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Sample records for alkaline anaerobic respiration

  1. Molecular AND logic gate based on bacterial anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Arugula, Mary Anitha; Shroff, Namita; Katz, Evgeny; He, Zhen

    2012-10-21

    Enzyme coding genes that integrate information for anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were used as input for constructing an AND logic gate. The absence of one or both genes inhibited electrochemically-controlled anaerobic respiration, while wild type bacteria were capable of accepting electrons from an electrode for DMSO reduction.

  2. Identification of Anaerobic Selenate-Respiring Bacteria from Aquatic Sediments▿

    PubMed Central

    Narasingarao, Priya; Häggblom, Max M.

    2007-01-01

    The diversity population of microorganisms with the capability to use selenate as a terminal electron acceptor, reducing it to selenite and elemental selenium by the process known as dissimilatory selenate reduction, is largely unknown. The overall objective of this study was to gain an in-depth understanding of anaerobic biotransformation of selenium in the environment, particularly anaerobic respiration, and to characterize the microorganisms catalyzing this process. Here, we demonstrate the isolation and characterization of four novel anaerobic dissimilatory selenate-respiring bacteria enriched from a variety of sources, including sediments from three different water bodies in Chennai, India, and a tidal estuary in New Jersey. Strains S5 and S7 from India, strain KM from the Meadowlands, NJ, and strain pn1, categorized as a laboratory contaminant, were all phylogenetically distinct, belonging to various phyla in the bacterial domain. The 16S rRNA gene sequence shows that strain S5 constitutes a new genus belonging to Chrysiogenetes, while strain S7 belongs to the Deferribacteres, with greater than 98% 16S rRNA gene similarity to Geovibrio ferrireducens. Strain KM is related to Malonomonas rubra, Pelobacter acidigallici, and Desulfuromusa spp., with 96 to 97% 16S rRNA gene similarity. Strain pn1 is 99% similar to Pseudomonas stutzeri. Strains S5, S7, and KM are obligately anaerobic selenate-respiring microorganisms, while strain pn1 is facultatively anaerobic. Besides respiring selenate, all these strains also respire nitrate. PMID:17435005

  3. The Energetics of Aerobic versus Anaerobic Respiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champion, Timothy D.; Schwenz, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Background information, laboratory procedures, and a discussion of the results of an experiment designed to investigate the difference in energy gained from the aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of glucose are presented. Sample experimental and calculated data are included. (CW)

  4. Anaerobic respiration of Escherichia coli in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shari A; Gibson, Terri; Maltby, Rosalie C; Chowdhury, Fatema Z; Stewart, Valley; Cohen, Paul S; Conway, Tyrrell

    2011-10-01

    The intestine is inhabited by a large microbial community consisting primarily of anaerobes and, to a lesser extent, facultative anaerobes, such as Escherichia coli, which we have shown requires aerobic respiration to compete successfully in the mouse intestine (S. A. Jones et al., Infect. Immun. 75:4891-4899, 2007). If facultative anaerobes efficiently lower oxygen availability in the intestine, then their sustained growth must also depend on anaerobic metabolism. In support of this idea, mutants lacking nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase have extreme colonization defects. Here, we further explore the role of anaerobic respiration in colonization using the streptomycin-treated mouse model. We found that respiratory electron flow is primarily via the naphthoquinones, which pass electrons to cytochrome bd oxidase and the anaerobic terminal reductases. We found that E. coli uses nitrate and fumarate in the intestine, but not nitrite, dimethyl sulfoxide, or trimethylamine N-oxide. Competitive colonizations revealed that cytochrome bd oxidase is more advantageous than nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase. Strains lacking nitrate reductase outcompeted fumarate reductase mutants once the nitrate concentration in cecal mucus reached submillimolar levels, indicating that fumarate is the more important anaerobic electron acceptor in the intestine because nitrate is limiting. Since nitrate is highest in the absence of E. coli, we conclude that E. coli is the only bacterium in the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine that respires nitrate. Lastly, we demonstrated that a mutant lacking the NarXL regulator (activator of the NarG system), but not a mutant lacking the NarP-NarQ regulator, has a colonization defect, consistent with the advantage provided by NarG. The emerging picture is one in which gene regulation is tuned to balance expression of the terminal reductases that E. coli uses to maximize its competitiveness and achieve the highest possible population in

  5. [Anaerobic humus respiration by Shewanella cinica D14T].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-cheng; Hong, Yi-guo; Luo, Wei; Chen, Xing-juan; Sun, Guo-ping; Xu, Mei-ying; Guo, Jun; Cen, Ying-hua

    2006-12-01

    Experimental results suggested Shewanella cinica D14T is capable of humus respiration utilizing various organic acids and some important environmental pollutants (e.g., toluene. etc) as electron donors and AQS or AQDS as a sole terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic condition. The dissimilatory reduction of 1mmol/L AQDS can couple to the production of enough ATP to support cell growth about 60 generations; The oxidization of electron donors was coupled to the reduction of humus, as reduced humus increased corresponding with increasing of electron donor; The typical inhibitors such as Cu2+ which inhibited Fe-S center, Stigmatellin which was methyl-naphthoquinone model, Dicumarol which inhibited oxidized methyl-naphthoquinone transform to reduced one, Metyrapone which was specific inhibitor for P450 enzyme blocked the humus respiration seriously. These were powerful evidences for humus-respiration by D14.

  6. The respiration pattern as an indicator of the anaerobic threshold.

    PubMed

    Mirmohamadsadeghi, Leila; Vesin, Jean-Marc; Lemay, Mathieu; Deriaz, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    The anaerobic threshold (AT) is a good index of personal endurance but needs a laboratory setting to be determined. It is important to develop easy AT field measurements techniques in order to rapidly adapt training programs. In the present study, it is postulated that the variability of the respiratory parameters decreases with exercise intensity (especially at the AT level). The aim of this work was to assess, on healthy trained subjects, the putative relationships between the variability of some respiration parameters and the AT. The heart rate and respiratory variables (volume, rate) were measured during an incremental exercise performed on a treadmill by healthy moderately trained subjects. Results show a decrease in the variance of 1/tidal volume with the intensity of exercise. Consequently, the cumulated variance (sum of the variance measured at each level of the exercise) follows an exponential relationship with respect to the intensity to reach eventually a plateau. The amplitude of this plateau is closely related to the AT (r=-0.8). It is concluded that the AT is related to the variability of the respiration.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa anaerobic respiration in biofilms: relationships to cystic fibrosis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sang Sun; Hennigan, Robert F; Hilliard, George M; Ochsner, Urs A; Parvatiyar, Kislay; Kamani, Moneesha C; Allen, Holly L; DeKievit, Teresa R; Gardner, Paul R; Schwab, Ute; Rowe, John J; Iglewski, Barbara H; McDermott, Timothy R; Mason, Ronald P; Wozniak, Daniel J; Hancock, Robert E W; Parsek, Matthew R; Noah, Terry L; Boucher, Richard C; Hassett, Daniel J

    2002-10-01

    Recent data indicate that cystic fibrosis (CF) airway mucus is anaerobic. This suggests that Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in CF reflects biofilm formation and persistence in an anaerobic environment. P. aeruginosa formed robust anaerobic biofilms, the viability of which requires rhl quorum sensing and nitric oxide (NO) reductase to modulate or prevent accumulation of toxic NO, a byproduct of anaerobic respiration. Proteomic analyses identified an outer membrane protein, OprF, that was upregulated approximately 40-fold under anaerobic versus aerobic conditions. Further, OprF exists in CF mucus, and CF patients raise antisera to OprF. An oprF mutant formed poor anaerobic biofilms, due, in part, to defects in anaerobic respiration. Thus, future investigations of CF pathogenesis and therapy should include a better understanding of anaerobic metabolism and biofilm development by P. aeruginosa.

  8. Bacterial Drug Tolerance under Clinical Conditions Is Governed by Anaerobic Adaptation but not Anaerobic Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Hemsley, Claudia M.; Luo, Jamie X.; Andreae, Clio A.; Butler, Clive S.; Soyer, Orkun S.

    2014-01-01

    Noninherited antibiotic resistance is a phenomenon whereby a subpopulation of genetically identical bacteria displays phenotypic tolerance to antibiotics. We show here that compared to Escherichia coli, the clinically relevant genus Burkholderia displays much higher levels of cells that tolerate ceftazidime. By measuring the dynamics of the formation of drug-tolerant cells under conditions that mimic in vivo infections, we show that in Burkholderia bacteria, oxygen levels affect the formation of these cells. The drug-tolerant cells are characterized by an anaerobic metabolic signature and can be eliminated by oxygenating the system or adding nitrate. The transcriptome profile suggests that these cells are not dormant persister cells and are likely to be drug tolerant as a consequence of the upregulation of anaerobic nitrate respiration, efflux pumps, β-lactamases, and stress response proteins. These findings have important implications for the treatment of chronic bacterial infections and the methodologies and conditions that are used to study drug-tolerant and persister cells in vitro. PMID:25049258

  9. Bacterial drug tolerance under clinical conditions is governed by anaerobic adaptation but not anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Claudia M; Luo, Jamie X; Andreae, Clio A; Butler, Clive S; Soyer, Orkun S; Titball, Richard W

    2014-10-01

    Noninherited antibiotic resistance is a phenomenon whereby a subpopulation of genetically identical bacteria displays phenotypic tolerance to antibiotics. We show here that compared to Escherichia coli, the clinically relevant genus Burkholderia displays much higher levels of cells that tolerate ceftazidime. By measuring the dynamics of the formation of drug-tolerant cells under conditions that mimic in vivo infections, we show that in Burkholderia bacteria, oxygen levels affect the formation of these cells. The drug-tolerant cells are characterized by an anaerobic metabolic signature and can be eliminated by oxygenating the system or adding nitrate. The transcriptome profile suggests that these cells are not dormant persister cells and are likely to be drug tolerant as a consequence of the upregulation of anaerobic nitrate respiration, efflux pumps, β-lactamases, and stress response proteins. These findings have important implications for the treatment of chronic bacterial infections and the methodologies and conditions that are used to study drug-tolerant and persister cells in vitro.

  10. Influence of the molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis on anaerobic respiration, biofilm formation and motility in Burkholderia thailandensis.

    PubMed

    Andreae, Clio A; Titball, Richard W; Butler, Clive S

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis is closely related to Burkholderia pseudomallei, a bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis. B. pseudomallei can survive and persist within a hypoxic environment for up to one year and has been shown to grow anaerobically in the presence of nitrate. Currently, little is known about the role of anaerobic respiration in pathogenesis of melioidosis. Using B. thailandensis as a model, a library of 1344 transposon mutants was created to identify genes required for anaerobic nitrate respiration. One transposon mutant (CA01) was identified with an insertion in BTH_I1704 (moeA), a gene required for the molybdopterin biosynthetic pathway. This pathway is involved in the synthesis of a molybdopterin cofactor required for a variety of molybdoenzymes, including nitrate reductase. Disruption of molybdopterin biosynthesis prevented growth under anaerobic conditions, when using nitrate as the sole terminal electron acceptor. Defects in anaerobic respiration, nitrate reduction, motility and biofilm formation were observed for CA01. Mutant complementation with pDA-17:BTH_I1704 was able to restore anaerobic growth on nitrate, nitrate reductase activity and biofilm formation, but did not restore motility. This study highlights the potential importance of molybdoenzyme-dependent anaerobic respiration in the survival and virulence of B. thailandensis.

  11. Cholera Toxin Production Induced upon Anaerobic Respiration is Suppressed by Glucose Fermentation in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Kang-Mu; Bari, Wasimul; Kim, Hwa Young; Kim, Hye Jin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2016-03-01

    The causative agent of pandemic cholera, Vibrio cholerae, infects the anaerobic environment of the human intestine. Production of cholera toxin (CT), a major virulence factor of V. cholerae, is highly induced during anaerobic respiration with trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as an alternative electron acceptor. However, the molecular mechanism of TMAO-stimulated CT production is not fully understood. Herein, we reveal that CT production during anaerobic TMAO respiration is affected by glucose fermentation. When the seventh pandemic V. cholerae O1 strain N16961 was grown with TMAO and additional glucose, CT production was markedly reduced. Furthermore, an N16961 Δcrp mutant, devoid of cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP), was defective in CT production during growth by anaerobic TMAO respiration, further suggesting a role of glucose metabolism in regulating TMAO-mediated CT production. TMAO reductase activity was noticeably decreased when grown together with glucose or by mutation of the crp gene. A CRP binding region was identified in the promoter region of the torD gene, which encodes a structural subunit of the TMAO reductase. Gel shift assays further confirmed the binding of purified CRP to the torD promoter sequence. Together, our results suggest that the bacterial ability to respire using TMAO is controlled by CRP, whose activity is dependent on glucose availability. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of major virulence factor production by V. cholerae under anaerobic growth conditions.

  12. Siderophores are not involved in Fe(III) solubilization during anaerobic Fe(III) respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Fennessey, Christine M; Jones, Morris E; Taillefert, Martial; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2010-04-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a wide range of anaerobic electron acceptors, including sparingly soluble Fe(III) oxides. In the present study, S. oneidensis was found to produce Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration, a respiratory strategy postulated to destabilize Fe(III) and produce more readily reducible soluble organic Fe(III). In-frame gene deletion mutagenesis, siderophore detection assays, and voltammetric techniques were combined to determine (i) if the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration were synthesized via siderophore biosynthesis systems and (ii) if the Fe(III)-siderophore reductase was required for respiration of soluble organic Fe(III) as an anaerobic electron acceptor. Genes predicted to encode the siderophore (hydroxamate) biosynthesis system (SO3030 to SO3032), the Fe(III)-hydroxamate receptor (SO3033), and the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase (SO3034) were identified in the S. oneidensis genome, and corresponding in-frame gene deletion mutants were constructed. DeltaSO3031 was unable to synthesize siderophores or produce soluble organic Fe(III) during aerobic respiration yet retained the ability to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. DeltaSO3034 retained the ability to synthesize siderophores during aerobic respiration and to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. These findings indicate that the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration are not synthesized via the hydroxamate biosynthesis system and that the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase is not essential for respiration of Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as an anaerobic electron acceptor.

  13. Contribution of cell elongation to the biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mi Young; Lee, Kang-Mu; Park, Yongjin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2011-01-18

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a gram-negative bacterium of clinical importance, forms more robust biofilm during anaerobic respiration, a mode of growth presumed to occur in abnormally thickened mucus layer lining the cystic fibrosis (CF) patient airway. However, molecular basis behind this anaerobiosis-triggered robust biofilm formation is not clearly defined yet. Here, we identified a morphological change naturally accompanied by anaerobic respiration in P. aeruginosa and investigated its effect on the biofilm formation in vitro. A standard laboratory strain, PAO1 was highly elongated during anaerobic respiration compared with bacteria grown aerobically. Microscopic analysis demonstrated that cell elongation likely occurred as a consequence of defective cell division. Cell elongation was dependent on the presence of nitrite reductase (NIR) that reduces nitrite (NO(2) (-)) to nitric oxide (NO) and was repressed in PAO1 in the presence of carboxy-PTIO, a NO antagonist, demonstrating that cell elongation involves a process to respond to NO, a spontaneous byproduct of the anaerobic respiration. Importantly, the non-elongated NIR-deficient mutant failed to form biofilm, while a mutant of nitrate reductase (NAR) and wild type PAO1, both of which were highly elongated, formed robust biofilm. Taken together, our data reveal a role of previously undescribed cell biological event in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and suggest NIR as a key player involved in such process.

  14. Activation of cholera toxin production by anaerobic respiration of trimethylamine N-oxide in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-Mu; Park, Yongjin; Bari, Wasimul; Yoon, Mi Young; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Sang Cheol; Lee, Hyung-Il; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2012-11-16

    Vibrio cholerae is a gram-negative bacterium that causes cholera. Although the pathogenesis caused by this deadly pathogen takes place in the intestine, commonly thought to be anaerobic, anaerobiosis-induced virulence regulations are not fully elucidated. Anerobic growth of the V. cholerae strain, N16961, was promoted when trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) was used as an alternative electron acceptor. Strikingly, cholera toxin (CT) production was markedly induced during anaerobic TMAO respiration. N16961 mutants unable to metabolize TMAO were incapable of producing CT, suggesting a mechanistic link between anaerobic TMAO respiration and CT production. TMAO reductase is transported to the periplasm via the twin arginine transport (TAT) system. A similar defect in both anaerobic TMAO respiration and CT production was also observed in a N16961 TAT mutant. In contrast, the abilities to grow on TMAO and to produce CT were not affected in a mutant of the general secretion pathway. This suggests that V. cholerae may utilize the TAT system to secrete CT during TMAO respiration. During anaerobic growth with TMAO, N16961 cells exhibit green fluorescence when stained with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, a specific dye for reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, CT production was decreased in the presence of an ROS scavenger suggesting a positive role of ROS in regulating CT production. When TMAO was co-administered to infant mice infected with N16961, the mice exhibited more severe pathogenic symptoms. Together, our results reveal a novel anaerobic growth condition that stimulates V. cholerae to produce its major virulence factor.

  15. The Regulatory Role of Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) during Anaerobic Respiration of Shewanella piezotolerans WP3

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xin-Wei; He, Ying; Xu, Jun; Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Feng-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) is a global regulator that controls bacterial iron homeostasis. In this study, a fur deletion mutant of the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 was constructed. Physiological studies revealed that the growth rate of this mutant under aerobic conditions was only slightly lower than that of wild type (WT), but severe growth defects were observed under anaerobic conditions when different electron acceptors (EAs) were provided. Comparative transcriptomic analysis demonstrated that Fur is involved not only in classical iron homeostasis but also in anaerobic respiration. Fur exerted pleiotropic effects on the regulation of anaerobic respiration by controlling anaerobic electron transport, the heme biosynthesis system, and the cytochrome c maturation system. Biochemical assays demonstrated that levels of c-type cytochromes were lower in the fur mutant, consistent with the transcriptional profiling. Transcriptomic analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed a primary regulation network for Fur in WP3. These results suggest that Fur may act as a sensor for anoxic conditions to trigger and influence the anaerobic respiratory system. PMID:24124499

  16. The regulatory role of ferric uptake regulator (Fur) during anaerobic respiration of Shewanella piezotolerans WP3.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin-Wei; He, Ying; Xu, Jun; Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Feng-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) is a global regulator that controls bacterial iron homeostasis. In this study, a fur deletion mutant of the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 was constructed. Physiological studies revealed that the growth rate of this mutant under aerobic conditions was only slightly lower than that of wild type (WT), but severe growth defects were observed under anaerobic conditions when different electron acceptors (EAs) were provided. Comparative transcriptomic analysis demonstrated that Fur is involved not only in classical iron homeostasis but also in anaerobic respiration. Fur exerted pleiotropic effects on the regulation of anaerobic respiration by controlling anaerobic electron transport, the heme biosynthesis system, and the cytochrome c maturation system. Biochemical assays demonstrated that levels of c-type cytochromes were lower in the fur mutant, consistent with the transcriptional profiling. Transcriptomic analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed a primary regulation network for Fur in WP3. These results suggest that Fur may act as a sensor for anoxic conditions to trigger and influence the anaerobic respiratory system.

  17. Anaerobic growth and potential for amino acid production by nitrate respiration in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Takeno, Seiki; Ohnishi, Junko; Komatsu, Tomoha; Masaki, Tatsuya; Sen, Kikuo; Ikeda, Masato

    2007-07-01

    Oxygen limitation is a crucial problem in amino acid fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum. Toward this subject, our study was initiated by analysis of the oxygen-requiring properties of C. glutamicum, generally regarded as a strict aerobe. This organism formed colonies on agar plates up to relatively low oxygen concentrations (0.5% O(2)), while no visible colonies were formed in the absence of O(2). However, in the presence of nitrate (NO3-), the organism exhibited limited growth anaerobically with production of nitrite (NO2-), indicating that C. glutamicum can use nitrate as a final electron acceptor. Assays of cell extracts from aerobic and hypoxic cultures yielded comparable nitrate reductase activities, irrespective of nitrate levels. Genome analysis revealed a narK2GHJI cluster potentially relevant to nitrate reductase and transport. Disruptions of narG and narJ abolished the nitrate-dependent anaerobic growth with the loss of nitrate reductase activity. Disruption of the putative nitrate/nitrite antiporter gene narK2 did not affect the enzyme activity but impaired the anaerobic growth. These indicate that this locus is responsible for nitrate respiration. Agar piece assays using L-lysine- and L-arginine-producing strains showed that production of both amino acids occurred anaerobically by nitrate respiration, indicating the potential of C. glutamicum for anaerobic amino acid production.

  18. Bacteria associated with deep, alkaline, anaerobic groundwaters in Southeast Washington.

    PubMed

    Stevens, T O; McKinley, J P; Fredrickson, J K

    1993-01-01

    The microbial diversity in two deep, confined aquifers, the Grande Ronde (1270 m) and the Priest Rapids (316 m), Hanford Reservation, Washington, USA, was investigated by sampling from artesian wells. These basaltic aquifers were alkaline (pH 8.5 to 10.5) and anaerobic (Eh -200 to -450 mV). The wells were allowed to free-flow until pH and Eh stabilized, then the microflora was sampled with water filtration and flow-through sandtrap methods. Direct microscopic counts showed 7.6 × 10(5) and 3.6 × 10(3) bacteria ml(-1) in water from the Grande Ronde and Priest Rapids aquifers, respectively. The sand filter method yielded 5.7 × 10(8) and 1.1 × 10(5) cells g(-1) wet weight of sand. The numbers of bacteria did not decrease as increasing volumes of water were flushed out. The heterotrophic diversity of these bacterial populations was assessed using enrichments for 20 functional groups. These groups were defined by their ability to grow in a matrix of five different electron acceptors (O2, Fe(III), NO3 (-), SO4 (2-), HCO3 (-)) and four groups of electron donors (fermentation products, monomers, polymers, aromatics) in a mineral salts medium at pH 9.5. Growth was assessed by protein production. Culture media were subsequently analyzed to determine substrate utilization patterns. Substrate utilization patterns proved to be more reliable indicators of the presence of a particular physiological group than was protein production. The sand-trap method obtained a greater diversity of bacteria than did water filtration, presumably by enriching the proportion of normally sessile bacteria relative to planktonic bacteria. Substrate utilization patterns were different for microflora from the two aquifers and corresponded to their different geochemistries. Activities in the filtered water enrichments more closely matched those predicted by aquifer geochemistry than did the sand-trap enrichments. The greatest activities were found in Fe(III)-reducing enrichments from both wells, SO4

  19. Dissimilatory reduction of extracellular electron acceptors in anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Richter, Katrin; Schicklberger, Marcus; Gescher, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    An extension of the respiratory chain to the cell surface is necessary to reduce extracellular electron acceptors like ferric iron or manganese oxides. In the past few years, more and more compounds were revealed to be reduced at the surface of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, and the list does not seem to have an end so far. Shewanella as well as Geobacter strains are model organisms to discover the biochemistry that enables the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular electron acceptors. In both cases, c-type cytochromes are essential electron-transferring proteins. They make the journey of respiratory electrons from the cytoplasmic membrane through periplasm and over the outer membrane possible. Outer membrane cytochromes have the ability to catalyze the last step of the respiratory chains. Still, recent discoveries provided evidence that they are accompanied by further factors that allow or at least facilitate extracellular reduction. This review gives a condensed overview of our current knowledge of extracellular respiration, highlights recent discoveries, and discusses critically the influence of different strategies for terminal electron transfer reactions.

  20. Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c-type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lianming; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha B.; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, David E.; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Tiedje, James M.; Romine, Margaret F.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-06-24

    Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c-type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr -1, 36 in-frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c-type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c-type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the wellstudied c-type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr -1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c-type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis.

  1. Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c-type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lin; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, Dave; Kennedy, David; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fredrickson, James K; Tiedje, James M; Romine, Margaret; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-07-01

    Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c-type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr -1, 36 in-frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c-type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c-type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the well-studied c-type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr -1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c-type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis.

  2. Effect of alkaline pretreatment on anaerobic digestion of solid wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez Torres, M. Espinosa Llorens, Ma. del C.

    2008-11-15

    The introduction of the anaerobic digestion for the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is currently of special interest. The main difficulty in the treatment of this waste fraction is its biotransformation, due to the complexity of organic material. Therefore, the first step must be its physical, chemical and biological pretreatment for breaking complex molecules into simple monomers, to increase solubilization of organic material and improve the efficiency of the anaerobic treatment in the second step. This paper describes chemical pretreatment based on lime addition (Ca(OH){sub 2}), in order to enhance chemical oxygen demand (COD) solubilization, followed by anaerobic digestion of the OFMSW. Laboratory-scale experiments were carried out in completely mixed reactors, 1 L capacity. Optimal conditions for COD solubilization in the first step of pretreatment were 62.0 mEq Ca(OH){sub 2}/L for 6.0 h. Under these conditions, 11.5% of the COD was solubilized. The anaerobic digestion efficiency of the OFMSW, with and without pretreatment, was evaluated. The highest methane yield under anaerobic digestion of the pretreated waste was 0.15 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg volatile solids (VS), 172.0% of the control. Under that condition the soluble COD and VS removal were 93.0% and 94.0%, respectively. The results have shown that chemical pretreatment with lime, followed by anaerobic digestion, provides the best results for stabilizing the OFMSW.

  3. Taurine reduction in anaerobic respiration of Bilophila wadsworthia RZATAU.

    PubMed

    Laue, H; Denger, K; Cook, A M

    1997-05-01

    Organosulfonates are important natural and man-made compounds, but until recently (T. J. Lie, T. Pitta, E. R. Leadbetter, W. Godchaux III, and J. R. Leadbetter. Arch. Microbiol. 166:204-210, 1996), they were not believed to be dissimilated under anoxic conditions. We also chose to test whether alkane- and arenesulfonates could serve as electron sinks in respiratory metabolism. We generated 60 anoxic enrichment cultures in mineral salts medium which included several potential electron donors and a single organic sulfonate as an electron sink, and we used material from anaerobic digestors in communal sewage works as inocula. None of the four aromatic sulfonates, the three unsubstituted alkanesulfonates, or the N-sulfonate tested gave positive enrichment cultures requiring both the electron donor and electron sink for growth. Nine cultures utilizing the natural products taurine, cysteate, or isethionate were considered positive for growth, and all formed sulfide. Two clearly different pure cultures were examined. Putative Desulfovibrio sp. strain RZACYSA, with lactate as the electron donor, utilized sulfate, aminomethanesulfonate, taurine, isethionate, and cysteate, converting the latter to ammonia, acetate, and sulfide. Strain RZATAU was identified by 16S rDNA analysis as Bilophila wadsworthia. In the presence of, e.g., formate as the electron donor, it utilized, e.g., cysteate and isethionate and converted taurine quantitatively to cell material and products identified as ammonia, acetate, and sulfide. Sulfite and thiosulfate, but not sulfate, were utilized as electron sinks, as was nitrate, when lactate was provided as the electron donor and carbon source. A growth requirement for 1,4-naphthoquinone indicates a menaquinone electron carrier, and the presence of cytochrome c supports the presence of an electron transport chain. Pyruvate-dependent disappearance of taurine from cell extracts, as well as formation of alanine and release of ammonia and acetate, was

  4. Low-heat, mild alkaline pretreatment of switchgrass for anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guang; Bierma, Tom; Walker, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of alkaline pretreatment under mild heat conditions (100°C or 212°F) on the anaerobic co-digestion of switchgrass. The effects of alkaline concentration, types of alkaline, heating time and rinsing were evaluated. In addition to batch studies, continuous-feed studies were performed in triplicate to identify potential digester operational problems caused by switchgrass co-digestion while accounting for uncertainty due to digester variability. Few studies have examined anaerobic digestion of switchgrass or the effects of mild heating to enhance alkaline pretreatment prior to biomass digestion. Results indicate that pretreatment can significantly enhance digestion of coarse-ground (≤ 0.78 cm particle size) switchgrass. Energy conversion efficiency as high as 63% was observed, and was comparable or superior to fine-grinding as a pretreatment method. The optimal NaOH concentration was found to be 5.5% (wt/wt alkaline/biomass) with a 91.7% moisture level. No evidence of operational problems such as solids build-up, poor mixing, or floating materials were observed. These results suggest the use of waste heat from a generator could reduce the concentration of alkaline required to adequately pretreat lignocellulosic feedstock prior to anaerobic digestion.

  5. Gene expression profiling of Corynebacterium glutamicum during Anaerobic nitrate respiration: induction of the SOS response for cell survival.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Taku; Teramoto, Haruhiko; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2011-03-01

    The gene expression profile of Corynebacterium glutamicum under anaerobic nitrate respiration revealed marked differences in the expression levels of a number of genes involved in a variety of cellular functions, including carbon metabolism and respiratory electron transport chain, compared to the profile under aerobic conditions using DNA microarrays. Many SOS genes were upregulated by the shift from aerobic to anaerobic nitrate respiration. An elongated cell morphology, similar to that induced by the DivS-mediated suppression of cell division upon cell exposure to the DNA-damaging reagent mitomycin C, was observed in cells subjected to anaerobic nitrate respiration. None of these transcriptional and morphological differences were observed in a recA mutant strain lacking a functional RecA regulator of the SOS response. The recA mutant cells additionally showed significantly reduced viability compared to wild-type cells similarly grown under anaerobic nitrate respiration. These results suggest a role for the RecA-mediated SOS response in the ability of cells to survive any DNA damage that may result from anaerobic nitrate respiration in C. glutamicum.

  6. Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii gen. nov., sp. nov., a halophilic anaerobe from Dead Sea sediments that respires selenate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Switzer, Blum J.; Stolz, J.F.; Oren, A.; Oremland, R.S.

    2001-01-01

    We isolated an obligately anaerobic halophilic bacterium from the Dead Sea that grew by respiration of selenate. The isolate, designated strain DSSe-1, was a gram-negative, non-motile rod. It oxidized glycerol or glucose to acetate+CO2 with concomitant reduction of selenate to selenite plus elemental selenium. Other electron acceptors that supported anaerobic growth on glycerol were nitrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide; nitrite, arsenate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite or sulfate could not serve as electron acceptors. Growth on glycerol in the presence of nitrate occurred over a salinity range from 100 to 240 g/l, with an optimum at 210 g/l. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence suggests that strain DSSe-1 belongs to the order Halanaerobiales, an order of halophilic anaerobes with a fermentative or homoacetogenic metabolism, in which anaerobic respiratory metabolism has never been documented. The highest 16S rRNA sequence similarity (90%) was found with Acetohalobium arabaticum (X89077). On the basis of physiological properties as well as the relatively low homology of 16S rRNA from strain DSSe-1 with known genera, classification in a new genus within the order Halanaerobiales, family Halobacteroidaceae is warranted. We propose the name Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii. Type strain is strain DSSe-1 (ATCC accession number BAA-73).

  7. Anaerobic respiration on tellurate and other metalloids in bacteria from hydrothermal vent fields in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Csotonyi, Julius T; Stackebrandt, Erko; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2006-07-01

    This paper reports the discovery of anaerobic respiration on tellurate by bacteria isolated from deep ocean (1,543 to 1,791 m) hydrothermal vent worms. The first evidence for selenite- and vanadate-respiring bacteria from deep ocean hydrothermal vents is also presented. Enumeration of the anaerobic metal(loid)-resistant microbial community associated with hydrothermal vent animals indicates that a greater proportion of the bacterial community associated with certain vent fauna resists and reduces metal(loid)s anaerobically than aerobically, suggesting that anaerobic metal(loid) respiration might be an important process in bacteria that are symbiotic with vent fauna. Isolates from Axial Volcano and Explorer Ridge were tested for their ability to reduce tellurate, selenite, metavanadate, or orthovanadate in the absence of alternate electron acceptors. In the presence of metal(loid)s, strains showed an ability to grow and produce ATP, whereas in the absence of metal(loid)s, no growth or ATP production was observed. The protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone depressed metal(loid) reduction. Anaerobic tellurate respiration will be a significant component in describing biogeochemical cycling of Te at hydrothermal vents.

  8. Microbial metal reduction by members of the genus Shewanella: novel strategies for anaerobic respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Dichristina, Thomas; Bates, David J.; Burns, Justin L.; Dale, Jason R.; Payne, Amanda N.

    2006-01-01

    Metal-reducing members of the genus Shewanella are important components of the microbial community residing in redox-stratified freshwater and marine environments. Metal-reducing gram-negative bacteria such as Shewanella, however, are presented with a unique physiological challenge: they are required to respire anaerobically on terminal electron acceptors which are either highly insoluble (Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides) and reduced to soluble end-products or highly soluble (U(VI) and Tc(VII)) and reduced to insoluble end-products. To overcome physiological problems associated with metal solubility, metal-respiring Shewanella are postulated to employ a variety of novel respiratory strategies not found in other gram-negative bacteria which respire on soluble electron acceptors such as O2, NO3 and SO4. The following chapter highlights the latest findings on the molecular mechanism of Fe(III), U(VI) and Tc(VII) reduction by Shewanella, with particular emphasis on electron transport chain physiology.

  9. Anaerobic respiration using a complete oxidative TCA cycle drives multicellular swarming in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Alteri, Christopher J; Himpsl, Stephanie D; Engstrom, Michael D; Mobley, Harry L T

    2012-10-30

    Proteus mirabilis rapidly migrates across surfaces using a periodic developmental process of differentiation alternating between short swimmer cells and elongated hyperflagellated swarmer cells. To undergo this vigorous flagellum-mediated motility, bacteria must generate a substantial proton gradient across their cytoplasmic membranes by using available energy pathways. We sought to identify the link between energy pathways and swarming differentiation by examining the behavior of defined central metabolism mutants. Mutations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (fumC and sdhB mutants) caused altered patterns of swarming periodicity, suggesting an aerobic pathway. Surprisingly, the wild-type strain swarmed on agar containing sodium azide, which poisons aerobic respiration; the fumC TCA cycle mutant, however, was unable to swarm on azide. To identify other contributing energy pathways, we screened transposon mutants for loss of swarming on sodium azide and found insertions in the following genes that involved fumarate metabolism or respiration: hybB, encoding hydrogenase; fumC, encoding fumarase; argH, encoding argininosuccinate lyase (generates fumarate); and a quinone hydroxylase gene. These findings validated the screen and suggested involvement of anaerobic electron transport chain components. Abnormal swarming periodicity of fumC and sdhB mutants was associated with the excretion of reduced acidic fermentation end products. Bacteria lacking SdhB were rescued to wild-type pH and periodicity by providing fumarate, independent of carbon source but dependent on oxygen, while fumC mutants were rescued by glycerol, independent of fumarate only under anaerobic conditions. These findings link multicellular swarming patterns with fumarate metabolism and membrane electron transport using a previously unappreciated configuration of both aerobic and anaerobic respiratory chain components. Bacterial locomotion and the existence of microbes were the first scientific

  10. Alkaline fermentation of waste sludge causes a significant reduction of antibiotic resistance genes in anaerobic reactors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haining; Zheng, Xiong; Chen, Yinguang; Liu, Hui; Wan, Rui; Su, Yinglong

    2017-02-15

    Alkaline fermentation has been reported to be an effective method to recover valuable products from waste sludge. However, to date, the potential effect of alkaline pH on the fate of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during anaerobic fermentation of sludge has never been documented. In this study, the target ARGs in sludge was observed to be removed effectively and stably when sludge was anaerobically fermented at pH10. Compared with the control (without pH adjustment), the abundances of target ARGs at pH10 were reduced by 0.87 (sulI), 1.36 (sulII), 0.42 (tet(O)), 1.11 (tet(Q)), 0.79 (tet(C)) and 1.04 (tet(X)) log units. Further investigations revealed that alkaline fermentation shifted the community structures of potential ARGs hosts. Moreover, alkaline fermentation remarkably decreased the quantities and the ARGs-possessing ability of genetic vectors (plasmid DNA, extracellular DNA and phage DNA), which might limit the transfer of ARGs via conjugation, transformation and transduction. These results suggest that the shifted compositions of gene hosts and restricted gene transfer potential might be the critical reasons for the attenuation of ARGs at pH10.

  11. Siderophores Are Not Involved in Fe(III) Solubilization during Anaerobic Fe(III) Respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fennessey, Christine M.; Jones, Morris E.; Taillefert, Martial; DiChristina, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a wide range of anaerobic electron acceptors, including sparingly soluble Fe(III) oxides. In the present study, S. oneidensis was found to produce Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration, a respiratory strategy postulated to destabilize Fe(III) and produce more readily reducible soluble organic Fe(III). In-frame gene deletion mutagenesis, siderophore detection assays, and voltammetric techniques were combined to determine (i) if the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration were synthesized via siderophore biosynthesis systems and (ii) if the Fe(III)-siderophore reductase was required for respiration of soluble organic Fe(III) as an anaerobic electron acceptor. Genes predicted to encode the siderophore (hydroxamate) biosynthesis system (SO3030 to SO3032), the Fe(III)-hydroxamate receptor (SO3033), and the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase (SO3034) were identified in the S. oneidensis genome, and corresponding in-frame gene deletion mutants were constructed. ΔSO3031 was unable to synthesize siderophores or produce soluble organic Fe(III) during aerobic respiration yet retained the ability to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. ΔSO3034 retained the ability to synthesize siderophores during aerobic respiration and to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. These findings indicate that the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration are not synthesized via the hydroxamate biosynthesis system and that the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase is not essential for respiration of Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as an anaerobic electron acceptor. PMID:20190086

  12. Involvement of a membrane-bound class III adenylate cyclase in regulation of anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Charania, M A; Brockman, K L; Zhang, Y; Banerjee, A; Pinchuk, G E; Fredrickson, J K; Beliaev, A S; Saffarini, D A

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  13. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K. L.; Zhang, Y.; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  14. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K.; Zhang, Yang; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, S. oneidensis MR-1 uses the cAMP receptor protein, CRP, for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an E. coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, DMSO, or Fe(III), whereas the deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III), and to a lesser extent with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and the cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagella biosynthesis, and electron transport, were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant, but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration, and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  15. Anaerobic respiration: In vitro efficacy of Nitazoxanide against mitochondriate Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype.

    PubMed

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Farooq, Maria; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    Acanthamoeba is an opportunistic protist pathogen that is responsible for serious human and animal infection. Being one of the most frequently isolated protists from the environment, it is likely that it readily encounters microaerophilic environments. For respiration under anaerobic or low oxygen conditions in several amitochondriate protists, decarboxylation of pyruvate is catalyzed by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase instead of pyruvate dehydrogenase. In support, Nitazoxanide, an inhibitor of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, is effective and non-mutagenic clinically against a range of amitochondriate protists, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis. The overall aim of the present study was to determine in vitro efficacy of Nitazoxanide against Acanthamoeba castellanii. At micromolar concentrations, the findings revealed that Nitazoxanide neither affected A. castellanii growth or viability nor amoeba-mediated host cell monolayer damage in vitro or extracellular proteolytic activities. Similarly, microaerophilic conditions alone had no significant effects. In contrast, microaerophilic conditions together with Nitazoxanide showed amoebicidal effects and inhibited A. castellanii-mediated host cell monolayer damage as well as extracellular proteases. Using encystation assays, it was observed that Nitazoxanide inhibited trophozoite transformation into cysts both under aerophilic and microaerophilic conditions. Furthermore, pre-treatment of cysts with Nitazoxanide inhibited A. castellanii excystation. These findings are important in the identification of potential targets that could be useful against parasite-specific respiration as well as to understand the basic biology of the life cycle of Acanthamoeba.

  16. Natural organic matter as electron acceptor: experimental evidence for its important role in anaerobic respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Maximilian Peter; Sander, Michael; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Hupfer, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Microbial respiration is a key driver of element cycling in oxic and anoxic environments. Upon depletion of oxygen as terminal electron acceptor (TEA), a number of anaerobic bacteria can employ alternative TEA for intracellular energy generation. Redox active quinone moieties in dissolved organic matter (DOM) are well known electron acceptors for microbial respiration. However, it remains unclear whether quinones in adsorbed and particulate OM accept electrons in a same way. In our studies we aim to understand the importance of natural organic matter (NOM) as electron acceptors for microbial energy gain and its possible implications for methanogenesis. Using a novel electrochemical approach, mediated electrochemical reduction and -oxidation, we can directly quantify reduced hydroquinone and oxidized quionone moieties in dissolved and particulate NOM samples. In a mesocosm experiment, we rewetted sediment and peat soil and followed electron transfer to the inorganic and organic electron acceptors over time. We found that inorganic and organic electron acceptor pools were depleted over the same timescales. More importantly, we showed that organic, NOM-associated electron accepting moieties represent as much as 21 40% of total TEA inventories. These findings support earlier studies that propose that the reduction of quinone moieties in particulate organic matter competitively suppresses methanogenesis in wetland soils. Our results indicate that electron transfer to organic, particulate TEA in inundated ecosystems has to be accounted for when establishing carbon budgets in and projecting greenhouse gas emissions from these systems.

  17. Effects of alkalinity sources on the stability of anaerobic digestion from food waste.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shujun; Zhang, Jishi; Wang, Xikui

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of some alkalinity sources on the stability of anaerobic digestion (AD) from food waste (FW). Four alkalinity sources, namely lime mud from papermaking (LMP), waste eggshell (WES), CaCO3 and NaHCO3, were applied as buffer materials and their stability effects were evaluated in batch AD. The results showed that LMP and CaCO3 had more remarkable effects than NaHCO3 and WES on FW stabilization. The methane yields were 120.2, 197.0, 156.2, 251.0 and 194.8 ml g(-1) VS for the control and synergistic digestions of CaCO3, NaHCO3, LMP and WES added into FW, respectively. The corresponding final alkalinity reached 5906, 7307, 9504, 7820 and 6782 mg l(-1), while the final acidities were determined to be 501, 200, 50, 350 and 250 mg l(-1), respectively. This indicated that the synergism between alkalinity and inorganic micronutrients from different alkalinity sources played an important role in the process stability of AD from FW.

  18. The multidrug efflux pump MdtEF protects against nitrosative damage during the anaerobic respiration in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiliang; Xiao, Minfeng; Horiyama, Tsukasa; Zhang, Yinfeng; Li, Xuechen; Nishino, Kunihiko; Yan, Aixin

    2011-07-29

    Drug efflux represents an important protection mechanism in bacteria to withstand antibiotics and environmental toxic substances. Efflux genes constitute 6-18% of all transporters in bacterial genomes, yet the expression and functions of only a handful of them have been studied. Among the 20 efflux genes encoded in the Escherichia coli K-12 genome, only the AcrAB-TolC system is constitutively expressed. The expression, activities, and physiological functions of the remaining efflux genes are poorly understood. In this study we identified a dramatic up-regulation of an additional efflux pump, MdtEF, under the anaerobic growth condition of E. coli, which is independent of antibiotic exposure. We found that expression of MdtEF is up-regulated more than 20-fold under anaerobic conditions by the global transcription factor ArcA, resulting in increased efflux activity and enhanced drug tolerance in anaerobically grown E. coli. Cells lacking mdtEF display a significantly decreased survival rate under the condition of anaerobic respiration of nitrate. Deletion of the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of indole, tnaAB, or replacing nitrate with fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor during the anaerobic respiration restores the decreased survival of ΔmdtEF cells. Moreover, ΔmdtEF cells are susceptible to indole nitrosative derivatives, a class of toxic byproducts formed and accumulated within E. coli when the bacterium respires nitrate under anaerobic conditions. Taken together, we conclude that the multidrug efflux pump MdtEF is up-regulated during the anaerobic physiology of E. coli to protect the bacterium from nitrosative damage through expelling the nitrosyl indole derivatives out of the cells.

  19. Cholera toxin production during anaerobic trimethylamine N-oxide respiration is mediated by stringent response in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Taek; Park, Yongjin; Yoon, Mi Young; Bari, Wasimul; Go, Junhyeok; Min, Kyung Bae; Raskin, David M; Lee, Kang-Mu; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2014-05-09

    As a facultative anaerobe, Vibrio cholerae can grow by anaerobic respiration. Production of cholera toxin (CT), a major virulence factor of V. cholerae, is highly promoted during anaerobic growth using trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as an alternative electron acceptor. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of TMAO-stimulated CT production and uncovered the crucial involvement of stringent response in this process. V. cholerae 7th pandemic strain N16961 produced a significantly elevated level of ppGpp, the bacterial stringent response alarmone, during anaerobic TMAO respiration. Bacterial viability was impaired, and DNA replication was also affected under the same growth condition, further suggesting that stringent response is induced. A ΔrelA ΔspoT ppGpp overproducer strain produced an enhanced level of CT, whereas anaerobic growth via TMAO respiration was severely inhibited. In contrast, a ppGpp-null strain (ΔrelA ΔspoT ΔrelV) grew substantially better, but produced no CT, suggesting that CT production and bacterial growth are inversely regulated in response to ppGpp accumulation. Bacterial capability to produce CT was completely lost when the dksA gene, which encodes a protein that works cooperatively with ppGpp, was deleted. In the ΔdksA mutant, stringent response growth inhibition was alleviated, further supporting the inverse regulation of CT production and anaerobic growth. In vivo virulence of ΔrelA ΔspoT ΔrelV or ΔdksA mutants was significantly attenuated. The ΔrelA ΔspoT mutant maintained virulence when infected with exogenous TMAO despite its defective growth. Together, our results reveal that stringent response is activated under TMAO-stimulated anaerobic growth, and it regulates CT production in a growth-dependent manner in V. cholerae.

  20. FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in the light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri

    PubMed Central

    Septer, Alecia N.; Bose, Jeffrey L.; Dunn, Anne K.; Stabb, Eric V.

    2010-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri induces both anaerobic respiration and bioluminescence during symbiotic infection. In many bacteria, the oxygen-sensitive regulator FNR activates anaerobic respiration, and a preliminary study using the light-generating lux genes from V. fischeri MJ1 cloned in Escherichia coli suggested that FNR stimulates bioluminescence. To test for FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in V. fischeri, we generated fnr mutants of V. fischeri strains MJ1 and ES114. In both strains, FNR was required for normal fumarate- and nitrate-dependent respiration. However, contrary to the report in transgenic E. coli, FNR mediated repression of lux. ArcA represses bioluminescence, and ParcA-lacZ reporters showed reduced expression in fnr mutants, suggesting a possible indirect effect of FNR on bioluminescence via arcA. Finally, the fnr mutant of ES114 was not impaired in colonization of its host squid, Euprymna scolopes. This study extends characterization of FNR to the Vibrionaceae and underscores the importance of studying lux regulation in its native background. PMID:20298504

  1. FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in the light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Septer, Alecia N; Bose, Jeffrey L; Dunn, Anne K; Stabb, Eric V

    2010-05-01

    Vibrio fischeri induces both anaerobic respiration and bioluminescence during symbiotic infection. In many bacteria, the oxygen-sensitive regulator FNR activates anaerobic respiration, and a preliminary study using the light-generating lux genes from V. fischeri MJ1 cloned in Escherichia coli suggested that FNR stimulates bioluminescence. To test for FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in V. fischeri, we generated fnr mutants of V. fischeri strains MJ1 and ES114. In both strains, FNR was required for normal fumarate- and nitrate-dependent respiration. However, contrary to the report in transgenic E. coli, FNR mediated the repression of lux. ArcA represses bioluminescence, and P(arcA)-lacZ reporters showed reduced expression in fnr mutants, suggesting a possible indirect effect of FNR on bioluminescence via arcA. Finally, the fnr mutant of ES114 was not impaired in colonization of its host squid, Euprymna scolopes. This study extends the characterization of FNR to the Vibrionaceae and underscores the importance of studying lux regulation in its native background.

  2. Systems-level analysis of Escherichia coli response to silver nanoparticles: the roles of anaerobic respiration in microbial resistance.

    PubMed

    Du, Huamao; Lo, Tat-Ming; Sitompul, Johnner; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2012-08-10

    Despite extensive use of silver nanoparticles for antimicrobial applications, cellular mechanisms underlying microbial response to silver nanoparticles remain to be further elucidated at the systems level. Here, we report systems-level response of Escherichia coli to silver nanoparticles using transcriptome-based biochemical and phenotype assays. Notably, we provided the evidence that anaerobic respiration is induced upon exposure to silver nanoparticles. Further we showed that anaerobic respiration-related regulators and enzymes play an important role in E. coli resistance to silver nanoparticles. In particular, our results suggest that arcA is essential for resistance against silver NPs and the deletion of fnr, fdnH and narH significantly increases the resistance. We envision that this study offers novel insights into modes of antimicrobial action of silver nanoparticles, and cellular mechanisms contributing to the development of microbial resistance to silver nanoparticles.

  3. Enhanced coproduction of hydrogen and methane from cornstalks by a three-stage anaerobic fermentation process integrated with alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xi-Yu; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2012-01-01

    A three-stage anaerobic fermentation process including H(2) fermentation I, H(2) fermentation II, methane fermentation was developed for the coproduction of hydrogen and methane from cornstalks. Hydrogen production from cornstalks using direct microbial conversion by Clostridium thermocellum 7072 was markedly enhanced in the two-stage thermophilic hydrogen fermentation process integrated with alkaline treatment. The highest total hydrogen yield from cornstalks in the two-stage fermentation process reached 74.4 mL/g-cornstalk. The hydrogen fermentation effluents and alkaline hydrolyzate were further used for methane fermentation by anaerobic granular sludge, and the total methane yield reached 205.8 mL/g-cornstalk. The total energy recovery in the three-stage anaerobic fermentation process integrated with alkaline hydrolysis reached 70.0%.

  4. Anaerobic digestion of the microalga Spirulina at extreme alkaline conditions: biogas production, metagenome, and metatranscriptome

    PubMed Central

    Nolla-Ardèvol, Vímac; Strous, Marc; Tegetmeyer, Halina E.

    2015-01-01

    A haloalkaline anaerobic microbial community obtained from soda lake sediments was used to inoculate anaerobic reactors for the production of methane rich biogas. The microalga Spirulina was successfully digested by the haloalkaline microbial consortium at alkaline conditions (pH 10, 2.0 M Na+). Continuous biogas production was observed and the obtained biogas was rich in methane, up to 96%. Alkaline medium acted as a CO2 scrubber which resulted in low amounts of CO2 and no traces of H2S in the produced biogas. A hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 15 days and 0.25 g Spirulina L−1 day−1 organic loading rate (OLR) were identified as the optimal operational parameters. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analysis showed that the hydrolysis of the supplied substrate was mainly carried out by Bacteroidetes of the “ML635J-40 aquatic group” while the hydrogenotrophic pathway was the main producer of methane in a methanogenic community dominated by Methanocalculus. PMID:26157422

  5. A novel regulatory circuit to control indole biosynthesis protects Escherichia coli from nitrosative damages during the anaerobic respiration of nitrate.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yong; Xu, Zeling; Yan, Aixin

    2017-02-01

    Indole is a widely distributed microbial secondary metabolite. It mediates a broad range of physiological processes in both its producing and surrounding species. Yet, indole biosynthesis during the anaerobiosis of bacteria remains largely uncharacterized. Here, we find that while indole production is promoted during fermentation and anaerobic respiration of fumarate and trimethylamine N-oxide in E. coli, its biosynthesis is repressed during anaerobic respiration of nitrate especially during exponential growth. We show that expression of the indole biosynthetic operon tnaCAB is repressed under this condition by the two component systems NarXL and NarPQ in the global regulator FNR dependent manner. During stationary growth phase of nitrate respiration, indole biosynthesis is derepressed. However, cellular indole concentration remains low. We demonstrate that this is due to the rapid conversion of indole into mutagenic indole nitrosative derivatives under this condition. Consistent with this, a supplement of exogenous indole during nitrate respiration causes elevated mutation frequencies in E. coli cells lacking the detoxifying efflux genes mdtEF, and ectopic over-expression of tnaAB genes decreases the fitness of E. coli to this physiological condition. Together, these results suggest that indole production is tuned to the bioenergetics activities of E. coli to facilitate its adaptation and fitness.

  6. Substrate-level phosphorylation is the primary source of energy conservation during anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Kristopher A; Flynn, Jeffrey M; Naranjo, Belén; Shikhare, Indraneel D; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2010-07-01

    It is well established that respiratory organisms use proton motive force to produce ATP via F-type ATP synthase aerobically and that this process may reverse during anaerobiosis to produce proton motive force. Here, we show that Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, a nonfermentative, facultative anaerobe known to respire exogenous electron acceptors, generates ATP primarily from substrate-level phosphorylation under anaerobic conditions. Mutant strains lacking ackA (SO2915) and pta (SO2916), genes required for acetate production and a significant portion of substrate-level ATP produced anaerobically, were tested for growth. These mutant strains were unable to grow anaerobically with lactate and fumarate as the electron acceptor, consistent with substrate-level phosphorylation yielding a significant amount of ATP. Mutant strains lacking ackA and pta were also shown to grow slowly using N-acetylglucosamine as the carbon source and fumarate as the electron acceptor, consistent with some ATP generation deriving from the Entner-Doudoroff pathway with this substrate. A deletion strain lacking the sole F-type ATP synthase (SO4746 to SO4754) demonstrated enhanced growth on N-acetylglucosamine and a minor defect with lactate under anaerobic conditions. ATP synthase mutants grown anaerobically on lactate while expressing proteorhodopsin, a light-dependent proton pump, exhibited restored growth when exposed to light, consistent with a proton-pumping role for ATP synthase under anaerobic conditions. Although S. oneidensis requires external electron acceptors to balance redox reactions and is not fermentative, we find that substrate-level phosphorylation is its primary anaerobic energy conservation strategy. Phenotypic characterization of an ackA deletion in Shewanella sp. strain MR-4 and genomic analysis of other sequenced strains suggest that this strategy is a common feature of Shewanella.

  7. Isolation, growth, and metabolism of an obligately anaerobic, selenate- respiring bacterium, strain SES-3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Blum, J.S.; Culbertson, C.W.; Visscher, P.T.; Miller, L.G.; Dowdle, P.; Strohmaier, F.E.

    1994-01-01

    A gram-negative, strictly anaerobic, motile vibrio was isolated from a selenate-respiring enrichment culture. The isolate, designated strain SES-3, grew by coupling the oxidation of lactate to acetate plus CO2 with the concomitant reduction of selenate to selenite or of nitrate to ammonium. No growth was observed on sulfate or selenite, but cell suspensions readily reduced selenite to elemental selenium (Se0). Hence, SES-3 can carry out a complete reduction of selenate to Se0. Washed cell suspensions of selenate- grown cells did not reduce nitrate, and nitrate-grown cells did not reduce selenate, indicating that these reductions are achieved by separate inducible enzyme systems. However, both nitrate-grown and selenate-grown cells have a constitutive ability to reduce selenite or nitrite. The oxidation of [14C]lactate to 14CO2 coupled to the reduction of selenate or nitrate by cell suspensions was inhibited by CCCP (carbonyl cyanide m- chlorophenylhydrazone), cyanide, and azide. High concentrations of selenite (5 mM) were readily reduced to Se0 by selenate-grown cells, but selenite appeared to block the synthesis of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Tracer experiments with [75Se]selenite indicated that cell suspensions could achieve a rapid and quantitative reduction of selenite to Se0. This reduction was totally inhibited by sulfite, partially inhibited by selenate or nitrite, but unaffected by sulfate or nitrate. Cell suspensions could reduce thiosulfate, but not sulfite, to sulfide. These results suggest that reduction of selenite to Se0 may proceed, in part, by some of the components of a dissimilatory system for sulfur oxyanions.

  8. Metabolic potential of fatty acid oxidation and anaerobic respiration by abundant members of Thaumarchaeota and Thermoplasmata in deep anoxic peat

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Xueju; Handley, Kim M.; Gilbert, Jack A.; ...

    2015-12-01

    To probe the metabolic potential of abundant Archaea in boreal peats, we reconstructed two near-complete archaeal genomes, affiliated with Thaumarchaeota group 1.1c (bin Fn1, 8% abundance), which was a genomically unrepresented group, and Thermoplasmata (bin Bg1, 26% abundance), from metagenomic data acquired from deep anoxic peat layers. Each of the near-complete genomes encodes the potential to degrade long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) via β-oxidation. Fn1 has the potential to oxidize LCFA either by syntrophic interaction with methanogens or by coupling oxidation with anaerobic respiration using fumarate as a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Fn1 is the first Thaumarchaeota genome without an identifiablemore » carbon fixation pathway, indicating that this mesophilic phylum encompasses more diverse metabolisms than previously thought. Furthermore, we report genetic evidence suggestive of sulfite and/or organosulfonate reduction by Thermoplasmata Bg1. In deep peat, inorganic TEAs are often depleted to extremely low levels, yet the anaerobic respiration predicted for two abundant archaeal members suggests organic electron acceptors such as fumarate and organosulfonate (enriched in humic substances) may be important for respiration and C mineralization in peatlands.« less

  9. Metabolic potential of fatty acid oxidation and anaerobic respiration by abundant members of Thaumarchaeota and Thermoplasmata in deep anoxic peat

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Xueju; Handley, Kim M.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2015-12-01

    To probe the metabolic potential of abundant Archaea in boreal peats, we reconstructed two near-complete archaeal genomes, affiliated with Thaumarchaeota group 1.1c (bin Fn1, 8% abundance), which was a genomically unrepresented group, and Thermoplasmata (bin Bg1, 26% abundance), from metagenomic data acquired from deep anoxic peat layers. Each of the near-complete genomes encodes the potential to degrade long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) via β-oxidation. Fn1 has the potential to oxidize LCFA either by syntrophic interaction with methanogens or by coupling oxidation with anaerobic respiration using fumarate as a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Fn1 is the first Thaumarchaeota genome without an identifiable carbon fixation pathway, indicating that this mesophilic phylum encompasses more diverse metabolisms than previously thought. Furthermore, we report genetic evidence suggestive of sulfite and/or organosulfonate reduction by Thermoplasmata Bg1. In deep peat, inorganic TEAs are often depleted to extremely low levels, yet the anaerobic respiration predicted for two abundant archaeal members suggests organic electron acceptors such as fumarate and organosulfonate (enriched in humic substances) may be important for respiration and C mineralization in peatlands.

  10. Metabolic potential of fatty acid oxidation and anaerobic respiration by abundant members of Thaumarchaeota and Thermoplasmata in deep anoxic peat.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xueju; Handley, Kim M; Gilbert, Jack A; Kostka, Joel E

    2015-12-01

    To probe the metabolic potential of abundant Archaea in boreal peats, we reconstructed two near-complete archaeal genomes, affiliated with Thaumarchaeota group 1.1c (bin Fn1, 8% abundance), which was a genomically unrepresented group, and Thermoplasmata (bin Bg1, 26% abundance), from metagenomic data acquired from deep anoxic peat layers. Each of the near-complete genomes encodes the potential to degrade long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) via β-oxidation. Fn1 has the potential to oxidize LCFA either by syntrophic interaction with methanogens or by coupling oxidation with anaerobic respiration using fumarate as a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Fn1 is the first Thaumarchaeota genome without an identifiable carbon fixation pathway, indicating that this mesophilic phylum encompasses more diverse metabolisms than previously thought. Furthermore, we report genetic evidence suggestive of sulfite and/or organosulfonate reduction by Thermoplasmata Bg1. In deep peat, inorganic TEAs are often depleted to extremely low levels, yet the anaerobic respiration predicted for two abundant archaeal members suggests organic electron acceptors such as fumarate and organosulfonate (enriched in humic substances) may be important for respiration and C mineralization in peatlands.

  11. Aerobically respiring prokaryotic strains exhibit a broader temperature–pH–salinity space for cell division than anaerobically respiring and fermentative strains

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Jesse P.; Dobinson, Luke; Freeman, Kenneth; McKenzie, Ross; Wyllie, Dale; Nixon, Sophie L.; Cockell, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Biological processes on the Earth operate within a parameter space that is constrained by physical and chemical extremes. Aerobic respiration can result in adenosine triphosphate yields up to over an order of magnitude higher than those attained anaerobically and, under certain conditions, may enable microbial multiplication over a broader range of extremes than other modes of catabolism. We employed growth data published for 241 prokaryotic strains to compare temperature, pH and salinity values for cell division between aerobically and anaerobically metabolizing taxa. Isolates employing oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor exhibited a considerably more extensive three-dimensional phase space for cell division (90% of the total volume) than taxa using other inorganic substrates or organic compounds as the electron acceptor (15% and 28% of the total volume, respectively), with all groups differing in their growth characteristics. Understanding the mechanistic basis of these differences will require integration of research into microbial ecology, physiology and energetics, with a focus on global-scale processes. Critical knowledge gaps include the combined impacts of diverse stress parameters on Gibbs energy yields and rates of microbial activity, interactions between cellular energetics and adaptations to extremes, and relating laboratory-based data to in situ limits for cell division. PMID:26354829

  12. Positive regulation of the Shewanella oneidensis OmpS38, a major porin facilitating anaerobic respiration, by Crp and Fur

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tong; Ju, Lili; Yin, Jianhua; Gao, Haichun

    2015-01-01

    Major porins are among the most abundant proteins embedded in the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, playing crucial roles in maintenance of membrane structural integrity and OM permeability. Although many OM proteins (especially c-type cytochromes) in Shewanella oneidensis, a research model for respiratory versatility, have been extensively studied, physiological significance of major porins remains largely unexplored. In this study, we show that OmpS38 and OmpA are two major porins, neither of which is responsive to changes in osmolarity or contributes to the intrinsic resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. However, OmpS38 but not OmpA is largely involved in respiration of non-oxygen electron acceptors. We then provide evidence that expression of ompS38 is transcribed from two promoters, the major of which is favored under anaerobic conditions while the other appears constitutive. The major promoter is under the direct control of Crp, the master regulator dictating respiration. As a result, the increase in the level of OmpS38 correlates with an elevated activity in Crp under anaerobic conditions. In addition, we show that the activity of the major promoter is also affected by Fur, presumably indirectly, the transcription factor for iron-dependent gene expression. PMID:26381456

  13. Positive regulation of the Shewanella oneidensis OmpS38, a major porin facilitating anaerobic respiration, by Crp and Fur.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tong; Ju, Lili; Yin, Jianhua; Gao, Haichun

    2015-09-18

    Major porins are among the most abundant proteins embedded in the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, playing crucial roles in maintenance of membrane structural integrity and OM permeability. Although many OM proteins (especially c-type cytochromes) in Shewanella oneidensis, a research model for respiratory versatility, have been extensively studied, physiological significance of major porins remains largely unexplored. In this study, we show that OmpS38 and OmpA are two major porins, neither of which is responsive to changes in osmolarity or contributes to the intrinsic resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. However, OmpS38 but not OmpA is largely involved in respiration of non-oxygen electron acceptors. We then provide evidence that expression of ompS38 is transcribed from two promoters, the major of which is favored under anaerobic conditions while the other appears constitutive. The major promoter is under the direct control of Crp, the master regulator dictating respiration. As a result, the increase in the level of OmpS38 correlates with an elevated activity in Crp under anaerobic conditions. In addition, we show that the activity of the major promoter is also affected by Fur, presumably indirectly, the transcription factor for iron-dependent gene expression.

  14. Tellurite-, tellurate-, and selenite-based anaerobic respiration by strain CM-3 isolated from gold mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Maltman, Chris; Piercey-Normore, Michele D; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2015-09-01

    The newly discovered strain CM-3, a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium from gold mine tailings of the Central Mine in Nopiming Provincial Park, Canada, is capable of dissimilatory anaerobic reduction of tellurite, tellurate, and selenite. CM-3 possesses very high level resistance to these oxides, both aerobically and anaerobically. During aerobic growth, tellurite and tellurate resistance was up to 1500 and 1000 µg/ml, respectively. In the presence of selenite, growth occurred at the highest concentration tested, 7000 µg/ml. Under anaerobic conditions, resistance was decreased to 800 µg/ml for the Te oxides; however, much like under aerobic conditions, growth with selenite still took place at 7000 µg/ml. In the absence of oxygen, CM-3 couples oxide reduction to an increase in biomass. Following an initial drop in viable cells, due to switching from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, there was an increase in CFU/ml greater than one order of magnitude in the presence of tellurite (6.6 × 10(3)-8.6 × 10(4) CFU/ml), tellurate (4.6 × 10(3)-1.4 × 10(5) CFU/ml), and selenite (2.7 × 10(5)-5.6 × 10(6) CFU/ml). A control culture without metalloid oxides showed a steady decrease in CFU/ml with no recovery. ATP production was also increased in the presence of each oxide, further indicating anaerobic respiration. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed a 99.0 % similarity of CM-3 to Pseudomonas reactans.

  15. Low-heat alkaline pretreatment of biomass for dairy anaerobic codigestion.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guang; Bierma, Tom

    2014-01-01

    In this research, low-heat alkaline pretreatment was evaluated to determine the extent to which urban landscape waste (yard waste), corn stover, and switchgrass could be codigested under conditions typical of US farm-based anaerobic digestion (AD). Waste heat from combined heat and power (CHP) units associated with AD could make such pretreatment economical. Short-term batch digestion studies and 8-week continuous-feed studies were used to screen and evaluate various pretreatment conditions. Results indicate that maple and oak leaves did not digest well, even with pretreatment. Pretreatment did improve digestion of corn leaves and stalks as well as switchgrass. However, these materials also digested reasonably well even without pretreatment. No digester operational problems were observed during continuous-feed studies of intermittently stirred bench top digesters, but optimal levels of alkali, temperature, and pretreatment time may be specific to the feedstock, particle size, and digester loading rate. Results suggest that some common lignocellulosic biomass materials, such as corn stover and switchgrass, could be successfully codigested in many existing farm-based digesters. Interestingly, without pretreatment, switchgrass digestion improved over 20-fold when digested with seed culture from a dairy digester compared to seed culture from a municipal digester, suggesting that culture acclimation could be as important as pretreatment in improving digestion of specific lignocellulosic feedstocks.

