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Sample records for alkaline agarose gel

  1. Recovering DNA from agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Hegen, P N

    1994-09-01

    Methods and reagents is a unique monthly column that highlights current discussions in the newsgroup bionet.molbio.methds-reagnts, available on the internet. A commonly occurring theme on the net is the recovery of DNA, and this month's column discusses the pros and cons of various methods used to extract DNA fragments directly from agarose gels. For details on how to partake in the newsgroup, see the accompanying box. PMID:7985233

  2. DNA DAMAGE QUANTITATION BY ALKALINE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND,B.M.; BENNETT,P.V.; SUTHERLAND, J.C.

    2004-03-24

    Physical and chemical agents in the environment, those used in clinical applications, or encountered during recreational exposures to sunlight, induce damages in DNA. Understanding the biological impact of these agents requires quantitation of the levels of such damages in laboratory test systems as well as in field or clinical samples. Alkaline gel electrophoresis provides a sensitive (down to {approx} a few lesions/5Mb), rapid method of direct quantitation of a wide variety of DNA damages in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNAs from laboratory, field, or clinical specimens, including higher plants and animals. This method stems from velocity sedimentation studies of DNA populations, and from the simple methods of agarose gel electrophoresis. Our laboratories have developed quantitative agarose gel methods, analytical descriptions of DNA migration during electrophoresis on agarose gels (1-6), and electronic imaging for accurate determinations of DNA mass (7-9). Although all these components improve sensitivity and throughput of large numbers of samples (7,8,10), a simple version using only standard molecular biology equipment allows routine analysis of DNA damages at moderate frequencies. We present here a description of the methods, as well as a brief description of the underlying principles, required for a simplified approach to quantitation of DNA damages by alkaline gel electrophoresis.

  3. Function, structure, and stability of enzymes confined in agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Jeffrey; Asuri, Prashanth

    2014-01-01

    Research over the past few decades has attempted to answer how proteins behave in molecularly confined or crowded environments when compared to dilute buffer solutions. This information is vital to understanding in vivo protein behavior, as the average spacing between macromolecules in the cell cytosol is much smaller than the size of the macromolecules themselves. In our study, we attempt to address this question using three structurally and functionally different model enzymes encapsulated in agarose gels of different porosities. Our studies reveal that under standard buffer conditions, the initial reaction rates of the agarose-encapsulated enzymes are lower than that of the solution phase enzymes. However, the encapsulated enzymes retain a higher percentage of their activity in the presence of denaturants. Moreover, the concentration of agarose used for encapsulation had a significant effect on the enzyme functional stability; enzymes encapsulated in higher percentages of agarose were more stable than the enzymes encapsulated in lower percentages of agarose. Similar results were observed through structural measurements of enzyme denaturation using an 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid fluorescence assay. Our work demonstrates the utility of hydrogels to study protein behavior in highly confined environments similar to those present in vivo; furthermore, the enhanced stability of gel-encapsulated enzymes may find use in the delivery of therapeutic proteins, as well as the design of novel strategies for biohybrid medical devices.

  4. Properties of cellulase immobilized on agarose gel with spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Chim-anage, P.; Kashiwagi, Y.; Magae, Y.; Ohta, T.; Sasaki, T.

    1986-12-01

    Cellulase produced by fungus Trichoderma viride was immobilized on agarose beads (Sepharose 4B) activated by cyanogen bromide and also on activated agarose beads that contained spacer arm (activated Ch-Sepharose 4B and Affi-Gel 15). The CMCase activity retained by immobilized cellulase on activated Sepharose containing the spacer tended to be higher than that immobilized without spacer, although the extent of protein immobilization was lower. Also, the higher substrate specificity for cellulase immobilized on beads with spacer was obtained for cellobiose, acid-swollen cellulose, or cellulose powder. The hydrolysis product from their substrates was mainly glucose. 10 references.

  5. Posing for a picture: vesicle immobilization in agarose gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira, Rafael B.; Steinkühler, Jan; Knorr, Roland L.; Dimova, Rumiana; Riske, Karin A.

    2016-05-01

    Taking a photo typically requires the object of interest to stand still. In science, imaging is potentiated by optical and electron microscopy. However, living and soft matter are not still. Thus, biological preparations for microscopy usually include a fixation step. Similarly, immobilization strategies are required for or substantially facilitate imaging of cells or lipid vesicles, and even more so for acquiring high-quality data via fluorescence-based techniques. Here, we describe a simple yet efficient method to immobilize objects such as lipid vesicles with sizes between 0.1 and 100 μm using agarose gel. We show that while large and giant unilamellar vesicles (LUVs and GUVs) can be caged in the pockets of the gel meshwork, small molecules, proteins and micelles remain free to diffuse through the gel and interact with membranes as in agarose-free solutions, and complex biochemical reactions involving several proteins can proceed in the gel. At the same time, immobilization in agarose has no adverse effect on the GUV size and stability. By applying techniques such as FRAP and FCS, we show that the lateral diffusion of lipids is not affected by the gel. Finally, our immobilization strategy allows capturing high-resolution 3D images of GUVs.

  6. Posing for a picture: vesicle immobilization in agarose gel

    PubMed Central

    Lira, Rafael B.; Steinkühler, Jan; Knorr, Roland L.; Dimova, Rumiana; Riske, Karin A.

    2016-01-01

    Taking a photo typically requires the object of interest to stand still. In science, imaging is potentiated by optical and electron microscopy. However, living and soft matter are not still. Thus, biological preparations for microscopy usually include a fixation step. Similarly, immobilization strategies are required for or substantially facilitate imaging of cells or lipid vesicles, and even more so for acquiring high-quality data via fluorescence-based techniques. Here, we describe a simple yet efficient method to immobilize objects such as lipid vesicles with sizes between 0.1 and 100 μm using agarose gel. We show that while large and giant unilamellar vesicles (LUVs and GUVs) can be caged in the pockets of the gel meshwork, small molecules, proteins and micelles remain free to diffuse through the gel and interact with membranes as in agarose-free solutions, and complex biochemical reactions involving several proteins can proceed in the gel. At the same time, immobilization in agarose has no adverse effect on the GUV size and stability. By applying techniques such as FRAP and FCS, we show that the lateral diffusion of lipids is not affected by the gel. Finally, our immobilization strategy allows capturing high-resolution 3D images of GUVs. PMID:27140695

  7. Hindered diffusion in agarose gels: test of effective medium model.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E M; Berk, D A; Jain, R K; Deen, W M

    1996-01-01

    The diffusivities of uncharged macromolecules in gels (D) are typically lower than in free solution (D infinity), because of a combination of hydrodynamic and steric factors. To examine these factors, we measured D and D infinity for dilute solutions of several fluorescein-labeled macromolecules, using an image-based fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. Test macromolecules with Stokes-Einstein radii (rs) of 2.1-6.2 nm, including three globular proteins (bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, lactalbumin) and four narrow fractions of Ficoll, were studied in agarose gels with agarose volume fractions (phi) of 0.038-0.073. The gels were characterized by measuring the hydraulic permeability of supported agarose membranes, allowing calculation of the Darcy permeability (kappa) for each gel sample. It was found that kappa, which is a measure of the intrinsic hydraulic conductance of the gel, decreased by an order of magnitude as phi was increased over the range indicated. The diffusivity ratio D/D infinity, which varied from 0.20 to 0.63, decreased with increases in rs or phi. Thus as expected, diffusional hindrances were the most severe for large macromolecules and/or relatively concentrated gels. According to a recently proposed theory for hindered diffusion through fibrous media, the diffusivity ratio is given by the product of a hydrodynamic factor (F) and a steric factor (S). The functional form is D/D infinity = F(rs/k1/2) S(f), where f = [(rs+rf)/rf]2 phi and rf is the fiber radius. Values of D/D infinity calculated from this effective medium theory, without use of adjustable parameters, were in much better agreement with the measured values than were predictions based on other approaches. The strengths and limitations of the effective medium theory for predicting diffusivities in gels are discussed. PMID:8789119

  8. Extraction and identification of electroimmunoprecipitated proteins from agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Natascha Helena; Schou, Christian; Houen, Gunnar; Heegaard, Niels H H

    2008-01-31

    A method for the identification of protein antigens captured in electroimmunoprecipitates was developed. Different antigen-antibody precipitates were generated by agarose gel immunoelectrophoresis. The immunoprecipitates were excised and various methods for extracting and dissociating the precipitates were systematically studied by analyzing for protein components of the extracts using peptide mass fingerprinting after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The optimal recovery of antigen was obtained by 24-h extraction at 37 degrees C using a minimal volume of 0.06 M Tris-HCl, 10% SDS (pH 7). This simple and robust method is useful for the characterization of antibody specificity. It can also be used to identify antigens generating unknown precipitates in crossed immunoelectrophoresis with polyspecific antisera, including human IgG-antigen complexes electroimmunoprecipitated by secondary antibodies. Thus, the method may prove useful as an additional technique in biomarker discovery.

  9. Cloning of DNA fragments: ligation reactions in agarose gel.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Agnelo

    2014-01-01

    Ligation reactions to ligate a desired DNA fragment into a vector can be challenging to beginners and especially if the amount of the insert is limiting. Although additives known as crowding agents, such as PEG 8000, added to the ligation mixes can increase the success one has with ligation reactions, in practice the amount of insert used in the ligation can determine the success or the failure of the ligation reaction. The method described here, which uses insert DNA in gel slice added directly into the ligation reaction, has two benefits: (a) using agarose as the crowding agent and (b) reducing steps of insert purification. The use of rapid ligation buffer and incubation of the ligation reaction at room temperature greatly increase the efficiency of the ligation reaction even for blunt-ended ligation. PMID:24243199

  10. Preparation of gold nanoparticles-agarose gel composite and its application in SERS detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoyuan; Xia, Yu; Ni, Lili; Song, Liangjing; Wang, Zhouping

    2014-03-01

    Agarose gel/gold nanoparticles hybrid was prepared by adding gold nanoparticles to preformed agarose gel. Nanocomposite structures and properties were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy. Based on the swelling-contraction characteristics of agarose gel and the adjustable localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the gold nanoparticles, the nanocomposites were used as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate to detect the Raman signal molecules (NBA, MBA, 1NAT). Results revealed that the porous structure of the agarose gel provided a good carrier for the enrichment of the gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles dynamic hot-spot effect arising from the agarose gel contraction loss of water in the air greatly enhanced the Raman signal. Furthermore, the gel could be cleaned with washing solution and recycling could be achieved for Raman detection.

  11. Rapid agarose gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay for quantitating protein: RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Ream, Jennifer A; Lewis, L Kevin; Lewis, Karen A

    2016-10-15

    Interactions between proteins and nucleic acids are frequently analyzed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). This technique separates bound protein:nucleic acid complexes from free nucleic acids by electrophoresis, most commonly using polyacrylamide gels. The current study utilizes recent advances in agarose gel electrophoresis technology to develop a new EMSA protocol that is simpler and faster than traditional polyacrylamide methods. Agarose gels are normally run at low voltages (∼10 V/cm) to minimize heating and gel artifacts. In this study we demonstrate that EMSAs performed using agarose gels can be run at high voltages (≥20 V/cm) with 0.5 × TB (Tris-borate) buffer, allowing for short run times while simultaneously yielding high band resolution. Several parameters affecting band and image quality were optimized for the procedure, including gel thickness, agarose percentage, and applied voltage. Association of the siRNA-binding protein p19 with its target RNA was investigated using the new system. The agarose gel and conventional polyacrylamide gel methods generated similar apparent binding constants in side-by-side experiments. A particular advantage of the new approach described here is that the short run times (5-10 min) reduce opportunities for dissociation of bound complexes, an important concern in non-equilibrium nucleic acid binding experiments. PMID:27495142

  12. Continuous Separation of Metallic and Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes Using Agarose Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takeshi; Urabe, Yasuko; Nishide, Daisuke; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2009-12-01

    We have developed a novel method to separate metallic and semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with high purities using agarose gel. When an SWCNTs/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) dispersion was applied to a column containing agarose gel beads, semiconducting SWCNTs were trapped by the beads, while metallic SWCNTs passed through the column. After the semiconducting SWCNTs adsorbed to the beads were eluted with sodium deoxycholate solution, the column could be used for repeated separation. Because this continuous, repeatable separation method is applicable to a low-cost, large-scale process, it should enable the industrial production of metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs.

  13. Enhanced Resolution of DNA Separation Using Agarose Gel Electrophoresis Doped with Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Jialiang; Yang, Yushi; Mao, Zhou; Huang, Wenjie; Qiu, Tong; Wu, Qingzhi

    2016-12-01

    In this work, a novel agarose gel electrophoresis strategy has been developed for separation of DNA fragments by doping graphene oxide (GO) into agarose gel. The results show that the addition of GO into agarose gel significantly improved the separation resolution of DNA fragments by increasing the shift distances of both the single DNA fragments and the adjacent DNA fragments and completely eliminating the background noise derived from the diffusion of the excessive ethidium bromide (EB) dye in the gel after electrophoresis. The improved resolution of DNA fragments in GO-doped agarose gel could be attributed to the successive adsorption-desorption processes between DNA fragments and GO sheets, while the elimination of the background noise could be attributed to the adsorption of the excessive EB dye on the surface of GO sheets and high fluorescence quenching efficiency of GO. These results provide promising potential for graphene and its derivate utilized in various electrophoresis techniques for separation and detection of DAN fragments and other biomolecules. PMID:27637896

  14. Enhanced Resolution of DNA Separation Using Agarose Gel Electrophoresis Doped with Graphene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jialiang; Yang, Yushi; Mao, Zhou; Huang, Wenjie; Qiu, Tong; Wu, Qingzhi

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a novel agarose gel electrophoresis strategy has been developed for separation of DNA fragments by doping graphene oxide (GO) into agarose gel. The results show that the addition of GO into agarose gel significantly improved the separation resolution of DNA fragments by increasing the shift distances of both the single DNA fragments and the adjacent DNA fragments and completely eliminating the background noise derived from the diffusion of the excessive ethidium bromide (EB) dye in the gel after electrophoresis. The improved resolution of DNA fragments in GO-doped agarose gel could be attributed to the successive adsorption-desorption processes between DNA fragments and GO sheets, while the elimination of the background noise could be attributed to the adsorption of the excessive EB dye on the surface of GO sheets and high fluorescence quenching efficiency of GO. These results provide promising potential for graphene and its derivate utilized in various electrophoresis techniques for separation and detection of DAN fragments and other biomolecules.

  15. Computerized methods for analyzing two-dimensional agarose gel electropherograms.

    PubMed

    Aldroubi, A; Unser, M; Tietz, D; Trus, B

    1991-01-01

    Previous methods interpret zonal or polydisperse gel patterns of two-dimensional Serwer-type gels in terms of size and free mobility (surface net charge density). These two parameters have been determined for each component without quantitatively measuring the abundance of the components. The present study advances these previous methods by determining the relative concentration of each component by computer evaluation of densitometrically analyzed gel patterns. Suitable procedures and their underlying algorithms are presented. The mathematical routines are implemented in a user-friendly software package, called GelFit and designed for a Macintosh personal computer. The program input consists of digitized images of gel staining patterns exemplified by those obtained from electrophoresis of native subcellular-sized particles. The data are processed through the following steps: (i) Noise reduction and calibration. (ii) Geometrical transformation of the pattern onto a rectangular size/free mobility coordinate system using rationales of the extended Ogston model. (iii) Analysis of the transformed image to determine density maxima, density profiles along iso-free-mobility or iso-size lines, curve fitting of one-dimensional profiles or two-dimensional surfaces using Gaussian functions and curve stripping of surfaces to determine the possible number of particle populations.

  16. Pulsatile dynamic stiffness of cartilage-like materials and use of agarose gels to validate mechanical methods and models.

    PubMed

    Scandiucci de Freitas, P; Wirz, D; Stolz, M; Göpfert, B; Friederich, N-F; Daniels, A U

    2006-08-01

    Stiffness is a fundamental indicator of the functional state of articular cartilage. Reported test modes include compressive incremental strain to determine the equilibrium modulus, and sinusoidal strain to determine the dynamic modulus and stress/strain loss angle. Here, initial development is described for a method recognizing that gait is pulsatile. Agarose gels have been used by others for validation or comparison of mechanical test methods and models for cartilage and proteoglycan aggregate. Accordingly, gels ranging from 0.5 to 20% agarose were prepared. Pulsatile stiffness in both indentation and unconfined compression were closely reproducible. Stiffness as a function of agarose concentration rose exponentially, as found using other methods. Indentation stiffness was higher than for unconfined compression and ranged from approximately 2.0 kPa for 0.5% gel to approximately 3,800 kPa for 20% gel. Pulsatile dynamic stiffness appears to be a useful method, although further development is needed. Agarose gel stiffness values obtained by other methods were reviewed for comparison. Unfortunately, reported values for a given agarose concentration ranged widely (e.g. fourfold) even when test methods were similar. Causes appear to include differences in molecular weight and gel preparation time-temperature regimens. Also, agarose is hygroscopic, leading to unintended variations in gel composition. Agarose gels are problematic materials for validation or comparison of cartilage mechanical test methods and models. PMID:16470817

  17. Isolation of DNA from agarose gels using DEAE-paper. Application to restriction site mapping of adenovirus type 16 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Winberg, G; Hammarskjöld, M L

    1980-01-01

    A new method for isolating DNA from agarose gels is described. The method involves the simultaneous transfer of all DNA-fragments from an agarose slab gel onto DEAE-cellulose paper and the elution of the individual fragments from the paper with 1 M NaCl. DNA isolated from agarose gels in this way is susceptible to cleavage with several restriction endonucleases, and can be labeled in vitro with E coli DNA-polymerase I, T4 DNA-polymerase and T4 polynucleotide kinase. We have used the method to construct restriction endonuclease maps of adenovirus type 16 DNA. Images PMID:6252542

  18. Diffusivity of ions in agarose gels and intervertebral disc: effect of porosity.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wei Yong; Yao, Hai; Vega, Adriana L; Flagler, Daniel

    2004-12-01

    The effect of tissue porosity on ion (sodium, potassium, and chloride) diffusivity in agarose gels and porcine intervertebral disc tissues was investigated using an electrical conductivity method. An empirical, constitutive model for diffusivity (D) of solutes in porous fibrous media was proposed: D/Do = exp[-alpha(r(s)/k(1/2))beta] where r(s) is the Stokes radius of a solute, kappa is the Darcy permeability of the porous medium, Do is the diffusivity in free solution, alpha and beta are two positive parameters whose values depend on material structure. It is found that alpha = 1.25 +/- 0.138, beta = 0.681 +/- 0.059 (95% confidence interval, R2 = 0.92, n = 72) for agarose gels and alpha = 1.29 +/- 0.171 and beta = 0.372 +/- 0.088 (95% confidence interval, R2 = 0.88, n = 86) for porcine annulus fibrosus. The functional relationship between solute diffusivity and tissue deformation was derived. Comparisons of our model prediction with experimental data on diffusion coefficients of macromolecules (proteins, dextrans, polymer beads) in agarose gels in the literature were made. Our results were also compared to the data on ion diffusivity in charged gels and in cartilaginous tissues reported in the literature. There was a good agreement between our model prediction and the data in the literature. The present study provides additional information on solute diffusivity in uncharged gels and charged tissues, and is important for understanding nutritional transport in avascular cartilaginous tissues under different mechanical loading conditions.

  19. Methods for determining agent concentration profiles in agarose gel during convection-enhanced delivery.

    PubMed

    Sindhwani, Nikhil; Ivanchenko, Oleksandr; Lueshen, Eric; Prem, Komal; Linninger, Andreas A

    2011-03-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is a promising technique to deliver large molecular weight drugs to the human brain for treatment of Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, or brain tumors. Researchers have used agarose gels to study mechanisms of agent transport in soft tissues like brain due to its similar mechanical and transport properties. However, inexpensive quantitative techniques to precisely measure achieved agent distribution in agarose gel phantoms during CED are missing. Such precise measurements of concentration distribution are needed to optimize drug delivery. An optical experimental method to accurately quantify agent concentration in agarose is presented. A novel geometry correction algorithm is used to determine real concentrations from observable light intensities captured by a digital camera. We demonstrate the technique in dye infusion experiments that provide cylindrical and spherical distributions when infusing with porous membrane and conventional single-port catheters, respectively. This optical method incorporates important parameters, such as optimum camera exposure, captured camera intensity calibration, and use of collimated light source for maximum precision. We compare experimental results with numerical solutions to the convection diffusion equation. The solutions of convection-diffusion equations in the cylindrical and spherical domains were found to match the experimental data obtained by geometry correction algorithm.

  20. Cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus classification by electropherotype; validation by serological analyses and agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Mertens, P P; Crook, N E; Rubinstein, R; Pedley, S; Payne, C C

    1989-01-01

    Serological analyses of several different cytoplasmic polyhedrosis viruses (CPVs), including two type 1 CPVs from Bombyx mori, type 1 CPV from Dendrolimus spectabilis, type 12 CPV from Autographa gamma, type 2 CPV from Inachis io, type 5 CPV from Orgyia pseudotsugata and type 5 CPV from Heliothis armigera, demonstrated a close correlation between the antigenic properties of the polyhedrin or virus particle structural proteins and the genomic dsRNA electropherotypes. The dsRNAs of these viruses were analysed by electrophoresis in 3% and 10% polyacrylamide gels with a discontinuous Tris-HCl/Tris-glycine buffer system or by 1% agarose gel electrophoresis using a continuous Tris-acetate-EDTA buffer system. Electrophoretic analysis in agarose gels was found to be the most suitable for the classification of CPV isolates into electropherotypes, and the results obtained showed a close correlation with the observed antigenic relationships between different virus isolates. However, electrophoretic analysis in 10% polyacrylamide gels was most sensitive for the detection of intra-type variation and the presence of mixed virus isolates. PMID:2499658

  1. Fractionation of SWNT/nucleic acid complexes by agarose gel electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetcher, Alexandre A.; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Vetcher, Ivan A.; Abramov, Semen M.; Kozlov, Mikhail; Baughman, Ray H.; Levene, Stephen D.

    2006-08-01

    We show that aqueous dispersions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), prepared with the aid of nucleic acids (NAs) such as RNA or DNA, can be separated into fractions using agarose gel electrophoresis. In a DC electric field, SWNT/NA complexes migrate in the gel in the direction of positive potential to form well-defined bands. Raman spectroscopy as a function of band position shows that nanotubes having different spectroscopic properties possess different electrophoretic mobilities. The migration patterns for SWNT/RNA and SWNT/DNA complexes differ. Parallel elution of the SWNT/NA complexes from the gel during electrophoresis and subsequent characterization by AFM reveals differences in nanotube diameter, length and curvature. The results suggest that fractionation of nanotubes can be achieved by this procedure. We discuss factors affecting the mobility of the nanotube complexes and propose analytical applications of this technique.

  2. Image-guided convection-enhanced delivery into agarose gel models of the brain.

    PubMed

    Sillay, Karl A; McClatchy, S Gray; Shepherd, Brandon A; Venable, Garrett T; Fuehrer, Tyler S

    2014-05-14

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) has been proposed as a treatment option for a wide range of neurological diseases. Neuroinfusion catheter CED allows for positive pressure bulk flow to deliver greater quantities of therapeutics to an intracranial target than traditional drug delivery methods. The clinical utility of real time MRI guided CED (rCED) lies in the ability to accurately target, monitor therapy, and identify complications. With training, rCED is efficient and complications may be minimized. The agarose gel model of the brain provides an accessible tool for CED testing, research, and training. Simulated brain rCED allows practice of the mock surgery while also providing visual feedback of the infusion. Analysis of infusion allows for calculation of the distribution fraction (Vd/Vi) allowing the trainee to verify the similarity of the model as compared to human brain tissue. This article describes our agarose gel brain phantom and outlines important metrics during a CED infusion and analysis protocols while addressing common pitfalls faced during CED infusion for the treatment of neurological disease.

  3. Agarose gel-coated LPG based on two sensing mechanisms for relative humidity measurement.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yinping; Zhang, Kaikiang; Yuam, Yujie; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Yan; Yao, Jianquan

    2013-01-01

    A relative humidity (RH) sensor based on long-period grating (LPG) with different responses is proposed by utilizing agarose gel as the sensitive cladding film. The spectral characteristic is discussed as the ambient humidity level ranges from 25% to 95% RH. Since increment of RH will result in volume expansion and refractive index increment of the agarose gel, the LPG is sensitive to applied strain and ambient refractive index; both the resonance wavelength and coupling intensity present particular responses to RH within two different RH ranges (25%-65% RH and 65%-96% RH). The coupling intensity decreases within a lower RH range while it increases throughout a higher RH range. The resonance wavelength is sensitive to the higher RH levels, and the highest sensitivity reaches 114.7 pm/% RH, and shares the same RH turning point with coupling intensity response. From a practical perspective, the proposed RH sensor would find its potential applications in high humidity level, temperature-independent RH sensing and multiparameter sensing based on wavelength/power hybrid demodulation and even static RH alarm for automatic monitoring of a particular RH value owing to the nonmonotonic RH dependence of the transmission power within the whole tested RH range.

  4. An agarose gel-based neurosphere culture system leads to enrichment of neuronal lineage cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyuhee; Nam, Yeonju; Choi, Yongmun

    2015-05-01

    Stem cell-based therapy holds great potential especially for neurological disorders. However, clinical applications await further understanding of many aspects of stem cell differentiation and development of technology enabling manipulation of stem cells into desired cell types in the central nervous system. Here, we developed a new method that leads to enrichment of neuronal lineage cells in neural stem cell cultures. The protocol involves cultivation of primary cells derived from the forebrains of rat E18 embryos above a layer of nonadhesive hard agarose gel in the form of neurospheres. In contrast to the neurospheres that were cultured above an anti-adhesive hydrogel layer, the primary cells that were cultured above a layer of agarose gel preferentially differentiated into β-III tubulin-positive neurons when allowed to undergo differentiation in vitro.In an effort to investigate the mechanism behind this observation, we found that the gene expression of a vertebrate neuronal determination gene (neurogenin1) was enhanced in the neurospheres that proliferated above a layer of agarose gel as compared with the control, and the gene expression level of neurogenin1 was quite well correlated with the rigidity of agarose gel. These results indicate that agarose gel can contribute, at least in part, to enrich neuronal progenitors and immature postmitotic neurons during neurosphere formation and may provide additional information to establish efficient protocols for the neural stem cell-based study.

  5. A new agarose matrix for single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), heteroduplex (HTX), and gel shift analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Dumais, M.M.; White, H.W.; Rashid, M.R.

    1994-09-01

    Detection of mutation, by SSCP or heteroduplex analysis, is important in medical genetics and oncology. Analysis of DNA binding proteins is a powerful tool in molecular biology research. Traditionally, these methods are performed using nondenaturing gel electrophoresis on poly-acrylamide or polyacrylamide-type matrices. Here we report the development of a new agarose gel matrix that can be used for all three methods. SSCP analyses were performed using the prototype agarose gel matrix for wild-type, polymorphic, and mutant samples from c-Kras exon 12, p53 exons 8 and 9, and HOX2B. We performed SSCP analyses using both isotopic and nonisotopic methods. We also analyzed the samples by deliberate HTX formation and subsequent gel analysis. Using the prototype agarose matrix, we detected single and multiple DNA sequence variants in 150-350 bp fragments with an efficiency comparable to polyacrylamide gels run under similar conditions. For SSCP and HTX assays, we achieved optimal resolution in gels run in vertical formats. However, some HTX samples could be resolved in horizontal gel systems. In addition, based on our studies, we have developed a useful battery of controls and standards for quality control of SSCP and HTX assays. We analyzed several different DNA/protein complexes (SP1, AP2, and octamer binding protein) using the prototype agarose matrix. We obtained good resolution in both vertical and horizontal gel formats. The horizontal gel system is generally superior for this application, due to its ease of use and slightly better resolution. This new prototype gel matrix offers an alternative for researchers performing analyses that previously could only be done on polyacrylamide-type gel matrices. For some applications, this new matrix offers the ease of horizontal gel casting. For all applications, this matrix offers the safety of a nontoxic system and the reproducibility of a thermally gelling system.

  6. Directionality of replication fork movement determined by two-dimensional native-native DNA agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ivessa, Andreas S

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of replication intermediates by the neutral-neutral two-dimensional agarose gel technique allows determining the chromosomal positions where DNA replication initiates, whether replication forks pause or stall at specific sites, or whether two DNA molecules undergo DNA recombination events. This technique does not, however, immediately tell in which direction replication forks migrate through the DNA region under investigation. Here, we describe the procedure to determine the direction of replication fork progression by carrying out a restriction enzyme digest of DNA imbedded in agarose after the completion of the first dimension of a 2D gel.

  7. Topological analysis of plasmid DNA replication intermediates using two-dimensional agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Hyrien, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental process in DNA replication is the disentangling of the two parental strands by DNA topoisomerases. In this chapter, I detail the topological analysis of plasmid replication intermediates using two-dimensional (2D) agarose gels. The method can resolve replication intermediates according to mass and topology, and can resolve unlinked monomeric circles from catenated dimers of varying topology. The method has been used, alone or in combination with a procedure for purifying covalent protein-DNA complexes, to analyse the effect oftopoisomerase inhibitors on the topology of replication intermediates, to map the location of drug-stabilized topoisomerase cleavage complexes with respect to replication forks and to detect the breakage and repair of replication forks following collision with cleavage complexes. Other applications include the detection of knots that form independently of, or concomitantly with, DNA replication.

  8. Isoelectric focusing of human von Willebrand factor in urea-agarose gels

    SciTech Connect

    Fulcher, C.A.; Ruggeri, Z.M.; Zimmerman, T.S.

    1983-02-01

    An analytical technique has been developed for the isoelectric focusing (IEF) of plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF) in agarose gels containing urea. Under these conditions, vWF freely enters the gel and focuses without artifact. The focused vWF is visualized by staining fixed gels with /sup 125/I-labeled affinity-purified heterologous antibody. Utilizing a pH gradient of 5.0-6.5, normal vWF in plasma or purified preparations focuses into at least three bands with apparent isoelectric points (pI) between pH 5.7 and 5.9. A reproducible difference in the IEF pattern of vWF has been established between normal plasmas and those of individuals with variant von Willebrand's disease (vWd) type IIA and type IIB. In type IIA, vWF has a distinctly lower pI than normal. This difference may be related to the presence of smaller vWF multimers in IIA plasma because forms of vWF of corresponding size contained in normal cryoprecipitate supernatant have a similar pI. Type IIB von Willebrand factor has a pI intermediate between normal and IIA. Neuraminidase treatment of plasma samples before IEF results in an increase in pI in normal, type IIA, and type IIB vWF. The data suggest that none of the 16 type IIA and 9 IIB plasmas studied here contain significantly decreased amounts of sialic acid.

  9. Effects of DS-modified agarose gels on neurite extension in 3D scaffold through mechanisms other than changing the pore radius of the gels.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jin; Pan, Qian; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Hao; Zhou, Xue; Jiang, Hua

    2014-07-01

    Dermatan sulfate is widely distributed as glycosaminoglycan side chains of proteoglycans, which are the main components of glial scar and inhibit neurite regeneration after nerve injury. However its role in the inhibiting process is not clear. Understanding neurite extension in three-dimensional scaffolds is critical for neural tissue engineering. This study used agarose gels modified with dermatan sulfate as the three-dimensional culture scaffold. We explored structure-function relationship between the three-dimensional scaffold and neurite extension and examined the role of dermatan sulfate on neurite extension in the three-dimensional scaffold. A range of agarose concentrations was used to generate varied gel physical structures and the corresponding neurite extension of embryonic day (E9) chick dorsal root ganglia was examined. We measured gel stiffness and gel pore size to determine whether dermatan sulfate changed the gels' conformation. As gel concentration increased, neurite length and gel pore size decreased, and gel stiffness increased. At 1.00 and 1.25% (wt/vol) concentrations, dermatan sulfates both immobilized with agarose gels and dissolved in culture medium inhibit neurite extension. While at 1.50 and 1.75% (wt/vol) concentrations, only immobilized dermatan sulfate worked. Immobilized dermatan sulfate could modify molecular shape of agarose gels, decrease gel pore size statistically, but did not influence gel stiffness. We have proved that the decrease of gel pore size is insufficient to inhibit neurite extension. These results indicate that dermatan sulfate inhibits neurite extension not through forming a mechanical barrier. Maybe its interaction with neuron membrane is the key factor in neurite extension.

  10. Detection and mapping of homologous, repeated and amplified DNA sequences by DNA renaturation in agarose gels.

    PubMed Central

    Roninson, I B

    1983-01-01

    A new molecular hybridization approach to the analysis of complex genomes has been developed. Tracer and driver DNAs were digested with the same restriction enzyme(s), and tracer DNA was labeled with 32P using T4 DNA polymerase. Tracer DNA was mixed with an excess amount of driver, and the mixture was electrophoresed in an agarose gel. Following electrophoresis, DNA was alkali-denatured in situ and allowed to reanneal in the gel, so that tracer DNA fragments could hybridize to the driver only when homologous driver DNA sequences were present at the same place in the gel, i.e. within a restriction fragment of the same size. After reannealing, unhybridized single-stranded DNA was digested in situ with S1 nuclease. The hybridized tracer DNA was detected by autoradiography. The general applicability of this technique was demonstrated in the following experiments. The common EcoRI restriction fragments were identified in the genomes of E. coli and four other species of bacteria. Two of these fragments are conserved in all Enterobacteriaceae. In other experiments, repeated EcoRI fragments of eukaryotic DNA were visualized as bands of various intensity after reassociation of a total genomic restriction digest in the gel. The situation of gene amplification was modeled by the addition of varying amounts of lambda phage DNA to eukaryotic DNA prior to restriction enzyme digestion. Restriction fragments of lambda DNA were detectable at a ratio of 15 copies per chicken genome and 30 copies per human genome. This approach was used to detect amplified DNA fragments in methotrexate (MTX)-resistant mouse cells and to identify commonly amplified fragments in two independently derived MTX-resistant lines. Images PMID:6310499

  11. Screening for amyloid aggregation by Semi-Denaturing Detergent-Agarose Gel Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Halfmann, Randal; Lindquist, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Amyloid aggregation is associated with numerous protein misfolding pathologies and underlies the infectious properties of prions, which are conformationally self-templating proteins that are thought to have beneficial roles in lower organisms. Amyloids have been notoriously difficult to study due to their insolubility and structural heterogeneity. However, resolution of amyloid polymers based on size and detergent insolubility has been made possible by Semi-Denaturing Detergent-Agarose Gel Electrophoresis (SDD-AGE). This technique is finding widespread use for the detection and characterization of amyloid conformational variants. Here, we demonstrate an adaptation of this technique that facilitates its use in large-scale applications, such as screens for novel prions and other amyloidogenic proteins. The new SDD-AGE method uses capillary transfer for greater reliability and ease of use, and allows any sized gel to be accomodated. Thus, a large number of samples, prepared from cells or purified proteins, can be processed simultaneously for the presence of SDS-insoluble conformers of tagged proteins. PMID:19066511

  12. Mucin Agarose Gel Electrophoresis: Western Blotting for High-molecular-weight Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Kathryn A; Rushton, Zachary L; Ehre, Camille

    2016-06-14

    Mucins, the heavily-glycosylated proteins lining mucosal surfaces, have evolved as a key component of innate defense by protecting the epithelium against invading pathogens. The main role of these macromolecules is to facilitate particle trapping and clearance while promoting lubrication of the mucosa. During protein synthesis, mucins undergo intense O-glycosylation and multimerization, which dramatically increase the mass and size of these molecules. These post-translational modifications are critical for the viscoelastic properties of mucus. As a result of the complex biochemical and biophysical nature of these molecules, working with mucins provides many challenges that cannot be overcome by conventional protein analysis methods. For instance, their high-molecular-weight prevents electrophoretic migration via regular polyacrylamide gels and their sticky nature causes adhesion to experimental tubing. However, investigating the role of mucins in health (e.g., maintaining mucosal integrity) and disease (e.g., hyperconcentration, mucostasis, cancer) has recently gained interest and mucins are being investigated as a therapeutic target. A better understanding of the production and function of mucin macromolecules may lead to novel pharmaceutical approaches, e.g., inhibitors of mucin granule exocytosis and/or mucolytic agents. Therefore, consistent and reliable protocols to investigate mucin biology are critical for scientific advancement. Here, we describe conventional methods to separate mucin macromolecules by electrophoresis using an agarose gel, transfer protein into nitrocellulose membrane, and detect signal with mucin-specific antibodies as well as infrared fluorescent gel reader. These techniques are widely applicable to determine mucin quantitation, multimerization and to test the effects of pharmacological compounds on mucins.

  13. Agarose Gel Electrophoresis Reveals Structural Fluidity of a Phage T3 DNA Packaging Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Serwer, Philip; Wright, Elena T.

    2012-01-01

    We find a new aspect of DNA packaging-associated structural fluidity for phage T3 capsids. The procedure is (1) glutaraldehyde cross-linking of in vivo DNA packaging intermediates for stabilization of structure and then (2) determining of effective radius by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis (2d-AGE). The intermediates are capsids with incompletely packaged DNA (ipDNA) and without an external DNA segment; these intermediates are called ipDNA-capsids. We initially increase production of ipDNA-capsids by raising NaCl concentration during in vivo DNA packaging. By 2d-AGE, we find a new state of contracted shell for some particles of one previously identified ipDNA-capsid. The contracted shell-state is found when ipDNA length/mature DNA length (F) is above 0.17, but not at lower F. Some contracted-shell ipDNA-capsids have the phage tail; others do not. The contracted-shell ipDNA-capsids are explained by premature DNA maturation cleavage that makes accessible a contracted-shell intermediate of a cycle of the T3 DNA packaging motor. The analysis of ipDNA-capsids, rather than intermediates with uncleaved DNA, provides a simplifying strategy for a complete biochemical analysis of in vivo DNA packaging. PMID:22222979

  14. Apatite formed on/in agarose gel as a bone-grafting material in the treatment of periodontal infrabony defect.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Masashi; Shimoda, Toru; Sugihara, Kazumasa; Ogomi, Daisuke; Ohgushi, Hajime; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2005-11-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of a hydroxyapatite/agarose (HA/agarose) composite gel formed by a novel alternate soaking process for the treatment of periodontal infrabony defects in three dogs. After creating two-wall infrabony periodontal defects on the medial aspect of the maxillary and mandibular second and forth premolars, the defects were implanted with temporary dental filling material (stopping) to induce inflammatory periodontal disease. Two months later, the mucoperiosteal flaps were raised, and after debridement, the infrabony defects were filled with one of the following three materials: (a) HA/agarose, (b) Bone ject (True-Bone Ceramic-collagen combined bone graft material, Koken, Japan), or (c) no material implantation (negative control). The animals were then randomly scheduled for sacrifice at 1, 2, and 6 months, and samples were taken for histological examination. In the HA/agarose gels, the 2-month postoperative cavities exhibited regeneration to new attachments with the apposition of a new cementum and well-oriented fibers. The neocementum was narrow and acellular, and the new bone apposition was limited. Six months postoperatively, newly formed bone was predominantly observed. The neocementum was wider and cellular. In the negative control, the 2-month postoperative cavities exhibited no regeneration of the cementum, nor any formation of periodontal pockets. The six-month postoperative cavities were nearly the same as the 2-month cavities. The Bone ject, 2-month postoperative cavities exhibited no regeneration of the periodontal tissue, nor any formation of periodontal pockets. Six months postoperatively, inflammatory granulation tissue was observed around the particles. The present study suggests that HA/agarose gels may play an important role in the regeneration of lost periodontal tissue. PMID:16034996

  15. Use of thiazole orange homodimer as an alternative to ethidium bromide for DNA detection in agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Wilke, W W; Heller, M J; Iakoubova, O K; Robinson, R A

    1994-04-01

    Detection of polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA fragments is commonly accomplished by visualizing the products in electrophoretic agarose beds with the use of ethidium bromide under ultraviolet light. However, ethidium bromide is mutagenic, and special handling and disposal precautions must be used. We report the use of a nonmutagenic dye, thiazole orange dimer (TOTO), which can be substituted for ethidium bromide. The excitation maximum for TOTO under ultraviolet light is 488 nm, and the absorption maximum is 510 nm, necessitating photographic filters different from those used for ethidium bromide for optimal results. Of particular importance in TOTO's use is the quantity used for each gel lane, since excess TOTO will cause unacceptable product mobility retardation. TOTO is only slightly more expensive than ethidium bromide. Overall, this stain provides very good visualization of polymerase chain reaction--amplified DNA bands in agarose gels. We believe the use of this safer reagent will become more widespread with increased regulation of laboratory activities.

  16. Mesenchymal stromal cells improve the osteogenic capabilities of mineralized agarose gels in a rat full-thickness cranial defect model.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Norihiko; Hattori, Koji; Suzawa, Yoshika; Iwai, Soichi; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Tadokoro, Mika; Nakano, Takayoshi; Akashi, Mitsuru; Ohgushi, Hajime; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    The authors previously created HAp or CaCO(3) formed on or in agarose gels (HAp and CaCO(3) gels, respectively) as biocompatible and biodegradable bone graft materials. However, these gels have limitations for bone regeneration. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have osteogenic potential and are considered useful for bone tissue engineering. The purpose of this study was to clarify the osteogenic abilities of MSCs loaded in HAp or CaCO(3) gels (MSC/HAp and MSC/CaCO(3) gels, respectively) using a rat cranial defect model compared to HAp and CaCO(3) gels alone. HAp, CaCO(3) , MSC/Hap, and MSC/CaCO(3) gels were prepared for in vivo analyses and implanted into full-thickness bone defects created in the rat cranium. All samples were assessed radiologically and histologically at 4 and 8 weeks after implantation. Using microfocus-computed tomography, an increase in bone formation was observed in the MSC-loaded gels compared to the gels alone. In addition, peripheral quantitative computed tomography revealed higher bone mineral contents in the MSC-loaded gels compared to the gels alone. After transmission X-ray diffraction analyses, the degree of apatite c-axis orientation as a bone quality index of newly formed bone in the MSC-loaded gels was close to that of living cranial bone. Histologically, more extensive bone formation was detected in the MSC-loaded gels compared to gels alone. Overall, MSC/HAp and MSC/CaCO(3) gels showed equivalent efficacy for bone regeneration. These findings demonstrate that loading of MSCs into the gels strengthened their osteogenic ability and improved the quality of the newly formed bone. As a result, MSC-loaded gels could represent viable therapeutic biomaterials for bone tissue engineering.

  17. Fluorometric determination of DNA in agarose gels: usefulness for measurement of double-strand breaks in nonlabeled cells by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, J K; Birnboim, H C

    1993-09-01

    Quantitative measurement of DNA in agarose gels, particularly as needed for measurement of double-strand breaks induced by agents such as radiation, usually involves the use of radioactively labeled DNA. Thus its usefulness is usually limited to growing cells which incorporate radiolabeled thymidine into DNA. To circumvent this problem, we have developed a fluorometric technique for quantitative estimation of DNA in the presence of large amounts of agarose. Gel slices are solubilized with concentrated sodium perchlorate and DNA is selectively precipitated with cadmium chloride. The amount of DNA can then be estimated with 3,5-diaminobenzoic acid. Determination of DNA is linear in the range 10 ng to 1 microgram or more. We describe the application of this technique to the measurement of 60Co gamma-ray-induced double-strand breaks by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Our results are essentially identical to those obtained using radiolabeled DNA.

  18. Rheological and mechanical behavior of polyacrylamide hydrogels chemically crosslinked with allyl agarose for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Suriano, R; Griffini, G; Chiari, M; Levi, M; Turri, S

    2014-02-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis currently represents one of the most standard techniques for protein separation. In addition to the most commonly employed polyacrylamide crosslinked hydrogels, acrylamide-agarose copolymers have been proposed as promising systems for separation matrices in 2-D electrophoresis, because of the good resolution of both high and low molecular mass proteins made possible by careful control and optimization of the hydrogel pore structure. As a matter of fact, a thorough understanding of the nature of the hydrogel pore structure as well as of the parameters by which it is influenced is crucial for the design of hydrogel systems with optimal sieving properties. In this work, a series of acrylamide-based hydrogels covalently crosslinked with different concentrations of allyl agarose (0.2-1%) is prepared and characterized by creep-recovery measurements, dynamic rheology and tensile tests, in the attempt to gain a clearer understanding of structure-property relationships in crosslinked polyacrylamide-based hydrogels. The rheological and mechanical properties of crosslinked acrylamide-agarose hydrogels are found to be greatly affected by crosslinker concentration. Dynamic rheological tests show that hydrogels with a percentage of allyl agarose between 0.2% and 0.6% have a low density of elastically effective crosslinks, explaining the good separation of high molecular mass proteins in 2-D gel electrophoresis. Over the same range of crosslinker concentration, creep-recovery measurements reveal the presence of non-permanent crosslinks in the hydrogel network that justifies the good resolution of low molecular mass proteins as well. In tensile tests, the hydrogel crosslinked with 0.4% of allyl agarose exhibits the best results in terms of mechanical strength and toughness. Our results show how the control of the viscoelastic and the mechanical properties of these materials allow the design of mechanically stable hydrogels with improved

  19. Rheological and mechanical behavior of polyacrylamide hydrogels chemically crosslinked with allyl agarose for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Suriano, R; Griffini, G; Chiari, M; Levi, M; Turri, S

    2014-02-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis currently represents one of the most standard techniques for protein separation. In addition to the most commonly employed polyacrylamide crosslinked hydrogels, acrylamide-agarose copolymers have been proposed as promising systems for separation matrices in 2-D electrophoresis, because of the good resolution of both high and low molecular mass proteins made possible by careful control and optimization of the hydrogel pore structure. As a matter of fact, a thorough understanding of the nature of the hydrogel pore structure as well as of the parameters by which it is influenced is crucial for the design of hydrogel systems with optimal sieving properties. In this work, a series of acrylamide-based hydrogels covalently crosslinked with different concentrations of allyl agarose (0.2-1%) is prepared and characterized by creep-recovery measurements, dynamic rheology and tensile tests, in the attempt to gain a clearer understanding of structure-property relationships in crosslinked polyacrylamide-based hydrogels. The rheological and mechanical properties of crosslinked acrylamide-agarose hydrogels are found to be greatly affected by crosslinker concentration. Dynamic rheological tests show that hydrogels with a percentage of allyl agarose between 0.2% and 0.6% have a low density of elastically effective crosslinks, explaining the good separation of high molecular mass proteins in 2-D gel electrophoresis. Over the same range of crosslinker concentration, creep-recovery measurements reveal the presence of non-permanent crosslinks in the hydrogel network that justifies the good resolution of low molecular mass proteins as well. In tensile tests, the hydrogel crosslinked with 0.4% of allyl agarose exhibits the best results in terms of mechanical strength and toughness. Our results show how the control of the viscoelastic and the mechanical properties of these materials allow the design of mechanically stable hydrogels with improved

  20. Viability of hydroxyethyl methacrylate-methyl methacrylate-microencapsulated PC12 cells after omental pouch implantation within agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Fleming, A J; Sefton, M V

    2003-10-01

    Hydroxyethyl methacrylate-methyl methacrylate (HEMA-MMA, 75 mol% HEMA). Microcapsules containing viable PC12 cells (as an allogeneic transplant model) were implanted into omental pouches in Wistar rats. Two different capsule preparations were tested, based on differences in polymer solutions during extrusion: 10% HEMA-MMA in TEG, and 9% HEMA-MMA in TEG with 30% poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP). The omental pouch proved to be an ideal transplant site in terms of implantation, recovery, and blood vessel proximity (nutrient supply). To minimize the fibrous overgrowth and damaged capsules previously seen on implantation of individual capsules, agarose gels were used to embed the capsules before implantation. Cells proliferated within the microcapsule-agarose device during the first 7 days of implantation, but overall cell viability declined over the 3-week period, when compared with similar capsules maintained in vitro. Nonetheless, approximately 50% of the initial encapsulated cells were still viable after 3 weeks in vivo. This approach to HEMA-MMA microcapsule implantation improved cell viability and capsule integrity after 3 weeks in vivo, compared with capsules implanted without agarose.

  1. Efficient transfer of large DNA fragments from agarose gels to diazobenzyloxymethyl-paper and rapid hybridization by using dextran sulfate.

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, G M; Stern, M; Stark, G R

    1979-01-01

    We describe a technique for transferring electrophoretically separated bands of double-stranded DNA from agarose gels to diazobenzyloxymethyl-paper. Controlled cleavage of the DNA in situ by sequential treatment with dilute acid, which causes partial depurination, and dilute alkali, which causes cleavage and separation of the strands, allows the DNA to leave the gel rapidly and completely, with an efficiency independent of its size. Covalent attachment of DNA to paper prevents losses during subsequent hybridization and washing steps and allows a single paper to be reused many times. Ten percent dextran sulfate, originally found to accelerate DNA hybridization in solution by about 10-fold [J.G. Wetmur (1975) Biopolymers 14, 2517-2524], accelerates the rate of hybridization of randomly cleaved double-stranded DNA probes to immobilized nucleic acids by as much as 100-fold, without increasing the background significantly. Images PMID:291033

  2. Serum protein electrophoresis by using high-resolution agarose gel in clinically healthy and Aspergillus species-infected falcons.

    PubMed

    Kummrow, Maya; Silvanose, Christudas; Di Somma, Antonio; Bailey, Thomas A; Vorbrüggen, Susanne

    2012-12-01

    Serum protein electrophoresis has gained importance in avian medicine during the past decade. Interpretation of electrophoretic patterns should be based on species-specific reference intervals and the electrophoresis gel system. In this study, serum protein electrophoresis by using high-resolution agarose gels was performed on blood samples collected from 105 falcons, including peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus), gyrfalcons (Falco rusticolus), saker falcons (Falco cherrug), red-naped shaheens (Falco pelegrinoides babylonicus), and hybrid falcons, that were submitted to the Dubai Falcon Hospital (Dubai, United Arab Emirates) between 2003 and 2006. Reference values were established in clinically healthy birds and compared with values from falcons infected with Aspergillus species (n = 32). Falcons with confirmed aspergillosis showed significantly lower prealbumin values, which is a novel finding. Prealbumin has been documented in many avian species, but further investigation is required to illuminate the diagnostic significance of this negative acute-phase protein.

  3. Agarose gel investigation of quantum dots conjugated with short ssDNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsai-Chin; Dutta, Mitra; Stroscio, Michael A

    2013-12-01

    Herein, we investigate the migration distance of quantum-dot-functionalized complexes in electrophoresis. The quantitative study of these moving particles in an electrophoretic environment is modeled using an extended Smoluchowski equation. An extended Smoluchowski equation is proposed to addressed the D(m) to Ln(N) plot slope variation issue present in previous work and agreement between experiment and theory is found. The procedures underlying this work then discusses the potential of using agarose electrophoresis as a mean of monitoring the composition of nano-complexes consisting of quantum dots functionalized with differing numbers of DNA molecules.

  4. Determining iron oxide nanoparticle heating efficiency and elucidating local nanoparticle temperature for application in agarose gel-based tumor model.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rhythm R; Dombrowsky, Alexander R; Paulson, Abigail L; Johnson, Margaret P; Nikles, David E; Brazel, Christopher S

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) have been developed for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) cancer therapy, where cancer cells are treated through the heat generated by application of a high frequency magnetic field. This heat has also been proposed as a mechanism to trigger release of chemotherapy agents. In each of these cases, MNPs with optimal heating performance can be used to maximize therapeutic effect while minimizing the required dosage of MNPs. In this study, the heating efficiencies (or specific absorption rate, SAR) of two types of MNPs were evaluated experimentally and then predicted from their magnetic properties. MNPs were also incorporated in the core of poly(ethylene glycol-b-caprolactone) micelles, co-localized with rhodamine B fluorescent dye attached to polycaprolactone to monitor local, nanoscale temperatures during magnetic heating. Despite a relatively high SAR produced by these MNPs, no significant temperature rise beyond that observed in the bulk solution was measured by fluorescence in the core of the magnetic micelles. MNPs were also incorporated into a macro-scale agarose gel system that mimicked a tumor targeted by MNPs and surrounded by healthy tissues. The agarose-based tumor models showed that targeted MNPs can reach hyperthermia temperatures inside a tumor with a sufficient MNP concentration, while causing minimal temperature rise in the healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. PMID:27523991

  5. Hydrolysis of chickpea proteins with Flavourzyme immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose gels improves functional properties.

    PubMed

    del Mar Yust, María; del Carmen Millán-Linares, María; Alcaide-Hidalgo, Juan María; Millán, Francisco; Pedroche, Justo

    2013-06-01

    Chickpea protein isolate was hydrolyzed using Flavourzyme immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose beads by multipoint covalent attachment. This Flavourzyme-glyoxyl derivative, produced after 1 h of immobilization at 4 °C followed by 5.5 h at room temperature, presented approximately 51% of the endoprotease activity of Flavourzyme but was around 700 times more stable than soluble enzyme. Chickpea protein hydrolysates ranging from 1% to 10% degree of hydrolysis were produced and their chemical composition was very close to that of protein isolate used as starting material. Solubility, oil absorption, emulsifying activity and stability, and foaming capacity and stability were determined. All protein hydrolysates showed higher solubility than intact proteins, especially at pHs near isoelectric point of native chickpea proteins. Moreover, all hydrolysates had better functional properties, except emulsifying activity, than the original protein isolate.

  6. A quality comparison of protein crystals grown under containerless conditions generated by diamagnetic levitation, silicone oil and agarose gel.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui-Ling; Sun, Li-Hua; Li, Jian; Tang, Lin; Lu, Hui-Meng; Guo, Yun-Zhu; He, Jin; Liu, Yong-Ming; Xie, Xu-Zhuo; Shen, He-Fang; Zhang, Chen-Yan; Guo, Wei-Hong; Huang, Lin-Jun; Shang, Peng; He, Jian-Hua; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2013-10-01

    High-quality crystals are key to obtaining accurate three-dimensional structures of proteins using X-ray diffraction techniques. However, obtaining such protein crystals is often a challenge. Several containerless crystallization techniques have been reported to have the ability to improve crystal quality, but it is unknown which is the most favourable way to grow high-quality protein crystals. In this paper, a quality comparison of protein crystals which were grown under three containerless conditions provided by diamagnetic levitation, silicone oil and agarose gel was conducted. A control experiment on a vessel wall was also simultaneously carried out. Seven different proteins were crystallized under the four conditions, and the crystal quality was assessed in terms of the resolution limit, the mosaicity and the Rmerge. It was found that the crystals grown under the three containerless conditions demonstrated better morphology than those of the control. X-ray diffraction data indicated that the quality of the crystals grown under the three containerless conditions was better than that of the control. Of the three containerless crystallization techniques, the diamagnetic levitation technique exhibited the best performance in enhancing crystal quality. This paper is to our knowledge the first report of improvement of crystal quality using a diamagnetic levitation technique. Crystals obtained from agarose gel demonstrated the second best improvement in crystal quality. The study indicated that the diamagnetic levitation technique is indeed a favourable method for growing high-quality protein crystals, and its utilization is thus potentially useful in practical efforts to obtain well diffracting protein crystals.

  7. A quality comparison of protein crystals grown under containerless conditions generated by diamagnetic levitation, silicone oil and agarose gel.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui-Ling; Sun, Li-Hua; Li, Jian; Tang, Lin; Lu, Hui-Meng; Guo, Yun-Zhu; He, Jin; Liu, Yong-Ming; Xie, Xu-Zhuo; Shen, He-Fang; Zhang, Chen-Yan; Guo, Wei-Hong; Huang, Lin-Jun; Shang, Peng; He, Jian-Hua; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2013-10-01

    High-quality crystals are key to obtaining accurate three-dimensional structures of proteins using X-ray diffraction techniques. However, obtaining such protein crystals is often a challenge. Several containerless crystallization techniques have been reported to have the ability to improve crystal quality, but it is unknown which is the most favourable way to grow high-quality protein crystals. In this paper, a quality comparison of protein crystals which were grown under three containerless conditions provided by diamagnetic levitation, silicone oil and agarose gel was conducted. A control experiment on a vessel wall was also simultaneously carried out. Seven different proteins were crystallized under the four conditions, and the crystal quality was assessed in terms of the resolution limit, the mosaicity and the Rmerge. It was found that the crystals grown under the three containerless conditions demonstrated better morphology than those of the control. X-ray diffraction data indicated that the quality of the crystals grown under the three containerless conditions was better than that of the control. Of the three containerless crystallization techniques, the diamagnetic levitation technique exhibited the best performance in enhancing crystal quality. This paper is to our knowledge the first report of improvement of crystal quality using a diamagnetic levitation technique. Crystals obtained from agarose gel demonstrated the second best improvement in crystal quality. The study indicated that the diamagnetic levitation technique is indeed a favourable method for growing high-quality protein crystals, and its utilization is thus potentially useful in practical efforts to obtain well diffracting protein crystals. PMID:24100310

  8. 40 CFR 721.9680 - Alkaline titania silica gel (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkaline titania silica gel (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9680 Alkaline titania silica gel (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... alkaline titania silica gel (PMN P-95-529) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  9. 40 CFR 721.9680 - Alkaline titania silica gel (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkaline titania silica gel (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9680 Alkaline titania silica gel (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... alkaline titania silica gel (PMN P-95-529) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  10. 40 CFR 721.9680 - Alkaline titania silica gel (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkaline titania silica gel (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9680 Alkaline titania silica gel (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... alkaline titania silica gel (PMN P-95-529) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  11. 40 CFR 721.9680 - Alkaline titania silica gel (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkaline titania silica gel (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9680 Alkaline titania silica gel (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... alkaline titania silica gel (PMN P-95-529) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9680 - Alkaline titania silica gel (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkaline titania silica gel (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9680 Alkaline titania silica gel (generic name). (a) Chemical substance... alkaline titania silica gel (PMN P-95-529) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  13. Radiation dose measurements with alanine/agarose gel and thin alanine films around a 192Ir brachytherapy source, using ESR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Olsson, S; Bergstrand, E S; Carlsson, A K; Hole, E O; Lund, E

    2002-04-21

    Alanine/agarose gel and alanine films in stacks have been used for measurements of absorbed dose around an HDR 192Ir source in a vaginal cylinder-applicator, with and without a 180 degrees tungsten shield. The gel and the films were analysed by means of ESR spectroscopy and calibrated against an ion chamber in a 4 MV photon beam to obtain absolute dose values. The gel serves as both dosimeter and phantom material, and the thin (130 microm) films are used to achieve an improved spatial resolution in the dose estimations. Experimental values were compared with Monte Carlo simulations using two different codes. Results from the measurements generally agree with the simulations to within 5%, for both the alanine/agarose gel and the alanine films.

  14. Quantification of DNA by Agarose Gel Electrophoresis and Analysis of the Topoisomers of Plasmid and M13 DNA Following Treatment with a Restriction Endonuclease or DNA Topoisomerase I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweedie, John W.; Stowell, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    A two-session laboratory exercise for advanced undergraduate students in biochemistry and molecular biology is described. The first session introduces students to DNA quantification by ultraviolet absorbance and agarose gel electrophoresis followed by ethidium bromide staining. The second session involves treatment of various topological forms of…

  15. Beverage-Agarose Gel Electrophoresis: An Inquiry-Based Laboratory Exercise with Virtual Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Steven C.; McNear, Brad; Pearlman, Rebecca S.; Kern, Scott E.

    2006-01-01

    A wide range of literature and experience has shown that teaching methods that promote active learning, such as inquiry-based approaches, are more effective than those that rely on passive learning. Gel electrophoresis, one of the most common laboratory techniques in molecular biology, has a wide range of applications in the life sciences. As…

  16. Topological complexity of different populations of pBR322 as visualized by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Parras, L; Lucas, I; Martínez-Robles, M L; Hernández, P; Krimer, D B; Hyrien, O; Schvartzman, J B

    1998-01-01

    Neutral/neutral two-dimensional (2D) agarose gelelectrophoresis was used to investigate populations of the different topological conformations that pBR322 can adopt in vivo in bacterial cells as well as in Xenopus egg extracts. To help in interpretation and identification of all the different signals, undigested as well as DNA samples pretreated with DNase I, topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II were analyzed. The second dimension of the 2D gel system was run with or without ethidium bromide to account for any possible changes in the migration behavior of DNA molecules caused by intercalation of this planar agent. Finally, DNA samples were isolated from a recA-strain of Escherichia coli , as well as after direct labeling of the replication intermediates in extracts of Xenopus laevis eggs. Altogether, the results obtained demonstrated that 2D gels can be readily used to identify most of the complex topological populations that circular molecules can adopt in vivo in both bacteria and eukaryotic cells. PMID:9649629

  17. Evaluation of the friction coefficient, the radial stress, and the damage work during needle insertions into agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Urrea, Fabián A; Casanova, Fernando; Orozco, Gustavo A; García, José J

    2016-03-01

    Agarose hydrogels have been extensively used as a phantom material to mimic the mechanical behavior of soft biological tissues, e.g. in studies aimed to analyze needle insertions into the organs producing tissue damage. To better predict the radial stress and damage during needle insertions, this study was aimed to determine the friction coefficient between the material of commercial catheters and hydrogels. The friction coefficient, the tissue damage and the radial stress were evaluated at 0.2, 1.8, and 10mm/s velocities for 28, 30, and 32 gauge needles of outer diameters equal to 0.36, 0.31, and 0.23mm, respectively. Force measurements during needle insertions and retractions on agarose gel samples were used to analyze damage and radial stress. The static friction coefficient (0.295±0.056) was significantly higher than the dynamic (0.255±0.086). The static and dynamic friction coefficients were significantly smaller for the 0.2mm/s velocity compared to those for the other two velocities, and there was no significant difference between the friction coefficients for 1.8 and 10mm/s. Radial stress averages were 131.2±54.1, 248.3±64.2, and 804.9±164.3Pa for the insertion velocity of 0.2, 1.8, and 10mm/s, respectively. The radial stress presented a tendency to increase at higher insertion velocities and needle size, which is consistent with other studies. However, the damage work did not show to be a good predictor of tissue damage, which appears to be due to simplifications in the analytical model. Differently to other approaches, the method proposed here based on radial stress may be extended in future studies to quantity tissue damage in vivo along the entire needle track.

  18. Evaluation of the friction coefficient, the radial stress, and the damage work during needle insertions into agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Urrea, Fabián A; Casanova, Fernando; Orozco, Gustavo A; García, José J

    2016-03-01

    Agarose hydrogels have been extensively used as a phantom material to mimic the mechanical behavior of soft biological tissues, e.g. in studies aimed to analyze needle insertions into the organs producing tissue damage. To better predict the radial stress and damage during needle insertions, this study was aimed to determine the friction coefficient between the material of commercial catheters and hydrogels. The friction coefficient, the tissue damage and the radial stress were evaluated at 0.2, 1.8, and 10mm/s velocities for 28, 30, and 32 gauge needles of outer diameters equal to 0.36, 0.31, and 0.23mm, respectively. Force measurements during needle insertions and retractions on agarose gel samples were used to analyze damage and radial stress. The static friction coefficient (0.295±0.056) was significantly higher than the dynamic (0.255±0.086). The static and dynamic friction coefficients were significantly smaller for the 0.2mm/s velocity compared to those for the other two velocities, and there was no significant difference between the friction coefficients for 1.8 and 10mm/s. Radial stress averages were 131.2±54.1, 248.3±64.2, and 804.9±164.3Pa for the insertion velocity of 0.2, 1.8, and 10mm/s, respectively. The radial stress presented a tendency to increase at higher insertion velocities and needle size, which is consistent with other studies. However, the damage work did not show to be a good predictor of tissue damage, which appears to be due to simplifications in the analytical model. Differently to other approaches, the method proposed here based on radial stress may be extended in future studies to quantity tissue damage in vivo along the entire needle track. PMID:26700572

  19. Agarose gel purification of PCR products for denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis results in GC-clamp deletion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guowei; Xiao, Jinzhou; Lu, Man; Wang, Hongming; Chen, Xiaobing; Yu, Yongxin; Pan, Yingjie; Wang, Yongjie

    2015-01-01

    The 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of marine archaeal samples was amplified using a nested PCR approach, and the V3 region of 16S rRNA gene of crab gut microbiota (CGM) was amplified using the V3 universal primer pair with a guanine and cytosine (GC)-clamp. Unpurified PCR products (UPPs), products purified from reaction solution (PPFSs), and products purified from gel (PPFGs) of above two DNA samples were used for denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, respectively. In contrast to almost identical band patterns shared by both the UPP and PPFS, the PPFGs were barely observed on the DGGE gel for both the marine archaea and CGM samples. Both PPFS and PPFG of CGM V3 regions were subjected to cloning. A small amount of positive clones was obtained for PPFS, but no positive clones were observed for PPFG. The melt curve and direct sequencing analysis of PPFS and PPFG of E. coli V3 region indicated that the Tm value of PPFG (82.35 ± 0.19 °C) was less than that of PPFS (83.81 ± 0.11 °C), and the number of shorter GC-clamps was significant higher in PPFG than in PPFS. The ultraviolet exposure experiment indicated that the ultraviolet was not responsible for the deletion of the GC-clamps. We conclude that the gel purification method is not suitable for DGGE PCR products or even other GC-rich DNA samples. PMID:25300603

  20. Comparison of three methods of DNA extraction in endocervical specimens for Chlamydia trachomatis infection by spectrophotometry, agarose gel, and PCR.

