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Sample records for alkali-silica reaction asr

  1. Influence of lithium hydroxide on alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bulteel, D.; Garcia-Diaz, E.; Degrugilliers, P.

    2010-04-15

    Several papers show that the use of lithium limits the development of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) in concrete. The aim of this study is to improve the understanding of lithium's role on the alteration mechanism of ASR. The approach used is a chemical method which allowed a quantitative measurement of the specific degree of reaction of ASR. The chemical concrete sub-system used, called model reactor, is composed of the main ASR reagents: reactive aggregate, portlandite and alkaline solution. Different reaction degrees are measured and compared for different alkaline solutions: NaOH, KOH and LiOH. Alteration by ASR is observed with the same reaction degrees in the presence of NaOH and KOH, accompanied by the consumption of hydroxyl concentration. On the other hand with LiOH, ASR is very limited. Reaction degree values evolve little and the hydroxyl concentration remains about stable. These observations demonstrate that lithium ions have an inhibitor role on ASR.

  2. In situ alkali-silica reaction observed by x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtis, K.E.; Monteiro, P.J.M.; Brown, J.T.; Meyer-Ilse, W.

    1997-04-01

    In concrete, alkali metal ions and hydroxyl ions contributed by the cement and reactive silicates present in aggregate can participate in a destructive alkali-silica reaction (ASR). This reaction of the alkalis with the silicates produces a gel that tends to imbibe water found in the concrete pores, leading to swelling of the gel and eventual cracking of the affected concrete member. Over 104 cases of alkali-aggregate reaction in dams and spillways have been reported around the world. At present, no method exists to arrest the expansive chemical reaction which generates significant distress in the affected structures. Most existing techniques available for the examination of concrete microstructure, including ASR products, demand that samples be dried and exposed to high pressure during the observation period. These sample preparation requirements present a major disadvantage for the study of alkali-silica reaction. Given the nature of the reaction and the affect of water on its products, it is likely that the removal of water will affect the morphology, creating artifacts in the sample. The purpose of this research is to observe and characterize the alkali-silica reaction, including each of the specific reactions identified previously, in situ without introducing sample artifacts. For observation of unconditioned samples, x-ray microscopy offers an opportunity for such an examination of the alkali-silica reaction. Currently, this investigation is focusing on the effect of calcium ions on the alkali-silica reaction.

  3. Alkali-silica reaction resistant concrete using pumice blended cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Uma

    Durability of structures is a major challenge for the building industry. One of the many types of concrete deterioration that can affect durability is alkali-silica reaction (ASR). ASR has been found in most types of concrete structures, including dams, bridges, pavements, and other structures that are 20 to 50 years old. The degradation mechanism of ASR produces a gel that significantly expands in the presence of water as supplied from the surrounding environment. This expansion gel product can create high stresses and cracking of the concrete, which can lead to other forms of degradation and expensive structural replacement costs. The four essential factors that produce an expansive ASR gel in concrete are the presence of alkalis, siliceous aggregate, moisture, and free calcium hydroxide (CH). If concrete is starved of any one of these essential components, the expansion can be prevented. Reducing CH through the use of a supplementary cementitious material (SCM) such as natural pozzolan pumice is the focus of this research. By using a pozzolan, the amount of CH is reduced with time based on the effectiveness of the pozzolan. Many pozzolans exist, but one such naturally occurring pozzolanic material is pumice. This research focuses on determining the effect of a finely ground pumice as a SCM in terms of its resistance to ASR expansion, as well as improving resistance to other potential concrete durability mechanisms. In spite of having high alkali contents in the pumice, mixtures containing the SCM pumice more effectively mitigated the ASR expansion reaction than other degradation mechanisms. Depending on the reactivity of the aggregates and fineness of the pumice, 10-15% replacement of cement with the pumice was found to reduce the ASR expansion to the acceptable limits. The amount of CH remaining in the concrete was compared to the ASR expansion in order to improve understanding of the role of CH in the ASR reaction. Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X

  4. Detection of alkali-silica reaction swelling in concrete by staining

    DOEpatents

    Guthrie, Jr., George D.; Carey, J. William

    1998-01-01

    A method using concentrated aqueous solutions of sodium cobaltinitrite and rhodamine B is described which can be used to identify concrete that contains gels formed by the alkali-silica reaction (ASR). These solutions present little health or environmental risk, are readily applied, and rapidly discriminate between two chemically distinct gels; K-rich, Na--K--Ca--Si gels are identified by yellow staining, and alkali-poor, Ca--Si gels are identified by pink staining.

  5. Detection of alkali-silica reaction swelling in concrete by staining

    DOEpatents

    Guthrie, G.D. Jr.; Carey, J.W.

    1998-04-14

    A method using concentrated aqueous solutions of sodium cobalt nitrite and rhodamine B is described which can be used to identify concrete that contains gels formed by the alkali-silica reaction (ASR). These solutions present little health or environmental risk, are readily applied, and rapidly discriminate between two chemically distinct gels; K-rich, Na-K-Ca-Si gels are identified by yellow staining, and alkali-poor, Ca-Si gels are identified by pink staining.

  6. Alkali-silica reaction and its effectes on concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.

    1995-12-31

    Alkali-silica reactivity (ASR) has resulted in cracking of concrete in numerous dams in the United States and elsewhere. Many of these dams were constructed prior to the initial discovery of ASR in California in the late 1930`s, thus no special precautions could have been taken to prevent its development Since that time, ASR has been identified in all types of structures located in many parts of the world. Voluminous research has been carried out to better characterize its development, to more completely understand the mechanisms of expansion and distress, and to design means to mitigate its development in new and existing construction. Based on this work, this paper describes the nature of ASR, its effects on concrete, and means to control its development, with special reference to dams.

  7. Physics and chemistry of alkali-silica reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, S.; Barneyback, R.S. Jr.; Struble, L.J.

    1981-01-01

    The philosophy underlying recent research on alkali-silica reactions is reviewed and illustrations of recent results are provided. It has been possible to follow the kinetics of the chemical reaction between dissolved alkalis and opal in mortars by monitoring the rate at which alkalis are removed from the pore solutions of reacting mortars. Studies of the expansion behavior of synthetic alkali silica gels under controlled conditions were carried out and show no obvious correlation to chemical composition. The alkali reaction in mortars was found to produce changes in the appearance of opal grains documentable by the use of a scanning electron microscope.

  8. Microstructural Changes Due to Alkali-Silica Reaction during Standard Mortar Test

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shin, Jun-Ho; Struble, Leslie; Kirkpatrick, R.

    2015-12-01

    The microstructural development of mortar bars with silica glass aggregate undergoing alkali-silica reaction (ASR) under the conditions of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard Test C1260 was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and qualitative X-ray microanalysis. Cracking in the aggregate, the hydrated paste, and the paste-aggregate interface was important in the development of the microstructure. Cracks were characterized according to their location, their relationship to other cracks, and whether they are filled with ASR gel. Expansion of the bars was approximately 1% at 12 days and 2% at 53 days. They fell apart by 63 days. The barsmore » contained two zones, an inner region that was undergoing ASR and an outer and much more highly damaged zone that extended further inward over time. Evidence of ASR was present even during the period when specimens were immersed in water, prior to immersion in NaOH solution.« less

  9. Microstructural Changes Due to Alkali-Silica Reaction during Standard Mortar Test

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jun-Ho; Struble, Leslie; Kirkpatrick, R.

    2015-12-01

    The microstructural development of mortar bars with silica glass aggregate undergoing alkali-silica reaction (ASR) under the conditions of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard Test C1260 was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and qualitative X-ray microanalysis. Cracking in the aggregate, the hydrated paste, and the paste-aggregate interface was important in the development of the microstructure. Cracks were characterized according to their location, their relationship to other cracks, and whether they are filled with ASR gel. Expansion of the bars was approximately 1% at 12 days and 2% at 53 days. They fell apart by 63 days. The bars contained two zones, an inner region that was undergoing ASR and an outer and much more highly damaged zone that extended further inward over time. Evidence of ASR was present even during the period when specimens were immersed in water, prior to immersion in NaOH solution.

  10. Petrography study on altered flint aggregate by alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bulteel, D. . E-mail: bulteel@ensm-douai.fr; Rafai, N.; Degrugilliers, P.; Garcia-Diaz, E.

    2004-11-15

    The aim of our study is to improve our understanding of an alkali-silica reaction (ASR) via petrography. We used a chemical concrete subsystem: flint aggregate, portlandite and KOH. The altered flint aggregate is followed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after acid treatment at different intervals. After acid treatment, the observations showed an increase in aggregate porosity and revealed internal degradation of the aggregate. This degradation created amorphous zones. Before acid treatment, the analyses on polished sections by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) enabled visualization of K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} penetration into the aggregate. The appearance of amorphous zones and penetration of positive ions into the aggregate are correlated with the increase in the molar fraction of silanol sites. This degradation is specific to the alkali-silica reaction.

  11. Influence of stress restraint on the expansive behaviour of concrete affected by alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Berra, M.; Faggiani, G.; Mangialardi, T.; Paolini, A.E.

    2010-09-15

    The primary objective of this study was to ascertain whether the Threshold Alkali Level (TAL) of the concrete aggregates may be taken as a suitable reactivity parameter for the selection of aggregates susceptible of alkali-silica reaction (ASR), even when ASR expansion in concrete develops under restrained conditions. Concrete mixes made with different alkali contents and two natural siliceous aggregates with very different TALs were tested for their expansivity at 38 {sup o}C and 100% RH under unrestrained and restrained conditions. Four compressive stress levels over the range from 0.17 to 3.50 N/mm{sup 2} were applied by using a new appositely designed experimental equipment. The lowest stress (0.17 N/mm{sup 2}) was selected in order to estimate the expansive pressure developed by the ASR gel under 'free' expansion conditions. It was found that, even under restrained conditions, the threshold alkali level proves to be a suitable reactivity parameter for designing concrete mixes that are not susceptible of deleterious ASR expansion. An empirical relationship between expansive pressure, concrete alkali content and aggregate TAL was developed in view of its possible use for ASR diagnosis and/or safety evaluation of concrete structures.

  12. Monitoring, Modeling, and Diagnosis of Alkali-Silica Reaction in Small Concrete Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vivek; Cai, Guowei; Gribok, Andrei V.; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2015-09-01

    Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear power plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Structural health monitoring of concrete structures aims to understand the current health condition of a structure based on heterogeneous measurements to produce high-confidence actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. This report describes alkali-silica reaction (ASR) degradation mechanisms and factors influencing the ASR. A fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical model developed by Saouma and Perotti by taking into consideration the effects of stress on the reaction kinetics and anisotropic volumetric expansion is presented in this report. This model is implemented in the GRIZZLY code based on the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment. The implemented model in the GRIZZLY code is randomly used to initiate ASR in a 2D and 3D lattice to study the percolation aspects of concrete. The percolation aspects help determine the transport properties of the material and therefore the durability and service life of concrete. This report summarizes the effort to develop small-size concrete samples with embedded glass to mimic ASR. The concrete samples were treated in water and sodium hydroxide solution at elevated temperature to study how ingress of sodium ions and hydroxide ions at elevated temperature impacts concrete samples embedded with glass. Thermal camera was used to monitor the changes in the concrete sample and results are summarized.

  13. Classification of alkali-silica reaction and corrosion distress using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelrahman, Marwa; ElBatanouny, Mohamed; Serrato, Michael; Dixon, Kenneth; Larosche, Carl; Ziehl, Paul

    2016-02-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulates approximately 100 commercial nuclear power reactor facilities that contribute about 20% of the total electric energy produced in the United States. Half of these reactor facilities are over 30 years old and are approaching their original design service life. Due to economic and durability considerations, significant portions of many of the facilities were constructed with reinforced concrete, including the containment facilities, cooling towers, and foundations. While most of these concrete facilities have performed exceptionally well throughout their initial expected service life, some are beginning to exhibit different forms of concrete deterioration. In this study, acoustic emission (AE) is used to monitor two main concrete deterioration mechanisms; alkali-silica reaction (ASR) distress and corrosion of reinforcing steel. An accelerated ASR test was conducted where specimens were continuously monitored with AE. The results show that AE can detect and classify damage due to ASR distress in the specimens. AE was also used to remotely monitor active corrosion regions in a reactor facility. AE monitoring of accelerated corrosion testing was also conducted on a concrete block specimen cut from a similar reactor building. Electrochemical measurements were conducted to correlate AE activity to quantifiable corrosion measurements and to enhance capabilities for service life prediction.

  14. Stability of cenospheres in lightweight cement composites in terms of alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junyan Zhang Minhong; Li Wei; Chia, Kok-Seng; Liew, Richard J.Y.

    2012-05-15

    This paper presents an experimental study on characteristics and stability of cenospheres used in lightweight cement composites. ASTM C227 and C1260 tests were used to evaluate if cenospheres are potentially deleterious due to alkali-silica reaction (ASR). Natural sand was used as control. Examination by scanning electron microscope with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and analyses by X-ray diffractometer and thermogravimetry were conducted on samples with cenospheres after 9-month C227 and C1260 tests to better understand the behavior of cenospheres exposed to high alkaline environments and higher temperatures in these tests. Results indicate that cenospheres are not potentially deleterious due to ASR. Expansion of the mortar specimens tested to ASTM C227 and C1260 seems to be affected by the pozzolanic reactivity of cenospheres. Fine cenospheres showed limited pozzolanic reactivity at 28-30 Degree-Sign C and 38 Degree-Sign C, but exhibited significant pozzolanic reactivity at 80 Degree-Sign C with aluminum tobermorite [Ca{sub 5}Si{sub 5}Al(OH)O{sub 17} Bullet-Operator 5H{sub 2}O] identified as the main reaction product.

  15. Cathodoluminescence microscopy and petrographic image analysis of aggregates in concrete pavements affected by alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stastna, A.; Sachlova, S.; Pertold, Z.; Prikryl, R.; Leichmann, J.

    2012-03-15

    Various microscopic techniques (cathodoluminescence, polarizing and electron microscopy) were combined with image analysis with the aim to determine a) the modal composition and degradation features within concrete, and b) the petrographic characteristics and the geological types (rocks, and their provenance) of the aggregates. Concrete samples were taken from five different portions of Highway Nos. D1, D11, and D5 (the Czech Republic). Coarse and fine aggregates were found to be primarily composed of volcanic, plutonic, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, as well as of quartz and feldspar aggregates of variable origins. The alkali-silica reaction was observed to be the main degradation mechanism, based upon the presence of microcracks and alkali-silica gels in the concrete. Use of cathodoluminescence enabled the identification of the source materials of the quartz aggregates, based upon their CL characteristics (i.e., color, intensity, microfractures, deformation, and zoning), which is difficult to distinguish only employing polarizing and electron microscopy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASR in concrete pavements on the Highways Nos. D1, D5 and D11 (Czech Republic). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cathodoluminescence was combined with various microscopic techniques and image analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASR was attributed to aggregates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Source materials of aggregates were identified based on cathodoluminescence characteristics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quartz comes from different volcanic, plutonic and metamorphic parent rocks.

  16. Use of ground clay brick as a pozzolanic material to reduce the alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Turanli, L.; Bektas, F.; Monteiro, P.J.M

    2003-10-01

    The objective of this experimental study was to use ground clay brick (GCB) as a pozzolanic material to minimize the alkali-silica reaction expansion. Two different types of clay bricks were finely ground and their activity indices were determined. ASTM accelerated mortar bar tests were performed to investigate the effect of GCB when used to replace cement mass. The microstructure of the mortar was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the GCBs meet the strength activity requirements of ASTM. In addition, the GCBs were found to be effective in suppressing the alkali-silica reaction expansion. The expansion decreased as the amount of GCBs in the mortar increased.

  17. Investigation of structural properties associated with alkali-silica reaction by means of macro- and micro-structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mo Xiangyin . E-mail: moxiangyin@njnu.edu.cn; Fournier, Benoit

    2007-02-15

    Structural properties associated with alkali-silica reaction were systematically investigated by means of macro-structural accelerated mortar prism expansion levels testing, combined with micro-structural analysis. One part of this study is to determine the reactivity of the aggregate by means of accelerated mortar bar tests, and also to evaluate perlite aggregate constituents, especially the presence of deleterious components and find main causes of the alkali-silica reaction, which was based on the petrographic studies by optical microscope and the implication of X-ray diffraction on the aggregate. Results implied that the aggregate was highly alkali-silica reactive and the main micro-crystalline quartz-intermediate character and matrix that is mainly composed of chalcedony are potentially suitable for alkali-silica reaction. The other part is to study the long-term effect of lithium salts against alkali-silica reaction by testing accelerated mortar prism expansion levels. The macro-structural results were also consistent with the micro-structural mechanisms of alkali-silica reaction of mortar prisms containing this aggregate and the effect of chemical admixtures by means of the methods of scanning electron microscope-X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. It was indicated by these techniques that lithium salts, which were introduced into concrete containing reactive aggregate at the mixing stage, suppressed the alkali-silica reaction by producing non-expansive crystalline materials.

  18. The effects of potassium and rubidium hydroxide on the alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Shomglin, K.; Turanli, L.; Wenk, H.-R.; Monteiro, P.J.M.; Sposito, G

    2003-11-01

    Expansion of mortar specimens prepared with an aggregate of mylonite from the Santa Rosa mylonite zone in southern California was studied to investigate the effect of different alkali ions on the alkali-silica reaction in concrete. The expansion tests indicate that mortar has a greater expansion when subjected to a sodium hydroxide bath than in a sodium-potassium-rubidium hydroxide bath. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) of mortar bars at early ages show that rubidium ions, used as tracer, were present throughout the sample by the third day of exposure. The analysis also shows a high concentration of rubidium in silica gel from mortar bars exposed to bath solutions containing rubidium. The results suggest that expansion of mortar bars using ASTM C 1260 does not depend on the diffusion of alkali ions. The results indicate that the expansion of alkali-silica gel depends on the type of alkali ions present. Alkali-silica gel containing rubidium shows a lower concentration of calcium, suggesting competition for the same sites.

  19. Alkali-silica reactions of mortars produced by using waste glass as fine aggregate and admixtures such as fly ash and Li2CO3.

    PubMed

    Topçu, Ilker Bekir; Boğa, Ahmet Raif; Bilir, Turhan

    2008-01-01

    Use of waste glass or glass cullet (GC) as concrete aggregate is becoming more widespread each day because of the increase in resource efficiency. Recycling of wastes is very important for sustainable development. When glass is used as aggregate in concrete or mortar, expansions and internal stresses occur due to an alkali-silica reaction (ASR). Furthermore, rapid loss in durability is generally observed due to extreme crack formation and an increase in permeability. It is necessary to use some kind of chemical or mineral admixture to reduce crack formation. In this study, mortar bars are produced by using three different colors of glass in four different quantities as fine aggregate by weight, and the effects of these glass aggregates on ASR are investigated, corresponding to ASTM C 1260. Additionally, in order to reduce the expansions of mortars, 10% and 20% fly ash (FA) as mineral admixture and 1% and 2% Li(2)CO(3) as chemical admixture are incorporated by weight in the cement and their effects on expansion are examined. It is observed that among white (WG), green (GG) and brown glass (BG) aggregates, WG aggregate causes the greatest expansion. In addition, expansion increases with an increase in amount of glass. According to the test results, it is seen that over 20% FA and 2% Li(2)CO(3) replacements are required to produce mortars which have expansion values below the 0.2% critical value when exposed to ASR. However, usages of these admixtures reduce expansions occurring because of ASR. PMID:17570652

  20. Microscopy and Cathodoluminescence Spectroscopy Characterization of Quartz Exhibiting Different Alkali-Silica Reaction Potential.

    PubMed

    Kuchařová, Aneta; Götze, Jens; Šachlová, Šárka; Pertold, Zdeněk; Přikryl, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Different quartz types from several localities in the Czech Republic and Sweden were examined by polarizing microscopy combined with cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy, spectroscopy, and petrographic image analysis, and tested by use of an accelerated mortar bar test (following ASTM C1260). The highest alkali-silica reaction potential was indicated by very fine-grained chert, containing significant amounts of fine-grained to cryptocrystalline matrix. The chert exhibited a dark red CL emission band at ~640 nm with a low intensity. Fine-grained orthoquartzites, as well as fine-grained metamorphic vein quartz, separated from phyllite exhibited medium expansion values. The orthoquartzites showed various CL of quartz grains, from blue through violet, red, and brown. Two CL spectral bands at ~450 and ~630 nm, with various intensities, were detected. The quartz from phyllite displayed an inhomogeneous dark red CL with two CL spectral bands of low intensities at ~460 and ~640 nm. The massive coarse-grained pegmatite quartz from pegmatite was assessed to be nonreactive and displayed a typical short-lived blue CL (~480 nm). The higher reactivity of the fine-grained hydrothermal quartz may be connected with high concentrations of defect centers, and probably with amorphized micro-regions in the quartz, respectively; indicated by a yellow CL emission (~570 nm). PMID:26790877

  1. Non-Destructive Diagnostic Technique for Detection of Deteriorated Porcelain Shell Due to Alkali-Silica Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takayuki; Yuasa, Sadayuki; Nakura, Toru; Hayashi, Tomohiro

    Recently we experienced gas leak trouble of a hollow porcelain shell, which had been working in service for more than a few decades. From our investigation, it was found that an alkali-silica reaction might occur in the porcelain body over time depending on the sealing structure, the number of times the porcelain was fired, and the amount of alkali in the cement. This paper describes the mechanism of porosity change in porcelain body, the factors of such deterioration speed, FEM stress analysis results, and an Ultrasonic Test (UT) for the integrity of porcelain. In addition, the UT inspection results are shown.

  2. GRIZZLY Model of Multi-Reactive Species Diffusion, Moisture/Heat Transfer and Alkali-Silica Reaction for Simulating Concrete Aging and Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hai; Spencer, Benjamin W.; Cai, Guowei

    2015-09-01

    Concrete is widely used in the construction of nuclear facilities because of its structural strength and its ability to shield radiation. The use of concrete in nuclear power plants for containment and shielding of radiation and radioactive materials has made its performance crucial for the safe operation of the facility. As such, when life extension is considered for nuclear power plants, it is critical to have accurate and reliable predictive tools to address concerns related to various aging processes of concrete structures and the capacity of structures subjected to age-related degradation. The goal of this report is to document the progress of the development and implementation of a fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical model in GRIZZLY code with the ultimate goal to reliably simulate and predict long-term performance and response of aged NPP concrete structures subjected to a number of aging mechanisms including external chemical attacks and volume-changing chemical reactions within concrete structures induced by alkali-silica reactions and long-term exposure to irradiation. Based on a number of survey reports of concrete aging mechanisms relevant to nuclear power plants and recommendations from researchers in concrete community, we’ve implemented three modules during FY15 in GRIZZLY code, (1) multi-species reactive diffusion model within cement materials; (2) coupled moisture and heat transfer model in concrete; and (3) anisotropic, stress-dependent, alkali-silica reaction induced swelling model. The multi-species reactive diffusion model was implemented with the objective to model aging of concrete structures subjected to aggressive external chemical attacks (e.g., chloride attack, sulfate attack, etc.). It considers multiple processes relevant to external chemical attacks such as diffusion of ions in aqueous phase within pore spaces, equilibrium chemical speciation reactions and kinetic mineral dissolution/precipitation. The moisture

  3. Application of micro X-ray diffraction to investigate the reaction products formed by the alkali silica reaction in concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dähn, R.; Arakcheeva, A.; Schaub, Ph.; Pattison, P.; Chapuis, G.; Grolimund, D.; Wieland, E.; Leemann, A.

    2015-12-21

    Alkali–silica reaction (ASR) is one of the most important deterioration mechanisms in concrete leading to substantial damages of structures worldwide. Synchrotron-based micro-X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD) was employed to characterize the mineral phases formed in micro-cracks of concrete aggregates as a consequence of ASR. This particular high spatial resolution technique enables to directly gain structural information on ASR products formed in a 40-year old motorway bridge damaged due to ASR. Micro-X-ray-fluorescence was applied on thin sections to locate the reaction products formed in veins within concrete aggregates. Micro-XRD pattern were collected at selected points of interest along a vein by rotating the sample. Rietveld refinement determined the structure of the ASR product consisting of a new layered framework similar to mountainite and rhodesite. Furthermore, it is conceivable that understanding the structure of the ASR product may help developing new technical treatments inhibiting ASR.

  4. The effects of lithium hydroxide solution on alkali silica reaction gels created with opal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Lyndon D.; Beaudoin, James J.; Grattan-Bellew, Patrick

    2004-04-01

    The reaction of Nevada opal with calcium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide and lithium hydroxide solutions was investigated. In addition, opal was exposed to a combined solution of these three hydroxides. The progress of the three reactions was followed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD results indicated the presence of a low-angle peak exclusive to the lithium-based reactions. The NMR results suggested a change in the silicate structure in the presence of lithium. These techniques indicated that the reaction of the alkali with the opal starting material is inhibited and perhaps stopped in the presence of lithium hydroxide. SEM revealed that the morphology of the reaction products on the surface of the reacted opal grains is markedly different invariably. It was concluded that evidence to support the theory of a protective layer exists and that the nature of the layer varies with ion type.

  5. A nonlinear wave mixing method for detecting Alkali-Silica reactivity of aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Tang, G.; Jacobs, L. J.; Qu, J.

    2012-05-01

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is a deleterious reaction in concrete. Significant ASR damage could undermine the durability of concrete structures and may result in reduced service life. Several nondestructive techniques based on ultrasound have been used to assess ASR damage. It has been shown that nonlinear ultrasound is more sensitive to internal stresses as well as to micro-cracks induced by ASR damage. In this investigation, we developed a co-linear wave mixing method for assessing ASR damage in concrete. By mixing two longitudinal waves, a new longitudinal wave with a lower frequency is generated. The amplitude of this new wave is proportional to the acoustic nonlinear parameter β which can then be obtained from the frequency spectrum of the newly generated longitudinal wave. Our experimental results show that (i) the acoustic nonlinearity parameter is closely correlated to ASR damage in concrete, (ii) the nonlinear wave mixing technique developed here is capable of measuring the changes in the acoustic nonlinearity parameter caused by ASR damage, even in its early stages, and (iii) the nonlinear wave mixing method has the potential to identify the different stages of ASR damage and to track the intrinsic characteristics of the ASR damage.

  6. Amorphisation mechanism of a flint aggregate during the alkali-silica reaction: X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption XANES contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Verstraete, J.; Khouchaf, L.; Bulteel, D.; Garcia-Diaz, E.; Flank, A.M; Tuilier, M.H

    2004-04-01

    Flint samples at different stages of the Alkali-Silica Reaction were prepared and analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and silicon K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure techniques (XANES). The results are compared to those of measurements performed on alpha quartz c-SiO{sub 2} and rough flint aggregate. The molar fraction of Q{sub 3} sites is determined as a function of the time of reaction. Up to 14 h of attack, the effect of the reaction seems of little importance. From 30 to 168 h, we showed an acceleration of the effect of the reaction on the crystal structure of the aggregate resulting in an amorphisation of the crystal. During this period, the amorphous fraction increases linearly with the number of Q{sub 3} sites. The results of the XANES confirm the amorphisation of the aggregate during the reaction and show the presence of silicon in a tetrahedral environment of oxygen whatever the time of attack.

  7. Geochemical Methods for the Identification of ASR Gel

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, G.D.; Carey, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents a geochemical method for staining various products of the alkali-silica reaction. The method is based on both the composition of ASR gel and one of its properties (the ability to exchange cations with a fluid). The stained concrete can be observed in normal light and serves as both a rapid field screening method and a useful aid for detailed petrographic examinations.

  8. Alkali-silica reactivity of expanded glass granules in structure of lightweight concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumanis, G.; Bajare, D.; Locs, J.; Korjakins, A.

    2013-12-01

    Main component in the lightweight concrete, which provides its properties, is aggregate. A lot of investigations on alkali silica reaction (ASR) between cement and lightweight aggregates have been done with their results published in the academic literature. Whereas expanded glass granules, which is relatively new product in the market of building materials, has not been a frequent research object. Therefore lightweight granules made from waste glass and eight types of cement with different chemical and mineralogical composition were examined in this research. Expanded glass granules used in this research is commercially available material produced by Penostek. Lightweight concrete mixtures were prepared by using commercial chemical additives to improve workability of concrete. The aim of the study is to identify effect of cement composition to the ASR reaction which occurs between expanded glass granules and binder. Expanded glass granules mechanical and physical properties were determined. In addition, properties of fresh and hardened concrete were determined. The ASR test was processed according to RILEM AAR-2 testing recommendation. Tests with scanning electron microscope and microstructural investigations were performed for expanded glass granules and hardened concrete specimens before and after exposing them in alkali solution.

  9. Increasing Class C fly ash reduces alkali silica reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, J.K.

    2007-07-01

    Contrary to earlier studies, it has been found that incremental additions of Class C fly ash do reduce alkali silica reactivity (ASR), in highly reactive, high alkali concrete mixes. AST can be further reduced by substituting 5% metakaolin or silica fume for the aggregate in concrete mixes with high (more than 30%) Class C fly ash substitution. The paper reports results of studies using Class C fly ash from the Labadie Station plant in Missouri which typically has between 1.3 and 1.45% available alkalis by ASTM C311. 7 figs.

  10. Crystallized alkali-silica gel in concrete from the late 1890s

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Karl . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Gress, David . E-mail: dlgress@unh.edu; Van Dam, Tom . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Sutter, Lawrence . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu

    2006-08-15

    The Elon Farnsworth Battery, a concrete structure completed in 1898, is in an advanced state of disrepair. To investigate the potential for rehabilitation, cores were extracted from the battery. Petrographic examination revealed abundant deposits of alkali silica reaction products in cracks associated with the quartz rich metasedimentary coarse aggregate. The products of the alkali silica reaction are variable in composition and morphology, including both amorphous and crystalline phases. The crystalline alkali silica reaction products are characterized by quantitative X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The broad extent of the reactivity is likely due to elevated alkali levels in the cements used.

  11. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Diagnosis and Prognosis of ASR Damage in Dry Cask Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jianmin; Bazant, Zdenek; Jacobs, Laurence; Guimaraes, Maria

    2015-11-30

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is a deleterious chemical process that may occur in cement-based materials such as mortars and concretes, where the hydroxyl ions in the highly alkaline pore solution attack the siloxane groups in the siliceous minerals in the aggregates. The reaction produces a cross-linked alkali-silica gel. The ASR gel swells in the presence of water. Expansion of the gel results in cracking when the swelling-induced stress exceeds the fracture toughness of the concrete. As the ASR continues, cracks may grow and eventually coalesce, which results in reduced service life and a decrease safety of concrete structures. Since concrete is widely used as a critical structural component in dry cask storage of used nuclear fuels, ASR damage poses a significant threat to the sustainability of long term dry cask storage systems. Therefore, techniques for effectively detecting, managing and mitigating ASR damage are needed. Currently, there are no nondestructive methods to accurately detect ASR damage in existing concrete structures. The only current way of accurately assessing ASR damage is to drill a core from an existing structure, and conduct microscopy on this drilled cylindrical core. Clearly, such a practice is not applicable to dry cask storage systems. To meet these needs, this research is aimed at developing (1) a suite of nonlinear ultrasonic quantitative nondestructive evaluation (QNDE) techniques to characterize ASR damage, and (2) a physics-based model for ASR damage evolution using the QNDE data. Outcomes of this research will provide a nondestructive diagnostic tool to evaluate the extent of the ASR damage, and a prognostic tool to estimate the future reliability and safety of the concrete structures in dry cask storage systems

  12. Variable mineral composition of metamorphic rocks from a single quarry compared to their ASR potential (Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stastna, Aneta; Sachlova, Sarka; Pertold, Zdenek; Nekvasilova, Zuzana; Prikryl, Richard

    2013-04-01

    The alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is one of the most damaging factors for concrete structures. ASR originates due to the presence of reactive silica (SiO2) that reacts with alkaline ions under wet conditions. The reaction mechanism consists of four different steps: initial attack of OH- compounds on SiO2 at aggregate-cement paste boundary; formation of silanol groups at SiO2 surface; formation of siloxane groups and their polymerization; adsorption of alkaline and Ca2+ ions and formation of alkali-silica gels. Alkali-silica gels tend to absorb water molecules and swell causing increasing internal pressures in concrete and microcracking. The most reactive aggregates are mainly composed of amorphous and/or fine-grained SiO2-rich phases. In the Czech Republic, ASR was observed in deteriorating concrete structures containing very fine-grained quartz (quartz in tuffaceous sandstones and greywackes), as well as quartz indicating variable degree of deformation (quartz in quartzite, granodiorite and various metamorphic rock types). In this study, mineralogical-petrographic methods (polarizing, electron and cathodoluminescence microscopy) were combined with the accelerated mortar bar test (following the standard ASTM C1260), with the aim to quantify the ASR potential, as well as to distinguish reactive mineral phases. Different aggregate varieties from the Těchobuz quarry (Moldanubian Zone, Czech Republic) have been compared. Mineralogical-petrographic characteristics permit a distinction between 1) medium-grained plagioclase quartzite and 2) fine-grained biotite-plagioclase-quartz paragneiss and 3) fine-grained calc-silicate rock. Mineralogical composition of the first type is quartz + Ca-plagioclase + K-feldspar + biotite + chlorite + diopside + pyrite + apatite + titanite ± calcite. The second type has mineral assemblage including quartz + Ca-plagioclase + K-feldspar + biotite + chlorite + pyrite + tourmaline + apatite + titanite ± calcite. The third type contains

  13. ASR prevention — Effect of aluminum and lithium ions on the reaction products

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, Andreas; Alahrache, Salaheddine; Winnefeld, Frank

    2015-10-15

    In spite of the recent progress in the understanding of the mechanisms enabling aluminum-containing SCM like metakaolin and added LiNO{sub 3} to limit the extent of ASR in mortar and concrete, some gaps still remain. They concern mainly the effect of aluminum-containing SCM on the formed ASR products and the influence of aggregate characteristics on the effectiveness of LiNO{sub 3}. In this study, a model system, concrete and mortar were investigated by pore solution analysis, TGA, XRD, NMR, SEM combined with EDX and ToF-SIMS to address these questions. The amount of aluminum present in the pore solution of concrete and mortar is only able to slow down SiO{sub 2} dissolution but not to alter morphology, structure and composition of the reaction products. LiNO{sub 3} can suppress ASR by forming dense products protecting reactive minerals from further reaction. But its effectiveness is decreasing with increasing specific surface area of the reactive minerals in aggregates. - Highlights: • Aluminum of SCM slows down SiO{sub 2} dissolution. • Aluminum of SCM does not alter morphology and structure of ASR product. • ASR suppressing effect of LiNO{sub 3} depends on specific surface area of the aggregates.

  14. Mitigation of ASR by the use of LiNO{sub 3}—Characterization of the reaction products

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, Andreas; Lörtscher, Luzia; Bernard, Laetitia; Le Saout, Gwenn; Lothenbach, Barbara; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M.

    2014-05-01

    The influence of the LiNO{sub 3} on the ASR product was studied both in a model system and in mortars. In the model system, the addition of LiNO{sub 3} decreases the dissolution rate and the solubility of silica. Lithium changes the 2-dimensional cross-linked (Q{sub 3} dominated) network of the ASR product into a less structured, Q{sub 2} dominated product, likely by adopting the role of calcium. In the mortar samples the addition of LiNO{sub 3} decreases expansion and significantly influences the chemical composition and the morphology of the reaction product. Lithium decreases the calcium, sodium and potassium content and changes the relatively porous plate-like reaction product into a dense one without texture. The findings in the mortars indicate that the ASR-suppressing effect of lithium is caused by the lower potential of the reaction product to swell. Furthermore, it forms a protective barrier after an initial reaction slowing down ASR. - Highlights: • Detection of lithium in ASR product by ToF-SIMS • Relation between composition of pore solution and ASR product • Identification of ASR suppressing mechanisms of LiNO{sub 3}.

  15. Dual effectiveness of lithium salt in controlling both delayed ettringite formation and ASR in concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Ekolu, S.O. . E-mail: stephen.ekolu@wits.ac.za; Thomas, M.D.A.; Hooton, R.D.

    2007-06-15

    The influence of lithium nitrate on expansions due to delayed ettringite formation (DEF) and alkali-silica reaction (ASR) has been investigated. Effects of the lithium salt were examined in heat-cured mortars and concretes containing one or both damage mechanisms. The mortars and concretes made using reactive and/or non-reactive aggregates were subjected to heat treatment consisting of a hydration delay period of 4 h at 23 deg. C followed by steam-curing at 95 deg. C and then stored in limewater. Results showed that the lithium salt admixture was able to reduce the occurrence of deleterious expansion due to delayed ettringite formation in addition to controlling alkali-silica reaction in cementitious systems containing one or both mechanisms. In concretes made using non-reactive limestone aggregates, incorporation of lithium nitrate in a proportion of 0.74 M ratio of Li to (Na + K) was found to control delayed ettringite formation during the one-year period of this study. By analyzing the leaching properties of lithium and other alkalis from mortars during storage, it was found that a substantial amount of lithium was retained in the cementitious system in a slightly soluble form, and is expected to be responsible for reducing DEF.

  16. ASR potential of quartz based on expansion values and microscopic characteristics of mortar bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stastna, Aneta; Sachlova, Sarka; Kuchynova, Marketa; Pertold, Zdenek; Prikryl, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The alkali-silica reaction (ASR) is one of the most damaging factors for concrete structures. Different analytical techniques are used to quantify ASR potential of aggregates. The accelerated mortar bar test (ASTM C1260) in combination with the petrographic examination of aggregates by microscopic techniques belongs to the frequently employed methods. Such a methodical approach enables quantification of the ASR potential, based on the expansion values of accelerated mortar bars; and also to identify deleterious components in aggregates. In this study, the accelerated mortar bar test (ASTM C1260) was modified and combined with the scanning electron microscopy of polished sections prepared from mortar bars. The standard 14-day test period of mortar bars was prolonged to 1-year. ASR potential of aggregates was assessed based on expansion values (both 14-day and 1-year) of mortar bars and microscopic analysis of ASR products (alkali silica gels, microcracks, dissolution gaps) detected in the sections. Different varieties of quartz-rich rocks including chert, quartz meta-greywacke, three types of quartzite and pegmatite were used as aggregate. Only quartz from pegmatite was assessed to be non reactive (14-day expansion of 0.08%, 1-year expansion of 1.25%). Aggregate sections exhibited minor ASR products even after 1-year of mortar bar immersion in 1 M NaOH. Expansion values of the rest of samples exceeded the limit of 0.10% after 14-day test period indicating aggregates as reactive. The highest ASR potential was detected in mortar bars containing chert (14-day expansion of 0.55%, 1-year expansion of 2.70%) and quartz meta-greywacke (14-day expansion of 0.46%, 1-year expansion of 2.41%). The high ASR potential was explained by presence of cryptocrystalline matrix in significant volumes (24 - 65 vol%). Influence of the lengths of the immersion in the alkaline solution was observed mainly in the microstructure of the cement paste and on the extension of ASR products. The

  17. Evaluation of ASR potential of quartz-rich rocks by alkaline etching of polished rock sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šachlová, Šárka; Kuchařová, Aneta; Pertold, Zdeněk; Přikryl, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Damaging effect of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) on concrete structures has been observed in various countries all over the World. Civil engineers and real state owners are demanding reliable methods in the assessment of ASR potential of aggregates before they are used in constructions. Time feasible methods are expected, as well as methods which enable prediction of long-term behaviour of aggregates in concrete. The most frequently employed accelerated mortar bar test (AMBT) quantifies ASR potential of aggregates according to the expansion values of mortar bars measured after fourteen days testing period. Current study aimed to develop a new methodical approach facilitating identification and quantification of ASR potential of aggregates. Polished rock sections of quartz and amorphous SiO2 (coming from orthoquartzite, quartz meta-greywacke, pegmatite, phyllite, chert, and flint) were subjected to experimental leaching in 1M NaOH solution at 80°C. After 14 days of alkaline etching, the rock sections were analyzed employing scanning electron microscope combined with energy dispersive spectrometer. Representative areas were documented in back scattered electron (BSE) images and measured using fully-automatic petrographic image analysis (PIA). Several features connected to alkaline etching were observed on the surface of polished rock sections: deep alkaline etching, partial leach-out of quartz and amorphous particles, alkaline etching connected to quartz grain boundaries, and alkaline etching without any connection to grain boundaries. All features mentioned above had significant influence on grey-scale spectrum of BSE images. A specific part of the grey-scale spectrum (i.e. grey-shade 0-70) was characteristic of areas affected by alkaline etching (ASR area). By measuring such areas we quantified the extent of alkaline etching in studied samples. Very good correlation was found between the ASR area and ASR potential of investigated rocks measured according to the

  18. Suitability of alkaline leaching and etching experiments in the quantification of ASR potential of quartz-rich rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchařová, Aneta; Šachlová, Šárka; Pertold, Zdeněk; Přikryl, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Three groups of methods are conventionally applied in the assessment of the susceptibility of aggregates used in concrete to be affected by alkali-silica reaction (ASR). The most frequently employed expansion tests (accelerated mortar bar test and concrete prism test, e.g. ASTM C1260, RILEM AAR2, RILEM AAR4.1) quantify ASR potential of aggregates according to the expansion values of mortar bars (resp. concrete prisms) measured after certain testing time period. Petrographic methods are based on the quantification of alkali-reactive phases by polarizing microscopy (e.g. RILEM AAR1). Chemical methods quantify ASR potential according to the amount of Si4+ dissolved into alkaline solution combined with the reduction of alkalinity of the solution (e.g. ASTM C289). The current study focused on the comparison of three approaches: the alkaline etching of polished rock sections and standard chemical method (following ASTM C289) with the measuring of expansion values of mortar bars (following ASTM C1260). Various types of quartz and amorphous SiO2 used for the experiments were separated from rock samples of orthoquartzite, quartz meta-greywacke, pegmatite, phyllite, chert, and flint. Polished rock sections (resp. crushed fraction 0.125/0.250) were used and subjected to leaching in 1M NaOH solution at 80°C for 14 days (resp. 24 hours). After alkaline etching in alkaline solution, the rock sections were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectrometer. Representative areas were documented in back scattered electron images and quantified using fully-automatic petrographic image analysis. ASR potential of the polished rock sections was evaluated by the vol. % of area affected by alkaline etching. ASR potential of crushed aggregate was estimated by measurements of Si4+ dissolved into the solution versus the reduction of alkalinity of the solution (following ASTM C289). Classification according to the ASTM C289 indicated three of investigated

  19. Comparison of the morphology of alkali–silica gel formed in limestones in concrete affected by the so-called alkali–carbonate reaction (ACR) and alkali–silica reaction (ASR)

    SciTech Connect

    Grattan-Bellew, P.E.; Chan, Gordon

    2013-05-15

    The morphology of alkali–silica gel formed in dolomitic limestone affected by the so-called alkali–carbonate reaction (ACR) is compared to that formed in a siliceous limestone affected by alkali–silica reaction (ASR). The particle of dolomitic limestone was extracted from the experimental sidewalk in Kingston, Ontario, Canada that was badly cracked due to ACR. The siliceous limestone particle was extracted from a core taken from a highway structure in Quebec, affected by ASR. Both cores exhibited marked reaction rims around limestone particles. The aggregate particles were polished and given a light gold coating in preparation for examination in a scanning electron microscope. The gel in the ACR aggregate formed stringers between the calcite crystals in the matrix of the rock, whereas gel in ASR concrete formed a thick layer on top of the calcite crystals, that are of the same size as in the ACR aggregate.

  20. Lithological influence of aggregate in the alkali-carbonate reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Buendia, A.M. . E-mail: angel.lopez@aidico.es; Climent, V. . E-mail: vcliment@grupogla.com; Verdu, P.

    2006-08-15

    The reactivity of carbonate rock with the alkali content of cement, commonly called alkali-carbonate reaction (ACR), has been investigated. Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) can also contribute in the alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR) in carbonate rock, mainly due to micro- and crypto-crystalline quartz or clay content in carbonate aggregate. Both ACR and ASR can occur in the same system, as has been also evidenced on this paper. Carbonate aggregate samples were selected using lithological reactivity criteria, taking into account the presence of dedolomitization, partial dolomitization, micro- and crypto-crystalline quartz. Selected rocks include calcitic dolostone with chert (CDX), calcitic dolostone with dedolomitization (CDD), limestone with chert (LX), marly calcitic dolostone with partial dolomitization (CD), high-porosity ferric dolostone with clays (FD). To evaluate the reactivity, aggregates were studied using expansion tests following RILEM AAR-2, AAR-5, a modification using LiOH AAR-5Li was also tested. A complementary study was done using petrographic monitoring with polarised light microscopy on aggregates immersed in NaOH and LiOH solutions after different ages. SEM-EDAX has been used to identify the presence of brucite as a product of dedolomitization. An ACR reaction showed shrinkage of the mortar bars in alkaline solutions explained by induced dedolomitization, while an ASR process typically displayed expansion. Neither shrinkage nor expansion was observed when mortar bars were immersed in solutions of lithium hydroxide. Carbonate aggregate classification with AAR pathology risk has been elaborated based on mechanical behaviours by expansion and shrinkage. It is proposed to be used as a petrographic method for AAR diagnosis to complement the RILEM AAR1 specifically for carbonate aggregate. Aggregate materials can be classified as I (non-reactive), II (potentially reactive), and III (probably reactive), considering induced dedolomitization ACR

  1. Alkali-aggregate reaction under the influence of deicing salts in the Hokuriku district, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Tetsuya . E-mail: katayamat@kge.co.jp; Tagami, Masahiko; Sarai, Yoshinori; Izumi, Satoshi; Hira, Toshikatsu

    2004-11-15

    Concrete cores taken from highway bridges and culverts undergoing alkali-silica reaction (ASR) were investigated petrographically by means of core scanning, point counting, polarizing microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), electron-probe microanalysis with energy-dispersive spectrometry, in conjunction with wet chemical analyses and expansion tests. Field damage was roughly proportional to the content of andesite in the gravel aggregates due to the presence of highly reactive cristobalite and tridymite. Electron-probe microanalyzer analysis of unhydrated cement phases in the concrete revealed that the cement used had contained at least 0.5% to 1.0% alkali (Na{sub 2}Oeq) and that both the aggregates and the deicing salts had supplied part of the water-soluble alkali to concrete toward the threshold of producing ASR (Na{sub 2}O{sub eq} 3.0 kg/m{sup 3}). An accelerated concrete core expansion test (1 M NaOH, 80 deg. C) of the damaged structures mostly gave core expansions of >0.10% at 21 days (or >0.05% at 14 days), nearly comparable to those of a slow expansion test with saturated NaCl solution (50 deg. C, 91 days) which produced Cl-containing ASR gel.

  2. The Symmetry of Adverse Local Tissue Reactions in Patients with Bilateral Simultaneous and Sequential ASR Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Madanat, Rami; Hussey, Daniel K; Donahue, Gabrielle S; Potter, Hollis G; Wallace, Robert; Bragdon, Charles R; Muratoglu, Orhun K; Malchau, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether patients with bilateral metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements have symmetric adverse local tissue reactions (ALTRs) at follow-up. An MRI of both hips was performed at a mean time of six years after surgery in 43 patients. The prevalence and severity of ALTRs were found to be similar in simultaneous hips but differences were observed in sequential hips. The order and timing of sequential hip arthroplasties did not affect the severity of ALTRs. Thus, in addition to metal ion exposure from an earlier MoM implant other factors may also play a role in the progression of ALTRs. Bilateral implants should be given special consideration in risk stratification algorithms for management of patients with MoM hip arthroplasty. PMID:26055146

  3. Ground Operations and ASRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda; Wichner, David; Jakey, Abegail Marie

    2013-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) in a partnership between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), participating carriers, and labor organizations. It is designed to improve the National Airspace System by collecting and studying reports detailing unsafe conditions and events in the aviation industry. Employees are able to report safety issues or concerns with confidentiality and without fear of discipline

  4. ASR DIAGNOSIS BY PETROGRAPHIC INVESTIGATION AND EVALUATION OF MECHANICAL PERFORMANCE OF ASR DETERIORATED PRETENSIONED PC BEAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiyama, Jun; Yamada, Kazuo; Kaneda, Kazuo; Iraha, Shigeo; Oshiro, Takeshi

    ASR diagnosis and evaluation of load carrying capacity have been performed on the pre-tensioned PC beam which was cut out of a national high way bridge. The bridge was replaced lately after 25years service due to ASR deterioration. Comprehensive investigations such as crack measurement, material strength test, petrographic investigation, beam bending test have been performed on the deteriorated beam. Cracks have been observed on all sides and the appearance has been classified as severe deterioration grade. Petrographic investigation concluded that the reacted mineral was mainly reactive cristobalite contained in andesite of fine aggregates and EPMA investigation found that the reaction seemed to be the final stage. The late expansive ASR has been superimposed by cryptocrystalline quartz in coarse aggregates and it is still in progress. Deteriorated concrete cores with no visual crack have reduced only 10% of compressive strength compared with design strength, but significant loss has been observed on the elastic modulus. The static bending load test on the deteriorated test beam showed 95% of design load capacity indicating that the visual deterioration on surfaces has affected slight damages at this moment. But loss of bending rigidity has been appeared on the deteriorated beam .after bending cracks have started. This comprehensive study including the petrographic diagnosis and the appraisal on mechanical performance of the deteriorated beam conclude that there is a possibility of ASR deterioration in progress and further loss of mechanical performance though the beam had some margin for loading capacity at this moment.

  5. Rice ASR1 and ASR5 are complementary transcription factors regulating aluminium responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Arenhart, Rafael Augusto; Schunemann, Mariana; Bucker Neto, Lauro; Margis, Rogerio; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia

    2016-03-01

    Rice is the most tolerant staple crop to aluminium (Al) toxicity, which is a limiting stress for grain production worldwide. This Al tolerance is the result of combined mechanisms that are triggered in part by the transcription factor ASR5. ASRs are dual target proteins that participate as chaperones in the cytoplasm and as transcription factors in the nucleus. Moreover, these proteins respond to biotic and abiotic stresses, including salt, drought and Al. Rice plants with silenced ASR genes are highly sensitive to Al. ASR5, a well-characterized protein, binds to specific cis elements in Al responsive genes and regulates their expression. Because the Al sensitive phenotype found in silenced rice plants could be due to the mutual silencing of ASR1 and ASR5, we investigated the effect of the specific silencing of ASR5. Plants with artificial microRNA silencing of ASR5 present a non-transformed phenotype in response to Al because of the induction of ASR1. ASR1 has the same subcellular localization as ASR5, binds to ASR5 cis-regulatory elements, regulates ASR5 regulated genes in a non-preferential manner and might replace ASR5 under certain conditions. Our results indicate that ASR1 and ASR5 act in concert and complementarily to regulate gene expression in response to Al. PMID:26476017

  6. ASRS Reports on Wake Vortex Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda J.; Taube, Elisa Ann; Drew, Charles Robert; Barclay, Tommy Earl

    2010-01-01

    ASRS is conducting a structured callback research project of wake vortex incidents reported to the ASRS at all US airports, as well as wake encounters in the enroute environment. This study has three objectives: (1) Utilize the established ASRS supplemental data collection methodology and provide ongoing analysis of wake vortex encounter reports; (2) Document event dynamics and contributing factors underlying wake vortex encounter events; and (3) Support ongoing FAA efforts to address pre-emptive wake vortex risk reduction by utilizing ASRS reporting contributions.

  7. 75 FR 13502 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Manette Bridge Replacement in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... in the concrete has resulted from a process called Alkali Silica Reaction (ASR). ASR causes deterioration of mortars and concretes due to the swelling of gel formed by the reaction of alkali in cement... population center in the Gulf of Alaska and the Aleutian Island chain. This species is separated into...

  8. Alkali-aggregate reaction in concrete containing high-alkali cement and granite aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Owsiak, Z

    2004-01-01

    The paper discusses results of the research into the influence of high-alkali Portland cement on granite aggregate. The deformation of the concrete structure occurred after 18 months. The research was carried out by means of a scanning electron microscope equipped with a high-energy dispersive X-ray analyzer that allowed observation of unpolished sections of concrete bars exhibiting the cracking pattern typical of the alkali-silica reaction. Both the microscopic observation and the X-ray elemental analysis confirm the presence of alkali-silica gel and secondary ettringite in the cracks.

  9. NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) collects, analyzes, and distributes de-identified safety information provided through confidentially submitted reports from frontline aviation personnel. Since its inception in 1976, the ASRS has collected over 900,000 reports and has never breached the identity of the people sharing their information about events or safety issues. From this volume of data, the ASRS has released over 5,500 aviation safety alerts concerning potential hazards and safety concerns. The ASRS processes these reports, evaluates the information, and provides de-identified report information through the online ASRS Database at http://asrs.arc.nasa.gov. The NASA ASRS is also a founding member of the International Confidential Aviation Safety Systems (ICASS) group which is a collection of other national aviation reporting systems throughout the world. The ASRS model has also been replicated for application to improving safety in railroad, medical, fire fighting, and other domains. This presentation \\vill discuss confidential, voluntary, and non-punitive reporting systems and their advantages in providing information for safety improvements.