  16. Volatile fatty acids production from anaerobic treatment of cassava waste water: effect of temperature and alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Salah Din Mahmud; Giongo, Citieli; Fiorese, Mônica Lady; Gomes, Simone Damasceno; Ferrari, Tatiane Caroline; Savoldi, Tarcio Enrico

    2015-01-01

    The production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs), intermediates in the anaerobic degradation process of organic matter from waste water, was evaluated in this work. A batch reactor was used to investigate the effect of temperature, and alkalinity in the production of VFAs, from the fermentation of industrial cassava waste water. Peak production of total volatile fatty acids (TVFAs) was observed in the first two days of acidogenesis. A central composite design was performed, and the highest yield (3400 mg L(-1) of TVFA) was obtained with 30°C and 3 g L(-1) of sodium bicarbonate. The peak of VFA was in 45 h (pH 5.9) with a predominance of acetic (63%) and butyric acid (22%), followed by propionic acid (12%). Decreases in amounts of cyanide (12.9%) and chemical oxygen demand (21.6%) were observed, in addition to the production of biogas (0.53 cm(3) h(-1)). The process was validated experimentally and 3400 g L(-1) of TVFA were obtained with a low relative standard deviation.

  17. The contribution of genes required for anaerobic respiration to the virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum for chickens.

    PubMed

    Paiva, J B; Penha Filho, R A C; Pereira, E A; Lemos, M V F; Barrow, P A; Lovell, M A; Berchieri, A

    2009-10-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (SG) is an intracellular pathogen of chickens. To survive, to invade and to multiply in the intestinal tract and intracellularly it depends on its ability to produce energy in anaerobic conditions. The fumarate reductase (frdABCD), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) reductase (dmsABC), and nitrate reductase (narGHIJ) operons in Salmonella Typhimurium (STM) encode enzymes involved in anaerobic respiration to the electron acceptors fumarate, DMSO, TMAO, and nitrate, respectively. They are regulated in response to nitrate and oxygen availability and changes in cell growth rate. In this study mortality rates of chickens challenged with mutants of Salmonella Gallinarum, which were defective in utilising anaerobic electron acceptors, were assessed in comparison to group of bird challenged with wild strain. The greatest degree of attenuation was observed with mutations affecting nitrate reductase (napA, narG) with additional attenuations induced by a mutation affecting fumarate reductase (frdA) and a double mutant (dmsA torC) affecting DMSO and TMAO reductase.

  18. Anaerobic

    MedlinePlus

    ... shock. Anaerobic is the opposite of aerobic . In exercise, our bodies need to perform both anaerobic and aerobic reactions ... during shorter, more intense activities like sprinting. Anaerobic ... removing the lactic acid by providing oxygen to their bodies.

  19. Treatment of a high-strength sulphate-rich alkaline leachate using an anaerobic filter

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Banks, C.J.

    2007-07-01

    The research looks at the feasibility of treating an alkaline sulphate-rich leachate arising from the co-disposal of municipal solid waste with cement kiln dust by means of an anaerobic filter (AF). This type of leachate with a high sulphate concentration is commonly prohibited for discharge to sewer and requires an on-site treatment solution. The AF used had a working volume of 4 l and contained reticulated polyurethane foam as the biomass support material. The filters were operated over a 152 day experimental period during which the COD loading onto the filter was increased from 0.76 to 7.63 kg COD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. In the early stages of operation at low loading, soluble sulphides accumulated that inhibited methanogenic activity. This was restored by dosing FeCl{sub 3} to the reactor. The continued dosing allowed efficient COD removal of between 75% and 90% until the nominal retention time in the reactor was 3 days, at which point reactor performance declined significantly. The main mechanism for COD removal was by sulphate-reducing bacteria, which also resulted in up to 88% sulphate removal from the leachate. The average methane generation rate was 0.10 l g{sup -1} COD removed. The results indicate the potential for using this approach as a pre-treatment that could significantly reduce the COD load to a second stage treatment process, but problems associated with the implementation of the technology at a larger scale have been identified.

  20. [2, 4, 6-Trichlorophenol Mineralization Promoted by Anaerobic Reductive Dechlorination of Acclimated Sludge and Extracellular Respiration Dechlorination Pathway].

    PubMed

    Song, Jia-xiu; Li, Ling; Sheng, Fan-fan; Guo, Cui-xiang; Zhang, Yong-ming; Li, Zu-yuan; Wang, Tian-li

    2015-10-01

    In anaerobic conditions, the acclimation of activated sludge was studied with sodium lactate as the electron donor and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol as the electron acceptor. Metabolic characteristics of dechlorination were the focus of this study. The result showed highly efficient dechlorination on 2, 4, 6-trichlorophenol that the conversion rate reached to 100% in 9 - 24 h when initial concentrations of sodium lactate and 2,4, 6-trichlorophenol were 20 mmol x L(-1) and 40 - 80 μmol x L(-1), respectively. The intermediate product 2,4-dichlorophenol was found in low concentration (< 4.22 μmol x L(-1)). And 4-chlorophenol and phenol were the main products. Ortho chlorophenol (2, 4, 6-trichlorophenol, 2, 4-dichlorophenol) can be converted rapidly by acclimated sludge, while the further conversion of 4-chlorophenol and phenol was limited. The residues of anaerobic metabolism were degraded by aerobic sludge, among which 4-chlorophenol (initial concentration of 33 mol x L(-1)) removal rate was up to 100% under aerobic conditions. The acclimated bacteria can rapidly transfer Fe(III) and humus (AQDS) into reductive Fe(II) and AQH2DS which indicated that the dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria was enriched in the acclimated sludge. The electron mediator [Fe(III) and AQDS] significantly accelerated the dechlorination rate. The acclimated sludge could perform extracellular respiration dechlorination with electron mediators.

  1. Iron and manganese in anaerobic respiration: environmental significance, physiology, and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Saffarini, D.

    1994-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron and/or manganese reduction is known to occur in several organisms, including anaerobic sulfur-reducing organisms such as Geobacter metallireducens or Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, and facultative aerobes such as Shewanella putrefaciens. These bacteria couple both carbon oxidation and growth to the reduction of these metals, and inhibitor and competition experiments suggest that Mn(IV) and Fe(III) are efficient electron acceptors similar to nitrate in redox abilities and capable of out-competing electron acceptors of lower potential, such as sulfate (sulfate reduction) or CO2 (methanogenesis). Field studies of iron and/or manganese reduction suggest that organisms with such metabolic abilities play important roles in coupling the oxidation of organic carbon to metal reduction under anaerobic conditions. Because both iron and manganese oxides are solids or colloids, they tend to settle downward in aquatic environments, providing a physical mechanism for the movement of oxidizing potential into anoxic zones. The resulting biogeochemical metal cycles have a strong impact on many other elements including carbon, sulfur, phosphorous, and trace metals.

  2. Reductive Dechlorination of Carbon Tetrachloride by Tetrachloroethene and Trichloroethene Respiring Anaerobic Mixed Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickstrom, K. E.; Azizian, M.; Semprini, L.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CT) is a toxic and recalcitrant groundwater contaminant with the potential to form a broad range of transformation products. Of the possible biochemical pathways through which CT can be degraded, reductive dehalogenation to less chlorinated compounds and mineralization to carbon dioxide (CO2) appear to be the most frequently utilized pathways by anaerobic organisms. Results will be presented from batch experiments of CT degradation by the Evanite (EV), Victoria Strain (VS) and Point Mugu (PM) anaerobic dechlorinating cultures. The cultures are grown in chemostats and are capable of transforming tetrachloroethene (PCE) or trichloroethene (TCE) to ethene by halorespiration via reductive dehalogenase enzymes. For the batch CT transformation tests, the cells along with supernatant were harvested from chemostats fed PCE or TCE, but never CT. The batch reactors were initially fed 0.0085 mM CT and an excess of formate (EV and VS) or lactate (PM) as electron donor. Transformation of CT was 100% with about 20% converted to chloroform (CF) and undetected products. Multiple additions of CT showed a slowing of pseudo first-order CT transformation rates across all cultures. Batch reactors were then established and fed 0.085 mM CT with an excess of electron donor in order to better quantify the reductive pathway. CT was transformed to CF and dichloromethane (DCM), with trace amounts of chloromethane (CM) detected. Between 60-90% of the mass added to the system was accounted for, showing that the majority of the carbon tetrachloride present is being reductively dehalogenated. Results from batch reactors that were poisoned using sodium azide, and from reactors not provided electron donor will be presented to distinguish between biotic and abiotic reactions. Furthermore, results from reactors prepared with acetylene (a potent, reversible inhibitor of reductive dehalogenases (1)) will be presented as a means of identifying the enzymes involved in the

  3. Proteomic analysis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae biofilms shows shift to anaerobic respiration and changes in nutrient transport and outermembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Nancy J; Steichen, Christopher T; Schilling, Birgit; Post, Deborah M B; Niles, Richard K; Bair, Thomas B; Falsetta, Megan L; Apicella, Michael A; Gibson, Bradford W

    2012-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of gonorrhea, can form biofilms in vitro and in vivo. In biofilms, the organism is more resistant to antibiotic treatment and can serve as a reservoir for chronic infection. We have used stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to compare protein expression in biofilm and planktonic organisms. Two parallel populations of N. gonorrhoeae strain 1291, which is an arginine auxotroph, were grown for 48 h in continuous-flow chambers over glass, one supplemented with (13)C(6)-arginine for planktonic organisms and the other with unlabeled arginine for biofilm growth. The biofilm and planktonic cells were harvested and lysed separately, and fractionated into three sequential protein extracts. Corresponding heavy (H) planktonic and light (L) biofilm protein extracts were mixed and separated by 1D SDS-PAGE gels, and samples were extensively analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Overall, 757 proteins were identified, and 152 unique proteins met a 1.5-fold cutoff threshold for differential expression with p-values <0.05. Comparing biofilm to planktonic organisms, this set included 73 upregulated and 54 downregulated proteins. Nearly a third of the upregulated proteins were involved in energy metabolism, with cell envelope proteins making up the next largest group. Of the downregulated proteins, the largest groups were involved in protein synthesis and energy metabolism. These proteomics results were compared with our previously reported results from transcriptional profiling of gonococcal biofilms using microarrays. Nitrite reductase and cytochrome c peroxidase, key enzymes required for anaerobic growth, were detected as highly upregulated in both the proteomic and transcriptomic datasets. These and other protein expression changes observed in the present study were consistent with a shift to anaerobic respiration in gonococcal biofilms, although changes in membrane proteins not explicitly related

  4. Systematic genomic analysis reveals the complementary aerobic and anaerobic respiration capacities of the human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Thiele, Ines

    2014-01-01

    Because of the specific anatomical and physiological properties of the human intestine, a specific oxygen gradient builds up within this organ that influences the intestinal microbiota. The intestinal microbiome has been intensively studied in recent years, and certain respiratory substrates used by gut inhabiting microbes have been shown to play a crucial role in human health. Unfortunately, a systematic analysis has not been previously performed to determine the respiratory capabilities of human gut microbes (HGM). Here, we analyzed the distribution of aerobic and anaerobic respiratory reductases in 254 HGM genomes. In addition to the annotation of known enzymes, we also predicted a novel microaerobic reductase and novel thiosulfate reductase. Based on this comprehensive assessment of respiratory reductases in the HGM, we proposed a number of exchange pathways among different bacteria involved in the reduction of various nitrogen oxides. The results significantly expanded our knowledge of HGM metabolism and interactions in bacterial communities.

  5. Physiological roles of ArcA, Crp, and EtrA and their interactive control on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Xiaohu; Yang, Zamin K; Chen, Jingrong; Liang, Yili; Chen, Haijiang; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-12-28

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, genes encoding the global regulators ArcA, Crp, and EtrA have been identified. All these proteins deviate from their counterparts in E. coli significantly in terms of functionality and regulon. It is worth investigating the involvement and relationship of these global regulators in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis. In this study, the impact of the transcriptional factors ArcA, Crp, and EtrA on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis were assessed. While all these proteins appeared to be functional in vivo, the importance of individual proteins in these two major biological processes differed. The ArcA transcriptional factor was critical in aerobic respiration while the Crp protein was indispensible in anaerobic respiration. Using a newly developed reporter system, it was found that expression of arcA and etrA was not influenced by growth conditions but transcription of crp was induced by removal of oxygen. An analysis of the impact of each protein on transcription of the others revealed that Crp expression was independent of the other factors whereas ArcA repressed both etrA and its own transcription while EtrA also repressed arcA transcription. Transcriptional levels of arcA in the wild type, crp, and etrA strains under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions were further validated by quantitative immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against ArcA. This extensive survey demonstrated that all these three global regulators are functional in S. oneidensis. In addition, the reporter system constructed in this study will facilitate in vivo transcriptional analysis of targeted promoters.

  6. Physiological roles of ArcA, Crp, and EtrA and their interactive control on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Xiaohu; Chen, Jingrong; Liang, Yili; Chen, Haijiang; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, genes encoding the global regulators ArcA, Crp, and EtrA have been identified. All these proteins deviate from their counterparts in E. coli significantly in terms of functionality and regulon. It is worth investigating the involvement and relationship of these global regulators in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis. In this study, the impact of the transcriptional factors ArcA, Crp, and EtrA on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis were assessed. While all these proteins appeared to be functional in vivo, the importance of individual proteins in these two major biological processes differed. The ArcA transcriptional factor was critical in aerobic respiration while the Crp protein was indispensible in anaerobic respiration. Using a newly developed reporter system, it was found that expression of arcA and etrA was not influenced by growth conditions but transcription of crp was induced by removal of oxygen. An analysis of the impact of each protein on transcription of the others revealed that Crp expression was independent of the other factors whereas ArcA repressed both etrA and its own transcription while EtrA also repressed arcA transcription. Transcriptional levels of arcA in the wild type, crp, and etrA strains under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions were further validated by quantitative immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against ArcA. This extensive survey demonstrated that all these three global regulators are functional in S. oneidensis. In addition, the reporter system constructed in this study will facilitate in vivo transcriptional analysis of targeted promoters.

  7. Diversity and ubiquity of bacteria capable of utilizing humic substances as electron donors for anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Coates, John D; Cole, Kimberly A; Chakraborty, Romy; O'Connor, Susan M; Achenbach, Laurie A

    2002-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that reduced humic substances (HS) can be reoxidized by anaerobic bacteria such as Geobacter, Geothrix, and Wolinella species with a suitable electron acceptor; however, little is known of the importance of this metabolism in the environment. Recently we investigated this metabolism in a diversity of environments including marine and aquatic sediments, forest soils, and drainage ditch soils. Most-probable-number enumeration studies were performed using 2,6-anthrahydroquinone disulfonate (AHDS), an analog for reduced HS, as the electron donor with nitrate as the electron acceptor. Anaerobic organisms capable of utilizing reduced HS as an electron donor were found in all environments tested and ranged from a low of 2.31 x 10(1) in aquifer sediments to a high of 9.33 x 10(6) in lake sediments. As part of this study we isolated six novel organisms capable of anaerobic AHDS oxidation. All of the isolates coupled the oxidation of AHDS to the reduction of nitrate with acetate (0.1 mM) as the carbon source. In the absence of cells, no AHDS oxidation was apparent, and in the absence of AHDS, no cell density increase was observed. Generally, nitrate was reduced to N(2). Analysis of the AHDS and its oxidized form, 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS), in the medium during growth revealed that the anthraquinone was not being biodegraded as a carbon source and was simply being oxidized as an energy source. Determination of the AHDS oxidized and nitrate reduced accounted for 109% of the theoretical electron transfer. In addition to AHDS, all of these isolates could also couple the oxidation of reduced humic substances to the reduction of nitrate. No HS oxidation occurred in the absence of cells and in the absence of a suitable electron acceptor, demonstrating that these organisms were capable of utilizing natural HS as an energy source and that AHDS serves as a suitable analog for studying this metabolism. Alternative electron donors included

  8. Sewage sludge pretreatment by microwave irradiation combined with activated carbon fibre at alkaline pH for anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dedong; Guo, Sixiao; Ma, Nina; Wang, Guowen; Ma, Chun; Hao, Jun; Xue, Mang; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the effects of microwave-assisted activated carbon fibre (ACF) (MW-ACF) treatment on sewage sludge at alkaline pH. The disintegration and biodegradability of sewage sludge were studied. It was found that the MW-ACF process at alkaline pH provided a rapid and efficient process to disrupt the microbial cells in the sludge. The results suggested that when irradiated at 800 W MW for 110 s with a dose of 1.0 g ACF/g solid concentration (SS) at pH 10.5, the MW-ACF pretreatment achieved 55% SS disintegration, 23% greater than the value of MW alone (32%). The concentration of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, supernatant soluble chemical oxygen demand, protein, and polysaccharide increased by 60%, 144%, 145%, 74%, and 77%, respectively. An increase in biogas production by 63.7% was achieved after 20 days of anaerobic digestion (AD), compared to the control. The results indicated that the MW-ACF pretreatment process at alkaline pH provides novel sludge management options in disintegration of sewage sludge for further AD.

  9. What iron minerals contribute to anaerobic respiration in peats differing in maturity on the Arctic Coastal Plain ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masue-Slowey, Y.; Wagner, F. E.; Lipson, D.; Raab, T. K.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial Fe-reduction accounts for 30-60% of ecosystem respiration in drained thaw-lake tundra of the Arctic Coastal Plain. Near Barrow, we collected diffraction, Fe-XANES, Moessbauer spectra (RT and liqHe), and wet-chemical data on the Fe mineralogy of DTLB over an age gradient from 0 - 5500 y BP to delineate the important phases involved in microbial cycling of Fe. Soils were cored frozen in early June of 2010/ 2011, wrapped/ transported to CA by overnight express. Cores varying in age since formation were further sectioned, and transferred to an anaerobic hood for size-fractionation based on settling velocity, and subjected to bulk XRD at SSRL. Fe-XANES of both clay-separates and bulk soil were collected at BL 4-1. Subsamples were packed into anaerobic vials and sent for Moessbauer spectroscopy. Present in bulk soils of all ages by XRD were quartz, albite and vermiculite. Additional smectitic minerals, goethite and Fe-phosphates were evident in some basin classes, esp. Young and Medium. XANES confirmed wet-chem results of a highly-reduced state for Fe in bulk soils, and fits of XAFS indicated goethite as 20% of the reactive Fe-pool among basin-age classes. The most abundant Fe-containing minerals in clay fractions (Old and Young soils) were a ferrosmectite, or hornblende-derived mineral. (Fig.1) MB spectra from various depths of an Old Basin (300-2000 yrs BP) - the DTLB class of greatest areal extent -- revealed largely reduced Fe pools (50-60%), with goethite and a Fhd-like component visible (~23%). LHe spectra indicated the presence of goethite as ~ 20% of the MB-visible pool (Fig 2). Two prominent quadrupole doublets had QS=3.24 mm/s; IS = 1.10 mm/s and QS = 2.84; IS=1.05 mm/s, respectively, and upon oxidation, demonstrated divergent kinetics. We attribute the doublet with lower splitting to the ferrosmectite component visible by XAFS. Although previous sequential extractions of Barrow soil minerals suggested a sizeable component of siderites (indeed geochem

  10. Effect of thermal-alkaline pretreatment on the anaerobic digestion of streptomycin bacterial residues for methane production.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weizhang; Li, Zaixing; Yang, Jingliang; Liu, Chun; Tian, Baokuo; Wang, Yongjun; Chen, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic digestion of streptomycin bacterial residues, solutions with hazardous waste treatments and bioenergy recovery, was tested in laboratory-scale digesters at 35°C at various organic loading rates (OLRs). The methane production and biomass digestion were efficient at OLRs below 2.33 gVS L(-1) d(-1) but were deteriorated as OLR increased because of the increased total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) concentration from cell protein decay. The thermal-alkaline pretreatment with 0.10 NaOH/TS at 70°C for 2 h significantly improved the digestion performance. With the thermal-alkaline pretreatment, the volumetric reactor productivity and specific methane yield of the pretreated streptomycin bacterial residue increased by 22.08-27.08% compared with those of the unpretreated streptomycin bacterial residue at an OLR of 2.33 gVS L(-1) d(-1). The volatile solid removal was 64.09%, with less accumulation of TAN and total volatile fatty acid.

  11. Analysis of MSW full-scale facilities based on anaerobic digestion and/or composting using respiration indices as performance indicators.

    PubMed

    Colón, J; Ponsá, S; Álvarez, C; Vinot, M; Lafuente, F J; Gabriel, D; Sánchez, A

    2017-03-30

    The Landfill Directive (1999/31/EC) forces European States to reduce the amount of biodegradable municipal waste landfilled to 35% of 1995 levels. Mechanical-Biological Treatment (MBT) plants are the main alternative to waste incineration and landfilling. In this work, the waste treatment efficiency of six full-scale MBT facilities has been analysed using respiration indices (Dynamic Respiration Index and Cumulative Oxygen Consumption) to monitor plant performance. MBTs relying on anaerobic digestion plus composting achieved a high grade of stability on final compost (0.24±0.09mgO2g(-1)DMh(-1) and 20±9mgO2g(-1)DM for dynamic respiration and cumulative consumption, respectively). On the contrary, MBTs relying only on composting showed a poor performance (1.3±0.2mgO2g(-1)DMh(-1) and 104±18mgO2g(-1)DM for dynamic respiration and cumulative consumption, respectively). These results highlight the usefulness of respirometric balances to assess the performance of MBT full-scale plants.

  12. Anaerobic respiration and antioxidant responses of Corythucha ciliata (Say) adults to heat-induced oxidative stress under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Ju, Rui-Ting; Wei, He-Ping; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Xu-Hui; Li, Bo

    2014-03-01

    High temperature often induces oxidative stress and antioxidant response in insects. This phenomenon has been well documented under controlled laboratory conditions, but whether it happens under fluctuating field conditions is largely unknown. In this study, we used an invasive lace bug (Corythucha ciliata) as a model species to compare the effects of controlled thermal treatments (2 h at 33-43 °C with 2 °C intervals in the laboratory) and naturally fluctuating thermal conditions (08:00-14:00 at 2-h intervals (29.7-37.2 °C) on a hot summer day in a field in Shanghai, China) on lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde (MDA) was the marker) and anaerobic respiration (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was the marker), as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH), and glutathione reductase (GR). The results show that MDA concentration increased significantly in response to heat stresses with similar trend in the laboratory and field. LDH activities did not significantly vary across temperatures in the laboratory-exposed individuals, but they significantly increased by rising temperature in the field. The activities or concentrations of SOD, CAT, GSH, and GR all significantly increased with increasing temperature in the two populations. These findings indicate that high temperature induces oxidative stress, resulting in high anaerobic respiration and antioxidant defenses in C. ciliata under both the laboratory and field conditions, which likely provide a defense mechanism against oxidative damage due to the accumulation of ROS.

  13. Improvement of anaerobic digestion of waste-activated sludge by using H₂O₂ oxidation, electrolysis, electro-oxidation and thermo-alkaline pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Feki, Emna; Khoufi, Sonia; Loukil, Slim; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-10-01

    Disintegration of municipal waste-activated sludge (WAS) is regarded as a prerequisite of the anaerobic digestion process to reduce sludge volume and improve biogas yield. Pretreatment of WAS using thermo-alkaline (TA), H2O2 oxidation, electrolysis and electro-oxidation (EO) processes were investigated and compared in term of COD solubilization and biogas production. For each pretreatment, the influences of different operational variables were studied in detail. At optimum conditions, EO gave the maximum COD solubilization (28 %). The effects of pretreatments under the optimum conditions on anaerobic digestion were experienced with biochemical methane potential assay. Significant increases in biogas yield up to 78 and 40 % were observed respectively in the EO and TA pretreated samples compared to raw sludge. Results clearly revealed that the application of EO is a significant alternative method for the improvement of WAS anaerobic digestion.

  14. Comparative genomic analysis of regulation of anaerobic respiration in ten genomes from three families of gamma-proteobacteria (Enterobacteriaceae, Pasteurellaceae, Vibrionaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Gerasimova, Anna V; Mironov, Andrey A; Gelfand, Mikhail S

    2007-01-01

    Background Gamma-proteobacteria, such as Escherichia coli, can use a variety of respiratory substrates employing numerous aerobic and anaerobic respiratory systems controlled by multiple transcription regulators. Thus, in E. coli, global control of respiration is mediated by four transcription factors, Fnr, ArcA, NarL and NarP. However, in other Gamma-proteobacteria the composition of global respiration regulators may be different. Results In this study we applied a comparative genomic approach to the analysis of three global regulatory systems, Fnr, ArcA and NarP. These systems were studied in available genomes containing these three regulators, but lacking NarL. So, we considered several representatives of Pasteurellaceae, Vibrionaceae and Yersinia spp. As a result, we identified new regulon members, functioning in respiration, central metabolism (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, pentose phosphate pathway, citrate cicle, metabolism of pyruvate and lactate), metabolism of carbohydrates and fatty acids, transcriptional regulation and transport, in particular: the ATP synthase operon atpIBEFHAGCD, Na+-exporting NADH dehydrogenase operon nqrABCDEF, the D-amino acids dehydrogenase operon dadAX. Using an extension of the comparative technique, we demonstrated taxon-specific changes in regulatory interactions and predicted taxon-specific regulatory cascades. Conclusion A comparative genomic technique was applied to the analysis of global regulation of respiration in ten gamma-proteobacterial genomes. Three structurally different but functionally related regulatory systems were described. A correlation between the regulon size and the position of a transcription factor in regulatory cascades was observed: regulators with larger regulons tend to occupy top positions in the cascades. On the other hand, there is no obvious link to differences in the species' lifestyles and metabolic capabilities. PMID:17313674

  15. Improved volatile fatty acids anaerobic production from waste activated sludge by pH regulation: Alkaline or neutral pH?

    PubMed

    Ma, Huijun; Chen, Xingchun; Liu, He; Liu, Hongbo; Fu, Bo

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the anaerobic fermentation was carried out for volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production at different pH (between 7.0 and 10.0) conditions with untreated sludge and heat-alkaline pretreated waste activated sludge. In the fermentation with untreated sludge, the extent of hydrolysis of organic matters and extent of acidification at alkaline pH are 54.37% and 30.37%, respectively, resulting in the highest VFAs yield at 235.46mg COD/gVS of three pH conditions. In the fermentation with heat-alkaline pretreated sludge, the acidification rate and VFAs yield at neutral pH are 30.98% and 240.14mg COD/gVS, respectively, which are higher than that at other pH conditions. With the glucose or bovine serum albumin as substrate for VFAs production, the neutral pH showed a higher VFAs concentration than the alkaline pH condition. The results of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis indicated that the alkaline pH caused low microbial richness. Based on the results in this study, we demonstrated that the alkaline pH is favor of hydrolysis of organic matter in sludge while neutral pH improved the acidogenesis for the VFAs production from sludge. Our finding is obvious different to the previous research and helpful for the understanding of how heat-alkaline pretreatment and alkaline fermentation influence the VFAs production, and beneficial to the development of VFAs production process.

  16. Comparative Genomics Analysis and Phenotypic Characterization of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1: Anaerobic Respiration, Bacterial Microcompartments, and Lateral Flagella

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, D.; Tu, Q.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Respiratory versatility and psychrophily are the hallmarks of Shewanella. The ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors for respiration is due to the large number of c-type cytochrome genes present in the genome of Shewanella strains. More recently the dissimilatory metal reduction of Shewanella species has been extensively and intensively studied for potential applications in the bioremediation of radioactive wastes of groundwater and subsurface environments. Multiple Shewanella genome sequences are now available in the public databases (Fredrickson et al., 2008). Most of the sequenced Shewanella strains were isolated from marine environments and this genus was believed to be of marine origin (Hau and Gralnick, 2007). However, the well-characterized model strain, S. oneidensis MR-1, was isolated from the freshwater lake sediment of Lake Oneida, New York (Myers and Nealson, 1988) and similar bacteria have also been isolated from other freshwater environments (Venkateswaran et al., 1999). Here we comparatively analyzed the genome sequence and physiological characteristics of S. putrefaciens W3-18-1 and S. oneidensis MR-1, isolated from the marine and freshwater lake sediments, respectively. The anaerobic respirations, carbon source utilization, and cell motility have been experimentally investigated. Large scale horizontal gene transfers have been revealed and the genetic divergence between these two strains was considered to be critical to the bacterial adaptation to specific habitats, freshwater or marine sediments.

  17. MudPIT Profiling Reveals a Link between Anaerobic Metabolism and the Alkaline Adaptive Response of Listeria monocytogenes EGD-e

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Rolf E.; Ross, Tom; Bowman, John P.; Britz, Margaret L.

    2013-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne human pathogen capable of causing life-threatening disease in susceptible populations. Previous proteomic analysis we performed demonstrated that different strains of L. monocytogenes initiate a stringent response when subjected to alkaline growth conditions. Here, using multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT), we show that in L. monocytogenes EGD-e this response involves an energy shift to anaerobic pathways in response to the extracellular pH environment. Importantly we show that this supports a reduction in relative lag time following an abrupt transition to low oxygen tension culture conditions. This has important implications for the packaging of fresh and ready-to-eat foods under reduced oxygen conditions in environments where potential exists for alkaline adaptation. PMID:23342094

  18. The tetraheme cytochrome CymA is required for anaerobic respiration with dimethyl sulfoxide and nitrite in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Schwalb, Carsten; Chapman, Stephen K; Reid, Graeme A

    2003-08-12

    The tetraheme c-type cytochrome, CymA, from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has previously been shown to be required for respiration with Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate [Myers, C. R., and Myers, J. M. (1997) J. Bacteriol. 179, 1143-1152]. It is located in the cytoplasmic membrane where the bulk of the protein is exposed to the periplasm, enabling it to transfer electrons to a series of redox partners. We have expressed and purified a soluble derivative of CymA (CymA(sol)) that lacks the N-terminal membrane anchor. We show here, by direct measurements of electron transfer between the purified proteins, that CymA(sol) efficiently reduces S. oneidensis fumarate reductase. This indicates that no further proteins are required for electron transfer between the quinone pool and fumarate if we assume direct reduction of CymA by quinols. By expressing CymA(sol) in a mutant lacking CymA, we have shown that this soluble form of the protein can complement the defect in fumarate respiration. We also demonstrate that CymA is essential for growth with DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) and for reduction of nitrite, implicating CymA in at least five different electron transfer pathways in Shewanella.

  19. Asparagus stem as a new lignocellulosic biomass feedstock for anaerobic digestion: increasing hydrolysis rate, methane production and biodegradability by alkaline pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohua; Gu, Yu; Zhou, Xuefei; Zhang, Yalei

    2014-07-01

    Recently, anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass for methane production has attracted considerable attention. However, there is little information regarding methane production from asparagus stem, a typical lignocellulosic biomass, by anaerobic digestion. In this study, alkaline pretreatment of asparagus stem was investigated for its ability to increase hydrolysis rate and methane production and to improve biodegradability (BD). The hydrolysis rate increased with increasing NaOH dose, due to higher removal rates of lignin and hemicelluloses. However, the optimal NaOH dose was 6% (w/w) according to the specific methane production (SMP). Under this condition, the SMP and the technical digestion time of the NaOH-treated asparagus stem were 242.3 mL/g VS and 18 days, which were 38.4% higher and 51.4% shorter than those of the untreated sample, respectively. The BD was improved from 40.1% to 55.4%. These results indicate that alkaline pretreatment could be an efficient method for increasing methane production from asparagus stem.

  20. Molecular and Stable Isotope Investigation of Nitrite Respiring Bacterial Communities Capable of Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (ANAMMOX) and Denitrifying Anaerobic Methane Oxidation (DAMO) in Nitrogen Contaminated Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, B.; Hirsch, M.; Taylor, J.; Smith, R. L.; Repert, D.; Tobias, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) and denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) are two recently discovered N2 production pathways in the microbial nitrogen cycle. ANAMMOX has been relatively well investigated in various aquatic ecosystems, while DAMO has been examined only in freshwater wetlands. However, neither ANAMMOX nor DAMO have been studied in groundwater ecosystems as microbial N removal processes where they could compliment or compete with denitrification to remediate N contaminated aquifers. Thus, we conducted molecular and stable isotope analyses to detect and measure ANAMMOX and DAMO in a nitrogen contaminated aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The study site has a plume of nitrogen contaminated groundwater as a result of continuous discharge of treated wastewater over 60 years. Groundwater was collected from multiport sampling devices installed at two sites, near the waste-water disposal location (A) and more than 3 km down gradient (B) along the contamination plume. Biomass was collected from water samples for DNA extraction and 15N tracer incubation experiments. PCR with specific 16S rRNA gene primers detected the presence of ANAMMOX and DAMO bacteria at both sites. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes revealed that the ANAMMOX community at site A was most associated with Kuenenia spp. while site B had a community more closely related to Brocadia spp. The DAMO communities at the two sites were quite different based on 16S rRNA gene analysis. The communities at site B are closely associated with Candidatus “Methylomirabilis oxyfera”, which is the first enriched DAMO culture. Most of the 16S rRNA sequences detected in site A were related to those found in other DAMO enrichment cultures established from a eutrophic ditch sediment. In order to determine active members of ANAMMOX communities, the transcriptional expression of hydrazine oxidase (hzo) and hydrazine hydrolase (hh) genes was examined at both sites. In addition, 15N tracer

  1. Shewanella putrefaciens produces an Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligand during anaerobic respiration on insoluble Fe(III) oxides.

    PubMed

    Taillefert, Martial; Beckler, Jordon S; Carey, Elizabeth; Burns, Justin L; Fennessey, Christine M; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2007-11-01

    The mechanism of Fe(III) reduction was investigated using voltammetric techniques in anaerobic incubations of Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 supplemented with Fe(III) citrate or a suite of Fe(III) oxides as terminal electron acceptor. Results indicate that organic complexes of Fe(III) are produced during the reduction of Fe(III) at rates that correlate with the reactivity of the Fe(III) phase and bacterial cell density. Anaerobic Fe(III) solubilization activity is detected with either Fe(III) oxides or Fe(III) citrate, suggesting that the organic ligand produced is strong enough to destabilize Fe(III) from soluble or solid Fe(III) substrates. Results also demonstrate that Fe(III) oxide dissolution is not controlled by the intrinsic chemical reactivity of the Fe(III) oxides. Instead, the chemical reaction between the endogenous organic ligand is only affected by the number of reactive surface sites available to S. putrefaciens. This report describes the first application of voltammetric techniques to demonstrate production of soluble organic-Fe(III) complexes by any Fe(III)-reducing microorganism and is the first report of a Fe(III)-solubilizing ligand generated by a metal-reducing member of the genus Shewanella.

  2. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC is activated by catecholamines and iron and regulates genes encoding proteins associated with anaerobic respiration and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, WA; Demuth, DR; Torres-Escobar, A; Juárez-Rodríguez, MD

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC regulates its own expression and is essential for biofilm growth and virulence. However, the signal that activates the QseC sensor has not been identified and the qseBC regulon has not been defined. In this study, we show that QseC is activated by catecholamine hormones and iron but not by either component alone. Activation of QseC requires an EYRDD motif in the periplasmic domain of the sensor and site-specific mutations in EYRDD or the deletion of the periplasmic domain inhibits catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of the ygiW-qseBC operon. Catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of transcription also requires interaction of the QseB response regulator with its binding site in the ygiW-qseBC promoter. Whole genome microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles of A. actinomycetemcomitans grown in a chemically defined medium with and without catecholamine and iron supplementation. Approximately 11.5% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genome was differentially expressed by at least two-fold upon exposure to catecholamines and iron. The expression of ferritin was strongly induced, suggesting that intracellular iron storage capacity is increased upon QseBC activation. Consistent with this, genes encoding iron binding and transport proteins were down-regulated by QseBC. Strikingly, 57% of the QseBC up-regulated genes (56/99) encode proteins associated with anaerobic metabolism and respiration. Most of these up-regulated genes were recently reported to be induced during in vivo growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results suggest that detection of catecholamines and iron by QseBC may alter the cellular metabolism of A. actinomycetemcomitans for increased fitness and growth in an anaerobic host environment. PMID:25923132

  3. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC is activated by catecholamines and iron and regulates genes encoding proteins associated with anaerobic respiration and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Weigel, W A; Demuth, D R; Torres-Escobar, A; Juárez-Rodríguez, M D

    2015-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC regulates its own expression and is essential for biofilm growth and virulence. However, the signal that activates the QseC sensor has not been identified and the qseBC regulon has not been defined. In this study, we show that QseC is activated by catecholamine hormones and iron but not by either component alone. Activation of QseC requires an EYRDD motif in the periplasmic domain of the sensor and site-specific mutations in EYRDD or the deletion of the periplasmic domain inhibits catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of the ygiW-qseBC operon. Catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of transcription also requires interaction of the QseB response regulator with its binding site in the ygiW-qseBC promoter. Whole genome microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles of A. actinomycetemcomitans grown in a chemically defined medium with and without catecholamine and iron supplementation. Approximately 11.5% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genome was differentially expressed by at least two-fold upon exposure to catecholamines and iron. The expression of ferritin was strongly induced, suggesting that intracellular iron storage capacity is increased upon QseBC activation. Consistent with this, genes encoding iron binding and transport proteins were down-regulated by QseBC. Strikingly, 57% of the QseBC up-regulated genes (56/99) encode proteins associated with anaerobic metabolism and respiration. Most of these up-regulated genes were recently reported to be induced during in vivo growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results suggest that detection of catecholamines and iron by QseBC may alter the cellular metabolism of A. actinomycetemcomitans for increased fitness and growth in an anaerobic host environment.

  4. Anaerobic Respiration of Elemental Sulfur and Thiosulfate by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Requires psrA, a Homolog of the phsA Gene of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium LT2▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Justin L.; DiChristina, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a facultatively anaerobic gammaproteobacterium, respires a variety of anaerobic terminal electron acceptors, including the inorganic sulfur compounds sulfite (SO32−), thiosulfate (S2O32−), tetrathionate (S4O62−), and elemental sulfur (S0). The molecular mechanism of anaerobic respiration of inorganic sulfur compounds by S. oneidensis, however, is poorly understood. In the present study, we identified a three-gene cluster in the S. oneidensis genome whose translated products displayed 59 to 73% amino acid similarity to the products of phsABC, a gene cluster required for S0 and S2O32− respiration by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2. Homologs of phsA (annotated as psrA) were identified in the genomes of Shewanella strains that reduce S0 and S2O32− yet were missing from the genomes of Shewanella strains unable to reduce these electron acceptors. A new suicide vector was constructed and used to generate a markerless, in-frame deletion of psrA, the gene encoding the putative thiosulfate reductase. The psrA deletion mutant (PSRA1) retained expression of downstream genes psrB and psrC but was unable to respire S0 or S2O32− as the terminal electron acceptor. Based on these results, we postulate that PsrA functions as the main subunit of the S. oneidensis S2O32− terminal reductase whose end products (sulfide [HS−] or SO32−) participate in an intraspecies sulfur cycle that drives S0 respiration. PMID:19542325

  5. Anaerobic respiration of elemental sulfur and thiosulfate by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 requires psrA, a homolog of the phsA gene of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium LT2.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justin L; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2009-08-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a facultatively anaerobic gammaproteobacterium, respires a variety of anaerobic terminal electron acceptors, including the inorganic sulfur compounds sulfite (SO3(2-)), thiosulfate (S2O3(2-)), tetrathionate (S4O6(2-)), and elemental sulfur (S(0)). The molecular mechanism of anaerobic respiration of inorganic sulfur compounds by S. oneidensis, however, is poorly understood. In the present study, we identified a three-gene cluster in the S. oneidensis genome whose translated products displayed 59 to 73% amino acid similarity to the products of phsABC, a gene cluster required for S(0) and S2O3(2-) respiration by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2. Homologs of phsA (annotated as psrA) were identified in the genomes of Shewanella strains that reduce S(0) and S2O3(2-) yet were missing from the genomes of Shewanella strains unable to reduce these electron acceptors. A new suicide vector was constructed and used to generate a markerless, in-frame deletion of psrA, the gene encoding the putative thiosulfate reductase. The psrA deletion mutant (PSRA1) retained expression of downstream genes psrB and psrC but was unable to respire S(0) or S2O3(2-) as the terminal electron acceptor. Based on these results, we postulate that PsrA functions as the main subunit of the S. oneidensis S2O3(2-) terminal reductase whose end products (sulfide [HS-] or SO3(2-)) participate in an intraspecies sulfur cycle that drives S(0) respiration.

  6. The contribution of aerobic and anaerobic respiration to intestinal colonization and virulence for Salmonella typhimurium in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Paul Andrew; Berchieri, Angelo; Freitas Neto, Oliveiro Caetano de; Lovell, Margaret

    2015-10-01

    The basic mechanism whereby Salmonella serovars colonize the chicken intestine remains poorly understood. Previous studies have indicated that proton-translocating proteins utilizing oxygen as terminal electron acceptor do not appear to be of major importance in the gut of the newly hatched chicken and consequently they would be even less significant during intestinal colonization of more mature chickens where the complex gut microflora would trap most of the oxygen in the lumen. Consequently, alternative electron acceptors may be more significant or, in their absence, substrate-level phosphorylation may also be important to Salmonella serovars in this environment. To investigate this we constructed mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium defective in various aspects of oxidative or substrate-level phosphorylation to assess their role in colonization of the chicken intestine, assessed through faecal shedding, and virulence. Mutations affecting use of oxygen or alternative electron acceptors did not eliminate faecal shedding. By contrast mutations in either pta (phosphotransacetylase) or ackA (acetate kinase) abolished shedding. The pta but not the ackA mutation also abolished systemic virulence for chickens. An additional ldhA (lactate dehydrogenase) mutant also showed poor colonizing ability. We hypothesise that substrate-level phosphorylation may be more important than respiration using oxygen or alternative electron acceptors for colonization of the chicken caeca.

  7. Hydrothermal and alkaline hydrothermal pretreatments plus anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge for dewatering and biogas production: Bench-scale research and pilot-scale verification.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunxing; Wang, Xingdong; Zhang, Guangyi; Yu, Guangwei; Lin, Jingjiang; Wang, Yin

    2017-03-25

    To test the feasibility and practicability of the process combing hydrothermal pretreatment for dewatering with biogas production for full utilization of sewage sludge, hydrothermal/alkaline hydrothermal pretreatments and in turn anaerobic digestion of the filtrates obtained after dewatering the pretreated sludge were performed at bench- and pilot-scales. The hydrothermal temperature fell within the range of 140 °C-220 °C and the pretreatment time varied from 30 min to 120 min. For the alkaline hydrothermal pretreatment the pH value of the sludge was adjusted to 9.0-11.0 by adding Ca(OH)2. The results showed that the dewaterability of the sewage sludge was improved with increasing pretreatment temperature but the impact of the pretreatment time was not significant. The addition of Ca(OH)2 gave better performance on the subsequent mechanical dewatering of the pretreated sludge compared to pure hydrothermal pretreatment, and the higher the pH value was, the better the dewaterability of the pretreated sludge was. The conditions of 180 °C/30 min and 160 °C/60 min/pH = 10.0 (for hydrothermal and alkaline hydrothermal pretreatments, respectively) resulted in relatively good results in the theoretical energy balance, which were verified in the pilot-scale tests. Based on the data from the pilot tests, the alkaline hydrothermal process realized self-sufficiency in energy at the cost of a proper amount of CaO.

  8. Hydrogen-dependent growth of Escherichia coli in anaerobic respiration and the presence of hydrogenases with different functions.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, I; Ishimoto, M

    1978-09-01

    E. coli K10 was found to grow anaerobically on molecular hydrogen by reducing nitrate, fumarate, and trimethylamine N-oxide when peptone was added to the culture medium. Molar growth yields based on consumed hydrogen estimated from the amounts of reduction products were all 7.8 g cells/mol, suggesting that 1 mol of ATP was produced in the oxidation of 1 mol of hydrogen. Hydrogenase activity measured in terms of hydrogen evolution was several times higher in cells grown on glucose than in cells grown on hydrogen in the presence of fumarate and trimethylamine N-oxide, while hydrogenase activity measured in terms of hydrogen uptake was unchanged in both cases. The ratio of hydrogenase activities measured in terms of hydrogen uptake and evolution was also high in the extract and centrifugal fractions from cells grown in hydrogen. The soluble fraction and trypsin digest of the precipitate at 100,000 X g were subjected to polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis and hydrogenase bands were stained by reduction of benzyl viologen with hydrogen and by oxidation of reduced methyl viologen. The resulting patterns suggest that multiple forms of hydrogenase are present and that the amounts of forms functioning in hydrogen evolution were greatly decresed in cells grown on hydrogen in the presence of acceptors.

  9. Anaerobic respiration sustains mitochondrial membrane potential in a prolyl hydroxylase pathway-activated cancer cell line in a hypoxic microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eiji; Sato, Michihiko

    2014-02-15

    To elucidate how tumor cells produce energy in oxygen-depleted microenvironments, we studied the possibility of mitochondrial electron transport without oxygen. We produced well-controlled oxygen gradients (ΔO2) in monolayer-cultured cells. We then visualized oxygen levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΦm) in individual cells by using the red shift of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence and a cationic fluorescent dye, respectively. In this two-dimensional tissue model, ΔΦm was abolished in cells >500 μm from the oxygen source [the anoxic front (AF)], indicating limitations in diffusional oxygen delivery. This result perfectly matched GFP-determined ΔO2. In cells pretreated with dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG), a prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein (PHD) inhibitor, the AF was expanded to 1,500-2,000 μm from the source. In these cells, tissue ΔO2 was substantially decreased, indicating that PHD pathway activation suppressed mitochondrial respiration. The expansion of the AF and the reduction of ΔO2 were much more prominent in a cancer cell line (Hep3B) than in the equivalent fibroblast-like cell line (COS-7). Hence, the results indicate that PHD pathway-activated cells can sustain ΔΦm, despite significantly decreased electron flux to complex IV. Complex II inhibition abolished the effect of DMOG in expanding the AF, although tissue ΔO2 remained shallow. Separate experiments demonstrated that complex II plays a substantial role in sustaining ΔΦm in DMOG-pretreated Hep3B cells with complex III inhibition. From these results, we conclude that PHD pathway activation can sustain ΔΦm in an otherwise anoxic microenvironment by decreasing tissue ΔO2 while activating oxygen-independent electron transport in mitochondria.

  10. Alkaline-mechanical pretreatment process for enhanced anaerobic digestion of thickened waste activated sludge with a novel crushing device: Performance evaluation and economic analysis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Si-Kyung; Ju, Hyun-Jun; Lee, Jeong-Gyu; Kim, Sang-Hyoun

    2014-08-01

    Although various pretreatments have been widely investigated to enhance the anaerobic digestion (AD) of waste activated sludge (WAS), economic feasibility issues have limited real-world applications. The authors examined the performance and economic analysis of an alkaline-mechanical process with a novel mechanical crushing device for thickened WAS pretreatment. The pretreatment at 40gTS/L, pH 13, and 90min reaction time achieved 64% of solubilization efficiency and 8.3 times higher CH4 yield than the control. In addition, a synergistic CH4 yield enhancement was observed when the pretreated and raw WAS were used together as feedstock, and the greatest synergy was observed at a volumetric mixture ratio of 50:50. Economic estimates indicate that up to 22% of WAS treatment costs would be saved by the installation of the suggested process. The experimental results clearly indicate that the alkaline-mechanical process would be highly effective and economically feasible for the AD of thickened WAS.

  11. Differences in nitric oxide steady states between arginine, hypoxanthine, uracil auxotrophs (AHU) and non-AHU strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae during anaerobic respiration in the presence of nitrite.

    PubMed

    Barth, Kenneth; Clark, Virginia L

    2008-08-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae can grow by anaerobic respiration using nitrite as an alternative electron acceptor. Under these growth conditions, N. gonorrhoeae produces and degrades nitric oxide (NO), an important host defense molecule. Laboratory strain F62 has been shown to establish and maintain a NO steady-state level that is a function of the nitrite reductase/NO reductase ratio and is independent of cell number. The nitrite reductase activities (122-197 nmol NO2 reduced x min(-1) x OD600(-1)) and NO reductase activities (88-155 nmol NO reduced x min(-1) x OD600(-1)) in a variety of gonococcal clinical isolates were similar to the specific activities seen in F62 (241 nmol NO2 reduced x min(-1) x OD600(-1) and 88 nmol NO reduced x min(-1) x OD600(-1), respectively). In seven gonococcal strains, the NO steady-state levels established in the presence of nitrite were similar to that of F62 (801-2121 nmol x L-1 NO), while six of the strains, identified as arginine, hypoxanthine, and uracil auxotrophs (AHU), that cause asymptomatic infection in men had either two- to threefold (373-579 nmol x L-1 NO) or about 100-fold (13-24 nmol x L-1 NO) lower NO steady-state concentrations. All tested strains in the presence of a NO donor, 2,2'-(hydroxynitrosohydrazono)bis-ethanimine/NO, quickly lowered and maintained NO levels in the noninflammatory range of NO (<300 nmol x L-1). The generation of a NO steady-state concentration was directly affected by alterations in respiratory control in both F62 and an AHU strain, although differences in membrane function are suspected to be responsible for NO steady-state level differences in AHU strains.

  12. Identification of anaerobic arsenite-oxidizing and arsenate-reducing bacteria associated with an alkaline saline lake in Khovsgol, Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, Natsuko; Itai, Takaaki; Liu, Yitai; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Damdinsuren, Narantuya; Inskeep, William P

    2014-10-01

    Microbial arsenic transformation pathways associated with a saline lake located in northern Mongolia were examined using molecular biological and culturing approaches. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from saline lake sediments and soils were affiliated with haloalkaliphiles, including Bacillus and Halomonas spp. Diverse sequences of arsenate respiratory reductase (arrA) and a new group of arsenite oxidase (arxA) genes were also identified. Pure cultures of arsenate-reducing Nitrincola strain and anaerobic arsenite-oxidizing Halomonas strain were isolated. The chemoorganotrophic Halomonas strain contains arxA gene similar to that of a chemoautotrophic arsenite-oxidizing Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii strain MLHE-1. These results revealed the diversity of arsenic transformation pathways associated with a geographically distinct saline system and the potential contribution of arx-dependent arsenite oxidation by heterotrophic bacteria.

  13. Reduction of N2O and NO generation in anaerobic-aerobic (low dissolved oxygen) biological wastewater treatment process by using sludge alkaline fermentation liquid.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Yinguang

    2011-03-15

    This paper reported an efficient method to significantly reduce nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and nitric oxide (NO) generation in anaerobic-aerobic (low dissolved oxygen) processes. It was found that by the use of waste-activated sludge alkaline fermentation liquid as the synthetic wastewater-carbon source, compared with the commonly used carbon source in the literature (e.g., acetic acid), the generation of N(2)O and NO was reduced by 68.7% and 50.0%, respectively, but the removal efficiencies of total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) were improved. Both N(2)O and NO were produced in the low dissolved oxygen (DO) stage, and the use of sludge fermentation liquid greatly reduced their generation from the denitrification. The presences of Cu(2+) and propionic acid in fermentation liquid were observed to play an important role in the reduction of N(2)O and NO generation. The analysis of the activities of denitrifying enzymes suggested that sludge fermentation liquid caused the significant decrease of both nitrite reductase activity to NO reductase activity ratio and NO reductase activity to N(2)O reductase activity ratio, which resulted in the lower generation of NO and N(2)O. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis indicated that the number of glycogen accumulating bacteria, which was reported to be relevant to nitrous oxide generation, in sludge fermentation liquid reactor was much lower than that in acetic acid reactor. The quantitative detection of the nosZ gene, encoding nitrous oxide reductase, showed that the use of fermentation liquid increased the number of bacteria capable of reducing N(2)O to N(2). The feasibility of using sludge fermentation liquid to reduce NO and N(2)O generation in an anaerobic-low DO process was finally confirmed for a municipal wastewater.

  14. Alkalinity production in intertidal sands intensified by lugworm bioirrigation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Alexandra M.F.; Malkin, Sairah Y.; Montserrat, Francesc; Meysman, Filip J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Porewater profiles and sediment-water fluxes of oxygen, nutrients, pH, calcium, alkalinity, and sulfide were measured in intertidal sandflat sediments from the Oosterschelde mesotidal lagoon (The Netherlands). The influence of bioturbation and bioirrigation by the deep-burrowing polychaete Arenicola marina on the rates and sources of benthic alkalinity generation was examined by comparing measurements in intact and defaunated sediment cores before and after the addition of A. marina in summer and fall 2011. Higher organic matter remineralization rates, shallower O2 penetration, and greater sediment-water solute fluxes were observed in summer, consistent with higher sediment community metabolic rates at a higher temperature. Lugworm activity stimulated porewater exchange (5.1 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), organic matter remineralization (6.2 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), aerobic respiration (2.4 × in summer, 2.1 × in fall), alkalinity release (4.7 × in summer, 4.0 × in fall), nutrient regeneration, and iron cycling. The effects of lugworm activity on net sediment-water fluxes were similar but more pronounced in summer than in fall. Alkalinity release in fall was entirely driven by metabolic carbonate dissolution, while this process explained between 22 and 69% of total alkalinity production in summer, indicating the importance of other processes in this season. By enhancing organic matter remineralization and the reoxidation of reduced metabolites by the sediment microbial community, lugworm activity stimulated the production of dissolved inorganic carbon and metabolic acidity, which in turn enhanced metabolic CaCO3 dissolution efficiency. In summer, evidence of microbial long distance electron transport (LDET) was observed in defaunated sediment. Thus, alkalinity production by net carbonate dissolution was likely supplemented by anaerobic respiration and LDET in summer. PMID:25431515

  15. Interactions of Cd and Cu in anaerobic estuarine sediments. 2: Bioavailability, body burdens and respiration effects as related to geochemical partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Rule, J.H.; Alden, R.W. III

    1996-04-01

    The relationship between Cd and Cu distribution in sediment geochemical fractions and their bioavailability was studied. A fine-sandy textured estuarine sediment was treated with all combinations of 0, 2.5, and 5 mg/kg Cd and 0, 12, and 25 mg/kg Cu using the chloride salts of each metal. Grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio), blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), and hard clam (Mercenaria mercenaria) were exposed to the treated sediments in aquaria with 20 ppt artificial seawater for 14 d. Sediments were sequentially extracted before and after organism exposure to determine the exchangeable, easily reducible, organic-sulfide, moderately reducible, and acid extractable phases. Low mortalities were observed for all organism types and none were attributable to any of the treatments. The Cd and Cu concentrations in the easily reducible and organic-sulfide phases were found to be significantly related to the bioavailability of these metals. The most highly significant relationship was established between Cd in the easily reducible phase and body burden of Cd in the blue mussel. Notable interactions were found between Cd and Cu in some of the geochemical phases, body burdens, and respiration rates. Metal uptake, respiration, and interactions were highly dependent on the test species. A significant correlation was found between increased body burden and depressed respiration for Cd but not for Cu. Multiple regression models are used to describe these relationships. It appears that the interactive responses in the organisms are driven primarily by the sediment geochemical effects and mediated by individual organism processes. These results underscore the necessity of multicomponent (multielement) studies in assessing the fate and effects of toxic elements in the environment.

  16. Selenate reduction to elemental selenium by anaerobic bacteria in sediments and culture: biogeochemical significance of a novel, sulfate-independent respiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Hollibaugh, James T.; Maest, Ann S.; Presser, Theresa S.; Miller, Laurence G.; Culbertson, Charles W.

    1989-01-01

    Interstitial water profiles of SeO42−, SeO32−, SO42−, and Cl− in anoxic sediments indicated removal of the seleno-oxyanions by a near-surface process unrelated to sulfate reduction. In sediment slurry experiments, a complete reductive removal of SeO42− occurred under anaerobic conditions, was more rapid with H2 or acetate, and was inhibited by O2, NO3−, MnO2, or autoclaving but not by SO42− or FeOOH. Oxidation of acetate in sediments could be coupled to selenate but not to molybdate. Reduction of selenate to elemental selenium was determined to be the mechanism for loss from solution. Selenate reduction was inhibited by tungstate and chromate but not by molybdate. A small quantity of the elemental selenium precipitated into sediments from solution could be resolublized by oxidation with either nitrate or FeOOH, but not with MnO2. A bacterium isolated from estuarine sediments demonstrated selenate-dependent growth on acetate, forming elemental selenium and carbon dioxide as respiratory end products. These results indicate that dissimilatory selenate reduction to elemental selenium is the major sink for selenium oxyanions in anoxic sediments. In addition, they suggest application as a treatment process for removing selenium oxyanions from wastewaters and also offer an explanation for the presence of selenite in oxic waters.

  17. BENTHIC MICROBIAL RESPIRATION IN APPALACHIAN MOUNTAIN, PIEDMONT, AND COASTAL PLAINS, STREAMS OF THE EASTERN USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our study had two objectives. First, in order to quantify the potential underestimation of community respiration caused by the exclusion of anaerobic processes, we compared benthic microbial respiration measured as 02 consumption with estimated based on DHA. Second, our previous ...

  18. Evaluation of ultrasonic, acid, thermo-alkaline and enzymatic pre-treatments on anaerobic digestion of Ulva rigida for biogas production.

    PubMed

    Karray, Raida; Hamza, Manel; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Pre-treatment of macroalgae has received considerable research globally due to its influence on the technical, economic and environmental sustainability of algae biogas production. Some of the most promising pre-treatment methods require the application of chemicals, enzymatic, and mechanical. This study focused on these pre-treatments of Ulva rigida for biogas production. The evaluation of different pre-treatment in terms of reducing sugar yields demonstrates that 3.62, 2.88, 2.53 and 7.3g/L of reducing sugar was obtained in acid catalysis, thermoalkaline, ultrasonication and enzymatic pre-treatment, respectively. However in crude macroalgae only 0.6g/L of reducing sugar was given. After anaerobic digestion, the enzymatic hydrolysis was demonstrated the best biogas yield than other pre-treatment which reached 626.5mL/gCODint with 62.65% of biodegradability. The best demonstrated method which uses crude broth of Aspergillus niger showed an effective and environmentally friendly strategy for enhancing the biogas production yields after the anaerobic digestion.

  19. Anaerobic methanethiol degradation and methanogenic community analysis in an alkaline (pH 10) biological process for liquefied petroleum gas desulfurization.

    PubMed

    van Leerdam, Robin C; Bonilla-Salinas, Monica; de Bok, Frank A M; Bruning, H; Lens, Piet N L; Stams, Alfons J M; Janssen, Albert J H

    2008-11-01

    Anaerobic methanethiol (MT) degradation by mesophilic (30 degrees C) alkaliphilic (pH 10) communities was studied in a lab-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) reactor inoculated with a mixture of sediments from the Wadden Sea (The Netherlands), Soap Lake (Central Washington), and Russian soda lakes. MT degradation started after 32 days of incubation. During the first 252 days, complete degradation was achieved till a volumetric loading rate of 7.5 mmol MT/L/day, and sulfide, methane, and carbon dioxide were the main reaction products. Temporary inhibition of MT degradation occurred after MT peak loads and in the presence of dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), which is the autooxidation product of MT. From day 252 onwards, methanol was dosed to the reactor as co-substrate at a loading rate of 3-6 mmol/L/day to stimulate growth of methylotrophic methanogens. Methanol was completely degraded and also a complete MT degradation was achieved till a volumetric loading rate of 13 mmol MT/L/day (0.77 mmol MT/gVSS/day). However, from day 354 till the end of the experimental run (day 365), acetate was formed and MT was not completely degraded anymore, indicating that methanol-degrading homoacetogenic bacteria had partially outcompeted the methanogenic MT-degrading archea. The archeal community in the reactor sludge was analyzed by DGGE and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The methanogenic archea responsible for the degradation of MT in the reactor were related to Methanolobus oregonensis. A pure culture, named strain SODA, was obtained by serial dilutions in medium containing both trimethyl amine and dimethyl sulfide (DMS). Strain SODA degraded MT, DMS, trimethyl amine, and methanol. Flow sheet simulations revealed that for sufficient MT removal from liquefied petroleum gas, the extraction and biological degradation process should be operated above pH 9.

  20. BACTERIAL RESPIRATION OF ARSENIC AND SELENIUM. (R826105)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Oxyanions of arsenic and selenium can be used in microbial anaerobic respiration as terminal electron acceptors. The detection of arsenate and selenate respiring bacteria in numerous pristine and contaminated environments and their rapid appearance in enrichme...

  1. Waiting to inhale: HIF-1 modulates aerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Adam T; Johnson, Randall S

    2007-04-06

    The hypoxia-inducible factor HIF-1 is known to promote anaerobic respiration during low oxygen conditions (hypoxia). In this issue, Fukuda et al. (2007) expand the range of HIF-1's functions by showing that it modulates aerobic respiration as well.

  2. Millimeter-scale alkalinity measurement in marine sediment using DET probes and colorimetric determination.

    PubMed

    Metzger, E; Viollier, E; Simonucci, C; Prévot, F; Langlet, D; Jézéquel, D

    2013-10-01

    Constrained DET (Diffusive Equilibration in Thin films) probes equipped with 75 sampling layers of agarose gel (DGT Research(©)) were used to sample bottom and pore waters in marine sediment with a 2 mm vertical resolution. After retrieval, each piece of hydrogel, corresponding to 25 μL, was introduced into 1 mL of colorimetric reagent (CR) solution consisting of formic acid and bromophenol blue. After the elution/reaction time, absorbance of the latter mixture was read at 590 nm and compared to a calibration curve obtained with the same protocol applied to mini DET probes soaked in sodium hydrogen carbonate standard solutions. This method allows rapid alkalinity determinations for the small volumes of anoxic pore water entrapped into the gel. The method was assessed on organic-rich coastal marine sediments from Thau lagoon (France). Alkalinity values in the overlying waters were in agreement with data obtained by classical sampling techniques. Pore water data showed a progressive increase of alkalinity in the sediment from 2 to 10 mmol kg(-1), corresponding to anaerobic respiration in organic-rich sediments. Moreover, replicates of high-resolution DET profiles showed important lateral heterogeneity at a decimeter scale. This underlines the importance of high-resolution spatial methods for alkalinity profiling in coastal marine systems.

  3. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these bacteria ... Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  4. Nosepiece respiration monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, A. L.; Long, L. E.; Rice, N. E.

    1968-01-01

    Comfortable, inexpensive nosepiece respiration monitor produces rapid response signals to most conventional high impedance medical signal conditioners. The monitor measures respiration in a manner that produces a large signal with minimum delay.

  5. Respirator Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... it last? That depends on how much filtering capacity the respirator has and the amount of hazard ... and it will vary by each respirator model's capacities. That's why your emergency plan must include some ...

  6. Chemoautotrophic production and respiration in the hyporheic zone of a sonoran desert stream

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.B. Jr.; Holmes, R.M.; Fisher, S.G.; Grimm, N.B.

    1994-12-31

    Chemoautotrophic production and respiration (aerobic and anaerobic) were examined along flowpaths in three subsystems in Sycamore Creek, Arizona. Chemoautotrophic production was highest where surface waters enter parafluvial sediments (64 to 76 mgC{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}d{sup {minus}1}) and lowest in anoxic bank sediments (14 to 16 mgC{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}d{sup {minus}1}). Aerobic respiration was considerable greater than chemoautotrophy in oxygenated hyporheic and parafluvial zones (2,400 to 4,900 mgC{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}d{sup {minus}1}). In anoxic bank sediments, respiration was also much greater than chemoautotrophy, but was entirely anaerobic (i.e., methane production; 3,500 mgC{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}d{sup {minus}1}). Weighting subsystems by areal extent, the largest proportion of aerobic respiration and chemoautotrophic production occurred in parafluvial sediments (64 to 76%), whereas anoxic bank sediments were most important for anaerobic respiration (94% of total anaerobic respiration). Overall, chemoautotrophic production was only 1.0 to 1.3% of respiration and methane production was only 5% of total sediment respiration.

  7. Development of a Molecular System for Studying Microbial Arsenate Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltikov, C. W.; Newman, D. K.

    2002-12-01

    The toxic element arsenic is a major contaminant of many groundwaters and surface waters throughout the world. Arsenic enrichment is primarily of geological origin resulting from weathering processes and geothermal activity. Not surprisingly, microorganisms inhabiting anoxic arsenic-contaminated environments have evolved to exploit arsenate during respiration. Numerous bacteria have been isolated that use arsenate as a terminal electron acceptor for respiratory growth. The diversity of this metabolism appears to be widespread throughout the microbial tree of life, suggesting respiratory arsenate reduction is ancient in origin. Yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms for how these organisms respire arsenate. We have developed a model system in Shewanella trabarsenatis, strain ANA-3, a facultative anaerobe that respires arsenate and tolerates high concentrations of arsenite (10 mM). Through loss-of-function studies, we have identified genes involved in both arsenic resistance and arsenate respiration. The genes that confer resistance to arsenic are homologous to the well-characterized ars operon of E. coli. However, the respiratory arsenate reductase is predicted to encode a novel protein that shares homologous regions (~ 40 % similarity) to molybdopterin anaerobic reductases specific for DMSO, thiosulfate, nitrate, and polysulfide. I will discuss our emerging model for how strain ANA-3 respires arsenate and the relationship between arsenite resistance and arsenate respiration. I will also highlight the relevance of this type of analysis for biogeochemical studies.

  8. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens.

