigger clusters of 6 As/Se atoms were observed. The Vanderbilt FEL delivers 3-5 microsecond long macropulses which consist of 1 ps long micropulses separated by 350 ps. Previous threshold measurements were made with the entire length of the macropulse hitting the sample. In the future a Pockel cell will be used to reduce the length of the macropulse to investigate the pulse length dependence of the ablation process. (Work funded by ONR)

  15. Thermal lensing in silver gallium selenide parametric oscillator crystals.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, C L; Cooper, D G; Budni, P A; Knights, M G; Schepler, K L; Dedomenico, R; Catella, G C

    1994-05-20

    We performed an experimental investigation of thermal lensing in silver gallium selenide (AgGaSe(2)) optical parametric oscillator crystals pumped by a 2-µm laser at ambient temperature. We determined an empirical expression for the effective thermal focusing power in terms of the pump power, beam diameter, crystal length, and absorption coefficient. This relation may be used to estimate average power limitations in designing AgGaSe(2) optical parametric oscillators. We also demonstrated an 18% slope efficiency from a 2-µm pumped AgGaSe(2) optical parametric oscillator operated at 77 K, at which temperature thermal lensing is substantially reduced because of an increase in the thermal conductivity and a decrease in the thermal index gradient dn/dT. Cryogenic cooling may provide an additional option for scaling up the average power capability of a 2-µm pumped AgGaSe(2) optical parametric oscillator.

  16. Spin Transfer Torque Generated by the Topological Insulator Bismuth Selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellnik, Alex; Grab, Jennifer L.; Mintun, Peter J.; Lee, Joon S.; Richardella, Anthony; Buhrman, Robert A.; Samarth, Nitin; Ralph, Dan C.

    2014-03-01

    We measure large spin-transfer torques generated by in-plane currents in thin films of the topological insulator bismuth selenide at room temperature. We use spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance in Bi2Se3/Ni81Fe19 bilayers to determine that the spin-torque arising from the Bi2Se3 and acting on the Ni81Fe19 layer possesses substantial vector components both in the sample plane and perpendicular to the plane. The out-of-plane torque is several times larger than expected from the Oersted field, and the efficiency of in-plane (anti-damping) spin torque generation per unit current density in the Bi2Se3 is greater than has been observed in any other material.

  17. Nanopatterned cadmium selenide Langmuir-Blodgett platform for leukemia detection.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aditya; Pandey, Chandra M; Matharu, Zimple; Soni, Udit; Sapra, Sameer; Sumana, Gajjala; Pandey, Manoj K; Chatterjee, Tathagat; Malhotra, Bansi D

    2012-04-01

    We present results of the studies relating to preparation of Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers of tri-n-octylphosphine oxide-capped cadmium selenide quantum dots (QCdSe) onto indium-tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate. The monolayer behavior has been studied at the air-water interface under various subphase conditions. This nanopatterned platform has been explored to fabricate an electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) by covalently immobilizing the thiol-terminated oligonucleotide probe sequence via a displacement reaction. The results of electrochemical response studies reveal that this biosensor can detect target DNA in the range of 10(-6) to 10(-14) M within 120 s, has a shelf life of 2 months, and can be used about 8 times. Further, this nucleic acid sensor has been found to distinguish the CML-positive and the control negative clinical patient samples.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of luminescent aluminium selenide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Balitskii, O.A.; Demchenko, P.Yu.; Mijowska, E.; Cendrowski, K.

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Synthesis procedure of size and sharp controlled Al{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanocrystals is introduced. ► Obtained nanoparticles are highly crystalline of hexagonal wurtzite type. ► Colloidal Al{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanocrystals are highly luminescent in the near UV spectral region. ► They can be implemented in light emitters/collectors, concurring with II–VI nanodots. -- Abstract: We propose the synthesis and characterization of colloidal aluminium selenide nanocrystals using trioctylphosphine as a solvent. The nanoparticles have several absorption bands in the spectral region 330–410 nm and are bright UV-blue luminescent, which is well demanded in light collecting and emitting devices, e.g. for tuning their spectral characteristics to higher energy solar photons.

  19. Double-Diffusive Convection During Growth of Halides and Selenides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Su, Ching-Hua; Duval, Walter M. B.

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metal halides and selenides have unique properties which make them excellent materials for chemical, biological and radiological sensors. Recently it has been shown that selenohalides are even better materials than halides or selenides for gamma-ray detection. These materials also meet the strong needs of a wide band imaging technology to cover ultra-violet (UV), midwave infrared wavelength (MWIR) to very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) region for hyperspectral imager components such as etalon filters and acousto-optic tunable filters (AO). In fact AOTF based imagers based on these materials have some superiority than imagers based on liquid crystals, FTIR, Fabry-Perot, grating, etalon, electro-optic modulation, piezoelectric and several other concepts. For example, broadband spectral and imagers have problems of processing large amount of information during real-time observation. Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter (AOTF) imagers are being developed to fill the need of reducing processing time of data, low cost operation and key to achieving the goal of covering long-wave infrared (LWIR). At the present time spectral imaging systems are based on the use of diffraction gratings are typically used in a pushbroom or whiskbroom mode. They are mostly used in systems and acquire large amounts of hyperspectral data that is processed off-line later. In contrast, acousto-optic tunable filter spectral imagers require very little image processing, providing new strategies for object recognition and tracking. They are ideally suited for tactical situations requiring immediate real-time image processing. But the performance of these imagers depends on the quality and homogeneity of acousto-optic materials. In addition for many systems requirements are so demanding that crystals up to sizes of 10 cm length are desired. We have studied several selenides and halide crystals for laser and AO imagers for MWIR and LWIR wavelength regions. We have grown and fabricated crystals of

  20. Amorphous Indium Selenide Thin Films Prepared by RF Sputtering: Thickness-Induced Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Han, Myoung Yoo; Park, Yong Seob; Kim, Nam-Hoon

    2016-05-01

    The influence of indium composition, controlled by changing the film thickness, on the optical and electrical properties of amorphous indium selenide thin films was studied for the application of these materials as Cd-free buffer layers in CI(G)S solar cells. Indium selenide thin films were prepared using RF magnetron sputtering method. The indium composition of the amorphous indium selenide thin films was varied from 94.56 to 49.72 at% by increasing the film thickness from 30 to 70 nm. With a decrease in film thickness, the optical transmittance increased from 87.63% to 96.03% and Eg decreased from 3.048 to 2.875 eV. Carrier concentration and resistivity showed excellent values of ≥1015 cm(-3) and ≤ 10(4) Ω x cm, respectively. The conductivity type of the amorphous indium selenide thin films could be controlled by changing the film-thickness-induced amount of In. These results indicate the possibility of tuning the properties of amorphous indium selenide thin films by changing their composition for use as an alternate buffer layer material in CI(G)S solar cells.

  1. Enzymatic methylation of sulfide, selenide, and organic thiols by Tetrahymena thermophila

    SciTech Connect

    Drotar, A.; Fall, L.R.; Mishalanie, E.A.; Tavernier, J.E.; Fall, R.

    1987-09-01

    Cell extracts from the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila catalyzed the S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methylation of sulfide. The product of the reaction, methanethiol, was detected by a radiometric assay and by a gas-chromatographic assay coupled to a sulfur-selective chemiluminescence detector. Extracts also catalyzed the methylation of selenide, and the product was shown by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to be methaneselenol. The sulfide and selenide methyltransferase activities copurified with the aromatic thiol methyltransferase previously characterized from this organism, but heat inactivation experiments suggested the involvement of distinct sulfide and selenide methyltransferases. Short-term toxicity tests were carried out for sulfide, selenide, and their methylated derivatives; the monomethylated forms were somewhat more toxic than the nonmethylated or dimethylated compounds. Cell suspensions of T. thermophila exposed to sulfide, methanethiol, or their selenium analogs emitted methylated derivatives into the headspace. These results suggest that this freshwater protozoan is capable of the stepwise methylation of sulfide and selenide, leading to the release of volatile methylated sulfur or selenium gases.

  2. Amorphous Indium Selenide Thin Films Prepared by RF Sputtering: Thickness-Induced Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Han, Myoung Yoo; Park, Yong Seob; Kim, Nam-Hoon

    2016-05-01

    The influence of indium composition, controlled by changing the film thickness, on the optical and electrical properties of amorphous indium selenide thin films was studied for the application of these materials as Cd-free buffer layers in CI(G)S solar cells. Indium selenide thin films were prepared using RF magnetron sputtering method. The indium composition of the amorphous indium selenide thin films was varied from 94.56 to 49.72 at% by increasing the film thickness from 30 to 70 nm. With a decrease in film thickness, the optical transmittance increased from 87.63% to 96.03% and Eg decreased from 3.048 to 2.875 eV. Carrier concentration and resistivity showed excellent values of ≥1015 cm(-3) and ≤ 10(4) Ω x cm, respectively. The conductivity type of the amorphous indium selenide thin films could be controlled by changing the film-thickness-induced amount of In. These results indicate the possibility of tuning the properties of amorphous indium selenide thin films by changing their composition for use as an alternate buffer layer material in CI(G)S solar cells. PMID:27483886

  3. Thermoelectric characterization of individual bismuth selenide topological insulator nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hao; Wang, Xiaomeng; Xiong, Yucheng; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Yin; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Juekuan; Xu, Dongyan

    2015-04-01

    Bismuth selenide (Bi2Se3) nanoribbons have attracted tremendous research interest recently to study the properties of topologically protected surface states that enable new opportunities to enhance the thermoelectric performance. However, the thermoelectric characterization of individual Bi2Se3 nanoribbons is rare due to the technological challenges in the measurements. One challenge is to ensure good contacts between the nanoribbon and electrodes in order to determine the thermal and electrical properties accurately. In this work, we report the thermoelectric characterization of individual Bi2Se3 nanoribbons via a suspended microdevice method. Through careful measurements, we have demonstrated that contact thermal resistance is negligible after the electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of platinum/carbon (Pt/C) composites at the contacts between the nanoribbon and electrodes. It is shown that the thermal conductivity of the Bi2Se3 nanoribbons is less than 50% of the bulk value over the whole measurement temperature range, which can be attributed to enhanced phonon boundary scattering. Our results indicate that intrinsic Bi2Se3 nanoribbons prepared in this work are highly doped n-type semiconductors, and therefore the Fermi level should be in the conduction band and no topological transport behavior can be observed in the intrinsic system.

  4. Cu Vacancies Boost Cation Exchange Reactions in Copper Selenide Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated cation exchange reactions in copper selenide nanocrystals using two different divalent ions as guest cations (Zn2+ and Cd2+) and comparing the reactivity of close to stoichiometric (that is, Cu2Se) nanocrystals with that of nonstoichiometric (Cu2–xSe) nanocrystals, to gain insights into the mechanism of cation exchange at the nanoscale. We have found that the presence of a large density of copper vacancies significantly accelerated the exchange process at room temperature and corroborated vacancy diffusion as one of the main drivers in these reactions. Partially exchanged samples exhibited Janus-like heterostructures made of immiscible domains sharing epitaxial interfaces. No alloy or core–shell structures were observed. The role of phosphines, like tri-n-octylphosphine, in these reactions, is multifaceted: besides acting as selective solvating ligands for Cu+ ions exiting the nanoparticles during exchange, they also enable anion diffusion, by extracting an appreciable amount of selenium to the solution phase, which may further promote the exchange process. In reactions run at a higher temperature (150 °C), copper vacancies were quickly eliminated from the nanocrystals and major differences in Cu stoichiometries, as well as in reactivities, between the initial Cu2Se and Cu2–xSe samples were rapidly smoothed out. These experiments indicate that cation exchange, under the specific conditions of this work, is more efficient at room temperature than at higher temperature. PMID:26140622

  5. Solvent‐Dependent Facile Synthesis of Diaryl Selenides and Biphenols Employing Selenium Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Quell, Thomas; Mirion, Michael; Schollmeyer, Dieter; Dyballa, Katrin M.; Franke, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Biphenols are important structure motifs for ligand systems in organic catalysis and are therefore included in the category of so‐called “privileged ligands”. We have developed a new synthetic pathway to construct these structures by the use of selenium dioxide, a stable, powerful, and commercially available oxidizer. Our new, and easy to perform protocol gives rise to biphenols and diaryl selenides depending on the solvent employed. Oxidative treatment of phenols in acetic acid yields the corresponding biphenols, whereas conversion in pyridine results in the preferred formation of diaryl selenides. As a consequence, we were able to isolate a broad scope of novel diaryl selenides, which could act as pincer‐like ligands with further applications in organic synthesis or as ligands in transition metal catalysis. PMID:27308222

  6. Solvent-Dependent Facile Synthesis of Diaryl Selenides and Biphenols Employing Selenium Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Quell, Thomas; Mirion, Michael; Schollmeyer, Dieter; Dyballa, Katrin M; Franke, Robert; Waldvogel, Siegfried R

    2016-04-01

    Biphenols are important structure motifs for ligand systems in organic catalysis and are therefore included in the category of so-called "privileged ligands". We have developed a new synthetic pathway to construct these structures by the use of selenium dioxide, a stable, powerful, and commercially available oxidizer. Our new, and easy to perform protocol gives rise to biphenols and diaryl selenides depending on the solvent employed. Oxidative treatment of phenols in acetic acid yields the corresponding biphenols, whereas conversion in pyridine results in the preferred formation of diaryl selenides. As a consequence, we were able to isolate a broad scope of novel diaryl selenides, which could act as pincer-like ligands with further applications in organic synthesis or as ligands in transition metal catalysis. PMID:27308222

  7. Solid-gas phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of cadmium selenide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigai, A. G.; Wiedemeier, H.

    1972-01-01

    Accurate vapor pressures are determined through direct weight loss measurements using the Knudsen effusion technique. The experimental data are evaluated by establishing the mode of vaporization and determining the heat capacity of cadmium selenide at elevated temperatures. Additional information is obtained through a second- and third-law evaluation of data, namely, the heat of formation and the absolute entropy of cadmium selenide. A preferential loss of selenium during the initial heating of CdSe is observed, which leads to a deviation in stoichiometry.

  8. Photoconductivity in reactively evaporated copper indium selenide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Urmila, K. S. Asokan, T. Namitha Pradeep, B.; Jacob, Rajani; Philip, Rachel Reena

    2014-01-28

    Copper indium selenide thin films of composition CuInSe{sub 2} with thickness of the order of 130 nm are deposited on glass substrate at a temperature of 423 ±5 K and pressure of 10{sup −5} mbar using reactive evaporation, a variant of Gunther's three temperature method with high purity Copper (99.999%), Indium (99.999%) and Selenium (99.99%) as the elemental starting materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies shows that the films are polycrystalline in nature having preferred orientation of grains along the (112) plane. The structural type of the film is found to be tetragonal with particle size of the order of 32 nm. The structural parameters such as lattice constant, particle size, dislocation density, number of crystallites per unit area and strain in the film are also evaluated. The surface morphology of CuInSe{sub 2} films are studied using 2D and 3D atomic force microscopy to estimate the grain size and surface roughness respectively. Analysis of the absorption spectrum of the film recorded using UV-Vis-NIR Spectrophotometer in the wavelength range from 2500 nm to cutoff revealed that the film possess a direct allowed transition with a band gap of 1.05 eV and a high value of absorption coefficient (α) of 10{sup 6} cm{sup −1} at 570 nm. Photoconductivity at room temperature is measured after illuminating the film with an FSH lamp (82 V, 300 W). Optical absorption studies in conjunction with the good photoconductivity of the prepared p-type CuInSe{sub 2} thin films indicate its suitability in photovoltaic applications.

  9. Ecotoxicological assessment of solar cell leachates: Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) cells show higher activity than organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells.

    PubMed

    Brun, Nadja Rebecca; Wehrli, Bernhard; Fent, Karl

    2016-02-01

    Despite the increasing use of photovoltaics their potential environmental risks are poorly understood. Here, we compared ecotoxicological effects of two thin-film photovoltaics: established copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Leachates were produced by exposing photovoltaics to UV light, physical damage, and exposure to environmentally relevant model waters, representing mesotrophic lake water, acidic rain, and seawater. CIGS cell leachates contained 583 μg L(-1) molybdenum at lake water, whereas at acidic rain and seawater conditions, iron, copper, zinc, molybdenum, cadmium, silver, and tin were present up to 7219 μg L(-1). From OPV, copper (14 μg L(-1)), zinc (87 μg L(-1)) and silver (78 μg L(-1)) leached. Zebrafish embryos were exposed until 120 h post-fertilization to these extracts. CIGS leachates produced under acidic rain, as well as CIGS and OPV leachates produced under seawater conditions resulted in a marked hatching delay and increase in heart edema. Depending on model water and solar cell, transcriptional alterations occurred in genes involved in oxidative stress (cat), hormonal activity (vtg1, ar), metallothionein (mt2), ER stress (bip, chop), and apoptosis (casp9). The effects were dependent on the concentrations of cationic metals in leachates. Addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid protected zebrafish embryos from morphological and molecular effects. Our study suggests that metals leaching from damaged CIGS cells, may pose a potential environmental risk. PMID:26615488

  10. Ecotoxicological assessment of solar cell leachates: Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) cells show higher activity than organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells.

    PubMed

    Brun, Nadja Rebecca; Wehrli, Bernhard; Fent, Karl

    2016-02-01

    Despite the increasing use of photovoltaics their potential environmental risks are poorly understood. Here, we compared ecotoxicological effects of two thin-film photovoltaics: established copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Leachates were produced by exposing photovoltaics to UV light, physical damage, and exposure to environmentally relevant model waters, representing mesotrophic lake water, acidic rain, and seawater. CIGS cell leachates contained 583 μg L(-1) molybdenum at lake water, whereas at acidic rain and seawater conditions, iron, copper, zinc, molybdenum, cadmium, silver, and tin were present up to 7219 μg L(-1). From OPV, copper (14 μg L(-1)), zinc (87 μg L(-1)) and silver (78 μg L(-1)) leached. Zebrafish embryos were exposed until 120 h post-fertilization to these extracts. CIGS leachates produced under acidic rain, as well as CIGS and OPV leachates produced under seawater conditions resulted in a marked hatching delay and increase in heart edema. Depending on model water and solar cell, transcriptional alterations occurred in genes involved in oxidative stress (cat), hormonal activity (vtg1, ar), metallothionein (mt2), ER stress (bip, chop), and apoptosis (casp9). The effects were dependent on the concentrations of cationic metals in leachates. Addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid protected zebrafish embryos from morphological and molecular effects. Our study suggests that metals leaching from damaged CIGS cells, may pose a potential environmental risk.

  11. Iron Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... detect and help diagnose iron deficiency or iron overload. In people with anemia , these tests can help ... also be ordered when iron deficiency or iron overload is suspected. Early iron deficiency often goes unnoticed. ...

  12. Benzyltrifluoromethyl (or Fluoroalkyl) Selenide: Reagent for Electrophilic Trifluoromethyl (or Fluoroalkyl) Selenolation.

    PubMed

    Glenadel, Quentin; Ismalaj, Ermal; Billard, Thierry

    2016-09-16

    Trifluoromethylseleno substituent (CF3Se) is an emerging group, but its direct introduction onto organic molecules is still quite limited and mainly restricted to nucleophilic methods. Herein, we describe a new approach to easily and safely perform electrophilic trifluoromethylselenolation starting from a simple and easily accessible reagent, namely, benzyltrifluoromethyl selenide. This strategy can be generalized to various fluoroalkylselanyl groups, even functionalized ones. PMID:27571314

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain RB, a Bacterium Capable of Synthesizing Cadmium Selenide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ayano, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Masashi; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RB is a bacterium capable of synthesizing cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles and was isolated from a soil sample. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa strain RB. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a draft genome of a CdSe-synthesizing bacterium.

  14. Synthesis and optical properties of cadmium selenide quantum dots for white light-emitting diode application

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xianmei; Wang, Yilin; Gule, Teri; Luo, Qiang; Zhou, Liya; Gong, Fuzhong

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Stable CdSe QDs were synthesized by the one-step and two-level process respectively. ► The fabricated white LEDs show good white balance. ► CdSe QDs present well green to yellow band luminescence. ► CdSe QDs displayed a broad excitation band. - Abstract: Yellow light-emitting cadmium selenide quantum dots were synthesized using one-step and two-step methods in an aqueous medium. The structural luminescent properties of these quantum dots were investigated. The obtained cadmium selenide quantum dots displayed a broad excitation band suitable for blue or near-ultraviolet light-emitting diode applications. White light-emitting diodes were fabricated by coating the cadmium selenide samples onto a 460 nm-emitting indium gallium nitrite chip. Both samples exhibited good white balance. Under a 20 mA working current, the white light-emitting diode fabricated via the one-step and two-step methods showed Commission Internationale de l’Éclairage coordinates at (0.27, 0.23) and (0.27, 0.33), respectively, and a color rendering index equal to 41 and 37, respectively. The one-step approach was simpler, greener, and more effective than the two-step approach. The one-step approach can be enhanced by combining cadmium selenide quantum dots with proper phosphors.

  15. Temperature dependent local atomic displacements in ammonia intercalated iron selenide superconductor

    PubMed Central

    Paris, E.; Simonelli, L.; Wakita, T.; Marini, C.; Lee, J.-H.; Olszewski, W.; Terashima, K.; Kakuto, T.; Nishimoto, N.; Kimura, T.; Kudo, K.; Kambe, T.; Nohara, M.; Yokoya, T.; Saini, N. L.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, ammonia-thermal reaction has been used for molecular intercalation in layered FeSe, resulting a new Lix(NH3)yFe2Se2 superconductor with Tc ~ 45 K. Here, we have used temperature dependent extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) to investigate local atomic displacements in single crystals of this new superconductor. Using polarized EXAFS at Fe K-edge we have obtained direct information on the local Fe-Se and Fe-Fe bondlengths and corresponding mean square relative displacements (MSRD). We find that the Se-height in the intercalated system is lower than the one in the binary FeSe, suggesting compressed FeSe4 tetrahedron in the title system. Incidentally, there is hardly any effect of the intercalation on the bondlengths characteristics, revealed by the Einstein temperatures, that are similar to those found in the binary FeSe. Therefore, the molecular intercalation induces an effective compression and decouples the FeSe slabs. Furthermore, the results reveal an anomalous change in the atomic correlations across Tc, appearing as a clear decrease in the MSRD, indicating hardening of the local lattice mode. Similar response of the local lattice has been found in other families of superconductors, e.g., A15-type and cuprates superconductors. This observation suggests that local atomic correlations should have some direct correlation with the superconductivity. PMID:27276997

  16. Temperature dependent local atomic displacements in ammonia intercalated iron selenide superconductor.

    PubMed

    Paris, E; Simonelli, L; Wakita, T; Marini, C; Lee, J-H; Olszewski, W; Terashima, K; Kakuto, T; Nishimoto, N; Kimura, T; Kudo, K; Kambe, T; Nohara, M; Yokoya, T; Saini, N L

    2016-01-01

    Recently, ammonia-thermal reaction has been used for molecular intercalation in layered FeSe, resulting a new Lix(NH3)yFe2Se2 superconductor with Tc ~ 45 K. Here, we have used temperature dependent extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) to investigate local atomic displacements in single crystals of this new superconductor. Using polarized EXAFS at Fe K-edge we have obtained direct information on the local Fe-Se and Fe-Fe bondlengths and corresponding mean square relative displacements (MSRD). We find that the Se-height in the intercalated system is lower than the one in the binary FeSe, suggesting compressed FeSe4 tetrahedron in the title system. Incidentally, there is hardly any effect of the intercalation on the bondlengths characteristics, revealed by the Einstein temperatures, that are similar to those found in the binary FeSe. Therefore, the molecular intercalation induces an effective compression and decouples the FeSe slabs. Furthermore, the results reveal an anomalous change in the atomic correlations across Tc, appearing as a clear decrease in the MSRD, indicating hardening of the local lattice mode. Similar response of the local lattice has been found in other families of superconductors, e.g., A15-type and cuprates superconductors. This observation suggests that local atomic correlations should have some direct correlation with the superconductivity. PMID:27276997

  17. Temperature dependent local atomic displacements in ammonia intercalated iron selenide superconductor.

    PubMed

    Paris, E; Simonelli, L; Wakita, T; Marini, C; Lee, J-H; Olszewski, W; Terashima, K; Kakuto, T; Nishimoto, N; Kimura, T; Kudo, K; Kambe, T; Nohara, M; Yokoya, T; Saini, N L

    2016-01-01

    Recently, ammonia-thermal reaction has been used for molecular intercalation in layered FeSe, resulting a new Lix(NH3)yFe2Se2 superconductor with Tc ~ 45 K. Here, we have used temperature dependent extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) to investigate local atomic displacements in single crystals of this new superconductor. Using polarized EXAFS at Fe K-edge we have obtained direct information on the local Fe-Se and Fe-Fe bondlengths and corresponding mean square relative displacements (MSRD). We find that the Se-height in the intercalated system is lower than the one in the binary FeSe, suggesting compressed FeSe4 tetrahedron in the title system. Incidentally, there is hardly any effect of the intercalation on the bondlengths characteristics, revealed by the Einstein temperatures, that are similar to those found in the binary FeSe. Therefore, the molecular intercalation induces an effective compression and decouples the FeSe slabs. Furthermore, the results reveal an anomalous change in the atomic correlations across Tc, appearing as a clear decrease in the MSRD, indicating hardening of the local lattice mode. Similar response of the local lattice has been found in other families of superconductors, e.g., A15-type and cuprates superconductors. This observation suggests that local atomic correlations should have some direct correlation with the superconductivity.

  18. Iron Chelation

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron overload and need treatment. What is iron overload? Iron chelation therapy is used when you have ... may want to perform: How quickly does iron overload happen? This is different for each person. It ...

  19. Metal-to-insulator crossover in alkali doped zeolite.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Mutsuo; Jeglič, Peter; Krajnc, Andraž; Žitko, Rok; Nakano, Takehito; Nozue, Yasuo; Arčon, Denis

    2016-01-01

    We report a systematic nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of the (23)Na spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, in sodium loaded low-silica X (LSX) zeolite, Nan/Na12-LSX, for various loading levels of sodium atoms n across the metal-to-insulator crossover. For high loading levels of n ≥ 14.2, 1/T1T shows nearly temperature-independent behaviour between 10 K and 25 K consistent with the Korringa relaxation mechanism and the metallic ground state. As the loading levels decrease below n ≤ 11.6, the extracted density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level sharply decreases, although a residual DOS at Fermi level is still observed even in the samples that lack the metallic Drude-peak in the optical reflectance. The observed crossover is a result of a complex loading-level dependence of electric potential felt by the electrons confined to zeolite cages, where the electronic correlations and disorder both play an important role.

  20. Enhanced Glutathione Peroxidase Activity of Water-Soluble and Polyethylene Glycol-Supported Selenides, Related Spirodioxyselenuranes, and Pincer Selenuranes.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Nicole M R; Press, David J; Mayder, Don M; Garnica, Pablo; Doyle, Lisa M; Back, Thomas G

    2016-09-01

    Diaryl selenides containing o-hydroxymethylene substituents function as peroxide-destroying mimetics of the antioxidant selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx), via oxidation to the corresponding spirodioxyselenuranes with hydrogen peroxide and subsequent reduction back to the original selenides with glutathione. Parent selenides with 3-hydroxypropyl or 2,3-dihydroxypropyl groups produced the novel compounds 10 and 11, respectively, with greatly improved aqueous solubility and catalytic activity. The phenolic derivative 28 displayed similarly ameliorated properties and also modest radical-inhibiting antioxidant activity, as evidenced by an assay based on phenolic hydrogen atom transfer to the stable free radical DPPH. In contrast, several selenides that afford pincer selenuranes (e.g., 20 and 21) instead of spiroselenuranes upon oxidation showed inferior catalytic activity. Several selenide analogues were attached to polyethylene glycol (PEG) oligomers, as PEG substituents can improve water solubility and bioavailability, while retarding clearance. Again, the PEG derivatives afforded remarkable activity when oxidation generated spirodioxyselenuranes and diminished activity when pincer compounds were produced. Several such compounds proved to be ca. 10- to 100-fold catalytically superior to the diaryl selenides and their spirodioxyselenurane counterparts investigated previously. Finally, an NMR-based assay employing glutathione in D2O was designed to accommodate the faster reacting water-soluble mimetics and to more closely duplicate in vivo conditions. PMID:27525346

  1. An amphiphilic selenide catalyst behaves like a hybrid mimic of protein disulfide isomerase and glutathione peroxidase 7.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kenta; Moriai, Kenji; Ogawa, Akinobu; Iwaoka, Michio

    2014-12-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and glutathione peroxidase 7 (GPx7) cooperatively promote the oxidative folding of disulfide (SS)-containing proteins in endoplasmic reticulum by recognizing the nascent proteins to convert them into the native folds by means of SS formation and SS isomerization and by catalyzing reoxidation of reduced PDI with H2O2, respectively. In this study, new amphiphilic selenides with a long-chain alkyl group were designed as hybrid mimics of PDI and GPx7 and were applied to the refolding of reduced hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL-R). Competitive SS formation at pH 4 using HEL-R and glutathione (GSH) in the presence of the selenide catalyst and H2O2 showed that the amphiphilic selenides can preferentially catalyze SS formation of HEL-R, probably on account of hydrophobic interactions between the protein and the catalyst. In contrast, simple water-soluble selenides did not exhibit such behavior. In addition, when the pH of the solution was adjusted to 8.5 after the SS formation, surviving GSH promoted the SS isomerization of misfolded HEL to recover the native SS linkages. Thus, the amphiphilic selenides designed here could mimic the function of the PDI-GPx7 system. The combination of a water-soluble selenide and a long-chain alkyl group would be a useful motif in designing medicines for both protein misfolding diseases and antioxidant therapy.

  2. Modified chemical deposition and physico-chemical properties of copper(I) selenide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathan, H. M.; Lokhande, C. D.; Amalnerkar, D. P.; Seth, T.

    2003-04-01

    Semiconducting stoichiometric copper(I) selenide (Cu 2Se) thin films were deposited onto glass substrate using a modified chemical method. The deposition conditions such as concentration and pH of cation and anionic precursor solutions, immersion and rinsing times and number of immersions, etc. were optimized for Cu 2Se films. The characterization of Cu 2Se films was carried out by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), Rutherford back scattering (RBS), optical absorption/transmittance, electrical resistivity and thermoemf measurement techniques. The XRD shows the formation of copper(I) selenide with monoclinic crystal structure. Absorbance of the Cu 2Se thin film is found to be high (10 4 cm -1) with optical band gap of 2.35 eV. The electrical resistivity is of the order of 10 -1 Ω cm. Film exhibits p-type electrical conductivity.

  3. Chemical synthesis of p-type nanocrystalline copper selenide thin films for heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambade, Swapnil B.; Mane, R. S.; Kale, S. S.; Sonawane, S. H.; Shaikh, Arif V.; Han, Sung-Hwan

    2006-12-01

    Nanocrystalline thin films of copper selenide have been grown on glass and tin doped-indium oxide substrates using chemical method. At ambient temperature, golden films have been synthesized and annealed at 200 °C for 1 h and were examined for their structural, surface morphological and optical properties by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy and UV-vis spectrophotometry techniques, respectively. Cu 2- xSe phase was confirmed by XRD pattern and spherical grains of 30 ± 4 - 40 ± 4 nm in size aggregated over about 130 ± 10 nm islands were seen by SEM images. Effect of annealing on crystallinity improvement, band edge shift and photoelectrochemical performance (under 80 mW/cm 2 light intensity and in lithium iodide electrolyte) has been studied and reported. Observed p-type electrical conductivity in copper selenide thin films make it a suitable candidate for heterojunction solar cells.

  4. Functional metal sulfides and selenides for the removal of hazardous dyes from Water.

    PubMed

    Shamraiz, Umair; Hussain, Raja Azadar; Badshah, Amin; Raza, Bareera; Saba, Sonia

    2016-06-01

    Water contamination by organic dyes, is among the most alarming threats to healthy green environment. Complete removal of organic dyes is necessary to make water healthy for drinking, cooking, and for other useful aspects. Recently use of nanotechnology for removing organic dyes, became fruitful because of high surface to volume ratio and adsorption properties. Among these materials, metal chalcogenides emerge as new class of active materials for water purification. In this review article, we gathered information related to sulfide and selenide based nanomaterials which include metal sulfides and selenides, their binary composites, and use of different capping agents and dopants for enhancing photocatalysis. We have discussed in detail, about adsorption power of different dyes, relative percentage degradation, reaction time and concentration.

  5. Chemically deposited thin films of sulfides and selenides of antimony and bismuth as solar energy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, M. T.; Nair, Padmanabhan K.; Garcia, V. M.; Pena, Y.; Arenas, O. L.; Garcia, J. C.; Gomez-Daza, O.

    1997-10-01

    Chemical bath deposition techniques for bismuth sulfide, bismuth selenide, antimony sulfide, and antimony selenide thin films of about 0.20 - 0.25 micrometer thickness are reported. All these materials may be considered as solar absorber films: strong optical absorption edges, with absorption coefficient, (alpha) , greater than 104 cm-1, are located at 1.31 eV for Bi2Se3, 1.33 eV for Bi2S3, 1.8 eV for Sb2S3, and 1.35 eV for Sb2Se3. As deposited, all the films are nearly amorphous. However, well defined crystalline peaks matching bismuthinite (JCPDS 17- 0320), paraguanajuatite (JCPDS 33-0214), and stibnite (JCPDS 6-0474) and antimony selenide (JCPDS 15-0861) for Bi2S3, Bi2Se3, Sb2S3 and Sb2Se3 respectively, are observed when the films are annealed in nitrogen at 300 degrees Celsius. This is accompanied by a substantial modification of the electrical conductivity in the films: from 10-7 (Omega) -1 cm-1 (in as prepared films) to 10 (Omega) -1 cm-1 in the case of bismuth sulfide and selenide films, and enhancement of photosensitivity in the case of antimony sulfide films. The chemical deposition of a CuS/CuxSe film on these Vx- VIy films and subsequent annealing at 300 degrees Celsius for 1 h at 1 torr of nitrogen leads to the formation of p-type films (conductivity of 1 - 100 (Omega) -1 cm-1) of multinary composition. Among these, the formation of Cu3BiS3 (JCPDS 9-0488) and Cu3SbS4 (JCPDS 35- 0581), CuSbS2 (JCPDS 35-0413) have been clearly detected. Solar energy applications of these films are suggested.

  6. Effect of sulfur doping on thermoelectric properties of tin selenide – A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaraman, Aditya; Molli, Muralikrishna Kamisetti, Venkataramaniah

    2015-06-24

    In this work we present the thermoelectric properties of tin selenide (SnSe) and sulfur doped tin selenide(SnSe{sub (1-x)}S{sub x}, x= 0.125 and 0.25) obtained using first principles calculations. We investigated the electronic band structure using the FP-LAPW method within the sphere of the density functional theory. Thermoelectric properties were calculated using BOLTZTRAP code using the constant relaxation time approximation at three different temperatures 300, 600 and 800 K. Seebeck coefficient (S) was found to decrease with increasing temperature, electrical conductivity (σ/τ) was almost constant in the entire temperature range and thermal conductivity (κ/τ) increased with increasing temperature for all samples. Sulfur doped samples showed enhanced seebeck coefficient, decreased thermal conductivity and decreased electrical conductivity at all temperatures. At 300 K, S increased from 1500 µV/K(SnSe) to 1720μV/K(SnSe{sub 0.75}S{sub 0.25}), thermal conductivity decreased from 5 × 10{sup 15} W/mKs(SnSe) to 3 × 10{sup 15} W/mKs(SnSe{sub 0.75}S{sub 0.25}), electrical conductivity decreased from 7 × 10{sup 20}/Ωms(SnSe) to 5 × 10{sup 20} /Ωms(SnSe{sub 0.75}S{sub 0.25}). These calculations show that sulfur doped tin selenide exhibit better thermoelectric properties than undoped tin selenide.

  7. Determination of dimethyl selenide and dimethyl sulphide compounds causing off-flavours in bottled mineral waters.

    PubMed

    Guadayol, Marta; Cortina, Montserrat; Guadayol, Josep M; Caixach, Josep

    2016-04-01

    Sales of bottled drinking water have shown a large growth during the last two decades due to the general belief that this kind of water is healthier, its flavour is better and its consumption risk is lower than that of tap water. Due to the previous points, consumers are more demanding with bottled mineral water, especially when dealing with its organoleptic properties, like taste and odour. This work studies the compounds that can generate obnoxious smells, and that consumers have described like swampy, rotten eggs, sulphurous, cooked vegetable or cabbage. Closed loop stripping analysis (CLSA) has been used as a pre-concentration method for the analysis of off-flavour compounds in water followed by identification and quantification by means of GC-MS. Several bottled water with the aforementioned smells showed the presence of volatile dimethyl selenides and dimethyl sulphides, whose concentrations ranged, respectively, from 4 to 20 ng/L and from 1 to 63 ng/L. The low odour threshold concentrations (OTCs) of both organic selenide and sulphide derivatives prove that several objectionable odours in bottled waters arise from them. Microbial loads inherent to water sources, along with some critical conditions in water processing, could contribute to the formation of these compounds. There are few studies about volatile organic compounds in bottled drinking water and, at the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the presence of dimethyl selenides and dimethyl sulphides causing odour problems in bottled waters. PMID:26852288

  8. Determination of dimethyl selenide and dimethyl sulphide compounds causing off-flavours in bottled mineral waters.

    PubMed

    Guadayol, Marta; Cortina, Montserrat; Guadayol, Josep M; Caixach, Josep

    2016-04-01

    Sales of bottled drinking water have shown a large growth during the last two decades due to the general belief that this kind of water is healthier, its flavour is better and its consumption risk is lower than that of tap water. Due to the previous points, consumers are more demanding with bottled mineral water, especially when dealing with its organoleptic properties, like taste and odour. This work studies the compounds that can generate obnoxious smells, and that consumers have described like swampy, rotten eggs, sulphurous, cooked vegetable or cabbage. Closed loop stripping analysis (CLSA) has been used as a pre-concentration method for the analysis of off-flavour compounds in water followed by identification and quantification by means of GC-MS. Several bottled water with the aforementioned smells showed the presence of volatile dimethyl selenides and dimethyl sulphides, whose concentrations ranged, respectively, from 4 to 20 ng/L and from 1 to 63 ng/L. The low odour threshold concentrations (OTCs) of both organic selenide and sulphide derivatives prove that several objectionable odours in bottled waters arise from them. Microbial loads inherent to water sources, along with some critical conditions in water processing, could contribute to the formation of these compounds. There are few studies about volatile organic compounds in bottled drinking water and, at the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the presence of dimethyl selenides and dimethyl sulphides causing odour problems in bottled waters.

  9. High-pressure phases of magnesium selenide and magnesium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Van Camp, P.E.; Van Doren, V.E.; Martins, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    The electronic structure, the charge density, and the total energy of MgSe and MgTe in the rocksalt (B1), cesium chloride (B2), zinc blende (B3), wurtzite (B4), nickel arsenide (B8{sub 1}), and iron silicide (B28) structures are studied using first-principles self-consistent local-density calculations in a large plane-wave basis employing soft nonlocal pseudopotentials. Experimentally for MgSe a transition was observed from the rocksalt to the iron silicide structure at 107 GPa. We find this transition between the same structures at 160 GPa. For MgTe the experimental ground state is the wurtzite structure, while the nickel arsenide structure obtained at 1{endash}3.5 GPa persists after unloading to normal pressure. Up to 60 GPa no other transition was observed. Theoretically we find a nickel arsenide ground state and a transition to the cesium chloride structure at 69.6 GPa. The wurtzite and nickel arsenide structures are energetically very close. The difference at the minimal energy in these two structures is only 20.3 meV per atom. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. TOPO-capped silver selenide nanoparticles and their incorporation into polymer nanofibers using electrospinning technique

    SciTech Connect

    More, D.S.; Moloto, M.J.; Moloto, N.; Matabola, K.P.

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Ag{sub 2}Se nanoparticles produced spherical particles with sizes 12 nm (180 °C) and 27 nm (200 °C). • Higher temperature produced increased particle size (∼75 nm) and changed in shape. • Ag{sub 2}Se nanoparticles (0.2–0.6%) added into PVP (35–45%) to yield reduced fiber beading. • Polymer nanofibers electrospun at 11–20 kV produced fiber diameters of 425–461 nm. • Optical properties in the fibers were observed due to the Ag{sub 2}Se nanoparticles loaded. - Abstract: Electrospinning is the most common technique for fabricating polymer fibers as well as nanoparticles embedded polymer fibers. Silver selenide nanoparticles were synthesized using tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP) as solvent and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) as capping environment. Silver selenide was prepared by reacting silver nitrate and selenium with tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP) to form TOP–Ag and TOP–Se solutions. Both absorption and emission spectra signify the formation of nanoparticles as well as the TEM which revealed spherical particles with an average particle size of 22 nm. The polymer, PVP used was prepared at concentrations ranging from (35 to 45 wt%) and the TOPO-capped silver selenide nanoparticles (0.2 and 0.6 wt%) were incorporated into them and electrospun by varying the voltage from 11 to 20 kV. The SEM images of the Ag{sub 2}Se/PVP composite fibers revealed the fibers of diameters with average values of 425 and 461 nm. The X-ray diffraction results show peaks which were identified due to α-Ag{sub 2}Se body centered cubic compound. The sharp peak observed for all the samples at 2θ = 44.5 suggest the presence of Ag in the face centered cubic which can be attributed to higher concentration of silver nitrate used with molar ratio of selenium to silver and the abundance of silver in the silver selenide crystal. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy were used to characterize the

  11. Dissimilatory Reduction of Elemental Selenium to Selenide in Sediments and Anaerobic Cultures of Selenium Respiring Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbel, M. J.; Switzer-Blum, J.; Oremland, R. S.

    2001-12-01

    Selenium contaminated environments often contain elemental Se (Se0) in their sediments that originates from dissimilatory reduction of Se oxyanions. The forms of Se in sedimentary rocks similarly contain high proportions of Se0, but much of the Se is also in the form of metal selenides, Se-2. It is not clear if the occurrence of these selenides is due to microbial reduction of Se0, or some other biological or chemical process. In this investigation we examined the possibility that bacterial respiratory reduction of Se0 to Se-2 could explain the presence of the latter species in sedimentary rocks. We conducted incubations of anoxic sediment slurries amended with different forms of Se0. High levels of Se0 (mM) were added to San Francisco Bay sediments in order to enhance the detection of soluble HSe-, which was precipitated with Cu2+ then redissolved and quantified by ICP-MS. Concentrations of HSe- were highest in live samples amended with red amorphous Se0 formed by either microbial reduction of Se+4 ("biogenic Se0") or by chemical oxidation of H2Se(g) ("chem. Se0"); very little HSe- was formed in those amended with black crystalline Se0, indicating the general lack of reactivity of this allotrope. Controls poisoned with 10% formalin did not produce HSe- from additions of chem. Se0. Reduction of both forms of red amorphous Se0 to HSe- occurred vigorously in growing cultures of Bacillus selenitireducens, an anaerobic halophile previously isolated from sediments of Mono Lake, CA. Up to 73% and 68% of red amorphous, biogenic Se0 or chem. Se0, respectively, was reduced to HSe- during growth of B. selenitireducens, (incubation time ~ 200 hrs): oxidation of lactate to acetate as well as cell density increases indicated that a dissimilatory reduction pathway was likely. Reduction was most enhanced when cells were previously grown on elemental sulfur or Se+4. In contrast to the growth experiments, washed cell suspensions of B. selenitireducens exhibited no HSe- production

  12. Iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  13. Two-step synthesis of silver selenide semiconductor with a linear magnetoresistance effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fengxia; Xiong, Shuangtao; Xia, Zhengcai; Liu, Fengxian; Han, Chong; Zhang, Duanming

    2012-12-01

    A two-step synthesis method for polycrystalline β-silver selenide (β-Ag2Se) was developed. In the first step, nanopowder was prepared using a chemical conversion method at room temperature. In the second step, the nanopowder was compressed and then the bulk Ag2Se was fabricated by the solid-state sintering process. The crystalline phase and morphology were examined. The results showed that β-Ag2Se was fast fabricated at room temperature. The dense polycrystalline Ag-rich Ag2Se was synthesized successfully at 450 °C for 0.5 h under Argon flow. For the polycrystalline, the electronic properties and transverse magnetoresistance (TMR) in a pulsed magnetic field were investigated. The samples displayed n-type semiconducting behaviors and a critical temperature with a broaden temperature range of 140-150 K. Also, it presented a positive and nearly linear dependence on magnetic field H at H ≥ Hc (crossover field) ranging from 2 to 20 T. Moreover, the linear dependence of TMR at strong field was non-saturating up to 35 T. Combining with the observation of morphology, it is thought that this unusual TMR effect was caused by slightly excess Ag. This new synthesis method provided a potential route to synthesize nonstoichiometric silver selenide.

  14. Transparent metal selenide alloy counter electrodes for high-efficiency bifacial dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yanyan; Tang, Qunwei; Liu, Juan; He, Benlin; Yu, Liangmin

    2014-12-22

    The exploration of cost-effective and transparent counter electrodes (CEs) is a persistent objective in the development of bifacial dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Transparent counter electrodes based on binary-alloy metal selenides (M-Se; M=Co, Ni, Cu, Fe, Ru) are now obtained by a mild, solution-based method and employed in efficient bifacial DSSCs. Owing to superior charge-transfer ability for the I(-) /I3 (-) redox couple, electrocatalytic activity toward I3 (-) reduction, and optical transparency, the bifacial DSSCs with CEs consisting of a metal selenide alloy yield front and rear efficiencies of 8.30 % and 4.63 % for Co0.85 Se, 7.85 % and 4.37 % for Ni0.85 Se, 6.43 % and 4.24 % for Cu0.50 Se, 7.64 % and 5.05 % for FeSe, and 9.22 % and 5.90 % for Ru0.33 Se in comparison with 6.18 % and 3.56 % for a cell with an electrode based on pristine platinum, respectively. Moreover, fast activity onset, high multiple start/stop capability, and relatively good stability demonstrate that these new electrodes should find applications in solar panels.