    PubMed

    Jenab, Anahita; Roghanian, Rasoul; Golbang, Naser; Golbang, Pouran; Chamani-Tabriz, Leili

    2010-06-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the major cause of sexually transmitted disease in the world. The aim of this study was to determine the best method of DNA extraction for detecting C. trachomatis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in sexually active women (n = 80) attending Shahid Beheshti Hospital in Isfahan, Iran. Endocervical swabs were collected from 80 women, 22 of whom were asymptomatic and 58 symptomatic. Three different DNA extraction methods were used in this study (phenol-chlorophorm, proteinase K, and boiling). DNA yield was evaluated by spectrophotometry, agarose gel, and PCR. The internal control was assayed by beta-globin primers (PCO4, GH20). The DNA cryptic plasmid was selected as the target for C. trachomatis and samples were examined by PCR using specific KL1 and KL2 primers. It was shown that DNA extraction by boiling was the most sensitive with the highest yield of DNA. Of the 80 samples, 17 (21.25%) showed positivity for C. trachomatis by PCR. The highest rate of C. trachomatis infection was found in the group aged between 35 and 45 years old and those who used withdrawal or an intrauterine device as methods of contraception. It was demonstrated that DNA extraction by boiling was the least expensive and a very rapid method that gave the highest DNA yield. The infection rate in the sexually active women, including symptomatic and asymptomatic, was 21.25%, with a presumably high prevalence compared with other studies done in this field.

  1. Development of a chamber system for rapid, high yield and cost-effective purification of deoxyribonucleic acid fragments from agarose gel

    PubMed Central

    Eslami, Gilda; Salehi, Rasoul

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are several methods commonly practicing for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) purification from agarose gel. In most laboratories, especially in developing countries, present methods for recovering of DNA fragments from the gel are mostly involved organic solvents. However, manual purification using organic solvents are toxic, labor intensive, time consuming and prone to contamination owing to several handling steps. The above mentioned burdens as well as cost and long time to import them, especially in developing countries, prompted us to design and develop a chamber system for rapid, non-toxic, cost-effective and user friendly device for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products purification from agarose gel. Materials and Methods: The device was made from plexiglass plates. After amplification of two fragments of 250 and 850 bp, PCR products were electrophoresed. Subsequently, the desired bands were excised and purified with three method: HiPer Mini chamber, phenol extraction method and spin column procedure. To assess the suitability of the purified DNAs, restriction digestion was applied. Results: Results showed that the yield of recovered DNA in our method was above 95%, whereas the yields obtained with conventional phenol extraction and spin column methods were around 60%. Conclusion: In conclusion, the current method for DNA elution is quick, inexpensive and robust and it does not require the use of toxic organic solvents. In addition, the purified DNA was well has suited for further manipulations such as restriction digestion, ligation, cloning, sequencing and hybridization. PMID:24761386

  2. A subtle calculation method for nanoparticle’s molar extinction coefficient: The gift from discrete protein-nanoparticle system on agarose gel electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Ruibo; Yuan, Ming; Gao, Haiyang; Bai, Zhijun; Guo, Jun; Zhao, Xinmin; Zhang, Feng

    2016-03-01

    Discrete biomolecule-nanoparticle (NP) conjugates play paramount roles in nanofabrication, in which the key is to get the precise molar extinction coefficient of NPs. By making best use of the gift from a specific separation phenomenon of agarose gel electrophoresis (GE), amphiphilic polymer coated NP with exact number of bovine serum albumin (BSA) proteins can be extracted and further experimentally employed to precisely calculate the molar extinction coefficient of the NPs. This method could further benefit the evaluation and extraction of any other dual-component NP-containing bio-conjugates.

  3. Cat and Dog Primordial Follicles Enclosed in Ovarian Cortex Sustain Viability after In vitro Culture on Agarose Gel in a Protein-Free Medium

    PubMed Central

    Fujihara, M; Comizzoli, P; Wildt, DE; Songsasen, N

    2014-01-01

    Contents Our objective was to examine the influences of differing media, protein supplementation and the microenvironment on cat vs dog primordial follicle viability in vitro. Ovarian cortical slices were cultured for 3, 9 or 15 days in α-minimum essential medium (α-MEM) or MEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), 10% knock-out serum replacement (KSR) or 0.1% polyvinyl alcohol (protein free). In a separate study, cat and dog ovarian tissues were cultured in protein-free α-MEM and MEM, respectively, in cell culture inserts, on 1.5% agarose gel or in 24-well cell culture plates (control). Follicle viability was assessed in both studies using calcein AM/ethidium homodimer and histological evaluation with haematoxylin/eosin staining. No cat follicle sustained viability beyond 9 days of in vitro culture in α-MEM compared to 37.5% of those incubated for 15 days in MEM in protein-free condition (p < 0.05). In contrast, α-MEM was superior (p < 0.05) to MEM in maintaining dog follicle viability (32.7% vs 8.1%) in protein-free condition at 15 days. Serum was detrimental (p < 0.05) to follicle survival in both species. Knock-out serum replacement supplementation and a protein-free condition supported cat follicle viability, whereas the latter was superior (p < 0.05) to the former for sustaining dog follicle survival. Likewise, dog follicle viability was enhanced (p < 0.05) by the agarose gel compared to the cell culture insert and control groups after 3 and 9 days of culture. For the cat, the agarose gel better (p < 0.05) supported follicle viability compared to the control, but was equivalent to the cell culture insert. Therefore, sustaining primordial follicle survival from intracortical ovarian slices requires a different in vitro microenvironment for the cat vs the dog. A key factor to enhancing survival of these early stage follicles in culture appears to be the use of agarose gel, which enhances follicle viability, perhaps by promoting gas exchange. PMID

  4. Cat and dog primordial follicles enclosed in ovarian cortex sustain viability after in vitro culture on agarose gel in a protein-free medium.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, M; Comizzoli, P; Wildt, D E; Songsasen, N

    2012-12-01

    Our objective was to examine the influences of differing media, protein supplementation and the microenvironment on cat vs dog primordial follicle viability in vitro. Ovarian cortical slices were cultured for 3, 9 or 15 days in α-minimum essential medium (α-MEM) or MEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), 10% knock-out serum replacement (KSR) or 0.1% polyvinyl alcohol (protein free). In a separate study, cat and dog ovarian tissues were cultured in protein-free α-MEM and MEM, respectively, in cell culture inserts, on 1.5% agarose gel or in 24-well cell culture plates (control). Follicle viability was assessed in both studies using calcein AM/ethidium homodimer and histological evaluation with haematoxylin/eosin staining. No cat follicle sustained viability beyond 9 days of in vitro culture in α-MEM compared to 37.5% of those incubated for 15 days in MEM in protein-free condition (p < 0.05). In contrast, α-MEM was superior (p < 0.05) to MEM in maintaining dog follicle viability (32.7% vs 8.1%) in protein-free condition at 15 days. Serum was detrimental (p < 0.05) to follicle survival in both species. Knock-out serum replacement supplementation and a protein-free condition supported cat follicle viability, whereas the latter was superior (p < 0.05) to the former for sustaining dog follicle survival. Likewise, dog follicle viability was enhanced (p < 0.05) by the agarose gel compared to the cell culture insert and control groups after 3 and 9 days of culture. For the cat, the agarose gel better (p < 0.05) supported follicle viability compared to the control, but was equivalent to the cell culture insert. Therefore, sustaining primordial follicle survival from intracortical ovarian slices requires a different in vitro microenvironment for the cat vs the dog. A key factor to enhancing survival of these early stage follicles in culture appears to be the use of agarose gel, which enhances follicle viability, perhaps by promoting gas exchange.

  5. Study of kinetic desorption rate constant in fish muscle and agarose gel model using solid phase microextraction coupled with liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Togunde, Oluranti Paul; Oakes, Ken; Servos, Mark; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2012-09-12

    This study aims to use solid phase microextraction (SPME), a simple tool to investigate diffusion rate (time) constant of selected pharmaceuticals in gel and fish muscle by comparing desorption rate of diffusion of the drugs in both agarose gel prepared with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS; pH 7.4) and fish muscle. The gel concentration (agarose gel model) that could be used to simulate tissue matrix (fish muscle) for free diffusion of drugs under in vitro and in vivo conditions was determined to model mass transfer phenomena between fibre polymer coating and environmental matrix such that partition coefficients and desorption time constant (diffusion coefficient) can be determined. SPME procedure involves preloading the extraction phase (fibre) with the standards from spiked PBS for 1h via direct extraction. Subsequently, the preloaded fibre is introduced to the sample such fish or agarose gel for specified time ranging from 0.5 to 60 h. Then, fibre is removed at specified time and desorbed in 100 μL of desorption solution (acetonitrile: water 1:1) for 90 min under agitation speed of 1000 rpm. The samples extract were immediately injected to the instrument and analysed using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). The limit of detection of the method in gel and fish muscle was 0.01-0.07 ng mL(-1) and 0.07-0.34 ng g(-1), respectively, while the limit quantification was 0.10-0.20 ng mL(-1) in gel samples and 0.40-0.97 ng g(-1) in fish sample. The reproducibility of the method was good (5-15% RSD). The results suggest that kinetics of desorption of the compounds in fish tissue and different viscosity of gel can be determined using desorption time constant. In this study, desorption time constant which is directly related to desorption rate (diffusion kinetics) of selected drugs from the fibre to the gel matrix is faster as the viscosity of the gel matrix reduces from 2% (w/v) to 0.8% (w/v). As the concentration of gel reduces

  6. A new approach for calibration of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using thin layers of spiked agarose gels as references.

    PubMed

    Stärk, H-J; Wennrich, Rainer

    2011-02-01

    Calibration of analytical methods using laser ablation for sample introduction is often problematic. The availability of matrix-adapted standard materials is a crucial factor in the analysis of biological samples in particular. In this work a method for preparation of thin-film references for LA-ICP-MS is presented which is inexpensive, relatively simple and generally practicable. Aqueous solutions of agarose spiked with defined amounts of the analytes were cast on a carrier and then dried. When the thin-film references were characterized the average thickness of the films was 0.03 mm in the centre of the film and the relative standard deviation was 8%. Nebulization ICP-MS analysis after acid digestion of the agarose film was used to investigate the effectiveness of the spiking procedure. Recovery of the spiked elements was frequently in the range 90-110% (for rare earth elements 97-102%). Laser ablation ICP-MS analysis was used to investigate the distribution of the spiked elements in the film. When the laser was scanned across the gel the measured intensities were not constant, but had a peak-shaped profile with a flat top. Use of this flat-top region for analytical purposes, after its characterization by laser ablation ICP-MS, is proposed. Analysis of cell cultures was carried out by direct laser ablation-ICP-MS with the calibration method described. The results were in accordance with values previously achieved by nebulization ICP-MS.

  7. Isolation and purification of chemical constituents from the pericarp of Sophora japonica L. by chromatography on a 12% cross-linked agarose gel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renmin; Qi, Yuanying; Sun, Ailing; Xie, Hongyan

    2007-08-01

    A chromatographic method using 12% cross-linked agarose gel Superose 12 as the separation medium was developed for isolation and purification of the chemical constituents from the pericarp of Sophora japonica L. The mobile phase used for the separation was 2% acetic acid and 7% acetic acid in gradient elution. As a result, eight compounds including four kinds of flavonoids and four kinds of isoflavonoids were obtained in a one-step separation. A straightforward explanation of the separation mechanism of flavonoids and isoflavonoids on Superose 12 is also given. The flavonoids and isoflavonoids are retained on Superose 12 by a combination of hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions between the hydroxyl groups of aglycone and the residues of the cross-linking reagents used in the manufacture of Superose 12. PMID:17638350

  8. Isolation and purification of flavonoid and isoflavonoid compounds from the pericarp of Sophora japonica L. by adsorption chromatography on 12% cross-linked agarose gel media.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yuanying; Sun, Ailing; Liu, Renmin; Meng, Zhaoling; Xie, Hongyan

    2007-01-26

    A method for isolation and purification of flavonoid and isoflavonoid compounds in extracts of the pericarp of Sophora japonica L. was established by adsorption chromatography on the 12% cross-linked agarose gel Superose 12. The crude extracts were pre-separated to two parts, sample A and sample B, on a D-101 macroporous resin column by elution with 20% ethanol and 40% ethanol, respectively. Samples A and B were then separated by adsorption chromatography on Superose 12 with 40% methanol as the mobile phase. Eight compounds including four kinds of flavonoids and four kinds of isoflavonoids were obtained by the proposed method. The adsorption mechanisms of flavonoids and isoflavonoids on Superose 12 were also discussed. PMID:17174318

  9. Dextran-grafted cation exchanger based on superporous agarose gel: adsorption isotherms, uptake kinetics and dynamic protein adsorption performance.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qing-Hong; Jia, Guo-Dong; Sun, Yan

    2010-07-30

    A novel chromatographic medium for high-capacity protein adsorption was fabricated by grafting dextran (40kDa) onto the pore surfaces of superporous agarose (SA) beads. The bead was denoted as D-SA. D-SA, SA and homogeneous agarose (HA) beads were modified with sulfopropyl (SP) group to prepare cation exchangers, and the adsorption and uptake of lysozyme on all three cation-exchange chromatographic beads (SP-HA, SP-SA and SP-D-SA) were investigated at salt concentrations of 6-50mmol/L. Static adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption capacity of SP-D-SA (2.24mmol/g) was 78% higher than that of SP-SA (1.26mmol/g) and 54% higher than that of SP-HA (1.45mmol/g) at a salt concentration of 6mmol/L. Moreover, salt concentration had less influence on the adsorption capacity and dissociation constant of SP-D-SA than it did on SP-HA, suggesting that dextran-grafted superporous bead is a more potent architecture for chromatographic beads. In the dynamic uptake of lysozyme to the three cation-exchange beads, the D(e)/D(0) (the ratio of effective pore diffusivity to free solution diffusivity) values of 1.6-2.0 were obtained in SA-D-SA, indicating that effective pore diffusivities of SP-D-SA were about two times higher than free solution diffusivity for lysozyme. At 6mmol/L NaCl, the D(e) value in SA-D-SA (22.0x10(-11)m(2)/s) was 14.4-fold greater than that in SP-HA. Due to the superior uptake kinetics in SA-D-SA, the highest dynamic binding capacity (DBC) and adsorption efficiency (the ratio of DBC to static adsorption capacity) was likewise found in SP-D-SA. It is thus confirmed that SP-D-SA has combined the advantages of superporous matrix structure and drafted ligand chemistry in mass transport and offers a new opportunity for the development of high-performance protein chromatography.

  10. Identification of column edges of DNA fragments by using K-means clustering and mean algorithm on lane histograms of DNA agarose gel electrophoresis images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turan, Muhammed K.; Sehirli, Eftal; Elen, Abdullah; Karas, Ismail R.

    2015-07-01

    Gel electrophoresis (GE) is one of the most used method to separate DNA, RNA, protein molecules according to size, weight and quantity parameters in many areas such as genetics, molecular biology, biochemistry, microbiology. The main way to separate each molecule is to find borders of each molecule fragment. This paper presents a software application that show columns edges of DNA fragments in 3 steps. In the first step the application obtains lane histograms of agarose gel electrophoresis images by doing projection based on x-axis. In the second step, it utilizes k-means clustering algorithm to classify point values of lane histogram such as left side values, right side values and undesired values. In the third step, column edges of DNA fragments is shown by using mean algorithm and mathematical processes to separate DNA fragments from the background in a fully automated way. In addition to this, the application presents locations of DNA fragments and how many DNA fragments exist on images captured by a scientific camera.

  11. Hydroponics gel as a new electrolyte gelling agent for alkaline zinc-air cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, R.; Basirun, W. J.; Yahaya, A. H.; Arof, A. K.

    The viability of hydroponics gel as a new alkaline electrolyte gelling agent is investigated. Zinc-air cells are fabricated employing 12 wt.% KOH electrolyte immobilised with hydroponics gel. The cells are discharged at constant currents of 5, 50 and 100 mA. XRD and SEM analysis of the anode plates after discharge show that the failure mode is due to the formation of zinc oxide insulating layers and not due to any side reactions between the gel and the plate or the electrolyte.

  12. Could a strong alkali deproteinization replace the standard lysis step in alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay (pH>13)?

    PubMed

    Vivek Kumar, P R; Cheriyan, V D; Seshadri, M

    2009-08-01

    The alkaline version of single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay is widely used for evaluating DNA damage at the individual cell level. The standard alkaline method of the comet assay involves deproteinization of cells embedded in agarose gel using a high salt-detergent lysis buffer, followed by denaturation of DNA and electrophoresis using a strong alkali at pH>13 [N.P. Singh, M.T. McCoy, R.R. Tice, E.L. Schneider, A simple technique for quantitation of low levels of DNA damage in individual cells, Exp. Cell. Res. 175 (1988) 184-191]. However, a recent report showed that a strong alkali treatment results in simultaneous deproteinization of cells and denaturation of genomic DNA [P. Sestili, C. Martinelli, V. Stocchi, The fast halo assay: an improved method to quantify genomic DNA strand breakage at the single cell-level, Mutat. Res. 607 (2006) 205-214]. This study was carried out to test whether the strong alkali deproteinization of cells could replace the high salt-detergent lysis step used in the standard method of the alkaline comet assay. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from 3 healthy individuals were irradiated with gamma rays at doses varying between 0 and 10 Gy. Following irradiation, the comet assay was performed according to the standard alkaline method (pH>13) and a modified method. In the modified method, agarose embedded cells were treated with a strong alkali (0.3M NaOH, 0.02 M Trizma and 1mM EDTA, pH>13) for 20 min to allow deproteinization of cells and denaturation of DNA. This was followed by electrophoresis using the same alkali solution to obtain comets. DNA damage expressed in terms of comet tail length, percentage of DNA in comet tail and tail moment obtained by the standard alkaline method and the modified method were compared. In both methods, DNA damage showed a good correlation with the dose of gamma ray. The results indicate a satisfactory sensitivity of the modified method in detecting radiation-induced DNA damage in human peripheral

  13. Temporal effect of inertial cavitation with and without microbubbles on surface deformation of agarose S gel in the presence of 1-MHz focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Y; Matsuura, T; Kodama, T

    2015-01-01

    Sonoporation has the potential to deliver extraneous molecules into a target tissue non-invasively. There have been numerous investigations of cell membrane permeabilization induced by microbubbles, but very few studies have been carried out to investigate sonoporation by inertial cavitation, especially from a temporal perspective. In the present paper, we show the temporal variations in nano/micro-pit formations following the collapse of inertial cavitation bubbles, with and without Sonazoid® microbubbles. Using agarose S gel as a target material, erosion experiments were conducted in the presence of 1-MHz focused ultrasound applied for various exposure times, Tex (0.002-60 s). Conventional microscopy was used to measure temporal variations in micrometer-scale pit numbers, and atomic force microscopy utilized to detect surface roughness on a nanometer scale. The results demonstrated that nanometer-scale erosion was predominantly caused by Sonazoid® microbubbles and C4F10 gas bubbles for 0.002 s

  14. The effects of alkaline and alkaline earth metal salts on the performance of a polymer actuator based on single-wal led carbon nanotube-ionic liquid gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasawa, Naohiro; Takeuchi, Ichiroh; Mukai, Ken; Asaka, Kinji

    We investigated an effect for alkaline metal salts or an alkaline earth metal salt on electrochemical and electromechanical properties of an actuator using a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-ionic liquid (IL) gel electrode, and much better performance of the actuator containing the metal salt/IL. The actuator containing the alkaline metal salt /IL or alkaline earth metal salt/IL performed much better than that containing only the IL. It is considered that the higher ionic conductivity of the gel electrolyte layer containing the alkaline metal salt /IL or alkaline earth metal salt/IL produces the quick response actuator, and that the large capacitance gives the large generated strain.

  15. The coexistence of geopolymeric gel and calcium silicate hydrate at the early stage of alkaline activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, C.K.; Lukey, G.C.; Deventer, J.S.J. van . E-mail: jannie@unimelb.edu.au

    2005-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the effects of the addition of ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of metakaolin (MK) based geopolymers. It was found that it is possible to have geopolymeric gel and calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel forming simultaneously within a single binder. The coexistence of these two phases is dependent on the alkalinity of the alkali activator and the MK / GGBFS mass ratio. It has been found that the formation of CSH gel together with the geopolymeric gel occurs only in a system at low alkalinity. In the presence of high concentrations of NaOH (> 7.5 M), the geopolymeric gel is the predominant phase formed with small calcium precipitates scattered within the binder. The coexistence of the two phases is not observed unless a substantial amount of a reactive calcium source is present initially. It is thought that voids and pores within the geopolymeric binder become filled with the CSH gel. This helps to bridge the gaps between the different hydrated phases and unreacted particles; thereby resulting in the observed increase in mechanical strength for these binders.

  16. O-hydroxylamine-coupled alkaline gel electrophoresis assay for the detection and measurement of DNA single-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Luke, April M; Nakamura, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The ability to detect and measure DNA single-strand breaks has been the aim of numerous assays developed to assess genotoxicity. These methods often rely on alkaline conditions to denature DNA. However, alkaline treatment of DNA also introduces artifactual SSBs through the cleavage of alkali-labile sites resulting in confounded data. Here, we describe a modified alkaline gel electrophoresis assay coupled with a neutral O-hydroxylamine to obtain the measurement of true SSB formation.

  17. All-solid-state Al-air batteries with polymer alkaline gel electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao; Zuo, Chuncheng; Liu, Zihui; Yu, Ying; Zuo, Yuxin; Song, Yu

    2014-04-01

    Aluminum-air (Al-air) battery is one of the most promising candidates for next-generation energy storage systems because of its high capacity and energy density, and abundance. The polyacrylic acid (PAA)-based alkaline gel electrolyte is used in all-solid-state Al-air batteries instead of aqueous electrolytes to prevent leakage. The optimal gel electrolyte exhibits an ionic conductivity of 460 mS cm-1, which is close to that of aqueous electrolytes. The Al-air battery peak capacity and energy density considering only Al can reach 1166 mAh g-1-Al and 1230 mWh g-1-Al, respectively, during constant current discharge. The battery prototype also exhibits a high power density of 91.13 mW cm-2. For the battery is a laminated structure, area densities of 29.2 mAh cm-2 and 30.8 mWh cm-2 are presented to appraise the performance of the whole cell. A novel design to inhibit anodic corrosion is proposed by separating the Al anode from the gel electrolyte when not in use, thereby effectively maintaining the available capacity of the battery.

  18. Analysis of branched DNA replication and recombination intermediates from prokaryotic cells by two-dimensional (2D) native-native agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Nicholas P

    2013-01-01

    Branched DNA molecules are generated by the essential processes of replication and recombination. Owing to their distinctive extended shapes, these intermediates migrate differently from linear double-stranded DNA under certain electrophoretic conditions. However, these branched species exist in the cell at much low abundance than the bulk linear DNA. Consequently, branched molecules cannot be visualized by conventional electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining. Two-dimensional native-native agarose electrophoresis has therefore been developed as a method to facilitate the separation and visualization of branched replication and recombination intermediates. A wide variety of studies have employed this technique to examine branched molecules in eukaryotic, archaeal, and bacterial cells, providing valuable insights into how DNA is duplicated and repaired in all three domains of life.

  19. Alkaline single-cell gel (comet) assay and genotoxicity monitoring using two species of tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Ralph, S; Petras, M; Pandrangi, R; Vrzoc, M

    1996-01-01

    Small bodies of water (e.g., creeks, ponds, and drainage ditches) have received very little attention in genotoxicity studies, yet these areas are important because they are often the first to be affected by industrial effluents, sewage contaminants, accidental spills, internal combustion engine emissions, landfill runoffs, and pesticide uses. To address this deficiency, we examined erythrocytes in two species of tadpoles, Rana clamitans and Bufo americanus, using the alkaline single-cell gel (SCG) ("comet") assay. This approach involves detection, under alkaline conditions, of cell DNA fragments, which on electrophoresis migrate from the nuclear core, resulting in a "comet-with-tail" formation. Exposure of R. clamitans todpoles to a range of concentrations of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) produced a linear increase in DNA length to DNA core width ratios. This is consistent with findings in a number of other species. Time-dose experiments using MMS suggest that the peak level of DNA damage in R. clamitans todpoles occurred 42 hr after exposure. B. americanus tadpoles exposed to 6.25 mg/l of MMS for 12 hours had a significant increase in DNA damage over that seen in the controls. Freshly caught R. clamitans tadpoles from Highgate and B. americanus tadpoles from Duart, both on the north shore of Lake Erie, gave ratios of 2.78 and 2.07, respectively. This region of Ontario is a prime agricultural area and pesticide use is extensive. Tadpoles from Highgate and Duart, maintained in the laboratory for 4 months and 6 weeks, respectively, gave ratios of 1.29 and 1.44. The results of the SCG procedure in tadpoles indicate that this assay is extremely sensitive and suitable for detecting genotoxicity in the environment.

  20. Human papillomavirus DNA from warts for typing by endonuclease restriction patterns: purification by alkaline plasmid methods.

    PubMed

    Chinami, M; Tanikawa, E; Hachisuka, H; Sasai, Y; Shingu, M

    1990-01-01

    The alkaline plasmid DNA extraction method of Birnboim and Doly was applied for the isolation of human papillomavirus (HPV) from warts. Tissue from common and plantar warts was digested with proteinase K, and the extrachromosomal circular covalently-closed form of HPV-DNA was rapidly extracted by alkaline sodium dodecyl sulphate and phenol-chloroform treatment. Recovery of HPV-DNA from the tissue was sufficient for determination of endonuclease restriction patterns by agarose gel electrophoresis.

  1. Gel-like properties of MCM-41 material and its transformation to MCM-50 in a caustic alkaline surround

    SciTech Connect

    Saputra, Hens; Othman, Raihan; Sutjipto, A.G.E.; Muhida, R.; Ani, M.H.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MCM-41 material transforms gradually into MCM-50 lamellar gel upon controlled exposure to 6 M KOH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of MCM-50 ordered gel structure occurs at KOH weight content of 40-70 wt. %. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MCM gel phase shows pseudoplastic behavior and possesses homogeneous matrix texture. -- Abstract: MCM-41 material, prepared by sol-gel method, reveals gel-like properties in a caustic alkaline environment, i.e., 6 M potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte. The gellation of MCM-41 starts at a KOH weight ratio of 40 wt.%. The structural change of the material is verified with X-Ray diffractograms and supported by observation using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). As the KOH weight ratio increases, the MCM-41 hexagonal arrays structure gradually transforms into MCM-50 lamellar structure before disappearing completely at 80 wt.% KOH. The MCM gel phase is further characterized by rotational viscometry and texture analysis. The gel phase shows shear thinning or pseudoplastic behavior and possesses homogeneous matrix structure.

  2. Continuous superporous agarose beds for chromatography and electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, P E; Larsson, P O

    1999-02-01

    Continuous agarose beds (monoliths) were prepared by casting agarose emulsions designed to generate superporous agarose. The gel structures obtained were transected by superpores (diameters could be varied in the range 20-200 microns) through which liquids could be pumped. The pore structure and the basic properties of the continuous gel were investigated by microscopy and size exclusion chromatography. The chromatographic behaviour was approximately the same as for beds packed with homogeneous agarose beads with a particle diameter equivalent to the distance between the superpores. In one application, the superporous continuous agarose bed was derivatized with a NAD+ analogue and used in the affinity purification of bovine lactate dehydrogenase from a crude extract. In another application, a new superporous composite gel material was prepared by adding hydroxyapatite particles to the agarose phase. The composite bed was used to separate a protein mixture by hydroxyapatite chromatography. In a third application, the continuous superporous agarose material was used as an electrophoresis gel. Here, a water-immiscible organic liquid was pumped through the superpores to dissipate the joule heat evolved, thus allowing high current densities.

  3. Degradation potential of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase from crude extract of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain KB2 immobilized in calcium alginate hydrogels and on glyoxyl agarose.

    PubMed

    Guzik, Urszula; Hupert-Kocurek, Katarzyna; Krysiak, Marta; Wojcieszyńska, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Microbial intradiol dioxygenases have been shown to have a great potential for bioremediation; however, their structure is sensitive to various environmental and chemical agents. Immobilization techniques allow for the improvement of enzyme properties. This is the first report on use of glyoxyl agarose and calcium alginate as matrixes for the immobilization of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase. Multipoint attachment of the enzyme to the carrier caused maintenance of its initial activity during the 21 days. Immobilization of dioxygenase in calcium alginate or on glyoxyl agarose resulted in decrease in the optimum temperature by 5 °C and 10 °C, respectively. Entrapment of the enzyme in alginate gel shifted its optimum pH towards high-alkaline pH while immobilization of the enzyme on glyoxyl agarose did not influence pH profile of the enzyme. Protocatechuate 3,4-dioygenase immobilized in calcium alginate showed increased activity towards 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate, caffeic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate, and 3,5-dihydroxybenzoate. Slightly lower activity of the enzyme was observed after its immobilization on glyoxyl agarose. Entrapment of the enzyme in alginate gel protected it against chelators and aliphatic alcohols while its immobilization on glyoxyl agarose enhanced enzyme resistance to inactivation by metal ions. PMID:24693536

  4. Degradation potential of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase from crude extract of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain KB2 immobilized in calcium alginate hydrogels and on glyoxyl agarose.

    PubMed

    Guzik, Urszula; Hupert-Kocurek, Katarzyna; Krysiak, Marta; Wojcieszyńska, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Microbial intradiol dioxygenases have been shown to have a great potential for bioremediation; however, their structure is sensitive to various environmental and chemical agents. Immobilization techniques allow for the improvement of enzyme properties. This is the first report on use of glyoxyl agarose and calcium alginate as matrixes for the immobilization of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase. Multipoint attachment of the enzyme to the carrier caused maintenance of its initial activity during the 21 days. Immobilization of dioxygenase in calcium alginate or on glyoxyl agarose resulted in decrease in the optimum temperature by 5 °C and 10 °C, respectively. Entrapment of the enzyme in alginate gel shifted its optimum pH towards high-alkaline pH while immobilization of the enzyme on glyoxyl agarose did not influence pH profile of the enzyme. Protocatechuate 3,4-dioygenase immobilized in calcium alginate showed increased activity towards 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate, caffeic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate, and 3,5-dihydroxybenzoate. Slightly lower activity of the enzyme was observed after its immobilization on glyoxyl agarose. Entrapment of the enzyme in alginate gel protected it against chelators and aliphatic alcohols while its immobilization on glyoxyl agarose enhanced enzyme resistance to inactivation by metal ions.

  5. Alkaline sodium borohydride gel as a hydrogen source for PEMFC or an energy carrier for NaBH 4-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. H.; Li, Z. P.; Chen, L. L.

    In this preliminary study, we tried to use sodium polyacrylate as the super absorbent polymer to form alkaline NaBH 4 gel and explored its possibilities for borohydride hydrolysis and borohydride electro-oxidation. It was found that the absorption capacity of sodium polyacrylate decreased with increasing NaBH 4 concentration. The formed gel was rather stable in the sealed vessel but tended to slowly decompose in open air. Hydrogen generation from the gel was carried out using CoCl 2 catalyst precursor solutions. Hydrogen generation rate from the alkaline NaBH 4 gel was found to be higher and impurities in hydrogen were less than that from the alkaline NaBH 4 solution. The NaBH 4 gel also successfully powered a NaBH 4-air battery.

  6. In situ selective determination of methylmercury in river water by diffusive gradient in thin films technique (DGT) using baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) immobilized in agarose gel as binding phase.

    PubMed

    Tafurt-Cardona, Makenly; Eismann, Carlos Eduardo; Suárez, Carlos Alfredo; Menegário, Amauri Antonio; Luko, Karen Silva; Sargentini Junior, Ézio

    2015-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilized in agarose gel as binding phase and polyacrylamide as diffusive layer in the diffusive gradient in thin films technique (DGT) was used for selective determination of methylmercury (MeHg). Deployment tests showed good linearity in mass uptake up to 48 h (3276 ng). When coupling the DGT technique with Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry, the method has a limit of detection of 0.44 ng L(-1) (pre concentration factor of 11 for 48 h deployment). Diffusion coefficient of 7.03 ± 0.77 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) at 23 °C in polyacrylamide gel (pH = 5.5 and ionic strength = 0.05 mol L(-1) NaCl) was obtained. Influence of ionic strength (from 0.0005 mol L(-1) to 0.1 mol L(-1) NaCl) and pH (from 3.5 to 8.5) on MeHg uptake were evaluated. For these range, recoveries of 84-105% and 84-98% were obtained for ionic strength and pH respectively. Potential interference due to presence of Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn was also assessed showing good recoveries (70-87%). The selectivity of the proposed approach was tested by deployments in solutions containing MeHg and Hg(II). Results obtained showed recoveries of 102-115 % for MeHg, while the uptake of Hg(II) was insignificant. The proposed approach was successfully employed for in situ measurements in the Negro River (Manaus-AM, Brazil).

  7. In situ selective determination of methylmercury in river water by diffusive gradient in thin films technique (DGT) using baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) immobilized in agarose gel as binding phase.

    PubMed

    Tafurt-Cardona, Makenly; Eismann, Carlos Eduardo; Suárez, Carlos Alfredo; Menegário, Amauri Antonio; Luko, Karen Silva; Sargentini Junior, Ézio

    2015-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilized in agarose gel as binding phase and polyacrylamide as diffusive layer in the diffusive gradient in thin films technique (DGT) was used for selective determination of methylmercury (MeHg). Deployment tests showed good linearity in mass uptake up to 48 h (3276 ng). When coupling the DGT technique with Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry, the method has a limit of detection of 0.44 ng L(-1) (pre concentration factor of 11 for 48 h deployment). Diffusion coefficient of 7.03 ± 0.77 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) at 23 °C in polyacrylamide gel (pH = 5.5 and ionic strength = 0.05 mol L(-1) NaCl) was obtained. Influence of ionic strength (from 0.0005 mol L(-1) to 0.1 mol L(-1) NaCl) and pH (from 3.5 to 8.5) on MeHg uptake were evaluated. For these range, recoveries of 84-105% and 84-98% were obtained for ionic strength and pH respectively. Potential interference due to presence of Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn was also assessed showing good recoveries (70-87%). The selectivity of the proposed approach was tested by deployments in solutions containing MeHg and Hg(II). Results obtained showed recoveries of 102-115 % for MeHg, while the uptake of Hg(II) was insignificant. The proposed approach was successfully employed for in situ measurements in the Negro River (Manaus-AM, Brazil). PMID:26320783

  8. Estimating the DNA strand breakage using a fuzzy inference system and agarose gel electrophoresis, a case study with toothed carp Aphanius sophiae exposed to cypermethrin.

    PubMed

    Poorbagher, Hadi; Moghaddam, Maryam Nasrollahpour; Eagderi, Soheil; Farahmand, Hamid

    2016-07-01

    The DNA breakage has been widely used in ecotoxicological studies to investigate effects of pesticides in fishes. The present study used a fuzzy inference system to quantify the breakage of DNA double strand in Aphanius sophiae exposed to the cypermethrin. The specimens were adapted to different temperatures and salinity for 14 days and then exposed to cypermethrin. DNA of each specimens were extracted, electrophoresed and photographed. A fuzzy system with three input variables and 27 rules were defined. The pixel value curve of DNA on each gel lane was obtained using ImageJ. The DNA breakage was quantified using the pixel value curve and fuzzy system. The defuzzified values were analyzed using a three-way analysis of variance. Cypermethrin had significant effects on DNA breakage. Fuzzy inference systems can be used as a tool to quantify the breakage of double strand DNA. DNA double strand of the gill of A. sophiae is sensitive enough to be used to detect cypermethrin in surface waters in concentrations much lower than those reported in previous studies.

  9. Superporous agarose anion exchangers for plasmid isolation.

    PubMed

    Tiainen, Peter; Gustavsson, Per-Erik; Ljunglöf, Anders; Larsson, Per-Olof

    2007-01-01

    Superporous agarose beads have wide, connecting flow pores allowing large molecules such as plasmids to be transported into the interior of the beads by convective flow. The pore walls provide additional surface for plasmid binding thus increasing the binding capacity of the adsorbent. Novel superporous agarose anion exchangers have been prepared, differing with respect to bead diameter, superpore diameter and type of anion-exchange functional group (poly(ethyleneimine) and quaternary amine). The plasmid binding capacities were obtained from breakthrough curves and compared with the binding capacity of homogeneous agarose beads of the same particle size. Significantly, the smaller diameter superporous agarose beads were found to have four to five times higher plasmid binding capacity than the corresponding homogeneous agarose beads. The experimentally determined plasmid binding capacity was compared with the theoretically calculated surface area for each adsorbent and fair agreement was found. Confocal microscopy studies of beads with adsorbed, fluorescently labelled plasmids aided in the interpretation of the results. Superporous poly(ethyleneimine)-substituted beads with a high ion capacity (230 micromol/ml) showed a plasmid binding of 3-4 mg/ml adsorbent. Superporous quaternary amine-substituted beads had a lower ion capacity (81 micromol/ml) and showed a correspondingly lower plasmid binding capacity (1-2 mg/ml adsorbent). In spite of the lower capacity, the beads with quaternary amine ligand were preferred, due to their much better plasmid recovery (70-100% recovery). Interestingly, both capacity and recovery was improved when the plasmid adsorption step was carried out in the presence of a moderate salt concentration. The most suitable superporous bead type (45-75 microm diameter beads; 4 microm superpores; quaternary amine ligand) was chosen for the capture of plasmid DNA from a clarified alkaline lysate. Two strategies were evaluated, one with and one

  10. Chemotaxis: Under Agarose Assay.

    PubMed

    Brazill, Derrick

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum represents a superb model for examining chemotaxis. Under vegetative conditions, the amoebae are chemotactically responsive to pterins, such as folate. Under starved conditions, they lose their sensitivity to pterins, and become chemotactically responsive to cAMP. As an NIH model system, Dictyostelium offers a variety of advantages in studying chemotaxis, including its conservation of mammalian signaling pathways, its ease of growth, and its genetic tractability. In this chapter, we describe the use of the under agarose chemotaxis assay to identify proteins involved in controlling motility and directional sensing in Dictyostelium discoideum. Given the similarities between Dictyostelium and mammalian cells, this allows us to dissect the conserved pathways involved in eukaryotic chemotaxis.

  11. Recycling of chemicals from alkaline waste generated during preparation of UO 3 microspheres by sol-gel process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashok; Vittal Rao, T. V.; Mukerjee, S. K.; Vaidya, V. N.

    2006-05-01

    Internal gelation process, one of the sol-gel processes for nuclear fuel fabrication, offers many advantages over conventional powder pellet route. However, one of the limitation of the process is generation of large volume of alkaline liquid waste containing hexamethylenetetramine, urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium hydroxide etc. Presence of ammonium nitrate with hexamethylenetetramine and urea presents a fire hazard which prevents direct disposal of the waste as well as its recycle by evaporation. The paper describes the studies carried out to suitably process the waste. Nitrate was removed from the waste by passing through Dowex 1 × 4 anion exchange resin in OH - form. 1.0 M NaOH was used to regenerate the resin. The nitrate-free waste was further treated to recover and recycle hexamethylenetetramine, urea and ammonium hydroxide for preparation of UO 3 microspheres. The quality of the microspheres obtained was satisfactory. An optimized flow sheet for processing of the waste solution has been suggested.

  12. Genotoxicity of select herbicides in Rana catesbeiana tadpoles using the alkaline single-cell gel DNA electrophoresis (comet) assay.

    PubMed

    Clements, C; Ralph, S; Petras, M

    1997-01-01

    Pesticides are broadly used for pest control in agriculture despite possible negative impacts they may pose to the environment. Thus, we examined the DNA damage caused by five herbicides commonly used in southern Ontario (Canada). Erythrocytes from Rana catesbeiana (bullfrog) tadpoles were evaluated for DNA damage following exposure to selected herbicides, using the alkaline single-cell gel DNA electrophoresis (SCG) or "comet" assay [Singh et al. (1988): Exp Cell Res 175:184-191; Ralph et al. (1996): Eviron Mol Mutagen 28:112-120]. This approach involves detection, under alkaline conditions, of DNA fragments that upon electrophoresis migrate from the nuclear care, resulting in a comet formation. The herbicides tested, along with their active ingredients, were AAtrex Nine-O (atrazine), Dual-960E (metalochlor), Roundup (glyphosate), Sencor-500F (metribuzin), and Amsol (2,4-D amine). Tadpoles were exposed in the laboratory for a 24-hr period to several concentrations of the herbicides dissolved in dechlorinated water. Methyl methanesulphonate was used as a positive control. The herbicides AAtrex Nine-O-, Dual-960E-, Roundup-, and Sencor-500F-treated tadpoles showed significant DNA damage when compared with unexposed control animals, whereas, Amsol-treated tadpoles did not. Unlike the other responding herbicides, Sencor-500F did not show a relationship between dosage and DNA damage. In summary, the results indicate that at least some of the herbicides currently used in southern Ontario are capable of inducing DNA damage in tadpoles.

  13. Characteristics and Gel Properties of Gelatin from Goat Skin as Influenced by Alkaline-pretreatment Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mad-Ali, Sulaiman; Benjakul, Soottawat; Prodpran, Thummanoon; Maqsood, Sajid

    2016-01-01

    Characteristics and properties of gelatin from goat skin pretreated with NaOH solutions (0.50 and 0.75 M) for various times (1 to 4 days) were investigated. All gelatins contained α-chains as the predominant component, followed by β-chain. Gelling and melting temperatures of those gelatins were 23.02°C to 24.16°C and 33.07°C to 34.51°C, respectively. Gel strength of gelatins increased as NaOH concentration and pretreatment time increased (p<0.05). Pretreatment for a longer time yielded gelatin with a decrease in L*-value but an increase in b*-value. Pretreatment of goat skin using 0.75 M NaOH for 2 days rendered the highest yield (15.95%, wet weight basis) as well as high gel strength (222.42 g), which was higher than bovine gelatin (199.15 g). Gelatin obtained had the imino acid content of 226 residues/1,000 residues and the gelatin gel had a fine and ordered structure. Therefore, goat skin gelatin could be used as a potential replacer of commercial gelatin. PMID:26954127

  14. AN EVALUATION OF THE RELATIVE GENOTOXICITY OF ARSENITE, ARSENATE, AND FOUR METHYLATED METABOLITES IN VITRO USING THE ALKALINE SINGLE CELL GEL ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An Evaluation of the Relative Genotoxicity of Arsenite, Arsenate, and Four Methylated
    Metabolites In Vitro Using the Alkaline Single Cell Gel Assay (ASCG).

    Arsenic ( As) is a genotoxic and carcinogenic metal found in many drinking water systems throughout the world. ...

  15. Removal of digoxin from plasma using monoclonal anti-digoxin antibodies immobilized on agarose

    SciTech Connect

    Brizgys, M.; Pincus, S.; Rollins, D.E.

    1986-05-01

    Monoclonal anti-digoxin antibodies (dig-Ab) have been covalently coupled to agarose supports to evaluate them as part of an extracorporeal device for removal of digoxin from the circulation. The agarose supports studied were Sepharose CL-6B, agarose-polyacrolein microsphere (APAM) beads, Bio Gel A-5m and Affi-gel 15 (Bio-Rad). Antibody concentrations between 2 and 4 mg/g gel were coupled to the agarose beads which were then placed in glass columns. Bovine ..cap alpha..-globulin coupled to the agarose supports was used as a control. Binding capacity and affinity of the immobilized antibody were determined by perfusing the dig-Ab agarose beads with a plasma solution containing /sup 3/H-digoxin and various concentrations of digoxin. The binding capacity of the immobilized dig-Ab was 30% of the theoretical value for Sepharose, Bio Gel and Affigel, and 10% of the theoretical value for dig-Ab coupled to APAM beads. The affinity of the immobilized dig-Ab was 10-100 fold less than non-immobilized Ab (3.4 x 10/sup 8/M/sup -1/. The APAM beads showed a significant decrease in binding of digoxin as the flow rate was increased from 0.5 to 5.0 ml/min. These data demonstrate that dig-Ab coupled to agarose and incorporated into a column can be used to remove digoxin from plasma in vitro.

  16. "Clickable" agarose for affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Punna, Sreenivas; Kaltgrad, Eiton; Finn, M G

    2005-01-01

    Successful purification of biological molecules by affinity chromatography requires the attachment of desired ligands to biocompatible chromatographic supports. The Cu(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition of azides and alkynes-the premier example of "click chemistry"-is an efficient way to make covalent connections among diverse molecules and materials. Both azide and alkyne units are highly selective in their reactivity, being inert to most chemical functionalities and stable to wide ranges of solvent, temperature, and pH. We show that agarose beads bearing alkyne and azide groups can be easily made and are practical precursors to functionalized agarose materials for affinity chromatography.

  17. Genotoxicity of chlorpyrifos in freshwater fish Labeo rohita using Alkaline Single-cell Gel Electrophoresis (Comet) assay.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Muhammad; Khan, Qaiser Mahmood; Ali, Rahat; Ali, Tayyaba; Mobeen, Ameena

    2014-10-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a widely used insecticide of organophosphate group, which causes severe toxicological effects in non target aquatic organisms especially in fish. In the present study the genotoxic effects of sublethal concentrations of chlorpyrifos were observed in the erythrocytes and gill cells of Labeo rohita (commonly known as rohu) using the Alkaline Single-Cell Gel Electrophoresis (Comet) assay. Effects of chlorpyrifos on the behavior of the fish were also investigated. The 96 h LC50 value of chlorpyrifos, estimated by Trimmed Spearman-Karber (TSK) in static bioassay, was found to be 442.8 µg/L. On the basis of LC50 value, the fish were exposed to three sublethal concentrations of chlorpyrifos (SL-I ∼221.4 µg/L, SL- II ∼110.7 µg/L and SL-III ∼73.8 µg/L) for 96 h. Blood and gill samples were collected at every 24 h and were subjected to the Comet assay. The observed DNA damage was concentration dependent and time dependent and those levels of DNA damage in between the tested concentrations and times were significantly different (p < 0.01). It was also found that the gill cells are more sensitive to chlorpyrifos, though; it revealed more DNA damage as compared to the erythrocytes of fish. Fish exposed to different concentrations of chlorpyrifos showed different neurotoxic behavioral responses. It was concluded that chlorpyrifos is a genotoxic and neurotoxic insecticide causing DNA damage and neurotoxic effects in Labeo rohita.

  18. Agarose coated spherical micro resonator for humidity measurements.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Arun Kumar; Liu, Dejun; Kavungal, Vishnu; Wu, Qiang; Farrell, Gerald; Semenova, Yuliya

    2016-09-19

    A new type of fiber optic relative humidity (RH) sensor based on an agarose coated silica microsphere resonator is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Whispering gallery modes (WGMs) in the micro resonator are excited by evanescent coupling using a tapered fiber with ~3.3 µm waist diameter. A change in the relative humidity of the surrounding the resonator air induces changes in the refractive index (RI) and thickness of the Agarose coating layer. These changes in turn lead to a spectral shift of the WGM resonances, which can be related to the RH value after a suitable calibration. Studies of the repeatability, long-term stability, measurement accuracy and temperature dependence of the proposed sensor are carried out. The RH sensitivity of the proposed sensor depends on the concentration of the agarose gel which determines the initial thickness of the deposited coating layer. Studies of the micro- resonators with coating layers fabricated from gels with three different Agarose concentrations of 0.5%, 1.125% and 2.25 wt./vol.% showed that an increase in the initial thickness of the coating material results in an increase in sensitivity but also leads to a decrease of quality factor (Q) of the micro resonator. The highest sensitivity achieved in our experiments was 518 pm/%RH in the RH range from 30% to 70%. The proposed sensor offers the advantages of a very compact form factor, low hysteresis, good repeatability, and low cross sensitivity to temperature. PMID:27661866

  19. Effect of Frozen Storage on the Gel-Forming Ability of Surimi Treated by Acid and Alkaline Solubilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo-Deaño, L.; Tovar, C. A.

    2008-07-01

    Rheological changes during five months of frozen storage of horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus) surimi elaborated by acid (Type A) and alkali (Type B) treatment, and their ability to form gels were evaluated. Frozen storage provoked a sligthly increase of rigidity and toughness in surimi B due to the loss of water holding capacity. This effect on surimi B disrupts the gel forming ability of muscle proteins, and the resulting gel experiments an increase of viscoelastic moduli, maximum stress and gel strength, showing a more increment in the network firmness after five months of frozen storage, however it is still better gel than that from method A.

  20. Agarose droplet microfluidics for highly parallel and efficient single molecule emulsion PCR.

    PubMed

    Leng, Xuefei; Zhang, Wenhua; Wang, Chunming; Cui, Liang; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2010-11-01

    An agarose droplet method was developed for highly parallel and efficient single molecule emulsion PCR. The method capitalizes on the unique thermoresponsive sol-gel switching property of agarose for highly efficient DNA amplification and amplicon trapping. Uniform agarose solution droplets generated via a microfluidic chip serve as robust and inert nanolitre PCR reactors for single copy DNA molecule amplification. After PCR, agarose droplets are gelated to form agarose beads, trapping all amplicons in each reactor to maintain the monoclonality of each droplet. This method does not require cocapsulation of primer labeled microbeads, allows high throughput generation of uniform droplets and enables high PCR efficiency, making it a promising platform for many single copy genetic studies.

  1. Fabrication of Self-Healable and Patternable Polypyrrole/Agarose Hybrid Hydrogels for Smart Bioelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Park, Nokyoung; Chae, Seung Chul; Kim, Il Tae; Hur, Jaehyun

    2016-02-01

    We present a new class of electrically conductive, mechanically moldable, and thermally self-healable hybrid hydrogels. The hybrid gels consist of polypyrrole and agarose as the conductive component and self-healable matrix, respectively. By using the appropriate oxidizing agent under conditions of mild temperature, the polymerization of pyrrole occurred along the three-dimensional network of the agarose hydrogel matrix. In contrast to most commercially available hydrogels, the physical crosslinking of agarose gel allows for reversible gelation in the case of our hybrid gel, which could be manipulated by temperature variation, which controls the electrical on/off behavior of the hybrid gel electrode. Exploiting this property, we fabricated a hybrid conductive hydrogel electrode which also self-heals thermally. The novel composite material we report here will be useful for many technological and biological applications, especially in reactive biomimetic functions and devices, artificial muscles, smart membranes, smart full organic batteries, and artificial chemical synapses. PMID:27433594

  2. An acid/alkaline stress and the addition of amino acids induce a prolonged viability of Lactobacillus plantarum loaded into alginate gel.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Antonio; Sinigaglia, Milena; Corbo, Maria Rosaria

    2010-08-15

    This study reports on the investigation on the effects of the conditions used throughout the step of biomass production on the survival of Lactobacillus plantarum loaded into alginate gels. L. plantarum was grown under different conditions (MRS or a laboratory medium-LB(2)-at acidic or alkaline pHs, with NaCl, phenols, vitamins or amino acids) and immobilized in sodium alginate; cell number was evaluated throughout the storage and death (delta(stand)) and first-reduction times (delta) were calculated. The storage of alginate gels at 4 degrees C prolonged cell viability up to 60 days (ca. 20 days for cells produced in MRS and stored at 30 degrees C); however, a similar prolongation was achieved for cells produced in LB(2) adjusted to pH 5.0 and 9.0 or added with amino acids (death time>50-60 days).

  3. Fabrication of superporous agarose beads for protein adsorption: effect of CaCO3 granules content.

    PubMed

    Du, Kai-Feng; Bai, Shu; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2010-09-10

    Agarose gels were fabricated by water-in-oil emulsification with the addition of CaCO(3) granules at 8-16 wt%. Thus agarose beads of different superporosities were produced after dissolving the solid porogen. The superporous agarose (SA) and homogeneous agarose gels were double cross-linked and modified with diethylaminoethyl chloride to produce anion exchangers. We have proposed to use a superporous replica (porous titania microspheres) to examine the superporous structure and pore size distribution of the soft gel. The replica was prepared with the agarose gel entrapping CaCO(3) granules by a sol-gel-templating method. It was found that the superpores created by CaCO(3) granules were uniformly distributed and ranged from 0.95 microm to 1.33 microm. The physical properties of the gels were significantly affected by the porogen content. Importantly, by increasing the solid porogen to 12 wt%, the bed permeability and effective porosity increased about 48% and 33%, respectively. Further increase in the porogen to 16 wt% led to a decrease of the mechanical strength. With increasing superpores in the beads, the dynamic adsorption capacity of the packed columns increased obviously at 305-916 cm/h. Besides, the column efficiency changed less with increasing flow velocity up to 1200 cm/h. It was concluded that the use of 12 wt% CaCO(3) granules in agarose solution was beneficial for the fabrication of the SA gel with good mechanical stability and promising performance for protein chromatography.

  4. Ultrasensitive detection of hydrogen peroxide-mediated DNA damage after alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis using occultation microscopy and TUNEL labeling.

    PubMed

    Kindzelskii, A L; Petty, H R

    1999-05-01

    DNA damage at the level of individual cells can be detected using the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) or 'comet' assay. In the present study, we report novel variations on the conventional comet assay that can be used to enhance the microscopic detection of DNA damage. Hydrogen peroxide-treated peripheral blood leukocytes were used as a DNA damage model system. Cells were embedded in agarose, treated, and electrophoresed according to the procedure of Singh et al. [N.P. Singh, M.T. McCoy, R.R. Tice, E.L. Schneider, A simple technique for quantitation of low levels of DNA damage in individual cells, Exp. Cell Res. 175 (1988), p. 184-191]. However, sites of strand breaks were directly labeled with the TUNEL (TdT-mediated fluorescein-dUTP nick end labeling) method. This labeling protocol revealed clumps and/or a series of stripes in the comet tail perpendicular to the direction of electrophoresis; these sites may account for the substructure seen in conventional comet assays. In a second comet variation, we passed an opaque disk into a field-conjugated plane of the microscope near the lamp, thus occluding the nucleus' image. Nuclear occultation allows the intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera gain to increase to a single photon detection level thus revealing low levels of DNA damage in the tail. These methods offer a substantial improvement in sensitivity.

  5. Rapid, Effective DNA Isolation from Osmanthus via Modified Alkaline Lysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Variability of leaf structure and presence of secondary metabolites in mature leaf tissue present a challenge for reliable DNA extraction from Osmanthus species and cultivars. The objective of this study was to develop a universal rapid, effective, and cost-efficient method of DNA isolation for Osmanthus mature leaf tissue. Four different methods were used to isolate DNA from 8 cultivars of Osmanthus. Absorbance spectra, DNA concentration, appearance on agarose gel, and performance in PCR were used to analyze quality, quantity, and integrity of isolated DNA. Methods were ranked in order, based on total quantity, quality, and performance points as the following: 1) solid-phase extraction (SPE), 2) modified alkaline lysis (SDS), 3) cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) with chloroform (CHL), and 4) CTAB with phenol/chloroform (PHE). Total DNA, isolated via SPE, showed the least contamination but the lowest mean quantity (9.6 ± 3.4 μg) and highest cost. The highest quantity of DNA was isolated via SDS (117 ± 54.1 μg). SPE and SDS resolved the most individuals on agarose gel, whereas the 2 CTAB methods had poorly resolved gels. All methods except PHE performed well in PCR. Additions to the modified alkaline lysis method increased A260:A230 by up to 59% without affecting yield. With the use of SDS, an average of 1000 μg/g DNA was isolated from fresh leaf tissue of 18 samples in ∼1.5 h at a cost of 0.74 U.S. dollars (USD)/sample. We recommend improved alkaline lysis as a rapid, effective, and cost-efficient method of isolating DNA from Osmanthus species. PMID:26816495

  6. Detection of DNA damage by alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic-acid- and butachlor-exposed erythrocytes of Clarias batrachus.

    PubMed

    Ateeq, Bushra; Abul Farah, M; Ahmad, Waseem

    2005-11-01

    The alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis, also known as comet assay, is a rapid, simple and sensitive technique for measuring DNA strand breaks in individual cells. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the genotoxic potential of two widely used herbicides; 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2-chloro-2,6-diethyl-N-(butoxymethyl) acetanilide (butachlor) in erythrocytes of freshwater catfish, Clarias batrachus. Fish were exposed by medium treatment with three sub-lethal concentrations of 2,4-D (25, 50, and 75ppm) and butachlor (1, 2, and 2.5ppm) and alkaline comet assay was performed on nucleated erythrocytes after 48, 72, and 96h. The amount of DNA damage in cells was estimated from comet tail length as the extent of migration of the genetic material. A significant increase in comet tail length indicating DNA damage was observed at all concentrations of both the herbicides compared with control (P<0.05). The mean comet tail length showed a concentration-related and time-dependent increase as the maximum tail length recorded at highest concentration and longer duration of 2,4-D (9.59microm) and butachlor (9.28microm). This study confirmed that the comet assay applied on the fish erythrocyte is a useful tool in determining potential genotoxicity of water pollutants and might be appropriate as a part of a monitoring program.

  7. BENZO[A]PYRENE AND ITS K-REGION DIOL INDUCE DNA DAMAGE IN C3H10T1/2C18 CELLS AS MEASURED BY THE ALKALINE SINGLE CELL GEL (COMET) ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory


    160. Benzo[a]pyrene and its K-region diol induce DNA damage in C3HlOTl/2Cl8 cells as measured by the alkaline single cell gel (Comet) assay

    In a continuing series of studies on the genotoxicity ofK-region dihydrodiols of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, we have repo...

  8. Superporous agarose beads as a solid support for microfluidic immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yoonsun; Nam, Seong-Won; Lee, Nae Yoon; Kim, Youn Sang; Park, Sungsu

    2008-09-01

    We demonstrate here with the feasibility of superporous agarose (SA) beads as a solid support in microfluidic immunoassay by detecting goat IgG. In our procedure, SA beads containing superpores were covalently conjugated to protein A. The conjugated beads were introduced into a polydimethyl siloxane microfluidic device. The sandwich immunoassay was performed in the microfluidic device by subsequently introducing anti-goat IgG as the primary antibodies, goat IgG as analytes, alkaline phosphatase-conjugated F(ab')2 anti-goat IgG as detection antibodies, and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolylphosphate/nitroblue tetrazolium as substrate in a flow. Depending on the goat IgG concentration, dark and pinky precipitates appeared inside the microchannel immediately after the introduction of all the reagents. The minimum detection limit, 100 pg goat IgG/mL in PBS, was achieved with the naked eye. This enhanced sensitivity is mainly because analytical reagents were allowed to access the outer surface as well as the inner matrices of the beads. This is supported by the facts that the binding of fluorescein isothiocyanate IgG happened throughout the inside matrices of protein A-conjugated SA beads but was limited to the outer surface of protein A-conjugated homogeneous agarose beads. These results suggest that SA beads are highly suitable as a solid support for microfluidic immunoassays.

  9. A new strategy for electrochemical immunoassay based on enzymatic silver deposition on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan; Mao, Xun; Peng, Zhao-Feng; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2008-02-15

    A novel, sensitive electrochemical immunoassay in a homogeneously dispersed medium is described herein based on the unique features of agarose beads and the special amplified properties of biometallization. The immunochemical recognition event between human immunoglobulin G (IgG) and goat anti-human IgG antibody is chosen as the model system to demonstrate the proposed immunoassay approach. Avidin-agarose beads rapidly react with the biotinylated goat anti-human IgG antibody to form agarose beads-goat anti-human IgG conjugate (agarose bead-Ab). Agarose bead-Ab, alkaline phosphatase conjugated goat anti-human IgG antibody (ALP-Ab) and the human IgG analyte are mixed to form sandwich-type immunocomplex followed by the addition of the enzymatic silver deposition solution to deposit silver onto the surface of proteins and agarose beads. The silver deposited are dissolved and quantified by anodic stripping voltammetry. The influence of relevant experimental variables was examined and optimized. The logarithm of the anodic stripping peak current depended linearly on the logarithm of the concentration of human IgG in the range from 1 to 1000ng/ml. A detection limit as low as 0.5ng/ml human IgG was attained by 3sigma-rule. The R.S.D. of the approach is 9.65% for eight times determination of 10ng/ml human IgG under same conditions. Optical microscope and TEM graphs were also utilized to characterize agarose beads and silver nanoparticles formed.

  10. Improved lectin-mediated immobilization of human red blood cells in superporous agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Ingo; Gustavsson, Per Erik; Ersson, Bo; Lundahl, Per

    2003-01-25

    A new type of agarose bead, superporous agarose, was used as a gel support for immobilization of human red blood cells (RBCs) mediated by wheat germ lectin. The number of immobilized cells was similar to that obtained with commercial wheat germ lectin-agarose but the cell stability appeared to be superior. This allowed improved frontal affinity chromatographic analyses of cytochalasin B (CB)-binding to the glucose transporter GLUT1 which established a ratio of one CB-binding site per GLUT1 dimer for both plain RBCs or those treated with different poly amino acids. The measured dissociation constants, 70+/-14 nM for CB and 12+/-3 mM for glucose binding to GLUT1, are similar to those reported earlier.

  11. Chromatin-like structures obtained after alkaline disruption of bovine and human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Favre, M; Breitburd, F; Croissant, O; Orth, G

    1977-01-01

    Four low-molecular-weight polypeptides migrating like H2a, H2b, H3, and H4 calf liver histones were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-acrylamide gel electrophoresis of highly purified preparations of bovine papillomavirus (BPV) and human papillomavirus (HPV). Complexes of these polypeptides and viral DNA were isolated by agarose-gel filtration of the alkaline disruption products of both viruses. When observed under the electron microscope, these complexes appeared as circular structures composed of nucleosomes with a diameter of about 8.0 nm interconnected by a naked DNA filament. The maximal frequency of nucleosomes per molecule was 30 for both viruses, corresponding to a condensation ratio of the viral DNA of 2.5. Images PMID:191643

  12. Crosslinking of agarose bioplastic using citric acid.

    PubMed

    Awadhiya, Ankur; Kumar, David; Verma, Vivek

    2016-10-20

    We report chemical crosslinking of agarose bioplastic using citric acid. Crosslinking was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The effects of crosslinking on the tensile strength, swelling, thermal stability, and degradability of the bioplastic were studied in detail. The tensile strength of the bioplastic films increased from 25.1MPa for control films up to a maximum of 52.7MPa for citric acid crosslinked films. At 37°C, the amount of water absorbed by crosslinked agarose bioplastic was only 11.5% of the amount absorbed by non-crosslinked controls. Thermogravimetric results showed that the crosslinked samples retain greater mass at high temperature (>450°C) than control samples. Moreover, while the crosslinked films were completely degradable, the rate of degradation was lower compared to non-crosslinked controls.

  13. Crosslinking of agarose bioplastic using citric acid.

    PubMed

    Awadhiya, Ankur; Kumar, David; Verma, Vivek

    2016-10-20

    We report chemical crosslinking of agarose bioplastic using citric acid. Crosslinking was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The effects of crosslinking on the tensile strength, swelling, thermal stability, and degradability of the bioplastic were studied in detail. The tensile strength of the bioplastic films increased from 25.1MPa for control films up to a maximum of 52.7MPa for citric acid crosslinked films. At 37°C, the amount of water absorbed by crosslinked agarose bioplastic was only 11.5% of the amount absorbed by non-crosslinked controls. Thermogravimetric results showed that the crosslinked samples retain greater mass at high temperature (>450°C) than control samples. Moreover, while the crosslinked films were completely degradable, the rate of degradation was lower compared to non-crosslinked controls. PMID:27474543

  14. The DNA repair inhibitors hydroxyurea and cytosine arabinoside enhance the sensitivity of the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis ('comet') assay in metabolically-competent MCL-5 cells.

    PubMed

    Martin, F L; Cole, K J; Orme, M H; Grover, P L; Phillips, D H; Venitt, S

    1999-09-15

    We have found previously that the metabolically-competent human MCL-5 cell line did not appear to be usefully sensitive to the DNA-damaging effects of several carcinogens, as measured by the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis ('comet') assay. We therefore sought to increase its sensitivity by inhibiting DNA repair during exposure to test compounds, using 10 mM hydroxyurea (HU) and 1.8 mM cytosine arabinoside (ara-C), which inhibit DNA resynthesis during nucleotide excision repair. The following compounds were tested, using a 30-min exposure, in the absence or presence of HU/ara-C: 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (8-MeIQx), 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (4, 8-DiMeIQx), 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), 2-amino-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (A[alpha]C), 2-amino-3-methyl-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (MeA[alpha]C), 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MCA), 7, 12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), 1-nitropyrene (1-NP), 2-nitrofluorene (2-NF), aniline, o-toluidine, benzene, lindane, bleomycin, cisplatin, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), sodium chromate, chromic chloride, and diethylstilboestrol (DES). We made the following observations. The background level of comet formation was reasonably constant over several months and was increased only slightly, but significantly, in the presence of the DNA-repair inhibitors. All compounds that induced comet formation did so without appreciable cytotoxicity as assessed by trypan blue exclusion. Of the compounds tested, the heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (with the exceptions of PhIP and B[a]P) failed to induce convincing levels of comet formation in the absence of repair inhibitors. In their presence the heterocyclic amines tested induced comet formation (with the exception of 8-MeIQx), with widely differing potencies. 1-NP failed to elicit marked comet formation even in the presence of HU

  15. Effect of gel structure of matrix orientation in pulsed alternating electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Stellwagen, N.C.; Stellwagen, J.

    1993-12-31

    Four polymeric gels with different structures, LE agarose, HEEO agarose, beta-carrageenan, and polyacrylamide, were studied by transient electric birefringence to determine the importance of various structural features on the orientation of the gels in pulsed alternating electric fields. The birefrigence relaxation times observed for agarose gels in low voltage electric fields suggest that long fibers and/or domains, ranging up to tens of microns in size, are oriented by the electric field. The sign of the birefringence reverses when the direction of the electric field is reversed, suggesting that the oriented domains change their direction of orientation from parallel to perpendicular (or vice versa) when the polarity of the electric field is reversed. These anamalous orientation effects are observed with both types of agarose gels, but not with beta-carrageenan or polyacrylamide gels, suggesting that the alternating D,L galactose residues in the agarose backbone are responsible for the anomalies.