    PubMed

    Nealson, K H; Moser, D P; Saffarini, D A

    1995-04-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  9. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Moser, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  10. Speech and respiration.

    PubMed

    Conrad, B; Schönle, P

    1979-04-12

    This investigation deals with the temporal aspects of air volume changes during speech. Speech respiration differs fundamentally from resting respiration. In resting respiration the duration and velocity of inspiration (air flow or lung volume change) are in a range similar to that of expiration. In speech respiration the duration of inspiration decreases and its velocity increases; conversely, the duration of expiration increases and the volume of air flow decreases dramatically. The following questions arise: are these two respiration types different entities, or do they represent the end points of a continuum from resting to speech respiration? How does articulation without the generation of speech sound affect breathing? Does (verbalized?) thinking without articulation or speech modify the breathing pattern? The main test battery included four tasks (spontaneous speech, reading, serial speech, arithmetic) performed under three conditions (speaking aloud, articulating subvocally, quiet performance by tryping to exclusively 'think' the tasks). Respiratory movements were measured with a chest pneumograph and evaluated in comparison with a phonogram and the identified spoken text. For quiet performance the resulting respiratory time ratio (relation of duration of inspiration versus expiration) showed a gradual shift in the direction of speech respiration--the least for reading, the most for arithmetic. This change was even more apparent for the subvocal tasks. It is concluded that (a) there is a gradual automatic change from resting to speech respiration and (b) the degree of internal verbalization (activation of motor speech areas) defines the degree of activation of the speech respiratory pattern.

  11. Voluntary use of respirators.

    PubMed

    Feiner, Lynn

    2009-11-01

    Allowing voluntary use of respirators can provide workers with an added level of comfort and relief from nuisance levels of particulates, gases, or vapors. But misuse can result in illness or injury to the worker. Understanding and following OSHA's guidelines on voluntary use of respirators is one of the many ways you help provide a safe workplace and ensure your employees stay healthy.

  12. Characterization of Microbes Capable of Using Vinyl Chloride and Ethene as Sole Carbon and Energy Sources by Anaerobic Oxidation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    nov., sp. nov., obligately organohalide- respiring anaerobic bacteria relevant to halogen cycling and bioremediation, belong to a novel bacterial...FINAL REPORT Characterization of Microbes Capable of Using Vinyl Chloride and Ethene as Sole Carbon and Energy Sources by Anaerobic Oxidation...1 1.1 Background: Anaerobic Mineralization of VC

  13. Respiration in Aquatic Insects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarland, John

    1985-01-01

    This article: (1) explains the respiratory patterns of several freshwater insects; (2) describes the differences and mechanisms of spiracular cutaneous, and gill respiration; and (3) discusses behavioral aspects of selected aquatic insects. (ML)

  14. Teaching Cellular Respiration & Alternate Energy Sources with a Laboratory Exercise Developed by a Scientist-Teacher Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Brandon; Mitton, Teri; Smith, Rosemary; Magnuson, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells are a current research area that harvests electricity from bacteria capable of anaerobic respiration. Graphite is an electrically conductive material that bacteria can respire on, thus it can be used to capture electrons from bacteria. When bacteria transfer electrons to graphite, an electrical potential is created that can…

  15. Transcriptional regulation of dimethyl sulfoxide respiration in a haloarchaeon, Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qiuzi; Ito, Yoshiyasu; Yoshimatsu, Katsuhiko; Fujiwara, Taketomo

    2016-01-01

    The halophilic euryarchaeon Haloferax volcanii can grow anaerobically by DMSO respiration. DMSO reductase was induced by DMSO respiration not only under anaerobic growth conditions but also in denitrifying cells of H. volcanii. Deletion of the dmsR gene, encoding a putative regulator for the DMSO reductase, resulted in the loss of anaerobic growth by DMSO respiration. Reporter experiments revealed that only the anaerobic condition was essential for transcription of the dmsEABCD genes encoding DMSO reductase and that transcription was enhanced threefold by supplementation of DMSO. In the ∆dmsR mutant, transcription of the dmsEABCD genes induced by the anaerobic condition was not enhanced by DMSO, suggesting that DmsR is a DMSO-responsive regulator. Transcriptions of the dmsR and mgd genes for Mo-bisMGD biosynthesis were regulated in the same manner as the dmsEABCD genes. These results suggest that the genetic regulation of DMSO respiration in H. volcanii is controlled by at least two systems: one is the DMSO-responsive DmsR, and the other is an unknown anaerobic regulator.

  16. Biotransformation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene by obligate marine Shewanella marisflavi EP1 under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiexun; Ning, Guojing; Li, Feili; Sheng, G Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Anaerobic transformation of 2,4-DNT by obligate marine Shewanella marisflavi EP1 was investigated. The cell growth of EP1 was proportional to the total amount of 2,4-DNT reduced. The eventual transformation product was 2,4-diaminotoluene, via 2-amino-4-nitrotoluene and 4-amino-2-nitrotoluene as intermediates. The presence of Cu(2+), dicumarol, metyrapone and flavins intensively influenced the reduction activity of 2,4-DNT, suggesting that dehydrogenease, menaquinone, cytochromes and flavins are essentially involved in electron transport process for 2,4-DNT reduction. These results indicate that biotransformation of 2,4-DNT by EP1 is a form of microbial anaerobic respiration. Furthermore, EP1 was capable of transforming 2,4-DNT at relatively alkaline range of pH (7-9), and at a wide range of temperature (4-40°C) and salinity (2-8% NaCl concentration). Our findings not only deepen our understanding of the environmental fate of 2,4-DNT, but also provide an extension to the application of shewanellae in the site bioremediation and/or wastewater treatment.

  17. Perspectives of the microbial carbon pump with special references to microbial respiration and ecological efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H.; Jiao, N.

    2014-01-01

    Although respiration consumes fixed carbon and produce CO2, it provides energy for essential biological processes of an ecosystem, including the microbial carbon pump (MCP). In MCP-driving biotransformation of labile DOC to recalcitrant DOC (RDOC), microbial respiration provides the metabolic energy for environmental organic substrate sensing, cellular enzyme syntheses and catalytic processes such as uptake, secretion, modification, fixation and storage of carbon compounds. The MCP efficiency of a heterotrophic microorganism is thus related to its energy production efficiency and hence to its respiration efficiency. Anaerobically respiring microbes usually have lower energy production efficiency and lower energy-dependent carbon transformation efficiency, and consequently lower MCP efficiency at per cell level. This effect is masked by the phenomena that anoxic environments often store more organic matter. Here we point out that organic carbon preservation and RDOC production is different in mechanisms, and anaerobically respiring ecosystems could also have lower MCP ecological efficiency. Typical cases can be found in large river estuarine ecosystems. Due to strong terrigenous input of nutrients and organic matter, estuarine ecosystems usually experience intense heterotrophic respiration processes that rapidly consume dissolved oxygen, potentially producing hypoxic and anoxic zones in the water column. The lowered availability of dissolved oxygen and the excessive supply of nutrients such as nitrate from river input prompt enhanced anaerobic respiration processes. Thus, some nutrients may be consumed by anaerobically respiring heterotrophic microorganisms, instead of being utilized by phytoplankton for carbon fixation and primary production. In this situation, the ecological functioning of the estuarine ecosystem is altered and the ecological efficiency is lowered, as less carbon is fixed and less energy is produced. Ultimately this would have negatively impacts

  18. Anaerobic Digestion.

    PubMed

    Liebetrau, Jan; Sträuber, Heike; Kretzschmar, Jörg; Denysenko, Velina; Nelles, Michael

    2017-04-09

    The term anaerobic digestion usually refers to the microbial conversion of organic material to biogas, which mainly consists of methane and carbon dioxide. The technical application of the naturally-occurring process is used to provide a renewable energy carrier and - as the substrate is often waste material - to reduce the organic matter content of the substrate prior to disposal.Applications can be found in sewage sludge treatment, the treatment of industrial and municipal solid wastes and wastewaters (including landfill gas utilization), and the conversion of agricultural residues and energy crops.For biorefinery concepts, the anaerobic digestion (AD) process is, on the one hand, an option to treat organic residues from other production processes. Concomitant effects are the reduction of organic carbon within the treated substance, the conversion of nitrogen and sulfur components, and the production of an energy-rich gas - the biogas. On the other hand, the multistep conversion of complex organic material offers the possibility of interrupting the conversion chain and locking out intermediates for utilization as basic material within the chemical industry.

  19. Anaerobic Degradation of the Benzene Nucleus by a Facultatively Anaerobic Microorganism1

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Barrie F.; Campbell, William L.; Chinoy, Ira

    1970-01-01

    A bacterium was isolated by elective culture with p-hydroxybenzoate as substrate and nitrate as electron acceptor. It grew either aerobically or anaerobically, by nitrate respiration, on a range of aromatic compounds. The organism was identified as a pseudomonad and was given the trivial name Pseudomonas PN-1. Benzoate and p-hydroxybenzoate were metabolized aerobically via protocatechuate, followed by meta cleavage catalyzed by protocatechuic acid-4,5-oxygenase, to yield α-hydroxy-γ-carboxymuconic semialdehyde. Pseudomonas PN-1 grew rapidly on p-hydroxybenzoate under strictly anaerobic conditions, provided nitrate was present, even though protocatechuic acid-4,5-oxygenase was repressed. Suspensions of cells grown anaerobically on p-hydroxybenzoate oxidized benzoate with nitrate and produced 4 to 5 μmoles of CO2 per μmole of benzoate added; these cells did not oxidize benzoate aerobically. The patterns of the oxidation of aromatic substrates with oxygen or nitrate by cells grown aerobically or anaerobically on different aromatic compounds indicated that benzoate rather than protocatechuate was a key intermediate in the early stages of anaerobic metabolism. It was concluded that the pathway for the anaerobic breakdown of the aromatic ring is different and quite distinct from the aerobic pathway. Mechanisms for the anaerobic degradation of the benzene nucleus by Pseudomonas PN-1 are discussed. PMID:5419260

  20. Wetting increases respiration loss from the Arctic tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zona, Donatella; Lipson, David; Barott, Katie; Tha Paw U, Kyaw; Oberbauer, Steven; Olivas, Paulo; Hastings, Steven; Hinzman, Larry; Oechel, Walter

    2010-05-01

    Numerous studies (Billings et al. 1982; Peterson et al. 1984; Oberbauer et al. 1991; Funk et al., 1994; Oechel et al., 1998) have demonstrated that decreasing soil moisture and increasing soil oxygen increase respiration loss in the Arctic tundra. Warming and drying of tundra soils due to climate change are assumed to increase greenhouse gas emissions and the potential for strong positive feedbacks on the climate of the Arctic. However, here we show that an increase in the water table can lead to the same result, increasing respiration. In the largest scale water table manipulation experiment ever performed in the Arctic tundra, we showed that increasing the water table to 7.5 cm above the surface caused the ecosystem to more than half its net C uptake (9 gCm-2season-1) compared to the 23 gCm-2season-1 of a control site where water table was about 2 cm below the surface. Standing water saturated the moss layer, increased the heat conduction into the soil, and lead to higher soil temperature, deeper thaw and, surprisingly, to higher respiration rates in the most anaerobic area of the manipulation experiment. Probably, the increase in thaw depth increased substrate availability and freed sufficient Fe(III) to act as an electron acceptor in place of oxygen for respiration and CO2 production in these anaerobic soils (Zehnder and Stumm 1988, Kappler et al. 2004, Lipson et al. in review). In contrast to the general assumption that aerobic peat soils release more CO2 than soils under anaerobic conditions (Billing et al., 1982; Funk et al., 1994; Bridgham et al., 1998), here we show that this is not always the case. That the increase in the water table can result in increased respiration, even under nearly fully anaerobic conditions, through previously underestimated pathways, highlights yet another unexpected positive feedback on climate change of carbon exchange in the Arctic. That anaerobic conditions do not necessarily prevent CO2 loss in permafrost areas has major

  1. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    PubMed Central

    Canganella, Francesco; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong to the Archaea has

  2. Anaerobic growth of a "strict aerobe" (Bacillus subtilis).

    PubMed

    Nakano, M M; Zuber, P

    1998-01-01

    There was a long-held belief that the gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis is a strict aerobe. But recent studies have shown that B. subtilis will grow anaerobically, either by using nitrate or nitrite as a terminal electron acceptor, or by fermentation. How B. subtilis alters its metabolic activity according to the availability of oxygen and alternative electron acceptors is but one focus of study. A two-component signal transduction system composed of a sensor kinase, ResE, and a response regulator, ResD, occupies an early stage in the regulatory pathway governing anaerobic respiration. One of the essential roles of ResD and ResE in anaerobic gene regulation is induction of fnr transcription upon oxygen limitation. FNR is a transcriptional activator for anaerobically induced genes, including those for respiratory nitrate reductase, narGHJI.B. subtilis has two distinct nitrate reductases, one for the assimilation of nitrate nitrogen and the other for nitrate respiration. In contrast, one nitrite reductase functions both in nitrite nitrogen assimilation and nitrite respiration. Unlike many anaerobes, which use pyruvate formate lyase, B. subtilis can carry out fermentation in the absence of external electron acceptors wherein pyruvate dehydrogenase is utilized to metabolize pyruvate.

  3. Bacterial respiration of arsenic and selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stolz, J.F.; Oremland, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    Oxyanions of arsenic and selenium can be used in microbial anaerobic respiration as terminal electron acceptors. The detection of arsenate and selenate respiring bacteria in numerous pristine and contaminated environments and their rapid appearance in enrichment culture suggest that they are widespread and metabolically active in nature. Although the bacterial species that have been isolated and characterized are still few in number, they are scattered throughout the bacterial domain and include Gram- positive bacteria, beta, gamma and epsilon Proteobacteria and the sole member of a deeply branching lineage of the bacteria, Chrysiogenes arsenatus. The oxidation of a number of organic substrates (i.e. acetate, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, ethanol) or hydrogen can be coupled to the reduction of arsenate and selenate, but the actual donor used varies from species to species. Both periplasmic and membrane-associated arsenate and selenate reductases have been characterized. Although the number of subunits and molecular masses differs, they all contain molybdenum. The extent of the environmental impact on the transformation and mobilization of arsenic and selenium by microbial dissimilatory processes is only now being fully appreciated.

  4. Anaerobic energy metabolism in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Atteia, Ariane; van Lis, Robert; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Martin, William F

    2013-02-01

    Anaerobic metabolic pathways allow unicellular organisms to tolerate or colonize anoxic environments. Over the past ten years, genome sequencing projects have brought a new light on the extent of anaerobic metabolism in eukaryotes. A surprising development has been that free-living unicellular algae capable of photoautotrophic lifestyle are, in terms of their enzymatic repertoire, among the best equipped eukaryotes known when it comes to anaerobic energy metabolism. Some of these algae are marine organisms, common in the oceans, others are more typically soil inhabitants. All these species are important from the ecological (O(2)/CO(2) budget), biotechnological, and evolutionary perspectives. In the unicellular algae surveyed here, mixed-acid type fermentations are widespread while anaerobic respiration, which is more typical of eukaryotic heterotrophs, appears to be rare. The presence of a core anaerobic metabolism among the algae provides insights into its evolutionary origin, which traces to the eukaryote common ancestor. The predicted fermentative enzymes often exhibit an amino acid extension at the N-terminus, suggesting that these proteins might be compartmentalized in the cell, likely in the chloroplast or the mitochondrion. The green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella NC64 have the most extended set of fermentative enzymes reported so far. Among the eukaryotes with secondary plastids, the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana has the most pronounced anaerobic capabilities as yet. From the standpoints of genomic, transcriptomic, and biochemical studies, anaerobic energy metabolism in C. reinhardtii remains the best characterized among photosynthetic protists. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The evolutionary aspects of bioenergetic systems.

  5. Soil Respiration in Different Agricultural and Natural Ecosystems in an Arid Region

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Liming; Zhao, Xuechun; Jiang, Lianhe; Wang, Yongji; Luo, Liangguo; Zheng, Yuanrun; Chen, Xi; Rimmington, Glyn M.

    2012-01-01

    The variation of different ecosystems on the terrestrial carbon balance is predicted to be large. We investigated a typical arid region with widespread saline/alkaline soils, and evaluated soil respiration of different agricultural and natural ecosystems. Soil respiration for five ecosystems together with soil temperature, soil moisture, soil pH, soil electric conductivity and soil organic carbon content were investigated in the field. Comparing with the natural ecosystems, the mean seasonal soil respiration rates of the agricultural ecosystems were 96%–386% higher and agricultural ecosystems exhibited lower CO2 absorption by the saline/alkaline soil. Soil temperature and moisture together explained 48%, 86%, 84%, 54% and 54% of the seasonal variations of soil respiration in the five ecosystems, respectively. There was a significant negative relationship between soil respiration and soil electrical conductivity, but a weak correlation between soil respiration and soil pH or soil organic carbon content. Our results showed that soil CO2 emissions were significantly different among different agricultural and natural ecosystems, although we caution that this was an observational, not manipulative, study. Temperature at the soil surface and electric conductivity were the main driving factors of soil respiration across the five ecosystems. Care should be taken when converting native vegetation into cropland from the point of view of greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:23082234

  6. A study of photosynthetic biogas upgrading based on a high rate algal pond under alkaline conditions: Influence of the illumination regime.

    PubMed

    Franco-Morgado, Mariana; Alcántara, Cynthia; Noyola, Adalberto; Muñoz, Raúl; González-Sánchez, Armando

    2017-03-20

    Microalgal-bacterial processes have emerged as environmental friendly systems for the cost-effective treatment of anaerobic effluents such as biogas and nutrients-laden digestates. Environmental parameters such as temperature, irradiation, nutrient concentration and pH effect the performance of the systems. In this paper, the potential of a microalgal-bacterial photobioreactor operated under high pH (≈9.5) and high alkalinity to convert biogas into biomethane was evaluated. The influence of the illumination regime (continuous light supply vs 12h/12h light/dark cycles) on the synthetic biogas upgrading efficiency, biomass productivity and nutrient removal efficiency was assessed in a High-Rate Algal Pond interconnected to a biogas absorption bubble column. No significant differences in the removal efficiency of CO2 and H2S (91.5±2% and 99.5%±0.5, respectively) were recorded regardless of the illumination regime. The high fluctuations of the dissolved oxygen concentration during operation under light/dark cycles allowed to evaluate the specific growth rate and the specific partial degradation rate of the microalgae biomass by photosynthesis and respiration, respectively. The respiration reduced the net microalgae biomass productivity under light/dark cycles compared with process operation under the continuous light supply.

  7. Anaerobic Catabolism of Aromatic Compounds: a Genetic and Genomic View

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María Teresa; Blázquez, Blas; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Juárez, Javier F.; Valderrama, J. Andrés; Barragán, María J. L.; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Aromatic compounds belong to one of the most widely distributed classes of organic compounds in nature, and a significant number of xenobiotics belong to this family of compounds. Since many habitats containing large amounts of aromatic compounds are often anoxic, the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds by microorganisms becomes crucial in biogeochemical cycles and in the sustainable development of the biosphere. The mineralization of aromatic compounds by facultative or obligate anaerobic bacteria can be coupled to anaerobic respiration with a variety of electron acceptors as well as to fermentation and anoxygenic photosynthesis. Since the redox potential of the electron-accepting system dictates the degradative strategy, there is wide biochemical diversity among anaerobic aromatic degraders. However, the genetic determinants of all these processes and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are much less studied. This review focuses on the recent findings that standard molecular biology approaches together with new high-throughput technologies (e.g., genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) have provided regarding the genetics, regulation, ecophysiology, and evolution of anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways. These studies revealed that the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds is more diverse and widespread than previously thought, and the complex metabolic and stress programs associated with the use of aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions are starting to be unraveled. Anaerobic biotransformation processes based on unprecedented enzymes and pathways with novel metabolic capabilities, as well as the design of novel regulatory circuits and catabolic networks of great biotechnological potential in synthetic biology, are now feasible to approach. PMID:19258534

  8. Livestock Anaerobic Digester Database

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Anaerobic Digester Database provides basic information about anaerobic digesters on livestock farms in the United States, organized in Excel spreadsheets. It includes projects that are under construction, operating, or shut down.

  9. Anaerobic Digestion Analysis. Training Module 5.120.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with alkalinity, volatile acids and carbon dioxide determinations for an anaerobic sludge digester. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This module considers total and bicarbonate…

  10. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  11. Hybrid respiration-signal conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinard, G. A.; Steffen, D. A.; Sturm, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Hybrid impedance-pneumograph and respiration-rate signal conditioner element of hand-held vital signs monitor measures changes in impedance of chest during breathing cycle and generates analog respiration signal as output along with synchronous square wave that can be monitored by breath-rate processor.

  12. Enhanced alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon release in intertidal sands from the Oosterschelde (The Netherlands) induced by a natural macrofaunal community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Heiko; Montserrat, Francesc; Meysman, Filip

    2014-05-01

    The influence of bioturbation and bioirrigation in intertidal sandflat sediments from the Oosterschelde (The Netherlands) on the rates and sources of benthic alkalinity (TA) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) generation was examined using measurements of sediment-water fluxes of bromide, oxygen, nutrients, TA and DIC. Sediments from the Oosterschelde typically contain the deep-burrowing polychaete Arenicola marina, the sub-surface bioturbator Macoma balthica and the surface bioturbator Cerastoderma edule. Measurements were carried out in six tanks (106 cm x 87 cm x 20 cm). The sediment was collected in November 2012. Measurements were started in June 2013. Each tank was sampled twice for benthic fluxes over the course of one month. Prior measurements three tanks were defaunated by covering the sediment surface with a black plastic sheet. Benthic flux measurements were carried out in closed plastic chambers (diameter 66 cm). These chambers typically contained about 10 cm sediment and 20 cm overlying water. The tank was completely covered with opaque a black plastic sheet during measurements. The incubation time ranged from 6 to 8 hours. Here we present preliminary results from both experimental runs. High benthic fluxes of TA (10 - 70 mmol m-2 d-1) and DIC (35 - 150 mmol m-2 d-1) were observed in all tanks. Whereas benthic TA and DIC fluxes were significantly higher in faunated tanks, total oxygen uptake (TOU: 30 - 75 mmol m-2 d-1) did not show any meaningful trend between the two treatments. Therefore, the apparent community respiratory quotient (CRQ = DIC/TOU) varied between 0.9 and 3.3, with significant higher values in faunated tanks, suggesting enhanced flushing of DIC produced in deeper layers and released by bioirrigation. This DIC was either produced by anaerobic respiration or carbonate dissolution. To unravel the contribution of carbonate dissolution and anaerobic respiration on the observed TA and DIC fluxes, we further present estimations for relevant

  13. Ecology and Biotechnology of Selenium-Respiring Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In nature, selenium is actively cycled between oxic and anoxic habitats, and this cycle plays an important role in carbon and nitrogen mineralization through bacterial anaerobic respiration. Selenium-respiring bacteria (SeRB) are found in geographically diverse, pristine or contaminated environments and play a pivotal role in the selenium cycle. Unlike its structural analogues oxygen and sulfur, the chalcogen selenium and its microbial cycling have received much less attention by the scientific community. This review focuses on microorganisms that use selenate and selenite as terminal electron acceptors, in parallel to the well-studied sulfate-reducing bacteria. It overviews the significant advancements made in recent years on the role of SeRB in the biological selenium cycle and their ecological role, phylogenetic characterization, and metabolism, as well as selenium biomineralization mechanisms and environmental biotechnological applications. PMID:25631289

  14. C4-Dicarboxylate Utilization in Aerobic and Anaerobic Growth.

    PubMed

    Unden, Gottfried; Strecker, Alexander; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Kim, Ok Bin

    2016-06-01

    C4-dicarboxylates and the C4-dicarboxylic amino acid l-aspartate support aerobic and anaerobic growth of Escherichia coli and related bacteria. In aerobic growth, succinate, fumarate, D- and L-malate, L-aspartate, and L-tartrate are metabolized by the citric acid cycle and associated reactions. Because of the interruption of the citric acid cycle under anaerobic conditions, anaerobic metabolism of C4-dicarboxylates depends on fumarate reduction to succinate (fumarate respiration). In some related bacteria (e.g., Klebsiella), utilization of C4-dicarboxylates, such as tartrate, is independent of fumarate respiration and uses a Na+-dependent membrane-bound oxaloacetate decarboxylase. Uptake of the C4-dicarboxylates into the bacteria (and anaerobic export of succinate) is achieved under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by different sets of secondary transporters. Expression of the genes for C4-dicarboxylate metabolism is induced in the presence of external C4-dicarboxylates by the membrane-bound DcuS-DcuR two-component system. Noncommon C4-dicarboxylates like l-tartrate or D-malate are perceived by cytoplasmic one-component sensors/transcriptional regulators. This article describes the pathways of aerobic and anaerobic C4-dicarboxylate metabolism and their regulation. The citric acid cycle, fumarate respiration, and fumarate reductase are covered in other articles and discussed here only in the context of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism. Recent aspects of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism like transport, sensing, and regulation will be treated in more detail. This article is an updated version of an article published in 2004 in EcoSal Plus. The update includes new literature, but, in particular, the sections on the metabolism of noncommon C4-dicarboxylates and their regulation, on the DcuS-DcuR regulatory system, and on succinate production by engineered E. coli are largely revised or new.

  15. Pyruvate kinase triggers a metabolic feedback loop that controls redox metabolism in respiring cells.

    PubMed

    Grüning, Nana-Maria; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Bluemlein, Katharina; Mülleder, Michael; Wamelink, Mirjam M C; Lehrach, Hans; Jakobs, Cornelis; Breitenbach, Michael; Ralser, Markus

    2011-09-07

    In proliferating cells, a transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is known as the Warburg effect, whose reversal inhibits cancer cell proliferation. Studying its regulator pyruvate kinase (PYK) in yeast, we discovered that central metabolism is self-adapting to synchronize redox metabolism when respiration is activated. Low PYK activity activated yeast respiration. However, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) did not increase, and cells gained resistance to oxidants. This adaptation was attributable to accumulation of the PYK substrate phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). PEP acted as feedback inhibitor of the glycolytic enzyme triosephosphate isomerase (TPI). TPI inhibition stimulated the pentose phosphate pathway, increased antioxidative metabolism, and prevented ROS accumulation. Thus, a metabolic feedback loop, initiated by PYK, mediated by its substrate and acting on TPI, stimulates redox metabolism in respiring cells. Originating from a single catalytic step, this autonomous reconfiguration of central carbon metabolism prevents oxidative stress upon shifts between fermentation and respiration.

  16. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    DOEpatents

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  17. Anaerobic bacteria from hypersaline environments.

    PubMed Central

    Ollivier, B; Caumette, P; Garcia, J L; Mah, R A

    1994-01-01

    Strictly anaerobic halophiles, namely fermentative, sulfate-reducing, homoacetogenic, phototrophic, and methanogenic bacteria are involved in the oxidation of organic carbon in hypersaline environments. To date, six anaerobic fermentative genera, containing nine species, have been described. Two of them are homoacetogens. Six species belong to the family Haloanaerobiaceae, as indicated by their unique 16S rRNA oligonucleotide sequences. Desulfohalobium retbaense and Desulfovibrio halophilus represent the only two moderately halophilic sulfate reducers so far reported. Among anoxygenic phototrophic anaerobes, a few purple bacteria with optimal growth at salinities between 6 and 11% NaCl have been isolated from hypersaline habitats. They belong to the genera Rhodospirillum, Chromatium, Thiocapsa, and Ectothiorhodospira. The commonest organisms isolated so far are Chromatium salexigens, Thiocapsa halophila, and Rhodospirillum salinarum. Extremely halophilic purple bacteria have most commonly been isolated from alkaline brines and require about 20 to 25% NaCl for optimal growth. They belong to the family Ectothiorodhospiraceae. Their osmoregulation involves synthesis or uptake of compatible solutes such as glycine-betaine that accumulate in their cytoplasm. The existence of methanogens in hypersaline environments is related to the presence of noncompetitive substrates such as methylamines, which originate mainly from the breakdown of osmoregulatory amines. Methanogenesis probably does not contribute to the mineralization of carbohydrates at NaCl concentrations higher than 15%. Above this concentration, sulfate reduction is probably the main way to oxidize H2 (although at rates too low to use up all the H2 formed) and occupies a terminal function kn the degradation of carbohydrates. Three genera and five species of halophilic methylotrophic methanogens have been reported. A bloom of phototrophic bacteria in the marine salterns of Salins-de-Giraud, located on the

  18. Phenotypic and Genomic Properties of Chitinispirillum alkaliphilum gen. nov., sp. nov., A Haloalkaliphilic Anaerobic Chitinolytic Bacterium Representing a Novel Class in the Phylum Fibrobacteres.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Rakitin, Andrey L; Gumerov, Vadim M; Beletsky, Alexey V; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Mardanov, Andrey V; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic enrichment from sediments of hypersaline alkaline lakes in Wadi el Natrun (Egypt) with chitin resulted in the isolation of a fermentative haloalkaliphilic bacterium, strain ACht6-1, growing exclusively with insoluble chitin as the substrate in a sodium carbonate-based medium at pH 8.5-10.5 and total Na(+) concentrations from 0.4 to 1.75 M. The isolate had a Gram-negative cell wall and formed lipid cysts in old cultures. The chitinolytic activity was associated with cells. Analysis of the 4.4 Mb draft genome identified pathways for chitin utilization, particularly, secreted chitinases linked to the cell surface, as well as genes for the hydrolysis of other polysaccharides and fermentation of sugars, while the genes needed for aerobic and anaerobic respiration were absent. Adaptation to a haloalkaliphilic lifestyle was reflected by the gene repertoire encoding sodium rather than proton-dependent membrane-bound ion pumps, including the Rnf-type complex, oxaloacetate decarboxylase, V-type ATPase, and pyrophosphatase. The phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene and ribosomal proteins indicated that ACht6-1 forms a novel deep lineage at the class level within the bacterial candidate division TG3. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic and genomic analyses, the novel chitinolytic bacterium is described as Chitinispirillum alkaliphilum gen. nov., sp. nov., within a novel class Chitinispirillia that could be included into the phylum Fibrobacteres.

  19. Phenotypic and Genomic Properties of Chitinispirillum alkaliphilum gen. nov., sp. nov., A Haloalkaliphilic Anaerobic Chitinolytic Bacterium Representing a Novel Class in the Phylum Fibrobacteres

    PubMed Central

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Rakitin, Andrey L.; Gumerov, Vadim M.; Beletsky, Alexey V.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Mardanov, Andrey V.; Ravin, Nikolai V.

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic enrichment from sediments of hypersaline alkaline lakes in Wadi el Natrun (Egypt) with chitin resulted in the isolation of a fermentative haloalkaliphilic bacterium, strain ACht6-1, growing exclusively with insoluble chitin as the substrate in a sodium carbonate-based medium at pH 8.5–10.5 and total Na+ concentrations from 0.4 to 1.75 M. The isolate had a Gram-negative cell wall and formed lipid cysts in old cultures. The chitinolytic activity was associated with cells. Analysis of the 4.4 Mb draft genome identified pathways for chitin utilization, particularly, secreted chitinases linked to the cell surface, as well as genes for the hydrolysis of other polysaccharides and fermentation of sugars, while the genes needed for aerobic and anaerobic respiration were absent. Adaptation to a haloalkaliphilic lifestyle was reflected by the gene repertoire encoding sodium rather than proton-dependent membrane-bound ion pumps, including the Rnf-type complex, oxaloacetate decarboxylase, V-type ATPase, and pyrophosphatase. The phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene and ribosomal proteins indicated that ACht6-1 forms a novel deep lineage at the class level within the bacterial candidate division TG3. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic and genomic analyses, the novel chitinolytic bacterium is described as Chitinispirillum alkaliphilum gen. nov., sp. nov., within a novel class Chitinispirillia that could be included into the phylum Fibrobacteres. PMID:27065971

  20. Respiration in the open ocean.

    PubMed

    del Giorgio, Paul A; Duarte, Carlos M

    2002-11-28

    A key question when trying to understand the global carbon cycle is whether the oceans are net sources or sinks of carbon. This will depend on the production of organic matter relative to the decomposition due to biological respiration. Estimates of respiration are available for the top layers, the mesopelagic layer, and the abyssal waters and sediments of various ocean regions. Although the total open ocean respiration is uncertain, it is probably substantially greater than most current estimates of particulate organic matter production. Nevertheless, whether the biota act as a net source or sink of carbon remains an open question.

  1. From breathing to respiration.

    PubMed

    Fitting, Jean-William

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of breathing remained an enigma for a long time. The Hippocratic school described breathing patterns but did not associate breathing with the lungs. Empedocles and Plato postulated that breathing was linked to the passage of air through pores of the skin. This was refuted by Aristotle who believed that the role of breathing was to cool the heart. In Alexandria, breakthroughs were accomplished in the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. Later, Galen proposed an accurate description of the respiratory muscles and the mechanics of breathing. However, his heart-lung model was hampered by the traditional view of two non-communicating vascular systems - veins and arteries. After a period of stagnation in the Middle Ages, knowledge progressed with the discovery of pulmonary circulation. The comprehension of the purpose of breathing progressed by steps thanks to Boyle and Mayow among others, and culminated with the contribution of Priestley and the discovery of oxygen by Lavoisier. Only then was breathing recognized as fulfilling the purpose of respiration, or gas exchange. A century later, a controversy emerged concerning the active or passive transfer of oxygen from alveoli to the blood. August and Marie Krogh settled the dispute, showing that passive diffusion was sufficient to meet the oxygen needs.

  2. Extracellular respiration of dimethyl sulfoxide by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1.

    PubMed

    Gralnick, Jeffrey A; Vali, Hojatollah; Lies, Douglas P; Newman, Dianne K

    2006-03-21

    Shewanella species are renowned for their respiratory versatility, including their ability to respire poorly soluble substrates by using enzymatic machinery that is localized to the outside of the cell. The ability to engage in "extracellular respiration" to date has focused primarily on respiration of minerals. Here, we identify two gene clusters in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 that each contain homologs of genes required for metal reduction and genes that are predicted to encode dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase subunits. Molecular and genetic analyses of these clusters indicate that one (SO1427-SO1432) is required for anaerobic respiration of DMSO. We show that DMSO respiration is an extracellular respiratory process through the analysis of mutants defective in type II secretion, which is required for transporting proteins to the outer membrane in Shewanella. Moreover, immunogold labeling of DMSO reductase subunits reveals that they reside on the outer leaflet of the outer membrane under anaerobic conditions. The extracellular localization of the DMSO reductase in S. oneidensis suggests these organisms may perceive DMSO in the environment as an insoluble compound.

  3. 78 FR 18601 - Respirator Certification Fees; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Respirator Certification Fees; Public Meeting... stakeholders to present information the impact of an increase on respirator fees on individual respirator... in respirator certification and approval fees on individual respirator manufacturers, the...

  4. Oxygen regulated gene expression in facultatively anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Unden, G; Becker, S; Bongaerts, J; Schirawski, J; Six, S

    1994-01-01

    In facultatively anaerobic bacteria such as Escherichia coli, oxygen and other electron acceptors fundamentally influence catabolic and anabolic pathways. E. coli is able to grow aerobically by respiration and in the absence of O2 by anaerobic respiration with nitrate, nitrite, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide and trimethylamine N-oxide as acceptors or by fermentation. The expression of the various catabolic pathways occurs according to a hierarchy with 3 or 4 levels. Aerobic respiration at the highest level is followed by nitrate respiration (level 2), anaerobic respiration with the other acceptors (level 3) and fermentation. In other bacteria, different regulatory cascades with other underlying principles can be observed. Regulation of anabolism in response to O2 availability is important, too. It is caused by different requirements of cofactors or coenzymes in aerobic and anaerobic metabolism and by the requirement for different O2-independent biosynthetic routes under anoxia. The regulation mainly occurs at the transcriptional level. In E. coli, 4 global regulatory systems are known to be essential for the aerobic/anaerobic switch and the described hierarchy. A two-component sensor/regulator system comprising ArcB (sensor) and ArcA (transcriptional regulator) is responsible for regulation of aerobic metabolism. The FNR protein is a transcriptional sensor-regulator protein which regulates anaerobic respiratory genes in response to O2 availability. The gene activator FhlA regulates fermentative formate and hydrogen metabolism with formate as the inductor. ArcA/B and FNR directly respond to O2, FhlA indirectly by decreased levels of formate in the presence of O2. Regulation of nitrate/nitrite catabolism is effected by two 2-component sensor/regulator systems NarX(Q)/NarL(P) in response to nitrate/nitrite. Co-operation of the different regulatory systems at the target promoters which are in part under dual (or manifold) transcriptional control causes the expression

  5. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    PubMed Central

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M.; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Löscher, Carolin; Schunck, Harald; Desai, Dhwani K.; Hauss, Helena; Kiko, Rainer; Holtappels, Moritz; LaRoche, Julie; Schmitz, Ruth A.; Graco, Michelle I.; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off Namibia and Peru. Experiments with additions of double-labelled oxygen revealed high aerobic activity in the upper OMZs, likely controlled by surface organic matter export. Consistently observed oxygen consumption in samples retrieved throughout the lower OMZs hints at efficient exploitation of vertically and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100%) in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein. PMID:26192623

  6. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones.

    PubMed

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Löscher, Carolin; Schunck, Harald; Desai, Dhwani K; Hauss, Helena; Kiko, Rainer; Holtappels, Moritz; LaRoche, Julie; Schmitz, Ruth A; Graco, Michelle I; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off Namibia and Peru. Experiments with additions of double-labelled oxygen revealed high aerobic activity in the upper OMZs, likely controlled by surface organic matter export. Consistently observed oxygen consumption in samples retrieved throughout the lower OMZs hints at efficient exploitation of vertically and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100%) in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein.

  7. Anaerobic thermophilic culture

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A newly discovered thermophilic anaerobe is described that was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC 3/550. T. Ethanolicus is cultured in aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions and is used in a novel process for producing ethanol by subjecting carbohydrates, particularly the saccharides, to fermentation action of the new microorganism in a biologically pure culture.

  8. Anaerobic Metabolism in Haloferax Genus: Denitrification as Case of Study.

    PubMed

    Torregrosa-Crespo, J; Martínez-Espinosa, R M; Esclapez, J; Bautista, V; Pire, C; Camacho, M; Richardson, D J; Bonete, M J

    2016-01-01

    A number of species of Haloferax genus (halophilic archaea) are able to grow microaerobically or even anaerobically using different alternative electron acceptors such as fumarate, nitrate, chlorate, dimethyl sulphoxide, sulphide and/or trimethylamine. This metabolic capability is also shown by other species of the Halobacteriaceae and Haloferacaceae families (Archaea domain) and it has been mainly tested by physiological studies where cell growth is observed under anaerobic conditions in the presence of the mentioned compounds. This work summarises the main reported features on anaerobic metabolism in the Haloferax, one of the better described haloarchaeal genus with significant potential uses in biotechnology and bioremediation. Special attention has been paid to denitrification, also called nitrate respiration. This pathway has been studied so far from Haloferax mediterranei and Haloferax denitrificans mainly from biochemical point of view (purification and characterisation of the enzymes catalysing the two first reactions). However, gene expression and gene regulation is far from known at the time of writing this chapter.

  9. Electrical stimulation to restore respiration.

    PubMed

    Creasey, G; Elefteriades, J; DiMarco, A; Talonen, P; Bijak, M; Girsch, W; Kantor, C

    1996-04-01

    Electrical stimulation has been used for over 25 years to restore breathing to patients with high quadriplegia causing respiratory paralysis and patients with central alveolar hypoventilation. Three groups have developed electrical pacing systems for long-term support of respiration in humans. These systems consist of electrodes implanted on the phrenic nerves, connected by leads to a stimulator implanted under the skin, and powered and controlled from a battery-powered transmitter outside the body. The systems differ principally in the electrode design and stimulation waveform. Approximately 1,000 people worldwide have received one of the three phrenic pacing devices, most with strongly positive results: reduced risk of tracheal problems and chronic infection, the ability to speak and smell more normally, reduced risk of accidental interruption of respiration, greater independence, and reduced costs and time for ventilatory care. For patients with partial lesions of the phrenic nerves, intercostal muscle stimulation may supplement respiration.

  10. Alkaline flooding injection strategy

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to improved alkali-surfactant flooding methods, and this includes determining the proper design of injection strategy. Several different injection strategies have been used or suggested for recovering heavy oils with surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding methods. Oil recovery was compared for four different injection strategies: (1) surfactant followed by polymer, (2) surfactant followed by alkaline polymer, (3) alkaline surfactant followed by polymer, and (4) alkali, surfactant, and polymer mixed in a single formulation. The effect of alkaline preflush was also studied under two different conditions. All of the oil recovery experiments were conducted under optimal conditions with a viscous, non-acidic oil from Hepler (KS) oil field. The coreflood experiments were conducted with Berea sandstone cores since field core was not available in sufficient quantity for coreflood tests. The Tucker sand of Hepler field is a Class I fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir, as classified by the Department of Energy, which has been selected as the site of a DOE-sponsored field pilot test.

  11. [Dark respiration of terrestrial vegetations: a review].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin-Wei; Yuan, Feng-Hui; Guan, De-Xin; Wu, Jia-Bing

    2013-06-01

    The source and sink effect of terrestrial plants is one of the hotspots in terrestrial ecosystem research under the background of global change. Dark respiration of terrestrial plants accounts for a large fraction of total net carbon balance, playing an important role in the research of carbon cycle under global climate change. However, there is little study on plant dark respiration. This paper summarized the physiological processes of plant dark respiration, measurement methods of the dark respiration, and the effects of plant biology and environmental factors on the dark respiration. The uncertainty of the dark respiration estimation was analyzed, and the future hotspots of related researches were pointed out.

  12. Measuring aerobic respiration in stream ecosystems using the resazurin-resorufin system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GonzáLez-Pinzón, Ricardo; Haggerty, Roy; Myrold, David D.

    2012-09-01

    The use of smart tracers to study hydrologic systems is becoming more widespread. Smart tracers are compounds that irreversibly react in the presence of a process or condition under investigation. Resazurin (Raz) is a smart tracer that undergoes an irreversible reduction to resorufin (Rru) in the presence of cellular metabolic activity. We quantified the relationship between the transformation of Raz and aerobic bacterial respiration in pure culture experiments using two obligate aerobes and two facultative anaerobes, and in colonized surface and shallow (<10 cm) hyporheic sediments using reach-scale experiments. We found that the transformation of Raz to Rru was nearly perfectly (minr2 = 0.986), positively correlated with aerobic microbial respiration in all experiments. These results suggest that Raz can be used as a surrogate to measure respiration in situ and in vivoat different spatial scales, thus providing an alternative to investigate mechanistic controls of solute transport and stream metabolism on nutrient processing. Lastly, a comparison of respiration and mass-transfer rates in streams suggests that field-scale respiration is controlled by the slower of respiration and mass transfer, highlighting the need to understand both biogeochemistry and physics in stream ecosystems.

  13. Improved methane production from waste activated sludge with low organic content by alkaline pretreatment at pH 10.

    PubMed

    Feng, L Y; Yang, L Q; Zhang, L X; Chen, H L; Chen, J

    2013-01-01

    Sludge with low organic content always results in an unsatisfactory performance, even failure of anaerobic digestion. The alkaline pretreatment effect on anaerobic digestion of sludge with low organic content has seldom been studied although it gives many benefits for sludge with high organic content. In this study the influence of alkaline pretreatment (pH 10, an effective alkaline pH) on the solubilization and methane production from waste activated sludge (WAS) with low organic content was investigated. Results from biochemical methane potential (BMP) experiments showed that anaerobic biodegradability of WAS was greatly improved by alkaline pretreatment at pH 10. Methane production from the current WAS under conditions of pretreatment time 4 h and digestion time 15 d was 139.6 mL/g VS (volatile solids), much higher than that from the unpretreated WAS with digestion time of 20 d (75.2 mL/g VS). Also, the solubilization of WAS was significantly accelerated by alkaline pretreatment. Mechanism exploration indicated that the general activities of anaerobic microorganisms, specific activities of key enzymes and the amounts of methanogens were enhanced by alkaline pretreatment at pH 10, showing good agreement with methane production.

  14. Contribution of anaerobic energy expenditure to whole body thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Christopher B

    2005-01-01

    Heat production serves as the standard measurement for the determination of energy expenditure and efficiency in animals. Estimations of metabolic heat production have traditionally focused on gas exchange (oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production) although direct heat measurements may include an anaerobic component particularly when carbohydrate is oxidized. Stoichiometric interpretations of the ratio of carbon dioxide production to oxygen uptake suggest that both anaerobic and aerobic heat production and, by inference, all energy expenditure – can be accounted for with a measurement of oxygen uptake as 21.1 kJ per liter of oxygen. This manuscript incorporates contemporary bioenergetic interpretations of anaerobic and aerobic ATP turnover to promote the independence of these disparate types of metabolic energy transfer: each has different reactants and products, uses dissimilar enzymes, involves different types of biochemical reactions, takes place in separate cellular compartments, exploits different types of gradients and ultimately each operates with distinct efficiency. The 21.1 kJ per liter of oxygen for carbohydrate oxidation includes a small anaerobic heat component as part of anaerobic energy transfer. Faster rates of ATP turnover that exceed mitochondrial respiration and that are supported by rapid glycolytic phosphorylation with lactate production result in heat production that is independent of oxygen uptake. Simultaneous direct and indirect calorimetry has revealed that this anaerobic heat does not disappear when lactate is later oxidized and so oxygen uptake does not adequately measure anaerobic efficiency or energy expenditure (as was suggested by the "oxygen debt" hypothesis). An estimate of anaerobic energy transfer supplements the measurement of oxygen uptake and may improve the interpretation of whole-body energy expenditure. PMID:15958171

  15. Anaerobic performance at altitude.

    PubMed

    Coudert, J

    1992-10-01

    Anaerobic metabolism is usually evaluated by the determination of the anaerobic capacity and the maximal anaerobic mechanical external power (Wmax). Conflicting results are reported on anaerobic capacity evaluated by maximal oxygen deficit and debt, and maximal blood lactate concentration during acute or chronic hypoxia (acclimatized subjects). Data on muscle biopsies (lactate concentration, changes in ATP, phosphocreatine and glycogen stores, glycolytic enzyme activities) and the few studies on lactate flux give in most cases evidence of a non-alteration of the anaerobic capacity for altitudes up to 5,500 m. No differences are observed in Wmax measured at high altitudes up to 5,200 m during intense short-term exercises: (1) jumps on a force platform which is a good indicator of alactic Wmax, and (2) 7-10 s sprints (i.e. force-velocity test) which solicit alactic metabolism but also lactic pathway. For exercises of duration equal or more than 30 s (i.e. Wingate test), there are conflicting results because a lower participation of aerobic metabolism during this test at high altitude can interfere with anaerobic performance. In conclusion, we can admit that anaerobic performances are not altered by high altitudes up to 5,200 m if the length of exposure does not exceed 5 weeks. After this period, muscle mass begins to decrease.

  16. Anaerobic Digestion and its Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic digestion is a natural biological process. The initials "AD" may refer to the process of anaerobic digestion, or the built systems of anaerobic digesters. While there are many kinds of digesters, the biology is basically the same for all. Anaerobic digesters are built...

  17. Early warning indicators for monitoring the process failure of anaerobic digestion system of food waste.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; He, Qingming; Wei, Yunmei; He, Qin; Peng, Xuya

    2014-11-01

    To determine reliable state parameters which could be used as early warning indicators of process failure due to the acidification of anaerobic digestion of food waste, three mesophilic anaerobic digesters of food waste with different operation conditions were investigated. Such parameters as gas production, methane content, pH, concentrations of volatile fatty acid (VFA), alkalinity and their combined indicators were evaluated. Results revealed that operation conditions significantly affect the responses of parameters and thus the optimal early warning indicators of each reactor differ from each other. None of the single indicators was universally valid for all the systems. The universally valid indicators should combine several parameters to supply complementary information. A combination of total VFA, the ratio of VFA to total alkalinity (VFA/TA) and the ratio of bicarbonate alkalinity to total alkalinity (BA/TA) can reflect the metabolism of the digesting system and realize rapid and effective early warning.

  18. Soil Respiration - A Geochemist's Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cappellen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Soil biogeochemistry is largely driven by the decomposition of plant-derived organic matter by soil microorganisms. In addition to its effects on water quality and soil fertility, the decomposition of organic matter couples soil processes to climate, via the production and emission of greenhouse gases. In this presentation, I will review a number of key factors controlling the rate of decomposition of soil organic matter. In particular, I will discuss the importance of the spatial and temporal variations in redox conditions as drivers of soil respiration. The discussion will highlight the limitations of current soil respiration models based on partitioning soil organic matter in a finite number of pools of different degradability. In order to predict the sensitivity of soil respiration to anthropogenic pressures - including climate warming - it is crucial to relate the apparent degradability of soil organic matter to the geochemical and hydrological dynamics of the soil environment. Overall, there remains much scope for geochemists to help develop more robust, process-based, representations of soil respiration in global carbon models and climate predictions.

  19. Extracellular respiration of dimethyl sulfoxide by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Vali, Hojatollah; Lies, Douglas P.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2006-01-01

    Shewanella species are renowned for their respiratory versatility, including their ability to respire poorly soluble substrates by using enzymatic machinery that is localized to the outside of the cell. The ability to engage in “extracellular respiration” to date has focused primarily on respiration of minerals. Here, we identify two gene clusters in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 that each contain homologs of genes required for metal reduction and genes that are predicted to encode dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase subunits. Molecular and genetic analyses of these clusters indicate that one (SO1427–SO1432) is required for anaerobic respiration of DMSO. We show that DMSO respiration is an extracellular respiratory process through the analysis of mutants defective in type II secretion, which is required for transporting proteins to the outer membrane in Shewanella. Moreover, immunogold labeling of DMSO reductase subunits reveals that they reside on the outer leaflet of the outer membrane under anaerobic conditions. The extracellular localization of the DMSO reductase in S. oneidensis suggests these organisms may perceive DMSO in the environment as an insoluble compound. PMID:16537430

  20. Anaerobic fermentation of beef cattle manure and crop residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, A. G.; Chen, Y. R.; Varel, V. H.; Robinson, S.

    1981-05-01

    Research on the feasibility of fermenting manure crop residue mixtures to methane, and on factors affecting the rate and extent of methane production is summarized. Experiments were conducted to evaluate effects of temperature, pH, substrate concentration, and alkaline pretreatment on the rate and extent of hydrolysis of manure straw mixtures. The effects of mixing duration and vacuum fermenters on methane production rates from anaerobically fermented beef cattle wastes were also determined.

  1. Increased performance of hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cells under alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Rago, Laura; Baeza, Juan A; Guisasola, Albert

    2016-06-01

    This work reports the first successful enrichment and operation of alkaline bioelectrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells, MFC, and microbial electrolysis cells, MEC). Alkaline (pH=9.3) bioelectrochemical hydrogen production presented better performance (+117%) compared to conventional neutral conditions (2.6 vs 1.2 litres of hydrogen gas per litre of reactor per day, LH2·L(-1)REACTOR·d(-1)). Pyrosequencing results of the anodic biofilm showed that while Geobacter was mainly detected under conventional neutral conditions, Geoalkalibacter sp. was highly detected in the alkaline MFC (21%) and MEC (48%). This is the first report of a high enrichment of Geoalkalibacter from an anaerobic mixed culture using alkaline conditions in an MEC. Moreover, Alkalibacter sp. was highly present in the anodic biofilm of the alkaline MFC (37%), which would indicate its potentiality as a new exoelectrogen.

  2. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy.

  3. Advanced alkaline water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, N.; Torikai, E.; Kawami, Y.; Takenaka, H.

    Results are presented of experimental studies of possible separators and electrodes for use in advanced, high-temperature, high-pressure alkaline water electrolyzers. Material evaluations in alkaline water electrolyzers at temperatures from 100 to 120 C have shown a new type polytetrafluoroethylene membrane impregnated with potassium titanate to be the most promising when the separator is prepared by the hydrothermal treatment of a porous PFTE membrane impregnated with hydrated titanium oxide. Measurements of cell voltages in 30% KOH at current densities from 5 to 100 A/sq dm at temperatures up to 120 C with nickel electrodes of various structures have shown the foamed nickel electrode, with an average pore size of 1-1.5 mm, to have the best performance. When the foamed nickel is coated by fine powdered nickel, carbonyl nickel or Raney nickel to increase electrode surface areas, even lower cell voltages were found, indicating better performance.

  4. Anaerobic brain abscess

    PubMed Central

    Sudhaharan, Sukanya; Chavali, Padmasri

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Brain abscess remains a potentially fatal central nervous system (CNS) disease, especially in developing countries. Anaerobic abscess is difficult to diagnose because of cumbersome procedures associated with the isolation of anaerobes. Materials and Methods: This is a hospital-based retrospective microbiological analysis of 430 brain abscess materials (purulent aspirates and/or tissue), for anaerobic organisms, that were received between 1987–2014, by the Microbiology Laboratory in our Institute. Results: Culture showed growth of bacteria 116/430 (27%) of the cases of which anaerobes were isolated in 48/116 (41.1%) of the cases. Peptostreptococcus (51.4 %), was the predominant organism isolated in four cases followed by Bacteroides and Peptococcus species. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and detection of these organisms would help in the appropriate management of these patients. PMID:27307977

  5. Defining Anaerobic Digestion Stability-Full Scale Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demitry, M. E., Sr.

    2014-12-01

    A full-scale anaerobic digester receiving a mixture of primary and secondary sludge was monitored for one hundred days. A chemical oxygen demand, COD, and a volatile solids, VS, mass balance was conducted to evaluate the stability of the digester and its capability of producing methane gas. The COD mass balance could account for nearly 90% of the methane gas produced while the VS mass balance showed that 91% of the organic matter removed resulted in biogas formation. Other parameters monitored included: pH, alkalinity, VFA, and propionic acid. The values of these parameters showed that steady state had occurred. Finally, at mesophilic temperature and at steady state performance, the anaerobic digester stability was defined as a constant ratio of methane produced per substrate of ΔVS (average ratio=0.404 l/g). This ratio can be used as universal metric to determine the anaerobic digester stability in an easy and inexpensive way.

  6. [Effects of simulated acid rain on respiration rate of cropland system with different soil pH].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue-zhu; Zhang, Gao-chuan; Li, Hui

    2009-10-15

    To evaluate the effects of acid rain on the respiration rate of cropland system, an outdoor pot experiment was conducted with paddy soils of pH 5.48 (S1), pH 6.70 (S1) and pH 8.18 (S3) during the 2005-2007 wheat-growing seasons. The cropland system was exposed to acid rain by spraying the wheat foliage and irrigating the soil with simulated rainwater of T1 (pH 6.0), T2 (pH 6.0, ionic concentration was twice as rainwater T1), and T3 (pH 4.4, ionic concentration was twice as rainwater T1), respectively. The static opaque chamber-gas chromatograph method was used to measure CO2 fluxes from cropland system. The results showed that acid rain affected the respiration rate of cropland system through crop plant, and the cropland system could adapt to acid rain. Acid rainwater significantly increased the average respiration rate in alkaline soil (S3) cropland system, while it had no significant effects on the average respiration rate in neutral soil (S2) and acidic soil (S1) cropland systems. During 2005-2006, after the alkaline soil cropland system was treated with rainwater T3, the average respiration rate was 23.6% and 27.6% higher than that of alkaline soil cropland system treated with rainwater T1 and T2, respectively. During March to April, the respiration rate was enhanced with the increase of rainwater ionic concentration, while it was dropped with the decrease of rainwater pH value in acidic soil cropland system. It was demonstrated that soil pH and crop plant played important roles on the respiration rate of cropland system.

  7. Energy metabolism of the anaerobic protozoon Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Lindmark, D G

    1980-03-01

    Cells of the aerotolerant anaerobe Giardia lamblia respire in the presence of oxygen. Endogenous respiration is stimulated by glucose but not by other carbohydrates and Krebs cycle intermediates. Endogenous and glucose-stimulated respiration are insensitive to cyanide, malonate, and 2,4-dinitrophenol, but are inhibited by atabrin and iodoacetamide. G. lamblia produces ethanol, acetate and CO2 both aerobically and anaerobically either from endogenous reserves or exogenous glucose. Molecular hydrogen is not produced. The following enzyme activities were detected in homogenates: hexokinase, fructose-biphosphate aldolase, pyruvate kinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, malate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating), pyruvate synthase, acetyl-CoA synthetase, alcohol dehydrogenase (NADP+), NADH dehydrogenase, NADPH dehydrogenase, NADPH oxidoreductase and superoxide dismutase. The enzymes of energy and carbohydrate metabolism are nonsedimentable (109 000 x g for 30 min). Activities of lactate dehydrogenase, hydrogenase, phosphate acetyltransferase, acetate kinase, citrate synthase, succinate dehydrogenase, fumarate hydratase and catalase were below the limits of detection. The results suggest the occurrence of glycolysis, energy production by substrate level phosphorylation and a flavin, iron-sulfur protein mediated electron transport system as well as the absence of cytochrome mediated oxidative phosphorylation and functional Krebs cycle.

  8. [Research advances in forest soil respiration].

    PubMed

    Luan, Junwei; Xiang, Chenghua; Luo, Zongshi; Gong, Yuanbo

    2006-12-01

    Among the methods of measuring forest soil respiration, infrared CO2 analysis is the optimal one so far. Comparing with empirical model, the process-based model in simulating the production and transportation of soil CO2 has the advantage of considering the biological and physical processes of soil respiration. Generally, soil respiration is positively correlated with soil temperature and moisture, but there are still many uncertainties about the relationships between soil respiration and forest management activities such as firing, cutting, and fertilization. The relationships of soil respiration with vegetation type and soil microbial biomass, as well as the spatial heterogeneity of soil respiration, are the hotspots in recent researches. Some issues and future development in forest soil respiration research were discussed in this paper.

  9. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles inhibit cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhimin; Morrow, Matthew P; Asefa, Tewodros; Sharma, Krishna K; Duncan, Cole; Anan, Abhishek; Penefsky, Harvey S; Goodisman, Jerry; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2008-05-01

    We studied the effect of two types of mesoporous silica nanoparticles, MCM-41 and SBA-15, on mitochondrial O 2 consumption (respiration) in HL-60 (myeloid) cells, Jurkat (lymphoid) cells, and isolated mitochondria. SBA-15 inhibited cellular respiration at 25-500 microg/mL; the inhibition was concentration-dependent and time-dependent. The cellular ATP profile paralleled that of respiration. MCM-41 had no noticeable effect on respiration rate. In cells depleted of metabolic fuels, 50 microg/mL SBA-15 delayed the onset of glucose-supported respiration by 12 min and 200 microg/mL SBA-15 by 34 min; MCM-41 also delayed the onset of glucose-supported respiration. Neither SBA-15 nor MCM-41 affected cellular glutathione. Both nanoparticles inhibited respiration of isolated mitochondria and submitochondrial particles.

  10. Gender comparisons in anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity tests.

    PubMed Central

    Maud, P J; Shultz, B B

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity test scores between young active men and women. Three performance measures of anaerobic power and two of anaerobic capacity were administered to a sample comprising 52 male and 50 female college students (means age = 21.4 yrs). Results indicated significant differences between men and women in body height, weight and per cent fat, in fat free mass (FFM), anaerobic power, and anaerobic capacity when recorded as gross work completed and relative to body weight. However, these differences are reduced when data is adjusted for body weight and further reduced when corrected for FFM. The study found no significant differences between men and women in either anaerobic power or anaerobic capacity when values were given relative to FFM. PMID:3730753

  11. Sulfate reduction and oxic respiration in marine sediments: implications for organic carbon preservation in euxinic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, D. E.; DeVincenzi, D. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    Compilations have been made of sulfate reduction rates and oxic respiration rates over the entire range of marine sedimentation rates, and sedimentary environments, including several euxinic sites. These data show, consistent with the findings of Jorgensen (1982, Nature, 296, 643-645), that sulfate reduction and oxic respiration oxidize equal amounts of organic carbon in nearshore sediments. As sedimentation rates decrease, oxic respiration, becomes progressively more important, and in deep-sea sediments 100-1000 times more organic carbon is oxidized by oxic respiration than by sulfate reduction. By contrast, nearly as much organic carbon is oxidized by sulfate reduction in euxinic sediments as is oxidized by the sum of sulfate reduction and oxic respiration in normal marine sediments of similar deposition rate. This observation appears at odds with the enhanced preservation of organic carbon observed in euxinic sediments. However, only small reductions in (depth-integrated) organic carbon decomposition rates (compared to normal marine) are required to give both high organic carbon concentrations and enhanced carbon preservation in euxinic sediments. Lower rates of organic carbon decomposition (if only by subtle amounts) are explained by the diminished ability of anaerobic bacteria to oxidize the full suite of sedimentary organic compounds.

  12. Biogas production from anaerobic digestion of Spirulina maxima algal biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Samson, R.; LeDuy, A.

    1982-08-01

    The photosynthetic spectrum of solar energy could be exploited for the production of chemical energy of methane through the combined algal-bacterial process. In this process, the algae are mass produced from light and from carbon in the first step. The algal biomass is then used as a nutrient for feeding the anaerobic digester, in the second step, for the production of methane by anaerobic bacteria. The carbon source for the production of algal biomass could be either organic carbon from wastewaters (for eucaryotic algae), or carbon dioxide from the atmosphere or from the combustion exhaust gases (for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic algae). The technical feasibility data on the anaerobic digestion of algal biomass have been reported for many species of algae including macroscopic algae and microscopic algae. Research being conducted in the authors' laboratory consists of using the semimicroscopic blue-green alga Spirulina maxima as the sole substrate for this combined algal-bacterial process. This species of alga is very attractive for the process because of its capability of using the atmospheric carbon dioxide as carbon source and its simple harvesting methods. Furthermore, it appeared that the fermentability of S. maxima is significantly higher than other microscopic algae. This communication presents the results on the anaerobic inoculum development by the adaptation technique. This inoculum was then used for the semicontinuous anaerobic digestion of S. maxima algal biomass. The evolutions of biogas production and composition, biogas yield, total volatile fatty acids, alkalinity, ammonia nitrogen, pH, and electrode potential were followed.

  13. Enhancing anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge by pretreatment: effect of volatile to total solids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Duan, Xu; Chen, Jianguang; Fang, Kuo; Feng, Leiyu; Yan, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Qi

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effect of volatile to total solids (VS/TS) on anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) pretreated by alkaline, thermal and thermal-alkaline strategies was studied. Experimental results showed that the production of methane from sludge was increased with VS/TS. When anaerobic digesters were fed with sludge pretreated by the thermal-alkaline method, the average methane yield was improved from 2.8 L/d at VS/TS 0.35 to 4.7 L/d at VS/TS 0.56. Also, the efficiency of VS reduction during sludge anaerobic digestion varied between 18.9% and 45.6%, and increased gradually with VS/TS. Mechanism investigation of VS/TS on WAS anaerobic digestion suggested that the general activities of anaerobic microorganisms, activities of key enzymes related to sludge hydrolysis, acidification and methanogenesis, and the ratio of Archaea to Bacteria were all increased with VS/TS, showing good agreement with methane production.

  14. Surface production fuels deep heterotrophic respiration in northern peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizabeth Corbett, J.; Burdige, David J.; Tfaily, Malak M.; Dial, Angela R.; Cooper, William T.; Glaser, Paul H.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.

    2013-12-01

    Multiple analyses of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from pore waters were conducted to define the processes that govern carbon balance in peatlands: (1) source, reactivity, and transport of DOC with respect to vegetation, peat, and age of carbon substrate, (2) reactivity of DOC with respect to molecular size, and (3) lability to photoxidation of surficial DOC. We found that surface organic production fuels heterotrophic respiration at depth in advection-dominated peatlands, especially in fens. Fen DOC was Δ14C enriched relative to the surrounding fen peat, and fen respiration products were similar to this enriched DOC indicating that DOC was the main microbial substrate. Bog DOC was more variable showing either enrichment in ∆14C at depth or ∆14C values that follow peat values. This variability in bogs is probably controlled by the relative importance of vertical transport of labile carbon substrates within the peat profile versus DOC production from bog peat. These results extended our set of observations to 10 years at one bog-fen pair and add two additional bog-fen pairs to our series of observations. Anaerobic incubations of peat, rinsed free of residual DOC, produced DOC and respiration products that were strikingly similar to the peat values in a bog and two fens. This result demonstrated conclusively that downward advection is the process responsible for the presence of modern DOC found at depth in the peat column. Fen DOC has lower C/N values and up to twice as much LMW (<1 kDa) DOC as bogs due to differences in organic inputs and greater microbial processing. Fluorescence irradiation experiments showed that fen DOC is more photolabile than bog DOC.

  15. Comparative investigation on microbial community and electricity generation in aerobic and anaerobic enriched MFCs.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xiang-chun; Quan, Yan-ping; Tao, Kun; Jiang, Xiao-man

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the difference in microbial community and power generation capacity of air-cathode MFCs enriched under anode aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Results showed that MFCs successfully started with continuous air inputting to anode chamber. The aerobic enriched MFC produced comparable and even more electricity with the fuels of acetate, glucose and ethanol compared to the anaerobic MFC when returning to anaerobic condition. The two MFCs showed a slightly different microbial community for anode biofilms (a similarity of 77%), but a highly similar microbial community (a similarity of 97%) for anolyte microbes. The anode biofilm of aerobic enriched MFC showed the presence of some specific bacteria closely related to Clostridium sticklandii, Leucobacter komagatae and Microbacterium laevaniformans. The anaerobic enriched MFC found the presence of a large number of yeast Trichosporon sp. This research demonstrates that it is possible to enrich oxygen-tolerant anode respiring bacteria through purposely aeration in anode chamber.