  15. Quantum Monte Carlo models of substitutional point defects in zinc oxide and zinc selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jaehyung; Ertekin, Elif

    2015-03-01

    Introducing dopants into semiconductors allows manipulation of electrical and optical properties, useful for applications such as optoelectronics and photovoltaics. While first principles quantitative descriptions of the defects properties in semiconductors are critical to understanding and engineering dopants in semiconductors, obtaining accurate descriptions has proven challenging in the past. Here we demonstrate the use of quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods to describing the properties of point defects in zinc oxide and zinc selenide. Due to its direct treatment of electron correlation, the QMC method is capable of accurate calculation of band gaps and defect behaviors. We describe the energetics and potential barrier to forming gallium DX-center defects according to QMC in zinc selenide, and compare the description to those of conventional and hybrid DFT. We also use QMC to determine the defect transition levels for nitrogen defects in zinc oxide, and show that QMC obtains descriptions that are in good agreement with GW and beyond-DFT approaches. Our results demonstrate the importance of accurate descriptions of electron correlation in the calculation of defect properties of semiconductors.

  16. Biological interaction between transition metals (Ag, Cd and Hg), selenide/sulfide and selenoprotein P.

    PubMed

    Sasakura, C; Suzuki, K T

    1998-09-01

    The interaction between transition metals (Ag+, Cd2+ and Hg2+) and selenium (Se) in the bloodstream was studied in vitro by means of the HPLC--inductively coupled argon plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP MS) method. Transition metal ions and selenide (produced in vitro from selenite in the presence of glutathione) or sulfide (Na2S) formed a (metal-Se/S) complex, which then bound to a plasma protein, selenoprotein P (Sel P), to form a ternary complex, (metal-Se/S)-Sel P. The molar ratios of metals to Se were 1:1 for Hg/Se and Cd/Se, but either 1:1 or 2:1 for Ag/Se, depending on the ratio of their doses. The results indicate that the interaction between transition metals and Se occurs through the general mechanism, i.e., transition metal ions and selenide form the unit complex (metal-Se)n, and then the complex binds to selenoprotein P to form the ternary complex ¿(metal-Se)n¿m--seleno-protein P in the bloodstream. PMID:9833321

  17. Thermochemically evolved nanoplatelets of bismuth selenide with enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Zulfiqar; Cao, Chuanbao Butt, Faheem K.; Tahir, Muhammad; Tanveer, M.; Aslam, Imran; Rizwan, Muhammad; Idrees, Faryal; Khalid, Syed; Butt, Sajid

    2014-11-15

    We firstly present a simple thermochemical method to fabricate high-quality Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanoplatelets with enhanced figure of merit using elemental bismuth and selenium powders as precursors. The crystal structure of as synthesized products is characterized via X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) measurements. Morphological and chemical synthetic parameters are investigated through a series of experiments; thickness and composition of the platelets are well controlled in large scale production. Subsequently spark plasma sintering (SPS) is performed to fabricate n-type nanostructured bulk thermoelectric materials. Raman Spectroscopy of the two selected samples with approximately of 50 and 100 nm thicknesses shows three vibrational modes. The lower thickness sample exhibits the maximum red shift of about 2.17 cm{sup -1} and maximum broadening of about 10 cm{sup -1} by in-plane vibrational mode E{sup 2}{sub g}. The enhanced value of figure of merit ∼0.41 is obtained for pure phase bismuth selenide to the best of our knowledge. We observe metallic conduction behavior while semiconducting behavior for nanostructured bismuth selenide is reported elsewhere which could be due to different synthetic techniques adopted. These results clearly suggest that our adopted synthetic technique has profound effect on the electronic and thermoelectric transport properties of this material.

  18. Transparent metal selenide alloy counter electrodes for high-efficiency bifacial dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yanyan; Tang, Qunwei; Liu, Juan; He, Benlin; Yu, Liangmin

    2014-12-22

    The exploration of cost-effective and transparent counter electrodes (CEs) is a persistent objective in the development of bifacial dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Transparent counter electrodes based on binary-alloy metal selenides (M-Se; M=Co, Ni, Cu, Fe, Ru) are now obtained by a mild, solution-based method and employed in efficient bifacial DSSCs. Owing to superior charge-transfer ability for the I(-) /I3 (-) redox couple, electrocatalytic activity toward I3 (-) reduction, and optical transparency, the bifacial DSSCs with CEs consisting of a metal selenide alloy yield front and rear efficiencies of 8.30 % and 4.63 % for Co0.85 Se, 7.85 % and 4.37 % for Ni0.85 Se, 6.43 % and 4.24 % for Cu0.50 Se, 7.64 % and 5.05 % for FeSe, and 9.22 % and 5.90 % for Ru0.33 Se in comparison with 6.18 % and 3.56 % for a cell with an electrode based on pristine platinum, respectively. Moreover, fast activity onset, high multiple start/stop capability, and relatively good stability demonstrate that these new electrodes should find applications in solar panels. PMID:25358619

  19. Iron Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A meteorite composed mainly of nickel-iron, with traces of other metals; also referred to simply as an iron, and formerly known as a siderite. Irons account for over 6% of all known meteorite specimens. They are the easiest type to identify, being heavy, magnetic and rust-colored; their metallic sheen tarnishes quickly on the Earth's surface, but otherwise irons show better resistance to weatheri...

  20. Microbial Reduction of Elemental Selenium to Selenide in Anoxic Sediments - A XANES Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbel, M. J.; Switzer Blum, J.; Borglin, S. E.; Oremland, R. S.

    2002-12-01

    Elemental selenium [Se(0)] is the dominant species of selenium present in anoxic sediments. The forms of Se in sedimentary rocks similarly contain high proportions of Se(0), but much of the Se is also in the form of metal selenides, Se(-II). It is not clear if the occurrence of these selenides is due to microbial reduction of Se(0), or a purely chemical process. In this study, we examined the Se redox state of San Francisco Bay sediments that were amended with chemically-formed amorphous Se(0) [Se(0)Chem], biologically-formed amorphous Se(0) [Se(0)Biol], chemically formed black crystalline Se(0) [Se(0)Black] and selenite [Se(IV)] by analyzing the Se XANES spectra in the region 12620-12700 eV. Additions of lactate were used to stimulate activity, while formalin was used as a poisoned control. Samples of the sediment slurries were taken over a period of 95 d. The sediments were centrifuged and loaded into acrylic sample holders in an anaerobic chamber. The sample spectra were fitted with up to three standards with the R-Space X-ray Absorption Package. The standards providing the best fits to the samples were the Se(0) form added to the sediments, selenocystine, FeSe(-II), and Se(IV). For samples amended with Se(0)Chem, first order Se(0) reduction rate constants ranged between 0.11 to 0.025 d-1, and only slight stimulation was found in lactate amended samples. A slightly higher initial reduction rate constant was found for samples amended with Se(0)Biol, while rapid reduction of Se(IV) to Se(0) and selenocystine was observed in the sample with Se(IV). No change in the Se(0) spectrum was observed for samples killed with formalin. The significant proportion of sedimentary Se(-II) as revealed by Se XANES spectra compared to freely soluble Se(-II) concentrations measured by ICP-MS or acid volatile Se(-II) indicates most of the reduced Se was present in the solid form. These results confirm our earlier findings that bacteria are capable of reducing Se(0) to Se(-II), and

  1. Colloidally stable selenium@copper selenide core@shell nanoparticles as selenium source for manufacturing of copper-indium-selenide solar cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hailong; Quintilla, Aina; Cemernjak, Marco; Popescu, Radian; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Ahlswede, Erik; Feldmann, Claus

    2014-02-01

    Selenium nanoparticles with diameters of 100-400nm are prepared via hydrazine-driven reduction of selenious acid. The as-prepared amorphous, red selenium (a-Se) particles were neither a stable phase nor were they colloidally stable. Due to phase transition to crystalline (trigonal), grey selenium (t-Se) at or even below room temperature, the particles merged rapidly and recrystallized as micronsized crystal needles. As a consequence, such Se particles were not suited for layer deposition and as a precursor to manufacture thin-film CIS (copper indium selenide/CuInSe2) solar cells. To overcome this restriction, Se@CuSe core@shell particles are presented here. For these Se@CuSe core@shell nanoparticles, the phase transition a-Se→t-Se is shifted to temperatures higher than 100°C. Moreover, a spherical shape of the particles is retained even after phase transition. Composition and structure of the Se@CuSe core@shell nanostructure are evidenced by electron microscopy (SEM/STEM), DLS, XRD, FT-IR and line-scan EDXS. As a conceptual study, the newly formed Se@CuSe core@shell nanostructures with CuSe acting as a protecting layer to increase the phase-transition temperature and to improve the colloidal stability were used as a selenium precursor for manufacturing of thin-film CIS solar cells and already lead to conversion efficiencies up to 3%.

  2. Colloidally stable selenium@copper selenide core@shell nanoparticles as selenium source for manufacturing of copper-indium-selenide solar cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hailong; Quintilla, Aina; Cemernjak, Marco; Popescu, Radian; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Ahlswede, Erik; Feldmann, Claus

    2014-02-01

    Selenium nanoparticles with diameters of 100-400nm are prepared via hydrazine-driven reduction of selenious acid. The as-prepared amorphous, red selenium (a-Se) particles were neither a stable phase nor were they colloidally stable. Due to phase transition to crystalline (trigonal), grey selenium (t-Se) at or even below room temperature, the particles merged rapidly and recrystallized as micronsized crystal needles. As a consequence, such Se particles were not suited for layer deposition and as a precursor to manufacture thin-film CIS (copper indium selenide/CuInSe2) solar cells. To overcome this restriction, Se@CuSe core@shell particles are presented here. For these Se@CuSe core@shell nanoparticles, the phase transition a-Se→t-Se is shifted to temperatures higher than 100°C. Moreover, a spherical shape of the particles is retained even after phase transition. Composition and structure of the Se@CuSe core@shell nanostructure are evidenced by electron microscopy (SEM/STEM), DLS, XRD, FT-IR and line-scan EDXS. As a conceptual study, the newly formed Se@CuSe core@shell nanostructures with CuSe acting as a protecting layer to increase the phase-transition temperature and to improve the colloidal stability were used as a selenium precursor for manufacturing of thin-film CIS solar cells and already lead to conversion efficiencies up to 3%. PMID:24267336

  3. Acute treatment with bis selenide, an organic compound containing the trace element selenium, prevents memory deficits induced by reserpine in rats.

    PubMed

    Bortolatto, Cristiani Folharini; Guerra Souza, Ana Cristina; Wilhelm, Ethel Antunes; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Taking into account the promising pharmacological actions of (Z)-2,3-bis(4-chlorophenylselanyl) prop-2-en-1-ol) (bis selenide), an organic compound containing the trace element selenium, and the constant search for drugs that improve the cognitive performance, the objective of the present study was to investigate whether bis selenide treatment ameliorates memory deficits induced by reserpine in rats. For this aim, male adult rats received a single subcutaneous injection of reserpine (1 mg/kg), a biogenic amine-depleting agent used to induce memory deficit. After 24 h, bis selenide at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg was administered to rats by intragastric route, and 1 h later, the animals were submitted to behavior tasks. The effects of acute administration of bis selenide on memory were evaluated by social recognition, step-down passive avoidance, and object recognition paradigms. Exploratory and locomotor activities of rats were determined using the open-field test. Analysis of data revealed that the social memory disruption caused by reserpine was reversed by bis selenide at both doses. In addition, bis selenide, at the highest dose, prevented the memory deficit resulting from reserpine administration to rats in step-down passive avoidance and object recognition tasks. No significant alterations in locomotor and exploratory behaviors were found in animals treated with reserpine and/or bis selenide. Results obtained from distinct memory behavioral paradigms revealed that an acute treatment with bis selenide attenuated memory deficits induced by reserpine in rats.

  4. Controllable synthesis of metal selenide heterostructures mediated by Ag2Se nanocrystals acting as catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiangcong; Huang, Feng; Xu, Ju; Wang, Yuansheng

    2013-09-01

    Ag2Se nanocrystals were demonstrated to be novel semiconductor mediators, or in other word catalysts, for the growth of semiconductor heterostructures in solution. This is a result of the unique feature of Ag2Se as a fast ion conductor, allowing foreign cations to dissolve and then to heterogrow the second phase. Using Ag2Se nanocrystals as catalysts, dimeric metal selenide heterostructures such as Ag2Se-CdSe and Ag2Se-ZnSe, and even multi-segment heterostructures such as Ag2Se-CdSe-ZnSe and Ag2Se-ZnSe-CdSe, were successfully synthesized. Several interesting features were found in the Ag2Se based heterogrowth. At the initial stage of heterogrowth, a layer of the second phase forms on the surface of an Ag2Se nanosphere, with a curved junction interface between the two phases. With further growth of the second phase, the Ag2Se nanosphere tends to flatten the junction surface by modifying its shape from sphere to hemisphere in order to minimize the conjunct area and thus the interfacial energy. Notably, the crystallographic relationship of the two phases in the heterostructure varies with the lattice parameters of the second phase, in order to reduce the lattice mismatch at the interface. Furthermore, a small lattice mismatch at the interface results in a straight rod-like second phase, while a large lattice mismatch would induce a tortuous product. The reported results may provide a new route for developing novel selenide semiconductor heterostructures which are potentially applicable in optoelectronic, biomedical, photovoltaic and catalytic fields.Ag2Se nanocrystals were demonstrated to be novel semiconductor mediators, or in other word catalysts, for the growth of semiconductor heterostructures in solution. This is a result of the unique feature of Ag2Se as a fast ion conductor, allowing foreign cations to dissolve and then to heterogrow the second phase. Using Ag2Se nanocrystals as catalysts, dimeric metal selenide heterostructures such as Ag2Se-CdSe and Ag2Se

  5. Revealing the preferred interlayer orientations and stackings of two-dimensional bilayer gallium selenide crystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Xufan; Basile, Leonardo; Yoon, Mina; Ma, Cheng; Puretzky, Alexander A; Lee, Jaekwang; Idrobo, Juan C; Chi, Miaofang; Rouleau, Christopher M; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2015-02-23

    Characterizing and controlling the interlayer orientations and stacking orders of two-dimensional (2D) bilayer crystals and van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures is crucial to optimize their electrical and optoelectronic properties. The four polymorphs of layered gallium selenide (GaSe) crystals that result from different layer stackings provide an ideal platform to study the stacking configurations in 2D bilayer crystals. Through a controllable vapor-phase deposition method, bilayer GaSe crystals were selectively grown and their two preferred 0° or 60° interlayer rotations were investigated. The commensurate stacking configurations (AA' and AB stacking) in as-grown bilayer GaSe crystals are clearly observed at the atomic scale, and the Ga-terminated edge structure was identified using scanning transmission electron microscopy. Theoretical analysis reveals that the energies of the interlayer coupling are responsible for the preferred orientations among the bilayer GaSe crystals.

  6. Searching for new thermoelectric materials: some examples among oxides, sulfides and selenides.

    PubMed

    Hébert, S; Berthebaud, D; Daou, R; Bréard, Y; Pelloquin, D; Guilmeau, E; Gascoin, F; Lebedev, O; Maignan, A

    2016-01-13

    Different families of thermoelectric materials have been investigated since the discovery of thermoelectric effects in the mid-19th century, materials mostly belonging to the family of degenerate semi-conductors. In the last 20 years, new thermoelectric materials have been investigated following different theoretical proposals, showing that nanostructuration, electronic correlations and complex crystallographic structures (low dimensional structures, large number of atoms per lattice, presence of 'rattlers'…) could enhance the thermoelectric properties by enhancing the Seebeck coefficient and/or reducing the thermal conductivity. In this review, the different strategies used to optimize the thermoelectric properties of oxides and chalcogenides will be presented, starting with a review on thermoelectric oxides. The thermoelectric properties of sulfides and selenides will then be discussed, focusing on layered materials and low dimensional structures (TiS2 and pseudo-hollandites). Some sulfides with promising ZT values will also be presented (tetrahedrites and chalcopyrites).

  7. The growth of zinc selenide single crystals by physical vapor transport in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Elmer E.; Rosenberger, Franz E.; Cheng, Hai-Yuin

    1990-01-01

    Growth and characterization studies will be performed on zinc selenide single crystals. The high temperature outgassing behavior of the silica ampoule material will be studied in order to develop a cleaning and bake-out procedure that will minimize the amount of impurities introduced into the vapor from the ampoule materials and in particular during the seal-off procedure. The outgassing behavior of the ZnSe starting material will be studied during high vacuum refinement at elevated temperatures in order to develop a temperature pressure program that will optimize the removal of impurities while minimizing a shift in stoichiometry due to preferred evaporation of the higher fugacity component. The mass spectrometer system was completed, and after calibration, will be used to perform the above tasks. The system and its operation is described in detail.

  8. Optoelectronic and low temperature thermoelectric studies on nanostructured thin films of silver gallium selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Rajani; Philip, Rachel Reena; Nazer, Sheeba; Abraham, Anitha; Nair, Sinitha B.; Pradeep, B.; Urmila, K. S.; Okram, G. S.

    2014-01-01

    Polycrystalline thin films of silver gallium selenide were deposited on ultrasonically cleaned soda lime glass substrates by multi-source vacuum co-evaporation technique. The structural analysis done by X-ray diffraction ascertained the formation of nano structured tetragonal chalcopyrite thin films. The compound formation was confirmed by X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopic technique has been used for surface morphological analysis. Direct allowed band gap ˜1.78eV with high absorption coefficient ˜106/m was estimated from absorbance spectra. Low temperature thermoelectric effects has been investigated in the temperature range 80-330K which manifested an unusual increase in Seebeck coefficient with negligible phonon drag toward the very low and room temperature regime. The electrical resistivity of these n-type films was assessed to be ˜2.6Ωm and the films showed good photo response.

  9. Dynamic observation of phase transformation behaviors in indium(III) selenide nanowire based phase change memory.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Chun-Wei; Chen, Jui-Yuan; Ting, Yi-Hsin; Lu, Kuo-Chang; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Wu, Wen-Wei

    2014-09-23

    Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) has been extensively investigated for its potential applications in next-generation nonvolatile memory. In this study, indium(III) selenide (In2Se3) was selected due to its high resistivity ratio and lower programming current. Au/In2Se3-nanowire/Au phase change memory devices were fabricated and measured systematically in an in situ transmission electron microscope to perform a RESET/SET process under pulsed and dc voltage swept mode, respectively. During the switching, we observed the dynamic evolution of the phase transformation process. The switching behavior resulted from crystalline/amorphous change and revealed that a long pulse width would induce the amorphous or polycrystalline state by different pulse amplitudes, supporting the improvement of the writing speed, retention, and endurance of PCRAM. PMID:25133955

  10. Mechanical stabilities and nonlinear properties of monolayer Gallium selenide under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Xia, Suxia; Hou, Bin; Gao, Tao; Zhang, Ru

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical stabilities and nonlinear properties of monolayer Gallium selenide (GaSe) under tension are investigated by using density functional theory (DFT). The ultimate stresses and ultimate strains and the structure evolutions of monolayer GaSe under armchair (AC), zigzag (ZZ) and equiaxial (EQ) tensions are predicted. A thermodynamically rigorous continuum description of nonlinear elastic response is given by expanding the elastic strain energy density in a Taylor series in Lagrangian strain truncated after the fifth-order term. Fourteen nonzero independent elastic constants are determined by least-square fit to the DFT calculations. Pressure-dependent elastic constants (Cij(P)) and pressure derivatives of Cij (P) (C'ij) are also calculated. Calculated values of ultimate stresses and strains and the in-plane Young's modulus are all positive. It proves that monolayer GaSe is mechanically stable.

  11. Effect of cadmium selenide quantum dots on the dielectric and physical parameters of ferroelectric liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D. P.; Gupta, S. K.; Manohar, R.; Varia, M. C.; Kumar, S.; Kumar, A.

    2014-07-21

    The effect of cadmium selenide quantum dots (CdSe QDs) on the dielectric relaxation and material constants of a ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) has been investigated. Along with the characteristic Goldstone mode, a new relaxation mode has been induced in the FLC material due to the presence of CdSe QDs. This new relaxation mode is strongly dependent on the concentration of CdSe QDs but is found to be independent of the external bias voltage and temperature. The material constants have also been modified remarkably due to the presence of CdSe QDs. The appearance of this new relaxation phenomenon has been attributed to the concentration dependent interaction between CdSe QDs and FLC molecules.

  12. Heterogeneous nanocomposites of silver selenide and hollow platinum nanoparticles toward methanol oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Penglei; He, Hongyan; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Suojiang; Yang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Making use of the electronic coupling between different domains in composite nanomaterials is an effective way to enhance the activity of electrocatalysts. Herein, we demonstrate the preparation of nanocomposites consisting of silver selenide (Ag2Se) and platinum (Pt) nanoparticles with a hollow interior by combining the inside-out diffusion of Ag in core-shell Ag-Pt nanoparticles with the synthesis of highly active hydrophobic Se species. In specific, the Ag2Se-hPt nanocomposites are found to have superior activity and stability for methanol oxidation reaction in an acidic condition due to the strong electronic coupling effect between semiconductor and metal domains. This strategy may provide a greener and less expensive way to the large-scale synthesis of Pt-based nanocomposites, and might be used to generate other heterogeneous nanomaterials with technological importance.

  13. M-lines characterization of selenide and telluride thick films for mid-infrared interferometry.

    PubMed

    Labadie, Lucas; Vigreux-Bercovici, Caroline; Pradel, Annie; Kern, Pierre; Arezki, Brahim; Broquin, Jean-Emmanuel

    2006-09-01

    Nulling interferometry is an astronomical technique that requires to combine extremely flat wavefronts to achieve a deep rejection ratio in order to detect Earth-like planets in the mid-infrared band [5 - 20 microm]. Similarly to what is done in the near-infrared, high spatial filtering of the incoming beams can be achieved using single-mode waveguides operating in the mid-infrared. An appreciable reduction of the instrumental complexity is also possible using integrated optics (IO) devices in this spectral range. The lack of single-mode guided optics in the mid-infrared has motivated the present technological study to demonstrate the feasibility of dielectric waveguides functioning at longer wavelengths. We propose to use selenide and telluride components to pursue the development of more complex IO functions. PMID:19529223

  14. Counter electrodes from binary ruthenium selenide alloys for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pinjiang; Cai, Hongyuan; Tang, Qunwei; He, Benlin; Lin, Lin

    2014-12-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is a promising solution to global energy and environmental problems because of its merits on clean, cost-effectiveness, relatively high efficiency, and easy fabrication. However, the reduction of fabrication cost without sacrifice of power conversion efficiencies of the DSSCs is a golden rule for their commercialization. Here we design a new binary ruthenium selenide (Ru-Se) alloy counter electrodes (CEs) by a low-temperature hydrothermal reduction method. The electrochemical behaviors are evaluated by cyclic voltammogram, electrochemical impedance, and Tafel measurements, giving an optimized Ru/Se molar ratio of 1:1. The DSSC device with RuSe alloy CE achieves a power conversion efficiency of 7.15%, which is higher than 5.79% from Pt-only CE based DSSC. The new concept, easy process along with promising results provide a new approach for reducing cost but enhancing photovoltaic performances of DSSCs.

  15. Temperature induced phonon behaviour in germanium selenide thin films probed by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taube, A.; Łapińska, A.; Judek, J.; Wochtman, N.; Zdrojek, M.

    2016-08-01

    Here we report a detailed study of temperature-dependent phonon properties of exfoliated germanium selenide thin films (several tens of nanometers thick) probed by Raman spectroscopy in the 70–350 K temperature range. The temperature-dependent behavior of the positions and widths of the Raman modes was nonlinear. We concluded that the observed effects arise from anharmonic phonon–phonon interactions and are explained by the phenomenon of optical phonon decay into acoustic phonons. At temperatures above 200 K, the position of the Raman modes tended to be linearly dependent, and the first order temperature coefficients χ were  ‑0.0277, ‑0.0197 and  ‑0.031 cm‑1 K‑1 for B 3g , A g(1) and A g(2) modes, respectively.

  16. Photoluminescence of zinc selenide single crystals annealed in zinc or selenium atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshino, Kenji; Matsushima, Yasushi; Kinoshita, Hiroyoshi; Hiramatsu, Makoto

    1994-12-31

    Zinc selenide single crystals grown by the sublimation method are annealed in Zn or Se atmosphere. The annealing effects are examined by means of photoluminescence (PL) and reflection spectroscopy at 4.2 K. In the PL spectrum for the as-grown crystal, bound exciton lines (I{sub 2}, I{sub 1}) are observed. For the Zn-annealed crystal, the free exciton line is clearly observed. For the Se-annealed crystal, peak positions of all lines shift to the higher energies and all lines become sharp, compared with the spectra for the as-grown crystal. It is concluded that Sc-vacancies affect the bandgap energy more than Zn-vacancies do.

  17. Optoelectronic and low temperature thermoelectric studies on nanostructured thin films of silver gallium selenide

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rajani Philip, Rachel Reena Nazer, Sheeba Abraham, Anitha Nair, Sinitha B.; Pradeep, B.; Urmila, K. S.; Okram, G. S.

    2014-01-28

    Polycrystalline thin films of silver gallium selenide were deposited on ultrasonically cleaned soda lime glass substrates by multi-source vacuum co-evaporation technique. The structural analysis done by X-ray diffraction ascertained the formation of nano structured tetragonal chalcopyrite thin films. The compound formation was confirmed by X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopic technique has been used for surface morphological analysis. Direct allowed band gap ∼1.78eV with high absorption coefficient ∼10{sup 6}/m was estimated from absorbance spectra. Low temperature thermoelectric effects has been investigated in the temperature range 80–330K which manifested an unusual increase in Seebeck coefficient with negligible phonon drag toward the very low and room temperature regime. The electrical resistivity of these n-type films was assessed to be ∼2.6Ωm and the films showed good photo response.

  18. Experimental investigation of effect of aromatic hydrocarbons on resistivity of indium selenide

    SciTech Connect

    Drapak, S. I. Kovalyuk, Z. D.

    2007-10-15

    The regular features in the variation of resistivity of n-and p-type indium selenide in the direction parallel to the hexagonal symmetry axis of crystals during its intercalation with aromatic-hydrocarbon molecules (benzene and naphthalene) are investigated. For the first time, the possibility of decreasing the resistivity of n-InSe aged under pressure of C{sub 10}H{sub 8} saturated vapors to values comparable to those in semiconductors used for manufacturing high-performance solar cells (for example, Si) is found. The qualitative model explaining the transition of n-type indium monoselenide from a 'high-resistance' to 'low-resistance' state during its intercalation with naphthalene molecules is proposed.

  19. A Rapid and Cost-Effective Laser Based Synthesis of High Purity Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Gondall, M A; Qahtan, Talal F; Dastageer, M A; Yamani, Z H; Anjum, D H

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and cost effective method is developed to synthesize high purity cadmium Selenide (CdSe) quantum dots in acetone medium using second harmonic of Nd:YAG nanosecond pulsed laser of 532 nm wavelength. The thermal agglomeration due the nanosecond pulse duration of the laser was successfully eliminated by using unfocussed laser beam and thereby providing a favorable conditions for the synthesis of quantum dots having the grain size of 3 nm. The morphological and optical characterizations like XRD, HRTEM, optical absorption of the synthesized CdSe quantum dots, reveal that the material possesses the similar characteristics of the one synthesized through cumbersome wet chemical methods. Relative to the CdSe bulk material, the synthesized CdSe quantum dots showed a blue shift in the measured band gap energy from near infrared spectral region to visible region, making this material very attractive for many solar energy harvesting applications like photo-catalysis and solar cells. PMID:27398538

  20. Searching for new thermoelectric materials: some examples among oxides, sulfides and selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert, S.; Berthebaud, D.; Daou, R.; Bréard, Y.; Pelloquin, D.; Guilmeau, E.; Gascoin, F.; Lebedev, O.; Maignan, A.

    2016-01-01

    Different families of thermoelectric materials have been investigated since the discovery of thermoelectric effects in the mid-19th century, materials mostly belonging to the family of degenerate semi-conductors. In the last 20 years, new thermoelectric materials have been investigated following different theoretical proposals, showing that nanostructuration, electronic correlations and complex crystallographic structures (low dimensional structures, large number of atoms per lattice, presence of ‘rattlers’…) could enhance the thermoelectric properties by enhancing the Seebeck coefficient and/or reducing the thermal conductivity. In this review, the different strategies used to optimize the thermoelectric properties of oxides and chalcogenides will be presented, starting with a review on thermoelectric oxides. The thermoelectric properties of sulfides and selenides will then be discussed, focusing on layered materials and low dimensional structures (TiS2 and pseudo-hollandites). Some sulfides with promising ZT values will also be presented (tetrahedrites and chalcopyrites).

  1. M-lines characterization of selenide and telluride thick films for mid-infrared interferometry.

    PubMed

    Labadie, Lucas; Vigreux-Bercovici, Caroline; Pradel, Annie; Kern, Pierre; Arezki, Brahim; Broquin, Jean-Emmanuel

    2006-09-01

    Nulling interferometry is an astronomical technique that requires to combine extremely flat wavefronts to achieve a deep rejection ratio in order to detect Earth-like planets in the mid-infrared band [5 - 20 microm]. Similarly to what is done in the near-infrared, high spatial filtering of the incoming beams can be achieved using single-mode waveguides operating in the mid-infrared. An appreciable reduction of the instrumental complexity is also possible using integrated optics (IO) devices in this spectral range. The lack of single-mode guided optics in the mid-infrared has motivated the present technological study to demonstrate the feasibility of dielectric waveguides functioning at longer wavelengths. We propose to use selenide and telluride components to pursue the development of more complex IO functions.

  2. Optical and morphological characteristics of zinc selenide-zinc sulfide solid solution crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N. B.; Su, Ching-Hua; Arnold, Bradley; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2016-10-01

    Experiments were performed to study the effect of point defects on the optical and morphological characteristics of zinc selenide-zinc sulfide ZnSe-ZnS (ZnSexS(1-x)) solid solution crystals grown under terrestrial (1-g) condition. We used the composition ZnSe0.91S0.09 and ZnSe0.73S0.27 for the detailed studies. Crystals of 8 mm and 12 mm diameter were grown using physical vapor transport methods. These crystals did not exhibit gross defects such as voids, bubbles or precipitates. The photoluminescence spectra indicated strong red emission for the 610-630-nm wavelength region in both crystals. This emission could be explained on the basis of high energy irradiation of Zn selenide. For the ZnSe0.73S0.27 crystal, absorption starts at a lower wavelength range (300 nm) when compared to the ZnSe0.91S0.09 crystal presumably due to the much higher bandgap of ZnS than that of ZnSe. Sharp peaks at 451 and 455 nm were observed for both samples corresponding to the band edge transitions, followed by a strong peak at 632 nm. These results were consistent with the observations based on Raman spectroscopy studies. Under 532-nm laser illumination both transverse optical (TO) and longitudinal optical (LO) phonon peaks appeared at Raman shifts of 220 and 280 Δcm-1, respectively. These peaks are similar to those observed for pure ZnSe Raman spectra for which TO and LO occur at 200 and 250 Δcm-1 for the x-axis (first order) polarization.

  3. Cellular antioxidant activity of phenylaminoethyl selenides as monitored by chemiluminescence of peroxalate nanoparticles and by reduction of lipopolysaccharide-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Elizabeth A; Taylor, Jennifer L; Oldham, Charlie D; Dasari, Madhuri; Doyle, Donald; Murthy, Niren; May, Sheldon W

    2013-12-10

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), produced in living cells by oxidases and by other biochemical reactions, plays an important role in cellular processes such as signaling and cell cycle progression. Nevertheless, H2O2 and other reactive oxygen species are capable of inducing damage to DNA and other cellular components, and oxidative stress caused by overproduction of cellular oxidants has been linked to pathologies such as inflammatory diseases and cancer. Therefore, new approaches for reducing the accumulation of cellular oxidants are of considerable interest from both a biotechnological and a therapeutic perspective. Recognizing that selenium is an essential component of the active sites of several antioxidant enzymes, we have developed a family of novel phenylaminoethyl selenide compounds that are readily taken up into cells and have low toxicity in vivo. We now report chemiluminescent imaging of hydrogen peroxide consumption by phenylaminoethyl selenides, via the use of peroxalate nanoparticle methodology. Further, we demonstrate the ability of phenylaminoethyl selenides to decrease lipopolysaccharide-induced oxidative stress in human embryonic kidney cells. We also report the successful encapsulation of a phenylaminoethyl selenide within poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles, and we show that these selenide-loaded nanoparticles exhibit antioxidant activity in cells. Taken together, these results significantly enhance the attractiveness of phenylaminoethyl selenides as potential agents for supplementing cellular defenses against reactive oxygen species. PMID:24315639

  4. Hydrothermal synthesis of copper selenides with controllable phases and morphologies from an ionic liquid precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaodi; Duan, Xiaochuan; Peng, Peng; Zheng, Wenjun

    2011-12-01

    Cu2-xSe nanocrystals and CuSe nanoflakes are successfully synthesized through a convenient hydrothermal method from an ionic liquid precursor 1-n-butyl-3-ethylimidazolium methylselenite ([BMIm][SeO2(OCH3)]). The phases and morphologies of the copper selenides can be controlled by simply changing the atom ratio of Cu/Se in the reactants and reaction temperature. Furthermore, it is found that the [BMIm][SeO2(OCH3)] not only serves as Se source but also has influence on the shapes of CuSe nanoflakes. The adsorption of alkyl imidazolium rings ([BMIm]+) onto the (0001) facets of covellite CuSe prohibits the growth in the [0001] direction, and CuSe nuclei growth mainly processes along the six symmetric directions (+/-[01&cmb.macr;11], +/-[101&cmb.macr;1&cmb.macr;], and +/-[1&cmb.macr;100]) to form flakelike CuSe. The obtained copper selenides are characterized by XRD, SEM, EDS, XPS, TEM, and HRTEM. The results indicate that the Cu2-xSe nanocrystals are nearly spherical particles with an average diameter of about 20 nm, the hexagonal CuSe nanoflakes are single crystals with an edge length of 100-400 nm and a thickness of 25-50 nm. The potential formation mechanism of the copper selenides is also proposed.Cu2-xSe nanocrystals and CuSe nanoflakes are successfully synthesized through a convenient hydrothermal method from an ionic liquid precursor 1-n-butyl-3-ethylimidazolium methylselenite ([BMIm][SeO2(OCH3)]). The phases and morphologies of the copper selenides can be controlled by simply changing the atom ratio of Cu/Se in the reactants and reaction temperature. Furthermore, it is found that the [BMIm][SeO2(OCH3)] not only serves as Se source but also has influence on the shapes of CuSe nanoflakes. The adsorption of alkyl imidazolium rings ([BMIm]+) onto the (0001) facets of covellite CuSe prohibits the growth in the [0001] direction, and CuSe nuclei growth mainly processes along the six symmetric directions (+/-[01&cmb.macr;11], +/-[101&cmb.macr;1&cmb.macr;], and +/-[1

  5. Fluorescence imaging technology (FI) for high-throughput screening of selenide-modified nano-TiO2 catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Lee, Jianchao; Zhang, Meijuan; Duan, Qiannan; Zhang, Jiarui; Qi, Hailang

    2016-02-18

    A high-throughput screening (HTS) method based on fluorescence imaging (FI) was implemented to evaluate the catalytic performance of selenide-modified nano-TiO2. Chemical ink-jet printing (IJP) technology was reformed to fabricate a catalyst library comprising 1405 (Ni(a)Cu(b)Cd(c)Ce(d)In(e)Y(f))Se(x)/TiO2 (M6Se/Ti) composite photocatalysts. Nineteen M6Se/Tis were screened out from the 1405 candidates efficiently.

  6. Effects of stock or purified diet on rat liver enzymes involved in the synthesis of dimethyl selenide.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, H S; Ganther, H E

    1976-11-01

    Rats fed either a stock deit or a purified diet based on casein were tested for their ability to convert 75Se-sodium selenite to volatile selenium (dimethyl selenide) in vivo. This conversion was also studied in liver and kidney in vitro. When injected with a subacute dose of selenite (2 mg Se/kg), rats previously fed stock diet volatilized more than twice as much of the dose compared to rats fed the purified diet, confirming earlier findings. Parallel dietary effects were also observed in vitro using subcellular fractions incubated with 75Se-selenite, glutathione, TPNH, and S-adenosylmethionine. The 9-000 X g supernate prepared from rats fed stock diet synthesized dimethyl selenide at approximately twice the rate of that prepared from rats fed purified diet. A fourfold higher activity was observed with liver microsomal fractions from rats fed the stock diet, whereas cytosol was slightly more active in rats fed the purified diet. Kidney fractions showed analogous changes with diet, although the activity of kidney microsomal fraction was very low. Only minor differences in the levels of glutathione reductase, nonspecific disulfide reducatse, and non-protein thiols were observed in liver and kidney from rats fed the two diets. Considering the effects of diet on the various enzymes known from our previous studies to be involved in dimethyl selenide synthesis, it was concluded that the enhanced ability of rats fed stock diet to synthesize dimethyl selenide results from the induction of a liver microsomal enzyme, apparently a Se-methyltransferase, caused by unknown substances in the stock diet.

  7. Cost-effective, transparent iron selenide nanoporous alloy counter electrode for bifacial dye-sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juan; Tang, Qunwei; He, Benlin; Yu, Liangmin

    2015-05-01

    Pursuit of cost-effective and efficient counter electrodes (CEs) is a persistent objective for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). We present here the design of transparent Fe-Se nanoporous alloy CEs for bifacial DSSC applications. Due to the superior charge-transfer ability for I-/I3- redox couples, electrocatalytic reduction toward I3- species, and optical transparency in visible-light region, the bifacial DSSC with FeSe alloy electrode yields maximum front and rear efficiencies of 9.16% and 5.38%, respectively. A fast start-up, high multiple start capability, and good stability of the FeSe alloy CE demonstrate the potential applications in driving solar panels. The impressive efficiency along with simple preparation of the cost-effective Fe-Se nanoporous alloy CEs highlights their potential application in robust bifacial DSSCs.

  8. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  9. Electronic properties of one-dimensional conductors: A study of molybdenum selenide molecular wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, Latha

    Quantum wires, such as nanowires and nanotubes, are ideal systems for exploring fundamental physics concepts in one-dimension. In this thesis, we present a new system of metallic one-dimensional conductors---molybdenum selenide molecular wires---that is well suited for such a study, along with experimental evidence of its one-dimensional character. We describe the synthesis of molybdenum selenide (Mo6Se 6) molecular wires from the dissolution of quasi-one-dimensional Li 2Mo6Se6 crystals in polar solvents. We then present atomically-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy images of these nanowires, ranging from 8.5 A wide individual molecular chains to bundles of chains over 5 nm in diameter. The electronic properties of these molecular wires, characterized by spatially resolved tunneling spectroscopy, reveal sharp peaks in the conductance. These peaks suggest the existence of van Hove singularities, as expected for one-dimensional systems, and as also predicted by tight binding calculations. Low-temperature tunneling spectroscopy measurements show no evidence of a band gap down to 5 K, implying that at these temperatures the wires remain metallic, and they do not undergo a Peierls distortion. We also present electron transport studies on Mo6Se6 nanowires. The measured two-terminal tunneling conductance of these wires is shown to scale as a power of temperature and bias voltage, consistent with the Luttinger liquid theory of interacting electrons in one-dimension. In addition, the exponents governing the power-law dependence of the conductance with temperature are found to vary inversely with wire diameter. From these data, we determine the Luttinger liquid interaction parameter to be g = 0.06, implying a strongly repulsive electron-electron interaction in this system. This finding is in contrast with measurements on micron-sized Mo6Se6 wires, where the conductance increases linearly with decreasing temperature, showing typical three-dimensional metallic behavior

  10. Preparation and Study of thin Films of Tungsten Selenides for Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, R.; Grigoriev, S.; Fominski, V.; Volosova, M.; Demin, M.

    Thin films of tungsten selenides (WSex) were obtained by using a method of shadow-masked pulsed laser deposition. The deposition at room temperature of substrates caused the formation of Se-enriched amorphous films (Se/W∼5) with pronounced surface roughness because of an effective nanoparticle growth. Heating or DC biasing the substrate during the deposition modified the film composition (Se/W∼1.7 - 4) and resulted in the smoothing of the film surface. Annealing the films, deposited at room temperature, as well as heating the substrate during the deposition caused crystallization of the films. Catalytic activity of WSex thin films in hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) was studied in 0.5 M H2SO4 aqueous solution at room temperature. The structural state and the chemical composition of WSex films had an expressed impact on the catalytic activity. A significant improvement in HER activity was observed in the case of Se-enriched films deposition followed by annealing at 500 °C.

  11. Topological insulator bismuth selenide as a theranostic platform for simultaneous cancer imaging and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Jiang, Fei; Yang, Bo; Song, Xiao-Rong; Liu, Yan; Yang, Huang-Hao; Cao, Dai-Rong; Shi, Wen-Rong; Chen, Guo-Nan

    2013-01-01

    Employing theranostic nanoparticles, which combine both therapeutic and diagnostic capabilities in one dose, has promise to propel the biomedical field toward personalized medicine. Here we investigate the theranostic properties of topological insulator bismuth selenide (Bi2Se3) in in vivo and in vitro system for the first time. We show that Bi2Se3 nanoplates can absorb near-infrared (NIR) laser light and effectively convert laser energy into heat. Such photothermal conversion property may be due to the unique physical properties of topological insulators. Furthermore, localized and irreversible photothermal ablation of tumors in the mouse model is successfully achieved by using Bi2Se3 nanoplates and NIR laser irradiation. In addition, we also demonstrate that Bi2Se3 nanoplates exhibit strong X-ray attenuation and can be utilized for enhanced X-ray computed tomography imaging of tumor tissue in vivo. This study highlights Bi2Se3 nanoplates could serve as a promising platform for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:23770650

  12. Topological insulator bismuth selenide as a theranostic platform for simultaneous cancer imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Jiang, Fei; Yang, Bo; Song, Xiao-Rong; Liu, Yan; Yang, Huang-Hao; Cao, Dai-Rong; Shi, Wen-Rong; Chen, Guo-Nan

    2013-01-01

    Employing theranostic nanoparticles, which combine both therapeutic and diagnostic capabilities in one dose, has promise to propel the biomedical field toward personalized medicine. Here we investigate the theranostic properties of topological insulator bismuth selenide (Bi2Se3) in in vivo and in vitro system for the first time. We show that Bi2Se3 nanoplates can absorb near-infrared (NIR) laser light and effectively convert laser energy into heat. Such photothermal conversion property may be due to the unique physical properties of topological insulators. Furthermore, localized and irreversible photothermal ablation of tumors in the mouse model is successfully achieved by using Bi2Se3 nanoplates and NIR laser irradiation. In addition, we also demonstrate that Bi2Se3 nanoplates exhibit strong X-ray attenuation and can be utilized for enhanced X-ray computed tomography imaging of tumor tissue in vivo. This study highlights Bi2Se3 nanoplates could serve as a promising platform for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:23770650

  13. Revealing the preferred interlayer orientations and stackings of two-dimensional bilayer gallium selenide crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xufan; Basile Carrasco, Leonardo A.; Yoon, Mina; Ma, Cheng; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Lee, Jaekwang; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Chi, Miaofang; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2015-01-21

    Characterizing and controlling the interlayer orientations and stacking order of bilayer two-dimensional (2D) crystals and van der Waals (vdW) heterostructure is crucial to optimize their electrical and optoelectronic properties. The four polymorphs of layered gallium selenide (GaSe) that result from different layer stacking provide an ideal platform to study the stacking configurations in bilayer 2D crystals. Here, through a controllable vapor-phase deposition method we selectively grow bilayer GaSe crystals and investigate their two preferred 0° or 60° interlayer rotations. The commensurate stacking configurations (AA' and AB-stacking) in as-grown 2D bilayer GaSe crystals are clearly observed at the atomic scale and the Ga-terminated edge structure are identified for the first time by using atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Theoretical analysis of the interlayer coupling energetics vs. interlayer rotation angle reveals that the experimentally-observed orientations are energetically preferred among the bilayer GaSe crystal polytypes. Here, the combined experimental and theoretical characterization of the GaSe bilayers afforded by these growth studies provide a pathway to reveal the atomistic relationships in interlayer orientations responsible for the electronic and optical properties of bilayer 2D crystals and vdW heterostructures.

  14. Impact of atmospheric species on copper indium gallium selenide solar cell stability: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theelen, Mirjam

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the measurement techniques and results of studies on the stability of copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) solar cells and their individual layers in the presence of atmospheric species is presented: in these studies, Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells, their molybdenum back contact, and their ZnO:Al front contact were exposed to liquid water purged with gases from the atmosphere, like carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), and air. The samples were analyzed before, during, and after exposure in order to define their stability under these conditions. The complete CIGS solar cells as well as the ZnO:Al front contact degraded rapidly when exposed to H2O combined with CO2, while they were relatively stable in H2O purged with O2 or N2. This was caused by either degradation of the grain boundaries in the ZnO:Al film or by the dissolution of part of this film. Uncovered molybdenum films, on the other hand, oxidized rapidly in the presence of H2O and O2, while they were more stable in the presence of H2O with N2 and/or CO2.

  15. Point contacts at the copper-indium-gallium-selenide interface—A theoretical outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercegol, Adrien; Chacko, Binoy; Klenk, Reiner; Lauermann, Iver; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch.; Liero, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that recombination in the space-charge region of copper-indium-gallium-selenide (CIGS) is dominant, at least in high efficiency solar cells with low band gap. The recent developments like potassium fluoride post deposition treatment and point-contact junction may call this into question. In this work, a theoretical outlook is made using three-dimensional simulations to investigate the effect of point-contact openings through a passivation layer on CIGS solar cell performance. A large set of solar cells is modeled under different scenarios for the charged defect levels and density, radius of the openings, interface quality, and conduction band offset. The positive surface charge created by the passivation layer induces band bending and this influences the contact (CdS) properties, making it beneficial for the open circuit voltage and efficiency, and the effect is even more pronounced when coverage area is more than 95%, and also makes a positive impact on the device performance, even in the presence of a spike at CIGS/CdS heterojunction.

  16. Noncentrosymmetric selenide Ba4Ga4GeSe12: Synthesis, structure, and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wenlong; Iyer, Abishek K.; Li, Chao; Lin, Xinsong; Yao, Jiyong; Mar, Arthur

    2016-09-01

    The selenide Ba4Ga4GeSe12, synthesized by reaction of BaSe, Ga2Se3, and GeSe2 at 1173 K, adopts a noncentrosymmetric tetragonal structure (space group P 4 bar21 c , Z=2, a=13.5468(4) Å, c=6.4915(2) Å) consisting of a three-dimensional network built from two types of corner-sharing MSe4 tetrahedra, with Ba cations occupying the intervening voids. It is isostructural to Pb4Ga4GeS12, Pb4Ga4GeSe12, and Ba4Ga4SnSe12, but differs subtly in site ordering. Structural refinements and bond valence sum analysis suggest partial disorder manifested by mixing of 0.75 Ga and 0.25 Ge within one tetrahedral site, and occupation of exclusively Ga within the other tetrahedral site. The optical band gap of 2.18(2) eV, measured from the UV/VIS/NIR diffuse reflectance spectrum, agrees with a calculated gap of 2.35 eV between valence and conduction bands and is consistent with the orange-yellow color of the crystals. Nonlinear optical measurements on powder samples revealed a weak second harmonic generation signal using 2.09 μm as the fundamental laser wavelength.