  10. Tomato ABSCISIC ACID STRESS RIPENING (ASR) Gene Family Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Golan, Ido; Dominguez, Pia Guadalupe; Konrad, Zvia; Shkolnik-Inbar, Doron; Carrari, Fernando; Bar-Zvi, Dudy

    2014-01-01

    Tomato ABSCISIC ACID RIPENING 1 (ASR1) was the first cloned plant ASR gene. ASR orthologs were then cloned from a large number of monocot, dicot and gymnosperm plants, where they are mostly involved in response to abiotic (drought and salinity) stress and fruit ripening. The tomato genome encodes five ASR genes: ASR1, 2, 3 and 5 encode low-molecular-weight proteins (ca. 110 amino acid residues each), whereas ASR4 encodes a 297-residue polypeptide. Information on the expression of the tomato ASR gene family is scarce. We used quantitative RT-PCR to assay the expression of this gene family in plant development and in response to salt and osmotic stresses. ASR1 and ASR4 were the main expressed genes in all tested organs and conditions, whereas ASR2 and ASR3/5 expression was two to three orders of magnitude lower (with the exception of cotyledons). ASR1 is expressed in all plant tissues tested whereas ASR4 expression is limited to photosynthetic organs and stamens. Essentially, ASR1 accounted for most of ASR gene expression in roots, stems and fruits at all developmental stages, whereas ASR4 was the major gene expressed in cotyledons and young and fully developed leaves. Both ASR1 and ASR4 were expressed in flower organs, with ASR1 expression dominating in stamens and pistils, ASR4 in sepals and petals. Steady-state levels of ASR1 and ASR4 were upregulated in plant vegetative organs following exposure to salt stress, osmotic stress or the plant abiotic stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA). Tomato plants overexpressing ASR1 displayed enhanced survival rates under conditions of water stress, whereas ASR1-antisense plants displayed marginal hypersensitivity to water withholding. PMID:25310287

  11. Tomato ABSCISIC ACID STRESS RIPENING (ASR) gene family revisited.

    PubMed

    Golan, Ido; Dominguez, Pia Guadalupe; Konrad, Zvia; Shkolnik-Inbar, Doron; Carrari, Fernando; Bar-Zvi, Dudy

    2014-01-01

    Tomato ABSCISIC ACID RIPENING 1 (ASR1) was the first cloned plant ASR gene. ASR orthologs were then cloned from a large number of monocot, dicot and gymnosperm plants, where they are mostly involved in response to abiotic (drought and salinity) stress and fruit ripening. The tomato genome encodes five ASR genes: ASR1, 2, 3 and 5 encode low-molecular-weight proteins (ca. 110 amino acid residues each), whereas ASR4 encodes a 297-residue polypeptide. Information on the expression of the tomato ASR gene family is scarce. We used quantitative RT-PCR to assay the expression of this gene family in plant development and in response to salt and osmotic stresses. ASR1 and ASR4 were the main expressed genes in all tested organs and conditions, whereas ASR2 and ASR3/5 expression was two to three orders of magnitude lower (with the exception of cotyledons). ASR1 is expressed in all plant tissues tested whereas ASR4 expression is limited to photosynthetic organs and stamens. Essentially, ASR1 accounted for most of ASR gene expression in roots, stems and fruits at all developmental stages, whereas ASR4 was the major gene expressed in cotyledons and young and fully developed leaves. Both ASR1 and ASR4 were expressed in flower organs, with ASR1 expression dominating in stamens and pistils, ASR4 in sepals and petals. Steady-state levels of ASR1 and ASR4 were upregulated in plant vegetative organs following exposure to salt stress, osmotic stress or the plant abiotic stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA). Tomato plants overexpressing ASR1 displayed enhanced survival rates under conditions of water stress, whereas ASR1-antisense plants displayed marginal hypersensitivity to water withholding. PMID:25310287

  12. Conversion of microwave pyrolysed ASR's char using high temperature agents.

    PubMed

    Donaj, Pawel; Blasiak, Wlodzimierz; Yang, Weihong; Forsgren, Christer

    2011-01-15

    Pyrolysis enables to recover metals and organic feedstock from waste conglomerates such as: automotive shredder residue (ASR). ASR as well as its pyrolysis solid products, is a morphologically and chemically varied mixture, containing mineral materials, including hazardous heavy metals. The aim of the work is to generate fundamental knowledge on the conversion of the organic residues of the solid products after ASR's microwave pyrolysis, treated at various temperatures and with two different types of gasifying agent: pure steam or 3% (v/v) of oxygen. The research is conducted using a lab-scale, plug-flow gasifier, with an integrated scale for analysing mass loss changes over time of experiment, serving as macro TG at 950, 850 and 760 °C. The reaction rate of char decomposition was investigated, based on carbon conversion during gasification and pyrolysis stage. It was found in both fractions that char conversion rate decreases with the rise of external gas temperature, regardless of the gasifying agent. No significant differences between the reaction rates undergoing with steam and oxygen for char decomposition has been observed. This abnormal char behaviour might have been caused by the inhibiting effects of ash, especially alkali metals on char activity or due to deformation of char structure during microwave heating. PMID:20940079

  13. Abiotic Stress Responsive Rice ASR1 and ASR3 Exhibit Different Tissue-Dependent Sugar and Hormone-Sensitivities

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Joungsu; Lee, Youn Hab; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Nahm, Baek Hie; Song, Sang Ik

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the six rice ASR genes is differentially regulated in a tissue-dependent manner according to environmental conditions and reproductive stages. OsASR1 and OsASR3 are the most abundant and are found in most tissues; they are enriched in the leaves and roots, respectively. Coexpression analysis of OsASR1 and OsASR3 and a comparison of the cis-acting elements upstream of OsASR1 and OsASR3 suggested that their expression is regulated in common by abiotic stresses but differently regulated by hormone and sugar signals. The results of quantitative real-time PCR analyses of OsASR1 and OsASR3 expression under various conditions further support this model. The expression of both OsASR1 and OsASR3 was induced by drought stress, which is a major regulator of the expression of all ASR genes in rice. In contrast, ABA is not a common regulator of the expression of these genes. OsASR1 transcription was highly induced by ABA, whereas OsASR3 transcription was strongly induced by GA. In addition, OsASR1 and OsASR3 expression was significantly induced by sucrose and sucrose/glucose treatments, respectively. The induction of gene expression in response to these specific hormone and sugar signals was primarily observed in the major target tissues of these genes (i.e., OsASR1 in leaves and OsASR3 in roots). Our data also showed that the overexpression of either OsASR1 or OsASR3 in transgenic rice plants increased their tolerance to drought and cold stress. Taken together, our results revealed that the transcriptional control of different rice ASR genes exhibit different tissue-dependent sugar and hormone-sensitivities. PMID:23620302

  14. On the ASR and ASR thermal residues characterization of full scale treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Mancini, G; Viotti, P; Luciano, A; Fino, D

    2014-02-01

    In order to obtain 85% recycling, several procedures on Automotive Shredder Residue (ASR) could be implemented, such as advanced metal and polymer recovery, mechanical recycling, pyrolysis, the direct use of ASR in the cement industry, and/or the direct use of ASR as a secondary raw material. However, many of these recovery options appear to be limited, due to the possible low acceptability of ASR based products on the market. The recovery of bottom ash and slag after an ASR thermal treatment is an option that is not usually considered in most countries (e.g. Italy) due to the excessive amount of contaminants, especially metals. The purpose of this paper is to provide information on the characteristics of ASR and its full-scale incineration residues. Experiments have been carried out, in two different experimental campaigns, in a full-scale tyre incineration plant specifically modified to treat ASR waste. Detailed analysis of ASR samples and combustion residues were carried out and compared with literature data. On the basis of the analytical results, the slag and bottom ash from the combustion process have been classified as non-hazardous wastes, according to the EU waste acceptance criteria (WAC), and therefore after further tests could be used in future in the construction industry. It has also been concluded that ASR bottom ash (EWC - European Waste Catalogue - code 19 01 12) could be landfilled in SNRHW (stabilized non-reactive hazardous waste) cells or used as raw material for road construction, with or without further treatment for the removal of heavy metals. In the case of fly ash from boiler or Air Pollution Control (APC) residues, it has been found that the Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations exceeded regulatory leaching test limits therefore their removal, or a stabilization process, would be essential prior to landfilling the use of these residues as construction material. PMID:24290536

  15. Anxiety Self Report (ASR (1,2,3,4,). X

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Jane S.

    The Anxiety Self Report (ASR 1,2,3,4) is provided, followed by information about the report. The ASR is discussed as to its development, description, response bias, scoring procedures, reliability, stability, validity, and correlation between the ASR and the Manifest Anxiety Scale. (For related documents, see TM 002 928, 929.) (DB)

  16. Automotive shredder residue (ASR) management: An overview.

    PubMed

    Cossu, R; Lai, T

    2015-11-01

    On the basis of statistical data, approximately 6.5 million tons of ELVs were produced in Europe in 2011. ELVs are processed according to a treatment scheme comprising three main phases: depollution, dismantling and shredding. The ferrous fraction represents about 70-75% of the total shredded output, while nonferrous metals represent about 5%. The remaining 20-25% is referred to as automotive shredder residue (ASR). ASR is largely landfilled due to its heterogeneous and complex matrix. With a start date of January 1st 2015, the European Directive 2000/53/EC establishes the reuse and recovery of a minimum of 95% ELV total weight. To reach these targets various post-shredder technologies have been developed with the aim of improving recovery of materials and energy from ASR. In order to evaluate the environmental impacts of different management options of ELVs, the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology has been applied taking into account the potential implication of sustainable design of vehicles and treatment of residues after shredding of ELVs. Findings obtained reveal that a combination of recycling and energy recovery is required to achieve European targets, with landfilling being viewed as the least preferred option. The aim of this work is to provide a general overview of the recent development of management of ELVs and treatment of ASR with a view to minimizing the amount of residues disposed of in landfill. PMID:26294011

  17. The ATC evaluation of the prototype Airport Surveillance Radar Wind Shear Processor (ASR-WSP) at Orlando International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Radame

    1993-03-01

    The Airport Surveillance Radar Wind Shear Processor (ASR-WSP), also known as Airport Surveillance Radar-9 (ASR-9) modification for low altitude wind shear detection, is a production ASR-9 with an expanded weather channel for added processing capabilities. The primary mission of the ASR-WSP is to enhance the safety of air travel through the timely detection and reporting of hazardous wind shear in and near the terminal approach and departure zones of the airport. It will also improve the management of air traffic (AT) in the terminal area through the forecast of precipitation, and ultimately the detection of other hazardous weather phenomena. The ASR-WSP may be used as a stand-alone system at airports without a Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) or Enhanced-Low Level Wind Shear Alert System (E-LLWAS), or in an integrated mode with either or both the TDWR and E-LLWAS. An operational evaluation of a prototype ASR-WSP, developed by Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratories (MIT/LL), was conducted at the Orlando International Airport (MCO) in Orlando, Florida, during the period 29 Jun. to 31 Aug. 1992. The objective of the evaluation was to obtain Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic controller reaction to the prototype ASR-WSP weather data and display equipment. The following are highlights of the evaluation: (1) the ASW-WSP is very useful when making runway configuration changes; (2) the ASR-WSP is not perceived to be as accurate as the prototype TDWR; (3) the gust front prediction feature is not reliable; and (4) the information provided on both the RDT and the GSD is very useful.

  18. Semi-continuous ultrasonic sounding and changes of ultrasonic signal characteristics as a sensitive tool for the evaluation of ongoing microstructural changes of experimental mortar bars tested for their ASR potential.

    PubMed

    Lokajíček, T; Kuchařová, A; Petružálek, M; Šachlová, Š; Svitek, T; Přikryl, R

    2016-09-01

    Semi-continuous ultrasonic sounding of experimental mortar bars used in the accelerated alkali silica reactivity laboratory test (ASTM C1260) is proposed as a supplementary measurement technique providing data that are highly sensitive to minor changes in the microstructure of hardening/deteriorating concrete mixture. A newly designed, patent pending, heating chamber was constructed allowing ultrasonic sounding of mortar bars, stored in accelerating solution without necessity to remove the test specimens from the bath during the measurement. Subsequent automatic data analysis of recorded ultrasonic signals proved their high correlation to the measured length changes (expansion) and their high sensitivity to microstructural changes. The changes of P-wave velocity, and of the energy, amplitude, and frequency of ultrasonic signal, were in the range of 10-80%, compared to 0.51% change of the length. Results presented in this study thus show that ultrasonic sounding seems to be more sensitive to microstructural changes due to ongoing deterioration of concrete microstructure by alkali-silica reaction than the dimensional changes. PMID:27268163

  19. The Alcohol Services Reporting System (ASRS) Revision Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borkman, Thomasina

    This document reports a revision study of the California Alcohol Services Reporting System (ASRS), a system which consists of a structure of definitions and categories of services, a budget form of planned alcohol services, instructions for the county plan, and the report of expenditures. The study problem is that the ASRS structure of…

  20. ASR1 transcription factor and its role in metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Pia Guadalupe; Carrari, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Asr1 (ABA, stress, ripening) is a plant gene widely distributed in many species which was discovered by differential induction levels in tomato plants subjected to drought stress conditions. ASR1 also regulates the expression of a hexose transporter in grape and is involved in sugar and amino acid accumulation in some species like maize and potato. The control that ASR1 exerts on hexose transport is interesting from a biotechnological perspective because both sugar partitioning and content in specific organs affect the yield and the quality of many agronomically important crops. ASR1 affect plant metabolism by its dual activity as a transcription factor and as a chaperone-like protein. In this paper, we review possible mechanisms by which ASR1 affects metabolism, the differences observed among tissues and species, and the possible physiological implications of its role in metabolism. PMID:25794140

  1. ASR1 transcription factor and its role in metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Pia Guadalupe; Carrari, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Asr1 (ABA, stress, ripening) is a plant gene widely distributed in many species which was discovered by differential induction levels in tomato plants subjected to drought stress conditions. ASR1 also regulates the expression of a hexose transporter in grape and is involved in sugar and amino acid accumulation in some species like maize and potato. The control that ASR1 exerts on hexose transport is interesting from a biotechnological perspective because both sugar partitioning and content in specific organs affect the yield and the quality of many agronomically important crops. ASR1 affect plant metabolism by its dual activity as a transcription factor and as a chaperone-like protein. In this paper, we review possible mechanisms by which ASR1 affects metabolism, the differences observed among tissues and species, and the possible physiological implications of its role in metabolism. PMID:25794140

  2. Microscopic analysis of alkali-aggregate reaction products in a 50-year-old concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, Isabel . E-mail: ifernand@fc.up.pt; Noronha, Fernando . E-mail: fmnoronh@fc.up.pt; Teles, Madalena . E-mail: mteles@fe.up.pt

    2004-11-15

    Fifty-year-old concrete from a large dam was examined in the scope of an investigation program concerning the properties of granite as aggregate material for concrete. Site inspection, which was developed in order to detect possible signs of deterioration of the concrete, revealed the existence of efflorescence and exudations. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analyses were attempted to identify the composition of these materials and their morphology. From the analyses, it was concluded that some of the exudations were composed by alkali-silica gel. In these samples, an interesting behavior was observed in different moments after a 3-month interval. It was noticed that the initially noncrystalline alkali-silica gel transformed into sodium-rich needles and tablets after a few months kept in a desiccator in the laboratory. Therefore, it was concluded that the materials identified corresponded to different stages of evolution of an alkali-aggregate reaction product.

  3. Initial exploration of the ASRS database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Richard; Wray, Buntine

    1993-01-01

    We applied a standard classification algorithm to a subset of NASA/FAA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) database. The subset concerned incidents of aircraft altitude deviations. We are exploring the database to address questions such as: Are there 'natural' classes into which the data will fall? How would these classes correspond to recognizable events or situations? Beyond addressing these we want the data to determine directions for further study. We conducted experiments on different data subsections and analyzed diagnostics such as 'message length reduction'; these characterize the classification in terms of its significance and information content. The classification effort was successful in revealing relationships in the data that were in consonance with other studies of the data and expert opinion.

  4. Multiscale characterization of a heterogeneous aquifer using an ASR operation.

    PubMed

    Pavelic, Paul; Dillon, Peter J; Simmons, Craig T

    2006-01-01

    Heterogeneity in the physical properties of an aquifer can significantly affect the viability of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) by reducing the recoverable proportion of low-salinity water where the ambient ground water is brackish or saline. This study investigated the relationship between knowledge of heterogeneity and predictions of solute transport and recovery efficiency by combining permeability and ASR-based tracer testing with modeling. Multiscale permeability testing of a sandy limestone aquifer at an ASR trial site showed that small-scale core data give lower-bound estimates of aquifer hydraulic conductivity (K), intermediate-scale downhole flowmeter data offer valuable information on variations in K with depth, and large-scale pumping test data provide an integrated measure of the effective K that is useful to constrain ground water models. Chloride breakthrough and thermal profiling data measured during two cycles of ASR showed that the movement of injected water is predominantly within two stratigraphic layers identified from the flowmeter data. The behavior of the injectant was reasonably well simulated with a four-layer numerical model that required minimal calibration. Verification in the second cycle achieved acceptable results given the model's simplicity. Without accounting for the aquifer's layered structure, high precision could be achieved on either piezometer breakthrough or recovered water quality, but not both. This study demonstrates the merit of an integrated approach to characterizing aquifers targeted for ASR. PMID:16556198

  5. Mecanismes d'action des fines et des granulats de verre sur la reaction alcali-silice et la reaction pouzzolanique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idir, Rachida

    Recycling composite glass with different colours in order to be manufactured into new glass products is at present not economically viable. Therefore, the search for new issues other than stockpile areas or dumping sites could be a serious opportunity. To a certain extent, one of the possible solutions is to use the recycled glass in manufacturing cements and in the preparation of concrete mixtures. However, it is essential to manage the two main behaviours that the glass can have when used in cement-based materials: (1) the use of glass as coarse aggregates reveals harmful behaviour related to alkali-silica reaction; (2) on the other hand, it can result in useful behaviour related to pozzolanic reaction if used as fine particles. Furthermore, the significant alkali content should not be overlooked as their mass corresponds to about 13% of the total mass of the glass and as they may activate the alkali-silica reaction. An experimental programme was conducted to provide answers to the various questions raised about the use of glass in cement-based materials. The first part of this work was primarily devoted to the evaluation of the reactive potential of glass in mortars (alkali and pozzolanic reactions). At this stage, nine classes of glass particles ranging from 3mum to 2.5 mm were considered. Then, fine glass particles were used in order to counteract the negative effect of some classes of coarse aggregates having revealed alkali-reactive behaviour. The second part of this work was performed to study the mechanisms that could explain the behaviours of fine and coarse particles in aqueous and concentrated environments. Different answers have been proposed to explain the observed behaviour in terms of grain sizes of glass. Keywords: Glass, Powder, Pozzolan, aggregates, alkali-reaction, alkali-aggregate reaction, alkali-silica reaction, Pouzzolanicity, alkalis, Mortars

  6. Experimental investigation of the mechanisms by which LiNO{sub 3} is effective against ASR

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, C.; Berube, M.A.; Fournier, B.; Thomas, M.D.; Folliard, K.J.

    2010-04-15

    Various series of experiments were carried out on cements pastes, concretes made with a variety of reactive aggregates, composite specimens made of cement paste and reactive aggregate particles, and a variety of reactive natural aggregates and mineral phases immersed in various Li-bearing solutions. The main objective was to determine which mechanisms(s) better explain(s) the effectiveness of LiNO{sub 3} against ASR and variations in this effectiveness as well with the type of reactive aggregate to counteract. The principal conclusions are the following: (1), the pH in the concrete pore solution does not significantly decrease in the presence of LiNO{sub 3}; (2), the concentration of silica in the pore solution is always low and not affected by the presence of LiNO{sub 3}, which does not support the mechanism relating to higher solubility of silica in the presence of lithium; (3), the only reaction product observed in the LiNO{sub 3}-bearing concretes looks like classical ASR gel and its abundance is proportional to concrete expansion, thus is likely expansive while likely containing lithium; this does not support the mechanisms relating to formation of a non or less expansive Si-Li crystalline product or amorphous gel; (4), early-formed reaction products coating the reactive silica grains or aggregate particles, which could act as a physical barrier against further chemical attack of silica, were not observed in the LiNO{sub 3}-bearing concretes, but only for a number of reactive materials after immersion in 1 N LiOH at 350 deg. C in the autoclave (also at 80 deg. C for obsidian); (5), higher chemical stability of silica due to another reason than pH reduction or early formation of a protective coating over the reactive phases, is the mechanism among those considered in this study that better explains the effectiveness of LiNO{sub 3} against ASR.

  7. Hydrometallurgical recovery of heavy metals from low grade automobile shredder residue (ASR): An application of advanced Fenton process (AFP).

    PubMed

    Singh, Jiwan; Lee, Byeong-Kyu

    2015-09-15

    To investigate the leaching and recovery of heavy metals from low-grade automobile shredder residue (ASR), the effects of nitric acid (HNO3) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations, liquid/solid (L/S) ratio, leaching temperature and ASR particle size fractions on the heavy metal leaching rate were determined. The heavy metals were recovered by fractional precipitation and advanced Fenton process (AFP) at different pHs. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test was also performed in the residue remaining after heavy metal leaching to evaluate the potential toxicity of ASR. The heavy metal leaching efficiency was increased with increasing HNO3 and H2O2 concentrations, L/S ratio and temperature. The heavy metal leaching efficiencies were maximized in the lowest ASR size fraction at 303 K and L/S ratio of 100 mL/g. The kinetic study showed that the metal leaching was best represented by a second-order reaction model, with a value of R(2) > 0.99 for all selected heavy metals. The determined activation energy (kJ/mol) was 21.61, 17.10, 12.15, 34.50, 13.07 and 11.45 for Zn, Fe, Ni, Pb, Cd and Cr, respectively. In the final residue, the concentrations of Cd, Cr and Pb were under their threshold limits in all ASR size fractions. Hydrometallurgical metal recovery was greatly increased by AFP up to 99.96% for Zn, 99.97% for Fe, 95.62% for Ni, 99.62% for Pb, 94.11% for Cd and 96.79% for Cr. AFP is highly recommended for the recovery of leached metals from solution even at low concentrations. PMID:26143080

  8. The ASRS-6 Has Two Latent Factors: Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesse, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To test whether the Adult Self-Report Scale for ADHD, six-items version (ASRS-6), measures inattentiveness and hyperactivity independently. Method: The ASRS-6 was completed by 234 university students and 157 outpatients treated for drug dependence. In both samples, the ASRS-6 was subjected to two confirmatory factor analyses, one…

  9. SNR-adaptive stream weighting for audio-MES ASR.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Seung

    2008-08-01

    Myoelectric signals (MESs) from the speaker's mouth region have been successfully shown to improve the noise robustness of automatic speech recognizers (ASRs), thus promising to extend their usability in implementing noise-robust ASR. In the recognition system presented herein, extracted audio and facial MES features were integrated by a decision fusion method, where the likelihood score of the audio-MES observation vector was given by a linear combination of class-conditional observation log-likelihoods of two classifiers, using appropriate weights. We developed a weighting process adaptive to SNRs. The main objective of the paper involves determining the optimal SNR classification boundaries and constructing a set of optimum stream weights for each SNR class. These two parameters were determined by a method based on a maximum mutual information criterion. Acoustic and facial MES data were collected from five subjects, using a 60-word vocabulary. Four types of acoustic noise including babble, car, aircraft, and white noise were acoustically added to clean speech signals with SNR ranging from -14 to 31 dB. The classification accuracy of the audio ASR was as low as 25.5%. Whereas, the classification accuracy of the MES ASR was 85.2%. The classification accuracy could be further improved by employing the proposed audio-MES weighting method, which was as high as 89.4% in the case of babble noise. A similar result was also found for the other types of noise. PMID:18632363

  10. Characterization of a novel plantain Asr gene, MpAsr, that is regulated in response to infection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense and abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Yan; Dai, Jin-Ran; Feng, Dong-Ru; Liu, Bing; Wang, Hong-Bin; Wang, Jin-Fa

    2010-03-01

    Asr (abscisic acid, stress, ripening induced) genes are typically upregulated by a wide range of factors, including drought, cold, salt, abscisic acid (ABA) and injury; in addition to plant responses to developmental and environmental signals. We isolated an Asr gene, MpAsr, from a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library of cold induced plantain (Musa paradisiaca) leaves. MpAsr expression was upregulated in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense infected plantain leaves, peels and roots, suggesting that MpAsr plays a role in plantain pathogen response. In addition, a 581-bp putative promoter region of MpAsr was isolated via genome walking and cis-elements involved in abiotic stress and pathogen-related responses were detected in this same region. Furthermore, the MpAsr promoter demonstrated positive activity and inducibility in tobacco under F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense infection and ABA, cold, dehydration and high salt concentration treatments. Interestingly, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing MpAsr exhibited higher drought tolerance, but showed no significant decreased sensitivity to F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense. These results suggest that MpAsr might be involved in plant responses to both abiotic stress and pathogen attack. PMID:20377692

  11. Aquifer Storage Recovery (ASR) of chlorinated municipal drinking water in a confined aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, John A.; Petersen, Christen E.; Glotzbach, Kenneth J.; Metzger, Loren F.; Christensen, Allen H.; Smith, Gregory A.; O'Leary, David R.; Fram, Miranda S.; Joseph, Trevor; Shannon, Heather

    2010-01-01

    About 1.02 x 106 m3 of chlorinated municipal drinking water was injected into a confined aquifer, 94-137 m below Roseville, California, between December 2005 and April 2006. The water was stored in the aquifer for 438 days, and 2.64 x 106 m3 of water were extracted between July 2007 and February 2008. On the basis of Cl data, 35% of the injected water was recovered and 65% of the injected water and associated disinfection by-products (DBPs) remained in the aquifer at the end of extraction. About 46.3 kg of total trihalomethanes (TTHM) entered the aquifer with the injected water and 37.6 kg of TTHM were extracted. As much as 44 kg of TTHMs remained in the aquifer at the end of extraction because of incomplete recovery of injected water and formation of THMs within the aquifer by reactions with freechlorine in the injected water. Well-bore velocity log data collected from the Aquifer Storage Recovery (ASR) well show as much as 60% of the injected water entered the aquifer through a 9 m thick, high-permeability layer within the confined aquifer near the top of the screened interval. Model simulations of ground-water flow near the ASR well indicate that (1) aquifer heterogeneity allowed injected water to move rapidly through the aquifer to nearby monitoring wells, (2) aquifer heterogeneity caused injected water to move further than expected assuming uniform aquifer properties, and (3) physical clogging of high-permeability layers is the probable cause for the observed change in the distribution of borehole flow. Aquifer heterogeneity also enhanced mixing of native anoxic ground water with oxic injected water, promoting removal of THMs primarily through sorption. A 3 to 4-fold reduction in TTHM concentrations was observed in the furthest monitoring well 427 m downgradient from the ASR well, and similar magnitude reductions were observed in depth-dependent water samples collected from the upper part of the screened interval in the ASR well near the end of the extraction

  12. MpAsr encodes an intrinsically unstructured protein and enhances osmotic tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jin-Ran; Liu, Bing; Feng, Dong-Ru; Liu, Hai-yan; He, Yan-ming; Qi, Kang-biao; Wang, Hong-Bin; Wang, Jin-Fa

    2011-07-01

    Abscisic acid-, stress- and ripening (ASR) -induced proteins are plant-specific proteins whose expression is up-regulated under abiotic stresses or during fruit ripening. In this study, we characterized an ASR protein from plantain to explore its physiological roles under osmotic stress. The expression pattern of MpAsr gene shows that MpAsr gene changed little at the mRNA level, while the MpASR protein accumulates under osmotic treatment. Through bioinformatic-based predictions, circular dichroism spectrometry, and proteolysis and heat-stability assays, we determined that the MpASR protein is an intrinsically unstructured protein in solution. We demonstrated that the hydrophilic MpASR protein could protect L: -lactate dehydrogenase (L: -LDH) from cold-induced aggregation. Furthermore, heterologous expression of MpAsr in Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis enhanced the tolerance of transformants to osmotic stress. Transgenic 35S::MpAsr Arabidopsis seeds had a higher germination frequency than wild-type seeds under unfavorable conditions. At the physiological level, 35S::MpAsr Arabidopsis showed increased soluble sugars and decreased cell membrane damage under osmotic stress. Thus, our results suggest that the MpASR protein may act as an osmoprotectant and water-retaining molecule to help cell adjustment to water deficit caused by osmotic stress. PMID:21327389

  13. Analysis of lead content in automotive shredder residue (ASR).

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, Oscar; Pessanha, Sofia; Queralt, Ignacio; Carvalho, Maria Luisa

    2009-09-01

    Automotive shredder residue (ASR) is a very heterogeneous waste, which could have a very high metal content on finest fractions phi<6 mm produced by the shredding of end of live vehicles. The approval of Directive 2000/53/EC and its transposition to the European Union member states requires an analytical technique for in-situ checking of the content of some metals in ASR wastes. The objective of this study is the evaluation of total Pb content in the different fractions using a rapid measurement method to easily accomplish the current legislation. An experimental Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer with tri-axial geometry was used to analyse the ASR in order to test the feasibility of this analytical technique. Likewise, a correction of the intensities by the incoherent scattering (Compton) radiation was made to compensate the matrix effects. The results show that values in the smaller fractions are bigger (11,600 mg kg(-1) in the fraction <125 microm) than in the coarser fractions (4600 mg kg(-1) in the fraction between 2 and 6 mm) and that such type of instrumentation enables a fast measurement with a limit of detection of 1.1 mg kg(-1) for 1000 s measurement). PMID:19493667

  14. Automotive shredder residue (ASR) characterization for a valuable management.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Luciano; Santini, Alessandro; Passarini, Fabrizio; Vassura, Ivano

    2010-11-01

    Car fluff is the waste produced after end-of-life-vehicles (ELVs) shredding and metal recovery. It is made of plastics, rubber, glass, textiles and residual metals and it accounts for almost one-third of a vehicle mass. Due to the approaching of Directive 2000/53/EC recycling targets, 85% recycling rate and 95% recovery rate in 2015, the implementation of automotive shredder residue (ASR) sorting and recycling technologies appears strategic. The present work deals with the characterization of the shredder residue coming from an industrial plant, representative of the Italian situation, as for annual fluxes and technologies involved. The aim of this study is to characterize ASR in order to study and develop a cost effective and environmentally sustainable recycling system. Results show that almost half of the residue is made of fines and the remaining part is mainly composed of polymers. Fine fraction is the most contaminated by mineral oils and heavy metals. This fraction produces also up to 40% ashes and its LHV is lower than the plastic-rich one. Foam rubber represents around half of the polymers share in car fluff. Moreover, some chemical-physical parameters exceed the limits of some parameters fixed by law to be considered refuse derived fuel (RDF). As a consequence, ASR needs to be pre-treated in order to follow the energy recovery route. PMID:20566277

  15. Intelligibility of an ASR-controlled synthetic talking face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siciliano, Catherine; Williams, Geoff; Faulkner, Andrew; Salvi, Giampiero

    2001-05-01

    The goal of the SYNFACE project is to develop a multilingual synthetic talking face, driven by an automatic speech recognizer (ASR), to assist hearing-impaired people with telephone communication. Previous multilingual experiments with the synthetic face have shown that time-aligned synthesized visual face movements can enhance speech intelligibility in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired users [C. Siciliano et al., Proc. Int. Cong. Phon. Sci. (2003)]. Similar experiments are in progress to examine whether the synthetic face remains intelligible when driven by ASR output. The recognizer produces phonetic output in real time, in order to drive the synthetic face while maintaining normal dialogue turn-taking. Acoustic modeling was performed with a neural network, while an HMM was used for decoding. The recognizer was trained on the SpeechDAT telephone speech corpus. Preliminary results suggest that the currently achieved recognition performance of around 60% frames correct limits the usefulness of the synthetic face movements. This is particularly true for consonants, where correct place of articulation is especially important for visual intelligibility. Errors in the alignment of phone boundaries representative of those arising in the ASR output were also shown to decrease audio-visual intelligibility. [Work supported by the EU IST Project 2001-33327.

  16. Analysis of lead content in automotive shredder residue (ASR)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, Oscar

    2009-09-15

    Automotive shredder residue (ASR) is a very heterogeneous waste, which could have a very high metal content on finest fractions {phi} < 6 mm produced by the shredding of end of live vehicles. The approval of Directive 2000/53/EC and its transposition to the European Union member states requires an analytical technique for in-situ checking of the content of some metals in ASR wastes. The objective of this study is the evaluation of total Pb content in the different fractions using a rapid measurement method to easily accomplish the current legislation. An experimental Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer with tri-axial geometry was used to analyse the ASR in order to test the feasibility of this analytical technique. Likewise, a correction of the intensities by the incoherent scattering (Compton) radiation was made to compensate the matrix effects. The results show that values in the smaller fractions are bigger (11,600 mg kg{sup -1} in the fraction <125 {mu}m) than in the coarser fractions (4600 mg kg{sup -1} in the fraction between 2 and 6 mm) and that such type of instrumentation enables a fast measurement with a limit of detection of 1.1 mg kg{sup -1} for 1000 s measurement)

  17. Molecular Characterization of a Strawberry FaASR Gene in Relation to Fruit Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yue-ming; Zhao, Ming-lei; Shan, Wei; Kuang, Jian-fei; Lu, Wang-jin

    2011-01-01

    Background ABA-, stress- and ripening-induced (ASR) proteins have been reported to act as a downstream component involved in ABA signal transduction. Although much attention has been paid to the roles of ASR in plant development and stress responses, the mechanisms by which ABA regulate fruit ripening at the molecular level are not fully understood. In the present work, a strawberry ASR gene was isolated and characterized (FaASR), and a polyclonal antibody against FaASR protein was prepared. Furthermore, the effects of ABA, applied to two different developmental stages of strawberry, on fruit ripening and the expression of FaASR at transcriptional and translational levels were investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings FaASR, localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus, contained 193 amino acids and shared common features with other plant ASRs. It also functioned as a transcriptional activator in yeast with trans-activation activity in the N-terminus. During strawberry fruit development, endogenous ABA content, levels of FaASR mRNA and protein increased significantly at the initiation of ripening at a white (W) fruit developmental stage. More importantly, application of exogenous ABA to large green (LG) fruit and W fruit markedly increased endogenous ABA content, accelerated fruit ripening, and greatly enhanced the expression of FaASR transcripts and the accumulation of FaASR protein simultaneously. Conclusions These results indicate that FaASR may be involved in strawberry fruit ripening. The observed increase in endogenous ABA content, and enhanced FaASR expression at transcriptional and translational levels in response to ABA treatment might partially contribute to the acceleration of strawberry fruit ripening. PMID:21915355

  18. 2010 Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science Team Meeting Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, DL

    2011-05-04

    This document contains the summaries of papers presented in poster format at the March 2010 Atmospheric System Research Science Team Meeting held in Bethesda, Maryland. More than 260 posters were presented during the Science Team Meeting. Posters were sorted into the following subject areas: aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions, aerosol properties, atmospheric state and surface, cloud properties, field campaigns, infrastructure and outreach, instruments, modeling, and radiation. To put these posters in context, the status of ASR at the time of the meeting is provided here.

  19. Defining groundwater transport times near ASR facilities using geochemical tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    Determining groundwater transport and travel times between recharge facilities and wells has become increasingly important in managing Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) projects. This is especially true in the State of California where water reuse rules that consider groundwater travel time in the permitting process are being discussed. Fundamental geochemical approaches for investigating transport include tritium/helium-3 dating and the addition of sulfur hexafluoride tracer in controlled experiments. When combined, groundwater flow can be imaged with time scales on the order of days to decades. The Orange County Water District recharges to their groundwater basin approximately 250,000 acre-ft of surface water annually from a series of spreading ponds and a 9-km section of the Santa Ana River. Sulfur hexafluoride gas was injected into the Santa Ana River over a period of 2 weeks, tagging approximately 3,000 acre-ft of recharged water. Groundwater flow and transport from the river has been determined for more than three years. Results of the gas tracer experiment demonstrate that linear groundwater flow velocities range from less than 1 km/yr to more than 5 km/yr and that the groundwater flow system is stratified. These results will be used to verify and refine numerical models of transport near the ASR facilities in Orange County and have been used to establish flowlines so that in situ water quality changes can be quantified.

  20. Archive of boomer seismic reflection data collected during USGS field activities 01ASR01, 01ASR02, 02ASR01, 02ASR02, Miami, Florida, November 2001-January 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calderon, Karynna; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Wiese, Dana S.; Flocks, James G.

    2002-01-01

    This appendix consists of two-dimensional marine seismic reflection profile data collected in canals in the Lake Belt Area of Miami, Florida. These data were acquired in November and December of 2001 and January and February of 2002 using a 4.9-m (16-ft) jonboat. The data are available in a variety of formats, including binary, ASCII, HTML, shapefiles, and GIF images. Binary data are in Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format and may be downloaded for further processing or display. The SEG-Y data files are too large to fit on one CD-ROM, so they have been distributed onto two CD-ROMs as explained below. Reference maps and GIF images of the profiles may be viewed with your web browser. The GIS information provided is compatible with ESRI's GIS software. A reconnaissance test line (02ASR02-02b02) was collected northwest of the survey area during Field Activity 02ASR02 for possible use in a future project. It is archived here for organizational purposes only.

  1. Primary and Secondary Contamination Mechanisms for Consideration in ASR Modeling and Practical Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is a useful water resource management option for water storage and reuse. Its increased use is recognized in adaptation to the ever increasing problem of water availability, both in timing and flow. Challenges in the ASR process may arise from...

  2. Primary and Secondary Contamination Mechanisms in ASR Modeling and Design of Practical Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is a useful water resource management option for water storage and reuse. Its increased use is recognized in adaptation to the ever increasing problem of water availability, both in timing and flow. Challenges in the ASR process may arise from...

  3. Phosphorylation of Trihelix Transcriptional Repressor ASR3 by MAP KINASE4 Negatively Regulates Arabidopsis Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Jiang, Shan; Yu, Xiao; Cheng, Cheng; Chen, Sixue; Cheng, Yanbing; Yuan, Joshua S.; Jiang, Daohong; He, Ping; Shan, Libo

    2015-01-01

    Proper control of immune-related gene expression is crucial for the host to launch an effective defense response. Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) induces rapid and profound transcriptional reprogramming via unclear mechanisms. Here, we show that ASR3 (ARABIDOPSIS SH4-RELATED3) functions as a transcriptional repressor and plays a negative role in regulating pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) in Arabidopsis thaliana. ASR3 belongs to a plant-specific trihelix transcription factor family for which functional studies are lacking. MAMP treatments induce rapid phosphorylation of ASR3 at threonine 189 via MPK4, a mitogen-activated protein kinase that negatively regulates PTI responses downstream of multiple MAMP receptors. ASR3 possesses transcriptional repressor activity via its ERF-associated amphiphilic repression motifs and negatively regulates a large subset of flg22-induced genes. Phosphorylation of ASR3 by MPK4 enhances its DNA binding activity to suppress gene expression. Importantly, the asr3 mutant shows enhanced disease resistance to virulent bacterial pathogen infection, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing the wild-type or phospho-mimetic form of ASR3 exhibit compromised PTI responses. Our studies reveal a function of the trihelix transcription factors in plant innate immunity and provide evidence that ASR3 functions as a transcriptional repressor regulated by MAMP-activated MPK4 to fine-tune plant immune gene expression. PMID:25770109

  4. Retrospective on the Accelerating Seismic Release (ASR) hypothesis: Controversy and new horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignan, Arnaud

    2011-06-01

    The hypothesis that large earthquakes may be preceded by a period of accelerating seismicity, or Accelerating Seismic Release (ASR), was proposed about twenty years ago. A compilation of almost one hundred peer-reviewed publications on this topic since the late 1980s to the present day shows that the rate of ASR studies increased gradually until 2004 but decreased afterwards. This negative trend is amplified by a recent increase in the number of negative results and criticisms of the ASR hypothesis. The author suggests that much of the recent negativity regarding this topic is due to the formulation of this hypothesis as a power-law fit to cumulative seismicity series. This approach is intrinsically linked to the consensus for criticality, evident from an overview of the ASR literature, to explain the emergence of power-laws in earthquake populations. The holistic view of the earth's crust as a complex system restricts seismicity pattern analyses to the study of main features such as power-laws, while a reductionist view would allow for more refined ones. Such a paradigm shift, or 'sea change', might be under way in the ASR literature where in 2007 a new approach was proposed to explain the ASR power-law from combined concepts of elastic rebound and geometry. Reductionism versus holism is a fundamental problem that not only applies to the study of ASR but also to the broader field of earthquake physics and earthquake predictability science.

  5. Asr genes belong to a gene family comprising at least three closely linked loci on chromosome 4 in tomato.

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; Lijavetzky, D; Bernacchi, D; Hopp, H E; Iusem, N

    1996-09-25

    Asr1, Asr2 and Asr3 are three homologous clones isolated from tomato whose expression is believed to be regulated by abscisic acid (ABA); the corresponding genes thus participate in physiological and developmental processes such as responses of leaf and root to water stress, and fruit ripening. In this report, results obtained with Near Isogenic Lines reveal that Asr1, Asr2 and Asr3 represent three different loci. In addition, we map these genes on the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) map of the tomato genome by using an F2 population derived from an interspecific hybrid cross L. esculentum x L. penelli. RFLP data allow us to map these genes on chromosome 4, suggesting that they belong to a gene family. The elucidation of the genomic organization of the Asr gene family may help in understanding the role of its members in the response to osmotic stress, as well as in fruit ripening, at the molecular level. PMID:8879251

  6. Predominantly Cytoplasmic Localization in Yeast of ASR1, a Non-Receptor Transcription Factor from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Urtasun, Nicolás; Correa García, Susana; Iusem, Norberto D; Bermúdez Moretti, Mariana

    2010-01-01

    The Asr gene family (named after abscisic acid, stress and ripening), currently classified as a novel group of the LEA superfamily, is exclusively present in the genomes of seed plants, except for the Brassicaceae family. It is associated with water-deficit stress and is involved in adaptation to dry climates. Motivated by separate reports depicting ASR proteins as either transcription factors or chaperones, we decided to determine the intracellular localization of ASR proteins. For that purpose, we employed an in vivo eukaryotic expression system, the heterologous model Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including wild type strains as well as mutants in which the variant ASR1 previously proved to be functionally protective against osmotic stress. Our methodology involved immunofluorescence-based confocal microscopy, without artificially altering the native structure of the protein under study. Results show that, in both normal and osmotic stress conditions, recombinant ASR1 turned out to localize mainly to the cytoplasm, irrespective of the genotype used, revealing a scattered distribution in the form of dots or granules. The results are discussed in terms of a plausible dual (cytoplasmic and nuclear) role of ASR proteins. PMID:20657719

  7. Beam filling loss adjustments for ASR-9 weather channel reflectivity estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engholm, Cynthia D.; Troxel, Seth W.

    1990-10-01

    The FAA is deploying over 100 new airport surveillance radars (ASR-9) across the country. In contrast to earlier ASRs, the ASR-9 utilizes a separate digital weather processing channel to provide air traffic controllers with timely, calibrated displays of precipitation intensity. The ASR-9 utilizes dual selectable fan shaped elevation beams designed to track aircraft over a large volume. As a consequence, weather echoes received from these fan shaped beams represent vertically averaged quantities. If the precipitation only partially or nonuniformly fills the beam, then the vertically integrated reflectivity may underestimate the actual intensity of the storm. The ASR-9 weather channel corrects for this by adjusting the range dependent six level reflectivity thresholds. The appropriateness of the currently implemented correction has not been carefully examined and may require modification to take into account regional and morphological variability in storm structure. The method used to derive new beam filling loss adjustments is discussed. An extensive database of volumetric pencil beam radar data were used in conjunction with the ASR-9 simulation facility to derive adjustments aimed at calibrating the precipitation intensity reports to the maximum perceived hazard. Results from this calibration indicate that a single correction is appropriate for all sites and intensities. The new corrections yield substantially improved results over the current corrections in producing these reflectivity reports.

  8. TaASR1, a transcription factor gene in wheat, confers drought stress tolerance in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Huang, Chao; Deng, Xiaomin; Zhou, Shiyi; Chen, Lihong; Li, Yin; Wang, Cheng; Ma, Zhanbing; Yuan, Qianqian; Wang, Yan; Cai, Rui; Liang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2013-08-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA)-, stress-, and ripening-induced (ASR) proteins are reported to be involved in abiotic stresses. However, it is not known whether ASR genes confer drought stress tolerance by utilizing the antioxidant system. In this study, a wheat ASR gene, TaASR1, was cloned and characterized. TaASR1 transcripts increased after treatments with PEG6000, ABA and H(2)O(2). Overexpression of TaASR1 in tobacco resulted in increased drought/osmotic tolerance, which was demonstrated that transgenic lines had lesser malondialdehyde (MDA), ion leakage (IL) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), but higher relative water content (RWC) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities than wild type (WT) under drought stress. Overexpression of TaASR1 in tobacco also enhanced the expression of ROS-related and stress-responsive genes under osmotic stress. In addition, transgenic lines exhibited improved tolerance to oxidative stress by retaining more effective antioxidant system. Finally, TaASR1 was localized in the cell nucleus and functioned as a transcriptional activator. Taken together, our results showed that TaASR1 functions as a positive factor under drought/osmotic stress, involved in the regulation of ROS homeostasis by activating antioxidant system and transcription of stress-associated genes. PMID:23356734

  9. Dimerization and DNA-binding of ASR1, a small hydrophilic protein abundant in plant tissues suffering from water loss

    SciTech Connect

    Maskin, Laura; Frankel, Nicolas; Gudesblat, Gustavo; Demergasso, Maria J.; Pietrasanta, Lia I.; Iusem, Norberto D. . E-mail: norbius@fbmc.fcen.uba.ar

    2007-01-26

    The Asr gene family is present in Spermatophyta. Its members are generally activated under water stress. We present evidence that tomato ASR1, one of the proteins of the family, accumulates in seed during late stages of embryogenesis, a physiological process characterized by water loss. In vitro, electrophoretic assays show a homo-dimeric structure for ASR1 and highlight strong non-covalent interactions between monomers prone to self-assemble. Direct visualization of single molecules by atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirms that ASR1 forms homodimers and that uncovers both monomers and dimers bind double stranded DNA.

  10. Improving ASR Recovery Efficiency by Partially-penetrating Wells in Brackish Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is a proven cost-effective powerful technology for environmental protection and water resources optimization. The recovery efficiency (RE) is regarded as the key criteria for evaluating the ASR performance. In this study, a particular ASR scheme with the fully-penetrating well (FPW) for injection and the partially-penetrating well (PPW) for recovery is proposed to improve the RE for ASR schemes implemented in brackish aquifers. This design appreciates the tilting shape of the interface with underlying heavier salt water. For the FPW, recovery has to be terminated as soon as the interface toe reaches the well, while the toe can be pulled up to the PPW for recovery termination, resulting in later breakthrough of salt water into the pumping well, more recoverable water extracted from the shallow layers, and a higher RE. Key hydrogeological and operational parameters affecting the RE were investigated by numerical simulations. Results demonstrated the effectiveness and efficiency of the new ASR scheme and provided practical guidance for designing such a scheme in various hydrogeological conditions.

  11. Field Investigation of a New Recharge Approach for ASR Projects in Near-Surface Aquifers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gaisheng; Knobbe, Steven; Reboulet, Edward C; Whittemore, Donald O; Händel, Falk; Butler, James J

    2016-05-01

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is the artificial recharge and temporary storage of water in an aquifer when water is abundant, and recovery of all or a portion of that water when it is needed. One key limiting factor that still hinders the effectiveness of ASR is the high costs of constructing, maintaining, and operating the artificial recharge systems. Here we investigate a new recharge method for ASR in near-surface unconsolidated aquifers that uses small-diameter, low-cost wells installed with direct-push (DP) technology. The effectiveness of a DP well for ASR recharge is compared with that of a surface infiltration basin at a field site in north-central Kansas. The performance of the surface basin was poor at the site due to the presence of a shallow continuous clay layer, identified with DP profiling methods, that constrained the downward movement of infiltrated water and significantly reduced the basin recharge capacity. The DP well penetrated through this clay layer and was able to recharge water by gravity alone at a much higher rate. Most importantly, the costs of the DP well, including both the construction and land costs, were only a small fraction of those for the infiltration basin. This low-cost approach could significantly expand the applicability of ASR as a water resources management tool to entities with limited fiscal resources, such as many small municipalities and rural communities. The results of this investigation demonstrate the great potential of DP wells as a new recharge option for ASR projects in near-surface unconsolidated aquifers. PMID:26313764

  12. Synthesis, structures and photocatalytic activities of microcrystalline ABi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} (A=Sr, Ba) powders

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weiming; Liang, Shijing; Wang, Xiaowei; Bi, Jinhong; Liu, Ping; Wu, Ling

    2011-01-15

    Microcrystalline ABi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} (A=Sr, Ba) photocatalysts were successfully synthesized by a citrate complex method. The as-prepared samples were characterized by the X-ray diffraction technique, BET surface area analysis, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrum, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The results indicated that single-phase orthorhombic SrBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} could be obtained after being calcined above 650 {sup o}C, while BaBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} was tetragonal. Based on the diffuse reflectance spectra, the band gaps of the obtained samples were calculated to be around 3.34-3.54 eV. For the photocatalytic redox reaction of methyl orange under UV-light irradiation, SrBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} exhibited higher photocatalytic activity than that of BaBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9}. The effects of the crystallinities, BET surface areas and crystal structures of the samples on the photocatalytic activities were discussed in detail. -- Graphical abstract: Aurivillius-type ABi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} (A=Sr, Ba) photocatalysts were successfully synthesized by a citrate complex method. SrBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} and BaBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} showed different photocatalytic performances in the redox reaction of methyl orange (MO) under UV-light ({lambda}=254 nm), due to the different crystal structures of ABi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} (A=Sr, Ba). Display Omitted

  13. QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF ASR DETERIORATION LEVEL BASED ON SURVEY RESULT OF EXISTING STRUCTURE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Yasushi; Kosa, Kenji; Matsumoto, Shigeru; Miura, Masatsugu

    The relationship between the crack density and compressive strength of the core cylinder, which drilled from actual structure damaged by ASR, was investigated. The results showed that even if the crack density increased about 1.0m/m2, the compressive strength decreased only 2N/mm2. Then, the new method for estimating future compressive strength using the accumulation crack density in the current is proposed. In addition, the declining tendency of compressive strength by the ASR expansion was early proportional to the expansion, and it was examined on the reason for becoming gentle curve afterwards. As a technique, the detailed observation of ASR crack which arose in the loading test for the plane was carried out, after cylindrical specimen for test was cut in longitudinal direction. As the result, It was proven that the proportion in which line of rupture overlaps with the ASR crack was low, and the load is resisted by interlocking between coarse aggregate and concrete in the crack plane.

  14. Personnel and Training Requirements for the ASR-21 Rescue Control Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Joseph F.; Noble, John F.

    This report covers personnel and training requirements for Rescue Control Center (RCC) twin hull submarine rescue ships (ASRs). Skills and knowledge similar to those of a sonar technician (ST-0408) and a data system technician (DS-1666) are needed to operate the special sonar set and computer based system, but no suitable Navy training facility…

  15. Deterioration of Pracana Dam due to ASR. Main features and repair works

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, D.S.; Camelo, S.; Silva, H.S.; Pinho, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    Some of the Portuguese concrete dams show evidences of ASR. In majority the phenomena is still benign. However, in a few cases some significant deterioration of ASR type have malfunctions arose. In such cases deteriorations of ASR type have been detected while in the others the ASSR type prevail, depending on the type of aggregate. The paper reports the most important case of ASR in Portuguese concrete dams. Pracana dam is a buttress structures built in 1948-51, being the aggregates predominantly of quartzitic and metapellitic nature. Subsequently to the intense fracturing due to a quick concrete cooling during the first filling of the reservoir, high levels of expansion rates had been detected by means of monitoring system. After 8 years emptied reservoir, rehabilitation works took place in 1991-92 aiming at the concrete mass regeneration and the installation of an upstream face membrane, the improvement of spillway capacity and of the foundation performances. The behaviour of the dam as well as the performed tests (petrographic, mechanic, ultrasonic and expansibility ones) and repair works are described in the paper.

  16. Full scale treatment of ASR wastes in a modified rotary kiln.

    PubMed

    Mancini, G; Viotti, P; Luciano, A; Raboni, M; Fino, D

    2014-11-01

    A plant, designed for the thermo-valorisation of tyres, was specifically modified in order to treat Automobile Shredder Residue (ASR). Results from two full-scale combustion experiments, carried out on large ASR feeding lots (thousands of tons) indicate the proposed technology as a potential route to help the fulfilling of impending 95% reuse and recovery target set by the End of life Vehicle (ELV) Directive (January 2015). The paper describes the main operational troubleshot occurred during the first experiment (emissions at the stack out of regulatory limits and problems of clogging on the conveyer belt) and the consequent upgrading solutions (pre-treatment, introduction of waste double low-flow screw feeder and a cyclone prior to the main fan, modification of rotatory kiln inlet) adopted to allow, during the second long-term experiment, a continuous basis operation of the plant in full compliance with the discharge limit to the atmosphere. Characterization of both ASR and combustion residues allowed to quantify a 18% of combustion residues as not dangerous waste while only the 2% as hazardous one. A pre-treatment for the reduction of fines in the ASR was recommended in order to achieve the required energy recovery efficiency. PMID:25103234

  17. Searching the ASRS Database Using QUORUM Keyword Search, Phrase Search, Phrase Generation, and Phrase Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGreevy, Michael W.; Connors, Mary M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To support Search Requests and Quick Responses at the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS), four new QUORUM methods have been developed: keyword search, phrase search, phrase generation, and phrase discovery. These methods build upon the core QUORUM methods of text analysis, modeling, and relevance-ranking. QUORUM keyword search retrieves ASRS incident narratives that contain one or more user-specified keywords in typical or selected contexts, and ranks the narratives on their relevance to the keywords in context. QUORUM phrase search retrieves narratives that contain one or more user-specified phrases, and ranks the narratives on their relevance to the phrases. QUORUM phrase generation produces a list of phrases from the ASRS database that contain a user-specified word or phrase. QUORUM phrase discovery finds phrases that are related to topics of interest. Phrase generation and phrase discovery are particularly useful for finding query phrases for input to QUORUM phrase search. The presentation of the new QUORUM methods includes: a brief review of the underlying core QUORUM methods; an overview of the new methods; numerous, concrete examples of ASRS database searches using the new methods; discussion of related methods; and, in the appendices, detailed descriptions of the new methods.