  16. Validation of Respirator Filter Efficacy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    A 1980’ s unpublished ECBC report presented calculations of the required degree of filtration needed to protect a respirator wearer from a given...tested against three bioaerosols ranging in size from 0.69 – 0.88 µm aerodynamic diameter (Mycobacterium abscessus , staphylococcus epidermidis , and 10...and penetration beginning with 99.97% @ 0.3 µm for 10 cm/ s face velocity, a fiber diameter of 0.9 µm, a 0.07 solidity, a 0.3 mm media thickness, and

  17. Soil respiration under climate warming: differential response of heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Lingli; Piao, Shilong; Janssens, Ivan A; Tang, Jianwu; Liu, Weixing; Chi, Yonggang; Wang, Jing; Xu, Shan

    2014-10-01

    Despite decades of research, how climate warming alters the global flux of soil respiration is still poorly characterized. Here, we use meta-analysis to synthesize 202 soil respiration datasets from 50 ecosystem warming experiments across multiple terrestrial ecosystems. We found that, on average, warming by 2 °C increased soil respiration by 12% during the early warming years, but warming-induced drought partially offset this effect. More significantly, the two components of soil respiration, heterotrophic respiration and autotrophic respiration showed distinct responses. The warming effect on autotrophic respiration was not statistically detectable during the early warming years, but nonetheless decreased with treatment duration. In contrast, warming by 2 °C increased heterotrophic respiration by an average of 21%, and this stimulation remained stable over the warming duration. This result challenged the assumption that microbial activity would acclimate to the rising temperature. Together, our findings demonstrate that distinguishing heterotrophic respiration and autotrophic respiration would allow us better understand and predict the long-term response of soil respiration to warming. The dependence of soil respiration on soil moisture condition also underscores the importance of incorporating warming-induced soil hydrological changes when modeling soil respiration under climate change.

  18. Alkali-solubilized organic matter from sludge and its degradability in the anaerobic process.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongzhe; Zhou, Yan; Tan, Youming; Pathak, Santosh; Majid, Maszenan Bin Abdul; Ng, Wun Jern

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates alkali-solubilized dissolved organic matter (DOM) and its fate in the anaerobic treatment process. DOM was fractionated into high molecular weight (HMW) protein-like substances (PL), HMW saccharide-like substances (SL), low molecular weight (LMW) PL, LMW SL, and humic acid-like substances (HAL). The results indicate alkali-solubilized DOM is primarily composed of LMW PL, HMW SL, and HAL. Alkaline pretreatment improved the overall anaerobic degradability of DOM in sludge (removal efficiency of total DOM increased by 28.4%). However, certain DOM fractions (mainly HMW PL and HAL) exhibited low degradability during anaerobic treatment, primarily caused by the low degradability of aromatic groups (such as aromatic amine groups from tryptophan-like PL). Alkaline pretreatment also resulted in an increase of residual DOM, which is mainly composed of HAL (52.9%) and HMW SL (49.9%).

  19. Aerobic Microbial Respiration in Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M.; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Schunck, Harald; Loescher, Carolin; Desai, Dhwani K.; LaRoche, Julie; Schmitz-Streit, Ruth; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.

    2014-05-01

    In the oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the tropical oceans, sluggish ventilation combined with strong microbial respiration of sinking organic matter results in the depletion of oxygen (O2). When O2 concentrations drop below ~5 µmol/L, organic matter is generally assumed to be respired with nitrate, ultimately leading to the loss of fixed inorganic nitrogen via anammox and denitrification. However, direct measurements of microbial O2 consumption at low O2 levels are - apart from a single experiment conducted in the OMZ off Peru - so far lacking. At the same time, consistently observed active aerobic ammonium and nitrite oxidation at non-detectable O2 concentrations (<1 µmol/L) in all major OMZs, suggests aerobic microorganisms, likely including heterotrophs, to be well adapted to near-anoxic conditions. Consequently, microaerobic (≤5 µmol/L) remineralization of organic matter, and thus release of ammonium, in low- O2 environments might be significantly underestimated at present. Here we present extensive measurements of microbial O2 consumption in OMZ waters, combined with highly sensitive O2 (STOX) measurements and meta-omic functional gene analyses. Short-term incubation experiments with labelled O2 (18-18O2) carried out in the Namibian and Peruvian OMZ, revealed persistent aerobic microbial activity at depths with non-detectable concentrations of O2 (≤50 nmol/L). In accordance, examination of metagenomes and metatranscriptomes from Chilean and Peruvian OMZ waters identified genes encoding for terminal respiratory oxidases with high O2 affinities as well as their expression by diverse microbial communities. Oxygen consumption was particularly enhanced near the upper OMZ boundaries and could mostly (~80%) be assigned to heterotrophic microbial activity. Compared to previously identified anaerobic microbial processes, microaerobic organic matter respiration was the dominant remineralization pathway and source of ammonium (~90%) in the upper Namibian and

  20. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and of Pu-EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Xun, Luying

    2009-11-20

    The enhanced mobility of radionuclides by co-disposed chelating agent, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), is likely to occur only under anaerobic conditions. Our extensive effort to enrich and isolate anaerobic EDTA-degrading bacteria has failed. Others has tried and also failed. To explain the lack of anaerobic biodegradation of EDTA, we proposed that EDTA has to be transported into the cells for metabolism. A failure of uptake may contribute to the lack of EDTA degradation under anaerobic conditions. We demonstrated that an aerobic EDTA-degrading bacterium strain BNC1 uses an ABC-type transporter system to uptake EDTA. The system has a periplasmic binding protein that bind EDTA and then interacts with membrane proteins to transport EDTA into the cell at the expense of ATP. The bind protein EppA binds only free EDTA with a Kd of 25 nM. The low Kd value indicates high affinity. However, the Kd value of Ni-EDTA is 2.4 x 10^(-10) nM, indicating much stronger stability. Since Ni and other trace metals are essential for anaerobic respiration, we conclude that the added EDTA sequestrates all trace metals and making anaerobic respiration impossible. Thus, the data explain the lack of anaerobic enrichment cultures for EDTA degradation. Although we did not obtain an EDTA degrading culture under anaerobic conditions, our finding may promote the use of certain metals that forms more stable metal-EDTA complexes than Pu(III)-EDTA to prevent the enhanced mobility. Further, our data explain why EDTA is the most dominant organic pollutant in surface waters, due to the lack of degradation of certain metal-EDTA complexes.

  1. Respirators: Supervisors Self-Study #43442

    SciTech Connect

    Chochoms, Michael

    2016-04-20

    This course, Respirators: Supervisors Self-Study (#43442), addresses training requirements for supervisors of respirator wearers as specified by the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) Standard for Respiratory Protection, ANSI Z88.2, and as incorporated by reference in the Department of Energy (DOE) Worker Health and Safety Rule, 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 851. This course also presents the responsibilities of supervisors of respirator wearers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  2. Anaerobic thermophilic culture system

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A mixed culture system of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC31550 and the microorganism Clostridium thermocellum ATCC31549 is described. In a mixed nutrient culture medium that contains cellulose, these microorganisms have been coupled and cultivated to efficiently ferment cellulose to produce recoverable quantities of ethanol under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions.

  3. The anaerobic digestion process

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, C.J.; Boone, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  4. Characterization of anaerobic fermentative growth of Bacillus subtilis: identification of fermentation end products and genes required for growth.

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, M M; Dailly, Y P; Zuber, P; Clark, D P

    1997-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis can grow anaerobically by respiration with nitrate as a terminal electron acceptor. In the absence of external electron acceptors, it grows by fermentation. Identification of fermentation products by using in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance scans of whole cultures indicated that B. subtilis grows by mixed acid-butanediol fermentation but that no formate is produced. An ace mutant that lacks pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity was unable to grow anaerobically and produced hardly any fermentation product. These results suggest that PDH is involved in most or all acetyl coenzyme A production in B. subtilis under anaerobic conditions, unlike Escherichia coli, which uses pyruvate formate lyase. Nitrate respiration was previously shown to require the ResDE two-component signal transduction system and an anaerobic gene regulator, FNR. Also required are respiratory nitrate reductase, encoded by the narGHJI operon, and moaA, involved in biosynthesis of a molybdopterin cofactor of nitrate reductase. The resD and resDE mutations were shown to moderately affect fermentation, but nitrate reductase activity and fnr are dispensable for fermentative growth. A search for genes involved in fermentation indicated that ftsH is required, and is also needed to a lesser extent for nitrate respiration. These results show that nitrate respiration and fermentation of B. subtilis are governed by divergent regulatory pathways. PMID:9352926

  5. An evaluation of respirator maintenance requirements.

    PubMed

    Brosseau, L M; Traubel, K

    1997-03-01

    A telephone survey was developed as part of a pilot study to evaluate the inspection, cleaning, maintenance, and storage aspects of respirator protection programs (RPP). Regulations and consensus standards such as those published by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) or the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) require or recommend that RPP contain elements that ensure that the respirators provide proper protection. A great deal of research has been done to evaluate the effectiveness of new respirators; however, little research has been conducted to evaluate how respirators behave over time in real industrial settings Respirator inspection, cleaning, maintenance, and storage are significant factors in determining how well a respirator continues to perform. The telephone survey was developed by reviewing the requirements and recommendations of CFR 1910.134 and ANSI Z88.2-1980. Approximately 30 companies were selected based on their use of negative air-purifying respirators. Most of the companies represented the hardgoods manufacturing or service industries. Although the majority of companies were meeting requirements, responses indicated that the following improvements in RPP were necessary: (1) inspection of all respirator parts should be carried out before and after each use, (2) replacement parts should be made readily available on site, (3) regular cleaning should be performed, and (4) more hands-on practice with respirators and their maintenance should be incorporated into training sessions.

  6. Respirator selection for clandestine methamphetamine laboratory investigation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gary O; Bronder, Gregory D; Larson, Scott A; Parker, Jay A; Metzler, Richard W

    2012-01-01

    First responders to illicit drug labs may not always have SCBA protection available. Air-purifying respirators using organic vapor cartridges with P-100 filters may not be sufficient. It would be better to use a NIOSH-approved CBRN respirator with its required multi-purpose cartridge system, which includes a P-100 filter. This would remove all the primary drug lab contaminants—organic vapors, acid gases, ammonia, phosphine, iodine, and airborne meth particulates. To assure the proper selection and use of a respirator, it is recommended that the contaminants present be identified and quantified and the OSHA 29 CFR 1910.134 respirator protection program requirements followed.

  7. Alkaline battery, separator therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An improved battery separator for alkaline battery cells has low resistance to electrolyte ion transfer and high resistance to electrode ion transfer. The separator is formed by applying an improved coating to an electrolyte absorber. The absorber, preferably, is a flexible, fibrous, and porous substrate that is resistant to strong alkali and oxidation. The coating composition includes an admixture of a polymeric binder, a hydrolyzable polymeric ester and inert fillers. The coating composition is substantially free of reactive fillers and plasticizers commonly employed as porosity promoting agents in separator coatings. When the separator is immersed in electrolyte, the polymeric ester of the film coating reacts with the electrolyte forming a salt and an alcohol. The alcohol goes into solution with the electrolyte while the salt imbibes electrolyte into the coating composition. When the salt is formed, it expands the polymeric chains of the binder to provide a film coating substantially permeable to electrolyte ion transfer but relatively impermeable to electrode ion transfer during use.

  8. Respirators: APR Issuer Self Study 33461

    SciTech Connect

    Chochoms, Michael

    2016-07-13

    Respirators: APR Issuer Self-Study (course 33461) is designed to introduce and familiarize employees selected as air-purifying respirator (APR) issuers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with the responsibilities, limitations, procedures, and resources for issuing APRs at LANL. The goal is to enable these issuers to consistently provide proper, functioning APRs to authorized users

  9. Mitochondrial respiration is sensitive to cytoarchitectural breakdown.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Judith; Angelin, Alessia A; Wallace, Douglas C; Eckmann, David M

    2016-11-07

    An abundance of research suggests that cellular mitochondrial and cytoskeletal disruption are related, but few studies have directly investigated causative connections between the two. We previously demonstrated that inhibiting microtubule and microfilament polymerization affects mitochondrial motility on the whole-cell level in fibroblasts. Since mitochondrial motility can be indicative of mitochondrial function, we now further characterize the effects of these cytoskeletal inhibitors on mitochondrial potential, morphology and respiration. We found that although they did not reduce mitochondrial inner membrane potential, cytoskeletal toxins induced significant decreases in basal mitochondrial respiration. In some cases, basal respiration was only affected after cells were pretreated with the calcium ionophore A23187 in order to stress mitochondrial function. In most cases, mitochondrial morphology remained unaffected, but extreme microfilament depolymerization or combined intermediate doses of microtubule and microfilament toxins resulted in decreased mitochondrial lengths. Interestingly, these two particular exposures did not affect mitochondrial respiration in cells not sensitized with A23187, indicating an interplay between mitochondrial morphology and respiration. In all cases, inducing maximal respiration diminished differences between control and experimental groups, suggesting that reduced basal respiration originates as a largely elective rather than pathological symptom of cytoskeletal impairment. However, viability experiments suggest that even this type of respiration decrease may be associated with cell death.

  10. Direct reading of electrocardiograms and respiration rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, J. P.

    1969-01-01

    Technique for reading heart and respiration rates is more accurate and direct than the previous method. Index of a plastic calibrated card is aligned with a point on the electrocardiogram. Complexes are counted as indicated on the card and heart or respiration rate is read directly from the appropriate scale.

  11. Photosynthesis and Respiration in a Jar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttner, Joseph K.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity that reduces the biosphere to a water-filled jar to simulate the relationship between cellular respiration, photosynthesis, and energy. Allows students in high school biology and related courses to explore quantitatively cellular respiration and photosynthesis in almost any laboratory setting. (ASK)

  12. Oxygen Respiration rates of benthic foraminifera measured under laboratory conditions using oxygen microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geslin, Emmanuelle; Risgaard-Petersen, N.; Langlet, D.; Metzger, E.; Jorissen, F.

    2010-05-01

    Oxygen respiration rates of benthic foraminifera are not well documented because of the difficulties to measure them. However, the determination of the respiration rates of benthic foraminifera is important in order: 1) to compare the metabolic rates of different species, of various size, and with different microhabitats in the sediment; 2) to estimate the contribution of benthic foraminifera in the aerobic mineralization of organic matter. Benthic foraminifera from 4 different natural environments were used: three species from the intertidal rocky shore of Yeu island, two species from the muddy Bay of Aiguillon, two species from the Bay of Biscay and eleven species from the Rhône prodelta (France). Living foraminifera were placed in a small tube, in which oxygen gradients were determined using oxygen microelectrodes. Respiration rates were calculated on the basis of the oxygen fluxes measured in the vivinity of the foraminiferal specimens. Foraminiferal biovolumes were estimated on the basis of the overall shape of the various species (for example, Ammonia is assimilated to a half sphere) and the width of the shell walls. The results show a wide range of respiration rates according to the species (around 90 to 5300 pmol. cell-1.day-1) and a clear correlation with the biovolume of the foraminifera. No clear relationship between respiration rates and microhabitat is observed. A comparison with previously published data shows that our estimations are generally lower for the small size species. For example, the respiration rate estimations published recently by Nomaki et al. (Journal of Foraminiferal Research, 37, 281-286, 2007) show a range of 900 to 10 000 pmol. cell-1.day-1. The total contribution of benthic foraminifera in the aerobic mineralization of organic matter is estimated for the studied areas. The first results suggest a minor role of benthic foraminifera in this process, which strongly contrasts with their strong contribution to anaerobic mineralisation

  13. Sleep and Respiration in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, John B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Prisk, G. Kim; Paiva, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Sleep is often reported to be of poor quality in microgravity, and studies on the ground have shown a strong relationship between sleep-disordered breathing and sleep disruption. During the 16-day Neurolab mission, we studied the influence of possible changes in respiratory function on sleep by performing comprehensive sleep recordings on the payload crew on four nights during the mission. In addition, we measured the changes in the ventilatory response to low oxygen and high carbon dioxide in the same subjects during the day, hypothesizing that changes in ventilatory control might affect respiration during sleep. Microgravity caused a large reduction in the ventilatory response to reduced oxygen. This is likely the result of an increase in blood pressure at the peripheral chemoreceptors in the neck that occurs when the normally present hydrostatic pressure gradient between the heart and upper body is abolished. This reduction was similar to that seen when the subjects were placed acutely in the supine position in one-G. In sharp contrast to low oxygen, the ventilatory response to elevated carbon dioxide was unaltered by microgravity or the supine position. Because of the similarities of the findings in microgravity and the supine position, it is unlikely that changes in ventilatory control alter respiration during sleep in microgravity. During sleep on the ground, there were a small number of apneas (cessation of breathing) and hypopneas (reduced breathing) in these normal subjects. During sleep in microgravity, there was a reduction in the number of apneas and hypopneas per hour compared to preflight. Obstructive apneas virtually disappeared in microgravity, suggesting that the removal of gravity prevents the collapse of upper airways during sleep. Arousals from sleep were reduced in microgravity compared to preflight, and virtually all of this reduction was as a result of a reduction in the number of arousals from apneas and hypopneas. We conclude that any sleep

  14. The effects of operational and environmental variations on anaerobic wastewater treatment systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Leitão, Renato Carrhá; van Haandel, Adrianus Cornelius; Zeeman, Grietje; Lettinga, Gatze

    2006-06-01

    With the aim of improving knowledge about the stability and reliability of anaerobic wastewater treatment systems, several researchers have studied the effects of operational or environmental variations on the performance of such reactors. In general, anaerobic reactors are affected by changes in external factors, but the severity of the effect is dependent upon the type, magnitude, duration and frequency of the imposed changes. The typical responses include a decrease in performance, accumulation of volatile fatty acids, drop in pH and alkalinity, change in biogas production and composition, and sludge washout. This review summarises the causes, types and effects of operational and environmental variation on anaerobic wastewater treatment systems. However, there still remain some unclear technical and scientific aspects that are necessary for the improvement of the stability and reliability of anaerobic processes.

  15. Improving respiration measurements with gas exchange analyzers.

    PubMed

    Montero, R; Ribas-Carbó, M; Del Saz, N F; El Aou-Ouad, H; Berry, J A; Flexas, J; Bota, J

    2016-12-01

    Dark respiration measurements with open-flow gas exchange analyzers are often questioned for their low accuracy as their low values often reach the precision limit of the instrument. Respiration was measured in five species, two hypostomatous (Vitis Vinifera L. and Acanthus mollis) and three amphistomatous, one with similar amount of stomata in both sides (Eucalyptus citriodora) and two with different stomata density (Brassica oleracea and Vicia faba). CO2 differential (ΔCO2) increased two-fold with no change in apparent Rd, when the two leaves with higher stomatal density faced outside. These results showed a clear effect of the position of stomata on ΔCO2. Therefore, it can be concluded that leaf position is important to guarantee the improvement of respiration measurements increasing ΔCO2 without affecting the respiration results by leaf or mass units. This method will help to increase the accuracy of leaf respiration measurements using gas exchange analyzers.

  16. Relative rates of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and nitrate respirers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, I. C.; Levine, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of the atmospheric chemical and photochemical effects of biogenic nitric and nitrous oxide emissions. The magnitude of the biogenic emission of NO is noted to remain uncertain. Possible soil sources of NO and N2O encompass nitrification by autotropic and heterotropic nitrifiers, denitrification by nitrifiers and denitrifiers, nitrate respiration by fermenters, and chemodenitrification. Oxygen availability is the primary determinant of these organisms' relative rates of activity. The characteristics of this major influence are presently investigated in light of the effect of oxygen partial pressure on NO and N2O production by a wide variety of common soil-nitrifying, denitrifying, and nitrate-respiring bacteria under laboratory conditions. The results obtained indicate that aerobic soils are primary sources only when there is sufficient moisture to furnish anaerobic microsites for denitrification.

  17. Respiration of Microbiota-Derived 1,2-propanediol Drives Salmonella Expansion during Colitis.

    PubMed

    Faber, Franziska; Thiennimitr, Parameth; Spiga, Luisella; Byndloss, Mariana X; Litvak, Yael; Lawhon, Sara; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L; Winter, Sebastian E; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium increases the availability of electron acceptors that fuel a respiratory growth of the pathogen in the intestinal lumen. Here we show that one of the carbon sources driving this respiratory expansion in the mouse model is 1,2-propanediol, a microbial fermentation product. 1,2-propanediol utilization required intestinal inflammation induced by virulence factors of the pathogen. S. Typhimurium used both aerobic and anaerobic respiration to consume 1,2-propanediol and expand in the murine large intestine. 1,2-propanediol-utilization did not confer a benefit in germ-free mice, but the pdu genes conferred a fitness advantage upon S. Typhimurium in mice mono-associated with Bacteroides fragilis or Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. Collectively, our data suggest that intestinal inflammation enables S. Typhimurium to sidestep nutritional competition by respiring a microbiota-derived fermentation product.

  18. Respiration of Microbiota-Derived 1,2-propanediol Drives Salmonella Expansion during Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Faber, Franziska; Spiga, Luisella; Byndloss, Mariana X.; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene L.; Winter, Sebastian E.; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium increases the availability of electron acceptors that fuel a respiratory growth of the pathogen in the intestinal lumen. Here we show that one of the carbon sources driving this respiratory expansion in the mouse model is 1,2-propanediol, a microbial fermentation product. 1,2-propanediol utilization required intestinal inflammation induced by virulence factors of the pathogen. S. Typhimurium used both aerobic and anaerobic respiration to consume 1,2-propanediol and expand in the murine large intestine. 1,2-propanediol-utilization did not confer a benefit in germ-free mice, but the pdu genes conferred a fitness advantage upon S. Typhimurium in mice mono-associated with Bacteroides fragilis or Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. Collectively, our data suggest that intestinal inflammation enables S. Typhimurium to sidestep nutritional competition by respiring a microbiota-derived fermentation product. PMID:28056091

  19. Anaerobic digestion process

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, M.; Haga, R.; Odawara, Y.

    1982-10-19

    An algae culture grown on the water from the digested slurry of a biogasification plant serves as a means of removing CO/sub 2/ from the methane stream while purifying the wastewater and providing more biomass for the anaerobic digestion plant. Tested on a sewage-sludge digestion system, the proposed process improved the methane yield by 32% and methane concentration by 53-98 vol % while lowering the concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus in the final water.

  20. Expedited CO2 respiration in people with Miltenberger erythrocyte phenotype GP.Mur.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kate; Kuo, Mei-Shin; Yao, Ching-Che; Lee, Ting-Ying; Chen, Yi-Chun; Cheng, Han-Chih; Lin, Chia-Hao; Yu, Tzung-Han; Lin, Hui-Ju

    2015-05-22

    In Southeast Asia, Miltenberger antigen subtype III (Mi.III; GP.Mur) is considered one of the most important red blood cell antigens in the field of transfusion medicine. Mi.III functions to promote erythrocyte band 3 expression and band 3-related HCO3(-) transport, with implications in blood CO2 metabolism. Could Mi.III affect physiologic CO2 respiration in its carriers? Here, we conducted a human trial to study the impacts of Mi.III expression in respiration. We recruited 188 healthy, adult subjects for blood typing, band 3 measurements, and respiratory tests before and after exercise. The 3-minute step exercise test forced the demand for CO2 dissipation to rise. We found that immediately following exercise, Mi.III + subjects exhaled CO2 at greater rates than Miltenberger-negative subjects. Respiration rates were also higher for Mi.III + subjects immediately after exercise. Blood gas tests further revealed distinct blood CO2 responses post-exercise between Mi.III and non-Mi.III. In contrast, from measurements of heart rates, blood O2 saturation and lactate, Mi.III phenotype was found to be independent of one's aerobic and anaerobic capacities. Thus, Mi.III expression supported physiologic CO2 respiration. Conceivably, Mi.III + people may have advantages in performing physically enduring activities.

  1. Early anaerobic metabolisms

    PubMed Central

    Canfield, Don E; Rosing, Minik T; Bjerrum, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis, the biosphere was driven by anaerobic metabolisms. We catalogue and quantify the source strengths of the most probable electron donors and electron acceptors that would have been available to fuel early-Earth ecosystems. The most active ecosystems were probably driven by the cycling of H2 and Fe2+ through primary production conducted by anoxygenic phototrophs. Interesting and dynamic ecosystems would have also been driven by the microbial cycling of sulphur and nitrogen species, but their activity levels were probably not so great. Despite the diversity of potential early ecosystems, rates of primary production in the early-Earth anaerobic biosphere were probably well below those rates observed in the marine environment. We shift our attention to the Earth environment at 3.8 Gyr ago, where the earliest marine sediments are preserved. We calculate, consistent with the carbon isotope record and other considerations of the carbon cycle, that marine rates of primary production at this time were probably an order of magnitude (or more) less than today. We conclude that the flux of reduced species to the Earth surface at this time may have been sufficient to drive anaerobic ecosystems of sufficient activity to be consistent with the carbon isotope record. Conversely, an ecosystem based on oxygenic photosynthesis was also possible with complete removal of the oxygen by reaction with reduced species from the mantle. PMID:17008221

  2. Automatic online buffer capacity (alkalinity) measurement of wastewater using an electrochemical cell.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Charles, Wipa; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    The use of an automatic online electrochemical cell (EC) for measuring the buffer capacity of wastewater is presented. pH titration curves of different solutions (NaHCO3, Na2HPO4, real municipal wastewater, and anaerobic digester liquid) were obtained by conventional chemical titration and compared to the online EC measurements. The results show that the pH titration curves from the EC were comparable to that of the conventional chemical titration. The results show a linear relationship between the response of the online EC detection system and the titrimetric partial alkalinity and total alkalinity of all tested samples. This suggests that an EC can be used as a simple online titration device for monitoring the buffer capacity of different industrial processes including wastewater treatment and anaerobic digestion processes.

  3. The effect of gender and respirator brand on the association of respirator fit with facial dimensions.

    PubMed

    Oestenstad, R Kent; Elliott, Leshan J; Beasley, T Mark

    2007-12-01

    This study examined the association of facial dimensions with respirator fit considering the effect of gender and respirator brand. Forty-one subjects (20 white females and 21 white males) participated in the study. Each subject was measured for 12 facial dimensions using anthropometric sliding and spreading calipers and a steel measuring tape. Three quantitative fit tests were conducted with the same subject wearing one size of three different brands of half-mask respirators resulting in a total of nine fit tests. Linear mixed model analysis was used to model respirator fit as a function of gender and respirator brand while controlling for facial dimensions. Results indicated that the gender by respirator brand interaction was not statistically significant (p = 0.794), and there was no significant difference in respirator fit between males and females (p = 0.356). There was a significant difference in respirator fit among respirator brands (p < 0.001). Because correlations between facial dimensions and respirator fit differed across gender and respirator brand, six separate linear mixed models were fit to assess which facial dimensions most strongly relate to respirator fit using a "one variable at a step" backward elimination procedure. None of the 12 facial dimensions were significantly associated with respirator fit in all six models. However, bigonial breadth and menton-nasion length were significantly associated with respirator fit in five of the six models, and biectoorbitale breadth, bizygomatic breadth, and lip width were significantly associated with respirator fit in four of the six models. Although this study resulted in significant findings related to the correlation of respirator fit with menton-nasion length and lip width (the dimensions currently used to define the half-mask respirator test panel), other facial dimensions were also shown to be significantly associated with respirator fit. Based on these findings and findings from previous studies

  4. Simple Method for Culturing Anaerobes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, C. E.; Hunter, W. J.; Ryan, J. L.; Braude, A. I.

    1973-01-01

    A simple, effective method is needed for growing obligate anaerobes in the clinical laboratory. This report describes a pre-reduced anaerobic bottle that can be taken to the bedside for direct inoculation, provides a flat agar surface for evaluation of number and morphology of colonies, and can be incubated in conventional bacteriological incubators. Each anaerobic culture set consisted of two bottles containing brain heart infusion agar and CO2. Gentamicin sulfate (50 μg/ml) was added to one of these to inhibit facultative enteric bacilli. Comparison of the anaerobic bottles with an identical aerobic bottle which was also routinely inoculated permitted early identification of anaerobic colonies. Representative species of most anaerobic genera of proven pathogenicity for man have been isolated from this system during 10 months of routine use. Images PMID:4571657

  5. Clinical pulmonary function and industrial respirator wear

    SciTech Connect

    Raven, P.B.; Moss, R.F.; Page, K.; Garmon, R.; Skaggs, B.

    1981-12-01

    This investigation was the initial step in determining a clinical pulmonary test which could be used to evaluate workers as to their suitability to industrial respirator wear. Sixty subjects, 12 superior, 37 normal, and 11 moderately impaired with respect to lung function tests were evaluated with a battery of clinical pulmonary tests while wearing an industrial respirator. The respirator was a full-face mask (MSA-Ultravue) demand breathing type equipped with an inspiratory resistance of 85mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow and an expiratory resistance of 25mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow. Comparisons of these tests were made between the three groups of subjects both with and without a respirator. It appears that those lung tests which measure the flow characteristics of the lung especially those that are effort dependant are more susceptible to change as a result of respirator wear. Hence, the respirator affects the person with superior lung function to a greater degree than the moderately impaired person. It was suggested that the clinical test of 15 second maximum voluntary ventilations (MVV./sub 25/) may be the test of choice for determining worker capability in wearing an industrial respirator.

  6. The alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite magmatism from Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberti, E.; Gomes, C. D. B.; Comin-Chiaramonti, P.

    2015-12-01

    Early to Late Cretaceous lasting to Paleocene alkaline magmatism from southern Brazil is found associated with major extensional structural features in and around the Paraná Basin and grouped into various provinces on the basis of several data. Magmatism is variable in size, mode of occurrence and composition. The alkaline rocks are dominantly potassic, a few occurrences showing sodic affinity. The more abundant silicate rocks are evolved undersaturated to saturated in silica syenites, displaying large variation in igneous forms. Less evolved types are restricted to subvolcanic environments and outcrops of effusive suites occur rarely. Cumulatic mafic and ultramafic rock types are very common, particularly in the alkali-carbonatitic complexes. Carbonatite bodies are represented by Ca-carbonatites and Mg-carbonatites and more scarcely by Fe-carbonatites. Available radiometric ages for the alkaline rocks fit on three main chronological groups: around 130 Ma, subcoveal with the Early Cretaceous flood tholeiites of the Paraná Basin, 100-110 Ma and 80-90 Ma (Late Cretaceous). The alkaline magmatism also extends into Paleocene times, as indicated by ages from some volcanic lavas. Geochemically, alkaline potassic and sodic rock types are distinguished by their negative and positive Nb-Ta anomalies, respectively. Negative spikes in Nb-Ta are also a feature common to the associated tholeiitic rocks. Sr-Nd-Pb systematics confirm the contribution of both HIMU and EMI mantle components in the formation of the alkaline rocks. Notably, Early and Late Cretaceous carbonatites have the same isotopic Sr-Nd initial ratios of the associated alkaline rocks. C-O isotopic Sr-Nd isotopic ratios indicate typical mantle signature for some carbonatites and the influence of post-magmatic processes in others. Immiscibility of liquids of phonolitic composition, derived from mafic alkaline parental magmas, has been responsible for the origin of the carbonatites. Close association of alkaline

  7. BOREAS TE-5 Soil Respiration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Ehleriinger, Jim; Brooks, J. Renee; Flanagan, Larry

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-5 team collected measurements in the NSA and SSA on gas exchange, gas composition, and tree growth. Soil respiration data were collected from 26-May-94 to 07-Sep-94 in the BOREAS NSA and SSA to compare the soil respiration rates in different forest sites using a LI-COR 6200 soil respiration chamber (model 6299). The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distrobuted Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  8. Anaerobic digestion of recalcitrant textile dyeing sludge with alternative pretreatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xinyi; Chen, Xiaoguang; Dai, Ruobin; Luo, Ying; Ma, Puyue; Ni, Shengsheng; Ma, Chengyu

    2016-12-01

    Abundant organic compounds in textile dyeing sludge (TDS) provide possibility for its anaerobic digestion (AD) treatment. However, preliminary test showed little biogas generation in direct AD of the TDS during 20days. In order to improve the AD availability of TDS, alkaline, acid, thermal and thermal alkaline pretreatments were performed. Color and aromatic amines were specifically measured as extra characteristics for the AD of TDS. The rate-limiting steps of AD of TDS were slow hydrolysis rate and inhibited acidogenesis, which were somewhat overcome by pretreatments. Thermal alkaline pretreated TDS performed best enhancement on solubilisation. The biochemical methane potential tests revealed that thermal pretreated TDS showed highest total methane production of 55.9mL/gVSfed compared to the control with little methane generation. However, thermal alkaline pretreated TDS did not perform well in BMP test as expected. Moreover, the hydrophilicity of reactive dyes in TDS could seriously affect dewaterability of TDS.

  9. [Enhancement for anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge pretreated by microwave and its combined processes ].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji-bao; Ni, Xiao-tang; Wei, Yuan-song; Tong, Juan; Wang, Ya-wei

    2014-09-01

    To improve anaerobic digestion and dewatering of sludge, impacts of sludge pretreated by microwave (MW) and its combined processes on sludge anaerobic digestion and dewatering were investigated. The results showed that microwave and its combined processes could effectively enhance anaerobic sludge digestion. Not only the cumulative methane production in the test of the MW-H2O2-alkaline (0. 2) was increased by 13. 34% compared with the control, but also its methane production rate was much higher than that of the control. Compared with the single MW process, the addition of both H2O2 and alkaline enhanced the solubilization of particle COD( >0. 45 micron) , indicating that synergistically generated soluble organics were faster to biodegrade which resulted in the enhancement of anaerobic digestion. The MW-acid process was effective in improving sludge dewaterability, e. g. , Capillary Suction Time (CST) at only 9. 85 s. The improvement of sludge dewatering was significantly correlated with sludge physical properties such as zeta potential, surface charge density and particle size. Under different sludge pretreatment conditions, the sludge dewatering after anaerobic digestion was similar, though the difference of sludge dewatering to some degrees was observed for pretreated sludge.

  10. Energetics of Respiration and Oxidative Phosphorylation in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hards, Kiel; Vilchèze, Catherine; Hartman, Travis; Berney, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacteria inhabit a wide range of intracellular and extracellular environments. Many of these environments are highly dynamic and therefore mycobacteria are faced with the constant challenge of redirecting their metabolic activity to be commensurate with either replicative growth or a non-replicative quiescence. A fundamental feature in this adaptation is the ability of mycobacteria to respire, regenerate reducing equivalents and generate ATP via oxidative phosphorylation. Mycobacteria harbor multiple primary dehydrogenases to fuel the electron transport chain and two terminal respiratory oxidases, an aa3-type cytochrome c oxidase and cytochrome bd-type menaquinol oxidase, are present for dioxygen reduction coupled to the generation of a protonmotive force. Hypoxia leads to the downregulation of key respiratory complexes, but the molecular mechanisms regulating this expression are unknown. Despite being obligate aerobes, mycobacteria have the ability to metabolize in the absence of oxygen and a number of reductases are present to facilitate the turnover of reducing equivalents under these conditions (e.g. nitrate reductase, succinate dehydrogenase/fumarate reductase). Hydrogenases and ferredoxins are also present in the genomes of mycobacteria suggesting the ability of these bacteria to adapt to an anaerobic-type of metabolism in the absence of oxygen. ATP synthesis by the membrane-bound F1FO-ATP synthase is essential for growing and non-growing mycobacteria and the enzyme is able to function over a wide range of protonmotive force values (aerobic to hypoxic). The discovery of lead compounds that target respiration and oxidative phosphorylation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis highlights the importance of this area for the generation of new front line drugs to combat tuberculosis. PMID:25346874

  11. Respiration in Neonate Sea Turtles

    PubMed Central

    Paladino, Frank V.; Strohl, Kingman P.; Pilar Santidrián, T.; Klann, Kenneth; Spotila, James R.

    2007-01-01

    The pattern and control of respiration is virtually unknown in hatchling sea turtles. Using incubator-raised turtles, we measured oxygen consumption, frequency, tidal volume, and minute volume for leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) and olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) turtle hatchlings for the first six days after pipping. In addition, we tested the hatchlings’ response to hypercapnic, hyperoxic, and hypoxic challenges over this time period. Hatchling sea turtles generally showed resting ventilation characteristics that are similar to those of adults: a single breath followed by a long respiratory pause, slow frequency, and high metabolic rate. With hypercapnic challenge, both species responded primarily by elevating respiratory frequency via a decrease in the non-ventilatory period. Leatherback resting tidal volume increased with age but otherwise, neither species’ resting respiratory pattern nor response to gas challenge changed significantly over the first few days after hatching. At the time of nest emergence, sea turtles have achieved a respiratory pattern that is similar to that of actively diving adults. PMID:17258487

  12. Respiration in a changing environment.

    PubMed

    Perry, Steven F; Spinelli Oliveira, Elisabeth

    2010-08-31

    Multidisciplinary respiratory research highlighted in the present symposium uses existing and new models from all Kingdoms in both basic and applied research and bears upon molecular signaling processes that have been present from the beginning of life and have been maintained as an integral part of it. Many of these old mechanisms are still recognizable as ROS and oxygen-dependent pathways that probably were in place even before photosynthesis evolved. These processes are not only recognizable through relatively small molecules such as nucleotides and their derivatives. Also some DNA sequences such as the hypoxia response elements and pas gene family are ancient and have been co-opted in various functions. The products of pas genes, in addition to their function in regulating nuclear response to hypoxia as part of the hypoxia-inducible factor HIF, play key roles in development, phototransduction, and control of circadian rhythmicity. Also RuBisCO, an enzyme best known for incorporating CO(2) into organic substrates in plants also has an ancient oxygenase function, which plays a key role in regulating peroxide balance in cells. As life forms became more complex and aerobic metabolism became dominant in multicellular organisms, the signaling processes also took on new levels of complexity but many ancient elements remained. The way in which they are integrated into remodeling processes involved in tradeoffs between respiration and nutrition or in control of aging in complex organisms is an exciting field for future research.

  13. Light respiration by subtropical seaweeds.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Matheus C; Eyre, Bradley D

    2017-03-20

    Here we report the first-ever measurements of light CO2 respiration rate (CRR) by seaweeds. We measured the influence of temperature (15 to 25°C) and light (irradiance from 60 to 670 μmol · m(-2) · s(-1) ) on the light CCR of two subtropical seaweed species, and measured the CRR of seven different seaweed species under the same light (150 μmol · m(-2) · s(-1) ) and temperature (25°C). There was little effect of irradiance on light CRR, but there was an effect of temperature. Across the seven species light CRR was similar to OCR (oxygen consumption rate in the dark), with the exception of a single species. The outlier species was a coralline alga, and the higher light CRR was probably driven by calcification. CRR could be estimated from OCR, as well as carbon photosynthetic rates from oxygen photosynthetic rates, which suggests that previous studies have probably provided good estimations of gross photosynthesis for seaweeds. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Respiration during sleep in kyphoscoliosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sawicka, E H; Branthwaite, M A

    1987-01-01

    Eleven subjects with non-paralytic and 10 with paralytic kyphoscoliosis and nine normal control subjects were studied during sleep. The Cobb angle of those with kyphoscoliosis varied from 60 degrees to 140 degrees (median 100 degrees) and the vital capacity varied from 17% to 56% (median 28%) of the value predicted on the basis of span. Recordings made during sleep included expired carbon dioxide tension at the nose, gas flow at the mouth, arterial oxygen saturation, chest wall movement, and the electroencephalogram, electro-oculogram, and electrocardiogram. In three subjects transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension was measured simultaneously. Patients with kyphoscoliosis hypoventilated during sleep, particularly in rapid eye movement sleep, resulting in a rise in end tidal and transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension, and a reduction in oxygen saturation to a degree not observed in normal subjects. Reduced chest wall movement was the major cause of these episodes, which were more frequent and occupied a greater proportion of sleep time in those with kyphoscoliosis than in normal subjects. Serious cardiac arrhythmias were rarely associated. It is concluded that disturbances of respiration during sleep occur in patients with kyphoscoliosis and that these may be important in the pathogenesis of cardiorespiratory failure. PMID:3424256

  15. Anaerobic wastewater treatment using anaerobic baffled bioreactor: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Siti Roshayu; Dahlan, Irvan

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is receiving renewed interest because it offers a means to treat wastewater with lower energy investment. Because the microorganisms involved grow more slowly, such systems require clever design so that the microbes have sufficient time with the substrate to complete treatment without requiring enormous reactor volumes. The anaerobic baffled reactor has inherent advantages over single compartment reactors due to its circulation pattern that approaches a plug flow reactor. The physical configuration of the anaerobic baffled reactor enables significant modifications to be made; resulting in a reactor which is proficient of treating complex wastewaters which presently require only one unit, ultimately significant reducing capital costs. This paper also concerns about mechanism, kinetic and hydrodynamic studies of anaerobic digestion for future application of the anaerobic baffled reactor for wastewater treatment.

  16. Anaerobic Metabolism: Linkages to Trace Gases and Aerobic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megonigal, J. P.; Hines, M. E.; Visscher, P. T.

    2003-12-01

    Life evolved and flourished in the absence of molecular oxygen (O2). As the O2 content of the atmosphere rose to the present level of 21% beginning about two billion years ago, anaerobic metabolism was gradually supplanted by aerobic metabolism. Anaerobic environments have persisted on Earth despite the transformation to an oxidized state because of the combined influence of water and organic matter. Molecular oxygen diffuses about 104 times more slowly through water than air, and organic matter supports a large biotic O2 demand that consumes the supply faster than it is replaced by diffusion. Such conditions exist in wetlands, rivers, estuaries, coastal marine sediments, aquifers, anoxic water columns, sewage digesters, landfills, the intestinal tracts of animals, and the rumen of herbivores. Anaerobic microsites are also embedded in oxic environments such as upland soils and marine water columns. Appreciable rates of aerobic respiration are restricted to areas that are in direct contact with air or those inhabited by organisms that produce O2.Rising atmospheric O2 reduced the global area of anaerobic habitat, but enhanced the overall rate of anaerobic metabolism (at least on an area basis) by increasing the supply of electron donors and acceptors. Organic carbon production increased dramatically, as did oxidized forms of nitrogen, manganese, iron, sulfur, and many other elements. In contemporary anaerobic ecosystems, nearly all of the reducing power is derived from photosynthesis, and most of it eventually returns to O2, the most electronegative electron acceptor that is abundant. This photosynthetically driven redox gradient has been thoroughly exploited by aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms for metabolism. The same is true of hydrothermal vents (Tunnicliffe, 1992) and some deep subsurface environments ( Chapelle et al., 2002), where thermal energy is the ultimate source of the reducing power.Although anaerobic habitats are currently a small fraction of Earth

  17. Decolorization of azo dyes under batch anaerobic and sequential anaerobic/aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Işik, Mustafa; Sponza, Delia Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Batch anaerobic and sequential anaerobic upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB)/aerobic continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) were used to determine the color and COD removals under anaerobic/aerobic conditions. Two azo dyes namely "Reactive Black 5 (RB 5)," "Congo Red (CR)," and glucose as a carbon source were used for synthetic wastewater. The course of the decolorization process approximates to first order and zero order kinetics with respect to dye concentration for RB 5 and Congo Red azo dyes, respectively, in batch conditions. The decolorization kinetic constant (K0) values increased from 3.6 to 11.8 mg(L h)(-1) as increases in dye concentrations from 200 to 3200 mg L(-1) for CR. Increases in dye concentrations from 0 to 3200 mg L(-1) reduce the decolorization rate constant (k1) values from 0.0141 to 0.0019 h(-1) in batch studies performed with RB 5. Decolorization was achieved effectively under test conditions but ultimate decolorization of azo dyes was not observed at all dye concentrations in batch assay conditions. Dye concentrations of 100 mg L(-1) and 3000 mg L(-1) of glucose-COD containing basal medium were used for continuous studies. The effect of organic loadings and HRT, on the color removal efficiencies and methane gas productions were monitored. 94.1-45.4% COD and 79-73% color removal efficiencies were obtained at an organic system during decolorization of Reactive Black 5. 92.3-77.0% COD and 95.3-92.2% decolorization efficiencies were achieved at a organic loading rate of 1.03-6.65 kg (m3 day)(-1) and a HRT of 3.54-0.49 for Congo Red treatment. The results of this study showed that, although decolorization continued, COD removal efficiencies and methane gas production were depressed at high organic loadings under anaerobic conditions. Furthermore, VFA accumulation, alkalinity consumption, and methane gas percentage were monitored at organic loading as high as 2.49-4.74 kg (m3 day)(-1) and 24.60-30.62 kg (m3 day)(-1), respectively, through the

  18. Photosynthesis and Respiration in Leaf Slices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Simon

    1998-01-01

    Demonstrates how leaf slices provide an inexpensive material for illustrating several fundamental points about the biochemistry of photosynthesis and respiration. Presents experiments that illustrate the effects of photon flux density and herbicides and carbon dioxide concentration. (DDR)

  19. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Wellinger, A.

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  20. Organohalide respiration: microbes breathing chlorinated molecules

    PubMed Central

    Leys, David; Adrian, Lorenz; Smidt, Hauke

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial respiration has taken advantage of almost every redox couple present in the environment. The reduction of organohalide compounds to release the reduced halide ion drives energy production in organohalide respiring bacteria. This process is centred around the reductive dehalogenases, an iron–sulfur and corrinoid containing family of enzymes. These enzymes, transcriptional regulators and the bacteria themselves have potential to contribute to future bioremediation solutions that address the pollution of the environment by halogenated organic compounds. PMID:23479746

  1. Syntrophic anaerobic photosynthesis via direct interspecies electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Phuc T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Shi, Liang; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Fredrickson, James K.; Madigan, Michael T.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2017-01-01

    Microbial phototrophs, key primary producers on Earth, use H2O, H2, H2S and other reduced inorganic compounds as electron donors. Here we describe a form of metabolism linking anoxygenic photosynthesis to anaerobic respiration that we call ‘syntrophic anaerobic photosynthesis'. We show that photoautotrophy in the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestaurii can be driven by either electrons from a solid electrode or acetate oxidation via direct interspecies electron transfer from a heterotrophic partner bacterium, Geobacter sulfurreducens. Photosynthetic growth of P. aestuarii using reductant provided by either an electrode or syntrophy is robust and light-dependent. In contrast, P. aestuarii does not grow in co-culture with a G. sulfurreducens mutant lacking a trans-outer membrane porin-cytochrome protein complex required for direct intercellular electron transfer. Syntrophic anaerobic photosynthesis is therefore a carbon cycling process that could take place in anoxic environments. This process could be exploited for biotechnological applications, such as waste treatment and bioenergy production, using engineered phototrophic microbial communities. PMID:28067226

  2. The Low Energy-Coupling Respiration in Zymomonas mobilis Accelerates Flux in the Entner-Doudoroff Pathway.

    PubMed

    Rutkis, Reinis; Strazdina, Inese; Balodite, Elina; Lasa, Zane; Galinina, Nina; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2016-01-01

    Performing oxidative phosphorylation is the primary role of respiratory chain both in bacteria and eukaryotes. Yet, the branched respiratory chains of prokaryotes contain alternative, low energy-coupling electron pathways, which serve for functions other than oxidative ATP generation (like those of respiratory protection, adaptation to low-oxygen media, redox balancing, etc.), some of which are still poorly understood. We here demonstrate that withdrawal of reducing equivalents by the energetically uncoupled respiratory chain of the bacterium Zymomonas mobilis accelerates its fermentative catabolism, increasing the glucose consumption rate. This is in contrast to what has been observed in other respiring bacteria and yeast. This effect takes place after air is introduced to glucose-consuming anaerobic cell suspension, and can be simulated using a kinetic model of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway in combination with a simple net reaction of NADH oxidation that does not involve oxidative phosphorylation. Although aeration hampers batch growth of respiring Z. mobilis culture due to accumulation of toxic byproducts, nevertheless under non-growing conditions respiration is shown to confer an adaptive advantage for the wild type over the non-respiring Ndh knock-out mutant. If cells get occasional access to limited amount of glucose for short periods of time, the elevated glucose uptake rate selectively improves survival of the respiring Z. mobilis phenotype.

  3. The Low Energy-Coupling Respiration in Zymomonas mobilis Accelerates Flux in the Entner-Doudoroff Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rutkis, Reinis; Strazdina, Inese; Balodite, Elina; Lasa, Zane; Galinina, Nina; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2016-01-01

    Performing oxidative phosphorylation is the primary role of respiratory chain both in bacteria and eukaryotes. Yet, the branched respiratory chains of prokaryotes contain alternative, low energy-coupling electron pathways, which serve for functions other than oxidative ATP generation (like those of respiratory protection, adaptation to low-oxygen media, redox balancing, etc.), some of which are still poorly understood. We here demonstrate that withdrawal of reducing equivalents by the energetically uncoupled respiratory chain of the bacterium Zymomonas mobilis accelerates its fermentative catabolism, increasing the glucose consumption rate. This is in contrast to what has been observed in other respiring bacteria and yeast. This effect takes place after air is introduced to glucose-consuming anaerobic cell suspension, and can be simulated using a kinetic model of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway in combination with a simple net reaction of NADH oxidation that does not involve oxidative phosphorylation. Although aeration hampers batch growth of respiring Z. mobilis culture due to accumulation of toxic byproducts, nevertheless under non-growing conditions respiration is shown to confer an adaptive advantage for the wild type over the non-respiring Ndh knock-out mutant. If cells get occasional access to limited amount of glucose for short periods of time, the elevated glucose uptake rate selectively improves survival of the respiring Z. mobilis phenotype. PMID:27100889

  4. Telephone communications with several commercial respirators.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A T; Scott, W H; Coyne, K M; Koh, F C; Rebar, J E

    2001-01-01

    Previous work showed that telephone communications while wearing military respirators degraded both word comprehension and recognition speed. In addition, electronic amplification of the speech diaphragm signal had shown no advantage to the extra hardware. This experiment was performed to test effects of different configurations of commercially available respirators on telephone communications accuracy and speed. Twelve pairs of subjects were separated into different rooms and communicated by telephone. Modified rhyme-test words were presented by computer to the speaker, who transmitted the word by telephone to the listener. During the first replication, subjects were given no instruction about telephone communications procedure. During the second replication subjects followed a communications protocol that instructed them when to move the telephone handset from their ears to their mouths. Results showed that the protocol uniformly improved communications accuracy without incurring any extra time penalty. Word comprehension was still twice as fast without a respirator as with a respirator. Accuracy with the protocol nearly equaled the no respirator control value for most respirators tested.

  5. Mitochondrial respiration without ubiquinone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Hekimi, Siegfried

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquinone (UQ), a.k.a. coenzyme Q, is a redox-active lipid that participates in several cellular processes, in particular mitochondrial electron transport. Primary UQ deficiency is a rare but severely debilitating condition. Mclk1 (a.k.a. Coq7) encodes a conserved mitochondrial enzyme that is necessary for UQ biosynthesis. We engineered conditional Mclk1 knockout models to study pathogenic effects of UQ deficiency and to assess potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of UQ deficiencies. We found that Mclk1 knockout cells are viable in the total absence of UQ. The UQ biosynthetic precursor DMQ9 accumulates in these cells and can sustain mitochondrial respiration, albeit inefficiently. We demonstrated that efficient rescue of the respiratory deficiency in UQ-deficient cells by UQ analogues is side chain length dependent, and that classical UQ analogues with alkyl side chains such as idebenone and decylUQ are inefficient in comparison with analogues with isoprenoid side chains. Furthermore, Vitamin K2, which has an isoprenoid side chain, and has been proposed to be a mitochondrial electron carrier, had no efficacy on UQ-deficient mouse cells. In our model with liver-specific loss of Mclk1, a large depletion of UQ in hepatocytes caused only a mild impairment of respiratory chain function and no gross abnormalities. In conjunction with previous findings, this surprisingly small effect of UQ depletion indicates a nonlinear dependence of mitochondrial respiratory capacity on UQ content. With this model, we also showed that diet-derived UQ10 is able to functionally rescue the electron transport deficit due to severe endogenous UQ deficiency in the liver, an organ capable of absorbing exogenous UQ. PMID:23847050

  6. 42 CFR 84.250 - Vinyl chloride respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vinyl chloride respirators; description. 84.250... Respirators § 84.250 Vinyl chloride respirators; description. Vinyl chloride respirators, including all... escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres containing adequate oxygen to support life, are...

  7. 42 CFR 84.250 - Vinyl chloride respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vinyl chloride respirators; description. 84.250... Respirators § 84.250 Vinyl chloride respirators; description. Vinyl chloride respirators, including all... escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres containing adequate oxygen to support life, are...

  8. 42 CFR 84.250 - Vinyl chloride respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vinyl chloride respirators; description. 84.250... Respirators § 84.250 Vinyl chloride respirators; description. Vinyl chloride respirators, including all... escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres containing adequate oxygen to support life, are...

  9. 42 CFR 84.250 - Vinyl chloride respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vinyl chloride respirators; description. 84.250... Respirators § 84.250 Vinyl chloride respirators; description. Vinyl chloride respirators, including all... escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres containing adequate oxygen to support life, are...

  10. 42 CFR 84.250 - Vinyl chloride respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vinyl chloride respirators; description. 84.250... Respirators § 84.250 Vinyl chloride respirators; description. Vinyl chloride respirators, including all... escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres containing adequate oxygen to support life, are...

  11. 42 CFR 84.197 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.197... Cartridge Respirators § 84.197 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Respirators shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type...

  12. 42 CFR 84.134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.134... Respirators § 84.134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Supplied-air respirators shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type...

  13. 42 CFR 84.174 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.174... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.174 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except..., durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type of respirator it...

  14. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  15. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  16. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  17. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  18. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  19. Re-interpreting anaerobic metabolism: an argument for the application of both anaerobic glycolysis and excess post-exercise oxygen comsumption (EPOC) as independent sources of energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Scott, C B

    1998-02-01

    Due to current technical difficulties and changing cellular conditions, the measurement of anaerobic and recovery energy expenditure remains elusive. During rest and low-intensity steady-state exercise, indirect calorimetric measurements successfully represent energy expenditure. The same steady-state O2 uptake methods are often used to describe the O2 deficit and excess post-oxygen consumption (EPOC): 1 l O2 = 5 kcal = 20.9 kJ. However, an O2 deficit plus exercise O2 uptake measurement ignores energy expenditure during recovery, and an exercise O2 uptake plus EPOC measurement misrepresents anaerobic energy expenditure. An alternative solution has not yet been proposed. Anaerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration are construed here as a symbiotic union of metabolic pathways, each contributing independently to energy expenditure and heat production. Care must be taken when using O2 uptake alone to quantify energy expenditure because various high-intensity exercise models reveal that O2 uptake can lag behind estimated energy demands or exceed them. The independent bioenergetics behind anaerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration can acknowledge these discrepancies. Anaerobic glycolysis is an additive component to an exercise O2 uptake measurement. Moreover, it is the assumptions behind steady-state O2 uptake that do not permit proper interpretation of energy expenditure during EPOC; 1 l O2 not = 20.9 kJ. Using both the O2 deficit and a modified EPOC for interpretation, rather than one or the other, leads to a better method of quantifying energy expenditure for higher intensity exercise and recovery.

  20. Anaerobic Metabolism of Indoleacetate

    PubMed Central

    Ebenau-Jehle, Christa; Thomas, Markus; Scharf, Gernot; Kockelkorn, Daniel; Knapp, Bettina; Schühle, Karola; Heider, Johann

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic metabolism of indoleacetate (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) in the denitrifying betaproteobacterium Azoarcus evansii was studied. The strain oxidized IAA completely and grew with a generation time of 10 h. Enzyme activities that transformed IAA were present in the soluble cell fraction of IAA-grown cells but were 10-fold downregulated in cells grown on 2-aminobenzoate or benzoate. The transformation of IAA did not require molecular oxygen but required electron acceptors like NAD+ or artificial dyes. The first products identified were the enol and keto forms of 2-oxo-IAA. Later, polar products were observed, which could not yet be identified. The first steps likely consist of the anaerobic hydroxylation of the N-heterocyclic pyrrole ring to the enol form of 2-oxo-IAA, which is catalyzed by a molybdenum cofactor-containing dehydrogenase. This step is probably followed by the hydrolytic ring opening of the keto form, which is catalyzed by a hydantoinase-like enzyme. A comparison of the proteome of IAA- and benzoate-grown cells identified IAA-induced proteins. Owing to the high similarity of A. evansii with strain EbN1, whose genome is known, we identified a cluster of 14 genes that code for IAA-induced proteins involved in the early steps of IAA metabolism. These genes include a molybdenum cofactor-dependent dehydrogenase of the xanthine oxidase/aldehyde dehydrogenase family, a hydantoinase, a coenzyme A (CoA) ligase, a CoA transferase, a coenzyme B12-dependent mutase, an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, a fusion protein of an enoyl-CoA hydratase and a 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, a beta-ketothiolase, and a periplasmic substrate binding protein for ABC transport as well as a transcriptional regulator of the GntR family. Five predicted enzymes form or act on CoA thioesters, indicating that soon after the initial oxidation of IAA and possibly ring opening, CoA thioesters are formed, and the carbon skeleton is rearranged, followed by a CoA-dependent thiolytic

  1. Thermochemical Pretreatment for Anaerobic Digestion of Sorted Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, W.; Hongtao, W.

    2008-02-01

    The effect of alkaline hydrothermal pre-treatment for anaerobic digestion of mechanically-sorted municipal solid waste (MSW) and source-sorted waste was studied. Waste was hydrothermally pre-treated in dilute alkali solution. Hydrolysis product was incubated in 500 ml saline bottle to determine methane potential (MP) under mesospheric anaerobic conditions. Optimum reaction condition obtained in the study is 170 °C at the dose of 4 g NaOH/100 g solid for one hour. Soluble COD was 13936 mg/L and methane yield was 164 ml/g VS for 6 days incubation at optimum conditions. More than 50% biogas increase was achieved over the control, and methane conversion ratio on carbon basis was enhanced to 30.6%. The digestion period was less than 6 days when pre-treatment temperature was above 130 °C. The organic part of sorted waste is mainly constituted of kitchen garbage and leaf. Model kitchen garbage was completely liquidized at 130 °C for one hour and the methane yield was 276 ml/g VS. Addition of alkali enhance hydroxylation rate and methane yield slightly. The biogas potential of leaf could be observed by pre-treatment above 150 °C under alkaline condition.

  2. Anaerobic Halo-Alkaliphilic Baterial Community of Athalassic, Hypersaline Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Marsic, Damien; Ng, Joseph D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The microorganisms of soda Mono Lake and other similar athalassic hypersaline alkaline soda lakes are of significance to Astrobiology. The microorganisms of these regimes represent the best known terrestrial analogs for microbial life that might have inhabited the hypersaline alkaline lakes and evaporites confined within closed volcanic basins and impact craters during the late Noachian and early Hesperian epochs (3.6 - 4.2 Gya) of ancient Mars. We have investigated the anaerobic microbiota of soda Mono Lake in northern California. In this paper we discuss the astrobiological significance of these ecosystems and describe several interesting features of two novel new species of anaerobic halo-alkaliphilic bacteria (Spirochaeta americana, sp. nov. and Desulfonatronum paiuteum, sp. nov) that we have isolated from Mono Lake.

  3. Zinc electrode in alkaline electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J.

    1995-12-31

    The zinc electrode in alkaline electrolyte is unusual in that supersaturated zincate solutions can form during discharge and spongy or mossy zinc deposits can form on charge at low overvoltages. The effect of additives on regular pasted ZnO electrodes and calcium zincate electrodes is discussed. The paper also reports on in situ x-ray absorption (XAS) results on mossy zinc deposits.

  4. PCB breakdown by anaerobic microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    Recently, altered PCB cogener distribution patterns observed in anaerobic sediment samples from the upper Hudson River are being attributed to biologically mediated reductive dechlorination. The authors report their successful demonstration of biologically mediated reductive dechlorination of an Aroclor mixture. In their investigation, they assessed the ability of microorganisms from PCB-contaminated Hudson River sediments (60-562 ppm PCBs) to dechlorinate Aroclor 1242 under anaerobic conditions by eluting microorganisms from the PCB- contaminated sediments and transferring them to a slurry of reduced anaerobic mineral medium and PCB-free sediments in tightly stoppered bottles. They observed dechlorination to be the most rapid at the highest PCB concentration tried by them.

  5. Respiration and Reproductive Effort in Xanthium canadense

    PubMed Central

    KINUGASA, TOSHIHIKO; HIKOSAKA, KOUKI; HIROSE, TADAKI

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims The proportion of resources devoted to reproduction in the plant is called the reproductive effort (RE), which is most commonly expressed as the proportion of reproductive biomass to total plant biomass production (REW). Reproductive yield is the outcome of photosynthates allocated to reproductive structures minus subsequent respiratory consumption for construction and maintenance of reproductive structures. Thus, REW can differ from RE in terms of photosynthates allocated to reproductive structures (REP). • Methods Dry mass growth and respiration of vegetative and reproductive organs were measured in Xanthium canadense and the amount of photosynthates and its partitioning to dry mass growth and respiratory consumption were determined. Differences between REW and REP were analysed in terms of growth and maintenance respiration. • Key Results The fraction of allocated photosynthates that was consumed by respiration was smaller in the reproductive organ than in the vegetative organs. Consequently, REP was smaller than REW. The smaller respiratory consumption in the reproductive organ resulted from its shorter period of existence and a seasonal decline in temperature, as well as a slower rate of maintenance respiration, although the fraction of photosynthates consumed by growth respiration was larger than in the vegetative organs. • Conclusions Reproductive effort in terms of photosynthates (REP) was smaller than that in terms of biomass (REW). This difference resulted from respiratory consumption for maintenance, which was far smaller in the reproductive organ than in vegetative organs. PMID:15837721

  6. Optical tweezers and non-ratiometric fluorescent-dye-based studies of respiration in sperm mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Timothy; Shi, Linda Z.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Berns, Michael W.

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the mitochondrial membrane potential affects sperm motility using laser tweezers and a non-ratiometric fluorescent probe, DiOC6(3). A 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 continuous wave laser was used to trap motile sperm at a power of 450 mW in the trap spot. Using customized tracking software, the curvilinear velocity (VCL) and the escape force from the laser tweezers were measured. Human (Homo sapiens), dog (Canis lupis familiaris) and drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) sperm were treated with DiOC6(3) to measure the membrane potential in the mitochondria-rich sperm midpieces. Sperm from all three species exhibited an increase in fluorescence when treated with the DiOC6(3). When a cyanide inhibitor (CCCP) of aerobic respiration was applied, sperm of all three species exhibited a reduction in fluorescence to pre-dye levels. With respect to VCL and escape force, the CCCP had no effect on dog or human sperm, suggesting a major reliance upon anaerobic respiration (glycolysis) for ATP in these two species. Based on the preliminary study on drill sperm, CCCP caused a drop in the VCL, suggesting potential reliance on both glycolysis and aerobic respiration for motility. The results demonstrate that optical trapping in combination with DiOC6(3) is an effective way to study sperm motility and energetics.

  7. Genetic identification of three ABC transporters as essential elements for nitrate respiration in Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, C; Soppa, J

    1999-01-01

    More than 40 nitrate respiration-deficient mutants of Haloferax volcanii belonging to three different phenotypic classes were isolated. All 15 mutants of the null phenotype were complemented with a genomic library of the wild type. Wild-type copies of mutated genes were recovered from complemented mutants using two different approaches. The DNA sequences of 13 isolated fragments were determined. Five fragments were found to overlap; therefore nine different genomic regions containing genes essential for nitrate respiration could be identified. Three genomic regions containing genes coding for subunits of ABC transporters were further characterized. In two cases, genes coding for an ATP-binding subunit and a permease subunit were clustered and overlapped by four nucleotides. The third gene for a permease subunit had no additional ABC transporter gene in proximity. One ABC transporter was found to be glucose specific. The mutant reveals that the ABC transporter solely mediates anaerobic glucose transport. Based on sequence similarity, the second ABC transporter is proposed to be molybdate specific, explaining its essential role in nitrate respiration. The third ABC transporter is proposed to be anion specific. Genome sequencing has shown that ABC transporters are widespread in Archaea. Nevertheless, this study represents only the second example of a functional characterization. PMID:10430572

  8. Significance of dissolved methane in effluents of anaerobically ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The need for energy efficient Domestic Wastewater (DWW) treatment is increasing annually with population growth and expanding global energy demand. Anaerobic treatment of low strength DWW produces methane which can be used to as an energy product. Temperature sensitivity, low removal efficiencies (Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Suspended Solids (SS), and Nutrients), alkalinity demand, and potential greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have limited its application to warmer climates. Although well designed anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors (AnMBRs) are able to effectively treat DWW at psychrophilic temperatures (10–30 °C), lower temperatures increase methane solubility leading to increased energy losses in the form of dissolved methane in the effluent. Estimates of dissolved methane losses are typically based on concentrations calculated using Henry's Law but advection limitations can lead to supersaturation of methane between 1.34 and 6.9 times equilibrium concentrations and 11–100% of generated methane being lost in the effluent. In well mixed systems such as AnMBRs which use biogas sparging to control membrane fouling, actual concentrations approach equilibrium values. Non-porous membranes have been used to recover up to 92.6% of dissolved methane and well suited for degassing effluents of Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors which have considerable solids and organic contents and can cause pore wetting and clogging in microporous membrane modules. Micro

  9. Anaerobic methane oxidation in a landfill-leachate plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grossman, Ethan L.; Cifuentes, Luis A.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2002-01-01

    The alluvial aquifer adjacent to Norman Landfill, OK, provides an excellent natural laboratory for the study of anaerobic processes impacting landfill-leachate contaminated aquifers. We collected groundwaters from a transect of seven multilevel wells ranging in depth from 1.3 to 11 m that were oriented parallel to the flow path. The center of the leachate plume was characterized by (1) high alkalinity and elevated concentrations of total dissolved organic carbon, reduced iron, and methane, and (2) negligible oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate concentrations. Methane concentrations and stable carbon isotope (δ13C) values suggest anaerobic methane oxidation was occurring within the plume and at its margins. Methane δ13C values increased from about −54‰ near the source to >−10‰ downgradient and at the plume margins. The isotopic fractionation associated with this methane oxidation was −13.6 ± 1.0‰. Methane 13C enrichment indicated that 80−90% of the original landfill methane was oxidized over the 210-m transect. First-order rate constants ranged from 0.06 to 0.23 per year, and oxidation rates ranged from 18 to 230 μM/y. Overall, hydrochemical data suggest that a sulfate reducer-methanogen consortium may mediate this methane oxidation. These results demonstrate that natural attenuation through anaerobic methane oxidation can be an important sink for landfill methane in aquifer systems.