  16. Tuning mechanical performance of poly(ethylene glycol) and agarose interpenetrating network hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rennerfeldt, Deena A; Renth, Amanda N; Talata, Zsolt; Gehrke, Stevin H; Detamore, Michael S

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogels are attractive for tissue engineering applications due to their incredible versatility, but they can be limited in cartilage tissue engineering applications due to inadequate mechanical performance. In an effort to address this limitation, our team previously reported the drastic improvement in the mechanical performance of interpenetrating networks (IPNs) of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) and agarose relative to pure PEG-DA and agarose networks. The goal of the current study was specifically to determine the relative importance of PEG-DA concentration, agarose concentration, and PEG-DA molecular weight in controlling mechanical performance, swelling characteristics, and network parameters. IPNs consistently had compressive and shear moduli greater than the additive sum of either single network when compared to pure PEG-DA gels with a similar PEG-DA content. IPNs withstood a maximum stress of up to 4.0 MPa in unconfined compression, with increased PEG-DA molecular weight being the greatest contributing factor to improved failure properties. However, aside from failure properties, PEG-DA concentration was the most influential factor for the large majority of properties. Increasing the agarose and PEG-DA concentrations as well as the PEG-DA molecular weight of agarose/PEG-DA IPNs and pure PEG-DA gels improved moduli and maximum stresses by as much as an order of magnitude or greater compared to pure PEG-DA gels in our previous studies. Although the viability of encapsulated chondrocytes was not significantly affected by IPN formulation, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content was significantly influenced, with a 12-fold increase over a three-week period in gels with a lower PEG-DA concentration. These results suggest that mechanical performance of IPNs may be tuned with partial but not complete independence from biological performance of encapsulated cells.

  17. Rheological Characterization of Ethanolamine Gel Propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V. S Jyoti, Botchu; Baek, Seung Wook

    2016-07-01

    Ethanolamine is considered to be an environmentally friendly propellant system because it has low toxicity and is noncarcinogenic in nature. In this article, efforts are made to formulate and prepare ethanolamine gel systems, using pure agarose and hybrids of paired gelling agents (agarose + polyvinylpyrrolidine (PVP), agarose + SiO2, and PVP + SiO2), that exhibit a measurable yield stress, thixotropic behavior under shear rate ranges of 1-1,000 s-1 and a viscoelastic nature. To achieve these goals, multiple rheological experiments (including flow and dynamic studies) are performed. In this article, results are presented from experiments measuring the apparent viscosity, yield stress, thixotropy, dynamic strain, frequency sweep, and tan δ behaviors, as well as the effects of the test temperature, in the gel systems. The results show that the formulated ethanolamine gels are thixotropic in nature with yield stress between 30 and 60 Pa. The apparent viscosity of the gel decreases as the test temperature increases, and the apparent activation energy is the lowest for the ethanolamine-(PVP + SiO2) gel system. The dynamic rheology study shows that the type of gellant, choice of hybrid gelling materials and their concentration, applied frequencies, and strain all vitally affect the viscoelastic properties of the ethanolamine gel systems. In the frequency sweep experiment, the ethanolamine gels to which agarose, agarose + PVP, and agarose + SiO2 were added behave like linear frequency-dependent viscoelastic liquids, whereas the ethanolamine gel to which PVP + SiO2 was added behaves like a nearly frequency-independent viscoelastic solid. The variation in the tan δ of these gelled propellants as a function of frequency is also discussed.

  18. Hyper alginate gel microbead formation by molecular diffusion at the hydrogel/droplet interface.

    PubMed

    Hirama, Hirotada; Kambe, Taisuke; Aketagawa, Kyouhei; Ota, Taku; Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Torii, Toru

    2013-01-15

    We report a simple method for forming monodispersed, uniformly shaped gel microbeads with precisely controlled sizes. The basis of our method is the placement of monodispersed sodium alginate droplets, formed by a microfluidic device, on an agarose slab gel containing a high-osmotic-pressure gelation agent (CaCl(2) aq.): (1) the droplets are cross-linked (gelated) due to the diffusion of the gelation agent from the agarose slab gel to the sodium alginate droplets and (2) the droplets simultaneously shrink to a fraction of their original size (<100 μm in diameter) due to the diffusion of water molecules from the sodium alginate droplets to the agarose slab gel. We verified the mass transfer mechanism between the droplet and the agarose slab gel. This method circumvents the limitations of gel microbead formation, such as the need to prepare microchannels of various sizes, microchannel clogging, and the deformation of the produced gel microbeads.

  19. Immobilization of angiotensin-converting enzyme on glyoxyl-agarose.

    PubMed

    Megías, Cristina; Pedroche, Justo; del Mar Yust, María; Alaiz, Manuel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Millán, Francisco; Vioque, Javier

    2006-06-28

    The assay of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition by food-derived peptides is usually carried out by using soluble ACE in a batch process. The purification of this enzyme from tissues is not an easy task, and the resulting preparation loses activity very fast. In addition, ACE commercial preparations are very expensive. In this work the immobilization of ACE, through lysine amino groups, to 4% beads cross-linked (4 BCL) glyoxyl-agarose is described. The amount of immobilized enzyme increased with increasing concentrations of enzyme and with incubation time until a saturation point was reached at 50 mg protein/mL gel and 3.5 hours, respectively. The IC50 values for a noncompetitive sunflower peptide inhibitor were similar for the soluble (30.56 microM) and immobilized (32.7 microM) enzymes. An immobilized derivative was obtained that was 60 times more stable than the soluble enzyme at 60 degrees C. This procedure yields a derivative that can be reused and has increased thermal stability compared to that of the soluble enzyme. Thus, ACE immobilization is a good alternative to using soluble freshly prepared or commercial preparations because of economical and practical reasons.

  20. In Situ Observations of Thermoreversible Gelation and Phase Separation of Agarose and Methylcellulose Solutions under High Pressure.

    PubMed

    Kometani, Noritsugu; Tanabe, Masahiro; Su, Lei; Yang, Kun; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi

    2015-06-01

    Thermoreversible sol-gel transitions of agarose and methylcellulose (MC) aqueous solutions on isobaric cooling or heating under high pressure up to 400 MPa have been investigated by in situ observations of optical transmittance and falling-ball experiments. For agarose, which undergoes the gelation on cooling, the application of pressure caused a gradual rise in the cloud-point temperature over the whole pressure range examined, which is almost consistent with the pressure dependence of gelling temperature estimated by falling-ball experiments, suggesting that agarose gel is stabilized by compression and that the gelation occurs nearly in parallel with phase separation under ambient and high-pressure conditions. For MC, which undergoes the gelation on heating, the cloud-point temperature showed a slight rise with an initial elevation of pressure up to ∼150 MPa, whereas it showed a marked depression above 200 MPa. In contrast, the gelling temperature of MC, which is nearly identical to the cloud-point temperature at ambient pressure, showed a monotonous rise with increasing pressure up to 350 MPa, which means that MC undergoes phase separation prior to gelation on heating under high pressure above 200 MPa. Similar results were obtained for the melting process of MC gel on cooling. The unique behavior of the sol-gel transition of MC under high pressure has been interpreted in terms of the destruction of hydrophobic hydration by compression.

  1. Agarose plating and a bead type culture technique enable and stimulate development of protoplast-derived colonies in a number of plant species.

    PubMed

    Shillito, R D; Paszkowski, J; Potrykus, I

    1983-10-01

    Two novel techniques improve division and colony formation from protoplasts: 1) Plating in agarose stimulates colony formation of protoplasts from a wide range of species. Protoplasts from Nicotiana tabacum developed to colonies from lower initial population densities in agarose than in agar or liquid. Protoplasts from Hyoscyamus muticus which do not divide in agar divided and formed colonies in agarose at higher efficiencies than in liquid medium. 2) Culture of gel embedded protoplasts in large volumes of liquid medium on a gyrotatory shaker ('bead culture') further improved plating efficiencies in some species (e.g. Lycopersicon esculentum and Crepis capillaris) and enabled sustained proliferation of protoplasts which had not previously developed beyond the few cell colony stage (Brassica rapa and a mutator gene variety of Petunia hybrida). The combination of 'agarose plating' and 'bead culture' dramatically improved plating efficiencies of protoplasts in all species tested.

  2. Biohybrid Carbon Nanotube/Agarose Fibers for Neural Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lewitus, Dan Y.; Landers, John; Branch, Jonathan; Smith, Karen L.; Callegari, Gerardo

    2011-01-01

    We report a novel approach for producing carbon nanotube fibers (CNF) composed with the polysaccharide agarose. Current attempts to make CNF’s require the use of a polymer or precipitating agent in the coagulating bath that may have negative effects in biomedical applications. We show that by taking advantage of the gelation properties of agarose one can substitute the bath with distilled water or ethanol and hence reduce the complexity associated with alternating the bath components or the use of organic solvents. We also demonstrate that these CNF can be chemically functionalized to express biological moieties through available free hydroxyl groups in agarose. We corroborate that agarose CNF are not only conductive and nontoxic, but their functionalization can facilitate cell attachment and response both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings suggest that agarose/CNT hybrid materials are excellent candidates for applications involving neural tissue engineering and biointerfacing with the nervous system. PMID:21887125

  3. In-gel multiple displacement amplification of long DNA fragments diluted to the single molecule level.

    PubMed

    Michikawa, Yuichi; Sugahara, Keisuke; Suga, Tomo; Ohtsuka, Yoshimi; Ishikawa, Kenichi; Ishikawa, Atsuko; Shiomi, Naoko; Shiomi, Tadahiro; Iwakawa, Mayumi; Imai, Takashi

    2008-12-15

    The isolation and multiple genotyping of long individual DNA fragments are needed to obtain haplotype information for diploid organisms. Limiting dilution of sample DNA followed by multiple displacement amplification is a useful technique but is restricted to short (<5 kb) DNA fragments. In the current study, a novel modification was applied to overcome these problems. A limited amount of cellular DNA was carefully released from intact cells into a mildly heated alkaline agarose solution and mixed thoroughly. The solution was then gently aliquoted and allowed to solidify while maintaining the integrity of the diluted DNA. Exogenously provided Phi29 DNA polymerase was used to perform consistent genomic amplification with random hexameric oligonucleotides within the agarose gels. Simple heat melting of the gel allowed recovery of the amplified materials in a solution of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-ready form. The haplotypes of seven SNPs spanning 240 kb of the DNA surrounding the human ATM gene region on chromosome 11 were determined for 10 individuals, demonstrating the feasibility of this new method.

  4. Composition of agarose substrate affects behavioral output of Drosophila larvae

    PubMed Central

    Apostolopoulou, Anthi A.; Hersperger, Fabian; Mazija, Lorena; Widmann, Annekathrin; Wüst, Alexander; Thum, Andreas S.

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade the Drosophila larva has evolved into a simple model organism offering the opportunity to integrate molecular genetics with systems neuroscience. This led to a detailed understanding of the neuronal networks for a number of sensory functions and behaviors including olfaction, vision, gustation and learning and memory. Typically, behavioral assays in use exploit simple Petri dish setups with either agarose or agar as a substrate. However, neither the quality nor the concentration of the substrate is generally standardized across these experiments and there is no data available on how larval behavior is affected by such different substrates. Here, we have investigated the effects of different agarose concentrations on several larval behaviors. We demonstrate that agarose concentration is an important parameter, which affects all behaviors tested: preference, feeding, learning and locomotion. Larvae can discriminate between different agarose concentrations, they feed differently on them, they can learn to associate an agarose concentration with an odor stimulus and change locomotion on a substrate of higher agarose concentration. Additionally, we have investigated the effect of agarose concentration on three quinine based behaviors: preference, feeding and learning. We show that in all cases examined the behavioral output changes in an agarose concentration-dependent manner. Our results suggest that comparisons between experiments performed on substrates differing in agarose concentration should be done with caution. It should be taken into consideration that the agarose concentration can affect the behavioral output and thereby the experimental outcomes per se potentially due to the initiation of an escape response or changes in foraging behavior on more rigid substrates. PMID:24478658

  5. Influence of gelling agents on the dosimetric performance of the Turnbull Blue gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šolc, Jaroslav; Sochor, Vladimír; Spěváček, Václav

    2010-11-01

    Gelling agents such as agarose, phytagel, and several types of gelatin were used for preparation of Turnbull Blue radiochromic gel dosimeter. Their influence on gel dose response and background value was assessed. It was found that all gelatins cause significant increase of background in a short period of time after gel preparation therefore gelatin is not a suitable gelling agent for this dosimeter. Phytagel and agarose gels exhibit low and stable background and higher dose sensitivity than gelatin gels; however, the disadvantage is increased scattered light intensity in the gel in comparison to gelatin gels. A simple measurement was done demonstrating that the scattered light intensity significantly increases in phytagel and agarose gel in comparison to gelatin gels.

  6. Oxidized dextrins as alternative crosslinking agents for polysaccharides: application to hydrogels of agarose-chitosan.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Mascaraque, Laura G; Méndez, José Alberto; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Mar; Vázquez, Blanca; San Román, Julio

    2014-02-01

    Hydrogel networks that combine suitable physical and biomechanical characteristics for tissue engineering scaffolds are in demand. The aim of this work was the development of hydrogel networks based on agarose and chitosan using oxidized dextrins as low cytotoxicity crosslinking agents, paying special attention to the study of the influence of the polysaccharide composition and oxidation degree of the dextrins in the final characteristics of the network. The results show that the formation of an interpenetrating or a semi-interpenetrating polymer network was mainly dependent on a minimum agarose content and degree of oxidation of dextrin. Spectroscopic, thermal and swelling analysis revealed good compatibility with an absence of phase separation of polysaccharides at agarose:chitosan proportions of 50:50 and 25:75. The analysis of atomic force microscopy images showed the formation of a fibrillar microstructure whose distribution within the crosslinked chitosan depended mainly on the crosslinker. All materials exhibited the viscoelastic behaviour typical of gels, with a constant storage modulus independent of frequency for all compositions. The stiffness was strongly influenced by the degree of oxidation of the crosslinker. Cellular response to the hydrogels was studied with cells of different strains, and cell adhesion and proliferation was correlated with the homogeneity of the samples and their elastic properties. Some hydrogel formulations seemed to be candidates for tissue engineering applications such as wound healing or soft tissue regeneration.

  7. Preparation of uniform-sized agarose beads by microporous membrane emulsification technique.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing-Zhu; Wang, Lian-Yan; Ma, Guang-Hui; Su, Zhi-Guo

    2007-07-01

    Uniform-sized agarose beads were prepared by membrane emulsification technique in this study. Agarose was dissolved in boiling water (containing 0.9% sodium chloride) and used as water phase. A mixture of liquid paraffin and petroleum ether containing 4 wt% of hexaglycerin penta ester (PO-500) emulsifier was used as oil phase. At 55 degrees C, the water phase permeated through uniform pores of microporous membrane into the oil phase by a pressure of nitrogen gas to form uniform W/O emulsion. Then the emulsion was cooled down to room temperature under gentle agitation to form gel beads. The effect of oil phase, emulsifier, especially temperature on the uniformity of the beads were investigated and interpreted from interfacial tension between water phase and oil phase. Under optimized condition, the coefficient variation (C.V.) showing the size distribution of the beads was under 15%. This was the first report to prepare uniform agarose beads by membrane emulsification, and to investigate the effect of temperature on the size distribution of the droplets and beads. The beads with different size can be prepared by using membranes with different pore size, and the result showed that there was a linear relationship between the average diameter of beads and pore size of the membranes; beads with diameter from 15 to 60 microm were able to obtain in this study.

  8. Hierarchically Designed Agarose and Poly(Ethylene Glycol) Interpenetrating Network Hydrogels for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    DeKosky, Brandon J.; Dormer, Nathan H.; Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Roatch, Christopher H.; Lomakin, Joseph; Detamore, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    A new method for encapsulating cells in interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels of superior mechanical integrity was developed. In this study, two biocompatible materials—agarose and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) diacrylate—were combined to create a new IPN hydrogel with greatly enhanced mechanical performance. Unconfined compression of hydrogel samples revealed that the IPN displayed a fourfold increase in shear modulus relative to a pure PEG-diacrylate network (39.9 vs. 9.9 kPa) and a 4.9-fold increase relative to a pure agarose network (8.2 kPa). PEG and IPN compressive failure strains were found to be 71% ± 17% and 74% ± 17%, respectively, while pure agarose gels failed around 15% strain. Similar mechanical property improvements were seen when IPNs-encapsulated chondrocytes, and LIVE/DEAD cell viability assays demonstrated that cells survived the IPN encapsulation process. The majority of IPN-encapsulated chondrocytes remained viable 1 week postencapsulation, and chondrocytes exhibited glycosaminoglycan synthesis comparable to that of agarose-encapsulated chondrocytes at 3 weeks postencapsulation. The introduction of a new method for encapsulating cells in a hydrogel with enhanced mechanical performance is a promising step toward cartilage defect repair. This method can be applied to fabricate a broad variety of cell-based IPNs by varying monomers and polymers in type and concentration and by adding functional groups such as degradable sequences or cell adhesion groups. Further, this technology may be applicable in other cell-based applications where mechanical integrity of cell-containing hydrogels is of great importance. PMID:20626274

  9. Enhancement of femtosecond laser-induced nucleation of protein in a gel solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Ryota; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Sazaki, Gen; Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke

    2010-01-01

    We found that the use of a gel solution with agarose enhanced femtosecond laser-induced nucleation and produced hen egg white lysozyme crystals at three to five times lower supersaturation than those by the femtosecond laser or agarose alone. The fast fluorescence imaging of the protein in the gel solution revealed that cavitation bubbles created high-concentration regions at the focal point, which could be the trigger for protein nucleation. The lower diffusions of protein molecules in agarose gel retained the high-concentration regions for a longer time, and facilitated the nucleation.

  10. Effect of the alkaline cation size on the conductivity in gel polymer electrolytes and their influence on photo electrochemical solar cells.

    PubMed

    Bandara, T M W J; Fernando, H D N S; Furlani, M; Albinsson, I; Dissanayake, M A K L; Ratnasekera, J L; Mellander, B-E

    2016-04-28

    The nature and concentration of cationic species in the electrolyte exert a profound influence on the efficiency of nanocrystalline dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). A series of DSSCs based on gel electrolytes containing five alkali iodide salts (LiI, NaI, KI, RbI and CsI) and polyacrylonitrile with plasticizers were fabricated and studied, in order to investigate the dependence of solar cell performance on the cation size. The ionic conductivity of electrolytes with relatively large cations, K(+), Rb(+) and Cs(+), was higher and essentially constant, while for the electrolytes containing the two smaller cations, Na(+) and Li(+), the conductivity values were lower. The temperature dependence of conductivity in this series appears to follow the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher equation. The sample containing the smallest cation shows the lowest conductivity and the highest activation energy of ∼36.5 meV, while K(+), Rb(+) and Cs(+) containing samples show an activation energy of ∼30.5 meV. DSSCs based on the gel electrolyte and a TiO2 double layer with the N719 dye exhibited an enhancement in the open circuit voltage with increasing cation size. This can be attributed to the decrease in the recombination rate of electrons and to the conduction band shift resulting from cation adsorption by TiO2. The maximum efficiency value, 3.48%, was obtained for the CsI containing cell. The efficiencies shown in this study are lower compared to values reported in the literature, and this can be attributed to the use of a single salt and the absence of other additives, since the focus of the present study was to analyze the cation effect. The highest short circuit current density of 9.43 mA cm(-2) was shown by the RbI containing cell. The enhancement of the solar cell performance with increasing size of the cation is discussed in terms of the effect of the cations on the TiO2 anode and ion transport in the electrolyte. In liquid electrolyte based DSSCs, the short circuit current density

  11. Magnetic Hyperthermia in ferrofluid-gel composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemala, Humeshkar; Wadehra, Anshu; Dixit, Ambesh; Regmi, Rajesh; Vaishnava, Prem; Lawes, Gavin; Naik, Ratna

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic hyperthermia is the generation of heat by an external magnetic field using superparamagnetic nanoparticles. However, there are still questions concerning magnetic hyperthermia in tissue; in particular the confinement of the nanoparticles at mesoscopic scales. We used Agarose and Alginate gels as models for human tissue and embedded magnetic nanoparticles in them. We report the synthesis and characterization of dextran coated iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. Characterization of these nanoparticles was done using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, magnetometry, and hyperthermia measurements. Temperature dependent susceptibility measurements reveal a sharp anomaly in the ferrofluid sample at the freezing temperature. This is conspicuously absent in the ferrofluid-gel composites. Heat generation studies on these superparamagnetic gel-composites revealed a larger heat production in the ferrofluids(˜4W/g) as compared to the gels(˜1W/g), which we attribute to a reduction in Brownian relaxation for the nanoparticles embedded in Agarose and Alginate.

  12. Characterization of a novel alkaline arylsulfatase from Marinomonas sp. FW-1 and its application in the desulfation of red seaweed agar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueyan; Duan, Delin; Xu, Jiachao; Gao, Xin; Fu, Xiaoting

    2015-10-01

    A bacterial strain capable of hydrolyzing sulfate ester bonds of p-nitrophenyl sulfate (pNPS) and agar was isolated from the coast area of Qingdao, China. It was identified as Marinomonas based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence and named as Marinomonas sp. FW-1. An arylsulfatase with a recovery of 13 % and a fold of 12 was purified to a homogeneity using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatographies. The enzyme was composed of a single polypeptide chain with the molecular mass of 33 kDa estimated using SDS-PAGE. The optimal pH and temperature of arylsulfatase were pH 9.0 and 45, respectively. Arylsulfatase was stable over pH 8-11 and at temperature below 55 °C. The K m and V max of this enzyme for the hydrolysis of pNPS were determined to be 13.73 and 270.27 μM/min, respectively. The desulfation ratio against agar from red seaweed Gelidium amansii and Gracilaria lemaneiformis were 86.11 and 89.61 %, respectively. There was no difference between the DNA electrophoresis spectrum on the gel of the arylsulfatase-treated G. amansii agar and that of the commercial agarose. Therefore, this novel alkaline arylsulfatase might have a great potential for application in enzymatic conversion of agar to agarose.

  13. Application of gel growth to hanging drop technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Karine; Robert, Marie-Claire

    1991-03-01

    Convection effects can be prevented by gelling the hanging drops used in protein crystal growth. An exploratory study has been made on a model material, hen egg white lysozyme, growing in agarose gel. In that case, it is observed that using gel promotes nucleation.

  14. Gel Electrophoresis--The Easy Way for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanRooy, Wilhelmina; Sultana, Khalida

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a simple, inexpensive, easy to conduct gel-electrophoresis activity using food dyes. It is an alternative to the more expensive counterparts which require agarose gel, DNA samples, purchased chamber and Tris-borate-EDTA buffer. We suggest some learning activities for senior biology students along with comments on several…

  15. Electrophoretic extraction of proteins from two-dimensional electrophoresis gel spots

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Jian-Shi; Giometti, C.S.; Tollaksen, S.L.

    1987-09-04

    After two-dimensional electrophoresis of proteins or the like, resulting in a polyacrylamide gel slab having a pattern of protein gel spots thereon, an individual protein gel spot is cored out from the slab, to form a gel spot core which is placed in an extraction tube, with a dialysis membrane across the lower end of the tube. Replicate gel spots can be cored out from replicate gel slabs and placed in the extraction tube. Molten agarose gel is poured into the extraction tube where the agarose gel hardens to form an immobilizing gel, covering the gel spot cores. The upper end portion of the extraction tube is filled with a volume of buffer solution, and the upper end is closed by another dialysis membrane. Upper and lower bodies of a buffer solution are brought into contact with the upper and lower membranes and are provided with electrodes connected to the positive and negative terminals of a dc power supply, thereby producing an electrical current which flows through the upper membrane, the volume of buffer solution, the agarose, the gel spot cores and the lower membrane. The current causes the proteins to be extracted electrophoretically from the gel spot cores, so that the extracted proteins accumulate and are contained in the space between the agarose gel and the upper membrane. 8 figs.

  16. Genotoxicity of three food processing contaminants in transgenic mice expressing human sulfotransferases 1A1 and 1A2 as assessed by the in vivo alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis assay

    PubMed Central

    Høie, Anja Hortemo; Svendsen, Camilla; Brunborg, Gunnar; Glatt, Hansruedi; Alexander, Jan; Meinl, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The food processing contaminants 2‐amino‐1‐methyl‐6‐phenylimidazo[4,5‐b]pyridine (PhIP), 5‐hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and 2,5 dimethylfuran (DMF) are potentially both mutagenic and carcinogenic in vitro and/or in vivo, although data on DMF is lacking. The PHIP metabolite N‐hydroxy‐PhIP and HMF are bioactivated by sulfotransferases (SULTs). The substrate specificity and tissue distribution of SULTs differs between species. A single oral dose of PhIP, HMF or DMF was administered to wild‐type (wt) mice and mice expressing human SULT1A1/1A2 (hSULT mice). DNA damage was studied using the in vivo alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay. No effects were detected in wt mice. In the hSULT mice, PhIP and HMF exposure increased the levels of DNA damage in the liver and kidney, respectively. DMF was not found to be genotoxic. The observation of increased DNA damage in hSULT mice compared with wt mice supports the role of human SULTs in the bioactivation of N‐hydroxy‐PhIP and HMF in vivo. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 56:709–714, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26270892

  17. Superporous agarose beads as a hydrophobic interaction chromatography support.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, P E; Axelsson, A; Larsson, P O

    1999-01-15

    Superporous agarose beads were used as a support for hydrophobic interaction chromatography. These beads have large connecting flow pores in addition to their normal diffusion pores. The flow pores, which are approximately one fifth of the overall diameter of the superporous agarose beads, were earlier shown to give the beads improved mass transfer properties relative to homogeneous agarose beads (Gustavsson and Larsson, J. Chromatogr. A, 734 (1996) 231-240). Superporous agarose beads and homogeneous agarose beads of the same particle size range (106-180 microns) were derivatized with phenyl groups. The properties of the superporous beads were then compared with the homogeneous beads in the separation of a mixture of three model proteins (ribonuclease A, lysozyme and bovine serum albumin) at various superficial flow velocities from 30 to 600 cm/h. The superporous beads gave satisfactory separation at flow velocities five times higher than was possible for homogeneous beads. The performance of the two types of beads was also compared in the purification of lactate dehydrogenase from a beef heart extract at a superficial flow velocity of 150 cm/h. The superporous beads performed considerably better, leading to twice the purification factor and twice the concentration of the desired product. The results were interpreted using the theoretical treatment given by Carta and Rodrigues (Carta and Rodrigues, Chem. Eng. Sci., 48 (1993) 3927).

  18. In vivo bioengineered ovarian tumors based on collagen, matrigel, alginate and agarose hydrogels: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li; Hu, Xuefeng; Huang, Yuanjie; Xu, Guojie; Yang, Jinsong; Li, Li

    2015-01-29

    Scaffold-based tumor engineering is rapidly evolving the study of cancer progression. However, the effects of scaffolds and environment on tumor formation have seldom been investigated. In this study, four types of injectable hydrogels, namely, collagen type I, Matrigel, alginate and agarose gels, were loaded with human ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells and then injected into nude mice subcutaneously. The growth of the tumors in vitro was also investigated. After four weeks, the specimens were harvested and analyzed. We found that tumor formation by SKOV3 cells was best supported by collagen, followed by Matrigel, alginate, control (without scaffold) and agarose in vivo. The collagen I group exhibited a larger tumor volume with increased neovascularization and increased necrosis compared with the other materials. Further, increased MMP activity, upregulated expression of laminin and fibronectin and higher levels of HIF-1α and VEGF-A in the collagen group revealed that the engineered tumor is closer to human ovarian carcinoma. In order, collagen, Matrigel, alginate, control (without scaffold) and agarose exhibited decreases in tumor formation. All evidence indicated that the in vivo engineered tumor is scaffold-dependent. Bioactive hydrogels are superior to inert hydrogels at promoting tumor regeneration. In particular, biomimetic hydrogels are advantageous because they provide a microenvironment that mimics the ECM of natural tumors. On the other hand, typical features of cancer cells and the expression of genes related to cancer malignancy were far less similar to the natural tumor in vitro, which indicated the importance of culture environment in vivo. Superior to the in vitro culture, nude mice can be considered satisfactory in vivo 'bioreactors' for the screening of favorable cell vehicles for tumor engineering in vitro.

  19. Rheological study of reinforcement of agarose hydrogels by cellulose nanowhiskers.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Kevin J; Gaillard, Cedric; Helbert, William; Garnier, Catherine; Aubry, Thierry

    2015-02-13

    The influence of the addition of tunicate cellulose nanowhiskers on the structural and rheological properties of an agarose hydrogel matrix has been studied, with the objective to design innovative green material, with good mechanical properties. The cellulose nanowhiskers were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, and their charge surface density was determined by a titration method. Oscillatory shear and stress relaxation tests were performed in order to characterize the rheological properties of the agarose matrix, and of the agarose hydrogels filled by nanowhiskers at volume fractions below 0.2%. The results show a significant reinforcement effect due to the addition of nanowhiskers, and suggest changes in the matrix network structure induced by the cellulose nanoparticles. PMID:25458280

  20. Monolithic cryogels made of agarose-chitosan composite and loaded with agarose beads for purification of immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Sun, Sijuan; Tang, Yuhai; Fu, Qiang; Liu, Xuan; Guo, Li'an; Zhao, Yanding; Chang, Chun

    2012-05-01

    In order to obtain a novel absorbent with high adsorption capacity for the purification of immunoglobulin G (IgG), continuous supermacroporous agarose beads embedded agarose-chitosan composite monolithic cryogels (agarose-chitosan cryogels) were prepared by cryo-copolymerization of agarose-chitosan blend solutions with glutaraldehyde as the crosslinker in the presence of agarose beads. After coupling 2-mercaptopyridine onto divinylsulfone-activated matrix, the obtained cryogels were used for the purification of IgG. The microstructure morphologies of the cryogels were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the obtained cryogels possess interconnected pores of 10-100 μm size. The specific surface area was 350 m(2)/g with maximum adsorption capacity of IgG 71.4 mg/g. The cryogels showed workable stability, and can be reused at least 15 times without significant loss in adsorption capacity. IgG purity after one-step purification from human plasma was monitored by electrophoresis and the average recovery was estimated to be 90%.

  1. Optical investigation of diffusion of levofloxacin mesylate in agarose hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Shuaixia; Dai, Hongjun; Wu, Juejie; Zhao, Ning; Zhang, Xiaoli; Xu, Jian

    2009-09-01

    Real-time electronic speckle pattern interferometry method has been applied to study the diffusion behavior of levofloxacin mesylate (MSALVFX) in agarose hydrogel. The results show that the diffusivity of solute decreases with the increase of concentration of agarose and adapts to Kohlrausch's law. Furthermore, Amsden's model, based on the retardance effect associated with polymer chain flexibility, was employed to simulate the diffusion behavior. The consistent results suggest that the retardance effect dominates the diffusion process of MSALFVX in hydrogel; moreover, polymer chain flexibility greatly affects drug transport within the polymer matrix.

  2. An improvement of restriction analysis of bacteriophage DNA using capillary electrophoresis in agarose solution.

    PubMed

    Klepárník, K; Malá, Z; Doskar, J; Rosypal, S; Bocek, P

    1995-03-01

    Seven representatives of the serogroup B Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophages, 29, 53, 55, 83A, 85, phi 11 and 80 alpha, were examined by capillary electrophoresis (CE) for genomic homology using DNA restriction analysis. Genomic DNA of individual bacteriophages was cleaved by HindIII restriction endonuclease, and the resulting restriction fragments were separated by standard horizontal agarose slab gel electrophoresis (SGE) as well as by CE in low-melting-point agarose solutions. The number and size of restriction fragments identified by both methods were compared. The high separation power of CE makes it possible to extend the restriction fragment patterns. In most of the restriction patterns, some additional restriction fragments as small as 150 bp, not identified by SGE, were detected. With respect to speed, high separation efficiency, low sample consumption and automation, CE offers a simple procedure for processing of multiple samples cost-effectively in a reasonable time. The comparison of the complemented restriction patterns of the different phage strains and the subsequent identification of their common fragments leads to a deeper understanding of their phylogenetic relationships. The genome homologies expressed for individual phage pairs in terms of coefficient F values ranged from 15 to 69%. These values are in good accordance with the degree of DNA homology of these phages as determined by DNA hybridization studies and thermal denaturation analysis of DNA by other authors. The total size of each phage genome was estimated by adding the sizes of individual restriction fragments.

  3. Porous ceramic/agarose composite adsorbents for fast protein liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Xia, Haifeng; Jin, Xionghua; Wu, Puqiang; Zheng, Zhiyong

    2012-02-01

    Porous ceramic/agarose composite adsorbents were designed and prepared with silica ceramic beads and 4% agarose gel, and then functionalized with a special ligand carboxymethyl. A novel method was introduced to fabricating of the porous silica ceramic beads. The morphology of SEM shows a spherical shape and a porous structure of the ceramic beads. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis gives an average pore size of 287.5 Å, a BET surface area of 29.33 m²/g and a porosity of 41.8%, respectively. Additionally, X-ray diffraction pattern indicates that the amorphous silica has been transformed into two crystal phases of quartz and cristobalite, leading to a porous and rigid skeleton and ensuring the application of the composite beads at high flow velocities. Lysozyme of hen egg-white with the activity of 12,700 U/mg was purified by the composite ion-exchanger in one step and the recovery and purification factor reaches 95.2% and 7.9, respectively.

  4. Enhanced sensitivity RNA gel loading buffer that enables efficient RNA separation on native gels.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Keqin; Zhou, Wenli; Ji, Wan; Davis, Sara

    2004-02-01

    RNA gel analysis is essential for quality assessment of RNA preparations for subsequent analysis such as microarrays and real-time PCRs. The routinely used standard electrophoresis of RNA through formaldehyde-containing agarose gels is not only labor-intensive and time-consuming, but also involves sizeable quantities of hazardous materials. Above all, it is not sensitive, requiring more than 1 microgram of RNA for the assay. Current gene expression profiling with microarrays and real-time PCR often involves limiting amounts of RNA. It is therefore important to have a more sensitive way to analyze RNA. Here we report an improved ethidium bromide-based RNA gel analysis system with our Superload buffer that increases sensitivity to 12.5 ng of total RNA and allows RNA analysis on a regular native Tris-acetate EDTA (TAE) agarose gel.

  5. Alternative to polyacrylamide gels improves the electrophoretic mobility shift assay.

    PubMed

    Vanek, P G; Fabian, S J; Fisher, C L; Chirikjian, J G; Collier, G B

    1995-04-01

    In this paper we outline a simplified protocol for the electrophoretic mobility shift assay utilizing TreviGel 500, a nontoxic alternative to polyacrylamide. The TreviGel 500 matrix combines the strength and resolution of polyacrylamide with the simplicity and flexibility of agarose in the casting of gels. Therefore, this method provides a simple, rapid and nontoxic alternative to current protocols for the investigation of protein: DNA interactions.

  6. Glycidol-modified gels for molecular-sieve chromatography. Surface hydrophilization and pore size reduction.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, K O

    1987-11-01

    Divinyl sulfone-crosslinked agarose gels were made hydrophilic by coupling glycidol to the agarose chains. The concentration of glycidol in the reaction mixture determines the pore size of the gels (the glycidol molecules probably form polymers, the degree of polymerization increasing with the glycidol concentration). Gels prepared with moderate glycidol concentrations are still porous enough to be used for separation of proteins and peptides. Gels with a high degree of glycidol polymerization are suited for desalting of low-molecular-weight compounds, for instance peptides.

  7. Purification of CD47-streptavidin fusion protein from bacterial lysate using biotin-agarose affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Nasrin; Peng, Ching-An

    2016-07-01

    CD47 is a widely expressed transmembrane glycoprotein that modulates the activity of a plethora of immune cells via its extracellular domain. Therefore, CD47 plays important roles in the regulation of immune responses and may serve as targets for the development of immunotherapeutic agents. To make sure CD47 functionality is intact under the process of protein conjugation, CD47-streptavidin fusion protein was expressed and purified because it can easily bind to biotin-tagged materials via the unique biotin-streptavidin affinity. In this study, gene sequences of CD47 extracellular domain (CD47ECD) and core streptavidin (coreSA) with a total 834 bp were inserted into pET20b plasmid to construct recombinant plasmid encoding CD47-SA fusion gene. After bacteria transformation, the CD47-SA fusion protein was expressed by isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction. The collected bacteria lysate was loaded on biotinylated agarose to proceed the purification of CD47-SA fusion protein. Due to the unexpected high affinity between biotin and coreSA, standard washing and elution approaches (e.g., varying pH, using biotin, and applying guanidine hydrochloride) reported for biotin-streptavidin affinity chromatography were not able to separate the target fusion protein. Instead, using low concentration of the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 followed with alkaline buffer could efficiently weaken the binding between biotin and coreSA, thereby eluting out CD47-SA fusion protein from the biotin agarose column. The purified CD47-SA fusion protein was further characterized by molecular biology methods and its antiphagocytic functionality was confirmed by the phagocytosis assay. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:949-958, 2016. PMID:27110670

  8. Preparation and stability of agarose microcapsules containing BCG.

    PubMed

    Esquisabel, A; Hernandez, R M; Igartua, M; Gascón, A R; Calvo, B; Pedraz, J L

    2002-01-01

    An emulsification/internal gelation method of preparing small-sized agarose microcapsules containing Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is reported. Agarose microcapsules have been prepared by the emulsification of the hydrogel within a vegetable oil followed by its gelation due to the cooling of the system. Four different oils (sesame, sweet almonds, camomile and jojoba) were assayed. The rheological analysis of the oils showed a Newtonian behaviour, with viscosity values of 37.7, 51.2, 59.3 and 67.1 mPa s for jojoba, camomile, sesame and sweet almonds oil, respectively. The particle size of the microcapsules obtained ranged from 23.1 microm for the microcapsules prepared with sweet almonds oil to 42.6 microm for those prepared with jojoba. The microcapsule particle size was found to be dependent on the viscosity of the oil used in the emulsification step. The encapsulated BCG was identified by the Difco TB stain set K, followed by observation under optical microscopy. Once prepared, microcapsules were freeze-dried using 5% trehalose as cryoprotectant and the stability of the microcapsules was assayed during 12 months storage at room temperature, observing that agarose microcapsules were stable after 12 months storage, since there was no evidence of alteration in the freeze-dried appearance, resuspension rate, observation under microscope, or particle size.

  9. Binding of glycosaminoglycans to cyano-activated agarose membranes: kinetic and diffusional effects on yield and homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Mattern, Kristin J; Deen, William M

    2007-11-01

    Methods were developed for binding a glycosaminoglycan (GAG, a 50 kDa chondroitin sulfate) to thin agarose membranes using 1-cyano-4-(dimethylamino)pyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP) as the activating agent. Process conditions were optimized to achieve high yields and spatially uniform concentrations of bound ligand. Yields were varied mainly by manipulating the duration and temperature of the aqueous washes prior to coupling, which affected the concentration of active sites available for subsequent GAG binding. The rate constants for degradation of the active cyanate esters in 0.1M bicarbonate solutions were 0.24+/-0.02 h(-1) at 4 degrees C and 0.08+/-0.03 h(-1) at 0 degrees C. Steric limitations in the 3% agarose gels severely restricted binding, with only about 0.1% of active sites being accessible to GAG molecules. The GAG binding occurred primarily in the outer 50-70 microm of the membranes, so that coupling was homogeneous only for thin gels. A model of GAG diffusion and reaction in the coupling step was developed to explain the observed effects of parameters such as the GAG concentration in solution and the membrane thickness. An analysis of the key time scales in the synthesis provides design principles that should be useful also for other cyanylating agents, other ligands, and for beads as well as membranes. PMID:17610855

  10. Binding of glycosaminoglycans to cyano-activated agarose membranes: kinetic and diffusional effects on yield and homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Mattern, Kristin J; Deen, William M

    2007-11-01

    Methods were developed for binding a glycosaminoglycan (GAG, a 50 kDa chondroitin sulfate) to thin agarose membranes using 1-cyano-4-(dimethylamino)pyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP) as the activating agent. Process conditions were optimized to achieve high yields and spatially uniform concentrations of bound ligand. Yields were varied mainly by manipulating the duration and temperature of the aqueous washes prior to coupling, which affected the concentration of active sites available for subsequent GAG binding. The rate constants for degradation of the active cyanate esters in 0.1M bicarbonate solutions were 0.24+/-0.02 h(-1) at 4 degrees C and 0.08+/-0.03 h(-1) at 0 degrees C. Steric limitations in the 3% agarose gels severely restricted binding, with only about 0.1% of active sites being accessible to GAG molecules. The GAG binding occurred primarily in the outer 50-70 microm of the membranes, so that coupling was homogeneous only for thin gels. A model of GAG diffusion and reaction in the coupling step was developed to explain the observed effects of parameters such as the GAG concentration in solution and the membrane thickness. An analysis of the key time scales in the synthesis provides design principles that should be useful also for other cyanylating agents, other ligands, and for beads as well as membranes.

  11. TIMP-2 promotes activation of progelatinase A by membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase immobilized on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, T; Sato, H; Okada, A; Ohuchi, E; Imai, K; Okada, Y; Seiki, M

    1998-06-26

    Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP)/MMP-14 is the activator of progelatinase A (proGelA)/proMMP-2 on the cell surface. However, it was a paradox that a tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), which is an inhibitor of MT1-MMP, is required for proGelA activation by the cells expressing MT1-MMP. In this study, a truncated MT1-MMP having a FLAG-tag sequence at the C terminus (MT1-F) was immobilized onto agarose beads (MT1-F/B) and used to analyze the role of TIMP-2. The proteolytic activity of MT1-F/B against a synthetic peptide substrate was inhibited by TIMP-2 in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, TIMP-2 promoted the processing of proGelA by MT1-F/B at low concentrations and inhibited it at higher concentrations. TIMP-2 promoted the binding of proGelA to the MT1-F on the beads by forming a trimolecular complex, which was followed by processing of proGelA. A stimulatory effect of TIMP-2 was observed under conditions in which unoccupied MT1-F was still available. Thus, the ternary complex is thought to act as a means to concentrate the substrate to the bead surface and to present it to the neighboring free MT1-F.

  12. Separation of human IgG fragments using copper, nickel, zinc, and cobalt chelated to CM-Asp-agarose by positive and negative chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mourão, Cecília Alves; Carmignotto, Gabriela Pannunzio; Bueno, Sonia Maria Alves

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of using immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) for separation of human Fab fragments using four different transition metal ions copper, nickel, zinc, and cobalt chelated to CM-Asp (carboxymethylaspartate) immobilized on the agarose gel. The Fab and Fc fragments (from human IgG digested with papain) interacted differently with the chelates studied, depending on the adsorption buffer system. The interaction between chelate and Fc fragment is predominantly based on the coordination bonds using adsorption buffer containing NaCl. Negative chromatography was performed on Cu(II)-CM-Asp-agarose obtaining 2.9mg of Fab per mL of adsorbent in nonretained fractions (Fc fragment-free without uncleaved IgG). The adsorption of Fab fragments is governed by electrostatic forces in the absence of NaCl in the adsorption buffer. High selectivity was achieved on Co(II)-CM-Asp-agarose and 5.7mg of Fab per mL of adsorbent was obtained in eluted fractions without Fc fragments, although having uncleaved IgG. The results showed that chromatography on transition metal ions chetated to CM-Asp-agarose is a promising approach to separation of Fab fragments from papain-digested human IgG solution. PMID:26974869

  13. Separation of human IgG fragments using copper, nickel, zinc, and cobalt chelated to CM-Asp-agarose by positive and negative chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mourão, Cecília Alves; Carmignotto, Gabriela Pannunzio; Bueno, Sonia Maria Alves

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of using immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) for separation of human Fab fragments using four different transition metal ions copper, nickel, zinc, and cobalt chelated to CM-Asp (carboxymethylaspartate) immobilized on the agarose gel. The Fab and Fc fragments (from human IgG digested with papain) interacted differently with the chelates studied, depending on the adsorption buffer system. The interaction between chelate and Fc fragment is predominantly based on the coordination bonds using adsorption buffer containing NaCl. Negative chromatography was performed on Cu(II)-CM-Asp-agarose obtaining 2.9mg of Fab per mL of adsorbent in nonretained fractions (Fc fragment-free without uncleaved IgG). The adsorption of Fab fragments is governed by electrostatic forces in the absence of NaCl in the adsorption buffer. High selectivity was achieved on Co(II)-CM-Asp-agarose and 5.7mg of Fab per mL of adsorbent was obtained in eluted fractions without Fc fragments, although having uncleaved IgG. The results showed that chromatography on transition metal ions chetated to CM-Asp-agarose is a promising approach to separation of Fab fragments from papain-digested human IgG solution.

  14. Electrophoretic extraction of proteins from two-dimensional electrophoresis gel spots

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Jian-Shi; Giometti, Carol S.; Tollaksen, Sandra L.

    1989-01-01

    After two-dimensional electrophoresis of proteins or the like, resulting in a polyacrylamide gel slab having a pattern of protein gel spots thereon, an individual protein gel spot is cored out from the slab, to form a gel spot core which is placed in an extraction tube, with a dialysis membrane across the lower end of the tube. Replicate gel spots can be cored out from replicate gel slabs and placed in the extraction tube. Molten agarose gel is poured into the extraction tube where the agarose gel hardens to form an immobilizing gel, covering the gel spot cores. The upper end portion of the extraction tube is filled with a volume of buffer solution, and the upper end is closed by another dialysis membrane. Upper and lower bodies of a buffer solution are brought into contact with the upper and lower membranes and are provided with electrodes connected to the positive and negative terminals of a DC power supply, thereby producing an electrical current which flows through the upper membrane, the volume of buffer solution, the agarose, the gel spot cores and the lower membrane. The current causes the proteins to be extracted electrophoretically from the gel spot cores, so that the extracted proteins accumulate and are contained in the space between the agarose gel and the upper membrane. A high percentage extraction of proteins is achieved. The extracted proteins can be removed and subjected to partial digestion by trypsin or the like, followed by two-dimensional electrophoresis, resulting in a gel slab having a pattern of peptide gel spots which can be cored out and subjected to electrophoretic extraction to extract individual peptides.

  15. On the Existence of Gel-Glasslike Transition Point in Biopolymer Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takushi, E.

    Existence of a gel-glasslike transition in biopolymer gels such as egg-white, DNA, RNA/DNA mixtures, gelatin, agarose is demonstrated in the drying process, and discussions are made on free water and bound water in the gel to glass change. A drastic decrease in the weight of egg-white gel was observed during drying at 25°C for 0 - 100 hours and a gradual decrease was observed for 100 - 450 hours. The first and second stages are due to the loss of free and bound water molecules in the egg-white gel, respectively. This was confirmed by a time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurement. Existence of a gel-glasslike transition may be a common phenomenon for materials in which the molecular network contains free and bound water molecules.

  16. Survival of different cell lines in alginate-agarose microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Orive, G; Hernández, R M; Gascón, A R; Igartua, M; Pedraz, J L

    2003-01-01

    Cell microencapsulation has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy to treat a wide range of diseases. The optimisation of this technology depends on several critical issues such as the careful selection of the cell line, the controlled manufacture of microcapsules and the suitable adaptation of the construct design to the selected cell line. In this work, we studied the behavior of hybridoma cells once enclosed in solid and liquefied core alginate-agarose beads. Results show that hybridoma cells presented a better growing pattern and improved their viability and antibody production within liquefied beads. However, when these beads were evaluated with a compression resistance study, they were found to be mechanically more fragile than solid ones. To address this problem, we entrapped non-autologous cells (BHK fibroblast and C2C12 myoblast) in solid alginate-agarose beads and observed that they showed an improved growing profile and prolonged their viability up to 70 days in comparison to the 15 days seen for the hybridoma cells.

  17. Efficacy of transdermal magnesium ascorbyl phosphate delivery after ultrasound treatment with microbubbles in gel-type surrounding medium in mice.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Lu, Ying-Jui; Hung, Chi-Ray; Yang, Meng-Yu

    2016-04-01

    Liquid microemulsions appropriate for topical application were obtained by increasing their viscosity through the addition of thickening agents. The present study first assessed the usefulness of ultrasound (US) plus US contrast agent, microbubbles (MBs), in agarose gel for enhancing transdermal drug delivery. The effect of US plus MBs in agarose gel on the penetration of the skin by magnesium ascorbyl phosphate (MAP) was explored both in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro experiments, the stability of MBs was investigated by examining the penetration of MAP by the model drug, Evans blue, in two media: an agarose phantom and pig skin. The penetration depth in the agarose phantom and pig skin increased by 40% and 195%, respectively, when treated with US plus MBs in 0.1% agarose solution combined with MAP (UMB1), and by 48% and 206%, respectively, when treated with US plus MBs in 0.15% agarose solution and MAP (UMB2). The skin-whitening effects in C57BL/6J mice in the UMB1 and UMB2 groups over a 4-week experimental period were significantly increased by 63% and 70%, respectively, in the fourth week. The findings of this study suggest that the survival of MBs with US is affected by the viscosity of the surrounding medium, and that in mice, treatment with US plus MBs in a suitable agarose gel can increase skin permeability and enhance transdermal MAP delivery. PMID:26838887

  18. Anion-switchable supramolecular gels for controlling pharmaceutical crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Jonathan A.; Piepenbrock, Marc-Oliver M.; Lloyd, Gareth O.; Clarke, Nigel; Howard, Judith A. K.; Steed, Jonathan W.

    2010-12-01

    We describe the use of low-molecular-weight supramolecular gels as media for the growth of molecular crystals. Growth of a range of crystals of organic compounds, including pharmaceuticals, was achieved in bis(urea) gels. Low-molecular-weight supramolecular gelators allow access to an unlimited range of solvent systems, in contrast to conventional aqueous gels such as gelatin and agarose. A detailed study of carbamazepine crystal growth in four different bis(urea) gelators, including a metallogelator, is reported. The crystallization of a range of other drug substances, namely sparfloxacin, piroxicam, theophylline, caffeine, ibuprofen, acetaminophen (paracetamol), sulindac and indomethacin, was also achieved in supramolecular gel media without co-crystal formation. In many cases, crystals can be conveniently recovered from the gels by using supramolecular anion-triggered gel dissolution; however, crystals of substances that themselves bind to anions are dissolved by them. Overall, supramolecular gel-phase crystallization offers an extremely versatile new tool in pharmaceutical polymorph screening.

  19. Identification of cisplatin-binding proteins using agarose conjugates of platinum compounds.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Takatoshi; Sibrian-Vazquez, Martha; Strongin, Robert M; Steyger, Peter S

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used as an antineoplastic drug, but its ototoxic and nephrotoxic side-effects, as well as the inherent or acquired resistance of some cancers to cisplatin, remain significant clinical problems. Cisplatin's selectivity in killing rapidly proliferating cancer cells is largely dependent on covalent binding to DNA via cisplatin's chloride sites that had been aquated. We hypothesized that cisplatin's toxicity in slowly proliferating or terminally differentiated cells is primarily due to drug-protein interactions, instead of drug-DNA binding. To identify proteins that bind to cisplatin, we synthesized two different platinum-agarose conjugates, one with two amino groups and another with two chlorides attached to platinum that are available for protein binding, and conducted pull-down assays using cochlear and kidney cells. Mass spectrometric analysis on protein bands after gel electrophoresis and Coomassie blue staining identified several proteins, including myosin IIA, glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), calreticulin, valosin containing protein (VCP), and ribosomal protein L5, as cisplatin-binding proteins. Future studies on the interaction of these proteins with cisplatin will elucidate whether these drug-protein interactions are involved in ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity, or contribute to tumor sensitivity or resistance to cisplatin treatment. PMID:23755301

  20. Direct measurement of intraparticle fluid velocity in superporous agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Larsson, P O; Gustavsson, P E; Axelsson, A

    1998-01-01

    Superporous agarose beads contain both normal diffusion pores and special, very wide superpores through which part of the chromatographic flow is transported, a situation that may greatly improve the chromatographic performance. For the first time such pore flow was measured directly by following the movement of microparticles (dyed yeast cells) through superporous beads packed in a chromatographic bed. The passage of the microparticles through the superpores and through the interstitial pores was recorded by a microscope/video camera. The video recordings were subsequently used to determine flow paths as well as the convective fluid velocities in both the superpores and the interstitial pores. The superpore fluid velocity was found to be proportional to the ratio between the squares of the respective pore diameters, which is in agreement with the Kozeny-Carman equation. Values for two-dimensional and three-dimensional tortuosity of the flow paths were measured and calculated respectively.

  1. Thermoresponsive chitosan-agarose hydrogel for skin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Sónia P; Ribeiro, Maximiano P; Brancal, Hugo; Coutinho, Paula; Correia, Ilídio J

    2014-10-13

    Healing enhancement and pain control are critical issues on wound management. So far, different wound dressings have been developed. Among them, hydrogels are the most applied. Herein, a thermoresponsive hydrogel was produced using chitosan (deacetylation degree 95%) and agarose. Hydrogel bactericidal activity, biocompatibility, morphology, porosity and wettability were characterized by confocal microscopy, MTS assay and SEM. The performance of the hydrogel in the wound healing process was evaluated through in vivo assays, during 21 days. The attained results revealed that hydrogel has a pore size (90-400 μm) compatible with cellular internalization and proliferation. A bactericidal activity was observed for hydrogels containing more than 188 μg/mL of chitosan. The improved healing and the lack of a reactive or a granulomatous inflammatory reaction in skin lesions treated with hydrogel demonstrate its suitability to be used in a near future as a wound dressing. PMID:25037363

  2. Analysis of cell surface properties using derivatized agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Salbilla, B A; Vaghefi, H; Chhabra, P; Hall, G; Brown, D; Sadoughi, F; Francisco, E; Attas, L; Walker, S L; Nguyen, B N; Oppenheimer, S B

    1999-07-01

    An assay has been developed to analyse cell surface properties using agarose beads derivatized with amino acids, sugars, proteins, and other molecules. The assay is simple and rapid and is useful to identify new cell surface markers. Various species and strains of yeast, paramecium, and Euglena were tested for their ability to bind to over 100 types of derivatized beads. A variety of specificity studies were performed in order to understand the nature of cell-bead binding. Our results indicate that cell-bead binding is often specific enough to distinguish between configurational isomers and spacer sizes and can be blocked by addition of specific molecules to the incubation medium. In some cases, different species or strains differed only by their binding to a single bead type. This simple and rapid assay may help to uncover new cell surface receptors and may lead to the development of clinically useful compounds for therapeutic applications.

  3. In vitro refolding of porcine pepsin immobilized on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Kurimoto, E; Harada, T; Akiyama, A; Sakai, T; Kato, K

    2001-08-01

    Since in vitro refolding of pepsin has long been attempted without success, it has been suspected that pepsin has no intrinsic refolding ability. In the present study, in order to eliminate unfavorable intermolecular interactions bringing about aggregation and autoproteolysis, we immobilized pepsin onto agarose beads. This technique enabled us to search extensively for appropriate refolding conditions without limitation of the refolding period. Renaturation of immobilized pepsin was observed exclusively at pH 3-5. This process was extremely slow and reached equilibrium after 300 h. Sixty percent of the proteolytic activity was recovered at pH 5. Addition of salts raised the recovery to 80% but had no significant effect on the refolding rate, suggesting that the salts mainly stabilize the native state of pepsin. This is the first report on the successful in vitro refolding of pepsin.

  4. Refolding of firefly luciferase immobilized on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Zako, T; Deguchi, H; Kitayama, A; Ueda, H; Nagamune, T

    2000-03-01

    The renaturation yield of the denatured firefly luciferase decreased strongly with increasing protein concentration in a renaturation buffer, because of aggregation. In this study, firefly luciferase was immobilized on agarose beads at a high concentration. Although the protein concentration was extremely high (about 100-fold) compared to that of soluble luciferase, the renaturation yield was comparable with that for the soluble one. Thus, immobilization was shown to be effective for avoiding aggregation of firefly luciferase. It was also shown that the optimum buffer conditions for renaturation of the immobilized luciferase were the same as those for the renaturation in solution. Also, it was indicated that electrostatic interactions between a protein and the matrix have a negative effect on renaturation of the immobilized luciferase since the renaturation yield decreased at acidic pH only for the immobilized luciferase. These novel observations are described in detail in this paper.

  5. High-quality substrate for fluorescence enhancement using agarose-coated silica opal film.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Li, Juan; Sun, Liguo; Zhao, Yuanjin; Xie, Zhuoying; Lv, Linli; Zhao, Xiangwei; Xiao, Pengfeng; Hu, Jing; Lv, Mei; Gu, Zhongze

    2010-08-01

    To improve the sensitivity of fluorescence detection in biochip, a new kind of substrates was developed by agarose coating on silica opal film. In this study, silica opal film was fabricated on glass substrate using the vertical deposition technique. It can provide stronger fluorescence signals and thus improve the detection sensitivity. After coating with agarose, the hybrid film could provide a 3D support for immobilizing sample. Comparing with agarose-coated glass substrate, the agarose-coated opal substrates could selectively enhance particular fluorescence signals with high sensitivity when the stop band of the silica opal film in the agarose-coated opal substrate overlapped the fluorescence emission wavelength. A DNA hybridization experiment demonstrated that fluorescence intensity of special type of agarose-coated opal substrates was about four times that of agarose-coated glass substrate. These results indicate that the optimized agarose-coated opal substrate can be used for improving the sensitivity of fluorescence detection with high quality and selectivity.

  6. Using chondroitin sulfate to improve the viability and biosynthesis of chondrocytes encapsulated in interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels of agarose and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate.

    PubMed

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Dormer, Nathan H; Gehrke, Stevin H; Detamore, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    We recently introduced agarose-poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels to cartilage tissue engineering that were able to encapsulate viable cells and provide a significant improvement in mechanical performance relative to its two constituent hydrogels. The goal of the current study was to develop a novel synthesis protocol to incorporate methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (MCS) into the IPN design hypothesized to improve cell viability and biosynthesis. The IPN was formed by encapsulating porcine chondrocytes in agarose, soaking the construct in a solution of 1:10 MCS:PEGDA, which was then photopolymerized to form a copolymer network as the second network. The IPN with incorporated CS (CS-IPN) (~0.5 wt%) resulted in a 4- to 5-fold increase in the compressive elastic modulus relative to either the PEGDA or agarose gels. After 6 weeks of in vitro culture, more than 50% of the encapsulated chondrocytes remained viable within the CS-modified IPN, in contrast to 35% viability observed in the unmodified. At week 6, the CS-IPN had significantly higher normalized GAG contents (347 ± 34 μg/μg) than unmodified IPNs (158 ± 27 μg/μg, P < 0.05). Overall, the approach of incorporating biopolymers such as CS from native tissue may provide favorable micro-environment and beneficial signals to cells to enhance their overall performance in IPNs. PMID:22116661

  7. Using chondroitin sulfate to improve the viability and biosynthesis of chondrocytes encapsulated in interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels of agarose and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate

    PubMed Central

    Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Dormer, Nathan H.; Gehrke, Stevin H.

    2013-01-01

    We recently introduced agarose-poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels to cartilage tissue engineering that were able to encapsulate viable cells and provide a significant improvement in mechanical performance relative to its two constituent hydrogels. The goal of the current study was to develop a novel synthesis protocol to incorporate methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (MCS) into the IPN design hypothesized to improve cell viability and biosynthesis. The IPN was formed by encapsulating porcine chondrocytes in agarose, soaking the construct in a solution of 1:10 MCS:PEGDA, which was then photopolymerized to form a copolymer network as the second network. The IPN with incorporated CS (CS-IPN) (~0.5 wt%) resulted in a 4- to 5-fold increase in the compressive elastic modulus relative to either the PEGDA or agarose gels. After 6 weeks of in vitro culture, more than 50% of the encapsulated chondrocytes remained viable within the CS-modified IPN, in contrast to 35% viability observed in the unmodified. At week 6, the CS-IPN had significantly higher normalized GAG contents (347 ± 34 µg/µg) than unmodified IPNs (158 ± 27 µg/µg, P < 0.05). Overall, the approach of incorporating biopolymers such as CS from native tissue may provide favorable micro-environment and beneficial signals to cells to enhance their overall performance in IPNs. PMID:22116661

  8. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson

    2004-10-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Neither aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide nor silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems produced significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested

  9. High specific surface area nickel mixed oxide powders LaNiO{sub 3} (perovskite) and NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} (spinel) via sol-gel type routes for oxygen electrocatalysis in alkaline media

    SciTech Connect

    El Baydi, M.; Chartier, P.; Koenig, J.F.; Poillerat, G.; Tiwari, S.K. |; Singh, R.N.; Rehspringer, J.L.

    1995-04-01

    A novel sol-gel process of preparation of oxide electrocatalysts is investigated to prepare Ni-containing mixed oxides LaNiO{sub 3} and NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} at moderate temperatures. High surface area (20-55 m{sup 2} g{sup {minus}1}) powders and high roughness electrodes (30-1500) were obtained. Apparent and real electrocatalytical activity are compared and discussed.

  10. Collagen and chondrocyte concentrations control ultrasound scattering in agarose scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, S; Liukkonen, J; Ylärinne, J H; Puhakka, P H; Lammi, M J; Virén, T; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasound imaging has been proposed for diagnostics of osteoarthritis and cartilage injuries in vivo. However, the specific contribution of chondrocytes and collagen to ultrasound scattering in articular cartilage has not been systematically studied. We investigated the role of these tissue structures by measuring ultrasound scattering in agarose scaffolds with varying collagen and chondrocyte concentrations. Ultrasound catheters with center frequencies of 9 MHz (7.1-11.0 MHz, -6 dB) and 40 MHz (30.1-45.3 MHz, -6 dB) were applied using an intravascular ultrasound device. Ultrasound backscattering quantified in a region of interest starting right below sample surface differed significantly (p < 0.05) with the concentrations of collagen and chondrocytes. An ultrasound frequency of 40 MHz, as compared with 9 MHz, was more sensitive to variations in collagen and chondrocyte concentrations. The present findings may improve diagnostic interpretation of arthroscopic ultrasound imaging and provide information necessary for development of models describing ultrasound propagation within cartilage. PMID:24972499

  11. NMR mechanisms in gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, L. J.

    2009-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance was critical to the development of gel dosimetry, as it established the potential for three dimensional dosimetry with chemical dosimeter systems through magnetic resonance imaging [1]. In the last two decades MRI has served as the gold standard for imaging, while NMR relaxometry has played an important role in the development and understanding of the behaviour of new gel dosimetry systems. Therefore, an appreciation of the relaxation mechanisms determining the NMR behaviour of irradiated gel dosimeters is important for a full comprehension of a considerable component of the literature on gel dosimetry. A number of excellent papers have presented this important theory, this brief review will highlight some of the salient points made previously [1-5]. The spin relaxation of gel dosimeters (which determines the dose dependence in most conventional MR imaging) is determined principally by the protons on water molecules in the system. These water protons exist in different environments, or groups (see Figure 1): on bulk water, on water hydrating the chemical species that are being modified under irradiation, and on water hydrating the gel matrix used to spatially stabilize the dosimeter (e.g., gelatin, agarose, etc). The spin relaxation depends on the inherent relaxation rate of each spin group, that is, on the relaxation rate which would be observed for the specific group if it were isolated. Also, the different water environments are not isolated from each other, and the observed relaxation rate also depends on the rate of exchange of magnetization between the groups, and on the fraction of protons in each group. In fact, the water exchanges quickly between the environments, so that relaxation is in what is usually termed the fast exchange regime. In the limit of fast exchange, the relaxation of the water protons is well characterized by a single exponential and hence by a single apparent relaxation rate. In irradiated gel dosimeters this

  12. A biodegradable gel electrolyte for use in high-performance flexible supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Moon, Won Gyun; Kim, Gil-Pyo; Lee, Minzae; Song, Hyeon Don; Yi, Jongheop

    2015-02-18

    Despite the significant advances in solid polymer electrolytes used for supercapacitors, intractable problems including poor ionic conductivity and low electrochemical performance limit the practical applications. Herein, we report a facile approach to synthesize a NaCl-agarose gel electrolyte for use in flexible supercapacitors. The as-prepared agarose hydrogel consists of a three-dimensional chemically interconnected agarose backbone and oriented interparticular submicropores filled with water. The interconnected agarose matrix acts as a framework that provides mechanical stability to the gel electrolyte and hierarchical porous networks for optimized ion transport. The developed pores with the water filler provide an efficient ionic pathway to the storage sites of electrode. With these properties, the gel electrolyte enables the supercapacitor to have a high specific capacitance of 286.9 F g(-1) and a high rate capability that is 80% of specific capacitance obtained in the case of a liquid electrolyte at 100 mV s(-1). In addition, attributed to the simple procedure and its components, the gel electrolyte is highly scalable, cost-effective, safe, and nontoxic. Thus, the developed gel electrolyte has the potential for use in various energy storage and delivery systems. PMID:25622040

  13. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-04-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent

  14. Methods of Manufacturing Bioactive Gels from Extracellular Matrix Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kentner, Kimberly A. (Inventor); Stuart, Katherine A. (Inventor); Janis, Abram D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention is directed to methods of manufacturing bioactive gels from ECM material, i.e., gels which retain bioactivity, and can serve as scaffolds for preclinical and clinical tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches to tissue reconstruction. The manufacturing methods take advantage of a new recognition that bioactive gels from ECM material can be created by digesting particularized ECM material in an alkaline environment and neutralizing to provide bioactive gels.