  18. Spoken Grammar Practice and Feedback in an ASR-Based CALL System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vries, Bart Penning; Cucchiarini, Catia; Bodnar, Stephen; Strik, Helmer; van Hout, Roeland

    2015-01-01

    Speaking practice is important for learners of a second language. Computer assisted language learning (CALL) systems can provide attractive opportunities for speaking practice when combined with automatic speech recognition (ASR) technology. In this paper, we present a CALL system that offers spoken practice of word order, an important aspect of…

  19. Effectiveness of Feedback for Enhancing English Pronunciation in an ASR-Based CALL System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Y.-H.; Young, S. S.-C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study on implementing the ASR-based CALL (computer-assisted language learning based upon automatic speech recognition) system embedded with both formative and summative feedback approaches and using implicit and explicit strategies to enhance adult and young learners' English pronunciation. Two groups of learners including 18…

  20. Improving the Readability of ASR Results for Lectures Using Multiple Hypotheses and Sentence-Level Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasuhisa; Yamamoto, Kazumasa; Nakagawa, Seiichi

    This paper presents a novel method for improving the readability of automatic speech recognition (ASR) results for classroom lectures. Because speech in a classroom is spontaneous and contains many ill-formed utterances with various disfluencies, the ASR result should be edited to improve the readability before presenting it to users, by applying some operations such as removing disfluencies, determining sentence boundaries, inserting punctuation marks and repairing dropped words. Owing to the presence of many kinds of domain-dependent words and casual styles, even state-of-the-art recognizers can only achieve a 30-50% word error rate for speech in classroom lectures. Therefore, a method for improving the readability of ASR results is needed to make it robust to recognition errors. We can use multiple hypotheses instead of the single-best hypothesis as a method to achieve a robust response to recognition errors. However, if the multiple hypotheses are represented by a lattice (or a confusion network), it is difficult to utilize sentence-level knowledge, such as chunking and dependency parsing, which are imperative for determining the discourse structure and therefore imperative for improving readability. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm that infers clean, readable transcripts from spontaneous multiple hypotheses represented by a confusion network while integrating sentence-level knowledge. Automatic and manual evaluations showed that using multiple hypotheses and sentence-level knowledge is effective to improve the readability of ASR results, while preserving the understandability.

  1. Material and energy recovery from Automotive Shredded Residues (ASR) via sequential gasification and combustion.

    PubMed

    Viganò, F; Consonni, S; Grosso, M; Rigamonti, L

    2010-01-01

    Shredding is the common end-of-life treatment in Europe for dismantled car wrecks. It produces the so-called Automotive Shredded Residue (ASR), usually disposed of in landfill. This paper summarizes the outcome of a study carried out by Politecnico di Milano and LEAP with the support of Actelios SpA on the prospects of a technology based on sequential gasification and combustion of this specific waste stream. Its application to the treatment of ASR allows the recovery of large fractions of metals as non-oxidized, easily marketable secondary raw materials, the vitrification of most of the ash content and the production of power via a steam cycle. Results show that despite the unfavourable characteristics of ASR, the proposed technology can reach appealing energy performances. Three of four environmental impact indicators and the cumulative energy demand index are favourable, the main positive contributes being electricity production and metal recovery (mainly aluminium and copper). The only unfavourable indicator is the global warming index because, since most of the carbon in ASR comes from fossil sources, the carbon dioxide emissions at the stack of the thermal treatment plant are mainly non-renewable and, at the same time, the avoided biogas production from the alternative disposal route of landfilling is minor. PMID:19853430

  2. The Oculus-ASR: An Orbiting Nanosatellite Testbed for Unresolved Object Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, L.; LaSarge, J. A.

    2012-09-01

    The Oculus-ASR is a 70-kg-nanosatellite specifically designed to advance USAF space situational awareness by providing calibration opportunities and validation techniques for AMOS's telescopic non-resolved object characterization program. This paper will describe the design and capabilities of the Oculus-ASR, its concept of operations, and report on its initial ground optical characterization. Nearly every object orbiting the Earth, when viewed using all but the largest ground-based telescopes, appear as unresolved point sources of light. Although these unresolved objects seem to be featureless, it may be possible to determine characteristics related to an object's attitude and/or rotation rate by analyzing the spectral and temporal content of reflected sunlight off of the object. For instance, a faceted rotating object may produce a periodic cycle of bright glints when viewed from the ground. Alternatively, a spectrally distinct surface coating on the object may be detectable from the ground using a spectrometer. The design of Oculus-ASR uses specific shape properties as well as spectrally distinct materials on the spacecraft in order to emphasize, to the ground observer, changes in light intensity and spectral characteristics when viewed from the ground. Additionally, the nanosatellite has the ability to change its shape (and therefore its visible characteristics) while in orbit. It also possesses 3-axis control capability, allowing the Oculus-ASR to present different structural features and maneuver states to the ground observer. In order to accurately recognize the visible properties of the vehicle while in space, the nanosatellite has been optically characterized in an AFRL ground facility to determine reflective signatures that can be expected on orbit. Once on orbit, the Oculus-ASR will be monitored by ground-based telescopes and these observations will be reconciled against the ‘truth' attitude data recorded by the Oculus-ASR during various overpasses

  3. A Novel Role for Banana MaASR in the Regulation of Flowering Time in Transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peiguang; Miao, Hongxia; Yu, Xiaomeng; Jia, Caihong; Liu, Juhua; Zhang, Jianbin; Wang, Jingyi; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Anbang; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    The abscisic acid (ABA)-, stress-, and ripening-induced (ASR) protein is a plant-specific hydrophilic transcriptional factor involved in fruit ripening and the abiotic stress response. To date, there have been no studies on the role of ASR genes in delayed flowering time. Here, we found that the ASR from banana, designated as MaASR, was preferentially expressed in the banana female flowers from the eighth, fourth, and first cluster of the inflorescence. MaASR transgenic lines (L14 and L38) had a clear delayed-flowering phenotype. The number of rosette leaves, sepals, and pedicel trichomes in L14 and L38 was greater than in the wild type (WT) under long day (LD) conditions. The period of buds, mid-flowers, and full bloom of L14 and L38 appeared later than the WT. cDNA microarray and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses revealed that overexpression of MaASR delays flowering through reduced expression of several genes, including photoperiod pathway genes, vernalization pathway genes, gibberellic acid pathway genes, and floral integrator genes, under short days (SD) for 28 d (from vegetative to reproductive transition stage); however, the expression of the autonomous pathway genes was not affected. This study provides the first evidence of a role for ASR genes in delayed flowering time in plants. PMID:27486844

  4. A Novel Role for Banana MaASR in the Regulation of Flowering Time in Transgenic Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaomeng; Jia, Caihong; Liu, Juhua; Zhang, Jianbin; Wang, Jingyi; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Anbang; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    The abscisic acid (ABA)-, stress-, and ripening-induced (ASR) protein is a plant-specific hydrophilic transcriptional factor involved in fruit ripening and the abiotic stress response. To date, there have been no studies on the role of ASR genes in delayed flowering time. Here, we found that the ASR from banana, designated as MaASR, was preferentially expressed in the banana female flowers from the eighth, fourth, and first cluster of the inflorescence. MaASR transgenic lines (L14 and L38) had a clear delayed-flowering phenotype. The number of rosette leaves, sepals, and pedicel trichomes in L14 and L38 was greater than in the wild type (WT) under long day (LD) conditions. The period of buds, mid-flowers, and full bloom of L14 and L38 appeared later than the WT. cDNA microarray and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses revealed that overexpression of MaASR delays flowering through reduced expression of several genes, including photoperiod pathway genes, vernalization pathway genes, gibberellic acid pathway genes, and floral integrator genes, under short days (SD) for 28 d (from vegetative to reproductive transition stage); however, the expression of the autonomous pathway genes was not affected. This study provides the first evidence of a role for ASR genes in delayed flowering time in plants. PMID:27486844

  5. Novel synthesis and applications of Thiomer solidification for heavy metals immobilization in hazardous ASR/ISW thermal residue.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jin Woong; Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Park, Hung Suck

    2016-03-01

    The present paper reports the novel synthesis and application of Thiomer solidification for heavy metal immobilization in hazardous automobile shredder residues and industrial solid waste (ASR/ISW) thermal residues. The word Thiomer is a combination of the prefix of a sulfur-containing compound "Thio" and the suffix of "Polymer" meaning a large molecule compound of many repeated subunits. To immobilize heavy metals, either ASR/ISW thermal residues (including bottom and fly ash) was mixed well with Thiomer and heated at 140°C. After Thiomer solidification, approximately 91-100% heavy metal immobilization was achieved. The morphology and mineral phases of the Thiomer-solidified ASR/ISW thermal residue were characterized by field emission-scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD), which indicated that the amounts of heavy metals detectable on the ASR/ISW thermal residue surface decreased and the sulfur mass percent increased. XRD indicated that the main fraction of the enclosed/bound materials on the ASR/ISW residue contained sulfur associated crystalline complexes. The Thiomer solidified process could convert the heavy metal compounds into highly insoluble metal sulfides and simultaneously encapsulate the ASR/ISW thermal residue. These results show that the proposed method can be applied to the immobilization of ASR/ISW hazardous ash involving heavy metals. PMID:26777552

  6. The MaASR gene as a crucial component in multiple drought stress response pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Hu, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Feng, Renjun; Zhang, Yindong; Liu, Juhua; Jia, Caihong; Miao, Hongxia; Zhang, Jianbin; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2015-03-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA)-, stress-, and ripening-induced (ASR) proteins are involved in abiotic stress responses. However, the exact molecular mechanism underlying their function remains unclear. In this study, we report that MaASR expression was induced by drought stress and MaASR overexpression in Arabidopsis strongly enhanced drought stress tolerance. Physiological analyses indicated that transgenic lines had higher plant survival rates, seed germination rates, and leaf proline content and lower water loss rates (WLR) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. MaASR-overexpressing lines also showed smaller leaves and reduced sensitivity to ABA. Further, microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation-based sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis revealed that MaASR participates in regulating photosynthesis, respiration, carbohydrate and phytohormone metabolism, and signal transduction to confer plants with enhanced drought stress tolerance. Direct interactions of MaASR with promoters for the hexose transporter and Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP) genes were confirmed by electrophoresis mobility shift array (EMSA) analysis. Our results indicate that MaASR acts as a crucial regulator of photosynthesis, respiration, carbohydrate and phytohormone metabolism, and signal transduction to mediate drought stress tolerance. PMID:25414087

  7. AsrR Is an Oxidative Stress Sensing Regulator Modulating Enterococcus faecium Opportunistic Traits, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lebreton, François; van Schaik, Willem; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella; Torelli, Riccardo; Le Bras, Florian; Verneuil, Nicolas; Zhang, Xinglin; Giard, Jean-Christophe; Dhalluin, Anne; Willems, Rob J. L.; Leclercq, Roland; Cattoir, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress serves as an important host/environmental signal that triggers a wide range of responses in microorganisms. Here, we identified an oxidative stress sensor and response regulator in the important multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen Enterococcus faecium belonging to the MarR family and called AsrR (antibiotic and stress response regulator). The AsrR regulator used cysteine oxidation to sense the hydrogen peroxide which results in its dissociation to promoter DNA. Transcriptome analysis showed that the AsrR regulon was composed of 181 genes, including representing functionally diverse groups involved in pathogenesis, antibiotic and antimicrobial peptide resistance, oxidative stress, and adaptive responses. Consistent with the upregulated expression of the pbp5 gene, encoding a low-affinity penicillin-binding protein, the asrR null mutant was found to be more resistant to β-lactam antibiotics. Deletion of asrR markedly decreased the bactericidal activity of ampicillin and vancomycin, which are both commonly used to treat infections due to enterococci, and also led to over-expression of two major adhesins, acm and ecbA, which resulted in enhanced in vitro adhesion to human intestinal cells. Additional pathogenic traits were also reinforced in the asrR null mutant including greater capacity than the parental strain to form biofilm in vitro and greater persistance in Galleria mellonella colonization and mouse systemic infection models. Despite overexpression of oxidative stress-response genes, deletion of asrR was associated with a decreased oxidative stress resistance in vitro, which correlated with a reduced resistance to phagocytic killing by murine macrophages. Interestingly, both strains showed similar amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Finally, we observed a mutator phenotype and enhanced DNA transfer frequencies in the asrR deleted strain. These data indicate that AsrR plays a major role in antimicrobial resistance and

  8. The Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS): utility in college students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Gray, Sarah; Woltering, Steven; Mawjee, Karizma; Tannock, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    Background. The number of students with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) enrolled in colleges and universities has increased markedly over the past few decades, giving rise to questions about how best to document symptoms and impairment in the post-secondary setting. The aim of the present study was to investigate the utility and psychometric properties of a widely-used rating scale for adults with ADHD, the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-V1.1), in a sample of post-secondary students with ADHD. Methods. A total of 135 college students (mean age = 24, 42% males) with ADHD were recruited from Student Disability Services in post-secondary institutions. We compared informant responses on the ASRS administered via different modalities. First, students' self-report was ascertained using the ASRS Screener administered via telephone interview, in which they were asked to provide real-life examples of behavior for each of the six items. Next, students self-reported symptoms on the 18-item paper version of the ASRS Symptom Checklist administered about 1-2 weeks later, and a collateral report using an online version of the 18-item ASRS Symptom Checklist. Students also completed self-report measures of everyday cognitive failure (CFQ) and executive functioning (BDEFS). Results. Results revealed moderate to good congruency between the 18-item ASRS-Self and ASRS-Collateral reports (correlation = .47), and between student self-report on the 6-item telephone-based and paper versions of the ASRS, with the paper version administered two weeks later (correlation = .66). The full ASRS self-report was related to impairment, such as in executive functioning (correlation = .63) and everyday cognitive failure (correlation = .74). Executive functioning was the only significant predictor of ASRS total scores. Discussion. Current findings suggest that the ASRS provides an easy-to-use, reliable, and cost-effective approach for gathering information about current symptoms of

  9. Detection Of Concrete Deterioration By Staining

    DOEpatents

    Guthrie, Jr., George D.; Carey, J. William

    1999-09-21

    A method using concentrated aqueous solutions of sodium cobaltinitrite and a rhodamine dye is described which can be used to identify concrete that contains gels formed by the alkali-silica reaction (ASR), and to identify degraded concrete which results in a porous or semi-permeable paste due to carbonation or leaching. These solutions present little health or environmental risk, are readily applied, and rapidly discriminate between two chemically distinct gels; K-rich, Na--K--Ca--Si gels are identified by yellow staining, and alkali-poor, Ca--Si gels are identified by pink staining.

  10. Automatic speech recognition (ASR) and its use as a tool for assessment or therapy of voice, speech, and language disorders.

    PubMed

    Kitzing, Peter; Maier, Andreas; Ahlander, Viveka Lyberg

    2009-01-01

    In general opinion computerized automatic speech recognition (ASR) seems to be regarded as a method only to accomplish transcriptions from spoken language to written text and as such quite insecure and rather cumbersome. However, due to great advances in computer technology and informatics methodology ASR has nowadays become quite dependable and easier to handle, and the number of applications has increased considerably. After some introductory background information on ASR a number of applications of great interest for professionals in voice, speech, and language therapy are pointed out. In the foreseeable future, the keyboard and mouse will by means of ASR technology be replaced in many functions by a microphone as the human-computer interface, and the computer will talk back via its loud-speaker. It seems important that professionals engaged in the care of oral communication disorders take part in this development so their clients may get the optimal benefit from this new technology. PMID:19173117

  11. Workload management and geographic disorientation in aviation incidents: A review of the ASRS data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Henry P.; Tham, Mingpo; Wickens, Christopher D.

    1993-01-01

    NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) incident reports are reviewed in two related areas: pilots' failures to appropriately manage tasks, and breakdowns in geographic orientation. Examination of 51 relevant reports on task management breakdowns revealed that altitude busts and inappropriate runway usee were the most frequently reported consequences. Task management breakdowns appeared to occur at all levels of expertise, and prominent causal factors were related to breakdowns in crew communications, over-involvement with the flight management system and, for small (general aviation) aircraft, preoccupation with weather. Analysis of the 83 cases of geographic disorientation suggested that these too occurred at all levels of pilot experience. With regard to causal factors, a majority was related to poor cockpit resource management, in which inattention led to a loss of geographic awareness. Other leading causes were related to poor weather and poor decision making. The potential of the ASRS database for contributing to research and design issues is addressed.

  12. High resolution transmission soft X-ray microscopy of deterioration products developed in large concrete dams

    PubMed

    Kurtis; Monteiro; Brown; Meyer-Ilse

    1999-12-01

    In concrete structures, the reaction of certain siliceous aggregates with the highly alkaline concrete pore solution produces an alkali-silicate gel that can absorb water and expand. This reaction can lead to expansion, cracking, increased permeability, and decreased strength of the concrete. Massive concrete structures, such as dams, are particularly susceptible to the damage caused by the alkali-silica reaction because of the availability of water and because massive gravity dams usually do not contain steel reinforcement to restrain the expansion. Both the cement hydration products and alkali-silica reaction products are extremely sensitive to humidity. Consequently, characterization techniques that require high vacuum or drying, as many existing techniques do, are not particularly appropriate for the study of the alkali-silica reaction because artefacts are introduced. Environmental scanning electron micrographs and scanning electron micrographs with energy dispersive X-ray analysis results demonstrate the effect of drying on the morphology and chemical composition of the alkali-silicate reaction gel. Thus, the impetus for this research was the need to observe and characterize the alkali-silica reaction and its gel product on a microscopic level in a wet environment (i.e. without introducing artefacts due to drying). Only soft X-ray transmission microscopy provides the required high spatial resolution needed to observe the reaction process in situ. The alkali-silica reaction can be observed over time, in a wet condition, and at normal pressures, features unavailable with most other high resolution techniques. Soft X-rays also reveal information on the internal structure of the sample. The purpose of this paper is to present research, obtained using transmission soft X-ray microscopy, on the effect of concrete pore solution cations, namely sodium and calcium, on the product formed as a result of alkali attack. Alkali-silicate reaction (ASR) gel was obtained from

  13. FASTER: A new DOE effort to bridge ESM and ASR sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.

    2010-03-15

    In order to better use the long-term ARM measurements to evaluate parameterizations of fast processes used in global climate models --- mainly those related to clouds, precipitation and aerosols, the DOE Earth System Modeling (ESM) program funds a new multi-institution project led by the Brookhaven National Laboratory, FAst -physics System Testbed and Research (FASTER). This poster will present an overview of this new project and its scientific relationships to the ASR sciences and ARM measurements.

  14. Severity-Based Adaptation with Limited Data for ASR to Aid Dysarthric Speakers

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Mumtaz Begum; Salim, Siti Salwah; Mohamed, Noraini; Al-Qatab, Bassam; Siong, Chng Eng

    2014-01-01

    Automatic speech recognition (ASR) is currently used in many assistive technologies, such as helping individuals with speech impairment in their communication ability. One challenge in ASR for speech-impaired individuals is the difficulty in obtaining a good speech database of impaired speakers for building an effective speech acoustic model. Because there are very few existing databases of impaired speech, which are also limited in size, the obvious solution to build a speech acoustic model of impaired speech is by employing adaptation techniques. However, issues that have not been addressed in existing studies in the area of adaptation for speech impairment are as follows: (1) identifying the most effective adaptation technique for impaired speech; and (2) the use of suitable source models to build an effective impaired-speech acoustic model. This research investigates the above-mentioned two issues on dysarthria, a type of speech impairment affecting millions of people. We applied both unimpaired and impaired speech as the source model with well-known adaptation techniques like the maximum likelihood linear regression (MLLR) and the constrained-MLLR(C-MLLR). The recognition accuracy of each impaired speech acoustic model is measured in terms of word error rate (WER), with further assessments, including phoneme insertion, substitution and deletion rates. Unimpaired speech when combined with limited high-quality speech-impaired data improves performance of ASR systems in recognising severely impaired dysarthric speech. The C-MLLR adaptation technique was also found to be better than MLLR in recognising mildly and moderately impaired speech based on the statistical analysis of the WER. It was found that phoneme substitution was the biggest contributing factor in WER in dysarthric speech for all levels of severity. The results show that the speech acoustic models derived from suitable adaptation techniques improve the performance of ASR systems in recognising

  15. Severity-based adaptation with limited data for ASR to aid dysarthric speakers.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mumtaz Begum; Salim, Siti Salwah; Mohamed, Noraini; Al-Qatab, Bassam; Siong, Chng Eng

    2014-01-01

    Automatic speech recognition (ASR) is currently used in many assistive technologies, such as helping individuals with speech impairment in their communication ability. One challenge in ASR for speech-impaired individuals is the difficulty in obtaining a good speech database of impaired speakers for building an effective speech acoustic model. Because there are very few existing databases of impaired speech, which are also limited in size, the obvious solution to build a speech acoustic model of impaired speech is by employing adaptation techniques. However, issues that have not been addressed in existing studies in the area of adaptation for speech impairment are as follows: (1) identifying the most effective adaptation technique for impaired speech; and (2) the use of suitable source models to build an effective impaired-speech acoustic model. This research investigates the above-mentioned two issues on dysarthria, a type of speech impairment affecting millions of people. We applied both unimpaired and impaired speech as the source model with well-known adaptation techniques like the maximum likelihood linear regression (MLLR) and the constrained-MLLR(C-MLLR). The recognition accuracy of each impaired speech acoustic model is measured in terms of word error rate (WER), with further assessments, including phoneme insertion, substitution and deletion rates. Unimpaired speech when combined with limited high-quality speech-impaired data improves performance of ASR systems in recognising severely impaired dysarthric speech. The C-MLLR adaptation technique was also found to be better than MLLR in recognising mildly and moderately impaired speech based on the statistical analysis of the WER. It was found that phoneme substitution was the biggest contributing factor in WER in dysarthric speech for all levels of severity. The results show that the speech acoustic models derived from suitable adaptation techniques improve the performance of ASR systems in recognising

  16. Questioning the Specificity of ASRS-v1.1 to Accurately Detect ADHD in Substance Abusing Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiasson, Jean-Pierre; Stavro, Katherine; Rizkallah, Elie; Lapierre, Luc; Dussault, Maxime; Legault, Louis; Potvin, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the specificity of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-v1.1) in detecting ADHD among individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs). Method: A chart review of 183 SUD patients was conducted. Patients were screened for ADHD with the ASRS-v1.1 and were later assessed by a psychiatrist specialized in ADHD. Results: Among SUD…

  17. Multi-media authoring - Instruction and training of air traffic controllers based on ASRS incident reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Herbert B.; Roske-Hofstrand, Renate J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of computer-assisted instructions and flight simulations to enhance procedural and perceptual motor task training. Attention is called to the fact that incorporating the accident and incident data contained in reports filed with the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) would be a valuable training tool which the learner could apply for other situations. The need to segment the events is emphasized; this would make it possible to modify events in order to suit the needs of the training environment. Methods were developed for designing meaningful scenario development on runway incursions on the basis of analysis of ASRS reports. It is noted that, while the development of interactive training tools using the ASRS and other data bases holds much promise, the design and production of interactive video programs and laser disks are very expensive. It is suggested that this problem may be overcome by sharing the costs of production to develop a library of materials available to a broad range of users.

  18. Performance of Lightweight Concrete based on Granulated Foamglass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, M.; Zakrevskaya, L.; Vaganov, V.; Hempel, S.; Mechtcherine, V.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents an investigation of lightweight concretes properties, based on granulated foamglass (GFG-LWC) aggregates. The application of granulated foamglass (GFG) in concrete might significantly reduce the volume of waste glass and enhance the recycling industry in order to improve environmental performance. The conducted experiments showed high strength and thermal properties for GFG-LWC. However, the use of GFG in concrete is associated with the risk of harmful alkali-silica reactions (ASR). Thus, one of the main aims was to study ASR manifestation in GFG-LWC. It was found that the lightweight concrete based on porous aggregates, and ordinary concrete, have different a mechanism of ASR. In GFG-LWC, microstructural changes, partial destruction of granules, and accumulation of silica hydro-gel in pores were observed. According to the existing methods of analysis of ASR manifestation in concrete, sample expansion was measured, however, this method was found to be not appropriate to indicate ASR in concrete with porous aggregates. Microstructural analysis and testing of the concrete strength are needed to evaluate the damage degree due to ASR. Low-alkali cement and various pozzolanic additives as preventive measures against ASR were chosen. The final composition of the GFG-LWC provides very good characteristics with respect to compressive strength, thermal conductivity and durability. On the whole, the potential for GFG-LWC has been identified.

  19. The SbASR-1 gene cloned from an extreme halophyte Salicornia brachiata enhances salt tolerance in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Jha, Bhavanath; Lal, Sanjay; Tiwari, Vivekanand; Yadav, Sweta Kumari; Agarwal, Pradeep K

    2012-12-01

    Salinity severely affects plant growth and development. Plants evolved various mechanisms to cope up stress both at molecular and cellular levels. Halophytes have developed better mechanism to alleviate the salt stress than glycophytes, and therefore, it is advantageous to study the role of different genes from halophytes. Salicornia brachiata is an extreme halophyte, which grows luxuriantly in the salty marshes in the coastal areas. Earlier, we have isolated SbASR-1 (abscisic acid stress ripening-1) gene from S. brachiata using cDNA subtractive hybridisation library. ASR-1 genes are abscisic acid (ABA) responsive, whose expression level increases under abiotic stresses, injury, during fruit ripening and in pollen grains. The SbASR-1 transcript showed up-regulation under salt stress conditions. The SbASR-1 protein contains 202 amino acids of 21.01-kDa molecular mass and has 79 amino acid long signatures of ABA/WDS gene family. It has a maximum identity (73 %) with Solanum chilense ASR-1 protein. The SbASR-1 has a large number of disorder-promoting amino acids, which make it an intrinsically disordered protein. The SbASR-1 gene was over-expressed under CaMV 35S promoter in tobacco plant to study its physiological functions under salt stress. T(0) transgenic tobacco seeds showed better germination and seedling growth as compared to wild type (Wt) in a salt stress condition. In the leaf tissues of transgenic lines, Na(+) and proline contents were significantly lower, as compared to Wt plant, under salt treatment, suggesting that transgenic plants are better adapted to salt stress. PMID:22639284

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of drought stress responsive abscisic acid-stress-ripening (Asr 1) gene from wild jujube, Ziziphus nummularia (Burm.f.) Wight & Arn.

    PubMed

    Padaria, Jasdeep Chatrath; Yadav, Radha; Tarafdar, Avijit; Lone, Showkat Ahmad; Kumar, Kanika; Sivalingam, Palaiyur Nanjappan

    2016-08-01

    Drought is a calamitous abiotic stress hampering agricultural productivity all over the world and its severity is likely to increase further. Abscisic acid-stress-ripening proteins (ASR), are a group of small hydrophilic proteins which are induced by abscisic acid, stress and ripening in many plants. In the present study, ZnAsr 1 gene was fully characterized for the first time from Ziziphus nummularia, which is one of the most low water forbearing plant. Full length ZnAsr 1 gene was characterised and in silico analysis of ZnASR1 protein was done for predicting its phylogeny and physiochemical properties. To validate transcriptional pattern of ZnAsr 1 in response to drought stress, expression profiling in polyethylene glycol (PEG) induced Z. nummularia seedlings was studied by RT-qPCR analysis and heterologous expression of the recombinant ZnAsr1 in Escherichia coli. The nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the complete open reading frame of ZnAsr 1 is 819 bp long encoding a protein of 273 amino acid residues, consisting of a histidine rich N terminus with an abscisic acid/water deficit stress domain and a nuclear targeting signal at the C terminus. In expression studies, ZnAsr 1 gene was found to be highly upregulated under drought stress and recombinant clones of E. coli cells expressing ZnASR1 protein showed better survival in PEG containing media. ZnAsr1 was proven to enhance drought stress tolerance in the recombinant E.coli cells expressing ZnASR1. The cloned ZnAsr1 after proper validation in a plant system, can be used to develop drought tolerant transgenic crops. PMID:27209581

  1. Arctic Precipitation Analysis from the Arctic System Reanalysis (ASR): 2000-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Stroeve, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent Arctic Amplification (AA), (e.g. the warming trend in the Arctic that is larger than for the Northern Hemisphere or the global average), is strongly linked to declining sea ice extent (SIE) [Serreze and Barry, 2011]. Precipitation over the Arctic Ocean is projected to increase thorough the twenty-first century, in part linked to AA and SIE decline [Kattsov et al., 2007; Bintanja and Selten, 2014]. Since mass loss from the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) is a key element in sea level rise through the end of this century, it is important to understand how precipitation may change in the future and impact the GrIS mass balance. As the first step, we need to better understand how current ice loss may be impacting precipitation over the ice sheet. Towards this end, monthly precipitation data from the Arctic System Reanalysis (ASR) is compared with gauge observations over Greenland. ASR is a high-resolution regional assimilation of model output developed as a resource for the detection and diagnosis of change in the coupled Arctic climate system [Bromwich et al., 2015]. In order to explore linkages between precipitation over Greenland and the surrounding SIE, ASR forecast precipitation data and SIE data from the NASA Team Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager data set [Cavalieri et al., 1999] are statistically analyzed from 2000 to 2012. As a case study, spatial distributions of precipitation and pressure at the surface and in the middle troposphere over the Arctic are analyzed during the great Arctic cyclone of August 2012 [Simmonds and Rudeva, 2012; Parkinson and Comiso, 2013; Zhang et al., 2013].

  2. A new operational paradigm for small-scale ASR in saline aquifers.

    PubMed

    van Ginkel, Marloes; Olsthoorn, Theo N; Bakker, Mark

    2014-01-01

    A new operational paradigm is presented for small-scale aquifer storage and recovery systems (ASR) in saline aquifers. Regular ASR is often not feasible for small-scale storage in saline aquifers because fresh water floats to the top of the aquifer where it is unrecoverable. In the new paradigm, fresh water storage is combined with salt water extraction from below the fresh water cone. The salt water extraction counteracts the buoyancy due to the density difference between fresh water and salt water, thus preventing the fresh water from floating up. The proposed approach is applied to assess the feasibility of ASR for the seasonal storage of fresh water produced by desalination plants in tourist resorts along the Egyptian Red Sea coast. In these situations, the continuous extraction of salt water can be used for desalination purposes. An analytical Dupuit solution is presented for the steady flow of salt water toward a well with a volume of fresh water floating on top of the cone of depression. The required salt water discharge for the storage of a given volume of fresh water can be computed with the analytical solution. Numerical modeling is applied to determine how the stored fresh water can be recovered. Three recovery approaches are examined. Fresh water recovery rates on the order of 70% are achievable when salt water is extracted in high volumes, subsurface impermeable barriers are constructed at a distance from the well, or several fresh water recovery drains are used. The effect of ambient flow and interruptions of salt water pumping on the recovery efficiency are reported. PMID:24102236

  3. Separation of non-ferrous metals from ASR by corona electrostatic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yang-soo; Choi, Jin-Young; Jeon, Ho-Seok; Han, Oh-Hyung; Park, Chul-Hyun

    2016-04-01

    Automotive shredder residue (ASR), the residual fraction of approximate 25% obtained after dismantling and shredding from waste car, consists of polymers (plastics and rubber), metals (ferrous and non-ferrous), wood, glass and fluff (textile and fiber). ASR cannot be effectively separated due to its heterogeneous materials and coated or laminated complexes and then largely deposited in land-fill sites as waste. Thus reducing a pollutant release before disposal, techniques that can improve the liberation of coated (or laminated) complexes and the recovery of valuable metals from the shredder residue are needed. ASR may be separated by a series of physical processing operations such as comminution, air, magnetic and electrostatic separations. The work deals with the characterization of the shredder residue coming from an industrial plant in korea and focuses on estimating the optimal conditions of corona electrostatic separation for improving the separation efficiency of valuable non-ferrous metals such as aluminum, copper and etc. From the results of test, the maximum separation achievable for non-ferrous metals using a corona electrostatic separation has been shown to be recovery of 92.5% at a grade of 75.8%. The recommended values of the process variables, particle size, electrode potential, drum speed, splitter position and relative humidity are -6mm, 50 kV, 35rpm, 20° and less 40%, respectively. Acknowledgments This study was supported by the R&D Center for Valuable Recycling (Global-Top R&BD Program) of the Ministry of Environment. (Project No. GT-11-C-01-170-0)

  4. Joint issues – conflicts of interest, the ASR hip and suggestions for managing surgical conflicts of interest

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Financial and nonfinancial conflicts of interest in medicine and surgery are troubling because they have the capacity to skew decision making in ways that might be detrimental to patient care and well-being. The recent case of the Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) hip provides a vivid illustration of the harmful effects of conflicts of interest in surgery. Discussion We identify financial and nonfinancial conflicts of interest experienced by surgeons, hospitals and regulators in the ASR case. These conflicts may have impacted surgical advice, decision-making and evidence gathering with respect to the ASR prosthesis, and contributed to the significant harms experienced by patients in whom the hip was implanted. Drawing on this case we explore shortcomings in the standard responses to conflicts of interest – disclosure and recusal. We argue disclosure is necessary but by no means sufficient to address conflicts of interest. Using the concept of recusal we develop remedies including second opinions and third party consent which may be effective in mitigating conflicts, but their implementation introduces new challenges. Summary Deployment of the ASR hip is a case of surgical innovation gone wrong. As we show, there were multiple conflicts of interest involved in the introduction of the ASR hip into practice and subsequent attempts to gloss over the mounting body of evidence about its lack of safety and effectiveness. Conflicts of interest in surgery are often not well managed. We suggest strategies in this paper which can minimise the conflicts of interest associated with surgical innovation. PMID:25128372

  5. What ASRS incident data tell about flight crew performance during aircraft malfunctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumwalt, Robert L.; Watson, Alan W.

    1995-01-01

    This research examined 230 reports in NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System's (ASRS) database to develop a better understanding of factors that can affect flight crew performance when crew are faced with inflight aircraft malfunctions. Each report was placed into one of two categories, based on severity of the malfunction. Report analysis was then conducted to extract information regarding crew procedural issues, crew communications and situational awareness. A comparison of these crew factors across malfunction type was then performed. This comparison revealed a significant difference in ways that crews dealt with serious malfunctions compared to less serious malfunctions. The authors offer recommendations toward improving crew performance when faced with inflight aircraft malfunctions.

  6. The ZmASR1 Protein Influences Branched-Chain Amino Acid Biosynthesis and Maintains Kernel Yield in Maize under Water-Limited Conditions1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Virlouvet, Laetitia; Jacquemot, Marie-Pierre; Gerentes, Denise; Corti, Hélène; Bouton, Sophie; Gilard, Françoise; Valot, Benoît; Trouverie, Jacques; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Falque, Matthieu; Damerval, Catherine; Rogowsky, Peter; Perez, Pascual; Noctor, Graham; Zivy, Michel; Coursol, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Abscisic acid-, stress-, and ripening-induced (ASR) proteins were first described about 15 years ago as accumulating to high levels during plant developmental processes and in response to diverse stresses. Currently, the effects of ASRs on water deficit tolerance and the ways in which their physiological and biochemical functions lead to this stress tolerance remain poorly understood. Here, we characterized the ASR gene family from maize (Zea mays), which contains nine paralogous genes, and showed that maize ASR1 (ZmASR1) was encoded by one of the most highly expressed paralogs. Ectopic expression of ZmASR1 had a large overall impact on maize yield that was maintained under water-limited stress conditions in the field. Comparative transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of wild-type and ZmASR1-overexpressing leaves led to the identification of three transcripts and 16 proteins up- or down-regulated by ZmASR1. The majority of them were involved in primary and/or cellular metabolic processes, including branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) biosynthesis. Metabolomic and transcript analyses further indicated that ZmASR1-overexpressing plants showed a decrease in BCAA compounds and changes in BCAA-related gene expression in comparison with wild-type plants. Interestingly, within-group correlation matrix analysis revealed a close link between 13 decreased metabolites in ZmASR1-overexpressing leaves, including two BCAAs. Among these 13 metabolites, six were previously shown to be negatively correlated to biomass, suggesting that ZmASR1-dependent regulation of these 13 metabolites might contribute to regulate leaf growth, resulting in improvement in kernel yield. PMID:21852416

  7. New Insights into Aluminum Tolerance in Rice: The ASR5 Protein Binds the STAR1 Promoter and Other Aluminum-Responsive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity in plants is one of the primary constraints in crop production. Al3+, the most toxic form of Al, is released into soil under acidic conditions and causes extensive damage to plants, especially in the roots. In rice, Al tolerance requires the ASR5 gene, but the molecular function of ASR5 has remained unknown. Here, we perform genome-wide analyses to identify ASR5-dependent Al-responsive genes in rice. Based on ASR5_RNAi silencing in plants, a global transcriptome analysis identified a total of 961 genes that were responsive to Al treatment in wild-type rice roots. Of these genes, 909 did not respond to Al in the ASR5_RNAi plants, indicating a central role for ASR5 in Al-responsive gene expression. Under normal conditions, without Al treatment, the ASR5_RNAi plants expressed 1.756 genes differentially compared to the wild-type plants, and 446 of these genes responded to Al treatment in the wild-type plants. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing identified 104 putative target genes that were directly regulated by ASR5 binding to their promoters, including the STAR1 gene, which encodes an ABC transporter required for Al tolerance. Motif analysis of the binding peak sequences revealed the binding motif for ASR5, which was confirmed via in vitro DNA-binding assays using the STAR1 promoter. These results demonstrate that ASR5 acts as a key transcription factor that is essential for Al-responsive gene expression and Al tolerance in rice. PMID:24253199

  8. Strategies for the enhancement of automobile shredder residues (ASRs) recycling: results and cost assessment.

    PubMed

    Ruffino, Barbara; Fiore, Silvia; Zanetti, Maria Chiara

    2014-01-01

    With reference to the European regulation about the management of End-of-Life Vehicles (ELVs), Directive 2000/53/EC imposes the achievement of a recycling target of 85%, and 95% of total recovery by 2015. Over the last few years many efforts have been made to find solutions to properly manage the waste coming from ELVs with the aim of complying with the targets fixed by the Directive. This paper focuses on the economical evaluation of a treatment process, that includes physical (size and density), magnetic and electrical separations, performed on the light fraction of the automobile shredder residue (ASR) with the aim of reducing the amount of waste to dispose of in a landfill and enhancing the recovery of valuable fractions as stated by the EU Directive. The afore mentioned process is able to enhance the recovery of ferrous and non-ferrous metals of an amount equal to about 1% b.w. (by weight) of the ELV weight, and to separate a high energetic-content product suitable for thermal valorization for an amount close to (but not higher than) 10% b.w. of the ELV weight. The results of the economical assessment led to annual operating costs of the treatment ranging from 300,000 €/y to 350,000 €/y. Since the considered plant treats about 13,500 metrictons of ASR per year, this would correspond to an operating cost of approximately 20-25 €/t. Taking into account the amount and the selling price of the scrap iron and of the non magnetic metal recovered by the process, thus leading to a gain of about 30 €/t per ton of light ASR treated, the cost of the recovery process is balanced by the profit from the selling of the recovered metals. On the other hand, the proposed treatment is able to achieve the fulfillment of the targets stated by Directive 2000/53/EC concerning thermal valorization and reduce the amount of waste generated from ELV shredding to landfill. PMID:24140377

  9. Benchmarking, Research, Development, and Support for ORNL Automated Image and Signature Retrieval (AIR/ASR) Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, K.W.

    2004-06-01

    This report describes the results of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with Applied Materials, Inc. (AMAT) of Santa Clara, California. This project encompassed the continued development and integration of the ORNL Automated Image Retrieval (AIR) technology, and an extension of the technology denoted Automated Signature Retrieval (ASR), and other related technologies with the Defect Source Identification (DSI) software system that was under development by AMAT at the time this work was performed. In the semiconductor manufacturing environment, defect imagery is used to diagnose problems in the manufacturing line, train yield management engineers, and examine historical data for trends. Image management in semiconductor data systems is a growing cause of concern in the industry as fabricators are now collecting up to 20,000 images each week. In response to this concern, researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed a semiconductor-specific content-based image retrieval method and system, also known as AIR. The system uses an image-based query-by-example method to locate and retrieve similar imagery from a database of digital imagery using visual image characteristics. The query method is based on a unique architecture that takes advantage of the statistical, morphological, and structural characteristics of image data, generated by inspection equipment in industrial applications. The system improves the manufacturing process by allowing rapid access to historical records of similar events so that errant process equipment can be isolated and corrective actions can be quickly taken to improve yield. The combined ORNL and AMAT technology is referred to hereafter as DSI-AIR and DSI-ASR.

  10. Joint ASRS and NASA Callback on FANS-1 Datalink Operational Incidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, John; Smith, Nancy; Morrison, Rowena; Palmer, Everett; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The recent certification and implementation of the Future Air Navigation System (FANS- 1) was based on the benefits of reduced separation minima, ability to optimize flight plans enroute, and the prompt transmission and reception of messages between oceanic controllers and 747-400 aircraft transiting the Pacific. In addition, FANS was intended to supersede High Frequency (HF) radio which has been the staple, yet problematic, long distance communication link for years. However, in the three initial years of operation, FANS has revealed its own unique operational issues. Although some technical and engineering problems have been studied and addressed, little research has been conducted on human factors issues associated with the use of FANS on the flight deck. This lack of prior data on the operational use of FANS prompted a joint NASA/Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) inquiry into FANS datalink. In addition, two foreign air carriers and their respective safety agencies were recruited to participate. This international FANS research effort consisting of three aviation safety agencies and three international commercial air-carriers has provided a unique opportunity for conducting human factors research in an operational environment. An ASRS 'callback' format was chosen for the study as a practical and viable method for capturing FANS events on the flight deck. Initially, 747-400 pilots were encouraged to submit reports to their respective safety agencies if they had experienced any positive or negative incidents with the use of FANS. Upon receipt of a report, it was evaluated and if deemed pertinent to the study, a telephone interview or 'callback' was conducted on the FANS incident to elicit further details, capture the key events, and gather contextual information. Once the operational data collection phase was completed, the reports and interviews were analyzed with two purposes in mind: primarily to identify and address problematic human factors issues with

  11. Automotive shredder residue (ASR): reviewing its production from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) and its recycling, energy or chemicals' valorisation.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, I; Van Caneghem, J; Block, C; Baeyens, J; Vandecasteele, C

    2011-06-15

    ASR is in Europe classified as hazardous waste. Both the stringent landfill legislation and the objectives/legislation related to ELV treatment of various countries, will limit current landfilling practice and impose an increased efficiency of the recovery and recycling of ELVs. The present paper situates ASR within the ELV context. Primary recovery techniques recycle up to 75% of the ELV components; the remaining 25% is called ASR. Characteristics of ASR and possible upgrading by secondary recovery techniques are reviewed. The latter techniques can produce a fuel- or fillergrade ASR, however with limitations as discussed. A further reduction of ASR to be disposed of calls upon (co-)incineration or the use of thermo-chemical processes, such as pyrolysis or gasification. The application in waste-to-energy plants, in cement kilns or in metallurgical processes is possible, with attention to the possible environmental impact: research into these impacts is discussed in detail. Pyrolysis and gasification are emerging technologies: although the sole use of ASR is debatable, its mixing with other waste streams is gradually being applied in commercial processes. The environmental impacts of the processes are acceptable, but more supporting data are needed and the advantage over (co-)incineration remains to be proven. PMID:21440364

  12. Quantitative analysis and reduction of the eco-toxicity risk of heavy metals for the fine fraction of automobile shredder residue (ASR) using H2O2.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jiwan; Yang, Jae-Kyu; Chang, Yoon-Young

    2016-02-01

    Automobile shredder residue (ASR) fraction (size <0.25mm) can be considered as hazardous due to presence of high concentrations of heavy metals. Hydrogen peroxide combined with nitric acid has been used for the recovery of heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Mn, Fe, Ni, Pb, Cd and Cr) from the fine fraction of ASR. A sequential extraction procedure has also been used to determine the heavy metal speciation in the fine fraction of ASR before and after treatment. A risk analysis of the fine fraction of ASR before and after treatment was conducted to assess the bioavailability and eco-toxicity of heavy metals. These results showed that the recovery of heavy metals from ASR increased with an increase in the hydrogen peroxide concentration. A high concentration of heavy metals was found to be present in Cbio fractions (the sum of the exchangeable and carbonate fractions) in the fine fraction of ASR, indicating high toxicity risk. The Cbio rate of all selected heavy metals was found to range from 8.6% to 33.4% of the total metal content in the fine fraction of ASR. After treatment, Cbio was reduced to 0.3-3.3% of total metal upon a treatment with 2.0% hydrogen peroxide. On the basis of the risk assessment code (RAC), the environmental risk values for heavy metals in the fine fraction of ASR reflect high risk/medium risk. However, after treatment, the heavy metals would be categorized as low risk/no risk. The present study concludes that hydrogen peroxide combined with nitric acid is a promising treatment for the recovery and reduction of the eco-toxicity risk of heavy metals in ASR. PMID:26482807

  13. The influence of DOM and microbial processes on arsenic release from karst during ASR operations in the Floridan Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, J.; Zimmerman, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    The mobilization of subsurface As poses a serious threat to human health, particularly in a region such as Florida where population is heavily dependent on highly porous karstic aquifers for drinking water. Injection water used in aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) or aquifer recharge (AR) operations is commonly high in dissolved organic matter (DOM) and OM can also be present in the subsurface carbonate rock. Using batch incubation experiments, this study examined the role of core preservation methods, as well as the influence of labile and more refractory DOM on the mobilization of As from carbonate rock. Incubation experiments used sealed reaction vessels with preserved and homogenized core materials collected via coring the Suwannee Formation in southwest Florida and treatment additions consisting of 1) source water (SW) enriched in sterilized soil DOM, 2) SW enriched in soil DOM and microbes, and 3) SW enriched in sodium acetate. During an initial equilibration phase in native groundwater (NGW) with low dissolved oxygen (DO; Phase 1), we found the greatest As release of the whole incubation. In the beginning of Phase 2 (N2 headspace) in which NGW was replaced with treatment solutions, there was little As release except in the vessel with Na-acetate added, which also had the lowest ORP. At the start of Phase 3, when incubations were exposed to air, most vessels saw more ion (including As) release into solution. Vessel with Na-acetate had less As release in Phase 3 than in Phase 2. During all experimental phases, treatments of DOM or microbe additions had no apparent effect on the amount of As release. The core materials was found contain significant amount of indigenous DOM (about 8 g OC/kg core) which was released during the incubation so DOC concentrations displayed no clear pattern among different treatments. At least three abiotic As mobilization mechanisms may play a role in As released during different stages of the experiment. Desorption of As from iron

  14. Cockpit Interruptions and Distractions: An Analysis of ASRS Reports and an Experimental Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dismukes, R. K.; Young, Grant E.; Connors, Mary (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A recent detailed analysis of 107 ASRS incident reports focusing on interruptions and distractions as their primary feature revealed several interesting and surprising findings. Of those tasks that were interfered with, over 40% fell within the category of monitoring; for example, monitoring the autopilot flying the aircraft, monitoring the pilot flying, or monitoring the altimeter or navigation instruments for future action. Surprisingly, over 60% of the tasks that were considered distractions fell under the broad category of communication or conversation. Using these findings, we have developed an experimental paradigm that will help us understand the method by which pilots perform certain monitoring tasks. Specifically, we hope to determine the degree to which pilots rely on internal time mechanisms versus external cues as a means of successfully completing a monitoring task. In addition, we will incorporate a battery of competing aviation type tasks, including communication, to see how these tasks affect the process of monitoring. The long range goal of this research is to find operational solutions that facilitate effective monitoring in the presence of both sudden interruptions and distractions that lead to unintended multiple tasks situations.

  15. RILEM TC ISR Summer 2015 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pape, Yann

    2015-08-01

    With aging infrastructures, instances of Alkali Silica Reaction (ASR) and Delayed Ettringite Formation (DEF), broadly covered under the term Internal Swelling Reaction (ISR), are increasingly being detected. They have been observed in bridges, dams, and most recently in nuclear power plants. Concrete swelling may result in bridge partial failure, dams with structural cracks and misaligned turbine shafts, and locked slice gates. For nuclear reactors micro-cracks may cause increased gas permeability which will jeopardize the containment integrity and may decrease the residual structural resistance under accidental loading. This TC, which limits its activity to structures with known expansive concrete, seeks to address two complementary but fundamental questions: a) What is the kinetics of the reaction and b) How would it affect the integrity of the structure (serviceability and strength) and thus establish a science based prognostic to the structure owner.

  16. Validity of the World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) Screener in a representative sample of health plan members.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Ronald C; Adler, Lenard A; Gruber, Michael J; Sarawate, Chaitanya A; Spencer, Thomas; Van Brunt, David L

    2007-01-01

    The validity of the six-question World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) Screener was assessed in a sample of subscribers to a large health plan in the US. A convenience subsample of 668 subscribers was administered the ASRS Screener twice to assess test-retest reliability and then a third time in conjunction with a clinical interviewer for DSM-IV adult ADHD. The data were weighted to adjust for discrepancies between the sample and the population on socio-demographics and past medical claims. Internal consistency reliability of the continuous ASRS Screener was in the range 0.63-0.72 and test-retest reliability (Pearson correlations) in the range 0.58-0.77. A four-category version The ASRS Screener had strong concordance with clinician diagnoses, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.90. The brevity and ability to discriminate DSM-IV cases from non-cases make the six-question ASRS Screener attractive for use both in community epidemiological surveys and in clinical outreach and case-finding initiatives. PMID:17623385

  17. Test and evaluation of the Airport Surveillance Radar (ASR)-8 wind shear detection system (phase 2), revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offi, D. L.; Lewis, W.; Lee, T.; Delamarche, A.

    1980-08-01

    A wind shear detection system developed by the Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) to operate with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Airport Surveillance Radar (ASR)-8 was installed and is being tested at the FAA technical Center. Initial efforts, previously reported in Report NA-78-59-LR, were directed toward hardware and software shakedown and feasibility determination. Second phase tests compared radar with aircraft and tower winds, evaluated the wind shear measurement capability under various weather conditions, and investigated the effectiveness of a simple two-azimuth pointing strategy and system capabilities and limitations. Results showed the system to be compatible with and to operate satisfactorily with the ASR-8. The processing and spectral display of clear air and precipitation returns is feasible. The accuracy of agreement between radar-measured winds and components of the aircraft-measured winds in both radially oriented flights and runway offset flights, using a two-azimuth pointing technique, was examined. Radar versus tower wind agreement was also examined. Potentially dangerous wind shears associated with weather during these tests were detectable. Certain system limitations also have been defined and considered. It is recommended that tests continue to complete definition of and demonstrate capabilities in all weather situations, to optimize performance, and to provide information to specify system design for possible development of a prototype model.

  18. Rating the Relevance of QUORUM-Selected ASRS Incident Narratives to a "Controlled Flight into Terrain" Accident

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGreevy, Michael W.; Statler, Irving C.

    1998-01-01

    An exploratory study was conducted to identify commercial aviation incidents that are relevant to a "controlled flight into terrain" (CFIT) accident using a NASA-developed text processing method. The QUORUM method was used to rate 67820 incident narratives, virtually all of the narratives in the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) database, according to their relevance to two official reports on the crash of American Airlines Flight 965 near Cali, Colombia in December 1995. For comparison with QUORUM's ratings, three experienced ASRS analysts read the reports of the crash and independently rated the relevance of the 100 narratives that were most highly rated by QUORUM, as well as 100 narratives randomly selected from the database. Eighty-four of 100 QUORUM-selected narratives were rated as relevant to the Cali accident by one or more of the analysts. The relevant incidents involved a variety of factors, including, over-reliance on automation, confusion and changes during descent/approach, terrain avoidance, and operations in foreign airspace. In addition, the QUORUM collection of incidents was found to be significantly more relevant than the random collection.

  19. [ASRS v.1.1., a tool for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder screening in adults treated for addictive behaviors: psychometric properties and estimated prevalence].

    PubMed

    Pedrero Pérez, Eduardo J; Puerta García, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    ASRS v.1.1. is a self-applied brief instrument for the screening of individuals presenting symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and proposed by the WHO. The purpose of the present work was to test the instrument and examine the results of its application to a sample of 280 individuals in treatment for substance-related disorders (cross-sectional descriptive study). We administered simultaneously in the initial phases of treatment the ASRS v.1.1. (short form) and the MCMI-II to the full sample and the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS), ADHD-Rating Scale-IV and ASRS v.1.1. (complete form) to various sub-samples. Diagnostic interviews were also carried out and the psychometric properties and factorial structure of ASRS v.1.1. were explored. Good convergent validity, sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic capability were obtained for the six-item version of ASRS v.1.1., even though 4 out of 6 items did not discriminate between Axis I and II disorders assessed through the MCMI-II and diagnostic interviews. According to DSM-IV-TR criteria the estimated prevalence of ADHD in the sample of addicts was 8.2%. ASRS v.1.1. is criticized as a specific instrument for ADHD detection, since most of its items appear to measure a non-specific dimension of compulsiveness/impulsiveness, common to Axis-I and Axis-II disorders. Other criticisms made in the discussion concern the lack of specificity of DSM criteria and the confusion they generate among the concepts of symptom, sign and trait (including the impact on study results), the general use of the A criterion but the omission of the B, C, D and E criteria of the DSM category, differences in samples (with regard to both severity and selection criteria), and the artifactual increases in prevalence found in many studies. PMID:18173102

  20. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-07-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the eleventh quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in unacceptable erosion of the test specimens. In subsequent tests, a different expansion procedure was implemented and an alternate curing method for cements formulated with TXI Lightweight cement was employed to prevent sample failure caused by thermal shock. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but data for some compositions were still questionable. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement were implemented and testing is ongoing.

  1. Psychometric properties and adaptation of the ASRS in a Spanish sample of patients with substance use disorders: Application of two IRT Rasch models.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Garcia, Manuel; Fernandez-Calderon, Fermin; Carmona-Marquez, Jose; Chico-Garcia, Marilo; Velez-Moreno, Antonio; Perez-Gomez, Lorena

    2015-06-01

    The Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS; Kessler et al., 2005) is one of the most extensively used scales to detect attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults. The aim of this work is to analyze the psychometric properties of the 18 ASRS items in people with substance use disorders (SUDs). Furthermore, we aimed to (a) confirm or, if necessary, modify the dichotomization criteria of the items proposed by the authors, and (b) identify the most informative items for a screening version or, when applicable, confirm the use of the 6 items that comprise the initially proposed short version. The ASRS was completed for 170 patients with SUD at the Provincial Unit for Drug Dependence of Huelva, Spain, aged 16 to 78 years. Two Rasch models—the dichotomous Rasch model and the Rating Scale Model (RSM) for polytomous items—were used in the psychometric analysis. The ASRS items fitted the RSM adequately, but the locations of the items along the underlying construct led us to propose new criteria of dichotomization. After analyzing the information function of dichotomized items, we identified 6 items that should integrate a new screening scale. Our dichotomization proposal is different from the original one and takes into account the different weights of the items. The selected screening version showed better metric properties than the other analyzed versions. Future research should test our proposal by using external criteria and to obtain evidences for other populations, cultures, or patient profiles. PMID:25580610

  2. A Study of the Design and Implementation of the ASR-Based iCASL System with Corrective Feedback to Facilitate English Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yi-Hsuan; Young, Shelley Shwu-Ching

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to explore and describe how to implement a pedagogical ASR-based intelligent computer-assisted speaking learning (iCASL) system to support adult learners with a private, flexible and individual learning environment to practice English pronunciation. The iCASL system integrates multiple levels of corrective feedback and…

  3. A coupled mechanical and chemical damage model for concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatelli, Rossella; Comi, Claudia; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2013-11-15

    To model the complex degradation phenomena occurring in concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction (ASR), we formulate a poro-mechanical model with two isotropic internal variables: the chemical and the mechanical damage. The chemical damage, related to the evolution of the reaction, is caused by the pressure generated by the expanding ASR gel on the solid concrete skeleton. The mechanical damage describes the strength and stiffness degradation induced by the external loads. As suggested by experimental results, degradation due to ASR is considered to be localized around reactive sites. The effect of the degree of saturation and of the temperature on the reaction development is also modeled. The chemical damage evolution is calibrated using the value of the gel pressure estimated by applying the electrical diffuse double-layer theory to experimental values of the surface charge density in ASR gel specimens reported in the literature. The chemo-damage model is first validated by simulating expansion tests on reactive specimens and beams; the coupled chemo-mechanical damage model is then employed to simulate compression and flexure tests results also taken from the literature. -- Highlights: •Concrete degradation due to ASR in variable environmental conditions is modeled. •Two isotropic internal variables – chemical and mechanical damage – are introduced. •The value of the swelling pressure is estimated by the diffuse double layer theory. •A simplified scheme is proposed to relate macro- and microscopic properties. •The chemo-mechanical damage model is validated by simulating tests in literature.