  10. Enrichment of anaerobic polychlorinated biphenyl dechlorinators from sediment with iron as a hydrogen source.

    PubMed

    Rysavy, Jason P; Yan, Tao; Novak, Paige J

    2005-02-01

    Little is known about anaerobic polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) dechlorination, although it is believed that some microorganisms are capable of respiring PCBs, gaining energy for growth from PCB dechlorination. If this is the case, the amendment of appropriate electron donors to contaminated sediment should stimulate dechlorination. The effect of elemental iron (Fe0) addition, an easily amended electron donor, on the microbial dechlorination of the PCB congeners 3,4,5-trichlorobiphenyl (3,4,5-CB) and 2,2',3,4,4',5,5'-heptachlorobiphenyl (2,2',3,4,4',5,5'-CB) was investigated in microcosms containing estuarine sediment from Baltimore Harbor. Results showed that the addition of 0.1 g Fe0/g sediment reduced the lag time for removal of doubly flanked para chlorines by approximately 100 days. Because Fe0 is a source of cathodic hydrogen (H2), the effect of direct H2 addition to sediment microcosms was also tested. The addition of 0.001 atm H2 in the headspace generated the same dechlorination activity and reduction in lag time as the addition of 0.1g Fe0/g. Higher concentrations of Fe0 or H2 increased the lag prior to dechlorination. Additional results showed that an alkaline pH (> or = 7.5), high [Fe2+] (3.3 g/L), or HS- (0.1 mg/L total sulfide) inhibited dechlorination. Elevated concentrations of Fe2+, OH-, and HS- are products of Fe0 oxidation or increased microbial activity (methanogenesis, homoacetogenesis, and sulfate reduction), both of which would result from the amendment of large quantities of Fe0 or H2 to sediment. This research shows that not only can PCB dechlorination be stimulated through the addition of electron donor, but implies that the dechlorinators are enriched by the continuous addition of low concentrations of H2, similar to other known dechlorinators, such as the dehalorespirer Dehalococcoides ethenogenes. These results suggest that the direct addition of controlled amounts of Fe0 to sediments may be an effective remediation tool to reduce the

  11. Ammonium excretion and oxygen respiration of tropical copepods and euphausiids exposed to oxygen minimum zone conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiko, Rainer; Hauss, Helena; Buchholz, Friedrich; Melzner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Calanoid copepods and euphausiids are key components of marine zooplankton communities worldwide. Most euphausiids and several copepod species perform diel vertical migrations (DVMs) that contribute to the export of particulate and dissolved matter to midwater depths. In vast areas of the global ocean, and in particular in the eastern tropical Atlantic and Pacific, the daytime distribution depth of many migrating organisms corresponds to the core of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). At depth, the animals experience reduced temperature and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) and an increased carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) compared to their near-surface nighttime habitat. Although it is well known that low oxygen levels can inhibit respiratory activity, the respiration response of tropical copepods and euphausiids to relevant pCO2, pO2, and temperature conditions remains poorly parameterized. Further, the regulation of ammonium excretion at OMZ conditions is generally not well understood. It was recently estimated that DVM-mediated ammonium supply could fuel bacterial anaerobic ammonium oxidation - a major loss process for fixed nitrogen in the ocean considerably. These estimates were based on the implicit assumption that hypoxia or anoxia in combination with hypercapnia (elevated pCO2) does not result in a down-regulation of ammonium excretion. We exposed calanoid copepods from the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic (ETNA; Undinula vulgaris and Pleuromamma abdominalis) and euphausiids from the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP; Euphausia mucronata) and the ETNA (Euphausia gibboides) to different temperatures, carbon dioxide and oxygen levels to study their survival, respiration and excretion rates at these conditions. An increase in temperature by 10 °C led to an approximately 2-fold increase of the respiration and excretion rates of U. vulgaris (Q10, respiration = 1.4; Q10, NH4-excretion = 1.6), P. abdominalis (Q10, respiration = 2.0; Q10, NH4-excretion = 2.4) and

  12. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  13. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  14. Modelling of the mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of olive mill wastewater with olive mill solid waste using anaerobic digestion model No. 1 (ADM1).

    PubMed

    Boubaker, Fezzani; Ridha, Ben Cheikh

    2008-09-01

    The anaerobic digestion model No. 1 (ADM1), conceived by the international water association (IWA) task group for mathematical modelling of anaerobic digestion processes is a structured generic model which includes multiples steps describing biochemical and physicochemical processes encountered in the anaerobic degradation of complex organic substrates and a common platform for further model enhancement and validation of dynamic simulations for a variety of anaerobic processes. In this study the ADM1 model was modified and applied to simulate the mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of olive mill wastewater (OMW) with olive mill solid waste (OMSW). The ADM1 equations were coded and implemented using the simulation software package MATLAB/Simulink. The most sensitive parameters were calibrated and validated using updated experimental data of our previous work. The results indicated that the ADM1 model could simulate with good accuracy: gas flows, methane and carbon-dioxide contents, pH and total volatile fatty acids (TVFA) concentrations of effluents for various feed concentrations digested at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) and especially at HRTs of 36 and 24 days. Furthermore, effluent alkalinity and ammonium nitrogen were successfully predicted by the model at HRTs of 12 and 24 days for some feed concentrations.

  15. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  16. Implementing Livestock Anaerobic Digestion Projects

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Page provides information to help make an informed decision about installing an anaerobic digester. Is it a good match for a farm’s organic waste, project financing, development guidelines and permit requirements?

  17. Soil respiration partition and its components in the total agro-ecosystem respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delogu, Emilie; LeDantec, Valerie; Mordelet, Patrick; Buysse, Pauline; Aubinet, Marc; Pattey, Elizabeth; Mary, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    Close to 15% of the Earth's terrestrial surface is used for cropland. In the context of global warming, and acknowledged by the Kyoto Protocol, agricultural soils could be a significant sink for atmospheric CO2. Understanding the factors influencing carbon fluxes of agricultural soils is essential for implementing efficient mitigation practices. Most of the soil respiration modeling studies was carried out in forest ecosystems, but only a few was carried out in agricultural ecosystems. In the study, we evaluated simple formalisms to model soil respiration using wheat data from four contrasting geographical mi-latitude regions. Soil respiration were measured in three winter wheat fields at Lamasquère (43°49'N, 01°23'E, 2007) and Auradé (43°54'N, 01°10'E, 2008), South-West France and Lonzée (50°33'N, 4°44'E, 2007), Belgium, and in a spring wheat field at Ottawa (45°22'N, 75°43'W, 2007, 2011), Ontario, Canada. Manual closed chambers were used in the French sites. The Belgium and Canadian sites were equipped with automated closed chamber systems, which continuously collected 30-min soil respiration exchanges. All the sites were also equipped with eddy flux towers. When eddy flux data were collected over bare soil, the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was equal to soil respiration exchange. These NEE data were used to validate the model. Different biotic and abiotic descriptors were used to model daily soil respiration and its heterotrophic and autotrophic components: soil temperature, soil relative humidity, Gross Primary Productivity (GPP), shoot biomass, crop height, with different formalisms. It was interesting to conclude that using biotic descriptors did not improve the performances of the model. In fact, a combination of abiotic descriptors (soil humidity and soil temperature) allowed significant model formalism to model soil respiration. The simple soil respiration model was used to calculate the heterotrophic and autotrophic source contributions to

  18. A rapid in situ respiration test for measuring aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchee, R.E.; Ong, S.K. )

    1992-10-01

    A in situ test method to measure the aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in contaminated soil is presented. The test method provides an initial assessment of bioventing as a remediation technology for hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. The in situ respiration test consists of ventilating the contaminated soil of the unsaturated zone with air and periodically monitoring the depletion of oxygen (O[sub 2]) and production of carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) over time after the air is turned off. The test is simple to implement and generally takes about four to five days to complete. The test was applied at eight hydrocarbon-contaminated sites of different geological and climatic conditions. These sites were contaminated with petroleum products or petroleum fuels, except for two sites where the contaminants were primarily polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Oxygen utilization rates for the eight sites ranged from 0.02 to 0.99 percent O[sub 2]/hour. Estimated biodegradation rates ranged from 0.4 to 19 mg/kg of soil/day. These rates were similar to the biodegradation rates obtained from field and pilot studies using mass balance methods. Estimated biodegradation rates based on O[sub 2] utilization were generally more reliable (especially for alkaline soils) than rates based on CO[sub 2] production, CO[sub 2] produced from microbial respiration was probably converted to carbonate under alkaline conditions. 14 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. A rapid in situ respiration test for measuring aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in soil.

    PubMed

    Hinchee, R E; Ong, S K

    1992-10-01

    An in situ test method to measure the aerobic biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in contaminated soil is presented. The test method provides an initial assessment of bioventing as a remediation technology for hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. The in situ respiration test consists of ventilating the contaminated soil of the unsaturated zone with air and periodically monitoring the depletion of oxygen (O2) and production of carbon dioxide (CO2) over time after the air is turned off. The test is simple to implement and generally takes about four to five days to complete. The test was applied at eight hydrocarbon-contaminated sites of different geological and climatic conditions. These sites were contaminated with petroleum products or petroleum fuels, except for two sites where the contaminants were primarily polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Oxygen utilization rates for the eight sites ranged from 0.02 to 0.99 percent O2/hour. Estimated biodegradation rates ranged from 0.4 to 19 mg/kg of soil/day. These rates were similar to the biodegradation rates obtained from field and pilot studies using mass balance methods. Estimated biodegradation rates based on O2 utilization were generally more reliable (especially for alkaline soils) than rates based on CO2 production. CO2 produced from microbial respiration was probably converted to carbonate under alkaline conditions.

  20. Improving methane production and phosphorus release in anaerobic digestion of particulate saline sludge from a brackish aquaculture recirculation system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuedong; Ferreira, Rui B; Hu, Jianmei; Spanjers, Henri; van Lier, Jules B

    2014-06-01

    In this study, batch tests were conducted to examine the effects of trehalose and glycine betaine as well as potassium on the specific methanogenic activity (SMA), acid and alkaline phosphatase activity of anaerobic biomass and phosphorus release in anaerobic digestion of saline sludge from a brackish recirculation aquaculture system. The results of ANOVA and Tukey's HSD (honestly significant difference) tests showed that glycine betaine and trehalose enhanced SMA of anaerobic biomass and reactive phosphorus release from the particulate waste. Moreover, SMA tests revealed that methanogenic sludge, which was long-term acclimatized to a salinity level of 17 g/L was severely affected by the increase in salinity to values exceeding 35 g/L. Addition of compatible solutes, such as glycine betaine and trehalose, could be used to enhance the specific methane production rate and phosphorus release in anaerobic digestion from particulate organic waste produced in marine or brackish aquaculture recirculation systems.

  1. BOREAS TE-2 Wood Respiration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Michael G.; Lavigne, Michael; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-2 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the respiration of the foliage, roots, and wood of boreal vegetation. This data set contains measurements of wood respiration conducted in the NSA during the growing season of 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  2. BOREAS TE-2 Continuous Wood Respiration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor); Ryan, Michael G.; Lavigne, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-2 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the respiration of the foliage, roots, and wood of boreal vegetation. This data set contains measurements of wood respiration measured continuously (about once per hour) in the NSA during the growing season of 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  3. BOREAS TE-2 Foliage Respiration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Michael G.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Lavigne, Michael; Papagno, Andrea (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-2 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the respiration of the foliage, roots, and wood of boreal vegetation. This data set contains measurements of foliar respiration conducted in the NSA during the growing season of 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  4. BOREAS TE-2 Root Respiration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Michael G.; Lavigne, Michael; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-2 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the respiration of the foliage, roots, and wood of boreal vegetation. This data set includes means of tree root respiration measurements on roots having diameters ranging from 0 to 2 mm conducted in the NSA during the growing season of 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  5. Mixed-valence cytoplasmic iron granules are linked to anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Glasauer, S; Langley, S; Boyanov, M; Lai, B; Kemner, K; Beveridge, T J

    2007-02-01

    Intracellular granules containing ferric and ferrous iron formed in Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 during dissimilatory reduction of solid-phase ferric iron. It is the first in situ detection at high resolution (150 nm) of a mixed-valence metal particle residing within a prokaryotic cell. The relationship of the internal particles to Fe(III) reduction may indicate a respiratory role.

  6. Distribution of Microbial Biomass and Potential for Anaerobic Respiration in Hanford Site 300 Area Subsurface Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David; Peacock, Aaron; McKinley, James; Resch, Charles T.; Fredrickson, James

    2012-01-01

    Subsurface sediments were recovered from a 52-m-deep borehole cored in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State to assess the potential for biogeochemical transformation of radionuclide contaminants. Microbial analyses were made on 17 sediment samples traversing multiple geological units: the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation (9 to 17.4 m), the oxic fine-grained upper Ringold formation (17.7 to 18.1 m), and the reduced Ringold formation (18.3 to 52 m). Microbial biomass (measured as phospholipid fatty acids) ranged from 7 to 974 pmols per g in discrete samples, with the highest numbers found in the Hanford formation. On average, strata below 17.4 m had 13-fold less biomass than those from shallower strata. The nosZ gene that encodes nitrous oxide reductase (measured by quantitative real-time PCR) had an abundance of 5 to 17 relative to that of total 16S rRNA genes below 18.3 m and <5 above 18.1 m. Most nosZ sequences were affiliated with Ochrobactrum anthropi (97 sequence similarity) or had a nearest neighbor of Achromobacter xylosoxidans (90 similarity). Passive multilevel sampling of groundwater geochemistry demonstrated a redox gradient in the 1.5-m region between the Hanford-Ringold formation contact and the Ringold oxic-anoxic interface. Within this zone, copies of the dsrA gene and Geobacteraceae had the highest relative abundance. The majority of dsrA genes detected near the interface were related to Desulfotomaculum spp. These analyses indicate that the region just below the contact between the Hanford and Ringold formations is a zone of active biogeochemical redox cycling. PMID:22138990

  7. Modeling of vapor intrusion from hydrocarbon-contaminated sources accounting for aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verginelli, Iason; Baciocchi, Renato

    2011-11-01

    A one-dimensional steady state vapor intrusion model including both anaerobic and oxygen-limited aerobic biodegradation was developed. The aerobic and anaerobic layer thickness are calculated by stoichiometrically coupling the reactive transport of vapors with oxygen transport and consumption. The model accounts for the different oxygen demand in the subsurface required to sustain the aerobic biodegradation of the compound(s) of concern and for the baseline soil oxygen respiration. In the case of anaerobic reaction under methanogenic conditions, the model accounts for the generation of methane which leads to a further oxygen demand, due to methane oxidation, in the aerobic zone. The model was solved analytically and applied, using representative parameter ranges and values, to identify under which site conditions the attenuation of hydrocarbons migrating into indoor environments is likely to be significant. Simulations were performed assuming a soil contaminated by toluene only, by a BTEX mixture, by Fresh Gasoline and by Weathered Gasoline. The obtained results have shown that for several site conditions oxygen concentration below the building is sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation. For these scenarios the aerobic biodegradation is the primary mechanism of attenuation, i.e. anaerobic contribution is negligible and a model accounting just for aerobic biodegradation can be used. On the contrary, in all cases where oxygen is not sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation alone (e.g. highly contaminated sources), anaerobic biodegradation can significantly contribute to the overall attenuation depending on the site specific conditions.

  8. Modeling of vapor intrusion from hydrocarbon-contaminated sources accounting for aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Verginelli, Iason; Baciocchi, Renato

    2011-11-01

    A one-dimensional steady state vapor intrusion model including both anaerobic and oxygen-limited aerobic biodegradation was developed. The aerobic and anaerobic layer thickness are calculated by stoichiometrically coupling the reactive transport of vapors with oxygen transport and consumption. The model accounts for the different oxygen demand in the subsurface required to sustain the aerobic biodegradation of the compound(s) of concern and for the baseline soil oxygen respiration. In the case of anaerobic reaction under methanogenic conditions, the model accounts for the generation of methane which leads to a further oxygen demand, due to methane oxidation, in the aerobic zone. The model was solved analytically and applied, using representative parameter ranges and values, to identify under which site conditions the attenuation of hydrocarbons migrating into indoor environments is likely to be significant. Simulations were performed assuming a soil contaminated by toluene only, by a BTEX mixture, by Fresh Gasoline and by Weathered Gasoline. The obtained results have shown that for several site conditions oxygen concentration below the building is sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation. For these scenarios the aerobic biodegradation is the primary mechanism of attenuation, i.e. anaerobic contribution is negligible and a model accounting just for aerobic biodegradation can be used. On the contrary, in all cases where oxygen is not sufficient to sustain aerobic biodegradation alone (e.g. highly contaminated sources), anaerobic biodegradation can significantly contribute to the overall attenuation depending on the site specific conditions.

  9. Changes in soil respiration components and their specific respiration along three successional forests in the subtropics

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Tianfeng; Liu, Juxiu; Wang, Gangsheng; ...

    2016-01-16

    1.Understanding how soil respiration components change with forest succession is critical for modelling and predicting soil carbon (C) processes and its sequestration below-ground. The specific respiration (a ratio of respiration to biomass) is increasingly being used as an indicator of forest succession conceptually based on Odum's theory of ecosystem development. However, the hypothesis that specific soil respiration declines with forest succession remains largely untested. 2.We used a trenching method to partition soil respiration into heterotrophic respiration and autotrophic respiration (RH and RA) and then evaluated the specific RH and specific RA in three successional forests in subtropical China. 3.Our resultsmore » showed a clear seasonality in the influence of forest succession on RH, with no significant differences among the three forests in the dry season but a higher value in the old-growth forest than the other two forests in the wet season. RA in the old-growth forest tended to be the highest among the three forests. Both the specific RH and specific RA decreased with the progressive maturity of three forests. 4.Lastly, our results highlight the importance of forest succession in determining the variation of RH in different seasons. With forest succession, soil microbes and plant roots become more efficient to conserve C resources, which would result in a greater proportion of C retained in soils.« less

  10. The secondary alkaline zinc electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLarnon, Frank R.; Cairns, Elton J.

    1991-02-01

    The worldwide studies conducted between 1975 and 1990 with the aim of improving cell lifetimes of secondary alkaline zinc electrodes are overviewed. Attention is given the design features and characteristics of various secondary alkaline zinc cells, including four types of zinc/nickel oxide cell designs (vented static-electrolyte, sealed static-electrolyte, vibrating-electrode, and flowing-electrolyte); two types of zinc/air cells (mechanically rechargeable consolidated-electrode and mechanically rechargeable particulate-electrode); zinc/silver oxide battery; zinc/manganese dioxide cell; and zinc/ferric cyanide battery. Particular consideration is given to recent research in the fields of cell thermodynamics, zinc electrodeposition, zinc electrodissolution, zinc corrosion, electrolyte properties, mathematical and phenomenological models, osmotic pumping, nonuniform current distribution, and cell cycle-life perforamnce.

  11. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassovs research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herrings group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  12. Prebiotic Synthesis of Glycine from Ethanolamine in Simulated Archean Alkaline Hydrothermal Vents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianlong; Tian, Ge; Gao, Jing; Han, Mei; Su, Rui; Wang, Yanxiang; Feng, Shouhua

    2016-09-23

    Submarine hydrothermal vents are generally considered as the likely habitats for the origin and evolution of early life on Earth. In recent years, a novel hydrothermal system in Archean subseafloor has been proposed. In this model, highly alkaline and high temperature hydrothermal fluids were generated in basalt-hosted hydrothermal vents, where H2 and CO2 could be abundantly provided. These extreme conditions could have played an irreplaceable role in the early evolution of life. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the abiotic synthesis of amino acids, which are indispensable components of life, at high temperature and alkaline condition. This study aims to propose a new method for the synthesis of glycine in simulated Archean submarine alkaline vent systems. We investigated the formation of glycine from ethanolamine under conditions of high temperature (80-160 °C) and highly alkaline solutions (pH = 9.70). Experiments were performed in an anaerobic environment under mild pressure (0.1-8.0 MPa) at the same time. The results suggested that the formation of glycine from ethanolamine occurred rapidly and efficiently in the presence of metal powders, and was favored by high temperatures and high pressures. The experiment provides a new pathway for prebiotic glycine formation and points out the phenomenal influence of high-temperature alkaline hydrothermal vents in origin of life in the early ocean.

  13. Prebiotic Synthesis of Glycine from Ethanolamine in Simulated Archean Alkaline Hydrothermal Vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianlong; Tian, Ge; Gao, Jing; Han, Mei; Su, Rui; Wang, Yanxiang; Feng, Shouhua

    2016-09-01

    Submarine hydrothermal vents are generally considered as the likely habitats for the origin and evolution of early life on Earth. In recent years, a novel hydrothermal system in Archean subseafloor has been proposed. In this model, highly alkaline and high temperature hydrothermal fluids were generated in basalt-hosted hydrothermal vents, where H2 and CO2 could be abundantly provided. These extreme conditions could have played an irreplaceable role in the early evolution of life. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the abiotic synthesis of amino acids, which are indispensable components of life, at high temperature and alkaline condition. This study aims to propose a new method for the synthesis of glycine in simulated Archean submarine alkaline vent systems. We investigated the formation of glycine from ethanolamine under conditions of high temperature (80-160 °C) and highly alkaline solutions (pH = 9.70). Experiments were performed in an anaerobic environment under mild pressure (0.1-8.0 MPa) at the same time. The results suggested that the formation of glycine from ethanolamine occurred rapidly and efficiently in the presence of metal powders, and was favored by high temperatures and high pressures. The experiment provides a new pathway for prebiotic glycine formation and points out the phenomenal influence of high-temperature alkaline hydrothermal vents in origin of life in the early ocean.

  14. Medium factors on anaerobic production of rhamnolipids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa SG and a simplifying medium for in situ microbial enhanced oil recovery applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Zhou, Jidong; Han, Siqin; Ma, Fang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Aerobic production of rhamnolipid by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was extensively studied. But effect of medium composition on anaerobic production of rhamnolipid by P. aeruginosa was unknown. A simplifying medium facilitating anaerobic production of rhamnolipid is urgently needed for in situ microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). Medium factors affecting anaerobic production of rhamnolipid were investigated using P. aeruginosa SG (Genbank accession number KJ995745). Medium composition for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid by P. aeruginosa is different from that for aerobic production of rhamnolipid. Both hydrophobic substrate and organic nitrogen inhibited rhamnolipid production under anaerobic conditions. Glycerol and nitrate were the best carbon and nitrogen source. The commonly used N limitation under aerobic conditions was not conducive to rhamnolipid production under anaerobic conditions because the initial cell growth demanded enough nitrate for anaerobic respiration. But rhamnolipid was also fast accumulated under nitrogen starvation conditions. Sufficient phosphate was needed for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. SO4(2-) and Mg(2+) are required for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. Results will contribute to isolation bacteria strains which can anaerobically produce rhamnolipid and medium optimization for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. Based on medium optimization by response surface methodology and ions composition of reservoir formation water, a simplifying medium containing 70.3 g/l glycerol, 5.25 g/l NaNO3, 5.49 g/l KH2PO4, 6.9 g/l K2HPO4·3H2O and 0.40 g/l MgSO4 was designed. Using the simplifying medium, 630 mg/l of rhamnolipid was produced by SG, and the anaerobic culture emulsified crude oil to EI24 = 82.5 %. The simplifying medium was promising for in situ MEOR applications.

  15. Anaerobic treatment of Tequila vinasses in a CSTR-type digester.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Acosta, Hugo Oscar; Snell-Castro, Raúl; Alcaraz-González, Víctor; González-Alvarez, Víctor; Pelayo-Ortiz, Carlos

    2010-06-01

    Tequila industries in general produce great volumes of effluents with high pollutant loads, which are discharged (untreated or partially treated) into natural receivers, thus causing severe environmental problems. In this contribution, we propose an integrated system as a first step to comply with the Mexican ecological norms and stabilize the anaerobic treatment of Tequila vinasses with main design criteria: simple and easy operation, reduce operating time and associated costs (maintenance), integrated and compact design, minimal cost of set-up, start-up, monitoring and control. This system is composed of a fully instrumented and automated lab-scale CSTR-type digester, on-line measuring devices of key variables (pH, temperature, flow rates, etc.), which are used along with off-line readings of chemical oxygen demand (COD), biogas composition, alkalinity and volatile fatty acids to guarantee the operational stability of the anaerobic digestion process. The system performance was evaluated for 200 days and the experimental results show that even under the influence of load disturbances, it is possible to reduce the COD concentration to 85% in the start-up phase and up to 95% during the normal operation phase while producing a biogas with a methane composition greater than 65%. It is also shown that in order to maintain an efficient treatment, the buffering capacity (given by the alkalinity ratio, alpha = intermediate alkalinity/total alkalinity) must be closely monitored.

  16. Isolation and Cr(VI) reduction characteristics of quinone respiration in Mangrovibacter plantisponsor strain CR1.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jing; Li, Zifu; Xu, Zhifang; Guo, Jianbo; Hu, Zhenzhen; Guo, Yankai; Li, Min; Yang, Jingliang

    2016-07-01

    A Cr(VI)-reducing Mangrovibacter plantisponsor strain, CR1, was isolated from tannery effluent sludge and had quinone respiration characteristics. Its chromate (CrO4 (2-) ) resistance, quinone respiration characteristics, and Cr(VI) reduction efficiencies were evaluated in detail. Strain CR1 exhibited a high Cr(VI) resistance with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 32 mM in LB medium, and its quinone respiration could occur when an electron donor and strain CR1 both existed in the reaction system. Cr(VI) reduction by strain CR1 was significantly enhanced by a factor of 0.4-4.3 with five different quinone compounds: anthraquinone-2,7-disulfonate, anthraquinone-1-sulfonate, anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS), anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate, and anthraquinone-1,5-disulfonate. AQS was the best electron shuttle among them, and the greatest enhancement to the Cr(VI) bio-reduction was achieved with 0.96 mM AQS. The correlation between the reaction constant k (mg Cr(VI) g(-1) dry cell weight H(-1) ) and thermodynamic temperature T (K) was expressed as an Arrhenius equation lnk=-7662.9/T+27.931(R2=0.9486); the activation energy Ea was 63.71 kJ mol(-1) , and the pre-exponential factor A was 1.35 × 10(12)  mg Cr(VI) g(-1) dry cell weight H(-1) . During the Cr(VI) reduction process, the pH tended to become neutral, and the oxidation-reduction potential decreased to -440 mV. The efficient reduction of Cr(VI) mediated by a quinone respiration strain shows potential for the rapid anaerobic removal of Cr(VI).

  17. Cytochrome p450nor, a novel class of mitochondrial cytochrome P450 involved in nitrate respiration in the fungus Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Takaya, N; Suzuki, S; Kuwazaki, S; Shoun, H; Maruo, F; Yamaguchi, M; Takeo, K

    1999-12-15

    Fusarium oxysporum, an imperfect filamentous fungus performs nitrate respiration under limited oxygen. In the respiratory system, Cytochrome P450nor (P450nor) is thought to catalyze the last step; reduction of nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. We examined its intracellular localization using enzymatic, spectroscopic, and immunological analyses to show that P450nor is found in both the mitochondria and the cytosol. Translational fusions between the putative mitochondrial targeting signal on the amino terminus of P450nor and Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase resulted in significant beta-galactosidase activity in the mitochondrial fraction of nitrate-respiring cells, suggesting that one of the isoforms of P450nor (P450norA) is in anaerobic mitochondrion of F. oxysporum and acts as nitric oxide reductase. Furthermore, these findings suggest the involvement of P450nor in nitrate respiration in mitochondria.

  18. 42 CFR 84.1130 - Respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... respective vapors, or from the chemical reaction between their respective vapors and gases. (3) Air-purifying... reaction with sorbent material in the canister. (c) Pesticide respirators, including all completely...) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas masks; (2) Chin-style gas mask; (3) Chemical cartridge; (4)...

  19. 42 CFR 84.1130 - Respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... respective vapors, or from the chemical reaction between their respective vapors and gases. (3) Air-purifying... reaction with sorbent material in the canister. (c) Pesticide respirators, including all completely...) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas masks; (2) Chin-style gas mask; (3) Chemical cartridge; (4)...

  20. 42 CFR 84.1130 - Respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... respective vapors, or from the chemical reaction between their respective vapors and gases. (3) Air-purifying... reaction with sorbent material in the canister. (c) Pesticide respirators, including all completely...) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas masks; (2) Chin-style gas mask; (3) Chemical cartridge; (4)...

  1. 42 CFR 84.1130 - Respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... respective vapors, or from the chemical reaction between their respective vapors and gases. (3) Air-purifying... reaction with sorbent material in the canister. (c) Pesticide respirators, including all completely...) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas masks; (2) Chin-style gas mask; (3) Chemical cartridge; (4)...

  2. 42 CFR 84.1130 - Respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... respective vapors, or from the chemical reaction between their respective vapors and gases. (3) Air-purifying... reaction with sorbent material in the canister. (c) Pesticide respirators, including all completely...) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas masks; (2) Chin-style gas mask; (3) Chemical cartridge; (4)...

  3. Respiration patterns of resting wasps (Vespula sp.).

    PubMed

    Käfer, Helmut; Kovac, Helmut; Stabentheiner, Anton

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the respiration patterns of wasps (Vespula sp.) in their viable temperature range (2.9-42.4°C) by measuring CO2 production and locomotor and endothermic activity. Wasps showed cycles of an interburst-burst type at low ambient temperatures (Ta<5°C) or typical discontinuous gas exchange patterns with closed, flutter and open phases. At high Ta of >31°C, CO2 emission became cyclic. With rising Ta they enhanced CO2-emission primarily by an exponential increase in respiration frequency, from 2.6 mHz at 4.7°C to 74 mHz at 39.7°C. In the same range of Ta CO2 release per cycle decreased from 38.9 to 26.4 μl g(-1)cycle(-1). A comparison of wasps with other insects showed that they are among the insects with a low respiratory frequency at a given resting metabolic rate (RMR), and a relatively flat increase of respiratory frequency with RMR. CO2 emission was always accompanied by abdominal respiration movements in all open phases and in 71.4% of the flutter phases, often accompanied by body movements. Results suggest that resting wasps gain their highly efficient gas exchange to a considerable extent via the length and type of respiration movements.

  4. 78 FR 18535 - Respirator Certification Fees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 84 RIN 0920-AA42 Respirator Certification Fees AGENCY: Centers for Disease... and Human Services (HHS) proposes to revise the fee structure currently used by the National Institute... number). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This proposed rule is designed to establish fees for the...

  5. Development of conformal respirator monitoring technology

    SciTech Connect

    Shonka, J.J.; Weismann, J.J.; Logan, R.J.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of a Small Business Innovative Research Phase II project to develop a modular, surface conforming respirator monitor to improve upon the manual survey techniques presently used by the nuclear industry. Research was performed with plastic scintillator and gas proportional modules in an effort to find the most conducive geometry for a surface conformal, position sensitive monitor. The respirator monitor prototype developed is a computer controlled, position-sensitive detection system employing 56 modular proportional counters mounted in molds conforming to the inner and outer surfaces of a commonly used respirator (Scott Model 801450-40). The molds are housed in separate enclosures and hinged to create a {open_quotes}waffle-iron{close_quotes} effect so that the closed monitor will simultaneously survey both surfaces of the respirator. The proportional counter prototype was also designed to incorporate Shonka Research Associates previously developed charge-division electronics. This research provided valuable experience into pixellated position sensitive detection systems. The technology developed can be adapted to other monitoring applications where there is a need for deployment of many traditional radiation detectors.

  6. Electrophrenic respiration in patients with high quadriplegia.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, P C; Halter, J A; Nakajima, K

    1989-04-01

    After determining that 15 patients with high spinal cord injuries who were permanently apneic had viable phrenic nerves, electrophrenic respiration units were implanted. Thirteen of the patients (86%) achieved full-time respiration and two more achieved half-time respiration. Despite the loss of 8 patients to unrelated problems, 7 now use electrophrenic respiration continuously, one having done so for 16 years. The patient selection criteria, neurophysiological evaluation method, surgical procedure, postoperative care, and methods for diagnosis of system failures are presented. A comparison of the cervical and thoracic procedures is made. The cervical approach is preferred. Complications consisted primarily of equipment failures. For the external components there were several cases of antenna connection and battery connection failures. The implanted receivers failed in 6 cases with an average lifetime of 48 months, ranging from 24 to 108 months. In one case fibrosis around the electrode resulted in failure to stimulate the phrenic nerve effectively. In another case, infection required removal of the system which was reimplanted later and has continued to provide successful ventilation.

  7. Effects of cadmium on heart mitochondrial respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Kisling, G.M.; Kopp, S.J.; Paulson, D.J.; Tow, J.P.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the direct effect of cadmium on isolated heart mitochondrial respiration. Mitochondria were rapidly prepared by polytroning hearts from male Sprague-Dawley rats in a 0.25 M Sucrose, 4 mM Tris, 1 mM EGTA, 0.2% BSA buffer (pH 7.4), followed by a two-part differential centrifugation. Mitochondria were resuspended in this same Tris-sucrose-BSA buffer minus EGTA and mitochondrial respiration was assayed using a Clark oxygen electrode system at a concentration of 0.5 mg total mitochondrial protein/ml assay buffer. At 5 x 10/sup -6/ M cadmium, mitochondrial state 3 respiration (pyruvate plus malate) was reduced to a level 74.8% of the control value. A 50% reduction in state 3 respiratory rate was achieved at a cadmium concentration of 8.75 x 10/sup -6/ M. The respiratory control ratio did not change significantly but at higher cadmium concentrations (< greater than or equal to 1.25 x 10/sup -5/ M) the ADP/O ratio was increased. None of the cadmium concentrations tested, from 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -4/ M, demonstrated an uncoupling response. These data suggest that cadmium acts strictly as an inhibitor of heart mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. These results contrast those of earlier work involving liver mitochondria in which cadmium was reported to uncouple mitochondrial respiration.

  8. Estimating Canopy Dark Respiration for Crop Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje Mejia, Oscar Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Crop production is obtained from accurate estimates of daily carbon gain.Canopy gross photosynthesis (Pgross) can be estimated from biochemical models of photosynthesis using sun and shaded leaf portions and the amount of intercepted photosyntheticallyactive radiation (PAR).In turn, canopy daily net carbon gain can be estimated from canopy daily gross photosynthesis when canopy dark respiration (Rd) is known.

  9. Coproduction of hydrogen and methane via anaerobic fermentation of cornstalk waste in continuous stirred tank reactor integrated with up-flow anaerobic sludge bed.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xi-Yu; Li, Qian; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2012-06-01

    A 10 L continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system was developed for a two-stage hydrogen fermentation process with an integrated alkaline treatment. The maximum hydrogen production rate reached 218.5 mL/L h at a cornstalk concentration of 30 g/L, and the total hydrogen yield and volumetric hydrogen production rate reached 58.0 mL/g-cornstalk and 0.55-0.57 L/L d, respectively. A 10 L up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) was used for continuous methane fermentation of the effluents obtained from the two-stage hydrogen fermentation. At the optimal organic loading rate of 15.0 g-COD/Ld, the COD removal efficiency and volumetric biogas production rate reached 83.3% and 4.6L/Ld, respectively. Total methane yield reached 200.9 mL/g-cornstalk in anaerobic fermentation with the effluents and alkaline hydrolysate. As a result, the total energy recovery by coproduction of hydrogen and methane with anaerobic fermentation of cornstalk reached 67.1%.

  10. Anaerobic benzene degradation by bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Carsten; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Richnow, Hans‐Hermann

    2011-01-01

    Summary Benzene is a widespread and toxic contaminant. The fate of benzene in contaminated aquifers seems to be primarily controlled by the abundance of oxygen: benzene is aerobically degraded at high rates by ubiquitous microorganisms, and the oxygen‐dependent pathways for its breakdown were elucidated more than 50 years ago. In contrast, benzene was thought to be persistent under anoxic conditions until 25 years ago. Nevertheless, within the last 15 years, several benzene‐degrading cultures have been enriched under varying electron acceptor conditions in laboratories around the world, and organisms involved in anaerobic benzene degradation have been identified, indicating that anaerobic benzene degradation is a relevant environmental process. However, only a few benzene degraders have been isolated in pure culture so far, and they all use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In some highly enriched strictly anaerobic cultures, benzene has been described to be mineralized cooperatively by two or more different organisms. Despite great efforts, the biochemical mechanism by which the aromatic ring of benzene is activated in the absence of oxygen is still not fully elucidated; methylation, hydroxylation and carboxylation are discussed as likely reactions. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the ‘key players’ of anaerobic benzene degradation under different electron acceptor conditions and the possible pathway(s) of anaerobic benzene degradation. PMID:21450012

  11. [Endogenous respiration process analysis of heterotrophic biomass and autotrophic biomass based on respiration map ].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-hua; Bai, Xu-li; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Yi; He, Chun-bo

    2014-09-01

    The endogenous process is an important metabolic part of the activated sludge, and the understanding of this process is still unclear. Characteristics of endogenous respiration for heterotrophic bacteria and autotrophic nitrifiers were analyzed using respirogram. Results showed that both heterotrophic and autotrophic bacteria entered the stage of endogenous respiration at almost the same time, but heterotrophic bacteria first entered the stage of dormancy i. e. , they were easier to recover a higher proportion of biomass during the dormancy stage, indicating that heterotrophic bacteria exhibited strong environmental adaptability. Autotrophic bacteria were, however, quite different. This finding confirmed that autotrophic bacteria were more vulnerable from the viewpoint of endogenous respiration. In addition, the study also found that the increase of endogenous respiration rate ratio reflected the decreased sludge activity. And the proportion of endogenous respiration was an important parameter to characterize the activity of activated sludge, which can be used as a quantitative index for the health status of activated sludge. The findings further deepened the understanding of endogenous respiration process and provided a theoretical basis for the operation and management of wastewater treatment plants.

  12. 21 CFR 892.1970 - Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. 892.1970... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1970 Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. (a) Identification. A radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer is a device intended to be used...

  13. 42 CFR 84.1156 - Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pesticide respirators; performance requirements... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1156 Pesticide respirators; performance requirements;...

  14. 42 CFR 84.1156 - Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pesticide respirators; performance requirements... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1156 Pesticide respirators; performance requirements;...

  15. 42 CFR 84.1156 - Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pesticide respirators; performance requirements... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1156 Pesticide respirators; performance requirements;...

  16. 42 CFR 84.1156 - Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pesticide respirators; performance requirements... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1156 Pesticide respirators; performance requirements;...

  17. 42 CFR 84.1156 - Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pesticide respirators; performance requirements... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1156 Pesticide respirators; performance requirements;...

  18. 42 CFR 84.1134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84... Combination Gas Masks § 84.1134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section each respirator shall be equipped with a substantial, durable...

  19. 42 CFR 84.190 - Chemical cartridge respirators: description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators: description. 84.190... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.190 Chemical cartridge respirators: description. (a) Chemical...

  20. 42 CFR 84.190 - Chemical cartridge respirators: description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators: description. 84.190... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.190 Chemical cartridge respirators: description. (a) Chemical...

  1. 42 CFR 84.190 - Chemical cartridge respirators: description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators: description. 84.190... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.190 Chemical cartridge respirators: description. (a) Chemical...

  2. 42 CFR 84.190 - Chemical cartridge respirators: description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators: description. 84.190... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.190 Chemical cartridge respirators: description. (a) Chemical...

  3. 42 CFR 84.190 - Chemical cartridge respirators: description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators: description. 84.190... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.190 Chemical cartridge respirators: description. (a) Chemical...

  4. The Bradyrhizobium japonicum napEDABC genes encoding the periplasmic nitrate reductase are essential for nitrate respiration.

    PubMed

    Delgado, María J; Bonnard, Nathalie; Tresierra-Ayala, Alvaro; Bedmar, Eulogio J; Müller, Peter

    2003-12-01

    The napEDABC gene cluster that encodes the periplasmic nitrate reductase from Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 has been isolated and characterized. napA encodes the catalytic subunit, and the napB and napC gene products are predicted to be a soluble dihaem c and a membrane-anchored tetrahaem c-type cytochrome, respectively. napE encodes a transmembrane protein of unknown function, and the napD gene product is a soluble protein which is assumed to play a role in the maturation of NapA. Western blots of the periplasmic fraction from wild-type cells grown anaerobically with nitrate revealed the presence of a protein band with a molecular size of about 90 kDa corresponding to NapA. A B. japonicum mutant carrying an insertion in the napA gene was unable to grow under nitrate-respiring conditions, lacked nitrate reductase activity, and did not show the 90 kDa protein band. Complementation of the mutant with a plasmid bearing the napEDABC genes restored both nitrate-dependent anaerobic growth of the cells and nitrate reductase activity. A membrane-bound and a periplasmic c-type cytochrome, with molecular masses of 25 kDa and 15 kDa, respectively, were not detected in the napA mutant strain incubated anaerobically with nitrate, which identifies those proteins as the NapC and the NapB components of the B. japonicum periplasmic nitrate reductase enzyme. These results suggest that the periplasmic nitrate reductase is the enzyme responsible for anaerobic growth of B. japonicum under nitrate-respiring conditions. The promoter region of the napEDABC genes has been characterized by primer extension. A major transcript initiates 66.5 bp downstream of the centre of a putative FNR-like binding site.

  5. Identification of Electrode Respiring, Hydrocarbonoclastic Bacterial Strain Stenotrophomonas maltophilia MK2 Highlights the Untapped Potential for Environmental Bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Venkidusamy, Krishnaveni; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2016-01-01

    Electrode respiring bacteria (ERB) possess a great potential for many biotechnological applications such as microbial electrochemical remediation systems (MERS) because of their exoelectrogenic capabilities to degrade xenobiotic pollutants. Very few ERB have been isolated from MERS, those exhibited a bioremediation potential toward organic contaminants. Here we report once such bacterial strain, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia MK2, a facultative anaerobic bacterium isolated from a hydrocarbon fed MERS, showed a potent hydrocarbonoclastic behavior under aerobic and anaerobic environments. Distinct properties of the strain MK2 were anaerobic fermentation of the amino acids, electrode respiration, anaerobic nitrate reduction and the ability to metabolize n-alkane components (C8–C36) of petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) including the biomarkers, pristine and phytane. The characteristic of diazoic dye decolorization was used as a criterion for pre-screening the possible electrochemically active microbial candidates. Bioelectricity generation with concomitant dye decolorization in MERS showed that the strain is electrochemically active. In acetate fed microbial fuel cells (MFCs), maximum current density of 273 ± 8 mA/m2 (1000 Ω) was produced (power density 113 ± 7 mW/m2) by strain MK2 with a coulombic efficiency of 34.8%. Further, the presence of possible alkane hydroxylase genes (alkB and rubA) in the strain MK2 indicated that the genes involved in hydrocarbon degradation are of diverse origin. Such observations demonstrated the potential of facultative hydrocarbon degradation in contaminated environments. Identification of such a novel petrochemical hydrocarbon degrading ERB is likely to offer a new route to the sustainable bioremedial process of source zone contamination with simultaneous energy generation through MERS. PMID:28018304

  6. Diclofenac salts. III. Alkaline and earth alkaline salts.

    PubMed

    Fini, Adamo; Fazio, Giuseppe; Rosetti, Francesca; Angeles Holgado, M; Iruín, Ana; Alvarez-Fuentes, Josefa

    2005-11-01

    Diclofenac salts containing the alkaline and two earth alkaline cations have been prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDAX spectroscopy; and by thermal and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA): all of them crystallize as hydrate when precipitated from water. The salts dehydrate at room temperature and more easily on heating, but recovery the hydration, when placed in a humid environment. X-ray diffraction spectra suggest that on dehydration new peaks appear on diffractograms and the lattice of the salts partially looses crystallinity. This phenomenon is readily visible in the case of the calcium and magnesium salts, whose thermograms display a crystallization exotherm, before melting or decomposing at temperatures near or above 200 degrees C; these last salts appear to form solvates, when prepared from methanol. The thermogram of each salt shows a complex endotherm of dehydration about 100 degrees C; the calcium salt displays two endotherms, well separated at about 120 and 160 degrees C, which disappear after prolonged heating. Decomposition exotherms, before or soon after the melting, appear below 300 degrees C. The ammonium salt is thermally unstable and, when heated to start dehydration, dissociates and leaves acidic diclofenac.

  7. Changes in gene expression of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in response to anaerobic stress reveal induction of central metabolism and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Zhu, Jiawen; Yang, Kui; Xu, Zhuofei; Liu, Ziduo; Zhou, Rui

    2014-06-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is an important porcine respiratory pathogen causing great economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. Oxygen deprivation is a stress that A. pleuropneumoniae will encounter during both early infection and the later, persistent stage. To understand modulation of A. pleuropneumoniae gene expression in response to the stress caused by anaerobic conditions, gene expression profiles under anaerobic and aerobic conditions were compared in this study. The microarray results showed that 631 genes (27.7% of the total ORFs) were differentially expressed in anaerobic conditions. Many genes encoding proteins involved in glycolysis, carbon source uptake systems, pyruvate metabolism, fermentation and the electron respiration transport chain were up-regulated. These changes led to an increased amount of pyruvate, lactate, ethanol and acetate in the bacterial cells as confirmed by metabolite detection. Genes encoding proteins involved in cell surface structures, especially biofilm formation, peptidoglycan biosynthesis and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis were up-regulated as well. Biofilm formation was significantly enhanced under anaerobic conditions. These results indicate that induction of central metabolism is important for basic survival of A. pleuropneumoniae after a shift to an anaerobic environment. Enhanced biofilm formation may contribute to the persistence of this pathogen in the damaged anaerobic host tissue and also in the early colonization stage. These discoveries give new insights into adaptation mechanisms of A. pleuropneumoniae in response to environmental stress.

  8. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more that two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  9. Aeration for plant root respiration in a tidal marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hailong; Li, Ling; Lockington, David

    2005-06-01

    This paper investigates the tidal effects on aeration conditions for plant root respiration in a tidal marsh. We extend the work of Ursino et al. (2004) by using a two-phase model for air and water flows in the marsh. Simulations have been conducted to examine directly the link between the airflow dynamics and the aeration condition in the marsh soil. The results show that the effects of entrapped air on water movement in the vadose zone are significant in certain circumstances. Single-phase models based on Richards' equation, which neglect such effects, may not be adequate for quantifying the aeration condition in tidal marsh. The optimal aeration condition, represented by the maximum of the integral magnitude of tidally advected air mass (TAAM) flux, is found to occur near the tidal creek for the four soil textures simulated. This may explain the observation that some salt marsh plant species grow better near tidal creeks than in the inner marsh areas. Our analyses, based on the two-phase model and predicted TAAM flux magnitude, provide further insight into the "positive feedback" mechanism proposed by Ursino et al. (2004). That is, pioneer plants may grow successfully near the creek where the root aeration condition is optimal. The roots of the pioneer plants can soften and loosen the rhizosphere soil, which increases the evapotranspiration rate, the soil porosity, and absolute permeability and weakens the capillary effects. These, in turn, improve further the root aeration conditions and may lead to colonization by plants less resistant to anaerobic conditions.

  10. Aeration for plant root respiration in a tidal marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hailong; Li, Ling; Lockington, David

    2005-06-01

    This paper investigates the tidal effects on aeration conditions for plant root respiration in a tidal marsh. We extend the work of Ursino et al. (2004) by using a two-phase model for air and water flows in the marsh. Simulations have been conducted to examine directly the link between the airflow dynamics and the aeration condition in the marsh soil. The results show that the effects of entrapped air on water movement in the vadose zone are significant in certain circumstances. Single-phase models based on Richards' equation, which neglect such effects, may not be adequate for quantifying the aeration condition in tidal marsh. The optimal aeration condition, represented by the maximum of the integral magnitude of tidally advected air mass (TAAM) flux, is found to occur near the tidal creek for the four soil textures simulated. This may explain the observation that some salt marsh plant species grow better near tidal creeks than in the inner marsh areas. Our analyses, based on the two-phase model and predicted TAAM flux magnitude, provide further insight into the ``positive feedback'' mechanism proposed by Ursino et al. (2004). That is, pioneer plants may grow successfully near the creek where the root aeration condition is optimal. The roots of the pioneer plants can soften and loosen the rhizosphere soil, which increases the evapotranspiration rate, the soil porosity, and absolute permeability and weakens the capillary effects. These, in turn, improve further the root aeration conditions and may lead to colonization by plants less resistant to anaerobic conditions.

  11. The Transition from Aerobic to Anaerobic Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, James S.; McLellan, Thomas H.

    1980-01-01

    The transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is discussed. More research is needed on different kinds of athletes and athletic activities and how they may affect aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms. (CJ)

  12. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa

  13. Anaerobic bioprocessing of organic wastes.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, W; de Beer, D; Pena, M; Lettinga, G; Lens, P

    1996-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion of dissolved, suspended and solid organics has rapidly evolved in the last decades but nevertheless still faces several scientific unknowns. In this review, some fundamentals of bacterial conversions and adhesion are addressed initially. It is argued in the light of ΔG-values of reactions, and in view of the minimum energy quantum per mol, that anaerobic syntrophs must have special survival strategies in order to support their existence: redistributing the available energy between the partners, reduced end-product fermentation reactions and special cell-to-cell physiological interactions. In terms of kinetics, it appears that both reaction rates and residual substrate thresholds are strongly related to minimum ΔG-values. These new fundamental insights open perspectives for efficient design and operation of anaerobic bioprocesses. Subsequently, an overview is given of the current anaerobic biotechnology. For treating wastewaters, a novel and high performance new system has been introduced during the last decade; the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket system (UASB). This reactor concept requires anaerobic consortia to grow in a dense and eco-physiologically well-organized way. The microbial principles of such granular sludge growth are presented. Using a thermodynamic approach, the formation of different types of aggregates is explained. The application of this bioprocess in worldwide wastewater treatment is indicated. Due to the long retention times of the active biomass, the UASB is also suitable for the development of bacterial consortia capable of degrading xenobiotics. Operating granular sludge reactors at high upflow velocities (5-6 m/h) in expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) systems enlarges the application field to very low strength wastewaters (chemical oxygen demand < 1 g/l) and psychrophilic temperatures (10°C). For the treatment of organic suspensions, there is currently a tendency to evolve from the conventional mesophilic

  14. Evaluation of the 5 and 8 pH point titration methods for monitoring anaerobic digesters treating solid waste.

    PubMed

    Vannecke, T P W; Lampens, D R A; Ekama, G A; Volcke, E I P

    2015-01-01

    Simple titration methods certainly deserve consideration for on-site routine monitoring of volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration and alkalinity during anaerobic digestion (AD), because of their simplicity, speed and cost-effectiveness. In this study, the 5 and 8 pH point titration methods for measuring the VFA concentration and carbonate system alkalinity (H2CO3*-alkalinity) were assessed and compared. For this purpose, synthetic solutions with known H2CO3*-alkalinity and VFA concentration as well as samples from anaerobic digesters treating three different kind of solid wastes were analysed. The results of these two related titration methods were verified with photometric and high-pressure liquid chromatography measurements. It was shown that photometric measurements lead to overestimations of the VFA concentration in the case of coloured samples. In contrast, the 5 pH point titration method provides an accurate estimation of the VFA concentration, clearly corresponding with the true value. Concerning the H2CO3*-alkalinity, the most accurate and precise estimations, showing very similar results for repeated measurements, were obtained using the 8 pH point titration. Overall, it was concluded that the 5 pH point titration method is the preferred method for the practical monitoring of AD of solid wastes due to its robustness, cost efficiency and user-friendliness.

  15. Alkaline detergent recycling via ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-06-01

    The metal finishing industry uses alkaline cleaners and detergents to remove oils and dirt from manufactured parts, often before they are painted or plated. The use of these cleaners has grown because environmental regulations are phasing out ozone depleting substances and placing restrictions on the use and disposal of many hazardous solvents. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is examining ultrafiltration as a cleaning approach that reclaims the cleaning solutions and minimizes wastes. The ultrafiltration membrane is made from sheets of polymerized organic film. The sheets are rolled onto a supporting frame and installed in a tube. Spent cleaning solution is pumped into a filter chamber and filtered through the membrane that captures oils and dirt and allows water and detergent to pass. The membrane is monitored and when pressure builds from oil and dirt, an automatic system cleans the surface to maintain solution flow and filtration quality. The results show that the ultrafiltration does not disturb the detergent concentration or alkalinity but removed almost all the oils and dirt leaving the solution in condition to be reused.

  16. [Contribution of wheat rhizosphere respiration to soil respiration under elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen application].

    PubMed

    Kou, Tai-ji; Xu, Xiao-feng; Zhu, Jian-guo; Xie, Zu-bin; Guo, Da-yong; Miao, Yan-fang

    2011-10-01

    With the support of free-air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) system and by using isotope 13C technique, and through planting wheat (Triticum aestivum L., C3 crop) on a soil having been planted with maize (Zea mays L., C4 crop) for many years, this paper studied the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen application on the delta 13C value of soil emitted CO2 and the wheat rhizosphere respiration. With the growth of wheat, the delta 13C value of soil emitted CO2 had a gradual decrease. Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (200 micromol mol(-1)) decreased the delta 13C value of emitted CO2 at booting and heading stages significantly when the nitrogen application rate was 250 kg hm(-2) (HN), and at jointing and booting stages significantly when the nitrogen application rate was 150 kg hm(-2) (LN). Nevertheless, the elevated atmospheric CO2 promoted the proportions of wheat rhizosphere respiration to soil respiration at booting and heading stages significantly. From jointing stage to maturing stage, the proportions of wheat rhizosphere respiration to soil respiration were 24%-48% (HN) and 21%-48% (LN) under elevated atmospheric CO2, and 20%-36% (HN) and 19%-32% (LN) under ambient atmospheric CO2. Under both elevated and ambient atmospheric CO2 concentrations, the delta 13C value of emitted CO2 and the rhizosphere respiration had different responses to the increased nitrogen application rate, and there was a significant interactive effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration and nitrogen application rate on the wheat rhizosphere respiration at jointing stage.

  17. Changes in soil respiration components and their specific respiration along three successional forests in the subtropics

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Tianfeng; Liu, Juxiu; Wang, Gangsheng; Huang, Wenjuan; Zhou, Guoyi

    2016-01-16

    1.Understanding how soil respiration components change with forest succession is critical for modelling and predicting soil carbon (C) processes and its sequestration below-ground. The specific respiration (a ratio of respiration to biomass) is increasingly being used as an indicator of forest succession conceptually based on Odum's theory of ecosystem development. However, the hypothesis that specific soil respiration declines with forest succession remains largely untested. 2.We used a trenching method to partition soil respiration into heterotrophic respiration and autotrophic respiration (RH and RA) and then evaluated the specific RH and specific RA in three successional forests in subtropical China. 3.Our results showed a clear seasonality in the influence of forest succession on RH, with no significant differences among the three forests in the dry season but a higher value in the old-growth forest than the other two forests in the wet season. RA in the old-growth forest tended to be the highest among the three forests. Both the specific RH and specific RA decreased with the progressive maturity of three forests. 4.Lastly, our results highlight the importance of forest succession in determining the variation of RH in different seasons. With forest succession, soil microbes and plant roots become more efficient to conserve C resources, which would result in a greater proportion of C retained in soils.

  18. How anaerobic is the Wingate Anaerobic Test for humans?

    PubMed

    Beneke, R; Pollmann, C; Bleif, I; Leithäuser, R M; Hütler, M

    2002-08-01

    The Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) is generally used to evaluate anaerobic cycling performance, but knowledge of the metabolic profile of WAnT is limited. Therefore the energetics of WAnT was analysed with respect to working efficiency and performance. A group of 11 male subjects [mean (SD), age 21.6 (3.8) years, height 178.6 (6.6) cm, body mass 82.2 (12.1) kg] performed a maximal incremental exercise test and a WAnT. Lactic and alactic anaerobic energy outputs were calculated from net lactate production and the fast component of the kinetics of post-exercise oxygen uptake. Aerobic metabolism was determined from oxygen uptake during exercise. The WAnT mean power of 683 (96.0) W resulted from a total energy output above the value at rest of 128.1 (23.2) kJ x 30 s(-1) [mean metabolic power=4.3 (0.8) kW] corresponding to a working efficiency of 16.2 (1.6)%. The WAnT working efficiency was lower (P < 0.01) than the corresponding value of 24.1 (1.7)% at 362 (41) W at the end of an incremental exercise test. During WAnT the fractions of the energy from aerobic, anaerobic alactic and lactic acid metabolism were 18.6 (2.5)%, 31.1 (4.6)%, and 50.3 (5.1)%, respectively. Energy from metabolism of anaerobic lactic acid explained 83% and 81% of the variance of WAnT peak and mean power, respectively. The results indicate firstly that WAnT requires the use of more anaerobically derived energy than previously estimated, secondly that anaerobic metabolism is dominated by glycolysis, thirdly that WAnT mechanical efficiency is lower than that found in aerobic exercise tests, and fourthly that the latter finding partly explains discrepancies between previously published and the present data about the metabolic profile of WAnT.

  19. A MEMS turbine prototype for respiration harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goreke, U.; Habibiabad, S.; Azgin, K.; Beyaz, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    The design, manufacturing, and performance characterization of a MEMS-scale turbine prototype is reported. The turbine is designed for integration into a respiration harvester that can convert normal human breathing into electrical power through electromagnetic induction. The device measures 10 mm in radius, and employs 12 blades located around the turbine periphery along with ball bearings around the center. Finite element simulations showed that an average torque of 3.07 μNm is induced at 12 lpm airflow rate, which lies in normal breathing levels. The turbine and a test package were manufactured using CNC milling on PMMA. Tests were performed at respiration flow rates between 5-25 lpm. The highest rotational speed was measured to be 9.84 krpm at 25 lpm, resulting in 8.96 mbar pressure drop across the device and 370 mW actuation power.

  20. Global transcriptomic analysis uncovers a switch to anaerobic metabolism in tellurite-exposed Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Molina-Quiroz, Roberto C; Loyola, David E; Díaz-Vásquez, Waldo A; Arenas, Felipe A; Urzúa, Ulises; Pérez-Donoso, José M; Vásquez, Claudio C

    2014-09-01

    Tellurite (TeO3(2-)) is harmful for most microorganisms, especially Gram-negative bacteria. Even though tellurite toxicity involves a number of individual aspects, including oxidative stress, malfunctioning of metabolic enzymes and a drop in the reduced thiol pool, among others, the general mechanism of toxicity is rather complex and not completely understood to date. This work focused on DNA microarray analysis to evaluate the Escherichia coli global transcriptomic response when exposed to the toxicant. Confirming previous results, the induction of the oxidative stress response regulator soxS was observed. Upregulation of a number of genes involved in the global stress response, protein folding, redox processes and cell wall organization was also detected. In addition, downregulation of aerobic respiration-related genes suggested a metabolic switch to anaerobic respiration. The expression results were validated through oxygen consumption experiments, which corroborated that tellurite-exposed cells effectively consume oxygen at lower rates than untreated controls.

  1. Respirators, internal dose, and Oyster Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Michal, R.

    1996-06-01

    This article looks at the experience of Oyster Creek in relaxing the requirements for the use of respirators in all facets of plant maintenance, on the overall dose received by plant maintenance personnel. For Roger Shaw, director of radiological controls for three years at GPU Nuclear Corporation`s Oyster Creek nuclear plant the correct dose balance is determined on a job-by-job basis: Does the job require a respirator, which is an effective means of decreasing worker inhalation of airborne radioactive particles? Will wearing a respirator slow down a worker, consequently increasing whole body radiation exposure by prolonging the time spent in fields of high external radiation? How does respiratory protection affect worker safety and to what degree? While changes to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s 10CFR20 have updated the radiation protection requirements for the nuclear industry, certain of the revisions have been directed specifically at reducing worker dose, Shaw said. {open_quotes}It basically delineates that dose is dose,{close_quotes} Shaw said, {open_quotes}regardless of whether it is acquired externally or internally.{close_quotes} The revision of Part 20 changed the industry`s attitude toward internal dose, which had always been viewed negatively. {open_quotes}Internal dose was always seen as preventable by wearing respirators and by using engineering techniques such as ventilation control and decontamination,{close_quotes} Shaw said, {open_quotes}whereas external dose, although reduced where practical, was seen as a fact of the job.{close_quotes}

  2. Robust respiration detection from remote photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    van Gastel, Mark; Stuijk, Sander; de Haan, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of respiration is essential for early detection of critical illness. Current methods require sensors attached to the body and/or are not robust to subject motion. Alternative camera-based solutions have been presented using motion vectors and remote photoplethysmography. In this work, we present a non-contact camera-based method to detect respiration, which can operate in both visible and dark lighting conditions by detecting the respiratory-induced colour differences of the skin. We make use of the close similarity between skin colour variations caused by the beating of the heart and those caused by respiration, leading to a much improved signal quality compared to single-channel approaches. Essentially, we propose to find the linear combination of colour channels which suppresses the distortions best in a frequency band including pulse rate, and subsequently we use this same linear combination to extract the respiratory signal in a lower frequency band. Evaluation results obtained from recordings on healthy subjects which perform challenging scenarios, including motion, show that respiration can be accurately detected over the entire range of respiratory frequencies, with a correlation coefficient of 0.96 in visible light and 0.98 in infrared, compared to 0.86 with the best-performing non-contact benchmark algorithm. Furthermore, evaluation on a set of videos recorded in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) shows that this technique looks promising as a future alternative to current contact-sensors showing a correlation coefficient of 0.87. PMID:28018717

  3. Radar sensitivity to human heartbeats and respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aardal, Øyvind; Brovoll, Sverre; Paichard, Yoann; Berger, Tor; Lande, Tor Sverre; Hamran, Svein-Erik

    2015-05-01

    Human heartbeats and respiration can be detected from a distance using radar. This can be used for medical applications and human being detection. It is useful to have a system independent measure of how detectable the vital signs are. In radar applications, the Radar Cross Section (RCS) is normally used to characterize the detectability of an object. Since the human vital signs are seen by the radar as movements of the torso, the modulations in the person RCS can be used as a system independent measure of the vital signs detectability. In this paper, measurements of persons seated in an anechoic chamber are presented. The measurements were calibrated using empty room and a metallic calibration sphere. A narrowband radar operating at frequencies from 500 MHz to 18 GHz in discrete steps was used. A turntable provided measurements at precise aspect angles all around the person under test. In an I & Q receiver, the heartbeat and respiration modulation is a combination of amplitude and phase mod- modulations. The measurements were filtered, leaving the modulations from the vital signs in the radar recordings. The procedure for RCS computation was applied to these filtered data, capturing the complex signatures. It was found that both the heartbeat and respiration detectability increase with increasing frequency. The heartbeat signatures are almost equal from the front and the back, while being almost undetectable from the sides of the person. The respiration signatures are slightly higher from the front than from the back, and smaller from the sides. The signature measurements presented in this paper provide an objective system independent measure of the detectability of human vital signs as a function of frequency and aspect angle. These measures are useful for example in system design and in assessing real measurement scenarios.

  4. Rotenone induces cell death in primary dopaminergic culture by increasing ROS production and inhibiting mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Radad, Khaled; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter; Gille, Gabriele

    2006-09-01

    Although the definite etiology of Parkinson's disease is still unclear, increasing evidence has suggested an important role for environmental factors such as exposure to pesticides in increasing the risk of developing Parkinson's disease. In the present study, primary cultures prepared from embryonic mouse mesencephala were applied to investigate the toxic effects and underlying mechanisms of rotenone-induced neuronal cell death relevant to Parkinson's disease. Results revealed that rotenone destroyed dopaminergic neurons in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Consistent with the cytotoxic effect of rotenone as evidenced by dopaminergic cell loss, it significantly increased the release of lactate dehydrogenase into the culture medium, the number of necrotic cells in the culture and the number of nuclei showing apoptotic features. Rotenone exerted toxicity by decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing reactive oxygen species production and shifting respiration to a more anaerobic state.

  5. A model of metabolic changes in respiration-deficient human cells.

    PubMed

    Bollmann, F Mathias

    2007-09-01

    Cells lacking aerobic metabolism because of damaged mtDNA accumulate in many postmitotic tissues in the course aging. Although being only a small fraction of cells, they might play a major role in oxidative stress affecting the whole body. However, it remains unclear how such cells, which are under normal circumstances dependent on aerobic metabolism, are able to survive for decades in vivo. Here a new model is presented that proposes a coexistence of anaerobic glycolysis and a partly reversed TCA cycle. Succinate plays a key role in the changed metabolic pathways because it has to be exported by the cell. This hypothesis supports the view that some respiration-deficient cells are able to survive permanently within the body and contribute to human aging.