  17. Field Effect Transistors Using Atomically Thin Layers of Copper Indium Selenide (CuInSe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Prasanna; Ghosh, Sujoy; Wasala, Milinda; Lei, Sidong; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel; Talapatra, Saikat

    We will report fabrication of field-effect transistors (FETs) using few-layers of Copper Indium Selenide (CuInSe) flakes exfoliated from crystals grown using chemical vapor transport technique. Our transport measurements indicate n-type FET with electron mobility µ ~ 3 cm2 V-1 s-1 at room temperature when Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is used as a back gate. Mobility can be further increased significantly when ionic liquid 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIM-PF6) is used as top gate. Similarly subthreshold swing can be further improved from 103 V/dec to 0.55 V/dec by using ionic liquid as a top gate. We also found ON/OFF ratio of ~ 102 for both top and back gate. Comparison between ionic liquid top gate and SiO2 back gate will be presented and discussed. This work is supported by the U.S. Army Research Office through a MURI Grant # W911NF-11-1-0362.

  18. Strong orientation dependence of electronic properties of Antimony Selenide (Sb2Se3) nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadapoo, Rajasekarakumar; Krishnan, Sridevi; Yilmaz, Hulusi; Marin, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    Antimony Selenide has applications in thermoelectric, photovoltaic and optical storage. Recently, it was demonstrated that bulk material under high pressure becomes a topological insulator and further undergoes insulator to metal to superconducting transitions. The Sb2 Se3 nanostructures reported so far exhibit direct bandgaps, whereas the bulk has an indirect gap. Considering different crystallographic orientations of synthesized nanostructures and the anisotropic nature of its structure, we have studied the influence of orientation on their electronic behavior. Using first principle methods, we explore the stability of nanowires in different orientations and its influence on electronic structure. We find confinement effects for the narrower nanostructures, whereas the [001] orientation showed a reduced bandgap. This anomalous behavior is discussed considering that bandgap reduction could be attributed to recent experimental findings of a insulator-metal transition, which is related to topological quantum transition. The surface reconstructions show similarities to the distortion of polyhedras occurring in bulk Sb2 Se3 under high pressure, which are related to the insulator-metal transition and superconductivity at 8.0 K.

  19. Annealed single-crystal cadmium selenide electrodes in liquid junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, S.; Mackintosh, A.; Colbow, K.

    1984-12-01

    I-V characteristics, voltage dependence of the quantum efficiency, and spectral response were compared for annealed single-crystal CdSe photoanodes. Annealing in cadmium atmosphere improved the overall solar response considerably, while annealing under vacuum revealed a poor response for photon energies larger than 1.8 eV and a high quantum efficiency for near-bandgap energies. This behavior may be attributed to electron-hole pair generation from interbandgap states and a large density of minority carrier recombination centers near the crystal surface, owing to a high nonstoichiometry and a selenium layer at the surface. Annealing in selenium atmosphere resulted in very poor solar response caused by compensation. Simultaneous illumination of the electrodes with a He-Ne laser strongly enhanced the quantum efficiency for vacuum-annealed crystals for near-bandgap photons. We attribute this to electron trapping in the selenium-rich surface, with a resulting increase in depletion-layer width in the cadmium selenide.

  20. Ba4Ga2Se8: A ternary selenide containing chains and discrete Se22- units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wenlong; Iyer, Abishek K.; Lin, Xinsong; Mar, Arthur

    2016-05-01

    The ternary selenide Ba4Ga2Se8 has been synthesized by reaction of BaSe, Ga2Se3, and Se at 1023 K. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed a monoclinic structure (space group P21/c, Z=4, a=13.2393(5) Å, b=6.4305(2) Å, c=20.6432(8) Å, β=104.3148(6)°) featuring one-dimensional chains of corner-sharing Ga-centered tetrahedra and discrete Se22- anionic units, with charge-compensating Ba2+ cations located between them. The UV/vis/NIR diffuse reflectance spectrum reveals an optical band gap of 1.63(2) eV, which is consistent with the black color of the crystals and agrees with a calculated gap of 1.51 eV obtained from band structure calculations. The presence of the Se22- units narrows the band gap in Ba4Ga2Se8 relative to other Ba-Ga-Se phases.

  1. Photoluminescence properties of cadmium-selenide quantum dots embedded in a liquid-crystal polymer matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Tselikov, G. I. Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Plenge, J.; Ruehl, E.; Shatalova, A. M.; Shandryuk, G. A.; Merekalov, A. S.; Tal'roze, R. V.

    2013-05-15

    The photoluminescence properties of cadmium-selenide (CdSe) quantum dots with an average size of {approx}3 nm, embedded in a liquid-crystal polymer matrix are studied. It was found that an increase in the quantum-dot concentration results in modification of the intrinsic (exciton) photoluminescence spectrum in the range 500-600 nm and a nonmonotonic change in its intensity. Time-resolved measurements show the biexponential decay of the photoluminescence intensity with various ratios of fast and slow components depending on the quantum-dot concentration. In this case, the characteristic lifetimes of exciton photoluminescence are 5-10 and 35-50 ns for the fast and slow components, respectively, which is much shorter than the times for colloidal CdSe quantum dots of the same size. The observed features of the photoluminescence spectra and kinetics are explained by the effects of light reabsorption, energy transfer from quantum dots to the liquid-crystal polymer matrix, and the effect of the electronic states at the CdSe/(liquid crystal) interface.

  2. Growth of zinc selenide single crystals by physical vapor transport in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1993-01-01

    The goals of this research were the optimization of growth parameters for large (20 mm diameter and length) zinc selenide single crystals with low structural defect density, and the development of a 3-D numerical model for the transport rates to be expected in physical vapor transport under a given set of thermal and geometrical boundary conditions, in order to provide guidance for an advantageous conduct of the growth experiments. In the crystal growth studies, it was decided to exclusively apply the Effusive Ampoule PVT technique (EAPVT) to the growth of ZnSe. In this technique, the accumulation of transport-limiting gaseous components at the growing crystal is suppressed by continuous effusion to vacuum of part of the vapor contents. This is achieved through calibrated leaks in one of the ground joints of the ampoule. Regarding the PVT transport rates, a 3-D spectral code was modified. After introduction of the proper boundary conditions and subroutines for the composition-dependent transport properties, the code reproduced the experimentally determined transport rates for the two cases with strongest convective flux contributions to within the experimental and numerical error.

  3. Bifacial dye-sensitized solar cells with transparent cobalt selenide alloy counter electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yanyan; Tang, Qunwei; He, Benlin; Zhao, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Ling; Yu, Liangmin

    2015-06-01

    High power conversion efficiency and cost-effectiveness are two persistent objectives for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). Electricity generation from either front or rear side of a bifacial DSSC has been considered as a facile avenue of bringing down the cost of solar-to-electric conversion. Therefore, the fabrication of a transparent counter electrode (CE) with a high electrocatalytic activity is a prerequisite to realize this goal. We present here the feasibility of utilizing transparent cobalt selenide (Co-Se) binary alloy counter electrode for bifacial DSSC application, in which binary Co-Se alloy electrode is synthesized by a mild solution strategy and the cell device is irradiated by either front or rear side. Due to the high optical transparency, charge-transfer ability, and electrocatalytic activity, maximum front and rear efficiencies of 8.30% and 4.63% are recorded under simulated air mass 1.5 (AM1.5) irradiation, respectively. The impressive efficiency along with fast start-up, multiple start capability, and simple preparation highlights the potential application of cost-effective and transparent Co-Se alloy CE in robust bifacial DSSCs.

  4. Development of new layered selenide oxides with perovskite-type oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushiyama, Koichi; Ogino, Hiraku; Kishio, Kohji; Shimoyama, Jun-Ichi

    2010-03-01

    Several Fe-based superconductors with perovskite-type oxide layers, such as Sr2ScFePO3 (Tc ˜ 17 K)^[1], were discovered in our previous study. These compounds are composed of alternate stacking of superconducting layers with antifluorite structure and perovskite-type blocking layers. Since both layers are flexible in terms of chemical composition, development of various new functional materials can be expected from this family. In the present study, we have attempted to synthesize new layered selenide oxides with CuSe layers and discovered more than ten compounds, such as Sr2MCu2Se2O2 (M = Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) and Sr2MCuSeO3 (M = Sc, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ga, In), thus far. These indicated that the CuSe layer can accommodate various types of blocking layers, which may lead various functions. Among them, Sr2Cu3Se2O2 has a potential as for the mother compound of superconductor, if appropriate concentration of carrier is introduced to the CuO2 layer. Crystal structure and physical properties of these newly found compounds will be reported. [1] H. Ogino et al., Supercond. Sci. Technol. 22 (2009) 075008

  5. Ultrafast Charge- and Energy-Transfer Dynamics in Conjugated Polymer: Cadmium Selenide Nanocrystal Blends

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid nanocrystal–polymer systems are promising candidates for photovoltaic applications, but the processes controlling charge generation are poorly understood. Here, we disentangle the energy- and charge-transfer processes occurring in a model system based on blends of cadmium selenide nanocrystals (CdSe-NC) with poly[2-methoxy-5-(3′,7′-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MDMO-PPV) using a combination of time-resolved absorption and luminescence measurements. The use of different capping ligands (n-butylamine, oleic acid) as well as thermal annealing allows tuning of the polymer–nanocrystal interaction. We demonstrate that energy transfer from MDMO-PPV to CdSe-NCs is the dominant exciton quenching mechanism in nonannealed blends and occurs on ultrafast time scales (<1 ps). Upon thermal annealing electron transfer becomes competitive with energy transfer, with a transfer rate of 800 fs independent of the choice of the ligand. Interestingly, we find hole transfer to be much less efficient than electron transfer and to extend over several nanoseconds. Our results emphasize the importance of tuning the organic–nanocrystal interaction to achieve efficient charge separation and highlight the unfavorable hole-transfer dynamics in these blends. PMID:24490650

  6. Influence of different deposition potential on the structural and optical properties of copper selenide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Harmanmeet; Kaur, Jaskiran; Singh, Lakhwant

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, nanowires were successfully fabricated from the aqueous solution containing 0.2 M/l CuSO4.5H2O, 0.1 M/l SeO2, 1 g/l PVP and a few drops of H2SO4 in Milli-Q water using electrodeposition technique at room temperature. Influence of different deposition potential on structural and optical properties of copper selenide nanowires has been investigated here. Morphological, structural and optical properties were monitored through field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV-visible 1800 spectrophotometer. From the XRD analysis, it was found that the stoichiometric (CuSe) nanowires are formed at deposition potential (-0.6 V) and (+0.6 V). Band gap of nanowires were found to be maximum around 3.13 eV for deposition potential (-0.8 V) and minimum of 2.81 eV for deposition potential (-0.6 V).

  7. Memory functions of nanocrystalline cadmium selenide embedded ZrHfO high-k dielectric stack

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chi-Chou; Kuo, Yue

    2014-02-28

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors made of the nanocrystalline cadmium selenide nc-CdSe embedded Zr-doped HfO{sub 2} high-k stack on the p-type silicon wafer have been fabricated and studied for their charge trapping, detrapping, and retention characteristics. Both holes and electrons can be trapped to the nanocrystal-embedded dielectric stack depending on the polarity of the applied gate voltage. With the same magnitude of applied gate voltage, the sample can trap more holes than electrons. A small amount of holes are loosely trapped at the nc-CdSe/high-k interface and the remaining holes are strongly trapped to the bulk nanocrystalline CdSe site. Charges trapped to the nanocrystals caused the Coulomb blockade effect in the leakage current vs. voltage curve, which is not observed in the control sample. The addition of the nanocrystals to the dielectric film changed the defect density and the physical thickness, which are reflected on the leakage current and the breakdown voltage. More than half of the originally trapped holes can be retained in the embedded nanocrystals for more than 10 yr. The nanocrystalline CdSe embedded high-k stack is a useful gate dielectric for this nonvolatile memory device.

  8. Gate-dependent carrier diffusion length in lead selenide quantum dot field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Otto, Tyler; Miller, Chris; Tolentino, Jason; Liu, Yao; Law, Matt; Yu, Dong

    2013-08-14

    We report a scanning photocurrent microscopy (SPCM) study of colloidal lead selenide (PbSe) quantum dot (QD) thin film field-effect transistors (FETs). PbSe QDs are chemically treated with sodium sulfide (Na2S) and coated with amorphous alumina (a-Al2O3) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) to obtain high mobility, air-stable FETs with a strongly gate-dependent conductivity. SPCM reveals a long photocurrent decay length of 1.7 μm at moderately positive gate bias that decreases to below 0.5 μm at large positive gate voltage and all negative gate voltages. After excluding other possible mechanisms including thermoelectric effects, a thick depletion width, and fringing electric fields, we conclude from photocurrent lifetime measurements that the diffusion of a small fraction of long-lived carriers accounts for the long photocurrent decay length. The long minority carrier lifetime is attributed to charge traps for majority carriers. PMID:23802707

  9. Revealing the preferred interlayer orientations and stackings of two-dimensional bilayer gallium selenide crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xufan; Basile Carrasco, Leonardo A.; Yoon, Mina; Ma, Cheng; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Lee, Jaekwang; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Chi, Miaofang; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Geohegan, David B.; et al

    2015-01-21

    Characterizing and controlling the interlayer orientations and stacking order of bilayer two-dimensional (2D) crystals and van der Waals (vdW) heterostructure is crucial to optimize their electrical and optoelectronic properties. The four polymorphs of layered gallium selenide (GaSe) that result from different layer stacking provide an ideal platform to study the stacking configurations in bilayer 2D crystals. Here, through a controllable vapor-phase deposition method we selectively grow bilayer GaSe crystals and investigate their two preferred 0° or 60° interlayer rotations. The commensurate stacking configurations (AA' and AB-stacking) in as-grown 2D bilayer GaSe crystals are clearly observed at the atomic scale andmore » the Ga-terminated edge structure are identified for the first time by using atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Theoretical analysis of the interlayer coupling energetics vs. interlayer rotation angle reveals that the experimentally-observed orientations are energetically preferred among the bilayer GaSe crystal polytypes. Here, the combined experimental and theoretical characterization of the GaSe bilayers afforded by these growth studies provide a pathway to reveal the atomistic relationships in interlayer orientations responsible for the electronic and optical properties of bilayer 2D crystals and vdW heterostructures.« less

  10. Highly efficient copper-zinc-tin-selenide (CZTSe) solar cells by electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Ok; Lee, Kee Doo; Seul Oh, Lee; Seo, Se-Won; Lee, Doh-Kwon; Kim, Honggon; Jeong, Jeung-hyun; Ko, Min Jae; Kim, BongSoo; Son, Hae Jung; Kim, Jin Young

    2014-04-01

    Highly efficient copper-zinc-tin-selenide (Cu2ZnSnSe4 ; CZTSe) thin-film solar cells are prepared via the electrodepostion technique. A metallic alloy precursor (CZT) film with a Cu-poor, Zn-rich composition is directly deposited from a single aqueous bath under a constant current, and the precursor film is converted to CZTSe by annealing under a Se atmosphere at temperatures ranging from 400 °C to 600 °C. The crystallization of CZTSe starts at 400 °C and is completed at 500 °C, while crystal growth continues at higher temperatures. Owing to compromises between enhanced crystallinity and poor physical properties, CZTSe thin films annealed at 550 °C exhibit the best and most-stable device performances, reaching up to 8.0 % active efficiency; among the highest efficiencies for CZTSe thin-film solar cells prepared by electrodeposition. Further analysis of the electronic properties and a comparison with another state-of-the-art device prepared from a hydrazine-based solution, suggests that the conversion efficiency can be further improved by optimizing parameters such as film thickness, antireflection coating, MoSe2 formation, and p-n junction properties.

  11. Development of bismuth tellurium selenide nanoparticles for thermoelectric applications via a chemical synthetic process

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Cham; Kim, Dong Hwan; Han, Yoon Soo; Chung, Jong Shik; Park, SangHa; Park, Soonheum; Kim, Hoyoung

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} We synthesized a Bi{sub 2}Te{sub y}Se{sub 3-y} nano-compound via a chemical synthetic process. {yields} The compound was sintered to achieve an average grain size of about 300 nm. {yields} The resulting sintered body showed very low thermal conductivity. It is likely caused by the vigorous phonon scattering of the nano-sized grains. -- Abstract: Bismuth tellurium selenide (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub y}Se{sub 3-y}) nanoparticles for thermoelectric applications are successfully prepared via a water-based chemical reaction under atmospheric conditions. The nanostructured compound is prepared using a complexing agent (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) and a reducing agent (ascorbic acid) to stabilize the bismuth precursor (Bi(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}) in water and to favor the reaction with reduced sources of tellurium and selenium. The resulting powder is smaller than ca. 100 nm and has a crystalline structure corresponding to the rhombohedral Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 2.7}Se{sub 0.3}. The nanocrystalline powder is sintered via a spark plasma sintering process to obtain a sintered body composed of nano-sized grains. Important transport properties of the sintered body are measured to calculate its most important characteristic, the thermoelectric performance. The results demonstrate a relationship between the nanostructure of the sintered body and its thermal conductivity.

  12. Superconductivity in a new layered nickel selenide CsNi2Se2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huimin; Yang, Jinhu; Cao, Chao; Li, Lin; Su, Qiping; Chen, Bin; Wang, Hangdong; Mao, Qianhui; Xu, Binjie; Du, Jianhua; Fang, Minghu

    2016-04-01

    The physical properties of CsNi2Se2 were characterized by electrical resistivity, magnetization and specific heat measurements. We found that the stoichiometric CsNi2Se2 compound undergoes a superconducting transition at T c = 2.7 K. A large Sommerfeld coefficient {γ }n (˜77.90 mJ/mol K-2) was obtained from the normal state electronic specific heat. However, the Kadowaki-Woods ratio of CsNi2Se2 was estimated to be about 0.041 × 10{}-5μ {{Ω }}cm(mol K2/mJ)2, indicating the absence of strong electron-electron correlations. In the superconducting state, we found that the zero-field electronic specific heat data, C es(T) (0.5 K ≤slant T < 2.7 K), can be fitted well with a two-gap BCS model, indicating the multi-gap feature of CsNi2Se2. The comparison with the density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggested that the large {γ }n in these nickel selenide superconductors may be related to the large density of states (DOS) at the Fermi surface.

  13. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since the pioneering research by Shoden in 1953. However, we recently developed a new method for determining ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron by computer-assisted serum ferritin kinetics. Serum ferritin increase or decrease curves were measured in patients with normal storage iron levels (chronic hepatitis C and iron deficiency anemia treated by intravenous iron injection), and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis and transfusion dependent anemia). We thereby confirmed the existence of two iron pathways where iron flows followed the numbered order (1) labile iron, (2) ferritin and (3) hemosiderin in iron deposition and mobilization among many previously proposed but mostly unproven routes. We also demonstrated the increasing and decreasing phases of ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron in iron deposition and mobilization. The author first demonstrated here the change in proportion between pre-existing ferritin iron and new ferritin iron synthesized by removing iron from hemosiderin in the course of iron removal. In addition, the author disclosed the cause of underestimation of storage iron turnover rate which had been reported by previous investigators in estimating storage iron turnover rate of normal subjects. PMID:25741033

  14. Optimization of a Non-arsenic Iron-based Superconductor for Wire Fabrication

    DOE PAGES

    Mitchell, Jonathan E; Hillesheim, D A; Bridges, Craig A; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Gofryk, Krzysztof; Rindfleisch, M; Tomsic, M; Safa-Sefat, Athena

    2015-03-13

    Here we report on the optimization of synthesis of iron selenide-based superconducting powders and the fabrication of selenide-based wire. The powders were synthesized by an ammonothermal method, whereby Ba is intercalated between FeSe layers to produce Bax(NH3)yFe2Se2, with tetragonal structure similar to AFe2X2 (X: As, Se), '122', superconductors. The optimal Tc (up to 38 K) and Meissner and shielding superconducting fractions are obtained from the shortest reaction time (t) of reactants in liquid ammonia (30 min). With the increase of t, a second crystalline 122 phase, with a smaller unit cell, emerges. A small amount of NH3 is released frommore » the structure above ~200 °C, which results in loss of superconductivity. However, in the confined space of niobium/Monel tubing, results indicate there is enough pressure for some of NH3 to remain in the crystal lattice, and thermal annealing can be performed at temperatures of up to 780 °C, increasing wire density and yielded a reasonable Tc ≈ 16 K. Here, we report of the first successful wire fabrication of non-arsenic high-Tc iron-based superconductor. We find that although bulk materials are estimated to carry critical current densities >100 kA cm₋2 (4 K, self-field), the current transport within wires need to be optimized (Jc ~ 1 kA cm₋2).« less

  15. Vacancies ordered in screw form (VOSF) and layered indium selenide thin film deposition by laser back ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Kenneth M.; Wiley, William R.; Venkatasubramanian, Eswaranand; Ohuchi, Fumio

    2009-09-01

    Indium selenide thin films are important due to their applications in non-volatile memory and solar cells. In this work, we present an initial study of a new application of deposition-site selective laser back ablation (LBA) for making thin films of In 2Se 3. Invacuo annealing and subsequent characterization of the films by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that control of substrate temperature during deposition and post-deposition annealing temperature is critical in determining the phase and composition of the films. The initial laser fluence and target film thickness determine the amount of material deposited onto the substrate.

  16. Vacancies Ordered in Screw Form (VOSF) and Layered Indium Selenide Thin Film Deposition by Laser Back Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Kenneth M.; Wiley, William R.; Venkatasubramanian, Eswaranand; Ohuchi, Fumio S.

    2009-09-30

    Indium selenide thin films are important due to their applications in non-volatile memory and solar cells. In this work, we present an initial study of a new application of deposition-site selective laser back ablation (LBA) for making thin films of In2Se3. In-vacuo annealing and subsequent characterization of the films by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that control of substrate temperature during deposition and post-deposition annealing temperature is critical in determining the phase and composition of the films. The initial laser fluence and target film thickness determine the amount of material deposited onto the substrate.

  17. Parallel molecular dynamics simulations of pressure-induced structural transformations in cadmium selenide nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nicholas Jabari Ouma

    Parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate pressure-induced solid-to-solid structural phase transformations in cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanorods. The effects of the size and shape of nanorods on different aspects of structural phase transformations are studied. Simulations are based on interatomic potentials validated extensively by experiments. Simulations range from 105 to 106 atoms. These simulations are enabled by highly scalable algorithms executed on massively parallel Beowulf computing architectures. Pressure-induced structural transformations are studied using a hydrostatic pressure medium simulated by atoms interacting via Lennard-Jones potential. Four single-crystal CdSe nanorods, each 44A in diameter but varying in length, in the range between 44A and 600A, are studied independently in two sets of simulations. The first simulation is the downstroke simulation, where each rod is embedded in the pressure medium and subjected to increasing pressure during which it undergoes a forward transformation from a 4-fold coordinated wurtzite (WZ) crystal structure to a 6-fold coordinated rocksalt (RS) crystal structure. In the second so-called upstroke simulation, the pressure on the rods is decreased and a reverse transformation from 6-fold RS to a 4-fold coordinated phase is observed. The transformation pressure in the forward transformation depends on the nanorod size, with longer rods transforming at lower pressures close to the bulk transformation pressure. Spatially-resolved structural analyses, including pair-distributions, atomic-coordinations and bond-angle distributions, indicate nucleation begins at the surface of nanorods and spreads inward. The transformation results in a single RS domain, in agreement with experiments. The microscopic mechanism for transformation is observed to be the same as for bulk CdSe. A nanorod size dependency is also found in reverse structural transformations, with longer nanorods transforming more

  18. Exploring the doping effects of copper on thermoelectric properties of lead selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayner, Chhatrasal; Sharma, Raghunandan; Mallik, Iram; Das, Malay K.; Kar, Kamal K.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we have explored the effect of dopant concentration (copper (Cu)) on the thermoelectric performance of Cu doped lead selenide (Pb1-x Cu x Se (0  ⩽  x  ⩽  0.1)). With increasing the dopant concentration, sign inversion of majority charge carriers takes place for x  ⩾  0.04 due to the donor behaviour of Cu in the P-type pristine PbSe. The room temperature Seebeck coefficients of Pb1-x Cu x Se with x  =  0.01, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06 and 0.08 are observed to be 233, 337, -473.7, -392.5 and  -257.6 μV K-1, respectively as compared to that of 186.4 μV K-1 of the pristine PbSe. This increment in Seebeck coefficient is the result of low carrier concentration and is not related to the resonance states created by Cu dopant. At room temperature, the lattice thermal conductivity of pristine PbSe is 0.52 W m-1 K-1 while for Cu doped PbSe, it varies from 0.8 to 1.1 W m-1 K-1. Finally, with ZT of ~0.59 and power factor of ~700 at 500 K, Pb0.98Cu0.02Se exhibits the highest thermoelectric performance among the studied Pb1-x Cu x Se systems. Owing to the high ZT and power factor, a single thermoelement of Pb0.98Cu0.02Se exhibits thermovoltage of  >100 mV at a temperature gradient of 200 °C.

  19. Various forms of coexistence of superconductivity and magnetism in iron-pnictide superconductors: a NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobroff, Julien

    2013-03-01

    Our NMR studies of iron pnictides allowed us to discover various forms of coexistence between superconductivity and magnetism. In Co-doped BaFe2As2, superconductivity and incommensurate antiferromagnetism coexist at the atomic level in an homogeneous state. In contrast, Ru isovalent doping leads to a disorderd situation where superconducting clusters appear in an antiferromagnetic background. Finally, in the 245 iron-selenide RbFeSe, antiferromagnetism and superconductivity separate in alternate layers of nanometer thickness. But in all these componds, the superconducting state remains similar in terms of local susceptibility and carrier doping. It looks as if, for superconductivity to appear, frozen Fe magnetic moments need to be small enough or far enough in distance, whatever the cause. Y. Texier et al., PRL 108, 237002 (2012); Y. Laplace et al., PRB Rapid Com 86, 020510(R) (2012); Y. Laplace, PRB Rapid Com 80, 140501 (2009) This work benefited from the support of the ANR PNICTIDES.

  20. Iron and alloys of iron. [lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastri, Sankar

    1992-01-01

    All lunar soil contains iron in the metallic form, mostly as an iron-nickel alloy in concentrations of a few tenths of 1 percent. Some of this free iron can be easily separated by magnetic means. It is estimated that the magnetic separation of 100,000 tons of lunar soil would yield 150-200 tons of iron. Agglutinates contain metallic iron which could be extracted by melting and made into powder metallurgy products. The characteristics and potential uses of the pure-iron and iron-alloy lunar products are discussed. Processes for working iron that might be used in a nonterrestrial facility are also addressed.

  1. Synthesis and high temperature transport properties of new quaternary layered selenide NaCuMnSe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Pavan Kumar, V.; Varadaraju, U.V.

    2014-04-01

    Synthesis and high temperature transport properties of NaCu{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 1−x}Se{sub 2}, (x=0−0.75) a new quaternary layered selenide, are reported. NaCuMnSe{sub 2} crystallizes in a trigonal unit cell with space group of P-3m1 (a=4.1276 Å, c=7.1253 Å). The isovalent substitution of Mn{sup 2+} by Cu{sup 2+} is carried out. All the compositions show semiconducting nature, whereas the Seebeck coefficient increases gradually over the entire measured temperature range. Compositions with x=0 and 0.025 follow thermally activated behavior. With increase in copper concentration the conduction mechanism transforms to 2D variable range hopping (VRH) for x=0.05 and 0.075. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of NaCuMnSe{sub 2}. - Highlights: • A new quaternary layered selenide NaCuMnSe{sub 2} is synthesized. • All the compositions show semiconducting nature, whereas the Seebeck coefficient increases gradually over the entire measured temperature range. • Conduction mechanism transforms from thermally activated behavior to 2D variable range hopping with increase in copper concentration.

  2. A nanoparticle ink printing process for all printed thin film copper-indium-selenide (CIS) solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. Charles; Soltesz, Istvan; Wu, Mindy; Ziobro, Frank; Amidon, Roger; Kiss, Zoltan

    2008-08-01

    Copper indium selenide (CIS) or its derivatives (such as gallium doped CIS and sulfur substituted CIS) are considered the best optical absorber material used in polycrystalline thin film photovoltaic solar cells due to their favorable electrical and optical properties, and long term stability. To develop a low cost yet high throughput thin film deposition process with both composition and film uniformity control, precursor ink has been formulated using nanoparticle metal oxide of copper and indium in an organic solvent system dissolved with selenium or sulfur. Smooth thin film of precursor oxide mixture has been demonstrated by wet printing process. Upon heat treatment of the precursor thin film under atmosphere of selenium and/or sulfur, copper-indium selenide and/or sulfide (CIS) was formed. Several approaches of nanoparticle ink coating processes have been investigated through spin-coating, screen-printing and contact printing. For using glass substrate, contact printing demonstrated superior uniformity and composition control. By using a post-thermal treatment process on the nanoparticle-coated film, good morphology thin film with composition control was achieved. Both the chemical composition and physical morphology has been investigated using ICP-OES and XRD measurements. Based on molybdenum glass substrate, all-printed solar cells have been demonstrated.

  3. Reduction of selenate to selenide by sulfate-respiring bacteria: Experiments with cell suspensions and estuarine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zehr, J.P.; Oremland, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    Washed cell suspension of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans subsp. aestuarii were capable of reducing nanomolar levels of selenate to selenide as well as sulfate to sulfide. Reduction of these species was inhibited by 1 mM selenate or tungstate. The addition of 1 mM sulfate decreased the reduction of selenate and enhanced the reduction of sulfate. Increasing concentrations of sulfate inhibited rates of selenate reduction but enhanced sulfate reduction rates. Cell suspensions kept in 1 mM selenate were incapable of reducing either selenate or sulfate when the selenate/sulfate ratio was ???0.02, indicating that irreversible inhibition occurs at high selenate concentrations. Anoxic estuarine sediments having an active flora of sulfate-respiring bacteria were capable of a small amount of selenate reduction when ambient sulfate concentrations were low (<4 mM). These results indicate that sulfate is an inhibitor of the reduction of trace qunatitites of selenate. Therefore, direct reduction of traces of selenate to selenide by sulfate-respiring bacteria in natural environments is constrained by the ambient concentration of sulfate ions. The significance of this observation with regard to the role sediments play in sequestering selenium is discussed

  4. Room temperature chemical bath deposition of cadmium selenide, cadmium sulfide and cadmium sulfoselenide thin films with novel nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderHyde, Cephas A.; Sartale, S. D.; Patil, Jayant M.; Ghoderao, Karuna P.; Sawant, Jitendra P.; Kale, Rohidas B.

    2015-10-01

    A simple, convenient and low cost chemical synthesis route has been used to deposit nanostructured cadmium sulfide, selenide and sulfoselenide thin films at room temperature. The films were deposited on glass substrates, using cadmium acetate as cadmium ion and sodium selenosulfate/thiourea as a selenium/sulfur ion sources. Aqueous ammonia was used as a complex reagent and also to adjust the pH of the final solution. The as-deposited films were uniform, well adherent to the glass substrate, specularly reflective and red/yellow in color depending on selenium and sulfur composition. The X-ray diffraction pattern of deposited cadmium selenide thin film revealed the nanocrystalline nature with cubic phase; cadmium sulfide revealed mixture of cubic along with hexagonal phase and cadmium sulfoselenide thin film were grown with purely hexagonal phase. The morphological observations revealed the growth and formation of interesting one, two and three-dimensional nanostructures. The band gap of thin films was calculated and the results are reported.

  5. Iron and iron derived radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Methods of making copper selenium precursor compositions with a targeted copper selenide content and precursor compositions and thin films resulting therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Ginley, David S.; Leisch, Jennifer; Taylor, Matthew; Stanbery, Billy J.

    2011-09-20

    Precursor compositions containing copper and selenium suitable for deposition on a substrate to form thin films suitable for semi-conductor applications. Methods of forming the precursor compositions using primary amine solvents and methods of forming the thin films wherein the selection of temperature and duration of heating controls the formation of a targeted species of copper selenide.

  7. Cytocompatibility of direct water synthesized cadmium selenide quantum dots in colo-205 cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Torres, Marcos R.; Velez, Christian; Zayas, Beatriz; Rivera, Osvaldo; Arslan, Zikri; Gonzalez-Vega, Maxine N.; Diaz-Diestra, Daysi; Beltran-Huarac, Juan; Morell, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium selenide quantum dots (CdSe QDs), inorganic semiconducting nanocrystals, are alluring increased attraction due to their highly refined chemistry, availability, and super tunable optical properties suitable for many applications in different research areas, such as photovoltaics, light-emitting devices, environmental sciences, and nanomedicine. Specifically, they are being widely used in bio-imaging in contrast to organic dyes due to their high brightness and improved photo-stability, and their ability to tune their absorption and emission spectra upon changing the crystal size. The production of CdSe QDs is mostly assisted by trioctylphosphine oxide compound, which acts as solvent or solubilizing agent and renders the QDs soluble in organic compounds (such as toluene, chloroform, and hexane) that are highly toxic. To circumvent the toxicity-related factor in CdSe QDs, we report the synthesis of CdSe QDs capped with thioglycolic acid (TGA) in an aqueous medium, and their biocompatibility in colo-205 cancer cells. In this study, the [Cd2+]/[TGA] ratio was adjusted to 11:1 and the Se concentration (10 and 15 mM) was monitored in order to evaluate its influence on the optical properties and cytocompatibility. QDs resulted to be quite stable in water (after purification) and RPMI cell medium and no precipitation was observed for long contact times, making them appealing for in vitro experiments. The spectroscopy analysis, advanced electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometry studies indicate that the final products were successfully formed exhibiting an improved optical response. Colo-205 cells being exposed to different concentrations of TGA-capped CdSe QDs for 12, 24, and 48 h with doses ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 mM show high tolerance reaching cell viabilities as high as 93 %. No evidence of cellular apoptotic pathways was observed as pointed out by our Annexin V assays at higher concentrations. Moreover, confocal microscopy analysis conducted to evaluate the

  8. Electronic structure of ruthenium-doped iron chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Winiarski, M. J. Samsel-Czekała, M.; Ciechan, A.

    2014-12-14

    The structural and electronic properties of hypothetical Ru{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x}Se and Ru{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x}Te systems have been investigated from first principles within the density functional theory (DFT). Reasonable values of lattice parameters and chalcogen atomic positions in the tetragonal unit cell of iron chalcogenides have been obtained with the use of norm-conserving pseudopotentials. The well known discrepancies between experimental data and DFT-calculated results for structural parameters of iron chalcogenides are related to the semicore atomic states which were frozen in the used here approach. Such an approach yields valid results of the electronic structures of the investigated compounds. The Ru-based chalcogenides exhibit the same topology of the Fermi surface (FS) as that of FeSe, differing only in subtle FS nesting features. Our calculations predict that the ground states of RuSe and RuTe are nonmagnetic, whereas those of the solid solutions Ru{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x}Se and Ru{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x}Te become the single- and double-stripe antiferromagnetic, respectively. However, the calculated stabilization energy values are comparable for each system. The phase transitions between these magnetic arrangements may be induced by slight changes of the chalcogen atom positions and the lattice parameters a in the unit cell of iron selenides and tellurides. Since the superconductivity in iron chalcogenides is believed to be mediated by the spin fluctuations in single-stripe magnetic phase, the Ru{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x}Se and Ru{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x}Te systems are good candidates for new superconducting iron-based materials.

  9. Electronic structure of ruthenium-doped iron chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winiarski, M. J.; Samsel-Czekała, M.; Ciechan, A.

    2014-12-01

    The structural and electronic properties of hypothetical RuxFe1-xSe and RuxFe1-xTe systems have been investigated from first principles within the density functional theory (DFT). Reasonable values of lattice parameters and chalcogen atomic positions in the tetragonal unit cell of iron chalcogenides have been obtained with the use of norm-conserving pseudopotentials. The well known discrepancies between experimental data and DFT-calculated results for structural parameters of iron chalcogenides are related to the semicore atomic states which were frozen in the used here approach. Such an approach yields valid results of the electronic structures of the investigated compounds. The Ru-based chalcogenides exhibit the same topology of the Fermi surface (FS) as that of FeSe, differing only in subtle FS nesting features. Our calculations predict that the ground states of RuSe and RuTe are nonmagnetic, whereas those of the solid solutions RuxFe1-xSe and RuxFe1-xTe become the single- and double-stripe antiferromagnetic, respectively. However, the calculated stabilization energy values are comparable for each system. The phase transitions between these magnetic arrangements may be induced by slight changes of the chalcogen atom positions and the lattice parameters a in the unit cell of iron selenides and tellurides. Since the superconductivity in iron chalcogenides is believed to be mediated by the spin fluctuations in single-stripe magnetic phase, the RuxFe1-xSe and RuxFe1-xTe systems are good candidates for new superconducting iron-based materials.

  10. Pharmacology of Iron Transport

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Shaina L.; Krishnamurthy, Divya; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular basis for the regulation of iron uptake, storage, and distribution is necessary to understand iron homeostasis. Pharmacological tools are emerging to identify and distinguish among different iron transport pathways. Stimulatory or inhibitory small molecules with effects on iron uptake can help characterize the mechanistic elements of iron transport and the roles of the transporters involved in these processes. In particular, iron chelators can serve as potential pharmacological tools to alleviate diseases of iron overload. This review focuses on the pharmacology of iron transport, introducing iron transport membrane proteins and known inhibitors. PMID:23020294

  11. The formation of a hybrid structure from tungsten selenide and oxide plates for a hydrogen-evolution electrocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fominski, V. Yu.; Grigoriev, S. N.; Romanov, R. I.; Volosova, M. A.; Grunin, A. I.; Teterina, G. D.

    2016-06-01

    It has been found that the pulsed laser deposition of a thin tungsten selenide film, followed by thermal treatment at 550°C in an Ar + O2 mixture of gases, results in the formation of a hybrid structure that is made up of ultrathin WSe2 and WO3- y platelets. The structural and size characteristics of the nanoplatelets deposited on microcrystalline graphite provide the effective hydrogen evolution reaction in a 0.5 M H2SO4 solution, with the cathode current made about seven times higher at a potential of-100 mV and the slope of the Tafel characteristic reduced from 340 to 90 mV/dec.

  12. A novel polysaccharide isolated from mulberry fruits (Murus alba L.) and its selenide derivative: structural characterization and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Zhang, Bin; Fu, Xiong; Liu, Rui Hai

    2016-06-15

    A novel polysaccharide (MFP3P) was isolated from Murus alba L. through the hot water extraction method followed by chromatographic purification. The chemical structure of MFP3P was elucidated by acid hydrolysis, Smith degradation and methylation analysis, along with FT-IR, GC-MS, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Its morphological properties were further characterized by SEM and AFM. The selenide of the polysaccharide (MFP3P-Se) was obtained by the Na2SeO3/BaCl2 method. The antioxidant properties showed that MFP3P-Se exhibited higher peroxy radical-scavenging capacity than MFP3P in vitro. Moreover, MFP3P-Se had more significant hypoglycemic effects than MFP3P through promoting pancreatic cell proliferation and increasing glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. PMID:27241036

  13. Formation of Metal Selenide and Metal-Selenium Nanoparticles using Distinct Reactivity between Selenium and Noble Metals.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Ho; Choi, Ji Yong; Lee, Young Hwan; Park, Joon T; Song, Hyunjoon

    2015-07-01

    Small Se nanoparticles with a diameter of ≈20 nm were generated by the reduction of selenium chloride with NaBH4 at -10 °C. The reaction with Ag at 60 °C yielded stable Ag2 Se nanoparticles, which subsequently were transformed into M-Se nanoparticles (M=Cd, Zn, Pb) through cation exchange reactions with corresponding ions. The reaction with Pt formed Pt layers that were evenly coated on the surface of the Se nanoparticles, and the dissolution of the Se cores with hydrazine generated uniform Pt hollow nanoparticles. The reaction with Au generated tiny Au clusters on the Se surface, and eventually formed acorn-shaped Au-Se nanoparticles through heat treatment. These results indicate that small Se nanoparticles with diameters of ≈20 nm can be used as a versatile platform for the synthesis of metal selenide and metal-selenium hybrid nanoparticles with complex structures.

  14. Carbon-Coated Co(3+)-Rich Cobalt Selenide Derived from ZIF-67 for Efficient Electrochemical Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Siwen; Peng, Sijia; Huang, Linsong; Cui, Xiaoqi; Al-Enizi, Abdullah M; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2016-08-17

    Oxygen evolution reaction (OER) electrocatalysts are confronted with challenges such as sluggish kinetics, low conductivity, and instability, restricting the development of water splitting. In this study, we report an efficient Co(3+)-rich cobalt selenide (Co0.85Se) nanoparticles coated with carbon shell as OER electrocatalyst, which are derived from zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-67) precursor. It is proposed that the organic ligands in the ZIF-67 can effectively enrich and stabilize the Co(3+) ions in the inorganic-organic frameworks and subsequent carbon-coated nanoparticles. In alkaline media, the catalyst exhibits excellent OER performances, which are attributed to its abundant active sites, high conductivity, and superior kinetics. PMID:27488352

  15. Critical behaviour of the curved region near 111-facet edge of equilibrium shape cuprous selenide large single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladić, Jadranko; Vučić, Zlatko; Lovrić, Davorin

    2002-07-01

    Several millimetres large spherical cuprous selenide single crystals with well developed (1 1 1) facets grown at about 30 K below the roughening temperature ( TR≈830 K) and rapidly cooled to room temperature were used to test the universality and value of critical exponent describing the surface profile behaviour near the facet edge. Enlarged photographs (52.5 times) of part of the crystal profile were digitised with resulting spatial resolution of 0.1904±0.0001 μm. After FFT low pass filtering, the position of crystal silhouette edge was determined as the loci of the extremes in the first derivative of each image row intensity profile. For assumed critical dependence z= A( x- x0) θ, the inverse logarithmic derivative applied to crystal profile data points disclosed the extent of intervals of different behaviour, giving independently the respective indicative values of fitting parameters θ and x0. In three distinct regions non-linear Levenberg-Marquardt fitting was applied to original data sets. In the region farthest away from the facet, the behaviour is well described by θ≈2.5 or by Andreev formula z= A( x0- x) 2+ B( x0- x) 4. In the stepped region, for ϕ=13.98-17.12° (tilt angle relative to facet plane), the critical exponent θ=1.499±0.003 is found, in agreement with Pokrovsky-Talapov universality class predicted value of θ= {3}/{2}. The step interaction energy, step free energy and facet free energy ratios obtained from data fitting parameters only, are compared to published values for 4He, Si and Pb single crystals. The behaviour in the immediate vicinity of the facet edge is discussed in the light of dynamics features recently observed on different single crystals during growth (cuprous selenide, 4He) and equilibration (Pb).

  16. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  17. Anodic electrosynthesis of cadmium selenide thin films; Characterization and comparison with the passive/transpassive behavior of CdX (X = S,Te) counterpart

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, D.; Mishra, K.K.; Rajeshwar, K. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on cadmium selenide thin films electrosynthesized by an anodic route employing alkaline selenide solutions. The thermodynamic aspects of the electrodeposition chemistry were first explored via Pourbaix diagrams; the kinetic aspects were studied by linear sweep voltammetry on a Cd anode. The photoaction spectra of these anodic thin films revealed an optical gap energy (1.7 eV) in good agreement with the value known for CdSe. Their luminescence response, however, suggested a high density of carrier recombination centers located {approximately}0.2 eV below the conduction band. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the anodic thin films were stoichiometric in composition. In situ examination of the material during thin film growth by cyclic photovoltammetry revealed anodic photoeffects at potentials just past the Cd corrosion wave. The growth kinetics in the passive region adhered to a direct logarithmic rate law, while a diffusion mechanism was seen to prevail in the transpassive regime.

  18. HEPCIDIN AND IRON HOMEOSTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2014-01-01

    Despite fluctuations in dietary iron intake and intermittent losses through bleeding, the plasma iron concentrations in humans remain stable at 10–30 μM. While most of the iron entering blood plasma comes from recycling, appropriate amount of iron is absorbed from the diet to compensate for losses and maintain nontoxic amounts in stores. Plasma iron concentration and iron distribution are similarly regulated in laboratory rodents. The hepatic peptide hepcidin was identified as the systemic iron-regulatory hormone. In the efferent arc, hepcidin regulates intestinal iron absorption, plasma iron concentrations, and tissue iron distribution by inducing degradation of its receptor, the cellular iron exporter ferroportin. Ferroportin exports iron into plasma from absorptive enterocytes, from macrophages that recycle the iron of senescent erythrocytes, and from hepatocytes that store iron. In the more complex and less well understood afferent arc, hepatic hepcidin synthesis is transcriptionally regulated by extracellular and intracellular iron concentrations through a molecular complex of bone morphogenetic protein receptors and their iron-specific ligands, modulators and iron sensors. Through as yet undefined pathways, hepcidin is also homeostatically regulated by the iron requirements of erythroid precursors for hemoglobin synthesis. In accordance with the role of hepcidin-mediated iron redistribution in host defense, hepcidin production is regulated by inflammation as well. Increased hepcidin concentrations in plasma are pathogenic in iron-restrictive anemias including anemias associated with inflammation, chronic kidney disease and some cancers. Hepcidin deficiency causes iron overload in hereditary hemochromatosis and ineffective erythropoiesis. Hepcidin, ferroportin and their regulators represent potential targets for the diagnosis and treatment of iron disorders and anemias. PMID:22306005

  19. Synthesis and characterization of (Ni1-xCox)Se2 based ternary selenides as electrocatalyst for triiodide reduction in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theerthagiri, J.; Senthil, R. A.; Buraidah, M. H.; Raghavender, M.; Madhavan, J.; Arof, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    Ternary metal selenides of (Ni1-xCox)Se2 with 0≤x≤1 were synthesized by using one-step hydrothermal reduction route. The synthesized metal selenides were utilized as an efficient, low-cost platinum free counter electrode for dye-sensitized solar cells. The cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies revealed that the Ni0.5Co0.5Se2 counter electrode exhibited higher electrocatalytic activity and lower charge transfer resistance at the counter electrode/electrolyte interface than the other compositions for reduction of triiodide to iodide. Ternary selenides of Ni0.5Co0.5Se2 offer a synergistic effect to the electrocatalytic activity for the reduction of triiodide that might be due to an increase in active catalytic sites and small charge transfer resistance. The DSSC with Ni0.5Co0.5Se2 counter electrode achieved a high power conversion efficiency of 6.02%, which is comparable with that of conventional platinum counter electrode (6.11%). This present investigation demonstrates the potential application of Ni0.5Co0.5Se2 as counter electrode in dye-sensitized solar cells.