  4. PREFACE: Advanced Science Research Symposium 2009 Positron, Muon and other exotic particle beams for materials and atomic/molecular sciences (ASR2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higemoto, Wataru; Kawasuso, Atsuo

    2010-05-01

    It is our great pleasure to deliver the proceedings of ASR2009, the Advanced Science Research International Symposium 2009. ASR2009 is part of a series of symposia which is hosted by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Advanced Science Research Center (JAEA-ASRC), and held every year with different scientific topics. ASR2009 was held at Tokai in Japan from 10-12 November 2009. In total, 102 participants, including 29 overseas scientists, made 44 oral presentations and 64 poster presentations. In ASR2009 we have focused on material and atomic/molecular science research using positrons, muons and other exotic particle beams. The symposium covered all the fields of materials science which use such exotic particle beams. Positrons, muons and other beams have similar and different features. For example, although positrons and muons are both leptons having charge and spin, they give quite different information about materials. A muon mainly detects the local magnetic state of the solid, while a positron detects crystal imperfections and electron momenta in solids. Other exotic particle beams also provide useful information about materials which is not able to be obtained with muons or positrons. Therefore, the complementary use of particle beams, coupled with an understanding of their relative advantages, leads to greater excellence in materials research. This symposium crossed the fields of muon science, positron science, unstable-nuclei science, and other exotic particle-beam science. We therefore believe that ASR2009 became an especially important meeting for finding new science with exotic particle beams. Finally, we would like to extend our appreciation to all the participants, committee members, and support staff for their great efforts to make ASR2009 a fruitful symposium. ASR2009 Chairs Wataru Higemoto and Atsuo Kawasuso Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency Organizing committee Y Hatano, JAEA (Director of ASRC) M Fujinami, Chiba Univ. R H

  5. Electron-phonon superconductivity in APt3P (A=Sr, Ca, La) compounds: From weak to strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, Alaska; Ortenzi, Luciano; Boeri, Lilia

    2013-04-01

    We study the newly discovered Pt phosphides APt3P (A=Sr, Ca, La) [T. Takayama , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.108.237001 108, 237001 (2012)] using first-principles calculations and Migdal-Eliashberg theory. Given the remarkable agreement with the experiment, we exclude the charge-density wave scenario proposed by previous first-principles calculations, and give conclusive answers concerning the superconducting state in these materials. The pairing increases from La to Ca and Sr due to changes in the electron-phonon matrix elements and low-frequency phonons. Although we find that all three compounds are well described by conventional s-wave superconductivity and spin-orbit coupling of Pt plays a marginal role, we show that it could be possible to tune the structure from centrosymmetric to noncentrosymmetric opening new perspectives towards the understanding of unconventional superconductivity.

  6. On-Going International Research Program on Irradiated Concrete Conducted by DOE, EPRI and Japan Research Institutions. Roadmap, Achievements and Path Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pape, Yann; Rosseel, Thomas M.

    2015-10-01

    The Joint Department of Energy (DOE)-Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Program (Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program–Material Pathway–Concrete and Long-Term Operation (LTO) Program) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) research studies aim at understanding the most prominent degradation modes and their effects on the long-term operation of concrete structures to nuclear power generation. Based on the results of the Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis (EMDA), (NUREG/CR-7153, ORNL/TM-2011/545), irradiated concrete and alkali-silica reaction (ASR)-affected concrete structures are the two prioritized topics of on-going research. This report focuses specifically on the topic of irradiated concrete and summarizes the main accomplishments obtained by this joint program, but also provides an overview of current relevant activities domestically and internationally. Possible paths forward are also suggested to help near-future orientation of this program.

  7. Characterizing the Nano and Micro Structure of Concrete toImprove its Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, P.J.M.; Kirchheim, A.P.; Chae, S.; Fischer, Peter; MacDowell, Alastair; Schaible, Eirc; Wenk, H.R.; Macdowell, Alastair A.

    2009-01-13

    New and advanced methodologies have been developed to characterize the nano and microstructure of cement paste and concrete exposed to aggressive environments. High resolution full-field soft X-ray imaging in the water window is providing new insight on the nano scale of the cement hydration process, which leads to a nano-optimization of cement-based systems. Hard X-ray microtomography images of ice inside cement paste and cracking caused by the alkali?silica reaction (ASR) enables three-dimensional structural identification. The potential of neutron diffraction to determine reactive aggregates by measuring their residual strains and preferred orientation is studied. Results of experiments using these tools are shown on this paper.

  8. Characterizing the nano and micro structure of concrete to improve its durability

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, P.J.M.; Kirchheim, A.P.; Chae, S.; Fischer, P.; MacDowell, A.A.; Schaible, E.; Wenk, H.R.

    2008-10-22

    New and advanced methodologies have been developed to characterize the nano and microstructure of cement paste and concrete exposed to aggressive environments. High resolution full-field soft X-ray imaging in the water window is providing new insight on the nano scale of the cement hydration process, which leads to a nano-optimization of cement-based systems. Hard X-ray microtomography images on ice inside cement paste and cracking caused by the alkali-silica reaction (ASR) enables three-dimensional structural identification. The potential of neutron diffraction to determine reactive aggregates by measuring their residual strains and preferred orientation is studied. Results of experiments using these tools will be shown on this paper.

  9. Modeling of early age loss of lithium ions from pore solution of cementitious systems treated with lithium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taehwan Olek, Jan

    2015-01-15

    Addition of lithium nitrate admixture to the fresh concrete mixture helps to minimize potential problems related to alkali-silica reaction. For this admixture to function as an effective ASR control measure, it is imperative that the lithium ions remain in the pore solution. However, it was found that about 50% of the originally added lithium ions are removed from the pore solution during early stages of hydration. This paper revealed that the magnitude of the Li{sup +} ion loss is highly dependent on the concentration of Li{sup +} ions in the pore solution and the hydration rate of the cementitious systems. Using these findings, an empirical model has been developed which can predict the loss of Li{sup +} ions from the pore solution during the hydration period. The proposed model can be used to investigate the effects of mixture parameters on the loss of Li{sup +} ions from the pore solution of cementitious system.

  10. Ternary CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type pnictides AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} (A=Sr, Eu; Pn=As, Sb)

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Khatun, Mansura; Scott Mullen, C.; Mar, Arthur

    2012-08-15

    Four ternary pnictides AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} (A=Sr, Eu; Pn=As, Sb) were prepared by reactions of the elements at 850 Degree-Sign C and their crystal structures were determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. These silver-containing pnictides AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} adopt the trigonal CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type structure (Pearson symbol hR21, space group R3-bar m, Z=3; a=4.5555(6) A, c=24.041(3) A for SrAg{sub 4}As{sub 2}; a=4.5352(2) A, c=23.7221(11) A for EuAg{sub 4}As{sub 2}; a=4.7404(4) A, c=25.029(2) A for SrAg{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}; a=4.7239(3) A, c=24.689(2) A for EuAg{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}), which can be derived from the trigonal CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure of the isoelectronic zinc-containing pnictides AZn{sub 2}Pn{sub 2} by insertion of additional Ag atoms into trigonal planar sites within [M{sub 2}Pn{sub 2}]{sup 2-} slabs built up of edge-sharing tetrahedra. Band structure calculations on SrAg{sub 4}As{sub 2} and SrAg{sub 4}Sb{sub 2} revealed that these charge-balanced Zintl phases actually exhibit no gap at the Fermi level and are predicted to be semimetals. - Graphical abstract: SrAg{sub 4}As{sub 2} and related pnictides adopt a CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type structure in which additional Ag atoms enter trigonal planar sites within slabs built from edge-sharing tetrahedra. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AAg{sub 4}Pn{sub 2} are the first Ag-containing members of the CaCu{sub 4}P{sub 2}-type structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag atoms are stuffed in trigonal planar sites within CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type slabs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag-Ag bonding develops through attractive d{sup 10}-d{sup 10} interactions.

  11. Natural Arsenic in the Miocene Hawthorn Group, Florida: Wide Ranging Implications for ASR, Phosphate Mining, Private Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazareva, O. V.; Pichler, T.

    2004-12-01

    organic material, clays, and iron oxides contain lower As concentrations contrasted to pyrite; (5) Pyrite occurs in framboidal and euhedral forms. Because phosphorous, arsenic and sulfur are chemically closely related, they often occur together in nature, thus posing a potential problem for the phosphate industry. There have been several occurrences of swine fatalities due to arsenic poisoning as a result of phosphate feed supplements. Information about the concentration, distribution and mineralogical association of naturally occurring As is important, because this is a first step to forecast its behavior during anthropogenic induced physico-chemical changes in the aquifer. Recently, aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) facilities in central Florida reported As concentrations in excess of 100 μ g/L in recovered water. The ASR storage zone is the Suwannee Limestone, which directly underlies the Hawthorn sediments. It is crucial to the future of ASR in this area to understand the source and distribution of arsenic in the overlying Hawthorn Group and the cycling of arsenic in the Florida platform.

  12. Characterization of Infrastructure Materials using Nonlinear Ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minghe

    In order to improve the safety, reliability, cost, and performance of civil and mechanical structures/components, it is necessary to develop techniques that are capable of characterizing and quantifying the amount of distributed damage in engineering materials before any detectable discontinuities (cracks, delaminations, voids, etc.) appear. In this dissertation, novel nonlinear ultrasonic NDE methods are developed and applied to characterize cumulative damage such as fatigue damage in metallic materials and degradation of cement-based materials due to chemical reactions. First, nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves are used to measure the near-surface residual stresses in shot-peened aluminum alloy (AA 7075) samples. Results show that the nonlinear Rayleigh wave is very sensitive to near-surface residual stresses, and has the potential to quantitatively detect them. Second, a novel two-wave mixing method is theoretically developed and numerically verified. This method is then successfully applied to detect the fatigue damage in aluminum alloy (AA 6061) samples subjected to monotonic compression. In addition to its high sensitivity to fatigue damage, this collinear wave mixing method allows the measurement over a specific region of interest in the specimen, and this capability makes it possible to obtain spatial distribution of fatigue damage through the thickness direction of the sample by simply timing the transducers. Third, the nonlinear wave mixing method is used to characterize the degradation of cement-based materials caused by alkali-silica reaction (ASR). It is found that the nonlinear ultrasonic method is sensitive to detect ASR damage at very early stage, and has the potential to identify the different damage stages. Finally, a micromechanics-based chemo-mechanical model is developed which relates the acoustic nonlinearity parameter to ASR damage. This model provides a way to quantitatively predict the changes in the acoustic nonlinearity parameter due to ASR

  13. Application of the mechanical perturbation produced by traffic as a new approach of nonlinear acoustic technique for detecting microcracks in the concrete: A laboratory simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi-Marani, F.; Kodjo, S. A.; Rivard, P.; Lamarche, C. P.

    2012-05-01

    Very few nonlinear acoustics techniques are currently applied on real structures because their large scale implementation is difficult. Recently, a new method based on nonlinear acoustics has been proposed at the Université de Sherbrooke for the characterization of the damage associated with Alkali-Silica Reaction (ASR). This method consists in quantifying the influence of an external mechanical disturbance on the propagation of a continual ultrasonic wave that probes the material. In this method, the mechanical perturbation produced by an impact causes sudden opening of microcracks and, consequently, the velocity of the probe ultrasonic wave is suddenly reduced. Then it slowly and gradually returns to its initial level as the microcracks are closing. The objective of this study is: using waves generated by traffics in infrastructures in order to monitor microdefects due to damage mechanisms like ASR. This type of mechanical disturbance (by traffic loadings) is used as a source of low frequency-high amplitude waves for opening/closing of the microdefects in the bulk of concrete. This paper presents a laboratory set-up made of three large deep concrete slabs used to study the nonlinear behavior of concrete using the disturbance caused by simulated traffic. The traffic is simulated with a controlled high accuracy jack to produce a wave similar to that produced by traffic. Results obtained from this study will be used in the future to design an in-situ protocol for assessing ASR-affected structures.

  14. Early post-traumatic stress disorder in relation to acute stress reaction: an ICD-10 study among help seekers following an earthquake.

    PubMed

    Soldatos, Constantin R; Paparrigopoulos, Thomas J; Pappa, Dimitra A; Christodoulou, George N

    2006-08-30

    Disaster research related to earthquakes has almost exclusively dealt with their long-term psychosocial impact; besides, diagnoses were previously based only on DSM criteria. Therefore, it is pertinent to assess stress-related reactions of earthquake victims during the early post-disaster period through the application of ICD-10 criteria. For the first 3 weeks following an earthquake, 102 help-seekers were assessed based on a checklist of sociodemographic variables and a semi-structured interview for the detection of acute stress reaction (ASR) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) according to ICD-10. Forty-four subjects (43%) fulfilled the ICD-10 criteria for PTSD; all but one of them had suffered ASR. Moreover, among a series of potential predictors for PTSD, ASR was found to be the only significant one; this indicates a definite association between ASR and early development of PTSD. Logistic regression to predict group membership (PTSD/no PTSD) based on specific ASR symptoms showed that accelerated heart rate and feelings of derealization were the only significant predictors for early PTSD. Individuals who fulfill the ICD-10 diagnostic criteria for ASR following an earthquake are at high risk for subsequent occurrence of early PTSD. Increased heart rate and feelings of derealization within the first 48 h after the traumatic event appear to be the principal factors associated with the development of early PTSD. In addition to their potential value for timely prevention and treatment, these findings raise important nosological issues pertaining to the current diagnostic classification of stress-related disorders (ICD-10 versus DSM-IV). PMID:16872683

  15. Preliminary results of three-dimensional stress orientation determined by anelastic strain recovery (ASR) measurements of core samples retrieved from IODP Expedition 343

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, W.; Yamamoto, Y.; Tanikawa, W.

    2013-12-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 343, Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST) penetrated to ~850 meter below seafloor (mbsf) in a water depth of 6890 m and passed through the plate boundary fault of the overriding North American Plate and the subducting Pacific plate witch. The fault locates at ~820 mbsf and is preliminarily considered to be the source fault of the 2011 Tohoku-oki Mw 9.0 earthquake. Area of JFAST drilling site (C0019) was in the largest coseismic slip zone where the fault slipped more than 50 m during the earthquake. Hole C0019E dedicated to coring retrieved a total of 21 cores having a total of 51 m long cores from both the hanging wall and the footwall of the plate boundary fault. To determine three-dimensional stress state after the huge earthquake, we collected four whole round core samples and measured anelastic strain recovery (ASR) also called 'relaxation' of the core samples onboard D/V Chikyu. The principle idea behind the ASR method is that stress-induced elastic strain is released first instantaneously (i.e., as time-independent elastic strain), followed by a more gradual or time-dependent recovery of anelastic strain. The ASR method takes advantage of the time-dependent strain and has been successfully applied in IODP expeditions (e.g. Byrne et al., 2009; Yamamoto et al., 2013). The four core samples used for ASR measurements were taken from C0019E-1R1 (~177 mbsf), C0019E-5R1 (~697 mbsf)), C0019E-13R1 (~802 mbsf) and C0019E-19R2 (~828 mbsf). The three core samples at shallower depths were in the hanging wall of the fault; and the deepest one was in the footwall. We started ASR measurements approximate three hours after the core was 'on deck', that is approximate six hours from the in situ stress was released, and keep the measurements for about two weeks. The anelastic strains measured in nine directions including six independent directions were extensional; all of the curves varied smoothly and similarly with

  16. Annual Statistical Report of the Public Schools of Arkansas, Public Charter Schools, and Education Service Cooperatives, 2013-2014 Actual and 2014-2015 Budgeted, (ASR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    In compliance with the provisions of A.C.A.§§6-20-2201 et seq., the Annual Statistical Report of the Public Schools of Arkansas, Public Charter Schools, and Education Service Cooperatives, 2013-2014 Actual and 2014-2015 Budgeted, (ASR) is presented here. The Rankings of Selected Items of the Public Schools of Arkansas, 2013-2014 Actual, (Rankings)…

  17. Introgression of the SbASR-1 gene cloned from a halophyte Salicornia brachiate enhances salinity and drought endurance in transgenic groundnut (arachis hypogaea)and acts as a transcription factor [corrected].

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vivekanand; Chaturvedi, Amit Kumar; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2015-01-01

    The SbASR-1 gene, cloned from a halophyte Salicornia brachiata, encodes a plant-specific hydrophilic and stress responsive protein. The genome of S. brachiata has two paralogs of the SbASR-1 gene (2549 bp), which is comprised of a single intron of 1611 bp, the largest intron of the  abscisic acid stress ripening [ASR] gene family yet reported. In silico analysis of the 843-bp putative promoter revealed the presence of ABA, biotic stress, dehydration, phytohormone, salinity, and sugar responsive cis-regulatory motifs. The SbASR-1 protein belongs to Group 7 LEA protein family with different amino acid composition compared to their glycophytic homologs. Bipartite Nuclear Localization Signal (NLS) was found on the C-terminal end of protein and localization study confirmed that SbASR-1 is a nuclear protein. Furthermore, transgenic groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) plants over-expressing the SbASR-1 gene constitutively showed enhanced salinity and drought stress tolerance in the T1 generation. Leaves of transgenic lines exhibited higher chlorophyll and relative water contents and lower electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde content, proline, sugars, and starch accumulation under stress treatments than wild-type (Wt) plants. Also, lower accumulation of H2O2 and O2.- radicals was detected in transgenic lines compared to Wt plants under stress conditions. Transcript expression of APX (ascorbate peroxidase) and CAT (catalase) genes were higher in Wt plants, whereas the SOD (superoxide dismutase) transcripts were higher in transgenic lines under stress. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) confirmed that the SbASR-1 protein binds at the consensus sequence (C/G/A)(G/T)CC(C/G)(C/G/A)(A/T). Based on results of the present study, it may be concluded that SbASR-1 enhances the salinity and drought stress tolerance in transgenic groundnut by functioning as a LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) protein and a transcription factor. PMID:26158616

  18. Introgression of the SbASR-1 Gene Cloned from a Halophyte Salicornia brachiata Enhances Salinity and Drought Endurance in Transgenic Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) and Acts as a Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Vivekanand; Chaturvedi, Amit Kumar; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2015-01-01

    The SbASR-1 gene, cloned from a halophyte Salicornia brachiata, encodes a plant-specific hydrophilic and stress responsive protein. The genome of S. brachiata has two paralogs of the SbASR-1 gene (2549 bp), which is comprised of a single intron of 1611 bp, the largest intron of the  abscisic acid stress ripening [ASR] gene family yet reported. In silico analysis of the 843-bp putative promoter revealed the presence of ABA, biotic stress, dehydration, phytohormone, salinity, and sugar responsive cis-regulatory motifs. The SbASR-1 protein belongs to Group 7 LEA protein family with different amino acid composition compared to their glycophytic homologs. Bipartite Nuclear Localization Signal (NLS) was found on the C-terminal end of protein and localization study confirmed that SbASR-1 is a nuclear protein. Furthermore, transgenic groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) plants over-expressing the SbASR-1 gene constitutively showed enhanced salinity and drought stress tolerance in the T1 generation. Leaves of transgenic lines exhibited higher chlorophyll and relative water contents and lower electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde content, proline, sugars, and starch accumulation under stress treatments than wild-type (Wt) plants. Also, lower accumulation of H2O2 and O2.- radicals was detected in transgenic lines compared to Wt plants under stress conditions. Transcript expression of APX (ascorbate peroxidase) and CAT (catalase) genes were higher in Wt plants, whereas the SOD (superoxide dismutase) transcripts were higher in transgenic lines under stress. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) confirmed that the SbASR-1 protein binds at the consensus sequence (C/G/A)(G/T)CC(C/G)(C/G/A)(A/T). Based on results of the present study, it may be concluded that SbASR-1 enhances the salinity and drought stress tolerance in transgenic groundnut by functioning as a LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) protein and a transcription factor. PMID:26158616

  19. Identification and characterization of a gibberellin-regulated protein, which is ASR5, in the basal region of rice leaf sheaths.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Hironori; Mahmood, Tariq; Matsuoka, Makoto; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2008-04-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) regulate growth and development in higher plants. To identify GA-regulated proteins during rice leaf sheath elongation, a proteomic approach was used. Proteins from the basal region of leaf sheath in rice seedling treated with GA(3) were analyzed by fluorescence two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. The levels of abscisic acid-stress-ripening-inducible 5 protein (ASR5), elongation factor-1 beta, translationally controlled tumor protein, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and a novel protein increased; whereas the level of RuBisCO subunit binding-protein decreased by GA(3) treatment. ASR5 out of these six proteins was significantly regulated by GA(3) at the protein level but not at the mRNA level in the basal region of leaf sheaths. Since this protein is regulated not only by abscisic acid but also by GA(3), these results indicate that ASR5 might be involved in plant growth in addition to stress in the basal regions of leaf sheaths. PMID:18210155

  20. The US-DOE ARM/ASR Effort in Quantifying Uncertainty in Ground-Based Cloud Property Retrievals (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S.; Protat, A.; Zhao, C.

    2013-12-01

    One primary goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is to obtain and retrieve cloud microphysical properties from detailed cloud observations using ground-based active and passive remote sensors. However, there is large uncertainty in the retrieved cloud property products. Studies have shown that the uncertainty could arise from instrument limitations, measurement errors, sampling errors, retrieval algorithm deficiencies in assumptions, as well as inconsistent input data and constraints used by different algorithms. To quantify the uncertainty in cloud retrievals, a scientific focus group, Quantification of Uncertainties In Cloud Retrievals (QUICR), was recently created by the DOE Atmospheric System Research (ASR) program. This talk will provide an overview of the recent research activities conducted within QUICR and discuss its current collaborations with the European cloud retrieval community and future plans. The goal of QUICR is to develop a methodology for characterizing and quantifying uncertainties in current and future ARM cloud retrievals. The Work at LLNL was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-641258.

  1. Diagnosing delayed ettringite formation in concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Michael Folliard, Kevin Drimalas, Thano Ramlochan, Terry

    2008-06-15

    There has been a number of cases involving deteriorated concrete structures in North America where there has been considerable controversy surrounding the respective contributions of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) and delayed ettringite formation (DEF) to the observed damage. The problem arises because the macroscopic symptoms of distress are not unequivocal and microscopical examinations of field samples often reveal evidence of both processes making it difficult to separate the individual contributions. This paper presents the results of an investigation of a number of concrete columns carrying a raised expressway in North America; prior studies had implicated both DEF and ASR as possible causes of deterioration. Although the columns were not deliberately heat-cured, it is estimated that the peak internal temperature would have exceeded 70 deg. C and perhaps even 80 deg. C, in some cases. The forensic investigation included scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and expansion testing of cores extracted from the structure. Small-diameter cores stored in limewater expanded significantly (0.3 to 1.3%) and on the basis of supplementary tests on laboratory-produced concrete specimens it was concluded that expansion under such conditions is caused by DEF as the conditions of the test will not sustain ASR. In at least one column, DEF was diagnosed as the sole contributory cause of damage with no evidence of any contribution from ASR or any other deterioration process. In other cases, both ASR and DEF were observed to have contributed to the apparent damage. Of the columns examined, only concrete containing fly ash appeared to be undamaged. The results of this study confirm that, under certain conditions, the process of DEF (acting in isolation of other processes) can result in significant deterioration of cast-in-place reinforced concrete structures.

  2. Involvement of an ATP-dependent protease, PA0779/AsrA, in inducing heat shock in response to tobramycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kindrachuk, Kristen N; Fernández, Lucía; Bains, Manjeet; Hancock, Robert E W

    2011-05-01

    The adaptive resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to aminoglycosides is known to occur during chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients in response to nonlethal concentrations of aminoglycosides. Not only is it difficult to achieve high levels of drug throughout the dehydrated mucus in the lung, but also steep oxygen gradients exist across the mucus layer, further reducing the bactericidal activity of aminoglycosides. In this study, microarray analysis was utilized to examine the gene responses of P. aeruginosa to lethal, inhibitory, and subinhibitory concentrations of tobramycin under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. While prolonged exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of tobramycin caused increased levels of expression predominantly of the efflux pump genes mexXY, the greatest increases in gene expression levels in response to lethal concentrations of tobramycin involved a number of heat shock genes and the PA0779 gene (renamed here asrA), encoding an alternate Lon protease. Microarray analysis of an asrA::luxCDABE transposon mutant revealed that the induction of heat shock genes in response to tobramycin in this mutant was significantly decreased compared to that in the parent strain. The level of expression of asrA was induced from an arabinose-inducible promoter to 35-fold greater than wild-type expression levels in the absence of tobramycin, and this overexpression alone caused an increased expression of the heat shock genes, as determined by quantitative PCR (qPCR). This overexpression of asrA conferred short-term protection against lethal levels (4 μg/ml) of tobramycin but did not affect the tobramycin MIC. The RpoH heat shock sigma factor was found to be involved in the regulation of asrA in response to both heat shock and tobramycin at the posttranscriptional level. The results of this work suggest that the tobramycin concentration has a significant impact on the gene expression of P. aeruginosa, with lethal concentrations resulting in

  3. Involvement of an ATP-Dependent Protease, PA0779/AsrA, in Inducing Heat Shock in Response to Tobramycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa▿†

    PubMed Central

    Kindrachuk, Kristen N.; Fernández, Lucía; Bains, Manjeet; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2011-01-01

    The adaptive resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to aminoglycosides is known to occur during chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients in response to nonlethal concentrations of aminoglycosides. Not only is it difficult to achieve high levels of drug throughout the dehydrated mucus in the lung, but also steep oxygen gradients exist across the mucus layer, further reducing the bactericidal activity of aminoglycosides. In this study, microarray analysis was utilized to examine the gene responses of P. aeruginosa to lethal, inhibitory, and subinhibitory concentrations of tobramycin under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. While prolonged exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of tobramycin caused increased levels of expression predominantly of the efflux pump genes mexXY, the greatest increases in gene expression levels in response to lethal concentrations of tobramycin involved a number of heat shock genes and the PA0779 gene (renamed here asrA), encoding an alternate Lon protease. Microarray analysis of an asrA::luxCDABE transposon mutant revealed that the induction of heat shock genes in response to tobramycin in this mutant was significantly decreased compared to that in the parent strain. The level of expression of asrA was induced from an arabinose-inducible promoter to 35-fold greater than wild-type expression levels in the absence of tobramycin, and this overexpression alone caused an increased expression of the heat shock genes, as determined by quantitative PCR (qPCR). This overexpression of asrA conferred short-term protection against lethal levels (4 μg/ml) of tobramycin but did not affect the tobramycin MIC. The RpoH heat shock sigma factor was found to be involved in the regulation of asrA in response to both heat shock and tobramycin at the posttranscriptional level. The results of this work suggest that the tobramycin concentration has a significant impact on the gene expression of P. aeruginosa, with lethal concentrations resulting in

  4. Front-end technologies for robust ASR in reverberant environments—spectral enhancement-based dereverberation and auditory modulation filterbank features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Feifei; Meyer, Bernd T.; Moritz, Niko; Rehr, Robert; Anemüller, Jörn; Gerkmann, Timo; Doclo, Simon; Goetze, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents extended techniques aiming at the improvement of automatic speech recognition (ASR) in single-channel scenarios in the context of the REVERB (REverberant Voice Enhancement and Recognition Benchmark) challenge. The focus is laid on the development and analysis of ASR front-end technologies covering speech enhancement and feature extraction. Speech enhancement is performed using a joint noise reduction and dereverberation system in the spectral domain based on estimates of the noise and late reverberation power spectral densities (PSDs). To obtain reliable estimates of the PSDs—even in acoustic conditions with positive direct-to-reverberation energy ratios (DRRs)—we adopt the statistical model of the room impulse response explicitly incorporating DRRs, as well in combination with a novel proposed joint estimator for the reverberation time T 60 and the DRR. The feature extraction approach is inspired by processing strategies of the auditory system, where an amplitude modulation filterbank is applied to extract the temporal modulation information. These techniques were shown to improve the REVERB baseline in our previous work. Here, we investigate if similar improvements are obtained when using a state-of-the-art ASR framework, and to what extent the results depend on the specific architecture of the back-end. Apart from conventional Gaussian mixture model (GMM)-hidden Markov model (HMM) back-ends, we consider subspace GMM (SGMM)-HMMs as well as deep neural networks in a hybrid system. The speech enhancement algorithm is found to be helpful in almost all conditions, with the exception of deep learning systems in matched training-test conditions. The auditory feature type improves the baseline for all system architectures. The relative word error rate reduction achieved by combining our front-end techniques with current back-ends is 52.7% on average with the REVERB evaluation test set compared to our original REVERB result.

  5. Integrated subsurface water solutions for coastal environments through integrated pump&treat and aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdikaki, Martha; Kallioras, Andreas; Christoforidis, Christophoros; Iossifidis, Dimitris; Zafeiropoulos, Anastasios; Dimitriadis, Klisthenis; Makropoulos, Christos; Raat, Klaasjan; van den Berg, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Coastal wetlands in semi-arid regions, as in Circum-Mediterranean, are considered important ecosystems that provide valuable services to human population and the environment, such as: flood protection, erosion control, wildlife habitat, water quality, recreation and carbon sequestration. Un-managed surface and groundwater exploitation in these areas usually leads to deterioration of such sensitive ecosystems by means of water resources degradation and/or increased salinity. Groundwater usually plays a vital role for the sustainability of these hydrological systems, as the underlying aquifers operate as regulators for both quantity and quality of their waters. Multi-layer and multi-objective Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) systems can be proved effective groundwater engineered solutions for the restoration of deteriorated coastal wetlands in semi- and arid regions. The plain of Marathon is a typical Mediterranean environment that hosts a naturally occurring -and today degraded- coastal wetland with the characteristics of a distinct ecosystem linked to a typical coastal hydrogeological system of a semi-arid region; and therefore can serve as a model for similar systems world-wide. The geo-hydrological setting of the area involves a multi-layer aquifer system consisting of (i) an upper un-consolidated formation of depositional unit dominated mostly by fluvial sediments and (ii) the surrounding and underlying karstified marbles; both being linked to the investigated wetland and also subjected to seawater encroachment. A smart engineered MAR system via an optimised Pump & Treat system integrated with an Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) scheme in this area would include the abstraction of brackish groundwater from the deeper karst aquifer at a location close to the shoreline and direct treatment with Reverse Osmosis (RO). for desalination. Two-fold re-use scheme of the purified effluent can then be engineered for (i) the restoration of the coastal wetland; and (ii

  6. Genome-wide data (ChIP-seq) enabled identification of cell wall-related and aquaporin genes as targets of tomato ASR1, a drought stress-responsive transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying the target genes of transcription factors is important for unraveling regulatory networks in all types of organisms. Our interest was precisely to uncover the spectrum of loci regulated by a widespread plant transcription factor involved in physiological adaptation to drought, a type of stress that plants have encountered since the colonization of land habitats 400 MYA. The regulator under study, named ASR1, is exclusive to the plant kingdom (albeit absent in Arabidopsis) and known to alleviate the stress caused by restricted water availability. As its target genes are still unknown despite the original cloning of Asr1 cDNA 20 years ago, we examined the tomato genome for specific loci interacting in vivo with this conspicuous protein. Results We performed ChIP followed by high throughput DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) on leaves from stressed tomato plants, using a high-quality anti-ASR1 antibody. In this way, we unraveled a novel repertoire of target genes, some of which are clearly involved in the response to drought stress. Many of the ASR1-enriched genomic loci we found encode enzymes involved in cell wall synthesis and remodeling as well as channels implicated in water and solute flux, such as aquaporins. In addition, we were able to determine a robust consensus ASR1-binding DNA motif. Conclusions The finding of cell wall synthesis and aquaporin genes as targets of ASR1 is consistent with their suggested role in the physiological adaptation of plants to water loss. The results gain insight into the environmental stress-sensing pathways leading to plant tolerance of drought. PMID:24423251

  7. Optimizing the use of fly ash in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, M.

    2007-07-01

    The optimum amount of fly ash varies not only with the application, but also with composition and proportions of all the materials in the concrete mixture (especially the fly ash), the conditions during placing (especially temperature), construction practices (for example, finishing and curing) and the exposure conditions. This document discusses issues related to using low to very high levels of fly ash in concrete and provides guidance for the use of fly ash without compromising the construction process or the quality of the finished product. The nature of fly ashes including their physical, mineralogical and chemical properties is covered in detail, as well as fly ash variability due to coal composition and plant operating conditions. A discussion on the effects of fly ash characteristics on fresh and hardened concrete properties includes; workability, bleeding, air entrainment, setting time, heat of hydration, compressive strength development, creep, drying shrinkage, abrasion resistance, permeability, resistance to chlorides, alkali-silica reaction (ASR), sulfate resistance, carbonation, and resistance to freezing and thawing and deicer salt scaling. Case studies were selected as examples of some of the more demanding applications of fly ash concrete for ASR mitigation, chloride resistance, and green building.

  8. Assessment of Patients with a DePuy ASR Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacement: Results of Applying the Guidelines of the Spanish Society of Hip Surgery in a Tertiary Referral Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Valencia, Jenaro; Gallart, Xavier; Bori, Guillem; Ramiro, Sebastián Garcia; Combalía, Andrés; Riba, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The prognosis associated with the DePuy ASR hip cup is poor and varies according to the series. This implant was withdrawn from use in 2010 and all patients needed to be assessed. We present the results of the assessment of our patients treated with this device, according to the Spanish Society of Hip Surgery (SECCA) algorithm published in 2011. This retrospective study evaluates 83 consecutive ASR cups, followed up at a mean of 2.9 years. Serum levels of chromium and cobalt, as well as the acetabular abduction angle, were determined in order to assess their possible correlation with failure, defined as the need for revision surgery. The mean Harris Hip Score was 83.2 (range 42–97). Eight arthroplasties (13.3%) required revision due to persistent pain and/or elevated serum levels of chromium/cobalt. All the cups had a correct abduction angle, and there was no correlation between elevated serum levels of metal ions and implant failure. Since two previous ASR implants were exchanged previously to the recall, the revision rate for ASR cups in our centre is 18.2% at 2.9 years. PMID:25431677

  9. Genome-wide data (ChIP-seq) enabled identification of cell wall-related and aquaporin genes as targets of tomato ASR1, a drought stress-responsive transcription factor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report efforts to take advantage of previous knowledge on well characterized proteins that extensively accumulate in dehydration, for example those belonging to the LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) superfamily. ASR proteins, a subgroup exclusive to the plant kingdom (albeit absent in Arabid...

  10. Variable-density modelling of multiple-cycle aquifer storage and recovery (ASR): Importance of anisotropy and layered heterogeneity in brackish aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, James D.; Simmons, Craig T.; Dillon, Peter J.

    2008-07-01

    SummaryAquifer storage and recovery (ASR) involves injection of freshwater into an aquifer for later removal and use. If the aquifer initially contains brackish or saline water, then the density difference between fluids can cause the injected plume to "float" towards the top of the aquifer. This causes saltwater to intrude the well at the bottom, meaning freshwater recovery must be terminated prematurely. This study examined the density-induced flow phenomena in hypothetical "layer-cake" aquifers (i.e. horizontal layers of alternating low and high permeability). Despite low ambient TDS concentration (2857 mg L-1), density-dependent simulations resulted in lower recovery efficiencies than density-invariant simulations. However, results showed that greater permeability ratios (between high and low permeability layers) led to suppression of the vertical buoyancy flow and therefore higher recovery efficiencies. Each stratified heterogeneous aquifer was "simplified" to an equivalent homogeneous, anisotropic medium using the arithmetic mean for horizontal hydraulic conductivity and harmonic mean for vertical hydraulic conductivity. The results showed a very similar effect of suppressing vertical flow as was noted in the heterogeneous models. The simulated recovery efficiencies in the homogeneous cases were in excellent agreement with the explicit heterogeneous cases, with higher anisotropy ratios resulting in higher recovery efficiencies. The important conclusion is that the recovery efficiency of a simulated ASR operation is sensitive to whether or not the model considers density-induced flow and whether the aquifer is considered to be isotropic or not, but relatively insensitive to the representation of heterogeneity as either an explicit heterogeneous medium or an equivalent homogeneous (anisotropic) medium.

  11. Using large Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) Sites as Analogs to Study the Mechanical Behavior of Large CO2 Storage Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneville, A.; Sullivan, E. C.; Heggy, E.; Dermond, J.; Sweeney, M.

    2010-12-01

    One of the main issues in the sequestration of large volumes of anthropogenic CO2 in the deep subsurface is to determine the field-scale induced displacements of fluids (mainly saline water) and their consequences on the mechanical behavior of the reservoir and surroundings. A quantifiable estimation of that displacement can be made by combining the robust, cost effective and repeatable geophysical techniques of microgravity and INSAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar INterferometry). The determination of the density distribution of materials in the subsurface and its evolution with time potentially provides a cost effective monitoring technique to determine field-scale displacements of reservoir fluids induced by injection of liquid or gas. At the same time, the accurate measurement of temporal ground deformation reflects geomechanical responses and spatial changes. With micro-gravimeters and DGPS, very small gravity anomalies can now be mapped as well as their evolution with time. Displacements of the ground surface can also be measured very precisely through satellite radar interferometry (INSAR). Each of these methods has been implemented on a few occasions on active storage fields (natural gas storage or CO2 pilot sites) and recently with success for INSAR Techniques at the commercial CO2 sequestration site at In Salah, Algeria. However, these technologies are largely uncalibrated for diverse environmental settings like vegetated or urban areas for example. We propose to field test and evaluate these techniques in an active large volume aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project where sufficient geological data and documented time series exist to create realistic models of mass distribution and surface motion displacement for comparison with gravity and radar interferometry observations. The results will be used as analogs to CO2 storage sites with the appropriate scaling in volume and physical properties for CO2 injection, as well as direct examples of sites where CO

  12. Anisotropic thermoelectric properties in layered cobaltite A{sub x}CoO{sub 2} (A=Sr and Ca) thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Tsutomu; Yotsuhashi, Satoshi; Adachi, Hideaki

    2004-08-02

    We have fabricated epitaxial thin films of layered cobaltite A{sub x}CoO{sub 2} (A=Sr and Ca) on sapphire substrates by rf magnetron sputtering. The grown phase in the A{sub x}CoO{sub 2} films was found to be a monoclinic {beta}-phase of primitive layered cobaltites and the epitaxial orientation of the film could be controlled by the surface plane of the substrates. The resistivity parallel to the CoO{sub 2} layers {rho}{sub parallel} for the {beta}-Sr{sub x}CoO{sub 2} is as low as 2 m{omega} cm at room temperature and shows metallic behavior. The ratio of perpendicular resistivity {rho}{sub perpendicular} to {rho}{sub parallel} increases from 20 at room temperature to 90 at 3 K. More isotropic nature was observed in the Seebeck coefficient. Parallel Seebeck coefficients S{sub parallel} of A{sub x}CoO{sub 2} are approximately 60 {mu}V/K at room temperature and the perpendicular S{sub perpendicular} are about half of S{sub parallel}.

  13. Evaluation of laboratory test method for determining the potential alkali contribution from aggregate and the ASR safety of the Three-Gorges dam concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Duyou . E-mail: duyoulu@njut.edu.cn; Zhou, Xiaoling; Xu Zhongzi; Lan Xianghui; Tang Mingshu; Fournier, Benoit

    2006-06-15

    The releasable alkali from granite, which was used in the Three-Gorges concrete dam project in China, and from gneiss and feldspar was estimated by extraction in distilled water and super-saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution. Results show that: i) the finer the particles and the higher the temperature, the greater and faster the release of alkali; ii) compared with extraction by distilled water, super-saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution had a stronger activation on feldspar than on granite and gneiss; iii) for the three rocks tested, thermal activation had the largest effect on gneiss and a lower and similar effect on granite and feldspar. For very fine particles, temperature had a similar effect on the release of alkali by all three rocks. Because the aggregate used in the Three-Gorges dam concrete is non-reactive and a low calcium fly ash was used in the concrete, ASR would not be an issue for the dam, despite the release of alkali from the aggregate into the concrete.

  14. DFT+ U study of electronic structure and Curie temperature of A2 B ReO6 (A=Sr, Ca and B=Cr, Fe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alex; Marianetti, Chris

    Re-based double perovskites (DPs) have attracted much attention due to their high Curie temperature (TC) and colossal magneto resistance with large potential for spintronic applications. Here we investigate the electronic and magnetic properties of the Re-based DPs A2 B ReO6 (A=Sr, Ca and B=Cr, Fe) using density functional theory + U (DFT+ U) calculations. While monoclinic Ca2CrReO6 and Ca2FeReO6 (monoclinic) are insulating within GGA+ U, tetragonal Sr2CrReO6 (a0a0c0) and Sr2FeReO6 (a0a0c-) remain metallic. We show that both on-site interaction U and octahedral tilting are critical to obtain the insulating phases. The a0a0c- -phase of Sr2CrReO6 is most stable and insulating with nonzero U, suggesting that the high quality Sr2CrReO6 film on STO substrate can be a semiconductor as reported in recent experiments. We explain that the insulator-to-metal transition (MIT) of Ca2FeReO6 at 140K is predominantly due to a structural phase transition which drives the insulating state. Curie temperatures of Re-based DPs are calculated using the classical Monte Carlo simulations based on the Heisenberg model.

  15. Clinical outcome and cost of treatment and care for neonates less than 1000 grams admitted to Vali-e ASR Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to estimate the cost of care and treatment for extremely low birth weight (ELBW) neonates admitted to a teaching and referral hospital. This cost estimation project can help health policy makers and planners make decisions and develop plans for perinatal service staging programs and better management of NICUs (Neonatal Intensive Care Units). Methods This cohort study performed on 50 extremely low birth weight neonates (w ≤ 1000gr) born in Vali-e Asr Hospital, Tehran-Iran in the period of March 2012 to September 2013. This teaching and referral hospital had 15 NICU beds as well as an active neonatal growth and development follow-up clinic with a pediatric neurodevelopment specialist during the period of the study. Cases would undergo initial developmental visits and preventative measures immediately after being admitted to the ward. Also after discharge, they were followed up monthly for six months and then every two months, during first year of life. Results Overalls, 23 newborns -46% of ELBW and 40% of total neonatal mortality rate (that amounted 55) died during hospital stay. Beside hospitalization, the major part of expenses was related to medication and medical supplies. All neonates needing rehabilitation underwent this type of intervention for one year. The mean cost of rehabilitation in neonates with no insurance coverage was 6700 US Dollars per year, which is reduced by half (3350 US Dollars) when covered by insurance. Conclusion Medication, medical supplies and equipment cost was significantly high. This is especially due to the fact that the present types of insurances do not cover such expenses very well, forcing parents to pay themselves. Insurance systems are expected to take this issue into immediate account. PMID:25343130

  16. I Hear You Eat and Speak: Automatic Recognition of Eating Condition and Food Type, Use-Cases, and Impact on ASR Performance

    PubMed Central

    Hantke, Simone; Weninger, Felix; Kurle, Richard; Ringeval, Fabien; Batliner, Anton; Mousa, Amr El-Desoky; Schuller, Björn

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new recognition task in the area of computational paralinguistics: automatic recognition of eating conditions in speech, i. e., whether people are eating while speaking, and what they are eating. To this end, we introduce the audio-visual iHEARu-EAT database featuring 1.6 k utterances of 30 subjects (mean age: 26.1 years, standard deviation: 2.66 years, gender balanced, German speakers), six types of food (Apple, Nectarine, Banana, Haribo Smurfs, Biscuit, and Crisps), and read as well as spontaneous speech, which is made publicly available for research purposes. We start with demonstrating that for automatic speech recognition (ASR), it pays off to know whether speakers are eating or not. We also propose automatic classification both by brute-forcing of low-level acoustic features as well as higher-level features related to intelligibility, obtained from an Automatic Speech Recogniser. Prediction of the eating condition was performed with a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier employed in a leave-one-speaker-out evaluation framework. Results show that the binary prediction of eating condition (i. e., eating or not eating) can be easily solved independently of the speaking condition; the obtained average recalls are all above 90%. Low-level acoustic features provide the best performance on spontaneous speech, which reaches up to 62.3% average recall for multi-way classification of the eating condition, i. e., discriminating the six types of food, as well as not eating. The early fusion of features related to intelligibility with the brute-forced acoustic feature set improves the performance on read speech, reaching a 66.4% average recall for the multi-way classification task. Analysing features and classifier errors leads to a suitable ordinal scale for eating conditions, on which automatic regression can be performed with up to 56.2% determination coefficient. PMID:27176486

  17. I Hear You Eat and Speak: Automatic Recognition of Eating Condition and Food Type, Use-Cases, and Impact on ASR Performance.

    PubMed

    Hantke, Simone; Weninger, Felix; Kurle, Richard; Ringeval, Fabien; Batliner, Anton; Mousa, Amr El-Desoky; Schuller, Björn

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new recognition task in the area of computational paralinguistics: automatic recognition of eating conditions in speech, i. e., whether people are eating while speaking, and what they are eating. To this end, we introduce the audio-visual iHEARu-EAT database featuring 1.6 k utterances of 30 subjects (mean age: 26.1 years, standard deviation: 2.66 years, gender balanced, German speakers), six types of food (Apple, Nectarine, Banana, Haribo Smurfs, Biscuit, and Crisps), and read as well as spontaneous speech, which is made publicly available for research purposes. We start with demonstrating that for automatic speech recognition (ASR), it pays off to know whether speakers are eating or not. We also propose automatic classification both by brute-forcing of low-level acoustic features as well as higher-level features related to intelligibility, obtained from an Automatic Speech Recogniser. Prediction of the eating condition was performed with a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier employed in a leave-one-speaker-out evaluation framework. Results show that the binary prediction of eating condition (i. e., eating or not eating) can be easily solved independently of the speaking condition; the obtained average recalls are all above 90%. Low-level acoustic features provide the best performance on spontaneous speech, which reaches up to 62.3% average recall for multi-way classification of the eating condition, i. e., discriminating the six types of food, as well as not eating. The early fusion of features related to intelligibility with the brute-forced acoustic feature set improves the performance on read speech, reaching a 66.4% average recall for the multi-way classification task. Analysing features and classifier errors leads to a suitable ordinal scale for eating conditions, on which automatic regression can be performed with up to 56.2% determination coefficient. PMID:27176486

  18. Characterization of concrete materials by using stress wave NDE techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, Afshin; deWalle, Brian

    1999-12-01

    A new instrument for monitoring the quality of concrete materials has been developed by Andec Mfg. Ltd. This new instrument, the AndeScope, can be used to evaluate concrete materials by measuring the stress wave velocity, dynamic elastic constant, quality factor (Q-factor), signal frequency, and decay coefficient. The AndeScope can be used to estimate the strength gain at the setting time, or it can be used to diagnose problems such as Alkali-Silica Reaction (ASR) or micro fracturing. The three stress wave propagation techniques are used in combination for this evaluation: ultrasonic through-transmission, pulse-echo and impact-echo. The ultrasonic through-transmission technique uses a direct arrangement between the transmitting and receiving transducers, while the pulse-echo and impact-echo technique are used to monitor concrete materials and structures from a single available face. The AndeScope's three stress wave modes can also be used to detect flaws, delamination, thickness, honeycombing, and crack depth measurements. In this paper, the principles of the three stress wave techniques and actual functions of the instrument are described. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique and new methodologies are discussed.

  19. Microscopical and mechanical evaluation of the durability of SiO2 aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bahraoui, Hassan; Khouchaf, Lahcen; Ben Fraj, Amor

    2016-05-01

    The durability of SiO2 compounds is closely related to its structural properties. In this work three natural siliceous aggregates (called G1, G2 and G3) are studied. Improvement of the durability of the starting material leads to a significant energy savings by extending the lifetime of structures. The chemical composition of the three natural aggregates shows that G1 and G2 have almost the same chemical composition (SiO2) and G3 is different and contains SiO2 quartz type and calcite as major components (SiO2, calcite and dolomite). X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that natural aggregates G1 is more crystallized than G2 and G3. After alkali silica reaction (ASR) process, the reactivity of G3 aggregate seems to be higher than the G1 and G2 aggregates. The mechanical results show the slight difference between mortar containing G1 (M_G1) and that containing G2 (M_G2). Their compressive strength is 10% less than that of reference (M_SS). As it is more reactive, G3 seems improving the compressive strength of M_G3, compared to M_G1 and M_G2. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage (ICOME 2015) - Elected submissions", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  20. Effects of lithium nitrate admixture on early-age cement hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, M.J. Kurtis, K.E.

    2008-04-15

    Although the benefits of lithium admixtures for mitigation of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) have been well documented, the potential ancillary effects of lithium compounds on cement and concrete remain largely uncharacterized. To examine the effects of the most common lithium admixture - lithium nitrate - on early-age behavior, the admixture was introduced at dosages of 0% to 400% of the recommended dosage to six cements of varying composition and to a cement-fly ash blend. Behavior was examined by isothermal calorimetry and measurements of chemical shrinkage, autogenous shrinkage, and setting time. Results indicate that lithium nitrate accelerates the early hydration of most cements but may retard hydration after 24 h. In the lowest alkali cement tested, set times were shortened in the presence of lithium nitrate by 15-22%. Higher dosages appeared to increase autogenous shrinkage after 40 days. The replacement of cement by Class F fly ash at 20% by weight appeared to diminish the early acceleration effects, but later hydration retardation and autogenous shrinkage were still observed.

  1. NEW NONLINEAR ACOUSTIC TECHNIQUES FOR NDE

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. TENCATE

    2000-09-01

    Acoustic nonlinearity in a medium may occur as a result of a variety of mechanisms. Some of the more common nonlinear effects may come from: (1) one or several cracks, volumetrically distributed due to age or fatigue or single disbonds or delamination; (2) imperfect grain-to-grain contacts, e.g., materials like concretes that are cemented together and have less than perfect bonds; (3) hard parts in a soft matrix, e.g., extreme duty materials like tungsten/copper alloys; or (4) atomic-scale nonlinearities. Nonlinear effects that arise from the first two mechanisms are considerably larger than the last two; thus, we have focused considerable attention on these. The most pervasive nonlinear measure of damage today is a second harmonic measurement. We show that for many cases of interest to NDE, a second harmonic measurement may not be the best choice. We examine the manifestations of nonlinearity in (nonlinear) materials with cracks and/or imperfect bonds and illustrate their applicability to NDE. For example, nonlinear resonance frequency shifts measured at increasing drive levels correlate strongly with the amount of ASR (alkali-silica reaction) damage of concrete cores. Memory effects (slow dynamics) also seem to correlate with the amount of damage.

  2. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    Most of the time, medicines make our lives better. They reduce aches and pains, fight infections, and control problems such as high blood pressure or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is ...

  3. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... using any of these products. Some types of food may also cause adverse drug reactions. For example, grapefruit and grapefruit juice, as well as alcohol and caffeine, may affect how drugs work. Every time your doctor ... interactions with any foods or beverages. What about medicines I've used ...

  4. Reaction of Soybean Rust Resistant Lines Identified in Paraguay to Mississippi Isolates of Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the Causal Agent of Soybean Rust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asian soybean rust (ASR) caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi is one of the most destructive diseases of soybean. Before 2004, ASR was not present in the continental USA and evaluation of U.S. soybean lines for resistance was conducted only with foreign isolates. Since ASR has been discovered in North Am...

  5. Assessing the potential of ToF-SIMS as a complementary approach to investigate cement-based materials — Applications related to alkali–silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Laetitia; Leemann, Andreas

    2015-02-15

    In this study, the potential of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) for the application in cement-based materials is assessed in combination and comparison with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). Mortar, concrete and samples from model systems providing products formed by the alkali–silica reaction (ASR) were studied. ToF-SIMS provides qualitative data on alkalis in cases where EDX reaches its limits in regard to detectable concentration, lateral resolution and atomic number of the elements. Due to its high in-depth resolution of a few atomic monolayers, thin layers of reaction products can be detected on the surfaces and chemically analyzed with ToF-SIMS. Additionally, it delivers information on the molecular conformation within the ASR product, its hydrogen content and its isotope ratios, information not provided by EDX. Provided the samples are carefully prepared, ToF-SIMS opens up new possibilities in the analysis of cement-based materials.

  6. Electronic, optical properties and chemical bonding in six novel 1111-like chalcogenide fluorides AMChF (A=Sr, Ba; M=Cu, Ag; and Ch=S, Se, Te) from first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannikov, V. V.; Shein, I. R.; Ivanovskii, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Employing first-principles band structure calculations, we have examined the electronic, optical properties and the peculiarities of the chemical bonding for six newly synthesized layered quaternary 1111-like chalcogenide fluorides SrAgSF, SrAgSeF, SrAgTeF, BaAgSF, BaAgSeF, and SrCuTeF, which are discussed in comparison with some isostructural 1111-like chalcogenide oxides. We found that all of the studied phases AMChF (A=Sr, Ba; M=Cu, Ag; and Ch=S, Se, Te) are semiconductors for which the fitted “experimental” gaps lie in the interval from 2.23 eV (for SrAgSeF) to 3.07 eV (for SrCuTeF). The near-Fermi states of AMChF are formed exclusively by the valence orbitals of the atoms from the blocks (MCh); thus, these phases belong to the layered materials with “natural multiple quantum wells”. The bonding in these new AMChF phases is described as a high-anisotropic mixture of ionic and covalent contributions, where ionic M-Ch bonds together with covalent M-Ch and Ch-Ch bonds take place inside blocks (MCh), while inside blocks (AF) and between the adjacent blocks (MCh)/(AF) mainly ionic bonds emerge.