  6. Comparison of liquid hot water and alkaline pretreatments of giant reed for improved enzymatic digestibility and biogas energy production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Danping; Ge, Xumeng; Zhang, Quanguo; Li, Yebo

    2016-09-01

    Liquid hot water (LHW) and alkaline pretreatments of giant reed biomass were compared in terms of digestibility, methane production, and cost-benefit efficiency for electricity generation via anaerobic digestion with a combined heat and power system. Compared to LHW pretreatment, alkaline pretreatment retained more of the dry matter in giant reed biomass solids due to less severe conditions. Under their optimal conditions, LHW pretreatment (190°C, 15min) and alkaline pretreatment (20g/L of NaOH, 24h) improved glucose yield from giant reed by more than 2-fold, while only the alkaline pretreatment significantly (p<0.05) increased cumulative methane yield (by 63%) over that of untreated biomass (217L/kgVS). LHW pretreatment obtained negative net electrical energy production due to high energy input. Alkaline pretreatment achieved 27% higher net electrical energy production than that of non-pretreatment (3859kJ/kg initial total solids), but alkaline liquor reuse is needed for improved net benefit.

  7. Frost Induces Respiration and Accelerates Carbon Depletion in Trees

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Or; Earles, J. Mason; Secchi, Francesca; Godfrey, Jessie; Zwieniecki, Maciej A.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular respiration depletes stored carbohydrates during extended periods of limited photosynthesis, e.g. winter dormancy or drought. As respiration rate is largely a function of temperature, the thermal conditions during such periods may affect non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) availability and, ultimately, recovery. Here, we surveyed stem responses to temperature changes in 15 woody species. For two species with divergent respirational response to frost, P. integerrima and P. trichocarpa, we also examined corresponding changes in NSC levels. Finally, we simulated respiration-induced NSC depletion using historical temperature data for the western US. We report a novel finding that tree stems significantly increase respiration in response to near freezing temperatures. We observed this excess respiration in 13 of 15 species, deviating 10% to 170% over values predicted by the Arrhenius equation. Excess respiration persisted at temperatures above 0°C during warming and reoccurred over multiple frost-warming cycles. A large adjustment of NSCs accompanied excess respiration in P. integerrima, whereas P. trichocarpa neither excessively respired nor adjusted NSCs. Over the course of the years included in our model, frost-induced respiration accelerated stem NSC consumption by 8.4 mg (glucose eq.) cm-3 yr-1 on average in the western US, a level of depletion that may continue to significantly affect spring NSC availability. This novel finding revises the current paradigm of low temperature respiration kinetics. PMID:26629819

  8. Frost Induces Respiration and Accelerates Carbon Depletion in Trees.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Or; Earles, J Mason; Secchi, Francesca; Godfrey, Jessie; Zwieniecki, Maciej A

    2015-01-01

    Cellular respiration depletes stored carbohydrates during extended periods of limited photosynthesis, e.g. winter dormancy or drought. As respiration rate is largely a function of temperature, the thermal conditions during such periods may affect non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) availability and, ultimately, recovery. Here, we surveyed stem responses to temperature changes in 15 woody species. For two species with divergent respirational response to frost, P. integerrima and P. trichocarpa, we also examined corresponding changes in NSC levels. Finally, we simulated respiration-induced NSC depletion using historical temperature data for the western US. We report a novel finding that tree stems significantly increase respiration in response to near freezing temperatures. We observed this excess respiration in 13 of 15 species, deviating 10% to 170% over values predicted by the Arrhenius equation. Excess respiration persisted at temperatures above 0 °C during warming and reoccurred over multiple frost-warming cycles. A large adjustment of NSCs accompanied excess respiration in P. integerrima, whereas P. trichocarpa neither excessively respired nor adjusted NSCs. Over the course of the years included in our model, frost-induced respiration accelerated stem NSC consumption by 8.4 mg (glucose eq.) cm(-3) yr(-1) on average in the western US, a level of depletion that may continue to significantly affect spring NSC availability. This novel finding revises the current paradigm of low temperature respiration kinetics.

  9. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  10. Treatment of municipal landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic digester and activated sludge system

    SciTech Connect

    Kheradmand, S.; Karimi-Jashni, A.; Sartaj, M.

    2010-06-15

    The main objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of treating sanitary landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic and activated sludge system. A high-strength leachate from Shiraz municipal landfill site was treated using this system. A two-stage laboratory-scale anaerobic digester under mesophilic conditions and an activated sludge unit were used. Landfill leachate composition and characteristics varied considerably during 8 months experiment (COD concentrations of 48,552-62,150 mg/L). It was found that the system could reduce the COD of the leachate by 94% at a loading rate of 2.25 g COD/L/d and 93% at loading rate of 3.37 g COD/L/d. The anaerobic digester treatment was quite effective in removing Fe, Cu, Mn, and Ni. However, in the case of Zn, removal efficiency was about 50%. For the rest of the HMs the removal efficiencies were in the range 88.8-99.9%. Ammonia reduction did not occur in anaerobic digesters. Anaerobic reactors increased alkalinity about 3.2-4.8% in the 1st digester and 1.8-7.9% in the 2nd digester. In activated sludge unit, alkalinity and ammonia removal efficiency were 49-60% and 48.6-64.7%, respectively. Methane production rate was in the range of 0.02-0.04, 0.04-0.07, and 0.02-0.04 L/g COD{sub rem} for the 1st digester, the 2nd digester, and combination of both digesters, respectively; the methane content of the biogas varied between 60% and 63%.

  11. Diffusion in biofilms respiring on electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-11-15

    The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed for noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that (1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; (2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; (3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms—the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and (4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms.

  12. Natural Niche for Organohalide-Respiring Chloroflexi

    PubMed Central

    Krzmarzick, Mark J.; Crary, Benjamin B.; Harding, Jevon J.; Oyerinde, Oyenike O.; Leri, Alessandra C.; Myneni, Satish C. B.

    2012-01-01

    The phylum Chloroflexi contains several isolated bacteria that have been found to respire a diverse array of halogenated anthropogenic chemicals. The distribution and role of these Chloroflexi in uncontaminated terrestrial environments, where abundant natural organohalogens could function as potential electron acceptors, have not been studied. Soil samples (116 total, including 6 sectioned cores) from a range of uncontaminated sites were analyzed for the number of Dehalococcoides-like Chloroflexi 16S rRNA genes present. Dehalococcoides-like Chloroflexi populations were detected in all but 13 samples. The concentrations of organochlorine ([organochlorine]), inorganic chloride, and total organic carbon (TOC) were obtained for 67 soil core sections. The number of Dehalococcoides-like Chloroflexi 16S rRNA genes positively correlated with [organochlorine]/TOC while the number of Bacteria 16S rRNA genes did not. Dehalococcoides-like Chloroflexi were also observed to increase in number with a concomitant accumulation of chloride when cultured with an enzymatically produced mixture of organochlorines. This research provides evidence that organohalide-respiring Chloroflexi are widely distributed as part of uncontaminated terrestrial ecosystems, they are correlated with the fraction of TOC present as organochlorines, and they increase in abundance while dechlorinating organochlorines. These findings suggest that organohalide-respiring Chloroflexi may play an integral role in the biogeochemical chlorine cycle. PMID:22101035

  13. Respirable coal mine dust sample processing

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, L.D.; Tomb, T.F.; Parobeck, P.S.

    1987-01-01

    The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969 established mandatory dust standards for coal mines. Regulatory requirements for complying with the provisions of the Act were prescribed in Title 30, Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 70 and 71, which were published in the Federal Register on April 3, 1970, and March 28, 1972, respectively. These standard and sampling requirements of coal mine operators, along with a description of the laboratory which was established to process respirable coal mine dust samples collected in accordance with these requirements, were published in MESA Informational Report (MESA, the acronym for the Mining Enforcement and Safety Administration, was changed to MSHA, the acronym for the Mine Safety and Health Administration, in 1977). These standards and regulatory requirements continued under the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 until November 1980, when major regulatory revisions were made in the operator's dust sampling program. This paper describes the changes in the respirable coal mine dust sampling program and the equipment and procedures used by MSHA to process respirable coal mine dust samples collected in accordance with regulatory requirements. 10 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Continuous respirable mine dust monitor development

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, B.K.; Williams, K.L.; Stein, S.W.

    1996-12-31

    In June 1992, the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) published the Report of the Coal Mine Respirable Dust Task Group, Review of the Program to Control Respirable Coal Mine Dust in the United States. As one of its recommendations, the report called for the accelerated development of two mine dust monitors: (1) a fixed-site monitor capable of providing continuous information on dust levels to the miner, mine operator, and to MSHA, if necessary, and (2) a personal sampling device capable of providing both a short-term personal exposure measurement as well as a full-shift measurement. In response to this recommendation, the U.S. Bureau of Mines initiated the development of a fixed-site machine-mounted continuous respirable dust monitor. The technology chosen for monitor development is the Rupprecht and Patashnick Co., Inc. tapered element oscillating microbalance. Laboratory and in-mine tests have indicated that, with modification, this sensor can meet the humidity and vibration requirements for underground coal mine use. The U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Research Center (DOE-PRC) is continuing that effort by developing prototypes of a continuous dust monitor based on this technology. These prototypes are being evaluated in underground coal mines as they become available. This effort, conducted as a joint venture with MSHA, is nearing completion with every promise of success.

  15. DIFFUSION IN BIOFILMS RESPIRING ON ELECTRODES

    PubMed Central

    Renslow, RS; Babauta, JT; Majors, PD; Beyenal, H

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that 1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; 2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; 3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms—the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and 4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms. PMID:23420623

  16. Volatile fatty acids production from marine macroalgae by anaerobic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thi Nhan; Nam, Woo Joong; Jeon, Young Joong; Yoon, Hyon Hee

    2012-11-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were produced from the marine macroalgae, Laminaria japonica, Pachymeniopsis elliptica, and Enteromorpha crinite by anaerobic fermentation using a microbial community derived from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Methanogen inhibitor (iodoform), pH control, substrate concentration, and alkaline and thermal pretreatments affected VFA productivity. Acetic, propionic, and butyric acids were the main products. A maximum VFA concentration of 15.2g/L was obtained from 50 g/L of L. japonica in three days at 35°C and pH 6.5-7.0. Pretreatment with 0.5 N NaOH improved VFA productivity by 56% compared to control. The result shows the applicability of marine macroalgae as biomass feedstock for the production of VFAs which can be converted to mixed alcohol fuels.

  17. Rates and potential mechanism of anaerobic nitrate-dependent microbial pyrite oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Julian; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2012-12-01

    Pyrite (FeS2) is a major iron- and sulfur-containing mineral phase in the environment. Oxidation of pyrite by aerobic micro-organisms has been well investigated. However, the reactivity of pyrite under anoxic conditions is still an open question. In the present paper, we summarize field and laboratory data on this chemolithotrophic respiration process with nitrate as terminal electron acceptor. Geochemical and stable isotope field data indicate that this process is occurring. Laboratory studies are more ambiguous, but recent positive results provide evidence that anaerobic microbial pyrite oxidation can, in fact, occur with nitrate as electron acceptor.

  18. The phylogeny of archaebacteria, including novel anaerobic thermoacidophiles in the light of RNA polymerase structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zillig, Wolfram; Schnabel, Ralf; Tu, Jenn; Stetter, Karl Otto

    1982-05-01

    DNA-dependent RNA polymerases of archaebacteria are distinct from those of eubacteria both in structure and in function. They show similarities to those of the eukaryotic cytoplasm. Extremely thermophilic anaerobic sulfur-respiring archaebacteria isolated from solfataric waters represent four different families, the Thermoproteaceae, the “stiff filaments”, the Desulfurococcaceae and the Thermococcaceae, of a novel order, Thermoproteales. Together with the Sulfolobales, they form the second branch of the urkingdom of the archaebacteria besides that of the methanogens and extreme halophiles. Thermoplasma appears isolated.

  19. Treatment of Alkaline Cr(VI)-Contaminated Leachate with an Alkaliphilic Metal-Reducing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Mathew P.; Khijniak, Tatiana V.; Boothman, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Chromium in its toxic Cr(VI) valence state is a common contaminant particularly associated with alkaline environments. A well-publicized case of this occurred in Glasgow, United Kingdom, where poorly controlled disposal of a cementitious industrial by-product, chromite ore processing residue (COPR), has resulted in extensive contamination by Cr(VI)-contaminated alkaline leachates. In the search for viable bioremediation treatments for Cr(VI), a variety of bacteria that are capable of reduction of the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) to the relatively nontoxic and less mobile Cr(III) oxidation state, predominantly under circumneutral pH conditions, have been isolated. Recently, however, alkaliphilic bacteria that have the potential to reduce Cr(VI) under alkaline conditions have been identified. This study focuses on the application of a metal-reducing bacterium to the remediation of alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated leachates from COPR. This bacterium, belonging to the Halomonas genus, was found to exhibit growth concomitant to Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions (pH 10). Bacterial cells were able to rapidly remove high concentrations of aqueous Cr(VI) (2.5 mM) under anaerobic conditions, up to a starting pH of 11. Cr(VI) reduction rates were controlled by pH, with slower removal observed at pH 11, compared to pH 10, while no removal was observed at pH 12. The reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) resulted in the precipitation of Cr(III) biominerals, which were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (TEM-EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effectiveness of this haloalkaliphilic bacterium for Cr(VI) reduction at high pH suggests potential for its use as an in situ treatment of COPR and other alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated environments. PMID:26048926

  20. Treatment of Alkaline Cr(VI)-Contaminated Leachate with an Alkaliphilic Metal-Reducing Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Watts, Mathew P; Khijniak, Tatiana V; Boothman, Christopher; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-08-15

    Chromium in its toxic Cr(VI) valence state is a common contaminant particularly associated with alkaline environments. A well-publicized case of this occurred in Glasgow, United Kingdom, where poorly controlled disposal of a cementitious industrial by-product, chromite ore processing residue (COPR), has resulted in extensive contamination by Cr(VI)-contaminated alkaline leachates. In the search for viable bioremediation treatments for Cr(VI), a variety of bacteria that are capable of reduction of the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) to the relatively nontoxic and less mobile Cr(III) oxidation state, predominantly under circumneutral pH conditions, have been isolated. Recently, however, alkaliphilic bacteria that have the potential to reduce Cr(VI) under alkaline conditions have been identified. This study focuses on the application of a metal-reducing bacterium to the remediation of alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated leachates from COPR. This bacterium, belonging to the Halomonas genus, was found to exhibit growth concomitant to Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions (pH 10). Bacterial cells were able to rapidly remove high concentrations of aqueous Cr(VI) (2.5 mM) under anaerobic conditions, up to a starting pH of 11. Cr(VI) reduction rates were controlled by pH, with slower removal observed at pH 11, compared to pH 10, while no removal was observed at pH 12. The reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) resulted in the precipitation of Cr(III) biominerals, which were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (TEM-EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effectiveness of this haloalkaliphilic bacterium for Cr(VI) reduction at high pH suggests potential for its use as an in situ treatment of COPR and other alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated environments.

  1. Plankton respiration in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Carol; Serret, Pablo; Tilstone, Gavin; Teira, Eva; Zubkov, Mikhail V.; Rees, Andrew P.; Woodward, E. Malcolm S.

    2002-05-01

    Concurrent measurements of dark community respiration (DCR), gross production (GP), size fractionated primary production ( 14C PP), nitrogen uptake, nutrients, chlorophyll a concentration, and heterotrophic and autotrophic bacterial abundance were collected from the upper 200 m of a latitudinal (32°S-48°N) transect in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean during May/June 1998. The mean mixed layer respiration rate was 2.5±2.1 mmol O 2 m -3 d -1 ( n=119) for the whole transect, 2.2±1.1 mmol O 2 m -3 d -1 ( n=32) in areas where chlorophyll a was <0.5 mg m -3 and 1.5±0.7 mmol O 2 m -3 d -1 ( n=10) where chlorophyll a was <0.2 mg m -3. These values lie within the range of published data collected in comparable waters, they co-vary with indicators of heterotrophic and autotrophic biomass (heterotrophic bacterial abundance, chlorophyll a concentration, beam attenuation and particulate organic carbon concentration) and they can be reconciled with accepted estimates of total respiratory activity. The mean and median respiratory quotient (RQ), calculated as the ratio of dissolved inorganic carbon production to dissolved oxygen consumption, was 0.8 ( n=11). At the time of the study, plankton community respiration exceeded GP in the picoautotroph dominated oligotrophic regions (Eastern Tropical Atlantic [15.5°S-14.2°N] and North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre [21.5-42.5°N]), which amounted to 50% of the stations sampled along the 12,100 km transect. These regions also exhibited high heterotrophic: autotrophic biomass ratios, higher turnover rates of phytoplankton than of bacteria and low f ratios. However, the carbon supply mechanisms required to sustain the rates of respiration higher than GP could not be fully quantified. Future research should aim to determine the temporal balance of respiration and GP together with substrate supply mechanisms in these ocean regions.

  2. Anaerobic denitrification in fungi from the coastal marine sediments off Goa, India.

    PubMed

    Cathrine, Sumathi J; Raghukumar, Chandralata

    2009-01-01

    Denitrification is a microbial process during which nitrate or nitrite is reduced under anaerobic condition to gaseous nitrogen. The Arabian Sea contains one of the major pelagic denitrification zones and in addition to this, denitrification also takes places along the continental shelf. Prokaryotic microorganisms were considered to be the only players in this process. However recent studies have shown that higher microeukaryotes such as fungi can also adapt to anaerobic mode of respiration and reduce nitrate to harmful green house gases such as NO and N2O. In this study we examined the distribution and biomass of fungi in the sediments of the seasonal anoxic region off Goa from two stations. The sampling was carried out in five different periods from October 2005, when dissolved oxygen levels were near zero in bottom waters to March 2006. We isolated mycelial fungi, thraustochytrids and yeasts. Species of Aspergillus and thraustochytrids were dominant. Fungi were isolated under aerobic, as well as anaerobic conditions from different seasons. Four isolates were examined for their denitrification activity. Two cultures obtained from the anoxic sediments showed better growth under anaerobic condition than the other two cultures that were isolated from oxic sediments. Our preliminary results suggest that several species of fungi can grow under oxygen deficient conditions and participate in denitrification processes.

  3. Effect of chlorate, molybdate, and shikimic acid on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in aerobic and anaerobic cultures.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Christy E; Beier, Ross C; Hume, Michael E; Horrocks, Shane M; Casey, Thomas A; Caton, Joel S; Nisbet, David J; Smith, David J; Krueger, Nathan A; Anderson, Robin C

    2010-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine factors that affect sensitivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to sodium chlorate (5mM). In our first experiment, cultures grown without chlorate grew more rapidly than those with chlorate. An extended lag before logarithmic growth was observed in anaerobic but not aerobic cultures containing chlorate. Chlorate inhibition of growth during aerobic culture began later than that observed in anaerobic cultures but persisted once inhibition was apparent. Conversely, anaerobic cultures appeared to adapt to chlorate after approximately 10h of incubation, exhibiting rapid compensatory growth. In anaerobic chlorate-containing cultures, 20% of total viable counts were resistant to chlorate by 6h and had propagated to 100% resistance (>10(9)CFU mL(-1)) by 24h. In the aerobic chlorate-containing cultures, 12.9% of colonies had detectable resistance to chlorate by 6h, but only 1% retained detectable resistance at 24h, likely because these cultures had opportunity to respire on oxygen and were thus not enriched via the selective pressure of chlorate. In another study, treatment with shikimic acid (0.34 mM), molybdate (1mM) or their combination had little effect on aerobic or anaerobic growth of Salmonella in the absence of added chlorate. As observed in our earlier study, chlorate resistance was not detected in any cultures without added chlorate. Chlorate resistant Salmonella were recovered at equivalent numbers regardless of treatment after 8h of aerobic or anaerobic culture with added chlorate; however, by 24h incubation chlorate sensitivity was completely restored to aerobic but not anaerobic cultures treated with shikimic acid or molybdate but not their combination. Results indicate that anaerobic adaptation of S. Typhimurium to sodium chlorate during pure culture is likely due to the selective propagation of low numbers of cells exhibiting spontaneous resistance to chlorate and this resistance is not reversible by

  4. Gene and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidensis during anaerobic growth with different electron acceptors.

    SciTech Connect

    Beliaev, A. S.; Thompson, D. K.; Khare, T.; Lim, H.; Brandt, C. C.; Li, G.; Murray, A. E.; Heidelberg, J. F.; Giometti, C. S.; Yates, J., III; Nealson, K. H.; Tiedje, J. M.; Zhou, J.; Biosciences Division; ORNL; Scripps Research Inst.; Michigan State Univ.; The Inst. for Genomic Research; Jet Propulsion Laboratory; California Inst. of Tech.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in mRNA and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1 during switch from aerobic to fumarate-, Fe(III)-, or nitrate-reducing conditions were examined using DNA microarrays and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). In response to changes in growth conditions, 121 of the 691 arrayed genes displayed at least a two-fold difference in transcript abundance as determined by microarray analysis. Genes involved in aerobic respiration encoding cytochrome c and d oxidases and TCA cycle enzymes were repressed under anaerobic conditions. Genes induced during anaerobic respiration included those involved in cofactor biosynthesis and assembly (moaACE, ccmHF, nosD, cysG), substrate transport (cysUP, cysTWA, dcuB), and anaerobic energy metabolism (dmsAB, psrC, pshA, hyaABC, hydA). Transcription of genes encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase (napBHGA), cytochrome c{sub 552}, and prismane was elevated 8- to 56-fold in response to the presence of nitrate, while cymA, ifcA, and frdA were specifically induced three- to eightfold under fumarate-reducing conditions. The mRNA levels for two oxidoreductase-like genes of unknown function and several cell envelope genes involved in multidrug resistance increased two- to fivefold specifically under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Analysis of protein expression profiles under aerobic and anaerobic conditions revealed 14 protein spots that showed significant differences in abundance on 2-D gels. Protein identification by mass spectrometry indicated that the expression of prismane, dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase, and alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis protein correlated with the microarray data.

  5. Effects of Dietary Acid Load on Exercise Metabolism and Anaerobic Exercise Performance

    PubMed Central

    Caciano, Susan L.; Inman, Cynthia L.; Gockel-Blessing, Elizabeth E.; Weiss, Edward P.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary acid load, quantified as the potential renal acid load (PRAL) of the diet, affects systemic pH and acid-base regulation. In a previous cross-sectional study, we reported that a low dietary PRAL (i.e. alkaline promoting diet) is associated with higher respiratory exchange ratio (RER) values during maximal exercise. The purpose of the present study was to confirm the previous findings with a short-term dietary intervention study. Additionally, we sought to determine if changes in PRAL affects submaximal exercise RER (as a reflection of substrate utilization) and anaerobic exercise performance. Subjects underwent a graded treadmill exercise test (GXT) to exhaustion and an anaerobic exercise performance test on two occasions, once after following a low-PRAL diet and on a separate occasion, after a high-PRAL diet. The diets were continued as long as needed to achieve an alkaline or acid fasted morning urine pH, respectively, with all being 4-9 days in duration. RER was measured during the GXT with indirect calorimetry. The anaerobic performance test was a running time-to-exhaustion test lasting 1-4 min. Maximal exercise RER was lower in the low-PRAL trial compared to the high-PRAL trial (1.10 ± 0.02 vs. 1.20 ± 0.05, p = 0.037). The low-PRAL diet also resulted in a 21% greater time to exhaustion during anaerobic exercise (2.56 ± 0.36 vs. 2.11 ± 0.31 sec, p = 0.044) and a strong tendency for lower RER values during submaximal exercise at 70% VO2max (0.88 ± 0.02 vs. 0.96 ± 0.04, p = 0.060). Contrary to our expectations, a short-term low-PRAL (alkaline promoting) diet resulted in lower RER values during maximal-intensity exercise. However, the low-PRAL diet also increased anaerobic exercise time to exhaustion and appears to have shifted submaximal exercise substrate utilization to favor lipid oxidation and spare carbohydrate, both of which would be considered favorable effects in the context of exercise performance. Key points Short-term (4-9 days) changes in

  6. Using O2 to study the relationships between soil CO2 efflux and soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angert, A.; Yakir, D.; Rodeghiero, M.; Preisler, Y.; Davidson, E. A.; Weiner, T.

    2014-08-01

    Soil respiration, is the sum of respiration processes in the soil, and is a major flux in the global carbon cycle. It is usually assumed that the CO2 efflux is equal to the soil respiration rate. Here we challenge this assumption by combining measurements of CO2 with high-precision measurements of O2. These measurements were conducted on different ecosystems and soil types, and included measurements of air-samples taken from the soil profile of three Mediterranean sites, a temperate forest, and two alpine forests. Root-free soils from the alpine sites were also incubated at the lab. We found that the ratio between the CO2 efflux to the O2 influx (which we defined as apparent respiratory quotient, ARQ) was in the range of 0.14 to 1.23, which strongly deviates from 0.9 ± 0.1, which is the ratio expected from the elemental composition of average plants and soil organic matter. At the Mediterranean sites these deviations were explained as a result of CO2 dissolution in the soil water and transformation to bi-carbonate in these high pH soils, and by carbonates dissolution and precipitation processes. Thus, correct estimate of the short-term, chamber-based biological respiratory flux in such soils can only be made by dividing the measured CO2 efflux by the average (efflux weighted) soil profile ARQ. We demonstrated that applying this approach to a semiarid pine forest resulted in estimated short-term respiration rate 3.8 times higher than the chamber-measured surface CO2 efflux (8.8 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1 instead of 2.3 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1, at the time of measurement). The ARQ values that were often found for the more acidic soils were lower than 0.7, and hence surprising. These values might be the result of the oxidation of reduced iron, which could previously form during times of high soil moisture and local anaerobic conditions inside aggregates. Further research is needed to confirm that low ARQ found in non-calcareous soils, is the result of this process, which can cause

  7. Microbial Cells and Aerobic Respiration from Seafloor to Basement in the South Pacific Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hondt, S.; Inagaki, F.; Alvarez Zarikian, C. A.; Morono, Y.; Pockalny, R. A.; Sauvage, J.; Spivack, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The seafloor is broadly divided into two regions (Emerson et al., 1985): one where sedimentary microbial respiration is high and oxygen (O2) penetrates only millimeters to centimeters into the sediment (Revsbech et al., 1980), and another where sedimentary respiration is low and O2 penetrates much deeper (Murray& Grundmanis, 1980; D'Hondt et al., 2011; Røy et al, 2012; Orcutt et al., 2013). Active anaerobic microbial communities persist for hundreds of meters or more in subseafloor sediment of the high-respiration region. In the low-respiration region, the existence of microbial communities is previously unknown throughout most of the sedimentary sequence (Morita & Zobell, 1955; D'Hondt et al., 2009; Røy et al., 2012). Here we show that microbial cells and aerobic respiration persist through the entire sediment sequence (to depths of at least 75 m below seafloor) throughout the vast expanse of the oligotrophic South Pacific Gyre. This sediment and underlying basalt may be continuously exposed to O2 for its entire history (up to 120 myrs at our sites). Redfield stoichiometry of dissolved O2 and nitrate indicates that net sedimentary O2 reduction is coupled to oxidation of marine organic matter. Oxygen and aerobic communities may occur throughout the entire sediment sequence in 15-44% of the Pacific and 9-37% of the global ocean. This result has major implications for the nature and distribution of subseafloor life. It may ultimately affect the chemical evolution of Earth's mantle and subduction-related volcanic systems. References D'Hondt, S., et al., 2009. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 11651-11656, doi:10.1073/pnas.0811793106. D'Hondt, S., et al., 2011. Proc. IODP 329, doi:10.2204/ iodp.proc.329.2011. Emerson, S., et al., 1985. Deep-Sea Research 32, 1-21. Morita, R.Y. & Zobell, C.E., 1955. Deep-Sea Research 3, 66-73.Murray, J.W. & Grundmanis, V., 1980. Science 209, 1527-1530. Orcutt, B.N., et al., 2013. Nature Communications 4, 2539, DOI: 10.1038/ncomms3539

  8. Using O2 to study the relationships between soil CO2 efflux and soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angert, A.; Yakir, D.; Rodeghiero, M.; Preisler, Y.; Davidson, E. A.; Weiner, T.

    2015-04-01

    Soil respiration is the sum of respiration processes in the soil and is a major flux in the global carbon cycle. It is usually assumed that the CO2 efflux is equal to the soil respiration rate. Here we challenge this assumption by combining measurements of CO2 with high-precision measurements of O2. These measurements were conducted on different ecosystems and soil types and included measurements of air samples taken from the soil profile of three Mediterranean sites: a temperate forest and two alpine forests. Root-free soils from the alpine sites were also incubated in the lab. We found that the ratio between the CO2 efflux and the O2 influx (defined as apparent respiratory quotient, ARQ) was in the range of 0.14 to 1.23 and considerably deviated from the value of 0.9 ± 0.1 expected from the elemental composition of average plants and soil organic matter. At the Mediterranean sites, these deviations are explained as a result of CO2 dissolution in the soil water and transformation to bicarbonate ions in these high-pH soils, as well as by carbonate mineral dissolution and precipitation processes. Thus, a correct estimate of the short-term, chamber-based biological respiratory flux in such soils can only be made by dividing the measured soil CO2 efflux by the average (efflux-weighted) soil profile ARQ. Applying this approach to a semiarid pine forest resulted in an estimated short-term biological respiration rate that is 3.8 times higher than the chamber-measured surface CO2. The ARQ values often observed in the more acidic soils were unexpectedly low (< 0.7). These values probably result from the oxidation of reduced iron, which has been formed previously during times of high soil moisture and local anaerobic conditions inside soil aggregates. The results reported here provide direct quantitative evidence of a large temporal decoupling between soil-gas exchange fluxes and biological soil respiration.

  9. Closed type alkaline storage battery

    SciTech Connect

    Hayama, H.

    1980-06-10

    The alkaline storage battery employs a metallic hat shaped terminal closure which has a piercing needle as well as a puncturable metallic diaphragm positioned below the piercing needle. The needle is fixed by caulking at its peripheral edge portion to a edge of the closure. A comparatively thick and hard metal plate is placed on the inner surface of the diaphragm and is applied to an open portion of a tubular metallic container which has a battery element. A peripheral edge portion of the closure, the diaphragm and the metallic plate are clamped in airtight relationship through a packing between the caulked end portion and an inner annular step portion of the metallic container of the battery. A lead wire extends from one polarity electrode of the battery element and is connected to a central portion of the metallic plate.

  10. Cassava Stillage Treatment by Thermophilic Anaerobic Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Gang; Xie, Li; Zou, Zhonghai; Zhou, Qi

    2010-11-01

    This paper assesses the performance of a thermophilic anaerobic Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) in the treatment of cassava stillage under various organic loading rates (OLRs) without suspended solids (SS) separation. The reactor was seeded with mesophilic anaerobic granular sludge, and the OLR increased by increments to 13.80 kg COD/m3/d (HRT 5d) over 80 days. Total COD removal efficiency remained stable at 90%, with biogas production at 18 L/d (60% methane). Increase in the OLR to 19.30 kg COD/m3/d (HRT 3d), however, led to a decrease in TCOD removal efficiency to 79% due to accumulation of suspended solids and incomplete degradation after shortened retention time. Reactor performance subsequently increased after OLR reduction. Alkalinity, VFA and pH levels were not significantly affected by OLR variation, indicating that no additional alkaline or pH adjustment is required. More than half of the SS in the cassava stillage could be digested in the process when HRT was 5 days, which demonstrated the suitability of anaerobic treatment of cassava stillage without SS separation.

  11. Overcoming challenges to struvite recovery from anaerobically digested dairy manure.

    PubMed

    Huchzermeier, Matthew P; Tao, Wendong

    2012-01-01

    Recovering struvite from dairy manure has consistently posed problems for researchers. This study separated solids from anaerobically digested dairy manure using a filtration system. Filtrate was rich in free magnesium (160 to 423 mg/L), ammonium (320 to 1800 mg N/L) and orthophosphate (93 to 332 mg P/L). High concentrations of free calcium (128 to 361 mg/L) and alkalinity (3309 to 6567 mg/L as CaCO3), however, may hinder struvite precipitation. Batch precipitation tests were conducted to identify and overcome factors that interfere with struvite formation. Precipitation tests at pH 9 identified calcium and ionic strength as most probable interferences. Calcium addition did not significantly change phosphorus removal efficiency, but decreased struvite purity because of formation of calcium phosphates when Ca:P activity ratio was greater than 0.5 to 1. Batch tests demonstrated effective calcium removal from anaerobically digested dairy manure through precipitation of calcium carbonate at pH 9 to 10 while retaining magnesium and orthophosphate, lessening hindrance to struvite formation.

  12. Structural and Spectral Features of Selenium Nanospheres Produced by Se-Respiring Bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Herbel, M.J.; Blum, J.S.; Langley, S.; Beveridge, T.J.; Ajayan, P.M.; Sutto, T.; Ellis, A.V.; Curran, S.

    2004-01-01

    Certain anaerobic bacteria respire toxic selenium oxyanions and in doing so produce extracellular accumulations of elemental selenium [Se(0)]. We examined three physiologically and phylogenetically diverse species of selenate- and selenite-respiring bacteria, Sulfurospirillum barnesii, Bacillus selenitireducens, and Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii, for the occurrence of this phenomenon. When grown with selenium oxyanions as the electron acceptor, all of these organisms formed extracellular granules consisting of stable, uniform nanospheres (diameter, ???300 nm) of Se(0) having monoclinic crystalline structures. Intracellular packets of Se(0) were also noted. The number of intracellular Se(0) packets could be reduced by first growing cells with nitrate as the electron acceptor and then adding selenite ions to washed suspensions of the nitrate-grown cells. This resulted in the formation of primarily extracellular Se nanospheres. After harvesting and cleansing of cellular debris, we observed large differences in the optical properties (UV-visible absorption and Raman spectra) of purified extracellular nanospheres produced in this manner by the three different bacterial species. The spectral properties in turn differed substantially from those of amorphous Se(0) formed by chemical oxidation of H2Se and of black, vitreous Se(0) formed chemically by reduction of selenite with ascorbate. The microbial synthesis of Se(0) nanospheres results in unique, complex, compacted nanostructural arrangements of Se atoms. These arrangements probably reflect a diversity of enzymes involved in the dissimilatory reduction that are subtly different in different microbes. Remarkably, these conditions cannot be achieved by current methods of chemical synthesis.

  13. Environmental and synthetic sulphydryl group inhibitors: effects on bioluminescence and respiration in Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Kalciene, Virginija; Cetkauskaite, Anolda

    2007-03-01

    Elemental sulphur (as S0 and S8) is abundant in anaerobic sediments and soil, and is highly toxic in the Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence test. This mode of S0 action remains uncertain. The objective of this research was the analysis of the toxic effects of S0 on bioluminescence and respiration in V. fischeri, in joint action with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) or 2,4-dithio-DL-threitol (DTT), which are -SH group inhibiting and maintaining synthetic agents, respectively. Non-toxic DTT immediately protected cell bioluminescence against S0 inhibition at low (5.5ppb) and high (55ppb) concentrations of S0, whilst restoration of the inhibitory effect of S0 took up to 30 minutes. NEM (62.5ppb) diminished cell bioluminescence by up to 50% after 5 minutes, but after 60 minutes, the inhibition reached 100%. DTT restored the bioluminescence function inhibited in vivo and in vitro by S0 and NEM. Enhancement of cell respiration by up to 20% and 33% was observed at 2.2ppm of S0 and 36.8ppm of 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP; an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation), respectively; whilst NEM (3.1ppm) caused a reduction of up to 40%. This comparative analysis confirmed that S0 has multiple modes of action--it acts as both an -SH group inhibitor and an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation in V. fischeri cells.

  14. Microbial Respiration and Formate Oxidation as Metabolic Signatures of Inflammation-Associated Dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Elizabeth R; Winter, Maria G; Duerkop, Breck A; Spiga, Luisella; Furtado de Carvalho, Tatiane; Zhu, Wenhan; Gillis, Caroline C; Büttner, Lisa; Smoot, Madeline P; Behrendt, Cassie L; Cherry, Sara; Santos, Renato L; Hooper, Lora V; Winter, Sebastian E

    2017-02-08

    Intestinal inflammation is frequently associated with an alteration of the gut microbiota, termed dysbiosis, which is characterized by a reduced abundance of obligate anaerobic bacteria and an expansion of facultative Proteobacteria such as commensal E. coli. The mechanisms enabling the outgrowth of Proteobacteria during inflammation are incompletely understood. Metagenomic sequencing revealed bacterial formate oxidation and aerobic respiration to be overrepresented metabolic pathways in a chemically induced murine model of colitis. Dysbiosis was accompanied by increased formate levels in the gut lumen. Formate was of microbial origin since no formate was detected in germ-free mice. Complementary studies using commensal E. coli strains as model organisms indicated that formate dehydrogenase and terminal oxidase genes provided a fitness advantage in murine models of colitis. In vivo, formate served as electron donor in conjunction with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor. This work identifies bacterial formate oxidation and oxygen respiration as metabolic signatures for inflammation-associated dysbiosis.

  15. Effects of photodynamic action on respiration in nonphosphorylating mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Salet, C; Moreno, G; Ricchelli, F

    1998-10-15

    We have studied the effects of singlet oxygen produced by photodynamic action on respiration in nonphosphorylating mitochondria (state 4). Isolated rat liver mitochondria were incubated with 3 microM hematoporphyrin and irradiated at 365 nm with a fluence rate of 25 W/m2. After short durations of irradiation, state 4 respiration with beta-hydroxybutyrate as substrate increases while respiration with succinate is negligibly affected. When mitochondria have been uncoupled with carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl hydrazone before irradiation, no change occurs in beta-hydroxybutyrate-driven respiration, while succinate-driven respiration strongly decreases. Stimulation of state 4 NADH respiration cannot be explained by slippage of the NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase because the stoichiometry of the redox pump was found insensitive to photodynamic action. In the light of the metabolite theory for linear enzymatic chains applied to state 4 respiration (Brand et al., Biochem. J. 255, 535-539, 1988), these results suggest that stimulation of NADH respiration is simply due to an increase of membrane leaks which occurs after irradiation. In the case of succinate-driven respiration, a strong inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase activity has been demonstrated after irradiation. It can be suggested that this inhibition introduces a negative control coefficient over state 4 respiration, counterbalancing the effects due to leakage.

  16. Processing anaerobic sludge for extended storage as anaerobic digester inoculum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiajia; Zicari, Steven M; Cui, Zongjun; Zhang, Ruihong

    2014-08-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic sludge was processed to reduce the volume and moisture content in order to reduce costs for storing and transporting the sludge as microbial inoculum for anaerobic digester startup. The moisture content of the sludge was reduced from 98.7% to 82.0% via centrifugation and further to 71.5% via vacuum evaporation. The processed sludge was stored for 2 and 4 months and compared with the fresh sludge for the biogas and methane production using food waste and non-fat dry milk as substrates. It was found that fresh unprocessed sludge had the highest methane yield and the yields of both unprocessed and processed sludges decreased during storage by 1-34%, however processed sludges seemed to regain some activity after 4 months of storage as compared to samples stored for only 2 months. Maximum methane production rates obtained from modified Gompertz model application also increased between the 2-month and 4-month processed samples.

  17. Large scale study on measurement of respiration activity (AT(4)) by Sapromat and OxiTop.

    PubMed

    Binner, Erwin; Böhm, Katharina; Lechner, Peter

    2012-10-01

    In the run-up for amending the Austrian landfill ordinance, parameters were developed to assess the stability/reactivity of mechanically-biologically pretreated residual wastes. The Landfill Ordinance 2008 regulates limit values for Respiration Activity (="Atmungsaktivität") RA(4) (AT(4))<7mgO(2)*(g dry matter (DM))(-1), Gas Generation Sum GS(21)<20Nl*kgDM(-1) and alternatively Gas Evolution (="Gasbildung") GB(21)<20Nl*kgDM(-1). Methods for analysing these parameters were established by the Austrian Standards Institute (2004). As laboratory practice shows, these methods also are used for the assessment of other wastes (sewage sludge, commercial waste, material from abandoned sites, biowaste compost). For measurement of respiration activity in Austria mainly two methods are used: the Sapromat®-method and the OxiTop®-method. Whether respectively to what extent these two methods give same results, is discussed in this paper. Since 2009 at ABF-BOKU 169 respiration activity tests of samples taken from different stages of MBT - as well as biowaste composting processes, materials from landfills as well as abandoned sites and residues from anaerobic treatment plants were analysed parallel by Sapromat® and OxiTop®. The results manifest very strong correlation between the Sapromat® and OxiTop® method. The correlation coefficient is 0.993. As a very clear tendency OxiTop® gives lower amounts than Sapromat®. In average the lower values of OxiTop® are around 88%.

  18. Combustion, Respiration and Intermittent Exercise: A Theoretical Perspective on Oxygen Uptake and Energy Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    While no doubt thought about for thousands of years, it was Antoine Lavoisier in the late 18th century who is largely credited with the first “modern” investigations of biological energy exchanges. From Lavoisier’s work with combustion and respiration a scientific trend emerges that extends to the present day: the world gains a credible working hypothesis but validity goes missing, often for some time, until later confirmed using proper measures. This theme is applied to glucose/glycogen metabolism where energy exchanges are depicted as conversion from one form to another and, transfer from one place to another made by both the anaerobic and aerobic biochemical pathways within working skeletal muscle, and the hypothetical quantification of these components as part of an oxygen (O2) uptake measurement. The anaerobic and aerobic energy exchange components of metabolism are represented by two different interpretations of O2 uptake: one that contains a glycolytic component (1 L O2 = 21.1 kJ) and one that does not (1 L O2 = 19.6 kJ). When energy exchange transfer and oxygen-related expenditures are applied separately to exercise and recovery periods, an increased energy cost for intermittent as compared to continuous exercise is hypothesized to be a direct result. PMID:24833508

  19. Evolution of alkaline phosphatases in primates.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, D J; Rogers, C; Harris, H

    1982-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase [orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum), EC 3.1.3.1] in placenta, intestine, liver, kidney, bone, and lung from a variety of primate species has been characterized by quantitative inhibition, thermostability, and immunological studies. Characteristic human placental-type alkaline phosphatase occurs in placentas of great apes (chimpanzee and orangutan) but not in placentas of other primates, including gibbon. It is also present in trace amounts in human lung but not in lung or other tissues of various Old and New World monkeys. However, a distinctive alkaline phosphatase resembling it occurs in substantial amounts in lungs from Old World monkeys but not New World monkeys. It appears that duplication of alkaline phosphatase genes and mutations of genetic elements controlling their tissue expression have occurred relatively recently in mammalian evolution. Images PMID:6950431

  20. Alkaline pH sensor molecules.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichiro N

    2015-11-01

    Animals can survive only within a narrow pH range. This requires continual monitoring of environmental and body-fluid pH. Although a variety of acidic pH sensor molecules have been reported, alkaline pH sensor function is not well understood. This Review describes neuronal alkaline pH sensors, grouped according to whether they monitor extracellular or intracellular alkaline pH. Extracellular sensors include the receptor-type guanylyl cyclase, the insulin receptor-related receptor, ligand-gated Cl- channels, connexin hemichannels, two-pore-domain K+ channels, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Intracellular sensors include TRP channels and gap junction channels. Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying alkaline pH sensing is crucial for understanding how animals respond to environmental alkaline pH and how body-fluid pH is maintained within a narrow range.

  1. Merging Metabolism and Power: Development of a Novel Photobioelectric Device Driven by Photosynthesis and Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ryan J.; White, Ryan; Hill, Russell T.

    2014-01-01

    Generation of renewable energy is one of the grand challenges facing our society. We present a new bio-electric technology driven by chemical gradients generated by photosynthesis and respiration. The system does not require pure cultures nor particular species as it works with the core metabolic principles that define phototrophs and heterotrophs. The biology is interfaced with electrochemistry with an alkaline aluminum oxide cell design. In field trials we show the system is robust and can work with an undefined natural microbial community. Power generated is light and photosynthesis dependent. It achieved a peak power output of 33 watts/m2 electrode. The design is simple, low cost and works with the biological processes driving the system by removing waste products that can impede growth. This system is a new class of bio-electric device and may have practical implications for algal biofuel production and powering remote sensing devices. PMID:24466132

  2. Merging metabolism and power: development of a novel photobioelectric device driven by photosynthesis and respiration.

    PubMed

    Powell, Ryan J; White, Ryan; Hill, Russell T

    2014-01-01

    Generation of renewable energy is one of the grand challenges facing our society. We present a new bio-electric technology driven by chemical gradients generated by photosynthesis and respiration. The system does not require pure cultures nor particular species as it works with the core metabolic principles that define phototrophs and heterotrophs. The biology is interfaced with electrochemistry with an alkaline aluminum oxide cell design. In field trials we show the system is robust and can work with an undefined natural microbial community. Power generated is light and photosynthesis dependent. It achieved a peak power output of 33 watts/m(2) electrode. The design is simple, low cost and works with the biological processes driving the system by removing waste products that can impede growth. This system is a new class of bio-electric device and may have practical implications for algal biofuel production and powering remote sensing devices.

  3. Microbial respiration and root respiration follow divergent seasonal and diel temporal patterns in a temperate forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, E. A.; Savage, K. E.; Tang, J.

    2010-12-01

    Soil respiration is often related to empirical measurements of soil temperature and water content, as if it were a single process that responds uniformly to these environmental drivers. However, we know that root and microbial processes both contribute to CO2 production within the soil, and the roots are connected to aboveground plant tissues, which may, in turn, be responding to other environmental cues. Trenched plots provide a method to separate these two processes, where only microbial respiration (Rm) occurs in the trenched plots that have had roots excluded, total soil respiration (Rt) occurs in untrenched reference plots, and root respiration (Rr) is inferred by the difference between the two treatments. Like all methods, this one has potential artifacts that may render the quantification of Rr uncertain, but the method is likely to demonstrate the phenology of Rr and its impact on diel and seasonal temporal patterns of Rt. We deployed three automated soil respiration chambers in both control and trenched plots at the Harvard Forest in central Massachusetts. Soil CO2 efflux was measured every half hour for each chamber from day-of-year 112 to 304, 2009 (with some data gaps in the intervening period due to equipment failure). For the combined measurement period, mean daily soil respiration and mean daily flux amplitude were significantly higher in the reference plots compared to the trenched plots. The peak flux also occurred about 2 hours later in the evening in the reference plots compared to the trenched plots. Breaking this period down into four seasonal windows (spring, early summer, late summer, and autumn), the mean daily flux was significantly higher in the reference plot for all seasons, the higher daily amplitude was significant only during the early summer, and the delay in peak emissions was significant during early and late summer. While roots were contributing to soil respiration in all measurement periods, their largest effect on daily mean

  4. Forest Soil Respiration: Identifying Sources and Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Högberg, P.

    2008-12-01

    Most of the respiration in forests comes from the soil. This flux is composed of two components, autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration. In a strict sense the former should be plant belowground respiration only, but the term is used here to denote respiration by roots, their mycorrhizal fungal symbionts and other closely associated organisms dependent on recent photosynthate. Heterotrophs are organisms using organic matter, chiefly above- and belowground litters, as substrate (i.e. substrates of in general much higher ecosystem age). Because of the complexity of the plant-soil system, the component fluxes are difficult to study. I will discuss results of different approaches to partition soil respiratory components and to study their controls. The focus will be on northern boreal forests. In these generally strongly nitrogen-limited forests, the autotrophic respiration equals or exceeds the heterotrophic component. The large autotrophic component reflects high plant allocation of C to roots and mycorrhizal fungi in response to the low N supply. A physiological manipulation, girdling, which stops the flow of photosynthates to roots, showed that autotrophic respiration could account for as much as 70% in N-limited forests, but only 40% in fertilized forests. Also using girdling, we could show that a shift to lower summertime temperature leads to a decrease in heterotrophic but not in autotrophic activity, suggesting substrate (photosynthate) limitation of the latter. Physiological manipulations like girdling and trenching cannot be used to reveal the finer details of soil C dynamics. Natural abundance stable isotope (13C) and 14C approaches also have their limitations if a high resolution in terms of time, space and organism is required. A very high resolution can, of course, be obtained in studies of laboratory micro- or mesocosms, but the possibility to extend the interpretation of their results to the field may be questioned. In the CANIFLEX (CArbon NItrogen

  5. Tillage Effects on Soil Properties & Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Teodor; Bogdan, Ileana; Moraru, Paula; Pop, Adrian; Duda, Bogdan; Cacovean, Horea; Coste, Camelia

    2015-04-01

    Soil tillage systems can be able to influence soil compaction, water dynamics, soil temperature and soil structural condition. These processes can be expressed as changes of soil microbiological activity, soil respiration and sustainability of agriculture. Objectives of this study were: 1) to assess the effects of tillage systems (Conventional System-CS, Minimum Tillage-MT, No-Tillage-NT) on soil compaction, soil temperature, soil moisture and soil respiration and 2) to establish the relationship that exists in changing soil properties. Three treatments were installed: CS-plough + disc; MT-paraplow + rotary grape; NT-direct sowing. The study was conducted on an Argic-Stagnic Faeoziom. The MT and NT applications reduce or completely eliminate the soil mobilization, due to this, soil is compacted in the first year of application. The degree of compaction is directly related to soil type and its state of degradation. The state of soil compaction diminished over time, tending toward a specific type of soil density. Soil moisture was higher in NT and MT at the time of sowing and in the early stages of vegetation and differences diminished over time. Moisture determinations showed statistically significant differences. The MT and NT applications reduced the thermal amplitude in the first 15 cm of soil depth and increased the soil temperature by 0.5-2.20C. The determinations confirm the effect of soil tillage system on soil respiration; the daily average was lower at NT (315-1914 mmoli m-2s-1) and followed by MT (318-2395 mmoli m-2s-1) and is higher in the CS (321-2480 mmol m-2s-1). Comparing with CS, all the two conservation tillage measures decreased soil respiration, with the best effects of no-tillage. An exceeding amount of CO2 produced in the soil and released into the atmosphere, resulting from aerobic processes of mineralization of organic matter (excessive loosening) is considered to be not only a way of increasing the CO2 in the atmosphere, but also a loss of

  6. In situ spectroscopic investigation of hyperthermophilic metal-respiring archaea at high-temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménez, B.; Bureau, H.; Gouget, B.; Avoscan, L.; Simionovici, A.; Somogyi, A.

    2003-04-01

    The main issue of this study is developing methodologies that can improve abilities to characterize life in extreme habitats. In particular, it aims at evaluating the possibility of monitoring microorganisms mediated reactions involving metals by using non destructive X-ray microprobe combined with high pressure and temperature micro-reactors. The first step was dedicated to the study of metal-respiring organisms that achieve growth with oxyanions of arsenate and selenate as their electron acceptors for the oxidation of organic substrates or H2, forming elemental selenium or arsenite, respectively, as the reduction products. We focused on a strictly anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaea, Pyrobaculum arsenaticum, recently isolated and well adapted to high levels of arsenate and selenate (Huber et al., 2000, System. Appl. Microbiol., 23, 305). We report here the first in situ X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopic characterization of the oxidation state of selenium following microbial respiration at high temperature. A Basset-modified Hydrothermal Diamond Anvil Cell (HDAC) acts as anaerobic micro-reactor to reproduce extreme temperature and pressure conditions for life and allows, together with the direct visual observation of the organisms, the microbeam characterization of the changes of metal concentration and speciation induced by microbial activity. The measurements were performed at the ESRF on undulator beamline ID22. P. arsenaticum together with its culture medium, doped with selenate (50 μM), were loaded under N_2 atmosphere in the HDAC. High-resolution X-ray fluorescence and selenium K-edge XANES spectra were collected alternatively and continuously at high temperature (up to 95^oC), allowing for the time-resolved monitoring of the chemical evolution of the culture medium. Data processing is still in progress. In the long-term, our aim is, on one hand, to shed light on the tolerance in terms of temperature, pressure and metal

  7. Catalase (KatA) Plays a Role in Protection against Anaerobic Nitric Oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shengchang; Panmanee, Warunya; Wilson, Jeffrey J.; Mahtani, Harry K.; Li, Qian; VanderWielen, Bradley D.; Makris, Thomas M.; Rogers, Melanie; McDaniel, Cameron; Lipscomb, John D.; Irvin, Randall T.; Schurr, Michael J.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Kovall, Rhett A.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a common bacterial pathogen, responsible for a high incidence of nosocomial and respiratory infections. KatA is the major catalase of PA that detoxifies hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a reactive oxygen intermediate generated during aerobic respiration. Paradoxically, PA displays elevated KatA activity under anaerobic growth conditions where the substrate of KatA, H2O2, is not produced. The aim of the present study is to elucidate the mechanism underlying this phenomenon and define the role of KatA in PA during anaerobiosis using genetic, biochemical and biophysical approaches. We demonstrated that anaerobic wild-type PAO1 cells yielded higher levels of katA transcription and expression than aerobic cells, whereas a nitrite reductase mutant ΔnirS produced ∼50% the KatA activity of PAO1, suggesting that a basal NO level was required for the increased KatA activity. We also found that transcription of the katA gene was controlled, in part, by the master anaerobic regulator, ANR. A ΔkatA mutant and a mucoid mucA22 ΔkatA bacteria demonstrated increased sensitivity to acidified nitrite (an NO generator) in anaerobic planktonic and biofilm cultures. EPR spectra of anaerobic bacteria showed that levels of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC), indicators of NO stress, were increased significantly in the ΔkatA mutant, and dramatically in a ΔnorCB mutant compared to basal levels of DNIC in PAO1 and ΔnirS mutant. Expression of KatA dramatically reduced the DNIC levels in ΔnorCB mutant. We further revealed direct NO-KatA interactions in vitro using EPR, optical spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. KatA has a 5-coordinate high spin ferric heme that binds NO without prior reduction of the heme iron (Kd ∼6 μM). Collectively, we conclude that KatA is expressed to protect PA against NO generated during anaerobic respiration. We proposed that such protective effects of KatA may involve buffering of free NO when potentially toxic concentrations of

  8. Catalase (KatA) plays a role in protection against anaerobic nitric oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Su, Shengchang; Panmanee, Warunya; Wilson, Jeffrey J; Mahtani, Harry K; Li, Qian; Vanderwielen, Bradley D; Makris, Thomas M; Rogers, Melanie; McDaniel, Cameron; Lipscomb, John D; Irvin, Randall T; Schurr, Michael J; Lancaster, Jack R; Kovall, Rhett A; Hassett, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a common bacterial pathogen, responsible for a high incidence of nosocomial and respiratory infections. KatA is the major catalase of PA that detoxifies hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a reactive oxygen intermediate generated during aerobic respiration. Paradoxically, PA displays elevated KatA activity under anaerobic growth conditions where the substrate of KatA, H2O2, is not produced. The aim of the present study is to elucidate the mechanism underlying this phenomenon and define the role of KatA in PA during anaerobiosis using genetic, biochemical and biophysical approaches. We demonstrated that anaerobic wild-type PAO1 cells yielded higher levels of katA transcription and expression than aerobic cells, whereas a nitrite reductase mutant ΔnirS produced ∼50% the KatA activity of PAO1, suggesting that a basal NO level was required for the increased KatA activity. We also found that transcription of the katA gene was controlled, in part, by the master anaerobic regulator, ANR. A ΔkatA mutant and a mucoid mucA22 ΔkatA bacteria demonstrated increased sensitivity to acidified nitrite (an NO generator) in anaerobic planktonic and biofilm cultures. EPR spectra of anaerobic bacteria showed that levels of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC), indicators of NO stress, were increased significantly in the ΔkatA mutant, and dramatically in a ΔnorCB mutant compared to basal levels of DNIC in PAO1 and ΔnirS mutant. Expression of KatA dramatically reduced the DNIC levels in ΔnorCB mutant. We further revealed direct NO-KatA interactions in vitro using EPR, optical spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. KatA has a 5-coordinate high spin ferric heme that binds NO without prior reduction of the heme iron (Kd ∼6 μM). Collectively, we conclude that KatA is expressed to protect PA against NO generated during anaerobic respiration. We proposed that such protective effects of KatA may involve buffering of free NO when potentially toxic concentrations of

  9. ESTIMATING ROOT RESPIRATION IN SPRUCE AND BEECH: DECREASES IN SOIL RESPIRATION FOLLOWING GIRDLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was undertaken to follow seasonal fluxes of CO2 from soil and to estimate the contribution of autotrophic (root + mycorrhizal) to total soil respiration (SR) in a mixed stand of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) near Freising, Germany. Matu...

  10. [Enhancement of anaerobic digestion of excess sludge by acid-alkali pretreatment].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Guang-Huan; Zhou, Xing-Qiu; Wu, Jian-Dong

    2012-06-01

    In order to enhance the efficiency of anaerobic digestion of excess sludge, acid-alkali pretreatment method was studied. Three different pretreatment methods (alkali alone,acid-alkali, alkali-acid) were compared to investigate their impacts on hydrolysis and acidification of activated sludge. In addition, their influences on methane-producing in subsequent anaerobic digestion process were also studied. The results showed that the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) of alkaline treatment alone was about 16% higher than the combining of acid and alkali treatment, SCOD concentration increased to 5406.1 mg x L(-1) after 8 d pretreatment. After treated by acid (pH 4.0, 4 d) and alkali (pH 10.0, 4 d), the acetic acid production and its content in short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were higher than other pretreatment methods. And the acetic acid production (as COD/VSS) could reach 74.4 mg x g(-1), accounting for 60.5% of SCFAs. After acid-alkali pretreatment, the C: N ratio of the sludge mixed liquor was about 25, and the C: P ratio was between 35-40, which was more favorable than C: N and C: P ratio of alkali alone and alkali-acid to subsequent anaerobic digestion. The control experiments showed that, after acid-alkali pretreatment, anaerobic digestion cumulative methane yield (CH4/VSS(in)) reached to 136.1 mL x g(-1) at 15 d, which was about 2.5-, 1.6-, and 1.7-fold of the blank (unpretreated), alkali alone pretreatment and alkali-acid pretreatment, respectively. After acid-alkali pretreatment for 8 d and anaerobic digestion for 15 d, the removal efficiency of VSS was about 60.9%, and the sludge reduction effect was better than other pretreatments. It is obvious that the acid-alkali pretreatment method was more favorable to anaerobic digestion and sludge reduction.

  11. Soil respiration under different land uses in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li-Chao; Yang, Ming-Zhen; Han, Wen-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Land-use change has a crucial influence on soil respiration, which further affects soil nutrient availability and carbon stock. We monitored soil respiration rates under different land-use types (tea gardens with three production levels, adjacent woodland, and a vegetable field) in Eastern China at weekly intervals over a year using the dynamic closed chamber method. The relationship between soil respiration and environmental factors was also evaluated. The soil respiration rate exhibited a remarkable single peak that was highest in July/August and lowest in January. The annual cumulative respiration flux increased by 25.6% and 20.9% in the tea garden with high production (HP) and the vegetable field (VF), respectively, relative to woodland (WL). However, no significant differences were observed between tea gardens with medium production (MP), low production (LP), WL, and VF. Soil respiration rates were significantly and positively correlated with organic carbon, total nitrogen, and available phosphorous content. Each site displayed a significant exponential relationship between soil respiration and soil temperature measured at 5 cm depth, which explained 84-98% of the variation in soil respiration. The model with a combination of soil temperature and moisture was better at predicting the temporal variation of soil respiration rate than the single temperature model for all sites. Q10 was 2.40, 2.00, and 1.86-1.98 for VF, WL, and tea gardens, respectively, indicating that converting WL to VF increased and converting to tea gardens decreased the sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature. The equation of the multiple linear regression showed that identical factors, including soil organic carbon (SOC), soil water content (SWC), pH, and water soluble aluminum (WSAl), drove the changes in soil respiration and Q10 after conversion of land use. Temporal variations of soil respiration were mainly controlled by soil temperature, whereas spatial variations were

  12. Performance of the Volumetric Diffusive Respirator at Altitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-18

    AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2014-0020 Performance of the Volumetric Diffusive Respirator at Altitude Dario Rodriquez, MSc1; Tyler Britton, RRT2...the Volumetric Diffusive Respirator at Altitude 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-12-2-6B012 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...volumetric diffusive respirator is a pneumatic ventilator used by the U.S. Army Burn Team and the U.S. Air Force Lung Team for patients with hypoxemic

  13. Exposure to elevated temperature and Pco(2) reduces respiration rate and energy status in the periwinkle Littorina littorea.

    PubMed

    Melatunan, Sedercor; Calosi, Piero; Rundle, Simon D; Moody, A John; Widdicombe, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In the future, marine organisms will face the challenge of coping with multiple environmental changes associated with increased levels of atmospheric Pco(2), such as ocean warming and acidification. To predict how organisms may or may not meet these challenges, an in-depth understanding of the physiological and biochemical mechanisms underpinning organismal responses to climate change is needed. Here, we investigate the effects of elevated Pco(2) and temperature on the whole-organism and cellular physiology of the periwinkle Littorina littorea. Metabolic rates (measured as respiration rates), adenylate energy nucleotide concentrations and indexes, and end-product metabolite concentrations were measured. Compared with values for control conditions, snails decreased their respiration rate by 31% in response to elevated Pco(2) and by 15% in response to a combination of increased Pco(2) and temperature. Decreased respiration rates were associated with metabolic reduction and an increase in end-product metabolites in acidified treatments, indicating an increased reliance on anaerobic metabolism. There was also an interactive effect of elevated Pco(2) and temperature on total adenylate nucleotides, which was apparently compensated for by the maintenance of adenylate energy charge via AMP deaminase activity. Our findings suggest that marine intertidal organisms are likely to exhibit complex physiological responses to future environmental drivers, with likely negative effects on growth, population dynamics, and, ultimately, ecosystem processes.

  14. Desulfohalophilus alkaliarsenatis gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely halophilic sulfate- and arsenate-respiring bacterium from Searles Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blum, Jodi Switzer; Kulp, Thomas R.; Han, Sukkyun; Lanoil, Brian; Saltikov, Chad W.; Stolz, John F.; Miller, Laurence G.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2012-01-01

    A haloalkaliphilic sulfate-respiring bacterium, strain SLSR-1, was isolated from a lactate-fed stable enrichment culture originally obtained from the extreme environment of Searles Lake, California. The isolate proved capable of growth via sulfate-reduction over a broad range of salinities (125–330 g/L), although growth was slowest at salt-saturation. Strain SLSR-1 was also capable of growth via dissimilatory arsenate-reduction and displayed an even broader range of salinity tolerance (50–330 g/L) when grown under these conditions. Strain SLSR-1 could also grow via dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia. Growth experiments in the presence of high borate concentrations indicated a greater sensitivity of sulfate-reduction than arsenate-respiration to this naturally abundant anion in Searles Lake. Strain SLSR-1 contained genes involved in both sulfate-reduction (dsrAB) and arsenate respiration (arrA). Amplicons of 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from DNA extracted from Searles Lake sediment revealed the presence of close relatives of strain SLSR-1 as part of the flora of this ecosystem despite the fact that sulfate-reduction activity could not be detected in situ. We conclude that strain SLSR-1 can only achieve growth via arsenate-reduction under the current chemical conditions prevalent at Searles Lake. Strain SLSR-1 is a deltaproteobacterium in the family Desulfohalobiacea of anaerobic, haloalkaliphilic bacteria, for which we propose the name Desulfohalophilus alkaliarsenatis gen. nov., sp. nov.

  15. Control by Fur of the nitrate respiration regulators NarP and NarL in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Teixidó, Laura; Cortés, Pilar; Bigas, Anna; Alvarez, Gerard; Barbé, Jordi; Campoy, Susana

    2010-03-01

    Anaerobic metabolism is controlled by several transcriptional regulators, including ArcA, Fnr, NarP, and NarL, with the Fnr and ArcA proteins sensitive to the cell's redox status. Specifically, the two-component ArcAB system is activated in response to the oxidation state of membrane-bound quinones, which are the central electron carriers of respiration. Fnr, by contrast, directly senses cellular oxidation status through the [4Fe-4S] cluster present in its own structure. In this study, a third additional redox-associated pathway that controls the nitrate respiration regulators NarL and NarP was identified. The results showed that, in Salmonella enterica, the expression of these two transcriptional regulators is under the control of Fur, a metalloregulator that senses the presence of Fe2+ and regulates the homeostasis of this cation inside the cell. Thus, the Fur- Fe2+ complex increases the expression of narL and represses that of narP. Furthermore, studies of S. enteric mutants defective in the Fur-regulated sRNA RfrA and RfrB showed that those sRNA control both narP and narL expression. These results confirm Fur as a global regulator based on its involvement not only in iron uptake and detoxification but also in the control of nitrate/nitrite respiration by sensing cellular redox status.