  20. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked.

  1. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  2. Alkali doped poly (2,5-benzimidazole) membrane for alkaline water electrolysis: Characterization and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Liliana A.; Hnát, Jaromír; Heredia, Nayra; Bruno, Mariano M.; Viva, Federico A.; Paidar, Martin; Corti, Horacio R.; Bouzek, Karel; Abuin, Graciela C.

    2016-04-01

    The properties and performance of linear and cross-linked KOH doped ABPBI membranes as electrolyte/separator for zero gap alkaline water electrolysis cells are evaluated and compared with a commercial Zirfon® diaphragm. Stability in alkaline environment, swelling, thermal properties, water sorption, KOH uptake and conductivity of linear (L-ABPBI) and cross-linked (C-ABPBI) membranes doped with different concentrations of KOH are analyzed. Linear membranes show stability up to 3.0 mol·dm-3 KOH doping, while cross-linked membranes are stable up to 4.2 mol·dm-3 KOH doping. Both kinds of membranes exhibit good thermal stability and reasonable specific ionic conductivity at 22 °C in the range between 7 and 25 mS·cm-1, being slightly higher the conductivity of C-ABPBI membranes than that of L-ABPBI ones. In short-term electrolysis tests both L-ABPBI and C-ABPBI membranes show better performance than Zirfon diaphragm in the range from 50 to 70 °C. A current density of 335 mA·cm-2 at a cell voltage of 2.0 V is attained with C-ABPBI membranes doped in 3 mol·dm-3 KOH at 70 °C, a performance comparable with that of commercial units operating at temperatures ca. 80 °C and 30 wt% KOH (6.7 mol·dm-3) as electrolyte.

  3. Preparation of C{sub 60} charge transfer complexes with organic donor molecules and alkali doping

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, A.; Saito, G.; Hirate, S.; Pac, S.; Ishida, T.; Zakhidov, A.A.; Yakushi, K.

    1998-07-01

    Solid charge transfer (CT) complexes of C{sub 60} with TseC{sub 1}-TTF, EDT-TTF, EOET-TTF, and TDAP (1, 3, 6, 8-tetrakis(dimethylamino)pyrene) were newly prepared. All the obtained black crystals were proved to be neutral despite their rather strong electron donor ability. Lattice parameters of them except for EOET-TTF complex were determined together with those of HMTTeF{center_dot}C{sub 60}, which had been reported with different values. Rubidium doping under a mild condition was examined on the complexes of TDAP, EOET-TTF, HMTTeF, BEDT-TTF, hydroquinone and ferrocene to search for the superconductors of new crystal and electronic structures. Among them, the rubidium-doped ferrocene complex easily showed an apparent superconducting signal in SQUID magnetization measurements. The doping effect on these CT complexes is compared to that on OMTTF complex.

  4. Iron status of vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Craig, W J

    1994-05-01

    An appropriately planned well-balanced vegetarian diet is compatible with an adequate iron status. Although the iron stores of vegetarians may be reduced, the incidence of iron-deficiency anemia in vegetarians is not significantly different from that in omnivores. Restrictive vegetarian diets (eg, macrobiotic) are associated with more widespread iron-deficiency anemia. Western vegetarians who consume a variety of foods have a better iron status than do those in developing countries who consume a limited diet based on unleavened, unrefined cereals. Whereas phytates, polyphenolics, and other plant constituents found in vegetarian diets inhibit nonheme-iron absorption, vitamin C, citric acid, and other organic acids facilitate nonheme-iron absorption.

  5. Optimization of a Non-arsenic Iron-based Superconductor for Wire Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Jonathan E; Hillesheim, D A; Bridges, Craig A; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Gofryk, Krzysztof; Rindfleisch, M; Tomsic, M; Safa-Sefat, Athena

    2015-03-13

    Here we report on the optimization of synthesis of iron selenide-based superconducting powders and the fabrication of selenide-based wire. The powders were synthesized by an ammonothermal method, whereby Ba is intercalated between FeSe layers to produce Bax(NH3)yFe2Se2, with tetragonal structure similar to AFe2X2 (X: As, Se), '122', superconductors. The optimal Tc (up to 38 K) and Meissner and shielding superconducting fractions are obtained from the shortest reaction time (t) of reactants in liquid ammonia (30 min). With the increase of t, a second crystalline 122 phase, with a smaller unit cell, emerges. A small amount of NH3 is released from the structure above ~200 °C, which results in loss of superconductivity. However, in the confined space of niobium/Monel tubing, results indicate there is enough pressure for some of NH3 to remain in the crystal lattice, and thermal annealing can be performed at temperatures of up to 780 °C, increasing wire density and yielded a reasonable Tc ≈ 16 K. Here, we report of the first successful wire fabrication of non-arsenic high-Tc iron-based superconductor. We find that although bulk materials are estimated to carry critical current densities >100 kA cm₋2 (4 K, self-field), the current transport within wires need to be optimized (Jc ~ 1 kA cm₋2).

  6. Neonatal iron nutrition.

    PubMed

    Rao, R; Georgieff, M K

    2001-10-01

    Preterm infants are prone to iron deficiency. Their total body iron content at birth is low and gets further depleted by clinical practices such as uncompensated phlebotomy losses and exogenous erythropoietin administration during the neonatal period. Early iron deficiency appears to adversely affect cognitive development in human infants. To maintain iron sufficiency and meet the iron demands of catch-up postnatal growth, iron supplementation is prudent in preterm infants. A dose of 2-4 mg/kg/day is recommended for preterm infants who are fed exclusively human milk. A dose of 6 mg/kg/day or more is needed with the use of exogenous erythropoietin or to correct preexisting iron deficiency. However, due to the poor antioxidant capabilities of preterm infants and the potential role of iron in several oxidant-related perinatal disorders, indiscriminate iron supplementation should be avoided.

  7. Pulsed voltage deposited lead selenide thin film as efficient counter electrode for quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Bin Bin; Wang, Ye Feng; Wang, Xue Qing; Zeng, Jing Hui

    2016-04-01

    Lead selenide (PbSe) thin films were deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass by a facile one-step pulse voltage electrodeposition method, and used as counter electrode (CE) in CdS/CdSe quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). A power conversion efficiency of 4.67% is received for the CdS/CdSe co-sensitized solar cells, which is much better than that of 2.39% received using Pt CEs. The enhanced performance is attributed to the extended absorption in the near infrared region, superior electrocatalytic activity and p-type conductivity with a reflection of the incident light at the back electrode in addition. The physical and chemical properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), reflectance spectra, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Tafel polarization measurements. The present work provides a facile pathway to an efficient CE in the QDSSCs.

  8. Loading of atorvastatin and linezolid in β-cyclodextrin-conjugated cadmium selenide/silica nanoparticles: A spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Antony, Eva Janet; Shibu, Abhishek; Ramasamy, Sivaraj; Paulraj, Mosae Selvakumar; Enoch, Israel V M V

    2016-08-01

    The preparation of β-cyclodextrin-conjugated cadmium selenide-silica nanoparticles, the loading of two drugs viz., Atorvastatin and linezolid in the cyclodextrin cavity, and the fluorescence energy transfer between CdSe/SiO2 nanoparticles and the drugs encapsulated in the cyclodextrin cavity are reported in this paper. IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy, and particle size analysis by light-scattering experiment were used as the tools of characterizing the size and the crystal system of the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles fall under hexagonal system. The silica-shell containing CdSe nanoparticles were functionalized by reaction with aminoethylamino-β-cyclodextrin. Fluorescence spectra of the nanoparticles in their free and drug-encapsulated forms were studied. The FÖrster distances between the encapsulated drugs and the CdSe nanoparticles are below 3nm. The change in the FÖrster resonance energy parameters under physiological conditions may aid in tracking the release of drugs from the cavity of the cyclodextrin. PMID:27157743

  9. Electrical Transport and Grain Growth in Solution-Cast, Chloride-Terminated Cadmium Selenide Nanocrystal Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the evolution of electrical transport and grain size during the sintering of thin films spin-cast from soluble phosphine and amine-bound, chloride-terminated cadmium selenide nanocrystals. Sintering of the nanocrystals occurs in three distinct stages as the annealing temperature is increased: (1) reversible desorption of the organic ligands (≤150 °C), (2) irreversible particle fusion (200–300 °C), and (3) ripening of the grains to >5 nm domains (>200 °C). Grain growth occurs at 200 °C in films with 8 atom % Cl–, while films with 3 atom % Cl– resist growth until 300 °C. Fused nanocrystalline thin films (grain size = 4.5–5.5 nm) on thermally grown silicon dioxide gate dielectrics produce field-effect transistors with electron mobilities as high as 25 cm2/(Vs) and on/off ratios of 105 with less than 0.5 V hysteresis in threshold voltage without the addition of indium. PMID:24960255

  10. Reduction of elemental selenium to selenide: Experiments with anoxic sediments and bacteria that respire Se-oxyanions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herbel, M.J.; Blum, J.S.; Oremland, R.S.; Borglin, S.E.

    2003-01-01

    A selenite-respiring bacterium, Bacillus selenitireducens, produced significant levels of Se(-II) (as aqueous HSe-) when supplied with Se(O). B. selenitireducens was also able to reduce selenite [Se(IV)] through Se(O) to Se(-II). Reduction of Se(O) by B.selenitireducens was more rapid in cells grown on colloidal sulfur [S(O)] or Se(IV) as their electron acceptor than for cell lines grown on fumarate. In contrast, three cultures of selenate-respiring bacteria, Sulfurospirillum barnesii, B. arsenicoselenatis, and Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii either were unable to reduce Se(O) to Se(-II) or had only a very limited capacity to achieve this reduction. Biological reduction of Se(O) to Se(-II) was observed during incubation of estuarine sediment slurries, while no such activity was noted in formalin-killed controls. The majority of the Se(-II) produced was found in the sediments as a solid precipitate of FeSe, rather than in solution as HSe-. These results demonstrate that certain anaerobic bacteria have the capacity to reduce Se(O) to Se(-II), providing a possible biological explanation for the occurrence of the selenide species in some sedimentary rocks.

  11. Effect of Molecular Interactions on Electron-Transfer and Antioxidant Activity of Bis(alkanol)selenides: A Radiation Chemical Study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pavitra V; Singh, Beena G; Phadnis, Prasad P; Jain, Vimal K; Priyadarsini, K Indira

    2016-08-16

    Understanding electron-transfer processes is crucial for developing organoselenium compounds as antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents. To find new redox-active selenium antioxidants, we have investigated one-electron-transfer reactions between hydroxyl ((.) OH) radical and three bis(alkanol)selenides (SeROH) of varying alkyl chain length, using nanosecond pulse radiolysis. (.) OH radical reacts with SeROH to form radical adduct, which is converted primarily into a dimer radical cation (>Se∴Se<)(+) and α-{bis(hydroxyl alkyl)}-selenomethine radical along with a minor quantity of an intramolecularly stabilized radical cation. Some of these radicals have been subsequently converted to their corresponding selenoxide, and formaldehyde. Estimated yield of these products showed alkyl chain length dependency and correlated well with their antioxidant ability. Quantum chemical calculations suggested that compounds that formed more stable (>Se∴Se<)(+) , produced higher selenoxide and lower formaldehyde. Comparing these results with those for sulfur analogues confirmed for the first time the distinctive role of selenium in making such compounds better antioxidants. PMID:27405246

  12. Preparation of Few-Layer Bismuth Selenide by Liquid-Phase-Exfoliation and Its Optical Absorption Properties

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liping; Lin, Zhiqin; Peng, Jian; Weng, Jian; Huang, Yizhong; Luo, Zhengqian

    2014-01-01

    Bismuth selenide (Bi2Se3), a new topological insulator, has attracted much attention in recent years owing to its relatively simple band structure and large bulk band gap. Compared to bulk, few-layer Bi2Se3 is recently considered as a highly promising material. Here, we use a liquid-phase exfoliation method to prepare few-layer Bi2Se3 in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone or chitosan acetic solution. The resulted few-layer Bi2Se3 dispersion demonstrates an interesting absorption in the visible light region, which is different from bulk Bi2Se3 without any absorption in this region. The absorption spectrum of few-layer Bi2Se3 depends on its size and layer number. At the same time, the nonlinear and saturable absorption of few-layer Bi2Se3 thin film in near infrared is also characterized well and further exploited to generate laser pulses by a passive Q-switching technique. Stable Q-switched operation is achieved with a lower pump threshold of 9.3 mW at 974 nm, pulse energy of 39.8 nJ and a wide range of pulse-repetition-rate from 6.2 to 40.1 kHz. Therefore, the few-layer Bi2Se3 may excite a potential applications in laser photonics and optoelectronic devices. PMID:24762534

  13. Influence of growth and photocatalytic properties of copper selenide (CuSe) nanoparticles using reflux condensation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonia, S.; Kumar, P. Suresh; Mangalaraj, D.; Ponpandian, N.; Viswanathan, C.

    2013-10-01

    Influence of reaction conditions on the synthesis of copper selenide (CuSe) nanoparticles and their photo degradation activity is studied. Nearly monodispersed uniform size (23-44 nm) nanoparticles are synthesized by varying the reaction conditions using reflux condensation method. The obtained nanoparticles are characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The X-ray diffraction analysis of the sample shows the formation of nanoparticles with hexagonal CuSe structure. The result indicates that on increasing the reaction time from 4 to 12 h, the particle size decreases from 44 to 23 nm, but an increase in the reaction temperature increases the particle size. The calculated band gap Eg is ranging from 2.34 to 3.05 eV which is blue shifted from the bulk CuSe (2.2 eV). The photocatalytic degradation efficiency of the CuSe nanoparticles on two organic dyes Methylene blue (MB) and Rhodamine-B (RhB) in aqueous solution under UV region is calculated as 76 and 87% respectively.

  14. Simultaneous Determination of Adenine and Guanine Using Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots-Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Modified Electrode.

    PubMed

    Kalaivani, Arumugam; Narayanan, Sangilimuthu Sriman

    2015-06-01

    A novel electrochemical sensor was fabricated by immobilizing Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots (CdSe QDs)-Graphene Oxide (GO) nanocomposite on a paraffin wax impregnated graphite electrode (PIGE) and was used for the simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine. The CdSe QDs-GO nanocomposite was prepared by ultrasonication and was characterized with spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The nanocomposite modified electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidative determination of adenine and guanine with a good peak separation of 0.31 V. This may be due to the high surface area and fast electron transfer kinetics of the nanocomposite. The modified electrode exhibited wide linear ranges from 0.167 μM to 245 μM for Guanine and 0.083 μM to 291 μM for Adenine with detection limits of 0.055 μM Guanine and 0.028 μM of Adenine (S/N = 3) respectively. Further, the modified electrode was used for the quantitative determination of adenine and guanine in herring sperm DNA with satisfactory results. The modified electrode showed acceptable selectivity, reproducibility and stability under optimal conditions. PMID:26369099

  15. Aspects of a Distinct Cytotoxicity of Selenium Salts and Organic Selenides in Living Cells with Possible Implications for Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Estevam, Ethiene Castellucci; Witek, Karolina; Faulstich, Lisa; Nasim, Muhammad Jawad; Latacz, Gniewomir; Domínguez-Álvarez, Enrique; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna; Demasi, Marilene; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Jacob, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Selenium is traditionally considered as an antioxidant element and selenium compounds are often discussed in the context of chemoprevention and therapy. Recent studies, however, have revealed a rather more colorful and diverse biological action of selenium-based compounds, including the modulation of the intracellular redox homeostasis and an often selective interference with regulatory cellular pathways. Our basic activity and mode of action studies with simple selenium and tellurium salts in different strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicate that such compounds are sometimes not particularly toxic on their own, yet enhance the antibacterial potential of known antibiotics, possibly via the bioreductive formation of insoluble elemental deposits. Whilst the selenium and tellurium compounds tested do not necessarily act via the generation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), they seem to interfere with various cellular pathways, including a possible inhibition of the proteasome and hindrance of DNA repair. Here, organic selenides are considerably more active compared to simple salts. The interference of selenium (and tellurium) compounds with multiple targets could provide new avenues for the development of effective antibiotic and anticancer agents which may go well beyond the traditional notion of selenium as a simple antioxidant.

  16. Effect of an iodine-containing additive on the composition, structure, and morphology of chemically deposited lead selenide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Z. I.; Bakanov, V. M.; Maskaeva, L. N.; Markov, V. F.; Voronin, V. I.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of an ammonium iodide additive on the elemental and phase compositions, structural parameters, and surface morphology of lead selenide films synthesized by chemical deposition from aqueous solutions has been studied using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. It has been established that the obtained PbSe films have a multiphase structure. The iodine content of the films is directly proportional to the NH4I concentration in the reaction mixture and increases linearly with an increase in this concentration to 0.25 mol/L. No individual iodine-containing phases have been detected in the film structure. However, the introduction of iodine leads to an increase in the PbSe phase lattice parameter from ˜6.11 to ˜6.16 Å and to a decrease in the crystal grain size to ˜ 20 nm. It has been found that there is a correlation between the grain size, lattice parameter, and ammonium iodide concentration in the reaction mixture, which can be explained by changes in the film growth mechanism at the initial growth steps.

  17. Serum iron test

    MedlinePlus

    ... of iron homeostasis: iron deficiency and overload. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, et al, ... EJ, Gardner LB. Anemia of chronic diseases. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, et al, ...

  18. Total iron binding capacity

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM. Disorders of iron homeostasis: iron deficiency and overload. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  19. Iron and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... 24 months old. Serve iron-rich foods alongside foods containing vitamin C — such as tomatoes, broccoli, oranges, and strawberries — which improves the body's absorption of iron. Avoid serving coffee ...

  20. Ferrous Sulfate (Iron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells. It is used to treat or prevent iron-deficiency anemia, a condition that occurs when the body ... than prescribed by your doctor.Although symptoms of iron deficiency usually improve within a few days, you may ...

  1. Iron losses in sweat

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, M.; Magnusson, B.; Persson, H.; Hallberg, L.

    1986-03-01

    The losses of iron in whole body cell-free sweat were determined in eleven healthy men. A new experimental design was used with a very careful cleaning procedure of the skin and repeated consecutive sampling periods of sweat in a sauna. The purpose was to achieve a steady state of sweat iron losses with minimal influence from iron originating from desquamated cells and iron contaminating the skin. A steady state was reached in the third sauna period (second sweat sampling period). Iron loss was directly related to the volume of sweat lost and amounted to 22.5 micrograms iron/l sweat. The findings indicate that iron is a physiological constituent of sweat and derived not only from contamination. Present results imply that variations in the amount of sweat lost will have only a marginal effect on the variation in total body iron losses.

  2. Iron supplements (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  3. Iron Dextran Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... called iron replacement products. It works by replenishing iron stores so that the body can make more red blood cells. ... and order certain lab tests to check your body's response to iron dextran injection.Before having any laboratory test, tell ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  5. Iron and the liver.

    PubMed

    Pietrangelo, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Humans have evolved to retain iron in the body and are exposed to a high risk of iron overload and iron-related toxicity. Excess iron in the blood, in the absence of increased erythropoietic needs, can saturate the buffering capacity of serum transferrin and result in non-transferrin-bound highly reactive forms of iron that can cause damage, as well as promote fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis in the parenchymatous organs. A number of hereditary or acquired diseases are associated with systemic or local iron deposition or iron misdistribution in organs or cells. Two of these, the HFE- and non-HFE hemochromatosis syndromes represent the paradigms of genetic iron overload. They share common clinical features and the same pathogenic basis, in particular, a lack of synthesis or activity of hepcidin, the iron hormone. Before hepcidin was discovered, the liver was simply regarded as the main site of iron storage and, as such, the main target of iron toxicity. Now, as the main source of hepcidin, it appears that the loss of the hepcidin-producing liver mass or genetic and acquired factors that repress hepcidin synthesis in the liver may also lead to iron overload. Usually, there is low-grade excess iron which, through oxidative stress, is sufficient to worsen the course of the underlying liver disease or other chronic diseases that are apparently unrelated to iron, such as chronic metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. In the future, modulation of hepcidin synthesis and activity or hepcidin hormone-replacing strategies may become therapeutic options to cure iron-related disorders.

  6. Thin film metallic glass as a diffusion barrier for copper indium gallium selenide solar cell on stainless steel substrate: A feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diyatmika, Wahyu; Xue, Lingjun; Lin, Tai-Nan; Chang, Chia-wen; Chu, Jinn P.

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of using Zr53.5Cu29.1Al6.5Ni10.9 thin-film metallic glass (TFMG) as a diffusion barrier for copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) solar cells on stainless steel (SS) is investigated. The detrimental Fe diffusion from SS into CIGS is found to be effectively hindered by the introduction of a 70-nm-thick TFMG barrier; the cell performance is thus improved. Compared with the 2.73% of CIGS on bare SS, a higher efficiency of 5.25% is obtained for the cell with the Zr52Cu32Al9Ni7 TFMG barrier.

  7. Study of the crystallographic phase change on copper (I) selenide thin films prepared through chemical bath deposition by varying the pH of the solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval-Paz, M. G.; Rodríguez, C. A.; Porcile-Saavedra, P. F.; Trejo-Cruz, C.

    2016-07-01

    Copper (I) selenide thin films with orthorhombic and cubic structure were deposited on glass substrates by using the chemical bath deposition technique. The effects of the solution pH on the films growth and subsequently the structural, optical and electrical properties of the films were studied. Films with orthorhombic structure were obtained from baths wherein both metal complex and hydroxide coexist; while films with cubic structure were obtained from baths where the metal hydroxide there is no present. The structural modifications are accompanied by changes in bandgap energy, morphology and electrical resistivity of the films.

  8. The stability domain of the selenide kesterite photovoltaic materials and NMR investigation of the Cu/Zn disorder in Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe).

    PubMed

    Choubrac, Léo; Lafond, Alain; Paris, Michaël; Guillot-Deudon, Catherine; Jobic, Stéphane

    2015-06-21

    Bulk compounds, prepared via the ceramic route, related to Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe), a material considered for use in photovoltaic devices, were investigated using NMR spectroscopy, electron-probe microanalyses and X-ray diffraction. These materials adopt the kesterite structure regardless of the Cu and Zn contents. It is also shown that the stability domain of the copper-poor quaternary phases is wider for selenide derivatives than for sulphides. Finally, the Cu/Zn disorder level in CZTSe is found to be higher when the samples are quenched, which is reminiscent of the behaviour of the parent sulphide compounds CZTS. PMID:25990030

  9. Continuously tunable, 6{endash}14 {mu}m silver-gallium selenide optical parametric oscillator pumped at 1.57 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Allik, T.H.; Catella, G.; Utano, R.; Hutchinson, J.A.

    1997-08-01

    An angle tuned silver gallium selenide (AgGaSe{sub 2}) optical parametric oscillator (OPO), pumped by the fixed wavelength 1.57 {mu}m output of a noncritically phase-matched KTiOPO{sub 4} OPO, yielded radiation continuously tunable from 6 to 14 {mu}m. Energies of up to 1.2 mJ/pulse with bandwidths of {approximately}5cm{sup {minus}1} (full width at half-maximum) were obtained using a 6.5{times}6.5{times}35.3mm long, type I AgGaSe{sub 2} crystal. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Iron, radiation, and cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, R G; Kalkwarf, D R

    1990-01-01

    Increased iron content of cells and tissue may increase the risk of cancer. In particular, high available iron status may increase the risk of a radiation-induced cancer. There are two possible mechanisms for this effect: iron can catalyze the production of oxygen radicals, and it may be a limiting nutrient to the growth and development of a transformed cell in vivo. Given the high available iron content of the western diet and the fact that the world is changing to the western model, it is important to determine if high iron increases the risk of cancer. PMID:2269234

  11. Quantum Oscillations in the Transverse Magnetoresistance (shubnikov - de Haas Effect) and Electronic Conduction in the Diluted Magnetic Semiconductor MERCURY(1-X)IRON(X)SELENIDE.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaziri, Mojtaba

    A study of the quantum oscillations in the transverse magneto- resistance (Shubnikov-de Haas effect) in oriented single crystals of Hg(,1-x)Fe(,x)Se with x (LESSTHEQ) 0.06 has been made as a function of tempera- ture (1.3 K (LESSTHEQ) T (LESSTHEQ) 35K) and for magnetic fields less than 5 Tesla. Significant(, )differences in the temperature dependence of the amp- litude of the oscillations for magnetic fields oriented along 110 , 111 , and 001 have been observed. The analysis of the data for (')H// 110 provide evidence for spin dependent scattering of the conduction electrons. Lineshape fits to the data allow estimates for the difference Dingle temperature (delta)T(,D) and the exchange enhanced effective g-factor as a function of temperature and magnetic field. It is concluded that some Fe ions, when incorporated in a HgSe host, exist in a magnetically active state. This result indicates the presence of Fe('+3) in addition to the Fe('+2) that might normally be expected in this material. In addition the amplitude of these oscillations as a function of the magnet angle for two different planes of rotation for x = 0.03 and x = 0.05 have been measured. The results clearly show two sets of zeros in the amplitude of the fundamental harmonic with completely different angular dependences. Low field zeros (H < 1 Tesla) have been identified that have a similar angular dependence as those reported for HgSe. The position of the zeros can not be explained by the combination of two different signals which result from lack of the inversion symmetry in the zinc-blende structure of the lattice. A distinct set of high field zeros (H > 1 Tesla) have also been observed which exhibit a different angular dependence than the zeros formed in HgSe. Finally, the variation in the carrier concentration as function of annealing conditions in HgSe, Hg(,1-x)Mn(,x)Se, and Hg(,1-x)Fe(,x)Se has been studied. Our results show that the carrier concentration in Hg(,1-x)Fe(,x)Se system with x (GREATERTHEQ) .003 is very stable and shows no change under various annealing conditions. Measurements of the Dingle temperature from Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, in addition to Hall mobilities at T = 4.2K, indicate a significantly longer collision time for the conduction electrons in Hg(,1-x)Fe(,x)Se for x (LESSTHEQ) 0.003 than in samples of HgSe with the same electron concentrations. The results of electron microprobe measurements on samples of Hg(,1-x)Mn(,x)Se and Hg(,1-x)Fe(,x)Se also suggest different temperature-composition diagrams for these two systems.

  12. Cost-effective bifacial dye-sensitized solar cells with transparent iron selenide counter electrodes. An avenue of enhancing rear-side electricity generation capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juan; Tang, Qunwei; He, Benlin; Yu, Liangmin

    2015-02-01

    Alloy materials have established themselves as alternative electrocatalysts for electrochemical devices because of their cost-effectiveness, high conductivity, good electrocatalytic activity, and reasonable stability. Aiming at reducing fabrication cost without sacrificing power conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), we report the feasibility of designing transparent and cost-effective Fe-Se alloy counter electrodes for bifacial DSSCs. Due to the rapid charge transfer ability and electrocatalytic activity, maximum front and rear efficiencies of 7.64% and 4.95% are measured for the DSSC with FeSe alloy electrode in comparison with 6.97% and 3.56% from Pt-based solar cell. The impressive results along with simple synthesis highlight the potential application of Fe-Se alloys in robust bifacial DSSCs.

  13. Spectroscopic and laser properties of bulk iron doped zinc magnesium selenide Fe:ZnMgSe generating at 4.5 - 5.1 µm.

    PubMed

    Doroshenko, M E; Osiko, V V; Jelínková, H; Jelínek, M; Šulc, J; Němec, M; Vyhlídal, D; Čech, M; Kovalenko, N O; Gerasimenko, A S

    2016-08-22

    The Fe:Zn(1-x)Mg(x)Se (x = 0.19, 0.27, and 0.38) solid solutions spectroscopic properties were investigated and laser oscillations were achieved for the first time. The increase of the magnesium concentration in the Fe:ZnMgSe crystal was shown to result in an almost similar long wavelength shift of both absorption and fluorescence spectra of about 60 nm per each 10% of magnesium. With the Fe:ZnMgSe crystal temperature decrease, the fluorescence spectrum maximum shifts towards shorter wavelength resulting mainly from strong narrowing of the longest wavelength fluorescence line. Laser radiation wavelength dependence on the magnesium concentration as well as on temperature was observed. The Fe:ZnMgSe x = 0.38 laser oscillation wavelength increased from 4780 nm at 80 K to 4920 nm at 240 K using the optical resonator without any intracavity spectrally-selective element. In comparison with the Fe:ZnSe laser operating in similar conditions, these wavelengths at both temperatures were shifted by about 500 nm towards mid-IR region. PMID:27557258

  14. Structure, photophysical properties, and DFT calculations of selenide-centered pentacapped trigonal prismatic silver(I) clusters.

    PubMed

    Liu, C W; Feng, Ching-Shiang; Fu, Rei-Jen; Chang, Hao-Wei; Saillard, Jean-Yves; Kahlal, Samia; Wang, Ju-Chun; Chang, I-Jy

    2010-06-01

    Undecanuclear silver clusters [Ag(11)(mu(9)-Se)(mu(3)-Br)(3){Se(2)P(OR)(2)}(6)] (R = Et, (i)Pr, (2)Bu) were isolated from the reaction of [Ag(CH(3)CN)(4)](PF(6)), NH(4)[Se(2)P(OR)(2)], and Bu(4)NBr in a molar ratio of 4:3:1 in CH(2)Cl(2) at -20 degrees C. Clusters were characterized by elemental analysis, NMR spectroscopy ((1)H, (31)P, and (77)Se), positive FAB mass spectrometry, and X-ray crystallography of the isopropyl derivative. Structural elucidations revealed that the Ag(11)Se core geometry of clusters is a selenide-centered, slightly distorted 3,3,4,4,4-pentacapped trigonal prism surrounded by six diselenophosphato ligands, each in a tetrametallic tetraconnective (mu(2), mu(2)) coordination mode, and three mu(3)-bromide anions. All compounds exhibited orange luminescence both as a solid and in solution. The electronic structure of these clusters was studied by DFT calculations, and their optical properties were rationalized through a TDDFT investigation. The computed metrical parameters of the clusters were consistent with the corresponding X-ray data of [Ag(11)(mu(9)-Se)(mu(3)-Br)(3){Se(2)P(O(i)Pr)(2)}(6)] . The theoretical investigations affirmed that the low-energy absorptions as well as emissions were due to transitions from an orbital mostly of a selenophosphate ligand/central Se atom character to an orbital of metal character. PMID:20459139

  15. [Iron function and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Though iron is an essential micronutrient for humans, the excess state is acknowledged to be associated with oncogenesis. For example, iron overload in the liver of the patients with hereditary hemocromatosis highly increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, as to asbestos-related mesothelioma, such kinds of asbestos with a higher iron content are considered to be more carcinogenic. Iron is a useful element, which enables fundamental functions for life such as oxygen carrying and electron transport. However, in the situation where organisms are unable to have good control of it, iron turns into a dangerous element which catalyzes generation of reactive oxygen. In this review, I first outline the relationships between iron and cancer in general, then give an explanation about iron-related animal carcinogenesis models.

  16. Macrophages and Iron Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Soares, Miguel P; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-03-15

    Iron is a transition metal that due to its inherent ability to exchange electrons with a variety of molecules is essential to support life. In mammals, iron exists mostly in the form of heme, enclosed within an organic protoporphyrin ring and functioning primarily as a prosthetic group in proteins. Paradoxically, free iron also has the potential to become cytotoxic when electron exchange with oxygen is unrestricted and catalyzes the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological properties demand that iron metabolism is tightly regulated such that iron is available for core biological functions while preventing its cytotoxic effects. Macrophages play a central role in establishing this delicate balance. Here, we review the impact of macrophages on heme-iron metabolism and, reciprocally, how heme-iron modulates macrophage function.

  17. [Iron function and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Though iron is an essential micronutrient for humans, the excess state is acknowledged to be associated with oncogenesis. For example, iron overload in the liver of the patients with hereditary hemocromatosis highly increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, as to asbestos-related mesothelioma, such kinds of asbestos with a higher iron content are considered to be more carcinogenic. Iron is a useful element, which enables fundamental functions for life such as oxygen carrying and electron transport. However, in the situation where organisms are unable to have good control of it, iron turns into a dangerous element which catalyzes generation of reactive oxygen. In this review, I first outline the relationships between iron and cancer in general, then give an explanation about iron-related animal carcinogenesis models. PMID:27455808

  18. Cellular iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ponka, P

    1999-03-01

    Iron is essential for oxidation-reduction catalysis and bioenergetics, but unless appropriately shielded, iron plays a key role in the formation of toxic oxygen radicals that can attack all biological molecules. Hence, specialized molecules for the acquisition, transport (transferrin), and storage (ferritin) of iron in a soluble nontoxic form have evolved. Delivery of iron to most cells, probably including those of the kidney, occurs following the binding of transferrin to transferrin receptors on the cell membrane. The transferrin-receptor complexes are then internalized by endocytosis, and iron is released from transferrin by a process involving endosomal acidification. Cellular iron storage and uptake are coordinately regulated post-transcriptionally by cytoplasmic factors, iron-regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP-1 and IRP-2). Under conditions of limited iron supply, IRP binding to iron-responsive elements (present in 5' untranslated region of ferritin mRNA and 3' untranslated region of transferrin receptor mRNA) blocks ferritin mRNA translation and stabilizes transferrin receptor mRNA. The opposite scenario develops when iron in the transit pool is plentiful. Moreover, IRP activities/levels can be affected by various forms of "oxidative stress" and nitric oxide. The kidney also requires iron for metabolic processes, and it is likely that iron deficiency or excess can cause disturbed function of kidney cells. Transferrin receptors are not evenly distributed throughout the kidney, and there is a cortical-to-medullary gradient in heme biosynthesis, with greatest activity in the cortex and least in the medulla. This suggests that there are unique iron/heme metabolism features in some kidney cells, but the specific aspects of iron and heme metabolism in the kidney are yet to be explained.

  19. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment.

  20. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment. PMID:26314490

  1. The ubiquity of iron.

    PubMed

    Frey, Perry A; Reed, George H

    2012-09-21

    The importance of iron in living systems can be traced to the many complexes within which it is found, to its chemical mobility in undergoing oxidation-reduction reactions, and to the abundance of iron in Earth's crust. Iron is the most abundant element, by mass, in the Earth, constituting about 80% of the inner and outer cores of Earth. The molten outer core is about 8000 km in diameter, and the solid inner core is about 2400 km in diameter. Iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust. It is the chemically functional component of mononuclear iron complexes, dinuclear iron complexes, [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters, [Fe-Ni-S] clusters, iron protophorphyrin IX, and many other complexes in protein biochemistry. Metals such as nickel, cobalt, copper, and manganese are present in the crust and could in principle function chemically in place of iron, but they are scarce in Earth's crust. Iron is plentiful because of its nuclear stability in stellar nuclear fusion reactions. It seems likely that other solid planets, formed by the same processes as Earth, would also foster the evolution of life and that iron would be similarly important to life on those planets as it is on Earth. PMID:22845493

  2. The ubiquity of iron.

    PubMed

    Frey, Perry A; Reed, George H

    2012-09-21

    The importance of iron in living systems can be traced to the many complexes within which it is found, to its chemical mobility in undergoing oxidation-reduction reactions, and to the abundance of iron in Earth's crust. Iron is the most abundant element, by mass, in the Earth, constituting about 80% of the inner and outer cores of Earth. The molten outer core is about 8000 km in diameter, and the solid inner core is about 2400 km in diameter. Iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust. It is the chemically functional component of mononuclear iron complexes, dinuclear iron complexes, [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters, [Fe-Ni-S] clusters, iron protophorphyrin IX, and many other complexes in protein biochemistry. Metals such as nickel, cobalt, copper, and manganese are present in the crust and could in principle function chemically in place of iron, but they are scarce in Earth's crust. Iron is plentiful because of its nuclear stability in stellar nuclear fusion reactions. It seems likely that other solid planets, formed by the same processes as Earth, would also foster the evolution of life and that iron would be similarly important to life on those planets as it is on Earth.

  3. Iron-sulfur clusters: why iron?

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kasper P

    2006-08-01

    This communication addresses a simple question by means of density functional calculations: Why is iron used as the metal in iron-sulfur clusters? While there may be several answers to this question, it is shown here that one feature - the well-defined inner-sphere reorganization energy of self-exchange electron transfer - is very much favored in iron-sulfur clusters as opposed to metal substituted analogues of Mn, Co, Ni, and Cu. Furthermore, the conclusion holds for both 1Fe and 2Fe type iron-sulfur clusters. The results show that only iron provides a small inner-sphere reorganization energy of 21 kJ/mol in 1Fe (rubredoxin) and 46 kJ/mol in 2Fe (ferredoxin) models, whereas other metal ions exhibit values in the range 57-135 kJ/mol (1Fe) and 94-140 kJ/mol (2Fe). This simple result provides an important, although partial, explanation why iron alone is used in this type of clusters. The results can be explained by simple orbital rules of electron transfer, which state that the occupation of anti-bonding orbitals should not change during the redox reactions. This rule immediately suggests good and poor electron carriers.

  4. Non-Stoichiometric Amorphous Indium Selenide Thin Films as a Buffer Layer for CIGS Solar Cells with Various Temperatures in Rapid Thermal Annealing.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Myoung Han; Kim, Nam-Hoon

    2016-05-01

    The conventional structure of most of copper indium gallium diselenide (Culn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2, CIGS) solar cells includes a CdS thin film as a buffer layer. Cd-free buffer layers have attracted great interest for use in photovoltaic applications to avoid the use of hazardous and toxic materials. The RF magnetron sputtering method was used with an InSe2 compound target to prepare the indium selenide precursor. Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) was conducted in ambient N2 gas to control the concentration of volatile Se from the precursor with a change in temperature. The nature of the RTA-treated indium selenide thin films remained amorphous under annealing temperatures of ≤ 700 degrees C. The Se concentration of the RTA-treated specimens demonstrated an opposite trend to the annealing temperature. The optical transmittance and band gap energies were 75.33% and 2.451-3.085 eV, respectively, and thus were suitable for the buffer layer. As the annealing temperature increased, the resistivity decreased by an order-of-magnitude from 10(4) to 10(1) Ω-cm. At lower Se concentrations, the conductivity abruptly changed from p-type to n-type without crystallite formation in the amorphous phase, with the carrier concentration in the order of 10(17) cm(-3). PMID:27483873

  5. 2-Pyridyl selenolates of antimony and bismuth: Synthesis, characterization, structures and their use as single source molecular precursor for the preparation of metal selenide nanostructures and thin films.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakesh K; Kedarnath, G; Jain, Vimal K; Wadawale, Amey; Nalliath, Manoj; Pillai, C G S; Vishwanadh, B

    2010-10-01

    Reactions of SbCl(3) and BiCl(3) with M'Se-C(5)H(3)(R-3)N (M' = Li or Na; R = H or Me) gave homoleptic selenolate complexes of the general formula [M{Se-C(5)H(3)(R-3)N}(3)] (M = Sb or Bi). The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, UV-vis and NMR ((1)H, (13)C and (77)Se) spectroscopy. The single crystal X-ray analysis of [M{Se-C(5)H(3)(Me-3)N}(3)].nH(2)O (M/n = Sb/1.5 and Bi/0.5) revealed that the antimony complex adopts a trigonal pyramidal configuration with monodentate selenolate ligands while the bismuth analogue acquires a distorted square pyramidal configuration defined by two chelating and one monodentate selenolate groups. Pyrolysis of [M{Se-C(5)H(3)(Me-3)N}(3)] either in a furnace or in hexadecylamine (HDA) at different temperatures gave a variety of M(2)Se(3) nanostructures. Thin films of metal selenides have also been deposited on glass substrate by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD). Both nanostructures and thin films of metal selenides were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PMID:20714620

  6. Exploring the thermoelectric and magnetic properties of uranium selenides: Tl2Ag2USe4 and Tl3Cu4USe6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, Sikander; Khan, Saleem Ayaz; Din, Haleem Ud; Khenata, Rabah; Goumri-Said, Souraya

    2016-09-01

    The electronic, magnetic and thermoelectric properties of Tl2Ag2USe4 and Tl3Cu4USe6 compounds were investigated using the full potential linear augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method based on the density functional theory (DFT). The exchange correlation was treated with the generalized gradient approximation plus optimized effective Hubbard parameter and spin-orbit coupling (GGA+U+SOC). The present uranium selenides show narrow direct energy band gap values of 0.7 and 0.875 eV for Tl2Ag2USe4 and Tl3Cu4USe6 respectively. For both selenides U-d/f states are responsible for electrical transport properties. Uranium atoms were the most contributors in the magnetic moment compared to other atoms and show ferromagnetic nature. The spin density isosurfaces show the polarization of neighboring atoms of Uranium, such as silver/copper and selenium. Thermoelectric calculations reveal that Tl3Cu4USe6 is more suitable for thermoelectric device applications than Tl2Ag2USe4.

  7. Iron and Stony-iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haack, H.; McCoy, T. J.

    2003-12-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids.Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar to that continuing on Earth - although on much smaller length- and timescales - with melting of the metal and silicates, differentiation into core, mantle, and crust, and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth and other terrestrial planets. This fact has been recognized since the work of Chladni (1794), who argued that stony-iron meteorites must have originated in outer space and fallen during fireballs and that they provide our closest analogue to the material that comprises our own planet's core. This chapter deals with our current knowledge of these meteorites. How did they form? What can they tell us about the early evolution of the solar system and its solid bodies? How closely do they resemble the materials from planetary interiors? What do we know and don't we know?Iron and stony-iron meteorites constitute ˜6% of meteorite falls (Grady, 2000). Despite their scarcity among falls, iron meteorites are our only samples of ˜75 of the ˜135 asteroids from which meteorites originate ( Keil et al., 1994; Scott, 1979; Meibom and Clark, 1999; see also Chapter 1.05), suggesting that both differentiated asteroids and the geologic processes that produced them were common.Despite the highly evolved nature of iron and stony-iron meteorites, their chemistry provides important

  8. Brain iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moos, Torben

    2002-11-01

    Iron is essential for virtually all types of cells and organisms. The significance of the iron for brain function is reflected by the presence of receptors for transferrin on brain capillary endothelial cells. The transport of iron into the brain from the circulation is regulated so that the extraction of iron by brain capillary endothelial cells is low in iron-replete conditions and the reverse when the iron need of the brain is high as in conditions with iron deficiency and during development of the brain. Whereas there is good agreement that iron is taken up by means of receptor-mediated uptake of iron-transferrin at the brain barriers, there are contradictory views on how iron is transported further on from the brain barriers and into the brain extracellular space. The prevailing hypothesis for transport of iron across the BBB suggests a mechanism that involves detachment of iron from transferrin within barrier cells followed by recycling of apo-transferrin to blood plasma and release of iron as non-transferrin-bound iron into the brain interstitium from where the iron is taken up by neurons and glial cells. Another hypothesis claims that iron-transferrin is transported into the brain by means of transcytosis through the BBB. This thesis deals with the topic "brain iron homeostasis" defined as the attempts to maintain constant concentrations of iron in the brain internal environment via regulation of iron transport through brain barriers, cellular iron uptake by neurons and glia, and export of iron from brain to blood. The first part deals with transport of iron-transferrin complexes from blood to brain either by transport across the brain barriers or by uptake and retrograde axonal transport in motor neurons projecting beyond the blood-brain barrier. The transport of iron and transport into the brain was examined using radiolabeled iron-transferrin. Intravenous injection of [59Fe-125]transferrin led to an almost two-fold higher accumulation of 59Fe than of

  9. Mechanisms of mammalian iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pantopoulos, Kostas; Porwal, Suheel Kumar; Tartakoff, Alan; Devireddy, L

    2012-07-24

    Iron is vital for almost all organisms because of its ability to donate and accept electrons with relative ease. It serves as a cofactor for many proteins and enzymes necessary for oxygen and energy metabolism, as well as for several other essential processes. Mammalian cells utilize multiple mechanisms to acquire iron. Disruption of iron homeostasis is associated with various human diseases: iron deficiency resulting from defects in the acquisition or distribution of the metal causes anemia, whereas iron surfeit resulting from excessive iron absorption or defective utilization causes abnormal tissue iron deposition, leading to oxidative damage. Mammals utilize distinct mechanisms to regulate iron homeostasis at the systemic and cellular levels. These involve the hormone hepcidin and iron regulatory proteins, which collectively ensure iron balance. This review outlines recent advances in iron regulatory pathways as well as in mechanisms underlying intracellular iron trafficking, an important but less studied area of mammalian iron homeostasis.

  10. IRON IN MULTIPLE MYELOMA

    PubMed Central

    VanderWall, Kristina; Daniels-Wells, Tracy R; Penichet, Manuel; Lichtenstein, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a non-curable B cell malignancy in which iron metabolism plays an important role. Patients with this disorder almost universally suffer from a clinically significant anemia, which is often symptomatic, and which is due to impaired iron utilization. Recent studies indicate that the proximal cause of dysregulated iron metabolism and anemia in these patients is cytokine-induced upregulation of hepcidin expression. Malignant myeloma cells are dependent on an increased influx of iron and therapeutic efforts are being made to target this requirement. The studies detailing the characteristics and biochemical abnormalities in iron metabolism causing anemia and the initial attempts to target iron therapeutically are described in this review. PMID:23879589

  11. Cellular iron transport.

    PubMed

    Garrick, Michael D; Garrick, Laura M

    2009-05-01

    Iron has a split personality as an essential nutrient that also has the potential to generate reactive oxygen species. We discuss how different cell types within specific tissues manage this schizophrenia. The emphasis in enterocytes is on regulating the body's supply of iron by regulating transport into the blood stream. In developing red blood cells, adaptations in transport manage the body's highest flux of iron. Hepatocytes buffer the body's stock of iron. Macrophage recycle the iron from effete red cells among other iron management tasks. Pneumocytes provide a barrier to prevent illicit entry that, when at risk of breaching, leads to a need to handle the dangers in a fashion essentially shared with macrophage. We also discuss or introduce cell types including renal cells, neurons, other brain cells, and more where our ignorance, currently still vast, needs to be removed by future research. PMID:19344751

  12. Austempered Ductile Iron Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilc, Jozef; Šajgalík, Michal; Holubják, Jozef; Piešová, Marianna; Zaušková, Lucia; Babík, Ondrej; Kuždák, Viktor; Rákoci, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    This article deals with the machining of cast iron. In industrial practice, Austempered Ductile Iron began to be used relatively recently. ADI is ductile iron that has gone through austempering to get improved properties, among which we can include strength, wear resistance or noise damping. This specific material is defined also by other properties, such as high elasticity, ductility and endurance against tenigue, which are the properties, that considerably make the tooling characteristic worse.