  7. Reaction of Soybean Rust Resistant Lines Identified in Paraguay to a Mississippi Isolate of Phakopsora Pachyrhizi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi Sydow is the causal agent of Asian soybean rust (ASR), one of the most destructive diseases of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.). Before 2004, ASR was not present in the continental USA and evaluation of U.S. soybean lines for resistance was conducted only with foreign isolates....

  8. Hydrogenous Gas Production through Reactions among Supercritical Water, Ironmaking Sludge, and Steelmaking Slag and Recycling of Wastes from Integrated Steel Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shoji

    Automobile Shredder Residue (ASR) and Refuse derived fuels (not carbonized and carbonized: YRDF and RDF) as carbonaceous wastes were reacted isothermally with sub-supercritical water (600-695°C, 200 atm) together with a CO2 fixation reagent Ca(OH)2 inside a closed metallic tube reactor (7cm3). Product gas mainly consisted of hydrogen gas and a little methane gas except YRDF. As a whole, gas generated more in order ASR, YRDF, and RDF. Addition of catalysis NaOH or KOH made product gas increase more. KOH was more effective to product gas than NaOH. X-ray diffraction followed that Ca(OH)2 and CaCO3 existed mainly in residues after reaction tests with a CO2 fixation reagent Ca(OH)2 or CaO. Therefore, it was supposed that an overall chemical reaction took place as shown below. BOF steelmaking slag for CO2 fixation provided maximum gas generation 1.42 times as much as molar carbon in a RDF sample with KOH. C + H2O + Ca(OH)2 = CaCO3 + 2H2 Two kinds of wastes from integrated steel mills (sludge from mill scale and activated sludge) were each reacted with supercritical water (600-650°C, 200 atm). Both sludges were effective to generate hydrogenous gas. It was found that harmful cyan in the latter sludge mostly decomposed after reaction. Also, the crushing strength after curing the steelmaking slag bearing residue briquette was not as high as that from Portland cement.

  9. The Glyoxal Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.; Negron, Alexandra Rodriguez; Stephens, Jessica; Stauffer, Rebecca; Furrow, Stanley D.

    2007-01-01

    Research on the glyoxal clock reaction has led to adaptation of the clock reaction to a general chemistry experiment. This particular reaction is just one of many that used formaldehyde in the past. The kinetics of the glyoxal clock makes the reaction suitable as a general chemistry lab using a Calculator Based Laboratory (CBL) or a LabPro. The…

  10. Practice Gaps: Drug Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wolverton, Stephen E

    2016-07-01

    The term "drug reactions" is relevant to dermatology in three categories of reactions: cutaneous drug reactions without systemic features, cutaneous drug reactions with systemic features, and systemic drugs prescribed by the dermatologist with systematic adverse effects. This article uses examples from each of these categories to illustrate several important principles central to drug reaction diagnosis and management. The information presented will help clinicians attain the highest possible level of certainty before making clinical decisions. PMID:27363888

  11. Characterization of basin concrete in support of structural integrity demonstration for extended storage

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.

    2014-09-30

    Concrete core samples from C basin were characterized through material testing and analysis to verify the design inputs for structural analysis of the L Basin and to evaluate the type and extent of changes in the material condition of the concrete under extended service for fuel storage. To avoid the impact on operations, core samples were not collected from L area, but rather, several concrete core samples were taken from the C Basin prior to its closure. C basin was selected due to its similar environmental exposure and service history compared to L Basin. The microstructure and chemical composition of the concrete exposed to the water was profiled from the water surface into the wall to evaluate the impact and extent of exposure. No significant leaching of concrete components was observed. Ingress of carbonation or deleterious species was determined to be insignificant. No evidence of alkali-silica reactions (ASR) was observed. Ettringite was observed to form throughout the structure (in air voids or pores); however, the sulfur content was measured to be consistent with the initial concrete that was used to construct the facility. Similar ettringite trends were observed in the interior segments of the core samples. The compressive strength of the concrete at the mid-wall of the basin was measured, and similar microstructural analysis was conducted on these materials post compression testing. The microstructure was determined to be similar to near-surface segments of the core samples. The average strength was 4148 psi, which is well-above the design strength of 2500 psi. The analyses showed that phase alterations and minor cracking in a microstructure did not affect the design specification for the concrete.

  12. Electronic, optical properties and chemical bonding in six novel 1111-like chalcogenide fluorides AMChF (A=Sr, Ba; M=Cu, Ag; and Ch=S, Se, Te) from first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bannikov, V.V.; Shein, I.R.; Ivanovskii, A.L.

    2012-12-15

    Employing first-principles band structure calculations, we have examined the electronic, optical properties and the peculiarities of the chemical bonding for six newly synthesized layered quaternary 1111-like chalcogenide fluorides SrAgSF, SrAgSeF, SrAgTeF, BaAgSF, BaAgSeF, and SrCuTeF, which are discussed in comparison with some isostructural 1111-like chalcogenide oxides. We found that all of the studied phases AMChF (A=Sr, Ba; M=Cu, Ag; and Ch=S, Se, Te) are semiconductors for which the fitted 'experimental' gaps lie in the interval from 2.23 eV (for SrAgSeF) to 3.07 eV (for SrCuTeF). The near-Fermi states of AMChF are formed exclusively by the valence orbitals of the atoms from the blocks (MCh); thus, these phases belong to the layered materials with 'natural multiple quantum wells'. The bonding in these new AMChF phases is described as a high-anisotropic mixture of ionic and covalent contributions, where ionic M-Ch bonds together with covalent M-Ch and Ch-Ch bonds take place inside blocks (MCh), while inside blocks (AF) and between the adjacent blocks (MCh)/(AF) mainly ionic bonds emerge. - Graphical Abstract: Isoelectronic surface for SrAgSeF and atomic-resolved densities of states for SrAgTeF, and SrCuTeF. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Very recently six new layered 1111-like chalcogenide fluorides AMChF were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electronic, optical properties for AMChF phases were examined from first principles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All these materials are characterized as non-magnetic semiconductors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bonding is highly anisotropic and includes ionic and covalent contributions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Introduction of magnetic ions in AMChF is proposed for search of novel magnetic materials.

  13. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  14. Continuous detonation reaction engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, O. H.; Stein, R. J.; Tubbs, H. E.

    1968-01-01

    Reaction engine operates on the principles of a controlled condensed detonation rather than on the principles of gas expansion. The detonation results in reaction products that are expelled at a much higher velocity.

  15. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  16. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction can be provoked by skin contact with poison plants, chemicals and animal scratches, as well as by ... dust, nuts and shellfish, may also cause allergic reaction. Medications such as penicillin and other antibiotics are ...

  17. Microscale Thermite Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnaiz, Francisco J.; Aguado, Rafael; Arnaiz, Susana

    1998-01-01

    Describes the adaptation of thermite (aluminum with metal oxides) reactions from whole-class demonstrations to student-run micro-reactions. Lists detailed directions and possible variations of the experiment. (WRM)

  18. Reaction coordinates for electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rasaiah, Jayendran C.; Zhu Jianjun

    2008-12-07

    The polarization fluctuation and energy gap formulations of the reaction coordinate for outer sphere electron transfer are linearly related to the constant energy constraint Lagrangian multiplier m in Marcus' theory of electron transfer. The quadratic dependence of the free energies of the reactant and product intermediates on m and m+1, respectively, leads to similar dependence of the free energies on the reaction coordinates and to the same dependence of the activation energy on the reorganization energy and the standard reaction free energy. Within the approximations of a continuum model of the solvent and linear response of the longitudinal polarization to the electric field in Marcus' theory, both formulations of the reaction coordinate are expected to lead to the same results.

  19. Catalytic diastereoselective petasis reactions.

    PubMed

    Muncipinto, Giovanni; Moquist, Philip N; Schreiber, Stuart L; Schaus, Scott E

    2011-08-22

    Multicomponent Petasis reactions: the first diastereoselective Petasis reaction catalyzed by chiral biphenols that enables the synthesis of syn and anti β-amino alcohols in pure form has been developed. The reaction exploits a multicomponent approach that involves boronates, α-hydroxy aldehydes, and amines. PMID:21751322

  20. Reaction efficiency effects on binary chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaridis, Filippos; Savara, Aditya; Argyrakis, Panos

    2014-09-01

    We study the effect of the variation of reaction efficiency in binary reactions. We use the well-known A + B → 0 model, which has been extensively studied in the past. We perform simulations on this model where we vary the efficiency of reaction, i.e., when two particles meet they do not instantly react, as has been assumed in previous studies, but they react with a probability γ, where γ is in the range 0 < γ < 1. Our results show that at small γ values the system is reaction limited, but as γ increases it crosses over to a diffusion limited behavior. At early times, for small γ values, the particle density falls slower than for larger γ values. This fall-off goes over a crossover point, around the value of γ = 0.50 for high initial densities. Under a variety of conditions simulated, we find that the crossover point was dependent on the initial concentration but not on the lattice size. For intermediate and long times simulations, all γ values (in the depleted reciprocal density versus time plot) converge to the same behavior. These theoretical results are useful in models of epidemic reactions and epidemic spreading, where a contagion from one neighbor to the next is not always successful but proceeds with a certain probability, an analogous effect with the reaction probability examined in the current work.

  1. Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; Bhatty, J.L.; Mishulovich, A.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. These residues are composed largely of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. Since the residues are used as an integral component of the cement and not just as additives to concrete, larger amounts of the residues can be utilized. The process uses submerged combustion to melt blends of coal combustion residues with lime, clay, and/or sand. The submerged combustion melter utilizes natural gas-oxidant firing directly into a molten bath to provide efficient melting of mineral-like materials. Use of this melter for cement production has many advantages over rotary kilns including very little, if any, grinding of the feed material, very low emissions, and compact size. During the first year of the program, samples of coal combustion residues were blended and mixed, as needed; with lime, clay, and/or sand to adjust the composition. Six mixtures, three with fly ash and three with bottom ash, were melted in a laboratory-scale furnace. The resultant products were used in mortar cubes and bars which were subjected to ASTM standard tests of cementitious properties. In the hydraulic activity test, mortar cubes were found to have a strength comparable to standard mortar cements. In the compressive strength test, mortar cubes were found to have strengths that exceeded ASTM blended cement performance specifications. In the ASR expansion test, mortar bars were subjected to alkali-silica reaction-induced expansion, which is a problem for siliceous aggregate-based concretes that are exposed to moisture. The mortar bars made with the products inhibited 85 to 97% of this expansion. These results show that residue-based products have an excellent potential as ASR-preventing additions in concretes.

  2. Anaphylactic reactions to cinoxacin.

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, B. H.; Slagboom, G.; Demaeseneer, R.; Slootmaekers, V.; Thijs, I.; Olsson, S.

    1988-01-01

    During 1981 to mid-1988 three cases of anaphylactic shock after treatment with the quinolone derivative cinoxacin were reviewed by the Netherlands Centre for Monitoring of Adverse Reactions to Drugs and 17 cases of an anaphylactic type of reaction notified to the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for International Drug Monitoring. In five out of six patients for whom data were available the reaction began shortly after taking a single capsule of a second or next course of treatment. Cinoxacin is related to nalidixic acid, and one patient previously treated with that agent subsequently had an anaphylactoid reaction to cinoxacin and later developed a skin reaction to nalidixic acid. There were no deaths, and patients treated as an emergency with plasma expanders or with adrenaline and corticosteroids generally recovered promptly and uneventfully. In view of the potentially fatal consequences of anaphylactic reactions to cinoxacin and other quinolones doctors should take care when prescribing these drugs. PMID:3147004

  3. Reactions to radiocontrast media.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sandra J; Wong, Johnson T; Bloch, Kurt J

    2002-01-01

    Adverse reactions to radiocontrast media (RCM) occur unexpectedly and may be life-threatening. This article describes an anaphylactoid reaction (AR) in one patient. The term AR refers to a syndrome clinically similar to anaphylaxis, but these reactions are independent of immunoglobulin E antibody-mediated mast cell or basophil degranulation. This article briefly reviews the literature regarding RCMs and types of reactions to RCM. The risk factors for AR to RCM infusions will be discussed along with current concepts of the pathogenesis of RCM-induced ARs. This article also describes the therapeutic management of patients who have had a previous adverse reaction to RCM and provides an approach to patients who have breakthrough reactions despite adequate premedication, but require additional radiographic studies. PMID:12476546

  4. Noncanonical Reactions of Flavoenzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sobrado, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes containing flavin cofactors are predominantly involved in redox reactions in numerous cellular processes where the protein environment modulates the chemical reactivity of the flavin to either transfer one or two electrons. Some flavoenzymes catalyze reactions with no net redox change. In these reactions, the protein environment modulates the reactivity of the flavin to perform novel chemistries. Recent mechanistic and structural data supporting novel flavin functionalities in reactions catalyzed by chorismate synthase, type II isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase, UDP-galactopyranose mutase, and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase are presented in this review. In these enzymes, the flavin plays either a direct role in acid/base reactions or as a nucleophile or electrophile. In addition, the flavin cofactor is proposed to function as a “molecular scaffold” in the formation of UDP-galactofuranose and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate by forming a covalent adduct with reaction intermediates. PMID:23203060

  5. Mechanisms in Knockout Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, D.; Charity, R. J.; de Souza, R. T.; Famiano, M. A.; Gade, A.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Hudan, S.; Lee, J.; Lukyanov, S.; Lynch, W. G.; McDaniel, S.; Mocko, M.; Obertelli, A.; Rogers, A. M.; Sobotka, L. G.; Terry, J. R.; Tostevin, J. A.; Tsang, M. B.; Wallace, M. S.

    2009-06-01

    We report the first detailed study of the relative importance of the stripping and diffraction mechanisms involved in nucleon knockout reactions, by the use of a coincidence measurement of the residue and fast proton following one-proton knockout reactions. The measurements used the S800 spectrograph in combination with the HiRA detector array at the NSCL. Results for the reactions Be9(C9,B8+X)Y and Be9(B8,Be7+X)Y are presented and compared with theoretical predictions for the two reaction mechanisms calculated using the eikonal model. The data show a clear distinction between the stripping and diffraction mechanisms and the measured relative proportions are very well reproduced by the reaction theory. This agreement adds support to the results of knockout reaction analyses and their applications to the spectroscopy of rare isotopes.

  6. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M. Allen; Beeman, Barton V.; Benett, William J.; Hadley, Dean R.; Landre, Phoebe; Lehew, Stacy L.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  7. Metal-mullite reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Loehman, R.E.; Tomsia, A.P.

    1993-11-01

    Mullite was reacted with pure Al and with Ti or Zr dissolved in Ag-Cu eutectic alloys at 1100 C in Ar. Analysis of the Ti and Zr-containing specimens showed reaction zones with compositions of Ti{sub 50}Cu{sub 3O}O{sub 20} and ZrO{sub 2}, respectively. The Al-mullite specimen showed much more extensive penetration into the ceramic and a more diffuse reaction zone than the other two systems. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Si were the main reaction products for Al-mullite reaction.

  8. A thermodynamic and kinetic model for paste–aggregate interactions and the alkali–silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, George D. Carey, J. William

    2015-10-15

    A new conceptual model is developed for ASR formation based on geochemical principles tied to aqueous speciation, silica solubility, kinetically controlled mineral dissolution, and diffusion. ASR development is driven largely by pH and silica gradients that establish geochemical microenvironments between paste and aggregate, with gradients the strongest within the aggregate adjacent to the paste boundary (i.e., where ASR initially forms). Super-saturation of magadiite and okenite (crystalline ASR surrogates) occurs in the zone defined by gradients in pH, dissolved silica, Na{sup +}, and Ca{sup 2} {sup +}. This model provides a thermodynamic rather than kinetic explanation of why quartz generally behaves differently from amorphous silica: quartz solubility does not produce sufficiently high concentrations of H{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} to super-saturate magadiite, whereas amorphous silica does. The model also explains why pozzolans do not generate ASR: their fine-grained character precludes formation of chemical gradients. Finally, these gradients have interesting implications beyond the development of ASR, creating unique biogeochemical environments.

  9. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  10. Chemical Reaction Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veal, William

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the role of chemical-equation problem solving in helping students predict reaction products. Methods for helping students learn this process must be taught to students and future teachers by using pedagogical skills within the content of chemistry. Emphasizes that solving chemical reactions should involve creative cognition where…

  11. Applications of Reaction Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  12. REUSABLE REACTION VESSEL

    DOEpatents

    Soine, T.S.

    1963-02-26

    This patent shows a reusable reaction vessel for such high temperature reactions as the reduction of actinide metal chlorides by calcium metal. The vessel consists of an outer metal shell, an inner container of refractory material such as sintered magnesia, and between these, a bed of loose refractory material impregnated with thermally conductive inorganic salts. (AEC)

  13. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Degradations and Rearrangement Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianbo

    This section deals with recent reports concerning degradation and rearrangement reactions of free sugars as well as some glycosides. The transformations are classified in chemical and enzymatic ways. In addition, the Maillard reaction will be discussed as an example of degradation and rearrangement transformation and its application in current research in the fields of chemistry and biology.

  15. Oscillating Reactions: Two Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruševski, Vladimir M.; Stojanovska, Marina I.; Šoptrajanov, Bojan T.

    2007-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions are truly spectacular phenomena, and demonstrations are always appreciated by the class. However, explaining such reactions to high school or first-year university students is problematic, because it may seem that no acceptable explanation is possible unless the students have profound knowledge of both physical…

  16. Clock Reaction: Outreach Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Yuen-ying; Phillips, Heather A.; Jakubinek, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry students are often introduced to the concept of reaction rates through demonstrations or laboratory activities involving the well-known iodine clock reaction. For example, a laboratory experiment involving thiosulfate as an iodine scavenger is part of the first-year general chemistry laboratory curriculum at Dalhousie University. With…

  17. Chemical burn or reaction

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000059.htm Chemical burn or reaction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chemicals that touch skin can lead to a reaction on the skin, throughout the body, or both. ...

  18. Lipases in lipophilization reactions.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Lipases are used in various sectors, as pharmaceutical, food or detergency industry. Their advantage versus classical chemical catalysts is that they exhibit a better selectivity and operate in milder reaction conditions. Theses enzymes can also be used in lipophilization reactions corresponding to the grafting of a lipophilic moiety to a hydrophilic one such as sugar, amino acids and proteins, or phenolic compounds. The major difficulty to overcome in such enzyme-catalyzed reaction resides in the fact that the two involved substrates greatly differ in term of polarity and solvent affinity. Therefore, several key parameters are to be considered in order to achieve the reaction in satisfactory kinetics and yields. The present review discusses the nature of such parameters (eg solvent nature, water activity, chemical modification of substrates) and illustrates their effect with examples of lipase-catalyzed lipophilization reactions of various sugar, amino acids or phenolic derivatives. PMID:17681737

  19. Mineralogy, geochemistry and expansion testing of an alkali-reactive basalt from western Anatolia, Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Copuroglu, Oguzhan; Andic-Cakir, Ozge; Broekmans, Maarten A.T.M.; Kuehnel, Radko

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, the alkali-silica reaction performance of a basalt rock from western Anatolia, Turkey is reported. It is observed that the rock causes severe gel formation in the concrete microbar test. It appears that the main source of expansion is the reactive glassy phase of the basalt matrix having approximately 70% of SiO{sub 2}. The study presents the microstructural characteristics of unreacted and reacted basalt aggregate by optical and electron microscopy and discusses the possible reaction mechanism. Microstructural analysis revealed that the dissolution of silica is overwhelming in the matrix of the basalt and it eventually generates four consequences: (1) Formation of alkali-silica reaction gel at the aggregate perimeter, (2) increased porosity and permeability of the basalt matrix, (3) reduction of mechanical properties of the aggregate and (4) additional gel formation within the aggregate. It is concluded that the basalt rock is highly prone to alkali-silica reaction. As an aggregate, this rock is not suitable for concrete production.

  20. Enhancing chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  1. Reactions of oriented molecules.

    PubMed

    Brooks, P R

    1976-07-01

    Beams of oriented molecules have been used to directly study geometrical requirements in chemical reactions. These studies have shown that reactivity is much greater in some orientations than others and demonstrated the existence of steric effects. For some reactions portions of the orientation results are in good accord with traditional views of steric hindrance, but for others it is clear that our chemical intuition needs recalibrating. Indeed, the information gained from simultaneously orienting the reactants and observing the scattering angle of the products may lead to new insights about the detailed mechanism of certain reactions. Further work must be done to extend the scope and detail of the studies described here. More detailed information is needed on the CH(3)I reaction and the CF(3)I reaction. The effects of alkyl groups of various sizes and alkali metals of various sizes are of interest. In addition, reactions where a long-lived complex is formed should be studied to see if orientation is important. Finally, it would be of interest to apply the technique to the sort of reactions that led to our interest in the first place: the S(N)2 displacements in alkyl halides where the fascinating Walden inversion occurs. PMID:17793988

  2. Mechanisms in knockout reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, D.; Charity, R. J.; de Souza, R. T.; Famiano, M. A.; Gade, A.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Hudan, S.; Lee, J.; Lukyanov, S.; Lynch, W. G.; McDaniel, S.; Mocko, M.; Obertelli, A.; Rogers, A. M.; Sobotka, L. G.; Terry, J. R.; Tostevin, J. A.; Tsang, M. B.; Wallace, M. S.

    2009-10-01

    We report on the first detailed study of the mechanisms involved in knockout reactions, via a coincidence measurement of the residue and fast proton in one-proton knockout reactions, using the S800 spectrograph in combination with the HiRA detector array at the NSCL. Results on the reactions ^9Be(^9C,^8B+X)Y and ^9Be(^8B,^7Be+X)Y are presented. They are compared with theoretical predictions for both the diffraction (elastic breakup) and stripping (inelastic breakup) reaction mechanisms, as calculated in the eikonal model. The data shows a clear distinction between the two reaction mechanisms, and the observed respective proportions are very well reproduced by the reaction theory. This agreement supports the results of knockout reaction analyses and their applications to the spectroscopy of rare isotopes. In particular, this add considerable support to the use of the eikonal model as a quantitative tool, able, for example, to determine single-particle spectroscopic strengths in rare isotopes.

  3. Hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Vatti, Rani R; Ali, Fatima; Teuber, Suzanne; Chang, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric

    2014-08-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids (CS) are rare in the general population, but they are not uncommon in high-risk groups such as patients who receive repeated doses of CS. Hypersensitivity reactions to steroids are broadly divided into two categories: immediate reactions, typically occurring within 1 h of drug administration, and non-immediate reactions, which manifest more than an hour after drug administration. The latter group is more common. We reviewed the literature using the search terms "hypersensitivity to steroids, adverse effects of steroids, steroid allergy, allergic contact dermatitis, corticosteroid side effects, and type I hypersensitivity" to identify studies or clinical reports of steroid hypersensitivity. We discuss the prevalence, mechanism, presentation, evaluation, and therapeutic options in corticosteroid hypersensitivity reactions. There is a paucity of literature on corticosteroid allergy, with most reports being case reports. Most reports involve non-systemic application of corticosteroids. Steroid hypersensitivity has been associated with type I IgE-mediated allergy including anaphylaxis. The overall prevalence of type I steroid hypersensitivity is estimated to be 0.3-0.5%. Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is the most commonly reported non-immediate hypersensitivity reaction and usually follows topical CS application. Atopic dermatitis and stasis dermatitis of the lower extremities are risk factors for the development of ACD from topical CS. Patients can also develop hypersensitivity reactions to nasal, inhaled, oral, and parenteral CS. A close and detailed evaluation is required for the clinician to confirm the presence of a true hypersensitivity reaction to the suspected drug and choose the safest alternative. Choosing an alternative CS is not only paramount to the patient's safety but also ameliorates the worry of developing an allergic, and potentially fatal, steroid hypersensitivity reaction. This evaluation becomes

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1963-09-01

    A nuclear reactor system is described for breeding fissionable material, including a heat-exchange tank, a high- and a low-pressure chamber therein, heat- exchange tubes connecting these chambers, a solution of U/sup 233/ in heavy water in a reaction container within the tank, a slurry of thorium dioxide in heavy water in a second container surrounding the first container, an inlet conduit including a pump connecting the low pressure chamber to the reaction container, an outlet conduit connecting the high pressure chamber to the reaction container, and means of removing gaseous fission products released in both chambers. (AEC)

  5. Catalysis in reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Gopalkrishnan, Manoj

    2011-12-01

    We define catalytic networks as chemical reaction networks with an essentially catalytic reaction pathway: one which is "on" in the presence of certain catalysts and "off" in their absence. We show that examples of catalytic networks include synthetic DNA molecular circuits that have been shown to perform signal amplification and molecular logic. Recall that a critical siphon is a subset of the species in a chemical reaction network whose absence is forward invariant and stoichiometrically compatible with a positive point. Our main theorem is that all weakly-reversible networks with critical siphons are catalytic. Consequently, we obtain new proofs for the persistence of atomic event-systems of Adleman et al., and normal networks of Gnacadja. We define autocatalytic networks, and conjecture that a weakly-reversible reaction network has critical siphons if and only if it is autocatalytic. PMID:21503834

  6. Chemisorption And Precipitation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport and bioavailability of chemical components within soils is, in part, controlled by partitioning between solids and solution. General terms used to describe these partitioning reactions include chemisorption and precipitation. Chemisorption is inclusive of the suit...

  7. An Illuminating Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of carbide lights as an excellent mechanism for introducing or reviewing many basic chemistry concepts including elements and compounds, endothermic and exothermic reactions, physical and chemical changes, and balancing chemical equations. (JRH)

  8. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  9. Iodine Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Richard S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a combination of solutions that can be used in the study of kinetics using the iodine clock reaction. The combination slows down degradation of the prepared solutions and can be used successfully for several weeks. (JRH)

  10. Untoward penicillin reactions

    PubMed Central

    Guthe, T.; Idsöe, O.; Willcox, R. R.

    1958-01-01

    The literature on untoward reactions following the administration of penicillin is reviewed. These reactions, including a certain number of deaths which have been reported, are of particular interest to health administrations and to WHO in view of the large-scale programmes for controlling the treponematoses which are now under way—programmes affecting millions of people in many parts of the world. The most serious problems are anaphylactic sensitivity phenomena and superinfection or cross-infection with penicillin-resistant organisms, and the reactions involved range in intensity from the mildest to the fatal; the incidence of the latter is estimated at 0.1-0.3 per million injections. The authors point out that with increasing use of penicillin, more persons are likely to become sensitized and the number of reactions can therefore be expected to rise. The best prevention against such an increase is the restriction of the unnecessary use of penicillin. PMID:13596877

  11. Adverse reactions to sulfites

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William H.; Purchase, Emerson C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfites are widely used as preservatives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In the United States more than 250 cases of sulfite-related adverse reactions, including anaphylactic shock, asthmatic attacks, urticaria and angioedema, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, seizures and death, have been reported, including 6 deaths allegedly associated with restaurant food containing sulfites. In Canada 10 sulfite-related adverse reactions have been documented, and 1 death suspected to be sulfite-related has occurred. The exact mechanism of sulfite-induced reactions is unknown. Practising physicians should be aware of the clinical manifestations of sulfite-related adverse reactions as well as which foods and pharmaceuticals contain sulfites. Cases should be reported to health officials and proper advice given to the victims to prevent further exposure to sulfites. The food industry, including beer and wine manufacturers, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider using alternative preservatives. In the interim, they should list any sulfites in their products. PMID:4052897

  12. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Hearn, Dennis; Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  13. Autocatalysis in reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Gopalkrishnan, Manoj

    2014-10-01

    The persistence conjecture is a long-standing open problem in chemical reaction network theory. It concerns the behavior of solutions to coupled ODE systems that arise from applying mass-action kinetics to a network of chemical reactions. The idea is that if all reactions are reversible in a weak sense, then no species can go extinct. A notion that has been found useful in thinking about persistence is that of "critical siphon." We explore the combinatorics of critical siphons, with a view toward the persistence conjecture. We introduce the notions of "drainable" and "self-replicable" (or autocatalytic) siphons. We show that: Every minimal critical siphon is either drainable or self-replicable; reaction networks without drainable siphons are persistent; and nonautocatalytic weakly reversible networks are persistent. Our results clarify that the difficulties in proving the persistence conjecture are essentially due to competition between drainable and self-replicable siphons. PMID:25245394

  14. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  15. Jets in hadronic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Paige, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental data on the properties of jets in hadronic reactions are reviewed and compared with theoretical expectations. Jets are clearly established as the dominant process for high E/sub T/ events in hadronic reactions. The cross section and the other properties of these events are in qualitative and even semiquantitative agreement with expectations based on perturbative QCD. However, we can not yet make precise tests of QCD, primarily because there are substantial uncertainties in the theoretical calculations. 45 references. (WHK)

  16. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions. PMID:25458866

  17. Immediate reaction to clarithromycin.

    PubMed

    Gangemi, S; Ricciardi, L; Fedele, R; Isola, S; Purello-D'Ambrosio, F

    2001-01-01

    We present the case of bronchospastic reaction to clarithromycin had during a drug challenge test. Personal allergic history was negative for respiratory allergies and positive for adverse drug reactions to general and regional anesthesia and to ceftriaxone. After the administration of 1/4 of therapeutic dose of clarithromycin the patient showed dyspnea, cough and bronchospasm in all the lung fields. The positivity of the test was confirmed by the negativity to the administration of placebo. The quickness and the clinical characteristic of the adverse reaction suggest a pathogenic mechanism of immediate-type hypersensitivity. On reviewing the literature we have found no reports of bronchospastic reaction to clarithromycin. Macrolides are a class of antibiotics mainly used in the last years in place of beta-lactams because of a broad spectrum of action and a low allergic power. In fact, there are few reports on allergic reactions to these molecules. Clarithromycin is one of the latest macrolides, characterised by the presence of a 14-carbon-atom lactone ring as erythromycin, active on a wide spectrum of pathogens. PMID:11449533

  18. Find favorable reactions faster

    SciTech Connect

    Yaws, C.L.; Chiang, P.Y. )

    1988-11-01

    Now, equations are given to identify whether the reactions are thermodynamically favorable. The method uses Gibbs free energy of formation for the reactants and products. The equation for any 700 major organic compounds is given as temperature coefficients. Then the reaction can be tested at various temperature levels beyond the standard 298/sup 0/K conditions imposed by many other data tabulations. Data for the water and hydrogen chloride are also included. Gibbs free energy of formation of ideal gas (..delta..G/sub f/, jkoule/g-mol) is calculated from the tabulated coefficients (A, B, C) and the temperature (T, /sup 0/K) using the following equation: (1) ..delta..G/sub f/ = A + BT + CT/sup 2/. Chemical equilibrium for a reaction is associated with the change in Gibbs free energy (..delta..G/sub r/) calculated as follows: (2) ..delta..G/sub r/ = ..delta..G/sub f/, products - ..delta..G/sub f/, reactants. If the change in Gibbs free energy is negative, the thermodynamics for the reaction are favorable. On the other hand, if the change in Gibbs free energy is highly positive, the thermodynamics for the reaction are not favorable and may be feasible only under special circumstances.

  19. Nanoparticle Reactions on Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J. M.; Kirner, Th.; Wagner, J.; Csáki, A.; Möller, R.; Fritzsche, W.

    The handling of heterogenous systems in micro reactors is difficult due to their adhesion and transport behaviour. Therefore, the formation of precipitates and gas bubbles has to be avoided in micro reaction technology, in most cases. But, micro channels and other micro reactors offer interesting possibilities for the control of reaction conditions and transport by diffusion and convection due to the laminar flow caused by small Reynolds numbers. This can be used for the preparation and modification of objects, which are much smaller than the cross section of microchannels. The formation of colloidal solutions and the change of surface states of nano particles are two important tasks for the application of chip reactors in nanoparticle technology. Some concepts for the preparation and reaction of nanoparticles in modular chip reactor arrangements will be discussed.

  20. Hipersensitivity Reactions to Corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Berbegal, L; DeLeon, F J; Silvestre, J F

    2016-03-01

    Corticosteroids are widely used drugs in the clinical practice, especially by topic application in dermatology. These substances may act as allergens and produce immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions. Allergic contact dermatitis is the most frequent presentation of corticosteroid allergy and it should be studied by patch testing in specific units. The corticosteroids included in the Spanish standard battery are good markers but not ideal. Therefore, if those makers are positive, it is useful to apply a specific battery of corticosteroids and the drugs provided by patients. Immediate reactions are relatively rare but potentially severe, and it is important to confirm the sensitization profile and to guide the use of alternative corticosteroids, because they are often necessary in several diseases. In this article we review the main concepts regarding these two types of hypersensitivity reactions in corticosteroid allergy, as well as their approach in the clinical practice. PMID:26621334

  1. Cutaneous reactions to vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Adena E; Stein, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinations are important for infectious disease prevention; however, there are adverse effects of vaccines, many of which are cutaneous. Some of these reactions are due to nonspecific inflammation and irritation at the injection site, whereas other reactions are directly related to the live attenuated virus. Rarely, vaccinations have been associated with generalized hypersensitivity reactions, such as erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, urticaria, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and drug hypersensitivity syndrome. The onset of certain inflammatory dermatologic conditions, such as lichen planus, granuloma annulare, and pemphigoid, were reported to occur shortly after vaccine administration. Allergic contact dermatitis can develop at the injection site, typically due to adjuvant ingredients in the vaccine, such as thimerosal and aluminum. Vaccinations are important to promote development of both individual and herd immunity. Although most vaccinations are considered relatively safe, there may be adverse effects associated with any vaccine. Cutaneous manifestations make up a large portion of the types of reactions associated with vaccines. There are many different reasons for the development of a cutaneous reaction to a vaccination. Some are directly related to the injection of a live attenuated virus, such as varicella or vaccinia (for immunity to smallpox), whereas others cause more nonspecific erythema and swelling at the injection site, as a result of local inflammation or irritation. Vaccinations have also been associated in rare reports with generalized hypersensitivity reactions, such as erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, urticaria, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and drug hypersensitivity syndrome. There have been case reports associating the administration of a vaccine with the new onset of a dermatologic condition, such as lichen planus, granuloma annulare, and Sweet syndrome. Finally, allergic contact

  2. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  3. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  4. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  5. Dolomite Dissolution in Alkaline Cementious Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittermayr, Florian; Klammer, Dietmar; Köhler, Stephan; Dietzel, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Chemical alteration of concrete has gained much attention over the past years as many cases of deterioration due to sulphate attack, thaumasite formation (TSA) or alkali silica reactions (ASR) have been reported in various constructions (Schmidt et al, 2009). Much less is known about the so called alkali carbonate reaction (ACR). It is believed that dolomite aggregates can react with the alkalis from the cement, dissolve and form calcite and brucite (Katayama, 2004). Due to very low solubility of dolomite in alkaline solutions this reaction seems doubtful. In this study we are trying to gain new insides about the conditions that can lead to the dissolution of dolomite in concrete. Therefore we investigated concrete samples from Austrian tunnels that show partially dissolved dolomite aggregates. Petrological analysis such as microprobe, SEM and Raman spectroscopy as well as a hydrochemical analysis of interstitial solutions and ground water and modelling with PhreeqC (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999) are carried out. In addition a series of batch experiments is set up. Modelling approaches by PhreeqC show a thermodynamically possibility in the alkaline range when additional Ca2+ in solution causes dolomite to become more and more undersaturated as calcite gets supersaturated. Interacting ground water is enriched in Ca2+and saturated with respect to gypsum as marine evaporites are found in situ rocks. Furthermore it is more likely that Portlandite (Ca(OH)2) plays a more important role than Na and K in the cement. Portlandite acts as an additional Ca2+ source and is much more abundant than the alkalies. Some interstitial solutions are dominated mainly by Na+ and SO42- and reach concentrations up to 30 g/l TDS. It is believed that solutions can even reach thenardite saturation as efflorescences are found on the tunnel walls. In consequence dolomite solubility increases with increasing ionic strength. pH > 11 further accelerate the process of dedolomitization by the removal

  6. Quinoprotein-catalysed reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, C

    1996-01-01

    This review is concerned with the structure and function of the quinoprotein enzymes, sometimes called quinoenzymes. These have prosthetic groups containing quinones, the name thus being analogous to the flavoproteins containing flavin prosthetic groups. Pyrrolo-quinoline quinone (PQQ) is non-covalently attached, whereas tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ), topaquinone (TPQ) and lysine tyrosylquinone (LTQ) are derived from amino acid residues in the backbone of the enzymes. The mechanisms of the quinoproteins are reviewed and related to their recently determined three-dimensional structures. As expected, the quinone structures in the prosthetic groups play important roles in the mechanisms. A second common feature is the presence of a catalytic base (aspartate) at the active site which initiates the reactions by abstracting a proton from the substrate, and it is likely to be involved in multiple reactions in the mechanism. A third common feature of these enzymes is that the first part of the reaction produces a reduced prosthetic group; this part of the mechanism is fairly well understood. This is followed by an oxidative phase involving electron transfer reactions which remain poorly understood. In both types of dehydrogenase (containing PQQ and TTQ), electrons must pass from the reduced prosthetic group to redox centres in a second recipient protein (or protein domain), whereas in amine oxidases (containing TPQ or LTQ), electrons must be transferred to molecular oxygen by way of a redox-active copper ion in the protein. PMID:9003352

  7. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  8. Exocharmic Reactions up Close

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramette, R. W.

    2007-01-01

    The exocharmic reactions that can be observed microscopically are discussed. The students can discover the optimal concentration of an acidic lead nitrate solution, so that a crystal of potassium iodide, nudged to the edge of a drop, results in glinting golden hexagons of lead iodide.

  9. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Henderson and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-04-14

    Chemical reactions at surfaces underlie some of the most important processes of today, including catalysis, energy conversion, microelectronics, human health and the environment. Understanding surface chemical reactions at a fundamental level is at the core of the field of surface science. The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is one of the premiere meetings in the field. The program this year will cover a broad range of topics, including heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry, surfaces in environmental chemistry and energy conversion, reactions at the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interface, electronic materials growth and surface modification, biological interfaces, and electrons and photons at surfaces. An exciting program is planned, with contributions from outstanding speakers and discussion leaders from the international scientific community. The conference provides a dynamic environment with ample time for discussion and interaction. Attendees are encouraged to present posters; the poster sessions are historically well attended and stimulate additional discussions. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for junior researchers (e.g. graduate students or postdocs) to present their work and interact with established leaders in the field.

  10. Radiobiology of tissue reactions.

    PubMed

    Dörr, W

    2015-06-01

    Tissue effects of radiation exposure are observed in virtually all normal tissues, with interactions when several organs are involved. Early reactions occur in turnover tissues, where proliferative impairment results in hypoplasia; late reactions, based on combined parenchymal, vascular, and connective tissue changes, result in loss of function within the exposed volume; consequential late effects develop through interactions between early and late effects in the same organ; and very late effects are dominated by vascular sequelae. Invariably, involvement of the immune system is observed. Importantly, latent times of late effects are inversely dependent on the biologically equieffective dose. Each tissue component and--importantly--each individual symptom/endpoint displays a specific dose-effect relationship. Equieffective doses are modulated by exposure conditions: in particular, dose-rate reduction--down to chronic levels--and dose fractionation impact on late responding tissues, while overall exposure time predominantly affects early (and consequential late) reactions. Consequences of partial organ exposure are related to tissue architecture. In 'tubular' organs (gastrointestinal tract, but also vasculature), punctual exposure affects function in downstream compartments. In 'parallel' organs, such as liver or lungs, only exposure of a significant (organ-dependent) fraction of the total volume results in clinical consequences. Forthcoming studies must address biomarkers of the individual risk for tissue reactions, and strategies to prevent/mitigate tissue effects after exposure. PMID:25816259

  11. Reaction and Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armento, Beverly J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Provides a reaction by three economic educators to an article by Raymond C. Miller calling for the elimination of economics. Contends that traditional economics does not necessarily lead to the degradation of the environment. Argues that economics should not promote any set of social values. (CFR)

  12. A Principal's Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaretsky, Lindy

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a principal's reaction to Catherine Marshall and Michael Ward's article on research on social justice and training for leadership. The author applauds Marshall and Ward's efforts to address what is undoubtedly among the most fundamentally important issues facing principals today. Marshall and Ward illuminate the importance of…

  13. Reaction product imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, D.W.

    1993-12-01

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  14. Reactions to Others' Intimacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeldt, David E.; Olinger, Evanelle J.

    Research using behavioral measures has indicated that men react less positively to the touch of a same sex individual than women, that both men and women react more positively to the touch of an opposite sex individual than to the touch of a same sex individual, and that men and women do not differ in their reactions to opposite sex touch. This…

  15. Polymerase chain reaction system

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Stratton, Paul L.; Hadley, Dean R.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Belgrader, Phil; Meyer, Peter L.

    2004-03-02

    A portable polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification and detection system includes one or more chamber modules. Each module supports a duplex assay of a biological sample. Each module has two parallel interrogation ports with a linear optical system. The system is capable of being handheld.

  16. A Superintendent's Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, James H.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a superintendent's reaction to Catherine Marshall and Michael Ward's article on research on social justice and training for leadership. The author states that there is a problem with Marshall and Ward's article which begins with the title, particularly with the word "training." The author contends that there is a significant…

  17. Enantioselective Vinylogous Organocascade Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, Hamish B; Dell'Amico, Luca; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Cascade reactions are powerful tools for rapidly assembling complex molecular architectures from readily available starting materials in a single synthetic operation. Their marriage with asymmetric organocatalysis has led to the development of novel techniques, which are now recognized as reliable strategies for the one-pot enantioselective synthesis of stereochemically dense molecules. In recent years, even more complex synthetic challenges have been addressed by applying the principle of vinylogy to the realm of organocascade catalysis. The key to the success of vinylogous organocascade reactions is the unique ability of the chiral organocatalyst to transfer reactivity to a distal position without losing control on the stereo-determining events. This approach has greatly expanded the synthetic horizons of the field by providing the possibility of forging multiple stereocenters in remote positions from the catalyst's point of action with high selectivity, while simultaneously constructing multiple new bonds. This article critically describes the developments achieved in the field of enantioselective vinylogous organocascade reactions, charting the ideas, the conceptual advances, and the milestone reactions that have been essential for reaching highly practical levels of synthetic efficiency. PMID:27256039

  18. Reaction Formulation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Reaction formation was studied by Sigmund Freud. This defense mechanism may be related to repression, substitution, reversal, and compensation (or over-compensation). Alfred Adler considered compensation a basic process in his individual psychology. Anna Freud discussed some defense mechanisms, and Bibring, Dwyer, Huntington, and Valenstein…

  19. Azlactone Reaction Developments.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Pedro P; Carpanez, Arthur G; Amarante, Giovanni W

    2016-07-18

    Azlactones (also known as oxazolones) are heterocycles usually employed in the stereoselective synthesis of α,α-amino acids, heterocycles and natural products. The versatility of the azlactone scaffold arises from the numerous reactive sites, allowing its application in a diversity of transformations. This review aims to cover classical and recent applications of oxazolones, especially those involving stereoselective processes. After a short introduction on their structures and intrinsic reactivities, dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) processes as well as reactions involving stereoselective formation of a new σ C-C bond, such as alkylation/allylation/arylation, aldol, ene, Michael and Mannich reactions will be exposed. Additionally, cycloadditions, Steglich rearrangement and sulfenylation reactions will also be discussed. Recent developments of the well-known Erlenmeyer azlactones will be described. For the most examples, the proposed mechanism, activation modes and/or key reaction intermediates will be exposed to rationalize both the final product and the observed stereochemistry. Finally, this review gives an overview of the synthetic utility of oxazolones. PMID:27245128

  20. Photoneutron reactions in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Varlamov, V. V. Ishkhanov, B. S.; Orlin, V. N.; Peskov, N. N.; Stopani, K. A.

    2014-12-15

    Among key problems in nuclear astrophysics, that of obtaining deeper insight into the mechanism of synthesis of chemical elements is of paramount importance. The majority of heavy elements existing in nature are produced in stars via radiative neutron capture in so-called s- and r processes, which are, respectively, slow and fast, in relation to competing β{sup −}-decay processes. At the same time, we know 35 neutron-deficient so-called bypassed p-nuclei that lie between {sup 74}Se and {sup 196}Hg and which cannot originate from the aforementioned s- and r-processes. Their production is possible in (γ, n), (γ, p), or (γ, α) photonuclear reactions. In view of this, data on photoneutron reactions play an important role in predicting and describing processes leading to the production of p-nuclei. Interest in determining cross sections for photoneutron reactions in the threshold energy region, which is of particular importance for astrophysics, has grown substantially in recent years. The use of modern sources of quasimonoenergetic photons obtained in processes of inverse Compton laser-radiation scattering on relativistic electronsmakes it possible to reveal rather interesting special features of respective cross sections, manifestations of pygmy E1 and M1 resonances, or the production of nuclei in isomeric states, on one hand, and to revisit the problem of systematic discrepancies between data on reaction cross sections from experiments of different types, on the other hand. Data obtained on the basis of our new experimental-theoretical approach to evaluating cross sections for partial photoneutron reactions are invoked in considering these problems.

  1. Water-gas shift reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    A review covers the industrial applications of the water-gas shift reaction in hydrogen manufacturing, removing CO from ammonia synthesis feeds, and detoxifying town gas; and the catalyst characteristics, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanisms of the water-gas shift reactions catalyzed by iron-based, copper-based, or sulfided cobalt-molybdenum catalysts.

  2. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Provides a collection of data on the mechanistic aspects of inorganic chemical reactions. Wherever possible includes procedures for classroom demonstration or student project work. The material covered includes gas phase reactions, reactions in solution, mechanisms of electron transfer, the reaction between iron III and iodine, and hydrolysis. (GS)

  3. What Is a Reaction Rate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Guy

    2005-01-01

    The definition of reaction rate is derived and demonstrations are made for the care to be taken while using the term. Reaction rate can be in terms of a reaction property, the extent of reaction and thus it is possible to give a definition applicable in open and closed systems.

  4. Dearomatization through Halofunctionalization Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao-Wei; Zheng, Chao; You, Shu-Li

    2016-08-16

    Recent advances in dearomatization through halofunctionalization reactions are summarized in this Minireview. Two general categories of strategies are currently employed in this field. On one hand, the reaction can be initiated with electrophilic halogenation at an alkyne or alkene moiety. The resulting halonium ion intermediate is then captured by a pendant aromatic ring at the ipso position, affording the dearomatization product. On the other hand, electrophilic halogenation can directly take place at a substituted arene, and the final dearomatization product is furnished by deprotonation or intramolecular nucleophilic trap. Highly enantioselective variants have been realized in the latter case by organocatalysis or transition metal catalysis. By applying these methods, various valuable halogenated polycyclic molecular architectures have been obtained from readily available starting materials. PMID:27377184

  5. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  6. Magnetically suspended reaction wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabnis, A. V.; Stocking, G. L.; Dendy, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Magnetic suspensions offer several advantages over conventional bearings, arising because of the contactless nature of the load support. In application to spacecraft reaction wheels, the advantages are low drag torque, wearfree, unlubricated, vacuum-compatible operation, and unlimited life. By the provision of redundancy in the control electronics, single-point failures are eliminated. The rational for selection of a passive radial, active axial, dc magnetic suspension is presented, and the relative merits of 3-loop and single-loop magnetic suspensions are discussed. The design of a .678 N-m-sec (.5 ft-lb-sec) reaction wheel using the single loop magnetic suspension was developed; the design compares favorably with current ball bearing wheels in terms of weight and power.

  7. Polymerase chain displacement reaction.

    PubMed

    Harris, Claire L; Sanchez-Vargas, Irma J; Olson, Ken E; Alphey, Luke; Fu, Guoliang

    2013-02-01

    Quantitative PCR assays are now the standard method for viral diagnostics. These assays must be specific, as well as sensitive, to detect the potentially low starting copy number of viral genomic material. We describe a new technique, polymerase chain displacement reaction (PCDR), which uses multiple nested primers in a rapid, capped, one-tube reaction that increases the sensitivity of normal quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. Sensitivity was increased by approximately 10-fold in a proof-of-principle test on dengue virus sequence. In PCDR, when extension occurs from the outer primer, it displaces the extension strand produced from the inner primer by utilizing a polymerase that has strand displacement activity. This allows a greater than 2-fold increase of amplification product for each amplification cycle and therefore increased sensitivity and speed over conventional PCR. Increased sensitivity in PCDR would be useful in nucleic acid detection for viral diagnostics. PMID:23384180

  8. Photochemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.C.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

  9. Nonhemolytic, noninfectious transfusion reactions.

    PubMed

    Barton, J C

    1981-04-01

    The delivery of optimal transfusion therapy requires that the physician first have a thorough understanding of his patient's disease and prior transfusion history. Sometimes the need for blood product administration is more apparent than real. In the selection of necessary therapy, particular blood components, their volumes, and the timing of their administration should be carefully planned. The transfusion of whole blood, particularly as single-unit transfusions, is rarely indicated. Often forgotten, autotransfusion represents a means whereby many subjects who have repeated, unusual, or severe reactions may receive safe treatment. An appreciation of the frequency and manifestations of transfusion-related problems permits effective treatment of ongoing reactions. The prophylactic measures which should be taken against future reactions in most patients are specific, and are the responsibility of the clinician, based upon his bedside observations and laboratory studies. Problems should be discussed with either a hematologist, pathologist, or blood banking expert without hesitation. These guidelines help conserve a precious resource and assure that safe, effective, and economical transfusion therapy is available for all patients in need. PMID:6164098

  10. On-surface reactions.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Robert; Kühnle, Angelika

    2015-06-01

    On-surface synthesis constitutes a rapidly growing field of research due to its promising application for creating stable molecular structures on surfaces. While self-assembled structures rely on reversible interactions, on-surface synthesis provides the potential for creating long-term stable structures with well-controlled properties, for example superior electron transport for future molecular electronic devices. On-surface synthesis holds the promise for preparing insoluble compounds that cannot be produced in solution. Another highly exciting aspect of on-surface synthesis is the chance to discover new reaction pathways due to the two-dimensional confinement of the reaction educts. In this review, we discuss the current state-of-the-art and classify the reactions that have been successfully performed so far. Special emphasis is put on electrically insulating surfaces, as these substrates pose particular challenges for on-surface synthesis while at the same time bearing high potential for future use, for example, in molecular electronics. PMID:25965579

  11. ADVERSE CUTANEOUS DRUG REACTION

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR. PMID:19967009

  12. Chemical Reactions in DSMC

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, G. A.

    2011-05-20

    DSMC simulations of chemically reacting gas flows have generally employed procedures that convert the macroscopic chemical rate equations to reaction cross-sections at the microscopic level. They therefore depend on the availability of experimental data that has been fitted to equations of the Arrhenius form. This paper presents a physical model for dissociation and recombination reactions and a phenomenological model for exchange and chain reactions. These are based on the vibrational states of the colliding molecules and do not require any experimentally-based data. The simplicity of the models allows the corresponding rate equations to be written down and, while these are not required for the implementation of the models, they facilitate their validation. The model is applied to a typical hypersonic atmospheric entry problem and the results are compared with the corresponding results from the traditional method. It is also used to investigate both spontaneous and forced ignition as well as the structure of a deflagration wave in an oxygen-hydrogen mixture.

  13. Chemical Reactions in DSMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, G. A.

    2011-05-01

    DSMC simulations of chemically reacting gas flows have generally employed procedures that convert the macroscopic chemical rate equations to reaction cross-sections at the microscopic level. They therefore depend on the availability of experimental data that has been fitted to equations of the Arrhenius form. This paper presents a physical model for dissociation and recombination reactions and a phenomenological model for exchange and chain reactions. These are based on the vibrational states of the colliding molecules and do not require any experimentally-based data. The simplicity of the models allows the corresponding rate equations to be written down and, while these are not required for the implementation of the models, they facilitate their validation. The model is applied to a typical hypersonic atmospheric entry problem and the results are compared with the corresponding results from the traditional method. It is also used to investigate both spontaneous and forced ignition as well as the structure of a deflagration wave in an oxygen-hydrogen mixture.

  14. Procedures for Decomposing a Redox Reaction into Half-Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishtik, Ilie; Berka, Ladislav H.

    2005-01-01

    A simple algorithm for a complete enumeration of the possible ways a redox reaction (RR) might be uniquely decomposed into half-reactions (HRs) using the response reactions (RERs) formalism is presented. A complete enumeration of the possible ways a RR may be decomposed into HRs is equivalent to a complete enumeration of stoichiometrically…

  15. Reaction Extrema: Extent of Reaction in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandezande, Jonathon E.; Vander Griend, Douglas A.; DeKock, Roger L.