  15. Methods of Manufacturing Bioactive Gels from Extracellular Matrix Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kentner, Kimberly A. (Inventor); Stuart, Katherine A. (Inventor); Janis, Abram D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is directed to methods of manufacturing bioactive gels from ECM material, i.e., gels which retain bioactivity, and can serve as scaffolds for preclinical and clinical tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches to tissue reconstruction. The manufacturing methods take advantage of a new recognition that bioactive gels from ECM material can be created by digesting particularized ECM material in an alkaline environment and neutralizing to provide bioactive gels.

  16. Methods of Manufacturing Bioactive Gels from Extracellular Matrix Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kentner, Kimberly A. (Inventor); Stuart, Katherine A. (Inventor); Janis, Abram D. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is directed to methods of manufacturing bioactive gels from ECM material, i.e., gels which retain bioactivity, and can serve as scaffolds for preclinical and clinical tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches to tissue reconstruction. The manufacturing methods take advantage of a new recognition that bioactive gels from ECM material can be created by digesting particularized ECM material in an alkaline environment and neutralizing to provide bioactive gels.

  17. Encapsulation of adult human mesenchymal stem cells within collagen-agarose microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Batorsky, Anna; Liao, Jiehong; Lund, Amanda W; Plopper, George E; Stegemann, Jan P

    2005-11-20

    Reliable control over the process of cell differentiation is a major challenge in moving stem cell-based therapies forward. The composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is known to play an important role in modulating differentiation. We have developed a system to encapsulate adult human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) within spherical three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments consisting of a defined mixture of collagen Type I and agarose polymers. These protein-based beads were produced by emulsification of liquid hMSC-matrix suspensions in a silicone fluid phase and subsequent gelation to form hydrogel beads, which were collected by centrifugation and placed in culture. Bead size and size distribution could be varied by changing the encapsulation parameters (impeller speed and blade separation), and beads in the range of 30-150 microns in diameter were reliably produced. Collagen concentrations up to 40% (wt/wt) could be incorporated into the bead matrix. Visible light and fluorescence microscopy confirmed that the collagen matrix was uniformly distributed throughout the beads. Cell viability post-encapsulation was in the range of 75-90% for all bead formulations (similar to control slab gels) and remained at this level for 8 days in culture. Fluorescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton revealed that hMSC spreading increased with increasing collagen concentration. This system of producing 3D microenvironments of defined matrix composition therefore offers a way to control cell-matrix interactions and thereby guide hMSC differentiation. The bead format allows the use of small amounts of matrix proteins, and such beads can potentially be used as a cell delivery vehicle in tissue repair applications.

  18. Microfabricated polymer chip for capillary gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hong, J W; Hosokawa, K; Fujii, T; Seki, M; Endo, I

    2001-01-01

    A polymer (PDMS: poly(dimethylsiloxane)) microchip for capillary gel electrophoresis that can separate different sizes of DNA molecules in a small experimental scale is presented. This microchip can be easily produced by a simple PDMS molding method against a microfabricated master without the use of elaborate bonding processes. This PDMS microchip could be used as a single use device unlike conventional microchips made of glass, quartz or silicon. The capillary channel on the chip was partially filled with agarose gel that can enhance separation resolution of different sizes of DNA molecules and can shorten the channel length required for the separation of the sample compared to capillary electrophoresis in free-flow or polymer solution format. We discuss the optimal conditions for the gel preparation that could be used in the microchannel. DNA molecules were successfully driven by an electric field and separated to form bands in the range of 100 bp to 1 kbp in a 2.0% agarose-filled microchannel with 8 mm of effective separation length.

  19. ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as: ALK PHOS; Alkp Formal name: Alkaline Phosphatase Related tests: AST ; ALT ; GGT ; Bilirubin ; Liver Panel ; Bone Markers ; Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes; Bone Specific ALP All content on Lab ...

  20. [Modification of seaweed polysaccharide-agarose and its application as skin dressing (III)--skin regeneration with agarose grafting hyaluronic acid sponge].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianyan; Zhang, Lingmin; Chu, Bin; Chen, Peng; Tang, Shunqing

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, a kind of skin dressing, agarose- grafting- hyaluronic acid (Ag-g-HA) sponge was applied to test the modified agarose based scaffold for skin regeneration. The bFGF loading agarose-grafting hyaluronan scaffold had homogenous porosities, and the loaded bFGF was bioactive in 2 weeks. The Ag-g-HA sponge was applied into skin of mice, and it was found that the dressing promoted skin regeneration and no infection and leakage in lesion site took place. H&E staining results showed that the repaired skin was similar to autologous skin. These demonstrate that Ag-g-HA sponge has a promise in skin regeneration.

  1. Direct measurements of convective fluid velocities in superporous agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, P E; Axelsson, A; Larsson, P O

    1998-02-01

    Superporous agarose beads contain two sets of pores, diffusion pores and so-called superpores or flow pores, in which the chromatographic flow can transport substances to the interior of each individual bead [Gustavsson and Larsson, J. Chromatogr. A 734 (1996) 231]. The existence of pore flow may be proven indirectly by the chromatographic performance of beads but it has never been directly demonstrated in a chromatographic bed. In this report, pore flow was directly measured by following the movement of micro-particles (dyed yeast cells) in a packed bed. The passage of the micro-particles through the superpores and through the interstitial pores was followed by a microscope/video camera focused on beads which were situated four layers from the glass wall. The video recordings were subsequently used to determine the convective fluid velocities in both the superpores and the interstitial pores. Experiments were carried out with three different bead size ranges, all of which contained superporous beads having an average superpore diameter of 30 microns. The superpore fluid velocity as % of interstitial fluid velocity was determined to be 2-5% for columns packed with 300-500-micron beads (3% average value), 6-12% for columns packed with 180-300-micron beads (7% average value) and 11-24% for columns packed with 106-180-micron beads (17% average value). These data were compared to and found to agree with theoretically calculated values based on the Kozeny-Carman equation. In order to observe and accurately measure fluid velocities within a chromatographic bed, special techniques were adopted. Also, precautions were made to ensure that the experimental conditions used were representative of normal chromatography runs.

  2. Optimal processing for gel electrophoresis images: Applying Monte Carlo Tree Search in GelApp.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phi-Vu; Ghezal, Ali; Hsueh, Ya-Chih; Boudier, Thomas; Gan, Samuel Ken-En; Lee, Hwee Kuan

    2016-08-01

    In biomedical research, gel band size estimation in electrophoresis analysis is a routine process. To facilitate and automate this process, numerous software have been released, notably the GelApp mobile app. However, the band detection accuracy is limited due to a band detection algorithm that cannot adapt to the variations in input images. To address this, we used the Monte Carlo Tree Search with Upper Confidence Bound (MCTS-UCB) method to efficiently search for optimal image processing pipelines for the band detection task, thereby improving the segmentation algorithm. Incorporating this into GelApp, we report a significant enhancement of gel band detection accuracy by 55.9 ± 2.0% for protein polyacrylamide gels, and 35.9 ± 2.5% for DNA SYBR green agarose gels. This implementation is a proof-of-concept in demonstrating MCTS-UCB as a strategy to optimize general image segmentation. The improved version of GelApp-GelApp 2.0-is freely available on both Google Play Store (for Android platform), and Apple App Store (for iOS platform).

  3. Optimal processing for gel electrophoresis images: Applying Monte Carlo Tree Search in GelApp.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phi-Vu; Ghezal, Ali; Hsueh, Ya-Chih; Boudier, Thomas; Gan, Samuel Ken-En; Lee, Hwee Kuan

    2016-08-01

    In biomedical research, gel band size estimation in electrophoresis analysis is a routine process. To facilitate and automate this process, numerous software have been released, notably the GelApp mobile app. However, the band detection accuracy is limited due to a band detection algorithm that cannot adapt to the variations in input images. To address this, we used the Monte Carlo Tree Search with Upper Confidence Bound (MCTS-UCB) method to efficiently search for optimal image processing pipelines for the band detection task, thereby improving the segmentation algorithm. Incorporating this into GelApp, we report a significant enhancement of gel band detection accuracy by 55.9 ± 2.0% for protein polyacrylamide gels, and 35.9 ± 2.5% for DNA SYBR green agarose gels. This implementation is a proof-of-concept in demonstrating MCTS-UCB as a strategy to optimize general image segmentation. The improved version of GelApp-GelApp 2.0-is freely available on both Google Play Store (for Android platform), and Apple App Store (for iOS platform). PMID:27251892

  4. Compression behaviour of biphasic calcium phosphate and biphasic calcium phosphate-agarose scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Puértolas, J A; Vadillo, J L; Sánchez-Salcedo, S; Nieto, A; Gómez-Barrena, E; Vallet-Regí, M

    2011-02-01

    There is an acknowledged need for shaping 3-D scaffolds with adequate porosity and mechanical properties for biomedical applications. The mechanical properties under static and cyclic compressive testing of dense and designed porous architecture bioceramic scaffolds based on the biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) systems and BCP-agarose systems have been evaluated. The dense and designed porous architecture scaffolds in BCP systems exhibited a brittle behaviour. Agarose, a biocompatible and biodegradable hydrogel, has been used to shape designed architecture ceramic-agarose scaffolds following a low-temperature shaping method. Agarose conferred toughness, ductility and a rubbery consistency for strains of up to 60% of in ceramic BCP-agarose systems. This combination of ceramic and organic matrix helps to avoid the inherent brittleness of the bioceramic and enhances the compression resistance of hydrogel. The presence of mechanical hysteresis, permanent deformation after the first cycle and recovery of the master monotonous curve indicate a Mullins-like effect such as that observed in carbon-filled rubber systems. We report this type of mechanical behaviour, the Mullins effect, for the first time in bioceramics and bioceramic-agarose systems.

  5. Modeling the Dynamics of Gel Electrophorresis in the High School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saucedo, Skyler R.

    2013-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis, used by geneticists and forensic experts alike, is an immensely popular technique that utilizes an electric field to separate molecules and proteins by size and charge. At the microscopic level, a dye or complex protein like DNA is passed through agarose, a gelatinous three-dimensional matrix of pores and nano-sized tunnels.…

  6. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  7. Osteocompatibility and osteoinductive potential of supermacroporous polyvinyl alcohol-TEOS-agarose-CaCl2 (PTAgC) biocomposite cryogels.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ruchi; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-05-01

    Bone tissue engineering majorly focuses on the development of biomaterials which have the capability to mimic bone as well as the ability to induce bone formation. To this direction, we have prepared supermacroporous polyvinyl alcohol-TEOS-Agarose-CaCl2 (PTAgC) biocomposite cryogels having a uniform porous structure with an interconnected porosity of 77 ± 0.16 % and pore size of 190 ± 0.78 μm, as determined by scanning electron microscopic and micro-computed tomographic analyses. These biocomposite cryogels show an osteocompatible response towards Saos-2 human osteoblasts as analyzed via MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay and cell adhesion behaviour showing a flattened morphology of the cells on the cryogel surface. The property of bioactivity was also observed on the surface of these biomaterials. Further, we also explored the osteoinductive potential of these biocomposite cryogels by the analysis of osteogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts after seeding onto these biocomposite cryogels. The results indicate that these biocomposite cryogels indeed show an osteoinductive potential as we could observe the presence of respective markers for different stages during osteoblast maturation. During early timepoints, higher alkaline phosphatase production via ALP assay and BCIP/NBT staining was observed in the case of biocomposite cryogel seeded cells suggesting the osteoblastic differentiation of C2C12 cells. Whereas, during later timepoints, formation of calcium-phosphate like crystals was confirmed by von-kossa staining, further indicating towards the onset of mineralization phase during osteoblast maturation. Therefore, these results suggest that PTAgC biocomposite cryogels can form an important part of bone tissue engineered biomaterials due to their osteocompatible behaviour and osteoinductive potential.

  8. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qui; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling

    2004-05-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding in the swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to the naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of the injected solution bypasses the target pore space containing oil. The objective of this work is to investigate whether combining these two technologies could broaden the applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium--polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 9.2 to 12.9.

  9. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Performance and produced polymer evaluation of four alkaline-surfactant-polymer projects concluded that only one of the projects could have benefited from combining the alkaline-surfactant-polymer and gelation technologies. Cambridge, the 1993 Daqing, Mellott Ranch, and the Wardlaw alkaline-surfacant-polymer floods were studied. An initial gel treatment followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood in the Wardlaw field would have been a benefit due to reduction of fracture flow. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls or 3.3% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery improvement over a waterflood was 392,000 bbls or 6.5% OOIP. Placing a gel into the B sand prior to an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood resulted in 989,000 bbl or 16.4% OOIP more oil than only water injection. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls or 9.9% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand.

  10. Direct printing of silver nanoparticles by an agarose stamp on planar and patterned substrates.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yu-Chih; Hong, Franklin Chau-Nan

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we have used an agarose stamp to conduct direct printing of silver nanoparticles, nanowires and nanoplates on both planar and structured substrates. Nanoparticle solution could be first coated on an agarose stamp, and then transferred to a planar substrate. Micro-patterns comprising metal nanoparticles could be printed on planar substrates without the formation of residual layers. Thus a three-dimensional metal microstructure could be easily fabricated. The patterning of electrodes by printing Ag nanowires directly on TiO(2) was also demonstrated to fabricate resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices by all-solution-processing methods. By using a flat agarose stamp, the patterns printed on the microstructured substrates were quite different from those on the nanostructured substrates. On the microstructured substrates, direct printing could print silver nanoparticles onto the protrusion surface, and could print silver layers as thick as several microns, useful for high conductivity electrodes. On the substrates with nanostructures such as photonic crystals or nano-gratings, direct printing could transfer nanoparticles into the grooves or cavities only due to the contact of the agarose stamp with the groove or concavity surface. A new approach to fabricate metal wire grid polarizers was further demonstrated. A nanoporous agarose stamp has a good potential for printing using nanoparticle suspension.

  11. Isolation and restriction endonuclease cleavage of Anaplasma marginale DNA in situ in agarose.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, C M; Buening, G M

    1988-01-01

    Bacterial restriction endonucleases were used to produce DNA cleavage patterns that could be useful as tools to study the relatedness among Anaplasma marginale isolates. Bovine erythrocytes infected with A. marginale were lysed, washed, and embedded in agarose. The embedded erythrocytes and bacterial pathogens were partially digested by sequential infiltration of the agarose with acetone, lysozyme, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and proteinase K. The unfragmented genomic DNA was left supported and protected in a porous matrix. The DNA was digested in situ in agarose under the following conditions: (i) brief treatment with phenol, (ii) brief washing with distilled water, and (iii) adjustment of restriction enzyme digestion mixture to compensate for the volume of the agarose. The cleaved DNA was electrophoresed horizontally to produce a DNA cleavage pattern. Of 19 restriction enzymes screened, 12 produced distinct DNA bands from the genomes of each of the five A. marginale isolates examined. The DNA cleavage pattern produced from each isolate with a given restriction enzyme was reproducible. However, the DNA cleavage patterns produced from different isolates with a given restriction enzyme were not necessarily identical. This procedure could be modified for general bacterial DNA isolation, in situ agarose digestion, and manipulations. Images PMID:2838504

  12. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  13. Alkaline "Permanent" Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Antony

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of paper manufacturing processes and their effects on library materials focuses on the promotion of alkaline "permanent" paper, with less acid, by Canadian library preservation specialists. Standards for paper acidity are explained; advantages of alkaline paper are described, including decreased manufacturing costs; and recyclability is…

  14. Fenugreek hydrogel-agarose composite entrapped gold nanoparticles for acetylcholinesterase based biosensor for carbamates detection.

    PubMed

    Kestwal, Rakesh Mohan; Bagal-Kestwal, Dipali; Chiang, Been-Huang

    2015-07-30

    A biosensor was fabricated to detect pesticides in food samples. Acetylcholinesterase was immobilized in a novel fenugreek hydrogel-agarose matrix with gold nanoparticles. Transparent thin films with superior mechanical strength and stability were obtained with 2% fenugreek hydrogel and 2% agarose. Immobilization of acetylcholinesterase on the membrane resulted in high enzyme retention efficiency (92%) and a significantly prolonged shelf life of the enzyme (half-life, 55 days). Transmission electron microscopy revealed that, gold nanoparticles (10-20 nm in diameter) were uniformly dispersed in the fenugreek hydrogel-agarose-acetylcholinesterase membrane. This immobilized enzyme-gold nanoparticle dip-strip system detected various carbamates, including carbofuran, oxamyl, methomyl, and carbaryl, with limits of detection of 2, 21, 113, and 236 nM (S/N = 3), respectively. Furthermore, the fabricated biosensor exhibited good testing capabilities when used to detect carbamates added to various fruit and vegetable samples. PMID:26320646

  15. Fenugreek hydrogel-agarose composite entrapped gold nanoparticles for acetylcholinesterase based biosensor for carbamates detection.

    PubMed

    Kestwal, Rakesh Mohan; Bagal-Kestwal, Dipali; Chiang, Been-Huang

    2015-07-30

    A biosensor was fabricated to detect pesticides in food samples. Acetylcholinesterase was immobilized in a novel fenugreek hydrogel-agarose matrix with gold nanoparticles. Transparent thin films with superior mechanical strength and stability were obtained with 2% fenugreek hydrogel and 2% agarose. Immobilization of acetylcholinesterase on the membrane resulted in high enzyme retention efficiency (92%) and a significantly prolonged shelf life of the enzyme (half-life, 55 days). Transmission electron microscopy revealed that, gold nanoparticles (10-20 nm in diameter) were uniformly dispersed in the fenugreek hydrogel-agarose-acetylcholinesterase membrane. This immobilized enzyme-gold nanoparticle dip-strip system detected various carbamates, including carbofuran, oxamyl, methomyl, and carbaryl, with limits of detection of 2, 21, 113, and 236 nM (S/N = 3), respectively. Furthermore, the fabricated biosensor exhibited good testing capabilities when used to detect carbamates added to various fruit and vegetable samples.

  16. Quantitative determination of glycine in aqueous solution using glutamate dehydrogenase-immobilized glyoxal agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Semra Yilmazer; Keskin, Can Serkan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, an enzymatic procedure for the determination of glycine (Gly) was developed by using a column containing immobilized glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) on glyoxal agarose beads. Ammonia is produced from the enzymatic reactions between Gly and GDH with NAD(+) in phosphate buffer medium. The indophenol blue method was used for ammonia detection based on the spectrophotometric measurements of blue-colored product absorbing at 640 nm. The calibration graph is linear in the range of 0.1-10 mM of Gly concentrations. The effect of pH, temperature, and time interval was studied to find column stability, and also the interference effects of other amino acids was investigated. The interaction between GDH and glyoxal agarose beads was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The morphology of the immobilized and non-immobilized agarose beads were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  17. Agarose- and alginate-based biopolymers for sample preparation: Excellent green extraction tools for this century.

    PubMed

    Sanagi, Mohd Marsin; Loh, Saw Hong; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Nazihah; Pourmand, Neda; Salisu, Ahmed; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Ali, Imran

    2016-03-01

    Recently, there has been considerable interest in the use of miniaturized sample preparation techniques before the chromatographic monitoring of the analytes in unknown complex compositions. The use of biopolymer-based sorbents in solid-phase microextraction techniques has achieved a good reputation. A great variety of polysaccharides can be extracted from marine plants or microorganisms. Seaweeds are the major sources of polysaccharides such as alginate, agar, agarose, as well as carrageenans. Agarose and alginate (green biopolymers) have been manipulated for different microextraction approaches. The present review is focused on the classification of biopolymer and their applications in multidisciplinary research. Besides, efforts have been made to discuss the state-of-the-art of the new microextraction techniques that utilize commercial biopolymer interfaces such as agarose in liquid-phase microextraction and solid-phase microextraction.

  18. The distribution of particles characterized by size and free mobility within polydisperse populations of protein-polysaccharide conjugates, determined from two-dimensional agarose electropherograms.

    PubMed

    Tietz, D; Aldroubi, A; Schneerson, R; Unser, M; Chrambach, A

    1991-01-01

    New approaches for the characterization of polydisperse particle populations are presented*. The investigated samples contain virus-sized protein-polysaccharide conjugates which had previously been prepared as immunogens against bacterial meningitis (Hib). The analysis is based on two-dimensional agarose electrophoresis (Serwer-type). This method, like the one of O'Farrell, achieves a separation according to size and charge. It relies on a different principle, however, and is applicable to nondenatured particles which are 100 to more than 1000 times larger in mass than regular uncrosslinked proteins. Data from stained gel patterns are evaluated by the computer program ELPHOFIT, which makes it possible to standardize the gel and to construct a nomogram which defines every position on the gel in terms of particle size and free mobility (related to surface net charge density). The output of ELPHOFIT, consisting of nomogram parameters, is transferred to the image processing program GELFIT. This software is used to evaluate the computer images obtained by digitizing the stained gel patterns: (i) The nomogram is electronically superimposed on the computer image. (ii) The gel pattern is transformed from a curvilinear to a rectangular coordinate system of particle size and free mobility. The center of gravity as well as density maxima are given in coordinates of particle size and free mobility. Ranges of grey levels can be accentuated by adding 16 pseudocolors. (iii) Using surface-stripping techniques, GELFIT provides an estimate for the number of major subpopulations within each preparation. (iv) Numerical values for the distribution of particle size and free mobility are determined. Using program IMAGE, the quantitative physical assessment of a given conjugate preparation is presented in the form of a computer-generated three-dimensional plot, the shape of which serves to identify and characterize the preparation visually. The data analysis based on digitized two

  19. Plaque assay of Heliothis zea baculovirus employing a mixed agarose overlay.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Maramorosch, K

    1981-01-01

    The nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Heliothis zea has been titrated in Heliothis zea cells by the plaque method, using 1 percent mixed agarose containing a mixture of Seakem and Ultra pure agarose. Visible plaques, formed 8 days postinfection, ranged in diameter from 0.5 to 2 mm. Dose-response experiments indicated that a single particle initiated the formation of a plaque. The titration of Heliothis zea baculovirus by the newly described plaque method provides an accurate technique for the determination of virus concentration.

  20. Studies of assay conditions for macrophage migration from an agarose droplet.

    PubMed

    Fahlbusch, B; Dornberger, G

    1979-01-01

    The agarose microdroplet method is a relatively simple and economic technique to determine migration inhibition of leukocytes or macrophages in vitro. In the present study, further cultural and technical requirements of this method for the determination of macrophage migration inhibition have been defined: influence of macrophage handling before the assay, kinetics of migration and dependence on the pH of the medium. Considering defined conditions, the agarose microdoplet assay gives highly reliable and reproducible results. In comparative experiments, it proved to be as sensitive and valid as the capillary tube technique.

  1. Fabricating neuromast-inspired gel structures for membrane-based hair cell sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaddoni, Nima J.; Stephens, Christopher P.; Sarles, S. A.

    2012-04-01

    Recent research has shown that a new class of mechanical sensor, assembled from biomolecules and which features an artificial cell membrane as the sensing element, can be used to mimic basic hair cell mechanotransduction in vertebrates. The work presented in this paper is motivated by the need to increase sensor performance and stability by refining the methods used to fabricate and connect lipid-encapsulated hydrogels. Inspired by superficial neuromasts found on fish, three hydrogel materials are compared for their ability to be readily shaped into neuromast-inspired geometries and enable lipid bilayer formation using self-assembly at an oil/water interface. Agarose, polyethylene glycol (PEG, 6kg/mole), and hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) gel materials are compared. The results of this initial study determined that UV-curable gel materials such as PEG and HEMA enable more accurate shaping of the gel-needed for developing a sensor that uses a gel material both for mechanical support and membrane formation-compared to agarose. However, the lower hydrophobicity of agarose and PEG materials provide a more fluid, water-like environment for membrane formation-unlike HEMA. In working toward a neuromast-inspired design, a final experiment demonstrates that a bilayer can also be formed directly between two lipid-covered PEG surfaces. These initial results suggest that candidate gel materials with a low hydrophobicity, high fluidity, and a low modulus can be used to provide membrane support.

  2. Aerosol gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Christopher M. (Inventor); Chakrabarti, Amitabha (Inventor); Dhaubhadel, Rajan (Inventor); Gerving, Corey (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved process for the production of ultralow density, high specific surface area gel products is provided which comprises providing, in an enclosed chamber, a mixture made up of small particles of material suspended in gas; the particles are then caused to aggregate in the chamber to form ramified fractal aggregate gels. The particles should have a radius (a) of up to about 50 nm and the aerosol should have a volume fraction (f.sub.v) of at least 10.sup.-4. In preferred practice, the mixture is created by a spark-induced explosion of a precursor material (e.g., a hydrocarbon) and oxygen within the chamber. New compositions of matter are disclosed having densities below 3.0 mg/cc.

  3. Purification and properties of detergent-compatible extracellular alkaline protease from Scopulariopsis spp.

    PubMed

    Niyonzima, Francois Niyongabo; More, Sunil

    2014-10-01

    A fungal alkaline protease of Scopulariopsis spp. was purified to homogeneity with a recovery of 32.2% and 138.1 U/mg specific activity on lectin-agarose column. The apparent molecular mass was 15 ± 1 kD by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacryalamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). It was a homogenous monomeric glycoprotein as shown by a single band and confirmed by native PAGE and gelatin zymography. The enzyme was active and stable over pH range 8.0-12.0 with optimum activity at pH 9.0. The maximum activity was recorded at 50°C and remained unaltered at 50°C for 24 hr. The enzyme was stimulated by Co(2+) and Mn(2+) at 10 mM but was unaffected by Ba(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), Na(+), K(+), and Fe(2+). Ca(2+) and Fe(3+) moderately reduced the activity (∼18%); however, a reduction of about 40% was seen for Zn(2+) and Hg(2+). The enzyme activity was completely inhibited by 5 mM phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and partially by N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) and tocylchloride methylketone (TLCK). The serine, tryptophan, and histidine may therefore be at or near the active site of the enzyme. The protease was more active against gelatin compared to casein, fibrinogen, egg albumin, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). With casein as substrate, Km and Vmax were 4.3 mg/mL and 15.9 U/mL, respectively. An activation was observed with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Tween-80, and Triton X-100 at 2% (v/v); however, H2O2 and NaClO did not affect the protease activity. Storage stability was better for all the temperatures tested (-20, 4, and 28 ± 2°C) with a retention of more than 85% of initial activity after 40 days. The protease retained more than 50% activity after 24 hr of incubation at 28, 60, and 90°C in the presence (0.7%, w/v) of commercial enzymatic and nonenzymatic detergents. The Super Wheel-enzyme solution was able to completely remove blood staining, differing from the detergent solution alone. The stability at alkaline pH and high temperatures, broad substrate specificity

  4. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  5. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    DOEpatents

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  6. Can You Solve the Crime? Using Agarose Electrophoresis To Identify an Unknown Colored Protein.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiltfong, Cynthia L.; Chester, Emily; Albertin, Faith; Smith, Julia; Hall, Judith C.; Arth, Emily C.; Martin, Stephanie

    2003-01-01

    Describes a lab that introduces agarose electrophoresis techniques and basic information on proteins to middle school and high school students. Insists that, built around a scenario in which students must solve a crime, the lab has real-world applications that should spark student interest. (KHR)

  7. Porous Agarose-Based Semi-IPN Hydrogels: Characterization and Cell Affinity Studies.

    PubMed

    Vardar, E; Vert, Michel; Coudane, Jean; Hasirci, V; Hasirci, N

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels are frequently considered for medical applications due to the ease of preparation in different forms and high water content that makes them comparable to natural tissues. However, these general properties are not sufficient to make any hydrogel suitable for cell attachment and growth which are necessary for their use in tissue regeneration. Besides, the high water content makes the hydrogels mechanically weak. The formation of semi-interpenetrating networks (semi-IPNs) can be used in attempts to enhance physical, mechanical and thermal properties. In this study, semi-IPNs of agarose were prepared with chitosan and alginate, two polyelectrolytes that are positively and negatively charged under physiological conditions, respectively. Zeta potential was used to confirm the formation of charged hydrogels. All hydrogels had ultimate compression strengths in the range of 91-210 Pa where the value for pure agarose was about 103 Pa. Chitosan increased the compressive strength about two folds whereas the alginate had opposite effects. The amount of strongly bound water present in the hydrogels were estimated from TGA and DSC analysis and the highest value was found for alginate-agarose hydrogels as about 15%. The attachment and the migration of L929 fibroblasts were monitored in vitro using the MTS assay and confocal microscopy. The highest cell proliferation and penetration were observed for positively charged chitosan-agarose semi-IPN hydrogels.

  8. Agarose-Based Substrate Modification Technique for Chemical and Physical Guiding of Neurons In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Krumpholz, Katharina; Rogal, Julia; El Hasni, Akram; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Bräunig, Peter; Bui-Göbbels, Katrin

    2015-08-26

    A new low cost and highly reproducible technique is presented that provides patterned cell culture substrates. These allow for selective positioning of cells and a chemically and mechanically directed guiding of their extensions. The patterned substrates consist of structured agarose hydrogels molded from reusable silicon micro templates. These templates consist of pins arranged equidistantly in squares, connected by bars, which mold corresponding wells and channels in the nonadhesive agarose hydrogel. Subsequent slice production with a standard vibratome, comprising the described template pattern, completes substrate production. Invertebrate neurons of locusts and pond snails are used for this application as they offer the advantage over vertebrate cells as being very large and suitable for cultivation in low cell density. Their neurons adhere to and grow only on the adhesive areas not covered by the agarose. Agarose slices of 50 μm thickness placed on glass, polystyrene, or MEA surfaces position and immobilize the neurons in the wells, and the channels guide their neurite outgrowth toward neighboring wells. In addition to the application with invertebrate neurons, the technique may also provide the potential for the application of a wide range of cell types. Long-term objective is the achievement of isolated low-density neuronal networks on MEAs or different culture substrates for various network analysis applications. PMID:26237337

  9. Agarose/gelatin immobilisation of tissues or embryo segments for orientated paraffin embedding and sectioning.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Kathryn S; Ng, Ee Ting; Bowles, Josephine

    2016-01-01

    The technique described in this protocol allows the user to position small tissues in the optimal orientation for paraffin embedding and sectioning by first immobilising the tissue in an agarose/gelatin cube. This method is an adaptation of methods used for early embryos and can be used for any small tissues or embryo segments. Processing of larger tissue sections using molds to create agarose/gelatin blocks has been described previously; this detailed protocol provides a method for dealing with much smaller tissues or embryos (≤5mm). The tissue is briefly fixed then an agarose/gelatin drop is created to surround the tissue. The tissue can be orientated as per the user's preference in the drop before it sets as is carved into a cube with a domed top. The cube is then dehydrated and goes through the embedding and sectioning process. The domed cube is easy to orientate when embedding the tissue in a wax block giving the user assured orientation of the small tissue for sectioning. Additionally, the agarose/gelatin cube is easy to see in the unmolded wax once embedded, making the region of interest easy to identify. PMID:26742717

  10. Effects of calcium salts of acidic monomers on mineral induction of phosphoprotein immobilized to agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shuichi; Iijima, Masahiro; Motai, Fumiko; Mizoguchi, Itaru; Saito, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the mineralizing potential of acidic monomers and their calcium salts for mineralization, using an in vitro mineral induction model. Phosvitin (PV) was used as a model phosphoprotein in this study. PV was immobilized on agarose beads with divinyl sulfone. Five aliquots of agarose-immobilized PV, acidic monomers, and their calcium salts were incubated in mineralizing solution at various concentrations. The PV beads and acidic monomers were incubated at 37°C. Samples were taken at several time points during the incubation. Then, the agarose beads were analyzed for bound calcium by atomic absorption spectrometry. The mineral formed on the agarose beads was identified as an apatite by microarea X-ray diffraction. Additionally, the specimens were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Mineral induction time decreased with increasing solution saturation. 4-METCa salt [calcium salt of 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate (CMET)] significantly reduced the mineral induction time. Using these data, the interfacial tension for mineral induction of PV and CMET was determined to be 90.1 and 92.7 ergs/cm(2), respectively. The mineral induced in each specimen after incubation for 24 h was identified by its X-ray diffraction pattern as apatite. SEM observation showed that lath-shaped crystals were formed on the surfaces of the CMET. We conclude that CMET could play a role in dentin remineralization.

  11. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-10-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent

  12. Non-toxic agarose/gelatin-based microencapsulation system containing gallic acid for antifungal application.

    PubMed

    Lam, P-L; Gambari, R; Kok, S H-L; Lam, K-H; Tang, J C-O; Bian, Z-X; Lee, K K-H; Chui, C-H

    2015-02-01

    Aspergillus niger (A. niger) is a common species of Aspergillus molds. Cutaneous aspergillosis usually occurs in skin sites near intravenous injection and approximately 6% of cutaneous aspergillosis cases which do not involve burn or HIV-infected patients are caused by A. niger. Biomaterials and biopharmaceuticals produced from microparticle-based drug delivery systems have received much attention as microencapsulated drugs offer an improvement in therapeutic efficacy due to better human absorption. The frequently used crosslinker, glutaraldehyde, in gelatin-based microencapsulation systems is considered harmful to human beings. In order to tackle the potential risks, agarose has become an alternative polymer to be used with gelatin as wall matrix materials of microcapsules. In the present study, we report the eco-friendly use of an agarose/gelatin-based microencapsulation system to enhance the antifungal activity of gallic acid and reduce its potential cytotoxic effects towards human skin keratinocytes. We used optimal parameter combinations, such as an agarose/gelatin ratio of 1:1, a polymer/oil ratio of 1:60, a surfactant volume of 1% w/w and a stirring speed of 900 rpm. The minimum inhibitory concentration of microencapsulated gallic acid (62.5 µg/ml) was significantly improved when compared with that of the original drug (>750 µg/ml). The anti-A. niger activity of gallic acid -containing microcapsules was much stronger than that of the original drug. Following 48 h of treatment, skin cell survival was approximately 90% with agarose/gelatin microcapsules containing gallic acid, whereas cell viability was only 25-35% with free gallic acid. Our results demonstrate that agarose/gelatin-based microcapsules containing gallic acid may prove to be helpful in the treatment of A. niger-induced skin infections near intravenous injection sites.

  13. Agarose Gel Electrophoresis System in the Classroom: Detection of DNA Strand Breaks through the Alteration of Plasmid Topology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Mattos, J. C. P.; Dantas, F. J. S.; Caldeira-de-Araujo, A.; Moraes, M. O.

    2004-01-01

    Good quality scientific teaching depends on the ability of researchers to translate laboratory experiments into high school and undergraduate classes, bridging the advanced and basic science with common knowledge. A fast-growing field in biomedical sciences is oxidative stress, which has been associated to several diseases, including cancer and…

  14. Hybrid model for an enzymatic reactor: hydrolysis of cheese whey proteins by alcalase immobilized in agarose gel particles.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ruy; Resende, Mariam M; Giordano, Raquel L C; Giordano, Roberto C

    2003-01-01

    Cheese whey proteolysis, carried out by immobilized enzymes, can either change or evidence functional properties of the produced peptides, increasing the potential applications of this byproduct of the dairy industry. Optimization and scale-up of the enzymatic reactor relies on its mathematical model-a set of mass balance equations, with reaction rates usually given by Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics; no information about the distribution of peptides' molecular sizes is supplied. In this article, a hybrid model of a batch enzymatic reactor is presented, consisting of differential mass balances coupled to a "neural-kinetic model," which provides the molecular weight distributions of the resulting peptides. PMID:12721464

  15. Agarose functionalization: Synthesis of PEG-agarose amino acid nano-conjugate - its structural ramifications and interactions with BSA in a varying pH regime.

    PubMed

    Chudasama, Nishith A; Prasad, Kamalesh; Siddhanta, Arup Kumar

    2016-10-20

    In a rapid one-step method protein-mimicking large agarose amino acid framework (AAE; GPC 156.7kDa) was conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG 9kDa) affording nano-sized PEGylated amphoteric agarose (PEG-AAE; <10nm; DLS) containing amino, carboxyl and ester groups [overall degree of substitution (DS) 0.91]. The PEG groups were at the residual free carboxylic acid groups of succinate half-ester moiety at C-6 positions of the 1, 3 β-d-galactopyranose moieties of AAE. This new nano-sized PEG-AAE performed like a giant protein conjugate (GPC 331.2kDa) and exhibited pH-responsive interconversion between the triple helix and single-stranded random structures (optical rotatory dispersion) presenting a mixed solubility pattern like random coil (soluble), helical (soluble) and aggregate (precipitation) formations. Circular dichroism studies showed its pH-dependent complexation and decomplexation with bovine serum albumin (BSA). Such pH-responsive PEG-conjugate may be of pronounced therapeutic potential in the area of pharmacology as well as in sensing applications. PMID:27474620

  16. Agarose functionalization: Synthesis of PEG-agarose amino acid nano-conjugate - its structural ramifications and interactions with BSA in a varying pH regime.

    PubMed

    Chudasama, Nishith A; Prasad, Kamalesh; Siddhanta, Arup Kumar

    2016-10-20

    In a rapid one-step method protein-mimicking large agarose amino acid framework (AAE; GPC 156.7kDa) was conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG 9kDa) affording nano-sized PEGylated amphoteric agarose (PEG-AAE; <10nm; DLS) containing amino, carboxyl and ester groups [overall degree of substitution (DS) 0.91]. The PEG groups were at the residual free carboxylic acid groups of succinate half-ester moiety at C-6 positions of the 1, 3 β-d-galactopyranose moieties of AAE. This new nano-sized PEG-AAE performed like a giant protein conjugate (GPC 331.2kDa) and exhibited pH-responsive interconversion between the triple helix and single-stranded random structures (optical rotatory dispersion) presenting a mixed solubility pattern like random coil (soluble), helical (soluble) and aggregate (precipitation) formations. Circular dichroism studies showed its pH-dependent complexation and decomplexation with bovine serum albumin (BSA). Such pH-responsive PEG-conjugate may be of pronounced therapeutic potential in the area of pharmacology as well as in sensing applications.

  17. Mullins effect behaviour under compression in micelle-templated silica and micelle-templated silica/agarose systems.

    PubMed

    Puértolas, J A; Vadillo, J L; Sánchez-Salcedo, S; Nieto, A; Gómez-Barrena, E; Vallet-Regí, M

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of bioceramic conformed pieces based on micelle-templated silica (MTS) such as SBA15, MCM41 and MCM48 as well as MTS/agarose systems have been evaluated under static and cyclic compressive tests. The MTS pieces exhibited a brittle behaviour. Agarose, a biocompatible and biodegradable hydrogel, has been used to shape ceramic-agarose pieces following a low temperature shaping method. Agarose conferred toughness, ductility and a rubbery consistency up to a 60% strain in ceramic MTS/agarose systems leading to a maximum strength of 10-50 MPa, without losing their initial cylindrical structure. This combination of ceramic and organic matrix contributes to avoiding the inherent brittleness of the bioceramic and enhances the compression resistance of hydrogel. The presence of mechanical hysteresis, permanent deformation after the first cycle and recovery of the master monotonous curve of MTS/agarose systems indicate a Mullins-like effect similar to that found in carbon-filled rubber systems. We report this type of mechanical behaviour, the Mullins effect, for the first time in MTS bioceramics and MTS bioceramic/agarose systems. PMID:22076528

  18. Massively parallel single-molecule and single-cell emulsion reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using agarose droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huifa; Jenkins, Gareth; Zou, Yuan; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-04-17

    A microfluidic device for performing single copy, emulsion Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) within agarose droplets is presented. A two-aqueous-inlet emulsion droplet generator was designed and fabricated to produce highly uniform monodisperse picoliter agarose emulsion droplets with RT-PCR reagents in carrier oil. Template RNA or cells were delivered from one inlet with RT-PCR reagents/cell lysis buffer delivered separately from the other. Efficient RNA/cell encapsulation and RT-PCR at the single copy level was achieved in agarose-in-oil droplets, which, after amplification, can be solidified into agarose beads for further analysis. A simple and efficient method to graft primer to the polymer matrix using 5'-acrydite primer was developed to ensure highly efficient trapping of RT-PCR products in agarose. High-throughput single RNA molecule/cell RT-PCR was demonstrated in stochastically diluted solutions. Our results indicate that single-molecule RT-PCR can be efficiently carried out in agarose matrix. Single-cell RT-PCR was successfully performed which showed a clear difference in gene expression level of EpCAM, a cancer biomarker gene, at the single-cell level between different types of cancer cells. This work clearly demonstrates for the first time, single-copy RT-PCR in agarose droplets. We believe this will open up new possibilities for viral RNA detection and single-cell transcription analysis.

  19. Phosphatidylinositol anchor of HeLa cell alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Jemmerson, R.; Low, M.G.

    1987-09-08

    Alkaline phosphatase from cancer cells, HeLa TCRC-1, was biosynthetically labeled with either /sup 3/H-fatty acids or (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitated material. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) released a substantial proportion of the /sup 3/H-fatty acid label from immunoaffinity-purified alkaline phosphatase but had no effect on the radioactivity of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled material. PI-PLC also liberated catalytically active alkaline phosphatase from viable cells, and this could be selectively blocked by monoclonal antibodies to alkaline phosphatase. However, the alkaline phosphatase released from /sup 3/H-fatty acid labeled cells by PI-PLC was not radioactive. By contrast, treatment with bromelain removed both the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from purified alkaline phosphatase. Subtilisin was also able to remove the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from the purified alkaline phosphatase. The /sup 3/H radioactivity in alkaline phosphatase purified from (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled cells comigrated with authentic (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine by anion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis. The data suggest that the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine are covalently attached to the carboxyl-terminal segment since bromelain and subtilisin both release alkaline phosphatase from the membrane by cleavage at that end of the polypeptide chain. The data are consistent with findings for other proteins recently shown to be anchored in the membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol structure and indicate that a similar structure contributes to the membrane anchoring of alkaline phosphatase.

  20. Minimizing inhibition of PCR-STR typing using digital agarose droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Geng, Tao; Mathies, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    The presence of PCR inhibitors in forensic and other biological samples reduces the amplification efficiency, sometimes resulting in complete PCR failure. Here we demonstrate a high-performance digital agarose droplet microfluidics technique for single-cell and single-molecule forensic short tandem repeat (STR) typing of samples contaminated with high concentrations of PCR inhibitors. In our multifaceted strategy, the mitigation of inhibitory effects is achieved by the efficient removal of inhibitors from the porous agarose microgel droplets carrying the DNA template through washing and by the significant dilution of targets and remaining inhibitors to the stochastic limit within the ultralow nL volume droplet reactors. Compared to conventional tube-based bulk PCR, our technique shows enhanced (20 ×, 10 ×, and 16 ×) tolerance of urea, tannic acid, and humic acid, respectively, in STR typing of GM09948 human lymphoid cells. STR profiling of single cells is not affected by small soluble molecules like urea and tannic acid because of their effective elimination from the agarose droplets; however, higher molecular weight humic acid still partially inhibits single-cell PCR when the concentration is higher than 200 ng/μL. Nevertheless, the full STR profile of 9948 male genomic DNA contaminated with 500 ng/μL humic acid was generated by pooling and amplifying beads carrying single-molecule 9948 DNA PCR products in a single secondary reaction. This superior performance suggests that our digital agarose droplet microfluidics technology is a promising approach for analyzing low-abundance DNA targets in the presence of inhibitors.

  1. Rapid monoclonal antibody adsorption on dextran-grafted agarose media for ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yinying; Carta, Giorgio

    2008-11-21

    The binding capacity and adsorption kinetics of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) are measured for experimental cation exchangers obtained by grafting dextran polymers to agarose beads and compared with measurements for two commercial agarose-based cation exchangers with and without dextran grafts. Introduction of charged dextran polymers results in enhanced adsorption kinetics despite a dramatic reduction of the accessible pore size as determined by inverse size-exclusion chromatography. Incorporation of neutral dextran polymers in a charged agarose bead results instead in substantially lower binding capacities. The effective pore diffusivities obtained from batch uptake curves increase substantially as the protein concentration is reduced for the resins containing charged dextran grafts, but are much less dependent on protein concentration for the resins with no dextran or uncharged dextran grafts. The batch uptake results are corroborated by microscopic observations of transient adsorption in individual particles. In all cases studied, the adsorption kinetics is characterized by a sharp adsorption front consistent with a shell-progressive, diffusion limited mechanism. Greatly enhanced transport rates are obtained with an experimental resin containing charged dextran grafts with effective pore diffusivities that are 1-9 times larger than the free solution diffusivity and adsorption capacity approaching 300 mg/cm3 of particle volume.

  2. Agarose-assisted micro-contact printing for high-quality biomolecular micro-patterns.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Jee; Nam, Yoonkey

    2015-05-01

    Micro-contact printing has been developed to print biomolecules, such as cell adhesive molecules, proteins, or DNAs, on a substrate, which can serve as experimental platforms for investigating biological issues and engineering biosensors. Despite the popularity of this method, it has been technically challenging to use a conventional stamp made of a hydrophobic polydimethoxysilane (PDMS) elastomer that often requires surface treatments to facilitate the inking and stamping of biomolecules. In this work, we proposed a new surface modification method for a PDMS stamp using agarose hydrogel and demonstrated the applications to the design of micro-patterned substrates with biomolecules. By using a simple bench-top dip-coating method with a commercial syringe pump to steadily pull out the stamp from boiled agarose solution, we coated an agarose layer on the stamp. It consequentially enhanced the transferability of ink molecules to the target substrate and the uniformity of printed patterns compared to the traditional methods for treating stamp surface such as surfactant coating and temporary oxidation with air plasma. In addition, this microstamping method was also used to produce patterns of proteins with the preservation of bioactivity, which could guide neuronal growth. Thus, we demonstrated the applicability to the interface designs of biochips and biosensors.

  3. A disposable bio-nano-chip using agarose beads for high performance immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Du, Nan; Chou, Jie; Kulla, Eliona; Floriano, Pierre N; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; McDevitt, John T

    2011-10-15

    This article reports on the fabrication of a disposable bio-nano-chip (BNC), a microfluidic device composed of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and thiolene-based optical epoxy which is both cost-effective and suitable for high performance immunoassays. A novel room temperature (RT) bonding technique was utilized so as to achieve irreversible covalent bonding between PDMS and thiolene-based epoxy layers, while at the same time being compatible with the insertion of agarose bead sensors, selectively arranged in an array of pyramidal microcavities replicated in the thiolene thin film layer. In the sealed device, the bead-supporting epoxy film is sandwiched between two PDMS layers comprising of fluidic injection and drain channels. The agarose bead sensors used in the device are sensitized with anti-C-reactive protein (CRP) antibody, and a fluorescent sandwich-type immunoassay was run to characterize the performance of this device. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used based on the device specifications to model the bead penetration. Experimental data revealed analyte penetration of the immunocomplex to 100 μm into the 280 μm diameter agarose beads, which correlated well with the simulation. A dose-response curve was obtained and the linear dynamic range of the assay was established over 1 ng/mL to 50 ng/mL with a limit of detection less than 1 ng/mL.

  4. Aqueous phase catalytic conversion of agarose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural by metal chlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lishi; Laskar, Dhrubojyoti D.; Lee, Suh-Jane; Yang, Bin

    2013-12-14

    Abstract: 5-HMF is a key intermediate for producing chemicals and fuels that can substitute for today’s petroleum-derived feedstocks. A series of metal chlorides, including NaCl, CaCl2, MgCl2, ZnCl2, CuCl2, FeCl3, and CrCl3, were comparatively investigated to catalyze agarose degradation for production of 5-HMF at temperature 180 oC, 200 oC, and 220 oC for 30 min, with catalyst concentration of 0.5% (w/w), 1% (w/w) and 5% (w/w), and substrate concentration of 2% (w/w). Our results revealed that alkali metal chlorides and alkali earth metal chlorides such as NaCl, CaCl2 and MgCl2 gave better 5-HMF yield compared with transition metal chlorides including ZnCl2, CrCl3, CuCl2 and FeCl3. 1% (w/w) MgCl2 was the more favorable catalyst for 5-HMF production from agarose, and resulted in 40.7% 5-HMF yield but no levulinic acid or lactic acid at 200 oC, 35 min. The reaction pathways of agarose degradation catalyzed by MgCl2 were also discussed.

  5. Homogeneous tosylation of agarose as an approach toward novel functional polysaccharide materials.

    PubMed

    Gericke, Martin; Heinze, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The homogeneous tosylation of agarose was studied with respect to the effects of reaction parameters, such as reaction medium, time, and molar ratio, on the reaction course, the degree of substitution (DS) with tosyl/chloro deoxy groups, and the molecular structure. Tosyl agaroses (TOSA) with DS tosyl ≤ 1 .81 could be obtained in completely homogeneous reactions by using N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA)/LiCl or 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI) as solvents. The products were characterized by FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy and it was demonstrated that two types of substitution pattern can be achieved: (i) non-preferential substitution at position 6 of the 1 → 3-linked β-d-galactose unit (G-6) and position 2 of the 1 → 4-linked 3,6-anyhdro-α-L-galactose unit (LA-2) and (ii) regioselective tosylation at G-6, depending on whether the reaction is performed with or without LiCl. Finally, the nucleophilic displacement reaction of TOSA was studied using azide and ethylenediamine as representative nucleophiles. Novel deoxy-agarose derivatives were obtained that showed an interesting solubility behavior and will be used for creating functional polysaccharide materials.

  6. Chondroitin sulfate-derivatized agarose beads: a new system for studying cation binding to glycosaminoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, G.K.

    1987-09-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) has been covalently attached to aminoethyl-agarose beads in a carbodiimide-catalyzed reaction. In this process, an amide bond is formed between carboxylate groups on the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and the primary amine groups of the beads. Under optimal conditions, up to 160 micrograms of CS is attached per milligram of beads. CS-agarose beads have been used to study Ca binding to GAGs. The beads are mixed with a solution containing CaCl/sub 2/ and /sup 45/Ca and allowed to sediment under unit gravity. An aliquot of supernatant is then removed and /sup 45/Ca activity is determined to quantitate remaining (free) Ca. Using this system, it was shown that CS binds approximately 0.7 Ca/disaccharide unit at saturation. Under the conditions used, the apparent association constant (KA) is approximately 14 mM. In principle, this derivatization protocol may be used to attach any proteoglycan or GAG (except keratan sulfate) to an insoluble support. CS-agarose beads provide a rapid, simple, and relatively artifact-free system for studying cation-GAG interactions.

  7. Homogeneous tosylation of agarose as an approach toward novel functional polysaccharide materials.

    PubMed

    Gericke, Martin; Heinze, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The homogeneous tosylation of agarose was studied with respect to the effects of reaction parameters, such as reaction medium, time, and molar ratio, on the reaction course, the degree of substitution (DS) with tosyl/chloro deoxy groups, and the molecular structure. Tosyl agaroses (TOSA) with DS tosyl ≤ 1 .81 could be obtained in completely homogeneous reactions by using N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA)/LiCl or 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI) as solvents. The products were characterized by FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy and it was demonstrated that two types of substitution pattern can be achieved: (i) non-preferential substitution at position 6 of the 1 → 3-linked β-d-galactose unit (G-6) and position 2 of the 1 → 4-linked 3,6-anyhdro-α-L-galactose unit (LA-2) and (ii) regioselective tosylation at G-6, depending on whether the reaction is performed with or without LiCl. Finally, the nucleophilic displacement reaction of TOSA was studied using azide and ethylenediamine as representative nucleophiles. Novel deoxy-agarose derivatives were obtained that showed an interesting solubility behavior and will be used for creating functional polysaccharide materials. PMID:25965480

  8. Potential of Agarose/Silk Fibroin Blended Hydrogel for in Vitro Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Singh, Yogendra Pratap; Bhardwaj, Nandana; Mandal, Biman B

    2016-08-24

    An osteoarthritis pandemic has accelerated exploration of various biomaterials for cartilage reconstruction with a special emphasis on silk fibroin from mulberry (Bombyx mori) and non-mulberry (Antheraea assamensis) silk worms. Retention of positive attributes of the agarose standard and nullification of its negatives are central to the current agarose/silk fibroin hydrogel design. In this study, hydrogels of mulberry and non-mulberry silk fibroin blended with agarose were fabricated and evaluated in vitro for two weeks for cartilaginous tissue formation. The fabricated hydrogels were physicochemically characterized and analyzed for cell viability, proliferation, and extra cellular matrix deposition. The amalgamation of silk fibroin with agarose impacted the pore size, as illustrated by field emission scanning electron microscopy studies, swelling behavior, and in vitro degradation of the hydrogels. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results indicated the blend formation and confirmed the presence of both components in the fabricated hydrogels. Rheological studies demonstrated enhanced elasticity of blended hydrogels with G' > G″. Biochemical analysis revealed significantly higher levels of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) and collagen (p ≤ 0.01) in blended hydrogels. More specifically, the non-mulberry silk fibroin blend showed sGAG and collagen content (∼1.5-fold) higher than that of the mulberry blend (p ≤ 0.05). Histological and immunohistochemical analyses further validated the enhanced deposition of sGAG and collagen, indicating maintenance of chondrogenic phenotype within constructs after two weeks of culture. Real-time PCR analysis further confirmed up-regulation of cartilage-specific aggrecan, sox-9 (∼1.5-fold) and collagen type II (∼2-fold) marker genes (p ≤ 0.01) in blended hydrogels. The hydrogels demonstrated immunocompatibility, which was evidenced by minimal in vitro secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by murine

  9. Short-Duration Low-Direct-Current Electrical Field Treatment Is a Practical Tool for Considerably Reducing Counts of Gram-Negative Bacteria Entrapped in Gel Beads

    PubMed Central

    Zvitov, R.; Zohar-Perez, C.; Nussinovitch, A.

    2004-01-01

    Application of a direct-current electrical field for very short times can serve as a practical nonthermal procedure to reduce or modify the microbial distribution in gel beads. The viability of Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens entrapped in alginate and agarose beads decreases as the field intensity and duration of electrical field increase. PMID:15184192

  10. High-sensitivity DNA detection with a laser-excited confocal fluorescence gel scanner.

    PubMed

    Quesada, M A; Rye, H S; Gingrich, J C; Glazer, A N; Mathies, R A

    1991-05-01

    A high-sensitivity, laser-excited confocal fluorescence gel scanner has been developed and applied to the detection of fluorescently labeled DNA. An argon ion laser (1-10 mW at 488 nm) is focused in the gel with a high-numerical aperture microscope objective. The laser-excited fluorescence is gathered by the objective and focused on a confocal spatial filter, followed by a spectral filter and photodetector. The gel is placed on a computer-controlled scan stage, and the scanned image of the gel fluorescence is stored and analyzed in a computer. This scanner has been used to detect DNA separated on sequencing gels, agarose mapping gels and pulsed field gels. Sanger sequencing gels were run on M13mp18 DNA using a fluoresceinated primer. The 400-microns-thick gels, loaded with 30 fmol of DNA fragments in 3-mm lanes, were scanned at 78-microns resolution. The high resolution of our scanner coupled with image processing allows us to read up to approximately 300 bases in four adjacent sequencing lanes. The minimum band size that could be detected and read was approximately 200 microns. This instrument has a limiting detection sensitivity of approximately 10 amol of fluorescein-labeled DNA in a 1 x 3-mm band. In applications to agarose mapping gels, we have exploited the fact that DNA can be prestained with ethidium homodimer, followed by electrophoresis and fluorescence detection to achieve picogram sensitivity. We have also developed methods using both ethidium homodimer and thiazole orange staining which permit two-color detection of DNA in one lane.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy. PMID:26404834

  12. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy.

  13. Genotoxicity of environmental agents assessed by the alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Møller, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Generation of DNA damage is considered to be an important initial event in carcinogenesis. A considerable battery of assays exists for the detection of different genotoxic effects of compounds in experimental systems, or for investigations of exposure to genotoxic agents in environmental or occupational settings. Some of the tests may have limited use because of complicated technical setup or because they only are applicable to a few cell types. The single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay is technically simple, relatively fast, cheap, and DNA damage can be investigated in virtually all mammalian cell types without requirement for cell culture. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate the comet assay as a genotoxicity test in genetic toxicology of environmental agents, encompassing both experimental animal models and biomonitoring. The comet assay detects strand breaks (SB). The cells are embedded in agarose and lysed, generating nucleus-like structures in the gel (referred to as nucleoids). Following alkaline electrophoresis, the DNA strands migrate toward the anode, and the extent of migration depends on the number of SB in the nucleoid. The migration is visualized and scored in a fluorescence microscope after staining. Broad classes of oxidative DNA damage can be detected as additional SB if nucleoids are incubated with bacterial DNA glycosylase/endonuclease enzymes. Oxidized pyrimidines and purines can be detected by incubation with endonuclease III and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase, respectively. The animal experimental studies indicated that the comet assay was able to detect genotoxic effects of diesel exhaust particles in lung tissue, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ)-induced DNA damage in colon epithelial cells and liver tissue, and benzene-induced damage in bone marrow and liver cells. The strength of the comet assay was further outlined by application of repair enzymes, indicating no oxidative DNA base damage following IQ treatment

  14. Overexpression of Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase in Pichia Pastoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel; Malone, Christine, C.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Pichiapastoris expression system was utilized to produce functionally active human bone alkaline phosphatase in gram quantities. Bone alkaline phosphatase is a key enzyme in bone formation and biomineralization, yet important questions about its structural chemistry and interactions with other cellular enzymes in mineralizing tissues remain unanswered. A soluble form of human bone alkaline phosphatase was constructed by deletion of the 25 amino acid hydrophobic C-terminal region of the encoding cDNA and inserted into the X-33 Pichiapastoris strain. An overexpression system was developed in shake flasks and converted to large-scale fermentation. Alkaline phosphatase was secreted into the medium to a level of 32mgAL when cultured in shake flasks. Enzyme activity was 12U/mg measured by a spectrophotometric assay. Fermentation yielded 880mgAL with enzymatic activity of 968U/mg. Gel electrophoresis analysis indicates that greater than 50% of the total protein in the fermentation is alkaline phosphatase. A purification scheme has been developed using ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. We are currently screening crystallization conditions of the purified recombinant protein for subsequent X-ray diffraction analyses. Structural data should provide additional information on the role of alkaline phosphatase in normal bone mineralization and in certain bone mineralization anomalies.

  15. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Cuttitta, Christina M.; Ericson, Daniel L.; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G.; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s−1) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening. PMID:25615864

  16. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    SciTech Connect

    Cuttitta, Christina M.; Ericson, Daniel L.; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G.; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S.

    2014-06-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s-1) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  17. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    DOE PAGES

    Cuttitta, Christina M.; Ericson, Daniel L.; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G.; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; et al

    2014-06-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s-1) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from themore » inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.« less

  18. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Cuttitta, Christina M; Ericson, Daniel L; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M; Sweet, Robert M; Soares, Alexei S

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s(-1)) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  19. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    SciTech Connect

    Cuttitta, Christina M.; Ericson, Daniel L.; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G.; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s{sup −1}) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  20. Hydrolysis of proteins by immobilized-stabilized alcalase-glyoxyl agarose.

    PubMed

    Tardioli, Paulo W; Pedroche, Justo; Giordano, Raquel L C; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisán, José M

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents stable Alcalase-glyoxyl derivatives, to be used in the controlled hydrolysis of proteins. They were produced by immobilizing-stabilizing Alcalase on cross-linked 10% agarose beads, using low and high activation grades of the support and different immobilization times. The Alcalase glyoxyl derivatives were compared to other agarose derivatives, prepared using glutaraldehyde and CNBr as activation reactants. The performance of derivatives in the hydrolysis of casein was also tested. At pH 8.0 and 50 degrees C, Alcalase derivatives produced with 1 h of immobilization time on agarose activated with glutaraldehyde, CNBr, and low and high glyoxyl groups concentration presented half-lives of ca. 10, 29, 60, and 164 h, respectively. More extensive immobilization monotonically led to higher stabilization. The most stabilized Alcalase-glyoxyl derivative was produced using 96 h of immobilization time and high activation grade of the support. It presented half-life of ca. 23 h, at pH 8.0 and 63 degrees C and was ca. 500-fold more stable than the soluble enzyme. Thermal inactivation of all derivatives followed a single-step non-first-order kinetics. The most stable derivative presented ca. 54% of the activity of the soluble enzyme for the hydrolysis of casein and of the small substrate Boc-Ala-ONp. This behavior suggests that the decrease in activity was due to enzyme distortion but not to wrong orientation. The hydrolysis degree of casein at 80 degrees C with the most stabilized enzyme was 2-fold higher than that achieved using soluble enzyme, as a result of the thermal inactivation of the latter. Therefore, the high stability of the new Alcalase-glyoxyl derivative allows the design of continuous processes to hydrolyze proteins at temperatures that avoid microbial growth.

  1. A rapid photoelectric method for reading cell migration from agarose microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Gauthier-Rahman, S; Morlat, J L; Leca, G; Bouin, M

    1982-08-27

    A rapid photoelectric method for reading cell migration from agarose microdroplets is described. Practically instantaneous, the method eliminates drawing and planimetry and makes feasible the use of a wide range of antigen concentrations. The results obtained are similar to those obtained by planimetry, but the photoelectric method is more sensitive. Enhancement of migration as well as inhibition were significantly demonstrated by this method. Migration inhibition of immune mouse spleen cells was found to be bizonal, with 2 peaks, one at very low antigen concentrations (10(-3) microgram/ml ovalbumin) and one at 10 microgram/ml.

  2. Ribosome display for selection of active dihydrofolate reductase mutants using immobilized methotrexate on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumio; Ebihara, Takashi; Mie, Masayasu; Yanagida, Yasuko; Endo, Yaeta; Kobatake, Eiry; Aizawa, Masuo

    2002-03-01

    Ribosome display was applied to the selection of an enzyme. As a model, we selected and amplified the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene by ribosome display utilizing a wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system based on binding affinity to its substrate analog, methotrexate, immobilized on agarose beads. After three rounds of selection, the DHFR gene could be effectively selected and preferentially amplified from a small proportion in a mixture also containing competitive genes. Active enzymes were expressed and amplified and by sequence analysis, four mutants of DHFR were identified. These mutants showed as much activity as the wild-type enzyme.

  3. Alkaline Comet Assay for Assessing DNA Damage in Individual Cells.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Wang, Zemin; Klaunig, James E

    2015-08-06

    Single-cell gel electrophoresis, commonly called a comet assay, is a simple and sensitive method for assessing DNA damage at the single-cell level. It is an important technique in genetic toxicological studies. The comet assay performed under alkaline conditions (pH >13) is considered the optimal version for identifying agents with genotoxic activity. The alkaline comet assay is capable of detecting DNA double-strand breaks, single-strand breaks, alkali-labile sites, DNA-DNA/DNA-protein cross-linking, and incomplete excision repair sites. The inclusion of digestion of lesion-specific DNA repair enzymes in the procedure allows the detection of various DNA base alterations, such as oxidative base damage. This unit describes alkaline comet assay procedures for assessing DNA strand breaks and oxidative base alterations. These methods can be applied in a variety of cells from in vitro and in vivo experiments, as well as human studies.

  4. Optimized conditions for pulsed field gel electrophoretic separations of DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Birren, B W; Lai, E; Clark, S M; Hood, L; Simon, M I

    1988-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of DNA migration in gel electrophoresis requires precisely controlled homogeneous electric fields. A new electrophoresis system has allowed us to explore several parameters governing DNA migration during homogeneous field pulsed field gel (PFG) electrophoresis. Migration was measured at different switch times, temperatures, agarose concentrations, and voltage gradients. Conditions which increase DNA velocities permit separation over a wider size range, but reduce resolution. We have also varied the angle between the alternating electric fields. Reorientation angles between 105 degrees and 165 degrees give equivalent resolution, despite significant differences in DNA velocity. Separation of DNA fragments from 50 to greater than 7000 kilobases (Kb) can easily be optimized for speed and resolution based on conditions we describe. Images PMID:3412895

  5. Highly selective and sensitive optical sensor for determination of Pb2+ and Hg2+ ions based on the covalent immobilization of dithizone on agarose membrane.

    PubMed

    Zargoosh, Kiomars; Babadi, Fatemeh Farhadian

    2015-02-25

    A highly sensitive and selective optical membrane for determination of Hg(2+) and Pb(2+) was prepared by covalent immobilization of dithizone on agarose membrane. In addition to its high stability, reproducibility and relatively long lifetime, the proposed optical sensor revealed good selectivity for target ions over a large number of alkali, alkaline earth, transition, and heavy metal ions. The proposed optical membrane displays linear responses from 1.1×10(-8) to 2.0×10(-6) mol L(-1) and 1.2×10(-8) to 2.4×10(-6) mol L(-1) for Hg(2+) and Pb(2+), respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) were 2.0×10(-9) mol L(-1) and 4.0×10(-9) mol L(-1) for Hg(2+) and Pb(2), respectively. The prepared optical membrane was successfully applied to the determination of Hg(2+) and Pb(2+) in industrial wastes, spiked tap water and natural waters without any preconcentration step.

  6. Highly selective and sensitive optical sensor for determination of Pb2+ and Hg2+ ions based on the covalent immobilization of dithizone on agarose membrane.