  13. Plea for Iron Astrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Mostefaoui, T. A.; Benmerad, B.; Kerkar, M.

    2010-10-31

    Iron is a key element and compound in living bodies. It is the most abundant refractory element and has the most stable nucleus in the Universe. Also, elemental Iron has a relevant abundance in the interstellar medium and dense clouds, it can be in gas phase or included in dust particles. During this talk, I shall explain why this special interest in Iron and shall give a brief explanation about its origin and the interstellar nucleosynthesis. After this I'll detail the rich chemistry that Iron can be involved in the interstellar medium, dense clouds with several species.

  14. Iron deficiency: beyond anemia.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Dinesh; Chandra, Jagdish

    2011-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder affecting at least one third of world's population. Though anemia is common manifestation of iron deficiency, other effects of iron deficiency on various tissues, organs and systems are usually under recognized. Impaired brain development and cognitive, behavioural and psychomotor impairment are most worrisome manifestations of iron deficiency. Studies have demonstrated that some of these changes occurring during period of brain growth spurt (<2 years age) may be irreversible. Association of iron deficiency with febrile seizures, pica, breath holding spells, restless leg syndrome and thrombosis is increasingly being recognized. Impaired cell-mediated immunity and bactericidal function are generally noted in iron-deficient persons; however, the findings are inconsistent. Despite proven reversible functional immunological defects in vitro studies, a clinically important relationship between states of iron deficiency and susceptibility to infections remains controversial. Studies from malaria endemic regions have reported increased incidence of malaria in association with iron supplementation. These and some other aspects of iron deficiency are reviewed in this article.

  15. Physics of iron

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, O.

    1993-10-01

    This volume comprises papers presented at the AIRAPT Conference, June 28 to July 1993. The iron sessions at the meeting were identified as the Second Ironworkers Convention. The renewal of interest stems from advances in technologies in both diamond-anvil cell (DAC) and shock wave studies as well as from controversies arising from a lack of consensus among both experimentalists and theoreticians. These advances have produced new data on iron in the pressure-temperature regime of interest for phase diagrams and for temperatures of the core/mantle and inner-core/outer-core boundaries. Particularly interesting is the iron phase diagram inferred from DAC studies. A new phase, {beta}, with a {gamma}-{beta}-{epsilon} triple point at about 30 GPa and 1190 K, and possible sixth phase, {omega}, with an {epsilon}-{Theta}-melt triple point at about 190 GPa and 4000 K are deemed possible. The importance of the equation of state of iron in consideration of Earth`s heat budget and the origin of its magnetic field invoke the interest of theoreticians who argue on the basis of molecular dynamics and other first principles methods. While the major thrust of both meetings was on the physics of pure iron, there was notable contributions on iron alloys. Hydrogen-iron alloys, iron-sulfur liquids, and the comparability to rhenium in phase diagram studies are discussed. The knowledge of the physical properties of iron were increased by several contributions.

  16. Physiology of Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Waldvogel-Abramowski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M.; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary A revolution occurred during the last decade in the comprehension of the physiology as well as in the physiopathology of iron metabolism. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent knowledge that has accumulated, allowing a better comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in iron homeostasis. Iron metabolism is very fine tuned. The free molecule is very toxic; therefore, complex regulatory mechanisms have been developed in mammalian to insure adequate intestinal absorption, transportation, utilization, and elimination. ‘Ironomics’ certainly will be the future of the understanding of genes as well as of the protein-protein interactions involved in iron metabolism. PMID:25053935

  17. Physics of iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, O.

    1993-10-01

    This volume comprises papers presented at the AIRAPT Conference, 28 June - 2 July 1993. The iron sessions at the meeting were identified as the Second Ironworkers Convention. The renewal of interest stems from advances in technologies in both diamond-anvil cell (DAC) and shock wave studies as well as from controversies arising from a lack of consensus among both experimentalists and theoreticians. These advances have produced new data on iron in the pressure-temperature regime of interest for phase diagrams and for temperatures of the core/mantle and inner-core/outer-core boundaries. Particularly interesting is the iron phase diagram inferred from DAC studies. A new phase, (beta), with a (gamma)-(beta)-(epsilon) triple point at about 30 GPa and 1190 K, and possible sixth phase, (omega), with an (epsilon)-(Theta)-melt triple point at about 190 GPa and 4000 K are deemed possible. The importance of the equation of state of iron in consideration of Earth's heat budget and the origin of its magnetic field invoke the interest of theoreticians who argue on the basis of molecular dynamics and other first principles methods. While the major thrust of both meetings was on the physics of pure iron, there were notable contributions on iron alloys. Hydrogen-iron alloys, iron-sulfur liquids, and the comparability to rhenium in phase diagram studies are discussed. The knowledge of the physical properties of iron were increased by several contributions.

  18. 35. GREY IRON TUMBLERS, IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ROTATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. GREY IRON TUMBLERS, IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ROTATE CASTINGS WITH SHOT TO REMOVE AND SURFACE OXIDES AND REMAINING EXCESS METALS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. Iron metabolism and iron supplementation in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Heinz; Evstatiev, Rayko; Kornek, Gabriela; Aapro, Matti; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Fridrik, Michael; Geissler, Dietmar; Geissler, Klaus; Gisslinger, Heinz; Koller, Elisabeth; Kopetzky, Gerhard; Lang, Alois; Rumpold, Holger; Steurer, Michael; Kamali, Houman; Link, Hartmut

    2015-12-01

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency-associated anemia are common complications in cancer patients. Most iron deficient cancer patients present with functional iron deficiency (FID), a status with adequate storage iron, but insufficient iron supply for erythroblasts and other iron dependent tissues. FID is the consequence of the cancer-associated cytokine release, while in absolute iron deficiency iron stores are depleted resulting in similar but often more severe symptoms of insufficient iron supply. Here we present a short review on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, clinical symptoms, and treatment of iron deficiency in cancer patients. Special emphasis is given to intravenous iron supplementation and on the benefits and limitations of different formulations. Based on these considerations and recommendations from current international guidelines we developed recommendations for clinical practice and classified the level of evidence and grade of recommendation according to the principles of evidence-based medicine.

  20. a Study of Volatile Precursors for the Growth of Cadmium Sulphide and Cadmium Selenide by Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, Michael P.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The wide-band-gap semiconductors, cadmium sulphide and cadmium selenide, may be grown by Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition (MOCVD). This method typically involves the reaction of gaseous streams of Me_2 Cd and H_2Y (Y = S, Se) over a heated substrate (usually gallium arsenide) on which the desired compound is grown as an epitaxial layer. Unfortunately, the precursors start to react in the cold zone of the reactor, that is before they reach the heated substrate. This problem is known as prereaction. The problem of prereaction is partially reduced by the use of adducts of dimethyl cadmium in place of the free dialkyl compound although the mechanism by which such adducts block prereaction is unknown. Accordingly, a study of adducts of dimethyl cadmium was undertaken with a view to determining their properties in all phases. The adduct of Me_2Cd with 2,2^ '-bipyridyl was found to be monomeric in the solid state while that with 1,4-dioxane, a volatile compound used for prereaction reduction, was found to be polymeric. A study of adducts in the gas phase using mass spectrometry and gas phase Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy gave no evidence to suggest there is any gas phase association between 1,4-dioxane and dimethyl cadmium. With the 2,2 ^'-bipyridyl adduct some evidence for partial retention of coordinate bonds upon sublimation was obtained. The solid adduct of Me _2Cd with N,N,N^' ,N^'-tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA) was prepared as it was hoped that the flexibility of the aliphatic Lewis base would permit the formation of an adduct containing strong co-ordinate bonds which would remain intact upon sublimation. Using gas phase electron diffraction, the structure of the adduct of Me_2Cd and TMEDA was determined. It was shown to exist in the gas phase purely as the associated monomeric species. The adduct was then employed for the growth of CdS and CdSe in an industrial MOCVD apparatus. The

  1. Benefits and harms of iron supplementation in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient children.

    PubMed

    Domellöf, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Due to high iron requirements, young children are at risk for iron deficiency anemia. Iron supplements are therefore often recommended, especially since iron deficiency anemia in children is associated with poor neurodevelopment. However, in contrast to most other nutrients, excess iron cannot be excreted by the human body and it has recently been suggested that excessive iron supplementation of young children may have adverse effects on growth, risk of infections, and even on cognitive development. Recent studies support that iron supplements are beneficial in iron-deficient children but there is a risk of adverse effects in those who are iron replete. In populations with a low prevalence of iron deficiency, general supplementation should therefore be avoided. Iron-fortified foods can still be generally recommended since they seem to be safer than medicinal iron supplements, but the level of iron fortification should be limited. General iron supplementation is recommended in areas with a high prevalence of iron deficiency, with the exception of malarious areas where a cautious supplementation approach needs to be adopted, based either on screening or a combination of iron supplements and infection control measures. More studies are urgently needed to better determine the risks and benefits of iron supplementation and iron-fortified foods given to iron-deficient and iron-sufficient children.

  2. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation Information Page Synonym(s): Hallervorden-Spatz Disease, ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation? Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) ...

  3. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    PubMed

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption.

  4. Iron nutrition in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Mesías, Marta; Seiquer, Isabel; Navarro, M Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is an important period of nutritional vulnerability due to increased dietary requirements for growth and development. Iron needs are elevated as a result of intensive growth and muscular development, which implies an increase in blood volume; thus, it is extremely important for the adolescent's iron requirements to be met. Diet, therefore, must provide enough iron and, moreover, nutrients producing adequate iron bioavailability to favor element utilization and thus be sufficient for needs at this stage of life. Currently, many adolescents consume monotonous and unbalanced diets which may limit mineral intake and/or bioavailability, leading to iron deficiency and, consequently, to ferropenic anemia, a nutritional deficit of worldwide prevalence. Iron deficiency, apart from provoking important physiological repercussions, can adversely affect adolescents' cognitive ability and behavior. Accordingly, promoting the consumption of a varied, adjusted, and balanced diet by adolescents will facilitate iron utilization, benefiting their health both at present and in adulthood. This review discusses how physiological changes during adolescence can cause iron requirements to increase. Consequently, it is important that diet should contribute an appropriate amount of this mineral and, moreover, with an adequate bioavailability to satisfy needs during this special period of life.

  5. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  6. Microbes: mini iron factories.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Kumar Batuk

    2014-12-01

    Microbes have flourished in extreme habitats since beginning of the Earth and have played an important role in geological processes like weathering, mineralization, diagenesis, mineral formation and destruction. Biotic mineralization is one of the most fascinating examples of how microbes have been influencing geological processes. Iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria are capable of precipitating wide varieties of iron oxides (magnetite), carbonates (siderite) and sulphides (greigite) via controlled or induced mineralization processes. Microbes have also been considered to play an important role in the history of evolution of sedimentary rocks on Earth from the formation of banded iron formations during the Archean to modern biotic bog iron and ochre deposits. Here, we discuss the role that microbes have been playing in precipitation of iron and the role and importance of interdisciplinary studies in the field of geology and biology in solving some of the major geological mysteries. PMID:25320452

  7. Microbes: mini iron factories.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Kumar Batuk

    2014-12-01

    Microbes have flourished in extreme habitats since beginning of the Earth and have played an important role in geological processes like weathering, mineralization, diagenesis, mineral formation and destruction. Biotic mineralization is one of the most fascinating examples of how microbes have been influencing geological processes. Iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria are capable of precipitating wide varieties of iron oxides (magnetite), carbonates (siderite) and sulphides (greigite) via controlled or induced mineralization processes. Microbes have also been considered to play an important role in the history of evolution of sedimentary rocks on Earth from the formation of banded iron formations during the Archean to modern biotic bog iron and ochre deposits. Here, we discuss the role that microbes have been playing in precipitation of iron and the role and importance of interdisciplinary studies in the field of geology and biology in solving some of the major geological mysteries.

  8. Iron studies in hemophilia

    SciTech Connect

    Lottenberg, R.; Kitchens, C.S.; Roessler, G.S.; Noyes, W.D.

    1981-12-01

    Although iron deficiency is not recognized as a usual complication of hemophilia, we questioned whether intermittent occult loss of blood in urine or stool might predispose hemophiliacs to chronic iron deficiency. Seven men with factor VII and one with factor IX deficiency were studied. Blood studied, bone marrow aspirates, urine and stool samples, and ferrokinetics with total-body counting up to five months were examined. These data showed no excessive loss of blood during the study period; however, marrow iron stores were decidedly decreased, being absent in four subjects. We suggest that in some hemophiliacs, iron deposits in tissues such as synovial membranes may form a high proportion of the body's total iron stores.

  9. Exploring the electronic structure and optical properties of the quaternary selenide compound, Ba{sub 4}Ga{sub 4}SnSe{sub 12}: For photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Azam, Sikander; Khan, Saleem Ayaz; Goumri-Said, Souraya

    2015-09-15

    Due to huge demand on discovering new materials for energy, we used first-principle calculations to explore the electronic structure and optical properties of a recent quaternary selenide, namely Ba{sub 4}Ga{sub 4}SnSe{sub 12}. The electronic structure and the optical properties of Ba{sub 4}Ga{sub 4}SnSe{sub 12} were calculated through a reliable approach of Engle Vosko-GGA (EV-GGA). We found that Ba{sub 4}Ga{sub 4}SnSe{sub 12} has a direct band gap of 2.14 eV positioned at Γ. Acquiring the fundamental characteristics of Ba{sub 4}Ga{sub 4}SnSe{sub 12,} we studied the linear optical properties like dielectric function in the energy range of 0–14 eV. From the dielectric function we noticed a weak directional anisotropy for the two components. The absorption spectrum indicates the possibility of greater multiple direct and indirect inter-band transitions in the visible regions and shows similar behavior with experimental spectrum. Ba{sub 4}Ga{sub 4}SnSe{sub 12} can be used as shielding material from UV radiations. Present study predicts that the Ba{sub 4}Ga{sub 4}SnSe{sub 12} is promising for photovoltaic applications due to their high absorption of solar radiations and photoconductivity in the visible range. - Graphical abstract: Interesting quaternary selenide compound, Ba{sub 4}Ga{sub 4}SnSe{sub 12}, for photovoltaic applications. - Highlights: • Ba{sub 4}Ga{sub 4}SnSe{sub 12} is a quaternary selenide designed for PV and thermoelectric. • Ba{sub 4}Ga{sub 4}SnSe{sub 12} has a direct band gap of 2.14 eV. • Ba{sub 4}Ga{sub 4}SnSe{sub 12,} has a maximum reflectivity in the visible and UV regions.

  10. Iron economy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Glaesener, Anne G.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.

    2013-01-01

    While research on iron nutrition in plants has largely focused on iron-uptake pathways, photosynthetic microbes such as the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii provide excellent experimental systems for understanding iron metabolism at the subcellular level. Several paradigms in iron homeostasis have been established in this alga, including photosystem remodeling in the chloroplast and preferential retention of some pathways and key iron-dependent proteins in response to suboptimal iron supply. This review presents our current understanding of iron homeostasis in Chlamydomonas, with specific attention on characterized responses to changes in iron supply, like iron-deficiency. An overview of frequently used methods for the investigation of iron-responsive gene expression, physiology and metabolism is also provided, including preparation of media, the effect of cell size, cell density and strain choice on quantitative measurements and methods for the determination of metal content and assessing the effect of iron supply on photosynthetic performance. PMID:24032036

  11. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  12. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  13. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  14. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  15. Molecular control of vertebrate iron homeostasis by iron regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wallander, Michelle L.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.; Eisenstein, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Both deficiencies and excesses of iron represent major public health problems throughout the world. Understanding the cellular and organismal processes controlling iron homeostasis is critical for identifying iron-related diseases and in advancing the clinical treatments for such disorders of iron metabolism. Iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) 1 and 2 are key regulators of vertebrate iron metabolism. These RNA binding proteins post-transcriptionally control the stability or translation of mRNAs encoding proteins involved in iron homeostasis thereby controlling the uptake, utilization, storage or export of iron. Recent evidence provides insight into how IRPs selectively control the translation or stability of target mRNAs, how IRP RNA binding activity is controlled by iron-dependent and iron-independent effectors, and the pathological consequences of dysregulation of the IRP system. PMID:16872694

  16. Iron overload and hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2004-01-01

    Although iron is essential for cell replication and survival, an increase of body iron stores has been implicated in the development of cancer. However, while the association between iron overload and hepatocellular carcinoma is well documented, the relationship with nonhepatocellular malignancies remains ill-defined. In this review, we briefly report the present knowledge regarding the association between iron overload and hematologic malignancies.

  17. Coal desulfurization. [using iron pentacarbonyl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Organic sulfur is removed from coal by treatment with an organic solution of iron pentacarbonyl. Organic sulfur compounds can be removed by reaction of the iron pentacarbonyl with coal to generate CO and COS off-gases. The CO gas separated from COS can be passed over hot iron fillings to generate iron pentacarbonyl.

  18. [Iron and liver disease].

    PubMed

    Miyanishi, Koji; Kato, Junji

    2016-07-01

    Free iron in the liver is believed to facilitate the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including hydroxyl radicals (*OH), which cause oxidative damage of numerous cellular components such as lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, and also upregulate collagen synthesis. The *OH radical is known to generate promutagenic bases such as 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). In cases with chronic hepatitis C, long-term iron reduction therapy reduced the activity of hepatitis, suppressed fibrosis, and prevented hepatocarcinogenesis. In nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) livers, hepatic iron accumulation as well as oxidative DNA damage significantly increased. Humoral factor(s) in NASH serum may upregulate DMT1 expression in small intestine. Iron reduction therapy for NASH patients has a potential to reduce disease activity as well as hepatic oxidative damage. PMID:27455806

  19. Iron in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in lamb, pork, and shellfish. Iron from vegetables, fruits, grains, and supplements is harder for the ... and peas Kidney beans Seeds: Almonds Brazil nuts Vegetables: Broccoli Spinach Kale Collards Asparagus Dandelion greens Whole ...

  20. Iron Sucrose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... often you receive iron sucrose injection and your total number of doses based on your condition and ... hands or feet; swelling of the hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs; loss of consciousness; or seizures. ...

  1. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in women.

    PubMed

    Coad, Jane; Pedley, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional problems in the world and disproportionately affects women and children. Stages of iron deficiency can be characterized as mild deficiency where iron stores become depleted, marginal deficiency where the production of many iron-dependent proteins is compromised but hemoglobin levels are normal and iron deficiency anemia where synthesis of hemoglobin is decreased and oxygen transport to the tissues is reduced. Iron deficiency anemia is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin levels but this approach lacks both specificity and sensitivity. Failure to identify and treat earlier stages of iron deficiency is concerning given the neurocognitive implications of iron deficiency without anemia. Most of the daily iron requirement is derived from recycling of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages; only 5-10 % comes from the diet. Iron absorption is affected by inhibitors and enhancers of iron absorption and by the physiological state. Inflammatory conditions, including obesity, can result in iron being retained in the enterocytes and macrophages causing hypoferremia as a strategic defense mechanism to restrict iron availability to pathogens. Premenopausal women usually have low iron status because of iron loss in menstrual blood. Conditions which further increase iron loss, compromise absorption or increase demand, such as frequent blood donation, gastrointestinal lesions, athletic activity and pregnancy, can exceed the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to upregulate iron absorption. Women of reproductive age are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency and its consequences however there is a controversial argument that evolutionary pressures have resulted in an iron deficient phenotype which protects against infection.

  2. Scotland's first iron lung.

    PubMed

    Porter, I A; Williams, M J

    1997-08-01

    The history of artificial ventilation and the development of the iron lung in the USA by Drinker and his colleagues is discussed. The building and use of an iron lung by Dr R G Henderson in Aberdeen in 1933 is described. The development of other types of ventilator in the UK is recorded and the circumstances whereby positive pressure ventilation was introduced in Denmark in 1952 is outlined. PMID:9507591

  3. Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Sri R. (Inventor); Prakash, G.K. Surya (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments include an iron-air rechargeable battery having a composite electrode including an iron electrode and a hydrogen electrode integrated therewith. An air electrode is spaced from the iron electrode and an electrolyte is provided in contact with the air electrode and the iron electrodes. Various additives and catalysts are disclosed with respect to the iron electrode, air electrode, and electrolyte for increasing battery efficiency and cycle life.

  4. Mining iron: iron uptake and transport in plants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun A; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2007-05-25

    Iron uptake in plants is highly regulated in order to supply amounts sufficient for optimal growth while preventing excess accumulation. In response to iron deficiency, plants induce either reduction-based or chelation-based mechanisms to enhance iron uptake from the soil. Genes involved in each mechanism have been identified from various model plants including Arabidopsis and rice. Iron transport within plants is also tightly controlled. New information has emerged on transporters that play a role in xylem loading and phloem loading/unloading of iron, and on the iron chelators involved in iron homeostasis. Some of the components regulating iron deficiency responses also have been elucidated, demonstrating that iron dependent gene regulation occurs at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. PMID:17485078

  5. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  6. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  7. Reactivity studies of plasma-synthesized aluminum trifluoride and electrochemical synthesis of non-stoichiometric silver selenide nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajime, Evan Koon Lun Yuuji

    made toward the template-assisted electrodeposition of Ag2+deltaSe nanowire arrays for fundamental and exploratory studies of the magnetoresistance in non-stoichiometric silver chalcogenides. Silver selenide can be difficult to electrodeposit due in part to the highly facile plating of silver metal from aqueous solutions. A new electrodeposition solution is proposed, containing AgNO3 and SeCl4 as the metal precursors, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the solvent and tetrabutylammonium chloride (TBACl) as a supporting electrolyte. The electrodeposition of Ag2Se from this solution and a previously reported solution using NaNO3 as supporting electrolyte was investigated using cyclic voltammetry and X-ray diffraction analysis of electrodeposited thin films. Cyclic voltammograms of solutions containing only AgNO3 and TBACl in DMSO showed one redox couple corresponding to the deposition and stripping of Ag metal, while the NaNO3-based solution showed an additional redox couple believed to involve the generation of negatively-charged Ag nanoparticles. Thin film electrodeposition of Ag metal from DMSO-based solutions produced non-dendritic deposits, and may be a useful alternative bath solvent for the silver plating industry. Solutions containing only SeCl 4 and TBACl in DMSO were studied by cyclic voltammetry, and revealed important potential ranges within which elemental Se is stable with respect to oxidation and reduction. The proposed mixed-metal electrodeposition solution was also analyzed with cyclic voltammetry, and the reductive formation of Ag2Se was found to occur at potentials between -0.55 V and -0.70 V (vs. Pt/0.1 M Nal, 0.05 M I2 (DMSO)). Using the results from the electroanalysis of the electrodeposition solutions, nanowire arrays of Ag2+deltaSe were successfully grown by electrodeposition into porous alumina membranes at room temperature (22°C) using an applied voltage of -0.70 V (vs. Pt/0.1 M Nal, 0.05 M I2 (DMSO)). Scanning electron microscopy showed smooth and

  8. [Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems].

    PubMed

    Dahlerup, Jens; Lindgren, Stefan; Moum, Björn

    2015-03-10

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems leading to deterioration in patients' quality of life and more serious prognosis in patients with chronic diseases. The cause of iron deficiency and anemia is usually a combination of increased loss and decreased intestinal absorption and delivery from iron stores due to inflammation. Oral iron is first line treatment, but often hampered by intolerance. Intravenous iron is safe, and the preferred treatment in patients with chronic inflammation and bowel diseases. The goal of treatment is normalisation of hemoglobin concentration and recovery of iron stores. It is important to follow up treatment to ensure that these objectives are met and also long-term in patients with chronic iron loss and/or inflammation to avoid recurrence of anemia.

  9. Mammalian iron metabolism and its control by iron regulatory proteins☆

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cole P.; Shen, Lacy; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular iron homeostasis is maintained by iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP1 and IRP2). IRPs bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) located in the untranslated regions of mRNAs encoding protein involved in iron uptake, storage, utilization and export. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in understanding how IRPs are regulated by iron-dependent and iron-independent mechanisms and the pathological consequences of IRP2 deficiency in mice. The identification of novel IREs involved in diverse cellular pathways has revealed that the IRP–IRE network extends to processes other than iron homeostasis. A mechanistic understanding of IRP regulation will likely yield important insights into the basis of disorders of iron metabolism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. PMID:22610083

  10. INTERIOR VIEW OF IRON TREATMENT (DESULPHURIZATION) AREA. MOLTEN IRON PROCEEDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF IRON TREATMENT (DESULPHURIZATION) AREA. MOLTEN IRON PROCEEDS FROM CUPOLA TO IRON TREATMENT AREAS BEFORE BEING TRANSFERRED TO PIPE CASTING MACHINES. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Melting & Treatment Areas, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  11. Iron Meteorite on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has found an iron meteorite on Mars, the first meteorite of any type ever identified on another planet. The pitted, basketball-size object is mostly made of iron and nickel. Readings from spectrometers on the rover determined that composition. Opportunity used its panoramic camera to take the images used in this approximately true-color composite on the rover's 339th martian day, or sol (Jan. 6, 2005). This composite combines images taken through the panoramic camera's 600-nanometer (red), 530-nanometer (green), and 480-nanometer (blue) filters.

  12. Iron in Infection and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Cassat, James E.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for both humans and pathogenic microbes. Because of its ability to exist in one of two oxidation states, iron is an ideal redox catalyst for diverse cellular processes including respiration and DNA replication. However, the redox potential of iron also contributes to its toxicity, thus iron concentration and distribution must be carefully controlled. Given the absolute requirement for iron by virtually all human pathogens, an important facet of the innate immune system is to limit iron availability to invading microbes in a process termed nutritional immunity. Successful human pathogens must therefore possess mechanisms to circumvent nutritional immunity in order to cause disease. In this review, we discuss regulation of iron metabolism in the setting of infection and delineate strategies used by human pathogens to overcome iron-withholding defenses. PMID:23684303

  13. Iron in infection and immunity.

    PubMed

    Cassat, James E; Skaar, Eric P

    2013-05-15

    Iron is an essential nutrient for both humans and pathogenic microbes. Because of its ability to exist in one of two oxidation states, iron is an ideal redox catalyst for diverse cellular processes including respiration and DNA replication. However, the redox potential of iron also contributes to its toxicity; thus, iron concentration and distribution must be carefully controlled. Given the absolute requirement for iron by virtually all human pathogens, an important facet of the innate immune system is to limit iron availability to invading microbes in a process termed nutritional immunity. Successful human pathogens must therefore possess mechanisms to circumvent nutritional immunity in order to cause disease. In this review, we discuss regulation of iron metabolism in the setting of infection and delineate strategies used by human pathogens to overcome iron-withholding defenses. PMID:23684303

  14. Nonbiological fractionation of iron isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Roe, J. E.; Barling, J.; Nealson, K. H.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory experiments demonstrate that iron isotopes can be chemically fractionated in the absence of biology. Isotopic variations comparable to those seen during microbially mediated reduction of ferrihydrite are observed. Fractionation may occur in aqueous solution during equilibration between inorganic iron complexes. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms of iron isotope fractionation and suggest that nonbiological processes may contribute to iron isotope variations observed in sediments.

  15. Iron excretion in iron dextran-overloaded mice

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Marco; Maccari, Sonia; Massimi, Alessia; Stati, Tonino; Sestili, Paola; Corritore, Elisa; Pastorelli, Augusto; Stacchini, Paolo; Marano, Giuseppe; Catalano, Liviana

    2014-01-01

    Background Iron homeostasis in humans is tightly regulated by mechanisms aimed to conserve iron for reutilisation, with a negligible role played by excretory mechanisms. In a previous study we found that mice have an astonishing ability to tolerate very high doses of parenterally administered iron dextran. Whether this ability is linked to the existence of an excretory pathway remains to be ascertained. Materials and methods Iron overload was generated by intraperitoneal injections of iron dextran (1 g/kg) administered once a week for 8 weeks in two different mouse strains (C57bl/6 and B6D2F1). Urinary and faecal iron excretion was assessed by inductively coupling plasma-mass spectrometry, whereas cardiac and liver architecture was evaluated by echocardiography and histological methods. For both strains, 24-hour faeces and urine samples were collected and iron concentration was determined on days 0, 1 and 2 after iron administration. Results In iron-overloaded C57bl/6 mice, the faecal iron concentration increased by 218% and 157% on days 1 and 2, respectively (p<0.01). The iron excreted represented a loss of 14% of total iron administered. Similar but smaller changes was also found in B6D2F1 mice. Conversely, we found no significant changes in the concentration of iron in the urine in either of the strains of mice. In both strains, histological examination showed accumulation of iron in the liver and heart which tended to decrease over time. Conclusions This study indicates that mice have a mechanism for removal of excess body iron and provides insights into the possible mechanisms of excretion. PMID:24960657

  16. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    PubMed Central

    Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. PMID:25419131

  17. 21 CFR 184.1375 - Iron, elemental.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron, elemental. 184.1375 Section 184.1375 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1375 Iron, elemental. (a) Iron, elemental (CAS Reg. No. 7439-89-6) is metallic iron obtained by any of the following processes: reduced iron, electrolytic iron,...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1375 - Iron, elemental.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron, elemental. 184.1375 Section 184.1375 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1375 Iron, elemental. (a) Iron, elemental (CAS Reg. No. 7439-89-6) is metallic iron obtained by any of the following processes: reduced iron, electrolytic iron, and...

  19. Development of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.; Sikka, V.K.; Andleigh, V.K.

    1995-06-01

    The primary reason for the poor room-temperature ductility of Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys is generally accepted to be environmental embrittlement due to hydrogen produced by the reaction of aluminum with water vapor present in the test atmosphere. In the as-cast condition, another possible reason for the low room-temperature ductility is the large grain size (0.5 to 3 mm) of the cast material. While recent studies on iron aluminides in the wrought condition have led to higher room-temperature ductility and increased high-temperature strength, limited studies have been conducted on iron aluminides in the as-cast condition. The purpose of this study was to induce grain refinement of the as-cast alloy through alloying additions to the melt and study the effect on room-temperature ductility as measured by the strain corresponding to the maximum stress obtained in a three-point bend test. A base charge of Fe-28% Al-5% Cr alloy was used; as in previous studies this ternary alloy exhibited the highest tensile ductility of several alloys tested. Iron aluminide alloys are being considered for many structural uses, especially for applications where their excellent corrosion resistance is needed. Several alloy compositions developed at ORNL have been licensed to commercial vendors for development of scale-up procedures. With the licensees and other vendors, several applications for iron aluminides are being pursued.

  20. Iron dominated magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.

    1985-07-01

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided.

  1. Iron, transferrin and myelinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M. H.; Devès, G.; Baron, B.; Guillou, F.

    2003-09-01

    Transferrin (Tf), the iron binding protein of vertebrates serum, is known to be synthesized by oligodendrocytes (Ols) in the central nervous system. It has been postulated that Tf is involved in Ols maturation and myelinogenesis. This link is particularly important in the understanding of a severe human pathology: the multiple sclerosis, which remains without efficient treatment. We generated transgenic mice containing the complete human Tf gene and extensive regulatory sequences from the 5 ' and 3 ' untranslated regions that specifically overexpress Tf in Ols. Brain cytoarchitecture of the transgenic mice appears to be normal in all brain regions examined, total myelin content is increased by 30% and motor coordination is significantly improved when compared with non-transgenic littermates. Tf role in the central nervous system may be related to its affinity for metallic cations. Normal and transgenic mice were used for determination of trace metals (iron, copper and zinc) and minerals (potassium and calcium) concentration in cerebellum and corpus callosum. The freeze-dried samples were prepared to allow proton-induced X-ray emission and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analyses with the nuclear microprobe in Bordeaux. Preliminary results were obtained and carbon distribution was revealed as a very good analysis to distinguish precisely the white matter region. A comparison of metallic and mineral elements contents in brain between normal and transgenic mice shows that iron, copper and zinc levels remained constant. This result provides evidence that effects of Tf overexpression in the brain do not solely relate to iron transport.

  2. Iron ERRs with Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ferric C; Weiss, Günter

    2014-05-14

    The hormone hepcidin promotes iron sequestration by macrophages. A recent study by Kim et al. (2014) implicates the orphan receptor ERRγ (estrogen-related receptor γ) in the regulation of hepcidin production and suggests that targeting the ERRγ-hepcidin axis may be beneficial during infection with the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella.

  3. Taking iron supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Iron Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  4. Extracting Iron from Cereal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students can investigate and evaluate the amount of iron found in most fortified breakfast cereals or cream of wheat. Includes a list of necessary materials, safety precautions, experimental procedure, disposal protocol, and nutritional explanation, utilization, and variations. (JJK)

  5. ([M(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}][Ag{sub 4}M{sub 4}Sn{sub 3}Se{sub 13}]){sub ∞} (M=Zn, Mn): Three-dimensional chalcogenide frameworks constructed from quaternary metal selenide clusters with two different transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Wei-Wei; Miao, Jianwei; Li, Pei-Zhou; Zhao, Yanli; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Qichun

    2014-10-15

    Herein we report solvothermal syntheses of two new three-dimensional chalcogenide frameworks ([M(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}][Ag{sub 4}M{sub 4}Sn{sub 3}Se{sub 13}]){sub n} (M=Zn (1), Mn (2)), which consist of quaternary metal selenide clusters with two different transition metals. The compounds represent the first Ag–Zn/Mn–Sn–Se based quaternary anionic frameworks. The optical studies show that the band gaps for 1 and 2 are 2.09 eV and 1.71 eV, respectively. Moreover, the photoelectrochemical study indicates that compound 1 displays n-type semiconducting behaviour and is photoactive under visible light illumination (λ>400 nm). - Graphical abstract: Two 3D framework selenides, [M(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}][Ag{sub 4}M{sub 4}Sn{sub 3}Se{sub 13}] (M=Zn (1), Mn (2)), constructed from quaternary metal selenide clusters, have been solvothermally synthesized and are photoactive under visible light illumination. - Highlights: • Two new three-dimensional selenide frameworks. • Quaternary metal selenide clusters with two different transition metals. • Photoelectrochemical study.

  6. Extracting phosphoric iron under laboratorial conditions smelting bog iron ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Török, B.; Thiele, A.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years it has been indicated by archaeometric investigations that phosphoric-iron (P-iron, low carbon steel with 0,5-1,5wt% P), which is an unknown and unused kind of steel in the modern industry, was widely used in different parts of the world in medieval times. In this study we try to explore the role of phosphorus in the arhaeometallurgy of iron and answer some questions regarding the smelting bog iron ores with high P-content. XRF analyses were performed on bog iron ores collected in Somogy county. Smelting experiments were carried out on bog iron ores using a laboratory model built on the basis of previously conducted reconstructed smelting experiments in copies of excavated furnaces. The effect of technological parameters on P-content of the resulted iron bloom was studied. OM and SEM-EDS analyses were carried out on the extracted iron and slag samples. On the basis of the material analyses it can be stated that P-iron is usually extracted but the P-content is highly affected by technological parameters. Typical microstructures of P-iron and of slag could also be identified. It could also be established that arsenic usually solved in high content in iron as well.

  7. Microorganisms pumping iron: anaerobic microbial iron oxidation and reduction.

    PubMed

    Weber, Karrie A; Achenbach, Laurie A; Coates, John D

    2006-10-01

    Iron (Fe) has long been a recognized physiological requirement for life, yet for many microorganisms that persist in water, soils and sediments, its role extends well beyond that of a nutritional necessity. Fe(II) can function as an electron source for iron-oxidizing microorganisms under both oxic and anoxic conditions and Fe(III) can function as a terminal electron acceptor under anoxic conditions for iron-reducing microorganisms. Given that iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth's crust, iron redox reactions have the potential to support substantial microbial populations in soil and sedimentary environments. As such, biological iron apportionment has been described as one of the most ancient forms of microbial metabolism on Earth, and as a conceivable extraterrestrial metabolism on other iron-mineral-rich planets such as Mars. Furthermore, the metabolic versatility of the microorganisms involved in these reactions has resulted in the development of biotechnological applications to remediate contaminated environments and harvest energy.

  8. Nutritional iron deficiency: the role of oral iron supplementation.

    PubMed

    Lachowicz, J I; Nurchi, V M; Fanni, D; Gerosa, C; Peana, M; Zoroddu, M A

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency represents a relevant health problem mainly in developing countries. Children and pregnant women represent the main target of this disease, and the low amount of bio-available iron mostly depends on plant-based diets. Iron deficiency may have serious consequences, with severe impairment of the immune function leading to infectious diseases. The brain development in embryos and fetuses during gestation can be greatly affected by iron deficiency of the mother with heavy outcomes on the cognition status of children. A better understanding of molecular pathways involved in iron absorption and metabolism are the basis for new strategies for developing a therapy for iron deficiency. Different therapeutic strategies are summarized, and iron fortification appears the best tool.

  9. Iron Aluminide Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.

    1998-11-20

    Iron aluminides with the B2 structure are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant. They are thermodynamically compatible with a wide range of ceramics such as TiC, WC, TiB{sub 2}, and ZrB{sub 2}. In addition, liquid iron aluminides wet these ceramics very well. Therefore, FeAl/ceramic composites may be produced by techniques such as liquid phase sintering of powder mixtures, or pressureless melt infiltration of ceramic powders with liquid FeAl. These techniques, the resulting microstructure, and their advantages as well as limitations are described. Iron aluminide composites can be very strong. Room temperature flexure strengths as high as 1.8 GPa have been observed for FeAl/WC. Substantial gains in strength at elevated temperatures (1073 K) have also been demonstrated. Above 40 vol.% WC the room temperature flexure strength becomes flaw-limited. This is thought to be due to processing flaws and limited interfacial strength. The fracture toughness of FeAl/WC is unexpectedly high and follows a mile of mixtures. Interestingly, sufficiently thin (< 1 {micro}m) FeAl ligaments between adjacent WC particles fracture not by cleavage, but in a ductile manner. For these thin ligaments the dislocation pile-ups formed during deformation are not long enough to nucleate cleavage fracture, and their fracture mode is therefore ductile. For several reasons, this brittle-to-ductile size transition does not improve the fracture toughness of the composites significantly. However, since no cleavage cracks are nucleated in sufficiently thin FeAl ligaments, slow crack growth due to ambient water vapor does not occur. Therefore, as compared to monolithic iron aluminizes, environmental embrittlement is dramatically reduced in iron aluminide composites.

  10. Syntheses, crystal structures, and resistivities of the two new ternary uranium selenides, Er3USe8 and Yb3USe8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Jai; Mesbah, Adel; Beard, Jessica C.; Malliakas, Christos D.; Ibers, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Two new ternary lanthanide (Ln) uranium selenides, Er3USe8 and Yb3USe8, were synthesized at 1198 K using NaI as a flux. Single-crystal X-ray studies show these two compounds to be isostructural and to crystallize in space group D2h 11 -Pbcm of the orthorhombic crystal system. The Ln and U atoms are disordered on the same crystallographic site in these crystal structures. Each Ln/U atom is coordinated to eight Se atoms in a bicapped trigonal prism, and sharing of these (Ln/U)Se8 units creates a three-dimensional network. Se2 atoms are connected to each other to form infinite one-dimensional chains along the c axis. In these chains, the two Se atoms are separated by about 2.74 Å, a distance intermediate to those of a Se-Se single bond and a van der Waals interaction. Temperature-dependent resistivity measurements show that Er3USe8 and Yb3USe8 are semiconductors with activation energies of 0.08(1) and 0.17(1) eV, respectively.

  11. "Green" synthesis of cadmium selenide nanocrystals: the scope of 1,2,3-selendiazoles in the synthesis of magic-size nanocrystals and quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Beri, Rupinder K; Khanna, Pawan K

    2011-06-01

    A range of cadmium selenide nano-particles (the quantum dots (QDs), the magic-size nano-crystals (MSNCs) or the mixture of two) have been synthesized by the use of organoselenium reagents viz. 1,2,3-selenadiazole and metal salts in an appropriate choice of long chain fatty acids e.g., oleic acid with or without a solvent. These different types of nanocrystals can be easily obtained simply by variation in reaction temperature. The employed approach does not use any hazardous reagents and is typically non-aqueous and can be considered "green." The temperature at which the reaction is carried out along with the ratio of reactants and surfactant affect the nature of products and have led to understanding of some parameters affecting the formation of either "thermodynamic" or "kinetically" stabilized products. We have obtained sub-nanosized particles (magic-sized nanocrystals), zero-dimensional quantum dots and self-assembled structures by these methods. The materials have been studied by UV-Visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersion X-ray analysis (EDAX), and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  12. Thermo-optical characterization of cadmium selenide/zinc sulfide (CdSe/ZnS) quantum dots embedded in biocompatible materials.

    PubMed

    Pilla, Viviane; Alves, Leandro P; Iwazaki, Adalberto N; Andrade, Acácio A; Antunes, Andrea; Munin, Egberto

    2013-09-01

    Cadmium selenide/zinc sulfide (CdSe/ZnS) core-shell quantum dots (QDs) embedded in biocompatible materials were thermally and optically characterized with a thermal lens (TL) technique. Transient TL measurements were performed with a mode-mismatched, dual-beam (excitation and probe) configuration. A thermo-optical study of the CdSe/ZnS QDs was performed for different core diameters (3.5, 4.0, 5.2, and 6.6 nm) in aqueous solution and synthetic saliva, and three different core diameters (2.4, 2.9, and 4.1 nm) embedded in restorative dental resin (0.025% by mass). The thermal diffusivity results are characteristic of the biocompatible matrices. The radiative quantum efficiencies for aqueous solution and biofluid materials are dependent on the core size of the CdSe/ZnS core-shell QDs. The results obtained from the fluorescence spectral measurements for the biocompatible materials support the TL results.

  13. Electronic characterization of defects in narrow gap semiconductors: Comparison of electronic energy levels and formation energies in mercury cadmium telluride, mercury zinc telluride, and mercury zinc selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, James D.; Li, Wei-Gang

    1995-03-01

    The project has evolved to that of using Green's functions to predict properties of deep defects in narrow gap materials. Deep defects are now defined as originating from short range potentials and are often located near the middle of the energy gap. They are important because they affect the lifetime of charge carriers and hence the switching time of transistors. We are now moving into the arena of predicting formation energies of deep defects. This will also allow us to make predictions about the relative concentrations of the defects that could be expected at a given temperature. The narrow gap materials mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT), and mercury zinc selenide (MZS) are of interest to NASA because they have commercial value for infrared detecting materials, and because there is a good possibility that they can be grown better in a microgravity environment. The uniform growth of these crystals on earth is difficult because of convection (caused by solute depletion just ahead of the growing interface, and also due to thermal gradients). In general it is very difficult to grow crystals with both radial and axial homogeneity.

  14. Electronic characterization of defects in narrow gap semiconductors: Comparison of electronic energy levels and formation energies in mercury cadmium telluride, mercury zinc telluride, and mercury zinc selenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James D.; Li, Wei-Gang

    1995-01-01

    The project has evolved to that of using Green's functions to predict properties of deep defects in narrow gap materials. Deep defects are now defined as originating from short range potentials and are often located near the middle of the energy gap. They are important because they affect the lifetime of charge carriers and hence the switching time of transistors. We are now moving into the arena of predicting formation energies of deep defects. This will also allow us to make predictions about the relative concentrations of the defects that could be expected at a given temperature. The narrow gap materials mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT), and mercury zinc selenide (MZS) are of interest to NASA because they have commercial value for infrared detecting materials, and because there is a good possibility that they can be grown better in a microgravity environment. The uniform growth of these crystals on earth is difficult because of convection (caused by solute depletion just ahead of the growing interface, and also due to thermal gradients). In general it is very difficult to grow crystals with both radial and axial homogeneity.

  15. A study of the atmospherically important reactions between dimethyl selenide (DMSe) and molecular halogens (X2 = Cl2, Br2, and I2) with ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Rhyman, Lydia; Armata, Nerina; Ramasami, Ponnadurai; Dyke, John M

    2012-06-14

    The atmospherically relevant reactions between dimethyl selenide (DMSe) and the molecular halogens (X(2) = Cl(2), Br(2), and I(2)) have been studied with ab initio calculations at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. Geometry optimization calculations showed that the reactions proceed from the reagents to the products (CH(3)SeCH(2)X + HX) via three minima, a van der Waals adduct (DMSe:X(2)), a covalently bound intermediate (DMSeX(2)), and a product-like complex (CH(3)SeCH(2)X:HX). The computed potential energy surfaces are used to predict what molecular species are likely to be observed in spectroscopic experiments such as gas-phase photoelectron spectroscopy and infrared matrix isolation spectroscopy. It is concluded that, for the reactions of DMSe with Cl(2) and Br(2), the covalent intermediate should be seen in spectroscopic experiments, whereas, in the DMSe + I(2) reaction, the van der Waals adduct DMSe:I(2) should be observed. Comparison is made with previous related calculations and experiments on dimethyl sulfide (DMS) with molecular halogens. The relevance of the results to atmospheric chemistry is discussed. The DMSeX(2) and DMSe:X(2) intermediates are likely to be reservoirs of molecular halogens in the atmosphere which will lead on photolysis to ozone depletion.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of cadmium selenide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon and its efficient application for removal of muroxide from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Amirabad, S Zamani; Marahel, F; Nasiri Kokhdan, S; Sahraei, R; Nosrati, M; Daneshfar, A

    2011-12-01

    In the first, Cadmium selenide Nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon (CdSe-NP-AC) has been synthesized and characterized by different techniques including XRD and SEM. Then, this new adsorbent successfully has been applied for the removal of muroxide (MO) from aqueous solution in batch studies, while the effect of various experimental parameters like initial pH (pH(0)), contact time, amount of (CdSe-NP-AC) and initial MO concentration (C(0)) on its removal percentage was examined by one at a time optimization method. It was found following optimization of variable, the adsorption of MO onto (CdSe-NP-AC) followed pseudo-second-order kinetics and show Tempkin and Langmuir models for interpretation of experimental data. It was observed that by increasing the temperature the removal percentage was improved and the positive change in entropy (ΔS°) and heat of adsorption (ΔH°) show the endothermic nature of process, while the high negative value in Gibbs free energy change (ΔG°) indicates the feasible nature of adsorption process. PMID:21903452

  17. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical characterization of lead selenide sub-micron particles capped with a benzoate ligand and prepared at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Weyshla A.; Colón, Jadiel; Guzmán, Roger; Rivera, Harry; Santiago-Berríos, Mitk'El B.