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago de Donder introduced the term "extent of reaction", ?. We build on that work by defining the concept of reagent extrema for an arbitrary chemical reaction, aA + bB [reversible reaction] yY + zZ. The central equation is ?^[subscript i] = -n[subscript i,0]/?[subscript i]. The symbol ?^[subscript i] represents the…

  16. Insect bite reactions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjay; Mann, Baldeep Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Insects are a class of living creatures within the arthropods. Insect bite reactions are commonly seen in clinical practice. The present review touches upon the medically important insects and their places in the classification, the sparse literature on the epidemiology of insect bites in India, and different variables influencing the susceptibility of an individual to insect bites. Clinical features of mosquito bites, hypersensitivity to mosquito bites Epstein-Barr virus NK (HMB-EBV-NK) disease, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, Skeeter syndrome, papular pruritic eruption of HIV/AIDS, and clinical features produced by bed bugs, Mexican chicken bugs, assassin bugs, kissing bugs, fleas, black flies, Blandford flies, louse flies, tsetse flies, midges, and thrips are discussed. Brief account is presented of the immunogenic components of mosquito and bed bug saliva. Papular urticaria is discussed including its epidemiology, the 5 stages of skin reaction, the SCRATCH principle as an aid in diagnosis, and the recent evidence supporting participation of types I, III, and IV hypersensitivity reactions in its causation is summarized. Recent developments in the treatment of pediculosis capitis including spinosad 0.9% suspension, benzyl alcohol 5% lotion, dimethicone 4% lotion, isopropyl myristate 50% rinse, and other suffocants are discussed within the context of evidence derived from randomized controlled trials and key findings of a recent systematic review. We also touch upon a non-chemical treatment of head lice and the ineffectiveness of egg-loosening products. Knockdown resistance (kdr) as the genetic mechanism making the lice nerves insensitive to permethrin is discussed along with the surprising contrary clinical evidence from Europe about efficacy of permethrin in children with head lice carrying kdr-like gene. The review also presents a brief account of insects as vectors of diseases and ends with discussion of prevention of insect bites and some serious adverse effects

  17. Copper mediated carbometalation reactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, D S; Marek, I

    2016-08-01

    Since the first discovery of carbocupration of alkynes in the 1970s a tremendous amount of research has been carried out in this field. The exceptionally high selectivities obtained attribute to the great synthetic value of carbocupration reactions. This tutorial review will present the most important features of carbocupration of alkynes and highlight the most relevant reviews. Then a comprehensive review of copper mediated carbometalation of cyclopropenes will follow. The latter method has received much attention over the last decade as it allows the highly selective construction of poly-substituted cyclopropanes which can be transformed into acyclic derivatives bearing one or multiple tertiary or quaternary carbon stereocenters. PMID:26808300

  18. Electronegativity and redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Quintana, Ramón Alain; Martínez González, Marco; Ayers, Paul W

    2016-08-10

    Using the maximum hardness principle, we show that the oxidation potential of a molecule increases as its electronegativity increases and also increases as its electronegativity in its oxidized state increases. This insight can be used to construct a linear free energy relation for the oxidation potential, which we train on a set of 31 organic redox couples and test on a set of 10 different redox reactions. Better results are obtained when the electronegativity of the oxidized/reduced reagents are adjusted to account for the reagents' interaction with their chemical environment. PMID:27451962

  19. Organic chemistry: Reactions triggered electrically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Limin; Tao, N. J.

    2016-03-01

    Single-molecule experiments have revealed that chemical reactions can be controlled using electric fields -- and that the reaction rate is sensitive to both the direction and the strength of the applied field. See Letter p.88

  20. Positive reaction to allergen (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  1. Hydrazine decomposition and other reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Warren E. (Inventor); La France, Donald S. (Inventor); Voge, Hervey H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to the catalytic decomposition of hydrazine, catalysts useful for this decomposition and other reactions, and to reactions in hydrogen atmospheres generally using carbon-containing catalysts.

  2. Demonstration of the Fenton Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luehrs, Dean C.; Roher, Alex E.

    2007-01-01

    The study demonstrates the Fenton reaction, which is carried out using the Fenton reagent that is used for groundwater and soil remediation. The Fenton reaction can be implicated in DNA damage, Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular disease and ageing in general.

  3. Allergic reactions to medication (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A true allergy to a medication is different than a simple adverse reaction to the drug. The allergic reaction occurs when the immune system, having been exposed to the drug before, creates antibodies to ...

  4. ''Subthreshold'' reactions involving nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, M.; Shrock, R.

    2001-02-01

    We analyze reactions of several types that are naively below threshold but can proceed because of the release of binding energy from nuclear fission and occasionally the formation of Coulombic bound states. These reactions include (i) photofission with pion production and (ii) charged current neutrino-nucleus reactions that lead to fission and/or formation of a Coulomb bound state of a {mu}{sup -} with the nucleus of a fission fragment. We comment on the possible experimental observation of these reactions.

  5. The Vitamin C Clock Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    An iodine clock reaction that gives a colorless to black result similar to that of the familiar Landolt iodate-bisulfite clock reaction is described. The vitamin C clock reaction uses chemicals that are readily available on the retail market: vitamin C, tincture of iodine, 3% hydrogen peroxide, and laundry starch. Orange juice may be used as the vitamin C source to give an orange to black reaction.

  6. More on Chemical Reaction Balancing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinehart, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    A previous article stated that only the matrix method was powerful enough to balance a particular chemical equation. Shows how this equation can be balanced without using the matrix method. The approach taken involves writing partial mathematical reactions and redox half-reactions, and combining them to yield the final balanced reaction. (JN)

  7. The Vitamin C Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an iodine clock reaction that produces an effect similar to the Landolt clock reaction. This reaction uses supermarket chemicals and avoids iodate, bisulfite, and mercury compounds. Ascorbic acid and tincture of iodine are the main reactants with alternate procedures provided for vitamin C tablets and orange juice. (DDR)

  8. Development of detonation reaction engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, O. H.; Stein, R. J.; Tubbs, H. E.

    1968-01-01

    Reaction engine operates on the principle of a controlled condensed detonation. In this engine the gas products that are expelled from the engine to produce thrust are generated by the condensed detonation reaction. The engine is constructed of two basic sections consisting of a detonation wave generator section and a condensed detonation reaction section.

  9. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  10. Hydrocracking reactions and catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbear, G.E.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrocracking processes convert aromatic gas oils into high quality gasoline, diesel, and turbine stocks. In doing this, they saturate aromatic rings, crack naphthenes and paraffins, and saturate olefins formed during cracking. The organic chemistry of these steps is well known. Catalysts for hydrocracking contain components for both the hydrogenation and cracking reactions. Hydrogenation activity is provided by Pd or promoted molybdenum or tungsten sulfides. Cracking takes place on strong acid sites in zeolites or amorphous silica aluminas. Specialty catalysts including narrow pore zeolites are used in dewaxing tube oil stocks. Basic nitrogen compounds such as quinoline can poison the acid sites. They are usually removed in a pretreating step, typically with a nickel/molybdenum sulfide catalyst that also removes sulfur.

  11. Laser induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ledingham, Ken; McCanny, Tom; Graham, Paul; Fang Xiao; Singhal, Ravi; Magill, Joe; Creswell, Alan; Sanderson, David; Allott, Ric; Neely, David; Norreys, Peter; Santala, Marko; Zepf, Matthew; Watts, Ian; Clark, Eugene; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, Michael; Dangor, Bucker; Machecek, Antonin; Wark, Justin

    1998-12-16

    Dramatic improvements in laser technology since 1984 have revolutionised high power laser technology. Application of chirped-pulse amplification techniques has resulted in laser intensities in excess of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. In the mid to late eighties, C. K. Rhodes and K. Boyer discussed the possibility of shining laser light of this intensity onto solid surfaces and to cause nuclear transitions. In particular, irradiation of a uranium target could induce electro- and photofission in the focal region of the laser. In this paper it is shown that {mu}Ci of {sup 62}Cu can be generated via the ({gamma},n) reaction by a laser with an intensity of about 10{sup 19} Wcm{sup -2}.

  12. ISMP Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this feature is to heighten awareness of specific adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discuss methods of prevention, and promote reporting of ADRs to the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) MedWatch program (800-FDA-1088). If you have reported an interesting, preventable ADR to MedWatch, please consider sharing the account with our readers. Write to Dr. Mancano at ISMP, 200 Lakeside Drive, Suite 200, Horsham, PA 19044 (phone: 215-707-4936; e-mail: mmancano@temple.edu). Your report will be published anonymously unless otherwise requested. This feature is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) in cooperation with the FDA’s MedWatch program and Temple University School of Pharmacy. ISMP is an FDA MedWatch partner. PMID:24421544

  13. Prebiotic photosynthetic reactions.

    PubMed

    Chittenden, G J; Schwartz, A W

    1981-01-01

    Historically, numerous attempts have been made to mimic - by means of inorganic model reactions - the photosynthetic fixation of CO2 by green plants. The literature in this field is strewn with claims and counter-claims. Two factors have led us to reexamine this subject: firstly; doubts concerning the highly reducing model for the atmosphere of the primitive Earth and secondly; recent results which demonstrate that photoreductive fixation is feasable on a suitable catalytic surface, for both CO2 and N2. The latter observation is of particular interest due to the well-known susceptibility of NH3 to photolytic destruction. Our review of the literature leads us to suggest that similar processes would have been plausible for the primitive Earth and could have been prebiotic precursors to an early development of CO2-fixing autotrophs. PMID:6791723

  14. The central tower of the cathedral of Schleswig - New investigations to understand the alcali-silica reaction of historical mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedekind, Wanja; Protz, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The damaging alcali-silica reaction leads to crack-formation and structural destruction at noumerous, constructed with cement mortar, buildings worldwide. The ASR-reaction causes the expansion of altered aggregates by the formation of a swelling gel. This gel consists of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) that increases in volume with water, which exerts an expansive pressure inside the material. The cathedral of Schleswig is one of the oldest in northern Germany. The first church was built in 985-965. The Romanesque building part was erected around 1180 and the Gothic nave at the end of the 13th century. The central tower was constructed between 1888 and 1894 with brick and cement mortar. With 112 meters, the tower is the second-largest church spire of the country of Schleswig-Holstein in northern Germany. Due to the formation of cracks and damages from 1953 to 1956 first restoration works took place. Further developments of cracks are making restoration necessary again today. For developing a suitable conservation strategy, different investigations were done. The investigation included the determination of the pore space properties, the hygric and thermal dilatation and mercury porosimetry measurements. Furthermore, the application of cathodoluminescence microscopy may give information about the alteration process and microstructures present and reveal the differences between unaltered and altered mortars. An obvious relation between the porosity and the swelling intensity could be detected. Furthermore it becomes apparent, that a clear zonation of the mortar took place. The mortar near the surface is denser with a lower porosity and has a significantly lower swelling or dilatation.

  15. Subdiffusion-reaction processes with A→B reactions versus subdiffusion-reaction processes with A+B→B reactions.

    PubMed

    Kosztołowicz, Tadeusz; Lewandowska, Katarzyna D

    2014-09-01

    We consider the subdiffusion-reaction process with reactions of a type A+B→B (in which particles A are assumed to be mobile, whereas B are assumed to be static) in comparison to the subdiffusion-reaction process with A→B reactions which was studied by Sokolov, Schmidt, and Sagués [Phys. Rev. E 73, 031102 (2006)]. In both processes a rule that reactions can only occur between particles which continue to exist is taken into account. Although in both processes a probability of the vanishing of particle A due to a reaction is independent of both time and space variables (assuming that in the system with the A+B→B reactions, particles B are distributed homogeneously), we show that subdiffusion-reaction equations describing these processes as well as their Green's functions are qualitatively different. The reason for this difference is as follows. In the case of the former reaction, particles A and B have to meet with some probability before the reaction occurs in contradiction with the case of the latter reaction. For the subdiffusion process with the A+B→B reactions we consider three models which differ in some details concerning a description of the reactions. We base the method considered in this paper on a random walk model in a system with both discrete time and discrete space variables. Then the system with discrete variables is transformed into a system with both continuous time and continuous space variables. Such a method seems to be convenient in analyzing subdiffusion-reaction processes with partially absorbing or partially reflecting walls. The reason is that within this method we can determine Green's functions without a necessity of solving a fractional differential subdiffusion-reaction equation with boundary conditions at the walls. As an example, we use the model to find the Green's functions for a subdiffusive reaction system (with the reactions mentioned above), which is bounded by a partially absorbing wall. This example shows how the model

  16. Nuclear Reactions on Unstable Nuclei and the Surrogate Reaction Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J

    2004-03-01

    Determining reaction cross sections on short-lived nuclear species is a major challenge for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics. Many of these nuclei are too difficult to produce with currently available experimental techniques or too short-lived to serve as targets in present-day set-ups. Some nuclear reactions will remain immeasurable even at upcoming and planned radioactive beam facilities. It is therefore important to explore alternative methods for determining reaction cross sections on unstable nuclei.

  17. Communication: Resonance reaction in diffusion-influenced bimolecular reactions.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Jakob J; Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2016-02-28

    We investigate the influence of a stochastically fluctuating step-barrier potential on bimolecular reaction rates by exact analytical theory and stochastic simulations. We demonstrate that the system exhibits a new "resonant reaction" behavior with rate enhancement if an appropriately defined fluctuation decay length is of the order of the system size. Importantly, we find that in the proximity of resonance, the standard reciprocal additivity law for diffusion and surface reaction rates is violated due to the dynamical coupling of multiple kinetic processes. Together, these findings may have important repercussions on the correct interpretation of various kinetic reaction problems in complex systems, as, e.g., in biomolecular association or catalysis. PMID:26931674

  18. Communication: Resonance reaction in diffusion-influenced bimolecular reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Jakob J.; Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the influence of a stochastically fluctuating step-barrier potential on bimolecular reaction rates by exact analytical theory and stochastic simulations. We demonstrate that the system exhibits a new "resonant reaction" behavior with rate enhancement if an appropriately defined fluctuation decay length is of the order of the system size. Importantly, we find that in the proximity of resonance, the standard reciprocal additivity law for diffusion and surface reaction rates is violated due to the dynamical coupling of multiple kinetic processes. Together, these findings may have important repercussions on the correct interpretation of various kinetic reaction problems in complex systems, as, e.g., in biomolecular association or catalysis.

  19. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is described. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 C and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  20. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  1. Reactions at Oxygen Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Ana M.

    Synthetic protocols based on carbohydrates require the differentiation of their abundant hydroxyl groups, by and large, in order to expose just one single hydroxyl group to the selected reagent. This differentiation is usually carried out with the assistance of protecting groups that block the rest of the hydroxyl groups while being compatible with the given reaction conditions. By corollary, the knowledge and apt choice of the appropriate protecting groups is a key factor in successful synthetic endeavors. In this chapter, an overview of the most commonly employed protecting groups in carbohydrate chemistry is given. Alkyl ethers, being robust protecting groups, have a long history in synthetic carbohydrate chemistry and in related structural studies of polysaccharides. Acetals and ketals, which are of fundamental importance in carbohydrate chemistry, are then discussed. Acyl and silyl protecting groups, which also play an important role in modern monosaccharide transformations, are also presented. Finally, recent blocking strategies are described, including orthogonal strategies, by which the protecting groups are harmoniously combined in modern carbohydrate chemistry.

  2. Formaldehyde reactions in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.; Federman, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    The low-pressure reactions of formaldehyde (H2CO) with D(+), D2(+), D3(+), and He(+) are studied by the ion-cyclotron resonance technique. These reactions are potential loss processes for formaldehyde in cores of dark interstellar clouds. The deuterated reactants represent direct analogs for protons. Rate coefficients and branching ratios of product channels have been measured. Charge transfer is observed to be the dominant reaction of H2CO with D(+), D2(+), and He(+) ions. Only the D3(+) reaction exhibits a proton-transfer channel. All reactions proceed at rate coefficients near the collision limit. Proton-deuteron exchange reactions are found to be inefficient processes in the formaldehyde system.

  3. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data.

    PubMed

    Dönertaş, Handan Melike; Martínez Cuesta, Sergio; Rahman, Syed Asad; Thornton, Janet M

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC) number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG). Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution. PMID:26840640

  4. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Thornton, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC) number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG). Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution. PMID:26840640

  5. Performance of concrete incorporating colloidal nano-silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidan, Mohamed Sabry

    Nanotechnology, as one of the most modern fields of science, has great market potential and economic impact. The need for research in the field of nanotechnology is continuously on the rise. During the last few decades, nanotechnology was developing rapidly into many fields of applied sciences, engineering and industrial applications, especially through studies of physics, chemistry, medicine and fundamental material science. These new developments may be attributed to the fact that material properties and performance can be significantly improved and controlled through nano-scale processes and nano-structures. This research program aims at 1) further understanding the behavior of cementitious materials when amended on the nano-scale level and 2) exploring the effect of this enhancement on the microstructure of cement matrix. This study may be considered as an important step towards better understanding the use of nano-silica in concrete. The main goal of the study is to investigate the effect of using colloidal nano-silica on properties of concrete, including mechanical properties, durability, transport properties, and microstructure. The experimental program that was conducted included a laboratory investigation of concrete mixtures in which nano-silica was added to cement or to a combination of cement and Class F fly ash. Various ratios of nano-silica were used in concrete mixtures to examine the extent and types of improvements that could be imparted to concrete. The conducted experimental program assessed these improvements in terms of reactivity, mechanical properties, and durability of the mixtures under investigation. Advanced testing techniques---including mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)---were used to investigate the effect of nano-silica on the microstructure of the tested mixtures. In addition, the effect of nano-silica on the alkali-silica reaction (ASR) was examined using various techniques, including testing

  6. Linear and non-linear frequency domain techniques for processing impact echo signals to evaluate distributed damage in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMorris, Nicolas

    The condition evaluation of in-situ concrete with non-destructive testing is difficult at best. The concrete deterioration processes of alkali-silica reaction (ASR), delayed ettringite formation (DEF) and freeze-thaw cycles all produce distributed damage in the form of micro-cracking which results in loss of strength or stiffness. Presently, a suitable field applicable method for determining the degree of microcracking does not exist. The impact echo test is potentially the best candidate if improvements can be made in the signal processing techniques which are crucial for accurately interpreting the data retrieved from concrete with distributed damage. In this research, two batches of concrete specimens were prepared in accordance with standard procedures. A portion of each batch was subjected to either the Modified Duggan cycle or to Freeze Thaw cycles, both proven methods of inducing DEF and micro-cracking respectively. Curing techniques and materials were also chosen to accelerate distributed damage in the concrete specimens. In addition to the impact echo, a number of secondary tests were employed to monitor the progress of distributed damage in the concrete specimens. Previous research efforts utilizing the impact echo method have attempted to characterize damage in terms of P-wave attenuation or pulse velocity. This involves signal processing in the time domain. These are inherently linear dynamics methods whereas the development of micro-cracks in concrete, an inhomogeneous material, gives rise to non-linear dynamics. Non-linear approaches to signal processing in the frequency domain are proposed herein. One involves calculating the deviation of the peak of the response spectrum from the shape of an ideal Lorentzian function model. The other calculates the second order non-linear harmonic coefficient. The results showed that the potassium content, the curing methods and the Duggan and Freeze Thaw cycles had the desired effect of inducing distributed damage

  7. Primary structural response in tryptophan residues of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin to photochromic reactions of the retinal chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Seisuke; Mizuno, Misao; Kato, Yoshitaka; Kawanabe, Akira; Kandori, Hideki; Wei, Zhengrong; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2013-06-01

    Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR) is a microbial rhodopsin found in eubacteria and functions as a photosensor. The photoreaction of ASR is photochromic between all-trans, 15-anti (ASRAT), and 13-cis, 15-syn (ASR13C) isomers. To understand primary protein dynamics in the photoreaction starting in ASRAT and ASR13C, picosecond time-resolved ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra were obtained. In the intermediate state appearing in the picosecond temporal region, spectral changes of Trp bands were observed. For both ASRAT and ASR13C, the intensities of the Trp bands were bleached within the instrumental response time and recovered with a time constant of 30 ps. This suggests that the rates of structural changes in the Trp residue in the vicinity of the chromophore do not depend on the direction of the isomerization of retinal. A comparison between spectra of the wild-type and Trp mutants indicates that the structures of Trp76 and Trp46 change upon the primary photoreaction of retinal.

  8. Speeding chemical reactions by focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasta, A. M.; Ramírez-Piscina, L.; Sancho, J. M.; Lindenberg, K.

    2013-04-01

    We present numerical results for a chemical reaction of colloidal particles which are transported by a laminar fluid and are focused by periodic obstacles in such a way that the two components are well mixed and consequently the chemical reaction is speeded up. The roles of the various system parameters (diffusion coefficients, reaction rate, and obstacles sizes) are studied. We show that focusing speeds up the reaction from the diffusion limited rate ˜t-1/2 to very close to the perfect mixing rate, ˜t-1.

  9. Anaphylactoid reactions to radiocontrast media.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Sachiko T

    2005-01-01

    Adverse reactions to contrast material are a concern because iodinated contrast materials are commonly used drugs. The risk for adverse reaction is 4% to 12% with ionic contrast materials and 1% to 3% with nonionic contrast materials. The risk for severe adverse reaction is 0.16% with ionic contrast materials and 0.03% with nonionic contrast materials. The death rate, one to three per 100,000 contrast administrations, is similar for both ionic and nonionic agents. More than 90% of adverse reactions with nonionic contrast materials are anaphylactoid. The types of severe reactions seen with nonionic contrast administration were initially predominantly anaphylactoid. With the advent of helical CT angiography, the reactions are now predominantly attributable to cardiopulmonary decompensation. With the widespread use of nonionic contrast materials, adverse reactions are now seen less frequently. Skills involved in evaluating and treating adverse reactions are not as frequently used. Periodic reviews and updates of specific treatment plans for various reactions with the physicians and staff who use contrast material are very important to ensure optimal preparedness. The key to successful treatment is preparation and early intervention. PMID:15659260

  10. Dearomatization Reactions Using Phthaloyl Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Eliasen, Anders M; Christy, Mitchell; Claussen, Karin R; Besandre, Ronald; Thedford, Randal P; Siegel, Dionicio

    2015-09-18

    A new oxidative dearomatization reaction has been developed using phthaloyl peroxide to chemoselectively install two oxygen-carbon bonds into aromatic precursors. The oxidation reaction proceeds only once; addition of superstoichiometric equivalents of phthaloyl peroxide does not react further with the newly generated 1,3-cyclohexadiene. The reaction has been challenged by the addition of different functional groups and shown to maintain chemoselectivity. Due to the broad reactivity with 1,2-methylenedioxybenzene derivatives, linear free energy correlations were determined and support a mechanism proceeding through diradicals analogous to arene-hydroxylation reactions using phthaloyl peroxide. PMID:26333308

  11. (Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions)

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following research projects; decay of excited nuclei formed in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV; mass and charge distributions in Cl-induced heavy ion reactions; and mass and charge distributions in {sup 56}Fe + {sup 165}Ho at E/A = 12 MeV.

  12. Dynamic Reaction Figures: An Integrative Vehicle for Understanding Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A highly flexible learning tool, referred to as a dynamic reaction figure, is described. Application of these figures can (i) yield the correct chemical equation by simply following a set of menu driven directions; (ii) present the underlying "mechanism" in chemical reactions; and (iii) help to solve quantitative problems in a number of different…

  13. Entropy Effects in Chelation Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Chung-Sun

    1984-01-01

    The entropy change for a reaction in aqueous solution can be evaluated as a combination of entropy factors. Valuable insight or understanding can be obtained from a detailed examination of these factors. Several entropy effects of inorganic chemical reactions are discussed as examples. (Author/JN)

  14. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  15. The Variance Reaction Time Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikstrom, Sverker

    2004-01-01

    The variance reaction time model (VRTM) is proposed to account for various recognition data on reaction time, the mirror effect, receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curves, etc. The model is based on simple and plausible assumptions within a neural network: VRTM is a two layer neural network where one layer represents items and one layer…

  16. Chemistry of heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1988-10-01

    The use of heavy ions to induce nuclear reactions was reported as early as 1950. Since that time it has been one of the most active areas of nuclear research. Intense beams of ions as heavy as uranium with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of even the heaviest elements are available. The wide variety of possible reactions gives rise to a multitude of products which have been studied by many ingenious chemical and physical techniques. Chemical techniques have been of special value for the separation and unequivocal identification of low yield species from the plethora of other nuclides present. Heavy ion reactions have been essential for the production of the trans-Md elements and a host of new isotopes. The systematics of compound nucleus reactions, transfer reactions, and deeply inelastic reactions have been elucidated using chemical techniques. A review of the variety of chemical procedures and techniques which have been developed for the study of heavy ion reactions and their products is given. Determination of the chemical properties of the trans-Md elements, which are very short-lived and can only be produced an ''atom-at-a-time'' via heavy ion reactions, is discussed. 53 refs., 19 figs.

  17. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  18. Enantioselective oxidative boron Heck reactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, A-L

    2016-06-28

    This review highlights the use of the oxidative boron Heck reaction in enantioselective Heck-type couplings. The enantioselective oxidative boron Heck reaction overcomes several limitations of the traditional Pd(0)-catalysed Heck coupling and has subsequently allowed for intermolecular couplings of challenging systems such as cyclic enones, acyclic alkenes, and even site selectively on remote alkenes. PMID:26529247

  19. "Greening up" the Suzuki Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aktoudianakis, Evangelos; Chan, Elton; Edward, Amanda R.; Jarosz, Isabel; Lee, Vicki; Mui, Leo; Thatipamala, Sonya S.; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the rapid, green synthesis of a biaryl compound (4-phenylphenol) via a Pd(0)-catalyzed Suzuki cross-coupling reaction in water. Mild reaction conditions and operational simplicity makes this experiment especially amenable to both mid- and upper-level undergraduates. The methodology exposes students to purely aqueous…

  20. Isosinglet approximation for nonelastic reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Group theoretic relations are derived between different combinations of projectile and secondary particles which appear to have a broad range of application in spacecraft shielding or radiation damage studies. These relations are used to reduce the experimental effort required to obtain nuclear reaction data for transport calculations. Implications for theoretical modeling are also noted, especially for heavy-heavy reactions.

  1. Statistical Factors in Complexation Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Chung-Sun

    1985-01-01

    Four cases which illustrate statistical factors in complexation reactions (where two of the reactants are monodentate ligands) are presented. Included are tables showing statistical factors for the reactions of: (1) square-planar complexes; (2) tetrahedral complexes; and (3) octahedral complexes. (JN)

  2. Tuff reaction vessel experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bazan, F.; Rego, J.H.

    1986-06-01

    A laboratory leaching test has been performed as part of a project to evaluate the suitability of tuff rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Glass samples of the kind that will be used to store nuclear waste were placed in water inside tuff vessels, and then the tuff vessels were placed in water inside Teflon containers. Glass-component leach rates and migration through the tuff were measured for samples of the ATM-8 actinide glass, which is a PNL 76-68 based glass with low levels of {sup 99}Tc, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu to simulate wastes. Disc samples of this glass were leached at 90{sup 0}C to 30, 90, and 1983 days inside tuff vessels using a natural groundwater (J-13 well-water) as the leachant. Some samples were held by 304L stainless steel supports to evaluate the effect of this metal on the release rate of glass constituents. At the end of each leaching interval, the J-13 water present inside and outside the rock vessel was analyzed for glass components in solution. On the basis of these analyses, B, Mo, and Tc, appear to migrate through the rock at rates that depend on the porosity of each vessel and the time of reaction. U, Np, and Pu were found only in the inner leachate. Na, Si, and Sr are present in the rock as well as in the J-13 water, and the addition of these elements from the glass could not be determined. Normalized elemental mass loss values for B, Mo, and Tc were calculated using the combined concentrations of the inner and outer leachates and assuming a negligible retention on the rock. The maximum normalized release was 2.3 g/m{sup 2} for Tc. B, Mo, Tc, and Np were released linearly with respect to each other, with B and Mo released at about 85% of the Tc rate, and Np at 5-10% of the Tc rate. Plutonium was found at low levels in the inner leachate but was strongly sorbed on the steel and Teflon supports. Neptunium was sorbed to a lesser extent.

  3. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems.

  4. [Anaphylactic reaction following hair bleaching].

    PubMed

    Babilas, P; Landthaler, M; Szeimies, R-M

    2005-12-01

    Ammonium persulphate is a potent bleach and oxidizing agent that is commonly present in hair bleaches. Because bleaching is so commonly performed, hairdressers often develop allergic contact dermatitis to ammonium persulphate. In addition to this delayed reaction, asthma and rhinitis may develop as immediate reactions in those exposed to the fumes. Severe anaphylactic reactions are rare. We report a 24-year-old woman who acquired dermatitis following contact with bleaching substances while working as a hairdresser. After changing her profession, the dermatitis disappeared. Following the private use of a hairdressing bleach containing ammonium persulphate, she suffered a severe anaphylactic reaction with unconsciousness. The patient also developed an anaphylactic reaction three hours following patch testing with the hairdresser battery. The rub test with ammonium persulphate (2.5%) in a 1:100 solution was positive. PMID:15688222

  5. [Skin reactions to tattoo ink].

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Hermanns, J-F; Piérard, G E

    2011-01-01

    Ritual and artistic tattoos rely on the use of numerous pigments which are not all entirely inert once placed in the dermis. The compositions of some tattoo inks are identified. However, new but less well identified compounds appear on the market. Allergic reactions can be present under different aspects. They may correspond to allergic contact dermatitis or to photodermatitis. Other reactions include allergic hypersensitivity reactions as well as lichenoid, granulomatous or pseudolymphoma reactions. Pulsed light and laser are typically used for regular tattoo removal. These procedures are not indicated in inflamed tattoos. Indeed, the pigment dispersed during photolysis may perpetuate the reaction. Pseudotattoos due to the stratum corneum staining are frequently responsible for photoeczema. PMID:21942077

  6. Fundamental reaction pathways during coprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Gatsis, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the fundamental reaction pathways in coal petroleum residuum coprocessing. Once the reaction pathways are defined, further efforts can be directed at improving those aspects of the chemistry of coprocessing that are responsible for the desired results such as high oil yields, low dihydrogen consumption, and mild reaction conditions. We decided to carry out this investigation by looking at four basic aspects of coprocessing: (1) the effect of fossil fuel materials on promoting reactions essential to coprocessing such as hydrogen atom transfer, carbon-carbon bond scission, and hydrodemethylation; (2) the effect of varied mild conditions on the coprocessing reactions; (3) determination of dihydrogen uptake and utilization under severe conditions as a function of the coal or petroleum residuum employed; and (4) the effect of varied dihydrogen pressure, temperature, and residence time on the uptake and utilization of dihydrogen and on the distribution of the coprocessed products. Accomplishments are described.

  7. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems. PMID:27146955

  8. Effective reaction rates for diffusion-limited reaction cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nałecz-Jawecki, Paweł; Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    Biological signals in cells are transmitted with the use of reaction cycles, such as the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, in which substrate is modified by antagonistic enzymes. An appreciable share of such reactions takes place in crowded environments of two-dimensional structures, such as plasma membrane or intracellular membranes, and is expected to be diffusion-controlled. In this work, starting from the microscopic bimolecular reaction rate constants and using estimates of the mean first-passage time for an enzyme-substrate encounter, we derive diffusion-dependent effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients (EMRRC) for a generic reaction cycle. Each EMRRC was found to be half of the harmonic average of the microscopic rate constant (phosphorylation c or dephosphorylation d), and the effective (crowding-dependent) motility divided by a slowly decreasing logarithmic function of the sum of the enzyme concentrations. This implies that when c and d differ, the two EMRRCs scale differently with the motility, rendering the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules diffusion-dependent. Analytical predictions are verified using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the two-dimensional triangular lattice at the single-molecule resolution. It is demonstrated that the proposed formulas estimate the steady-state concentrations and effective reaction rates for different sets of microscopic reaction rates and concentrations of reactants, including a non-trivial example where with increasing diffusivity the fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules changes from 10% to 90%.

  9. Allergic reactions, "spillover' reactions, and T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Bruynzeel, D P; Nieboer, C; Boorsma, D M; Scheper, R J; van Ketel, W G

    1983-01-01

    A strong positive, allergic patch-test reaction was elicited in 15 patients with an established allergy for a particular allergen. Patches with a marginally irritating concentration of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) were applied at fixed distances. The SLS patch situated adjacent to the allergic reaction was significantly enhanced in 12 of 15 patients (P less than 0.01) compared to more distant SLS reactions ("spillover'). Only quantitative differences were observed in the histologic pictures of the different types of reaction. The infiltrate consisted of lymphocytes and histiocytes, mainly located perivascular in the upper dermis. T-cell subsets were assessed with monoclonal antibodies using an immunoperoxidase technique. The distribution of the different T cells was the same for both reaction types. T cells located outside the perivascular infiltrates (e.g., in the epidermal vesicles) were OKT-8-positive (cytotoxic/suppressor T lymphocytes). Immunofluorescence examination did not show different patterns for the allergic or "enhanced toxic' reactions with regard to the presence of immunoglobulins and complement. The "spillover' phenomenon may cause false-positive patch-test reactions. PMID:6223603

  10. Integrated Microreactors for Reaction Automation: New Approaches to Reaction Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullen, Jonathan P.; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2010-07-01

    Applications of microsystems (microreactors) in continuous-flow chemistry have expanded rapidly over the past two decades, with numerous reports of higher conversions and yields compared to conventional batch benchtop equipment. Synthesis applications are enhanced by chemical information gained from integrating microreactor components with sensors, actuators, and automated fluid handling. Moreover, miniaturized systems allow experiments on well-defined samples at conditions not easily accessed by conventional means, such as reactions at high pressure and temperatures. The wealth of synthesis information that could potentially be acquired through use of microreactors integrated with physical sensors and analytical chemistry techniques for online reaction monitoring has not yet been well explored. The increased efficiency resulting from use of continuous-flow microreactor platforms to automate reaction screening and optimization encourages a shift from current batchwise chemical reaction development to this new approach. We review advances in this new area and provide application examples of online monitoring and automation.

  11. Thermally multiplexed polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Phaneuf, Christopher R.; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D. Curtis; Holst, Gregory L.; Birjiniuk, Joav; Nagpal, Nikita; Culpepper, Stephen; Popler, Emily; Shane, Andi L.; Jerris, Robert; Forest, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Amplification of multiple unique genetic targets using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly required in molecular biology laboratories. Such reactions are typically performed either serially or by multiplex PCR. Serial reactions are time consuming, and multiplex PCR, while powerful and widely used, can be prone to amplification bias, PCR drift, and primer-primer interactions. We present a new thermocycling method, termed thermal multiplexing, in which a single heat source is uniformly distributed and selectively modulated for independent temperature control of an array of PCR reactions. Thermal multiplexing allows amplification of multiple targets simultaneously—each reaction segregated and performed at optimal conditions. We demonstrate the method using a microfluidic system consisting of an infrared laser thermocycler, a polymer microchip featuring 1 μl, oil-encapsulated reactions, and closed-loop pulse-width modulation control. Heat transfer modeling is used to characterize thermal performance limitations of the system. We validate the model and perform two reactions simultaneously with widely varying annealing temperatures (48 °C and 68 °C), demonstrating excellent amplification. In addition, to demonstrate microfluidic infrared PCR using clinical specimens, we successfully amplified and detected both influenza A and B from human nasopharyngeal swabs. Thermal multiplexing is scalable and applicable to challenges such as pathogen detection where patients presenting non-specific symptoms need to be efficiently screened across a viral or bacterial panel. PMID:26339317

  12. Reactions and properties of clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1992-09-01

    The elucidation from a molecular point of view of the differences and similarities in the properties and reactivity of matter in the gaseous compared to the condensed state is a subject of considerable current interest. One of the promising approaches to this problem is to utilize mass spectrometry in conjunction with laser spectroscopy and fast-flow reaction devices to investigate the changing properties, structure and reactivity of clusters as a function of the degree of solvation under well-controlled conditions. In this regard, an investigation of molecular cluster ions has provided considerable new insight into the basic mechanisms of ion reactions within a cluster, and this paper reviews some of the recent advances in cluster production, the origin of magic numbers and relationship to cluster ion stabilities, and solvation effects on reactions. There have been some notable advances in the production of large cluster ions under thermal reaction conditions, enabling a systematic study of the influence of solvation on reactions to be carried out. These and other new studies of magic numbers have traced their origin to the thermochemical stability of cluster ions. There are several classes of reaction where solvation has a notable influence on reactivity. A particularly interesting example comes from recent studies of the reactions of the hydroxyl anion with CO2 and SO2, studied as a function of the degree of hydration of OH-. Both reactions are highly exothermic, yet the differences in reactivity are dramatic. In the case of SO2, the reaction occurs at near the collision rate. By contrast, CO2 reactivity plummets dramatically for clusters having more than four water molecules. The slow rate is in accord with observations in the liquid phase.

  13. Nuclear Structure and Reaction Mechanism Studies with Multinucleon Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, P. H.; Jones, G. A.; Podolyak, Zs.; Abdullah, M.; Gelletly, W.; Langdown, S. D.; Wollel, G.; De Angelis, G.; Gadea, A.; Kroell, Th.; Marginean, N.; Martinez, T.; Napoli, D. R.; Rusu, C.; Tonev, D.; Zhang, Y. H.; Ur, C. A.; Axiotis, M.; Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E.

    2006-08-14

    This contribution reports on the results of an experiment to study the near-yrast states in selenium- and osmium-like nuclei, following their population in thick-target, multinucleon transfer reactions between an 82Se beam and a 192Os target. The experimental results for the level scheme for 84Se are presented together with investigations into the use of multi-dimensional gamma-ray energy gating to investigate angular momentum population in such heavy-ion binary reactions.

  14. Tilting mode in nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dossing, T.; Randrup, J.

    1986-02-01

    The relation between tilting relaxation and the reaction plane dynamics is discussed, providing an intuitive understanding of the expression for the cross section close to the beam direction, which has recently been derived. Second, the tilting relaxation time and the related wriggling relaxation time are discussed, based upon nucleon exchange transport (window friction). Finally, recent experimental information on the tilting mode relaxation is discussed, and the dynamics of the tilting mode is discussed qualitatively for the three different types of nuclear reactions considered, compound nucleus fission, quasifission, and damped nuclear reactions. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Renormalized reaction and relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, Yuriy E.

    2016-06-01

    Impact of the non-equilibrium on the reaction and relaxation rates (called as generalized relaxation rates - GRR), for the spatially inhomogeneous gas mixture is considered. Discarding the assumption that the 'chemical' part of the collisional integral is a small correction to non-reactive part, the expression for the zero-order GRR is derived. They are represented as a renormalization of the traditional reaction and relaxation rates, which means mixing of all corresponding processes. Thus all reactions and relaxation processes are entangled.

  16. Leukemoid Reaction in Chikungunya Fever

    PubMed Central

    Charaniya, Riyaz; Sahoo, Ratnakar; Tansir, Ghazal; Sasmal, Gargi

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya is a viral illness caused by an arbovirus which is transmitted by Aedes mosquito. Fever and polyarthralgia are hallmark of this viral illness. Viral infections are generally associated with leucopenia and bacterial infections with leukocytosis. Leukemoid Reaction (LR) is defined by reactive increase in leukocyte count of more than 50,000/cu mm with increase in mature leukocytes on peripheral blood. Leukocytosis is common in Chikungunya but leukemoid reaction has not been reported in medical literature. Our patient presented with high grade fever and symmetrical polyarthritis. Blood investigation showed Leukemoid reaction and after extensive work up a diagnosis of chikungunya was made. PMID:27437276

  17. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  18. Hypersensitivity reaction associated with phenytoin

    PubMed Central

    Indu, T. H.; Basutkar, Roopa Satyanarayan

    2015-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are generally associated with aromatic AEDs. We present a case of hypersensitivity reactions followed by administration of phenytoin with diazepam and ranitidine in a patient with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Antigen-antibody reactions or decreased levels of epoxide hydrolase are well known with phenytoin. Increased level of serum phenytoin causing toxicities due to competitive inhibition with diazepam on co-administration was also reported in the literature. Prevention of the adverse effects with AEDs is a multi-stage process, which requires implementation of preventive measures through careful monitoring and prompts interventions. PMID:26692739

  19. Magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocking, G.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly (MSRWA) is the product of a development effort funded by the Air Force Materials Laboratory (AFML) at Wright Patterson AFB. The specific objective of the project was to establish the manufacturing processes for samarium cobalt magnets and demonstrate their use in a space application. The development was successful on both counts. The application portion of the program, which involves the magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly, is emphasized. The requirements for the reaction wheel were based on the bias wheel requirements of the DSP satellite. The tasks included the design, fabrication, and test of the unit to the DSP program qualification requirements.

  20. Hypersensitivity reaction associated with phenytoin.

    PubMed

    Indu, T H; Basutkar, Roopa Satyanarayan

    2015-09-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are generally associated with aromatic AEDs. We present a case of hypersensitivity reactions followed by administration of phenytoin with diazepam and ranitidine in a patient with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Antigen-antibody reactions or decreased levels of epoxide hydrolase are well known with phenytoin. Increased level of serum phenytoin causing toxicities due to competitive inhibition with diazepam on co-administration was also reported in the literature. Prevention of the adverse effects with AEDs is a multi-stage process, which requires implementation of preventive measures through careful monitoring and prompts interventions. PMID:26692739

  1. Nuclear reactions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyam, Radhey

    2016-05-01

    In the domain of Nuclear reactions at intermediate energies, the QCD coupling constant αs is large enough (~ 0.3 - 0.5) to render the perturbative calculational techniques inapplicable. In this regime the quarks are confined into colorless hadrons and it is expected that effective field theories of hadron interactions via exchange of hadrons, provide useful tools to describe such reactions. In this contribution we discuss the application of one such theory, the effective Lagrangian model, in describing the hadronic reactions at intermediate energies whose measurements are the focus of a vast international experimental program.

  2. Siloxy alkynes in annulation reactions.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hui; Zhao, Wanxiang; Sun, Jianwei

    2014-12-01

    Siloxy alkynes are a family of versatile species in organic synthesis. This account reviews the annulation reactions of siloxy alkynes for the synthesis of a variety of carbo- and heterocyclic products. With various dipolarophiles or dipolarophile-like reaction partners, siloxy alkynes are capable of forming small (three- to six-membered) rings. Recently, we have expanded the scope to the synthesis of medium- and large-ring lactones, enabled by the design of new amphoteric molecules as well as a new ring-expansion strategy. These annulation reactions provide not only practically useful syntheses of cyclic molecules, but also important understanding of the fundamental reactivity of siloxy alkynes. PMID:25171137

  3. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    PubMed

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27237470

  4. Radiative capture reactions in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, Carl R.; Davids, Barry

    2015-08-07

    Here, the radiative capture reactions of greatest importance in nuclear astrophysics are identified and placed in their stellar contexts. Recent experimental efforts to estimate their thermally averaged rates are surveyed.

  5. Experimental Study of Serpentinization Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, B. A.; Brearley, A. J.; Ganguly, J.; Liermann, H.-P.; Keil, K.

    2004-01-01

    Current carbonaceous chondrite parent-body thermal models [1-3] produce scenarios that are inconsistent with constraints on aqueous alteration conditions based on meteorite mineralogical evidence, such as phase stability relationships within the meteorite matrix minerals [4] and isotope equilibration arguments [5, 6]. This discrepancy arises principally because of the thermal runaway effect produced by silicate hydration reactions (here loosely called serpentinization, as the principal products are serpentine minerals), which are so exothermic as to produce more than enough heat to melt more ice and provide a self-sustaining chain reaction. One possible way to dissipate the heat of reaction is to use a very small parent body [e.g., 2] or possibly a rubble pile model. Another possibility is to release this heat more slowly, which depends on the alteration reaction path and kinetics.

  6. Method for conducting exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-01-05

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  7. Transfer reactions in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardayan, D. W.

    2016-08-01

    To a high degree many aspects of the large-scale behavior of objects in the Universe are governed by the underlying nuclear physics. In fact the shell structure of nuclear physics is directly imprinted into the chemical abundances of the elements. The tranquility of the night sky is a direct result of the relatively slow rate of nuclear reactions that control and determines a star’s fate. Understanding the nuclear structure and reaction rates between nuclei is vital to understanding our Universe. Nuclear-transfer reactions make accessible a wealth of knowledge from which we can extract much of the required nuclear physics information. A review of transfer reactions for nuclear astrophysics is presented with an emphasis on the experimental challenges and opportunities for future development.

  8. Solar-thermal reaction processing

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, Alan W; Dahl, Jaimee K; Lewandowski, Allan A; Bingham, Carl; Raska Buechler, Karen J; Grothe, Willy

    2014-03-18

    In an embodiment, a method of conducting a high temperature chemical reaction that produces hydrogen or synthesis gas is described. The high temperature chemical reaction is conducted in a reactor having at least two reactor shells, including an inner shell and an outer shell. Heat absorbing particles are included in a gas stream flowing in the inner shell. The reactor is heated at least in part by a source of concentrated sunlight. The inner shell is heated by the concentrated sunlight. The inner shell re-radiates from the inner wall and heats the heat absorbing particles in the gas stream flowing through the inner shell, and heat transfers from the heat absorbing particles to the first gas stream, thereby heating the reactants in the gas stream to a sufficiently high temperature so that the first gas stream undergoes the desired reaction(s), thereby producing hydrogen or synthesis gas in the gas stream.

  9. The Retro-Hydroformylation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, Shuhei; Tatsuki, Toshiumi; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2015-07-13

    Hydroformylation, a reaction that adds carbon monoxide and dihydrogen across an unsaturated carbon-carbon multiple bond, has been widely employed in the chemical industry since its discovery in 1938. In contrast, the reverse reaction, retro-hydroformylation, has seldom been studied. The retro-hydroformylation reaction of an aldehyde into an alkene and synthesis gas (a mixture of carbon monoxide and dihydrogen) in the presence of a cyclopentadienyl iridium catalyst is now reported. Aliphatic aldehydes were converted into the corresponding alkenes in up to 91% yield with concomitant release of carbon monoxide and dihydrogen. Mechanistic control experiments indicated that the reaction proceeds by retro-hydroformylation and not by a sequential decarbonylation-dehydrogenation or dehydrogenation-decarbonylation process. PMID:26089259

  10. Medications and Drug Allergic Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just for Kids Library School Tools Videos Virtual Allergist Education & Training Careers in ... reaction to a medication. These include: genetics, body chemistry, frequent drug exposure or the presence of an ...

  11. Method for conducting exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence; Hearn, Dennis; Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  12. Adverse reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1986-01-01

    There are thousands of agents that are intentionally added to the food that we consume. These include preservatives, stabilizers, conditioners, thickeners, colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, antioxidants, etc. etc. Yet only a surprisingly small number have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Amongst all the additives, FD&C dyes have been most frequently associated with adverse reactions. Tartrazine is the most notorious of them all; however, critical review of the medical literature and current Scripps Clinic studies would indicate that tartrazine has been confirmed to be at best only occasionally associated with flares of urticaria or asthma. There is no convincing evidence in the literature of reactivity to the other azo or nonazo dyes. This can also be said of BHA/BHT, nitrites/nitrates and sorbates. Parabens have been shown to elicit IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions when used as pharmaceutical preservatives; however, as with the other additives noted above, ingested parabens have only occasionally been associated with adverse reactions. MSG, the cause of the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' has only been linked to asthma in one report. Sulfiting agents used primarily as food fresheners and to control microbial growth in fermented beverages have been established as the cause of any where from mild to severe and even fatal reactions in at least 5% of the asthmatic population. Other reactions reported to follow sulfite ingestion include anaphylaxis, gastro intestinal complaints and dermatological eruptions. The prevalence of these non asthmatic reactions is unknown. The mechanism of sulfite sensitive asthma is also unknown but most likely involves hyperreactivity to inhale SO2 in the great majority of cases; however, there are reports of IgE mediated reactions and other sulfite sensitive asthmatics have been found with low levels of sulfite oxidase; necessary to oxidize endogenous sulfite to sulfate. PMID:3302664

  13. Expert system for predicting reaction conditions: the Michael reaction case.

    PubMed

    Marcou, G; Aires de Sousa, J; Latino, D A R S; de Luca, A; Horvath, D; Rietsch, V; Varnek, A

    2015-02-23

    A generic chemical transformation may often be achieved under various synthetic conditions. However, for any specific reagents, only one or a few among the reported synthetic protocols may be successful. For example, Michael β-addition reactions may proceed under different choices of solvent (e.g., hydrophobic, aprotic polar, protic) and catalyst (e.g., Brønsted acid, Lewis acid, Lewis base, etc.). Chemoinformatics methods could be efficiently used to establish a relationship between the reagent structures and the required reaction conditions, which would allow synthetic chemists to waste less time and resources in trying out various protocols in search for the appropriate one. In order to address this problem, a number of 2-classes classification models have been built on a set of 198 Michael reactions retrieved from literature. Trained models discriminate between processes that are compatible and respectively processes not feasible under a specific reaction condition option (feasible or not with a Lewis acid catalyst, feasible or not in hydrophobic solvent, etc.). Eight distinct models were built to decide the compatibility of a Michael addition process with each considered reaction condition option, while a ninth model was aimed to predict whether the assumed Michael addition is feasible at all. Different machine-learning methods (Support Vector Machine, Naive Bayes, and Random Forest) in combination with different types of descriptors (ISIDA fragments issued from Condensed Graphs of Reactions, MOLMAP, Electronic Effect Descriptors, and Chemistry Development Kit computed descriptors) have been used. Models have good predictive performance in 3-fold cross-validation done three times: balanced accuracy varies from 0.7 to 1. Developed models are available for the users at http://infochim.u-strasbg.fr/webserv/VSEngine.html . Eventually, these were challenged to predict feasibility conditions for ∼50 novel Michael reactions from the eNovalys database (originally

  14. Polarization phenomena in collinear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravcsik, Michael J.; Arash, Firooz

    1985-06-01

    It is shown for a collinear reaction containing four particles with arbitrary spins which amplitudes remain nonzero and how they are related to the observables. In terms of primary observables all submatrices relating products of amplitudes to observables either vanish or turn into one-by-one submatrices, except the 8i types which may turn into three-by-three submatrices, but these latter submatrices are mostly avoidable when determining amplitudes. In terms of the secondary observables the 1M and 2i submatrices are slightly larger. Specifically, it is shown that in collinear reactions all observables in which only one particle is polarized (no matter how) vanish. Since reactions at very high energies are expected to be predominantly very close to being collinear, the smallness of such observables in such reactions can be expected on general grounds but polarization effects involving observables with more than one polarized particle can very well be very large. An iterative approximation method for the polarization analysis of reactions at very high energies is suggested. The results of this paper are also applicable to all models in which helicity conservation holds, since they are, for all t values, formally identical with collinear reactions.

  15. Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

  16. Nuclear Reactions for Astrophysics and Other Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Scielzo, N D; Ressler, J J

    2011-03-01

    Cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions are required for many applications. The surrogate nuclear reactions method provides an indirect approach for determining cross sections for reactions on unstable isotopes, which are difficult or impossible to measure otherwise. Current implementations of the method provide useful cross sections for (n,f) reactions, but need to be improved upon for applications to capture reactions.

  17. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation

    PubMed Central

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model, and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is on the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules. PMID:26871190

  18. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach, in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is of the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules.

  19. Study of char gasification reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ballal, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    A Texas lignite, an anthracite and two bituminous coals, Pittsburgh number8 and Illinois number6, were pyrolyzed in a nitrogen atmosphere to prepare chars. Optical microscopy, mercury porosimetry and gas adsorption techniques using nitrogen, CO/sub 2/ and CO, were employed for pore structure characterization. The lignite char exhibited the fastest rates of gaseous diffusion, followed in order of decreasing diffusivities by the Illinois number6, Pittsburgh number8 and anthracite chars. The changes in reactivities and pore structures of chars were measured experimentally during their reaction with oxygen (400-550C) and CO/sub 2/ (800-1000C). For a particular char-gas system, the normalized rate-conversion pattern was invariant with respect to temperature and gaseous concentration. In the case of lignite and Pittsburgh number8 chars, the rate-conversion pattern was similar during reaction with oxygen and CO/sub 2/. Adsorption experiments on partially reacted chars indicated that the micropores in the lignite char were accessible to both reactants. The micropores in the Illinois number6 char were, however, not accessible during its reaction with oxygen. The evolution of pore structure during reaction was modeled by using a probabilistic approach which accounts for overlapping pores with different shapes and sizes. The kinetics of gasification of the lignite and the Pittsburgh number8 chars was studied using a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type kinetic expression to correlate the experimental data. CO was found to inhibit the reaction substantially. The effect of a potassium carbonate catalyst on the reaction of these two chars was also investigated. Substantial increases in reaction rates were observed, and the enhancement was approximately proportional to the catalyst loading.

  20. Reaction pathways of propene pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yena; Su, Kehe; Wang, Xin; Liu, Yan; Zeng, Qingfeng; Cheng, Laifei; Zhang, Litong

    2010-05-01

    The gas-phase reaction pathways in preparing pyrolytic carbon with propene pyrolysis have been investigated in detail with a total number of 110 transition states and 50 intermediates. The structure of the species was determined with density functional theory at B3PW91/6-311G(d,p) level. The transition states and their linked intermediates were confirmed with frequency and the intrinsic reaction coordinates analyses. The elementary reactions were explored in the pathways of both direct and the radical attacking decompositions. The energy barriers and the reaction energies were determined with accurate model chemistry method at G3(MP2) level after an examination of the nondynamic electronic correlations. The heat capacities and entropies were obtained with statistical thermodynamics. The Gibbs free energies at 298.15 K for all the reaction steps were reported. Those at any temperature can be developed with classical thermodynamics by using the fitted (as a function of temperature) heat capacities. It was found that the most favorable paths are mainly in the radical attacking chain reactions. The chain was proposed with 26 reaction steps including two steps of the initialization of the chain to produce H and CH(3) radicals. For a typical temperature (1200 K) adopted in the experiments, the highest energy barriers were found in the production of C(3) to be 203.4 and 193.7 kJ/mol. The highest energy barriers for the production of C(2) and C were found 174.1 and 181.4 kJ/mol, respectively. These results are comparable with the most recent experimental observation of the apparent activation energy 201.9 +/- 0.6 or 137 +/- 25 kJ/mol. PMID:20082392

  1. Reactions in water: alkyl nitrile coupling reactions using Fenton's reagent.

    PubMed

    Keller, Christopher L; Dalessandro, James D; Hotz, Richard P; Pinhas, Allan R

    2008-05-01

    The coupling reaction of water-soluble alkyl nitriles using Fenton's reagent (Fe(II) and H2O2) is described. The best metal for the reaction is iron(II), and the greatest yields are obtained when the concentration of the metal is kept low. Hydrogen-atom abstraction is selective, preferentially producing the radical alpha to the nitrile. In order to increase the production of dinitrile, in situ reduction of iron(III) to iron(II), using a variety of reducing agents, was investigated. PMID:18363368

  2. Nonlocality in deuteron stripping reactions.

    PubMed

    Timofeyuk, N K; Johnson, R C

    2013-03-15

    We propose a new method for the analysis of deuteron stripping reactions, A(d,p)B, in which the nonlocality of nucleon-nucleus interactions and three-body degrees of freedom are accounted for in a consistent way. The model deals with equivalent local nucleon potentials taken at an energy shifted by ∼40  MeV from the "E(d)/2" value frequently used in the analysis of experimental data, where E(d) is the incident deuteron energy. The "E(d)/2" rule lies at the heart of all three-body analyses of (d, p) reactions performed so far with the aim of obtaining nuclear structure properties such as spectroscopic factors and asymptotic normalization coefficients that are crucial for our understanding of nuclear shell evolution in neutron- and proton-rich regions of the nuclear periodic table and for predicting the cross sections of stellar reactions. The large predicted shift arises from the large relative kinetic energy of the neutron and proton in the incident deuteron in those components of the n+p+A wave function that dominate the (d, p) reaction amplitude. The large shift reduces the effective d-A potentials and leads to a change in predicted (d, p) cross sections, thus affecting the interpretation of these reactions in terms of nuclear structure. PMID:25166525

  3. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  4. Thermal reactions of brushite cements.