    PubMed

    Zargoosh, Kiomars; Babadi, Fatemeh Farhadian

    2015-02-25

    A highly sensitive and selective optical membrane for determination of Hg(2+) and Pb(2+) was prepared by covalent immobilization of dithizone on agarose membrane. In addition to its high stability, reproducibility and relatively long lifetime, the proposed optical sensor revealed good selectivity for target ions over a large number of alkali, alkaline earth, transition, and heavy metal ions. The proposed optical membrane displays linear responses from 1.1×10(-8) to 2.0×10(-6) mol L(-1) and 1.2×10(-8) to 2.4×10(-6) mol L(-1) for Hg(2+) and Pb(2+), respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) were 2.0×10(-9) mol L(-1) and 4.0×10(-9) mol L(-1) for Hg(2+) and Pb(2), respectively. The prepared optical membrane was successfully applied to the determination of Hg(2+) and Pb(2+) in industrial wastes, spiked tap water and natural waters without any preconcentration step. PMID:25216460

  7. Highly selective and sensitive optical sensor for determination of Pb2+and Hg2+ ions based on the covalent immobilization of dithizone on agarose membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zargoosh, Kiomars; Babadi, Fatemeh Farhadian

    2015-02-01

    A highly sensitive and selective optical membrane for determination of Hg2+ and Pb2+ was prepared by covalent immobilization of dithizone on agarose membrane. In addition to its high stability, reproducibility and relatively long lifetime, the proposed optical sensor revealed good selectivity for target ions over a large number of alkali, alkaline earth, transition, and heavy metal ions. The proposed optical membrane displays linear responses from 1.1 × 10-8 to 2.0 × 10-6 mol L-1 and 1.2 × 10-8 to 2.4 × 10-6 mol L-1 for Hg2+ and Pb2+, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) were 2.0 × 10-9 mol L-1 and 4.0 × 10-9 mol L-1 for Hg2+ and Pb2, respectively. The prepared optical membrane was successfully applied to the determination of Hg2+ and Pb2+ in industrial wastes, spiked tap water and natural waters without any preconcentration step.

  8. The Arabidopsis alkaline ceramidase TOD1 is a key turgor pressure regulator in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Yu; Shi, Dong-Qiao; Zhang, Wen-Juan; Tang, Zuo-Shun; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2015-01-01

    Turgor pressure plays pivotal roles in the growth and movement of walled cells that make up plants and fungi. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating turgor pressure and the coordination between turgor pressure and cell wall remodelling for cell growth remain poorly understood. Here, we report the characterization of Arabidopsis TurgOr regulation Defect 1 (TOD1), which is preferentially expressed in pollen tubes and silique guard cells. We demonstrate that TOD1 is a Golgi-localized alkaline ceramidase. tod1 mutant pollen tubes have higher turgor than wild type and show growth retardation both in pistils and in agarose medium. In addition, tod1 guard cells are insensitive to abscisic acid (ABA)-induced stomatal closure, whereas sphingosine-1-phosphate, a putative downstream component of ABA signalling and product of alkaline ceramidases, promotes closure in both wild type and tod1. Our data suggest that TOD1 acts in turgor pressure regulation in both guard cells and pollen tubes.

  9. Microfluidic dielectrophoretic sorter using gel vertical electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jason; Nelson, Edward L.; Li, G. P.; Bachman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We report the development and results of a two-step method for sorting cells and small particles in a microfluidic device. This approach uses a single microfluidic channel that has (1) a microfabricated sieve which efficiently focuses particles into a thin stream, followed by (2) a dielectrophoresis (DEP) section consisting of electrodes along the channel walls for efficient continuous sorting based on dielectric properties of the particles. For our demonstration, the device was constructed of polydimethylsiloxane, bonded to a glass surface, and conductive agarose gel electrodes. Gold traces were used to make electrical connections to the conductive gel. The device had several novel features that aided performance of the sorting. These included a sieving structure that performed continuous displacement of particles into a single stream within the microfluidic channel (improving the performance of downstream DEP, and avoiding the need for additional focusing flow inlets), and DEP electrodes that were the full height of the microfluidic walls (“vertical electrodes”), allowing for improved formation and control of electric field gradients in the microfluidic device. The device was used to sort polymer particles and HeLa cells, demonstrating that this unique combination provides improved capability for continuous DEP sorting of particles in a microfluidic device. PMID:24926390

  10. Microfluidic dielectrophoretic sorter using gel vertical electrodes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jason; Nelson, Edward L; Li, G P; Bachman, Mark

    2014-05-01

    We report the development and results of a two-step method for sorting cells and small particles in a microfluidic device. This approach uses a single microfluidic channel that has (1) a microfabricated sieve which efficiently focuses particles into a thin stream, followed by (2) a dielectrophoresis (DEP) section consisting of electrodes along the channel walls for efficient continuous sorting based on dielectric properties of the particles. For our demonstration, the device was constructed of polydimethylsiloxane, bonded to a glass surface, and conductive agarose gel electrodes. Gold traces were used to make electrical connections to the conductive gel. The device had several novel features that aided performance of the sorting. These included a sieving structure that performed continuous displacement of particles into a single stream within the microfluidic channel (improving the performance of downstream DEP, and avoiding the need for additional focusing flow inlets), and DEP electrodes that were the full height of the microfluidic walls ("vertical electrodes"), allowing for improved formation and control of electric field gradients in the microfluidic device. The device was used to sort polymer particles and HeLa cells, demonstrating that this unique combination provides improved capability for continuous DEP sorting of particles in a microfluidic device.

  11. Gel filtration chromatography of triple-helical calf skin collagen.

    PubMed

    Noelken, M E; Bettin, B D

    1983-10-15

    Gel filtration of type I collagen has been of limited use, because at low pH where the protein is not associated it binds to agarose gels, and at neutrality collagen has a tendency to form fibrils. The more porous polyacrylamide-based gels do not interact with collagen but cannot be used at very high flow rates because they are compressible. It was found that these difficulties are surmounted by use of Fractogel TSK HW-65F, a spherical gel made from a weakly hydrophilic vinyl polymer, and use of the buffer system 0.5 M urea, 0.117 M Tris-HCl, pH 7.3, which prevents fibril formation. The solvent has only a slight effect on the thermal stability of collagen, as determined by circular dichroism measurements. The recovery of native collagen, at 25 degrees C, was at least 88% and that of partially unfolded collagen, at 35 degrees C where it is about one-third unfolded, was 98%. The Fractogel TSK gels and the urea, Tris solvent system should be useful for both preparative work and for studies involving interaction of unaggregated type I collagen with smaller molecules at physiological pH.

  12. Alkaline galvanic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, T.; Maeda, Y.; Momose, K.; Wakahata, T.

    1983-10-04

    An alkaline galvanic cell is disclosed including a container serving for a cathode terminal, a sealing plate in the form of a layered clad plate serving for an anode terminal to be fitted into the container, and an insulating packing provided between the sealing plate and container for sealing the cell upon assembly. The cell is provided with a layer of epoxy adduct polyamide amine having amine valence in the range of 50 to 400 and disposed between the innermost copper layer of the sealing plate arranged to be readily amalgamated and the insulating packing so as to serve as a sealing agent or liquid leakage suppression agent.

  13. Simulated moving bed separation of agarose-hydrolyzate components for biofuel production from marine biomass.

    PubMed

    Kim, Pung-Ho; Nam, Hee-Geun; Park, Chanhun; Wang, Nien-Hwa Linda; Chang, Yong Keun; Mun, Sungyong

    2015-08-01

    The economically-efficient separation of galactose, levulinic acid (LA), and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) in acid hydrolyzate of agarose has been a key issue in the area of biofuel production from marine biomass. To address this issue, an optimal simulated moving bed (SMB) process for continuous separation of the three agarose-hydrolyzate components with high purities, high yields, and high throughput was developed in this study. As a first step for this task, the adsorption isotherm and mass-transfer parameters of each component on the qualified adsorbent were determined through a series of multiple frontal experiments. The determined parameters were then used in optimizing the SMB process for the considered separation. Finally, the optimized SMB process was tested experimentally using a self-assembled SMB unit with four zones. The SMB experimental results and the relevant computer simulations verified that the developed process in this study was quite successful in the economically-efficient separation of galactose, LA, and 5-HMF in a continuous mode with high purities and high yields. It is thus expected that the developed SMB process in this study will be able to serve as one of the trustworthy ways of improving the economic feasibility of biofuel production from marine biomass.

  14. Finite difference time domain model of ultrasound propagation in agarose scaffold containing collagen or chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, Satu I; Liukkonen, Jukka; Malo, Markus K H; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of ultrasound backscattering is a promising diagnostic technique for arthroscopic evaluation of articular cartilage. However, contribution of collagen and chondrocytes on ultrasound backscattering and speed of sound in cartilage is not fully understood and is experimentally difficult to study. Agarose hydrogels have been used in tissue engineering applications of cartilage. Therefore, the aim of this study was to simulate the propagation of high frequency ultrasound (40 MHz) in agarose scaffolds with varying concentrations of chondrocytes (1 to 32 × 10(6) cells/ml) and collagen (1.56-200 mg/ml) using transversely isotropic two-dimensional finite difference time domain method (FDTD). Backscatter and speed of sound were evaluated from the simulated pulse-echo and through transmission measurements, respectively. Ultrasound backscatter increased with increasing collagen and chondrocyte concentrations. Furthermore, speed of sound increased with increasing collagen concentration. However, this was not observed with increasing chondrocyte concentrations. The present study suggests that the FDTD method may have some applicability in simulations of ultrasound scattering and propagation in constructs containing collagen and chondrocytes. Findings of this study indicate the significant role of collagen and chondrocytes as ultrasound scatterers and can aid in development of modeling approaches for understanding how cartilage architecture affects to the propagation of high frequency ultrasound. PMID:27475127

  15. Dependence of light attenuation and backscattering on collagen concentration and chondrocyte density in agarose scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhakka, P. H.; Ylärinne, J. H.; Lammi, M. J.; Saarakkala, S.; Tiitu, V.; Kröger, H.; Virén, T.; Jurvelin, J. S.; Töyräs, J.

    2014-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been applied for high resolution imaging of articular cartilage. However, the contribution of individual structural elements of cartilage on OCT signal has not been thoroughly studied. We hypothesize that both collagen and chondrocytes, essential structural components of cartilage, act as important light scatterers and that variation in their concentrations can be detected by OCT through changes in backscattering and attenuation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we established a controlled model system using agarose scaffolds embedded with variable collagen concentrations and chondrocyte densities. Using OCT, we measured the backscattering coefficient (µb) and total attenuation coefficient (µt) in these scaffolds. Along our hypothesis, light backscattering and attenuation in agarose were dependent on collagen concentration and chondrocyte density. Significant correlations were found between µt and chondrocyte density (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001) and between µt and collagen concentration (ρ = 0.694, p < 0.001). µb correlated significantly with chondrocyte density (ρ = 0.504, p < 0.001) but not with collagen concentration (ρ = 0.103, p = 0.422) of the scaffold. Thus, quantitation of light backscattering and, especially, attenuation could be valuable when evaluating the integrity of soft tissues, such as articular cartilage with OCT.

  16. Dependence of light attenuation and backscattering on collagen concentration and chondrocyte density in agarose scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Puhakka, P H; Ylärinne, J H; Lammi, M J; Saarakkala, S; Tiitu, V; Kröger, H; Virén, T; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J

    2014-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been applied for high resolution imaging of articular cartilage. However, the contribution of individual structural elements of cartilage on OCT signal has not been thoroughly studied. We hypothesize that both collagen and chondrocytes, essential structural components of cartilage, act as important light scatterers and that variation in their concentrations can be detected by OCT through changes in backscattering and attenuation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we established a controlled model system using agarose scaffolds embedded with variable collagen concentrations and chondrocyte densities. Using OCT, we measured the backscattering coefficient (µb) and total attenuation coefficient (µt) in these scaffolds. Along our hypothesis, light backscattering and attenuation in agarose were dependent on collagen concentration and chondrocyte density. Significant correlations were found between µt and chondrocyte density (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001) and between µt and collagen concentration (ρ = 0.694, p < 0.001). µb correlated significantly with chondrocyte density (ρ = 0.504, p < 0.001) but not with collagen concentration (ρ = 0.103, p = 0.422) of the scaffold. Thus, quantitation of light backscattering and, especially, attenuation could be valuable when evaluating the integrity of soft tissues, such as articular cartilage with OCT. PMID:25310088

  17. A Novel Agarolytic β-Galactosidase Acts on Agarooligosaccharides for Complete Hydrolysis of Agarose into Monomers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chan Hyoung; Kim, Hee Taek; Yun, Eun Ju; Lee, Ah Reum; Kim, Sa Rang; Kim, Jae-Han; Choi, In-Geol

    2014-01-01

    Marine red macroalgae have emerged to be renewable biomass for the production of chemicals and biofuels, because carbohydrates that form the major component of red macroalgae can be hydrolyzed into fermentable sugars. The main carbohydrate in red algae is agarose, and it is composed of d-galactose and 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose (AHG), which are alternately bonded by β1-4 and α1-3 linkages. In this study, a novel β-galactosidase that can act on agarooligosaccharides (AOSs) to release galactose was discovered in a marine bacterium (Vibrio sp. strain EJY3); the enzyme is annotated as Vibrio sp. EJY3 agarolytic β-galactosidase (VejABG). Unlike the lacZ-encoded β-galactosidase from Escherichia coli, VejABG does not hydrolyze common substrates like lactose and can act only on the galactose moiety at the nonreducing end of AOS. The optimum pH and temperature of VejABG on an agarotriose substrate were 7 and 35°C, respectively. Its catalytic efficiency with agarotriose was also similar to that with agaropentaose or agaroheptaose. Since agarotriose lingers as the unreacted residual oligomer in the currently available saccharification system using β-agarases and acid prehydrolysis, the agarotriose-hydrolyzing capability of this novel β-galactosidase offers an enormous advantage in the saccharification of agarose or agar in red macroalgae for its use as a biomass feedstock for fermentable sugar production. PMID:25038102

  18. A novel agarolytic β-galactosidase acts on agarooligosaccharides for complete hydrolysis of agarose into monomers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chan Hyoung; Kim, Hee Taek; Yun, Eun Ju; Lee, Ah Reum; Kim, Sa Rang; Kim, Jae-Han; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2014-10-01

    Marine red macroalgae have emerged to be renewable biomass for the production of chemicals and biofuels, because carbohydrates that form the major component of red macroalgae can be hydrolyzed into fermentable sugars. The main carbohydrate in red algae is agarose, and it is composed of D-galactose and 3,6-anhydro-L-galactose (AHG), which are alternately bonded by β1-4 and α1-3 linkages. In this study, a novel β-galactosidase that can act on agarooligosaccharides (AOSs) to release galactose was discovered in a marine bacterium (Vibrio sp. strain EJY3); the enzyme is annotated as Vibrio sp. EJY3 agarolytic β-galactosidase (VejABG). Unlike the lacZ-encoded β-galactosidase from Escherichia coli, VejABG does not hydrolyze common substrates like lactose and can act only on the galactose moiety at the nonreducing end of AOS. The optimum pH and temperature of VejABG on an agarotriose substrate were 7 and 35°C, respectively. Its catalytic efficiency with agarotriose was also similar to that with agaropentaose or agaroheptaose. Since agarotriose lingers as the unreacted residual oligomer in the currently available saccharification system using β-agarases and acid prehydrolysis, the agarotriose-hydrolyzing capability of this novel β-galactosidase offers an enormous advantage in the saccharification of agarose or agar in red macroalgae for its use as a biomass feedstock for fermentable sugar production. PMID:25038102

  19. Method for trapping affinity chromatography of transcription factors using aldehyde-hydrazide coupling to agarose.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yinshan; Jarrett, Harry W

    2015-08-01

    The use of a method of coupling DNA was investigated for trapping and purifying transcription factors. Using the GFP-C/EBP (CAAT/enhancer binding protein) fusion protein as a model, trapping gives higher purity and comparable yield to conventional affinity chromatography. The chemistry used is mild and was shown to have no detrimental effect on GFP fluorescence or GFP-C/EBP DNA binding. The method involves introducing a ribose nucleotide to the 3' end of a DNA sequence. Reaction with mM NaIO4 (sodium metaperiodate) produces a dialdehyde of ribose that couples to hydrazide-agarose. The DNA is combined at nM concentration with a nuclear extract or other protein mixture, and DNA-protein complexes form. The complex is then coupled to hydrazide-agarose for trapping the DNA-protein complex and the protein eluted by increasing NaCl concentration. Using a different oligonucleotide with the proximal E-box sequence from the human telomerase promoter, USF-2 transcription factor was purified by trapping, again with higher purity than results from conventional affinity chromatography and similar yield. Other transcription factors binding E-boxes, including E2A, c-Myc, and Myo-D, were also purified, but myogenin and NFκB were not. Therefore, this approach proved to be valuable for both affinity chromatography and the trapping approach. PMID:25935261

  20. Method for trapping affinity chromatography of transcription factors using aldehyde-hydrazide coupling to agarose

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yinshan; Jarrett, Harry W.

    2015-01-01

    The uses of a method of coupling DNA is investigated for trapping and purifying transcription factors. Using the GFP-C/EBP fusion protein as a model, trapping gives higher purity and comparable yield to conventional affinity chromatography. The chemistry utilized is mild and was shown to have no detrimental effect on GFP fluorescence or GFP-C/EBP DNA-binding. The method involves introducing a ribose nucleotide to the 3′ end of a DNA sequence. Reaction with mM NaIO4 (sodium metaperiodate) produces a dialdehyde of ribose which couples to hydrazide-agarose. The DNA is combined at nM concentration with a nuclear extract or other protein mixture and DNA-protein complexes form. The complex is then coupled to hydrazide-agarose for trapping the DNA-protein complex and the protein eluted by increasing NaCl concentration. Using a different oligonucleotide with the proximal E-box sequence from the human telomerase promoter, USF-2 transcription factor was purified by trapping, again with higher purity than results from conventional affinity chromatography and similar yield. Other transcription factors binding E-boxes including E2A, c-myc, and myo-D were also purified but myogenenin and NFκB were not. Therfore, this approach proved valuable for both affinity chromatography and for the trapping approach. PMID:25935261

  1. Location of biomarkers and reagents within agarose beads of a programmable bio-nano-chip.

    PubMed

    Jokerst, Jesse V; Chou, Jie; Camp, James P; Wong, Jorge; Lennart, Alexis; Pollard, Amanda A; Floriano, Pierre N; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; Simmons, Glennon W; Zhou, Yanjie; Ali, Mehnaaz F; McDevitt, John T

    2011-03-01

    The slow development of cost-effective medical microdevices with strong analytical performance characteristics is due to a lack of selective and efficient analyte capture and signaling. The recently developed programmable bio-nano-chip (PBNC) is a flexible detection device with analytical behavior rivaling established macroscopic methods. The PBNC system employs ≈300 μm-diameter bead sensors composed of agarose "nanonets" that populate a microelectromechanical support structure with integrated microfluidic elements. The beads are an efficient and selective protein-capture medium suitable for the analysis of complex fluid samples. Microscopy and computational studies probe the 3D interior of the beads. The relative contributions that the capture and detection of moieties, analyte size, and bead porosity make to signal distribution and intensity are reported. Agarose pore sizes ranging from 45 to 620 nm are examined and those near 140 nm provide optimal transport characteristics for rapid (<15 min) tests. The system exhibits efficient (99.5%) detection of bead-bound analyte along with low (≈2%) nonspecific immobilization of the detection probe for carcinoembryonic antigen assay. Furthermore, the role analyte dimensions play in signal distribution is explored, and enhanced methods for assay building that consider the unique features of biomarker size are offered.

  2. Analysis of protein-DNA binding by streptavidin-agarose pulldown.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kenneth K

    2006-01-01

    Binding of nuclear transactivators to sequence-specific regulatory elements on the promoter regions is of fundamental importance in gene expression and regulation. DNA-bound transactivators recruit transcription coactivators or repressors and an array of associated proteins that interact with the basal transcription factors, thereby activating the transcription machinery. Analysis of the large complex of proteins that bind to DNA is an important step in elucidating the mechanisms by which gene expressions are regulated. Commonly used techniques to determine DNA-protein binding such as the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) have limited value for analyzing simultaneously a large number of proteins in the complex. We describe here a streptavidin-agarose pulldown assay that is capable of analyzing quantitatively binding of an array of proteins to DNA probes. The assay is easy to perform and does not require radiolabeled probes. It involves incubation of nuclear extract proteins with 5'biotinylated double-stranded DNA probes and streptavidin-agarose beads. The complex is pulled down, and proteins in the complex are dissociated and analyzed by Western blotting. This method has been shown to be useful in determining the regulation of binding of transactivators, p300/CBP, and associated proteins to the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) promoter.

  3. Covalent attachment of lipases on glyoxyl-agarose beads: application in fruit flavor and biodiesel synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Adriano A; de Castro, Heizir F; Giordano, Raquel L C

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare biocatalysts to catalyze the synthesis of butyl butyrate by esterification reaction, and the synthesis of biodiesel by transesterification of palm and babassu oils with ethanol. Lipase preparations Lipolase® (TLL1) and Lipex® 100 L (TLL2) from Thermomyces lanuginosus and Lipase AK from Pseudomonas fluorescens (PFL) were immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose beads prepared by activation with glycidol (Gly) and epichlorohydrin (Epi). The influence of immobilization time, lipase source and activating agents on the catalytic activity of the biocatalysts were evaluated in both aqueous and organic media. TLL1 immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose by 24 h of incubation resulted biocatalysts with high hydrolytic activity (varying from 1347.3 to 1470.0 IU/g of support) and thermal-stability, around 300-fold more stable than crude TLL1 extract. The maximum load of immobilized TLL1 was around 20 mg of protein/g of support. The biocatalyst prepared exhibited high activity and operational stability on the butyl butyrate synthesis by esterification after five successive cycles of 24 h each (conversion around 85-90%). Immobilized TLL1 and PFL were active in the synthesis of biodiesel by transesterification reaction. Maximum transesterification yield (≥98.5% after 48 h of reaction at 45°C) was provided by using palm oil as feedstock.

  4. Alkaline fuel cells applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, Karl; Hacker, Viktor; Gsellmann, Josef; Cifrain, Martin; Faleschini, Gottfried; Enzinger, Peter; Fankhauser, Robert; Ortner, Markus; Muhr, Michael; Aronson, Robert R.

    On the world-wide automobile market technical developments are increasingly determined by the dramatic restriction on emissions as well as the regimentation of fuel consumption by legislation. Therefore there is an increasing chance of a completely new technology breakthrough if it offers new opportunities, meeting the requirements of resource preservation and emission restrictions. Fuel cell technology offers the possibility to excel in today's motive power techniques in terms of environmental compatibility, consumer's profit, costs of maintenance and efficiency. The key question is economy. This will be decided by the costs of fuel cell systems if they are to be used as power generators for future electric vehicles. The alkaline hydrogen-air fuel cell system with circulating KOH electrolyte and low-cost catalysed carbon electrodes could be a promising alternative. Based on the experiences of Kordesch [K. Kordesch, Brennstoffbatterien, Springer, Wien, 1984, ISBN 3-387-81819-7; K. Kordesch, City car with H 2-air fuel cell and lead-battery, SAE Paper No. 719015, 6th IECEC, 1971], who operated a city car hybrid vehicle on public roads for 3 years in the early 1970s, improved air electrodes plus new variations of the bipolar stack assembly developed in Graz are investigated. Primary fuel choice will be a major issue until such time as cost-effective, on-board hydrogen storage is developed. Ammonia is an interesting option. The whole system, ammonia dissociator plus alkaline fuel cell (AFC), is characterised by a simple design and high efficiency.

  5. Characterization of Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase in Pichia Pastoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Christine C.; Ciszak, Eva; Karr, Laurel J.

    1999-01-01

    A soluble form of human bone alkaline phosphatase has been expressed in a recombinant strain of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. We constructed a plasmid containing cDNA encoding for human bone alkaline phosphatase, with the hydrophobic carboxyl terminal portion deleted. Alkaline phosphatase was secreted into the medium to a level of 32mg/L when cultured in shake flasks, and enzyme activity was 12U/mg, as measured by a spectrophotometric assay. By conversion to a fermentation system, a yield of 880mg/L has been achieved with an enzyme activity of 968U/mg. By gel electrophoresis analysis, it appears that greater than 50% of the total protein in the fermentation media is alkaline phosphatase. Although purification procedures are not yet completely optimized, they are expected to include filtration, ion exchange and affinity chromatography. Our presentation will focus on the purification and crystallization results up to the time of the conference. Structural data should provide additional information on the role of alkaline phosphatase in normal bone mineralization and in certain bone mineralization anomalies.

  6. A least-squares error minimization approach in the determination of ferric ion diffusion coefficient of Fricke-infused dosimeter gels

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Y.J.; Huang, S.-C.; Chu, W.C.

    2005-04-01

    A least-squares error minimization approach was adopted to assess ferric ion diffusion coefficient of Fricke-agarose gels. Ferric ion diffusion process was modeled as a Gaussian-shaped degradation kernel operating on an initial concentration distribution. Diffusion coefficient was iteratively determined by minimizing the error function defined as the difference between the theoretically calculated and the experimentally measured dose distributions. A rapid MR image-based differential gel dosimetry technique that time resolves the evolution of the ferric ion diffusion process minimizes smearing of the dose distribution. Our results showed that for a Fricke-agarose gel contained 1 mM ammonium ferrous sulfate, 1% agarose, 1 mM sodium chloride, and 50 mM sulfuric acid, its ferric ion diffusion coefficient is (1.59{+-}0.28)x10{sup -2} cm{sup 2} h{sup -1} at room temperature. This value falls within the 1.00-2.00x10{sup -2} cm{sup 2} h{sup -1} range previously reported under varying gelling ingredients and concentrations. This method allows a quick, nondestructive evaluation of the ferric ion diffusion coefficient that can be used in conjunction with the in situ gel dosimetry experiment to provide a practical diffusion characterization of the dosimeter gel.

  7. Silica in alkaline brines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, B.F.; Rettig, S.L.; Eugster, H.P.

    1967-01-01

    Analysis of sodium carbonate-bicarbonate brines from closed basins in volcanic terranes of Oregon and Kenya reveals silica contents of up to 2700 parts per million at pH's higher than 10. These high concentrations of SiO 2 can be attributed to reaction of waters with silicates, and subsequent evaporative concentration accompanied by a rise in pH. Supersaturation with respect to amorphous silica may occur and persist for brines that are out of contact with silicate muds and undersaturated with respect to trona; correlation of SiO2 with concentration of Na and total CO2 support this interpretation. Addition of moredilute waters to alkaline brines may lower the pH and cause inorganic precipitation of substantial amounts of silica.

  8. Bifunctional alkaline oxygen electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.; Mccatty, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the identification and testing of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate-temperature, single-unit, rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. Recent work on Na(x)Pt3O4, a potential bifunctional catalyst, is described, as well as the application of novel approaches to the development of more efficient bifunctional electrode structures. The three dual-character electrodes considered here showed similar superior performance; the Pt/RhO2 and Rh/RhO2 electrodes showed slightly better performance than the Pt/IrO2 electrode. It is concluded that Na(x)Pt3O4 continues to be a promising bifunctional oxygen electrode catalyst but requires further investigation and development.

  9. Analysis of rRNA Gene Methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana by CHEF-Conventional 2D Gel Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Mohannath, Gireesha; Pikaard, Craig S

    2016-01-01

    Contour-clamped homogenous electric field (CHEF) gel electrophoresis, a variant of Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), is a powerful technique for resolving large fragments of DNA (10 kb-9 Mb). CHEF has many applications including the physical mapping of chromosomes, artificial chromosomes, and sub-chromosomal DNA fragments, etc. Here, we describe the use of CHEF and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to analyze rRNA gene methylation patterns within the two ~4 million base pair nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) of Arabidopsis thaliana. The method involves CHEF gel electrophoresis of agarose-embedded DNA following restriction endonuclease digestion to cut the NORs into large but resolvable segments, followed by digestion with methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases and conventional (or CHEF) gel electrophoresis, in a second dimension. Resulting products are then detected by Southern blotting or PCR analyses capable of discriminating rRNA gene subtypes. PMID:27576719

  10. Gel Scramble: An E-Tool for Teaching Molecular Neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Grisham, William; Keller, Lani; Schottler, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    In this completely digital teaching module, students interpret the results of two separate procedures: a restriction endonuclease digestion, and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The first consists of matching restriction endonuclease digest protocols with images obtained from stained agarose gels. Students are given the sequence of six plasmid cDNAs, characteristics of the plasmid vector, and the endonuclease digest protocols, which specify the enzyme(s) used. Students calculate the expected lengths of digestion products using this information and free tools available on the web. Students learn how to read gels and then match their predicted fragment lengths to the digital images obtained from the gel electrophoresis of the cDNA digest. In the PCR experiment, students are given six cDNA sequences and six sets of primers. By querying NCBI BLAST, students can match the PCR fragments to the lengths of the predicted in silico PCR products. The ruse posed to students is that the gels were inadvertently mislabeled during processing. Although students know the experimental details, they do not know which gel goes with a given restriction endonuclease digest or PCR-they must deduce the answers. Because the gel images are from actual students' experiments, the data sometimes result from mishandling/mislabeling or faulty protocol execution. The most challenging part of the exercise is to explain these errors. This latter aspect requires students to use critical thinking skills to explain aberrant outcomes. This entire exercise is available in a digital format and downloadable for free at http://mdcune.psych.ucla.edu/modules/gel.

  11. Gel Scramble: An E-Tool for Teaching Molecular Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Grisham, William; Keller, Lani; Schottler, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    In this completely digital teaching module, students interpret the results of two separate procedures: a restriction endonuclease digestion, and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The first consists of matching restriction endonuclease digest protocols with images obtained from stained agarose gels. Students are given the sequence of six plasmid cDNAs, characteristics of the plasmid vector, and the endonuclease digest protocols, which specify the enzyme(s) used. Students calculate the expected lengths of digestion products using this information and free tools available on the web. Students learn how to read gels and then match their predicted fragment lengths to the digital images obtained from the gel electrophoresis of the cDNA digest. In the PCR experiment, students are given six cDNA sequences and six sets of primers. By querying NCBI BLAST, students can match the PCR fragments to the lengths of the predicted in silico PCR products. The ruse posed to students is that the gels were inadvertently mislabeled during processing. Although students know the experimental details, they do not know which gel goes with a given restriction endonuclease digest or PCR—they must deduce the answers. Because the gel images are from actual students’ experiments, the data sometimes result from mishandling/mislabeling or faulty protocol execution. The most challenging part of the exercise is to explain these errors. This latter aspect requires students to use critical thinking skills to explain aberrant outcomes. This entire exercise is available in a digital format and downloadable for free at http://mdcune.psych.ucla.edu/modules/gel. PMID:26240527

  12. Stimulation of cytolytic T cells by isolated viral peptides and HN protein coupled to agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Guertin, D P; Fan, D P

    1980-01-17

    Sendai virus-infected mouse cells can be lysed by mouse cytolytic thymus-dependent lymphocytes (CTL) directed specifically against the infected cells. The CTL is known to recognise the H-2 antigens on the target cells together with structure(s) including at least the two viral surface glycoproteins also found on purified virus. We report here that anti-Sendai CTL can be stimulated in vitro by detergent-solubilised viral haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), either as the isolated protein or coupled to agarose beads. We further show stimulation by the hydrophilic portion of a protein removed from the virus by the protease subtilisin BPN', and we demonstrate that cyanogen bromide- (CNBr-) cleaved viral peptides also produce such stimulation.

  13. Binding of regulatory subunits of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase to cyclic CMP agarose.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Andreas; Chatterji, Bijon; Zeiser, Johannes; Schröder, Anke; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Pich, Andreas; Kaever, Volkhard; Schwede, Frank; Wolter, Sabine; Seifert, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins CyaA from Bordetella pertussis and edema factor from Bacillus anthracis as well as soluble guanylyl cyclase α(1)β(1) synthesize the cyclic pyrimidine nucleotide cCMP. These data raise the question to which effector proteins cCMP binds. Recently, we reported that cCMP activates the regulatory subunits RIα and RIIα of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In this study, we used two cCMP agarose matrices as novel tools in combination with immunoblotting and mass spectrometry to identify cCMP-binding proteins. In agreement with our functional data, RIα and RIIα were identified as cCMP-binding proteins. These data corroborate the notion that cAMP-dependent protein kinase may serve as a cCMP target. PMID:22808067

  14. Using cells encapsulated in agarose microbeads to analyse nuclear structure and functions.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Dean

    2009-01-01

    It is now generally agreed that the nuclei of higher eukaryotes, and particularly of mammalian cells, are highly structured and that different aspects of this structure contribute to the regulation of function (1, 2). Despite the general consensus, the key mechanisms that link nuclear structure and function have proved elusive. A major reason for this is a lack of techniques that allow nuclei to be manipulated in a way that preserves the complex architectural features that are present in vivo. Historically, significant progress in understanding the makeup of nuclei from mammalian cells has been made using cells that are permeabilised in a physiological buffer after being encapsulated in agarose microbeads. By using such beads, cells are protected from shear forces that otherwise can degrade crucial elements of the architecture that it is essential to preserve.

  15. Multi-featured macroporous agarose-alginate cryogel: synthesis and characterization for bioengineering applications.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Anuj; Kumar, Ashok

    2011-01-10

    In this study agarose-alginate scaffolds are synthesized using cryogelation technology in different formats like monolith, sheet, discs, and beads, and show amiable mechanical strength like soft tissue properties and high interconnected macroporous degradable architecture. In cell-material interactions, fibroblast (NIH-3T3) cells showed good adherence and proliferation on these scaffolds presenting its potential application in soft tissue engineering. The application of cryogel beads and monoliths was also examined by the efficient immobilization of bacterial cells (BL21) on these matrices revealing their use for recovery of product from continuous fermentation systems without cell leakage. These scaffolds also showed potential as a filter for repeated recovery of heavy metal binding, such as copper and nickel from the waste water. The cryogels prepared herein do have a number of unique features that make them an important class of soft materials for developing multi-featured scaffolds as a novel carrier for bioengineering applications.

  16. Multi-featured macroporous agarose-alginate cryogel: synthesis and characterization for bioengineering applications.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Anuj; Kumar, Ashok

    2011-01-10

    In this study agarose-alginate scaffolds are synthesized using cryogelation technology in different formats like monolith, sheet, discs, and beads, and show amiable mechanical strength like soft tissue properties and high interconnected macroporous degradable architecture. In cell-material interactions, fibroblast (NIH-3T3) cells showed good adherence and proliferation on these scaffolds presenting its potential application in soft tissue engineering. The application of cryogel beads and monoliths was also examined by the efficient immobilization of bacterial cells (BL21) on these matrices revealing their use for recovery of product from continuous fermentation systems without cell leakage. These scaffolds also showed potential as a filter for repeated recovery of heavy metal binding, such as copper and nickel from the waste water. The cryogels prepared herein do have a number of unique features that make them an important class of soft materials for developing multi-featured scaffolds as a novel carrier for bioengineering applications. PMID:21077225

  17. Surfactant free fractions of metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes via optimised gel chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Lukaszczuk, Pawel; Ruemmeli, Mark H.; Knupfer, Martin; Kalenczuk, Ryszard J.; Borowiak-Palen, Ewa

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The application of gel permeation chromatography technique in a field of SWCNT separation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-commercial agarose gel used as a column filling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Purification route is presented, quality and quantity estimation is shown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Process is ready for high-scale separation of SWCNTs. -- Abstract: We report the procedure of sorting/purification of carbon nanotubes by electronic type using chromatographic column with sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and sodium deoxycholate (DOC) solutions as the eluents. The non-commercial agarose gel in different concentrations has been tested in the process. It was found that in optimal gel concentration the fractionation resulted in {approx}96.2% yield of semiconducting species. Importantly, to get surfactant-free fractions the post-separation purification procedure has been carried out. The UV-vis-NIR and Raman spectroscopy have been utilised for the samples analysis. High resolution transmission microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis allowed to study the sample morphology and purity, respectively.

  18. A new simplified procedure for C1 inhibitor purification. A novel use for jacalin-agarose.

    PubMed

    Pilatte, Y; Hammer, C H; Frank, M M; Fries, L F

    1989-06-01

    C1 inhibitor (C1-INH), the major regulatory protein of the classical pathway of complement activation, is also involved in the regulation of several other plasma proteolytic systems including the coagulation, fibrinolytic and contact systems. All the previously published methods for the purification of C1-INH are time-consuming and some do not yield highly pure protein. Recently, it was reported that Jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) lectin, also called jacalin, binds C1-INH. Since jacalin binds only a small number of human serum proteins it appeared that jacalin-agarose affinity chromatography would constitute a very selective early step for the purification of C1-INH. Consequently we have designed a new, simplified three-step procedure for the purification of C1-INH which includes PEG fractionation, jacalin-agarose chromatography and hydrophobic interaction chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose which takes advantage of the marked hydrophilicity of the inhibitor. This procedure has three major advantages over those which have been the most frequently used. Firstly, it includes only two fast chromatographic steps. Secondly, because the C1-INH pool is cleanly and predictably separated from the unwanted proteins by differential elution conditions in both chromatographic steps, no antigenic or functional assays are required to define the desired peaks. Thirdly, only the final product is dialyzed while all other methods required several buffer changes. For these reasons this procedure is much faster and simpler than the previously published methods. About 10-12 mg of highly purified and fully active C1-INH can be obtained within 1 day from 120 ml of plasma giving an average yield of 40-45%. This method may thus be highly adaptable to bulk purification for clinical use or for preparation of genetically or pathologically altered C1-INH from clinical specimens.

  19. Carbon dots rooted agarose hydrogel hybrid platform for optical detection and separation of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Neelam; Barooah, Mayuri; Majumdar, Gitanjali; Chowdhury, Devasish

    2015-02-11

    A robust solid sensing platform for an on-site operational and accurate detection of heavy metal is still a challenge. We introduce chitosan based carbon dots rooted agarose hydrogel film as a hybrid solid sensing platform for detection of heavy metal ions. The fabrication of the solid sensing platform is centered on simple electrostatic interaction between the NH3+ group present in the carbon dots and the OH- groups present in agarose. Simply on dipping the hydrogel film strip into the heavy metal ion solution, in particular Cr6+, Cu2+, Fe3+, Pb2+, Mn2+, the strip displays a color change, viz., Cr6+→yellow, Cu2+→blue, Fe3+→brown, Pb2+→white, Mn2+→tan brown. The optical detection limit of the respective metal ion is found to be 1 pM for Cr6+, 0.5 μM for Cu2+, and 0.5 nM for Fe3+, Pb2+, and Mn2+ by studying the changes in UV-visible reflectance spectrum of the hydrogel film. Moreover, the hydrogel film finds applicability as an efficient filtration membrane for separation of these quintet heavy metal ions. The strategic fundamental feature of this sensing platform is the successful capability of chitosan to form colored chelates with transition metals. This proficient hybrid hydrogel solid sensing platform is thus the most suitable to employ as an on-site operational, portable, cheap colorimetric-optical detector of heavy metal ion with potential skill in their separation. Details of the possible mechanistic insight into the colorimetric detection and ion separation are also discussed.

  20. New resin gel for uranium determination by diffusive gradient in thin films technique.

    PubMed

    Gregusova, Michaela; Docekal, Bohumil

    2011-01-17

    A new resin gel based on Spheron-Oxin(®) chelating ion-exchanger with anchored 8-hydroxyquinoline functional groups was tested for application in diffusive gradient in thin film technique (DGT) for determination of uranium. Selectivity of uranium uptake from model carbonate loaded solutions of natural water was studied under laboratory conditions and compared with selectivity of the conventional Chelex 100 based resin gel. The affinity of Spheron-Oxin(®) functional groups enables determination of the overall uranium concentration in water containing carbonates up to the concentration level of 10(2) mg L(-1). The effect of uranium binding to the polyacrylamide (APA) and agarose diffusive gels (AGE) was also studied. Uranium is probably bound in both gels by a weak interaction with traces of acrylic acid groups in the structure of APA gel and with pyruvic and sulfonic acid groups in the AGE gel. These sorption effects can be eliminated to the negligible level by prolonged deployment of DGT probes or by disassembling probes after the 1-2 days post-sampling period that is sufficient for release of uranium from diffusive gel and its sorption in resin gel. PMID:21167996

  1. Pulsed-field gel electrophoretic analysis of leptospiral DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, K A; Barbour, A G; Thomas, D D

    1991-01-01

    The genomic structures of spirochete species are not well characterized, and genetic studies on these organisms have been hampered by lack of a genetic exchange mechanism in these bacteria. In view of these observations, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to examine the genomes of Leptospira species. Live cells, prepared in agarose plugs, were lysed in situ, and the DNA was analyzed under different electrophoretic conditions. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of DNA digested with infrequently cutting restriction enzymes showed that the genome of Leptospira interrogans serovar canicola is approximately 3.1 Mb, while that of the saprophytic L. biflexa serovar patoc I is 3.5 Mb. DNA forms of approximately 2,000 and 350 kb which were present in samples from L. interrogans serovars were not readily detected in nonpathogenic serovars. Three distinct populations, designated type alpha, beta, and gamma, of L. interrogans DNA molecules were further analyzed with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Evidence suggested that two of these DNA forms, type alpha and gamma, were linear structures. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has proven to be a valuable tool with which to size bacterial genomes and to take the first steps toward characterization of a form of leptospiral DNA which behaves as a linear molecule and which may be related to the virulence of L. interrogans. Images PMID:1987046

  2. Molecular transport in collagenous tissues measured by gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hunckler, Michael D; Tilley, Jennifer M R; Roeder, Ryan K

    2015-11-26

    Molecular transport in tissues is important for drug delivery, nutrient supply, waste removal, cell signaling, and detecting tissue degeneration. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate gel electrophoresis as a simple method to measure molecular transport in collagenous tissues. The electrophoretic mobility of charged molecules in tissue samples was measured from relative differences in the velocity of a cationic dye passing through an agarose gel in the absence and presence of a tissue section embedded within the gel. Differences in electrophoretic mobility were measured for the transport of a molecule through different tissues and tissue anisotropy, or the transport of different sized molecules through the same tissue. Tissue samples included tendon and fibrocartilage from the proximal (tensile) and distal (compressive) regions of the bovine flexor tendon, respectively, and bovine articular cartilage. The measured electrophoretic mobility was greatest in the compressive region of the tendon (fibrocartilage), followed by the tensile region of tendon, and lowest in articular cartilage, reflecting differences in the composition and organization of the tissues. The anisotropy of tendon was measured by greater electrophoretic mobility parallel compared with perpendicular to the predominate collagen fiber orientation. Electrophoretic mobility also decreased with increased molecular size, as expected. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that gel electrophoresis may be a useful method to measure differences in molecular transport within various tissues, including the effects of tissue type, tissue anisotropy, and molecular size.

  3. Sol-Gel Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  4. Immobilization and stabilization of a cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase by covalent attachment on highly activated glyoxyl-agarose supports.

    PubMed

    Ferrarotti, Susana Alicia; Bolivar, Juan M; Mateo, Cesar; Wilson, Lorena; Guisan, Jose M; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Covalent immobilization of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase on glyoxyl-agarose beads promotes a very high stabilization of the enzyme against any distorting agent (temperature, pH, organic solvents). For example, the optimized immobilized preparation preserves 90% of initial activity when incubated for 22 h in 30% ethanol at pH 7 and 40 degrees C. Other immobilized preparations (obtained via other immobilization protocols) exhibit less than 10% of activity after incubation under similar conditions. Optimized glyoxyl-agarose immobilized preparation expressed a high percentage of catalytic activity (70%). Immobilization using any technique prevents enzyme inactivation by air bubbles during strong stirring of the enzyme. Stabilization of the enzyme immobilized on glyoxyl-agarose is higher when using the highest activation degree (75 micromol of glyoxyl per milliliter of support) as well as when performing long enzyme-support incubation times (4 h) at room temperature. Multipoint covalent immobilization seems to be responsible for this very high stabilization associated to the immobilization process on highly activated glyoxyl-agarose. The stabilization of the enzyme against the inactivation by ethanol seems to be interesting to improve cyclodextrin production: ethanol strongly inhibits the enzymatic degradation of cyclodextrin while hardly affecting the cyclodextrin production rate of the immobilized-stabilized preparation.

  5. Immobilization of Lipases on Heterofunctional Octyl-Glyoxyl Agarose Supports: Improved Stability and Prevention of the Enzyme Desorption.

    PubMed

    Rueda, N; Dos Santos, J C S; Torres, R; Ortiz, C; Barbosa, O; Fernandez-Lafuente, R

    2016-01-01

    Lipases are among the most widely used enzymes in industry. Here, a novel method is described to rationally design the support matrix to retain the enzyme on the support matrix without leaching and also activate the enzyme for full activity retention. Lipases are interesting biocatalysts because they show the so-called interfacial activation, a mechanism of action that has been used to immobilize lipases on hydrophobic supports such as octyl-agarose. Thus, adsorption of lipases on hydrophobic surfaces is very useful for one step purification, immobilization, hyperactivation, and stabilization of most lipases. However, lipase molecules may be released from the support under certain conditions (high temperature, organic solvents), as there are no covalent links between the enzyme and the support matrix. A heterofunctional support has been proposed in this study to overcome this problem, such as the heterofunctional glyoxyl-octyl agarose beads. It couples the numerous advantages of the octyl-agarose support to covalent immobilization and creates the possibility of using the biocatalyst under any experimental conditions without risk of enzyme desorption and leaching. This modified support may be easily prepared from the commercially available octyl-agarose. Preparation of this useful support and enzyme immobilization on it via covalent linking is described here. The conditions are described to increase the possibility of achieving at least one covalent attachment between each enzyme molecule and the support matrix.

  6. Alkaline battery, separator therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An improved battery separator for alkaline battery cells has low resistance to electrolyte ion transfer and high resistance to electrode ion transfer. The separator is formed by applying an improved coating to an electrolyte absorber. The absorber, preferably, is a flexible, fibrous, and porous substrate that is resistant to strong alkali and oxidation. The coating composition includes an admixture of a polymeric binder, a hydrolyzable polymeric ester and inert fillers. The coating composition is substantially free of reactive fillers and plasticizers commonly employed as porosity promoting agents in separator coatings. When the separator is immersed in electrolyte, the polymeric ester of the film coating reacts with the electrolyte forming a salt and an alcohol. The alcohol goes into solution with the electrolyte while the salt imbibes electrolyte into the coating composition. When the salt is formed, it expands the polymeric chains of the binder to provide a film coating substantially permeable to electrolyte ion transfer but relatively impermeable to electrode ion transfer during use.

  7. Evaluation of Alkaline Cleaner Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partz, Earl

    1998-01-01

    Alkaline cleaners used to process aluminum substrates have contained chromium as the corrosion inhibitor. Chromium is a hazardous substance whose use and control are described by environmental laws. Replacement materials that have the characteristics of chromated alkaline cleaners need to be found that address both the cleaning requirements and environmental impacts. This report will review environmentally friendly candidates evaluated as non-chromium alkaline cleaner replacements and methods used to compare those candidates one versus another. The report will also list characteristics used to select candidates based on their declared contents. It will also describe and evaluate methods used to discriminate among the large number of prospective candidates.

  8. How it all began: a personal history of gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Smithies, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Arne Tiselius' moving boundary electrophoresis method was still in general use in 1951 when this personal history begins, although zonal electrophoresis with a variety of supporting media (e.g., filter paper or starch grains) was beginning to replace it. This chapter is an account of 10 years of experiments carried out by the author during which molecular sieving gel electrophoresis was developed and common genetic variants of two proteins, haptoglobin and transferrin, were discovered in normal individuals. Most of the figures are images of pages from the author's laboratory notebooks, which are still available, so that some of the excitement of the time and the humorous moments are perhaps apparent. Alkaline gels, acidic gels with and without denaturants, vertical gels, two-dimensional gels, and gels with differences in starch concentration are presented. The subtle details that can be discerned in these various gels played an indispensable role in determining the nature of the change in the haptoglobin gene (Hp) that leads to the polymeric series characteristic of Hp ( 2 ) /Hp ( 2 ) homozygotes. Where possible, the names of scientific friends who made this saga of gel electrophoresis so memorable and enjoyable are gratefully included.

  9. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2003-09-01

    This report describes work performed during the second year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' The project has two objectives. The first objective is to identify gel compositions and conditions that substantially reduce flow through fractures that allow direct channeling between wells, while leaving secondary fractures open so that high fluid injection and production rates can be maintained. The second objective is to optimize treatments in fractured production wells, where the gel must reduce permeability to water much more than that to oil. Pore-level images from X-ray computed microtomography were re-examined for Berea sandstone and porous polyethylene. This analysis suggests that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than a gel-ripping mechanism. This finding helps to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil. We analyzed a Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel treatment in a production well in the Arbuckle formation. The availability of accurate pressure data before, during, and after the treatment was critical for the analysis. After the gel treatment, water productivity was fairly constant at about 20% of the pre-treatment value. However, oil productivity was stimulated by a factor of 18 immediately after the treatment. During the six months after the treatment, oil productivity gradually decreased to approach the pre-treatment value. To explain this behavior, we proposed that the fracture area open to oil flow was increased substantially by the gel treatment, followed by a gradual closing of the fractures during subsequent production. For a conventional Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel, the delay between gelant preparation and injection into a fracture impacts the placement, leakoff, and permeability reduction behavior. Formulations placed as partially formed gels showed relatively low pressure gradients during placement, and yet substantially reduced the flow capacity of

  10. Modeling the Dynamics of Gel Electrophorresis in the High School Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saucedo, Skyler R.

    2013-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis, used by geneticists and forensic experts alike, is an immensely popular technique that utilizes an electric field to separate molecules and proteins by size and charge. At the microscopic level, a dye or complex protein like DNA is passed through agarose, a gelatinous three-dimensional matrix of pores and nano-sized tunnels. When forced through a maze of holes, the molecule unravels, forming a long chain, slithering through the field of pores in a process colloquially coined "reputation." As a result, the smaller molecules travel farther through the gel when compared to molecules of larger molecular weight. This highly effective "molecular sieve" provides consistent data and allows scientists to compare similar sequences of DNA base pairs in a routine fashion.2 When performed at the high school level, gel electrophoresis provides students the opportunity to learn about a contemporary lab technique of great scientific relevance. Doing real science certainly excites students and motivates them to learn more.

  11. Functionalizing single crystals: incorporation of nanoparticles inside gel-grown calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yujing; Yuan, Wentao; Shi, Ye; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Yong; Chen, Hongzheng; Li, Hanying

    2014-04-14

    Synthetic single crystals are usually homogeneous solids. Biogenic single crystals, however, can incorporate biomacromolecules and become inhomogeneous solids so that their properties are also extrinsically regulated by the incorporated materials. The discrepancy between the properties of synthetic and biogenic single crystals leads to the idea to modify the internal structure of synthetic crystals to achieve nonintrinsic properties by incorporation of foreign material. Intrinsically colorless and diamagnetic calcite single crystals are turned into colored and paramagnetic solids, through incorporation of Au and Fe3O4 nanoparticles without significantly disrupting the crystalline lattice of calcite. The crystals incorporate the nanoparticles and gel fibers when grown in agarose gel media containing the nanoparticles, whereas the solution-grown crystals do not. As such, our work extends the long-history gel method for crystallization into a platform to functionalize single-crystalline materials.

  12. Preparation and characterization of agarose-nickel nanoporous composite particles customized for liquid expanded bed adsorption.

    PubMed

    Asghari, F; Jahanshahi, M; Ghoreyshi, A A

    2012-06-15

    Agarose-nickel nanoporous composite matrices with a series of densities, named Ag-Ni, were prepared herein for expanded bed adsorption of nanobioproduct/bioproduct by a water-in-oil emulsification method. The optical microscope (OM), scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and particle size analyzer (PSA) were utilized in order to characterize the structure and morphology of the agarose-nickel composite. The results indicated that the matrices prepared had a spherical appearance, appropriate wet density of 1.73-2.56 g/ml, water content of 32.2-58.5% and porosity of 79.4-96.37% and pore size of about 100-150 nm. All the Ag-Ni beads follow logarithmic normal size distribution with the range of 60-230 μm and average diameter of 133.68-148.4 μm. One of the useful properties of the Ag-Ni particles is the high wet density up to 2.56 g/ml, which shows a potential for the operation in an expanded bed at high flow rate. The impact of nickel powder addition on the physical and hydrodynamic properties was also investigated. In addition, the fluidization behavior of the Ag-Ni particles under various conditions was characterized by the measurement of bed expansion and axial dispersion coefficients for the liquid phase when operated in a standard fluidized bed contactor. It was observed that the expansion factors were decreased with the increasing matrix density under the same velocity. The bed expansion and fluid velocity were correlated with Richardson-Zaki equation for all particles prepared and the correlation parameters (the terminal settling velocity U(t) and expansion index n) were investigated. Using measurements of residence time distributions, hydrodynamic properties in the expanded beds were investigated and were compared with reported matrices in other literatures. In addition, the impact of the flow velocity, bed expansion degree and density of adsorbent on hydrodynamic properties in the expanded beds were investigated. The results indicated that the expansion factor

  13. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2004-09-30

    This report describes work performed during the third and final year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' Corefloods revealed throughput dependencies of permeability reduction by polymers and gels that were much more prolonged during oil flow than water flow. This behavior was explained using simple mobility ratio arguments. A model was developed that quantitatively fits the results and predicts ''clean up'' times for oil productivity when production wells are returned to service after application of a polymer or gel treatment. X-ray computed microtomography studies of gels in strongly water-wet Berea sandstone and strongly oil-wet porous polyethylene suggested that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than gel-ripping or gel-displacement mechanisms. In contrast, analysis of data from the University of Kansas suggests that the gel-ripping or displacement mechanisms are more important in more permeable, strongly water-wet sandpacks. These findings help to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil under different conditions. Since cement is the most commonly used material for water shutoff, we considered when gels are preferred over cements. Our analysis and experimental results indicated that cement cannot be expected to completely fill (top to bottom) a vertical fracture of any width, except near the wellbore. For vertical fractures with apertures less than 4 mm, the cement slurry will simply not penetrate very far into the fracture. For vertical fractures with apertures greater than 4 mm, the slurry may penetrate a substantial distance into the bottom part of the fracture. However, except near the wellbore, the upper part of the fracture will remain open due to gravity segregation. We compared various approaches to plugging fractures using gels, including (1) varying polymer content, (2) varying placement (extrusion) rate, (3) using partially formed gels, (4

  14. The use of collagen or fibrin gels for the assay of human neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Islam, L N; McKay, I C; Wilkinson, P C

    1985-12-17

    Neutrophil leucocytes are known to migrate actively into 3-dimensional gels of collagen or fibrin. In this paper, we have used such gels to study chemotaxis of human blood neutrophils towards gradient sources of formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) using 2 assay systems. The first resembled the micropore filter assay in that neutrophils on the upper surface of collagen gels were allowed to invade in the presence of either an isotropic concentration or a gradient of FMLP. Neutrophils invaded the gel vigorously in both cases. The effect of the gradient was assessed by determining the population distribution at different levels in the gel. Cells moving randomly should be distributed normally, and directional locomotion should cause deviation from normal distribution. Such a deviation was seen, but was of marginal significance. A more direct demonstration of chemotaxis was achieved by the second assay in which an agarose slab containing FMLP was incorporated into a gel, and the paths of nearby neutrophils were filmed. These cells showed an unequivocal directional response to the FMLP gradient. Protein gels can thus be used in the same way as both the presently used filter assays and visual assays using plane substrata, but with the advantage of providing a more physiological environment for the study of chemotaxis than either.

  15. The alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite magmatism from Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberti, E.; Gomes, C. D. B.; Comin-Chiaramonti, P.

    2015-12-01

    Early to Late Cretaceous lasting to Paleocene alkaline magmatism from southern Brazil is found associated with major extensional structural features in and around the Paraná Basin and grouped into various provinces on the basis of several data. Magmatism is variable in size, mode of occurrence and composition. The alkaline rocks are dominantly potassic, a few occurrences showing sodic affinity. The more abundant silicate rocks are evolved undersaturated to saturated in silica syenites, displaying large variation in igneous forms. Less evolved types are restricted to subvolcanic environments and outcrops of effusive suites occur rarely. Cumulatic mafic and ultramafic rock types are very common, particularly in the alkali-carbonatitic complexes. Carbonatite bodies are represented by Ca-carbonatites and Mg-carbonatites and more scarcely by Fe-carbonatites. Available radiometric ages for the alkaline rocks fit on three main chronological groups: around 130 Ma, subcoveal with the Early Cretaceous flood tholeiites of the Paraná Basin, 100-110 Ma and 80-90 Ma (Late Cretaceous). The alkaline magmatism also extends into Paleocene times, as indicated by ages from some volcanic lavas. Geochemically, alkaline potassic and sodic rock types are distinguished by their negative and positive Nb-Ta anomalies, respectively. Negative spikes in Nb-Ta are also a feature common to the associated tholeiitic rocks. Sr-Nd-Pb systematics confirm the contribution of both HIMU and EMI mantle components in the formation of the alkaline rocks. Notably, Early and Late Cretaceous carbonatites have the same isotopic Sr-Nd initial ratios of the associated alkaline rocks. C-O isotopic Sr-Nd isotopic ratios indicate typical mantle signature for some carbonatites and the influence of post-magmatic processes in others. Immiscibility of liquids of phonolitic composition, derived from mafic alkaline parental magmas, has been responsible for the origin of the carbonatites. Close association of alkaline

  16. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2004-03-01

    This technical progress report describes work performed from September 1, 2003, through February 29, 2004, for the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' We examined the properties of several ''partially formed'' gels that were formulated with a combination of high and low molecular weight HPAM polymers. After placement in 4-mm-wide fractures, these gels required about 25 psi/ft for brine to breach the gel (the best performance to date in fractures this wide). After this breach, stabilized residual resistance factors decreased significantly with increased flow rate. Also, residual resistance factors were up to 9 times greater for water than for oil. Nevertheless, permeability reduction factors were substantial for both water and oil flow. Gel with 2.5% chopped fiberglass effectively plugged 4-mm-wide fractures if a 0.5-mm-wide constriction was present. The ability to screen-out at a constriction appears crucial for particulate incorporation to be useful in plugging fractures. In addition to fiberglass, we examined incorporation of polypropylene fibers into gels. Once dispersed in brine or gelant, the polypropylene fibers exhibited the least gravity segregation of any particulate that we have tested to date. In fractures with widths of at least 2 mm, 24-hr-old gels (0.5% high molecular weight HPAM) with 0.5% fiber did not exhibit progressive plugging during placement and showed extrusion pressure gradients similar to those of gels without the fiber. The presence of the fiber roughly doubled the gel's resistance to first breach by brine flow. The breaching pressure gradients were not as large as for gels made with high and low molecular weight polymers (mentioned above). However, their material requirements and costs (i.e., polymer and/or particulate concentrations) were substantially lower than for those gels. A partially formed gel made with 0.5% HPAM did not enter a 0.052-mm-wide fracture when applying a pressure gradient of 65 psi/ft. This result

  17. Agarose Microchambers for Long-term Calcium Imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Turek, Michal; Besseling, Judith; Bringmann, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Behavior is controlled by the nervous system. Calcium imaging is a straightforward method in the transparent nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to measure the activity of neurons during various behaviors. To correlate neural activity with behavior, the animal should not be immobilized but should be able to move. Many behavioral changes occur during long time scales and require recording over many hours of behavior. This also makes it necessary to culture the worms in the presence of food. How can worms be cultured and their neural activity imaged over long time scales? Agarose Microchamber Imaging (AMI) was previously developed to culture and observe small larvae and has now been adapted to study all life stages from early L1 until the adult stage of C. elegans. AMI can be performed on various life stages of C. elegans. Long-term calcium imaging is achieved without immobilizing the animals by using short externally triggered exposures combined with an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera recording. Zooming out or scanning can scale up this method to image up to 40 worms in parallel. Thus, a method is described to image behavior and neural activity over long time scales in all life stages of C. elegans. PMID:26132740

  18. Achondrogenesis type IB (Fraccaro): study of collagen in the tissue and in chondrocytes cultured in agarose.

    PubMed

    Freisinger, P; Stanescu, V; Jacob, B; Cohen-Solal, L; Maroteaux, P; Bonaventure, J

    1994-02-15

    A lethal chondrodysplasia characterized by extreme micromelia was diagnosed by ultrasound examination in two sibs whose nonconsanguineous parents were healthy. Radiographic and histopathologic data indicated that the two foetuses (18 and 21 weeks old) had achondrogenesis type IB (Fraccaro). Quantitation of total collagen extractable from dried cartilage samples demonstrated a 50% decrease when compared to an age-related control. This decrease was essentially related to type II collagen. Nevertheless, the alpha chains and the CB peptides of type II collagen had a normal electrophoretic mobility. A significant amount of collagen type I was also detected. The electrophoretic pattern of collagens type IX and XI did not differ significantly from control sample. The extracellular matrix elaborated by patient chondrocytes cultured in agarose for 10-12 days, contained less collagen type II than normal cells. Labelling with 14C-proline of cultured cells showed the presence of procollagen and type II collagen chains with a normal electrophoretic mobility, but an alpha 2(I) chain was detectable in the patient material, indicating the presence of collagen type I which supported the tissue findings. The significance of the type II collagen reduction in the patient's cartilage is unclear but it is unlikely to be the primary defect in achondrogenesis type I. PMID:8160740

  19. Stabilization of Candida antarctica Lipase B (CALB) Immobilized on Octyl Agarose by Treatment with Polyethyleneimine (PEI).

    PubMed

    Peirce, Sara; Tacias-Pascacio, Veymar G; Russo, Maria Elena; Marzocchella, Antonio; Virgen-Ortíz, José J; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Lipase B from Candida antarctica (CALB) was immobilized on octyl agarose (OC) and physically modified with polyethyleneimine (PEI) in order to confer a strong ion exchange character to the enzyme and thus enable the immobilization of other enzymes on its surface. The enzyme activity was fully maintained during the coating and the thermal stability was marginally improved. The enzyme release from the support by incubation in the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 was more difficult after the PEI-coating, suggesting that some intermolecular physical crosslinking had occurred, making this desorption more difficult. Thermal stability was marginally improved, but the stability of the OCCALB-PEI was significantly better than that of OCCALB during inactivation in mixtures of aqueous buffer and organic cosolvents. SDS-PAGE analysis of the inactivated biocatalyst showed the OCCALB released some enzyme to the medium during inactivation, and this was partially prevented by coating with PEI. This effect was obtained without preventing the possibility of reuse of the support by incubation in 2% ionic detergents. That way, this modified CALB not only has a strong anion exchange nature, while maintaining the activity, but it also shows improved stability under diverse reaction conditions without affecting the reversibility of the immobilization. PMID:27338317

  20. Tuning the catalytic properties of lipases immobilized on divinylsulfone activated agarose by altering its nanoenvironment.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Jose C S; Rueda, Nazzoly; Gonçalves, Luciana R B; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    Lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus (TLL) and lipase B from Candida antarctica (CALB) have been immobilized on divinylsulfone (DVS) activated agarose beads at pH 10 for 72 h. Then, as a reaction end point, very different nucleophiles have been used to block the support and the effect of the nature of the blocking reagent has been analyzed on the features of the immobilized preparations. The blocking has generally positive effects on enzyme stability in both thermal and organic solvent inactivations. For example, CALB improved 7.5-fold the thermal stability after blocking with imidazole. The effect on enzyme activity was more variable, strongly depending on the substrate and the experimental conditions. Referring to CALB; using p-nitrophenyl butyrate (p-NPB) and methyl phenylacetate, activity always improved by the blocking step, whatever the blocking reagent, while with methyl mandelate or ethyl hexanoate not always the blocking presented a positive effect. Other example is TLL-DVS biocatalyst blocked with Cys. This was more than 8 times more active than the non-blocked preparation and become the most active versus p-NPB at pH 7, the least active versus methyl phenylacetate at pH 5 but the third one most active at pH 9, versus methyl mandelate presented lower activity than the unblocked preparation at pH 5 and versus ethyl hexanoate was the most active at all pH values. That way, enzyme specificity could be strongly altered by this blocking step.

  1. Uranium (VI) recovery from aqueous medium using novel floating macroporous alginate-agarose-magnetite cryobeads.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Anuj; Melo, Jose Savio; D'Souza, Stanislaus Francis

    2013-02-15

    This study presents a novel development of a floating polymeric-magnetite cryobead for the recovery of hexavalent uranium from the aqueous sub-surfaces. The alginate-agarose-magnetite cryobeads were synthesized by the process of cryotropic-gelation at subzero-temperature. The physico-chemical properties of cryobeads showed high surface area and high interconnected porosity (≈ 90%). Low density of these cryobeads explains their floating property in the aqueous medium. The rheological analysis of cryobeads showed its stability and increased stiffness after uranium adsorption. The presence of magnetite nanoparticles in the porous cryobeads facilitates the recovery of these beads by applying an external magnetic field. Maximum uranium adsorption (97 ± 2%) was observed in the pH range of 4.5-5.5. The thermodynamic parameters suggest passive endothermic adsorption behaviour. HCl was found to be an efficient eluent for the uranium desorption. Five repeated cycles for the desorption of uranium from biosorbent showed 69 ± 3% of uranium recovery. These results suggest stability of these novel floating magnetite-cryobeads under environmental conditions with potential for the recovery of uranium from contaminated aqueous subsurfaces.