    2014-09-01

    Semiconductor materials offer several potential benefits as active elements in the development of harvesting-energy conversion technologies. In particular, lead selenide (PbSe) semiconductors have been used and proposed to design solar energy harvesting devices, IR sensors, FET devices, etc. Lead salts have drawn particular attention from the applied and fundamental research communities due to their exceptionally strong quantum confinement effects. Several syntheses of PbSe have been proposed using long chain surfactants to allow the formation of particles and nanoparticles. Here we present a synthesis using benzoic acid as the capping ligand in ambient atmosphere. Although the particles are not in nanometric size, we compare the crystal structure (using x-ray powder diffraction data), the near infrared and mid-infrared absorption properties of PbSe using oleic acid as the capping ligand with PbSe using benzoic acid as the capping ligand. The new synthetized particles were shown to have similar crystal structure and absorb light in the near infrared region at 1410 nm. We also performed cyclic voltammetry of these particles drop-casted in the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. The particles showed electrochemical behavior with an oxidation peak near (-402 ± 5 mV) versus Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The particles seem to form a polymeric film at the surface of a glassy carbon electrode.

  18. Cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium selenide (CdSe) leaching behavior and surface chemistry in response to pH and O2.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chao; Ramos-Ruiz, Adriana; Field, Jim A; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2015-05-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium selenide (CdSe) are increasingly being applied in photovoltaic solar cells and electronic components. A major concern is the public health and ecological risks associated with the potential release of toxic cadmium, tellurium, and/or selenium species. In this study, different tests were applied to investigate the leaching behavior of CdTe and CdSe in solutions simulating landfill leachate. CdTe showed a comparatively high leaching potential. In the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and Waste Extraction Test (WET), the concentrations of cadmium released from CdTe were about 1500 and 260 times higher than the regulatory limit (1 mg/L). In contrast, CdSe was relatively stable and dissolved selenium in both leaching tests was below the regulatory limit (1 mg/L). Nonetheless, the regulatory limit for cadmium was exceeded by 5- to 6- fold in both tests. Experiments performed under different pH and redox conditions confirmed a marked enhancement in CdTe and CdSe dissolution both at acidic pH and under aerobic conditions. These findings are in agreement with thermodynamic predictions. Taken as a whole, the results indicate that recycling of decommissioned CdTe-containing devices is desirable to prevent the potential environmental release of toxic cadmium and tellurium in municipal landfills.

  19. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  20. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  1. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  2. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  3. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  4. Iron status in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Fairweather-Tait, Susan J; Wawer, Anna A; Gillings, Rachel; Jennings, Amy; Myint, Phyo K

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is prevalent in older age, particularly after the age of 80. Serum ferritin concentrations also decline, although there is no evidence to suggest that changes in iron stores are an inevitable consequence of ageing. Chronic inflammation is a common condition in older people, making the measurement of iron status difficult, and it is likely that elevated levels of circulating hepcidin are responsible for changes in iron metabolism that result in systemic iron depletion. Other contributory factors are poor diet and some medications, such as aspirin. Anaemia in older age has undesirable health outcomes, including increased susceptibility to falling and depression. However, there are concerns about possible adverse effects of iron supplements, either in relation to pro-inflammatory effects in the gut or inappropriate tissue iron deposition. Brain iron levels are increased with age-related degenerative diseases, but it is not known if this is the cause or a consequence of the disease, and genetic factors are likely to play a role. In order to maintain body iron within the normal range a personalised approach is required, taking into account all of the factors that may affect iron metabolism and the available strategies for preventing iron deficiency or overload.

  5. Degradation of chlorofluorocarbons using granular iron and bimetallic irons.

    PubMed

    Jeen, Sung-Wook; Lazar, Snezana; Gui, Lai; Gillham, Robert W

    2014-03-01

    Degradation of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC11) and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (CFC113) by granular iron and bimetallic (nickel- or palladium-enhanced) irons was studied in flow-through column tests. Both compounds were rapidly degraded, following pseudo-first-order kinetics with respect to the parent compounds. The average pseudo-first-order rate constants for CFC11 were similar among different materials, except for palladium-enhanced iron (PdFe), in which the rate of degradation was about two times faster than for the other materials. In the case of CFC113, the rate constants for bimetallic irons were about two to three times greater than for the regular iron material. The smaller than expected differences in degradation rate constants of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) between regular iron and bimetallic irons suggested little, if any, catalytic effect of the bimetallic materials in the initial degradation step. Subsequent degradation steps involved catalytic hydrogenation, however, playing a significant role in further degradation of reaction intermediates. The degradation intermediates and final products of CFC11 and CFC113 suggested that degradation proceeded through hydrogenolysis and α/β-elimination in the presence of regular iron (Fe) and nickel-enhanced iron (NiFe). Even though there is only minor benefit in the use of bimetallic iron in terms of degradation kinetics of the parent CFCs, enhanced degradation rates of intermediates such as chlorotriflouroethene (CTFE) in subsequent reaction steps could be beneficial. PMID:24492233

  6. Degradation of chlorofluorocarbons using granular iron and bimetallic irons.

    PubMed

    Jeen, Sung-Wook; Lazar, Snezana; Gui, Lai; Gillham, Robert W

    2014-03-01

    Degradation of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC11) and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (CFC113) by granular iron and bimetallic (nickel- or palladium-enhanced) irons was studied in flow-through column tests. Both compounds were rapidly degraded, following pseudo-first-order kinetics with respect to the parent compounds. The average pseudo-first-order rate constants for CFC11 were similar among different materials, except for palladium-enhanced iron (PdFe), in which the rate of degradation was about two times faster than for the other materials. In the case of CFC113, the rate constants for bimetallic irons were about two to three times greater than for the regular iron material. The smaller than expected differences in degradation rate constants of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) between regular iron and bimetallic irons suggested little, if any, catalytic effect of the bimetallic materials in the initial degradation step. Subsequent degradation steps involved catalytic hydrogenation, however, playing a significant role in further degradation of reaction intermediates. The degradation intermediates and final products of CFC11 and CFC113 suggested that degradation proceeded through hydrogenolysis and α/β-elimination in the presence of regular iron (Fe) and nickel-enhanced iron (NiFe). Even though there is only minor benefit in the use of bimetallic iron in terms of degradation kinetics of the parent CFCs, enhanced degradation rates of intermediates such as chlorotriflouroethene (CTFE) in subsequent reaction steps could be beneficial.

  7. Computational and experimental investigation for new transition metal selenides and sulfides: The importance of experimental verification for stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Awadhesh; Bhutani, Ankita; Rubeck, Samantha; Eckstein, James N.; Shoemaker, Daniel P.; Wagner, Lucas K.

    2016-07-01

    Expanding the library of known inorganic materials with functional electronic or magnetic behavior is a long-standing goal in condensed matter physics and materials science. Recently, the transition metal chalcogenides including selenium and sulfur have been of interest because of their correlated-electron properties, as seen in the iron-based superconductors and the transition metal dichalcogenides. However, the chalcogenide chemical space is less explored than that of oxides, and there is an open question of whether there may be new materials heretofore undiscovered. We perform a systematic combined theoretical and experimental search over ternary phase diagrams that are empty in the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database containing cations, transition metals, and one of selenium or sulfur. In these 27 ternary systems, we use a probabilistic model to reduce the likelihood of false negative predictions, which results in a list of 24 candidate materials. We then conduct a variety of synthesis experiments to check the candidate materials for stability. While the prediction method did obtain previously unknown compositions that are predicted stable within density functional theory, none of the candidate materials formed in our experiments. We come to the conclusion that these phase diagrams are "empty" in the case of bulk synthesis, but it remains a possibility that alternate synthesis routes may produce some of these phases.

  8. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  9. Iron homoeostasis in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Baker, Joshua F; Ghio, Andrew J

    2009-11-01

    Iron is critical in nearly all cell functions and the ability of a cell, tissue and organism to procure this metal is obligatory for survival. Iron is necessary for normal immune function, and relative iron deficiency is associated with mild immunosuppression. Concentrations of this metal in excess of those required for function can present both an oxidative stress and elevate risks for infection. As a result, the human has evolved to have a complex mechanism of regulating iron and limiting its availability. This homoeostasis can be disrupted. Autoimmune diseases and gout often present with abnormal iron homoeostasis, thus supporting a participation of the metal in these injuries. We review the role of iron in normal immune function and discuss both clinical evidence of altered iron homoeostasis in autoimmune diseases and gout as well as possible implications of both depletion and supplementation of this metal in this patient population. We conclude that altered iron homoeostasis may represent a purposeful response to inflammation that could have theoretical anti-inflammatory benefits. We encourage physicians to avoid routine iron supplementation in those without depleted iron stores.

  10. Iron homeostasis and eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Allison; Hadziahmetovic, Majda; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Iron is necessary for life, but excess iron can be toxic to tissues. Iron is thought to damage tissues primarily by generating oxygen free radicals through the Fenton reaction. We present an overview of the evidence supporting iron's potential contribution to a broad range of eye disease using an anatomical approach. Firstly, iron can be visualized in the cornea as iron lines in the normal aging cornea as well as in diseases like keratoconus and pterygium. In the lens, we present the evidence for the role of oxidative damage in cataractogenesis. Also, we review the evidence that iron may play a role in the pathogenesis of the retinal disease age-related macular degeneration. Although currently there is no direct link between excess iron and development of optic neuropathies, ferrous iron's ability to form highly reactive oxygen species may play a role in optic nerve pathology. Lastly, we discuss recent advances in prevention and therapeutics for eye disease with antioxidants and iron chelators,. PMID:19059309

  11. Iron deficiency and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    von Haehling, Stephan; Jankowska, Ewa A; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D

    2015-11-01

    Iron deficiency affects up to one-third of the world's population, and is particularly common in elderly individuals and those with certain chronic diseases. Iron excess can be detrimental in cardiovascular illness, and research has now also brought anaemia and iron deficiency into the focus of cardiovascular medicine. Data indicate that iron deficiency has detrimental effects in patients with coronary artery disease, heart failure (HF), and pulmonary hypertension, and possibly in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Around one-third of all patients with HF, and more than one-half of patients with pulmonary hypertension, are affected by iron deficiency. Patients with HF and iron deficiency have shown symptomatic improvements from intravenous iron administration, and some evidence suggests that these improvements occur irrespective of the presence of anaemia. Improved exercise capacity has been demonstrated after iron administration in patients with pulmonary hypertension. However, to avoid iron overload and T-cell activation, it seems that recipients of cardiac transplantations should not be treated with intravenous iron preparations.

  12. Iron acquisition in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, Elizabeth E; Mey, Alexandra R; Payne, Shelley M

    2007-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, has an absolute requirement for iron and must obtain this element in the human host as well as in its varied environmental niches. It has multiple systems for iron acquisition, including the TonB-dependent transport of heme, the endogenous siderophore vibriobactin and several siderophores that are produced by other microorganisms. There is also a Feo system for the transport of ferrous iron and an ABC transporter, Fbp, which transports ferric iron. There appears to be at least one additional high affinity iron transport system that has not yet been identified. In iron replete conditions, iron acquisition genes are repressed by Fur. Fur also represses the synthesis of a small, regulatory RNA, RyhB, which negatively regulates genes for iron-containing proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and respiration as well as genes for motility and chemotaxis. The redundancy in iron transport systems has made it more difficult to determine the role of individual systems in vivo and in vitro, but it may reflect the overall importance of iron in the growth and survival of V. cholerae.

  13. Iron absorption and transport-an update.

    PubMed

    Conrad, M E; Umbreit, J N

    2000-08-01

    Iron is vital for all living organisms. However, excess iron is hazardous because it produces free radical formation. Therefore, iron absorption is carefully regulated to maintain an equilibrium between absorption and body loss of iron. In countries where heme is a significant part of the diet, most body iron is derived from dietary heme iron because heme binds few of the luminal intestinal iron chelators that inhibit absorption of non-heme iron. Uptake of luminal heme into enterocytes occurs as a metalloporphyrin. Intracellularly, iron is released from heme by heme oxygenase so that iron leaves the enterocyte to enter the plasma as non-heme iron. Ferric iron is absorbed via a beta(3) integrin and mobilferrin (IMP) pathway that is not shared with other nutritional metals. Ferrous iron uptake is facilitated by DMT-1 (Nramp-2, DCT-1) in a pathway shared with manganese. Other proteins were recently described which are believed to play a role in iron absorption. SFT (Stimulator of Iron Transport) is postulated to facilitate both ferric and ferrous iron uptake, and Hephaestin is thought to be important in transfer of iron from enterocytes into the plasma. The iron concentration within enterocytes reflects the total body iron and either upregulates or satiates iron-binding sites on regulatory proteins. Enterocytes of hemochromatotics are iron-depleted similarly to the absorptive cells of iron-deficient subjects. Iron depletion, hemolysis, and hypoxia each can stimulate iron absorption. In non-intestinal cells most iron uptake occurs via either the classical clathrin-coated pathway utilizing transferrin receptors or the poorly defined transferrin receptor independent pathway. Non-intestinal cells possess the IMP and DMT-1 pathways though their role in the absence of iron overload is unclear. This suggests that these pathways have intracellular functions in addition to facilitating iron uptake.

  14. Ternary lanthanum sulfide selenides {alpha}-LaS{sub 2-x}Se{sub x} (0

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, Christian; Doert, Thomas

    2012-01-15

    Mixed lanthanum sulfide selenides LaS{sub 2-x}Se{sub x} (0selenides. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vegard series of mixed lanthanum sulfide selenides LaS{sub 2-x}Se{sub x} (0

  15. Template free-solvothermaly synthesized copper selenide (CuSe, Cu 2- xSe, β-Cu 2Se and Cu 2Se) hexagonal nanoplates from different precursors at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pushpendra; Singh, Kedar; Srivastava, O. N.

    2010-09-01

    Nonstoichiometric (Cu 2- xSe) and stoichiometric (CuSe, β-Cu 2Se and Cu 2Se) copper selenide hexagonal nanoplates have been synthesized using different general and convenient copper sources, e.g. copper chloride, copper sulphate, copper nitrate, copper acetate, elemental copper with elemental selenium, friendly ethylene glycol and hydrazine hydrate in a defined amount of water at 100 °C within 12 h adopting the solvothermal method. Phase analysis, purity and morphology of the product have been well studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDAX) techniques. The structural and compositional analysis revealed that the products were of pure phase with corresponding atomic ratios. SEM, TEM and HRTEM analyses revealed that the nanoplates were in the range 200-450 nm and the as-prepared products were uniform and highly crystallized. The nanoplates consisted of {0 0 1} facets of top-bottom surfaces and {1 1 0} facets of the other six side surfaces. This new approach encompasses many advantages over the conventional solvothermal method in terms of product quality (better morphology control with high yield) and reaction conditions (lower temperatures). Copper selenide hexagonal nanoplates obtained by the described method could be potential building blocks to construct functional devices and solar cell. This work may open up a new rationale on designing the solution synthesis of nanostructures for materials possessing similar intrinsic crystal symmetry. On the basis of the carefully controlled experiments mentioned herein, a plausible formation mechanism of the hexagonal nanoplates was suggested and discussed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on nonstoichiometric (Cu 2- xSe) as well as stoichiometric (CuSe, β-Cu 2Se and Cu 2Se) copper selenide hexagonal nanoplates with

  16. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1989-11-14

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

  17. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, Michael R.; Arnold, Robert G.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

  18. The Irony of Iron – Biogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, David

    2016-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity. PMID:26779157

  19. The Irony of Iron - Biogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean.

    PubMed

    Emerson, David

    2015-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity.

  20. The Irony of Iron - Biogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean.

    PubMed

    Emerson, David

    2015-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity. PMID:26779157

  1. 21 CFR 184.1375 - Iron, elemental.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... carbonyl iron. (1) Reduced iron is prepared by reacting ground ferric oxide with hydrogen or carbon... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron, elemental. 184.1375 Section 184.1375 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1375 Iron, elemental. (a) Iron, elemental (CAS Reg. No....

  2. 21 CFR 184.1375 - Iron, elemental.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... carbonyl iron. (1) Reduced iron is prepared by reacting ground ferric oxide with hydrogen or carbon... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron, elemental. 184.1375 Section 184.1375 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1375 Iron, elemental. (a) Iron, elemental (CAS Reg. No....

  3. 21 CFR 184.1375 - Iron, elemental.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... iron is prepared by reacting ground ferric oxide with hydrogen or carbon monoxide at an elevated... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron, elemental. 184.1375 Section 184.1375 Food... GRAS § 184.1375 Iron, elemental. (a) Iron, elemental (CAS Reg. No. 7439-89-6) is metallic iron...

  4. Replacing London's cast iron mains

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, A. ); Mathews, P. )

    1992-07-01

    This paper discusses the cast iron gas distribution systems that exist in many cities and contains considerable amounts of pipe that vary in age from 20 to 150 years. In many ways, cast iron is an excellent material. It is inherently corrosion resistant, easy to install and cheap. However, it is also brittle and smaller diameter cast iron pipe has a relatively low beam strength. This can lead, under some circumstances, to failure without external warning, with typically a full-circumferential failure. In congested areas this can lead to serious consequences. As a result, cast iron replacement programs are a common feature in such urban gas distribution systems.

  5. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Breymann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in obstetrics and perinatal care. Any hemoglobin below 10.5 g/dL can be regarded as true anemia regardless of gestational age. Reasons for anemia in pregnancy are mainly nutritional deficiencies, parasitic and bacterial diseases, and inborn red blood cell disorders such as thalassemias. The main cause of anemia in obstetrics is iron deficiency, which has a worldwide prevalence between estimated 20%-80% and consists of a primarily female population. Stages of iron deficiency are depletion of iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis without anemia, and iron deficiency anemia, the most pronounced form of iron deficiency. Pregnancy anemia can be aggravated by various conditions such as uterine or placental bleedings, gastrointestinal bleedings, and peripartum blood loss. In addition to the general consequences of anemia, there are specific risks during pregnancy for the mother and the fetus such as intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity, feto-placental miss ratio, and higher risk for peripartum blood transfusion. Besides the importance of prophylaxis of iron deficiency, the main therapy options for the treatment of pregnancy anemia are oral iron and intravenous iron preparations.

  6. Calcium, iron and neuronal function.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Cecilia; Núñez, Marco T

    2007-01-01

    Calcium and iron play dual roles in neuronal function: they are both essential but when present in excess they cause neuronal damage and may even induce neuronal death. Calcium signals are required for synaptic plasticity, a neuronal process that entails gene expression and which is presumably the cellular counterpart of cognitive brain functions such as learning and memory. Neuronal activity generates cytoplasmic and nuclear calcium signals that in turn stimulate pathways that promote the transcription of genes known to participate in synaptic plasticity. In addition, evidence discussed in this article shows that iron deficiency causes learning and memory impairments that persist following iron repletion, indicating that iron is necessary for normal development of cognitive functions. Recent results from our group indicate that iron is required for long-term potentiation in hippocampal CA1 neurons and that iron stimulates ryanodine receptor-mediated calcium release through ROS produced via the Fenton reaction leading to stimulation of the ERK signaling pathway. These combined results support a coordinated action between iron and calcium in synaptic plasticity and raise the possibility that elevated iron levels may contribute to neuronal degeneration through excessive intracellular calcium increase caused by iron-induced oxidative stress. PMID:17505966

  7. Ultrasensitive sensing platform for platelet-derived growth factor BB detection based on layered molybdenum selenide-graphene composites and Exonuclease III assisted signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke-Jing; Shuai, Hong-Lei; Zhang, Ji-Zong

    2016-03-15

    A highly sensitive and ultrasensitive electrochemical aptasensor for platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) detection is fabricated based on layered molybdenum selenide-graphene (MoSe2-Gr) composites and Exonuclease III (Exo III)-aided signal amplification. MoSe2-Gr is prepared by a simple hydrothermal method and used as a promising sensing platform. Exo III has a specifical exo-deoxyribonuclease activity for duplex DNAs in the direction from 3' to 5' terminus, however its activity is limited on the duplex DNAs with more than 4 mismatched terminal bases at 3' ends. Herein, aptamer and complementary DNA (cDNA) sequences are designed with four thymine bases on 3' ends. In the presence of target protein, the aptamer associates with it and facilitates the formation of duplex DNA between cDNA and signal DNA. The duplex DNA then is digested by Exo III and releases cDNA, which hybridizes with signal DNA to perform a new cleavage process. Nevertheless, in the absence of target protein, the aptamer hybridizes with cDNA will inhibit the Exo III-assisted nucleotides cleavage. The signal DNA then hybridizes with capture DNA on the electrode. Subsequently, horse radish peroxidase is fixed on electrode by avidin-biotin reaction and then catalyzes hydrogen peroxide and hydroquinone to produce electrochemical response. Therefore, a bridge can be established between the concentration of target protein and the degree of the attenuation of the obtained signal, providing a quantitative measure of target protein with a broad detection range of 0.0001-1 nM and a detection limit of 20 fM.

  8. The presence of mercury selenide in various tissues of the striped dolphin: evidence from μ-XRF-XRD and XAFS analyses.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Emiko; Ikemoto, Tokutaka; Hokura, Akiko; Terada, Yasuko; Kunito, Takashi; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Nakai, Izumi

    2011-07-01

    Marine mammals accumulate mercury in their tissues at high concentration and detoxify by forming mercury selenide (HgSe, tiemannite) mainly in the liver. We investigated the possibility of formation of HgSe in various tissues (liver, kidney, lung, spleen, pancreas, muscle and brain) other than the liver of the striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba). We applied a combination method of micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) imaging and micro-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD) using a synchrotron radiation X-ray microbeam to analyze the tissue samples directly with minimal sample preparation. By this method, many accumulation points for Hg and Se on a micron scale were found in thin sections of the spleen and liver tissue and consequently, the XRF spectra and the XRD pattern of the hot spots confirmed the presence of tiemannite, HgSe. On the other hand, the insoluble fractions after enzyme digestion of the nuclear and mitochondrial fractions of all tissues were subjected to X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis. XAFS analysis confirmed the presence of HgSe in all the tissues examined (liver, kidney, lung, spleen, pancreas, muscle and brain) of the striped dolphin. The presence of HgSe in all the tissues examined suggests that Se would be involved in the detoxification process of Hg in various tissues other than the liver. This contribution seems to be large especially in the liver and spleen but relatively small in the kidney, pancreas and brain, because the proportion of insoluble fraction containing HgSe was lower in these tissues (25 to 46%). This is the first report on the presence of tiemannite HgSe in various tissues of marine mammals. PMID:21468440

  9. Microbial toxicity of ionic species leached from the II-VI semiconductor materials, cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium selenide (CdSe).

    PubMed

    Ramos-Ruiz, Adriana; Zeng, Chao; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Teixeira, Luiz H; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-01

    This work investigated the microbial toxicity of soluble species that can potentially be leached from the II-VI semiconductor materials, cadmium telluride and cadmium selenide. The soluble ions tested included: cadmium, selenite, selenate, tellurite, and tellurate. Their toxicity towards the acetoclastic and hydrogen-consuming trophic groups in a methanogenic consortium as well as towards a bioluminescent marine bacterium, Aliivibrio fischeri (Microtox(®) test), was assessed. The acetoclastic methanogenic activity was the most affected as evidenced by the low 50% inhibiting concentrations (IC50) values obtained of 8.6 mg L(-1) for both cadmium and tellurite, 10.2 mg L(-1) for tellurate, and 24.1 mg L(-1) for selenite. Both tellurium oxyanions caused a strong inhibition of acetoclastic methanogenesis at low concentrations, each additional increment in concentration provided progressively less inhibition increase. In the case of the hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, cadmium followed by selenite caused the greatest inhibition with IC50 values of 2.9 and 18.0 mg L(-1), respectively. Tellurite caused a moderate effect as evidenced by a 36.8% inhibition of the methanogenic activity at the highest concentration tested, and a very mild effect of tellurate was observed. Microtox(®) analyses showed a noteworthy inhibition of cadmium, selenite, and tellurite with 50% loss in bioluminescence after 30 min of exposure of 5.5, 171.1, and 458.6 mg L(-1), respectively. These results suggest that the leaching of cadmium, tellurium and selenium ions from semiconductor materials can potentially cause microbial toxicity. PMID:27494313

  10. Effect of the Concentration on the X-ray Luminescence Efficiency of a Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide (CdSe/ZnS) Quantum Dot Nanoparticle Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valais, I.; Michail, C.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Fountzoula, C.; Bakas, A.; Yannakopoulos, P.; Fountos, G.; Panayiotakis, G.; Kandarakis, I.

    2015-09-01

    In the current study preliminary results on the luminescence efficiency (LE) of toluene dissolved Cadmium Selenide/Zinc Sulfide (CdSe/ZnS, Sigma-Aldrich, Lumidot 694622) quantum dot samples (QDs) after exposure to X-rays of variable radiation flux are shown. The distinctive influence of the weight over volume (w/v) concentration of the samples in LE was investigated. The light emission of the QDs was additionally measured after UV irradiation. The distribution of the emitted light was symmetrical with a maximum at 590 nm. The w/v concentration of the QDs varied between 7.1×10-5 mg/mL to 28.4×10-5 mg/mL. The samples were handled in a cubic 12.5×12.5×45mm3 quartz cuvette. Each sample was excited under X-ray irradiation, in the energy range from 50 to 130 kVp using a BMI General Medical Merate tube with rotating Tungsten anode and inherent filtration equivalent to 2 mm Al. The X-ray LE, induced by the 28.4×10-5 mg/mL QDs found higher, however, the distinction was vague in the highly concentrated samples. The maximum efficiency was obtained at the 90 kVp for QDs with 21.3×10-5 mg/mL w/v concentration. In the high energy range (120-130 kVp) all concentration levels exhibited comparable X-ray induced LE. The luminescence properties of the investigated QDs appear promising for X-ray detection applications.

  11. Electronic Characterization of Defects in Narrow Gap Semiconductors-Comparison of Electronic Energy Levels and Formation Energies in Mercury Cadmium Telluride, Mercury Zinc Telluride, and Mercury Zinc Selenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James D.

    1996-01-01

    We have used a Green's function technique to calculate the energy levels and formation energy of deep defects in the narrow gap semiconductors mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT) and mercury zinc selenide (MZS). The formation energy is calculated from the difference between the total energy with an impurity cluster and the total energy for the perfect crystal. Substitutional (including antisite), interstitial (self and foreign), and vacancy deep defects are considered. Relaxation effects are calculated (with molecular dynamics). By use of a pseudopotential, we generalize the ideal vacancy model so as to be able to consider relaxation for vacancies. Different charge states are considered and the charged state energy shift (as computed by a modified Haldane-Anderson model) can be twice that due to relaxation. Different charged states for vacancies were not calculated to have much effect on the formation energy. For all cases we find deep defects in the energy gap only for cation site s-like orbitals or anion site p-like orbitals, and for the substitutional case only the latter are appreciably effected by relaxation. For most cases for MCT, MZT, MZS, we consider x (the concentration of Cd or Zn) in the range appropriate for a band gap of 0.1 eV. For defect energy levels, the absolute accuracy of our results is limited, but the precision is good, and hence chemical trends are accurately predicted. For the same reason, defect formation energies are more accurately predicted than energy level position. We attempt, in Appendix B, to calculate vacancy formation energies using relatively simple chemical bonding ideas due to Harrison. However, these results are only marginally accurate for estimating vacancy binding energies. Appendix C lists all written reports and publications produced for the grant. We include abstracts and a complete paper that summarizes our work which is not yet available.

  12. Diorganotin(IV) 2-pyridyl selenolates: synthesis, structures and their utility as molecular precursors for the preparation of tin selenide nanocrystals and thin films.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakesh K; Kedarnath, G; Wadawale, Amey; Betty, C A; Vishwanadh, B; Jain, Vimal K

    2012-10-21

    Reactions of R(2)SnCl(2) (R = Me, Et, (t)Bu) with NaSeC(5)H(3)(R'-3)N (R' = H or Me) gave complexes of the composition [R(2)Sn{2-SeC(5)H(3)(R'-3)N)}(2)], which on treatment with R(2)SnCl(2) afforded chloro complexes, [R(2)Sn{2-SeC(5)H(3)(R'-3)N}Cl]. These complexes were characterized by elemental analyses and UV-vis and NMR ((1)H, (13)C, (77)Se and (119)Sn) spectroscopy. The crystal structures of [R(2)Sn(SeC(5)H(4)N)(2)] (R = Me or (t)Bu) and [Me(2)Sn{2-SeC(5)H(3)(Me-3)N}Cl] were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The tin atom in the former two structures acquires a skew trapezoidal configuration, whereas in the latter it adopts a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry. Thermolysis of [R(2)Sn(2-SeC(5)H(4)N)(2)] (R = Me, Et or (t)Bu) and [Et(2)Sn{2-SeC(5)H(3)(Me-3)N}(2)] in oleylamine (OA) afforded tin selenide nanostructures. Thin films of SnSe were deposited on glass and silicon substrates by the AACVD of [(t)Bu(2)Sn(2-SeC(5)H(4)N)(2)]. The nanostructures and thin films were characterized by XRD, EDX, AFM, SEM, TEM and SAED techniques. The photovoltaic properties of the thin films have been evaluated. PMID:22918450

  13. Ultrasensitive sensing platform for platelet-derived growth factor BB detection based on layered molybdenum selenide-graphene composites and Exonuclease III assisted signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke-Jing; Shuai, Hong-Lei; Zhang, Ji-Zong

    2016-03-15

    A highly sensitive and ultrasensitive electrochemical aptasensor for platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) detection is fabricated based on layered molybdenum selenide-graphene (MoSe2-Gr) composites and Exonuclease III (Exo III)-aided signal amplification. MoSe2-Gr is prepared by a simple hydrothermal method and used as a promising sensing platform. Exo III has a specifical exo-deoxyribonuclease activity for duplex DNAs in the direction from 3' to 5' terminus, however its activity is limited on the duplex DNAs with more than 4 mismatched terminal bases at 3' ends. Herein, aptamer and complementary DNA (cDNA) sequences are designed with four thymine bases on 3' ends. In the presence of target protein, the aptamer associates with it and facilitates the formation of duplex DNA between cDNA and signal DNA. The duplex DNA then is digested by Exo III and releases cDNA, which hybridizes with signal DNA to perform a new cleavage process. Nevertheless, in the absence of target protein, the aptamer hybridizes with cDNA will inhibit the Exo III-assisted nucleotides cleavage. The signal DNA then hybridizes with capture DNA on the electrode. Subsequently, horse radish peroxidase is fixed on electrode by avidin-biotin reaction and then catalyzes hydrogen peroxide and hydroquinone to produce electrochemical response. Therefore, a bridge can be established between the concentration of target protein and the degree of the attenuation of the obtained signal, providing a quantitative measure of target protein with a broad detection range of 0.0001-1 nM and a detection limit of 20 fM. PMID:26386905

  14. Microbial toxicity of ionic species leached from the II-VI semiconductor materials, cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium selenide (CdSe).

    PubMed

    Ramos-Ruiz, Adriana; Zeng, Chao; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Teixeira, Luiz H; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-01

    This work investigated the microbial toxicity of soluble species that can potentially be leached from the II-VI semiconductor materials, cadmium telluride and cadmium selenide. The soluble ions tested included: cadmium, selenite, selenate, tellurite, and tellurate. Their toxicity towards the acetoclastic and hydrogen-consuming trophic groups in a methanogenic consortium as well as towards a bioluminescent marine bacterium, Aliivibrio fischeri (Microtox(®) test), was assessed. The acetoclastic methanogenic activity was the most affected as evidenced by the low 50% inhibiting concentrations (IC50) values obtained of 8.6 mg L(-1) for both cadmium and tellurite, 10.2 mg L(-1) for tellurate, and 24.1 mg L(-1) for selenite. Both tellurium oxyanions caused a strong inhibition of acetoclastic methanogenesis at low concentrations, each additional increment in concentration provided progressively less inhibition increase. In the case of the hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, cadmium followed by selenite caused the greatest inhibition with IC50 values of 2.9 and 18.0 mg L(-1), respectively. Tellurite caused a moderate effect as evidenced by a 36.8% inhibition of the methanogenic activity at the highest concentration tested, and a very mild effect of tellurate was observed. Microtox(®) analyses showed a noteworthy inhibition of cadmium, selenite, and tellurite with 50% loss in bioluminescence after 30 min of exposure of 5.5, 171.1, and 458.6 mg L(-1), respectively. These results suggest that the leaching of cadmium, tellurium and selenium ions from semiconductor materials can potentially cause microbial toxicity.

  15. Iron metabolism in aerobes: managing ferric iron hydrolysis and ferrous iron autoxidation.

    PubMed

    Kosman, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Aerobes and anaerobes alike express a plethora of essential iron enzymes; in the resting state, the iron atom(s) in these proteins are in the ferrous state. For aerobes, ferric iron is the predominant environmental valence form which, given ferric iron's aqueous chemistry, occurs as 'rust', insoluble, bio-inert polymeric ferric oxide that results from the hydrolysis of [Fe(H(2)O)(6)](3+). Mobilizing this iron requires bio-ferrireduction which in turn requires managing the rapid autoxidation of the resulting Fe(II) which occurs at pH > 6. This review examines the aqueous redox chemistry of iron and the mechanisms evolved in aerobes to suppress the 'rusting out' of Fe(III) and the ROS-generating autoxidation of Fe(II) so as to make this metal ion available as the most ubiquitous prosthetic group in metallobiology. PMID:23264695

  16. Iron oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  17. Effects of iron deficiency on iron binding and internalization into acidic vacuoles in Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Paz, Yakov; Shimoni, Eyal; Weiss, Meira; Pick, Uri

    2007-07-01

    Uptake of iron in the halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina is mediated by a transferrin-like protein (TTf), which binds and internalizes Fe(3+) ions. Recently, we found that iron deficiency induces a large enhancement of iron binding, which is associated with accumulation of three other plasma membrane proteins that associate with TTf. In this study, we characterized the kinetic properties of iron binding and internalization and identified the site of iron internalization. Iron deficiency induces a 4-fold increase in Fe binding, but only 50% enhancement in the rate of iron uptake and also increases the affinity for iron and bicarbonate, a coligand for iron binding. These results indicate that iron deprivation leads to accumulation and modification of iron-binding sites. Iron uptake in iron-sufficient cells is preceded by an apparent time lag, resulting from prebound iron, which can be eliminated by unloading iron-binding sites. Iron is tightly bound to surface-exposed sites and hardly exchanges with medium iron. All bound iron is subsequently internalized. Accumulation of iron inhibits further iron binding and internalization. The vacuolar inhibitor bafilomycin inhibits iron uptake and internalization. Internalized iron was localized by electron microscopy within vacuolar structures that were identified as acidic vacuoles. Iron internalization is accompanied by endocytosis of surface proteins into these acidic vacuoles. A novel kinetic mechanism for iron uptake is proposed, which includes two pools of bound/compartmentalized iron separated by a rate-limiting internalization stage. The major parameter that is modulated by iron deficiency is the iron-binding capacity. We propose that excessive iron binding in iron-deficient cells serves as a temporary reservoir for iron that is subsequently internalized. This mechanism is particularly suitable for organisms that are exposed to large fluctuations in iron availability. PMID:17513481

  18. IRON RELEASE AND COLORED WATER FORMATION FROM IRON SCALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron corrosion in water distribution networks is of special concern in the drinking water industry because of the large amount of unlined iron pipe that is in use. Corrosion can destroy the pipe, consume oxidants and disinfectants in the water, create scales that increase the en...

  19. Iron and iron-related proteins in asbestosis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: We tested the postulate that iron homeostasis is altered among patients diagnosed to have asbestosis. Lung tissue from six individuals diagnosed to have had asbestosis at autopsy was stained for iron, ferritin, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), and ferroportin 1 (FP...

  20. MALLEABLE IRON BULL LADLE, HOLDS IRON AFTER IT IS TAPPED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MALLEABLE IRON BULL LADLE, HOLDS IRON AFTER IT IS TAPPED OUT OF THE CUPOLA UNTIL IT NEEDED BY POURERS ON THE CONVEYOR LINES WHO FILL MOBILE LADLES ATTACHED TO OVERHEAD RAIL SYSTEMS AS THE BULL LADLE TIPS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  1. Can Iron Lift Your Learning Ability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schibeci, Renato

    1997-01-01

    Presents samples of publicly available materials related to the role of iron in the diet. Summarizes what nutritionists feel about iron in the human diet and suggests some experiments related to iron for the classroom. (AIM)

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  3. The Iron Metallome in Eukaryotic Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Dlouhy, Adrienne C.; Outten, Caryn E.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is focused on the iron metallome in eukaryotes at the cellular and subcellular level, including properties, utilization in metalloproteins, trafficking, storage, and regulation of these processes. Studies in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells will be highlighted. The discussion of iron properties will center on the speciation and localization of intracellular iron as well as the cellular and molecular mechanisms for coping with both low iron bioavailability and iron toxicity. The section on iron metalloproteins will emphasize heme, iron-sulfur cluster, and non-heme iron centers, particularly their cellular roles and mechanisms of assembly. The section on iron uptake, trafficking, and storage will compare methods used by yeast and mammalian cells to import iron, how this iron is brought into various organelles, and types of iron storage proteins. Regulation of these processes will be compared between yeast and mammalian cells at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational levels. PMID:23595675

  4. Iron Meteorites and Upwelling in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourlay, B. S.; Behr, E.; Mardon, A.; Behr, E.

    2016-09-01

    In Antarctica, a meteorite stranding zone, stone meteorites are more common than iron. Dr. Evatt's team suggests that the heat conductivity of iron may be opposing the upwelling effects so iron meteorites sink under the ice unlike the stone ones.

  5. Advanced zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron particles for acidic magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited ZnS and other IR materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzman, S.; Giannechini, L. J.; Romanofsky, H. J.; Golini, N.; Taylor, B.; Jacobs, S. D.; Lambropoulos, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    We present a modified version of zirconia-coated carbonyl-iron (CI) particles that were invented at the University of Rochester in 2008. The amount of zirconia on the coating is increased to further protect the iron particles from corrosion when introduced to an acidic environment. Five low-pH, magnetorheological (MR) fluids were made with five acids: acetic, hydrochloric, nitric, phosphoric, and hydrofluoric. All fluids were based on the modified zirconia-coated CI particles. Off-line viscosity and pH stability were measured for all acidic MR fluids to determine the ideal fluid composition for acidic MR finishing of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) zinc sulfide (ZnS) and other infrared (IR) optical materials, such as hot-isostatic-pressed (HIP) ZnS, CVD zinc selenide (ZnSe), and magnesium fluoride (MgF2). Results show significant reduction in surface artifacts (millimeter-size, pebble-like structures on the finished surface) for several standard-grade CVD ZnS substrates and good surface roughness for the non-CVD MgF2 substrate when MR finished with our advanced acidic MR fluid.

  6. Iron oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  7. The case for iron

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.H.; Gordon, R.M.; Fitzwater, S.E. )

    1991-12-01

    Excess major nutrients occur in offshore areas ranging from the tropical equatorial Pacific to the polar Antarctic. In spite of the great ecological differences in these environments, the authors believe they share a common trait: iron deficiency. Here they present the case of iron; they point out that all of these areas are far from Fe-rich terrestrial sources and that atmospheric dust loads in these regions are among the lowest in the world. The authors summarize experiments performed in three nutrient-rich areas: The Gulf of Alaska, the Ross Sea, and the equatorial Pacific. In general, populations without added Fe doubled at rates 11-40% of the expected maxima at various temperatures. The additions of nanomole quantities of Fe increased these doubling rates by factors of 2-3. In spite of the lack of Fe, tightly coupled phytoplankton/zooplankton communities seem to inhabit these major nutrient-rich areas. Since Fe is required for the synthesis of chlorophyll and nitrate reductase, little chlorophyll is found and NH{sub 3} is the favored N source. Normal rate values of specific productivity indicate that these populations are healthy, but limited by the insufficient Fe supply. When Fe becomes available either artificially in bottle experiments or in the environment as Fe-rich land masses are approached, diatoms quickly bloom, chlorophyll levels increase, and nutrient stocks are rapidly depleted. These combined results indicate that Fe availability is the primary factor controlling phytoplankton production in nutrient-rich areas of the open sea.

  8. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron...

  9. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron...

  10. Iron biofortification of maize grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mineral nutrient deficiencies are a worldwide problem that is directly correlated with poverty and food insecurity. The most common of these is iron deficiency; more than one-third of the world’s population suffers from iron deficiency-induced anemia, 80% of which are in developing countries. The de...

  11. Iron biofortification of maize grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mineral nutrient deficiencies are a worldwide problem that is directly correlated with poverty and food insecurity. The most common of these is iron deficiency; more than one-third of the world’s population suffers from iron deficiency-induced anemia, 80% of which are in developing countries. The co...

  12. IRON HOMEOSTATIS IN THE LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron is essential for many aspects of cellular function. However, it can also generate oxygen-based free radicals that result in injury to biological molecules. For this reason, iron acquisition and distribution are tightly regulated. Constant exposure to the atmosphere result...

  13. Iron deficiency in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Fleming, A F

    1982-06-01

    Iron in food is classified as belonging to the haem pool, the nonhaem pool, and extraneous sources. Haem iron is derived from vegetable and animal sources with varying bioavailability. Hookworm infestation of the intestinal tract affects 450 million people in the tropics. Schistosoma mansoni caused blood loss in 7 Egyptian patients of 7.5- 25.9 ml/day which is equivalent to a daily loss of iron of .6-7.3 mg daily urinary loss of iron in 9 Egyptian patients. Trichuris trichiura infestation by whipworm is widespread in children with blood loss of 5 ml/day/worm. The etiology of anemia in children besides iron deficiency includes malaria, bacterial or viral infections, folate deficiency and sickle-cell disease. Severe infections cause profound iron-deficiency anemia in children in central American and Malaysia. Plasmodium falciparum malaria-induced anaemia in tropical Africa lowers the mean haemoglobin concentration in the population by 2 g/dI, causing profound anaemia in some. The increased risk of premature delivery, low birthweight, fetal abnormalities, and fetal death is directly related to the degree of maternal anemia. Perinatal mortality was reduced from 38 to 4% in treated anemic mothers. Mental performance was significantly lower in anemic school children and improved after they received iron. Supplements of iron, soy-protein, calcium, and vitamins given to villagers with widespread malnutrition, iron deficiency, and hookworm infestation in Colombia reduced enteric infections in children. Severe iron-deficiency anemia was treated in adults in northern Nigeria by daily in Ferastral 10 ml, which is equivalent to 500 mg of iron per day. Choloroquine, folic acid, rephenium hydroxynaphthoate, and tetrachlorethylene treat adults with severe iron deficiency from hookworm infestation in rural tropical Africa. Blood transfusion is indicated if the patient is dying of anaemia or is pregnant with a haemoglobin concentration 6 gm/dl. In South East Asia, mg per day

  14. Iron deficiency in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Fleming, A F

    1982-06-01

    Iron in food is classified as belonging to the haem pool, the nonhaem pool, and extraneous sources. Haem iron is derived from vegetable and animal sources with varying bioavailability. Hookworm infestation of the intestinal tract affects 450 million people in the tropics. Schistosoma mansoni caused blood loss in 7 Egyptian patients of 7.5- 25.9 ml/day which is equivalent to a daily loss of iron of .6-7.3 mg daily urinary loss of iron in 9 Egyptian patients. Trichuris trichiura infestation by whipworm is widespread in children with blood loss of 5 ml/day/worm. The etiology of anemia in children besides iron deficiency includes malaria, bacterial or viral infections, folate deficiency and sickle-cell disease. Severe infections cause profound iron-deficiency anemia in children in central American and Malaysia. Plasmodium falciparum malaria-induced anaemia in tropical Africa lowers the mean haemoglobin concentration in the population by 2 g/dI, causing profound anaemia in some. The increased risk of premature delivery, low birthweight, fetal abnormalities, and fetal death is directly related to the degree of maternal anemia. Perinatal mortality was reduced from 38 to 4% in treated anemic mothers. Mental performance was significantly lower in anemic school children and improved after they received iron. Supplements of iron, soy-protein, calcium, and vitamins given to villagers with widespread malnutrition, iron deficiency, and hookworm infestation in Colombia reduced enteric infections in children. Severe iron-deficiency anemia was treated in adults in northern Nigeria by daily in Ferastral 10 ml, which is equivalent to 500 mg of iron per day. Choloroquine, folic acid, rephenium hydroxynaphthoate, and tetrachlorethylene treat adults with severe iron deficiency from hookworm infestation in rural tropical Africa. Blood transfusion is indicated if the patient is dying of anaemia or is pregnant with a haemoglobin concentration 6 gm/dl. In South East Asia, mg per day

  15. The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Iron Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Geisser, Peter; Burckhardt, Susanna

    2011-01-01

    Standard approaches are not appropriate when assessing pharmacokinetics of iron supplements due to the ubiquity of endogenous iron, its compartmentalized sites of action, and the complexity of the iron metabolism. The primary site of action of iron is the erythrocyte, and, in contrast to conventional drugs, no drug-receptor interaction takes place. Notably, the process of erythropoiesis, i.e., formation of new erythrocytes, takes 3–4 weeks. Accordingly, serum iron concentration and area under the curve (AUC) are clinically irrelevant for assessing iron utilization. Iron can be administered intravenously in the form of polynuclear iron(III)-hydroxide complexes with carbohydrate ligands or orally as iron(II) (ferrous) salts or iron(III) (ferric) complexes. Several approaches have been employed to study the pharmacodynamics of iron after oral administration. Quantification of iron uptake from radiolabeled preparations by the whole body or the erythrocytes is optimal, but alternatively total iron transfer can be calculated based on known elimination rates and the intrinsic reactivity of individual preparations. Degradation kinetics, and thus the safety, of parenteral iron preparations are directly related to the molecular weight and the stability of the complex. High oral iron doses or rapid release of iron from intravenous iron preparations can saturate the iron transport system, resulting in oxidative stress with adverse clinical and subclinical consequences. Appropriate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics analyses will greatly assist our understanding of the likely contribution of novel preparations to the management of anemia. PMID:24310424

  16. Aluminium toxicity and iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ward, R J; Zhang, Y; Crichton, R R

    2001-11-01

    In an animal model of aluminum overload, (aluminium gluconate), the increases in tissue aluminium content were paralleled by elevations of tissue iron in the kidney, liver heart and spleen as well as in various brain regions, frontal, temporal and parietal cortex and hippocampus. Despite such increases in iron content there were no significant changes in the activities of a wide range of cytoprotective enzymes apart from an increase in superoxide dismutase in the frontal cortex of the aluminium loaded rats. Such increases in tissue iron content may be attributed to the stabilisation of IRP-2 by aluminium thereby promoting transferrin receptor synthesis while blocking ferritin synthesis. Using the radioactive tracer (26)Al less than 1% of the injected dose was recovered in isolated ferritin, supporting previous studies which also found little evidence for aluminium storage within ferritin. The increases in brain iron may well be contributory to neurodegeneration, although the pathogenesis by which iron exerts such an effect is unclear.