    PubMed

    Bohner, M; Gbureck, U

    2008-02-01

    The thermal reactions of a brushite cement made of beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM), and an aqueous solution were followed in situ with an isothermal calorimeter at 37 degrees C. The investigated parameters were the beta-TCP/MCPM weight ratio, the liquid-to-powder ratio, the synthesis route and milling duration of the beta-TCP powder, as well as the presence of sulfate, citrate, and pyrophosphate ions in the mixing liquid. The thermograms were complex, particularly for mixtures containing an excess of MCPM or additives in the mixing solution. Results suggested that the endothermic MCPM dissolution and the highly exothermic beta-TCP dissolution occurred simultaneously, thereby leading to the formation of a large exothermic peak at early reaction time. Both reactions were followed by the exothermic crystallization of brushite and in the presence of an excess of MCPM by the endothermic crystallization of monetite. Additives generally widened the main exothermic reaction peak, or in some cases with pyrophosphate ions postponed the main exothermic peak at late reaction time. Generally, the results could be well explained and understood based on thermodynamic and solubility data. PMID:17618509

  5. [Recipients adverse reactions: guidance supports].

    PubMed

    Bazin, A

    2010-12-01

    Since 1994, adverse effects of transfusion transmitted to the French haemovigilance network are registered on "e-fit", the database of the French agency for the safety of health products (Afssaps). In order to improve their analysis, guidance supports have been made by Afssaps working groups. Each support deals with a blood transfusion side effect and is composed of five parts including pathophysiological mechanisms, diagnostic criteria, management recommendations, etiologic investigations and rules of filing the notification form on e-fit. The major characteristics of sheets published or soon-to-be published are presented: transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-transmitted bacterial infection, non-haemolytic febrile reaction, allergic reaction, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, hypotensive transfusion reaction, alloimmunization, erythrocyte incompatibility reaction and hemosiderosis. These new supports give relevant guidelines allowing a better analysis and evaluation of recipients' adverse reactions, particularly their diagnosis, gravity and accountability. They could also initiate studies in European and international haemovigilance and transfusion networks. PMID:21051267

  6. A unified diabatic description for electron transfer reactions, isomerization reactions, proton transfer reactions, and aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S

    2015-10-14

    While diabatic approaches are ubiquitous for the understanding of electron-transfer reactions and have been mooted as being of general relevance, alternate applications have not been able to unify the same wide range of observed spectroscopic and kinetic properties. The cause of this is identified as the fundamentally different orbital configurations involved: charge-transfer phenomena involve typically either 1 or 3 electrons in two orbitals whereas most reactions are typically closed shell. As a result, two vibrationally coupled electronic states depict charge-transfer scenarios whereas three coupled states arise for closed-shell reactions of non-degenerate molecules and seven states for the reactions implicated in the aromaticity of benzene. Previous diabatic treatments of closed-shell processes have considered only two arbitrarily chosen states as being critical, mapping these states to those for electron transfer. We show that such effective two-state diabatic models are feasible but involve renormalized electronic coupling and vibrational coupling parameters, with this renormalization being property dependent. With this caveat, diabatic models are shown to provide excellent descriptions of the spectroscopy and kinetics of the ammonia inversion reaction, proton transfer in N2H7(+), and aromaticity in benzene. This allows for the development of a single simple theory that can semi-quantitatively describe all of these chemical phenomena, as well as of course electron-transfer reactions. It forms a basis for understanding many technologically relevant aspects of chemical reactions, condensed-matter physics, chemical quantum entanglement, nanotechnology, and natural or artificial solar energy capture and conversion. PMID:26193994

  7. Surface reactions of natural glasses

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.F.

    1986-12-31

    Reactions at natural glass surfaces are important in studies involving nuclear waste transport due to chemical control on ground water in host rocks such as basalt and tuff, to potential diffusion into natural hydrated glass surfaces and as natural analogs for waste glass stability. Dissolution kinetics can be described by linear surface reaction coupled with cation interdiffusion with resulting rates similar to those of synthetic silicate glasses. Rates of Cs diffusion into hydrated obsidian surfaces between 25{sup 0} and 75{sup 0}C were determined by XPS depth profiles and loss rates from aqueous solutions. Calculated diffusion coefficients were ten others of magnitude more rapid than predicted from an Arrhenius extrapolation of high temperature tracer diffusion data due to surface hydration reactions.

  8. Catalytic, enantioselective, vinylogous aldol reactions.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott E; Heemstra, John R; Beutner, Gregory L

    2005-07-25

    In 1935, R. C. Fuson formulated the principle of vinylogy to explain how the influence of a functional group may be felt at a distant point in the molecule when this position is connected by conjugated double-bond linkages to the group. In polar reactions, this concept allows the extension of the electrophilic or nucleophilic character of a functional group through the pi system of a carbon-carbon double bond. This vinylogous extension has been applied to the aldol reaction by employing "extended" dienol ethers derived from gamma-enolizable alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Since 1994, several methods for the catalytic, enantioselective, vinylogous aldol reaction have appeared, with which varying degrees of regio- (site), enantio-, and diastereoselectivity can be attained. In this Review, the current scope and limitations of this transformation, as well as its application in natural product synthesis, are discussed. PMID:15940727

  9. Anaphylactoid reactions to radiocontrast media.

    PubMed

    Canter, Lauren M

    2005-01-01

    As the role for diagnostic and therapeutic contrast-enhanced imaging increases, review of the epidemiology, mechanisms, risk factors, and pretreatment for radiocontrast-mediated anaphylactoid reactions becomes more and more pertinent. Ongoing research has failed to elucidate the precise mechanisms of both early and late reactions, though the current data point to a multifactorial pathogenesis. The risk of reactions has decreased over time as contrast media have evolved from ionic, high-osmolality to nonionic, low-osmolality formulations; however, the expense of the low-osmolality agents limit their universal use. Today, 1-12% of patients exhibit adverse responses ranging from mild to severe, with individual risk depending on the type of contrast administered and certain baseline patient characteristics. For those high-risk patients who must receive contrast, effective pretreatment guidelines have been established. PMID:16119034

  10. Spatial model of autocatalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Anna, Pietro; di Patti, Francesca; Fanelli, Duccio; McKane, Alan J.; Dauxois, Thierry

    2010-05-01

    Biological cells with all of their surface structure and complex interior stripped away are essentially vesicles—membranes composed of lipid bilayers which form closed sacs. Vesicles are thought to be relevant as models of primitive protocells, and they could have provided the ideal environment for prebiotic reactions to occur. In this paper, we investigate the stochastic dynamics of a set of autocatalytic reactions, within a spatially bounded domain, so as to mimic a primordial cell. The discreteness of the constituents of the autocatalytic reactions gives rise to large sustained oscillations even when the number of constituents is quite large. These oscillations are spatiotemporal in nature, unlike those found in previous studies, which consisted only of temporal oscillations. We speculate that these oscillations may have a role in seeding membrane instabilities which lead to vesicle division. In this way synchronization could be achieved between protocell growth and the reproduction rate of the constituents (the protogenetic material) in simple protocells.

  11. Reaction models in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descouvemont, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We present different reaction models commonly used in nuclear astrophysics, in particular for the nucleosynthesis of light elements. Pioneering works were performed within the potential model, where the internal structure of the colliding nuclei is completely ignored. Significant advances in microscopic cluster models provided the first microscopic description of the 3He(α,&gamma)7 Be reaction more than thirty years ago. In this approach, the calculations are based on an effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, but the cluster approximation should be made to simplify the calculations. Nowadays, modern microscopic calculations are able to go beyond the cluster approximation, and aim at finding exact solutions of the Schrödinger equation with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions. We discuss recent examples on the d+d reactions at low energies.

  12. Photonuclear reactions on titanium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Belyshev, S. S.; Dzhilavyan, L. Z.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kapitonov, I. M.; Kuznetsov, A. A. Orlin, V. N.; Stopani, K. A.

    2015-03-15

    The photodisintegration of titanium isotopes in the giant-dipole-resonance energy region is studied by the photon-activation method. Bremsstrahlung photons whose spectrum has the endpoint energy of 55 MeV is used. The yields and integrated cross sections are determined for photoproton reactions on the titanium isotopes {sup 47,48,49,50}Ti. The respective experimental results are compared with their counterparts calculated on the basis of the TALYS code and a combined photonucleon-reaction model. The TALYS code disregards the isospin structure of the giant dipole resonance and is therefore unable to describe the yield of photoproton reactions on the heavy titanium isotopes {sup 49,50}Ti.

  13. Unraveling reaction pathways and specifying reaction kinetics for complex systems.

    PubMed

    Vinu, R; Broadbelt, Linda J

    2012-01-01

    Many natural and industrial processes involve a complex set of competing reactions that include several different species. Detailed kinetic modeling of such systems can shed light on the important pathways involved in various transformations and therefore can be used to optimize the process conditions for the desired product composition and properties. This review focuses on elucidating the various components involved in modeling the kinetics of pyrolysis and oxidation of polymers. The elementary free radical steps that constitute the chain reaction mechanism of gas-phase/nonpolar liquid-phase processes are outlined. Specification of the rate coefficients of the various reaction families, which is central to the theme of kinetics, is described. Construction of the reaction network on the basis of the types of end groups and reactive moieties in a polymer chain is discussed. Modeling frameworks based on the method of moments and kinetic Monte Carlo are evaluated using illustrations. Finally, the prospects and challenges in modeling biomass conversion are addressed. PMID:22468596

  14. Coupled Reactions "versus" Connected Reactions: Coupling Concepts with Terms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aledo, Juan Carlos

    2007-01-01

    A hallmark of living matter is its ability to extract and transform energy from the environment. Not surprisingly, biology students are required to take thermodynamics. The necessity of coupling exergonic reactions to endergonic processes is easily grasped by most undergraduate students. However, when addressing the thermodynamic concept of…

  15. (2SR,4aSR,8aSR)-6-Oxoperhydro­naphthalene-2-carboxylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Efthimiopoulos, Georgia; Davison, Mark; Lalancette, Roger A.; Thompson, Hugh W.

    2009-01-01

    In the title racemic compound, C11H16O3, the mol­ecule adopts a conformation that places its carboxyl group in an equatorial position. Mol­ecules aggregate by hydrogen-bond pairing of carboxyl groups, yielding centrosymmetric dimers that are arranged into layers in the (020) planes. PMID:21581624

  16. Reaction pathway for alkane dehydrocyclization

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Buchang; Davis, B.H.

    1996-08-01

    Naphtha reforming to produce high octane gasoline is an important process. Many reaction mechanisms are involved in this process. For example, the study of the fundamentals of this process led to the concept of bi- or poly-functional catalysis. The results of this study provide additional mechanistic information about the dehydrocyclization of an n-alkane to produce aromatics. The reaction coordinate diagram advanced to account for the observation of irreversible adsorption should be modified to account for the present results. 32 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Learning to predict chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Kayala, Matthew A; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Chen, Jonathan H; Baldi, Pierre

    2011-09-26

    Being able to predict the course of arbitrary chemical reactions is essential to the theory and applications of organic chemistry. Approaches to the reaction prediction problems can be organized around three poles corresponding to: (1) physical laws; (2) rule-based expert systems; and (3) inductive machine learning. Previous approaches at these poles, respectively, are not high throughput, are not generalizable or scalable, and lack sufficient data and structure to be implemented. We propose a new approach to reaction prediction utilizing elements from each pole. Using a physically inspired conceptualization, we describe single mechanistic reactions as interactions between coarse approximations of molecular orbitals (MOs) and use topological and physicochemical attributes as descriptors. Using an existing rule-based system (Reaction Explorer), we derive a restricted chemistry data set consisting of 1630 full multistep reactions with 2358 distinct starting materials and intermediates, associated with 2989 productive mechanistic steps and 6.14 million unproductive mechanistic steps. And from machine learning, we pose identifying productive mechanistic steps as a statistical ranking, information retrieval problem: given a set of reactants and a description of conditions, learn a ranking model over potential filled-to-unfilled MO interactions such that the top-ranked mechanistic steps yield the major products. The machine learning implementation follows a two-stage approach, in which we first train atom level reactivity filters to prune 94.00% of nonproductive reactions with a 0.01% error rate. Then, we train an ensemble of ranking models on pairs of interacting MOs to learn a relative productivity function over mechanistic steps in a given system. Without the use of explicit transformation patterns, the ensemble perfectly ranks the productive mechanism at the top 89.05% of the time, rising to 99.86% of the time when the top four are considered. Furthermore, the system

  18. Some Concepts in Reaction Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanyi, John C.

    1987-05-01

    The objective in this work has been one which I have shared with the two other 1986 Nobel lecturers in chemistry, D. R. Herschbach and Y. T. Lee, as well as with a wide group of colleagues and co-workers who have been responsible for bringing this field to its current state. That state is summarized in the title; we now have some concepts relevant to the motions of atoms and molecules in simple reactions, and some examples of the application of these concepts. We are, however, richer in vocabulary than in literature. The great epics of reaction dynamics remain to be written. I shall confine myself to some simple stories.

  19. Learning to Predict Chemical Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kayala, Matthew A.; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Chen, Jonathan H.

    2011-01-01

    Being able to predict the course of arbitrary chemical reactions is essential to the theory and applications of organic chemistry. Approaches to the reaction prediction problems can be organized around three poles corresponding to: (1) physical laws; (2) rule-based expert systems; and (3) inductive machine learning. Previous approaches at these poles respectively are not high-throughput, are not generalizable or scalable, or lack sufficient data and structure to be implemented. We propose a new approach to reaction prediction utilizing elements from each pole. Using a physically inspired conceptualization, we describe single mechanistic reactions as interactions between coarse approximations of molecular orbitals (MOs) and use topological and physicochemical attributes as descriptors. Using an existing rule-based system (Reaction Explorer), we derive a restricted chemistry dataset consisting of 1630 full multi-step reactions with 2358 distinct starting materials and intermediates, associated with 2989 productive mechanistic steps and 6.14 million unproductive mechanistic steps. And from machine learning, we pose identifying productive mechanistic steps as a statistical ranking, information retrieval, problem: given a set of reactants and a description of conditions, learn a ranking model over potential filled-to-unfilled MO interactions such that the top ranked mechanistic steps yield the major products. The machine learning implementation follows a two-stage approach, in which we first train atom level reactivity filters to prune 94.00% of non-productive reactions with a 0.01% error rate. Then, we train an ensemble of ranking models on pairs of interacting MOs to learn a relative productivity function over mechanistic steps in a given system. Without the use of explicit transformation patterns, the ensemble perfectly ranks the productive mechanism at the top 89.05% of the time, rising to 99.86% of the time when the top four are considered. Furthermore, the system

  20. Vision 2020. Reaction Engineering Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Klipstein, David H.; Robinson, Sharon

    2001-01-01

    The Reaction Engineering Roadmap is a part of an industry- wide effort to create a blueprint of the research and technology milestones that are necessary to achieve longterm industry goals. This report documents the results of a workshop focused on the research needs, technology barriers, and priorities of the chemical industry as they relate to reaction engineering viewed first by industrial use (basic chemicals; specialty chemicals; pharmaceuticals; and polymers) and then by technology segment (reactor system selection, design, and scale-up; chemical mechanism development and property estimation; dealing with catalysis; and new, nonstandard reactor types).

  1. Reaction theory: Status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, A. M.; Gómez-Camacho, J.

    2016-05-01

    The current status of the reaction theory of nuclear collisions involving weakly-bound exotic nuclei is presented. The problem is addressed within the Continuum Discretized Coupled Channel (CDCC) framework, recalling its foundations and applications, as well as its connection with the Faddeev formalism. Recent developments and improvements of the method, such as core and target excitations and the extension to three-body projectiles, are presented. The use of the CDCC wave function in the calculation of inclusive breakup reactions is also introduced.

  2. Reactions and reaction intermediates on iron surfaces. III. Reactions of aldehydes and ketones on Fe(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Benziger, J.B.; Madix, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The reactions of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acetone on Fe(100) were studied by temperature-programmed reaction spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were observed to react with adsorbed hydrogen to form adsorbed alkoxy intermediates. These reactions occurred at low temperature (ca. 200 K). In the absence of adsorbed hydrogen, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde decomposed to adsorbed CO and hydrogen. This reaction was also observed at low temperatures. On an initially clean surface the aldehydes first decomposed, forming adsorbed hydrogen which subsequently reacted with adsorbed aldehyde to form an alkoxy intermediate. The alkoxy intermediates reacted to form CO and H/sub 2/ primarily, with lesser amounts of alcohol, aldehyde, and hydrocarbon products. Acetone reacted differently from the aldehydes and did not appear to form an alkoxy intermediate. XPS results suggested that acetone and acetaldehyde did not adsorb in their keto form on the surface and it is suggested that they adsorbed as enol intermediates. The distinct reaction behavior of acetone may be due to these enol intermediates.

  3. Runaway Reaction: Solving for X.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartz, Solveig A.

    2003-01-01

    This article examines the runaway reaction as it was displayed by Barry, a 14-year-old eighth-grade boy with learning disabilities. It identifies some of the common characteristics of this response and proposes school intervention methods. Functional behavioral assessments and strength-based assessments are encouraged, along with using strategy…

  4. Teachers' Reactions to Children's Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesdale, Drew; Pickering, Kaye

    2006-01-01

    Drawing on social schema theory (Fiske & Taylor, 1991) and social identity theory (Tajfel & Turner, 1979), this study examined the impact on teachers' reactions to children's aggression of three variables, two of which were related to the aggressors and one was related to the teachers. Experienced female elementary school teachers (N=90) each read…

  5. Severe immediate reaction to nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo-Garijo, M A; Cordobés-Duran, C; Lamilla-Yerga, A M; Moreno-Gastón, I

    2007-01-01

    Nabumetone is a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory (NSAID) prodrug that inhibits cyclooxygenase-2. It has been recommended as a safe alternative in most patients with hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs. Systemic reactions caused by nabumetone are not frequent. We report 2 cases of immediate systemic reactions due to nabumetone. The first case involved a 68-year-old woman who developed immediate generalized pruritus, erythema, morbilliform eruption, swollen tongue sensation, diarrhea, and hypotension after the ingestion of a single dose of nabumetone. In the second case, a 77-year-old woman developed generalized pruritus, palm erythema, colic abdominal pain, diarrhea, dizziness, tightness of the chest, dyspnea, and hypotension immediately after oral intake of nabumetone. Both patients had previously tolerated this drug. Since these episodes, they have avoided nabumetone. Skin prick tests with nabumetone (10 and 100 mg/mL) were negative. Oral challenge tests with other NSAIDs, even of the same group as nabumetone, were negative in both patients. The mechanisms responsible for the reaction were not established. PMID:17694703

  6. Reactions to threatening health messages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Threatening health messages that focus on severity are popular, but frequently have no effect or even a counterproductive effect on behavior change. This paradox (i.e. wide application despite low effectiveness) may be partly explained by the intuitive appeal of threatening communication: it may be hard to predict the defensive reactions occurring in response to fear appeals. We examine this hypothesis by using two studies by Brown and colleagues, which provide evidence that threatening health messages in the form of distressing imagery in anti-smoking and anti-alcohol campaigns cause defensive reactions. Methods We simulated both Brown et al. experiments, asking participants to estimate the reactions of the original study subjects to the threatening health information (n = 93). Afterwards, we presented the actual original study outcomes. One week later, we assessed whether this knowledge of the actual study outcomes helped participants to more successfully estimate the effectiveness of the threatening health information (n = 72). Results Results showed that participants were initially convinced of the effectiveness of threatening health messages and were unable to anticipate the defensive reactions that in fact occurred. Furthermore, these estimates did not improve after participants had been explained the dynamics of threatening communication as well as what the effects of the threatening communication had been in reality. Conclusions These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the effectiveness of threatening health messages is intuitively appealing. What is more, providing empirical evidence against the use of threatening health messages has very little effect on this intuitive appeal. PMID:23171445

  7. Knoevenagel Reaction of Unprotected Sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrmann, Marie-Christine

    The Knoevenagel reaction of unprotected sugars was investigated in the 1950s using zinc chloride as promoter. The so-called Garcia Gonzalez reaction had been almost forgotten for 50 years, until the emergence of new water tolerant catalysts having Lewis acid behavior. The reaction was thus reinvestigated and optimal conditions have been found to prepare trihydroxylated furan derivatives from pentose or β-tetrahydrofuranylfuran from hexoses with non-cyclic β-keto ester or β-diketones. Other valuable compounds such as β-linked tetrahydrobenzofuranyl glycosides or hydroxyalkyl-3,3,6,6,-tetramethyl-3,4,5,6,7,9-hexahydro-1H-xanthene-1,8(2H)-dione can be obtained using cyclic β-dicarbonylic derivatives. Apart from one report in the 1950s, the Knoevenagel reaction of unprotected carbohydrate in basic condition has been studied only in the mid-1980s to prepare C-glycosyl barbiturates from barbituric acids and, later on, from non-cyclic β-diketones, β-C-glycosidic ketones. The efficient method exploited to prepare such compounds has found an industrial development in cosmetics.

  8. Adverse drug reactions in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Ferner, R E

    2015-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) - that is, unintended and harmful responses to medicines - are important to dermatologists because many present with cutaneous signs and because dermatological treatments can cause serious ADRs. The detection of ADRs to new drugs is often delayed because they have a long latency or are rare or unexpected. This means that ADRs to newer agents emerge only slowly after marketing. ADRs are part of the differential diagnosis of unusual rashes. A good drug history that includes details of drug dose, time-course of the reaction and factors that may make the patient more susceptible, will help. For example, Stevens-Johnson syndrome with abacavir is much commoner in patients with HLA-B*5701, and has a characteristic time course. Newer agents have brought newer reactions; for example, acneiform rashes associated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors such as erlotinib. Older systemic agents used to treat skin disease, including corticosteroids and methotrexate, cause important ADRs. The adverse effects of newer biological agents used in dermatology are becoming clearer; for example, hypersensitivity reactions or loss of efficacy from antibody formation and progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy due to reactivation of latent JC (John Cunningham) virus infections during efalizumab treatment. Unusual or serious harm from medicines, including ADRs, medication errors and overdose, should be reported. The UK Yellow Card scheme is online, and patients can report their own ADRs. PMID:25622648

  9. Severe allergic reaction to Dermabond.

    PubMed

    Perry, Arthur W; Sosin, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The use of 2-octyl cyanoacrylate (Dermabond; Ethicon, Somerville, NJ) for wound closure is increasingly popular. Problems with Dermabond are generally related to application techniques and rarely relate to the chemical nature of the adhesive. This article describes a severe allergic reaction to Dermabond following breast augmentation/mastopexy. PMID:19717065

  10. The Pitfalls of Precipitation Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slade, Peter W.; Rayner-Canham, Geoffrey W.

    1990-01-01

    Described are some of the difficulties presented in these reactions by competing equilibria that are usually ignored. Situations involving acid-base equilibria, solubility product calculations, the use of ammonia as a complexing agent, and semiquantitative comparisons of solubility product values are discussed. (CW)

  11. Reduction of chemical reaction models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to reconcile the different terminologies pertaining to reduction of chemical reaction models. The approaches considered include global modeling, response modeling, detailed reduction, chemical lumping, and statistical lumping. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods are pointed out.

  12. Dehydrogenative Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Takuya; Kurahashi, Takuya; Matsubara, Seijiro

    2011-10-01

    The dehydrogenative cycloaddition of dieneynes, which possess a diene in the form of a styrene moiety and a dienophile in the form of an alkyne moiety, produces naphthalene derivatives when heated. It was found that a key requirement of this process is the presence of a silyl group attached to the alkyne moiety, which forces a dehydrogenation reaction to occur. PMID:21905638

  13. Interfacial Reaction Studies Using ONIOM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    2003-01-01

    In this report, we focus on the calculations of the energetics and chemical kinetics of heterogeneous reactions for Organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE). The work described in this report builds upon our own previous thermochemical and chemical kinetics studies. The first of these articles refers to the prediction of thermochemical properties, and the latter one deals with the prediction of rate constants for gaseous homolytic dissociation reactions. The calculations of this investigation are at the microscopic level. The systems chosen consisted of a gallium nitride (GaN) substrate, and molecular nitrogen (N2) and ammonia (NH3) as adsorbants. The energetics for the adsorption and the adsorbant dissociation processes were estimated, and reaction rate constants for the dissociation reactions of free and adsorbed molecules were predicted. The energetics for substrate decomposition was also computed. The ONIOM method, implemented in the Gaussian98 program, was used to perform the calculations. This approach has been selected since it allows dividing the system into two layers that can be treated at different levels of accuracy. The atoms of the substrate were modeled using molecular mechanics6 with universal force fields, whereas the adsorbed molecules were approximated using quantum mechanics, based on density functional theory methods with B3LYP functionals and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. Calculations for the substrate were performed in slabs of several unit cells in each direction. The N2 and NH3 adsorbates were attached to a central location at the Ga-lined surface.

  14. Quasistationary distributions for autocatalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, R.W.; Pollett, P.K.

    1987-01-01

    The authors provide simple conditions for the existence of quasistationary distributions that can be used to describe the long-term behavior of open autocatalytic reaction systems. They illustrate with reference to a particular example that the quasistationary distribution is close to the usual stationary diffusion approximation.

  15. Reactions of dehydrodiferulates with ammonia.

    PubMed

    Azarpira, Ali; Lu, Fachuang; Ralph, John

    2011-10-01

    Lignocellulosic materials derived from forages and agricultural residues are potential sustainable resources for production of bioethanol or other liquid biofuels. However, the natural recalcitrance of such materials to enzymatic hydrolysis is a major obstacle in their efficient utilization. In grasses, much of the recalcitrance is associated with ferulate cross-linking in the cell wall, i.e., with polysaccharide-polysaccharide cross-linking that results from ferulate dehydrodimerization or with lignin-polysaccharide cross-linking that results from the incorporation of (polysaccharide-bound) ferulates or diferulates into lignin, mainly via free-radical coupling reactions. Many pretreatment methods have been developed to address recalcitrance, with ammonia pretreatments in general, and the AFEX (Ammonia Fiber Expansion) process in particular, among the more promising methods. In order to understand the polysaccharide liberating reactions involved in the cleavage of diferulate cell wall cross-links during AFEX pretreatment, reaction products from five esters modeling the major diferulates in grass cell walls treated under AFEX-like conditions were separated and characterized by NMR and HR-MS. Results from this study indicate that, beyond the anticipated amide products, a range of degradation products derive from an array of cleavage and substitution reactions, and reveal various pathways for incorporating ammonia-based nitrogen into biomass. PMID:21853208

  16. Nuclear excitations and reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Fallieros, S.; Levin, F.S.

    1983-07-31

    This is an interim report describing completed, continuing and proposed research activities for the period 1 August 1983-31 January 1985. These activities include studies of few-body systems, nuclear reaction models, atomic and molecular structure, nuclear electroexcitation and photon scattering from nuclei.

  17. FOREIGN BODY REACTION TO BIOMATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, James M.; Rodriguez, Analiz; Chang, David T.

    2008-01-01

    The foreign body reaction composed of macrophages and foreign body giant cells is the end-stage response of the inflammatory and wound healing responses following implantation of a medical device, prosthesis, or biomaterial. A brief, focused overview of events leading to the foreign body reaction is presented. The major focus of this review is on factors that modulate the interaction of macrophages and foreign body giant cells on synthetic surfaces where the chemical, physical, and morphological characteristics of the synthetic surface are considered to play a role in modulating cellular events. These events in the foreign body reaction include protein adsorption, monocyte/macrophage adhesion, macrophage fusion to form foreign body giant cells, consequences of the foreign body response on biomaterials, and cross-talk between macrophages/foreign body giant cells and inflammatory/wound healing cells. Biomaterial surface properties play an important role in modulating the foreign body reaction in the first two to four weeks following implantation of a medical device, even though the foreign body reaction at the tissue/material interface is present for the in vivo lifetime of the medical device. An understanding of the foreign body reaction is important as the foreign body reaction may impact the biocompatibility (safety) of the medical device, prosthesis, or implanted biomaterial and may significantly impact short- and long-term tissue responses with tissue-engineered constructs containing proteins, cells, and other biological components for use in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Our perspective has been on the inflammatory and wound healing response to implanted materials, devices, and tissue-engineered constructs. The incorporation of biological components of allogeneic or xenogeneic origin as well as stem cells into tissue-engineered or regenerative approaches opens up a myriad of other challenges. An in depth understanding of how the immune system

  18. Reactions of arsine with hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Hatlelid, K.M.; Brailsford, C.; Carter, D.E.

    1996-02-09

    The mechanism of arsine (AsH{sub 3}) induced hemolysis was studied in vitro using isolated red blood cells (RBCs) from the rat or dog. AsH{sub 3}-induced hemolysis of dog red blood cells was completely blocked by carbon monoxide (CO) preincubation and was reduced by pure oxygen (O{sub 2}) compared to incubations in air. Since CO and O{sub 2} bind to heme and also reduced hemolysis, these results suggested a reaction between AsH{sub 3} and hemoglobin in the hemeligand binding pocket or with the heme iron. Further, sodium nitrite induction of methemoglobin (metHb) to 85% and 34% of total Hb in otherwise intact RBCs resulted in 56% and 16% decreases in hemolysis, respectively, after incubation for 4 h. This provided additional evidence for the involvement of hemoglobin in the AsH{sub 3}-induced hemolysis mechanism. Reactions between AsH{sub 3} and hemoglobin were studied in solutions of purified dog hemoglobin. Spectrophotometric studies of the reaction of AsH{sub 3} with various purified hemoglobin species revealed that AsH{sub 3} reacted with HbO{sub 2} to produce metHb and, eventually, degraded Hb characterized by gross precipitation of the protein. AsH{sub 3} did not alter the spectrum of deoxyHb and did not cause degradation of metHb in oxygen, but bound to and reduced metHb in the absence of oxygen. These data indicate that a reaction of AsH{sub 3} with oxygenated hemoglobin, HbO{sub 2}, may lead to hemolysis, but there are reactions between AsH{sub 3} and metHb that may not be directly involved in the hemolytic process. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Adverse Drug Reactions in Dental Practice

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Adverse reactions may occur with any of the medications prescribed or administered in dental practice. Most of these reactions are somewhat predictable based on the pharmacodynamic properties of the drug. Others, such as allergic and pseudoallergic reactions, are less common and unrelated to normal drug action. This article will review the most common adverse reactions that are unrelated to drug allergy. PMID:24697823

  20. Experimental Demonstrations in Teaching Chemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugerat, Muhamad; Basheer, Sobhi

    2001-01-01

    Presents demonstrations of chemical reactions by employing different features of various compounds that can be altered after a chemical change occurs. Experimental activities include para- and dia-magnetism in chemical reactions, aluminum reaction with base, reaction of acid with carbonates, use of electrochemical cells for demonstrating chemical…

  1. [Gomori reactions in orthology and pathology].

    PubMed

    Wohlrab, F

    1990-01-01

    The following four basic histochemical reactions were developed by Gomori (1904-1957): 1. Silver impregnation of reticular fibres (1937); 2. Metal salt principle for detection of hydrolytic enzyme activity (1939); 3. Silver-methenamine reaction (1946); 4. Aldehyde fuchsin reaction (1950). These reactions and their modifications have assumed growing importance to expansion of knowledge, primarily on orthological and pathobiological problems. PMID:1694055

  2. Finding reaction paths using the potential energy as reaction coordinate.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Mogas, Antoni; Giménez, Xavier; Bofill, Josep Maria

    2008-03-14

    The intrinsic reaction coordinate curve (IRC), normally proposed as a representation of a reaction path, is parametrized as a function of the potential energy rather than the arc-length. This change in the parametrization of the curve implies that the values of the energy of the potential energy surface points, where the IRC curve is located, play the role of reaction coordinate. We use Caratheodory's relation to derive in a rigorous manner the proposed parametrization of the IRC path. Since this Caratheodory's relation is the basis of the theory of calculus of variations, then this fact permits to reformulate the IRC model from this mathematical theory. In this mathematical theory, the character of the variational solution (either maximum or minimum) is given through the Weierstrass E-function. As proposed by Crehuet and Bofill [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 234105 (2005)], we use the minimization of the Weierstrass E-function, as a function of the potential energy, to locate an IRC path between two minima from an arbitrary curve on the potential energy surface, and then join these two minima. We also prove, from the analysis of the Weierstrass E-function, the mathematical bases for the algorithms proposed to locate the IRC path. The proposed algorithm is applied to a set of examples. Finally, the algorithm is used to locate a discontinuous, or broken, IRC path, namely, when the path connects two first order saddle points through a valley-ridged inflection point. PMID:18345872

  3. Finding reaction paths using the potential energy as reaction coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Mogas, Antoni; Giménez, Xavier; Bofill, Josep Maria

    2008-03-01

    The intrinsic reaction coordinate curve (IRC), normally proposed as a representation of a reaction path, is parametrized as a function of the potential energy rather than the arc-length. This change in the parametrization of the curve implies that the values of the energy of the potential energy surface points, where the IRC curve is located, play the role of reaction coordinate. We use Carathéodory's relation to derive in a rigorous manner the proposed parametrization of the IRC path. Since this Carathéodory's relation is the basis of the theory of calculus of variations, then this fact permits to reformulate the IRC model from this mathematical theory. In this mathematical theory, the character of the variational solution (either maximum or minimum) is given through the Weierstrass E-function. As proposed by Crehuet and Bofill [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 234105 (2005)], we use the minimization of the Weierstrass E-function, as a function of the potential energy, to locate an IRC path between two minima from an arbitrary curve on the potential energy surface, and then join these two minima. We also prove, from the analysis of the Weierstrass E-function, the mathematical bases for the algorithms proposed to locate the IRC path. The proposed algorithm is applied to a set of examples. Finally, the algorithm is used to locate a discontinuous, or broken, IRC path, namely, when the path connects two first order saddle points through a valley-ridged inflection point.

  4. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 74 Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database (Web, free access)   The Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database contains thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions that have been recently published in the Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data (JPCRD). For each reaction the following information is provided: the reference for the data, the reaction studied, the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number, the method of measurement, the data and an evaluation thereof.

  5. Investigation of oxygen reduction reaction kinetics on Sm 0.5Sr 0.5CoO 3- δ cathode supported on Ce 0.85Sm 0.075Nd 0.075O 2- δ electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhan; Liu, Xingmin; Bergman, Bill; Zhao, Zhe

    Sm 0.5Sr 0.5CoO 3- δ (SSC) cathode prepared by a glycine-nitrate process (GNP) is investigated for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) based on Ce 0.85Sm 0.075Nd 0.075O 2- δ (SNDC) electrolyte. SSC forms cubic perovskite structure after being annealed at 1100 °C for 5 h. SSC cathode and SNDC electrolyte can retain their own structure and there is no reaction between the two compositions. The microstructure of the cathode and the interfaces between cathodes and SNDC electrolytes are studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after sintering at various temperatures. Impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal that area specific resistances (ASRs) of SSC-SNDC30 cathode are much lower than those of SSC cathode. Kinetics of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on porous SSC cathode is investigated by analysis of impedance spectra. Medium-frequency conductivities show no dependency on oxygen partial pressure (PO2) , which can be attributed to the oxygen ions transfer across the electrode/electrolyte interface. The dependencies of low-frequency conductivities on oxygen partial pressure (PO2) vary in the range from ca. 0.31 to ca. 0.34 and increase with the increasing temperatures. The low-frequency electrode process is a mixing process involving oxygen reduction reaction related to atomic oxygen and oxygen ions conduction step together with total charge-transfer step. IR-compensated current density (i)-overpotential (η) relationship is established and the exchange current densities i o originated from high-field approximations are much higher than those of low-field approximations and a.c. impedance data under OCV state. It demonstrates the polarization overpotential has great effect on the kinetics of ORR. The polarization current is observed to increase with time in the long-term stability measurement, which can be ascribed to the propagation process of oxygen vacancies.

  6. Modelling reaction kinetics inside cells

    PubMed Central

    Grima, Ramon; Schnell, Santiago

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, advances in molecular biology such as the development of non-invasive single molecule imaging techniques have given us a window into the intricate biochemical activities that occur inside cells. In this article we review four distinct theoretical and simulation frameworks: (1) non-spatial and deterministic, (2) spatial and deterministic, (3) non-spatial and stochastic and (4) spatial and stochastic. Each framework can be suited to modelling and interpreting intracellular reaction kinetics. By estimating the fundamental length scales, one can roughly determine which models are best suited for the particular reaction pathway under study. We discuss differences in prediction between the four modelling methodologies. In particular we show that taking into account noise and space does not simply add quantitative predictive accuracy but may also lead to qualitatively different physiological predictions, unaccounted for by classical deterministic models. PMID:18793122

  7. Water-gas shift reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent kinetic and mechanistic studies of the water-gas shift reaction, H/sub 2/O(g) + CO(g) reversible CO/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/(g), catalyzed by iron and copper catalysts are reviewed. Composition, structure, active sites, preparation methods, additives, and poisons are discussed relative to each catalyst. New water-gas shift reaction catalyst systems studied are Mo-magnesia, Ni - Mo, Co - Mo, sulfided Co - Mo - Cs, sulfided Co - Mo, sulfided Ni - Mo, Co - Mo - Ni with added alkaki, and Co - Mo with added alkali, Cesium carbonate - cesium acetate - potassium carbonate or potassium acetate - Co - Mo is claimed to be an especially active catalyst. These new catalyst systems are sulfur tolerant and hold promise as catalysts for hydrogenation of high-sulfur coals. (BLM)

  8. Electrochemical promotion of catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbihl, R.

    2010-05-01

    The electrochemical promotion of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions (EPOC) became feasible through the use of porous metal electrodes interfaced to a solid electrolyte. With the O 2- conducting yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the Na + conducting β″-Al 2O 3 (β-alumina), and several other types of solid electrolytes the EPOC effect has been demonstrated for about 100 reaction systems in studies conducted mainly in the mbar range. Surface science investigations showed that the physical basis for the EPOC effect lies in the electrochemically induced spillover of oxygen and alkali metal, respectively, onto the surface of the metal electrodes. For the catalytic promotion effect general concepts and mechanistic schemes were proposed but these concepts and schemes are largely speculative. Applying surface analytical tools to EPOC systems the proposed mechanistic schemes can be verified or invalidated. This report summarizes the progress which has been achieved in the mechanistic understanding of the EPOC effect.

  9. Investigating Reaction-Driven Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.; Savage, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many metamorphic reactions lead to large volume changes, and potentially to reaction-driven cracking [1,2]. Large-scale hydration of mantle peridotite to produce serpentine or talc is invoked to explain the rheology of plate boundaries, the nature of earthquakes, and the seismic properties of slow-spread ocean crust and the 'mantle wedge' above subduction zones. Carbonation of peridotite may be an important sink in the global carbon cycle. Zones of 100% magnesite + quartz replacing peridotite, up to 200 m thick, formed where oceanic mantle was thrust over carbonate-bearing metasediments in Oman. Talc + carbonate is an important component of the matrix in subduction mélanges at Santa Catalina Island , California, and the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt, Japan. Engineered systems to emulate natural mineral carbonation could provide relatively inexpensive CO2 capture and storage [3]. More generally, engineered reaction-driven cracking could supplement or replace hydraulic fracture in geothermal systems, solution mining, and extraction of tight oil and gas. The controls on reaction-driven cracking are poorly understood. Hydration and carbonation reactions can be self-limiting, since they potentially reduce permeability and armor reactive surfaces [4]. Also, in some cases, hydration or carbonation may take place at constant volume. Small changes in volume due to precipitation of solid products increases stress, destabilizing solid reactants, until precipitation and dissolution rates become equal at a steady state stress [5]. In a third case, volume change due to precipitation of solid products causes brittle failure. This has been invoked on qualitative grounds to explain, e.g., complete serpentinization of mantle peridotite [6]. Below ~ 300°C, the available potential energy for hydration and carbonation of olivine could produce stresses of 100's of MPa [2], sufficient to fracture rocks to 10 km depth or more, causing brittle failure below the steady state stress required

  10. Propulsive Reaction Control System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Phan, Linh H.; Serricchio, Frederick; San Martin, Alejandro M.

    2011-01-01

    This software models a propulsive reaction control system (RCS) for guidance, navigation, and control simulation purposes. The model includes the drive electronics, the electromechanical valve dynamics, the combustion dynamics, and thrust. This innovation follows the Mars Science Laboratory entry reaction control system design, and has been created to meet the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry, descent, and landing simulation needs. It has been built to be plug-and-play on multiple MSL testbeds [analysis, Monte Carlo, flight software development, hardware-in-the-loop, and ATLO (assembly, test and launch operations) testbeds]. This RCS model is a C language program. It contains two main functions: the RCS electronics model function that models the RCS FPGA (field-programmable-gate-array) processing and commanding of the RCS valve, and the RCS dynamic model function that models the valve and combustion dynamics. In addition, this software provides support functions to initialize the model states, set parameters, access model telemetry, and access calculated thruster forces.

  11. Prebiotic condensation reactions using cyanamide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, E.; Nooner, D. W.; Eichberg, J.; Epps, D. E.; Oro, J.

    1978-01-01

    Condensation reactions in cyanamide, 4-amino-5-imidazole-carboxamide and cyanamide, imidazole systems under dehydrating conditions at moderate temperatures (60 to 100 deg C) were investigated. The cyanamide, imidazole system was used for synthesis of palmitoylglycerols from ammonium palmitate and glycerol. With the addition of deoxythymidine to the former system, P1, P2-dideoxythymidine 5 prime-phosphate was obtained; the same cyanamide, 4-amino-5-imidazole-carboxamide system was used to synthesize deoxythymidine oligonucleotides using deoxythymidine 5 prime-phosphate and deoxythymidine 5 prime-triphosphate, and peptides using glycine, phenylalanine or isoleucine with adenosine 5 prime-triphosphate. The pH requirements for these reactions make their prebiotic significance questionable; however, it is conceivable that they could occur in stable pockets of low interlayer acidity in a clay such as montmorillonite.

  12. Programmability of Chemical Reaction Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Matthew; Soloveichik, David; Winfree, Erik; Bruck, Jehoshua

    Motivated by the intriguing complexity of biochemical circuitry within individual cells we study Stochastic Chemical Reaction Networks (SCRNs), a formal model that considers a set of chemical reactions acting on a finite number of molecules in a well-stirred solution according to standard chemical kinetics equations. SCRNs have been widely used for describing naturally occurring (bio)chemical systems, and with the advent of synthetic biology they become a promising language for the design of artificial biochemical circuits. Our interest here is the computational power of SCRNs and how they relate to more conventional models of computation. We survey known connections and give new connections between SCRNs and Boolean Logic Circuits, Vector Addition Systems, Petri nets, Gate Implementability, Primitive Recursive Functions, Register Machines, Fractran, and Turing Machines. A theme to these investigations is the thin line between decidable and undecidable questions about SCRN behavior.

  13. Nova reaction rates and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, S.; Herlitzius, C.; Fiehl, J.

    2011-04-01

    Oxygen-neon novae form a subset of classical novae events known to freshly synthesize nuclei up to mass number A≲40. Because several gamma-ray emitters lie in this mass range, these novae are also interesting candidates for gamma-ray astronomy. The properties of excited states within those nuclei in this mass region play a critical role in determining the resonant (p,γ) reaction rates, themselves, largely unknown for the unstable nuclei. We describe herein a new Doppler shift lifetime facility at the Maier-Leibnitz tandem laboratory, Technische Universität München, with which we will map out important resonant (p,γ) nova reaction rates.

  14. MEANS FOR TERMINATING NUCLEAR REACTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, C.M.

    1959-02-17

    An apparatus is presented for use in a reactor of the heterogeneous, fluid cooled type for the purpose of quickly terminating the reaction, the coolant being circulated through coolant tubes extending through the reactor core. Several of the tubes in the critical region are connected through valves to a tank containing a poisoning fluid having a high neutron capture crosssection and to a reservoir. When it is desired to quickly terminate the reaction, the valves are operated to permit the flow of the poisoning fluid through these particular tubes and into the reservoir while normal coolant is being circulated through the remaining tubes. The apparatus is designed to prevent contamination of the primary coolant by the poisoning fluid.

  15. Anaphylactic reaction to intravenous diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranju; Bansal, Deepak; Baduni, Neha; Vajifdar, Homay

    2011-01-01

    Diclofenac sodium is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug widely used as an opioid sparing agent for postoperative analgesia. Anaphylaxis due to intravenous diclofenac sodium is very rare. We report a case of anaphylactic reaction to IV diclofenac sodium, occurring postoperatively in a 25-year-old primigravida, the clinical features of which mimicked pulmonary embolism. The rarity, clinical importance and the diagnostic dilemma associated prompted us to report this case. PMID:21633544

  16. Multicomponent reactions in nucleoside chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Buchowicz, Włodzimierz

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review covers sixty original publications dealing with the application of multicomponent reactions (MCRs) in the synthesis of novel nucleoside analogs. The reported approaches were employed for modifications of the parent nucleoside core or for de novo construction of a nucleoside scaffold from non-nucleoside substrates. The cited references are grouped according to the usually recognized types of the MCRs. Biochemical properties of the novel nucleoside analogs are also presented (if provided by the authors). PMID:25161730

  17. (Laser enhanced chemical reaction studies)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies of dynamic molecular processes are described with particular emphasis on the use of a powerful infrared diode laser probe technique developed in our laboratory. This technique allows us to determine the final states of CO{sub 2} (and other molecules) produced by collisions, photofragmentation, or chemical reactions with a spectral resolution of 0.0003 cm{sup {minus}1} and a time resolution of 10{sup {minus}7} sec. Such high spectral resolution provides a detailed picture of the vibrational and rotational states of molecules produced by these dynamic events. We have used this experimental method to probe collisions between hot hydrogen/deuterium atoms and CO{sub 2}, between O({sup 1}D) atoms and CO{sub 2}, to study the final states of DC1 molecules produced as a result of the reactions of hot Cl atoms, and to investigate the dynamics of the reaction between OH and CO molecules. Advances in our techniques over the past two years have allowed us to identify and study more than 200 final rotational states in ten different vibrational levels of CO{sub 2} encompassing all 3 normal modes, many overtones, and combination states of the molecule. We have extended the technique to probe a variety of new molecules such as OCS, N{sub 2}O, DCl, and CS{sub 2}. All of this work is aimed at providing experimental tests for polyatomic molecule potential energy surfaces, chemical transition states in complex systems, and theories of reaction dynamic in molecules with more than 3 atoms.

  18. Radiation recall reaction causing cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Masri, Sofia Carolina; Misselt, Andrew James; Dudek, Arkadiusz; Konety, Suma H

    2014-01-01

    Radiation recall phenomenon is a tissue reaction that develops within a previously irradiated area, precipitated by the subsequent administration of certain chemotherapeutic agents. It commonly affects the skin, but can also involve internal organs with functional consequences. To our best knowledge, this phenomenon has never been reported as a complication on the heart and should be consider as a potential cause of cardiotoxicity. PMID:24755097

  19. Photosynthetic reaction centers in bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J.R. Univ. of Chicago, IL ); Schiffer, M. )

    1990-07-30

    The photochemistry of photosynthesis begins in complexes called reaction centers. These have become model systems to study the fundamental process by which plants and bacteria convert and store solar energy as chemical free energy. In green plants, photosynthesis occurs in two systems, each of which contains a different reaction center, working in series. In one, known as photosystem 1, oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP[sup +]) is reduced to NADPH for use in a series of dark reactions called the Calvin cycle, named for Nobel Laureate Melvin Calvin, by which carbon dioxide is converted into useful fuels such as carbohydrates and sugars. In the other half of the photosynthetic machinery of green plants, called photosystem 2, water is oxidized to produce molecular oxygen. A different form of photosynthesis occurs in photosynthetic bacteria, which typically live at the bottom of ponds and feed on organic debris. Two main types of photosynthetic bacteria exist: purple and green. Neither type liberates oxygen from water. Instead, the bacteria feed on organic media or inorganic materials, such as sulfides, which are easier to reduce or oxidize than carbon dioxide or water. Perhaps in consequence, their photosynthetic machinery is simpler than that of green, oxygen-evolving plants and their primary photochemistry is better understood.

  20. Primary reactions of sensory rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, I.; Sieg, A.; Wegener, A. A.; Engelhard, M.; Boche, I.; Otsuka, M.; Oesterhelt, D.; Wachtveitl, J.; Zinth, W.

    2001-01-01

    The first steps in the photocycles of the archaeal photoreceptor proteins sensory rhodopsin (SR) I and II from Halobacterium salinarum and SRII from Natronobacterium pharaonis have been studied by ultrafast pump/probe spectroscopy and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. The data for both species of the blue-light receptor SRII suggests that their primary reactions are nearly analogous with a fast decay of the excited electronic state in 300–400 fs and a transition between two red-shifted product states in 4–5 ps. Thus SRII behaves similarly to bacteriorhodopsin. In contrast for SRI at pH 6.0, which absorbs in the orange part of the spectrum, a strongly increased fluorescence quantum yield and a drastically slower and biexponential decay of the excited electronic state occurring on the picosecond time scale (5 ps and 33 ps) is observed. The results suggest that the primary reactions are controlled by the charge distribution in the vicinity of the Schiff base and demonstrate that there is no direct connection between absorption properties and reaction dynamics for the retinal protein family. PMID:11158578

  1. Variable expansion ratio reaction engine

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, W.R.

    1987-11-24

    A variable expansion ratio reaction rocket engine for producing a mainstream of hot combustion gases is described comprising: a reaction chamber including a thrust nozzle portion formed by converging and diverging wall portions in which the diverging portion terminates in a gas discharge and through which the combustion gases pass; a nozzle throat section at the juncture of the convergent-divergent wall portions; rows of circumferentially and axially spaced injection ports formed within the wall portions and communicating therethrough and into the reaction chamber; fluid conduit means in communication with the injection ports; at least one high pressure pump in communication with the fluid conduit means; a fluid containing storage tank including a conduit in communication with the high pressure pump; and means for selectively controlling a flow of fluid out of the tank, through the pump and to the fluid conduit means and the injection ports for controlling a cross-sectional area of the mainstream combustion gases passing through the thrust nozzle.

  2. Transfer reactions with heavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1986-04-01

    Transfer reactions for several transuranium elements are studied. (/sup 248/Cm, /sup 249/Bk, /sup 249/CF, /sup 254/Es), /sup 16,18/O, /sup 20,22/Ne, and /sup 40,48/Ca projectiles are used. The production of neutron-rich heavy actinides is enhanced by the use of neutron-rich projectiles /sup 18/O and /sup 22/Ne. The maxima of the isotopic distributions occur at only 2 to 3 mass numbers larger for /sup 48/Ca than for /sup 40/Ca reactions with /sup 248/Cm. The cross sections decrease rapidly with the number of nucleons transferred. The use of neutron-rich targets favors the production of neutron-rich isotopes. ''Cold'' heavy targets are produced. Comparisons with simple calculations of the product excitation energies assuming binary transfers indicate that the maxima of the isotopic distributions occur at the lightest product isotope for which the energy exceeds the reaction barrier. The cross sections for transfer of the same nucleon clusters appear to be comparable for a wide variety of systems. 23 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Catalytic reactions in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, R

    2001-12-01

    The chemical industry is under considerable pressure to replace many of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are currently used as solvents in organic synthesis. The toxic and/or hazardous properties of many solvents, notably chlorinated hydrocarbons, combined with serious environmental issues, such as atmospheric emissions and contamination of aqueous effluents is making their use prohibitive. This is an important driving force in the quest for novel reaction media. Curzons and coworkers, for example, recently noted that rigorous management of solvent use is likely to result in the greatest improvement towards greener processes for the manufacture of pharmaceutical intermediates. The current emphasis on novel reaction media is also motivated by the need for efficient methods for recycling homogeneous catalysts. The key to waste minimisation in chemicals manufacture is the widespread substitution of classical 'stoichiometric' syntheses by atom efficient, catalytic alternatives. In the context of homogeneous catalysis, efficient recycling of the catalyst is a conditio sine qua non for economically and environmentally attractive processes. Motivated by one or both of the above issues much attention has been devoted to homogeneous catalysis in aqueous biphasic and fluorous biphasic systems as well as in supercritical carbon dioxide. Similarly, the use of ionic liquids as novel reaction media may offer a convenient solution to both the solvent emission and the catalyst recycling problem. PMID:12239988

  4. Reaction Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-02-02

    The understanding of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is of paramount importance to our society today. In this review we outline the current state of the art in research on selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. Current in-situ surface science techniques have revealed several important features of catalytic selectivity. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy has shown us the importance of understanding the reaction intermediates and mechanism of a heterogeneous reaction, and can readily yield information as to the effect of temperature, pressure, catalyst geometry, surface promoters, and catalyst composition on the reaction mechanism. DFT calculations are quickly approaching the ability to assist in the interpretation of observed surface spectra, thereby making surface spectroscopy an even more powerful tool. HP-STM has revealed three vitally important parameters in heterogeneous selectivity: adsorbate mobility, catalyst mobility, and selective site-blocking. The development of size controlled nanoparticles from 0.8 to 10 nm, of controlled shape, and of controlled bimetallic composition has revealed several important variables for catalytic selectivity. Lastly, DFT calculations may be paving the way to guiding the composition choice for multi-metallic heterogeneous catalysis for the intelligent design of catalysts incorporating the many factors of selectivity we have learned.

  5. Electromagnetic wave propagation characteristics in unimolecular reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingpeng; Huang, Kama

    2016-01-01

    Microwave-assisted chemical reactions have attracted interests because of their benefits for enhancement of reaction rates. However, the problems, such as hot spots and thermal runaway, limit the application of microwaves in the chemical industry. To study the characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in a chemical reaction is critical to solve the problems. The research on the characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in the unimolecular reaction that is a simple model reaction, can be generalized to the research in a chemical reaction. The approximate expressions of the attenuation and dispersion characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in the unimolecular reaction are derived by the nonlinear propagation theory. Specially, when the reaction rate is zero, the derived approximate expressions can be reduced to the formulas in low-loss dispersive media. Moreover, a 1D mold is used to validate the feasibility of the approximate expressions. The influences of the reaction rate and initial reactant concentration on the characteristics are obtained.

  6. Microfabricated electrochemiluminescence cell for chemical reaction detection

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Hsueh, Yun-Tai; Smith, Rosemary L.