  2. Analysis of surface properties of fixed and live cells using derivatized agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Vanessa M; Walker, Sherri L; Badali, Oliver; Abundis, Maria I; Ngo, Lylla L; Weerasinghe, Gayani; Barajas, Marcela; Zem, Gregory; Oppenheimer, Steven B

    2002-01-01

    A novel assay has been developed for the histochemical characterization of surface properties of cells based on their adhesion to agarose beads derivatized with more than 100 types of molecules, including sugars, lectins and other proteins, and amino acids. The assay simply involves mixing small quantities of washed cells and beads in droplets on glass microscope slides and determining to which beads various cell types adhere. Distilled water was found to be the best medium for this assay because added ions or molecules in other media inhibit adhesion in some cases. Many cells, however, cannot tolerate distilled water. Here we show that cells fixed with either of two fixatives (1% formaldehyde or Prefer fixative) displayed similar bead-binding properties as did live cells. Specificity of cell-bead binding was tested by including specific free molecules in the test suspensions in hapten-type inhibition experiments. If a hapten compound inhibited live-cell adhesion to a specific bead, it also inhibited fixed-cell adhesion to a specific bead. The results of these experiments suggest that fixed cells display authentic surface properties, opening the door for the use of this assay with many cell types that cannot tolerate distilled water.

  3. Enrichment by organomercurial agarose and identification of cys-containing peptides from yeast cell lysates.

    PubMed

    Raftery, Mark J

    2008-05-01

    Dynamic range and the presence of highly abundant proteins limit the number of proteins that may be identified within a complex mixture. Cysteine (Cys) has unique chemical reactivity that may be exploited for chemical tagging/capture with biotin/avidin reagents or affinity chromatography allowing specific isolation and subsequent identification of peptide sequences by mass spectrometry. Organomercurial agarose (Hg-beads) specifically captures Cys-containing peptides and proteins from cell lysates. Tryptic peptides from yeast lysates containing Cys were captured and eluted from Hg-beads after incubation with TCEP and trypsin. From two 1 h nano 1-D LC DDA/MS of the eluate >700 proteins were identified with an estimated false positive rate of approximately 1%. Few peptides were identified with high confidence without Cys within their sequence after capture, and extensive washing, indicating little nonspecific binding. The number of fragmentation spectra was increased using automated 2-D nano-LC/MS and allowed identification of 1496 proteins with an estimated false positive rate of 1.1%. Approximately 4% of the proteins identified were from peptides that did not contain Cys, and these were biased toward higher abundance proteins. Comparison of the 1496 proteins to those reported previously showed that >25% were from yeast proteins not previously observed. Most proteins were identified from a single peptide, and sequence coverage was sacrificed by focusing only on identifying Cys-containing peptides, but large numbers of proteins were rapidly identified by eliminating many of the peptides from the higher abundance proteins.

  4. Gel mobilities of linking-number topoisomers and their dependence on DNA helical repeat and elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Vetcher, Alexandre A.; McEwen, Abbye E.; Abujarour, Ramzey; Hanke, Andreas; Levene, Stephen D.

    2010-01-01

    Agarose-gel electrophoresis has been used for more than thirty years to characterize the linking-number (Lk) distribution of closed-circular DNA molecules. Although the physical basis of this technique remains poorly understood, the gel-electrophoretic behavior of covalently closed DNAs has been used to determine the local unwinding of DNA by proteins and small-molecule ligands, characterize supercoiling-dependent conformational transitions in duplex DNA, and to measure helical-repeat changes due to shifts in temperature and ionic strength. Those results have been analyzed by assuming that the absolute mobility of a particular topoisomer is mainly a function of the integral number of superhelical turns, and thus a slowly varying function of plasmid molecular weight. In examining the mobilities of Lk topoisomers for a series of plasmids that differ incrementally in size over more than one helical turn, we found that the size-dependent agarose-gel mobility of individual topoisomers with identical values of Lk (but different values of the excess linking number, ΔLk) vary dramatically over a duplex turn. Our results suggest that a simple semi-empirical relationship holds between the electrophoretic mobility of linking-number topoisomers and their average writhe in solution. PMID:20346570

  5. Investigations on gel forming media for use in low gravity bioseparations research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Paul; Szlag, David C.; Plank, Lindsay D.; Delcourt, Scott G.; Kunze, M. Elaine; Kirkpatrick, Francis H.; Pike, Roland G.

    Microgravity research includes investigations designed to gain insight on methods of separating living cells. During a typical separation certain real-time measurements can be made by optical methods, but some materials must also be subjected to subsequent analyses, sometimes including cultivation of the separated cells. In the absence of on-orbit analytical or fraction collecting procedures, some means is required to ``capture'' cells after separation. The use of solutions that form gels was therefore investigated as a means of maintaining cells and/or macromolecules in the separated state after two types of simple ground-based experiments. Microgravity electrophoresis experiments were simulated by separating model cell types (rat, chicken, human and rabbit erythrocytes) in a vertical density gradient containing low-conductivity buffer, 1.7%-6.5% Ficoll, 6.8-5.0% sucrose, and 1% SeaPrep low-melting temperature agarose and demonstrating that, upon cooling, a gel formed in the column, and cells could be captured in the positions to which they had migrated. Two-phase extraction experiments were simulated by choosing two-polymer solutions in which phase separation occurs in normal saline at temperatures compatible with cell viability and in which one or both phases form a gel upon cooling. Suitable polymers included commercial agaroses (1-2%), maltodextrin (5-7%) and gelatin (5-20%).

  6. Gels composed of sodium-aluminium silicate, lake magadi, kenya.

    PubMed

    Eugster, H P; Jones, B F

    1968-07-12

    Sodium-aluminum silicate gels are found in surficial deposits as thick as 5 centimeters in the Magadi area of Kenya. Chemical data indicate they are formed by the interaction of hot alkaline springwaters (67 degrees to 82 degrees C; pH, about 9) with alkali trachyte flows and their detritus, rather than by direct precipitation. In the process, Na(2)O is added from and silica is released to the saline waters of the springs. Algal mats protect the gels from erosion and act as thermal insulators. The gels are probably yearly accumulates that are washed into the lakes during floods. Crystallization of these gels in the laboratory yields analcite; this fact suggests that some analcite beds in lacustrine deposits may have formed from gels. Textural evidence indicates that cherts of rocks of the Pleistocene chert series in the Magadi area may have formed from soft sodium silicate gels. Similar gels may have acted as substrates for the accumulation and preservation of prebiological organic matter during the Precambrian.

  7. Gels composed of sodium-aluminium silicate, lake magadi, kenya.

    PubMed

    Eugster, H P; Jones, B F

    1968-07-12

    Sodium-aluminum silicate gels are found in surficial deposits as thick as 5 centimeters in the Magadi area of Kenya. Chemical data indicate they are formed by the interaction of hot alkaline springwaters (67 degrees to 82 degrees C; pH, about 9) with alkali trachyte flows and their detritus, rather than by direct precipitation. In the process, Na(2)O is added from and silica is released to the saline waters of the springs. Algal mats protect the gels from erosion and act as thermal insulators. The gels are probably yearly accumulates that are washed into the lakes during floods. Crystallization of these gels in the laboratory yields analcite; this fact suggests that some analcite beds in lacustrine deposits may have formed from gels. Textural evidence indicates that cherts of rocks of the Pleistocene chert series in the Magadi area may have formed from soft sodium silicate gels. Similar gels may have acted as substrates for the accumulation and preservation of prebiological organic matter during the Precambrian. PMID:17770594

  8. Gels composed of sodium-aluminum silicate, Lake Magadi, Kenya

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eugster, H.P.; Jones, B.F.

    1968-01-01

    Sodium-aluminum silicate gels are found in surftcial deposits as thick as 5 centimeters in the Magadi area of Kenya. Chemical data indicate they are formed by the interaction of hot alkaline springwaters (67?? to 82??C; pH, about 9) with alkali trachyte flows and their detritus, rather than by direct precipitation. In the process, Na2O is added from and silica is released to the saline waters of the springs. Algal mats protect the gels from erosion and act as thermal insulators. The gels are probably yearly accumulates that are washed into the lakes during floods. Crystallization of these gels in the laboratory yields analcite; this fact suggests that some analcite beds in lacustrine deposits may have formed from gels. Textural evidence indicates that cherts of rocks of the Pleistocene chert series in the Magadi area may have formed from soft sodium silicate gels. Similar gels may have acted as substrates for the accumulation and preservation of prebiological organic matter during the Precambrian.

  9. Preparation of a novel pH optical sensor using orange (II) based on agarose membrane as support.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Rouhollah; Hosseini, Mohammad; Amraei, Ahmadreza; Mohammadzadeh, Ali

    2016-04-01

    A novel and cost effective optical pH sensor was prepared using covalent immobilization of orange (II) indicator on the agarose membrane as solid support. The fabricated optical sensor was fixed into a sample holder of a spectrophotometer instrument for pH monitoring. Variables affecting sensor performance including pH of dye bonding to agarose membrane and dye concentration were optimized. The sensor responds to the pH changes in the range of 3.0-10.0 with a response time of 2.0 min and appropriate reproducibility (RSD ≤ 0.9%). No significant variation was observed on sensor response after increasing the ionic strength in the range of 0.0-0.5M of sodium chloride. Determination of pH using the proposed optical sensor is quick, simple, inexpensive, selective and sensitive in the pH range of 3.0-10.0.

  10. Label-free hybridization detection of a single nucleotide mismatch by immobilization of molecular beacons on an agarose film.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Li, Jiong; Liu, Heping; Liu, Quanjun; Mei, Qian; Wang, Yijin; Zhu, Jijun; He, Nongyue; Lu, Zuhong

    2002-06-15

    We developed a new technique to immobilize a set of molecular beacons on an agarose film-coated slide and found that it has the ability to identify a single nucleotide difference in label-free DNA targets. The annealing properties, specificity and hybridization dynamics of the present technique were compared with those of the conventional technique that directly immobilizes molecular beacons on a planar glass slide. It is demonstrated that the molecular beacon array on an agarose film has high quench efficiency, an excellent discrimination ratio for single nucleotide mismatches and a short detection time. We hypothesize that such a low fluorescence background and high specificity molecular beacon array will find practical applications in label-free, high-throughput mutation analysis and disease diagnosis.

  11. In vitro osteogenic differentiation of HOS cells on two types of collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Takitoh, Takako; Kato, Yoichi; Nakasu, Asako; Tadokoro, Mika; Bessho, Masahiko; Hirose, Motohiro; Ohgushi, Hajime; Mori, Hideki; Hara, Masayuki

    2010-10-01

    HOS cell is a model strain of human osteoblasts derived from human osteosarcoma. We cultured the HOS cells on both the conventional collagen gel (neutral gel), and the gamma-crosslinked collagen gel without collagen fibrils (acidic gel). The shape of HOS cells on the neutral gel was similar to that on the culture dish. However, HOS cells on acidic gel had an elongated shape and attached each other to form a mesh-like pattern. The cells attached to the surface of both gels but scarcely penetrated their depths. We measured the biochemical markers for osteogenic differentiation in the HOS cells cultured on both the neutral gel and the acidic gel. The expressions of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin were detected in the HOS cells on both types of collagen gel. Deposition of the calcium also occurred on both gels although it was higher in the neutral gel than the acidic one. These results indicate the importance of collagen for the differentiation of HOS cells, but it is not dependent on the molecular structure (fibril formation) of collagen.

  12. High-Frequency Alternating-Crossed-Field Gel Electrophoresis WithNeutral or Slightly Charged Interpenetrating Networks to Improve DNASeparation

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, B.; Prausnitz, J.; Blanch, H.

    1998-07-01

    Toward improving DNA separations, this work reports theeffects of high-frequency square-wave AC fields superimposedperpendicular to the direct current (DC) separation field on DNAmigration in both polyacrylamide-based interpenetrating networks (IPNs)and in agarose networks. Compared to standard polyacrylamide gels, IPNsallow the separation of larger DNA (9000 bp vs. 5000 bp at 5 V/cm). Innovel polyacrylamide-based IPNs, an alternating current (AC) field of 5Hz increased the maximum DNA size separable. This effect was extended tolarger DNA sizes with increasing electric-field strength up to andapparently beyond the power supply-limited maximum electric-fieldstrength of 48 V/cm. The orthogonal AC field also increased mobility.These two results combine to yield a reduction in separation time of upto a factor of 20 in novel polyacrylamide-based IPNs. When negativelycharged acrylic-acid groups were incorporated into the IPNs, the use ofthe AC field changed the DNA-network interaction, which altered the sizedependence of DNA mobility. In agarose gels, an AC field of 50 Hzincreased the size range separable; however, there was no increase in DNAmobility. There was no change in size dependence of mobility in an ACfield when the number of charged groups in the agarose network wasincreased. Based on results in the literature, possible mechanisms wereexamined for the effects of the AC field on DNA separation.

  13. High-frequency alternating-crossed-field gel electrophoresis with neutral or slightly charged interpenetrating networks to improve DNA separation.

    PubMed

    Boyd, B M; Prausnitz, J M; Blanch, H W

    1998-12-01

    Toward improving DNA separations, this work reports the effects of high-frequency square-wave AC fields superimposed perpendicular to the direct current (DC) separation field on DNA migration in both polyacrylamide-based interpenetrating networks (IPNs) and in agarose networks. Compared to standard polyacrylamide gels, IPNs allow the separation of larger DNA (9000 bp vs. 5000 bp at 5 V/cm). In novel polyacrylamide-based IPNs, an alternating current (AC) field of 5 Hz increased the maximum DNA size separable. This effect was extended to larger DNA sizes with increasing electric-field strength up to and apparently beyond the power supply-limited maximum electric-field strength of 48 V/cm. The orthogonal AC field also increased mobility. These two results combine to yield a reduction in separation time of up to a factor of 20 in novel polyacrylamide-based IPNs. When negatively charged acrylic-acid groups were incorporated into the IPNs, the use of the AC field changed the DNA-network interaction, which altered the size dependence of DNA mobility. In agarose gels, an AC field of 50 Hz increased the size range separable; however, there was no increase in DNA mobility. There was no change in size dependence of mobility in an AC field when the number of charged groups in the agarose network was increased. Based on results in the literature, possible mechanisms were examined for the effects of the AC field on DNA separation.

  14. Free gp70 from FeLV: enrichment from cell culture fluid by ferric oxide-agarose chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zelikman, I; Akerblom, L; Hjertèn, S; Morein, B

    1989-04-01

    A new chromatographic material based on beads of macroporous crosslinked agarose containing ferric oxide particles was used for enrichment of gp70--the envelope glycoprotein of feline leukemia virus (FeLV). Free gp70 was purified from cell culture fluid in one step with a recovery of 50 to 60% and a purification of about 60 times. The described procedure is a suitable first step for the purification of gp70 from large volumes of cell culture fluid.

  15. Inhibition of colony formation in agarose of metastatic human breast carcinoma and melanoma cells by synthetic glycoamine analogs.

    PubMed

    Glinsky, G V; Mossine, V V; Price, J E; Bielenberg, D; Glinsky, V V; Ananthaswamy, H N; Feather, M S

    1996-05-01

    We studied the influence of 10 synthetic glycoamine analogs on colony formation in 0.3 and 0.9% agarose by metastatic human breast carcinoma (MDA-MB-435) and melanoma (TXM-13) cells. Nine synthetic analogs significantly inhibited the colony formation in 0.9% agarose of MDA-MB-435 human breast carcinoma cells; five compounds caused a 73-83% reduction of colony formation. Seven synthetic glycoamines caused a significant inhibition of colony formation in 0.9% agarose by TXM-13 melanoma cells with the inhibitory effect ranging from 71 to 87%. The 50% inhibition (I50) doses and relative activity rank of the compounds were similar for both breast carcinoma and melanoma cell lines. The murine B16 melanoma cell aggregation assay was employed to elucidate the potential mechanism(s) of the inhibitory activity of synthetic glycoamines. The relative activity ranks of the compounds based on the independently determined I50 doses for both cell aggregation and clonogenic growth assays were very similar for the four most active synthetic analogs and clearly indicated the importance of hydrophobic amino acid in mediating the bioactivity of synthetic glycoamines. In both experimental systems (clonogenic growth in agarose and cell aggregation assay) the leading compound was N-(1-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl)-D-leucine (Fru-D-Leu) and the least active analog was N-(l-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl)-glycine (Fru-Gly). These results show that synthetic glycoamines may act by competing for specific carbohydrate-lectin interactions, particularly those involving beta-galactoside-specific lectins expressed on metastatic cells. PMID:8674280

  16. Design and synthesis of cyclic and linear peptide-agarose tools for baiting interacting protein partners of GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Granier, Sébastien; Jean-Alphonse, Frédéric; Déméné, Hélène; Guillon, Gilles; Pascal, Robert; Mendre, Christiane

    2006-02-01

    A ligation strategy for the synthesis of cyclic and linear peptides covalently linked to agarose beads designed as baits to identify new interacting partners of intracellular loops of the V2 vasopressin receptor, a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor family, is reported. The peptide-resin conjugates were subsequently shown to interact specifically with a fraction of proteins present in cellular lysates.

  17. Combination of fibrin-agarose hydrogels and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for peripheral nerve regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carriel, Víctor; Garrido-Gómez, Juan; Hernández-Cortés, Pedro; Garzón, Ingrid; García-García, Salomé; Sáez-Moreno, José Antonio; Sánchez-Quevedo, María del Carmen; Campos, Antonio; Alaminos, Miguel

    2013-04-01

    Objective. The objective was to study the effectiveness of a commercially available collagen conduit filled with fibrin-agarose hydrogels alone or with fibrin-agarose hydrogels containing autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. Approach. A 10 mm gap was created in the sciatic nerve of 48 rats and repaired using saline-filled collagen conduits or collagen conduits filled with fibrin-agarose hydrogels alone (acellular conduits) or with hydrogels containing ADMSCs (ADMSC conduits). Nerve regeneration was assessed in clinical, electrophysiological and histological studies. Main results. Clinical and electrophysiological outcomes were more favorable with ADMSC conduits than with the acellular or saline conduits, evidencing a significant recovery of sensory and motor functions. Histological analysis showed that ADMSC conduits produce more effective nerve regeneration by Schwann cells, with higher remyelination and properly oriented axonal growth that reached the distal areas of the grafted conduits, and with intensely positive expressions of S100, neurofilament and laminin. Extracellular matrix was also more abundant and better organized around regenerated nerve tissues with ADMSC conduits than those with acellular or saline conduits. Significance. Clinical, electrophysiological and histological improvements obtained with tissue-engineered ADMSC conduits may contribute to enhancing axonal regeneration by Schwann cells.

  18. Hollow agarose microneedle with silver coating for intradermal surface-enhanced Raman measurements: a skin-mimicking phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2015-06-01

    Human intradermal components contain important clinical information beneficial to the field of immunology and disease diagnosis. Although microneedles have shown great potential to act as probes to break the human skin barrier for the minimally invasive measurement of intradermal components, metal microneedles that include stainless steel could cause the following problems: (1) sharp waste production, and (2) contamination due to reuse of microneedles especially in developing regions. In this study, we fabricate agarose microneedles coated with a layer of silver (Ag) and demonstrate their use as a probe for the realization of intradermal surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements in a set of skin-mimicking phantoms. The Ag-coated agarose microneedle quantifies a range of glucose concentrations from 5 to 150 mM inside the skin phantoms with a root-mean-square error of 5.1 mM within 10 s. The needle is found enlarged by 53.9% after another 6 min inside the phantom. The shape-changing capability of this agarose microneedle ensures that the reuse of these microneedles is impossible, thus avoiding sharp waste production and preventing needle contamination, which shows the great potential for safe and effective needle-based measurements.

  19. Reversible covalent immobilization of Trametes villosa laccase onto thiolsulfinate-agarose: An insoluble biocatalyst with potential for decoloring recalcitrant dyes.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Larissa; Rodríguez-Couto, Susana; Menéndez, María Del Pilar; Manta, Carmen; Ovsejevi, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The development of a solid-phase biocatalyst based on the reversible covalent immobilization of laccase onto thiol-reactive supports (thiolsulfinate-agarose [TSI-agarose]) was performed. To achieve this goal, laccase-producing strains isolated from Eucalyptus globulus were screened and white rot fungus Trametes villosa was selected as the best strain for enzyme production. Reduction of disulfide bonds and introduction of "de novo" thiol groups in partially purified laccase were assessed to perform its reversible covalent immobilization onto thiol-reactive supports (TSI-agarose). Only the thiolation process dramatically improved the immobilization yield, from 0% for the native and reduced enzyme to 60% for the thiolated enzyme. Mild conditions for the immobilization process (pH 7.5 and 4°C) allowed the achievement of nearly 100% of coupling efficiency when low loads were applied. The kinetic parameters, pH, and thermal stabilities for the immobilized biocatalyst were similar to those for the native enzyme. After the first use and three consecutives reuses, the insoluble derivative kept more than 80% of its initial capacity for decolorizing Remazol Brilliant Blue R, showing its suitability for color removal from textile industrial effluents. The possibility of reusing the support was demonstrated by the reversibility of enzyme-support binding. PMID:25196324

  20. Dynamic Compression of Chondrocyte-Agarose Constructs Reveals New Candidate Mechanosensitive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bougault, Carole; Aubert-Foucher, Elisabeth; Paumier, Anne; Perrier-Groult, Emeline; Huot, Ludovic; Hot, David; Duterque-Coquillaud, Martine; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Articular cartilage is physiologically exposed to repeated loads. The mechanical properties of cartilage are due to its extracellular matrix, and homeostasis is maintained by the sole cell type found in cartilage, the chondrocyte. Although mechanical forces clearly control the functions of articular chondrocytes, the biochemical pathways that mediate cellular responses to mechanical stress have not been fully characterised. The aim of our study was to examine early molecular events triggered by dynamic compression in chondrocytes. We used an experimental system consisting of primary mouse chondrocytes embedded within an agarose hydrogel; embedded cells were pre-cultured for one week and subjected to short-term compression experiments. Using Western blots, we demonstrated that chondrocytes maintain a differentiated phenotype in this model system and reproduce typical chondrocyte-cartilage matrix interactions. We investigated the impact of dynamic compression on the phosphorylation state of signalling molecules and genome-wide gene expression. After 15 min of dynamic compression, we observed transient activation of ERK1/2 and p38 (members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways) and Smad2/3 (members of the canonical transforming growth factor (TGF)-β pathways). A microarray analysis performed on chondrocytes compressed for 30 min revealed that only 20 transcripts were modulated more than 2-fold. A less conservative list of 325 modulated genes included genes related to the MAPK and TGF-β pathways and/or known to be mechanosensitive in other biological contexts. Of these candidate mechanosensitive genes, 85% were down-regulated. Down-regulation may therefore represent a general control mechanism for a rapid response to dynamic compression. Furthermore, modulation of transcripts corresponding to different aspects of cellular physiology was observed, such as non-coding RNAs or primary cilium. This study provides new insight into how chondrocytes respond

  1. Viscoelasticity of silica gels

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.W.

    1995-12-01

    The response of silica gels to mechanical loads depends on the properties of the solid phase and the permeability of the network. Understanding this behavior is essential for modeling of stresses developed during drying or heating of gels. The permeability and the mechanical properties are readily determined from a simple beam-bending experiment, by measuring the load relaxation that occurs at constant deflection. Load decay results from movement of the liquid within the network; in addition, there may be viscoelastic relaxation of the network itself. Silica gel is viscoelastic in chemically aggressive media, but in inert liquids (such as ethanol or acetone) it is elastic. Experiments show that the viscoelastic relaxation time decreases as the concentration and pH of the water in the pore liquid increase. During drying, the permeability decreases and the viscosity increases, both exhibiting a power-law dependence on density of the gel network.

  2. Conformance Improvement Using Gels

    SciTech Connect

    Seright, Randall S.; Schrader; II Hagstrom, John; Wang, Ying; Al-Dahfeeri, Abdullah; Marin, Amaury

    2002-09-26

    This research project had two objectives. The first objective was to identify gel compositions and conditions that substantially reduce flow through fractures that allow direct channeling between wells, while leaving secondary fractures open so that high fluid injection and production rates can be maintained. The second objective was to optimize treatments in fractured production wells, where the gel must reduce permeability to water much more than that to oil.

  3. Crystallization from Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana Kalkura, S.; Natarajan, Subramanian

    Among the various crystallization techniques, crystallization in gels has found wide applications in the fields of biomineralization and macromolecular crystallization in addition to crystallizing materials having nonlinear optical, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, and other properties. Furthermore, by using this method it is possible to grow single crystals with very high perfection that are difficult to grow by other techniques. The gel method of crystallization provides an ideal technique to study crystal deposition diseases, which could lead to better understanding of their etiology. This chapter focuses on crystallization in gels of compounds that are responsible for crystal deposition diseases. The introduction is followed by a description of the various gels used, the mechanism of gelling, and the fascinating phenomenon of Liesegang ring formation, along with various gel growth techniques. The importance and scope of study on crystal deposition diseases and the need for crystal growth experiments using gel media are stressed. The various crystal deposition diseases, viz. (1) urolithiasis, (2) gout or arthritis, (3) cholelithiasis and atherosclerosis, and (4) pancreatitis and details regarding the constituents of the crystal deposits responsible for the pathological mineralization are discussed. Brief accounts of the theories of the formation of urinary stones and gallstones and the role of trace elements in urinary stone formation are also given. The crystallization in gels of (1) the urinary stone constituents, viz. calcium oxalate, calcium phosphates, uric acid, cystine, etc., (2) the constituents of the gallstones, viz. cholesterol, calcium carbonate, etc., (3) the major constituent of the pancreatic calculi, viz., calcium carbonate, and (4) cholic acid, a steroidal hormone are presented. The effect of various organic and inorganic ions, trace elements, and extracts from cereals, herbs, and fruits on the crystallization of major urinary stone and gallstone

  4. Permeability Modification Using a Reactive Alkaline-Soluble Biopolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Sandra L. Fox; Xina Xie; Greg Bala

    2004-11-01

    Polymer injection has been used in reservoirs to alleviate contrasting permeability zones to enhance oil recovery (EOR). Polymer technology relies mainly on the use of polyacrylamides cross-linked by a hazardous metal or organic. Contemporary polymer plugging has investigated the stimulation of in-situ microorganisms to produce polymers (Jenneman et. al., 2000) and the use of biocatalysts to trigger gelling (Bailey et. al., 2000). The use of biological polymers are advantageous in that they can block high permeability areas, are environmentally friendly, and have potential to form reversible gels without the use of hazardous cross-linkers. Recent efforts have produced a reactive alkaline-soluble biopolymer from Agrobacterium species ATCC # 31749 that gels upon decreasing the pH of the polymeric solution. Microbial polymers are of interest due to their potential cost savings, compared to conventional use of synthetic chemical polymers. Numerous microorganisms are known to produce extracellular polysaccharides. One microbiological polymer of interest is curdlan, â - (1, 3) glucan, which has demonstrated gelling properties by a reduction in pH. The focus of this study was to determine the impact an alkaline-soluble biopolymer can have on sandstone permeability.

  5. Manufacturing of agarose-based chromatographic adsorbents--effect of ionic strength and cooling conditions on particle structure and mechanical strength.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Nicolas; Bowen, James; Pacek, Andrzej; Zhang, Zhibing

    2012-02-01

    The effect of ionic strength of agarose solution and quenching temperature of the emulsion on the structure and mechanical strength of agarose-based chromatographic adsorbents was investigated. Solutions of agarose containing different amounts of NaCl were emulsified at elevated temperature in mineral oil using a high-shear mixer. The hot emulsion was quenched at different temperatures leading to the gelation of agarose and formation of soft particles. Analysis of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) images of particle surfaces shows that pore size of particles increases with ionic strength and/or high quenching temperature. Additionally it has been found that the compressive strength of particles measured by micromanipulation also increases with ionic strength of the emulsion and/or high quenching temperature but these two parameters have no significant effect on the resulting particle size and particle size distribution. Results from both characterization methods were compared with Sepharose 4B, a commercial agarose-based adsorbent. This is the first report examining the effect of ionic strength and cooling conditions on the microstructure of micron-sized agarose beads for bioseparation.

  6. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Seright

    2002-02-28

    This technical progress report describes work performed from June 20 through December 19, 2001, for the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels''. Interest has increased in some new polymeric products that purport to substantially reduce permeability to water while causing minimum permeability reduction to oil. In view of this interest, we are currently studying BJ's Aqua Con. Results from six corefloods revealed that the Aqua Con gelant consistently reduced permeability to water more than that to oil. However, the magnitude of the disproportionate permeability reduction varied significantly for the various experiments. Thus, as with most materials tested to date, the issue of reproducibility and control of the disproportionate permeability remains to be resolved. Concern exists about the ability of gels to resist washout after placement in fractures. We examined whether a width constriction in the middle of a fracture would cause different gel washout behavior upstream versus downstream of the constriction. Tests were performed using a formed Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel in a 48-in.-long fracture with three sections of equal length, but with widths of 0.08-, 0.02-, and 0.08-in., respectively. The pressure gradients during gel extrusion (i.e., placement) were similar in the two 0.08-in.-wide fracture sections, even though they were separated by a 0.02-in.-wide fracture section. The constriction associated with the middle fracture section may have inhibited gel washout during the first pulse of brine injection after gel placement. However, during subsequent phases of brine injection, the constriction did not inhibit washout in the upstream fracture section any more than in the downstream section.

  7. Difference between Chitosan Hydrogels via Alkaline and Acidic Solvent Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jingyi; Wang, Zhengke; Hu, Qiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) has generated considerable interest for its desirable properties and wide applications. Hydrogel has been proven to be a major and vital form in the applications of CS materials. Among various types of CS hydrogels, physical cross-linked CS hydrogels are popular, because they avoided the potential toxicity and sacrifice of intrinsic properties caused by cross-linking or reinforcements. Alkaline solvent system and acidic solvent system are two important solvent systems for the preparation of physical cross-linked CS hydrogels, and also lay the foundations of CS hydrogel-based materials in many aspects. As members of physical cross-linked CS hydrogels, gel material via alkaline solvent system showed significant differences from that via acidic solvent system, but the reasons behind are still unexplored. In the present work, we studied the difference between CS hydrogel via alkaline system and acidic system, in terms of gelation process, hydrogel structure and mechanical property. In-situ/pseudo in-situ studies were carried out, including fluorescent imaging of gelation process, which provided dynamic visualization. Finally, the reasons behind the differences were explained, accompanied by the discussion about design strategy based on gelation behavior of the two systems. PMID:27786262

  8. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  9. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  10. Examination of Interactions of Oppositely Charged Proteins in Gels

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy,P.; El-Maghrabi, M.; Halada, G.; Miller, L.; Rafailovich, M.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the interactions of proteins with one another serves as an important step for developing faster protein separation methods. To examine protein-protein interactions of oppositely charged proteins, fluorescently labeled albumin and poly-L-lysine were subjected to electrophoresis in agarose gels, in which the cationic albumin and the anionic poly-L-lysine were allowed to migrate toward each other and interact. Fluorescence microscopy was used to image fluorescently tagged proteins in the gel. The secondary structure of the proteins in solution was studied using conventional FTIR spectroscopy. Results showed that sharp interfaces were formed where FITC tagged albumin met poly-L-lysine and that the interfaces did not migrate after they had been formed. The position of the interface in the gel was found to be linearly dependent upon the relative concentration of the proteins. The formation of the interface also depended upon the fluorescent tag attached to the protein. The size of the aggregates at the interface, the fluorescence intensity modifications, and the mobility of the interface for different pore sizes of the gel were investigated. It was observed that the interface was made up of aggregates of about 1 {mu}m in size. Using dynamic light scattering, it was observed that the size of the aggregates that formed due to interactions of oppositely charged proteins depended upon the fluorescent tags attached to the proteins. The addition of small amounts of poly-L-lysine to solutions containing FITC albumin decreased the zeta potential drastically. For this, we propose a model suggesting that adding small amounts of poly-L-lysine to solutions containing FITC -albumin favors the formation of macromolecular complexes having FITC albumin molecules on its surface. Although oppositely charged FITC tagged poly-L-lysine and FITC tagged albumin influence each other's migration velocities by forming aggregates, there were no observable secondary structural

  11. High performance gel imaging with a commercial single lens reflex camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobodan, J.; Corbett, R.; Wye, N.; Schein, J. E.; Marra, M. A.; Coope, R. J. N.

    2011-03-01

    A high performance gel imaging system was constructed using a digital single lens reflex camera with epi-illumination to image 19 × 23 cm agarose gels with up to 10,000 DNA bands each. It was found to give equivalent performance to a laser scanner in this high throughput DNA fingerprinting application using the fluorophore SYBR Green®. The specificity and sensitivity of the imager and scanner were within 1% using the same band identification software. Low and high cost color filters were also compared and it was found that with care, good results could be obtained with inexpensive dyed acrylic filters in combination with more costly dielectric interference filters, but that very poor combinations were also possible. Methods for determining resolution, dynamic range, and optical efficiency for imagers are also proposed to facilitate comparison between systems.

  12. Dataset of gene cloning and gel filtration chromatography of R-est6.

    PubMed

    Soni, Surabhi; Odaneth, Annamma A; Lali, Arvind M; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K

    2016-06-01

    The data presented in this article are connected to the research article entitled "Expression, purification and biochemical characterization of a family 6 carboxylesterase from Methylococcus capsulatus (bath)" (Soni et al., 2016 [1]). The family 6 carboxylesterases are the smallest and display broad substrate specificity. The 1 kb gene encoding, a family 6 carboxylesterase - R-est6, was amplified from the genome of M. capsulatus (bath strain), and showed in the agarose gel. The corresponding purified protein, after overexpression in Escherichia coli, was biochemically studied in the research article (Soni et al., 2016 [1]). R-est6 has hydrophobic patches on the surface so, it is expected to show oligimeric forms. Here, we have confirmed the presence of oligomers by gel filtration chromatography data and the proteins belonging to the different peaks are shown on a SDS-PAGE. PMID:27222859

  13. The influence of ionic strength on DNA diffusion in gel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuanxi; Jee, Ah-Young; Kim, Hyeong-Ju; Granick, Steve

    Cations are known to reduce the rigidity of the DNA molecules by screening the negative charge along the sugar phosphate backbone. This was established by optical tweezer pulling experiment of immobilized DNA strands. However, little is known regarding the influence of ions on the motion of DNA molecules as they thread through network meshes. We imaged in real time the Brownian diffusion of fluorescent labeled lambda-DNA in an agarose gel network in the presence of salt with monovalent or multivalent cations. Each movie was analyzed using home-written program to yield a trajectory of center of the mass and the accompanying history of the shape fluctuations. One preliminary finding is that ionic strength has a profound influence on the slope of the trace of mean square displacement (MSD) versus time. The influence of ionic strength on DNA diffusion in gel networks.

  14. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for isolation of full-length phytoplasma chromosomes from plants.

    PubMed

    Marcone, Carmine

    2013-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is a powerful technique for genomic studies of unculturable plant-pathogenic phytoplasmas, which enables separation of full-length phytoplasma chromosomes from contaminating host plant nucleic acids. The PFGE method described here involves isolation of phytoplasmal DNA from high-titer phytoplasma-infected herbaceous plants using a phytoplasma enrichment procedure, embedding of phytoplasma chromosomes in agarose blocks, and separation of entire phytoplasma chromosomes from contaminating host plant nucleic acids by electrophoresis. Full-length phytoplasma chromosomes are resolved as single, discrete bands in the gel. The identity of these bands can be confirmed by Southern blot hybridization using a ribosomal DNA fragment as a probe. The method does not utilize gamma-irradiation to linearize phytoplasma chromosomes prior to electrophoresis. PMID:22987433

  15. Separation of chromosomal DNA molecules from yeast by orthogonal-field-alternation gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Carle, G F; Olson, M V

    1984-01-01

    A simple agarose-gel apparatus has been developed that allows the separation of DNA molecules in the size range from 50 kb to well over 750 kb, the largest size for which size standards were available. The apparatus is based on the recent discovery that large DNA molecules are readily fractionated on agarose gels if they are alternately subjected to two approximately orthogonal electric fields. The switching time, which was on the order of 20-50 sec in our experiments, can be adjusted to optimize fractionation in a given size range. The resolution of the technique is sufficient to allow the fractionation of a sample of self-ligated lambda DNA into a ladder of approximately 15 bands, spaced at 50 kb intervals. We have applied the technique to the fractionation of yeast DNA into 11 distinct bands, several of which have been shown by DNA-DNA hybridization to hybridize uniquely to different chromosome-specific hybridization probes. In this paper, we describe the design of the apparatus, the electrophoretic protocol, and the sample-handling procedures that we have employed. Images PMID:6379602

  16. Investigations on gel forming media use in low gravity bioseparations research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, Paul; Szlag, David C.; Plank, Lindsay D.; Delcourt, Scott G.; Kunze, M. Elaine

    1989-01-01

    Research on gelling media and conditions suitable for the preservation of the spatial configuration of cell suspensions and macromolecular solutions after separation in free fluid during low gravity experiments is presented. The examples studied included free electrophoresis of cells in a cylindrical column and two-phase aqueous polymer separation. Microgravity electrophoresis experiments were simulated by separating model cell types (animal or human) in a vertical density gradient containing low-conductivity buffer, 1.7-6.5 percent Ficoll, 6.8-5.0 percent sucrose, and 1 percent SeaPrep low-melting temperature agarose. Upon cooling, a gel formed in the column and cells could be captured at the forming locations. Two-phase extraction experiments were simulated using two-polymer solutions in which phase separation occurs in normal saline at temperatures compatible with cell viability and in which one or both phases form a gel upon cooling. Suitable polymers included commercial agaroses (1-2 percent), maltodextrin (5-7 percent), and gelatin (5-20 percent).

  17. Nucleus pulposus cells synthesize a functional extracellular matrix and respond to inflammatory cytokine challenge following long term agarose culture

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lachlan J.; Chiaro, Joseph A.; Nerurkar, Nandan L.; Cortes, Daniel H.; Horava, Sarena D.; Hebela, Nader M.; Mauck, Robert L.; Dodge, George R.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2012-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration is characterized by a cascade of cellular, biochemical and structural changes that may lead to functional impairment and low back pain. Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is strongly implicated in the etiology of disc degeneration, however there is currently no direct evidence linking IL-1β upregulation to downstream biomechanical changes. The objective of this study was to evaluate long-term agarose culture of nucleus pulposus (NP) cells as a potential in-vitro model system to investigate this. Bovine NP cells were cultured in agarose for 49 days in a defined medium containing transforming growth factor-beta 3, after which both mechanical properties and composition were evaluated and compared to native NP. The mRNA levels of NP cell markers were compared to those of freshly isolated NP cells. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, aggregate modulus and hydraulic permeability of mature constructs were similar to native NP, and aggrecan and SOX9 mRNA levels were not significantly different from freshly isolated cells. To investigate direct links between IL-1β and biomechanical changes, mature agarose constructs were treated with IL-1β, and effects on biomechanical properties, extracellular matrix composition and mRNA levels were quantified. IL-1β treatment resulted in upregulation of ADAMTS4, MMP13 and INOS, decreased GAG and modulus, and increased permeability. To evaluate the model as a test platform for therapeutic intervention, co-treatment with IL-1β and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) was evaluated. IL-1ra significantly attenuated degradative changes induced by IL-1β. These results suggest that this in vitro model represents a reliable and cost-effective platform for evaluating new therapies for disc degeneration. PMID:22102324

  18. Development of a bi-functional silica monolith for electro-osmotic pumping and DNA clean-up/extraction using gel-supported reagents in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Jennifer A; Shaw, Kirsty J; Docker, Peter T; Dyer, Charlotte E; Greenman, John; Greenway, Gillian M; Haswell, Stephen J

    2009-06-01

    A silica monolith used to support both electro-osmotic pumping (EOP) and the extraction/elution of DNA coupled with gel-supported reagents is described. The benefits of the combined EOP extraction/elution system were illustrated by combining DNA extraction and gene amplification using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process. All the reagents necessary for both processes were supported within pre-loaded gels that allow the reagents to be stored at 4 degrees C for up to four weeks in the microfluidic device. When carrying out an analysis the crude sample only needed to be hydrodynamically introduced into the device which was connected to an external computer controlled power supply via platinum wire electrodes. DNA was extracted with 65% efficiency after loading lysed cells onto a silica monolith. Ethanol contained within an agarose gel matrix was then used to wash unwanted debris away from the sample by EOP (100 V cm(-1) for 5 min). The retained DNA was subsequently eluted from the monolith by water contained in a second agarose gel, again by EOP using an electric field of 100 V cm(-1) for 5 min, and transferred into the PCR reagent containing gel. The eluted DNA in solution was successfully amplified by PCR, confirming that the concept of a complete self-contained microfluidic device could be realised for DNA sample clean up and amplification, using a simple pumping and on-chip reagent storage methodology.

  19. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassovs research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herrings group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  20. Visualizing single rod-shaped fission yeast vertically in micro-sized holes on agarose pad made by soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Tran, Phong T

    2014-01-01

    Fission yeast cells are rod-shaped unicellular organism that is normally imaged horizontally with its long axis parallel to image plane. This orientation, while practical, limits the imaging resolution of biological structures which are oriented perpendicular to the long axis of the cell. We present here a method to prepare agarose pads with micro-sized holes to load single fission yeast cell vertically and image cell with its long axis perpendicular to the image plane. As a demonstration, actomyosin ring contraction is shown with this new imaging device.

  1. A baculovirus alkaline nuclease knockout construct produces fragmented DNA and aberrant capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Kazuhiro; Vanarsdall, Adam L.; Rohrmann, George F. . E-mail: rohrmanng@orst.edu

    2007-03-01

    DNA replication of bacmid-derived constructs of the Autographa californica multiple nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) was analyzed by field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE) in combination with digestion at a unique Eco81I restriction enzyme site. Three constructs were characterized: a parental bacmid, a bacmid deleted for the alkaline nuclease gene, and a bacmid from which the gp64 gene had been deleted. The latter was employed as a control for comparison with the alkaline nuclease knockout because neither yields infectious virus and their replication is limited to the initially transfected cells. The major difference between DNA replicated by the different constructs was the presence in the alkaline nuclease knockout of high concentrations of relatively small, subgenome length DNA in preparations not treated with Eco81I. Furthermore, upon Eco81I digestion, the alkaline nuclease knockout bacmid also yielded substantially more subgenome size DNA than the other constructs. Electron microscopic examination of cells transfected with the alkaline nuclease knockout indicated that, in addition to a limited number of normal-appearing electron-dense nucleocapsids, numerous aberrant capsid-like structures were observed indicating a defect in nucleocapsid maturation or in a DNA processing step that is necessary for encapsidation. Because of the documented role of the baculovirus alkaline nuclease and its homologs from other viruses in homologous recombination, these data suggest that DNA recombination may play a major role in the production of baculovirus genomes.

  2. Directed, strong, and reversible immobilization of proteins tagged with a β-trefoil lectin domain: a simple method to immobilize biomolecules on plain agarose matrixes.

    PubMed

    López-Gallego, Fernando; Acebrón, Ivan; Mancheño, Jose Miguel; Raja, Sebastian; Lillo, M Pilar; Guisán Seijas, Jose Manuel

    2012-03-21

    A highly stable lipase from Geobacillus thermocatenolatus (BTL2) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein from Aquorea victoria (EGFP) were recombinantly produced N-terminally tagged to the lectin domain of the hemolytic pore-forming toxin LSLa from the mushroom Laetiporus sulphureus . Such a domain (LSL(150)), recently described as a novel fusion tag, is based on a β-trefoil scaffold with two operative binding sites for galactose or galactose-containing derivatives. The fusion proteins herein analyzed have enabled us to characterize the binding mode of LSL(150) to polymeric and solid substrates such as agarose beads. The lectin-fusion proteins are able to be quantitatively bound to both cross-linked and non-cross-linked agarose matrixes in a very rapid manner, resulting in a surprisingly dynamic protein distribution inside the porous beads that evolves from heterogeneous to homogeneous along the postimmobilization time. Such dynamic distribution can be related to the reversible nature of the LSL(150)-agarose interaction. Furthermore, this latter interaction is temperature dependent since it is 4-fold stronger when the immobilization takes place at 25 °C than when it does at 4 °C. The strongest lectin-agarose interaction is also quite stable under a survey of different conditions such as high temperatures (up to 60 °C) or high organic solvent concentrations (up to 60% of acetonitrile). Notably, the use of cross-linked agarose would endow the system with more robustness due to its better mechanical properties compared to the noncross-linked one. The stability of the LSL(150)-agarose interaction would prevent protein leaching during the operation process unless high pH media are used. In summary, we believe that the LSL(150) lectin domain exhibits interesting structural features as an immobilization domain that makes it suitable to reversibly immobilize industrially relevant enzymes in very simple carriers as agarose.

  3. Model and computer simulations of the motion of DNA molecules during pulse field gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.B.; Bustamante, C. ); Heller, C. )

    1991-05-28

    A model is presented for the motion of individual molecules of DNA undergoing pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The molecule is represented by a chain of charged beads connected by entropic springs, and the gel is represented by a segmented tube surrounding the beads. This model differs from earlier reptation/tube models in that the tube is allowed to leak in certain places and the chain can double over and flow out of the side of the tube in kinks. It is found that these kinks often lead to the formation of U shapes, which are a major source of retardation in PFGE. The results of computer simulations using this model are compared with real DNA experimental results for the following cases: steady field motion as seen in fluorescence microscopy, mobility in steady fields, mobility in transverse field alternation gel electrophoresis (TFAGE), mobility in field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE), and linear dichroism (LD) of DNA in agarose gels during PFGE. Good agreement between the simulations and the experimental results is obtained.

  4. Supplementation of fibrin gels with sodium chloride enhances physical properties and ensuing osteogenic response.

    PubMed

    Davis, H E; Miller, S L; Case, E M; Leach, J K

    2011-02-01

    Modifying the relative concentrations of fibrinogen and thrombin can control the physical properties of fibrin gels, while the viability of associated cells has been linked to the gel's final network structure. It was hypothesized that increasing the gel ionic strength during fabrication through supplementation with sodium chloride (NaCl) would provide an improved approach for tailoring the physical properties of fibrin gels and maintaining the viability and osteogenic potential of entrapped cells. Fibrin gels were formed by mixing fibrinogen, thrombin and calcium chloride with varying masses of NaCl (0-4.40% w/v), and the osteogenic potential of entrapped human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) was examined over 14 days. Physical properties including gelation time, compressive modulus and fiber diameter were dependent upon NaCl content, with gels containing 2.60% NaCl possessing compressive moduli threefold higher than gels without NaCl. Alkaline phosphatase activity was highest for MSC entrapped in gels containing 2.15-2.60% NaCl after 14 days, and all gels exhibited increased calcium incorporation over the culture period. These data confirm that varying the salt concentration of the pre-gel solution can modulate the material properties of fibrin constructs without additional fibrinogen or thrombin, thereby offering a new approach for generating improved cell transplantation vehicles for use in bone tissue regeneration.

  5. Alkaline decomposition of synthetic jarosite with arsenic

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The widespread use of jarosite-type compounds to eliminate impurities in the hydrometallurgical industry is due to their capability to incorporate several elements into their structures. Some of these elements are of environmental importance (Pb2+, Cr6+, As5+, Cd2+, Hg2+). For the present paper, AsO43- was incorporated into the lattice of synthetic jarosite in order to carry out a reactivity study. Alkaline decomposition is characterized by removal of sulfate and potassium ions from the lattice and formation of a gel consisting of iron hydroxides with absorbed arsenate. Decomposition curves show an induction period followed by a conversion period. The induction period is independent of particle size and exponentially decreases with temperature. The conversion period is characterized by formation of a hydroxide halo that surrounds an unreacted jarosite core. During the conversion period in NaOH media for [OH-] > 8 × 10-3 mol L-1, the process showed a reaction order of 1.86, and an apparent activation energy of 60.3 kJ mol-1 was obtained. On the other hand, during the conversion period in Ca(OH)2 media for [OH-] > 1.90 × 10-2 mol L-1, the reaction order was 1.15, and an apparent activation energy of 74.4 kJ mol-1 was obtained. The results are consistent with the spherical particle model with decreasing core and chemical control. PMID:23566061

  6. An improved method for immobilizing IgG antibodies on protein A-agarose.

    PubMed

    Sisson, T H; Castor, C W

    1990-03-01

    This report describes a modification of a procedure developed by others for crosslinking IgG to protein A which itself is covalently linked to a gel support. Earlier immunoaffinity columns were described as having large antigen-binding capacities and stability under a variety of elution conditions. The present data show that columns constructed with earlier techniques were only partially stable to pH 3.0 buffers, and, as a result, bound less than 20% of the antigen predicted by theory. Modifying parameters of the dimethylpimelimidate crosslinking method led to immunoaffinity columns which did not leak immunoglobulin under low pH elution buffer conditions. The new immunoaffinity absorbants, because of the increased strength of the couple between the antibody and protein A, were capable of binding antigen at over 80% of their theoretical capacity.

  7. Sequential differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in an agarose scaffold promotes a physis-like zonal alignment of chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Jacqueline Frida; See, Kwee Hua; Hua, See Kwee; Yang, Zheng; Zheng, Yang; Hui, James Hoi Po; Po, James Hui Hoi; Lee, Eng Hin; Hin, Lee Eng

    2012-11-01

    Chondrocytes of the epiphyseal growth plate (physis) differentiate and mature in defined linear zones. The current study examines the differentiation of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) into zonal physeal cartilage. hBMSCs were embedded in an agarose scaffold with only the surface of the scaffold in direct contact with the culture medium. The cells were differentiated using a two-step system involving the sequential addition of TGFβ followed by BMP2. The resultant samples displayed a heterogenic population of physis-like collagen type 2 positive cells including proliferating chondrocytes and mature chondrocytes showing hypertrophy, expression of early bone markers and matrix mineralization. Histological analysis revealed a physis-like linear zonal alignment of chondrocytes in varying stages of differentiation. The less mature chondrocytes were seen at the base of the construct while hypertrophic chondrocytes and matrix mineralization was observed closer to the surface of the construct. The described differentiation protocol using hBMSCs in an agarose scaffold can be used to study the factors and conditions that influence the differentiation, proliferation, maturation, and zonal alignment of physeal chondrocytes. PMID:22517299

  8. The potential of pulsed low intensity ultrasound to stimulate chondrocytes matrix synthesis in agarose and monolayer cultures.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Natalie M; Grainger, James; Bader, Dan L; Knight, Martin M

    2010-12-01

    Pulsed low intensity ultrasound (PLIUS) has been used successfully for bone fracture repair and has therefore been suggested for cartilage regeneration. However, previous in vitro studies with chondrocytes show conflicting results as to the effect of PLIUS on the elaboration of extracellular matrix. This study tests the hypothesis that PLIUS, applied for 20 min/day, stimulates the synthesis of sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) by adult bovine articular chondrocytes cultured in either monolayer or agarose constructs. For both culture models, PLIUS at either 30 or 100 mW/cm(2) intensity had no net effect on the total sGAG content. Although PLIUS at 100 mW/cm(2) did induce a 20% increase in sGAG content at day 2 of culture in agarose, this response was lost by day 5. Intensities of 200 and 300 mW/cm(2) resulted in cell death probably due to heating from the ultrasound transducers. The lack of a sustained up-regulation of sGAG synthesis may reflect the suggestion that PLIUS only induces a stimulatory effect in the presence of a tissue injury response. These results suggest that PLIUS has a limited potential to provide an effective method of stimulating matrix production as part of a tissue engineering strategy for cartilage repair. PMID:20938751

  9. Supplementation of exogenous adenosine 5'-triphosphate enhances mechanical properties of 3D cell-agarose constructs for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Gadjanski, Ivana; Yodmuang, Supansa; Spiller, Kara; Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-10-01

    Formation of tissue-engineered cartilage is greatly enhanced by mechanical stimulation. However, direct mechanical stimulation is not always a suitable method, and the utilization of mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction might allow for a highly effective and less aggressive alternate means of stimulation. In particular, the purinergic, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-mediated signaling pathway is strongly implicated in mechanotransduction within the articular cartilage. We investigated the effects of transient and continuous exogenous ATP supplementation on mechanical properties of cartilaginous constructs engineered using bovine chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) encapsulated in an agarose hydrogel. For both cell types, we have observed significant increases in equilibrium and dynamic compressive moduli after transient ATP treatment applied in the fourth week of cultivation. Continuous ATP treatment over 4 weeks of culture only slightly improved the mechanical properties of the constructs, without major changes in the total glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen content. Structure-function analyses showed that transiently ATP-treated constructs, and in particular those based on hMSCs, had the highest level of correlation between compositional and mechanical properties. Transiently treated groups showed intense staining of the territorial matrix for GAGs and collagen type II. These results indicate that transient ATP treatment can improve functional mechanical properties of cartilaginous constructs based on chondrogenic cells and agarose hydrogels, possibly by improving the structural organization of the bulk phase and territorial extracellular matrix (ECM), that is, by increasing correlation slopes between the content of the ECM components (GAG, collagen) and mechanical properties of the construct.

  10. Co-immobilization of fungal endo-xylanase and α-L-arabinofuranosidase in glyoxyl agarose for improved hydrolysis of arabinoxylan.

    PubMed

    Damásio, André Ricardo de Lima; Pessela, Benevides C; da Silva, Tony Márcio; Guimarães, Luis Henrique Souza; Jorge, João Atílio; Guisán, Jose Manuel; Polizeli, Maria de Lourdes T M

    2013-09-01

    Plant cell-wall arabinoxylans have a complex structure that requires the action of a pool of debranching (arabinofuranosidases) and depolymerizing enzymes (endo-xylanase). Two Aspergillus nidulans strains over-secreting endo-xylanase and arabinofuranosidase were inoculated in defined 2% maltose-minimum medium resulting in the simultaneously production of these enzymes. To study the synergistic hydrolysis was used arabinoxylan with 41% of arabinose and 59% of xylose residues. Thus, it was adopted different approaches to arabinoxylan hydrolysis using immobilized arabinofuranosidase and endo-xylanase: (i) endo-xylanase immobilized on glyoxyl agarose; (ii) arabinofuranosidase immobilized on glyoxyl agarose; (T1) hydrolysis of arabinoxylan with arabinofuranosidase immobilized on glyoxyl agarose for debranching, followed by a second hydrolysis with endo-xylanase immobilized on glyoxyl agarose; (T2) hydrolysis using (i) and (ii) simultaneously; and (T3) hydrolysis of arabinoxylan with endo-xylanase and arabinofuranosidase co-immobilized on glyoxyl agarose. It was concluded that arabinoxylan hydrolysis using two derivatives simultaneously (T2) showed greater hydrolytic efficiency and consequently a higher products yield. However, the hydrolysis with multi-enzymatic derivative (T3) results in direct release of xylose and arabinose from a complex substrate as arabinoxylan, which is a great advantage as biotechnological application of this derivative, especially regarding the application of biofuels, since these monosaccharides are readily assimilable for fermentation and ethanol production.

  11. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more that two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  12. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more than two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  13. MAGIC Gel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mifflin, Rachel; Shahnazi, Kambiz; Jesseph, Rick

    2008-10-01

    Proton therapy has proven a very successful tool in treating certain tumors, but a three dimensional view of this fact has not yet been clearly demonstrated. In this experiment we have used MAGIC (Methacrylic and Ascorbic Acid in Gelatin Initiated by Copper) gel to represent brain tissue and gone through normal treatment planning for an Acoustic Neuroma to show the three dimensional dose distributions associated with such a tumor.

  14. Gel-assisted crystallization of [Ir4(IMe)7(CO)H10](2+) and [Ir4(IMe)8H9](3+) clusters derived from catalytic glycerol dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Sharninghausen, Liam S; Mercado, Brandon Q; Crabtree, Robert H; Balcells, David; Campos, Jesús

    2015-11-14

    The two title clusters were formed during iridium-catalyzed glycerol dehydrogenation and display a remarkably high NHC content. They were crystallized in either agarose or polyethylene oxide gel matrices, while more conventional crystallization techniques proved unsuccessful. Cluster [Ir4(IMe)8H9](3+), with a net charge of +3, was only crystallizable with a polyoxometalate Keggin trianion. The crystal packing of this intercluster compound is discussed. Computational studies position the iridium hydrides and provide insights into the bonding. PMID:26435314

  15. Permeability Modification Using a Reactive Alkaline-Soluble Biopolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Snadra L. Fox; X. Xie; K. D. Schaller; E. P. Robertson; G. A. Bala

    2003-10-01

    Polymer injection has been used in reservoirs to alleviate contrasting permeability zones. Current technology relies on the use of cross-linking agents to initiate gelation. The use of biological polymers are advantageous in that they can block high permeability areas, are environmentally friendly, and have potential to form reversible gels without the use of hazardous cross-linkers. Recent efforts at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) have produced a reactive alkaline-soluble biopolymer from Agrobacterium sp. ATCC no. 31749 that gels upon decreasing the pH of the polymeric solution. The focus of this study was to determine the impact an alkaline-soluble biopolymer can have on sandstone permeability. Permeability modification was investigated by injecting solubilized biopolymer into Berea sandstone cores and defining the contribution of pH, salt, temperature, and Schuricht crude oil on biopolymer gelation. The biopolymer was soluble in KOH at a pH greater than 11.4 and gelled when the pH dropped below 10.8. The Berea sandstone core buffered the biopolymer solution, decreasing the pH sufficiently to form a gel, which subsequently decreased the permeability. The effluent pH of the control cores injected with 0.01 {und M} KOH (pH 12.0) and 0.10{und M} KOH (pH 13.0) decreased to 10.6 and 12.7, respectively. The permeability of the sandstone core injected with biopolymer was decreased to greater than 95% of the original permeability at 25 C in the presence of 2% NaCl, and Schuricht crude oil; however, the permeability increased when the temperature of the core was increased to 60 C. Residual resistance factors as high as 792 were seen in Berea cores treated with biopolymer. The buffering capacity of sandstone has been demonstrated to reduce the pH of a biopolymer solution sufficiently to cause the polymer to form a stable in-situ gel. This finding could potentially lead to alternate technology for permeability modification, thus

  16. Alkaline Water and Longevity: A Murine Study.

    PubMed

    Magro, Massimiliano; Corain, Livio; Ferro, Silvia; Baratella, Davide; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Terzo, Milo; Corraducci, Vittorino; Salmaso, Luigi; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The biological effect of alkaline water consumption is object of controversy. The present paper presents a 3-year survival study on a population of 150 mice, and the data were analyzed with accelerated failure time (AFT) model. Starting from the second year of life, nonparametric survival plots suggest that mice watered with alkaline water showed a better survival than control mice. Interestingly, statistical analysis revealed that alkaline water provides higher longevity in terms of "deceleration aging factor" as it increases the survival functions when compared with control group; namely, animals belonging to the population treated with alkaline water resulted in a longer lifespan. Histological examination of mice kidneys, intestine, heart, liver, and brain revealed that no significant differences emerged among the three groups indicating that no specific pathology resulted correlated with the consumption of alkaline water. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survival data as a function of watering with alkaline water of long-lived mouse models.

  17. Alkaline detergent recycling via ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-06-01

    The metal finishing industry uses alkaline cleaners and detergents to remove oils and dirt from manufactured parts, often before they are painted or plated. The use of these cleaners has grown because environmental regulations are phasing out ozone depleting substances and placing restrictions on the use and disposal of many hazardous solvents. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is examining ultrafiltration as a cleaning approach that reclaims the cleaning solutions and minimizes wastes. The ultrafiltration membrane is made from sheets of polymerized organic film. The sheets are rolled onto a supporting frame and installed in a tube. Spent cleaning solution is pumped into a filter chamber and filtered through the membrane that captures oils and dirt and allows water and detergent to pass. The membrane is monitored and when pressure builds from oil and dirt, an automatic system cleans the surface to maintain solution flow and filtration quality. The results show that the ultrafiltration does not disturb the detergent concentration or alkalinity but removed almost all the oils and dirt leaving the solution in condition to be reused.

  18. Grace DAKASEP alkaline battery separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovannoni, R. T.; Lundquist, J. T.; Choi, W. M.

    1987-01-01

    The Grace DAKASEP separator was originally developed as a wicking layer for nickel-zinc alkaline batteries. The DAKASEP is a filled non-woven separator which is flexible and heat sealable. Through modification of formulation and processing variables, products with a variety of properties can be produced. Variations of DAKASEP were tested in Ni-H2, Ni-Zn, Ni-Cd, and primary alkaline batteries with good results. The properties of DAKASEP which are optimized for Hg-Zn primary batteries are shown in tabular form. This separator has high tensile strength, 12 micron average pore size, relatively low porosity at 46-48 percent, and consequently moderately high resistivity. Versions were produced with greater than 70 percent porosity and resistivities in 33 wt percent KOH as low as 3 ohm cm. Performance data for Hg-Zn E-1 size cells containing DAKASEP with the properties shown in tabular form, are more reproducible than data obtained with a competitive polypropylene non-woven separator. In addition, utilization of active material is in general considerably improved.

  19. The design of alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, K.

    1990-01-01

    Alkaline fuel cells recently developed have yielded satisfactory operation even in the cases of their use of mobile and matrix-type electrolytes; the advantages of realistic operation have been demonstrated by a major West German manufacturer's 100 kW alkaline fuel cell apparatus, which was operated in the role of an air-independent propulsion system. Development has begun for a spacecraft alkaline fuel cell of the matrix-electrolyte configuration.

  20. Purification and characterization of an alkaline protease from Acetes chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiachao; Liu, Xin; Li, Zhaojie; Xu, Jie; Xue, Changhu; Gao, Xin

    2005-07-01

    An alkaline protease from Acetes chinensis was purified and characterized in this study. The steps of purification include ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow, gel filtration chromatography with S300 and the second ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow. The protease was isolated and purified, which was present and active on protein substrates (azocasein and casein). The specific protease activity was 17.15 folds and the recovery was 4.67. The molecular weight of the protease was estimated at 23.2 kD by SDS-PAGE. With azocasein as the susbstrate, the optimal temperature was 55°C and the optimal pH value was 5.5. Ion Ca2+ could enhance the proteolytic activity of the protease, while Cu2+, EDTA and PMSF could inhibit its activity.

  1. In-gel expression and in situ immobilization of proteins for generation of three dimensional protein arrays in a hydrogel matrix.

    PubMed

    Byun, Ju-Young; Lee, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Ka-Young; Kim, Min-Gon; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2013-03-01

    A method has been developed for the direct conversion of DNA arrays into three dimensional protein arrays on a hydrogel matrix. An agarose gel embedded with bacterial protein synthesis machinery was used as the DNA-programmable expression gel matrix for the in situ translation of genes on a DNA array. Upon incubation of the expression gel matrix cast on a DNA array, protein synthesis took place at the interface of the two surfaces and the cell-free synthesized proteins were deposited on the gel matrix surrounding the corresponding DNA spots. Diffusional dilution of the expressed proteins was minimized by modifying the agarose with Ni-NTA moieties. This procedure resulted in the generation of localized protein spots with confined radii. The developed approach not only simplifies the procedures typically used for the preparation of protein arrays but it also provides conditions for the loading of higher amounts of proteins on the array while retaining their structural integrity and functionality over extended time periods.

  2. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  3. Analysis of chicken bile by gel precipitation reactions using a lectin in the place of antibody.

    PubMed

    Cotter, P F

    2000-09-01

    A lectin obtained from black turtle beans (BTB) was precipitated with IgA in chicken bile samples in various forms of agarose gel systems. Ouchterlony-type double-diffusion (ODD) precipitation patterns between the lectin, bile IgA, and heavy chain-specific antibody contained spurs of the type suggestive of partial immunologic identity. The immunoelectrophoresis precipitation patterns between the same three reactants were mirror images and fused on the cathodic side of the immunoelectrophoresis origin. In addition to use in ODD-type gels, BTB could also be incorporated into agarose gels suitable for Mancini (radial immunodiffusion) or Laurell-type rocket electrophoresis. Bile samples obtained from Cornell lines OS and C, broiler breeder males, and University of California-Davis congenic lines were investigated using BTB- and antibody-based methods. The results of this study indicated that IgA was the most frequently detected isotype in bile, occurring in 139 of 156 (89%) samples. Most bile samples (128/156; 82%) also contained IgG, whereas fewer (19/156; 12%) contained IgM. Cornell lines appeared to differ from broiler breeders, having a higher frequency of IgM-positive samples. Of the total bile samples studied, 11% (17/156) of samples from broiler breeders and the Cornell lines appeared to be devoid of IgA; the bile of one broiler breeder was found to be devoid of all three isotypes. Instances were found in which bile samples shown to be negative for IgA by antibody-ODD were shown to be positive by BTB-ODD. Thus BTB appears to be a suitable adjunct to antibody for the study of IgA.

  4. Determination of free acidic and alkaline residues of protein via moving reaction boundary titration in microdevice electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hou-yu; Li, Si; Tang, Yun-yun; Dong, Jing-yu; Fan, Liu-yin; Cao, Cheng-xi

    2013-06-21

    As two important physico-chemical parameters, the acidic and alkaline residues of protein are of evident significance for the evaluation of protein properties and the design of relevant separation and analysis. However, there is still no electrophoretic method used for the direct detection of free acidic and alkaline residues of protein. Herein, we developed the concepts of moving reaction boundary (MRB) and MRB titration, relevant MRB titration theory, and the method of microdevice electrophoresis for the determination of free acidic and alkaline residues of protein. In the MRB titration, the boundary was created with acid or alkali and target protein immobilized via highly cross-linked polyacrylamide gel (PAG). It was theoretically revealed that the number of free acidic or alkaline residues of protein was as a function of MRB displacement in the electrophoretic titration system. As a proof of concept, seven model proteins were chosen for the determination of acidic or alkaline residues of protein via MRB titration. The results showed that the numbers of free acidic and alkaline residues of proteins detected were in good agreement with those obtained from the relevant amino sequences in the NCBI database, demonstrating the feasibility of the developed concept, theory and technique. The general methodology of MRB titration has potential application for inexpensive, facilitative and informative protein structure analysis of free acidic or alkaline residues of protein.