  16. Divergent PCB organohalide-respiring consortia enriched from the efflux channel of a former Delor manufacturer in Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Praveckova, Martina; Brennerova, Maria V; Cvancarova, Monika; De Alencastro, Luiz Felippe; Holliger, Christof; Rossi, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) organohalide-respiring communities from the efflux channel of a former Delor manufacturer in Eastern Slovakia were assessed using metagenomic, statistical and cultivation-adapted approaches. Multivariate analysis of environmental factors together with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the bacterial communities in the primary sediments revealed both temporal and spatial heterogeneity in the distribution of microbial populations, which reflects the dynamic pattern of contamination and altered conditions for biodegradation activity along the channel. Anaerobic microcosms were developed from eight sediments sampled along the channel, where high concentrations of PCBs - from 6.6 to 136mg/kg dry weight, were measured. PCB dehalorespiring activity, congruent with changes in the microbial composition in all microcosms, was detected. After 10 months of cultivation, the divergently evolved consortia achieved up to 35.9 percent reduction of the total PCB concentration. Phylogenetic-analysis of the active Chloroflexi-related organohalide-respiring bacteria by partial sequencing of 16S rRNA genes in cDNA from microcosms with the highest PCB dechlorination activity revealed diverse and unique complexity of the populations. The predominant organohalide respirers were either affiliated with Dehalococcoides sp. and Dehalococcoides-like group (DLG) organisms or were composed of currently unknown distant clades of DLG bacteria. The present study should encourage researchers to explore the full potential of the indigenous PCB dechlorinating populations to develop effective bioremediation approaches that can perform the complete mineralization of PCBs in polluted environments.

  17. Anaerobic digestion of aliphatic polyesters.

    PubMed

    Šmejkalová, Pavla; Kužníková, Veronika; Merna, Jan; Hermanová, Soňa

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic processes for the treatment of plastic materials waste represent versatile and effective approach in environmental protection and solid waste management. In this work, anaerobic biodegradability of model aliphatic polyesters, poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), in the form of powder and melt-pressed films with varying molar mass, was studied. Biogas production was explored in batch laboratory trials at 55 ± 1°C under a nitrogen atmosphere. The inoculum used was thermophilic digested sludge (total solids concentration of 2.9%) from operating digesters at the Central Waste Water Treatment Plant in Prague, Czech Republic. Methanogenic biodegradation of PCLs typically yielded from 54 to 60% of the theoretical biogas yield. The biodegradability of PLAs achieved from 56 to 84% of the theoretical value. High biogas yield (up to 677 mL/g TS) with high methane content (more than 60%), comparable with conventionally processed materials, confirmed the potential of polyester samples for anaerobic treatment in the case of their exploitation in agriculture or as a packaging material in the food industry.

  18. Ecosystem-level controls on root-rhizosphere respiration.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Francesca; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A; Flower, Charles E; Lynch, Douglas J; Czimczik, Claudia; Tang, Jianwu; Subke, Jens-Arne

    2013-07-01

    Recent advances in the partitioning of autotrophic from heterotrophic respiration processes in soils in conjunction with new high temporal resolution soil respiration data sets offer insights into biotic and environmental controls of respiration. Besides temperature, many emerging controlling factors have not yet been incorporated into ecosystem-scale models. We synthesize recent research that has partitioned soil respiration into its process components to evaluate effects of nitrogen, temperature and photosynthesis on autotrophic flux from soils at the ecosystem level. Despite the widely used temperature dependence of root respiration, gross primary productivity (GPP) can explain most patterns of ecosystem root respiration (and to some extent heterotrophic respiration) at within-season time-scales. Specifically, heterotrophi crespiration is influenced by a seasonally variable supply of recent photosynthetic products in the rhizosphere. The contribution of stored root carbon (C) to root respiratory fluxes also varied seasonally, partially decoupling the proportion of photosynthetic C driving root respiration. In order to reflect recent insights, new hierarchical models, which incorporate root respiration as a primary function of GPP and which respond to environmental variables by modifying Callocation belowground, are needed for better prediction of future ecosystem C sequestration.

  19. Autotrophic and heterotrophic components of soil respiration in permafrost zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udovenko, Maria; Goncharova, Olga

    2016-04-01

    Soil carbon dioxide emissions production is an important integral indicator of soil biological activity and it includes several components: the root respiration and microbial decomposition of organic matter. Separate determination of the components of soil respiration is necessary for studying the balance of carbon in the soil and to assessment its potential as a sink or source of carbon dioxide. The aim of this study was testing field methods of separate determination of root and microbial respiration in soils of north of West Siberia. The research took place near the town Nadym, Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous District (north of West Siberia).The study area was located in the northern taiga with sporadic permafrost. Investigations were carried out at two sites: in forest and in frozen peatland. 3 methods were tested for the separation of microbial and root respiration. 1) "Shading"; 2) "Clipping"(removing the above-ground green plant parts); 3)a modified method of roots exclusion (It is to compare the emission of soils of "peat spots", devoid of vegetation and roots, and soils located in close proximity to the spots on which there is herbaceous vegetation and moss). For the experiments on methods of "Shading" and "Clipping" in the forest and on the frozen peatland ware established 12 plots, 1 x 1 m (3 plots in the forest and at 9 plots on frozen peatland; 4 of them - control).The criterions for choosing location sites were the similarity of meso- and microrelief, the same depth of permafrost, the same vegetation. Measurement of carbon dioxide emissions (chamber method) was carried out once a day, in the evening, for a week. Separation the root and microbial respiration by "Shading" showed that in the forest the root respiration contribution is 5%, and microbial - 95%. On peatlands root respiration is 41%, 59% of the microbial. In the experiment "Clipping" in peatlands root respiration is 56%, the microbial respiration - 44%, in forest- root respiration is 17%, and

  20. 42 CFR 84.1134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators...

  1. 42 CFR 84.1134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators...

  2. 42 CFR 84.1134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators...

  3. 42 CFR 84.1134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators...

  4. Influences of environmental noise level and respiration rate on the accuracy of acoustic respiration rate monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Shizuha; Toyama, Hiroaki; Takei, Yusuke; Wagatsuma, Toshihiro; Yabuki, Hiroshi; Yamauchi, Masanori

    2017-02-07

    We tested the hypothesis that the environmental noise generated by a forced-air warming system reduces the monitoring accuracy of acoustic respiration rate (RRa). Noise levels were adjusted to 45-55, 56-65, 66-75, and 76-85 dB. Healthy participants breathed at set respiration rates (RRset) of 6, 12, and 30/min. Under each noise level at each RRset, the respiration rates by manual counting (RRm) and RRa were recorded. Any appearance of the alarm display on the RRa monitor was also recorded. Each RRm of all participants agreed with each RRset at each noise level. At 45-55 dB noise, the RRa of 13, 17, and 17 participants agreed with RRset of 6, 12, and 30/min, respectively. The RRa of 14, 17, and 16 participants at 56-65 dB noise, agreed with RRset of 6, 12, and 30/min, respectively. At 66-75 dB noise, the RRa of 9, 15, and 16 participants agreed with RRset of 6, 12, and 30/min, respectively. The RRa of one, nine, and nine participants at 76-85 dB noise agreed with RRset of 6, 12, and 30/min, respectively, which was significantly less than the other noise levels (P < 0.05). Overall, 72.9% of alarm displays highlighted incorrect values of RRa. In a noisy situation involving the operation of a forced-air warming system, the acoustic respiration monitoring should be used carefully especially in patients with a low respiration rate.

  5. Struvite recovery from anaerobically digested dairy manure: A review of application potential and hindrances.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wendong; Fattah, Kazi P; Huchzermeier, Matthew P

    2016-03-15

    Anaerobically digested dairy manure is rich in ammonium, orthophosphates, and magnesium, indicating a high potential for struvite recovery. Continuous generation of large amounts of dairy manure plus increasing global interest in anaerobic digestion of dairy manure suggest a huge market for struvite production with anaerobically digested dairy manure. However, the complex chemical composition of digested dairy manure presents hindrances to struvite recovery. This review paper assesses the significance and potential of struvite recovery from anaerobically digested dairy manure, identifies the factors hindering struvite recovery, and discusses the methods to overcome hindrances and the measures to improve phosphorus speciation of dairy manure for struvite formation. This paper proposes using "struvite recovery potential" or Pstruvite based on the least molar activity of struvite component ions in addition to "supersaturation ratio" to identify the potential for struvite recovery. The probable hindrances mainly include high Ca(2+) concentration and molar activity ratios of Ca(2+): Mg(2+) and Ca(2+): PO4(3-), high ionic strength, and high alkalinity. Struvite formation and purity is likely a function of all the interfering variables, rather than just a single factor with digested dairy manure. Potential enhancement measures need to be tested for technical and economic feasibility and applicability to various sources of digested dairy manure. This review paper provides guidance to overcoming the hindrances of digested dairy manure to struvite formation.

  6. Anaerobic digestion of thin stillage for energy recovery and water reuse in corn-ethanol plants.

    PubMed

    Alkan-Ozkaynak, A; Karthikeyan, K G

    2011-11-01

    Recycling of anaerobically-digested thin stillage within a corn-ethanol plant may result in the accumulation of nutrients of environmental concern in animal feed coproducts and inhibitory organic materials in the fermentation tank. Our focus is on anaerobic digestion of treated (centrifugation and lime addition) thin stillage. Suitability of digestate from anaerobic treatment for reuse as process water was also investigated. Experiments conducted at various inoculum-to-substrate ratios (ISRs) revealed that alkalinity is a critical parameter limiting digestibility of thin stillage. An ISR level of 2 appeared optimal based on high biogas production level (763 mL biogas/g volatile solids added) and organic matter removal (80.6% COD removal). The digester supernatant at this ISR level was found to contain both organic and inorganic constituents at levels that would cause no inhibition to ethanol fermentation. Anaerobic digestion of treated-thin stillage can be expected to improve the water and energy efficiencies of dry grind corn-ethanol plants.

  7. Should we pretreat solid waste prior to anaerobic digestion? An assessment of its environmental cost.

    PubMed

    Carballa, Marta; Duran, Cecilia; Hospido, Almudena

    2011-12-15

    Many studies have shown the effectiveness of pretreatments prior to anaerobic digestion of solid wastes, but to our knowledge, none analyzes their environmental consequences/costs. In this work, seven different pretreatments applied to two types of waste (kitchen waste and sewage sludge) have been environmentally evaluated by using life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. The results show that the environmental burdens associated to the application of pretreatments prior to anaerobic digestion cannot be excluded. Among the options tested, the pressurize-depressurize and chemical (acid or alkaline) pretreatments could be recommended on the basis of their beneficial net environmental performance, while thermal and ozonation alternatives require energy efficiency optimization to reduce their environmental burdens. Reconciling operational, economic and environmental aspects in a holistic approach for the selection of the most sustainable option, mechanical (e.g., pressurize-depressurize) and chemical methods appear to be the most appropriate alternatives at this stage.

  8. Predicting the impact of anaerobic microsites on soil organic matter mineralization rates in upland soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, K. E.; Keiluweit, M.; Denney, A.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Soils are a crucial component of the global carbon (C) cycle, representing a highly dynamic and large reservoir of C stored as soil organic matter (SOM). An important control on SOM residence time is microbial mineralization. While the impact of climactic and site-specific constraints on SOM mineralization rates are recognized, the role of oxygen limitations remains elusive. If oxygen consumption (via heterotrophic respiration) outpaces supply (via diffusion), anaerobic microsites can occur even within seemingly well-aerated upland soils. Under anaerobic conditions, SOM mineralization rates are expected to be slower due to metabolic constraints on microbial C oxidation. Process-based C cycling models have begun to incorporate the inhibiting effect of oxygen limitations by estimating anaerobic pore volume. However, such model predictions still lack experimental validation and research on environmental controls thus far has largely been focused on soil moisture. Here we aimed to determine the extent of anaerobic microsites within seemingly well-aerated upland soils experimentally and identify whether texture, SOM content, and microbial biomass can act as useful predictors in modeling frameworks. To this end, we monitored oxygen dynamics in soils spanning natural and artificial gradients in texture, SOM content and microbial biomass. Anaerobic microsites was visualized using a planar optode imaging system. Oxygen consumption rates were determined using gas chromatography, while oxygen diffusion rates were estimated based on porosity and pore-size distribution quantified by x-ray microtomography. Our results show that bulk oxygen concentrations ranged from 70% to as low as 20% saturation. However, all soils showed substantial micro-scale variability in oxygen concentrations, leading to the formation of anaerobic microsites even at modest moisture content. The extent of anaerobic microsites correlated with an overall reduction in SOM mineralization rates, and depended

  9. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    1995-01-01

    A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

  10. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  11. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  12. Can we distinguish autotrophic respiration from heterotrophic respiration in a field site using high temporal resolution CO2 flux measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biro, Beatrice; Berger, Sina; Praetzel, Leandra; Blodau, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The processes behind C-cycling in peatlands are important to understand for assessing the vulnerability of peatlands as carbon sinks under changing climate conditions. Especially boreal peatlands are likely to underlie strong alterations in the future. It is expected that C-pools that are directly influenced by vegetation and water table fluctuations can be easily destabilized. The CO2 efflux through respiration underlies autotrophic and heterotrophic processes that show different feedbacks on changing environmental conditions. In order to understand the respiration fluxes better for more accurate modelling and prognoses, the determination of the relative importance of different respiration sources is necessary. Earlier studies used e.g. exfoliation experiments, incubation experiments or modelling approaches to estimate the different respiration sources for the total ecosystem respiration (Reco). To further the understanding in this topic, I want to distinguish autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration using high temporal resolution measurements. The study site was selected along a hydrological gradient in a peatland in southern Ontario (Canada) and measurements were conducted from May to September 2015 once per month. Environmental controls (water table, soil temperature and soil moisture) that effect the respiration sources were recorded. In my study I used a Li-COR 6400XT and a Los Gatos greenhouse gas analyzer (GGA). Reco was determined by chamber flux measurements with the GGA, while simultaneously CO2 respiration measurements on different vegetation compartments like roots, leaves and mosses were conducted using the Li-COR 6400XT. The difference between Reco and autotrophic respiration equals heterotrophic respiration. After the measurements, the vegetation plots were harvested and separated for all compartments (leaves, roots, mosses, soil organic matter), dried and weighed. The weighted respiration rates from all vegetation compartments sum up to

  13. Alkaline solubilization and microwave irradiation as a combined sludge disintegration and minimization method.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Ilgin; Sanin, F Dilek

    2009-05-01

    Commonly used pretreatment method of alkaline solubilization (using NaOH) and a relatively new technology of microwave (MW) irradiation (160 degrees C) were combined as a pretreatment method of waste activated sludge (WAS) in this study. First alkaline and MW pretreatment methods were examined separately, then their combination for different conditions was investigated in terms of their effect on COD solubilization, turbidity and capillary suction time (CST). For combined pretreatments, soluble COD to total COD ratio (SCOD/TCOD) of WAS increased from 0.005 (control) to 0.18, 0.27, 0.34 and 0.37 for combined methods of MW and pH-10, 11, 12 and 12.5, respectively. Deteriorated dewaterability due to alkaline pretreatment was also improved due to the incorporation of MW irradiation. Further, with small scale batch anaerobic reactors, pH-10, pH-12, MW (alone), MW+pH-10 and MW+pH-12 pretreated WAS samples were anaerobically digested. Highest total gas and methane productions were achieved with MW+pH-12 pretreatment with 16.3% and 18.9% improvements over control reactor, respectively. Finally the performance of MW+pH-12 pretreatment was examined with 2L anaerobic semi-continuous reactors for 92 days and compared to that of the control reactors. These reactors were operated at an SRT of 15 days. After steady state, 43.5% and 55% improvements were obtained in respective daily total gas and methane productions. TS, VS and TCOD reductions were improved by 24.9%, 35.4% and 30.3%, respectively based on a relative calculation with respect to control reactors. This way combined alkaline-microwave treatment proved to be an effective sludge minimization method. Pretreated digested sludge had 22% improved dewaterability than unpretreated digested sludge. Higher SCOD and NH(3)-N concentrations were measured in the pretreated digested sludge supernatant; however, PO(4)-P concentration did not increase much.

  14. Experimental burial inhibits methanogenesis and anaerobic decomposition in water-saturated peats.

    PubMed

    Blodau, Christian; Siems, Melanie; Beer, Julia

    2011-12-01

    A mechanistic understanding of carbon (C) sequestration and methane (CH(4)) production is of great interest due to the importance of these processes for the global C budget. Here we demonstrate experimentally, by means of column experiments, that burial of water saturated, anoxic bog peat leads to inactivation of anaerobic respiration and methanogenesis. This effect can be related to the slowness of diffusive transport of solutes and evolving energetic constraints on anaerobic respiration. Burial lowered decomposition constants in homogenized peat sand mixtures from about 10(-5) to 10(-7) yr(-1), which is considerably slower than previously assumed, and methanogenesis slowed down in a similar manner. The latter effect could be related to acetoclastic methanogenesis approaching a minimum energy quantum of -25 kJ mol(-1) (CH(4)). Given the robustness of hydraulic properties that locate the oxic-anoxic boundary near the peatland surface and constrain solute transport deeper into the peat, this effect has likely been critical for building the peatland C store and will continue supporting long-term C sequestration in northern peatlands even under moderately changing climatic conditions.

  15. Characterization of wheat straw-degrading anaerobic alkali-tolerant mixed cultures from soda lake sediments by molecular and cultivation techniques.

    PubMed

    Porsch, Katharina; Wirth, Balázs; Tóth, Erika M; Schattenberg, Florian; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2015-09-01

    Alkaline pretreatment has the potential to enhance the anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass to biogas. However, the elevated pH of the substrate may require alkalitolerant microbial communities for an effective digestion. Three mixed anaerobic lignocellulolytic cultures were enriched from sediments from two soda lakes with wheat straw as substrate under alkaline (pH 9) mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. The gas production of the three cultures ceased after 4 to 5 weeks, and the produced gas was composed of carbon dioxide and methane. The main liquid intermediates were acetate and propionate. The physiological behavior of the cultures was stable even after several transfers. The enrichment process was also followed by molecular fingerprinting (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and of the mcrA/mrtA functional gene for methanogens. The main shift in the microbial community composition occurred between the sediment samples and the first enrichment, whereas the structure was stable in the following transfers. The bacterial communities mainly consisted of Sphingobacteriales, Clostridiales and Spirochaeta, but differed at genus level. Methanothermobacter and Methanosarcina genera and the order Methanomicrobiales were predominant methanogenes in the obtained cultures. Additionally, single cellulolytic microorganisms were isolated from enrichment cultures and identified as members of the alkaliphilic or alkalitolerant genera. The results show that anaerobic alkaline habitats harbor diverse microbial communities, which can degrade lignocellulose effectively and are therefore a potential resource for improving anaerobic digestion.

  16. Characterization of wheat straw-degrading anaerobic alkali-tolerant mixed cultures from soda lake sediments by molecular and cultivation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Porsch, Katharina; Wirth, Balázs; Tóth, Erika M; Schattenberg, Florian; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline pretreatment has the potential to enhance the anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass to biogas. However, the elevated pH of the substrate may require alkalitolerant microbial communities for an effective digestion. Three mixed anaerobic lignocellulolytic cultures were enriched from sediments from two soda lakes with wheat straw as substrate under alkaline (pH 9) mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. The gas production of the three cultures ceased after 4 to 5 weeks, and the produced gas was composed of carbon dioxide and methane. The main liquid intermediates were acetate and propionate. The physiological behavior of the cultures was stable even after several transfers. The enrichment process was also followed by molecular fingerprinting (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and of the mcrA/mrtA functional gene for methanogens. The main shift in the microbial community composition occurred between the sediment samples and the first enrichment, whereas the structure was stable in the following transfers. The bacterial communities mainly consisted of Sphingobacteriales, Clostridiales and Spirochaeta, but differed at genus level. Methanothermobacter and Methanosarcina genera and the order Methanomicrobiales were predominant methanogenes in the obtained cultures. Additionally, single cellulolytic microorganisms were isolated from enrichment cultures and identified as members of the alkaliphilic or alkalitolerant genera. The results show that anaerobic alkaline habitats harbor diverse microbial communities, which can degrade lignocellulose effectively and are therefore a potential resource for improving anaerobic digestion. PMID:25737100

  17. Reverse Methanogenesis and Respiration in Methanotrophic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Koehorst, Jasper J.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is catalyzed by anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) via a reverse and modified methanogenesis pathway. Methanogens can also reverse the methanogenesis pathway to oxidize methane, but only during net methane production (i.e., “trace methane oxidation”). In turn, ANME can produce methane, but only during net methane oxidation (i.e., enzymatic back flux). Net AOM is exergonic when coupled to an external electron acceptor such as sulfate (ANME-1, ANME-2abc, and ANME-3), nitrate (ANME-2d), or metal (oxides). In this review, the reversibility of the methanogenesis pathway and essential differences between ANME and methanogens are described by combining published information with domain based (meta)genome comparison of archaeal methanotrophs and selected archaea. These differences include abundances and special structure of methyl coenzyme M reductase and of multiheme cytochromes and the presence of menaquinones or methanophenazines. ANME-2a and ANME-2d can use electron acceptors other than sulfate or nitrate for AOM, respectively. Environmental studies suggest that ANME-2d are also involved in sulfate-dependent AOM. ANME-1 seem to use a different mechanism for disposal of electrons and possibly are less versatile in electron acceptors use than ANME-2. Future research will shed light on the molecular basis of reversal of the methanogenic pathway and electron transfer in different ANME types. PMID:28154498

  18. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1991-06-01

    This study seeks to determine numbers, diversity, and morphology of anaerobic microorganisms in 15 samples of subsurface material from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in 18 samples from the Hanford Reservation and in 1 rock sample from the Nevada Test Site; set up long term experiments on the chemical activities of anaerobic microorganisms based on these same samples; work to improve methods for the micro-scale determination of in situ anaerobic microbial activity;and to begin to isolate anaerobes from these samples into axenic culture with identification of the axenic isolates.

  19. Infected Pneumatocele Following Anaerobic Pneumonia in Adult

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yeon Tae; Lee, Kyung Duk; Seon, Kyoung Youn; Lee, Jong Hyun; Lee, Sung Ho; Choi, Se Ho

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of an infected pneumatocele in the course of anaerobic pneumonia in an adult. To the best of our knowledge, anaerobic pneumonia complicated by a pneumatocele in an adult has not previously been described. The pneumatocele occurred on the fifth day of hospitalization, and rapidly increased in size, with the development of a subsequent mixed anaerobe infection. A pig-tail catheter was inserted and the pus drained. The bacterial culture from the pus was positive for three anaerobes: Bacteroid species, Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus and Fusobacterium species. Intravenous antibiotics and percutaneous catheter drainage resulted in a successful treatment. PMID:16491835

  20. Influence of alkaline co-contaminants on technetium mobility in vadose zone sediments.

    PubMed

    Szecsody, Jim E; Jansik, Danielle P; McKinley, James P; Hess, Nancy J

    2014-09-01

    Pertechnetate was slowly reduced in a natural, untreated arid sediment under anaerobic conditions (0.02 nmolg(-1)h(-1)), which could occur in low permeability zones in the field, most of which was quickly oxidized. A small portion of the surface Tc may be incorporated into slowly dissolving surface phases, so was not readily oxidized/remobilized into pore water. In contrast, pertechnetate reduction in an anaerobic sediment containing adsorbed ferrous iron as the reductant was rapid (15-600 nmolg(-1)h(-1)), and nearly all (96-98%) was rapidly oxidized/remobilized (2.6-6.8 nmolg(-1)h(-1)) within hours. Tc reduction in an anaerobic sediment containing 0.5-10mM sulfide showed a relatively slow reduction rate (0.01-0.03 nmolg(-1)h(-1)) that was similar to observations in the natural sediment. Pertechnetate infiltration into sediment with a highly alkaline water resulted in rapid reduction (0.07-0.2 nmolg(-1)h(-1)) from ferrous iron released during biotite or magnetite dissolution. Oxidation of NaOH-treated sediments resulted in slow Tc oxidation (∼0.05 nmolg(-1)h(-1)) of a small fraction of the surface Tc (13-23%). The Tc remaining on the surface was Tc(IV) (by XANES), and autoradiography and elemental maps of Tc (by electron microprobe) showed Tc was present associated with specific minerals, rather than being evenly distributed on the surface. Dissolution of quartz, montmorillonite, muscovite, and kaolinite also occurred in the alkaline water, resulting in significant aqueous silica and aluminum. Over time, aluminosilicates, cancrinite, zeolite and sodalite were precipitating. These precipitates may be coating surface Tc(IV) phases, limiting reoxidation.

  1. Influence of Alkaline Co-Contaminants on Technetium Mobility in Vadose Zone Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; Jansik, Danielle P.; McKinley, James P.; Hess, Nancy J.

    2014-09-01

    Pertechnetate was slowly reduced in a natural, untreated arid sediment under anaerobic conditions (0.02 nmol g-1 h-1), which could occur in low permeability zones in the field, most of which was quickly oxidized. A small portion of the surface Tc may be incorporated into slowly dissolving surface phases, so was not readily oxidized/remobilized into pore water. In contrast, pertechnetate reduction in an anaerobic sediment containing adsorbed ferrous iron as the reductant was rapid (15 to 600 nmol g-1 h-1), and nearly all (96 - 98%) was rapidly oxidized/remobilized (2.6 to 6.8 nmol g-1 h-1) within hours. Tc reduction in an anaerobic sediment containing 0.5 to 10 mM sulfide showed a relatively slow reduction rate (0.01 to 0.03 nmol g-1 h-1) that was similar to observations in the natural sediment. Pertechnetate infiltration into sediment with a highly alkaline water resulted in rapid reduction (0.07 to 0.2 nmol g-1 h-1) from ferrous iron released during biotite or magnetite dissolution. Oxidation of NaOH-treated sediments resulted in slow Tc oxidation (~0.05 nmol g-1 h-1) of a small fraction of the surface Tc (13% to 23%). The Tc remaining on the surface was TcIV (by XANES), and autoradiography and elemental maps of Tc (by electron microprobe) showed Tc was present associated with specific minerals, rather than being evenly distributed on the surface. Dissolution of quartz, montmorillonite, muscovite, and kaolinite also occurred in the alkaline water, resulting in significant aqueous silica and aluminum. Over time, aluminosilicates cancrinite, zeolite and sodalite were precipitating. These precipitates may be coating surface Tc(IV) phases, limiting reoxidation.

  2. Interannual sedimentary effluxes of alkalinity in the southern North Sea: Model results compared with summer observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetsch, Johannes; Kuehn, Wilfried; Six, Katharina

    2016-04-01

    Alkalinity generation in the sediment of the southern North Sea is the focus of several recent studies. One motivation for these efforts is the potentially enhanced buffering capacity of anthropogenic CO2 invasion into the corresponding pelagic system. An adaptation of a global multilayer sediment model (Heinze et al., 1999) in combination with a pelagic ecosystem model for shelf sea dynamics was used to study the benthic reactions on very different annual cycles (2001 - 2009) including the River Elbe summer flooding in 2002. The focus of this study is the efflux of alkalinity, their different contributors (aerobic respiration, denitrification, net sulfate reduction, calcite dissolution, nitrification) and their seasonal and interannual cycles. Similar to the observations covering the southern North Sea (Brenner et al., 2015) the model results show large horizontal gradients from the near-shore high productive areas with benthic remineralization up to Rmin = 10.6 mol C m-2 yr-1 and TA generation RTA = 2 mol C m-2 yr-1 to off-shore moderate productive areas with mean Rmin = 2.5 mol C m-2 yr-1 and mean TA generation RTA = 0.4 mol C m-2 yr-1. Beside calcite dissolution, aerobic respiration (producing ammonium) and denitrification are the largest contributors to alkalinity generation. Nitrification is reducing alkalinity in the sediment. Due to low regenerated primary production in summer, the year 2001 exhibits the lowest input of particulate organic matter into the sediment (POCexp=2.3 mol C m-2 yr-1), while the year 2003 exhibits the highest export production (POCexp=2.6 mol C m-2 yr-1). The biogeochemical reactions and the effluxes from the sediment follow these pelagic amplitudes with a time lag of about one year with damped amplitudes. References Brenner, H., Braeckman, U., Le Guitton, M., Meysman, F.J.R., 2015. The impact of sedimentary alkalinity release on the water column CO2 system in the North Sea. Biogeosiences Discussion, 12(15): 12395-12453. Heinze, C

  3. Performance of an Anaerobic Baffled Reactor (ABR) in treatment of cassava wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Ferraz, Fernanda M.; Bruni, Aline T.; Del Bianchi, Vanildo L.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of an anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) was evaluated in the treatment of cassava wastewater, a pollutant residue. An ABR divided in four equal volume compartments (total volume 4L) and operated at 35ºC was used in cassava wastewater treatment. Feed tank chemical oxygen demand (COD) was varied from 2000 to 7000 mg L-1 and it was evaluated the most appropriated hydraulic retention time (HRT) for the best performance on COD removal. The ABR was evaluated by analysis of COD (colorimetric method), pH, turbidity, total and volatile solids, alkalinity and acidity. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried to better understand data obtained. The system showed buffering ability as acidity decreased along compartments while alkalinity and pH values were increased. There was particulate material retention and COD removal varied from 83 to 92% for HRT of 3.5 days. PMID:24031316

  4. Observing Mean Annual Mediterranean Maquis Ecosystem Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marras, S.; Bellucco, V.; Mereu, S.; Sirca, C.; Spano, D.

    2014-12-01

    In semi arid ecosystems, extremely low Soil Water Content (SWC) values may limit ecosystem respiration (Reco) to the point of hiding the typical exponential response of respiration to temperature. This work is aimed to understand and model the Reco of an evergreen Mediterranean maquis ecosystem and to estimate the contribution of soil CO2 efflux to Reco. The selected site is located in the center of the Mediterranean sea in Sardinia (Italy). Mean annual precipitation is 588 mm and mean annual temperature is 15.9 °C. Vegetation cover is heterogeneous: 70% covered by shrubs and 30% of bare soil. Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) is monitored with an Eddy Covariance (EC) tower since April 2004. Soil collars were placed underneath the dominant species (Juniperus phoenicea and Pistacia lentiscus) and over the bare soil. Soil CO2 efflux was measured once a month since April 2012. Soil temperature and SWC were monitored continuously at 5 cm depth in 4 different positions close to the soil collars. Six years of EC measurements (2005-2010) and two years of soil CO2 efflux (2012-2013) measurements were analysed. Reco was estimated from the measured EC fluxes at night after filtering for adequate turbulence (u* > 1.5). Reco measurements were then binned into 1°C intervals and median values were first fitted using the Locally Estimated Scatterplot Smoothing (LOESS) method (to determine the dominant trend of the experimental curve) Reco shows an exponential increase with air and soil temperature, until SWC measured at 0.2 m depth remains above 19% vol. Secondly, the coefficients of the selected Lloyd and Taylor (1994) were estimated through the nonlinear least square (nls) method: Rref (ecosystem respiration rate at a reference temperature of 10 °C was equal to 1.65 μmol m-2 s-1 and E0 (activation energy parameter that determines the temperature sensitivity) was equal to 322.46. In addition, bare and drier soils show a reduced response of measured CO2 efflux to increasing

  5. Alkaline tolerant dextranase from streptomyces anulatus

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Stephen R.; Adney, William S.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    A process for production of an alkaline tolerant dextranase enzyme comprises culturing a dextran-producing microorganism Streptomyces anulatus having accession no. ATCC PTA-3866 to produce an alkaline tolerant dextranase, Dex 1 wherein the protein in said enzyme is characterized by a MW of 63.3 kDa and Dex 2 wherein its protein is characterized by a MW of 81.8 kDa.

  6. Technetium recovery from high alkaline solution

    DOEpatents

    Nash, Charles A.

    2016-07-12

    Disclosed are methods for recovering technetium from a highly alkaline solution. The highly alkaline solution can be a liquid waste solution from a nuclear waste processing system. Methods can include combining the solution with a reductant capable of reducing technetium at the high pH of the solution and adding to or forming in the solution an adsorbent capable of adsorbing the precipitated technetium at the high pH of the solution.

  7. Toxicity of alkalinity to Hyalella azteca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasier, P.J.; Winger, P.V.; Reinert, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    Toxicity testing and chemical analyses of sediment pore water have been suggested for use in sediment quality assessments and sediment toxicity identification evaluations. However, caution should be exercised in interpreting pore-water chemistry and toxicity due to inherent chemical characteristics and confounding relationships. High concentrations of alkalinity, which are typical of sediment pore waters from many regions, have been shown to be toxic to test animals. A series of tests were conducted to assess the significance of elevated alkalinity concentrations to Hyalella azteca, an amphipod commonly used for sediment and pore-water toxicity testing. Toxicity tests with 14-d old and 7-d old animals were conducted in serial dilutions of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solutions producing alkalinities ranging between 250 to 2000 mg/L as CaCO3. A sodium chloride (NaCl) toxicity test was also conducted to verify that toxicity was due to bicarbonate and not sodium. Alkalinity was toxic at concentrations frequently encountered in sediment pore water. There was also a significant difference in the toxicity of alkalinity between 14-d old and 7-d old animals. The average 96-h LC50 for alkalinity was 1212 mg/L (as CaCO3) for 14-d old animals and 662 mg/L for the younger animals. Sodium was not toxic at levels present in the NaHCO3 toxicity tests. Alkalinity should be routinely measured in pore-water toxicity tests, and interpretation of toxicity should consider alkalinity concentration and test-organism tolerance.

  8. Alkaline Water and Longevity: A Murine Study

    PubMed Central

    Magro, Massimiliano; Corain, Livio; Ferro, Silvia; Baratella, Davide; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Terzo, Milo; Corraducci, Vittorino; Salmaso, Luigi; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The biological effect of alkaline water consumption is object of controversy. The present paper presents a 3-year survival study on a population of 150 mice, and the data were analyzed with accelerated failure time (AFT) model. Starting from the second year of life, nonparametric survival plots suggest that mice watered with alkaline water showed a better survival than control mice. Interestingly, statistical analysis revealed that alkaline water provides higher longevity in terms of “deceleration aging factor” as it increases the survival functions when compared with control group; namely, animals belonging to the population treated with alkaline water resulted in a longer lifespan. Histological examination of mice kidneys, intestine, heart, liver, and brain revealed that no significant differences emerged among the three groups indicating that no specific pathology resulted correlated with the consumption of alkaline water. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survival data as a function of watering with alkaline water of long-lived mouse models. PMID:27340414

  9. Performed surfactant-optimized aqueous alkaline flood

    SciTech Connect

    Thigpen, D.R.; Lawson, J.B.; Nelson, R.C.

    1991-11-26

    This paper describes improvement in a process for recovering oil from an acidic oil reservoir by injecting an aqueous alkaline solution comprising water, sodium chloride, and alkaline material for reacting with the reservoir oil forming a petroleum acid soap to form an in-situ surfactant system. The improvement comprises: selecting a preformed cosurfactant which is soluble in both the aqueous solution and the reservoir oil and has a solubility ratio which is grater than the solubility ratio of the petroleum acid soap where the solubility ratio is the ratio of solubility in the aqueous alkaline solution to the solubility in the reservoir oil; combining with the alkaline solution an amount of the preformed cosurfactant which will result in the in-situ surfacant system having a salinity about equal to a salinity which results in minimal interfacial tension between the oil in the reservoir and the in-situ surfactant system at reservoir temperature, wherein the amount of the preformed cosurfactant is about 0.3 percent by weight in the aqueous alkaline solution; and injecting the cosurfactant-aqueous alkaline solution mixture into the reservoir to displace oil toward a fluid production location.

  10. Cyanide-resistant Respiration in Freshly Cut Potato Slices.

    PubMed

    Rychter, A; Janes, H W; Frenkel, C

    1978-04-01

    Treating intact white potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber with ethylene in air or O(2) made it possible to obtain freshly cut slices which exhibit cyanide-resistant respiration. The cyanide-resistant path requires induction in whole tubers. The data also indicate that high O(2) concentration is necessary for the full development of cyanide-resistant respiration.

  11. Respirator Speech Intelligibility Testing with an Experienced Speaker

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    RESPIRATOR SPEECH INTELLIGIBILITY TESTING WITH AN EXPERIENCED...2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Oct 2008 - Jun 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Respirator Speech Intelligibility Testing with an...14. ABSTRACT The Modified Rhyme Test (MRT) is used by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to assess speech

  12. Respiration hastens maturation and lowers yield in rice.

    PubMed

    Sitaramam, V; Bhate, R; Kamalraj, P; Pachapurkar, S

    2008-07-01

    Role of respiration in plant growth remains an enigma. Growth of meristematic cells, which are not photosynthetic, is entirely driven by endogenous respiration. Does respiration determine growth and size or does it merely burn off the carbon depleting the biomass? We show here that respiration of the germinating rice seed, which is contributed largely by the meristematic cells of the embryo, quantitatively correlates with the dynamics of much of plant growth, starting with the time for germination to the time for flowering and yield. Seed respiration appears to define the quantitative phenotype that contributes to yield via growth dynamics that could be discerned even in commercial varieties, which are biased towards higher yield, despite considerable susceptibility of the dynamics to environmental perturbations. Intrinsic variation, irreducible despite stringent growth conditions, required independent validation of relevant physiological variables both by critical sampling design and by constructing dendrograms for the interrelationships between variables that yield high consensus. More importantly, seed respiration, by mediating the generation clock time via variable time for maturation as seen in rice, directly offers the plausible basis for the phenotypic variation, a major ecological stratagem in a variable environment with uncertain water availability. Faster respiring rice plants appear to complete growth dynamics sooner, mature faster, resulting in a smaller plant with lower yield. Counter to the common allometric views, respiration appears to determine size in the rice plant, and offers a valid physiological means, within the limits of intrinsic variation, to help parental selection in breeding.

  13. Soil Respiration and Student Inquiry: A Perfect Match

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Catherine Marie; Wallenstein, Matthew David

    2011-01-01

    This activity explores the cycling of carbon between the atmosphere (primarily as CO[subscript 2]) and biomass in plants, animals, and microscopic organisms. Students design soil respiration experiments using a protocol that resembles current practice in soil ecology. Three methods for measuring soil respiration are presented. Student-derived…

  14. 30 CFR 70.300 - Respiratory equipment; respirable dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respiratory equipment; respirable dust. 70.300... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Respiratory Equipment § 70.300 Respiratory equipment; respirable dust. Respiratory equipment approved by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84 shall...

  15. Antibiotic efficacy is linked to bacterial cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Lobritz, Michael A; Belenky, Peter; Porter, Caroline B M; Gutierrez, Arnaud; Yang, Jason H; Schwarz, Eric G; Dwyer, Daniel J; Khalil, Ahmad S; Collins, James J

    2015-07-07

    Bacteriostatic and bactericidal antibiotic treatments result in two fundamentally different phenotypic outcomes--the inhibition of bacterial growth or, alternatively, cell death. Most antibiotics inhibit processes that are major consumers of cellular energy output, suggesting that antibiotic treatment may have important downstream consequences on bacterial metabolism. We hypothesized that the specific metabolic effects of bacteriostatic and bactericidal antibiotics contribute to their overall efficacy. We leveraged the opposing phenotypes of bacteriostatic and bactericidal drugs in combination to investigate their activity. Growth inhibition from bacteriostatic antibiotics was associated with suppressed cellular respiration whereas cell death from most bactericidal antibiotics was associated with accelerated respiration. In combination, suppression of cellular respiration by the bacteriostatic antibiotic was the dominant effect, blocking bactericidal killing. Global metabolic profiling of bacteriostatic antibiotic treatment revealed that accumulation of metabolites involved in specific drug target activity was linked to the buildup of energy metabolites that feed the electron transport chain. Inhibition of cellular respiration by knockout of the cytochrome oxidases was sufficient to attenuate bactericidal lethality whereas acceleration of basal respiration by genetically uncoupling ATP synthesis from electron transport resulted in potentiation of the killing effect of bactericidal antibiotics. This work identifies a link between antibiotic-induced cellular respiration and bactericidal lethality and demonstrates that bactericidal activity can be arrested by attenuated respiration and potentiated by accelerated respiration. Our data collectively show that antibiotics perturb the metabolic state of bacteria and that the metabolic state of bacteria impacts antibiotic efficacy.

  16. 20 CFR 718.303 - Death from a respirable disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Death from a respirable disease. 718.303... DISABILITY OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Presumptions Applicable to Eligibility Determinations § 718.303 Death from a respirable disease. (a)(1) If a deceased miner was employed for ten or more years in one...

  17. 20 CFR 718.303 - Death from a respirable disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Death from a respirable disease. 718.303... DISABILITY OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Presumptions Applicable to Eligibility Determinations § 718.303 Death from a respirable disease. (a)(1) If a deceased miner was employed for ten or more years in one...

  18. 20 CFR 718.303 - Death from a respirable disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Death from a respirable disease. 718.303... DISABILITY OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Presumptions Applicable to Eligibility Determinations § 718.303 Death from a respirable disease. (a)(1) If a deceased miner was employed for ten or more years in one...

  19. 78 FR 56273 - Occupational Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ...The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) proposes to amend its existing standards for occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica. The basis for issuance of this proposal is a preliminary determination by the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health that employees exposed to respirable crystalline silica face a significant risk to their health......

  20. 30 CFR 70.300 - Respiratory equipment; respirable dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Respiratory equipment; respirable dust. 70.300... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Respiratory Equipment § 70.300 Respiratory equipment; respirable dust. Respiratory equipment approved by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84 shall...

  1. 30 CFR 72.700 - Respiratory equipment; respirable dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Respiratory equipment; respirable dust. 72.700... SAFETY AND HEALTH HEALTH STANDARDS FOR COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 72.700 Respiratory equipment; respirable dust. (a) Respiratory equipment approved by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84 shall be made available...

  2. 30 CFR 70.300 - Respiratory equipment; respirable dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Respiratory equipment; respirable dust. 70.300... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Respiratory Equipment § 70.300 Respiratory equipment; respirable dust. Respiratory equipment approved by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84 shall...

  3. 30 CFR 70.300 - Respiratory equipment; respirable dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Respiratory equipment; respirable dust. 70.300... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Respiratory Equipment § 70.300 Respiratory equipment; respirable dust. Respiratory equipment approved by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84 shall...

  4. 30 CFR 70.300 - Respiratory equipment; respirable dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Respiratory equipment; respirable dust. 70.300... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Respiratory Equipment § 70.300 Respiratory equipment; respirable dust. Respiratory equipment approved by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84 shall...

  5. Study of contact characteristics between a respirator and a headform.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mang; Shen, Shengnan; Li, Hui; Zhang, Xiaotie; Ma, Yanzhao

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a computational study on contact characteristics of contact pressure and resultant deformation between an N95 filtering facepiece respirator and a newly developed digital headform. The geometry of the headform model is obtained based on computed tomography scanning of a volunteer. The segmentation and reconstruction of the headform model is performed by Mimics v16.0 (Materialise, Leuven, Belgium), which is a medical image processing software. The respirator model is obtained by scanning the surface of a 3M 8210 N95 respirator using a 3D digitizer and then the model is transformed by Geomagic Studio v12.0 (3D system, Rock Hill, SC), a reverse engineering software. The headform model contains a soft tissue layer, a skull layer, and a separate nose. The respirator model contains two layers (an inner face sealing layer and an outer layer) and a nose clip. Both the headform and respirator are modeled as solid elements and are deformable. The commercial software, LS-DYNA (LSTC, Livermore, CA), is used to simulate the contact between the respirator and headform. Contact pressures and resultant deformation of the headform are investigated. Effects of respirator stiffness on contact characteristics are also studied. A Matlab (MathWorks, Natick, MA) program is developed to calculate local gaps between the headform and respirator in the stable wearing state.

  6. Automatic patient respiration failure detection system with wireless transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Pope, J. M.

    1968-01-01

    Automatic respiration failure detection system detects respiration failure in patients with a surgically implanted tracheostomy tube, and actuates an audible and/or visual alarm. The system incorporates a miniature radio transmitter so that the patient is unencumbered by wires yet can be monitored from a remote location.

  7. Theoretical description of RESPIRATION-CP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Anders B.; Tan, Kong Ooi; Shankar, Ravi; Penzel, Susanne; Cadalbert, Riccardo; Samoson, Ago; Meier, Beat H.; Ernst, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    We present a quintuple-mode operator-based Floquet approach to describe arbitrary amplitude modulated cross polarization experiments under magic-angle spinning (MAS). The description is used to analyze variants of the RESPIRATION approach (RESPIRATIONCP) where recoupling conditions and the corresponding first-order effective Hamiltonians are calculated, validated numerically and compared to experimental results for 15N-13C coherence transfer in uniformly 13C,15N-labeled alanine and in uniformly 2H,13C,15N-labeled (deuterated and 100% back-exchanged) ubiquitin at spinning frequencies of 16.7 and 90.9 kHz. Similarities and differences between different implementations of the RESPIRATIONCP sequence using either CW irradiation or small flip-angle pulses are discussed.

  8. Soil carbon cycle of different saline and alkaline soils under cotton fields in Tarim River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoning; Zhao, Chengyi; Stahr, Karl; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Calcium carbonate is the most common form of carbon (C) in semiarid and arid soils. Depending on pH and salinity changes, soils can act as sink or source of atmospheric CO2 as well as contribute to C exchange between CO2 and CaCO3 leading to formation of pedogenic carbonates. However, the rates of these processes and the effects of environmental factors remains unknown. 14CO2 was used to assess carbonate recrystallization in 4 saline and alkaline soils (Aksu alkaline, Aksu saline, Yingbazar alkaline, Yingbazar saline) (EC = 0.32, 1.35, 1.72, 3.67 (1:20) mS cm-1, pH = 8.5, 8.2, 8.9, 7.9 respectively) and to trace the C exchange in the soils of the Tarim River basin depending on CO2 concentrations in soils (0.02%, 0.04%, 0.2%, 0.4% and 4%). 14C was traced in soil water and air as well as in carbonates. The highest 14C in 14CO2 (95% of the 14C input) was observed in Aksu alkaline soil and the highest 14C incorporation in CaCO3 (54%) was observed in Yingbazar saline soil. There were close negative linear relationships between initial CO2 concentrations (0.04%, 0.4% and 4%) and the 14C in Ca14CO3 and in 14CO2. The carbonate recrystallization rate increased with the CO2 concentration and were depended on the recrystalliztion period. The average carbonate recrystallization rate was highest at 4% CO2 concentration for Yingbazar saline soil (6.59×10-4 % per day) and the lowest at 0.04% CO2 concentration for Aksu alkaline soil (0.03×10-4 % per day). The carbonate recrystallization rate linearly increased with the soil EC and with 0.04% and 0.4% CO2 concentration , whereas the carbonate recrystallization rate decreased with pH. The highest CO2 concentration of 4% can 10 to 100 times shorten the full carbonate recrystallization of the remaining primary carbonates compared to lower CO2 concentrations 0.4% and 0.04% for complete (95%) recrystallization of soil carbonate. We conclude that microbial and root respiration affecting CO2 concentration in soil is the most important

  9. Hot spots of soil respiration in an Asian tropical rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Mizue; Kume, Tomonori; Yamane, Seiki; Suzuki, Masakazu

    2007-04-01

    Little is known about the variability in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from soil (soil respiration) in tropical rainforests. We studied temporal and spatial fluctuations of soil respiration in an intact Asian tropical rainforest. The values of soil respiration were distributed lognormally with mean and median values of 5.32 and 4.65 μmol m-2 s-1, respectively. Soil respiration varied little over time though highly in space. CO2 hot spots (>10 μmol m-2 s-1) were found with extremely high values (15-25 μmol m-2 s-1). Each CO2 hot spot occurred sporadically at different times and locations. It is hypothesized that animal activities are responsible for the hot spots. The impact of CO2 hot spots on total soil respiration was 10%, which is comparable to the estimation of net C balance in tropical rainforests.

  10. Relative rates of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and nitrate respirers. [Pseudomonas fluorescens; Serratia marcescens; Alcaligenes faecalis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.C.; Levine, J.S.

    1986-05-01

    The authors investigated the effect of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO/sub 2/) on the production of NO and N/sub 2/O by a wide variety of common soil nitrifying, denitrifying, and nitrate-respiring bacteria under laboratory conditions. The production of NO per cell was highest by autotrophic nitrifiers and was independent of pO/sub 2/ in the range tested (0.5 to 10%), whereas N/sub 2/O production was inversely proportional to pO/sub 2/. Nitrous oxide production was highest in the denitrifier Pseudomonas fluorescens, but only under anaerobic conditions. The molar ratio of NO/N/sub 2/O produced was usually greater than unity for nitrifiers and much less than unity for denitrifiers. Chemodenitrification was the major source of both the NO and N/sub 2/O produced by the nitrate respirer Serratia marcescens. Chemodenitrification was also a possible source of NO and N/sub 2/O produced by the nitrate respirer Serratia marcescens. Chemodenitrification was also a possible source of No and N/sub 2/O in nitrifier cultures but only when high concentrations of nitrite had accumulated or were added to the medium. Although most of the denitrifiers produced NO and N/sub 2/O only under anaerobic conditions, chemostat cultures of Alcaligenes faecalis continued to emit these gases even when the cultures were sprayed with air. Based upon these results, we predict that aerobic soils are primary sources of NO and that N/sub 2/O is produced only when there is sufficient soil moisture to provide the anaerobic microsites necessary for denitrification by either denitrifiers or nitrifiers.

  11. [Alkaline phosphatase in Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    2005-01-01

    In free-living Amoeba proteus (strain B), 3 phosphatase were found after disc-electrophoresis of 10 microg of protein in PAGE and using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a substrate a pH 9.0. These phosphatases differed in their electrophoretic mobilities - "slow" (1-3 bands), "middle" (one band) and "fast" (one band). In addition to 1-naphthyl phosphate, "slow" phosphatases were able to hydrolyse 2-naphthyl phosphate and p-nitrophenyl phosphate. They were slightly activated by Mg2+, completely inhibited by 3 chelators (EDTA, EGTA and 1,10-phenanthroline), L-cysteine, sodium dodecyl sulfate and Fe2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+ (50 mM), considerably inactivated by orthovanadate, molybdate, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 1, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, Na2HPO4, DL-dithiothreitol and urea and partly inhibited by H2O2, DL-phenylalanine, 2-mercaptoethanol, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 2 and Ca2+. Imidazole, L-(+)-tartrate, okadaic acid, NaF and sulfhydryl reagents -p-(hydroxy-mercuri)benzoate and N-ethylmaleimide - had no influence on the activity of "slow" phosphatases. "Middle" and "fast" phosphatases, in contrast to "slow" ones, were not inactivated by 3 chelators. The "middle" phosphatase differed from the "fast" one by smaller resistance to urea, Ca2+, Mn2+, phosphates and H2O2 and greater resistance to dithiothreitol and L-(+)-tartrate. In addition, the "fast" phosphatase was inhibited by L-cysteine but the "middle" one was activated by it. Of 5 tested ions (Mg2+, Cu2+, Mn2+, Ca2+ and Zn2+), only Zn2+ reactivated "slow" phosphatases after their inactivation by EDTA treatment. The reactivation of apoenzyme was only partial (about 35 %). Thus, among phosphatases found in amoebae at pH 9.0, only "slow" ones are Zn-metalloenzymes and may be considered as alkaline phosphatases (EC 3.1.3.1). It still remains uncertain, to which particular phosphatase class "middle" and "fast" phosphatases (pH 9.0) may belong.

  12. 76 FR 3175 - Proposed Extension of Existing Information Collection; Respirator Program Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... Safety and Health Administration Proposed Extension of Existing Information Collection; Respirator... miners against hazards. Where protective equipment or respirators are required because of exposure to... respirators is essential for ensuring that workers are properly and effectively using the equipment. Title...

  13. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  14. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  15. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  16. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  17. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  18. Factor Analysis of Various Anaerobic Power Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, James M.; And Others

    A study investigated the relationship between selected anthropometric variables and of numerous anaerobic power tests with measures obtained on an isokinetic dynamometer. Thirty-one male college students performed several anaerobic power tests, including: the vertical jump using the Lewis formula; the Margaria-Kalamen stair climb test; the Wingate…

  19. Anaerobic Infections in Children with Neurological Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Itzhak

    1995-01-01

    Children with neurological impairments are prone to develop serious infection with anaerobic bacteria. The most common anaerobic infections are decubitus ulcers; gastrostomy site wound infections; pulmonary infections (aspiration pneumonia, lung abscesses, and tracheitis); and chronic suppurative otitis media. The unique microbiology of each of…

  20. Respiration and growth of Shewanella decolorationis S12 with an Azo compound as the sole electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yiguo; Xu, Meiying; Guo, Jun; Xu, Zhicheng; Chen, Xingjuan; Sun, Guoping

    2007-01-01

    The ability of Shewanella decolorationis S12 to obtain energy for growth by coupling the oxidation of various electron donors to dissimilatory azoreduction was investigated. This microorganism can reduce a variety of azo dyes by use of formate, lactate, pyruvate, or H(2) as the electron donor. Furthermore, strain S12 grew to a maximal density of 3.0 x 10(7) cells per ml after compete reduction of 2.0 mM amaranth in a defined medium. This was accompanied by a stoichiometric consumption of 4.0 mM formate over time when amaranth and formate were supplied as the sole electron acceptor and donor, respectively, suggesting that microbial azoreduction is an electron transport process and that this electron transport can yield energy to support growth. Purified membranous, periplasmic, and cytoplasmic fractions from S12 were analyzed, but only the membranous fraction was capable of reducing azo dyes with formate, lactate, pyruvate, or H(2) as the electron donor. The presence of 5 microM Cu(2+) ions, 200 microM dicumarol, 100 microM stigmatellin, and 100 microM metyrapone inhibited anaerobic azoreduction activity by both whole cells and the purified membrane fraction, showing that dehydrogenases, cytochromes, and menaquinone are essential electron transfer components for azoreduction. These results provide evidence that the microbial anaerobic azoreduction is linked to the electron transport chain and suggest that the dissimilatory azoreduction is a form of microbial anaerobic respiration. These findings not only expand the number of potential electron acceptors known for microbial energy conservation but also elucidate the mechanisms of microbial anaerobic azoreduction.

  1. Comparison of aerobic and anaerobic stability indices through a MSW biological treatment process.

    PubMed

    Ponsá, Sergio; Gea, Teresa; Alerm, Llorenç; Cerezo, Javier; Sánchez, Antoni

    2008-12-01

    A complex mechanical-biological waste treatment plant designed for the processing of mixed municipal solid wastes (MSW) and source-selected organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (OFMSW) has been studied by using stability indices related to aerobic (respiration index, RI) and anaerobic conditions (biochemical methane potential, BMP). Several selected stages of the plant have been characterized: waste inputs, mechanically treated wastes, anaerobically digested materials and composted wastes, according to the treatment sequence used in the plant. Results obtained showed that the main stages responsible for waste stabilization were the two first stages: mechanical separation and anaerobic digestion with a diminution of both RI and BMP around 40% and 60%, respectively, whereas the third stage, composting of digested materials, produced lesser biological degradation (20-30%). The results related to waste stabilization were similar in both lines (MSW and OFMSW), although the indices obtained for MSW were significantly lower than those obtained for OFMSW, which demonstrated a high biodegradability of OFMSW. The methodology proposed can be used for the characterization of organic wastes and the determination of the efficiency of operation units used in mechanical-biological waste treatment plants.

  2. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Alternative Fuels and Associated Biocorrosion of Carbon Steel in Marine Environments.

    PubMed

    Liang, Renxing; Aktas, Deniz F; Aydin, Egemen; Bonifay, Vincent; Sunner, Jan; Suflita, Joseph M

    2016-05-03

    Fuels that biodegrade too easily can exacerbate through-wall pitting corrosion of pipelines and tanks and result in unintentional environmental releases. We tested the biological stability of two emerging naval biofuels (camelina-JP5 and Fischer-Tropsch-F76) and their potential to exacerbate carbon steel corrosion in seawater incubations with and without a hydrocarbon-degrading sulfate-reducing bacterium. The inclusion of sediment or the positive control bacterium in the incubations stimulated a similar pattern of sulfate reduction with different inocula. However, the highest rates of sulfate reduction were found in incubations amended with camelina-JP5 [(57.2 ± 2.2)-(80.8 ± 8.1) μM/day] or its blend with petroleum-JP5 (76.7 ± 2.4 μM/day). The detection of a suite of metabolites only in the fuel-amended incubations confirmed that alkylated benzene hydrocarbons were metabolized via known anaerobic mechanisms. Most importantly, general (r(2) = 0.73) and pitting (r(2) = 0.69) corrosion were positively correlated with sulfate loss in the incubations. Thus, the anaerobic biodegradation of labile fuel components coupled with sulfate respiration greatly contributed to the biocorrosion of carbon steel. While all fuels were susceptible to anaerobic metabolism, special attention should be given to camelina-JP5 biofuel due to its relatively rapid biodegradation. We recommend that this biofuel be used with caution and that whenever possible extended storage periods should be avoided.

  3. Cadmium removal by Euglena gracilis is enhanced under anaerobic growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Martínez, M Geovanni; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Encalada, Rusely; Pineda, Erika; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Zepeda-Rodriguez, Armando; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo

    2015-05-15

    The facultative protist Euglena gracilis, a heavy metal hyper-accumulator, was grown under photo-heterotrophic and extreme conditions (acidic pH, anaerobiosis and with Cd(2+)) and biochemically characterized. High biomass (8.5×10(6)cellsmL(-1)) was reached after 10 days of culture. Under anaerobiosis, photosynthetic activity built up a microaerophilic environment of 0.7% O₂, which was sufficient to allow mitochondrial respiratory activity: glutamate and malate were fully consumed, whereas 25-33% of the added glucose was consumed. In anaerobic cells, photosynthesis but not respiration was activated by Cd(2+) which induced higher oxidative stress. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were 20 times lower in control cells under anaerobiosis than in aerobiosis, although Cd(2+) induced a higher MDA production. Cd(2+) stress induced increased contents of chelating thiols (cysteine, glutathione and phytochelatins) and polyphosphate. Biosorption (90%) and intracellular accumulation (30%) were the mechanisms by which anaerobic cells removed Cd(2+) from medium, which was 36% higher versus aerobic cells. The present study indicated that E. gracilis has the ability to remove Cd(2+) under anaerobic conditions, which might be advantageous for metal removal in sediments from polluted water bodies or bioreactors, where the O₂ concentration is particularly low.

  4. Plasmodesmal-mediated cell-to-cell transport in wheat roots is modulated by anaerobic stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleland, R. E.; Fujiwara, T.; Lucas, W. J.

    1994-01-01

    Cell-to-cell transport of small molecules and ions occurs in plants through plasmodesmata. Plant roots are frequently subjected to localized anaerobic stress, with a resultant decrease in ATP. In order to determine the effect of this stress on plasmodesmal transport, fluorescent dyes of increasing molecular weight (0.46 to 1OkDa) were injected into epidermal and cortical cells of 3-day-old wheat roots, and their movement into neighboring cells was determined by fluorescence microscopy. Anaerobiosis was generated by N2 gas or simulated by the presence of sodium azide, both of which reduced the ATP levels in the tissue by over 80%. In the absence of such stress, the upper limit for movement, or size exclusion limit (SEL), of cortical plasmodesmata was <1 kDa. The ATP analogue TNP-ADP (mw 681) moved across the plasmodesmata of unstressed roots, indicating that plasmodesmata may be conduits for nucleotide (ATP and ADP) exchange between cells. Upon imposition of stress, the SEL rose to between 5 and 10 kDa. This response of plasmodesmata to a decrease in the level of ATP suggests that they are constricted by an ATP-dependent process so as to maintain a restricted SEL. When roots are subjected to anaerobic stress, an increase in SEL may permit enhanced delivery of sugars to the affected cells of the root where anaerobic respiration could regenerate the needed ATP.

  5. Anaerobic biorefinery: Current status, challenges, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sawatdeenarunat, Chayanon; Nguyen, Duc; Surendra, K C; Shrestha, Shilva; Rajendran, Karthik; Oechsner, Hans; Xie, Li; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) has been in use for many decades. To date, it has been primarily aimed at treating organic wastes, mainly manures and wastewater sludge, and industrial wastewaters. However, with the current advancements, a more open mind is required to look beyond these somewhat restricted original applications of AD. Biorefineries are such concepts, where multiple products including chemicals, fuels, polymers etc. are produced from organic feedstocks. The anaerobic biorefinery concept is now gaining increased attention, utilizing AD as the final disposal step. This review aims at evaluating the potential significance of anaerobic biorefineries, including types of feedstocks, uses for the produced energy, as well as sustainable applications of the generated residual digestate. A comprehensive analysis of various types of anaerobic biorefineries has been developed, including both large-scale and household level applications. Finally, future directives are highlighted showing how anaerobic biorefinery concept could impact the bioeconomy in the near future.

  6. Toxicants inhibiting anaerobic digestion: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Lin; Ortiz, Raphael; Steele, Terry W J; Stuckey, David C

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion is increasingly being used to treat wastes from many sources because of its manifold advantages over aerobic treatment, e.g. low sludge production and low energy requirements. However, anaerobic digestion is sensitive to toxicants, and a wide range of compounds can inhibit the process and cause upset or failure. Substantial research has been carried out over the years to identify specific inhibitors/toxicants, and their mechanism of toxicity in anaerobic digestion. In this review we present a detailed and critical summary of research on the inhibition of anaerobic processes by specific organic toxicants (e.g., chlorophenols, halogenated aliphatics and long chain fatty acids), inorganic toxicants (e.g., ammonia, sulfide and heavy metals) and in particular, nanomaterials, focusing on the mechanism of their inhibition/toxicity. A better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms behind inhibition/toxicity will enhance the wider application of anaerobic digestion.

  7. Anaerobic digestion for household organics

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, R.; Kelleher, M.

    1995-04-01

    Considerable success in using anaerobic technology for processing household organics is being reported by several recently constructed facilities in Europe. Organic residuals collected separately in a Belgian town are processed to produce biogas and a compost-like material in less than one month. The dry anaerobic conversion process (DRANCO) was developed by Organic Waste Systems (OWS) in the 1980s, with the collaboration of Professor Willy Verstraete at the University of Ghent`s Laboratory of Applied Microbial Ecology. The patented process converts solid and semisolid organic residuals into biogas (for energy recovery) and a stable humus like product. The plant has competing odor sources such as the active landfill and the surrounding farmland - in fact, the smell of livestock manure is quite prevalent in this heavily agricultural area. Addition of the nonrecyclable paper fraction to the feedstock improves the carbon/nitrogen ratio, soaks up moisture, and absorbs odor. The entire Brecht facility does not occupy much space and total material retention time at the site is one month, compared to a number of months for aerobic systems. It also has a low staffing requirement, provides energy self-sufficiency, and the final soil enhancement product meets established quality standards.

  8. Anaerobic digestion in rural China

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The People`s Republic of China has been promoting underground, individual, anaerobic digesters to process rural organic materials. This strategy has resulted in approximately five million household anaerobic digesters installed in China today. Simple reactors provide energy and fertilizer for Chinese farms and villages. Another benefit includes improved household sanitation. Reactor design has evolved over time. In the standard modern design, effluent is removed from the reactor at the top of the water column, meaning that supernatant is collected rather than sludge. Additionally, no mixing of the system occurs when effluent is removed. In some systems, a vertical cylindrical pull-rod port is added to the base of the effluent port. Effluent is removed by moving the pull-rod - simply a wooden shaft with a metal disk on the bottom - up and down in the port. A bucket can be placed directly under the pull-rod port, simplifying effluent removal, while the movement of the wooden shaft provides some mixing in the reactor. The gas primarily is used for cooking and lighting. A digester can provide approximately 60 percent of a family`s energy needs. Effluent from the reactors is an odorless, dark colored slurry, primarily used as an agricultural fertilizer. 3 figs.

  9. Y-12 Respirator Flow Cycle Time Reduction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, C.T.; Rogers, P.E.

    2000-12-01

    In mid-July 2000, a Cycle Time Reduction (CTR) project was initiated by senior management to improve the flow and overall efficiency of the respirator distribution process at Y-12. A cross-functional team was formed to evaluate the current process and to propose necessary changes for improvement. Specifically, the team was challenged to make improvements that would eliminate production work stoppages due to the unavailability of respirators in Y-12 Stores. Prior to the team initiation, plant back orders for a specific model respirator were averaging above 600 and have been as high as 750+. The Cycle Time Reduction team segmented the respirator flow into detailed steps, with the focus and emphasis primarily being on the movement of dirty respirators out of work areas, transportation to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laundry, and return back to Y-12 Stores inventory. The team selected a popular model respirator, size large, to track improvements. Despite a 30 percent increase in respirator usage for the same period of time in the previous year, the team has reduced the back orders by 89% with a steady trend downward. Summary of accomplishments: A 47 percent reduction in the average cycle time for dirty respirators to be laundered and stocked for reuse at the Y-12 Complex; A 73 percent reduction in the average cycle time for dirty respirators to be laundered and stocked for reuse specifically for major users: Enriched Uranium Operations (EUO) and Facilities Maintenance Organization (FMO); Development of a performance measure for tracking back orders; An 89 percent reduction in the number of laundered respirators on back order; Implementation of a tracking method to account for respirator loss; Achievement of an annual cost savings/avoidance of $800K with a one-time cost of $20K; Implementation of a routine pick-up schedule for EUO (major user of respirators); Elimination of activities no longer determined to be needed; Elimination of routine complaint calls to

  10. Response of anaerobic carbon cycling to water table manipulation in an Alaskan rich fen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, E.S.; Chivers, M.R.; Turetsky, M.R.; Treat, C.C.; Petersen, D.G.; Waldrop, M.; Harden, J.W.; McGuire, A.D.