  17. Ferric iron reduction and iron assimilation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Anderson, G J; Lesuisse, E; Dancis, A; Roman, D G; Labbe, P; Klausner, R D

    We have used the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism to study the role of ferric iron reduction in eucaryotic iron uptake. S. cerevisiae is able to utilize ferric chelates as an iron source by reducing the ferric iron to the ferrous form, which is subsequently internalized by the cells. A gene (FRE1) was identified which encodes a protein required for both ferric iron reduction and efficient ferric iron assimilation, thus linking these two activities. The predicted FRE1 protein appears to be a membrane protein and shows homology to the beta-subunit of the human respiratory burst oxidase. These data suggest that FRE1 is a structural component of the ferric reductase. Subcellular fractionation studies showed that the ferric reductase activity of isolated plasma membranes did not reflect the activity of the intact cells, implying that cellular integrity was necessary for function of the major S. cerevisiae ferric reductase. An NADPH-dependent plasma membrane ferric reductase was partially purified from plasma membranes. Preliminary evidence suggests that the cell surface ferric reductase may, in addition to mediating cellular iron uptake, help modulate the intracellular redox potential of the yeast cell.

  18. Microbial acquisition of iron from ferric iron bearing minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Hersman, L.E.; Sposito, G.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Iron is a universal requirement for all life forms. Although the fourth most abundant element in the geosphere, iron is virtually insoluble at physiological pH in oxidizing environments, existing mainly as very insoluble oxides and hydroxides. Currently it is not understood how iron is solubilized and made available for biological use. This research project addressed this topic by conducting a series of experiments that utilized techniques from both soil microbiology and mineral surface geochemistry. Microbiological analysis consisted of the examination of metabolic and physiological responses to mineral iron supplements. At the same time mineral surfaces were examined for structural changes brought about by microbially mediated dissolution. The results of these experiments demonstrated that (1) bacterial siderophores were able to promote the dissolution of iron oxides, (2) that strict aerobic microorganisms may use anaerobic processes to promote iron oxide dissolution, and (3) that it is possible to image the surface of iron oxides undergoing microbial dissolution.

  19. Iron endowment at birth: maternal iron status and other influences.

    PubMed

    Viteri, Fernando E

    2011-11-01

    The iron endowment at birth depends, in large part, on the newborn's birth weight and gestational age. These are determined by many factors, some of which are maternal characteristics, including the following: maternal iron stores at her own birth and during her own early life, maternal growth and development, maternal age at conception, intergenesic intervals, maternal body characteristics and iron status at conception and during early pregnancy, gestational body weight gain, and iron status throughout gestation, particularly at conception and early pregnancy, and gestational body weight gain. Although less studied, paternal influences on the initiation and progression of pregnancy and on maternal environmental exposures are also important. Even though tools for the quantitative evaluation of women's iron status are very well developed, the quantitative estimation of body iron in the newborn and young infant remains a challenge. This article describes the crucial role played by the placenta in protecting the embryo and the fetus. In addition, neonatal health, particularly early in pregnancy, is briefly addressed, as are some important aspects of antenatal nutritional interventions that include iron.

  20. Iron biomineralization by anaerobic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Benzerara, Karim; Morin, Guillaume; Kappler, Andreas; Bernard, Sylvain; Obst, Martin; Férard, Céline; Skouri-Panet, Fériel; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Posth, Nicole; Galvez, Matthieu; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; Guyot, François

    2009-02-01

    Minerals formed by bio-oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) at neutral pH, their association with bacterial ultrastructures as well as their impact on the metabolism of iron-oxidizing bacteria remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated iron biomineralization by the anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 in the presence of dissolved Fe(II) using electron microscopy and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM). All detected minerals consisted mainly of amorphous iron phosphates, but based on their morphology and localization, three types of precipitates could be discriminated: (1) mineralized filaments at distance from the cells, (2) globules of 100 ± 25 nm in diameter, at the cell surface and (3) a 40-nm thick mineralized layer within the periplasm. All of those phases were shown to be intimately associated with organic molecules. Periplasmic encrustation was accompanied by an accumulation of protein moieties. In the same way, exopolysaccharides were associated with the extracellular mineralized filaments. The evolution of cell encrustation was followed by TEM over the time course of a culture: cell encrustation proceeded progressively, with rapid precipitation in the periplasm (in a few tens of minutes), followed by the formation of surface-bound globules. Moreover, we frequently observed an asymmetric mineral thickening at the cell poles. In parallel, the evolution of iron oxidation was quantified by STXM: iron both contained in the bacteria and in the extracellular precipitates reached complete oxidation within 6 days. While a progressive oxidation of Fe in the bacteria and in the medium could be observed, spatial redox (oxido-reduction state) heterogeneities were detected at the cell poles and in the extracellular precipitates after 1 day. All these findings provide new information to further the understanding of molecular processes involved in iron biomineralization by anaerobic iron-oxidizing bacteria and

  1. Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFex)

    SciTech Connect

    Coale, Kenneth H.

    2005-07-28

    The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) was an experiment decades in the planning. It's implementation was among the most complex ship operations that SIO has been involved in. The SOFeX field expedition was successful in creating and tracking two experimentally enriched areas of the Southern Ocean, one characterized by low silicic acid, one characterized by high silicic acid. Both experimental sites were replete with abundant nitrate. About 100 scientists were involved overall. The major findings of this study were significant in several ways: (1) The productivity of the southern ocean is limited by iron availability. (2) Carbon uptake and flux is therefore controlled by iron availability (3) In spite of low silicic acid, iron promotes non-silicious phytoplankton growth and the uptake of carbon dioxide. (4) The transport of fixed carbon from the surface layers proceeds with a C:N ratio that would indicate differential remineralization of nitrogen at shallow depths. (5) These finding have major implications for modeling of carbon export based on nitrate utilization. (6) The general results of the experiment indicate that, beyond other southern ocean enrichment experiments, iron inputs have a much wider impact of productivity and carbon cycling than previously demonstrated. Scientific presentations: Coale, K., Johnson, K, Buesseler, K., 2002. The SOFeX Group. Eos. Trans. AGU 83(47) OS11A-0199. Coale, K., Johnson, K. Buesseler, K., 2002. SOFeX: Southern Ocean Iron Experiments. Overview and Experimental Design. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47) OS22D-01. Buesseler, K.,et al. 2002. Does Iron Fertilization Enhance Carbon Sequestration? Particle flux results from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-09. Johnson, K. et al. 2002. Open Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiments From IronEx-I through SOFeX: What We Know and What We Still Need to Understand. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-12. Coale, K. H., 2003. Carbon and Nutrient Cycling During the Southern

  2. Iron Mountain Electromagnetic Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gail Heath

    2012-07-01

    Iron Mountain Mine is located seventeen miles northwest of Redding, CA. After the completion of mining in early 1960s, the mine workings have been exposed to environmental elements which have resulted in degradation in water quality in the surrounding water sheds. In 1985, the EPA plugged ore stoops in many of the accessible mine drifts in an attempt to restrict water flow through the mine workings. During this process little data was gathered on the orientation of the stoops and construction of the plugs. During the last 25 years, plugs have begun to deteriorate and allow acidic waters from the upper workings to flow out of the mine. A team from Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed geophysical surveys on a single mine drift and 3 concrete plugs. The project goal was to evaluate several geophysical methods to determine competence of the concrete plugs and orientation of the stopes.

  3. Iron bromide vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanov, V. B.; Shiyanov, D. V.; Trigub, M. V.; Dimaki, V. A.; Evtushenko, G. S.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the characteristics of a pulsed gas-discharge laser on iron bromide vapor generating radiation with a wavelength of 452.9 nm at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 5-30 kHz. The maximum output power amounted to 10 mW at a PRF within 5-15 kHz for a voltage of 20-25 kV applied to electrodes of the discharge tube. Addition of HBr to the medium produced leveling of the radial profile of emission. Initial weak lasing at a wavelength of 868.9 nm was observed for the first time, which ceased with buildup of the main 452.9-nm line.

  4. Antimony in iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, J.

    1981-01-01

    Sb concentrations determined by radiochemical neutron activation analysis in 60 iron meteorites range from 0.2 ng/g to 36 microg/g. The meteorites with the highest Sb concentrations are those of the nonmagmatic groups IAB and IIICD, while meteorites with the lowest Sb concentrations are found in groups IVA and IVB. In all groups Sb is positively correlated with Ni; slopes on log Sb vs log Ni plots decrease with increasing Ni. This decrease may reflect an increasing tendency to avoid schreibersite during the analysis of high-Ni meteorites because Sb partitions strongly into schreibersite. It is found that schreibersite from New Westville is enriched in Cr, Ni, Ge, As, Sb, and Au and depleted in Fe, Co, Ir; the Sb content in schreibersite is 540 times higher than the bulk metal value.

  5. High temperature oxidation of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires composed of iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, M; Brzozka, K; Lin, W S; Lin, H M; Tokarczyk, M; Borysiuk, J; Kowalski, G; Wasik, D

    2016-02-01

    This work describes an oxidation process of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires at temperatures between 100 °C and 800 °C. The studied nanomaterial was synthesized through a simple chemical reduction of iron trichloride in an external magnetic field under a constant flow of argon. The electron microscopy investigations allowed determining that the as-prepared nanowires were composed of self-assembled iron nanoparticles which were covered by a 3 nm thick oxide shell and separated from each other by a thin interface layer. Both these layers exhibited an amorphous or highly-disordered character which was traced by means of transmission electron microscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The thermal oxidation was carried out under a constant flow of argon which contained the traces of oxygen. The first stage of process was related to slow transformations of amorphous Fe and amorphous iron oxides into crystalline phases and disappearance of interfaces between iron nanoparticles forming the studied nanomaterial (range: 25-300 °C). After that, the crystalline iron core and iron oxide shell became oxidized and signals for different compositions of iron oxide sheath were observed (range: 300-800 °C) using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. According to the thermal gravimetric analysis, the nanowires heated up to 800 °C under argon atmosphere gained 37% of mass with respect to their initial weight. The structure of the studied nanomaterial oxidized at 800 °C was mainly composed of α-Fe2O3 (∼ 93%). Moreover, iron nanowires treated above 600 °C lost their wire-like shape due to their shrinkage and collapse caused by the void coalescence. PMID:26766540

  6. Passivating metals on cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mckay, D.L.

    1980-01-15

    Metals such as nickel, vanadium and iron contaminating a cracking catalyst are passivated by contacting the cracking catalyst under elevated temperature conditions with antimony selenide, antimony sulfide, antimony sulfate, bismuth selenide, bismuth sulfide, or bismuth phosphate.

  7. Orally active iron chelators in the treatment of iron overload.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, N F

    1996-03-01

    Data from several trials have provided evidence for the efficacy of deferiprone in the treatment of iron overload in thalassemia major. Deferiprone has now been shown to induce sustained decreases in tissue iron to concentrations that are associated with survival free of the complications of iron overload in deferoxamine-treated patients. Despite this evidence of efficacy, the risk of agranulocytosis mandates a careful evaluation of the risk of this drug in patients willing and able to use deferoxamine. The incidence of agranulocytosis associated with deferiprone is under study in a prospective multicenter trial in Canada, Italy, and the United States, under corporate sponsorship by Apotex Research in Canada. The results of this study should determine the risk associated with the use of this agent and may provide the data required for a US Food and Drug Administration decision regarding licensing of this agent for the treatment of iron overload, a goal supported by investigators worldwide.

  8. Recovery of scrap iron metal value using biogenerated ferric iron.

    PubMed

    Ballor, Nicholas R; Nesbitt, Carl C; Lueking, Donald R

    2006-04-20

    The utility of employing biogenerated ferric iron as an oxidant for the recycling of scrap metal has been demonstrated using continuously growing cells of the extremophilic organism Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. A ferric iron rich (70 mol%) lixiviant resulting from bioreactor based growth of A. ferrooxidans readily solubilized target scrap metal with the resultant generation of a leachate containing elevated ferrous iron levels and solubilized copper previously resident in the scrap metal. Recovery of the copper value was easily accomplished via a cementation reaction and the clarified leachate containing a replenished level of ferrous iron as growth substrate was shown to support the growth of A. ferrooxidans and be fully recyclable. The described process for scrap metal recycling and copper recovery was shown to be efficient and economically attractive. Additionally, the utility of employing the E(h) of the growth medium as a means for monitoring fluctuations in cell density in cultures of A. ferrooxidans is demonstrated.

  9. Iron Metabolism in Hodgkin's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beamish, M. R.; Jones, P. Ashley; Trevett, D.; Evans, I. Howell; Jacobs, A.

    1972-01-01

    An evaluation of iron metabolism has been carried out in 23 untreated patients with Hodgkin's disease and 6 patients with other lymphomata. The reduction in red cell life span is related to the stage of the disease. There is an almost universal impairment of iron release from the reticuloendothelial system with a consequent sideropenia and failure of iron delivery to the bone marrow for erythropoiesis. This defect is found in all stages of the disease and is not related to systemic symptoms. PMID:4567182

  10. [Phosphate metabolism and iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Keitaro

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets(ADHR)is caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGF23 that prevent its proteolytic cleavage. Fibroblast growth factor 23(FGF23)is a hormone that inhibits renal phosphate reabsorption and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D biosynthesis. Low iron status plays a role in the pathophysiology of ADHR. Iron deficiency is an environmental trigger that stimulates FGF23 expression and hypophosphatemia in ADHR. It was reported that FGF23 elevation in patients with CKD, who are often iron deficient. In patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, treatment with ferric citrate hydrate resulted in significant reductions in serum phosphate and FGF23.

  11. Austempered ductile iron process development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, C. D.; Keough, J. R.; Pramstaller, D. M.

    1986-11-01

    Pressure from imports and material substitution has severly affected demand for domestic iron industry products. It is estimated that the potential market for Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) is as large as the market for carburized and/or through hardened forgings. The primary interest in ADI is generated by the economics of process. Improved machinability and reduced processing costs as well as interesting physical properties has created an enormous interest in all metalworking industries towards ADI. The development of gas-fired austempering processes and resoluton of technical and economic uncertainities concerning the process will help improve the outlook for iron founderies.

  12. Iron incorporation and post-malaria anaemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron supplementation is employed to treat post-malarial anaemia in environments where iron deficiency is common. Malaria induces an intense inflammatory reaction that stalls reticulo-endothelial macrophagal iron recycling from haemolysed red blood cells and inhibits oral iron absorption, but the mag...

  13. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including...

  14. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including...

  15. Iron trafficking as an antimicrobial target

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, Rosanne E.; Mayfield, Jeffery A.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is essential for the survival of most organisms. Microbial iron acquisition depends on multiple, sometimes complex steps, many of which are not shared by higher eukaryotes. Depriving pathogenic microbes of iron is therefore a potential antimicrobial strategy. The following minireview briefly describes general elements in microbial iron uptake pathways and summarizes some of the current work aiming at their medicinal inhibition. PMID:19350396

  16. Hydrolysis of soybean protein improves iron bioavailability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron is an important trace metal element in human body. Iron deficiency affects human health, especially pregnant women and children. Soybean protein is a popular food in Asia and can contain a high amount of iron (145.70±0.74 ug/g); however, it is usually reported as an inhibitor of iron absorption...

  17. Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process

    DOEpatents

    Sarma, Balu; Downing, Kenneth B.

    1999-01-01

    A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (i) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (ii) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (iii) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: e) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550.degree. C. and f) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 tonne per square meter.

  18. Correlation, magnetization and conduction in iron pnictides and iron chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhiping; Haule, Kristjan; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2011-03-01

    By combining density functional theory (DFT) and dynamical mean field theory (DMFT), we study the electronic properties of iron pnictides and iron chalcogenides in both the paramagnetic and magnetic states. With ab initio derived realistic Coulomb interaction U and Hund's exchange coupling J, we find detailed agreements bewtween our calculations and many experimental observations in these compounds, including ARPES, magnetic properties, optical conductivity and anisotropy, and so on, WITHOUT any adjustment such as shifting of atomic positions, Fermi level and bands and renormalizations of bands which are commonly needed in DFT calculations in order to compare with experiments. Our theory explains the origin of the different magnetizations in FeTe and other iron pnictides and provides a unique physical picture. We find that in the magnetic phase of the iron pnictides, both the spin and the orbital polarization are strongly energy dependent. The spin polarization becomes weaker around Fermi level when the orbital polarization is stronger and vice verse at high energies. We stress on the role of the Hund's J rather than the Coulomb U and show how the iron pnictides and iron chalcogenides differ from other compounds.

  19. Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, B.; Downing, K.B.

    1999-03-23

    A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: (a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; (b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (1) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (2) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (3) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; (c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and (d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: (1) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550 C and (2) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 ton per square meter. 13 figs.

  20. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. (a) Each service line connected to a cast iron or ductile iron main must be...

  1. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. (a) Each service line connected to a cast iron or ductile iron main must be...

  2. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement: WARNING... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for Specific New Drugs or Devices §...

  3. IRON-TOLERANT CYANOBACTERIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR ASTROBIOLOGY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Igor I.; Allen, Carlton C.; Mummey, Daniel L.; Sarkisova, Svetlana A.; McKay, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The review is dedicated to the new group of extremophiles - iron tolerant cyanobacteria. The authors have analyzed earlier published articles about the ecology of iron tolerant cyanobacteria and their diversity. It was concluded that contemporary iron depositing hot springs might be considered as relative analogs of Precambrian environment. The authors have concluded that the diversity of iron-tolerant cyanobacteria is understudied. The authors also analyzed published data about the physiological peculiarities of iron tolerant cyanobacteria. They made the conclusion that iron tolerant cyanobacteria may oxidize reduced iron through the photosystem of cyanobacteria. The involvement of both Reaction Centers 1 and 2 is also discussed. The conclusion that iron tolerant protocyanobacteria could be involved in banded iron formations generation is also proposed. The possible mechanism of the transition from an oxygenic photosynthesis to an oxygenic one is also discussed. In the final part of the review the authors consider the possible implications of iron tolerant cyanobacteria for astrobiology.

  4. Iron overload in cultured rat myocardial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauminger, E. R.; Iancu, T. C.; Link, G.; Pinson, A.; Hershko, C.

    1987-03-01

    In order to characterize the nature of iron deposits associated with iron overload in heart cells, Mössbauer spectroscopy and ultrastructural studies were performed in iron loaded heart cell cultures obtained from newborn rats grown in a medium containing 20 μg iron/ml. Maximal uptake of iron after 24 hrs was about 15%. Not more than 20% of the iron in these cells was stored in ferritin and the rest was found in smaller trivalent iron aggregates. With time there was a shift from smaller to larger aggregates. In chase samples there was only a very limited spontaneous release of iron from heart cells. Desferrioxamine, an iron chelating drug, removed a major part of the smaller aggregates, but did not remove ferritin iron.

  5. Emergent nesting of the Fermi surface from local-moment description of iron-pnictide high-Tc superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jose P.; Araujo, Miguel A. N.; Sacramento, Pedro D.

    2014-07-01

    We uncover the low-energy spectrum of a t-J model for electrons on a square lattice of spin-1 iron atoms with 3dxz and 3dyz orbital character by applying Schwinger-boson-slave-fermion mean-field theory and by exact diagonalization of one hole roaming over a 4 × 4 × 2 lattice. Hopping matrix elements are set to produce hole bands centered at zero two-dimensional (2D) momentum in the free-electron limit. Holes can propagate coherently in the t-J model below a threshold Hund coupling when long-range antiferromagnetic order across the d + = 3d(x + iy)z and d - = 3d(x - iy)z orbitals is established by magnetic frustration that is off-diagonal in the orbital indices. This leads to two hole-pocket Fermi surfaces centered at zero 2D momentum. Proximity to a commensurate spin-density wave (cSDW) that exists above the threshold Hund coupling results in emergent Fermi surface pockets about cSDW momenta at a quantum critical point (QCP). This motivates the introduction of a new Gutzwiller wavefunction for a cSDW metal state. Study of the spin-fluctuation spectrum at cSDW momenta indicates that the dispersion of the nested band of one-particle states that emerges is electron-type. Increasing Hund coupling past the QCP can push the hole-pocket Fermi surfaces centered at zero 2D momentum below the Fermi energy level, in agreement with recent determinations of the electronic structure of mono-layer iron-selenide superconductors.

  6. Iron for restless legs syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Trotti, Lynn M; Bhadriraju, Srinivas; Becker, Lorne A

    2014-01-01

    Background Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurologic syndrome and is associated with iron deficiency in many patients. It is unclear whether iron therapy is effective treatment for RLS. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effects of iron supplementation (oral or intravenous) for patients with RLS. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (Jan 1995 to April 2011); EMBASE (Jan 1995 to April 2011); PsycINFO (Jan 1995 to April 2011); and CINAHL (Jan 1995 to April 2011). Corresponding authors of included trials and additional members of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group were contacted to locate additional published or unpublished trials. Selection criteria Controlled trials comparing any formulation of iron with placebo, other medications, or no treatment in adults diagnosed with RLS according to expert clinical interview or explicit diagnostic criteria. Data collection and analysis Two review authors extracted data and at least two authors assessed trial quality. We contacted trial authors for missing data. Main results Six studies (192 total subjects) were identified and included in this analysis. The quality of trials was variable. Our primary outcome was restlessness or uncomfortable leg sensations, which was quantified using the IRLS severity scale in four trials and another RLS symptom scale in a fifth trial. Combining data from the four trials using the IRLS severity scale, there was no clear benefit from iron therapy (mean difference in IRLS severity scores of -3.79, 95% CI: -7.68 to 0.10, p = 0.06). However, the fifth trial did find iron therapy to be beneficial (median decrease of 3 points in the iron group and no change in the placebo group on a 10 point scale of RLS symptoms, p = 0.01). Quality of life was improved in the iron group relative to placebo in some studies but not others. Changes in periodic limb movements were not different between groups

  7. Iron catalyzed coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Givens, Edwin N.

    1983-01-01

    A process is described for the solvent refining of coal into a gas product, a liquid product and a normally solid dissolved product. Particulate coal and a unique co-catalyst system are suspended in a coal solvent and processed in a coal liquefaction reactor, preferably an ebullated bed reactor. The co-catalyst system comprises a combination of a stoichiometric excess of iron oxide and pyrite which reduce predominantly to active iron sulfide catalysts in the reaction zone. This catalyst system results in increased catalytic activity with attendant improved coal conversion and enhanced oil product distribution as well as reduced sulfide effluent. Iron oxide is used in a stoichiometric excess of that required to react with sulfur indigenous to the feed coal and that produced during reduction of the pyrite catalyst to iron sulfide.

  8. Study of iron nanoparticle melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Shulgin, A. V.; Lavruk, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    In paper melting process of iron nanoparticles was investigated with molecular dynamics method. Melting temperatures was found for particles with radius from 1.5 to 4 nm. Results match with data of other authors. Heat capacity was calculated based on investigation of caloric curves. Dependence between heat capacity and temperature for different size of nanoparticles was approximated. Heat conductivity of iron nanoparticles was calculated.

  9. Luminescent iron clusters in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Nirmal; Baksi, Ananya; Giri, Anupam; Xavier, Paulrajpillai Lourdu; Basu, Gautam; Pradeep, Thalappil; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Metal clusters, composed of a few atoms at the core, exhibit unique properties and have potential applications. Although atomically precise clusters of noble metals have been synthesized, analogous systems of reactive metals, such as iron, have not been realized in solution due to high reactivity. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of novel iron clusters in the hemoglobin matrix that are highly luminescent (quantum yield 10% at 565 nm). The super-paramagnetic iron clusters, after successful ligand exchange from protein and phase transfer from water to chloroform using tri-octylphosphineoxide (TOPO), were detected as [Fe10(TOPO)3(H2O)3]+, [Fe13(TOPO)2(H2O)]+ and [Fe8(TOPO)(H2O)2]+ by mass spectrometry. This study lays the groundwork for exploiting unique properties of soluble iron clusters.Metal clusters, composed of a few atoms at the core, exhibit unique properties and have potential applications. Although atomically precise clusters of noble metals have been synthesized, analogous systems of reactive metals, such as iron, have not been realized in solution due to high reactivity. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of novel iron clusters in the hemoglobin matrix that are highly luminescent (quantum yield 10% at 565 nm). The super-paramagnetic iron clusters, after successful ligand exchange from protein and phase transfer from water to chloroform using tri-octylphosphineoxide (TOPO), were detected as [Fe10(TOPO)3(H2O)3]+, [Fe13(TOPO)2(H2O)]+ and [Fe8(TOPO)(H2O)2]+ by mass spectrometry. This study lays the groundwork for exploiting unique properties of soluble iron clusters. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05784d

  10. Iron loading: a risk factor for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, E D

    2006-12-01

    Iron loaded persons are at increased risk for infection, neoplasia, arthropathy, cardiomyopathy and an array of endocrine and neurodegenerative diseases. This report summarizes evidence of increased risk of iron loading for osteoporosis. Iron suppresses bone remodeling apparently by decreasing osteoblast formation and new bone synthesis. Low molecular mass iron chelators as well as a natural protein iron chelator, lactoferrin, may be useful in prevention of osteoporosis.

  11. Oxygen isotope relationships in iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.; Olsen, E. J.; Prinz, M.

    1983-01-01

    Iron meteorites with oxygen-bearing phases can be classified in terms of their oxygen isotopic abundances. These iron meteorite classes are isotopically similar to various stony meteorite classes, which may indicate a common origin. The group IAB and IIICD irons may be related to the winonaites; group IIE irons may be related to H chondrites; group IVA irons may be related to L or LL chondrites.

  12. Process for the synthesis of iron powder

    DOEpatents

    Welbon, William W.

    1983-01-01

    A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder.

  13. Process for the synthesis of iron powder

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-03-06

    A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder.

  14. Process for the synthesis of iron powder

    DOEpatents

    Welbon, W.W.

    1983-11-08

    A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder. 2 figs.

  15. Iron transport in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, E C

    2009-12-01

    Dopaminergic cell death in the substantia nigra (SN) is central to Parkinson's disease (PD) but the neurodegenerative mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. Iron accumulation in dopaminergic neurons and glial cells in the SN of PD patients may contribute to the generation of oxidative stress, protein aggregation and neuronal death. However, the mechanisms involved in iron accumulation remain unclear. In previous studies we excluded a role of transferrin and its receptor in iron accumulation while we showed that lactoferrin receptors were overexpressed in blood vessels and dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. We recently also described an increase in the expression of the divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1/Nramp2/Slc11a2) in the SN of PD patients. Using the PD animal model of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) intoxication in mice, we showed that DMT1 expression increased in the ventral mesencephalon of intoxicated animals, concomitant with iron accumulation, oxidative stress and dopaminergic cell loss. A mutation in DMT1 that impairs iron transport protected rodents against parkinsonism-inducing neurotoxins MPTP and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). This study supports a critical role for DMT1 in iron-mediated neurodegeneration in PD. PMID:20082992

  16. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  17. Relativistic Iron Line Fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, M.; Dauser, T.; Beuchert, T.; Jeffreson, S.; Tawabutr, J.; Wilms, J.; García, J.; Walton, D. J.

    2016-08-01

    The 6.4 keV Iron reflection line possesses strong diagnostic potential for AGN-systems. In the rare case of unobscured AGN, this line receives a contribution from the very center of the accretion flow close to the event horizon that is subject to strong relativistic effects. The shape of this line distortion can be used infer important parameters of the central accretion region, especially the black hole spin parameter a* and the accretion disk inclination i. We analyze several (nine?) bare AGN spectra from the sample of Walton et al. 2012 using high resolution spectra from the XMM and NuStar archives. The relativistic reflection is modeled using the RELXILL code (Dauser 20XX). The newest iteration of the RELXILL model also supports a lamp post geometry for the irradiation of the accretion disk. By combining these detailed models with the wide spectral range of NuStar and XMM/NuStar joint observations we can put tight constraints on the aforementioned parameters and we can constrain the height of the source h in a possible lamp post geometry.

  18. In vitro bioavailability of iron from the heme analogue sodium iron chlorophyllin.

    PubMed

    Miret, Silvia; Tascioglu, Serpil; van der Burg, Monique; Frenken, Leon; Klaffke, Werner

    2010-01-27

    The use of heme analogues from vegetable origin could provide an alternative iron source of potentially high bioavailability. Sodium iron chlorophyllin is a water-soluble semisynthetic chlorophyll derivative where the magnesium in the porphyrin ring has been substituted by iron. We have used an in vitro model that combines gastric and intestinal digestion followed by intestinal iron uptake in Caco-2 cells to determine the bioavailability of iron from sodium iron chlorophyllin. Our results demonstrate that sodium iron chlorophyllin is stable under simulated gastrointestinal conditions and is able to deliver bioavailable iron to Caco-2 cells. Similar to the heme, the bioavailability of iron from sodium iron chlorophyllin is dependent on the food matrix, and it was inhibited by calcium. Potentially, sodium iron chlorophyllin could be used as an iron fortificant from vegetable origin with high bioavailability.

  19. Host iron status and iron supplementation mediate susceptibility to erythrocytic stage Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Clark, Martha A; Goheen, Morgan M; Fulford, Anthony; Prentice, Andrew M; Elnagheeb, Marwa A; Patel, Jaymin; Fisher, Nancy; Taylor, Steve M; Kasthuri, Raj S; Cerami, Carla

    2014-07-25

    Iron deficiency and malaria have similar global distributions, and frequently co-exist in pregnant women and young children. Where both conditions are prevalent, iron supplementation is complicated by observations that iron deficiency anaemia protects against falciparum malaria, and that iron supplements increase susceptibility to clinically significant malaria, but the mechanisms remain obscure. Here, using an in vitro parasite culture system with erythrocytes from iron-deficient and replete human donors, we demonstrate that Plasmodium falciparum infects iron-deficient erythrocytes less efficiently. In addition, owing to merozoite preference for young erythrocytes, iron supplementation of iron-deficient individuals reverses the protective effects of iron deficiency. Our results provide experimental validation of field observations reporting protective effects of iron deficiency and harmful effects of iron administration on human malaria susceptibility. Because recovery from anaemia requires transient reticulocytosis, our findings imply that in malarious regions iron supplementation should be accompanied by effective measures to prevent falciparum malaria.

  20. Differences in activation of mouse hepcidin by dietary iron and parenterally administered iron dextran: compartmentalization is critical for iron sensing.

    PubMed

    Daba, Alina; Gkouvatsos, Konstantinos; Sebastiani, Giada; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2013-01-01

    The iron regulatory hormone hepcidin responds to both oral and parenteral iron. Here, we hypothesized that the diverse iron trafficking routes may affect the dynamics and kinetics of the hepcidin activation pathway. To address this, C57BL/6 mice were administered an iron-enriched diet or injected i.p. with iron dextran and analyzed over time. After 1 week of dietary loading with carbonyl iron, mice exhibited significant increases in serum iron and transferrin saturation, as well as in hepatic iron, Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6), and hepcidin mRNAs. Nevertheless, hepcidin expression reached a plateau afterward, possibly due to upregulation of inhibitory Smad7, Id1, and matriptase-2 mRNAs, while hepatic and splenic iron continued to accumulate over 9 weeks. One day following parenteral administration of iron dextran, mice manifested elevated serum and hepatic iron levels and Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation, but no increases in transferrin saturation or BMP6 mRNA. Surprisingly, hepcidin failed to appropriately respond to acute overload with iron dextran, and a delayed (after 5-7 days) hepcidin upregulation correlated with increased transferrin saturation, partial relocation of iron from macrophages to hepatocytes, and induction of BMP6 mRNA. Our data suggest that the physiological hepcidin response is saturable and are consistent with the idea that hepcidin senses exclusively iron compartmentalized within circulating transferrin and/or hepatocytes.

  1. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  2. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  3. Defect Interaction in Iron and Iron-based Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haixuan; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Stoller, Roger

    2014-03-01

    Magnetism has a profound influence on the defect properties in iron and iron-based alloys. For instance, it has been shown from first principles calculations that the helium interstitial occupies the tetrahedral site instead of octahedral site in contrast to all previous work that neglected the magnetic effects. In this study, we explore the effects of magnetism on the defect interaction, primarily interstitial-type defects, in bcc iron and Fe-Cr systems. The magnetic moment change during the interaction of two 1/2 <111>interstitial loops in bcc iron was calculated using the ab initio locally self-consistent multiple-scattering (LSMS) method and a significant fluctuation was observed. Adding Cr significantly modifies the magnetic structure of the defects and defect interactions. In addition, the effects of magnetism on the defect energetics are evaluated. This study provides useful insights on whether magnetism can be used as a effective means to manipulate the defect evolution in iron-based structural alloys. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Defect Physics, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  4. Electrochemically fabricated zero-valent iron, iron-nickel, and iron-palladium nanowires for environmental remediation applications.

    PubMed

    Yoo, B Y; Hernandez, S C; Koo, B; Rheem, Y; Myung, N V

    2007-01-01

    Monodisperse crystalline zero-valent iron, iron-nickel, iron-palladium nanowires were synthesised using template-directed electrodeposition methods. Prior to nanowire fabrication, alumina nanotemplates with controlled pore structure (e.g. pore diameter and porosity) were fabricated by anodising high purity aluminium foil in sulphuric acid. After fabrication of alumina nanotemplates, iron, iron-nickel and iron-palladium nanowires were electrodeposited within the pore structure. The dimensions of nanowires including diameter and length were precisely controlled by pore diameter of anodised alumina and deposition rate and time. The composition, crystal structure and orientation were controlled by adjusting electrodeposition parameters including applied current density and solution compositions.

  5. Synthesis, properties, and applications of iron nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Dale L.

    2005-01-01

    Iron, the most ubiquitous of the transition metals and the fourth most plentiful element in the Earths crust, is the structural backbone of our modern infrastructure. It is therefore ironic that as a nanoparticle, iron has been somewhat neglected in favor of its own oxides, as well as other metals such as cobalt, nickel, gold, and platinum. This is unfortunate, but understandable. Irons reactivity is important in macroscopic applications (particularly rusting), but is a dominant concern at the nanoscale. Finely divided iron has long been known to be pyrophoric, which is a major reason that iron nanoparticles have not been more fully studied to date. This extreme reactivity has traditionally made iron nanoparticles difficult to study and inconvenient for practical applications. Iron however has a great deal to offer at the nanoscale, including very potent magnetic and catalytic properties. Recent work has begun to take advantage of irons potential, and work in this field appears to be blossoming.

  6. Sequestration and Scavenging of Iron in Infection

    PubMed Central

    Parrow, Nermi L.; Fleming, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    The proliferative capability of many invasive pathogens is limited by the bioavailability of iron. Pathogens have thus developed strategies to obtain iron from their host organisms. In turn, host defense strategies have evolved to sequester iron from invasive pathogens. This review explores the mechanisms employed by bacterial pathogens to gain access to host iron sources, the role of iron in bacterial virulence, and iron-related genes required for the establishment or maintenance of infection. Host defenses to limit iron availability for bacterial growth during the acute-phase response and the consequences of iron overload conditions on susceptibility to bacterial infection are also examined. The evidence summarized herein demonstrates the importance of iron bioavailability in influencing the risk of infection and the ability of the host to clear the pathogen. PMID:23836822

  7. Shigella Iron Acquisition Systems and their Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yahan; Murphy, Erin R.

    2016-01-01

    Survival of Shigella within the host is strictly dependent on the ability of the pathogen to acquire essential nutrients, such as iron. As an innate immune defense against invading pathogens, the level of bio-available iron within the human host is maintained at exceeding low levels, by sequestration of the element within heme and other host iron-binding compounds. In response to sequestration mediated iron limitation, Shigella produce multiple iron-uptake systems that each function to facilitate the utilization of a specific host-associated source of nutrient iron. As a mechanism to balance the essential need for iron and the toxicity of the element when in excess, the production of bacterial iron acquisition systems is tightly regulated by a variety of molecular mechanisms. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on the iron-uptake systems produced by Shigella species, their distribution within the genus, and the molecular mechanisms that regulate their production. PMID:26904516

  8. Orbital-selective magnetism in the spin-ladder iron selenides Ba[subscript 1;#8722;x]K[subscript x]Fe[subscript 2]Se[subscript 3

    SciTech Connect

    Caron, J.M.; Neilson, J.R.; Miller, D.C.; Arpino, K.; Llobet, A.; McQueen, T.M.

    2012-07-11

    Here we show that the 2.80(8){mu}{sub B} Fe{sup -1} block antiferromagnetic order of BaFe{sub 2}Se{sub 3} transforms into stripe antiferromagnetic order in KFe{sub 2}Se{sub 3} with a decrease in moment to 2.1(1){mu}{sub B} Fe{sup -1}. This reduction is larger than expected from the change in electron count from Ba{sup 2+} to K{sup +}, and occurs with the loss of the displacements of Fe atoms from ideal positions in the ladders, as found by neutron pair distribution function analysis. Intermediate compositions remain insulating, and magnetic susceptibility measurements show a suppression of magnetic order and probable formation of a spin glass. Together, these results imply an orbital-dependent selection of magnetic versus bonded behavior, driven by relative bandwidths and fillings.

  9. Syntheses, structures, and optical properties of the indium/germanium selenides Cs{sub 4}In{sub 8}GeSe{sub 16}, CsInSe{sub 2}, and CsInGeSe{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Matthew D.; Pozzi, Eric A.; Van Duyne, Richard P.; Ibers, James A.

    2014-04-01

    The three solid-state indium/germanium selenides Cs{sub 4}In{sub 8}GeSe{sub 16}, CsInSe{sub 2}, and CsInGeSe{sub 4} have been synthesized at 1173 K. The structure of Cs{sub 4}In{sub 8}GeSe{sub 16} is a three-dimensional framework whereas those of CsInSe{sub 2} and CsInGeSe{sub 4} comprise sheets separated by Cs cations. Both Cs{sub 4}In{sub 8}GeSe{sub 16} and CsInGeSe{sub 4} display In/Ge disorder. From optical absorption measurements these compounds have band gaps of 2.20 and 2.32 eV, respectively. All three compounds are charge balanced. - Graphical abstract: Structure of Cs{sub 4}In{sub 8}GeSe{sub 16}. - Highlights: • The solid-state In/Ge selenides Cs{sub 4}In{sub 8}GeSe{sub 16}, CsInSe{sub 2}, and CsInGeSe{sub 4} have been synthesized. • Both Cs{sub 4}In{sub 8}GeSe{sub 16} and CsInGeSe{sub 4} display In/Ge disorder. • Cs{sub 4}In{sub 8}GeSe{sub 16} and CsInGeSe{sub 4} have band gaps of 2.20 eV and 2.32 eV, respectively.

  10. Preparation and protection of iron and iron compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprinarov, N.; Konstantinova, M.; Avdeev, G.; Ruskov, T.; Tzacheva, Tz

    2012-03-01

    Iron, iron carbide and iron oxide nano- and micro-particles were synthesized in a hermetically sealed container using ferrocene and a mixture of ferrocene, xylene and water. The particles produced possess well expressed magnetic properties and are wrapped in a protective carbon cover. Carbon provides excellent protection against moisture and chemical influences and insures a long-lasting stability. Structural changes in the particles and their covers were examined at up to 1000 °C in vacuum and 800 °C in air, as were their stability under the influence of acids. The particles morphology was examined by scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM); their chemical composition and crystal structure were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mössbauer spectroscopy and electron probe X-ray micro analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS).

  11. Iron isotope composition of some Archean and Proterozoic iron formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planavsky, Noah; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Bekker, Andrey; Hofmann, Axel; Little, Crispin T. S.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2012-03-01

    Fe isotopes can provide new insight into redox-dependent biogeochemical processes. Precambrian iron formations (IF) are deserving targets for Fe isotope studies because they are composed predominantly of authigenic Fe phases and record a period of unprecedented iron deposition in Earth's history. We present Fe isotope data for bulk samples from 24 Archean and Proterozoic IF and eight Phanerozoic Fe oxide-rich deposits. These data reveal that many Archean and early Paleoproterozoic iron formations were a sink for isotopically heavy Fe, in contrast to later Proterozoic and Phanerozoic Fe oxide-rich rocks. The positive δ56Fe values in IF are best explained by delivery of particulate ferric oxides formed in the water column to the sediment-water interface. Because IF are a net sink for isotopically heavy Fe, there must be a corresponding pool of isotopically light Fe in the sedimentary record. Earlier work suggested that Archean pyritic black shales were an important part of this light sink before 2.35 billion years ago (Ga). It is therefore likely that the persistently and anomalously low δ56Fe values in shales are linked with the deposition of isotopically heavy Fe in IF in the deeper parts of basins. IF deposition produced a residual isotopically light dissolved Fe pool that was captured by pyritic Fe in shales. Local dissimilatory Fe reduction in porewater and associated diagenetic reactions resulting in pyrite and carbonate precipitation may have further enhanced Fe isotope heterogeneity in marine sediments, and an 'iron shuttle' may have transported isotopically light Fe from shelf sediments to the basin. Nevertheless, water-column processing of hydrothermally delivered Fe likely had the strongest influence on the bulk iron isotope composition of Archean and Paleoproterozoic iron formations and other marine sediments.

  12. Haem iron-containing peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Isaac, I S; Dawson, J H

    1999-01-01

    Peroxidases are enzymes that utilize hydrogen peroxide to oxidize substrates. A histidine residue on the proximal side of the haem iron ligates most peroxidases. The various oxidation states and ligand complexes have been spectroscopically characterized. HRP-I is two oxidation states above ferric HRP. It contains an oxoferryl (= oxyferryl) iron with a pi-radical cation that resides on the haem. HRP-II is one oxidation state above ferric HRP and contains an oxoferryl iron. HRP-III is equivalent to the oxyferrous state. Only compounds I and II are part of the peroxidase reaction cycle. CCP-ES contains an oxoferryl iron but the radical cation resides on the Trp-191 residue and not on the haem. CPO is the only known peroxidase that is ligated by a cysteine residue rather than a histidine residue, on the proximal side of the haem iron. CPO is a more versatile enzyme, catalysing numerous types of reaction: peroxidase, catalase and halogenation reactions. The various CPO species are less stable than other peroxidase species and more elusive, thus needing further characterization. The roles of the amino acid residues on the proximal and distal sides of the haem need more investigation to further decipher their specific roles. Haem proteins, especially peroxidases, are structure-function-specific. PMID:10730188

  13. Sonochemical synthesis of iron colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.; Fang, M.; Hyeon, T.

    1996-11-27

    We present here a new method for the preparation of stable ferromagnetic colloids of iron using high-intensity ultrasound to sonochemically decompose volatile organometallic compounds. These colloids have narrow size distributions centered at a few nanometers and are found to be superparamagnetic. In conclusion, a simple synthetic method has been discovered to produce nanosized iron colloid using high-intensity ultrasound. Nanometer iron particles dispersed in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) matrix or stabilized by adsorption of oleic acid have been synthesized by sonochemical decomposition of Fe(CO){sub 5}. Transmission electron micrographs show that the iron particles have a relatively narrow range in size from 3 to 8 nm for polyvinylpyrrolidone, while oleic acid gives an even more uniform distribution at 8 nm. magnetic measurements revealed that these nanometer iron particles are superparamagnetic with a saturation magnetization of 101 emu/g (Fe) at 290 K. This work is easily extended to colloids of other metals and to alloys of two or more metals, simply by using multiple volatile precursors. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Graphite Formation in Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    In the first phase of the project it was proven that by changing the ratio between the thermal gradient and the growth rate for commercial cast iron samples solidifying in a Bridgman type furnace, it is possible to produce all types of graphite structures, from flake to spheroidal, and all types of matrices, from ferritic to white at a certain given level of cerium. KC-135 flight experiments have shown that in a low-gravity environment, no flotation occurs even in spheroidal graphite cast irons with carbon equivalent as high as 5%, while extensive graphite flotation occurred in both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons, in high carbon samples solidified in a high gravity environment. This opens the way for production of iron-carbon composite materials, with high carbon content (e.g., 10%) in a low gravity environment. By using KC-135 flights, the influence of some basic elements on the solidification of cast iron will be studied. The mechanism of flake to spheroidal graphite transition will be studied, by using quenching experiments at both low and one gravity for different G/R ratios.

  15. Redox control of iron regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Fillebeen, Carine; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2002-01-01

    Iron regulatory proteins, IRP1 and IRP2, are cytoplasmic proteins of the iron-sulfur cluster isomerase family and serve as major post-transcriptional regulators of cellular iron metabolism. They bind to 'iron responsive elements' (IREs) of several mRNAs and thereby control their translation or stability. IRP1 and IRP2 respond to alterations in intracellular iron levels, but also to other signals such as nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The redox regulation of IRP1 and IRP2 provides direct links between the control of iron homeostasis and oxidative stress.

  16. Advances in Pediatric Intravenous Iron Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mantadakis, Elpis

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be very common worldwide. Intravenous (IV) iron is an infrequently used therapeutic option in children with IDA despite numerous studies in adults and several small but notable pediatric studies showing efficacy and safety. Presently, the availability of newer IV iron products allows for replacement of the total iron deficit at a single setting. These products appear safer compared to the high molecular weight iron dextrans of the past. Herein, we review the medical literature and suggest that front line use of IV iron should be strongly considered in diseases associated with IDA in children.

  17. A Systems Biology Approach to Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chifman, J.; Laubenbacher, R.; Torti, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    Iron is critical to the survival of almost all living organisms. However, inappropriately low or high levels of iron are detrimental and contribute to a wide range of diseases. Recent advances in the study of iron metabolism have revealed multiple intricate pathways that are essential to the maintenance of iron homeostasis. Further, iron regulation involves processes at several scales, ranging from the subcellular to the organismal. This complexity makes a systems biology approach crucial, with its enabling technology of computational models based on a mathematical description of regulatory systems. Systems biology may represent a new strategy for understanding imbalances in iron metabolism and their underlying causes. PMID:25480643

  18. Thermoelectric Properties of Selenides Spinels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G.; Caillat, T.; Fleurial, J-P.

    2000-01-01

    Many compounds with the spinel structure type have been analyzed for their thermoelectric properties. Published data was used to augment experimental results presented here to select promising thermoelectric spinels.