    2003-01-01

    A detector cell for a silicon-based or non-silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The detector cell is an electrochemiluminescence cell constructed of layers of silicon with a cover layer of glass, with spaced electrodes located intermediate various layers forming the cell. The cell includes a cavity formed therein and fluid inlets for directing reaction fluid therein. The reaction chamber and detector cell may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The ECL cell may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis.

  7. [Injectable fillers: adverse reactions and their management].

    PubMed

    Rzany, B; Bachmann, F; Nast, A

    2013-02-01

    Injectable fillers are one of the corner stones of aesthetic medicine. In general they are safe to use. However, adverse reactions may occur. These reactions may be acute, subacute or delayed, e.g. after decades. It is important to know these reactions and to be prepared so that they can be adequately treated, in view of the clinical symptoms, the injected material and if applicable other diseases/treatments that might trigger these reactions. Last but not least, all reactions should be reported either to specialized registries or regulatory agencies. Only then we are able to learn more about these reactions and their best possible treatment. PMID:23407758

  8. The molecular dynamics of atmospheric reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanyi, J. C.

    1971-01-01

    Detailed information about the chemistry of the upper atmosphere took the form of quantitative data concerning the rate of reaction into specified states of product vibration, rotation and translation for exothermic reaction, as well as concerning the rate of reaction from specified states of reagent vibration, rotation and translation for endothermic reaction. The techniques used were variants on the infrared chemiluminescence method. Emphasis was placed on reactions that formed, and that removed, vibrationally-excited hydroxyl radicals. Fundamental studies were also performed on exothermic reactions involving hydrogen halides.

  9. Microfabricated sleeve devices for chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen

    2003-01-01

    A silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The reaction chamber combines a critical ratio of silicon and non-silicon based materials to provide the thermal properties desired. For example, the chamber may combine a critical ratio of silicon and silicon nitride to the volume of material to be heated (e.g., a liquid) in order to provide uniform heating, yet low power requirements. The reaction chamber will also allow the introduction of a secondary tube (e.g., plastic) into the reaction sleeve that contains the reaction mixture thereby alleviating any potential materials incompatibility issues. The reaction chamber may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The reaction chamber may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis.

  10. Severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wen-Hung; Wang, Chuang-Wei; Dao, Ro-Lan

    2016-07-01

    The clinical manifestations of drug eruptions can range from mild maculopapular exanthema to severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCAR), including drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome/drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) which are rare but occasionally fatal. Some pathogens may induce skin reactions mimicking SCAR. There are several models to explain the interaction of human leukocyte antigen (HLA), drug and T-cell receptor (TCR): (i) the "hapten/prohapten" theory; (ii) the "p-i concept"; (iii) the "altered peptide repertoire"; and (iv) the "altered TCR repertoire". The checkpoints of molecular mechanisms of SCAR include specific drug antigens interacting with the specific HLA loci (e.g. HLA-B*15:02 for carbamazepine-induced SJS/TEN and HLA-B*58:01 for allopurinol-induced SCAR), involvement of specific TCR, induction of T-cell-mediated responses (e.g. granulysin, Fas ligand, perforin/granzyme B and T-helper 1/2-associated cytokines) and cell death mechanism (e.g. miR-18a-5p-induced apoptosis; annexin A1 and formyl peptide receptor 1-induced necroptosis in keratinocytes). In addition to immune mechanism, metabolism has been found to play a role in the pathogenesis of SCAR, such as recent findings of strong association of CYP2C9*3 with phenytoin-induced SCAR and impaired renal function with allopurinol SCAR. With a better understanding of the mechanisms, effective therapeutics and prevention for SCAR can be improved. PMID:27154258

  11. Pulp reaction to vital bleaching.

    PubMed

    Fugaro, Jessica O; Nordahl, Inger; Fugaro, Orlando J; Matis, Bruce A; Mjör, Ivar A

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the histological changes in dental pulp after nightguard vital bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide gel. Fifteen patients between 12 and 26 years of age with caries-free first premolars scheduled for orthodontic extraction were treated with 10% Opalescence (Ultradent Products, Inc). Tooth #5 had four days of bleaching, tooth #12 was treated for two weeks, tooth #21 was bleached for two weeks followed by two weeks without treatment and tooth #28, serving as the control, was without treatment. All teeth were extracted at the same time. Immediately after extraction, 4 mm of the most apical portion of the root was sectioned off and each specimen was placed in a vial containing 10% neutral buffered formalin. The samples were prepared for histological evaluation at the Scandinavian Institute of Dental Materials (NIOM) and microscopically examined independently at both NIOM and Indiana University School of Dentistry (IUSD). Pulp reactions were semi-quantitatively graded as none, slight, moderate and severe. Slight pulpal changes were detected in 16 of the 45 bleached teeth. Neither moderate nor severe reactions were observed. The findings indicate that the slight histological changes sometimes observed after bleaching tend to resolve within two weeks post-treatment. Statistical differences existed only between the untreated control and the four-day (p=0.0109) and two-week (p=0.0045) treatment groups. The findings from this study demonstrated that nightguard vital bleaching procedures using 10% carbamide peroxide might cause initial mild, localized pulp reactions. However, the minor histological changes observed did not affect the overall health of the pulp tissue and were reversible within two weeks post-treatment. Therefore, two weeks of treatment with 10% carbamide peroxide used for nightguard vital bleaching is considered safe for dental pulp. PMID:15279473

  12. Control Electronics For Reaction Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Keith

    1995-01-01

    Bidirectional operation achieved with single-polarity main power supply. Control circuitry generates pulse-width-modulated 800-Hz waveforms to drive two-phase ac motor and reaction wheel. Operates partly in response to digital magnitude-and-direction torque command generated by external control subsystem and partly in response to tachometric feedback in form of two once-per-revolution sinusoids with amplitudes proportional to speed. Operation in either of two modes called "normal" and "safehold." In normal mode, drive pulses timed so that, on average over one or few cycles, motor applies commanded torque. In safehold mode, pulses timed to keep motor running at set speed in one direction.

  13. Caustic reaction caused by cement.

    PubMed

    Rados, Jaka; Lipozencić, Jasna; Milavec-Puretić, Visnja

    2005-01-01

    A case is reported of a patient who developed full thickness chemical burns of the skin after a prolonged contact while working with wet cement. The history, course of disease, and therapy are described. Cement is an alkaline substance (pH >12) leading to colliquative necrosis. Tissue damage is due to the exothermic reaction of calcium oxide and water forming calcium hydroxide. Patch test was performed to test sensitization to chromium, chromate and cobalt, the usual cement ingredients. In our opinion, such lesions may not be rare because cement is widely used in construction, but are rarely described or under-recognized. PMID:16324425

  14. Chemical reactions at aqueous interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecitis, Chad David

    2009-12-01

    Interfaces or phase boundaries are a unique chemical environment relative to individual gas, liquid, or solid phases. Interfacial reaction mechanisms and kinetics are often at variance with homogeneous chemistry due to mass transfer, molecular orientation, and catalytic effects. Aqueous interfaces are a common subject of environmental science and engineering research, and three environmentally relevant aqueous interfaces are investigated in this thesis: 1) fluorochemical sonochemistry (bubble-water), 2) aqueous aerosol ozonation (gas-water droplet), and 3) electrolytic hydrogen production and simultaneous organic oxidation (water-metal/semiconductor). Direct interfacial analysis under environmentally relevant conditions is difficult, since most surface-specific techniques require relatively `extreme' conditions. Thus, the experimental investigations here focus on the development of chemical reactors and analytical techniques for the completion of time/concentration-dependent measurements of reactants and their products. Kinetic modeling, estimations, and/or correlations were used to extract information on interfacially relevant processes. We found that interfacial chemistry was determined to be the rate-limiting step to a subsequent series of relatively fast homogeneous reactions, for example: 1) Pyrolytic cleavage of the ionic headgroup of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) adsorbed to cavitating bubble-water interfaces during sonolysis was the rate-determining step in transformation to their inorganic constituents carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and fluoride; 2) ozone oxidation of aqueous iodide to hypoiodous acid at the aerosol-gas interface is the rate-determining step in the oxidation of bromide and chloride to dihalogens; 3) Electrolytic oxidation of anodic titanol surface groups is rate-limiting for the overall oxidation of organics by the dichloride radical. We also found chemistry unique to the interface, for example: 1

  15. Radiation reaction at ultrahigh intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Richard T.

    2010-06-15

    Intensities of 10{sup 22} W cm{sup -2} have been reached and it is expected that this will be increased by two orders of magnitude in the near future. At these intensities the radiation reaction force is important, especially in calculating the terminal velocity of an electron. The following briefly describes some of the problems of the existing most well-known equations and describes an approach based on conservation of energy. The resulting equation is compared to the Landau Lifshitz and Ford O'Connell equations, and laboratory tests are proposed.

  16. Effective radii of deuteron-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Shintaro; Chiba, Satoshi; Yahiro, Masanobu; Ogata, Kazuyuki; Minomo, Kosho

    2011-05-15

    The continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC) for exclusive reactions and the eikonal reaction theory (ERT) as an extension of CDCC to inclusive reactions are applied to deuteron-induced reactions. The CDCC result reproduces experimental data on the reaction cross section for d+{sup 58}Ni scattering at 200 MeV/nucleon, and ERT provides data on the neutron-stripping cross section for inclusive {sup 7}Li(d,n) reaction at 40 MeV. For deuteron-induced reactions at 200 MeV/nucleon, target-dependence of the reaction, elastic-breakup, nucleon-stripping, nucleon-removal, and complete- and incomplete-fusion cross sections is clearly explained by simple formulas. Accuracy of the Glauber model is also investigated.

  17. Anomalous subdiffusion with multispecies linear reaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Langlands, T A M; Henry, B I; Wearne, S L

    2008-02-01

    We have introduced a set of coupled fractional reaction-diffusion equations to model a multispecies system undergoing anomalous subdiffusion with linear reaction dynamics. The model equations are derived from a mesoscopic continuous time random walk formulation of anomalously diffusing species with linear mean field reaction kinetics. The effect of reactions is manifest in reaction modified spatiotemporal diffusion operators as well as in additive mean field reaction terms. One consequence of the nonseparability of reaction and subdiffusion terms is that the governing evolution equation for the concentration of one particular species may include both reactive and diffusive contributions from other species. The general solution is derived for the multispecies system and some particular special cases involving both irreversible and reversible reaction dynamics are analyzed in detail. We have carried out Monte Carlo simulations corresponding to these special cases and we find excellent agreement with theory. PMID:18351991

  18. Competing reaction channels in IR-laser-induced unimolecular reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    The competing reaction channels in the unimolecular decomposition of two molecules, formaldehyde and tetralin were studied. A TEA CO/sub 2/ laser was used as the excitation source in all experiments. The dissociation of D/sub 2/CO was studied by infrared multiphoton dissociation (MPD) and the small-molecule nature of formaldehyde with regard to MPD was explored. The effect of collisions in MPD were probed by the pressure dependence of the MPD yield and ir fluorescence from multiphoton excited D/sub 2/CO. MPD yield shows a near cubic dependence in pure D/sub 2/CO which is reduced to a 1.7 power dependence when 15 torr of NO is added. The peak amplitude of 5 ..mu..m ir fluorescence from D/sub 2/CO is proportional to the square of the D/sub 2/CO pressure in pure D/sub 2/CO or in the presence of 50 torr of Ar. Results are explained in terms of bottlenecks to excitation at the v = 1 level which are overcome by a combination of vibrational energy transfer and rotational relaxation. The radical/molecule branching ratio in D/sub 2/CO MPD was 0.10 +- 0.02 at a fluence of 125 J/cm/sup 2/ at 946.0 cm/sup -1/. The barrier height to molecular dissociation was calculated to be 3.6 +- 2.0 kcal/mole below the radical threshold or 85.0 +- 3.0 kcal/mole above the ground state of D/sub 2/CO. In H/sub 2/CO, this corresponds to 2.5 +- 2.0 kcal/mole below the radical threshold or 83.8 +- 3.0 kcal/mole above the ground state. Comparison with uv data indicate that RRKM theory is an acceptable description of formaldehyde dissociation in the 5 to 10 torr pressure range. The unimolecular decomposition of tetralin was studied by MPD and SiF/sub 4/ - sensitized pyrolysis. Both techniques induce decomposition without the interference of catalytic surfaces. Ethylene loss is identified as the lowest energy reaction channel. Dehydrogenation is found to result from step-wise H atom loss. Isomerization via disproportionation is also identified as a primary reaction channel.

  19. Indirect techniques for astrophysical reaction rates determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammache, F.; Oulebsir, N.; Benamara, S.; De Séréville, N.; Coc, A.; Laird, A.; Stefan, I.; Roussel, P.

    2016-05-01

    Direct measurements of nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest can be challenging. Alternative experimental techniques such as transfer reactions and inelastic scattering reactions offer the possibility to study these reactions by using stable beams. In this context, I will present recent results that were obtained in Orsay using indirect techniques. The examples will concern various astrophysical sites, from the Big-Bang nucleo synthesis to the production of radioisotopes in massive stars.

  20. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  1. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculationsmore » of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.« less

  2. Radiation Reaction and Thomson Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, James

    2007-07-11

    In recent years high power high irradiance lasers of peta-watt order have been or are under construction. In addition, in the next 10 years lasers of unprecedented powers, exa-watt, could be built If lasers such as these are focused to very small spot sizes, extremely high laser irradiances will be achieved. When electrons interact with such a laser, they become highly relativistic over very short time and spatial scales. Usually the motion of an electron under the influence of electromagnetic fields is influenced to a small extent by radiation emission from acceleration. However, under such violent acceleration the amount of radiation emitted by electrons can become so large that significant damping of the electron motion by the emission of this radiation can occur. In this lecture note we will study this problem of radiation reaction by first showing how the equations of motion are obtained. Then, we will examine the problems with such equations and what approximations are made. We will specifically examine the effects of radiation reaction on the Thomson scattering of radiation from counter-streaming laser pulses and high energy electrons through the numerical integration of the equations of motion. We will briefly address the fundamental physics, which can be addressed by using such high irradiance lasers interacting with high energy electrons.

  3. 'GREENER' CHEMICAL SYNTHESES USING ALTERNATE REACTION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave (MW) irradiation in conjunction with water as reaction media has proven to be a greener chemical approach for expeditious N-alkylation reactions of amines and hydrazines wherein the reactions under mildly basic conditions afford tertiary amines and double N-alkylation t...

  4. Emotional and Behavioral Reaction to Intrusive Thoughts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Lisa-Marie; May, Jon; Andrade, Jackie; Kavanagh, David

    2010-01-01

    A self-report measure of the emotional and behavioral reactions to intrusive thoughts was developed. The article presents data that confirm the stability, reliability, and validity of the new seven-item measure. Emotional and behavioral reactions to intrusions emerged as separate factors on the Emotional and Behavioral Reactions to Intrusions…

  5. Modified triglyceride oil through reactions with phenyltriazolinedione

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The synthesis of a modified triglyceride oil was achieved through the reactions with 4-phenyl-1,2-4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD). 1H NMR was used for structure determination and to monitor the reactions. Several reaction products were produced, and their relative yields depended on the stoichiometry ...

  6. Organocatalytic C–H activation reactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Organocatalytic C–H activation reactions have recently been developed besides the traditional metal-catalysed C–H activation reactions. The recent non-asymmetric and asymmetric C–H activation reactions mediated by organocatalysts are discussed in this review. PMID:23019474

  7. The Rate Laws for Reversible Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Edward L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the rate laws for reversible reactions. Indicates that although prediction of the form of the rate law for a reverse reaction given the rate law for the forward reaction is not certain, the number of possibilities is limited because of relationships described. (JN)

  8. Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murov, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry lists all the most commonly studied reactions in organic chemistry on one page. The discussed Reaction-Map will act as another learning aide for the students, making the study of organic chemistry much easier.

  9. An Iodine Fluorescence Quenching Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Richard B.; Muyskens, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Clock reactions based upon competing oxidation and reduction reactions of iodine and starch as the most popular type of chemistry example is presented to illustrate the redox phenomena, reaction kinetics, and principles of chemical titration. The examination of the photophysical principles underlying the iodine fluorescence quenching clock…

  10. New reaction tester accurate within 56 microseconds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, H.

    1972-01-01

    Testing device measures simple and disjunctive reaction time of human subject to light stimuli. Tester consists of reaction key, logic card, panel mounted neon indicators, and interconnecting wiring. Device is used for determining reaction times of patients undergoing postoperative neurological therapy.

  11. Method of controlling fusion reaction rates

    DOEpatents

    Kulsrud, Russell M.; Furth, Harold P.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Goldhaber, Maurice

    1988-03-01

    A method of controlling the reaction rates of the fuel atoms in a fusion reactor comprises the step of polarizing the nuclei of the fuel atoms in a particular direction relative to the plasma confining magnetic field. Fusion reaction rates can be increased or decreased, and the direction of emission of the reaction products can be controlled, depending on the choice of polarization direction.

  12. Method of controlling fusion reaction rates

    DOEpatents

    Kulsrud, Russell M.; Furth, Harold P.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Goldhaber, Maurice

    1988-01-01

    A method of controlling the reaction rates of the fuel atoms in a fusion reactor comprises the step of polarizing the nuclei of the fuel atoms in a particular direction relative to the plasma confining magnetic field. Fusion reaction rates can be increased or decreased, and the direction of emission of the reaction products can be controlled, depending on the choice of polarization direction.

  13. Reaction Order Ambiguity in Integrated Rate Plots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Integrated rate plots are frequently used in reaction kinetics to determine orders of reactions. It is often emphasised, when using this methodology in practice, that it is necessary to monitor the reaction to a substantial fraction of completion for these plots to yield unambiguous orders. The present article gives a theoretical and statistical…

  14. Parental Reactions to Cleft Palate Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanpoelvoorde, Leah

    This literature review examines parental reactions following the birth of a cleft lip/palate child, focusing primarily on the mother's reactions. The research studies cited have explored such influences on maternal reactions as her feelings of lack of control over external forces and her feelings of guilt that the deformity was her fault. Delays…

  15. A Generalized Selection Rule for Pericyclic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Fu-Cheng; Pfeiffer, Gary V.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a convenient procedure, the Odd-Even Rule, for predicting the allowedness of forbiddenness of ground-state, pericyclic reactions. The rule is applied to a number of specific reactions. In contrast to the Woodward-Hoffman approach, the application to each reaction is always the same. (JN)

  16. Immunohistochemical appearance of corticosteroid contact hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, S M; Andrew, S M; Maseruka, H; Beck, M H

    1994-11-01

    We have studied, immunohistochemically, hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids and compared them with allergic contact dermatitis from nickel and appropriate controls. We could find no qualitative differences between nickel and corticosteroid contact reactions, providing further evidence that hypersensitivity to corticosteroids is an immunologically mediated reaction. PMID:7532558

  17. Reactions of butadiyne. 1: The reaction with hydrogen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwanebeck, W.; Warnatz, J.

    1984-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen (H) atoms with butadiene (C4H2) was studied at room temperature in a pressure range between w mbar and 10 mbar. The primary step was an addition of H to C4H2 which is in its high pressure range at p 1 mbar. Under these conditions the following addition of a second H atom lies in the transition region between low and high pressure range. Vibrationally excited C4H4 can be deactivated to form buten-(1)-yne-(3)(C4H4) or decomposes into two C2H2 molecules. The rate constant at room temperature for primary step is given. The second order rate constant for the consumption of buten-(1)-yne-(3) is an H atom excess at room temperature is given.

  18. Assesment of Alkali Resistance of Basalt Used as Concrete Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    al-Swaidani, Aref M.; Baddoura, Mohammad K.; Aliyan, Samira D.; Choeb, Walid

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to report a part of an ongoing research on the influence of using crushed basalt as aggregates on one of durability-related properties of concrete (i.e. alkali-silica reaction which is the most common form of Alkali-Aggregate Reaction). Alkali resistance has been assessed through several methods specified in the American Standards. Results of petrographic examination, chemical test (ASTM C289) and accelerated mortar bar test (ASTM C1260) have particularly been reported. In addition, the weight change and compressive strength of 28 days cured concrete containing basaltic aggregates were also reported after 90 days of exposure to 10% NaOH solution. Dolomite aggregate were used in the latter test for comparison. The experimental results revealed that basaltic rocks quarried from As-Swaida'a region were suitable for production of aggregates for concrete. According to the test results, the studied basalt aggregates can be classified as innocuous with regard to alkali-silica reaction. Further, the 10% sodium hydroxide attack did not affect the compressive strength of concrete.

  19. Nonadiabatic reaction of energetic molecules.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Atanu; Guo, Yuanqing; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2010-12-21

    Energetic materials store a large amount of chemical energy that can be readily converted into mechanical energy via decomposition. A number of different ignition processes such as sparks, shocks, heat, or arcs can initiate the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic materials. Experiments have demonstrated the essential role of excited electronic state decomposition in the energy conversion process. A full understanding of the mechanisms for the decomposition of energetic materials from excited electronic states will require the investigation and analysis of the specific topography of the excited electronic potential energy surfaces (PESs) of these molecules. The crossing of multidimensional electronic PESs creates a funnel-like topography, known as conical intersections (CIs). CIs are well established as a controlling factor in the excited electronic state decomposition of polyatomic molecules. This Account summarizes our current understanding of the nonadiabatic unimolecular chemistry of energetic materials through CIs and presents the essential role of CIs in the determination of decomposition pathways of these energetic systems. Because of the involvement of more than one PES, a decomposition process involving CIs is an electronically nonadiabatic mechanism. Based on our experimental observations and theoretical calculations, we find that a nonadiabatic reaction through CIs dominates the initial decomposition process of energetic materials from excited electronic states. Although the nonadiabatic behavior of some polyatomic molecules has been well studied, the role of nonadiabatic reactions in the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic molecules has not been well investigated. We use both nanosecond energy-resolved and femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopic techniques to determine the decomposition mechanism and dynamics of energetic species experimentally. Subsequently, we employ multiconfigurational methodologies (such as, CASSCF

  20. Incidents of chemical reactions in cell equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, N.M.; Barlow, C.R.

    1991-12-31

    Strongly exothermic reactions can occur between equipment structural components and process gases under certain accident conditions in the diffusion enrichment cascades. This paper describes the conditions required for initiation of these reactions, and describes the range of such reactions experienced over nearly 50 years of equipment operation in the US uranium enrichment program. Factors are cited which can promote or limit the destructive extent of these reactions, and process operations are described which are designed to control the reactions to minimize equipment damage, downtime, and the possibility of material releases.

  1. Electromagnetic effects on explosive reaction and plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tasker, Douglas G; Whitley, Von H; Mace, Jonathan L; Pemberton, Steven J; Sandoval, Thomas D; Lee, Richard J

    2010-01-01

    A number of studies have reported that electric fields can have quantifiable effects on the initiation and growth of detonation, yet the mechanisms of these effects are not clear. Candidates include Joule heating of the reaction zone, perturbations to the activation energy for chemical reaction, reduction of the Peierls energy barrier that facilitates dislocation motion, and acceleration of plasma projected from the reaction zone. In this study the possible role of plasma in the initiation and growth of explosive reaction is investigated. The effects of magnetic and electric field effects on reaction growth will be reviewed and recent experiments reported.

  2. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, J.L. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  3. Heat partition in damped reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Pal, D. )

    1990-12-01

    The effect of driving force on the division of excitation energy between the asymmetric colliding partners in deep inelastic heavy-ion collisions is studied in the nucleon-exchange model. For this purpose an event-by-event analysis using Monte Carlo simulation technique is performed. It is seen that the fraction of the total excitation energy carried by the projectile-like fragment is sensitive to the mass drift. The model is also applied to analyze the correlation between fragment mass and excitation energy for a given total energy loss and significant correlation is found. The reactions induced by {sup 56}Fe at 9 MeV/nucleon and {sup 74}Ge at 8.5 MeV/nucleon on {sup 165}Ho are considered in our analysis and the calculated correlations are in good agreement with the results obtained from the kinematic coincidence experiments.

  4. Transfer Reaction Studies with JENSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, P.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Chipps, K. A.; Greife, U.; Linhardt, L. E.; Kontos, A.; Kozub, R. L.; Matos, M.; Montes, F.; Pain, S. D.; Pittman, S. T.; Sachs, A.; Schatz, H.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Jensa Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas jet target system was designed to provide a gas target that was pure, localized, and dense. Several commissioning experiments with the JENSA target, performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), were undertaken to demonstrate the unique capability of JENSA for transfer reaction studies. JENSA has since completed its move from ORNL to the ReA3 reaccelerated beam hall at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). An overview of the JENSA design and operation will be presented, as well as a brief discussion of the experiments performed at ORNL with JENSA, with a focus on preliminary results from the 20Ne(p,t)18Ne commissioning experiment.

  5. The OH + HBr reaction revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravishankara, A. R.; Wine, P. H.; Wells, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Variable-temperature measurements of the rate coefficient /k(1)/ for the reaction OH + HBr yield Br + H2O are presented. The measurements are verified by two techniques: one involved a 266-nm pulsed-laser photolysis of O3/H2O/HBr/He mixtures in conjunction with time-resolved resonance fluorescence detection of OH, the second comprised pulsed laser-induced fluorescence detection of OH following 248-nm pulsed-laser photolysis of H2O2/HBr/Ar mixtures. It is reported that k(1) = (11.9 + or -1.4 x 10 to the -12th (cu cm)/(molecule)(s) independent of temperature. The measurements are compared with other available results.

  6. Acute transfusion reactions: an update.

    PubMed

    Scorer, T; Doughty, H

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the use of blood products by the United Kingdom (UK) military has increased significantly; with the increase in transfusion comes an increased incidence of transfusion-related incidents. Acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) are a common consequence of transfusion, which vary widely in their severity and are likely to be under-reported, although reporting is a regulatory requirement. This paper discusses the importance of identifying ATRs and managing them appropriately. It introduces a flowchart (due to be incorporated in the next version of Joint Service Publication (JSP) 999, Clinical Guidelines for Operations (CGOs)), which is designed to assist the military multi-disciplinary team caring for patients in the operational environment. PMID:25895413

  7. Adverse Reactions of Ferric Carboxymaltose

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Navin; Shenoy, Smita; Bairy, K L; Sarma, Yashdeep

    2014-01-01

    The author reports a 55-year-old female diagnosed of chronic kidney disease grade-5 with associated co-morbidities like type 2 diabetes mellitus, diabetic retinopathy and hypothyroidism was admitted for arteriovenous fistula construction. She was started on ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of anaemia. She was given a test dose before administering the drug intravenously and she did not develop any reaction. The drug ferric carboxymaltose was then administered over a period of one hour. About half an hour after drug administration, the patient developed breathlessness and myalgia. After half hour of the above episode of breathlessness and myalgia she also developed vomiting (one episode). Patient was managed with oxygen therapy, IV fluids and other drugs like corticosteroids, phenaramine maleate and nalbuphine which controlled the above symptoms. PMID:25478369

  8. Local reaction kinetics by imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchorski, Yuri; Rupprechter, Günther

    2016-01-01

    In the present contribution we present an overview of our recent studies using the "kinetics by imaging" approach for CO oxidation on heterogeneous model systems. The method is based on the correlation of the PEEM image intensity with catalytic activity: scaled down to the μm-sized surface regions, such correlation allows simultaneous local kinetic measurements on differently oriented individual domains of a polycrystalline metal-foil, including the construction of local kinetic phase diagrams. This allows spatially- and component-resolved kinetic studies and, e.g., a direct comparison of inherent catalytic properties of Pt(hkl)- and Pd(hkl)-domains or supported μm-sized Pd-powder agglomerates, studies of the local catalytic ignition and the role of defects and grain boundaries in the local reaction kinetics.

  9. Adverse reactions of ferric carboxymaltose.

    PubMed

    Thanusubramanian, Harish; Patil, Navin; Shenoy, Smita; Bairy, K L; Sarma, Yashdeep

    2014-10-01

    The author reports a 55-year-old female diagnosed of chronic kidney disease grade-5 with associated co-morbidities like type 2 diabetes mellitus, diabetic retinopathy and hypothyroidism was admitted for arteriovenous fistula construction. She was started on ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of anaemia. She was given a test dose before administering the drug intravenously and she did not develop any reaction. The drug ferric carboxymaltose was then administered over a period of one hour. About half an hour after drug administration, the patient developed breathlessness and myalgia. After half hour of the above episode of breathlessness and myalgia she also developed vomiting (one episode). Patient was managed with oxygen therapy, IV fluids and other drugs like corticosteroids, phenaramine maleate and nalbuphine which controlled the above symptoms. PMID:25478369

  10. Chemical reactions in endoreversible thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Katharina; Hoffmann, Karl Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Endoreversible thermodynamics is a theory for the (approximate) description of thermodynamic non-equilibrium systems, which allows us to capture the ever present irreversibilities of real processes. For instance in heat engines the dissipation due to finite heat transport capabilities, as well as the resulting limitations in the energy fluxes, can be incorporated into the theory. It has thus been very successful in closing the gap between observed and theoretically predicted efficiencies. Here an extension of the theory is provided, with which chemical reactions can be included in the formalism. This opens up a wide field of applications for endoreversible modeling and the investigation of dissipative processes, for instance in fuel cells or batteries.

  11. Local reaction kinetics by imaging☆

    PubMed Central

    Suchorski, Yuri; Rupprechter, Günther

    2016-01-01

    In the present contribution we present an overview of our recent studies using the “kinetics by imaging” approach for CO oxidation on heterogeneous model systems. The method is based on the correlation of the PEEM image intensity with catalytic activity: scaled down to the μm-sized surface regions, such correlation allows simultaneous local kinetic measurements on differently oriented individual domains of a polycrystalline metal-foil, including the construction of local kinetic phase diagrams. This allows spatially- and component-resolved kinetic studies and, e.g., a direct comparison of inherent catalytic properties of Pt(hkl)- and Pd(hkl)-domains or supported μm-sized Pd-powder agglomerates, studies of the local catalytic ignition and the role of defects and grain boundaries in the local reaction kinetics. PMID:26865736

  12. Radiation reaction of multipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2007-08-01

    A Poincaré-invariant description is proposed for the effective dynamics of a localized system of charged particles in classical electrodynamics in terms of the intrinsic multipole moments of the system. A relativistic-invariant definition for the intrinsic multipole moments of a system of charged particles is given. A new generally covariant action functional for a relativistic perfect fluid is proposed. In the case of relativistic charged dust, it is proven that the description of the problem of radiation reaction of multipole moments by the model of particles is equivalent to the description of this problem by a hydrodynamic model. An effective model is obtained for a pointlike neutral system of charged particles that possesses an intrinsic dipole moment, and the free dynamics of this system is described. The bound momentum of a point dipole is found.

  13. Cold molecules, collisions and reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    I will report on recent experiments of my group where we have been studying the formation of ultracold diatomic molecules and their subsequent inelastic/reactive collisions. For example, in one of these experiments we investigate collisions of triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We observe fast molecular loss and compare the measured loss rates to predictions based on universality. In another set of experiments we investigate the formation of (BaRb)+ molecules after three-body recombination of a single Ba+ ion with two Rb atoms in an ultracold gas of Rb atoms. Our investigations indicate that the formed (BaRb)+ molecules are weakly bound and that several secondary processes take place ranging from photodissociation of the (BaRb)+ molecule to reactive collisions with Rb atoms. I will explain how we can experimentally distinguish these processes and what the typical reaction rates are. Support from the German Research foundation DFG and the European Community is acknowledged.

  14. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum mechanical methods have been used to compute potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions. The reactions studied were among those believed to be important to the NASP and HSR programs and included the recombination of two H atoms with several different third bodies; the reactions in the thermal Zeldovich mechanism; the reactions of H atom with O2, N2, and NO; reactions involved in the thermal De-NO(x) process; and the reaction of CH(squared Pi) with N2 (leading to 'prompt NO'). These potential energy surfaces have been used to compute reaction rate constants and rates of unimolecular decomposition. An additional application was the calculation of transport properties of gases using a semiclassical approximation (and in the case of interactions involving hydrogen inclusion of quantum mechanical effects).

  15. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to obtain accurate potential energy surfaces (PES's) for a number of reactions which are important in the H/N/O combustion process. The interest in this is centered around the design of the SCRAM jet engine for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), which was envisioned as an air-breathing hydrogen-burning vehicle capable of reaching velocities as large as Mach 25. Preliminary studies indicated that the supersonic flow in the combustor region of the scram jet engine required accurate reaction rate data for reactions in the H/N/O system, some of which was not readily available from experiment. The most important class of combustion reactions from the standpoint of the NASP project are radical recombinaton reactions, since these reactions result in most of the heat release in the combustion process. Theoretical characterizations of the potential energy surfaces for these reactions are presented and discussed.

  16. The Ozone-Iodine-Chlorate Clock Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sant'Anna, Rafaela T. P.; Monteiro, Emily V.; Pereira, Juliano R. T.; Faria, Roberto B.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a new clock reaction based on ozone, iodine, and chlorate that differs from the known chlorate-iodine clock reaction because it does not require UV light. The induction period for this new clock reaction depends inversely on the initial concentrations of ozone, chlorate, and perchloric acid but is independent of the initial iodine concentration. The proposed mechanism considers the reaction of ozone and iodide to form HOI, which is a key species for producing non-linear autocatalytic behavior. The novelty of this system lies in the presence of ozone, whose participation has never been observed in complex systems such as clock or oscillating reactions. Thus, the autocatalysis demonstrated in this new clock reaction should open the possibility for a new family of oscillating reactions. PMID:24386257

  17. A Networks Approach to Modeling Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Imhof, P

    2016-01-01

    Modeling enzymatic reactions is a demanding task due to the complexity of the system, the many degrees of freedom involved and the complex, chemical, and conformational transitions associated with the reaction. Consequently, enzymatic reactions are not determined by precisely one reaction pathway. Hence, it is beneficial to obtain a comprehensive picture of possible reaction paths and competing mechanisms. By combining individually generated intermediate states and chemical transition steps a network of such pathways can be constructed. Transition networks are a discretized representation of a potential energy landscape consisting of a multitude of reaction pathways connecting the end states of the reaction. The graph structure of the network allows an easy identification of the energetically most favorable pathways as well as a number of alternative routes. PMID:27497170

  18. Inflammatory reaction - communication of cells.

    PubMed

    Terheyden, Hendrik; Stadlinger, Bernd; Sanz, Mariano; Garbe, Annette I; Meyle, Jörg

    2014-04-01

    This article presents scientific background information on the animated 3D film "Inflammatory Reactions - Communication of Cells" (Quintessence Publications, ISBN 978-1-85097-231-0). Gingivitis and periodontitis are understood as the result of a coordinated action of a few clearly identified cellular players who communicate with each other via cytokines. For didactic reasons, the course of a periodontal infection is described here in four phases: (1) bacterial biofilm formation and development of a host response in the marginal periodontium, (2) innate immune response leading to gingivitis, (3) role of the adaptive immune system in attachment loss and pocket formation, and (4) down-regulation of inflammation and periodontal regeneration and repair following biofilm removal. The control of the cells is discussed as a cytokine network, which can be modulated in pro- or anti-inflammatory direction depending on the control of the bacterial infection. Degradation of soft tissue structural proteins like collagen and proteoglycans by matrix metalloproteinases and degradation of hard tissue matrix by osteoclasts are explained as an interference of the immune system with the natural equilibrium of tissue remodeling. Five mechanisms of promotion of bone loss through the influence of the immune system are described. One example is bone resorption as a consequence of the shift of the RANKL/osteoprotegerin balance by soluble RANKL synthesized by CD4(+) Th 1 cells as well as the interference with the coupling of osteoclasts and osteoblasts through dedifferentiation of osteoblasts by TNFα. Finally, the signaling required for down-regulation of inflammatory reactions and the reasons for the incomplete regeneration after periodontal bone loss are discussed. PMID:23600659

  19. Subdiffusion-reaction processes with A →B reactions versus subdiffusion-reaction processes with A +B→B reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosztołowicz, Tadeusz; Lewandowska, Katarzyna D.

    2014-09-01

    We consider the subdiffusion-reaction process with reactions of a type A +B→B (in which particles A are assumed to be mobile, whereas B are assumed to be static) in comparison to the subdiffusion-reaction process with A →B reactions which was studied by Sokolov, Schmidt, and Sagués [Phys. Rev. E 73, 031102 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.031102]. In both processes a rule that reactions can only occur between particles which continue to exist is taken into account. Although in both processes a probability of the vanishing of particle A due to a reaction is independent of both time and space variables (assuming that in the system with the A +B→B reactions, particles B are distributed homogeneously), we show that subdiffusion-reaction equations describing these processes as well as their Green's functions are qualitatively different. The reason for this difference is as follows. In the case of the former reaction, particles A and B have to meet with some probability before the reaction occurs in contradiction with the case of the latter reaction. For the subdiffusion process with the A +B→B reactions we consider three models which differ in some details concerning a description of the reactions. We base the method considered in this paper on a random walk model in a system with both discrete time and discrete space variables. Then the system with discrete variables is transformed into a system with both continuous time and continuous space variables. Such a method seems to be convenient in analyzing subdiffusion-reaction processes with partially absorbing or partially reflecting walls. The reason is that within this method we can determine Green's functions without a necessity of solving a fractional differential subdiffusion-reaction equation with boundary conditions at the walls. As an example, we use the model to find the Green's functions for a subdiffusive reaction system (with the reactions mentioned above), which is bounded by a partially absorbing wall

  20. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics and a fluctuation theorem for individual reaction steps in a chemical reaction network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Krishnendu; Das, Biswajit; Banerjee, Kinshuk; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2015-09-01

    We have introduced an approach to nonequilibrium thermodynamics of an open chemical reaction network in terms of the propensities of the individual elementary reactions and the corresponding reverse reactions. The method is a microscopic formulation of the dissipation function in terms of the relative entropy or Kullback-Leibler distance which is based on the analogy of phase space trajectory with the path of elementary reactions in a network of chemical process. We have introduced here a fluctuation theorem valid for each opposite pair of elementary reactions which is useful in determining the contribution of each sub-reaction on the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of overall reaction. The methodology is applied to an oligomeric enzyme kinetics at a chemiostatic condition that leads the reaction to a nonequilibrium steady state for which we have estimated how each step of the reaction is energy driven or entropy driven to contribute to the overall reaction.

  1. Palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Feng; Neumann, Helfried; Beller, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions have become a powerful tool for advanced organic synthesis. This type of reaction is of significant value for the preparation of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, as well as advanced materials. Both, academic as well as industrial laboratories continuously investigate new applications of the different methodologies. Clearly, this area constitutes one of the major topics in homogeneous catalysis and organic synthesis. Among the different palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions, several carbonylations have been developed and widely used in organic syntheses and are even applied in the pharmaceutical industry on ton-scale. Furthermore, methodologies such as the carbonylative Suzuki and Sonogashira reactions allow for the preparation of interesting building blocks, which can be easily refined further on. Although carbonylative coupling reactions of aryl halides have been well established, palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation reactions are also interesting. Compared with the reactions of aryl halides, oxidative carbonylation reactions offer an interesting pathway. The oxidative addition step could be potentially avoided in oxidative reactions, but only few reviews exist in this area. In this Minireview, we summarize the recent development in the oxidative carbonylation reactions. PMID:23307763

  2. Chemical Reactions in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wai, Chien M.; Hunt, Fred; Ji, Min; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    1998-12-01

    Utilizing supercritical fluids as environmentally benign solvents for chemical synthesis is one of the new approaches in the "greening" of chemistry. Carbon dioxide is the most widely used gas for supercritical fluid studies because of its moderate critical constants, nontoxic nature, and availability in pure form. One unique property of supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) is its high solubility for fluorinated compounds. Thus sc-CO2 can be used to replace Freons that are conventionally used as solvents for synthesis of perfluoro-polymers. Another property of sc-CO2 is its miscibility with gases such as H2. Heterogeneous reactions involving these gases may become homogeneous reactions in sc-CO2. Reactions in sc-CO2 may offer several advantages including controlling phase behavior and products, increasing speed of reactions, and obtaining specific reaction channels. This paper describes the following nine types of chemical reactions reported in the literature utilizing sc-CO2 as a solvent to illustrate the unique properties of the supercritical fluid reaction systems: (i) hydrogenation and hydroformylation, (ii) synthesis of organometallic compounds, (iii) metal chelation and extraction, (iv) preparation of inorganic nanoparticles, (v) stereo-selectivity of lipase-catalyzed reactions, (vi) asymmetric catalytic hydrogenation, (vii) polymerization, (viii) Diels-Alder reaction, and (ix) free radical reactions.

  3. Charge exchange reactions and applications to astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ha, Eunja; Kajino, T.

    2012-11-01

    Neutrino-induced reactions have been known to play important roles as the neutrino process on the nucleosynthesis in core collapsing supernovae (SNe) explosions because expected neutrino flux and energy are sufficiently high enough to excite many relevant nuclei in spite of small cross sections of the weak interaction. However, we do not have enough data for the neutrino reaction to be exploited in the network calculation. Only a sparse data in the relevant energy range is known, in specific, for 12C. Therefore we have to rely on theoretical estimation of the reaction, which has two different modes, charge current (CC) and neutral current (NC). In particular, CC reactions are closely related to charge exchange reactions (CEXRs) which are feasible in the experiment, such as, (p,n) or (n,p) reactions. These CEXRs are usually dominated by the Gamow-Teller (GT) transition in the lower energy region. In this respect, any theoretical approaches for the neutrino reaction should be investigated for the CEXR because we have and expect more useful experimental data. After confirming our models to the GT strength deduced from the CEXR, we calculated neutrino-induced reactions in the energy range below the quasielastic region for nuclei of astrophysical importance. Our calculations are carried out with the Quasi-particle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA), which successfully described the nuclear beta decays of relevant nuclei. To describe neutrino-nucleus reactions, general multipole transitions by the weak interaction are considered for CC and NC reactions. Both reactions are described in a theoretical framework. Our results are shown to well reproduce the data from CEXRs and the sparse experimental data related to the neutrino-induced reaction, and further extended for neutrino reactions on various nuclear targets. Parts of the results are reported in this talk.

  4. Trimolecular reactions of uranium hexafluoride with water.

    PubMed

    Lind, Maria C; Garrison, Stephen L; Becnel, James M

    2010-04-01

    The hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride (UF(6)) is a key step in the synthesis of uranium dioxide (UO(2)) powder for nuclear fuels. Mechanisms for the hydrolysis reactions are studied here with density functional theory and the Stuttgart small-core scalar relativistic pseudopotential and associated basis set for uranium. The reaction of a single UF(6) molecule with a water molecule in the gas phase has been previously predicted to proceed over a relatively sizable barrier of 78.2 kJ x mol(-1), indicating this reaction is only feasible at elevated temperatures. Given the observed formation of a second morphology for the UO(2) product coupled with the observations of rapid, spontaneous hydrolysis at ambient conditions, an alternate reaction pathway must exist. In the present work, two trimolecular hydrolysis mechanisms are studied with density functional theory: (1) the reaction between two UF(6) molecules and one water molecule, and (2) the reaction of two water molecules with a single UF(6) molecule. The predicted reaction of two UF(6) molecules with one water molecule displays an interesting "fluorine-shuttle" mechanism, a significant energy barrier of 69.0 kJ x mol(-1) to the formation of UF(5)OH, and an enthalpy of reaction (DeltaH(298)) of +17.9 kJ x mol(-1). The reaction of a single UF(6) molecule with two water molecules displays a "proton-shuttle" mechanism, and is more favorable, having a slightly lower computed energy barrier of 58.9 kJ x mol(-1) and an exothermic enthalpy of reaction (DeltaH(298)) of -13.9 kJ x mol(-1). The exothermic nature of the overall UF(6) + 2H(2)O trimolecular reaction and the lowering of the barrier height with respect to the bimolecular reaction are encouraging. PMID:20210345

  5. Modeling Enzymatic Reactions in Proteins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesner, Richard

    2007-03-01

    We will discuss application of our density functional (DFT)-based QM/MM methodology to modeling a variety of protein active sites, including methane monooxygenase, myoglobin, and cytochrome P450. In addition to the calculation of intermediates, transition states, and rate constants, we will discuss modeling of reactions requiring protein conformational changes. Our methodology reliably achieves small errors as a result of imposition of the QM/MM boundary. However, the accuracy of DFT methods can vary significantly with the type of system under study. We will discuss a novel approach to the reduction of errors in gradient corrected and hybrid DFT functionals, using empirical localized orbital corrections (DFT-LOC), which addresses this problem effectively. For example, the mean unsigned error in atomization energies for the G3 data set using the B3LYP-LOC model is 0.8 kcal/mole, as compared with 4.8 kcal/mole for B3LYP and 1.0 kcal/mole for G3 theory.

  6. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, A A

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxide treatment of organic materials are oxidized species, some of which also contain chlorine. The relative amounts of species types may depend on the amount of chlorine dioxide residual maintained and the concentration and nature of the organic material present in the source water. The trend toward lower concentrations of chlorinated by-products with increasing ClO2 concentration, which was observed with phenols, has not been observed with natural humic materials as measured by the organic halogen parameter. Organic halogen concentrations have been shown to increase with increasing chlorine dioxide dose, but are much lower than those observed when chlorine is applied. Aldehydes have been detected as apparent by-products of chlorine dioxide oxidation reactions in a surface water that is a drinking water source. Some other nonchlorinated products of chlorine dioxide treatment may be quinones and epoxides. The extent of formation of these moieties within the macromolecular humic structure is also still unknown. PMID:7151750

  7. Clindamycin-induced hypersensitivity reaction.

    PubMed

    Bulloch, Marilyn N; Baccas, Jonathan T; Arnold, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Drug-induced anaphylaxis is an unpredictable adverse reaction. Although it may occur with any medication, antibiotics induce more cases of anaphylaxis than any other medication class with most cases being induced by β-lactam antibiotics. Clindamycin is an antibiotic with good gram-positive and anaerobe coverage which is often used in patients with β-lactam allergies. We report the case of a 46-year-old female who experienced anaphylaxis after a dose of intravenous (IV) clindamycin. Following treatment with methylprednisolone, epinephrine, diphenhydramine, and albuterol, the patient stabilized. The patient's score on the Naranjo's algorithm was 8 (probable); a score of 9 (definite) limited only by absence of drug re-challenge. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a clindamycin-induced anaphylaxis where the patient was not exposed to any other agent that may have triggered the response, the first case in the United States, and only the third documented case in the literature. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for drug-induced anaphylaxis in all medications. PMID:26216470

  8. Demisable Reaction-Wheel Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roder, Russell; Ahronovich, Eliezer; Davis, Milton C., III

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses the concept of a demisable motor-drive-and-flywheel assembly [reaction-wheel assembly (RWA)] used in controlling the attitude of a spacecraft. Demisable as used here does not have its traditional legal meaning; instead, it signifies susceptible to melting, vaporizing, and/or otherwise disintegrating during re-entry of the spacecraft into the atmosphere of the Earth so as not to pose a hazard to anyone or anything on the ground. Prior RWAs include parts made of metals (e.g., iron, steel, and titanium) that melt at high temperatures and include structures of generally closed character that shield some parts (e.g., magnets) against re-entry heating. In a demisable RWA, the flywheel would be made of aluminum, which melts at a lower temperature. The flywheel web would not be a solid disk but would have a more open, nearly-spoke-like structure so that it would disintegrate more rapidly; hence, the flywheel rim would separate more rapidly so that parts shielded by the rim would be exposed sooner to re-entry heating. In addition, clearances between the flywheel and other components would be made greater, imparting a more open character and thus increasing the exposure of those components.

  9. 2005 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cynthia M. Friend

    2006-03-14

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2005 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Ventura Beach Marriott, Ventura California from February 13, 2005 through February 18, 2005. The Conference was well-attended with 124 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, 'free time' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field.

  10. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  11. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  12. Glycation Reactions of Casein Micelles.

    PubMed

    Moeckel, Ulrike; Duerasch, Anja; Weiz, Alexander; Ruck, Michael; Henle, Thomas

    2016-04-13

    After suspensions of micellar casein or nonmicellar sodium caseinate had been heated, respectively, in the presence and absence of glucose for 0-4 h at 100 °C, glycation compounds were quantitated. The formation of Amadori products as indicators for the "early" Maillard reaction were in the same range for both micellar and nonmicellar caseins, indicating that reactive amino acid side chains within the micelles are accessible for glucose in a comparable way as in nonmicellar casein. Significant differences, however, were observed concerning the formation of the advanced glycation end products (AGEs), namely, N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (CML), pyrraline, pentosidine, and glyoxal-lysine dimer (GOLD). CML could be observerd in higher amounts in nonmicellar casein, whereas in the micelles the pyrraline formation was increased. Pentosidine and GOLD were formed in comparable amounts. Furthermore, the extent of protein cross-linking was significantly higher in the glycated casein micelles than in the nonmicellar casein samples. Dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy showed that glycation has no influence on the size of the casein micelles, indicating that cross-linking occurs only in the interior of the micelles, but altered the surface morphology. Studies on glycation and nonenzymatic cross-linking can contribute to the understanding of the structure of casein micelles. PMID:27018258

  13. Human collective reactions to threat.

    PubMed

    Dezecache, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    A common assumption regarding mass emergency situations is that individuals in such contexts behave in a way that maximizes their likelihood to escape, at the expense, or with little concern for, the welfare and survival of their neighbors. Doing so, they might even compromise the effectiveness of group evacuation. This conception follows the views of early works on crowd psychology, a tradition born with Gustave Le Bon's The Crowd: a study of the Popular Mind, first published in 1895, and which has had a tremendous impact on scientific representations of people's behavior in mass emergency contexts. Indeed, this work has greatly contributed to the idea that, in such situations, people revert to a primitive, impulsive, irrational, and antisocial nature, causing the breakdown of social order. However, more empirically oriented studies have consistently reported little collective panic, as well as a great deal of solidarity and pro-social behavior during mass emergency situations. Because of institutional barriers, such views have remained largely unknown to cognitive psychologists. Yet these are important results in that they show that human individual and collective reactions to threat are primarily affiliative. Indeed, far from leading to the breakdown of the social fabrics, the presence of a common threat can strengthen social bonds. PMID:26263225

  14. Pyrotechnic reaction residue particle analysis.

    PubMed

    Kosanke, Kenneth L; Dujay, Richard C; Kosanke, Bonnie J

    2006-03-01

    Pyrotechnic reaction residue particle (PRRP) production, sampling and analysis are all very similar to that for primer gunshot residue. In both cases, the preferred method of analysis uses scanning electron microscopy to locate suspect particles and then uses energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to characterize the particle's constituent chemical elements. There are relatively few times when standard micro-analytical chemistry performed on pyrotechnic residues may not provide sufficient information for forensic investigators. However, on those occasions, PRRP analysis provides a greatly improved ability to discriminate between materials of pyrotechnic origin and other unrelated substances also present. The greater specificity of PRRP analysis is the result of its analyzing a large number of individual micron-sized particles, rather than producing only a single integrated result such as produced using standard micro-analytical chemistry. For example, PRRP analyses are used to demonstrate its ability to successfully (1) discriminate between pyrotechnic residues and unrelated background contamination, (2) identify that two different pyrotechnic compositions had previously been exploded within the same device, and (3) establish the chronology of an incident involving two separate and closely occurring explosions. PMID:16566762

  15. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests.

    PubMed

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-27

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches. PMID:27090846

  16. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-01

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  17. Anatomy of an Elementary Chemical Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Andrew J.; Zare, Richard N.

    1998-09-01

    The alchemists of old sought the knowledge to transform one material to another-for example, base metals into gold-as a path to the elixir of life. As chemists have concerned themselves with the transformation from compound to compound, so they have become involved in trying to uncover the structures of molecules and the pathways that reactions follow. Classically, the study of reaction mechanisms in chemistry encompasses reaction kinetics, the study of velocities or rates of reactions, and reaction dynamics, the study of the nanoscopic motion and rearrangement of atoms during a reactive event. An essential aim of this article is to bring the reader to a favorable vantage point with a brief introduction to reactive dynamics, and from there to describe some examples of recent strategies that have been employed to promote a fundamental understanding of the anatomy of elementary chemical reactions. In the final section we ponder future directions for this rapidly evolving field of research.

  18. Delayed reactions to reusable protective gloves.

    PubMed

    Pontén, Ann; Dubnika, Inese

    2009-04-01

    The materials in plastic protective gloves are thought to cause less contact allergy than rubber gloves. Our aim was to estimate the frequency of delayed reactions to different types of reusable protective gloves among dermatitis patients. 2 x 2 cm pieces of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) gloves, nitrile gloves, and natural rubber latex (NRL) gloves were tested as is in consecutive dermatitis patients tested with the baseline series. Among 658 patients, 6 patients reacted to PVC gloves and 6 patients to the NRL gloves. None reacted to both these types of gloves. Five of six patients with reactions to rubber gloves reacted to thiuram mix in the baseline series. Delayed reactions to reusable PVC gloves may be as common as to reusable NRL gloves. In contrast to most reactions to the NRL glove, the reactions to the PVC glove had no obvious association with reactions to any allergen(s) in the baseline series. PMID:19338595

  19. Periosteal reaction in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joong Kyong; Lee, You Sun; Chung, Hey Won; Cha, Hoon-Suk; Koh, Eun-Mi

    2007-12-01

    Musculoskeletal complaints are the most common presenting symptoms in most of the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, periosteal new bone formation is an extraordinarily rare condition in SLE. We report a case of periosteal reaction in SLE. A 31-year-old woman with SLE presented with both knee pain. Radiographs revealed periosteal reactions in both femur and tibia and around the metaphysis of the right distal tibia. Periosteal reaction can be caused by benign or malignant lesions and infection. We cannot find any other cause of periosteal reaction in our case after thorough evaluations. Periosteal reaction in SLE might be associated with inflammatory vascular changes. This is the first report of periosteal reaction in SLE after the 1990s description and the first report in Korea. PMID:17920323

  20. Antibody-mediated cofactor-driven reactions

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reactions capable of being rate-enhanced by auxiliary species which interact with the reactants but do not become chemically bound to them in the formation of the final product are performed in the presence of antibodies which promote the reactions. The antibodies contain regions within their antigen binding sites which recognize the auxiliary species in a conformation which promotes the reaction. The antigen binding site frequently recognizes a particular transition state complex or other high energy complex along the reaction coordinate, thereby promoting the progress of the reaction along the desired route as opposed to other less favorable routes. Various classes of reaction together with appropriate antigen binding site specificities tailored for each are disclosed.