  5. Evaluation of the Effects of Injection Velocity and Different Gel Concentrations on Nanoparticles in Hyperthermia Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Javidi, M; Heydari, M; Karimi, A; Haghpanahi, M; Navidbakhsh, M; Razmkon, A

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective: In magnetic fluid hyperthermia therapy, controlling temperature elevation and optimizing heat generation is an immense challenge in practice. The resultant heating configuration by magnetic fluid in the tumor is closely related to the dispersion of particles, frequency and intensity of magnetic field, and biological tissue properties. Methods: In this study, to solve heat transfer equation, we used COMSOL Multiphysics and to verify the model, an experimental setup has been used.  To show the accuracy of the model, simulations have been compared with experimental results. In the second part, by using experimental results of nanoparticles distribution inside Agarose gel according to various gel concentration, 0.5%, 1%, 2%, and 4%, as well as the injection velocity, 4 µL/min, 10 µL/min, 20 µL/min, and 40 µL/min, for 0.3 cc magnetite fluid, power dissipation inside gel has been calculated and used for temperature prediction inside of the gel. Results: The Outcomes demonstrated that by increasing the flow rate injection at determined concentrations, mean temperature drops. In addition, 2% concentration has a higher mean temperature than semi spherical nanoparticles distribution. Conclusion: The results may have implications for treatment of the tumor and any kind of cancer diseases. PMID:25599061

  6. Ultra-fast high-resolution agarose electrophoresis of DNA and RNA using low-molarity conductive media.

    PubMed

    Brody, Jonathan R; Calhoun, Eric S; Gallmeier, Eike; Creavalle, Talisa D; Kern, Scott E

    2004-10-01

    Current DNA electrophoretic solutions employ high ionic concentrations and require long electrophoretic run times. Here we demonstrate that high and low molecular weight double-stranded DNA, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), and RNA can be separated rapidly in agarose-based low-molarity conductive media. Separation of small DNA fragments was optimized by substituting 1-mM solutions of alkali metals or a nonbiological amine that distributed voltage with a minute current. These ultra-dilute solutions can separate DNA at least 15-fold faster Low-molarity media at 5-10 mM adequately separated RNA and larger DNA fragments as well. These novel media reduce the Joule heating of the electrophoretic system and allow for easy-to-use, ultra-fast separation of DNA fragments.

  7. Chemical characterisation of different separation media based on agarose by static time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Bo-Lennart; Andersson, Mikael; Lausmaa, Jukka; Sjövall, Peter

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the novel application of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) for qualitative and semi-quantitative investigation of the surface chemistry of separation media based on beaded agarose is reported. Five different media were studied: DEAE Sepharose Fast Flow, Q Sepharose Fast Flow, SP Sepharose Fast Flow, Phenyl Sepharose Fast Flow at ligand densities between 7 and 33% (w/w) and the base matrix Sepharose 6 Fast Flow. The obtained TOF-SIMS spectra reveal significant chemical information regarding the ligands (DEAE, Q, SP and Phenyl) which are covalently attached to the agarose-based matrix Sepharose 6 Fast Flow. For the anion-exchange media (DEAE and Q Sepharose Fast Flow), the positive TOF-SIMS spectra yielded several strong characteristic fragment peaks from the amine ligands. Structural information was obtained, e.g. from the peak at m/z 173.20, originating from the ion structure [(C2H5)2NCH2CH2NH(C2H5)2l+, which shows that the ligand in DEAE Sepharose Fast Flow is composed of both tertiary and quaternary amines. The positive spectrum of Phenyl Sepharose Fast Flow contained major fragments both from the base matrix and the ligand. The cation-exchanger (SP Sepharose Fast Flow) gave rise to a positive spectrum resembling that of the base matrix (Sepharose 6 Fast Flow) but with a different intensity pattern of the matrix fragments. In addition, peaks with low intensity at m/z 109.94, 125.94 and 139.95 corresponding to Na2SO2+, Na2SO3+ and Na2SO3CH2+, respectively, were observed. The positive TOF-SIMS spectrum of Sepharose 6 Fast Flow contains a large number of fragments in the mass range up to m/z 200 identified as CxHyOz and CxHy structures. The results clearly show that positive TOF-SIMS spectra of different media based on Sepharose 6 Fast Flow are strongly influenced by the ligand coupled to the matrix. The negative TOF-SIMS spectra contained several ligand-specific, characteristic peaks for the cation-exchanger, having sulphonate

  8. Interfacial activity in alkaline flooding enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization of long-chained organic acids in the crude oil to form soaps was shown to be primarily responsible for the lowering of oil-water interfacial tension at alkaline pH. These active acids can be concentrated by silica gel chromatography into a minor polar fraction. An equilibrium chemical model was proposed based on 2 competing reactions: the ionization of acids to form active anions, and the formation of undissociated soap between acid anions and sodium ions. It correlates the interfacial activity with the interfacial concentration of active acid anions which is expressed in terms of the concentrations of the chemical species in the system. The model successfully predicts the observed oil-alkaline solution interfacial phenomenon, including its dependence on pH, alkali and salt concentrations, type of acid present and type of soap formed. Flooding at different alkali concentrations to activate different acid species present in the crude was shown to give better recovery than flooding at a single high alkali concentration. Treating the crude oil with a dilute solution of mineral acids liberates additional free active acids and yields better interfacial activity during subsequent alkali contact.

  9. Factors influencing alginate gel biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Tam, Susan K; Dusseault, Julie; Bilodeau, Stéphanie; Langlois, Geneviève; Hallé, Jean-Pierre; Yahia, L'Hocine

    2011-07-01

    Alginate remains the most popular polymer used for cell encapsulation, yet its biocompatibility is inconsistent. Two commercially available alginates were compared, one with 71% guluronate (HiG), and the other with 44% (IntG). Both alginates were purified, and their purities were verified. After 2 days in the peritoneal cavity of C57BL/6J mice, barium (Ba)-gel and calcium (Ca)-gel beads of IntG alginate were clean, while host cells were adhered to beads of HiG alginate. IntG gel beads, however, showed fragmentation in vivo while HiG gel beads stayed firm. The physicochemical properties of the sodium alginates and their gels were thoroughly characterized. The intrinsic viscosity of IntG alginate was 2.5-fold higher than that of HiG alginate, suggesting a greater molecular mass. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that both alginates were similar in elemental composition, including low levels of counterions in all gels. The wettabilities of the alginates and gels were also identical, as measured by contact angles of water on dry films. Ba-gel beads of HiG alginate resisted swelling and degradation when immersed in water, much more than the other gel beads. These results suggest that the main factors contributing to the biocompatibility of gels of purified alginate are the mannuronate/guluronate content and/or intrinsic viscosity.

  10. Analysis of one-dimensional gels and two-dimensional Serwer-type gels on the basis of the extended Ogston model using personal computers.

    PubMed

    Tietz, D

    1991-01-01

    This report presents the stand-alone computer application ELPHOFIT, a software package for the analysis of gel electrophoretic data based on Ferguson plots. Either conventional one-dimensional gels or two-dimensional agarose gels (Serwer-type) can be evaluated. Special emphasis is on the latter gel type, which has been applied previously for the separation of DNA, intact viruses and polydisperse meningitis vaccines. ELPHOFIT is designed for Macintosh PCs and for the IBM XT, AT, PS/2 and compatibles. The program operates interactively with the user, who determines the course of evaluation. Data input is in the format of files providing values of gel electrophoretic migration distances or particle mobility (absolute or relative). Data processing involves a simultaneous least-square curve fitting algorithm (Newton-Gauss, Marquardt-Levenberg) which uses equations derived from the extended Ogston model. Functions are fit to the database by adjusting their variables, representing physical parameters of the gel and the electrophoresed particle. The program output consists of tables and graphics accompanied by an explanatory text providing the following information: (i) radius and free mobility of the electrophoresed particle, (ii) fiber radius, length and volume, mean or median pore radius of the gel, (iii) linear Ferguson plots, (iv) iso-free-mobility/iso-size nomogram for two-dimensional gels, (v) confidence ellipses, (vi) required parameters for image processing program GELFIT and (vii) goodness-of-fit and other statistical parameters, such as standard errors, dependency values, root-mean-square (RMS) error and determination coefficient. Other features of the program are (i) simulation of Serwer-type two-dimensional electrophoresis, (ii) standardization according to size, or size and free mobility, (iii) the conversion of particle radii to molecular (or particle) weight and vice versa, (iv) interconversion of DNA size specifications, i.e. the number of base pairs and

  11. Alkaline pH sensor molecules.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichiro N

    2015-11-01

    Animals can survive only within a narrow pH range. This requires continual monitoring of environmental and body-fluid pH. Although a variety of acidic pH sensor molecules have been reported, alkaline pH sensor function is not well understood. This Review describes neuronal alkaline pH sensors, grouped according to whether they monitor extracellular or intracellular alkaline pH. Extracellular sensors include the receptor-type guanylyl cyclase, the insulin receptor-related receptor, ligand-gated Cl- channels, connexin hemichannels, two-pore-domain K+ channels, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Intracellular sensors include TRP channels and gap junction channels. Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying alkaline pH sensing is crucial for understanding how animals respond to environmental alkaline pH and how body-fluid pH is maintained within a narrow range.

  12. High transparent shape memory gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jin; Arai, Masanori; Kabir, M. H.; Makino, Masato; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2014-03-01

    Gels are a new material having three-dimensional network structures of macromolecules. They possess excellent properties as swellability, high permeability and biocompatibility, and have been applied in various fields of daily life, food, medicine, architecture, and chemistry. In this study, we tried to prepare new multi-functional and high-strength gels by using Meso-Decoration (Meso-Deco), one new method of structure design at intermediate mesoscale. High-performance rigid-rod aromatic polymorphic crystals, and the functional groups of thermoreversible Diels-Alder reaction were introduced into soft gels as crosslinkable pendent chains. The functionalization and strengthening of gels can be realized by meso-decorating the gels' structure using high-performance polymorphic crystals and thermoreversible pendent chains. New gels with good mechanical properties, novel optical properties and thermal properties are expected to be developed.

  13. Studies of matrix vesicle-induced mineralization in a gelatin gel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boskey, A. L.; Boyan, B. D.; Doty, S. B.; Feliciano, A.; Greer, K.; Weiland, D.; Swain, L. D.; Schwartz, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Matrix vesicles isolated from fourth-passage cultures of chondrocytes were tested for their ability to induce hydroxyapatite formation in a gelatin gel in order to gain insight into the function of matrix vesicles in in situ mineralization. These matrix vesicles did not appear to be hydroxyapatite nucleators per se since the extent of mineral accumulation in the gel diffusion system was not altered by the presence of matrix vesicles alone, and in the vesicle containing gels, mineral crystals were formed whether associated with vesicles or not. In gels with these matrix vesicles and beta-glycerophosphate, despite the presence of alkaline phosphatase activity, there was no increase in mineral deposition. This suggested that in the gel system these culture-derived vesicles did not increase local phosphate concentrations. However, when known inhibitors of mineral crystal formation and growth (proteoglycan aggregates [4 mg/ml], or ATP [1 mM], or both proteoglycan and ATP) were included in the gel, more mineral was deposited in gels with the vesicles than in comparable gels without vesicles, indicating that enzymes within these vesicles were functioning to remove the inhibition. These data support the suggestion that one function of the extracellular matrix vesicles is to transport enzymes for matrix modification.

  14. Alkaline-resistance model of subtilisin ALP I, a novel alkaline subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Maeda, H; Mizutani, O; Yamagata, Y; Ichishima, E; Nakajima, T

    2001-05-01

    The alkaline-resistance mechanism of the alkaline-stable enzymes is not yet known. To clarify the mechanism of alkaline-resistance of alkaline subtilisin, structural changes of two typical subtilisins, subtilisin ALP I (ALP I) and subtilisin Sendai (Sendai), were studied by means of physicochemical methods. Subtilisin NAT (NAT), which exhibits no alkaline resistance, was examined as a control. ALP I gradually lost its activity, accompanied by protein degradation, but, on the contrary, Sendai was stable under alkaline conditions. CD spectral measurements at neutral and alkaline pH indicated no apparent differences between ALP I and Sendai. A significant difference was observed on measurement of fluorescence emission spectra of the tryptophan residues of ALP I that were exposed on the enzyme surface. The fluorescence intensity of ALP I was greatly reduced under alkaline conditions; moreover, the reduction was reversed when alkaline-treated ALP I was neutralized. The fluorescence spectrum of Sendai remained unchanged. The enzymatic and optical activities of NAT were lost at high pH, indicating a lack of functional and structural stability in an alkaline environment. Judging from these results, the alkaline resistance is closely related to the surface structure of the enzyme molecule.

  15. Gel polymer electrolytes for batteries

    DOEpatents

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gur, Ilan; Singh, Mohit; Hudson, William

    2014-11-18

    Nanostructured gel polymer electrolytes that have both high ionic conductivity and high mechanical strength are disclosed. The electrolytes have at least two domains--one domain contains an ionically-conductive gel polymer and the other domain contains a rigid polymer that provides structure for the electrolyte. The domains are formed by block copolymers. The first block provides a polymer matrix that may or may not be conductive on by itself, but that can soak up a liquid electrolyte, thereby making a gel. An exemplary nanostructured gel polymer electrolyte has an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-4 S cm.sup.-1 at 25.degree. C.

  16. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, D.B.; Shahinpoor, M.; Segalman, D.J.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1993-10-05

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles are described capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots. 11 figures.

  17. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, Douglas B.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Segalman, Daniel J.; Witkowski, Walter R.

    1993-01-01

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots.

  18. An optical micromethod for the determination of relative crystallisation rates of calcium oxalate in gels: method and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Achilles, W; Mergner, C; Simon, M

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a new, highly efficient micromethod for the determination of relative crystallisation rates of calcium oxalate (CaOx). Crystallisation is performed in the upper layer of a gel (bactoagar, agarose) which contains one component (oxalate) of the sparingly soluble salt. Precipitation is started by pipetting Ca++ containing solutions (in the presence and absence of crystallisation inhibitors) onto the gel. The process is followed quantitatively as a function of time by means of vertical light path photometry carrying out quasi-simultaneous multideterminations within a 50-fold multicuvette. The test volume is 0.1 ml. The method is suitable for large scale determinations. About 50 single crystallisation kinetics can be measured within 5-15 min. Testing three known inhibitors of CaOx crystal formation, relative inhibitory activities were obtained with standard errors of 1%-4%. PMID:6868222

  19. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE): application in population structure studies of bovine mastitis-causing streptococci.

    PubMed

    Santos-Sanches, Ilda; Chambel, Lélia; Tenreiro, Rogério

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) separates large DNA molecules by the use of an alternating electrical field, such that greater size resolution can be obtained when compared to normal agarose gel electrophoresis. PFGE is often employed to track pathogens and is a valuable typing scheme to detect and differentiate strains. Particularly, the contour-clamped homogeneous electric field (CHEF) PFGE system is considered to be the gold standard for use in epidemiological studies of many bacterial pathogens. Here we describe a PFGE protocol that was applicable to the study of bovine streptococci, namely, Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS), Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae (group C Streptococcus, GCS), and Streptococcus uberis-which are relevant pathogens causing mastitis, a highly prevalent and costly disease in dairy industry due to antibiotherapy and loss in milk production. PMID:25399106

  20. Highly parallel single-molecule amplification approach based on agarose droplet polymerase chain reaction for efficient and cost-effective aptamer selection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei Yun; Zhang, Wenhua; Liu, Zhiyuan; Li, Cong; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a novel method for efficiently screening affinity ligands (aptamers) from a complex single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) library by employing single-molecule emulsion polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on the agarose droplet microfluidic technology. In a typical systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) process, the enriched library is sequenced first, and tens to hundreds of aptamer candidates are analyzed via a bioinformatic approach. Possible candidates are then chemically synthesized, and their binding affinities are measured individually. Such a process is time-consuming, labor-intensive, inefficient, and expensive. To address these problems, we have developed a highly efficient single-molecule approach for aptamer screening using our agarose droplet microfluidic technology. Statistically diluted ssDNA of the pre-enriched library evolved through conventional SELEX against cancer biomarker Shp2 protein was encapsulated into individual uniform agarose droplets for droplet PCR to generate clonal agarose beads. The binding capacity of amplified ssDNA from each clonal bead was then screened via high-throughput fluorescence cytometry. DNA clones with high binding capacity and low K(d) were chosen as the aptamer and can be directly used for downstream biomedical applications. We have identified an ssDNA aptamer that selectively recognizes Shp2 with a K(d) of 24.9 nM. Compared to a conventional sequencing-chemical synthesis-screening work flow, our approach avoids large-scale DNA sequencing and expensive, time-consuming DNA synthesis of large populations of DNA candidates. The agarose droplet microfluidic approach is thus highly efficient and cost-effective for molecular evolution approaches and will find wide application in molecular evolution technologies, including mRNA display, phage display, and so on.

  1. Characterization of crystals of the Hjc resolvase from Archaeoglobus fulgidus grown in gel by counter-diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Biertümpfel, Christian; Basquin, Jérôme; Birkenbihl, Rainer P.; Suck, Dietrich; Sauter, Claude

    2005-07-01

    The Holliday junction-cutting enzyme Hjc from A. fulgidus was crystallized by the counter-diffusion method in agarose gel and complete data were collected at 2.7 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. Holliday junction-resolving enzymes are ubiquitous proteins that play a key role in DNA repair and reorganization by homologous recombination. The Holliday junction-cutting enzyme (Hjc) from the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus is a member of this group. The first Hjc crystals were obtained by conventional sparse-matrix screening. They exhibited an unusually elongated unit cell and their X-ray characterization required special care to avoid spot overlaps along the c* axis. The use of an arc appended to the goniometric head allowed proper orientatation of plate-like crystals grown in agarose gel by counter-diffusion. Thus, complete diffraction data were collected at 2.7 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. They belong to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 37.4, c = 271.8 Å.

  2. [Immunodiffusion tests in gel media with the addition of polyethyleneglycol 6000 for the serodiagnosis of mycoses].

    PubMed

    Zaror, L; Robles, A M; Negroni, R

    1978-01-01

    Different immunodiffusion techniques with and without the addition of polyetilenglycol 6000 (PEG), were studied to determine its effect on the sensitivity of these reactions. One hundred thirteen sera from patients who suffered or had suffered deep mycoses (paracoccidioidomycosis: 49, histoplasmosis: 25, aspergillosis: 25, candidiasis: 8 and coccidioidomycosis: 6) were examined by the quantitative Ouchterlony's immunodiffusion procedure. Regular medium and media with 2% and 4% PEG were used. Eighty two out of the one hundred thirteen sera were positive for the regular medium and 91 for the medium containing 2% of PEG; furthermore, an increase of 1 or 2 two fold dilutions in the titers was observed in 40% of the sera, for the later media. Twenty one sera from aspergillosis cases were examined by agarose gel immunoelectrophoresis, 80% had more precipitin bands in the medium with 2% of PEG. Thirty four serum samples of patients suffering aspergillosis, paracoccidioidomycosis and histoplasmosis were studied using the agarose electroosmophoresis with the secondary immunodiffusion test. An increase in the number of the anodic bands were observed in 55% while 64% presented more catodic bands, when the PEG medium was used. This results would indicate that the addition of 2% PEG 6000 to the regular medium improves the sensitivity of the immunodiffusion tests for mycoses.

  3. A monoclonal antibody against the surface of osteoblasts recognizes alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes in bone, liver, kidney, and intestine.

    PubMed

    Bruder, S P; Caplan, A I

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against the surface of embryonic osteogenic cells have been used to characterize the osteoblastic lineage. One antibody, SB-1, reacts in frozen sections with a family of cells in bone, liver, kidney, and intestine which are identically stained by the histochemical substrate for alkaline phosphatase. In this report, biochemical and immunochemical evidence is presented to indicate that SB-1 is directed against an epitope on alkaline phosphatase which is shared by isoenzymes in a variety of chick tissues. In a solid-phase assay system, high dilutions (1:10(5] of ascites fluid were found to give significant binding of SB-1 to alkaline phosphatase extracted from chick limb or intestine. Partial purification of intestinal alkaline phosphatase on a Sepharose CL-6B column results in the co-elution of alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity and antibody-binding material; this indicates that SB-1 recognizes intestinal alkaline phosphatase rather than an impurity in the crude preparation. Furthermore, Western immunoblots of chick calvarial bone extract electrophoresed on a 5-20% SDS-polyacrylamide gel show that SB-1 reacts with a single 155 kD band which also is stained by the alkaline phosphatase histochemical substrate. In a similar set of experiments, SB-1 reacts with an intestinal alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme whose molecular weight is approximately 185 kD. From these studies, we conclude that SB-1 is specifically reactive with alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes present in bone, liver, kidney, cartilage, and intestine. The reactive epitope is stable to SDS denaturation, not associated with the active site of the enzyme, and dependent on disulfide bonds which impart secondary structure to the protein.

  4. Active gel physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prost, J.; Jülicher, F.; Joanny, J.-F.

    2015-02-01

    The mechanical behaviour of cells is largely controlled by a structure that is fundamentally out of thermodynamic equilibrium: a network of crosslinked filaments subjected to the action of energy-transducing molecular motors. The study of this kind of active system was absent from conventional physics and there was a need for both new theories and new experiments. The field that has emerged in recent years to fill this gap is underpinned by a theory that takes into account the transduction of chemical energy on the molecular scale. This formalism has advanced our understanding of living systems, but it has also had an impact on research in physics per se. Here, we describe this developing field, its relevance to biology, the novelty it conveys to other areas of physics and some of the challenges in store for the future of active gel physics.

  5. Antimicrobial Graft Copolymer Gels.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Amanda C; Madsen, Jeppe; Douglas, C W Ian; MacNeil, Sheila; Armes, Steven P

    2016-08-01

    In view of the growing worldwide rise in microbial resistance, there is considerable interest in designing new antimicrobial copolymers. The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between antimicrobial activity and copolymer composition/architecture to gain a better understanding of their mechanism of action. Specifically, the antibacterial activity of several copolymers based on 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine [MPC] and 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA) toward Staphylococcus aureus was examined. Both block and graft copolymers were synthesized using either atom transfer radical polymerization or reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization and characterized via (1)H NMR, gel permeation chromatography, rheology, and surface tensiometry. Antimicrobial activity was assessed using a range of well-known assays, including direct contact, live/dead staining, and the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), while transmission electron microscopy was used to study the morphology of the bacteria before and after the addition of various copolymers. As expected, PMPC homopolymer was biocompatible but possessed no discernible antimicrobial activity. PMPC-based graft copolymers comprising PHPMA side chains (i.e. PMPC-g-PHPMA) significantly reduced both bacterial growth and viability. In contrast, a PMPC-PHPMA diblock copolymer comprising a PMPC stabilizer block and a hydrophobic core-forming PHPMA block did not exhibit any antimicrobial activity, although it did form a biocompatible worm gel. Surface tensiometry studies and LDH release assays suggest that the PMPC-g-PHPMA graft copolymer exhibits surfactant-like activity. Thus, the observed antimicrobial activity is likely to be the result of the weakly hydrophobic PHPMA chains penetrating (and hence rupturing) the bacterial membrane. PMID:27409712

  6. Embedding in a collagen gel stabilizes the polarity of epithelial cells in thyroid follicles in suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Garbi, C; Nitsch, L; Wollman, S H

    1984-04-01

    Separated thyroid follicles are stable in suspension culture in Coon's modified Ham's F12 medium containing 0.5% calf serum. They resemble follicles in vivo except for the absence of a basal lamina. However, the epithelial cells reverse polarity and the follicles invert when the serum concentration is raised to 5%. A number of substances, especially components of extracellular matrix, were added to the medium to ascertain if they could stabilize the follicles against inversion in 5% serum. Cellular and plasma fibronectin, gelatin, heat-denatured collagen, methylcellulose and laminin did not stabilize. The addition to the medium of as little as 50 micrograms/ml of acid-soluble collagen prepared from calf skin or rat tail tendons resulted in the formation of small clouds of gel. Follicles embedded within the gel were stabilized. Follicles in the same dish but not embedded in the gel inverted. Stabilization was not specific for collagen, since follicles embedded in a plasma clot were also stabilized. A gel was not sufficient for stabilization, since embedding in an agarose gel did not stabilize. Ultrastructural studies indicate that adherence to a limited number of gelled fibers of collagen covering only a small fraction of the basal plasma membrane may be sufficient to stabilize and that a basal lamina formed in the presence of laminin but without added collagen does not stabilize.

  7. Gel-Entrapped Staphylococcus aureus Bacteria as Models of Biofilm Infection Exhibit Growth in Dense Aggregates, Oxygen Limitation, Antibiotic Tolerance, and Heterogeneous Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Pabst, Breana; Pitts, Betsey; Lauchnor, Ellen; Stewart, Philip S

    2016-10-01

    An experimental model that mimicked the structure and characteristics of in vivo biofilm infections, such as those occurring in the lung or in dermal wounds where no biomaterial surface is present, was developed. In these infections, microbial biofilm forms as cell aggregates interspersed in a layer of mucus or host matrix material. This structure was modeled by filling glass capillary tubes with an agarose gel that had been seeded with Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and then incubating the gel biofilm in medium for up to 30 h. Confocal microscopy showed that the bacteria formed in discrete pockets distributed throughout the gel matrix. These aggregates enlarged over time and also developed a size gradient, with the clusters being larger near the nutrient- and oxygen-supplied interface and smaller at greater depths. Bacteria entrapped in gels for 24 h grew slowly (specific growth rate, 0.06 h(-1)) and were much less susceptible to oxacillin, minocycline, or ciprofloxacin than planktonic cells. Microelectrode measurements showed that the oxygen concentration decreased with depth into the gel biofilm, falling to values less than 3% of air saturation at depths of 500 μm. An anaerobiosis-responsive green fluorescent protein reporter gene for lactate dehydrogenase was induced in the region of the gel where the measured oxygen concentrations were low, confirming biologically relevant hypoxia. These results show that the gel biofilm model captures key features of biofilm infection in mucus or compromised tissue: formation of dense, distinct aggregates, reduced specific growth rates, local hypoxia, and antibiotic tolerance. PMID:27503656

  8. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    1995-01-01

    A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

  9. Inorganic-organic separators for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible separator is reported for use between the electrodes of Ni-Cd and Ni-Zn batteries using alkaline electrolytes. The separator was made by coating a porous substrate with a battery separator composition. The coating material included a rubber-based resin copolymer, a plasticizer and inorganic and organic fillers which comprised 55% by volume or less of the coating as finally dried. One or more of the filler materials, whether organic or inorganic, is preferably active with the alkaline electrolyte to produce pores in the separator coating. The plasticizer was an organic material which is hydrolyzed by the alkaline electrolyte to improve conductivity of the separator coating.

  10. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  11. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  12. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    DOEpatents

    Petruska, Melissa A.; Klimov, Victor L.

    2012-06-12

    The present invention is directed to solid composites including colloidal nanocrystals within a sol-gel host or matrix and to processes of forming such solid composites. The present invention is further directed to alcohol soluble colloidal nanocrystals useful in formation of sol-gel based solid composites

  13. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    DOEpatents

    Petruska, Melissa A.; Klimov, Victor L.

    2007-06-05

    The present invention is directed to solid composites including colloidal nanocrystals within a sol-gel host or matrix and to processes of forming such solid composites. The present invention is further directed to alcohol soluble colloidal nanocrystals useful in formation of sol-gel based solid composites.

  14. A Constructed Alkaline Consortium and Its Dynamics in Treating Alkaline Black Liquor with Very High Pollution Load

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunyu; Cao, Guangchun; Li, Yang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ren, Hongyan; Wang, Xia; Feng, Jinhui; Zhao, Liping; Xu, Ping

    2008-01-01

    Background Paper pulp wastewater resulting from alkaline extraction of wheat straw, known as black liquor, is very difficult to be treated and causes serious environmental problems due to its high pH value and chemical oxygen demand (COD) pollution load. Lignin, semicellulose and cellulose are the main contributors to the high COD values in black liquor. Very few microorganisms can survive in such harsh environments of the alkaline wheat straw black liquor. A naturally developed microbial community was found accidentally in a black liquor storing pool in a paper pulp mill of China. The community was effective in pH decreasing, color and COD removing from the high alkaline and high COD black liquor. Findings Thirty-eight strains of bacteria were isolated from the black liquor storing pool, and were grouped as eleven operational taxonomy units (OTUs) using random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR profiles (RAPD). Eleven representative strains of each OTU, which were identified as genera of Halomonas and Bacillus, were used to construct a consortium to treat black liquor with a high pH value of 11.0 and very high COD pollution load of 142,600 mg l−1. After treatment by the constructed consortium, about 35.4% of color and 39,000 mg l−1 (27.3%) CODcr were removed and the pH decreased to 7.8. 16S rRNA gene polymerase chain reaction denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis suggested a two-stage treatment mechanism to elucidate the interspecies collaboration: Halomonas isolates were important in the first stage to produce organic acids that contributed to the pH decline, while Bacillus isolates were involved in the degradation of lignin derivatives in the second stage under lower pH conditions. Conclusions/Significance Tolerance to the high alkaline environment and good controllability of the simple consortium suggested that the constructed consortium has good potential for black liquor treatment

  15. Preparation of decarboxylic-functionalized weak cation exchanger and application for simultaneous separation of alkali, alkaline earth and transition metals.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yahui; Gan, Yihui; He, Chengxia; Yang, Bingcheng; Guo, Zhimou; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-06-01

    A novel weak cation exchanger (WCX) with dicarboxyl groups functionalized has been developed by clicking mercaptosuccinic acid onto silica gel. The simple synthesis starts with modification of silica gel with triethoxyvinylsilane, followed by efficient coupling vinyl-bonded silica with mercaptosuccinic acid via a "thiol-ene" click reaction. The obtained WCX demonstrated good separation and high selectivity towards common metals. Simultaneous separation of 10 alkali, alkaline earth and transition metals was achieved within 12min. Ion exchange and complex mechanism dominates the separation process. Its utility was demonstrated for determination of metals in tap water. PMID:27130093

  16. Sucrose release from polysaccharide gels.

    PubMed

    Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Fang, Yapeng

    2016-05-18

    Sucrose release from polysaccharide gels has been studied extensively because it is expected to be useful in understanding flavour release from solid foods and to find a new processing method which produces more palatable and healthier foods. We provide an overview of the release of sucrose and other sugars from gels of agar and related polysaccharides. The addition of sucrose to agar solutions leads to the increase in transparency of the resulting gels and the decrease in syneresis, which is attributed to the decrease in mesh size in gels. The syneresis occurring in the quiescent condition and fluid release induced by compression is discussed. The relationship between the sugar release and the structural, rheological and thermal properties of gels is also discussed. Finally, the future research direction is proposed.

  17. Sucrose release from polysaccharide gels.

    PubMed

    Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Fang, Yapeng

    2016-05-18

    Sucrose release from polysaccharide gels has been studied extensively because it is expected to be useful in understanding flavour release from solid foods and to find a new processing method which produces more palatable and healthier foods. We provide an overview of the release of sucrose and other sugars from gels of agar and related polysaccharides. The addition of sucrose to agar solutions leads to the increase in transparency of the resulting gels and the decrease in syneresis, which is attributed to the decrease in mesh size in gels. The syneresis occurring in the quiescent condition and fluid release induced by compression is discussed. The relationship between the sugar release and the structural, rheological and thermal properties of gels is also discussed. Finally, the future research direction is proposed. PMID:26952168

  18. Optimization of Pulsed-field Gel Electrophoresis Procedure for Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui Juan; Pan, Zhuo; Wei, Jian Chun; Zhang, En Min; Cai, Hong; Liang, Xu Dong; Li, Wei

    2016-03-01

    In order to develop a rapid and reliable method for B. cereus genotyping, factors influencing PFGE results, including preparation of bacterial cells embedded in agarose, lysis of embedded cells, enzymatic digestion of intact genomic DNA, and electrophoresis parameters allowing for reproducible and meaningful DNA fragment separation, were controlled. Optimal cellular growth (Luria-Bertani agar plates for 12-18 h) and lysis conditions (4 h incubation with 500 µg/mL lysozyme) produced sharp bands on the gel. Restriction enzyme NotI was chosen as the most suitable. Twenty-two isolates were analyzed by NotI digestion, using three electrophoretic parameters (EPs). The EP-a was optimal for distinguishing between isolates. The optimized protocol could be completed within 40 h which is a significant improvement over the previous methods. PMID:27109136

  19. Composite seal reduces alkaline battery leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clatterbuck, C. H.; Plitt, K. F.

    1965-01-01

    Composite seal consisting of rubber or plastic washers and a metal washer reduces alkaline battery leakage. Adhesive is applied to each washer interface, and the washers are held together mechanically.

  20. Ratiometric electrochemical detection of alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Goggins, Sean; Naz, Christophe; Marsh, Barrie J; Frost, Christopher G

    2015-01-11

    A novel ferrocene-derived substrate for the ratiometric electrochemical detection of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was designed and synthesised. It was demonstrated to be an excellent electrochemical substrate for the ALP-labelled enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

  1. Innovations in non-isotopic DNA sequencing: using an electrotransfer unit to blot sequencing gels and an automated membrane processor for detecting DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Patel, A; Nash, B

    1995-02-01

    As alternatives to radiolabeled DNA sequencing, chemiluminescent and chromogenic sequencing methods can be comparable in both sensitivity and resolution. Chemiluminescent/chromogenic detection procedures are safer because they completely eliminate the handling and use of radioisotopes. One method involves standard dideoxy DNA sequencing reactions that are initiated with biotinylated primers, separated by gel electrophoresis, transferred onto nylon membrane and detected utilizing chemiluminescent 1,2-dioxetane substrates for alkaline-phosphatase. Alkaline phosphatase is linked to the biotinylated sequencing products by a streptavidin/alkaline phosphatase conjugate (SAAP). In this paper we describe an optimized procedure for transferring sequencing gels. The procedure is based on a semidry method developed at Hoefer Laboratories using the GeneSweep Sequencing Gel Transfer Unit. Transfer is rapid, uniform and reliable from gel to gel. We also describe automation of the development process using a fully programmable Gel/Membrane Processor that automates delivery, incubation and disposal of reagents. All crucial points for electrotransfer of sequencing gels and the detection of biotinylated DNA sequencing reaction products are discussed.

  2. Bouncing gel balls: Impact of soft gels onto rigid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Yamazaki, Y.; Okumura, K.

    2003-07-01

    After being thrown onto a solid substrate, very soft spherical gels bounce repeatedly. Separate rheological measurements suggest that these balls can be treated as nearly elastic. The Hertz contact deformation expected in the static (elastic) limit was observed only at very small impact velocities. For larger velocities, the gel ball deformed into flattened forms like a pancake. We measured the size of the gel balls at the maximal deformation and the contact time as a function of velocities for samples different in the original spherical radius and the Young modulus. The experimental results revealed a number of scaling relations. To interpret these relations, we developed scaling arguments to propose a physical picture.

  3. Clusterin and the terminal complement pathway synthesized by human umbilical vein endothelial cells are closely linked when detected on co-cultured agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Berge, V; Johnson, E; Høgåsen, K

    1997-01-01

    Clusterin and the terminal complement pathway synthesized by human umbilical vein endothelial cells are closely linked when detected on co-cultured agarose beads. Clusterin is a multifunctional regulatory protein rendering the terminal complement complex (TCC) soluble and unable to insert into cell membranes. The aim of the present study was to examine whether clusterin was an integral part of serum-derived TCC bound to agarose beads which activate the alternative pathway of complement. Further, we searched for evidence of clusterin synthesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) and whether this synthesis was regulated by various proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, and TNF) and IFN-gamma. The clusterin and TCC on co-incubated beads were measured by radioimmunoassay based on primary anti-complement antibodies (anti-C3c, anti-TCC, anti-clusterin). We found that clusterin in serum experiments is bound to C9 in agarose bound TCC and not directly to the agarose. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide to cultured human umbilical vein cells resulted in a strong reduction (about 70%) of anti-clusterin binding to co-cultured beads, which strongly supports de novo synthesis of clusterin in EC. The results indicate that clusterin derived from the EC is linked with the TCC on the co-incubated beads for the following reasons: First, in serum experiments clusterin like vitronectin, was co-deposited with C9 in agarose-bound TCC. Second, cytokine stimulation of the EC with proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6 and TNF, known to increase the detection of bound TCC, also increased the amount of clusterin detected on the beads. Third, IFN-gamma, which reduces the concentration of bound TCC, exhibited the same effect on the amount of clusterin detected on such beads. There was a strong and dose-dependent reduction of anti-TCC binding from about 45% to about 95% when clusterin (5-40 micrograms/ml) was added to EC cultures. This effect was also

  4. Agarose cell block technique as a complementary method in the diagnosis of fungal osteomyelitis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Zanoni, D.S.; Grandi, F.; Cagnini, D.Q.; Bosco, S.M.G.; Rocha, N.S.

    2012-01-01

    A 7-year-old Labrador Retriever female dog presenting left forelimb lameness for one day was admitted to the Veterinary Hospital (UNESP-Botucatu) for clinical evaluation. Several tests, including blood and image analysis, microbiological culture and cytology of lytic areas of affected bone were made in order to establish a diagnosis. Serum biochemical profile revealed increased levels of liver enzymes, plasma globulin, creatine kinase (CK) and calcium. Hemogram revealed anemia and leukocytosis; left humerus image analysis revealed an osteolytic lesion and cytology revealed a suppurative periostitis. Differential diagnosis was a nonspecific infectious inflammatory process or osteosarcoma. Since it was not possible to achieve a definitive diagnosis and there was a highly suspicious for an infectious agent, an agarose cell block of the bone marrow fine-needle aspiration was made. The cytological examination of cell block presented similar findings as described previously. However, additional stains including periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) were positive for fungal hyphae, which rendered a diagnosis of fungal osteomyelitis due to Aspergillus spp. This case report illustrates an uncommon cause of osteomyelitis for breed that was diagnosed by an underused method in veterinary medicine. PMID:26623286

  5. Combined biosynthetic pathway for de novo production of UDP-galactose: catalysis with multiple enzymes immobilized on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziye; Zhang, Jianbo; Chen, Xi; Wang, Peng G

    2002-04-01

    Regeneration of sugar nucleotides is a critical step in the biosynthetic pathway for the formation of oligosaccharides. To alleviate the difficulties in the production of sugar nucleotides, we have developed a method to produce uridine diphosphate galactose (UDP-galactose). The combined biosynthetic pathway, which involves seven enzymes, is composed of three parts: i) the main pathway to form UDP-galactose from galactose, with the enzymes galactokinase, galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, and inorganic pyrophosphatase, ii) the uridine triphosphate supply pathway catalyzed by uridine monophosphate (UMP) kinase and nucleotide diphosphate kinase, and iii) the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regeneration pathway catalyzed by polyphosphate kinase with polyphosphate added as an energy resource. All of the enzymes were expressed individually and immobilized through their hexahistidine tags onto nickel agarose beads ("super beads"). The reaction requires a stoichiometric amount of UMP and galactose, and catalytic amounts of ATP and glucose 1-phosphate, all inexpensive starting materials. After continuous circulation of the reaction mixture through the super-bead column for 48 h, 50 % of the UMP was converted into UDP-galactose. The results show that de novo production of UDP-galactose on the super-bead column is more efficient than in solution because of the stability of the immobilized enzymes.

  6. Assaying Bcr-Abl kinase activity and inhibition in whole cell extracts by phosphorylation of substrates immobilized on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ding; Nair-Gill, Evan; Sher, Dorie A; Parker, Laurie L; Campbell, Jennifer M; Siddiqui, Mariah; Stock, Wendy; Kron, Stephen J

    2005-12-01

    There is a current and increasing demand for simple, robust, nonradioactive assays of protein tyrosine kinase activity with applications for clinical diagnosis and high-throughput screening of potential molecularly targeted therapeutic agents. One significant challenge is to detect and measure the activity of specific kinases with key roles in cell signaling as an approach to distinguish normal cells from cancer cells and as a means of evaluating targeted drug efficacy and resistance in cancer cells. Here, we describe a method in which kinase substrates fused to glutathione-S-transferase and immobilized on glutathione agarose beads are phosphorylated, eluted, and then assayed to detect kinase activity. The activity of recombinant, purified c-Abl kinase or Bcr-Abl kinase in whole cell extracts can be detected with equivalent specificity, sensitivity, and reproducibility. Similarly, inhibition of recombinant c-Abl or Bcr-Abl in cells or cell extracts by imatinib mesylate and other Bcr-Abl targeted kinase inhibitors is readily assayed. This simple kinase assay is sufficiently straightforward and robust for use in clinical laboratories and is potentially adaptable to high-throughput assay formats.

  7. Evaluation of a novel agarose-based synthetic ligand adsorbent for the recovery of antibodies from ovine serum.

    PubMed

    Chhatre, Sunil; Francis, Richard; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel J; Newcombe, Anthony R; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli

    2007-12-15

    This paper evaluates a prototype agarose-based affinity adsorbent utilizing a bound synthetic ligand designed to replace Protein A as an IgG-affinity capture resin and compares its purification characteristics with four commercially available matrices for the recovery of polyclonal antibodies from crude hyperimmune ovine serum. The novel adsorbent was found to show the highest dynamic capacity (29.2 mg/mL) of all matrices under evaluation--30% higher than the other commercial adsorbents evaluated. When using a post-load caprylic acid wash, IgG yields of over 85% and purities of over 90% were achieved consistently over multiple loading cycles. To evaluate bead diffusion, inverted confocal microscopy was used to visualise fluorescent antibody binding on to individual adsorbent beads in real time. The results indicate that the binding characteristics of the prototype adsorbent are similar to those obtained with Protein G Sepharose. This study indicates that the high-capacity prototype matrix is a feasible and potentially cost-effective alternative for the direct capture of antibodies from crude ovine serum and may therefore also be applicable to the purification of other complex industrial feedstocks such as transgenic milk or monoclonal antibodies expressed using recombinant technologies.

  8. Quantitative analysis of binding of transcription factor complex to biotinylated DNA probe by a streptavidin-agarose pulldown assay.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wu-Guo; Zhu, Ying; Montero, Alberto; Wu, Kenneth K

    2003-12-01

    Gene expression is regulated by a large complex of proteins that bind to the promoter/enhancer region of a gene. We determined whether a streptavidin-bead binding assay might be useful in detecting individual proteins in the complex comprising transactivators, coactivators, mediators, and general transcription factors. We used biotinylated cyclooxygenase-2 promoter probes as a model. Nuclear extracts obtained from human fibroblasts treated with or without an agonist were incubated with a 5(')-biotinylated probe and streptavidin-agarose beads at room temperature for 1h. After centrifugation, the pellet was washed and proteins in the complex were assessed by immunoblots. An array of transcription factors was detectable concurrently in the same batch of pellets at basal state. p300 and its associated factor PCAF levels but not Srb7, Med7, or TFII(B) were increased by phorbol ester or tumor necrosis factor alpha stimulation. Only trace of CREB-binding protein was detected. These results suggest that p300 and PCAF are the predominant coactivators for COX-2 promoter activation. Our findings indicate that the streptavidin-bead pulldown assay is valuable for determining the binding of a large number of transcription factors to promoter/enhancer and evaluating the relationship of protein binding with regulation of gene expression.

  9. First-in-Human Phase 1 Trial of Agarose Beads Containing Murine RENCA Cells in Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Barry H.; Parikh, Tapan; Andrada, Zoe P.; Fahey, Thomas J.; Berman, Nathaniel; Wiles, Madeline; Nazarian, Angelica; Thomas, Joanne; Arreglado, Anna; Akahoho, Eugene; Wolf, David J.; Levine, Daniel M.; Parker, Thomas S.; Gazda, Lawrence S.; Ocean, Allyson J.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Agarose macrobeads containing mouse renal adenocarcinoma cells (RMBs) release factors, suppressing the growth of cancer cells and prolonging survival in spontaneous or induced tumor animals, mediated, in part, by increased levels of myocyte-enhancing factor (MEF2D) via EGFR-and AKT-signaling pathways. The primary objective of this study was to determine the safety of RMBs in advanced, treatment-resistant metastatic cancers, and then its efficacy (survival), which is the secondary objective. METHODS Thirty-one patients underwent up to four intraperitoneal implantations of RMBs (8 or 16 macrobeads/kg) via laparoscopy in this single-arm trial (FDA BB-IND 10091; NCT 00283075). Serial physical examinations, laboratory testing, and PET-CT imaging were performed before and three months after each implant. RESULTS RMBs were well tolerated at both dose levels (mean 660.9 per implant). AEs were (Grade 1/2) with no treatment-related SAEs. CONCLUSION The data support the safety of RMB therapy in advanced-malignancy patients, and the preliminary evidence for their potential efficacy is encouraging. A Phase 2 efficacy trial is ongoing. PMID:27499645

  10. Evaluation of the alkaline electrolysis of zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Meisenhelder, J.H.; Brown, A.P.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1981-05-01

    The alkaline leach and electrolysis process for zinc production is compared to the conventional acid-sulfate process in terms of both energy saving and technical merit. In addition, the potential for industrial application of the alkaline process is discussed on the basis of present market conditions, possible future zinc market scenarios, and the probability of increased secondary zinc recovery. In primary zinc production, the energy-saving potential for the alkaline process was estimated to be greater than 10%, even when significantly larger electrolysis current densities than those required for the sulfate process are used. The principal technical advantages of the alkaline process are that it can handle low-grade, high-iron-content or oxidized ores (like most of those found in the US) in a more cost- and energy-efficient manner than can the sulfate process. Additionally, in the electrowinning operation, the alkaline process should be technically superior because a dendritic or sponge deposit is formed that is amenable to automated collection without interruption of the electrolysis. Also, use of the higher current densities would result in significant capital cost reductions. Alkaline-based electrolytic recovery processes were considered for the recycling of zinc from smelter baghouse dusts and from the potential source of nickel/zinc electric-vehicle batteries. In all comparisons, an alkaline process was shown to be technically superior and, particularly for the baghouse dusts, energetically and economically superior to alternatively proposed recovery methods based on sulfate electrolysis. It is concluded that the alkaline zinc method is an important alternative technology to the conventional acid zinc process. (WHK)

  11. Toxicity of alkalinity to Hyalella azteca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasier, P.J.; Winger, P.V.; Reinert, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    Toxicity testing and chemical analyses of sediment pore water have been suggested for use in sediment quality assessments and sediment toxicity identification evaluations. However, caution should be exercised in interpreting pore-water chemistry and toxicity due to inherent chemical characteristics and confounding relationships. High concentrations of alkalinity, which are typical of sediment pore waters from many regions, have been shown to be toxic to test animals. A series of tests were conducted to assess the significance of elevated alkalinity concentrations to Hyalella azteca, an amphipod commonly used for sediment and pore-water toxicity testing. Toxicity tests with 14-d old and 7-d old animals were conducted in serial dilutions of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solutions producing alkalinities ranging between 250 to 2000 mg/L as CaCO3. A sodium chloride (NaCl) toxicity test was also conducted to verify that toxicity was due to bicarbonate and not sodium. Alkalinity was toxic at concentrations frequently encountered in sediment pore water. There was also a significant difference in the toxicity of alkalinity between 14-d old and 7-d old animals. The average 96-h LC50 for alkalinity was 1212 mg/L (as CaCO3) for 14-d old animals and 662 mg/L for the younger animals. Sodium was not toxic at levels present in the NaHCO3 toxicity tests. Alkalinity should be routinely measured in pore-water toxicity tests, and interpretation of toxicity should consider alkalinity concentration and test-organism tolerance.

  12. Technetium recovery from high alkaline solution

    DOEpatents

    Nash, Charles A.

    2016-07-12

    Disclosed are methods for recovering technetium from a highly alkaline solution. The highly alkaline solution can be a liquid waste solution from a nuclear waste processing system. Methods can include combining the solution with a reductant capable of reducing technetium at the high pH of the solution and adding to or forming in the solution an adsorbent capable of adsorbing the precipitated technetium at the high pH of the solution.

  13. Alkaline tolerant dextranase from streptomyces anulatus

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Stephen R.; Adney, William S.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    A process for production of an alkaline tolerant dextranase enzyme comprises culturing a dextran-producing microorganism Streptomyces anulatus having accession no. ATCC PTA-3866 to produce an alkaline tolerant dextranase, Dex 1 wherein the protein in said enzyme is characterized by a MW of 63.3 kDa and Dex 2 wherein its protein is characterized by a MW of 81.8 kDa.

  14. Alkaline Water and Longevity: A Murine Study

    PubMed Central

    Magro, Massimiliano; Corain, Livio; Ferro, Silvia; Baratella, Davide; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Terzo, Milo; Corraducci, Vittorino; Salmaso, Luigi; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The biological effect of alkaline water consumption is object of controversy. The present paper presents a 3-year survival study on a population of 150 mice, and the data were analyzed with accelerated failure time (AFT) model. Starting from the second year of life, nonparametric survival plots suggest that mice watered with alkaline water showed a better survival than control mice. Interestingly, statistical analysis revealed that alkaline water provides higher longevity in terms of “deceleration aging factor” as it increases the survival functions when compared with control group; namely, animals belonging to the population treated with alkaline water resulted in a longer lifespan. Histological examination of mice kidneys, intestine, heart, liver, and brain revealed that no significant differences emerged among the three groups indicating that no specific pathology resulted correlated with the consumption of alkaline water. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survival data as a function of watering with alkaline water of long-lived mouse models. PMID:27340414

  15. Performed surfactant-optimized aqueous alkaline flood

    SciTech Connect

    Thigpen, D.R.; Lawson, J.B.; Nelson, R.C.

    1991-11-26

    This paper describes improvement in a process for recovering oil from an acidic oil reservoir by injecting an aqueous alkaline solution comprising water, sodium chloride, and alkaline material for reacting with the reservoir oil forming a petroleum acid soap to form an in-situ surfactant system. The improvement comprises: selecting a preformed cosurfactant which is soluble in both the aqueous solution and the reservoir oil and has a solubility ratio which is grater than the solubility ratio of the petroleum acid soap where the solubility ratio is the ratio of solubility in the aqueous alkaline solution to the solubility in the reservoir oil; combining with the alkaline solution an amount of the preformed cosurfactant which will result in the in-situ surfacant system having a salinity about equal to a salinity which results in minimal interfacial tension between the oil in the reservoir and the in-situ surfactant system at reservoir temperature, wherein the amount of the preformed cosurfactant is about 0.3 percent by weight in the aqueous alkaline solution; and injecting the cosurfactant-aqueous alkaline solution mixture into the reservoir to displace oil toward a fluid production location.

  16. Development of New Cementitious Caterials by Alkaline Activating Industrial by-Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Jimenez, A.; García-Lodeiro, I.; Palomo, A.

    2015-11-01

    The alkaline activation of aluminosiliceous industrial by-products such as blast furnace slag and fly ash is widely known to yield binders whose properties make them comparable to or even stronger and more durable than ordinary Portland cement. The present paper discusses activation fundamentals (such as the type and concentration of alkaline activator and curing conditions) as well as the structure of the cementitious gels formed (C-A-S-H, N-A-S-H). The durability and strength of these systems make these materials apt for use in many industrial applications, such as precast concrete elements (masonery blocks, railroad sleepers), protective coatings for materials with low fire ratings and lightweight elements.

  17. Mechanical Failure in Colloidal Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodger, Thomas Edward

    When colloidal particles in a dispersion are made attractive, they aggregate into fractal clusters which grow to form a space-spanning network, or gel, even at low volume fractions. These gels are crucial to the rheological behavior of many personal care, food products and dispersion-based paints. The mechanical stability of these products relies on the stability of the colloidal gel network which acts as a scaffold to provide these products with desired mechanical properties and to prevent gravitational sedimentation of the dispersed components. Understanding the mechanical stability of such colloidal gels is thus of crucial importance to predict and control the properties of many soft solids. Once a colloidal gel forms, the heterogeneous structure bonded through weak physical interactions, is immediately subject to body forces, such as gravity, surface forces, such as adhesion to a container walls and shear forces; the interplay of these forces acting on the gel determines its stability. Even in the absence of external stresses, colloidal gels undergo internal rearrangements within the network that may cause the network structure to evolve gradually, in processes known as aging or coarsening or fail catastrophically, in a mechanical instability known as syneresis. Studying gel stability in the laboratory requires model colloidal system which may be tuned to eliminate these body or endogenous forces systematically. Using existing chemistry, I developed several systems to study delayed yielding by eliminating gravitational stresses through density matching and cyclic heating to induce attraction; and to study syneresis by eliminating adhesion to the container walls, altering the contact forces between colloids, and again, inducing gelation through heating. These results elucidate the varied yet concomitant mechanisms by which colloidal gels may locally or globally yield, but then reform due to the nature of the physical, or non-covalent, interactions which form

  18. Structural Features of Alkaline Extracted Polysaccharide from the Seeds of Plantago asiatica L. and Its Rheological Properties.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun-Yi; Chen, Hai-Hong; Lin, Hui-Xia; Xie, Ming-Yong; Nie, Shao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Polysaccharide from the seeds of Plantago asiatica L. has many bioactivities, but few papers report on the structural and rheological characteristics of the alkaline extract. The alkaline extracted polysaccharide was prepared from seeds of P. asiatica L. and named herein as alkaline extracted polysaccharide from seeds of P. asiatica L. (PLAP). Its structural and rheological properties were characterized by monosaccharide composition, methylation, GC-MS and rheometry. PLAP, as an acidic arabinoxylan, was mainly composed of 1,2,4-linked Xylp and 1,3,4-linked Xylp residues. PLAP solution showed pseudoplastic behavior, and weak gelling properties at high concentration. Sodium and especially calcium ions played a significant role in increasing the apparent viscosity and gel strength. PMID:27608001

  19. Adhesive, elastomeric gel impregnating composition

    DOEpatents

    Shaw, David Glenn; Pollard, John Randolph; Brooks, Robert Aubrey

    2002-01-01

    An improved capacitor roll with alternating film and foil layers is impregnated with an adhesive, elastomeric gel composition. The gel composition is a blend of a plasticizer, a polyol, a maleic anhydride that reacts with the polyol to form a polyester, and a catalyst for the reaction. The impregnant composition is introduced to the film and foil layers while still in a liquid form and then pressure is applied to aid with impregnation. The impregnant composition is cured to form the adhesive, elastomeric gel. Pressure is maintained during curing.

  20. Cellulose nanocrystal-based composite electrolyte with superior dimensional stability for alkaline fuel cell membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Yuan; Artmentrout, Aaron A.; Li, Juchuan; Tekinalp, Halil L.; Nanda, Jagjit; Ozcan, Soydan

    2015-05-13

    Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC)-based composite films were prepared as a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells. Poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and silica gel hybrid was used to bind the CNCs to form a robust composite film. The mass ratio (i.e., 1 : 1, 1 : 2) of PVA and silica gel was tuned to control the hydrophobicity of the resulting films. Composite films with a range of CNC content (i.e., 20 to 60%) were prepared to demonstrate the impact of CNC on the performance of these materials as a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells. Different from previously reported cross-linked polymermore » films, CNC-based composite films with 40% hydrophobic binder (i.e., PVA : silica gel=1 : 2) exhibited simultaneous low water swelling (e.g., ~5%) and high water uptake (e.g., ~80%) due to the hydrophilicity and extraordinary dimensional stability of CNC. It also showed a conductivity of 0.044 and 0.065 S/cm at 20 and 60 oC, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the film with 60% CNC and 40% binder is characterized by the lowest hydroxide conductivity-normalized swelling ratio. Decreased CNC content (i.e., 40 and 20%) resulted in comparable hydroxide conductivity but a greater swelling ratio. These results demonstrate the advantage of CNC as a key component for a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells over conventional polymers, suggesting the great potential of CNCs in improving the dimensional stability while maintaining the conductivity of existing anion exchange membranes.« less

  1. Cellulose nanocrystal-based composite electrolyte with superior dimensional stability for alkaline fuel cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yuan; Artmentrout, Aaron A.; Li, Juchuan; Tekinalp, Halil L.; Nanda, Jagjit; Ozcan, Soydan

    2015-05-13

    Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC)-based composite films were prepared as a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells. Poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and silica gel hybrid was used to bind the CNCs to form a robust composite film. The mass ratio (i.e., 1 : 1, 1 : 2) of PVA and silica gel was tuned to control the hydrophobicity of the resulting films. Composite films with a range of CNC content (i.e., 20 to 60%) were prepared to demonstrate the impact of CNC on the performance of these materials as a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells. Different from previously reported cross-linked polymer films, CNC-based composite films with 40% hydrophobic binder (i.e., PVA : silica gel=1 : 2) exhibited simultaneous low water swelling (e.g., ~5%) and high water uptake (e.g., ~80%) due to the hydrophilicity and extraordinary dimensional stability of CNC. It also showed a conductivity of 0.044 and 0.065 S/cm at 20 and 60 oC, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the film with 60% CNC and 40% binder is characterized by the lowest hydroxide conductivity-normalized swelling ratio. Decreased CNC content (i.e., 40 and 20%) resulted in comparable hydroxide conductivity but a greater swelling ratio. These results demonstrate the advantage of CNC as a key component for a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells over conventional polymers, suggesting the great potential of CNCs in improving the dimensional stability while maintaining the conductivity of existing anion exchange membranes.

  2. Culture phases, cytotoxicity and protein expressions of agarose hydrogel induced Sp2/0, A549, MCF-7 cell line 3D cultures.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Maddaly; Kaviya, S R; Paramesh, V

    2016-05-01

    Advancements in cell cultures are occurring at a rapid pace, an important direction is culturing cells in 3D conditions. We demonstrate the usefulness of agarose hydrogels in obtaining 3 dimensional aggregates of three cell lines, A549, MCF-7 and Sp2/0. The differences in culture phases, susceptibility to cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity are studied. Also, the 3D aggregates of the three cell lines were reverted into 2D cultures and the protein profile differences among the 2D, 3D and revert cultures were studied. The analysis of protein profile differences using UniProt data base further augment the usefulness of agarose hydrogels for obtaining 3D cell cultures.

  3. Dynamics of a DNA Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Aniket; Dogariu, Aristide

    We study in silico the properties of a gel consisting of DNA strands (modeled as semi-flexible chains) and linkers of varying flexibility, length, and topology. These linkers are envisioned and modeled as active components with additional attributes so as to mimic properties of a synthetic DNA gel containing motor proteins. We use Brownian dynamics to directly obtain frequency dependent complex shear moduli of the gel. We further carry out force spectroscopy on these computer generated gels and study the relaxation properties as a function of the important parameters of the model, e.g., densities and relative ratios of the DNAs and the linkers, the average life time of a link, etc. Our studies are relevant for designing synthetic bio-materials for both materials and medical applications.

  4. Agarose film liquid phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water.

    PubMed

    Sanagi, Mohd Marsin; Loh, Saw Hong; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Hasan, Mohamed Noor

    2012-11-01

    Agarose film liquid phase microextraction (AF-LPME) procedure for the extraction and preconcentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water has been investigated. Agarose film was used for the first time as an interface between donor and acceptor phases in liquid phase microextraction which allowed for selective extraction of the analytes prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Using 1-octanol as acceptor phase, high enrichment factors in the range of 57-106 for the targeted analytes (fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene) were achieved. Under the optimum extraction conditions, the method showed good linearity in the range of 0.1-200 μgL(-1), good correlation coefficients in the range of 0.9963-0.9999, acceptable reproducibility (RSD 6.1-9.2%, n=3), low limits of detection (0.01-0.04 μgL(-1)) and satisfactory relative recoveries (92.9-104.7%). As the AF-LPME device was non-expensive, reuse or recycle of the film was not required, thus eliminating the possibility of analytes carry-over between runs. The AF-LPME technique is environment-friendly and compatible with the green chemistry concept as agarose is biodegradable polysaccharide extracted from seaweed and the procedure requires small volume of organic solvent and generates little waste. The validated method was successfully applied to the analysis of the four analytes in river water samples.

  5. Detection of mutations using microarrays of poly(C)10-poly(T)10 modified DNA probes immobilized on agarose films.

    PubMed

    Dufva, Martin; Petersen, Jesper; Stoltenborg, Michael; Birgens, Henrik; Christensen, Claus B V

    2006-05-15

    Allele-specific hybridization to a DNA microarray can be a useful method for genotyping patient DNA. In this article, we demonstrate that 13- to 17-base oligonucleotides tagged with a poly(T)10-poly(C)10 tail (TC tag), but otherwise unmodified, can be crosslinked by UV light irradiation to an agarose film grafted onto unmodified glass. Microarrays of TC-tagged probes immobilized on the agarose film can be used to diagnose mutations in the human beta-globin gene, which encodes the beta-chains in hemoglobin. Although the probes differed widely regarding melting point temperature ( approximately 20 degrees C), a single stringency wash still gave sufficiently high discrimination signals between perfect match and mismatch probes to allow robust mutation detection. In all, 270 genotypings were performed on patient materials, and no genotype was incorrectly classified. Quality control experiments conducted using a target DNA specific for the TC tag of the immobilized probes showed that the spotting and hybridization procedure had a variance of 20%, indicating that signal differences as low as twofold could be detected between perfect match and mismatch. Together, our results show that the use of microarrays of TC-tagged probes that have been immobilized on agarose films grafted onto glass is a robust and inexpensive genotyping method.

  6. Multiple phases of protien gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annaka, Masahiko; Tanaka, Toyoichi

    1994-03-01

    A multiple phase transition was observed in gels made by covalently cross-linking proteins in either native or denatured state. The enzymatic activity of the gels prepared from native α-chymotrypsin was determined for each of the multiple phases. The reversibility of the swelling degrees and the enzymatic reaction rates upon phase transition suggests that the protein is at a free energy minimum and thus in a phase.

  7. Uptake of arsenic by alkaline soils near alkaline coal fly ash disposal facilities.

    PubMed

    Khodadoust, Amid P; Theis, Thomas L; Murarka, Ishwar P; Naithani, Pratibha; Babaeivelni, Kamel

    2013-12-01

    The attenuation of arsenic in groundwater near alkaline coal fly ash disposal facilities was evaluated by determining the uptake of arsenic from ash leachates by surrounding alkaline soils. Ten different alkaline soils near a retired coal fly ash impoundment were used in this study with pH ranging from 7.6 to 9.0, while representative coal fly ash samples from two different locations in the coal fly ash impoundment were used to produce two alkaline ash leachates with pH 7.4 and 8.2. The arsenic found in the ash leachates was present as arsenate [As(V)]. Adsorption isotherm experiments were carried out to determine the adsorption parameters required for predicting the uptake of arsenic from the ash leachates. For all soils and leachates, the adsorption of arsenic followed the Langmuir and Freundlich equations, indicative of the favorable adsorption of arsenic from leachates onto all soils. The uptake of arsenic was evaluated as a function of ash leachate characteristics and the soil components. The uptake of arsenic from alkaline ash leachates, which occurred mainly as calcium hydrogen arsenate, increased with increasing clay fraction of soil and with increasing soil organic matter of the alkaline soils. Appreciable uptake of arsenic from alkaline ash leachates with different pH and arsenic concentration was observed for the alkaline soils, thus attenuating the contamination of groundwater downstream of the retired coal fly ash impoundment.

  8. Topical Review: Polymer gel dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Baldock, C; De Deene, Y; Doran, S; Ibbott, G; Jirasek, A; Lepage, M; McAuley, K B; Oldham, M; Schreiner, L J

    2010-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose gradients exist such as in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery. Polymer gel dosimeters also have specific advantages for brachytherapy dosimetry. Potential dosimetry applications include those for low-energy x-rays, high-linear energy transfer (LET) and proton therapy, radionuclide and boron capture neutron therapy dosimetries. These 3D dosimeters are radiologically soft-tissue equivalent with properties that may be modified depending on the application. The 3D radiation dose distribution in polymer gel dosimeters may be imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical-computerized tomography (optical-CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound. The fundamental science underpinning polymer gel dosimetry is reviewed along with the various evaluation techniques. Clinical dosimetry applications of polymer gel dosimetry are also presented. PMID:20150687

  9. Development of a microfluidics biosensor for agarose-bead immobilized Escherichia coli bioreporter cells for arsenite detection in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Buffi, Nina; Merulla, Davide; Beutier, Julien; Barbaud, Fanny; Beggah, Siham; van Lintel, Harald; Renaud, Philippe; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2011-07-21

    Contamination with arsenic is a recurring problem in both industrialized and developing countries. Drinking water supplies for large populations can have concentrations much higher than the permissible levels (for most European countries and the United States, 10 μg As per L; elsewhere, 50 μg As per L). Arsenic analysis requires high-end instruments, which are largely unavailable in developing countries. Bioassays based on genetically engineered bacteria have been proposed as suitable alternatives but such tests would profit from better standardization and direct incorporation into sensing devices. The goal of this work was to develop and test microfluidic devices in which bacterial bioreporters could be embedded, exposed and reporter signals detected, as a further step towards a complete miniaturized bacterial biosensor. The signal element in the biosensor is a nonpathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli, which produces a variant of the green fluorescent protein after contact to arsenite and arsenate. E. coli bioreporter cells were encapsulated in agarose beads and incorporated into a microfluidic device where they were captured in 500 × 500 μm(2) cages and exposed to aqueous samples containing arsenic. Cell-beads frozen at -20 °C in the microfluidic chip retained inducibility for up to a month and arsenic samples with 10 or 50 μg L(-1) could be reproducibly discriminated from the blank. In the 0-50 μg L(-1) range and with an exposure time of 200 minutes, the rate of signal increase was linearly proportional to the arsenic concentration. The time needed to reliably and reproducibly detect a concentration of 50 μg L(-1) was 75-120 minutes, and 120-180 minutes for a concentration of 10 μg L(-1).