  19. Laboratory experiments on the weathering of iron meteorites and carbonaceous chondrites by iron-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronstal, A.; Pearson, V.; Kappler, A.; Dooris, C.; Anand, M.; Poitrasson, F.; Kee, T. P.; Cockell, C. S.

    2009-03-01

    Batch culture experiments were performed to investigate the weathering of meteoritic material by iron-oxidizing bacteria. The aerobic, acidophilic iron oxidizer (A. ferrooxidans) was capable of oxidizing iron from both carbonaceous chondrites (Murchison and Cold Bokkeveld) and iron meteorites (York and Casas Grandes). Preliminary iron isotope results clearly show contrasted iron pathways during oxidation with and without bacteria suggesting that a biological role in meteorite weathering could be distinguished isotopically. Anaerobic iron-oxidizers growing under pH-neutral conditions oxidized iron from iron meteorites. These results show that rapid biologicallymediated alteration of extraterrestrial materials can occur in both aerobic and anaerobic environments. These results also demonstrate that iron can act as a source of energy for microorganisms from both iron and carbonaceous chondrites in aerobic and anaerobic conditions with implications for life on the early Earth and the possible use of microorganisms to extract minerals from asteroidal material.

  20. Non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate does not interact with heme iron absorption in humans.

    PubMed

    Gaitán, Diego; Olivares, Manuel; Lönnerdal, Bo; Brito, Alex; Pizarro, Fernando

    2012-12-01

    The absorption of heme iron has been described as distinctly different from that of non-heme iron. Moreover, whether heme and non-heme iron compete for absorption has not been well established. Our objective was to investigate the potential competition between heme and non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate for absorption, when both iron forms are ingested on an empty stomach. Twenty-six healthy nonpregnant women were selected to participate in two iron absorption studies using iron radioactive tracers. We obtained the dose-response curve for absorption of 0.5, 10, 20, and 50 mg heme iron doses, as concentrated red blood cells. Then, we evaluated the absorption of the same doses, but additionally we added non-heme iron, as ferrous sulfate, at constant heme/non-heme iron molar ratio (1:1). Finally, we compare the two curves by a two-way ANOVA. Iron sources were administered on an empty stomach. One factor analysis showed that heme iron absorption was diminished just by increasing total heme iron (P < 0.0001). The addition of non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate did not have any effect on heme iron absorption (P = NS). We reported evidence that heme and non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate does not compete for absorption. The mechanism behind the absorption of these iron sources is not clear. PMID:22935997

  1. Alginate-Iron Speciation and Its Effect on In Vitro Cellular Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Horniblow, Richard D.; Dowle, Miriam; Iqbal, Tariq H.; Latunde-Dada, Gladys O.; Palmer, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Alginates are a class of biopolymers with known iron binding properties which are routinely used in the fabrication of iron-oxide nanoparticles. In addition, alginates have been implicated in influencing human iron absorption. However, the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles employs non-physiological pH conditions and whether nanoparticle formation in vivo is responsible for influencing cellular iron metabolism is unclear. Thus the aims of this study were to determine how alginate and iron interact at gastric-comparable pH conditions and how this influences iron metabolism. Employing a range of spectroscopic techniques under physiological conditions alginate-iron complexation was confirmed and, in conjunction with aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticles were observed. The results infer a nucleation-type model of iron binding whereby alginate is templating the condensation of iron-hydroxide complexes to form iron oxide centred nanoparticles. The interaction of alginate and iron at a cellular level was found to decrease cellular iron acquisition by 37% (p < 0.05) and in combination with confocal microscopy the alginate inhibits cellular iron transport through extracellular iron chelation with the resulting complexes not internalised. These results infer alginate as being useful in the chelation of excess iron, especially in the context of inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer where excess unabsorbed luminal iron is thought to be a driver of disease. PMID:26378798

  2. Measurement of hair iron concentration as a marker of body iron content

    PubMed Central

    SAHIN, CEM; PALA, CIGDEM; KAYNAR, LEYLAGUL; TORUN, YASEMIN ALTUNER; CETIN, AYSUN; KURNAZ, FATIH; SIVGIN, SERDAR; SAHIN, FATIH SERDAR

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to define the possible association between blood parameters and hair iron concentration in patient groups showing a difference in body iron content. The study population comprised subjects with iron deficiency anaemia and transfusion-related anaemia with different body iron contents and a healthy control group. All the cases included in the study were examined with respect to hair iron concentration, serum iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), transferrin saturation and erythrocyte markers in the total blood count with ferritin values. Differences in hair iron concentration were evaluated between the groups. Correlation analysis was applied to define the association between the laboratory values used as markers of body iron content and hair iron concentration. A statistically significant difference was determined in hair iron 56Fe and 57Fe concentrations between the group with transfusion-related anaemia, the iron deficiency anaemia group and the healthy control group (P<0.001). In addition, a positive correlation was determined between hair iron 56Fe and 57Fe concentrations and serum iron, ferritin level, transferrin saturation, mean erythrocyte volume and mean erythrocyte haemoglobin values and a negative correlation with TIBC. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed a statistically significant difference in the hair iron concentrations of the patient groups with different body iron content and these values were correlated to the laboratory markers of body iron content. PMID:26137241

  3. Disorders of iron metabolism. Part 1: molecular basis of iron homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Manuel; García-Erce, José Antonio; Remacha, Angel Francisco

    2011-04-01

    IRON FUNCTIONS: Iron is an essential micronutrient, as it is required for satisfactory erythropoietic function, oxidative metabolism and cellular immune response. IRON PHYSIOLOGY: Absorption of dietary iron (1-2 mg/day) is tightly regulated and just balanced against iron loss because there are no active iron excretory mechanisms. Dietary iron is found in haem (10%) and non-haem (ionic, 90%) forms, and their absorption occurs at the apical surface of duodenal enterocytes via different mechanisms. Iron is exported by ferroportin 1 (the only putative iron exporter) across the basolateral membrane of the enterocyte into the circulation (absorbed iron), where it binds to transferrin and is transported to sites of use and storage. Transferrin-bound iron enters target cells-mainly erythroid cells, but also immune and hepatic cells-via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Senescent erythrocytes are phagocytosed by reticuloendothelial system macrophages, haem is metabolised by haem oxygenase, and the released iron is stored as ferritin. Iron will be later exported from macrophages to transferrin. This internal turnover of iron is essential to meet the requirements of erythropoiesis (20-30 mg/day). As transferrin becomes saturated in iron-overload states, excess iron is transported to the liver, the other main storage organ for iron, carrying the risk of free radical formation and tissue damage. REGULATION OF IRON HOMOEOSTASIS: Hepcidin, synthesised by hepatocytes in response to iron concentrations, inflammation, hypoxia and erythropoiesis, is the main iron-regulatory hormone. It binds ferroportin on enterocytes, macrophages and hepatocytes triggering its internalisation and lysosomal degradation. Inappropriate hepcidin secretion may lead to either iron deficiency or iron overload.

  4. Iron deficiency and iron excess damage mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA in rats.

    PubMed

    Walter, Patrick B; Knutson, Mitchell D; Paler-Martinez, Andres; Lee, Sonia; Xu, Yu; Viteri, Fernando E; Ames, Bruce N

    2002-02-19

    Approximately two billion people, mainly women and children, are iron deficient. Two studies examined the effects of iron deficiency and supplementation on rats. In study 1, mitochondrial functional parameters and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage were assayed in iron-deficient (< or =5 microg/day) and iron-normal (800 microg/day) rats and in both groups after daily high-iron supplementation (8,000 microg/day) for 34 days. This dose is equivalent to the daily dose commonly given to iron-deficient humans. Iron-deficient rats had lower liver mitochondrial respiratory control ratios and increased levels of oxidants in polymorphonuclear-leukocytes, as assayed by dichlorofluorescein (P < 0.05). Rhodamine 123 fluorescence of polymorphonuclear-leukocytes also increased (P < 0.05). Lowered respiratory control ratios were found in daily high-iron-supplemented rats regardless of the previous iron status (P < 0.05). mtDNA damage was observed in both iron-deficient rats and rats receiving daily high-iron supplementation, compared with iron-normal rats (P < 0.05). Study 2 compared iron-deficient rats given high doses of iron (8,000 microg) either daily or every third day and found that rats given iron supplements every third day had less mtDNA damage on the second and third day after the last dose compared to daily high iron doses. Both inadequate and excessive iron (10 x nutritional need) cause significant mitochondrial malfunction. Although excess iron has been known to cause oxidative damage, the observation of oxidant-induced damage to mitochondria from iron deficiency has been unrecognized previously. Untreated iron deficiency, as well as excessive-iron supplementation, are deleterious and emphasize the importance of maintaining optimal iron intake.

  5. Direct Biohydrometallurgical Extraction of Iron from Ore

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Eisele

    2005-10-01

    A completely novel approach to iron extraction was investigated, based on reductive leaching of iron by anaerobic bacteria. Microorganisms were collected from an anaerobic bog where natural seepage of dissolved iron was observed. This mixed culture was used to reduce insoluble iron in a magnetite ore to the soluble ferrous (Fe{sup +2}) state. While dissolution rates were slow, concentrations of dissolved iron as high as 3487 mg/l could be reached if sufficient time was allowed. A factorial study of the effects of trace nutrients and different forms of organic matter indicated that the best dissolution rates and highest dissolved iron concentrations were achieved using soluble carbohydrate (sucrose) as the bacterial food source, and that nutrients other than nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and acetate were not necessary. A key factor in reaching high levels of dissolved iron was maintaining a high level of carbon dioxide in solution, since the solubility of iron carbonates increases markedly as the quantity of dissolved carbon dioxide increases. Once the iron is dissolved, it has been demonstrated that the ferrous iron can then be electroplated from solution, provided that the concentration of iron is sufficiently high and the hydrogen ion concentration is sufficiently low. However, if the leaching solution is electrolyzed directly, organic matter precipitates at the cathode along with the metallic iron. To prevent this problem, the ferrous iron should be separated from the bulk solution in a more concentrated, purified form. One route to accomplishing this is to take advantage of the change in solubility of ferrous iron as a function of carbon dioxide concentration. By cycling the concentration of carbon dioxide in solution, it is possible to produce an iron-rich concentrate that should be suitable for electrolysis. This represents the first viable hydrometallurgical method for leaching iron directly from ore and producing metallic iron.

  6. Monitoring iron uptake by siderophores.

    PubMed

    Hoegy, Françoise; Schalk, Isabelle J

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an important element for almost all forms of life. In order to get access to this essential nutriment, Pseudomonads produce two major siderophores, pyoverdine PVD and pyochelin (PCH). Uptake of iron in bacterial cells can be monitored accurately using (55)Fe. Bacteria cells are incubated in the presence of either PVD or PCH loaded with (55)Fe. After incubation, extracellular iron ions are separated from those accumulated in the bacteria cells by either centrifugation or filtration on glass microfiber filters, for the PCH and PVD assays, respectively. (55)Fe contained in the harvested cells on the filter or in the cell pellet is counted in scintillation cocktail. The number of moles of (55)Fe transported can be determined using the specific activity of the radionuclide. PMID:24818918

  7. Facile and sustainable synthesis of shaped iron oxide nanoparticles: effect of iron precursor salts on the shapes of iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Farheen N; Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2015-05-05

    A facile and sustainable protocol for synthesis of six different shaped iron oxides is developed. Notably, all the six shapes of iron oxides can be synthesised using exactly same synthetic protocol, by simply changing the precursor iron salts. Several of the synthesised shapes are not reported before. This novel protocol is relatively easy to implement and could contribute to overcome the challenge of obtaining various shaped iron oxides in economical and sustainable manner.

  8. Facile and Sustainable Synthesis of Shaped Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Effect of Iron Precursor Salts on the Shapes of Iron Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Sayed, Farheen N.; Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    A facile and sustainable protocol for synthesis of six different shaped iron oxides is developed. Notably, all the six shapes of iron oxides can be synthesised using exactly same synthetic protocol, by simply changing the precursor iron salts. Several of the synthesised shapes are not reported before. This novel protocol is relatively easy to implement and could contribute to overcome the challenge of obtaining various shaped iron oxides in economical and sustainable manner. PMID:25939969

  9. Estimation of dietary iron bioavailability from food iron intake and iron status.

    PubMed

    Dainty, Jack R; Berry, Rachel; Lynch, Sean R; Harvey, Linda J; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    Currently there are no satisfactory methods for estimating dietary iron absorption (bioavailability) at a population level, but this is essential for deriving dietary reference values using the factorial approach. The aim of this work was to develop a novel approach for estimating dietary iron absorption using a population sample from a sub-section of the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS). Data were analyzed in 873 subjects from the 2000-2001 adult cohort of the NDNS, for whom both dietary intake data and hematological measures (hemoglobin and serum ferritin (SF) concentrations) were available. There were 495 men aged 19-64 y (mean age 42.7±12.1 y) and 378 pre-menopausal women (mean age 35.7±8.2 y). Individual dietary iron requirements were estimated using the Institute of Medicine calculations. A full probability approach was then applied to estimate the prevalence of dietary intakes that were insufficient to meet the needs of the men and women separately, based on their estimated daily iron intake and a series of absorption values ranging from 1-40%. The prevalence of SF concentrations below selected cut-off values (indicating that absorption was not high enough to maintain iron stores) was derived from individual SF concentrations. An estimate of dietary iron absorption required to maintain specified SF values was then calculated by matching the observed prevalence of insufficiency with the prevalence predicted for the series of absorption estimates. Mean daily dietary iron intakes were 13.5 mg for men and 9.8 mg for women. Mean calculated dietary absorption was 8% in men (50th percentile for SF 85 µg/L) and 17% in women (50th percentile for SF 38 µg/L). At a ferritin level of 45 µg/L estimated absorption was similar in men (14%) and women (13%). This new method can be used to calculate dietary iron absorption at a population level using data describing total iron intake and SF concentration. PMID:25356629

  10. Iron chelation and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Kelsey J.; Lynch, Sharon G.; LeVine, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Histochemical and MRI studies have demonstrated that MS (multiple sclerosis) patients have abnormal deposition of iron in both gray and white matter structures. Data is emerging indicating that this iron could partake in pathogenesis by various mechanisms, e.g., promoting the production of reactive oxygen species and enhancing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Iron chelation therapy could be a viable strategy to block iron-related pathological events or it can confer cellular protection by stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor 1α, a transcription factor that normally responds to hypoxic conditions. Iron chelation has been shown to protect against disease progression and/or limit iron accumulation in some neurological disorders or their experimental models. Data from studies that administered a chelator to animals with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of MS, support the rationale for examining this treatment approach in MS. Preliminary clinical studies have been performed in MS patients using deferoxamine. Although some side effects were observed, the large majority of patients were able to tolerate the arduous administration regimen, i.e., 6–8 h of subcutaneous infusion, and all side effects resolved upon discontinuation of treatment. Importantly, these preliminary studies did not identify a disqualifying event for this experimental approach. More recently developed chelators, deferasirox and deferiprone, are more desirable for possible use in MS given their oral administration, and importantly, deferiprone can cross the blood–brain barrier. However, experiences from other conditions indicate that the potential for adverse events during chelation therapy necessitates close patient monitoring and a carefully considered administration regimen. PMID:24397846

  11. Disassembling Iron Availability to Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Yeala; Lis, Hagar

    2012-01-01

    The bioavailability of iron to microorganisms and its underlying mechanisms have far reaching repercussions to many natural systems and diverse fields of research, including ocean biogeochemistry, carbon cycling and climate, harmful algal blooms, soil and plant research, bioremediation, pathogenesis, and medicine. Within the framework of ocean sciences, short supply and restricted bioavailability of Fe to phytoplankton is thought to limit primary production and curtail atmospheric CO2 drawdown in vast ocean regions. Yet a clear-cut definition of bioavailability remains elusive, with elements of iron speciation and kinetics, phytoplankton physiology, light, temperature, and microbial interactions, to name a few, all intricately intertwined into this concept. Here, in a synthesis of published and new data, we attempt to disassemble the complex concept of iron bioavailability to phytoplankton by individually exploring some of its facets. We distinguish between the fundamentals of bioavailability – the acquisition of Fe-substrate by phytoplankton – and added levels of complexity involving interactions among organisms, iron, and ecosystem processes. We first examine how phytoplankton acquire free and organically bound iron, drawing attention to the pervasiveness of the reductive uptake pathway in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic autotrophs. Turning to acquisition rates, we propose to view the availability of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton as a spectrum rather than an absolute “all or nothing.” We then demonstrate the use of uptake rate constants to make comparisons across different studies, organisms, Fe-compounds, and environments, and for gaging the contribution of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton growth in situ. Last, we describe the influence of aquatic microorganisms on iron chemistry and fate by way of organic complexation and bio-mediated redox transformations and examine the bioavailability of these bio-modified Fe species. PMID:22529839

  12. Selected properties of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    Important properties of iron aluminides have been compiled in order to help engineers and scientists to be able to quickly assess this materials system. This compilation is by no means exhaustive, but it represents a reasonable first effort to summarize the properties of iron aluminides. Considerable care has been, used in assembling the data into tables. However, no guarantee can be made that all the values compiled here are correct; and in case of doubt, or in order to obtain more detailed information, the original sources should always be consulted.

  13. Bioavailability of bi- and trivalent oral iron preparations. Investigations of iron absorption by postabsorption serum iron concentrations curves.

    PubMed

    Dietzfelbinger, H

    1987-01-01

    Since 1977 the bioavailability of 14 bi- and trivalent oral iron preparations has been investigated in five separate orientated clinical studies by using postabsorption serum iron concentration curves. The range of relative bioavailability was 46 to 100% in the first group of preparations, 31 to 47% in the second group and 6 to 29% in the third group. The first group contained mainly bivalent quick release preparations, the second group slow or sustained release preparations and the third mainly trivalent iron preparations. The postabsorption serum iron concentration curves which show a good congruence with exact 59Fe whole body retention tests again confirmed the nearly 50-year-old rule that bivalent iron is up to 16 times better absorbed than trivalent iron. There is no doubt that the oral iron preparations of good bioavailability are able to cure an iron deficiency more rapidly than iron preparations with a low bioavailability. This therefore has a clear influence on the overall expense of iron therapy. Only those preparations from the first group can be recommended for oral iron therapy. The preparations in the second group are less suitable and those in the third group should be excluded from iron therapy in all countries. PMID:3566864

  14. Fatal overdose of iron tablets in adults.

    PubMed

    Abhilash, Kundavaram P P; Arul, J Jonathan; Bala, Divya

    2013-09-01

    Acute iron toxicity is usually seen in children with accidental ingestion of iron-containing syrups. However, the literature on acute iron toxicity with suicidal intent in adults is scant. We report, the first instance of two adults with fatal ingestion of a single drug overdose with iron tablets from India. Two young adults developed severe gastro-intestinal bleeding and fulminant hepatic failure 48 h after deliberate consumption of large doses of iron tablets. Serum iron levels measured 36 h after ingestion were normal presumably due to the redistribution of iron to the intracellular compartment. Despite aggressive supportive management in medical intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital, the patients succumbed to the toxic doses of iron.

  15. Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/001225.htm Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (formerly known as Hallervorden-Spatz disease) is ...

  16. Fatal overdose of iron tablets in adults.

    PubMed

    Abhilash, Kundavaram P P; Arul, J Jonathan; Bala, Divya

    2013-09-01

    Acute iron toxicity is usually seen in children with accidental ingestion of iron-containing syrups. However, the literature on acute iron toxicity with suicidal intent in adults is scant. We report, the first instance of two adults with fatal ingestion of a single drug overdose with iron tablets from India. Two young adults developed severe gastro-intestinal bleeding and fulminant hepatic failure 48 h after deliberate consumption of large doses of iron tablets. Serum iron levels measured 36 h after ingestion were normal presumably due to the redistribution of iron to the intracellular compartment. Despite aggressive supportive management in medical intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital, the patients succumbed to the toxic doses of iron. PMID:24339645

  17. Synthetic mononuclear nonheme iron-oxygen intermediates.

    PubMed

    Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-08-18

    Mononuclear nonheme iron-oxygen species, such as iron-superoxo, -peroxo, -hydroperoxo, and -oxo, are key intermediates involved in dioxygen activation and oxidation reactions catalyzed by nonheme iron enzymes. Because these iron-oxygen intermediates are short-lived due to their thermal instability and high reactivity, it is challenging to investigate their structural and spectroscopic properties and reactivity in the catalytic cycles of the enzymatic reactions themselves. One way to approach such problems is to synthesize biomimetic iron-oxygen complexes and to tune their geometric and electronic structures for structural characterization and reactivity studies. Indeed, a number of biologically important iron-oxygen species, such as mononuclear nonheme iron(III)-superoxo, iron(III)-peroxo, iron(III)-hydroperoxo, iron(IV)-oxo, and iron(V)-oxo complexes, were synthesized recently, and the first X-ray crystal structures of iron(III)-superoxo, iron(III)-peroxo, and iron(IV)-oxo complexes in nonheme iron models were successfully obtained. Thus, our understanding of iron-oxygen intermediates in biological reactions has been aided greatly from the studies of the structural and spectroscopic properties and the reactivities of the synthetic biomimetic analogues. In this Account, we describe our recent results on the synthesis and characterization of mononuclear nonheme iron-oxygen complexes bearing simple macrocyclic ligands, such as N-tetramethylated cyclam ligand (TMC) and tetraamido macrocyclic ligand (TAML). In the case of iron-superoxo complexes, an iron(III)-superoxo complex, [(TAML)Fe(III)(O2)](2-), is described, including its crystal structure and reactivities in electrophilic and nucleophilic oxidative reactions, and its properties are compared with those of a chromium(III)-superoxo complex, [(TMC)Cr(III)(O2)(Cl)](+), with respect to its reactivities in hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactions. In the case of iron-peroxo intermediates

  18. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron (III) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1309-37-1, red-brown to black trigonal crystals). (b) In accordance with §...

  19. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron (III) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1309-37-1, red-brown to black trigonal crystals). (b) In accordance with §...

  20. Effects of developmental iron deficiency and post-weaning iron repletion on the levels of iron transporter proteins in rats

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sugyoung; Shin, Pill-kyung

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Iron deficiency in early life is associated with developmental problems, which may persist until later in life. The question of whether iron repletion after developmental iron deficiency could restore iron homeostasis is not well characterized. In the present study, we investigated the changes of iron transporters after iron depletion during the gestational-neonatal period and iron repletion during the post-weaning period. MATERIALS/METHODS Pregnant rats were provided iron-deficient (< 6 ppm Fe) or control (36 ppm Fe) diets from gestational day 2. At weaning, pups from iron-deficient dams were fed either iron-deficient (ID group) or control (IDR group) diets for 4 week. Pups from control dams were continued to be fed with the control diet throughout the study period (CON). RESULTS Compared to the CON, ID rats had significantly lower hemoglobin and hematocrits in the blood and significantly lower tissue iron in the liver and spleen. Hepatic hepcidin and BMP6 mRNA levels were also strongly down-regulated in the ID group. Developmental iron deficiency significantly increased iron transporters divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and ferroportin (FPN) in the duodenum, but decreased DMT1 in the liver. Dietary iron repletion restored the levels of hemoglobin and hematocrit to a normal range, but the tissue iron levels and hepatic hepcidin mRNA levels were significantly lower than those in the CON group. Both FPN and DMT1 protein levels in the liver and in the duodenum were not different between the IDR and the CON. By contrast, DMT1 in the spleen was significantly lower in the IDR, compared to the CON. The splenic FPN was also decreased in the IDR more than in the CON, although the difference did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS Our findings demonstrate that iron transporter proteins in the duodenum, liver and spleen are differentially regulated during developmental iron deficiency. Also, post-weaning iron repletion efficiently

  1. The Iron-Iron Carbide Phase Diagram: A Practical Guide to Some Descriptive Solid State Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Gary J.; Leighly, H. P., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the solid state chemistry of iron and steel in terms of the iron-iron carbide phase diagram. Suggests that this is an excellent way of introducing the phase diagram (equilibrium diagram) to undergraduate students while at the same time introducing the descriptive solid state chemistry of iron and steel. (Author/JN)

  2. Early postnatal iron repletion overcomes lasting effects of gestational iron deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Beard, John L; Unger, Erica L; Bianco, Laura E; Paul, Tessy; Rundle, Sarah E; Jones, Byron C

    2007-05-01

    Iron deficiency anemia in early childhood causes developmental delays and, very likely, irreversible alterations in neurological functioning. One primary goal for the present study was to determine whether the effects of late gestational iron deficiency on brain monoamine metabolism, iron content, and behavioral phenotypes could be repaired with iron intervention in early lactation. Young pregnant rats were provided iron-deficient or control diets from mid-gestation (G15). At postnatal d 4 (P4), pups from iron-deficient dams were out-fostered either to other ID dams or control dams while pups of control dams were similarly fostered to other control dams. Dietary treatments continued to adulthood (P65) when brain iron and regional monoamines were evaluated. P4 iron repletion normalized body iron status, brain iron concentrations, monoamine concentrations, and monoamine transporter and receptor densities in most brain regions. Dopamine transporter densities in caudate and substantia nigra were lower in ID rats but were normalized with iron repletion. Serotonin transporter levels in most brain regions and open-field exploration were also normalized with iron repletion. The success of this approach of early postnatal iron intervention following iron deficiency in utero contrasts to a relative lack of success when the intervention is performed at weaning. These data suggest that a window of opportunity exists for reversing the detrimental effects of iron deficiency in utero in rats and provides strong support of intervention approaches in humans with iron deficiency during pregnancy.

  3. The role of ceruloplasmin in iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Roeser, H P; Lee, G R; Nacht, S; Cartwright, G E

    1970-12-01

    The importance of ceruloplasmin in iron metabolism was studied in swine made hypoceruloplasminemic by copper deprivation. When the plasma ceruloplasmin level fell below 1% of normal, cell-to-plasma iron flow became sufficiently impaired to cause hypoferremia, even though total body iron stores were normal. When ceruloplasmin was administered to such animals, plasma iron increased immediately and continued to rise at a rate proportional to the logarithm of the ceruloplasmin dose. The administration of inorganic copper induced increases in plasma iron only after ceruloplasmin appeared in the circulation. Thus, ceruloplasmin appeared to be essential to the normal movement of iron from cells to plasma. Studies designed to define the mechanism of action of ceruloplasmin were based on the in vitro observation that ceruloplasmin behaves as an enzyme (ferroxidase) that catalyzes oxidation of ferrous iron. Retention of injected ferrous iron in the plasma of ceruloplasmin-deficient swine was significantly less than that of ferric iron, reflecting impaired transferrin iron binding. Rat ceruloplasmin, which has little ferroxidase activity, was much less effective than porcine or human ceruloplasmin in inducing increases in plasma iron. These observations suggest that ceruloplasmin acts by virtue of its ferroxidase activity. Eight patients with Wilson's disease were evaluated in order to investigate iron metabolism in a disorder characterized by reduced ceruloplasmin levels. Evidence of iron deficiency was found in six of these, and in five of the six, plasma ceruloplasmin was less than 5% of normal. In comparison, the two patients without evidence of iron deficiency had ceruloplasmin levels of 11 and 18% of normal. It is suggested that iron deficiency tends to occur in those patients with Wilson's disease who have the severest degrees of hypoceruloplasminemia, possibly because of defective transfer of iron from intestinal mucosal cells to plasma.

  4. Intravenous iron-containing products: EMA procrastination.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    A European reassessment has led to identical changes in the summaries of product characteristics (SPCs) for all intravenous iron-containing products: the risk of serious adverse effects is now highlighted, underlining the fact that intravenous iron-containing products should only be used when the benefits clearly outweigh the harms. Unfortunately, iron dextran still remains on the market despite a higher risk of hypersensitivity reactions than with iron sucrose. PMID:25162093

  5. Intravenous iron-containing products: EMA procrastination.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    A European reassessment has led to identical changes in the summaries of product characteristics (SPCs) for all intravenous iron-containing products: the risk of serious adverse effects is now highlighted, underlining the fact that intravenous iron-containing products should only be used when the benefits clearly outweigh the harms. Unfortunately, iron dextran still remains on the market despite a higher risk of hypersensitivity reactions than with iron sucrose.

  6. Mitochondrial Iron-Sulfur Cluster Activity and Cytosolic Iron Regulate Iron Traffic in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Joshua D; Lindahl, Paul A

    2015-11-01

    An ordinary differential equation-based mathematical model was developed to describe trafficking and regulation of iron in growing fermenting budding yeast. Accordingly, environmental iron enters the cytosol and moves into mitochondria and vacuoles. Dilution caused by increasing cell volume is included. Four sites are regulated, including those in which iron is imported into the cytosol, mitochondria, and vacuoles, and the site at which vacuolar Fe(II) is oxidized to Fe(III). The objective of this study was to determine whether cytosolic iron (Fecyt) and/or a putative sulfur-based product of iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) activity was/were being sensed in regulation. The model assumes that the matrix of healthy mitochondria is anaerobic, and that in ISC mutants, O2 diffuses into the matrix where it reacts with nonheme high spin Fe(II) ions, oxidizing them to nanoparticles and generating reactive oxygen species. This reactivity causes a further decline in ISC/heme biosynthesis, which ultimately gives rise to the diseased state. The ordinary differential equations that define this model were numerically integrated, and concentrations of each component were plotted versus the concentration of iron in the growth medium and versus the rate of ISC/heme biosynthesis. Model parameters were optimized by fitting simulations to literature data. The model variant that assumed that both Fecyt and ISC biosynthesis activity were sensed in regulation mimicked observed behavior best. Such "dual sensing" probably arises in real cells because regulation involves assembly of an ISC on a cytosolic protein using Fecyt and a sulfur species generated in mitochondria during ISC biosynthesis and exported into the cytosol.

  7. Why are biotic iron pools uniform across high- and low-iron pelagic ecosystems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, P. W.; Strzepek, R. F.; Ellwood, M. J.; Hutchins, D. A.; Nodder, S. D.; Twining, B. S.; Wilhelm, S. W.

    2015-07-01

    Dissolved iron supply is pivotal in setting global phytoplankton productivity and pelagic ecosystem structure. However, most studies of the role of iron have focussed on carbon biogeochemistry within pelagic ecosystems, with less effort to quantify the iron biogeochemical cycle. Here we compare mixed-layer biotic iron inventories from a low-iron (~0.06 nmol L-1) subantarctic (FeCycle study) and a seasonally high-iron (~0.6 nmol L-1) subtropical (FeCycle II study) site. Both studies were quasi-Lagrangian, and had multi-day occupation, common sampling protocols, and indirect estimates of biotic iron (from a limited range of available published biovolume/carbon/iron quotas). Biotic iron pools were comparable (~100 ± 30 pmol L-1) for low- and high-iron waters, despite a tenfold difference in dissolved iron concentrations. Consistency in biotic iron inventories (~80 ± 24 pmol L-1, largely estimated using a limited range of available quotas) was also conspicuous for three Southern Ocean polar sites. Insights into the extent to which uniformity in biotic iron inventories was driven by the need to apply common iron quotas obtained from laboratory cultures were provided from FeCycle II. The observed twofold to threefold range of iron quotas during the evolution of FeCycle II subtropical bloom was much less than reported from laboratory monocultures. Furthermore, the iron recycling efficiency varied by fourfold during FeCycle II, increasing as stocks of new iron were depleted, suggesting that quotas and iron recycling efficiencies together set biotic iron pools. Hence, site-specific differences in iron recycling efficiencies (which provide 20-50% and 90% of total iron supply in high- and low-iron waters, respectively) help offset the differences in new iron inputs between low- and high-iron sites. Future parameterization of iron in biogeochemical models must focus on the drivers of biotic iron inventories, including the differing iron requirements of the resident biota

  8. Regulation of iron transport systems in Enterobacteriaceae in response to oxygen and iron availability.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Chandra; Payne, Shelley M

    2014-04-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for most bacteria. Depending on the oxygen available in the surrounding environment, iron is found in two distinct forms: ferrous (Fe(II)) or ferric (Fe(III)). Bacteria utilize different transport systems for the uptake of the two different forms of iron. In oxic growth conditions, iron is found in its insoluble, ferric form, and in anoxic growth conditions iron is found in its soluble, ferrous form. Enterobacteriaceae have adapted to transporting the two forms of iron by utilizing the global, oxygen-sensing regulators, ArcA and Fnr to regulate iron transport genes in response to oxygen.

  9. The impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on child’s health

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Ouf, Noran M.; Jan, Mohammed M.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is extremely common, particularly in the developing world, reaching a state of global epidemic. Iron deficiency during pregnancy is one of the leading causes of anemia in infants and young children. Many women go through the entire pregnancy without attaining the minimum required intake of iron. This review aims to determine the impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on infants and young children. Extensive literature review revealed that iron deficiency is a global nutritional problem affecting up to 52% of pregnant women. Many of these women are symptomatic. Lack of proper weight gain during pregnancy is an important predictor of iron deficiency. PMID:25719576

  10. Fate of blood meal iron in mosquitos

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guoli; Kohlhepp, Pete; Geiser, Dawn; Frasquillo, Maria del Carmen; Vazquez-Moreno, Luz; Winzerling, Joy J.

    2007-01-01

    Iron is an essential element of living cells and organisms as a component of numerous metabolic pathways. Hemoglobin and ferric-transferrin in vertebrate host blood are the two major iron sources for female mosquitoes. We used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and radioisotope-labeling to quantify the fate of iron supplied from hemoglobin or as transferrin in Aedes aegypti. At the end of the first gonotrophic cycloe, ~87% of the ingested total meal heme iron was excreted, while 7% was distributed into the eggs and 6% was stored in different tissues. In contrast, ~8% of the iron provided as transferrin was excreted and of that absorbed, 77% was allocated to the eggs and 15% distributed in the tissues. Further analyses indicate that of the iron supplied in a blood meal, ~7% appears in the eggs and of this iron 98% is from hemoglobin and 2% from ferric-transferrin. Whereas of iron from a blood meal retained in body of the female, ~97% is from heme and <1 % is from transferrin. Evaluation of iron-binding proteins in hemolymph and egg following intake of 59Fe-transferrin revealed that ferritin is iron loaded in these animals, and indicate that this protein plays a critical role in meal iron transport and iron storage in eggs in A. aegypti. PMID:17689557

  11. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform...

  12. 21 CFR 522.1182 - Iron injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... oxide; or (iii) Elemental iron. (2) 200 mg of elemental iron derived from ferric hydroxide. (b) Sponsors... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron injection. 522.1182 Section 522.1182 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1182...

  13. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform...

  14. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform...

  15. 21 CFR 522.1182 - Iron injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... oxide; or (iii) Elemental iron. (2) 200 mg of elemental iron derived from ferric hydroxide. (b) Sponsors... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron injection. 522.1182 Section 522.1182 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1182...

  16. 21 CFR 522.1182 - Iron injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... oxide; or (iii) Elemental iron. (2) 200 mg of elemental iron derived from ferric hydroxide. (b) Sponsors... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron injection. 522.1182 Section 522.1182 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1182...

  17. Iron Deficiency in Autism and Asperger Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latif, A.; Heinz, P.; Cook, R.

    2002-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the full blood count and, when available, serum ferritin measurements of 96 children (52 with autism and 44 with Asperger syndrome) found six autistic children had iron deficiency and 12 of the 23 autistic children with serum ferritin measures were iron deficient. Far fewer Asperger children were iron deficient. Results…

  18. 21 CFR 522.1182 - Iron injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron injection. 522.1182 Section 522.1182 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1182 Iron... equivalent of: (1) 100 milligrams (mg) of elemental iron derived from: (i) Ferric hydroxide; (ii)...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5375 - Iron reduced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron reduced. 582.5375 Section 582.5375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5375 Iron reduced. (a) Product. Iron reduced. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  20. 21 CFR 582.5375 - Iron reduced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron reduced. 582.5375 Section 582.5375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5375 Iron reduced. (a) Product. Iron reduced. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  1. 49 CFR 230.91 - Chafing irons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chafing irons. 230.91 Section 230.91 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Tenders Draw Gear and Draft Systems § 230.91 Chafing irons. Chafing irons that permit proper curving...

  2. 21 CFR 522.1182 - Iron injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron injection. 522.1182 Section 522.1182 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1182 Iron... equivalent of: (1) 100 milligrams (mg) of elemental iron derived from: (i) Ferric hydroxide; (ii)...

  3. 49 CFR 230.91 - Chafing irons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chafing irons. 230.91 Section 230.91 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Tenders Draw Gear and Draft Systems § 230.91 Chafing irons. Chafing irons that permit proper curving...

  4. Treatment of Iron Deficiency in Women

    PubMed Central

    Breymann, C.; Römer, T.; Dudenhausen, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency with and without anaemia is a common cause of morbidity, particularly in women. Iron deficiency is generally the result of an imbalance between iron loss and iron absorption. In women with symptoms suspicious for iron deficiency, it is important to confirm or exclude the suspicion using proper tests. The use of serum ferritin levels is considered the gold standard for diagnosis. Although the ideal ferritin levels are not unknown the current consent is that levels < 40 ng/ml indicate iron deficiency, which needs to be treated in symptomatic patients. However, symptoms can already occur at ferritin levels of < 100 ng/ml and treatment must be adapted to the individual patient. Iron supplementation is only indicated in symptomatic patients diagnosed with iron deficiency whose quality of life is affected. It is important to treat iron deficiency together with its causes or risk factors. For example, blood loss from hypermenorrhea should be reduced. Women also need to receive information about the benefits of an iron-rich diet. If oral treatment with iron supplements is ineffective, parenteral iron administration is recommended. PMID:26633902

  5. Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Casey, Charles P.; Guan, Hairong

    2010-11-16

    Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

  6. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron... per million. (c) Uses and restrictions. Iron oxides are safe for use in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with good manufacturing...

  7. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron... per million. (c) Uses and restrictions. Iron oxides are safe for use in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with good manufacturing...

  8. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron... per million. (c) Uses and restrictions. Iron oxides are safe for use in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with good manufacturing...

  9. Iron bioaccumulation in mycelium of Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Sandra M; Umeo, Suzana H; Marcante, Rafael C; Yokota, Meire E; Valle, Juliana S; Dragunski, Douglas C; Colauto, Nelson B; Linde, Giani A

    2015-03-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is able to bioaccumulate several metals in its cell structures; however, there are no reports on its capacity to bioaccumulate iron. The objective of this study was to evaluate cultivation variables to increase iron bioaccumulation in P. ostreatus mycelium. A full factorial design and a central composite design were utilized to evaluate the effect of the following variables: nitrogen and carbon sources, pH and iron concentration in the solid culture medium to produce iron bioaccumulated in mycelial biomass. The maximum production of P. ostreatus mycelial biomass was obtained with yeast extract at 2.96 g of nitrogen L (-1) and glucose at 28.45 g L (-1) . The most important variable to bioaccumulation was the iron concentration in the cultivation medium. Iron concentration at 175 mg L (-1) or higher in the culture medium strongly inhibits the mycelial growth. The highest iron concentration in the mycelium was 3500 mg kg (-1) produced with iron addition of 300 mg L (-1) . The highest iron bioaccumulation in the mycelium was obtained in culture medium with 150 mg L (-1) of iron. Iron bioaccumulation in P. ostreatus mycelium is a potential alternative to produce non-animal food sources of iron. PMID:26221108

  10. Voice Modulations in German Ironic Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharrer, Lisa; Christmann, Ursula; Knoll, Monja

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has shown that in different languages ironic speech is acoustically modulated compared to literal speech, and these modulations are assumed to aid the listener in the comprehension process by acting as cues that mark utterances as ironic. The present study was conducted to identify paraverbal features of German "ironic criticism"…

  11. Africa: The Birthplace of Iron Mining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutunhu, Tendai

    1981-01-01

    Describes the discovery in Swaziland of the oldest iron mining site known. Before this evidence that it was Africans who discovered iron mining and smelting around 42,000 B.C., it had been believed that the knowledge of iron originated in the Middle East between 550-1500 B.C. (GC)

  12. 49 CFR 230.91 - Chafing irons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chafing irons. 230.91 Section 230.91 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Tenders Draw Gear and Draft Systems § 230.91 Chafing irons. Chafing irons that permit proper curving...

  13. 49 CFR 230.91 - Chafing irons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chafing irons. 230.91 Section 230.91 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Tenders Draw Gear and Draft Systems § 230.91 Chafing irons. Chafing irons that permit proper curving...

  14. 49 CFR 230.91 - Chafing irons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chafing irons. 230.91 Section 230.91 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Tenders Draw Gear and Draft Systems § 230.91 Chafing irons. Chafing irons that permit proper curving...

  15. Micromilling enhances iron bioaccessibility from wholegrain wheat.

    PubMed

    Latunde-Dada, G O; Li, X; Parodi, A; Edwards, C H; Ellis, P R; Sharp, P A

    2014-11-19

    Cereals constitute important sources of iron in human diet; however, much of the iron in wheat is lost during processing for the production of white flour. This study employed novel food processing techniques to increase the bioaccessibility of naturally occurring iron in wheat. Iron was localized in wheat by Perl's Prussian blue staining. Soluble iron from digested wheat flour was measured by a ferrozine spectrophotometric assay. Iron bioaccessibility was determined using an in vitro simulated peptic-pancreatic digestion, followed by measurement of ferritin (a surrogate marker for iron absorption) in Caco-2 cells. Light microscopy revealed that iron in wheat was encapsulated in cells of the aleurone layer and remained intact after in vivo digestion and passage through the gastrointestinal tract. The solubility of iron in wholegrain wheat and in purified wheat aleurone increased significantly after enzymatic digestion with Driselase, and following mechanical disruption using micromilling. Furthermore, following in vitro simulated peptic-pancreatic digestion, iron bioaccessibility, measured as ferritin formation in Caco-2 cells, from micromilled aleurone flour was significantly higher (52%) than from whole aleurone flour. Taken together our data show that disruption of aleurone cell walls could increase iron bioaccessibility. Micromilled aleurone could provide an alternative strategy for iron fortification of cereal products.

  16. Adipocyte iron regulates leptin and food intake

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Li, Zhonggang; Gabrielsen, J. Scott; Simcox, Judith A.; Lee, Soh-hyun; Jones, Deborah; Cooksey, Bob; Stoddard, Gregory; Cefalu, William T.; McClain, Donald A.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary iron supplementation is associated with increased appetite. Here, we investigated the effect of iron on the hormone leptin, which regulates food intake and energy homeostasis. Serum ferritin was negatively associated with serum leptin in a cohort of patients with metabolic syndrome. Moreover, the same inverse correlation was observed in mice fed a high-iron diet. Adipocyte-specific loss of the iron exporter ferroportin resulted in iron loading and decreased leptin, while decreased levels of hepcidin in a murine hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) model increased adipocyte ferroportin expression, decreased adipocyte iron, and increased leptin. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with iron decreased leptin mRNA in a dose-dependent manner. We found that iron negatively regulates leptin transcription via cAMP-responsive element binding protein activation (CREB activation) and identified 2 potential CREB-binding sites in the mouse leptin promoter region. Mutation of both sites completely blocked the effect of iron on promoter activity. ChIP analysis revealed that binding of phosphorylated CREB is enriched at these two sites in iron-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes compared with untreated cells. Consistent with the changes in leptin, dietary iron content was also directly related to food intake, independently of weight. These findings indicate that levels of dietary iron play an important role in regulation of appetite and metabolism through CREB-dependent modulation of leptin expression. PMID:26301810

  17. Iron bioaccumulation in mycelium of Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Sandra M.; Umeo, Suzana H.; Marcante, Rafael C.; Yokota, Meire E.; Valle, Juliana S.; Dragunski, Douglas C.; Colauto, Nelson B.; Linde, Giani A.

    2015-01-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is able to bioaccumulate several metals in its cell structures; however, there are no reports on its capacity to bioaccumulate iron. The objective of this study was to evaluate cultivation variables to increase iron bioaccumulation in P. ostreatus mycelium. A full factorial design and a central composite design were utilized to evaluate the effect of the following variables: nitrogen and carbon sources, pH and iron concentration in the solid culture medium to produce iron bioaccumulated in mycelial biomass. The maximum production of P. ostreatus mycelial biomass was obtained with yeast extract at 2.96 g of nitrogen L −1 and glucose at 28.45 g L −1 . The most important variable to bioaccumulation was the iron concentration in the cultivation medium. Iron concentration at 175 mg L −1 or higher in the culture medium strongly inhibits the mycelial growth. The highest iron concentration in the mycelium was 3500 mg kg −1 produced with iron addition of 300 mg L −1 . The highest iron bioaccumulation in the mycelium was obtained in culture medium with 150 mg L −1 of iron. Iron bioaccumulation in P. ostreatus mycelium is a potential alternative to produce non-animal food sources of iron. PMID:26221108

  18. Intravenous iron-dextran: studies on unsaturated iron-binding capacity

    PubMed Central

    Cox, J. S. G.; Moss, G. F.; Bremner, I.; Reason, Janet

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for measuring the plasma unsaturated iron-binding capacity in the presence of very high concentrations of iron as iron-dextran. The procedure utilizes 59Fe to label the apotransferrin with subsequent separation of ionic iron from transferrin-bound iron on an ion exchange or Sephadex G.25 column. The unsaturated iron-binding capacity has been measured in rabbits and dogs after intravenous injection of iron-dextran and in human subjects after total dose infusion of iron-dextran. No evidence of saturation of the unsaturated iron-binding capacity was found even when the plasma iron values were greater than 40,000 μg Fe/100 ml. PMID:5697365

  19. Microbial iron uptake as a mechanism for dispersing iron from deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Toner, Brandy M; Baker, Brett J; Breier, John A; Sheik, Cody S; Dick, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are a significant source of oceanic iron. Although hydrothermal iron rapidly precipitates as inorganic minerals on mixing with seawater, it can be stabilized by organic matter and dispersed more widely than previously recognized. The nature and source of this organic matter is unknown. Here we show that microbial genes involved in cellular iron uptake are highly expressed in the Guaymas Basin deep-sea hydrothermal plume. The nature of these microbial iron transporters, taken together with the low concentration of dissolved iron and abundance of particulate iron in the plume, indicates that iron minerals are the target for this microbial scavenging and uptake. Our findings indicate that cellular iron uptake is a major process in plume microbial communities and suggest new mechanisms for generating Fe-C complexes. This 'microbial iron pump' could represent an important mode of converting hydrothermal iron into bioavailable forms that can be dispersed throughout the oceans.

  20. Coal desulfurization with iron pentacarbonyl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    Coal desulfurization with iron pentacarbonyl treatment under mild conditions removes up to eighty percent of organic sulfur. Preliminary tests on treatment process suggest it may be economical enough to encourage investigation of use for coal desulfurization. With mild operating conditions, process produces environmentally-acceptable clean coal at reasonable cost.