    2013-01-01

    To test the effects of altered hydrology on organic soil decomposition, we investigated CO2 and CH4 production potential of rich-fen peat (mean surface pH = 6.3) collected from a field water table manipulation experiment including control, raised and lowered water table treatments. Mean anaerobic CO2 production potential at 10 cm depth (14.1 ± 0.9 μmol C g−1 d−1) was as high as aerobic CO2 production potential (10.6 ± 1.5 μmol C g−1 d−1), while CH4 production was low (mean of 7.8 ± 1.5 nmol C g−1 d−1). Denitrification enzyme activity indicated a very high denitrification potential (197 ± 23 μg N g−1 d−1), but net NO-3 reduction suggested this was a relatively minor pathway for anaerobic CO2 production. Abundances of denitrifier genes (nirK and nosZ) did not change across water table treatments. SO2-4 reduction also did not appear to be an important pathway for anaerobic CO2 production. The net accumulation of acetate and formate as decomposition end products in the raised water table treatment suggested that fermentation was a significant pathway for carbon mineralization, even in the presence of NO-3. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations were the strongest predictors of potential anaerobic and aerobic CO2 production. Across all water table treatments, the CO2:CH4 ratio increased with initial DOC leachate concentrations. While the field water table treatment did not have a significant effect on mean CO2 or CH4 production potential, the CO2:CH4 ratio was highest in shallow peat incubations from the drained treatment. These data suggest that with continued drying or with a more variable water table, anaerobic CO2 production may be favored over CH4 production in this rich fen. Future research examining the potential for dissolved organic substances to facilitate anaerobic respiration, or alternative redox processes that limit the effectiveness of organic acids as substrates in anaerobic metabolism, would help explain additional

  11. Transcriptional Regulation of the Outer Membrane Porin Gene ompW Reveals its Physiological Role during the Transition from the Aerobic to the Anaerobic Lifestyle of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Minfeng; Lai, Yong; Sun, Jian; Chen, Guanhua; Yan, Aixin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding bacterial physiology relies on elucidating the regulatory mechanisms and cellular functions of those differentially expressed genes in response to environmental changes. A widespread Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane protein OmpW has been implicated in the adaptation to stresses in various species. It is recently found to be present in the regulon of the global anaerobic transcription factor FNR and ArcA in Escherichia coli. However, little is known about the physiological implications of this regulatory disposition. In this study, we demonstrate that transcription of ompW is indeed mediated by a series of global regulators involved in the anaerobiosis of E. coli. We show that FNR can both activate and repress the expression of ompW through its direct binding to two distinctive sites, -81.5 and -126.5 bp respectively, on ompW promoter. ArcA also participates in repression of ompW under anaerobic condition, but in an FNR dependent manner. Additionally, ompW is also subject to the regulation by CRP and NarL which senses the availability and types of carbon sources and respiration electron acceptors in the environment respectively, implying a role of OmpW in the carbon and energy metabolism of E. coli during its anaerobic adaptation. Molecular docking reveals that OmpW can bind fumarate, an alternative electron acceptor in anaerobic respiration, with sufficient affinity. Moreover, supplement of fumarate or succinate which belongs to the C4-dicarboxylates family of metabolite, to E. coli culture rescues OmpW-mediated colicin S4 killing. Taken together, we propose that OmpW is involved in anaerobic carbon and energy metabolism to mediate the transition from aerobic to anaerobic lifestyle in E. coli. PMID:27303386

  12. Transcriptional Regulation of the Outer Membrane Porin Gene ompW Reveals its Physiological Role during the Transition from the Aerobic to the Anaerobic Lifestyle of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Minfeng; Lai, Yong; Sun, Jian; Chen, Guanhua; Yan, Aixin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding bacterial physiology relies on elucidating the regulatory mechanisms and cellular functions of those differentially expressed genes in response to environmental changes. A widespread Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane protein OmpW has been implicated in the adaptation to stresses in various species. It is recently found to be present in the regulon of the global anaerobic transcription factor FNR and ArcA in Escherichia coli. However, little is known about the physiological implications of this regulatory disposition. In this study, we demonstrate that transcription of ompW is indeed mediated by a series of global regulators involved in the anaerobiosis of E. coli. We show that FNR can both activate and repress the expression of ompW through its direct binding to two distinctive sites, -81.5 and -126.5 bp respectively, on ompW promoter. ArcA also participates in repression of ompW under anaerobic condition, but in an FNR dependent manner. Additionally, ompW is also subject to the regulation by CRP and NarL which senses the availability and types of carbon sources and respiration electron acceptors in the environment respectively, implying a role of OmpW in the carbon and energy metabolism of E. coli during its anaerobic adaptation. Molecular docking reveals that OmpW can bind fumarate, an alternative electron acceptor in anaerobic respiration, with sufficient affinity. Moreover, supplement of fumarate or succinate which belongs to the C4-dicarboxylates family of metabolite, to E. coli culture rescues OmpW-mediated colicin S4 killing. Taken together, we propose that OmpW is involved in anaerobic carbon and energy metabolism to mediate the transition from aerobic to anaerobic lifestyle in E. coli.

  13. Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Respiration on Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Robert C.

    2013-04-26

    The overall aim of this project was to contribute to our fundamental understanding of proteins and biological processes under extreme environmental conditions. We sought to define the biochemical and physiological mechanisms that underlie biodegradative and other cellular processes in normal, extreme, and engineered environments. Toward that end, we sought to understand the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during respiration by bacteria on soluble iron and insoluble sulfide minerals. In accordance with these general aims, the specific aims were two-fold: To identify, separate, and characterize the extracellular biomolecules necessary for aerobic respiration on iron under strongly acidic conditions; and to elucidate the molecular principles whereby these bacteria recognize and adhere to their insoluble mineral substrates under harsh environmental conditions. The results of these studies were described in a total of nineteen manuscripts. Highlights include the following: 1. The complete genome of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 (type strain) was sequenced in collaboration with the DOE Joint Genome Institute; 2. Genomic and mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods were used to evaluate gene expression and in situ microbial activity in a low-complexity natural acid mine drainage microbial biofilm community. This was the first effort to successfully analyze a natural community using these techniques; 3. Detailed functional and structural studies were conducted on rusticyanin, an acid-stable electron transfer protein purified from cell-free extracts of At. ferrooxidans. The three-dimensional structure of reduced rusticyanin was determined from a combination of homonuclear proton and heteronuclear 15N- and 13C-edited NMR spectra. Concomitantly, the three-dimensional structure of oxidized rusticyanin was determined by X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.9 A by multiwavelength

  14. Soil Respiration Hotspots in Temperate Tidal Restored and Natural Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, M.; Schafer, K. V.

    2015-12-01

    Whether a wetland is a carbon dioxide sink or source is dependent on the balance of photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration. As temperature is increasing, respiration may accelerate over photosynthesis, yet the dynamics in tidal temperate wetlands are not clear as the tidal influence impact respiration egress of the soil. Here, we investigated soil respiration of two different microsites in each a natural and a restored wetland over a range of temperature and water level conditions over the growing season. Soil respiration increased with incoming tide and was lowest under water-inundated conditions. Mudflat microsites tended to have higher soil respiration than vegetated areas, indicating sufficiently high carbon input into non-vegetated areas for high respiratory fluxes. Whereby Spartina alterniflora microsites exhibited on average lower soil respiration fluxes of about 13 micromol m-2 s-1, Spartina patens exhibited higher fluxes at about 38 micromol m2 s-1 with Phragmites australis intermediate soil respiratory fluxes. Largest spatial variation was observed for mudflat microsites.

  15. Soil Respiration in Semiarid Temperate Grasslands under Various Land Management.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Ji, Lei; Hou, Xiangyang; Schellenberg, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Soil respiration, a major component of the global carbon cycle, is significantly influenced by land management practices. Grasslands are potentially a major sink for carbon, but can also be a source. Here, we investigated the potential effect of land management (grazing, clipping, and ungrazed enclosures) on soil respiration in the semiarid grassland of northern China. Our results showed the mean soil respiration was significantly higher under enclosures (2.17 μmol.m(-2).s(-1)) and clipping (2.06 μmol.m(-2).s(-1)) than under grazing (1.65 μmol.m-(2).s(-1)) over the three growing seasons. The high rates of soil respiration under enclosure and clipping were associated with the higher belowground net primary productivity (BNPP). Our analyses indicated that soil respiration was primarily related to BNPP under grazing, to soil water content under clipping. Using structural equation models, we found that soil water content, aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and BNPP regulated soil respiration, with soil water content as the predominant factor. Our findings highlight that management-induced changes in abiotic (soil temperature and soil water content) and biotic (ANPP and BNPP) factors regulate soil respiration in the semiarid temperate grassland of northern China.

  16. Soil Respiration in Semiarid Temperate Grasslands under Various Land Management

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiangyang; Schellenberg, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Soil respiration, a major component of the global carbon cycle, is significantly influenced by land management practices. Grasslands are potentially a major sink for carbon, but can also be a source. Here, we investigated the potential effect of land management (grazing, clipping, and ungrazed enclosures) on soil respiration in the semiarid grassland of northern China. Our results showed the mean soil respiration was significantly higher under enclosures (2.17μmol.m−2.s−1) and clipping (2.06μmol.m−2.s−1) than under grazing (1.65μmol.m−2.s−1) over the three growing seasons. The high rates of soil respiration under enclosure and clipping were associated with the higher belowground net primary productivity (BNPP). Our analyses indicated that soil respiration was primarily related to BNPP under grazing, to soil water content under clipping. Using structural equation models, we found that soil water content, aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and BNPP regulated soil respiration, with soil water content as the predominant factor. Our findings highlight that management-induced changes in abiotic (soil temperature and soil water content) and biotic (ANPP and BNPP) factors regulate soil respiration in the semiarid temperate grassland of northern China. PMID:26808376

  17. Radiolytic hydrogen and microbial respiration in subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Blair, Carly C; D'Hondt, Steven; Spivack, Arthur J; Kingsley, Richard H

    2007-12-01

    Radiolysis of water may provide a continuous flux of an electron donor (molecular hydrogen) to subsurface microbial communities. We assessed the significance of this process in anoxic marine sediments by comparing calculated radiolytic H(2) production rates to estimates of net (organic-fueled) respiration at several Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 201 sites. Radiolytic H(2) yield calculations are based on abundances of radioactive elements (uranium, thorium, and potassium), porosity, grain density, and a model of water radiolysis. Net respiration estimates are based on fluxes of dissolved electron acceptors and their products. Comparison of radiolytic H(2) yields and respiration at multiple sites suggests that radiolysis gains importance as an electron donor source as net respiration and organic carbon content decrease. Our results suggest that radiolytic production of H(2) may fuel 10% of the metabolic respiration at the Leg 201 site where organic-fueled respiration is lowest (ODP Site 1231). In sediments with even lower rates of organic-fueled respiration, water radiolysis may be the principal source of electron donors. Marine sedimentary ecosystems may be useful models for non-photosynthetic ecosystems on early Earth and on other planets and moons, such as Mars and Europa.

  18. Alternative respiration and fumaric acid production of Rhizopus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shuai; Xu, Qing; Huang, He; Li, Shuang

    2014-06-01

    Under the conditions of fumaric acid fermentation, Rhizopus oryzae ME-F14 possessed at least two respiratory systems. The respiration of mycelia was partially inhibited by the cytochrome respiration inhibitor antimycin A or the alternative respiration inhibitor salicylhydroxamic acid and was completely inhibited in the presence of both antimycin A and salicylhydroxamic acid. During fumaric acid fermentation process, the activity of alternative respiration had a great correlation with fumaric acid productivity; both of them reached peak at the same time. The alternative oxidase gene, which encoded the mitochondrial alternative oxidase responsible for alternative respiration in R. oryzae ME-F14, was cloned and characterized in Escherichia coli. The activity of alternative respiration, the alternative oxidase gene transcription level, as well as the fumaric acid titer were measured under different carbon sources and different carbon-nitrogen ratios. The activity of alternative respiration was found to be comparable to the transcription level of the alternative oxidase gene and the fumaric acid titer. These results indicated that the activity of the alternative oxidase was regulated at the transcription stage under the conditions tested for R. oryzae ME-F14.

  19. Respiration and sodium transport in rabbit urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, S U; Eaton, D C

    1982-07-28

    Respiration of rabbit urinary bladder was measured in free-floating pieces and in short-circuited pieces mounted in an Ussing chamber. Ouabain, amiloride, and potassium-free saline inhibited respiration approx. 20%; sodium-free saline depressed respiration approx. 40-50%. The coupling ratio between respiration and transport in short-circuited tissues was about two sodium ions per molecule O2. Chloride-free saline depressed mean oxygen consumption 21% in free-floating tissue pieces; 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS) and furosemide had no effect. The effect of chloride-free saline in short-circuited tissues was variable; in tissues with low transport rates, respiration was stimulated about 21% while in tissue with high transport rates respiration was reduced about 24%. Nystatin and monensin, both of which markedly increase the conductance of cell membranes with a concomitant increase in sodium entry, stimulated respiration. These data indicate that 50-60% of the total oxygen consumption is not influenced by sodium, 20-25% is linked to (Na+ +K+)-ATPase transport, while the remaining 25-30% is sodium-dependent but not ouabain-inhibitable.

  20. Root Zone Respiration on Hydroponically Grown Wheat Plant Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soler-Crespo, R. A.; Monje, O. A.

    2010-01-01

    Root respiration is a biological phenomenon that controls plant growth and physiological development during a plant's lifespan. This process is dependent on the availability of oxygen in the system where the plant is located. In hydroponic systems, where plants are submerged in a solution containing vital nutrients but no type of soil, the availability of oxygen arises from the dissolved oxygen concentration in the solution. This oxygen concentration is dependent on the , gas-liquid interface formed on the upper surface of the liquid, as given by Henry's Law, depending on pressure and temperature conditions. Respiration rates of the plants rise as biomass and root zone increase with age. The respiration rate of Apogee wheat plants (Triticum aestivum) was measured as a function of light intensity (catalytic for photosynthesis) and CO2 concentration to determine their effect on respiration rates. To determine their effects on respiration rate and plant growth microbial communities were introduced into the system, by Innoculum. Surfactants were introduced, simulating gray-water usage in space, as another factor to determine their effect on chemical oxygen demand of microbials and on respiration rates of the plants. It is expected to see small effects from changes in CO2 concentration or light levels, and to see root respiration decrease in an exponential manner with plant age and microbial activity.

  1. Aerosol penetration through filtering facepieces and respirator cartridges.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Lehtimäki, M; Willeke, K

    1992-09-01

    Air-purifying respirators must be certified following the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) filter test criteria (30 CFR 11). The criteria specify a range for the mean particle size and the measure of spread permissible for the test aerosol. The authors' experiments have shown that aerosol penetration as a function of particle size differs considerably among certified respirators of the same type. Filtering facepieces (disposable respirators) and cartridges of the dust-mist, dust-mist-fume, and high-efficiency particulate air type were tested. The respirators were sealed to mannequins in a test chamber. The aerosol concentrations inside and outside the respirator were measured by an aerodynamic particle sizer and a laser aerosol spectrometer over a particle size range of 0.1 to 15 microns. Five flow rates ranging from 5 to 100 L/min were used to study flow dependency. The aerosol penetration through the filters is presented as a function of particle size. Aerosol penetration and pressure drop are combined to express the performance of each filter in terms of "quality factor." Under the same test conditions, the quality factor of one respirator may be as much as 6.6 times more than that of another respirator of the same type. The filter quality factor has a greater aerosol size dependency as airflow and aerosol size increase. In general, cartridges have a larger surface area than filtering facepieces but not necessarily lower filter penetration or higher filter quality.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. The cytological implications of primary respiration.

    PubMed

    Crisera, P N

    2001-01-01

    Observing the macroscopic complexities of evolved species, the exceptional continuity that occurs among different cells, tissues and organs to respond coherently to the proper set of stimuli as a function of self/species survival is appreciable. Accordingly, it alludes to a central rhythm that resonates throughout the cell; nominated here as primary respiration (PR), which is capable of binding and synchronizing a diversity of physiological processes into a functional biological unity. Phylogenetically, it was conserved as an indispensable element in the makeup of the subkingdom Metazoa, since these species require a high degree of coordination among the different cells that form their body. However, it does not preclude the possibility of a basal rhythm to orchestrate the intricacies of cellular dynamics of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. In all probability, PR emerges within the crucial organelles, with special emphasis on the DNA (5), and propagated and transduced within the infrastructure of the cytoskeleton as wave harmonics (49). Collectively, this equivalent vibration for the subphylum Vertebrata emanates as craniosacral respiration (CSR), though its expression is more elaborate depending on the development of the CNS. Furthermore, the author suggests that the phenomenon of PR or CSR be intimately associated to the basic rest/activity cycle (BRAC), generated by concentrically localized neurons that possess auto-oscillatory properties and assembled into a vital network (39). Historically, during Protochordate-Vertebrate transition, this area circumscribes an archaic region of the brain in which many vital biological rhythms have their source, called hindbrain rhombomeres. Bass and Baker (2) propose that pattern-generating circuits of more recent innovations, such as vocal, electromotor, extensor muscle tonicity, locomotion and the extraocular system, have their origin from the same Hox gene-specified compartments of the embryonic hindbrain (rhombomeres

  3. Influence of soil moisture on soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fer, Miroslav; Kodesova, Radka; Nikodem, Antonin; Klement, Ales; Jelenova, Klara

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work was to describe an impact of soil moisture on soil respiration. Study was performed on soil samples from morphologically diverse study site in loess region of Southern Moravia, Czech Republic. The original soil type is Haplic Chernozem, which was due to erosion changed into Regosol (steep parts) and Colluvial soil (base slope and the tributary valley). Soil samples were collected from topsoils at 5 points of the selected elevation transect and also from the parent material (loess). Grab soil samples, undisturbed soil samples (small - 100 cm3, and large - 713 cm3) and undisturbed soil blocks were taken. Basic soil properties were determined on grab soil samples. Small undisturbed soil samples were used to determine the soil water retention curves and the hydraulic conductivity functions using the multiple outflow tests in Tempe cells and a numerical inversion with HYDRUS 1-D. During experiments performed in greenhouse dry large undisturbed soil samples were wetted from below using a kaolin tank and cumulative water inflow due to capillary rise was measured. Simultaneously net CO2 exchange rate and net H2O exchange rate were measured using LCi-SD portable photosynthesis system with Soil Respiration Chamber. Numerical inversion of the measured cumulative capillary rise data using the HYDRUS-1D program was applied to modify selected soil hydraulic parameters for particular conditions and to simulate actual soil water distribution within each soil column in selected times. Undisturbed soil blocks were used to prepare thin soil sections to study soil-pore structure. Results for all soil samples showed that at the beginning of soil samples wetting the CO2 emission increased because of improving condition for microbes' activity. The maximum values were reached for soil column average soil water content between 0.10 and 0.15 cm3/cm3. Next CO2 emission decreased since the pore system starts filling by water (i.e. aggravated conditions for microbes

  4. Anaerobic growth and cyanide synthesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa depend on anr, a regulatory gene homologous with fnr of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, A; Reimmann, C; Galimand, M; Haas, D

    1991-06-01

    Anaerobic growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on nitrate or arginine requires the anr gene, which codes for a positive control element (ANR) capable of functionally complementing an fnr mutation in Escherichia coli. The anr gene was sequenced; it showed 51% identity with the fnr gene at the amino acid sequence level. Four cysteine residues known to be essential in the FNR protein are conserved in ANR. The anr gene product (deduced Mr 27,129) was visualized by the maxicell method and migrated like a 32 kDa protein in gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. An anr mutant of P. aeruginosa constructed by gene replacement was defective in nitrate respiration, arginine deiminase activity, and hydrogen cyanide biosynthesis, underscoring the diverse metabolic functions of ANR during oxygen limitation. Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas syringae, and Pseudomonas mendocina all had a functional analogue of ANR, indicating that similar anaerobic control mechanisms exist in these bacteria.

  5. The impact of dissolved organic carbon and bacterial respiration on pCO2 in experimental sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J.; Kotovitch, M.; Kaartokallio, H.; Moreau, S.; Tison, J.-L.; Kattner, G.; Dieckmann, G.; Thomas, D. N.; Delille, B.

    2016-02-01

    Previous observations have shown that the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) in sea ice brines is generally higher in Arctic sea ice compared to those from the Antarctic sea ice, especially in winter and early spring. We hypothesized that these differences result from the higher dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content in Arctic seawater: Higher concentrations of DOC in seawater would be reflected in a greater DOC incorporation into sea ice, enhancing bacterial respiration, which in turn would increase the pCO2 in the ice. To verify this hypothesis, we performed an experiment using two series of mesocosms: one was filled with seawater (SW) and the other one with seawater with an addition of filtered humic-rich river water (SWR). The addition of river water increased the DOC concentration of the water from a median of 142 μmol Lwater-1 in SW to 249 μmol Lwater-1 in SWR. Sea ice was grown in these mesocosms under the same physical conditions over 19 days. Microalgae and protists were absent, and only bacterial activity has been detected. We measured the DOC concentration, bacterial respiration, total alkalinity and pCO2 in sea ice and the underlying seawater, and we calculated the changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in both media. We found that bacterial respiration in ice was higher in SWR: median bacterial respiration was 25 nmol C Lice-1 h-1 compared to 10 nmol C Lice-1 h-1 in SW. pCO2 in ice was also higher in SWR with a median of 430 ppm compared to 356 ppm in SW. However, the differences in pCO2 were larger within the ice interiors than at the surfaces or the bottom layers of the ice, where exchanges at the air-ice and ice-water interfaces might have reduced the differences. In addition, we used a model to simulate the differences of pCO2 and DIC based on bacterial respiration. The model simulations support the experimental findings and further suggest that bacterial growth efficiency in the ice might approach 0.15 and 0.2. It is thus credible

  6. Temperature response of soil respiration largely unaltered with experimental warming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carey, Joanna C.; Tang, Jianwu; Templer, Pamela H.; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Crowther, Thomas W.; Burton, Andrew J.; Dukes, Jeffrey S.; Emmett, Bridget; Frey, Serita D.; Heskel, Mary A.; Jiang, Lifen; Machmuller, Megan B.; Mohan, Jacqueline; Panetta, Anne Marie; Reich, Peter B.; Reinsch, Sabine; Wang, Xin; Allison, Steven D.; Bamminger, Chris; Bridgham, Scott; Collins, Scott L.; de Dato, Giovanbattista; Eddy, William C.; Enquist, Brian J.; Estiarte, Marc; Harte, John; Henderson, Amanda; Johnson, Bart R.; Steenberg Larsen, Klaus; Luo, Yiqi; Marhan, Sven; Melillo, Jerry M.; Penuelas, Josep; Pfeifer-Meister, Laurel; Poll, Christian; Rastetter, Edward B.; Reinmann, Andrew B.; Reynolds, Lorien L.; Schmidt, Inger K.; Shaver, Gaius R.; Strong, Aaron L.; Suseela, Vidya; Tietema, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The respiratory release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from soil is a major yet poorly understood flux in the global carbon cycle. Climatic warming is hypothesized to increase rates of soil respiration, potentially fueling further increases in global temperatures. However, despite considerable scientific attention in recent decades, the overall response of soil respiration to anticipated climatic warming remains unclear. We synthesize the largest global dataset to date of soil respiration, moisture, and temperature measurements, totaling >3,800 observations representing 27 temperature manipulation studies, spanning nine biomes and over 2 decades of warming. Our analysis reveals no significant differences in the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration between control and warmed plots in all biomes, with the exception of deserts and boreal forests. Thus, our data provide limited evidence of acclimation of soil respiration to experimental warming in several major biome types, contrary to the results from multiple single-site studies. Moreover, across all nondesert biomes, respiration rates with and without experimental warming follow a Gaussian response, increasing with soil temperature up to a threshold of ∼25 °C, above which respiration rates decrease with further increases in temperature. This consistent decrease in temperature sensitivity at higher temperatures demonstrates that rising global temperatures may result in regionally variable responses in soil respiration, with colder climates being considerably more responsive to increased ambient temperatures compared with warmer regions. Our analysis adds a unique cross-biome perspective on the temperature response of soil respiration, information critical to improving our mechanistic understanding of how soil carbon dynamics change with climatic warming.

  7. Noninvasive, quantitative respirator fit testing through dynamic pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, D R; Willeke, K

    1988-10-01

    A new method has been invented for the noninvasive and quantitative determination of fit for a respirator. The test takes a few seconds and requires less expensive instrumentation than presently used for invasive testing. In this test, the breath is held at a negative pressure for a few seconds, and the leak-induced pressure decay inside the respirator cavity is monitored. A dynamic pressure sensor is attached to a modified cartridge of an air-purifying respirator or built into the respirator body or into the air supply line of an air-supplied respirator. The method is noninvasive in that the modified cartridge can be mounted onto any air-purifying respirator. The pressure decay during testing quantifies the airflow entered through the leak site. An equation has been determined which gives the air leakage as a function of pressure decay slope, respirator volume and the pressure differential during actual wear--all of which are determined by the dynamic pressure sensor. Thus, the ratio of air inhaled through the filters or via the air supply line to the leak rate is a measure of respirator fit, independent of aerosol deposition in the lung and aerosol distribution in the respirator cavity as found for quantitative fit testing with aerosols. The new method is shown to be independent of leak and sensor locations. The concentration and distribution of aerosols entered through the leak site is dependent only on the physical dimensions of the leak site and the air velocity in it, which can be determined independently.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Temperature response of soil respiration largely unaltered with experimental warming.

    PubMed

    Carey, Joanna C; Tang, Jianwu; Templer, Pamela H; Kroeger, Kevin D; Crowther, Thomas W; Burton, Andrew J; Dukes, Jeffrey S; Emmett, Bridget; Frey, Serita D; Heskel, Mary A; Jiang, Lifen; Machmuller, Megan B; Mohan, Jacqueline; Panetta, Anne Marie; Reich, Peter B; Reinsch, Sabine; Wang, Xin; Allison, Steven D; Bamminger, Chris; Bridgham, Scott; Collins, Scott L; de Dato, Giovanbattista; Eddy, William C; Enquist, Brian J; Estiarte, Marc; Harte, John; Henderson, Amanda; Johnson, Bart R; Larsen, Klaus Steenberg; Luo, Yiqi; Marhan, Sven; Melillo, Jerry M; Peñuelas, Josep; Pfeifer-Meister, Laurel; Poll, Christian; Rastetter, Edward; Reinmann, Andrew B; Reynolds, Lorien L; Schmidt, Inger K; Shaver, Gaius R; Strong, Aaron L; Suseela, Vidya; Tietema, Albert

    2016-11-29

    The respiratory release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from soil is a major yet poorly understood flux in the global carbon cycle. Climatic warming is hypothesized to increase rates of soil respiration, potentially fueling further increases in global temperatures. However, despite considerable scientific attention in recent decades, the overall response of soil respiration to anticipated climatic warming remains unclear. We synthesize the largest global dataset to date of soil respiration, moisture, and temperature measurements, totaling >3,800 observations representing 27 temperature manipulation studies, spanning nine biomes and over 2 decades of warming. Our analysis reveals no significant differences in the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration between control and warmed plots in all biomes, with the exception of deserts and boreal forests. Thus, our data provide limited evidence of acclimation of soil respiration to experimental warming in several major biome types, contrary to the results from multiple single-site studies. Moreover, across all nondesert biomes, respiration rates with and without experimental warming follow a Gaussian response, increasing with soil temperature up to a threshold of ∼25 °C, above which respiration rates decrease with further increases in temperature. This consistent decrease in temperature sensitivity at higher temperatures demonstrates that rising global temperatures may result in regionally variable responses in soil respiration, with colder climates being considerably more responsive to increased ambient temperatures compared with warmer regions. Our analysis adds a unique cross-biome perspective on the temperature response of soil respiration, information critical to improving our mechanistic understanding of how soil carbon dynamics change with climatic warming.

  9. Geochemical modeling of the influence of silicate mineral alteration on alkalinity production and carbonate precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herda, Gerhard; Kraemer, Stephan M.; Gier, Susanne; Meister, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    High CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) in deep rock reservoirs causes acidification of the porefluid. Such conditions occur during injection and subsurface storage of CO2 (to prevent the release of greenhouse gas) but also naturally in zones of strong methanogenic microbial activity in organic matter-rich ocean margin sediments. The acidic fluids are corrosive to carbonates and bear the risk of leakage of CO2 gas to the surface. Porefluid acidification may be moderated by processes that increase the alkalinity, i.e. that produce weak acid anions capable of buffering the acidification imposed by the CO2. Often, alkalinity increases as a result of anaerobic microbial activity, such as anaerobic oxidation of methane. However, on a long term the alteration of silicates, in particular, clay minerals, may be a more efficient mechanism of alkalinity production. Under altered temperature, pressure and porefluid composition at depth, clay minerals may change to thermodynamically more stable states, thereby increasing the alkalinity of the porefluid by partial leaching of Mg-(OH)2 and Ca-(OH)2 (e.g. Wallmann et al., 2008; Mavromatis et al., 2014). This alteration may even be enhanced by a high pCO2. Thus, silicate alteration can be essential for a long-term stabilization of volatile CO2 in the form of bicarbonate or may even induce precipitation of carbonate minerals, but these processes are not fully understood yet. The goal of this study is to simulate the alkalinity effect of silicate alteration under diagenetic conditions and high pCO2 by geochemical modeling. We are using the program PHREEQC (Parkhurst and Appelo, 2013) to generate high rock/fluid ratio characteristics for deep subsurface rock reservoirs. Since we are interested in the long-term evolution of diagenetic processes, over millions of years, we do not consider kinetics but calculate the theoretically possible equilibrium conditions. In a first step we are calculating the saturation state of different clay minerals

  10. Effect of long term anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic starvation on aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Pijuan, Maite; Werner, Ursula; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2009-08-01

    The effect of long term anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic starvation on the structure and activity of aerobic granules was studied. Aerobic granular sludge treating abattoir wastewater and achieving high levels of nutrient removal was subjected to 4-5 week starvation under anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic conditions. Microscopic pictures of granules at the beginning of the starvation period presented a round and compact surface morphology with a much defined external perimeter. Under both starvation conditions, the morphology changed at the end of starvation with the external border of the granules surrounded by floppy materials. The loss of granular compactness was faster and more pronounced under anaerobic/aerobic starvation conditions. The release of Ca(2+) at the onset of anaerobic/aerobic starvation suggests a degradation of extracellular polymeric substances. The activity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria was reduced by 20 and 36% during anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic starvation, respectively. When fresh wastewater was reintroduced, the granules recovered their initial morphology within 1 week of normal operation and the nutrient removal activity recovered fully in 3 weeks. The results show that both anaerobic and intermittent anaerobic/aerobic conditions are suitable for maintaining granule structure and activity during starvation.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus strain AHT2(T), a haloalkaliphilic sulfidogen from Egyptian hypersaline alkaline lakes.

    PubMed

    Melton, Emily Denise; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Overmars, Lex; Chertkov, Olga; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Shapiro, Nicole; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja; Lapidus, Alla L; Muyzer, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus strain AHT2(T) is a strictly anaerobic sulfidogenic haloalkaliphile isolated from a composite sediment sample of eight hypersaline alkaline lakes in the Wadi al Natrun valley in the Egyptian Libyan Desert. D. alkaliphilus AHT2(T) is Gram-negative and belongs to the family Desulfobulbaceae within the Deltaproteobacteria. Here we report its genome sequence, which contains a 3.10 Mbp chromosome. D. alkaliphilus AHT2(T) is adapted to survive under highly alkaline and moderately saline conditions and therefore, is relevant to the biotechnology industry and life under extreme conditions. For these reasons, D. alkaliphilus AHT2(T) was sequenced by the DOE Joint Genome Institute as part of the Community Science Program.

  12. Characterization of an alkaline lipase from Proteus vulgaris K80 and the DNA sequence of the encoding gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, H K; Lee, J K; Kim, H; Oh, T K

    1996-01-01

    A facultatively anaerobic bacterium producing an extracellular alkaline lipase was isolated from the soil collected near a sewage disposal plant in Korea and identified to be a strain of Proteus vulgaris. The molecular mass of the purified lipase K80 was estimated to be 31 kDa by SDS-PAGE. It was found to be an alkaline enzyme having maximum hydrolytic activity at pH 10, while fairly stable in a wide pH range from 5 to 11. The gene for lipase K80 was cloned in Escherichia coli. Sequence analysis showed an open reading frame of 861 bp coding for a polypeptide of 287 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence of the lipase gene had 46.3% identity to the lipase from Pseudomonas fragi.

  13. Comparison of different liquid anaerobic digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Fuqing; Shi Jian; Lv Wen; Yu Zhongtang; Li Yebo

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared methane production of solid AD inoculated with different effluents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Food waste effluent (FWE) had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with FWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dairy waste effluent (DWE) was rich of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with DWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 2. - Abstract: Effluents from three liquid anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5 L/kgVS{sub feed}, while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6 L/kgVS{sub feed}. The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairy waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3 g CaCO{sub 3}/kg. The performance of solid-state batch anaerobic digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid anaerobic digestion effluents.

  14. Quantitative respirator fit testing: dynamic pressure versus aerosol measurement.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, D R; Willeke, K

    1988-10-01

    A noninvasive, fast, inexpensive new fit testing method has been invented which relates the slope of the pressure decay inside a respirator during breath-holding to the fit of the respirator on the wearer's face. The dynamic pressure test has been compared with the conventional aerosol test at different leakage levels. The results of this comparison show that the sensitivity of the dynamic pressure test is similar to that of the aerosol test. The pressure test, however, is independent of leak site and probe location and can be performed on respirators before and after their use.

  15. Wood and foliar respiration of tropical wet forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asao, S.; Bedoya Arrieta, R.; Ryan, M. G.

    2011-12-01

    Wood and foliar respiration from tropical forests constitute major components of ecosystem respiration that may control their productivity and carbon storage. However, few estimates on tropical forests vary greatly. Furthermore, the trees in these forests respire great amounts of carbon, but impacts of individual tree species on respiration is not well known. We examined wood and foliar respiration in this environment in relation to individual tree species. The objectives of this study were to: 1) identify how respiration rates relate to scaling variables for wood and foliage, 2) examine the effects of individual tree species on these relationships, 3) extrapolate the rates to the annual fluxes of the whole stands, and 4) determine if tree species differed in these fluxes. Established on an abandoned pasture in 1988 at La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica, the monodominant stands contained four native species in a complete randomized block design. Respiration rates based on tissue surface area ranged among dominant tree species from 0.6 to 1.0 μg C m^-2 s^-1 for small diameter wood (<10cm), 1.0 to 1.8 μg C m^-2 s^-1 for large diameter wood, and 0.7 to 0.8 μg C m^-2 s^-1 for foliage. Understory species had similar wood respiration rates, but foliage respiration rates were about half of those for canopy leaves. Among surface area, volume, or biomass, respiration rates scaled best with surface area for wood with small diameter, volume or biomass for large diameter wood, and leaf area for foliage. These relationships differed slightly among tree species and between canopy trees and understory species. Foliar respiration rate was generally related to leaf nitrogen content, and this relationship differed among dominant tree species. Temperature response of foliar respiration also differed among tree species and canopy class. However, daily and annual temperature fluctuations had less than 3% effect on annual flux. Annual respiratory fluxes from wood and foliage

  16. Increased expression of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and gluconeogenesis in anaerobically growing xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Runquist, David; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    Background Fermentation of xylose to ethanol has been achieved in S. cerevisiae by genetic engineering. Xylose utilization is however slow compared to glucose, and during anaerobic conditions addition of glucose has been necessary for cellular growth. In the current study, the xylose-utilizing strain TMB 3415 was employed to investigate differences between anaerobic utilization of glucose and xylose. This strain carried a xylose reductase (XYL1 K270R) engineered for increased NADH utilization and was capable of sustained anaerobic growth on xylose as sole carbon source. Metabolic and transcriptional characterization could thus for the first time be performed without addition of a co-substrate or oxygen. Results Analysis of metabolic fluxes showed that although the specific ethanol productivity was an order of magnitude lower on xylose than on glucose, product yields were similar for the two substrates. In addition, transcription analysis identified clear regulatory differences between glucose and xylose. Respiro-fermentative metabolism on glucose during aerobic conditions caused repression of cellular respiration, while metabolism on xylose under the same conditions was fully respiratory. During anaerobic conditions, xylose repressed respiratory pathways, although notably more weakly than glucose. It was also observed that anaerobic xylose growth caused up-regulation of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and gluconeogenesis, which may be driven by an increased demand for NADPH during anaerobic xylose catabolism. Conclusion Co-factor imbalance in the initial twp steps of xylose utilization may reduce ethanol productivity by increasing the need for NADP+ reduction and consequently increase reverse flux in glycolysis. PMID:19778438

  17. Intermediate range order in alkaline borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crupi, C.; Carini, G.; Ruello, G.; D'Angelo, G.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the neutron diffraction patterns of a series of alkaline borate glasses at different metal oxide content. Strong differences are observed in the intermediate range order as a function of the specific alkaline ion and of its concentration. On these results, we propose that the first sharp diffraction peak arises from correlations of atoms of voids and show that the compositional variation of this peak intensity in alkaline borate glasses is due to changes in the distribution of void sizes within the three-dimensional network. We argue that our interpretation in terms of interstitial (empty and/or filled) voids, having different sizes, provides a general explanation for all anomalous behaviours revealed for the first sharp diffraction peak.

  18. Anaerobic co-digestion of aircraft deicing fluid and municipal wastewater sludge.

    PubMed

    Zitomer, D; Ferguson, N; McGrady, K; Schilling, J

    2001-01-01

    At many airports, aircraft deicing fluid and precipitation mix, becoming aircraft deicing runoff having a 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) of 10(2) to 10(6) mg/L. Publicly owned treatment works can be used for aerobic biological treatment; however, it may be more economical to use anaerobic digesters to codigest a mixture of aircraft deicing fluid and sludge. The objectives of this investigation were to determine benefits and appropriate propylene glycol aircraft deicing fluid loadings to anaerobic codigesters. Results demonstrate aircraft deicing fluid can be successfully codigested to produce methane; supernatant BOD5 and Kjeldahl nitrogen concentration were not higher in codigesters compared to a conventional digester. Aircraft deicing fluid loadings as high as 1.6 g chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L x d were sustainable in codigesters, whereas system fed only aircraft deicing fluid with nutrients and alkalinity achieved a loading of 0.65 g COD/L x d. The sludge used increased digester alkalinity and provided nitrogen, iron, nickel, cobalt, and biomass required for methanogenesis. The deicer provides organics for increased methane production.

  19. Comparison of Seven Chemical Pretreatments of Corn Straw for Improving Methane Yield by Anaerobic Digestion

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zilin; GaiheYang; Liu, Xiaofeng; Yan, Zhiying; Yuan, Yuexiang; Liao, Yinzhang

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture straw is considered a renewable resource that has the potential to contribute greatly to bioenergy supplies. Chemical pretreatment prior to anaerobic digestion can increase the anaerobic digestibility of agriculture straw. The present study investigated the effects of seven chemical pretreatments on the composition and methane yield of corn straw to assess their effectiveness of digestibility. Four acid reagents (H2SO4, HCl, H2O2, and CH3COOH) at concentrations of 1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% (w/w) and three alkaline reagents (NaOH, Ca(OH)2, and NH3·H2O) at concentrations of 4%, 6%, 8%, and 10% (w/w) were used for the pretreatments. All pretreatments were effective in the biodegradation of the lignocellulosic straw structure. The straw, pretreated with 3% H2O2 and 8% Ca(OH)2, acquired the highest methane yield of 216.7 and 206.6 mL CH4 g VS −1 in the acid and alkaline pretreatments, which are 115.4% and 105.3% greater than the untreated straw. H2O2 and Ca(OH)2 can be considered as the most favorable pretreatment methods for improving the methane yield of straw because of their effectiveness and low cost. PMID:24695485

  20. [Factors of effecting hydrogen production from anaerobic fermentation of excess sewage sludge].

    PubMed

    Cai, Mu-lin; Liu, Jun-xin

    2005-03-01

    Large amounts of sewage sludge is produced from the treatment of wastewater by biological processes, which is usually treated by anaerobic digestion to produce methane gas. Acetogenesis and hydrogen are an intermediate phase during the anaerobic digestion. Batch tests of fermentative hydrogen production under different initial pH (3.0 - 12.5) were compared using the raw sludge and alkaline pretreated sludge. The influences of the characteristics and concentration of sludge were also examined thereafter. Results show that the optimal initial pH for biohydrogen production from sewage sludge was around 11.0. Under this optimal condition, the biohydrogen yield of raw sludge was 8.1 mL/g, and it would reach to 16.9 mL/g when the sludge was pretreated by alkali. Furthermore, there is no methane generation during the biohydrogen fermentation of the alkaline pretreatment sludge in 4 days and the hydrogen consumption is also slowed down. In addition, a low VSS/SS rate will reduce the hydrogen yield, while the concentrations of sludge have no obvious compact on it.

  1. Common Mesophilic Anaerobes, Including Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani, in 21 Soil Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Louis Ds.

    1975-01-01

    A relatively rich medium was markedly superior to a dilute medium for the isolation of anaerobic bacteria from soil. The obligate anaerobes isolated from 21 soil samples were all clostridia and the counts ranged from 2.7 × 102 to 3.3 × 106 per g. The organisms most frequently isolated were Clostridium subterminale, C. sordellii, C. sporogenes, C. indolis, C. bifermentans, C. mangenoti, and C. perfringens. Seventeen other species were also recognized but almost one-third of the isolates could not be identified with any known species of Clostridum. C. botulinum type A was demonstrated in six soil samples, and type B in one. These soils were neutral to alkaline in reaction (average pH 7.9) and low in organic matter content (1.4%). The association of C. botulinum types A and B with neutral to alkaline soils was statistically significant (P = 0.001) as was their association with soils low in organic matter (P = 0.005). C. botulinum types E and F were found in one soil sample, pH 4.5, with organic matter 13.7%. C. tetani was isolated from two soil samples, both of intermediate pH value and higher than average organic matter content. PMID:238468

  2. Comparison of seven chemical pretreatments of corn straw for improving methane yield by anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Song, Zilin; GaiheYang; Liu, Xiaofeng; Yan, Zhiying; Yuan, Yuexiang; Liao, Yinzhang

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture straw is considered a renewable resource that has the potential to contribute greatly to bioenergy supplies. Chemical pretreatment prior to anaerobic digestion can increase the anaerobic digestibility of agriculture straw. The present study investigated the effects of seven chemical pretreatments on the composition and methane yield of corn straw to assess their effectiveness of digestibility. Four acid reagents (H2SO4, HCl, H2O2, and CH3COOH) at concentrations of 1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% (w/w) and three alkaline reagents (NaOH, Ca(OH)2, and NH3·H2O) at concentrations of 4%, 6%, 8%, and 10% (w/w) were used for the pretreatments. All pretreatments were effective in the biodegradation of the lignocellulosic straw structure. The straw, pretreated with 3% H2O2 and 8% Ca(OH)2, acquired the highest methane yield of 216.7 and 206.6 mL CH4 g VS(-1) in the acid and alkaline pretreatments, which are 115.4% and 105.3% greater than the untreated straw. H2O2 and Ca(OH)2 can be considered as the most favorable pretreatment methods for improving the methane yield of straw because of their effectiveness and low cost.

  3. Ammonium excretion and oxygen respiration of tropical copepods and euphausiids exposed to oxygen minimum zone conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiko, R.; Hauss, H.; Buchholz, F.; Melzner, F.

    2015-10-01

    Calanoid copepods and euphausiids are key components of marine zooplankton communities worldwide. Most euphausiids and several copepod species perform diel vertical migrations (DVMs) that contribute to the export of particulate and dissolved matter to midwater depths. In vast areas of the global ocean, and in particular in the eastern tropical Atlantic and Pacific, the daytime distribution depth of many migrating organisms corresponds to the core of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). At depth, the animals experience reduced temperature and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) and an increased carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) compared to their near-surface nighttime habitat. Although it is well known that low oxygen levels can inhibit respiratory activity, the respiration response of tropical copepods and euphausiids to relevant pCO2, pO2 and temperature conditions remains poorly parameterized. Further, the regulation of ammonium excretion at OMZ conditions is generally not well understood. It was recently estimated that DVM-mediated ammonium supply considerably fuels bacterial anaerobic ammonium oxidation - a major loss process for fixed nitrogen in the ocean. These estimates were based on the implicit assumption that hypoxia or anoxia in combination with hypercapnia (elevated pCO2) does not result in a downregulation of ammonium excretion. Here we show that exposure to OMZ conditions can result in strong depression of respiration and ammonium excretion in calanoid copepods and euphausiids from the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic and the Eastern Tropical South Pacific. These physiological responses need to be taken into account when estimating DVM-mediated fluxes of carbon and nitrogen into OMZs.

  4. Redox sensing by a Rex-family repressor is involved in the regulation of anaerobic gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Pagels, Martin; Fuchs, Stephan; Pané-Farré, Jan; Kohler, Christian; Menschner, Leonhard; Hecker, Michael; McNamarra, Peter J; Bauer, Mikael C; von Wachenfeldt, Claes; Liebeke, Manuel; Lalk, Michael; Sander, Gunnar; von Eiff, Christof; Proctor, Richard A; Engelmann, Susanne

    2010-06-01

    An alignment of upstream regions of anaerobically induced genes in Staphylococcus aureus revealed the presence of an inverted repeat, corresponding to Rex binding sites in Streptomyces coelicolor. Gel shift experiments of selected upstream regions demonstrated that the redox-sensing regulator Rex of S. aureus binds to this inverted repeat. The binding sequence--TTGTGAAW(4)TTCACAA--is highly conserved in S. aureus. Rex binding to this sequence leads to the repression of genes located downstream. The binding activity of Rex is enhanced by NAD+ while NADH, which competes with NAD+ for Rex binding, decreases the activity of Rex. The impact of Rex on global protein synthesis and on the activity of fermentation pathways under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was analysed by using a rex-deficient strain. A direct regulatory effect of Rex on the expression of pathways that lead to anaerobic NAD+ regeneration, such as lactate, formate and ethanol formation, nitrate respiration, and ATP synthesis, is verified. Rex can be considered a central regulator of anaerobic metabolism in S. aureus. Since the activity of lactate dehydrogenase enables S. aureus to resist NO stress and thus the innate immune response, our data suggest that deactivation of Rex is a prerequisite for this phenomenon.

  5. Arabidopsis alternative oxidase sustains Escherichia coli respiration.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A M; Söll, D

    1992-01-01

    Glutamyl-tRNA reductase, encoded by the hemA gene, is the first enzyme in porphyrin biosynthesis in many organisms. Hemes, important porphyrin derivatives, are essential components of redox enzymes, such as cytochromes. Thus a hemA Escherichia coli strain (SASX41B) is deficient in cytochrome-mediated aerobic respiration. Upon complementation of this strain with an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library, we isolated a clone which permitted the SASX41B strain to grow aerobically. The clone encodes the gene for Arabidopsis alternative oxidase, whose deduced amino acid sequence was found to have 71% identity with that of the enzyme from the voodoo lily, Sauromatum guttatum. The Arabidopsis protein is expressed as a 31-kDa protein in E. coli and confers on this organism cyanide-resistant growth, which in turn is sensitive to salicylhydroxamate. This implies that a single polypeptide is sufficient for alternative oxidase activity. Based on these observations we propose that a cyanide-insensitive respiratory pathway operates in the transformed E. coli hemA strain. Introduction of this pathway now opens the way to genetic/molecular biological investigations of alternative oxidase and its cofactor. Images PMID:1438286

  6. Salt stimulated respiration of Chlorella fusca.

    PubMed

    Löppert, H G

    1976-01-01

    ATP contents have been measured before and after addition of KCl (5 mM final concentration) to suspensions of Chlorella in distilled water under different conditions of energy supply. The levels decreased immediately after salt addition and returned to the original values under conditions both of oxidative phosphorylation and of cyclic photophosphorylation, but not under conditions of fermentation. It appears that this decrease in the ATP level is the cause for salt stimulated respiration (S.S.R.). Furthermore, it is shown that cycloheximide and EDTA, which interact with Rb+ uptake (active and ATP-driven) at low salt concentration, also reduce S.S.R. From this parallelism it is concluded that the ATPase involved in Rb+ uptake at low salt concentration is also responsible for S.S.R. at high salt concentration. As S.S.R. provides far more energy than is required for the small influx of ions it is suggested that the ATPase is decoupled by the salt from ion transport.

  7. Effects of anaerobic regulatory mutations and catabolite repression on regulation of hydrogen metabolism and hydrogenase isoenzyme composition in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, D J; Sawers, R G; Rugman, P A; Boxer, D H; Higgins, C F

    1986-10-01

    Hydrogen metabolism in Salmonella typhimurium is differentially regulated by mutations in the two anaerobic regulatory pathways, defined by the fnr (oxrA) and oxrC genes, and is controlled by catabolite repression. The synthesis of the individual hydrogenase isoenzymes is also specifically influenced by fnr and oxrC mutations and by catabolite repression in a manner entirely consistent with the proposed role for each isoenzyme in hydrogen metabolism. Synthesis of hydrogenase isoenzyme 2 was found to be fnr dependent and oxrC independent, consistent with a role in respiration-linked hydrogen uptake which was shown to be similarly regulated. Also in keeping with such a respiratory role was the finding that both hydrogen uptake and the expression of isoenzyme 2 are under catabolite repression. In contrast, formate hydrogenlyase-dependent hydrogen evolution, characteristic of fermentative growth, was reduced in oxrC strains but not in fnr strains. Hydrogenase 3 activity was similarly regulated, consistent with a role in hydrogen evolution. Unlike the expression of hydrogenases 2 and 3, hydrogenase 1 expression was both fnr and oxrC dependent. Hydrogen uptake during fermentative growth was also both fnr and oxrC dependent. This provided good evidence for a distinction between hydrogen uptake during fermentation- and respiration-dependent growth and for a hydrogen-recycling process. The pattern of anaerobic control of hydrogenase activities illustrated the functional diversity of the isoenzymes and, in addition, the physiological distinction between the two anaerobic regulatory pathways, anaerobic respiratory genes being fnr dependent and enzymes required during fermentative growth being oxrC dependent.

  8. Occupational Exposure to Respirable Dust, Respirable Crystalline Silica and Diesel Engine Exhaust Emissions in the London Tunnelling Environment.

    PubMed

    Galea, Karen S; Mair, Craig; Alexander, Carla; de Vocht, Frank; van Tongeren, Martie

    2016-03-01

    Personal 8-h shift exposure to respirable dust, diesel engine exhaust emissions (DEEE) (as respirable elemental carbon), and respirable crystalline silica of workers involved in constructing an underground metro railway tunnel was assessed. Black carbon (BC) concentrations were also assessed using a MicroAeth AE51. During sprayed concrete lining (SCL) activities in the tunnel, the geometric mean (GM) respirable dust exposure level was 0.91mg m(-3), with the highest exposure measured on a back-up sprayer (3.20mg m(-3)). The GM respirable crystalline silica concentration for SCL workers was 0.03mg m(-3), with the highest measurement also for the back-up sprayer (0.24mg m(-3)). During tunnel boring machine (TBM) activities, the GM respirable dust concentration was 0.54mg m(-3). The GM respirable elemental carbon concentration for all the TBM operators was 18 µg m(-3); with the highest concentration measured on a segment lifter. The BC concentrations were higher in the SCL environment in comparison to the TBM environment (daily GM 18-54 µg m(-3) versus 3-6 µg m(-3)). This small-scale monitoring campaign provides additional personal data on exposures experienced by underground tunnel construction workers.

  9. Two-stage high-rate biogas (H2 and CH4) production from food waste using anaerobic mixed microflora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, K.; Lee, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Ebie, Y.; Li, Y.; Inamori, Y.

    2010-12-01

    To achieve the high-rate H2 and CH4 production from food waste using fermentative anaerobic microflora, the effects of carbonate-alkalinity in the recirculated digestion sludge on continuous two-stage fermentation were investigated. Higher H2 production rate of 2.9 L-H2/L/day was achieved at the recycle ratio of 1.0 in an alkalinity range of 9000 to 10000 mg-CaCO3/L. The maximum CH4 production rate was stably maintained at the range of 1.85 to 1.88 L-CH4/L/day without alkalinity change. Carbonate alkalinity in digestion sludge could reduce the H2 partial pressure in the headspace of the fermentation reactors, and improve a biogas production capacity in the two-stage fermentation process. The average volatile solids degradation rate in the overall process increased as the digestion sludge recycle increased from 0.5 to 1.0. These results show that the alkalinity in recycle of the digestion sludge is crucial factor in determining biogas (H2 and CH4) production capacity and reducing the total solids.

  10. The ars detoxification system is advantageous but not required for As(V) respiration by the genetically tractable Shewanella species strain ANA-3.

    PubMed

    Saltikov, Chad W; Cifuentes, Ana; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Newman, Dianne K

    2003-05-01

    Arsenate [As(V); HAsO(4)(2-)] respiration by bacteria is poorly understood at the molecular level largely due to a paucity of genetically tractable organisms with this metabolic capability. We report here the isolation of a new As(V)-respiring strain (ANA-3) that is phylogenetically related to members of the genus Shewanella and that also provides a useful model system with which to explore the molecular basis of As(V) respiration. This gram-negative strain stoichiometrically couples the oxidation of lactate to acetate with the reduction of As(V) to arsenite [As(III); HAsO(2)]. The generation time and lactate molar growth yield (Y(lactate)) are 2.8 h and 10.0 g of cells mol of lactate(-1), respectively, when it is grown anaerobically on lactate and As(V). ANA-3 uses a wide variety of terminal electron acceptors, including oxygen, soluble ferric iron, oxides of iron and manganese, nitrate, fumarate, the humic acid functional analog 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate, and thiosulfate. ANA-3 also reduces As(V) to As(III) in the presence of oxygen and resists high concentrations of As(III) (up to 10 mM) when grown under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. ANA-3 possesses an ars operon (arsDABC) that allows it to resist high levels of As(III); this operon also confers resistance to the As-sensitive strains Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Escherichia coli AW3110. When the gene encoding the As(III) efflux pump, arsB, is inactivated in ANA-3 by a polar mutation that also eliminates the expression of arsC, which encodes an As(V) reductase, the resulting As(III)-sensitive strain still respires As(V); however, the generation time and the Y(lactate) value are two- and threefold lower, respectively, than those of the wild type. These results suggest that ArsB and ArsC may be useful for As(V)-respiring bacteria in environments where As concentrations are high, but that neither is required for respiration.

  11. Anaerobic Methane Oxidation and the Formation of Dolomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. S.; Murray, R. W.; Kurtz, A. C.; Schrag, D. P.

    2003-12-01

    The environment and conditions necessary for the formation of dolomite has been a long standing problem in many scientific fields. In particular, the formation of organogenic dolomites and how they relate to the degradation of organic matter have been the focus of numerous studies. We examine the link between organic matter degradation, anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO), and sulfate depletion, and explore how these processes potentially influence dolomitization. We determined rates and depths of AMO and dolomite formation for a variety of organic-rich sites along the west African Margin at sites occupied during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 175. Our data set is porewater and gas data gathered during the cruise (alkalinity, sulfate, methane, Ca, and Mg), as well as postcruise analyses of δ 13C of DIC. We find that the rates of dolomite formation are relatively constant regardless of the depth at which it is forming, indicating that the diffusive fluxes of Mg and Ca are not limiting. Based upon the calculated log IAP values, log Ksp values for dolomite was found to narrowly range between -16.1 and -16.4. Dolomite formation is controlled in part by competition between AMO and methanogenesis, which controls the speciation of dissolved CO2. AMO increases the concentration of CO32- through sulfate reduction, favoring dolomite formation, while methanogenesis increases the pCO2 of the pore waters, inhibiting dolomite formation. By regulating the pCO2 and alkalinity, methanogenesis and AMO can regulate the formation of dolomite in organic-rich marine sediments. In addition to providing a mechanistic link between AMO and dolomite formation, our findings provide a method by which the stability constant of dolomite can be calculated in modern sediments, and allows prediction of regions and depth domains in which dolomite may be forming.

  12. Oxidation of ammonia and methane in an alkaline, saline lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joye, S.B.; Connell, T.L.; Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.; Jellison, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    The oxidation of ammonia (NH3) and methane (CH4) was investigated in an alkaline saline lake, Mono Lake, California (U.S.A.). Ammonia oxidation was examined in April and July 1995 by comparing dark 14CO2 fixation rates in the presence or absence of methyl fluoride (MeF), an inhibitor of NH3 oxidation. Ammonia oxidizer-mediated dark 14CO2 fixation rates were similar in surface (5-7 m) and oxycline (11-15 m) waters, ranging between 70-340 and 89-186 nM d-1, respectively, or 1-7% of primary production by phytoplankton. Ammonia oxidation rates ranged between 580-2,830 nM d-1 in surface waters and 732-1,548 nM d-1 in oxycline waters. Methane oxidation was examined using a 14CH4 tracer technique in July 1994, April 1995, and July 1995. Methane oxidation rates were consistently higher in July, and rates in oxycline and anaerobic bottom waters (0.5-37 and 7-48 nM d-1, respectively) were 10-fold higher than those in aerobic surface waters (0.04-3.8 nM d-1). The majority of CH4 oxidation, in terms of integrated activity, occurred within anoxic bottom waters. Water column oxidation reduced the potential lake-atmosphere CH4 flux by a factor of two to three. Measured oxidation rates and water column concentrations were used to estimate the biological turnover times of NH3 and CH4. The NH3 pool turns over rapidly, on time scales of 0.8 d in surface waters and 10 d within the oxycline, while CH4 is cycled on 103-d time scales in surface waters and 102-d time scales within oxycline and bottom waters. Our data suggest an important role for NH3 oxidation in alkaline, saline lakes since the process converts volatile NH3 to soluble NO2-, thereby reducing loss via lake-atmosphere exchange and maintaining nitrogen in a form that is readily available to phytoplankton.

  13. Anaerobic filter for biogas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavadej, S.

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory study evaluated the performance of an anaerobic filter in producing biogas from pig waste with 30,000 mg/l of COD. The filter packing was bamboo rings of 1 and 1/2 in. diameter, 1 in. long; the bamboo-bed filter operated satisfactorily in a wide COD loading range of 3.74-15.65 kg/cu m/d which corresponds to the hydraulic retention of 8.47 to 1.68 days. At the optimum loading of 7.299 kg COD/cu m/d, the largest gas rate of 0.212 cu m/kg of COD was produced. The required volume of the digester for 1.2 cu m/d of gas production would be only 1.5 cu m; in practical applications, consideration should be given to the gas collecting system and clogging problems.

  14. Anaerobic digestion of alcohol stillage

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, L.K.

    1981-01-01

    In the production of ethanol from grain, the distillation step produces a residue of distillers grains or stillage that contains greater than 90% water and is currently dried and used as a cattle feed supplement. Experimental work was carried out on the anaerobic digestion of the stillage to determine the feasibility of using the CH/sub 4/ produced to supply the energy required in the ethanol distillation step. The fermentation characteristics of the stillage were studied, and the amount of CH/sub 4/ produced was determined. Based on an economic analysis, the value of the pressed solids fraction of the stillage as feed is much greater than the potential return from producing CH/sub 4/.

  15. DNA-based determination of microbial biomass suitable for frozen and alkaline soil samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Mikhail; Blagodatskaya, Evgeniya; Kogut, Boris; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Microbial biomass is a sensitive indicator of changes due to soil management, long before other basic soil measures such as Corg or Ntot. Improvement of methods for determination of microbial biomass still remains relevant, and these methods should be correctly applicable for the soil samples being in various state. This study was designed to demonstrate the applicability of DNA-based determination of microbial biomass under conditions when the common basic approaches, namely chloroform fumigation-extraction (CFE) and substrate-induced respiration (SIR), are restricted by certain soil properties, experimental designs or research needs, e.g. in frozen, alkaline or carbonaceous soils. We compared microbial biomass determined by CFE, SIR and by DNA approaches in the range of neutral and slightly alkaline Chernozem and alkaline Calcisol of semi-arid climate. The samples of natural and agricultural ecosystems were taken throughout the soil profile from long-term static field experiments in the European part of Russia. Extraction and subsequent quantification of dsDNA revealed a strong agreement with SIR and CFE when analyzing the microbial biomass content in soils with pH below 8. The conversion factors (FDNA) from dsDNA to SIR-Cmic (5.10) and CFE-Cmic (4.41) were obtained by testing a range of the soil samples down to 1.5 m depth and indicated a good reproducibility of DNA-based estimations. In alkaline soils (pH > 8), CO2 retention due to alkaline pH and exchange with carbonates resulted in a strong underestimation of soil microbial biomass by SIR or even in the absence of any CO2 emission, especially at low absolute values of microbial biomass in subsoil. Correction of CO2 efflux by theoretical retention pH-dependent factors caused overestimation of SIR-biomass. In alkaline conditions, DNA extraction proved to be a reliable alternative for microbial biomass determination. Moreover, the DNA-based approach can serve as an excellent alternative enabling correct

  16. Sleep deprivation induced anxiety and anaerobic performance.

    PubMed

    Vardar, Selma Arzu; Oztürk, Levent; Kurt, Cem; Bulut, Erdogan; Sut, Necdet; Vardar, Erdal

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sleep deprivation induced anxiety on anaerobic performance. Thirteen volunteer male physical education students completed the Turkish version of State Anxiety Inventory and performed Wingate anaerobic test for three times: (1) following a full-night of habitual sleep (baseline measurements), (2) following 30 hours of sleep deprivation, and (3) following partial-night sleep deprivation. Baseline measurements were performed the day before total sleep deprivation. Measurements following partial sleep deprivation were made 2 weeks later than total sleep deprivation measurements. State anxiety was measured prior to each Wingate test. The mean state anxiety following total sleep deprivation was higher than the baseline measurement (44.9 ± 12.9 vs. 27.6 ± 4.2, respectively, p = 0.02) whereas anaerobic performance parameters remained unchanged. Neither anaerobic parameters nor state anxiety levels were affected by one night partial sleep deprivation. Our results suggest that 30 hours continuous wakefulness may increase anxiety level without impairing anaerobic performance, whereas one night of partial sleep deprivation was ineffective on both state anxiety and anaerobic performance. Key pointsShort time total sleep deprivation (30 hours) increases state anxiety without any competition stress.Anaerobic performance parameters such as peak power, mean power and minimum power may not show a distinctive difference from anaerobic performance in a normal sleep day despite the high anxiety level induced by short time sleep deprivation.Partial sleep deprivation does not affect anxiety level and anaerobic performance of the next day.

  17. Laser direct write of planar alkaline microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, C. B.; Kim, H.; Piqué, A.

    We are developing a laser engineering approach to fabricate and optimize alkaline microbatteries in planar geometries. The laser direct-write technique enables multicapability for adding, removing and processing material and provides the ability to pattern complicated structures needed for fabricating complete microbattery assemblies. In this paper, we demonstrate the production of planar zinc-silver oxide alkaline cells under ambient conditions. The microbattery cells exhibit 1.55-V open-circuit potentials, as expected for the battery chemistry, and show a flat discharge behavior under constant-current loads. High capacities of over 450 μAhcm-2 are obtained for 5-mm2 microbatteries.

  18. Alkaline earth filled nickel skutterudite antimonide thermoelectrics

    DOEpatents

    Singh, David Joseph

    2013-07-16

    A thermoelectric material including a body centered cubic filled skutterudite having the formula A.sub.xFe.sub.yNi.sub.zSb.sub.12, where A is an alkaline earth element, x is no more than approximately 1.0, and the sum of y and z is approximately equal to 4.0. The alkaline earth element includes guest atoms selected from the group consisting of Be, Mb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra and combinations thereof. The filled skutterudite is shown to have properties suitable for a wide variety of thermoelectric applications.

  19. Alkaline Capacitors Based on Nitride Nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldissi, Matt

    2003-01-01

    High-energy-density alkaline electrochemical capacitors based on electrodes made of transition-metal nitride nanoparticles are undergoing development. Transition- metal nitrides (in particular, Fe3N and TiN) offer a desirable combination of high electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability in aqueous alkaline electrolytes like KOH. The high energy densities of these capacitors are attributable mainly to their high capacitance densities, which, in turn, are attributable mainly to the large specific surface areas of the electrode nanoparticles. Capacitors of this type could be useful as energy-storage components in such diverse equipment as digital communication systems, implanted medical devices, computers, portable consumer electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  20. Gram-Positive Anaerobic Cocci

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) are a heterogeneous group of organisms defined by their morphological appearance and their inability to grow in the presence of oxygen; most clinical isolates are identified to species in the genus Peptostreptococcus. GPAC are part of the normal flora of all mucocutaneous surfaces and are often isolated from infections such as deep organ abscesses, obstetric and gynecological sepsis, and intraoral infections. They have been little studied for several reasons, which include an inadequate classification, difficulties with laboratory identification, and the mixed nature of the infections from which they are usually isolated. Nucleic acid studies indicate that the classification is in need of radical revision at the genus level. Several species of Peptostreptococcus have recently been described, but others still await formal recognition. Identification has been based on carbohydrate fermentation tests, but most GPAC are asaccharolytic and use the products of protein degradation for their metabolism; the introduction of commercially available preformed enzyme kits affords a physiologically more appropriate method of identification, which is simple and relatively rapid and can be used in routine diagnostic laboratories. Recent reports have documented the isolation in pure culture of several species, notably Peptostreptococcus magnus, from serious infections. Studies of P. magnus have elucidated several virulence factors which correlate with the site of infection, and reveal some similarities to Staphylococcus aureus. P. micros is a strongly proteolytic species; it is increasingly recognized as an important pathogen in intraoral infections, particularly periodontitis, and mixed anaerobic deep-organ abscesses. Comparison of antibiotic susceptibility patterns reveals major differences between species. Penicillins are the antibiotics of choice, although some strains of P. anaerobius show broad-spectrum β-lactam resistance. PMID:9457430