  10. The bioactivity of agarose-PEGDA interpenetrating network hydrogels with covalently immobilized RGD peptides and physically entrapped aggrecan

    PubMed Central

    Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Gehrke, Stevin H.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Our previous reports of interpenetrating networks (IPNs) have demonstrated drastic improvements in mechanical performance relative to individual constituent networks while maintaining viability of encapsulated cells. The current study investigated whether covalent linkage of RGD to the poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) network could improve upon cell viability and performance of agarose-PEGDA IPNs compared to unmodified IPNs (control) and to IPNs with different concentrations of physically entrapped aggrecan, providing a point of comparison to previous work. The inclusion of RGD or aggrecan generally did not adversely affect mechanical performance, and significantly improved chondrocyte viability and performance. Although both 4 and 100 μ g/mL of aggrecan improved cell viability, only 100 μ g/mL aggrecan was clearly beneficial to improving biosynthesis, whereas 100 μg/mL of RGD was beneficial to both chondrocyte viability and biosynthesis. Interestingly, clustering of cells within the IPNs with RGD and the higher aggrecan concentration were observed, likely indicating cell migration and/or preferred regional proliferation. This clustering resulted in a clearly visible enhancement of matrix production compared to the other IPNs. With this cell migration, we also observed significant cell proliferation and matrix synthesis beyond the periphery of the IPN, which could have important implications in facilitating integration with surrounding cartilage in vivo. With RGD and aggrecan (at its higher concentration) providing substantial and comparable improvements in cell performance, RGD would be the recommended bioactive signal for this particular IPN formulation and cell source given the significant cost savings and potentially more straightforward regulatory pathway in commercialization. PMID:24462353

  11. Characterization of a chemostable serine alkaline protease from Periplaneta americana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proteases are important enzymes involved in numerous essential physiological processes and hold a strong potential for industrial applications. The proteolytic activity of insects’ gut is endowed by many isoforms with diverse properties and specificities. Thus, insect proteases can act as a tool in industrial processes. Results In the present study, purification and properties of a serine alkaline protease from Periplaneta americana and its potential application as an additive in various bio-formulations are reported. The enzyme was purified near to homogeneity by using acetone precipitation and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration chromatography. Enzyme activity was increased up to 4.2 fold after gel filtration chromatography. The purified enzyme appeared as single protein-band with a molecular mass of ~ 27.8 kDa in SDS-PAGE. The optimum pH and temperature for the proteolytic activity for purified protein were found around pH 8.0 and 60°C respectively. Complete inhibition of the purified enzyme by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride confirmed that the protease was of serine-type. The purified enzyme revealed high stability and compatibility towards detergents, oxidizing, reducing, and bleaching agents. In addition, enzyme also showed stability towards organic solvents and commercial detergents. Conclusion Several important properties of a serine protease from P. Americana were revealed. Moreover, insects can serve as excellent and alternative source of industrially important proteases with unique properties, which can be utilized as additives in detergents, stain removers and other bio-formulations. Properties of the P. americana protease accounted in the present investigation can be exploited further in various industrial processes. As an industrial prospective, identification of enzymes with varying essential properties from different insect species might be good approach and bioresource. PMID:24229392

  12. Photoelastic response of alkaline earth aluminosilicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Smedskjaer, Morten M; Saxton, Scott A; Ellison, Adam J; Mauro, John C

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the structural origins of the photoelastic response in oxide glasses is important for discovering new families of zero-stress optic glasses and for developing a predictive physical model. In this Letter, we have investigated the composition dependence of the stress optic coefficient C of 32 sodium aluminosilicate glasses with different types of alkaline earth oxides (MgO, CaO, SrO, and BaO). We find that most of the composition dependence of the stress optic response can be captured by a linear regression model and that the individual contributions from the alkaline earths to C depend on the alkaline earth-oxygen bond metallicity. High bond metallicity is required to allow bonds to be distorted along both the bonding direction and perpendicular to it. These findings are valuable for understanding the photoelastic response of oxide glasses.

  13. Rheological behavior of Slide Ring Gels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vivek; Park, Jong Seung; Park, Jung O.; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2006-03-01

    Slide ring gels were synthesized by chemically crosslinking, sparsely populated α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) present on the polyrotaxanes consisting of α-CD and polyethylene glycol (PEG). [1] Unlike physically or chemically crosslinked gels, slide ring gels are topological gels where crosslinks can slide along the chain. [2] We investigate the rheological behavior of these gels swollen in water and compare their viscoelastic properties to those of physical and chemical gels. We also study the equilibrium swelling behavior of these gels. [1] Okumura and Ito, Adv. Mater. 2001, 13, 485 [2] C. Zhao et al, J. Phys. Cond. Mat. 2005, 17, S2841

  14. Alkaline Capacitors Based on Nitride Nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldissi, Matt

    2003-01-01

    High-energy-density alkaline electrochemical capacitors based on electrodes made of transition-metal nitride nanoparticles are undergoing development. Transition- metal nitrides (in particular, Fe3N and TiN) offer a desirable combination of high electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability in aqueous alkaline electrolytes like KOH. The high energy densities of these capacitors are attributable mainly to their high capacitance densities, which, in turn, are attributable mainly to the large specific surface areas of the electrode nanoparticles. Capacitors of this type could be useful as energy-storage components in such diverse equipment as digital communication systems, implanted medical devices, computers, portable consumer electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  15. Alkaline earth filled nickel skutterudite antimonide thermoelectrics

    DOEpatents

    Singh, David Joseph

    2013-07-16

    A thermoelectric material including a body centered cubic filled skutterudite having the formula A.sub.xFe.sub.yNi.sub.zSb.sub.12, where A is an alkaline earth element, x is no more than approximately 1.0, and the sum of y and z is approximately equal to 4.0. The alkaline earth element includes guest atoms selected from the group consisting of Be, Mb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra and combinations thereof. The filled skutterudite is shown to have properties suitable for a wide variety of thermoelectric applications.

  16. Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation

    DOEpatents

    Riha, Brian D.

    2012-07-03

    A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

  17. Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation

    DOEpatents

    Riha, Brian D.; Looney, Brian B.

    2015-10-27

    A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

  18. Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation

    DOEpatents

    Rhia, Brian D.

    2011-03-01

    A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

  19. Capillary fracture of soft gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua B.; Daniels, Karen E.

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L∝t3/4. We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent.

  20. Healing Efficacy of an EGF Impregnated Triple Gel Based Wound Dressing: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Khanbanha, Najmeh; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Taheri, Azade; Talaie, Fatemeh; Mahbod, Mirgholamreza

    2014-01-01

    To accomplish an ideal wound healing process which promotes healthy tissue growth with less scaring, a novel gel based topical drug delivery system composed of 3 different polymers chitosan, dextran sulfate, and polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 (CDP) was prepared. The physicochemical properties of the prepared gels were investigated in vitro. Gels showed a maximum swelling ratio of 50 ± 1.95 times of dried gel in PBS at pH 7.4. The swelling ratios increase in acidic and alkaline pH to 55.3 ± 1.75 and 65.5 ± 2.42, respectively. In the rheological test, prepared gels revealed viscoelastic properties and a small linear viscoelastic region of 0.166%. In vivo wound healing promoting activities of CDP gels containing 20 μg/mL EGF were evaluated on surgically induced dermal wounds in rats using pathologic examination. The application of CDP gel with incorporated EGF significantly reduced the defect on the rat's skin and enhanced epithelial healing compared with the topical application of the EGF-free CDP gel. The results clearly substantiate the beneficial effects of the topical application of CDP containing EGF in the acceleration of healthy wound healing process with less scarring. PMID:25110681

  1. The Alkaline Diet: Is There Evidence That an Alkaline pH Diet Benefits Health?

    PubMed Central

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K.

    2012-01-01

    This review looks at the role of an alkaline diet in health. Pubmed was searched looking for articles on pH, potential renal acid loads, bone health, muscle, growth hormone, back pain, vitamin D and chemotherapy. Many books written in the lay literature on the alkaline diet were also reviewed and evaluated in light of the published medical literature. There may be some value in considering an alkaline diet in reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases and further studies are warranted in this area of medicine. PMID:22013455

  2. Sol-gel derived sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Sigman, Michael E.; Dindal, Amy B.

    2003-11-11

    Described is a method for producing copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent particles for the production of copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent material. The method for producing copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent particles comprises adding a basic solution to an aqueous metal alkoxide mixture for a pH.ltoreq.8 to hydrolyze the metal alkoxides. Then, allowing the mixture to react at room temperature for a precalculated period of time for the mixture to undergo an increased in viscosity to obtain a desired pore size and surface area. The copolymerized mixture is then added to an immiscible, nonpolar solvent that has been heated to a sufficient temperature wherein the copolymerized mixture forms a solid upon the addition. The solid is recovered from the mixture, and is ready for use in an active sampling trap or activated for use in a passive sampling trap.

  3. Fundamentals of Polymer Gel Dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuley, Kim B.

    2006-12-01

    The recent literature on polymer gel dosimetry contains application papers and basic experimental studies involving polymethacrylic-acid-based and polyacrylamide-based gel dosimeters. The basic studies assess the relative merits of these two most commonly used dosimeters, and explore the effects of tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride (THPC) antioxidant on dosimeter performance. Polymer gel dosimeters that contain THPC or other oxygen scavengers are called normoxic dosimeters, because they can be prepared under normal atmospheric conditions, rather than in a glove box that excludes oxygen. In this review, an effort is made to explain some of the underlying chemical phenomena that affect dosimeter performance using THPC, and that lead to differences in behaviour between dosimeters made using the two types of monomer systems. Progress on the development of new more effective and less toxic dosimeters is also reported.

  4. Copolymers For Capillary Gel Electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Changsheng; Li, Qingbo

    2005-08-09

    This invention relates to an electrophoresis separation medium having a gel matrix of at least one random, linear copolymer comprising a primary comonomer and at least one secondary comonomer, wherein the comonomers are randomly distributed along the copolymer chain. The primary comonomer is an acrylamide or an acrylamide derivative that provides the primary physical, chemical, and sieving properties of the gel matrix. The at least one secondary comonomer imparts an inherent physical, chemical, or sieving property to the copolymer chain. The primary and secondary comonomers are present in a ratio sufficient to induce desired properties that optimize electrophoresis performance. The invention also relates to a method of separating a mixture of biological molecules using this gel matrix, a method of preparing the novel electrophoresis separation medium, and a capillary tube filled with the electrophoresis separation medium.

  5. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry in combination with gel electrophoresis: a new strategy for speciation of metal binding serum proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, J. L.; Abildtrup, A.; Christensen, J.; Watson, P.; Cox, A.; McLeod, C. W.

    1998-02-01

    A new hyphenated technique-crossed immunoelectrophoresis in combination with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-mass spectrometry—for the identification and quantitation of metal binding proteins in blood serum is described. Human serum enriched with Co was subjected to electrophoresis and the agarose gels corresponding to the first and second dimensions were interrogated and analysed using a Nd Yag laser (1064 nm) interfaced to ICP-mass spectrometry. Comparison of the distribution map for Co with the protein distribution map obtained via Coommassie Brilliant Blue staining allowed identification of main Co binding serum proteins. Signals for Co (single ion monitoring, mle 59) were transient in nature and for gels enriched with increasing concentrations of Co, peak area response was linear with concentration. Precision for replicate analyses was 6% R.S.D. and the limit of detection was - 0.29 ng.

  6. Studies on the purification of antihemophilic factor (factor VIII). II. Separation of partially purified antihemophilic factor by gel filtration of plasma.

    PubMed

    Ratnoff, O D; Kass, L; Lang, P D

    1969-05-01

    A high degree of purification of antihemophilic factor was achieved by filtration of chylomicronpoor human plasma through columns of agarose. The final product contained, on the average, 67 units of antihemophilic activity per mg of protein, and was 3360-fold purified compared with the filtered plasma. The molecular weight of antihemophilic factor appeared to be at least two million. Preparations separated by gel filtration were contaminated with appreciable amounts of plasma thromboplastin antecedent (PTA), and traces of Christmas factor and Hageman factor, but no detectable fibrinogen was present. Similar fractions of plasma prepared from the blood of patients with classic hemophilia, von Willebrand's disease, or a circulating anticoagulant directed against antihemophilic factor contained, on the average, somewhat less protein than normal plasma; whether this difference was significant is not yet known. The purified fractions were partially stabilized by the addition of 1% gelatin. Adaptation of the technique of gel filtration to purification of antihemophilic factor for clinical use remains to be explored.

  7. Gel stretch method: a new method to measure constitutive properties of cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zile, M. R.; Cowles, M. K.; Buckley, J. M.; Richardson, K.; Cowles, B. A.; Baicu, C. F.; Cooper G, I. V.; Gharpuray, V.

    1998-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction is an important cause of congestive heart failure; however, the basic mechanisms causing diastolic congestive heart failure are not fully understood, especially the role of the cardiac muscle cell, or cardiocyte, in this process. Before the role of the cardiocyte in this pathophysiology can be defined, methods for measuring cardiocyte constitutive properties must be developed and validated. Thus this study was designed to evaluate a new method to characterize cardiocyte constitutive properties, the gel stretch method. Cardiocytes were isolated enzymatically from normal feline hearts and embedded in a 2% agarose gel containing HEPES-Krebs buffer and laminin. This gel was cast in a shape that allowed it to be placed in a stretching device. The ends of the gel were held between a movable roller and fixed plates that acted as mandibles. Distance between the right and left mandibles was increased using a stepper motor system. The force applied to the gel was measured by a force transducer. The resultant cardiocyte strain was determined by imaging the cells with a microscope, capturing the images with a CCD camera, and measuring cardiocyte and sarcomere length changes. Cardiocyte stress was characterized with a finite-element method. These measurements of cardiocyte stress and strain were used to determine cardiocyte stiffness. Two variables affecting cardiocyte stiffness were measured, the passive elastic spring and viscous damping. The passive spring was assessed by increasing the force on the gel at 1 g/min, modeling the resultant stress vs. strain relationship as an exponential [sigma = A/k(ekepsilon - 1)]. In normal cardiocytes, A = 23.0 kN/m2 and k = 16. Viscous damping was assessed by examining the loop area between the stress vs. strain relationship during 1 g/min increases and decreases in force. Normal cardiocytes had a finite loop area = 1.39 kN/m2, indicating the presence of viscous damping. Thus the gel stretch method provided accurate

  8. ISSUES WITH ALKALINE TREATMENT OF SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation begins with a discussion of the use of lime and other alkaline materials from the very earliest times to the present for killing bacteria, viruses and parasites and for controlling odors in wastewaters and sludge. It answers the question "How did EPA arrive at i...

  9. Alkaline electrochemical cells and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    Equilibrated cellulose ether membranes of increased electrolytic conductivity for use as separators in concentrated alkaline electrochemical cells are investigated. The method of making such membranes by equilibration to the degree desired in an aqueous alkali solution mantained at a temperature below about 10 C is described.

  10. Kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Christodoulatos, C; Su, T L; Koutsospyros, A

    2001-01-01

    Cellulose nitrate (nitrocellulose) is an explosive solid substance used in large quantities in various formulations of rocket and gun propellants. Safe destruction of nitrocellulose can be achieved by alkaline hydrolysis, which converts it to biodegradable products that can then be treated by conventional biological processes. The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of munitions-grade nitrocellulose in sodium hydroxide solutions were investigated in completely mixed batch reactors. Experiments were conducted using solutions of alkaline strength ranging from 0.1 to 15% by mass and temperatures in the range of 30 to 90 degrees C. Regression analysis of the kinetic data revealed that alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose is of the order 1.0 and 1.5 with respect to nitrocellulose and hydroxide concentration, respectively. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction was found to be 100.9 kJ/mol with a preexponential Arrhenius constant of 4.73 x 10(13). Nitrite and nitrate, in a 3:1 ratio, were the primary nitrogen species present in the posthydrolysis solution. The kinetic information is pertinent to the development and optimization of nitrocellulose chemical-biological treatment systems.

  11. Alkaline Bohr effect of human hemoglobin Ao.

    PubMed

    Di Cera, E; Doyle, M L; Gill, S J

    1988-04-01

    Differential oxygen binding measurements obtained over the pH range 6.95 to 9.10 at 25 degrees C have allowed a detailed description of the alkaline Bohr effect of human hemoglobin Ao. Phenomenological analysis of the data in terms of the Adair equation shows that: (1) the oxygen binding curves are asymmetrical with the population of the triply oxygenated species being negligible throughout the pH range studied: (2) the shape of the oxygen binding curve is affected by pH, especially at low saturation; and (3) the maximum O2-proton linkage is -0.52 mole of proton per mole of oxygen at pH 7.4. A possible molecular mechanism of the Bohr effect is proposed within the framework of an allosteric model which accounts for the low population of triply oxygenated hemoglobin species. At least three Bohr groups are necessary for a quantitative description of the alkaline Bohr effect. Two of these groups titrate in the range of the His146 beta and Vall alpha residues, which have long been identified as the main alkaline Bohr groups, and altogether contribute 84% of the alkaline Bohr effect at physiological pH. A third ionizable group, linked to oxygenation presumably at the beta chains, is implicated and is titrated in a pH range characteristic of a surface histidyl residue.

  12. MERCURIC CHLORIDE CAPTURE BY ALKALINE SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of bench-scale mechanistic studies of mercury/sorbent reactions that showed that mercuric chloride (HgC12) is readily adsorbed by alkaline sorbents, which may offers a less expensive alternative to the use of activated carbons. A laboratory-scale, fixed-b...

  13. Use Alkalinity Monitoring to Optimize Bioreactor Performance.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher S; Kult, Keegan J

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the agricultural community has reduced flow of nitrogen from farmed landscapes to stream networks through the use of woodchip denitrification bioreactors. Although deployment of this practice is becoming more common to treat high-nitrate water from agricultural drainage pipes, information about bioreactor management strategies is sparse. This study focuses on the use of water monitoring, and especially the use of alkalinity monitoring, in five Iowa woodchip bioreactors to provide insights into and to help manage bioreactor chemistry in ways that will produce desirable outcomes. Results reported here for the five bioreactors show average annual nitrate load reductions between 50 and 80%, which is acceptable according to established practice standards. Alkalinity data, however, imply that nitrous oxide formation may have regularly occurred in at least three of the bioreactors that are considered to be closed systems. Nitrous oxide measurements of influent and effluent water provide evidence that alkalinity may be an important indicator of bioreactor performance. Bioreactor chemistry can be managed by manipulation of water throughput in ways that produce adequate nitrate removal while preventing undesirable side effects. We conclude that (i) water should be retained for longer periods of time in bioreactors where nitrous oxide formation is indicated, (ii) measuring only nitrate and sulfate concentrations is insufficient for proper bioreactor operation, and (iii) alkalinity monitoring should be implemented into protocols for bioreactor management. PMID:27136151

  14. Use Alkalinity Monitoring to Optimize Bioreactor Performance.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher S; Kult, Keegan J

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the agricultural community has reduced flow of nitrogen from farmed landscapes to stream networks through the use of woodchip denitrification bioreactors. Although deployment of this practice is becoming more common to treat high-nitrate water from agricultural drainage pipes, information about bioreactor management strategies is sparse. This study focuses on the use of water monitoring, and especially the use of alkalinity monitoring, in five Iowa woodchip bioreactors to provide insights into and to help manage bioreactor chemistry in ways that will produce desirable outcomes. Results reported here for the five bioreactors show average annual nitrate load reductions between 50 and 80%, which is acceptable according to established practice standards. Alkalinity data, however, imply that nitrous oxide formation may have regularly occurred in at least three of the bioreactors that are considered to be closed systems. Nitrous oxide measurements of influent and effluent water provide evidence that alkalinity may be an important indicator of bioreactor performance. Bioreactor chemistry can be managed by manipulation of water throughput in ways that produce adequate nitrate removal while preventing undesirable side effects. We conclude that (i) water should be retained for longer periods of time in bioreactors where nitrous oxide formation is indicated, (ii) measuring only nitrate and sulfate concentrations is insufficient for proper bioreactor operation, and (iii) alkalinity monitoring should be implemented into protocols for bioreactor management.

  15. Negative Electrode For An Alkaline Cell

    DOEpatents

    Coco, Isabelle; Cocciantelli, Jean-Michel; Villenave, Jean-Jacques

    1998-07-14

    The present invention concerns a negative electrode for an alkaline cell, comprising a current collector supporting a paste containing an electrochemically active material and a binder, characterized in that said binder is a polymer containing hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, said polymer being selected from an acrylic homopolymer, copolymer and terpolymer, an unsaturated organic acid copolymer and an unsaturated acid anhydride copolymer.

  16. Development of composite membranes of PVA-TEOS doped KOH for alkaline membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haryadi, Sugianto, D.; Ristopan, E.

    2015-12-01

    Anion exchange membranes (AEMs) play an important role in separating fuel and oxygen (or air) in the Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells. Preparation of hybrid organic inorganic materials of Polyvinylalcohol (PVA) - Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) composite membrane doped KOH for direct alcohol alkaline fuel cell application has been investigated. The sol-gel method has been used to prepare the composite membrane of PVA-TEOS through crosslinking step and catalyzed by concentrated of hydrochloric acid. The gel solution was cast on the membrane plastic plate to obtain membrane sheets. The dry membranes were then doped by immersing in various concentrations of KOH solutions for about 4 hours. Investigations of the cross-linking process and the presence of hydroxyl group were conducted by FTIR as shown for frequency at about 1600 cm-1 and 3300 cm-1 respectively. The degree of swelling in ethanol decreased as the KOH concentration for membrane soaking process increased. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) of the membrane was 0.25meq/g. This composite membranes display significant ionic conductivity of 3.23 x 10-2 S/cm in deionized water at room temperature. In addition, the morphology observation by scanning electron microscope (SEM) of the membrane indicates that soaking process of membrane in KOH increased thermal resistant.

  17. Development of composite membranes of PVA-TEOS doped KOH for alkaline membrane fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Haryadi, Sugianto, D.; Ristopan, E.

    2015-12-29

    Anion exchange membranes (AEMs) play an important role in separating fuel and oxygen (or air) in the Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells. Preparation of hybrid organic inorganic materials of Polyvinylalcohol (PVA) - Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) composite membrane doped KOH for direct alcohol alkaline fuel cell application has been investigated. The sol-gel method has been used to prepare the composite membrane of PVA-TEOS through crosslinking step and catalyzed by concentrated of hydrochloric acid. The gel solution was cast on the membrane plastic plate to obtain membrane sheets. The dry membranes were then doped by immersing in various concentrations of KOH solutions for about 4 hours. Investigations of the cross-linking process and the presence of hydroxyl group were conducted by FTIR as shown for frequency at about 1600 cm{sup −1} and 3300 cm{sup −1} respectively. The degree of swelling in ethanol decreased as the KOH concentration for membrane soaking process increased. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) of the membrane was 0.25meq/g. This composite membranes display significant ionic conductivity of 3.23 x 10{sup −2} S/cm in deionized water at room temperature. In addition, the morphology observation by scanning electron microscope (SEM) of the membrane indicates that soaking process of membrane in KOH increased thermal resistant.

  18. Birch pulp xylan works as a food hydrocolloid in acid milk gels and is fermented slowly in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Sibakov, Natalia; Hakala, Terhi K; Sözer, Nesli; Nordlund, Emilia; Poutanen, Kaisa; Aura, Anna-Marja

    2016-12-10

    The objective was to evaluate the potential of birch xylan as a food hydrocolloid and dietary fibre. High-molecular weight xylan was isolated from birch kraft pulp by alkaline extraction, and enzymatically hydrolysed. Fermentability of xylans was evaluated using an in vitro colon model and performance as a hydrocolloid was studied in low-fat acid milk gels (1.5% and 3% w/w). Texture of the gels and water holding capacity of xylans were compared with inulin, fructooligosaccharide and xylooligosaccharide. Xylans showed slower fermentation rate by faecal microbiota than the references. Xylan-enriched acid milk gels (3% w/w) had improved water holding capacity (over 2-fold) and showed lower spontaneous syneresis, firmness and elasticity when compared to control (no hydrocolloids) or to references. In conclusion, birch xylan improved texture of low-fat acid milk gel applications, and the slow in vitro fermentation rate predicts lower incidence of intestinal discomfort in comparison to the commercial references.

  19. Titanium corrosion in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Been, Jantje

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion of Grade 2 titanium in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments has been studied by weight loss corrosion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and potentiodynamic polarography. Calcium ions and wood pulp were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. In alkaline peroxide, the titanium corrosion rate increased with increasing pH, temperature, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The corrosion controlling mechanism is thought to be the reaction of the oxide with the perhydroxyl ion. No evidence of thermodynamically stable calcium titanate was found in the surface film of test coupons exposed to calcium-inhibited alkaline peroxide solutions. Calcium inhibition is probably the result of low local alkali and peroxide concentrations at the metal surface produced by reaction of adsorbed calcium with hydrogen peroxide. It has been shown that the inhibiting effect of calcium is temporary, possibly through an effect of calcium on the chemical and/or physical stability of the surface oxide. Pulp is an effective and stable corrosion inhibitor. Raising the pulp concentration decreased the corrosion rate. The inhibiting effect of pulp may be related to the adsorption and interaction of the pulp fibers with H 2O2, thereby decreasing the peroxide concentration and rendering the solution less corrosive. The presence of both pulp and calcium led to higher corrosion rates than obtained by either one inhibitor alone. Replacement of hydrofluoric acid with alkaline peroxide for pickling of titanium was investigated. Titanium corrosion rates in alkaline peroxide exceeded those obtained in the conventional hydrofluoric acid bath. General corrosion was observed with extensive roughening of the surface giving a dull gray appearance. Preferred dissolution of certain crystallographic planes was investigated through the corrosion of a titanium single crystal. Whereas the overall effect on the corrosion rate was small

  20. Recent Alkaline Lakes: Clues to Understanding the Evolution of Early Planetary Alkaline Oceans and Biogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempe, S.; Hartmann, J.; Kazmierczak, J.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract New models suggest that terrestrial weathering consumes 0.26GtC/a (72% silicate-, 28% carbonateweathering), equivalent to a loss of one atmospheric C content every 3700a. Rapid weathering leads in volcanic areas to alkaline conditions, illustrated by the crater lake of Niuafo`ou/Tonga and Lake Van/Turkey, the largest soda lake on Earth. Alkaline conditions cause high CaCO3 supersaturation, permineralization of algal mats and growth of stromatolites. Alkaline conditions can nearly depress free [Ca2+] to levels necessary for proteins to function. Therefore early oceans on Earth (and possibly on Mars) should have been alkaline (i.e. "Soda Oceans"). Recent findings of MgSO4 in top soils on Mars may be misleading about the early history of martian oceans.

  1. A method for making an alkaline battery electrode plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chida, K.; Ezaki, T.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for making an alkaline battery electrode plate where the desired active substances are filled into a nickel foam substrate. In this substrate an electrolytic oxidation reduction occurs in an alkaline solution containing lithium hydroxide.

  2. Factors affecting alkalinity generation by successive alkalinity-producing systems: regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Jage, C R; Zipper, C E; Noble, R

    2001-01-01

    Use of successive alkalinity-producing systems (SAPS) for treatment of acidic mine drainage (AMD) has grown in recent years. However, inconsistent performance has hampered widespread acceptance of this technology. This research was conducted to determine the influence of system design and influent AMD chemistry on net alkalinity generation by SAPS. Monthly observations were obtained from eight SAPS cells in southern West Virginia and southwestern Virginia. Analysis of these data revealed strong, positive correlations between net alkalinity generation and three variables: the natural log of limestone residence time, influent dissolved Fe concentration, and influent non-Mn acidity. A statistical model was constructed to describe SAPS performance. Subsequent analysis of data obtained from five systems in western Pennsylvania (calibration data set) was used to reevaluate the model form, and the statistical model was adjusted using the combined data sets. Limestone residence time exhibited a strong, positive logarithmic correlation with net alkalinity generation, indicating net alkalinity generation occurs most rapidly within the first few hours of AMD-limestone contact and additional residence time yields diminishing gains in treatment. Influent Fe and non-Mn acidity concentrations both show strong positive linear relationships with net alkalinity generation, reflecting the increased solubility of limestone under acidic conditions. These relationships were present in the original and the calibration data sets, separately, and in the statistical model derived from the combined data set. In the combined data set, these three factors accounted for 68% of the variability in SAPS systems performance. PMID:11401248

  3. Self-formation of bilayer lipid membranes on agarose-coated silicon surfaces studied by simultaneous electrophysiological and surface infrared spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Oshima, Azusa; Onodera, Kota; Aoto, Kouji; Taira, Tasuku; Yamaguchi, Ryo-taro; Kimura, Yasuo; Niwano, Michio

    2009-06-01

    Self-formation process of bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) cushioned on agarose-coated Si surfaces was in situ monitored by simultaneous electrophysiological and infrared absorption spectroscopic (IRAS) measurements using IRAS with the multiple internal reflection geometry. IRAS signals corresponding to self-thinning of lipid solution to form BLMs were demonstrated. It was found that the appearance of IRAS bands due to C=O modes of phosphstidylcholine is related to formation of BLMs with a gigaohm seal. The functionality of the present BLM system was also demonstrated by incorporating gramicidin into the BLMs and recording its channel activities.

  4. Gluing gels: A nanoparticle solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, Eric A.; Scherman, Oren A.

    2014-03-01

    Synthetic polymer gels with certain surface chemistries can be glued together by a simple and inexpensive method that uses commercially available silica nanoparticles. Biological tissues can also be joined by this nanotechnological route, eliminating the need for sutures, additional adhesives or chemical reactions.

  5. Physicochemical behaviour of chitin gels.

    PubMed

    Vachoud, L; Zydowicz, N; Domard, A

    2000-06-30

    Syneresis of chitin gels formed in the course of N-acetylation of chitosan in hydroalcoholic media has been studied. A critical cross-linking density related to a critical acetylation degree for which the gel undergoes weak syneresis and swells in water was shown (degree of acetylation (DA) 88%). Above this value, the weight loss during syneresis increases with DA. Conversely, syneresis decreases on increasing the polymer concentration, but disappears at a macroscopic level for a polymer concentration close to the critical concentration of entanglement in the initial solution. An increase in temperature favours the formation of hydrophobic interactions and new inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bondings. Due to the weak polyelectrolyte character of chitin, the weight of the gel depends on the pH and ionic strength of the media. Swelling-deswelling experiments show that the swelling of the gel is not fully reversible in relation with the formation of new cross-links during the depletion of the network. Our results reveals that the balance between segment-segment and segment-solvent interactions as well as the molecular mobility play the major role.

  6. Nonlinear elasticity of alginate gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemnejad, Seyed Meysam; Kundu, Santanu

    Alginate is a naturally occurring anionic polysaccharide extracted from brown algae. Because of biocompatibility, low toxicity, and simple gelation process, alginate gels are used in biomedical and food applications. Here, we report the rheological behavior of ionically crosslinked alginate gels, which are obtained by in situ gelation of alginates with calcium salts, in between two parallel plates of a rheometer. Strain stiffening behavior was captured using large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) experiments. In addition, negative normal stress was observed for these gels, which has not been reported earlier for any polysaccharide networks. The magnitude of negative normal stress increases with applied strain and can exceed that of the shear stress at large strain. Rheological results fitted with a constitutive model that considers both stretching and bending of chains indicate that nonlinearity is likely related to the stretching of the chains between the crosslink junctions. The results provide an improved understanding of the deformation mechanism of ionically crosslinked alginate gel and the results will be important in developing synthetic extracellular matrix (ECM) from these materials.

  7. Alkaline polymer electrolyte membranes for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Jie; Qiao, Jinli; Baker, Ryan; Zhang, Jiujun

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we examine the most recent progress and research trends in the area of alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) development in terms of material selection, synthesis, characterization, and theoretical approach, as well as their fabrication into alkaline PEM-based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) and the corresponding performance/durability in alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Respective advantages and challenges are also reviewed. To overcome challenges hindering alkaline PEM technology advancement and commercialization, several research directions are then proposed.

  8. Capillary fracture of soft gels.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, Joshua B; Daniels, Karen E

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L[proportional]t(3/4). We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent.

  9. Capillary fracture of soft gels.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, Joshua B; Daniels, Karen E

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L[proportional]t(3/4). We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent. PMID:24229192

  10. The sulphate-reduction alkalinity pump tested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Patrick; Petrishcheva, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate precipitation has been suggested to be induced by alkalinity increase during sulphate reduction under anoxic conditions. This mechanism may explain the formation of carbonate deposits in shallow marine environments, either within a redox stratified sediment inhabited by phototrophic microbial mats or in shallow water within the photic zone where sulphidic water is upwelling onto the shelf. The alkalinity pump may work as long as the sulphide is not reoxidized to sulphate, a process that would acidify the surrounding. The alkalinity effect of sulphate reduction was recently tested by Aloisi (2008) for microbial mats using a model approach. He found that sulphate reduction does not significantly increase or even decrease carbonate saturation and is unlikely to have played a significant role through Earth history. The model considers many environmental factors, including the effect of carbonate precipitation itself on the carbonate equilbrium and on the alkalinity. We used a modified version of Aloisi's (2008) model to simulate the saturation states of aragonite, calcite and dolomite without the effects of carbonate precipitation. This is necessary to evaluate the effect of microbial metabolisms exclusively on carbonate saturation, since carbonate precipitation is only the consequence, but not the cause of oversaturation. First results show that the saturation state is increased in the zone of phototrophic CO2 uptake. In contrast, the saturation state is strongly decreased in the zone where dissolved oxygen overlaps with dissolved sulphide. Aerobic sulphide oxidation consumes most of the HS- and dissipates most of the alkalinity produced in the sulphate reduction zone below. Hence, our results are consistent with the findings of Aloisi (2008), and they even more clearly show that sulphate reduction does not induce carbonate precipitation nor contributes to carbonate precipitation in combination with phototrophic CO2 uptake. The alkalinity effect of sulphate

  11. Functional 3D Neural Mini-Tissues from Printed Gel-Based Bioink and Human Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qi; Tomaskovic-Crook, Eva; Lozano, Rodrigo; Chen, Yu; Kapsa, Robert M; Zhou, Qi; Wallace, Gordon G; Crook, Jeremy M

    2016-06-01

    Direct-write printing of stem cells within biomaterials presents an opportunity to engineer tissue for in vitro modeling and regenerative medicine. Here, a first example of constructing neural tissue by printing human neural stem cells that are differentiated in situ to functional neurons and supporting neuroglia is reported. The supporting biomaterial incorporates a novel clinically relevant polysaccharide-based bioink comprising alginate, carboxymethyl-chitosan, and agarose. The printed bioink rapidly gels by stable cross-linking to form a porous 3D scaffold encapsulating stem cells for in situ expansion and differentiation. Differentiated neurons form synaptic contacts, establish networks, are spontaneously active, show a bicuculline-induced increased calcium response, and are predominantly gamma-aminobutyric acid expressing. The 3D tissues will facilitate investigation of human neural development, function, and disease, and may be adaptable for engineering other 3D tissues from different stem cell types. PMID:27028356

  12. Functional 3D Neural Mini-Tissues from Printed Gel-Based Bioink and Human Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qi; Tomaskovic-Crook, Eva; Lozano, Rodrigo; Chen, Yu; Kapsa, Robert M; Zhou, Qi; Wallace, Gordon G; Crook, Jeremy M

    2016-06-01

    Direct-write printing of stem cells within biomaterials presents an opportunity to engineer tissue for in vitro modeling and regenerative medicine. Here, a first example of constructing neural tissue by printing human neural stem cells that are differentiated in situ to functional neurons and supporting neuroglia is reported. The supporting biomaterial incorporates a novel clinically relevant polysaccharide-based bioink comprising alginate, carboxymethyl-chitosan, and agarose. The printed bioink rapidly gels by stable cross-linking to form a porous 3D scaffold encapsulating stem cells for in situ expansion and differentiation. Differentiated neurons form synaptic contacts, establish networks, are spontaneously active, show a bicuculline-induced increased calcium response, and are predominantly gamma-aminobutyric acid expressing. The 3D tissues will facilitate investigation of human neural development, function, and disease, and may be adaptable for engineering other 3D tissues from different stem cell types.

  13. Beyond Agar: Gel Substrates with Improved Optical Clarity and Drug Efficiency and Reduced Autofluorescence for Microbial Growth Experiments.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Philipp A; McElfresh, Cameron; Wong, Lily R; Ideker, Trey

    2015-08-15

    Agar, a seaweed extract, has been the standard support matrix for microbial experiments for over a century. Recent developments in high-throughput genetic screens have created a need to reevaluate the suitability of agar for use as colony support, as modern robotic printing systems now routinely spot thousands of colonies within the area of a single microtiter plate. Identifying optimal biophysical, biochemical, and biological properties of the gel support matrix in these extreme experimental conditions is instrumental to achieving the best possible reproducibility and sensitivity. Here we systematically evaluate a range of gelling agents by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model microbe. We find that carrageenan and Phytagel have superior optical clarity and reduced autofluorescence, crucial for high-resolution imaging and fluorescent reporter screens. Nutrient choice and use of refined Noble agar or pure agarose reduce the effective dose of numerous selective drugs by >50%, potentially enabling large cost savings in genetic screens. Using thousands of mutant yeast strains to compare colony growth between substrates, we found no evidence of significant growth or nutrient biases between gel substrates, indicating that researchers could freely pick and choose the optimal gel for their respective application and experimental condition.

  14. Automated Gel Size Selection to Improve the Quality of Next-generation Sequencing Libraries Prepared from Environmental Water Samples.

    PubMed

    Uyaguari-Diaz, Miguel I; Slobodan, Jared R; Nesbitt, Matthew J; Croxen, Matthew A; Isaac-Renton, Judith; Prystajecky, Natalie A; Tang, Patrick

    2015-04-17

    Next-generation sequencing of environmental samples can be challenging because of the variable DNA quantity and quality in these samples. High quality DNA libraries are needed for optimal results from next-generation sequencing. Environmental samples such as water may have low quality and quantities of DNA as well as contaminants that co-precipitate with DNA. The mechanical and enzymatic processes involved in extraction and library preparation may further damage the DNA. Gel size selection enables purification and recovery of DNA fragments of a defined size for sequencing applications. Nevertheless, this task is one of the most time-consuming steps in the DNA library preparation workflow. The protocol described here enables complete automation of agarose gel loading, electrophoretic analysis, and recovery of targeted DNA fragments. In this study, we describe a high-throughput approach to prepare high quality DNA libraries from freshwater samples that can be applied also to other environmental samples. We used an indirect approach to concentrate bacterial cells from environmental freshwater samples; DNA was extracted using a commercially available DNA extraction kit, and DNA libraries were prepared using a commercial transposon-based protocol. DNA fragments of 500 to 800 bp were gel size selected using Ranger Technology, an automated electrophoresis workstation. Sequencing of the size-selected DNA libraries demonstrated significant improvements to read length and quality of the sequencing reads.

  15. Intraparenchymal drug delivery via positive-pressure infusion: experimental and modeling studies of poroelasticity in brain phantom gels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Jian; Broaddus, William C; Viswanathan, Raju R; Raghavan, Raghu; Gillies, George T

    2002-02-01

    We have used agarose gel to develop a robust model of the intraparenchymal brain tissues for the purpose of simulating positive-pressure infusion of therapeutic agents directly into the brain. In parallel with that effort, we have synthesized a mathematical description of the infusion process on the basis of a poroelastic theory for the swelling of the tissues under the influence of the infusate's penetration into the interstitial space. Infusion line pressure measurements and video microscopy determinations of infusate volume of distribution within the gel demonstrate a good match between theory and experiment over a wide range of flow rates (0.5-10.0 microliters/min) and have clinical relevance for the convection-enhanced delivery of drugs into the brain without hindrance by the blood-brain barrier. We have put the brain phantom gel and the infusion measurement system into routine use in determining performance characteristics of novel types of neurosurgical catheters. This approach simplifies the catheter design process and helps to avoid some of the costs of in vivo testing. It also will allow validation of the elementary aspects of treatment planning systems that predict infusion distribution volumes on the basis of theoretical descriptions such as those derived from the poroelastic model. PMID:12066887

  16. Beyond Agar: Gel Substrates with Improved Optical Clarity and Drug Efficiency and Reduced Autofluorescence for Microbial Growth Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Philipp A.; McElfresh, Cameron; Wong, Lily R.

    2015-01-01

    Agar, a seaweed extract, has been the standard support matrix for microbial experiments for over a century. Recent developments in high-throughput genetic screens have created a need to reevaluate the suitability of agar for use as colony support, as modern robotic printing systems now routinely spot thousands of colonies within the area of a single microtiter plate. Identifying optimal biophysical, biochemical, and biological properties of the gel support matrix in these extreme experimental conditions is instrumental to achieving the best possible reproducibility and sensitivity. Here we systematically evaluate a range of gelling agents by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model microbe. We find that carrageenan and Phytagel have superior optical clarity and reduced autofluorescence, crucial for high-resolution imaging and fluorescent reporter screens. Nutrient choice and use of refined Noble agar or pure agarose reduce the effective dose of numerous selective drugs by >50%, potentially enabling large cost savings in genetic screens. Using thousands of mutant yeast strains to compare colony growth between substrates, we found no evidence of significant growth or nutrient biases between gel substrates, indicating that researchers could freely pick and choose the optimal gel for their respective application and experimental condition. PMID:26070672

  17. A glycosaminoglycan mimetic peptide nanofiber gel as an osteoinductive scaffold.

    PubMed

    Tansik, Gulistan; Kilic, Erden; Beter, Mustafa; Demiralp, Bahtiyar; Kiziltas Sendur, Gullu; Can, Nuray; Ozkan, Huseyin; Ergul, Elif; Guler, Mustafa O; Tekinay, Ayse B

    2016-08-16

    Biomineralization of the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in bone formation. Functional and structural biomimetic native bone ECM components can therefore be used to change the fate of stem cells and induce bone regeneration and mineralization. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) mimetic peptide nanofibers can interact with several growth factors. These nanostructures are capable of enhancing the osteogenic activity and mineral deposition of osteoblastic cells, which is indicative of their potential application in bone tissue regeneration. In this study, we investigated the potential of GAG-mimetic peptide nanofibers to promote the osteogenic differentiation of rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) in vitro and enhance the bone regeneration and biomineralization process in vivo in a rabbit tibial bone defect model. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and Alizarin red staining results suggested that osteogenic differentiation is enhanced when rMSCs are cultured on GAG-mimetic peptide nanofibers. Moreover, osteogenic marker genes were shown to be upregulated in the presence of the peptide nanofiber system. Histological and micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT) observations of regenerated bone defects in rabbit tibia bone also suggested that the injection of a GAG-mimetic nanofiber gel supports cortical bone deposition by enhancing the secretion of an inorganic mineral matrix. The volume of the repaired cortical bone was higher in GAG-PA gel injected animals. The overall results indicate that GAG-mimetic peptide nanofibers can be utilized effectively as a new bioactive platform for bone regeneration. PMID:27447002

  18. Study of Fricke gel dosimeter response for different gel quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavinato, C. C.; Campos, L. L.

    2010-11-01

    The Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) dosimeter has been studied for application in radiotherapy because it is capable of to measure the spatial distribution of radiation doses. The dosimetry is based on the oxidation of ferrous (Fe2+) to ferric (Fe3+) ions radiation induced, related to the radiation dose. The gel material usually employed is the 300 Bloom gelatin, which is imported and very expensive in Brazil. Aiming to analyze the viability of to use a locally produced and low cost gel material, in this work the spectrophotometric responses of FXG solutions prepared using 270 Bloom gelatin commercially available and 300 Bloom gelatin imported were compared. The absorption spectra of solutions prepared with 5% by weight 270 and 300 Bloom gelatins non-irradiated and irradiated with 60Co gamma radiation in the dose range between 0.5 and 100 Gy were analysed, the dose-response curves were evaluated and the useful dose range was established. The obtained results indicate that the FXG solution prepared with 270 Bloom gelatin presents good performance, similar to that presented by the FXG solution prepared with 300 Bloom gelatin and its use can be recommended owing to the low cost and the availability in local market.

  19. The alkaline earth intercalates of molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.; Samson, S.; Woollam, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide has been intercalated with calcium and strontium by means of the liquid ammonia technique. Chemical, X-ray, and superconductivity data are presented. The X-ray data reveal a lowering of crystal symmetry and increase of complexity of the structure upon intercalation with the alkaline earth metals. The Ca and Sr intercalates start to superconduct at 4 and 5.6 K, respectively, and show considerable anisotropy regarding the critical magnetic field.

  20. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Mark; Horwitz, E. Philip

    2003-01-01

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  1. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.

    1991-10-01

    The Tucker sand of Helper (KS) field is a candidate for surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding. The geology of the Helper site is typical of many DOE Class I reservoirs. The Tucker sand of Helper field was deposited in a fluvial dominated deltaic environment. Helper oil can be mobilized with either chemical system 2 or chemical system 3, as described in this report. Oil fields in the Gulf Coast region are also good candidates for surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding. The results from laboratory tests conducted in Berea sandstone cores with oil brine from Helper (KS) field are encouraging. The crude oil is viscous and non-acidic and, yet, was mobilized by the chemical formulations described in this report. Significant amounts of the oil were mobilized under simulated reservoir conditions. The results in Berea sandstone cores were encouraging and should be verified by tests with field core. Consumption of alkali, measured with field core, was very low. Surfactant loss appeared to be acceptable. Despite the good potential for mobilization of Helper oil, certain reservoir characteristics such as low permeability, compartmentalization, and shallow depth place constraints on applications of any chemical system in the Tucker sand. These constraints are typical of many DOE Class I reservoirs. Although Hepler field is not a perfect reservoir in which to apply surfactant- enhanced alkaline flooding, Hepler oil is particularly amenable to mobilization by surfactant-enhanced alkaline systems. A field test is recommended, dependent upon final evaluation of well logs and cores from the proposed pilot area. 14 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. Alkaline flooding for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Gittler, W.E.

    1983-09-01

    There are over 12 active projects of varying size using one of 3 major types of alkaline agents. These include sodium silicate, caustic soda, and soda ash. Among the largest pilots currently is the THUMS project in the Wilmington field, California. Plans called for the injection of a 4% weight concentration of sodium orthosilicate over a 60% PV. Through the first 3 yr, over 27 million bbl of chemicals have been injected. Gulf Oil is operating several alkaline floods, one of which is located off shore in the Quarantine Bay field, Louisiana. In this pilot, sodium hydroxide in a weight concentration of 5 to 12% is being injected. Belco Petroleum Corp. has reported that their pilot operating in the Isenhour Unit in Wyoming is using a .5% weight concentration of soda ash in conjunction with a polymer. Other uses for alkaline agents in chemical flooding include the use of silicate as a preflush or sacrificial agent in micellar/polymer and surfactant recovery systems. In addition, caustic has been tested in the surface-mixed caustic emulsion process while orthosilicate has been tested in a recovery method known as mobility-controlled caustic floods.

  3. Extracellular Production of a Novel Endo-β-Agarase AgaA from Pseudomonas vesicularis MA103 that Cleaves Agarose into Neoagarotetraose and Neoagarohexaose

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Pang-Hung; Wei, Chien-Han; Lu, Wen-Jung; Shen, Fen; Pan, Chorng-Liang; Lin, Hong-Ting Victor

    2015-01-01

    The gene agaA, of the isolated marine bacterium Pseudomonas vesicularis MA103, comprised 2958-bp nucleotides encoding a putative agarase AgaA of 985 amino acids, which was predicted to contain a signal peptide of 29 amino acids in the N-terminus, a catalytic domain of glycoside hydrolase 16 (GH16) family, a bacterial immunoglobulin group 2 (Big 2), and three carbohydrate binding modules 6 (CBM 6). The gene agaA was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the optimum temperatures for AgaA overexpression were 16, 20 and 24 °C. The agaA was cloned without its signal peptide for cytosolic production overexpression, whereas it was cloned with the heterologous signal peptide PelB and its endogenous signal peptide for periplasmic and extracellular productions, respectively. Extracellular and periplasmic rAgaA showed greater activity than that of cytosolic rAgaA, indicating that membrane translocation of AgaA may encourage proper protein folding. Time-course hydrolysis of agarose by rAgaA was accomplished and the products were analyzed using thin layer chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption inoization-time of flight mass spectrometry, indicating that AgaA from P. vesicularis was an endo-type β-1,4 agarase that cleaved agarose into neoagarotetraose and neoagarohexaose as the final products. PMID:25768342

  4. Alkaline injection for enhanced oil recovery: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, E.H.; Berg, R.L.; Carmichael, J.D.; Weinbrandt, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    In the past several years, there has been renewed interest in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by alkaline injection. Alkaline solutions also are being used as preflushes in micellar/polymer projects. Several major field tests of alkaline flooding are planned, are in progress, or recently have been completed. Considerable basic research on alkaline injection has been published recently, and more is in progress. This paper summarizes known field tests and, where available, the amount of alkali injected and the performance results. Recent laboratory work, much sponsored by the U.S. DOE, and the findings are described. Alkaline flood field test plans for new projects are summarized.

  5. 21 CFR 520.1452 - Moxidectin gel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Moxidectin gel. 520.1452 Section 520.1452 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1452 Moxidectin gel. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of gel contains 20 milligrams (2 percent) moxidectin. (b) Sponsor. See No....

  6. Spring-loaded polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    1995-01-01

    Spring-loaded electrically controllable polymeric gel actuators are disclosed. The polymeric gels can be polyvinyl alcohol, polyacrylic acid, or polyacrylamide, and are contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as water plus acetone. The action of the gel is mechanically biased, allowing the expansive and contractile forces to be optimized for specific applications.

  7. Spring-loaded polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, M.

    1995-02-14

    Spring-loaded electrically controllable polymeric gel actuators are disclosed. The polymeric gels can be polyvinyl alcohol, polyacrylic acid, or polyacrylamide, and are contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as water plus acetone. The action of the gel is mechanically biased, allowing the expansive and contractile forces to be optimized for specific applications. 5 figs.

  8. The fate of added alkalinity in model scenarios of ocean alkalinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer González, Miriam; Ilyina, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    The deliberate large-scale manipulation of the Earth's climate (geo-engineering) has been proposed to mitigate climate change and ocean acidification. Whilst the mitigation potential of these technologies could sound promising, they may also pose many environmental risks. Our research aims at exploring the ocean-based carbon dioxide removal method of alkalinity enhancement. Its mitigation potential to reduce atmospheric CO2 and counteract the consequences of ocean acidification, risks and unintended consequences are studied. In order to tackle these questions, different scenarios are implemented in the state-of-the-art Earth system model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology. The model configuration is based on the 5th phase of the coupled model intercomparison project following a high CO2 future climate change scenario RCP8.5 (in which radiative forcing rises to 8.5 W/m² in 2100). Two different scenarios are performed where the alkalinity is artificially added globally uniformly in the upper ocean. In the first scenario, alkalinity is increased as a pulse by doubling natural values of the first 12 meters. In the second scenario we add alkalinity into the same ocean layer such that the atmospheric CO2 concentration is reduced from RCP8.5 to RCP4.5 levels (with the radiative forcing of 4.5 W/m² in 2100). We investigate the fate of the added alkalinity in these two scenarios and compare the differences in alkalinity budgets. In order to increase oceanic CO2 uptake from the atmosphere, enhanced alkalinity has to stay in the upper ocean. Once the alkalinity is added, it will become part of the biogeochemical cycles and it will be distributed with the ocean currents. Therefore, we are particularly interested in the residence time of the added alkalinity at the surface. Variations in CO2 partial pressure, seawater pH and saturation state of carbonate minerals produced in the implemented scenarios will be presented. Collateral changes in ocean biogeochemistry and

  9. The Swelling of Olympic Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Michael; Fischer, Jakob; Werner, Marco; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2014-03-01

    The swelling equilibrium of Olympic gels is studied by Monte Carlo Simulations. We observe that gels consisting of flexible cyclic molecules of a higher degree of polymerization N show a smaller equilibrium swelling degree Q ~N - 0 . 28φ0- 0 . 72 for the same monomer volume fraction φ0 at network preparation. This observation is explained by a disinterpenetration process of overlapping non-concatenated polymers upon swelling. In the limit of a sufficiently large number of concatenations per cyclic molecule we expect that the equilibrium degree of swelling becomes proportional to φ0- 1 / 2 independent of N. Our results challenge current textbook models for the equilibrium degree of swelling of entangled polymer networks. Now at: Bio Systems Analysis Group, Jena Centre for Bioinformatics (JCB) and Department for Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, 07743 Jena, Germany.

  10. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    DOEpatents

    Klimov, Victor L.; Petruska, Melissa A.

    2010-05-25

    The present invention is directed to a process for preparing a solid composite having colloidal nanocrystals dispersed within a sol-gel matrix, the process including admixing colloidal nanocrystals with an amphiphilic polymer including hydrophilic groups selected from the group consisting of --COOH, --OH, --SO.sub.3H, --NH.sub.2, and --PO.sub.3H.sub.2 within a solvent to form an alcohol-soluble colloidal nanocrystal-polymer complex, admixing the alcohol-soluble colloidal nanocrystal-polymer complex and a sol-gel precursor material, and, forming the solid composite from the admixture. The present invention is also directed to the resultant solid composites and to the alcohol-soluble colloidal nanocrystal-polymer complexes.

  11. Alkaline and ultrasound assisted alkaline pretreatment for intensification of delignification process from sustainable raw-material.

    PubMed

    Subhedar, Preeti B; Gogate, Parag R

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline and ultrasound-assisted alkaline pretreatment under mild operating conditions have been investigated for intensification of delignification. The effect of NaOH concentration, biomass loading, temperature, ultrasonic power and duty cycle on the delignification has been studied. Most favorable conditions for only alkaline pretreatment were alkali concentration of 1.75 N, solid loading of 0.8% (w/v), temperature of 353 K and pretreatment time of 6 h and under these conditions, 40.2% delignification was obtained. In case of ultrasound-assisted alkaline approach, most favorable conditions obtained were alkali concentration of 1N, paper loading of 0.5% (w/v), sonication power of 100 W, duty cycle of 80% and pretreatment time of 70 min and the delignification obtained in ultrasound-assisted alkaline approach under these conditions was 80%. The material samples were characterized by FTIR, SEM, XRD and TGA technique. The lignin was recovered from solution by precipitation method and was characterized by FTIR, GPC and TGA technique.

  12. Alkaline solution/binder ratio as a determining factor in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Santaquiteria, C.; Fernandez-Jimenez, A.; Palomo, A.

    2012-09-15

    This study investigates the effect of the alkaline solution/binder (S/B) ratio on the composition and nanostructure of the reaction products generated in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates. The experiments used two mixtures of fly ash and dehydroxylated white clay and for each of these, varying proportions of the solution components. The alkali activator was an 8 M NaOH solution (with and without sodium silicate) used at three S/B ratios: 0.50, 0.75 and 1.25. The {sup 29}Si, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and XRD characterisation of the reaction products reveal that for ratios nearest the value delivering suitable paste workability, the reaction-product composition and structure depend primarily on the nature and composition of the starting materials and the alkaline activator used. However, when an excess alkaline activator is present in the system, the reaction products tend to exhibit SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratios of approximately 1, irrespective of the composition of the starting binder or the alkaline activator.

  13. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in 100 Patients With Tuberculosis Using Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Pooideh, Mohammad; Jabbarzadeh, Ismail; Ranjbar, Reza; Saifi, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is a widespread infectious disease. Today, TB has created a public health crisis in the world. Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates is useful for surveying the dynamics of TB infection, identifying new outbreaks, and preventing the disease. Different molecular methods for clustering of M. tuberculosis isolates have been used. Objectives: During a one year study of genotyping, 100 M. tuberculosis isolates from patients referred to Pasteur Institute of Iran were collected and their genotyping was accomplished using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) method. Materials and Methods: Identification of all M. tuberculosis isolates was accomplished using standard biochemical and species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using proportional method. After preparing PFGE plaques for each isolate of M. tuberculosis, XbaI restriction enzyme was applied for genome digestion. Finally, the digested DNA fragments were separated on 1% agarose gel and analyzed with GelCompar II software. Results: Genotyping of the studied isolates in comparison with the molecular weight marker revealed two common types; pulsotype A with 71 isolates and one multidrug resistant mycobacterium (MDR) case, and pulsotype B including 29 isolates and three MDR cases. No correlation between the antibiotypes and pulsotypes was observed. Conclusions: Molecular epidemiology studies of infectious diseases have been useful when bacterial isolates have been clustered in a period of time and in different geographical regions with variable antibiotic resistance patterns. In spite of high geographical differences and different antibiotic resistant patterns, low genetic diversity among the studied TB isolates may refer to the low rate of mutations in XbaI restriction sites in the mycobacterial genome. We also identified three MDR isolates in low-incidence pulsotype B, which could be disseminated and is highly

  14. Pst I restriction fragment length polymorphism of the human placental alkaline phosphatase gene in normal placentae and tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsavaler, L.; Penhallow, R.C.; Kam, W.; Sussman, H.H.

    1987-07-01

    The structure of the human placental alkaline phosphatase gene from normal term placentae was studied by restriction enzyme digestion and Southern blot analysis using a cDNA probe to the gene for the placental enzyme. The DNA digests fall into three distinct patterns based on the presence and intensity of an extra 1.1-kilobase Pst I Band. The extra 1.1-kilobase band is present in 9 of 27 placenta samples, and in 1 of these samples the extra band is present at double intensity. No polymorphism was revealed by digestion with restriction enzymes EcoRI, Sma I, BamHI, or Sac I. The extra Pst I-digestion site may lie in a noncoding region of the gene because no correlation was observed between the restriction fragment length polymorphism and the common placental alkaline phosphatase alleles identified by starch gel electrophoresis. In addition, because placental alkaline phosphatase is frequently re-expressed in neoplasms, the authors examined tissue from ovarian, testicular, and endometrial tumors and from BeWo choriocarcinoma cells in culture. The Pst I-DNA digestion patterns from these cells and tissues were identical to those seen in the normal ovary and term placentae. The consistent reproducible digestion patterns seen in DNA from normal and tumor tissue indicate that a major gene rearrangement is not the basis for the ectopic expression of placental alkaline phosphatase in neoplasia.

  15. Sol-gel processing using aminofunctional silanes

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, W.; Hunt, A.J.

    1994-12-31

    Clear gels have been made from TEOS and the amino functional silane under acid-catalyzed conditions and light scattering of the gels has been related to pH and the concentration of fluoride ions in the sol as well as the amount of the amino silane used. The authors have succeeded in preparing a series of gels containing Ni{sup 2+} or Cu{sup 2+} ions immobilized by chelation either before or after the gel formation. Aerogels made from these gels in particular, doped by the method of impregnation, have had a homogeneous microstructure on the scale of only a few nanometers.

  16. Oriented covalent immobilization of antibodies onto heterofunctional agarose supports: a highly efficient immuno-affinity chromatography platform.

    PubMed

    Batalla, Pilar; Bolívar, Juan M; Lopez-Gallego, Fernando; Guisan, Jose M

    2012-11-01

    The development of new bioconjugates formed by one antibody optimally bound (through its Fc region) to fairly inert solid surfaces is of primary relevance in immuno-affinity chromatography. Immunoglobulins G (IgG) have a Fc region very rich in histidine (His) residues. In this way, immobilization of IgGs on heterofunctional metal chelate-glyoxyl supports (Ag-Me(2+)/G) takes place in two steps: firstly the antibodies are conjugated to the support via His-metal coordination bonds. Secondly, their incubation under alkaline condition promotes an intramolecular covalent attachment between lysine residues at the Fc region and glyoxyl groups on the support surface. The IgG that recognizes as antigen the HRP (antiHRP-IgG) has been conjugated to Ag-Me(2+)/G supports. The resulting bioconjugate is highly inert and able to specifically bind the antigen (HRP) without significant unspecific binding of any other proteins, resulting in an excellent HRP purification platform. The binding activity of this bioconjugate has been optimized by controlling the antibody distribution throughout the bead's surface in order to avoid high antibody densities that led to a low binding activity of the antibodies. The optimal antibody distribution has been achieved when these proteins were slowly immobilized on Ag-Cu(2+)/G in presence of imidazole. This bioconjugate was able to bind up to 1.5 moles of antigen per mole of antibody, only 1.3-fold less than the antibody in solution. Hence, we have been able to develop an optimal protocol to prepare bioconjugated composites in an oriented and irreversible fashion which results in highly efficient and specific surfaces for the exclusive biological recognition. PMID:23021645

  17. Alkaline biofiltration of H2S odors.

    PubMed

    González-Sánchez, Armando; Revah, Sergio; Deshusses, Marc A

    2008-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a very common odor nuisance which is best controlled by chemical or biological scrubbing. Under alkaline pH, the amount of H2S that can be solubilized in a scrubbing liquid increases significantly, and therefore, gas-liquid mass transfer limitations can be reduced. To date, biological scrubbing of H2S has been limited to neutral or acidic pH, despite the potential benefit of reduced mass transfer limitations at alkaline pH. In the present paper, an alkaliphilic sulfoxidizing bacterial consortium was deployed in a laboratory-scale biotrickling filter treating H2S at pH 10. The gas contact time ranged from 1 to 6 s, and H2S inlet concentrations, from 2.5 to 18 ppm(v). The results showed that under most conditions, H2S removal exceeded 98% and the degradation end-product was sulfate. At the highest H2S concentrations and shortest gas contacttimes, when the loading exceeded 30 g m(-3) h(-1), the H2S removal efficiency decreased significantly due to biological reaction limitation, and incompletely oxidized sulfides were measured in the trickling liquid. An analysis of the process demonstrated that operating the biotrickling filter at high pH results in an enhancement of the mass transfer by a factor of 1700-11 000. Overall, alkaline biotrickling filtration was shown to be very effective at low concentration of H2S and very short gas contact time. This is the first demonstration of a biotrickling filter for air pollution control operated at high pH.

  18. Status of ELENCO's alkaline fuel cell technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Broeck, H.; van Bogaert, G.; Vennekens, G.; Vermeeren, L.; Vlasselaer, F.

    Low-temperature alkaline fuel cells which can be operated with air, oxygen-enriched air, and pure oxygen are discussed. Aspects of the electrochemical stack development, including manufacturing techniques, performance levels, and reactant purity, are first reviewed. Design, engineering, and operating aspects of the 1.5 kW, 15 kW, and 50 kW prototype fuel cell systems are considered. An ejector device based on the venturi principle is used to improve the H2 gas circulation and to reduce the H2 losses. Various industrial and aerospace applications of the modules are discussed.

  19. Effects of pH-treated Fish Sarcoplasmic Proteins on the Functional Properties of Chicken Myofibrillar Protein Gel Mediated by Microbial Transglutaminase

    PubMed Central

    Hemung, Bung-Orn

    2014-01-01

    pH adjustment would be of advantage in improving the water holding capacity of muscle proteins. The objective of this study was to evaluate the addition of fish sarcoplasmic protein (SP) solution, which was adjusted to pH 3.0 or 12.0, neutralized to pH 7.0, and lyophilized to obtain the acid- and alkaline-treated SP samples, on the functional properties of the chicken myofibrillar protein induced by microbial transglutaminase (MTG). The solubility of alkaline-treated SP was higher than that of the acid counterpart; however, those values of the two pH-treated samples were lower than that of normal SP (p<0.05). All SP solutions were mixed with myofibrillar proteins (MP) extracted from chicken breast, and incubated with MTG. The shear stresses of MP with acid- and alkaline-treated SP were higher than that of normal SP. The thermal stability of MP mixture reduced upon adding SP, regardless of the pH treatment. The breaking force of MP gels with acid-treated SP increased more than those of alkaline-treated SP, while normal SP showed the highest value. The MP gel lightness increased, but cooking loss reduced, with the addition of SP. Smooth microstructure of the gel surface was observed. These results indicated that adjusting the pH of SP improved the water holding capacity of chicken myofibrillar proteins induced by MTG. PMID:26761171

  20. Effect of solvent on melting gel behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnah, Ahmed Abdulaziz

    Melting gel and hybrid glass are organic-inorganic materials derived from sol gel processing. The behavior of the melting gel is that it is a solid at room temperature, but when the melting gel is reheated to 110°C (T1) it becomes fluid. The melting gel has reversible behavior due to incomplete crosslinking between polysiloxane chains. When the melting gel is heated to its consolidation temperature of 150°C (T2) the gel no longer softens (T2>T1), because crosslinking is completed. The melting gel at the consolidation temperature becomes hybrid glass. Melting gel coatings were applied to titanium alloy substrates. Melting gels were prepared containing phenyl substitutions with 1.0 mole Phenyltrimethoxysilane (PhTMS) in ratio to 0.25 moles of Diphenyldimethoxysilane (DPhDMS). The methanol to DPhDMS ratio was varied to change the thickness of the coatings. The coatings were inspected visually to see that there is good adhesion between the coating and the substrate. Nanoindenter tests were performed to determine hardness. The coated samples were placed in an oven and heated to 150ºC for 24, 48 or 96 hours before cooling back to room temperature, which took about 4 hours. The measurements of the hardness on samples containing 3 levels of solvent and heat treatment were collected by indentation technique. The best combination of solvent and temperature was 1:8 PhTMS:MeOH for all temperatures.