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Sample records for alkaline battery cells

  1. Performance of alkaline battery cells used in emergency locator transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, G. A.; Sokol, S.; Motley, W. R., III; Mcclelland, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of battery power supplies for emergency locator transmitters (ELT's) were investigated by testing alkaline zinc/manganese dioxide cells of the type typically used in ELT's. Cells from four manufacturers were tested. The cells were subjected to simulated environmental and load conditions representative of those required for survival and operation. Battery cell characteristics that may contribute to ELT malfunctions and limitations were evaluated. Experimental results from the battery cell study are discussed, and an evaluation of ELT performance while operating under a representative worst-case environmental condition is presented.

  2. Dry cell battery poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  3. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    DOEpatents

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  4. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy. PMID:26404834

  5. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy.

  6. Alkaline battery, separator therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An improved battery separator for alkaline battery cells has low resistance to electrolyte ion transfer and high resistance to electrode ion transfer. The separator is formed by applying an improved coating to an electrolyte absorber. The absorber, preferably, is a flexible, fibrous, and porous substrate that is resistant to strong alkali and oxidation. The coating composition includes an admixture of a polymeric binder, a hydrolyzable polymeric ester and inert fillers. The coating composition is substantially free of reactive fillers and plasticizers commonly employed as porosity promoting agents in separator coatings. When the separator is immersed in electrolyte, the polymeric ester of the film coating reacts with the electrolyte forming a salt and an alcohol. The alcohol goes into solution with the electrolyte while the salt imbibes electrolyte into the coating composition. When the salt is formed, it expands the polymeric chains of the binder to provide a film coating substantially permeable to electrolyte ion transfer but relatively impermeable to electrode ion transfer during use.

  7. Ultrafine polybenzimidazole (PBI) fibers. [separators for alkaline batteries and dfuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chenevey, E. C.

    1979-01-01

    Mats were made from ultrafine polybenzimidazole (PBI) fibers to provide an alternate to the use of asbestos as separators in fuel cells and alkaline batteries. To minimize distortion during mat drying, a process to provide a dry fibrid was developed. Two fibrid types were developed: one coarse, making mats for battery separators; the other fine, making low permeability matrices for fuel cells. Eventually, it was demonstrated that suitable mat fabrication techniques yielded fuel cell separators from the coarser alkaline battery fibrids. The stability of PBI mats to 45% KOH at 123 C can be increased by heat treatment at high temperatures. Weight loss data to 1000 hours exposure show the alkali resistance of the mats to be superior to that of asbestos.

  8. Seeking effective dyes for a mediated glucose-air alkaline battery/fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eustis, Ross; Tsang, Tsz Ming; Yang, Brigham; Scott, Daniel; Liaw, Bor Yann

    2014-02-01

    A significant level of power generation from an abiotic, air breathing, mediated reducing sugar-air alkaline battery/fuel cell has been achieved in our laboratories at room temperature without complicated catalysis or membrane separation in the reaction chamber. Our prior studies suggested that mass transport limitation by the mediator is a limiting factor in power generation. New and effective mediators were sought here to improve charge transfer and power density. Forty-five redox dyes were studied to identify if any can facilitate mass transport in alkaline electrolyte solution; namely, by increasing the solubility and mobility of the dye, and the valence charge carried per molecule. Indigo dyes were studied more closely to understand the complexity involved in mass transport. The viability of water-miscible co-solvents was also explored to understand their effect on solubility and mass transport of the dyes. Using a 2.0 mL solution, 20% methanol by volume, with 100 mM indigo carmine, 1.0 M glucose and 2.5 M sodium hydroxide, the glucose-air alkaline battery/fuel cell attained 8 mA cm-2 at short-circuit and 800 μW cm-2 at the maximum power point. This work shall aid future optimization of mediated charge transfer mechanism in batteries or fuel cells.

  9. Grace DAKASEP alkaline battery separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovannoni, R. T.; Lundquist, J. T.; Choi, W. M.

    1987-01-01

    The Grace DAKASEP separator was originally developed as a wicking layer for nickel-zinc alkaline batteries. The DAKASEP is a filled non-woven separator which is flexible and heat sealable. Through modification of formulation and processing variables, products with a variety of properties can be produced. Variations of DAKASEP were tested in Ni-H2, Ni-Zn, Ni-Cd, and primary alkaline batteries with good results. The properties of DAKASEP which are optimized for Hg-Zn primary batteries are shown in tabular form. This separator has high tensile strength, 12 micron average pore size, relatively low porosity at 46-48 percent, and consequently moderately high resistivity. Versions were produced with greater than 70 percent porosity and resistivities in 33 wt percent KOH as low as 3 ohm cm. Performance data for Hg-Zn E-1 size cells containing DAKASEP with the properties shown in tabular form, are more reproducible than data obtained with a competitive polypropylene non-woven separator. In addition, utilization of active material is in general considerably improved.

  10. Separator for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. W.; Pfluger, H. L.

    1968-01-01

    Separator compositions have been tested as components of three-plate silver-zinc oxide cells in a standard cycling test. Six materials meet imposed requirements, giving cycling performance superior to cellophane.

  11. Batteries: from alkaline to zinc-air.

    PubMed

    Dondelinger, Robert M

    2004-01-01

    There is no perfect disposable battery--one that will sit on the shelf for 20 years, then continually provide unlimited current, at a completely constant voltage until exhausted, without producing heat. There is no perfect rechargeable battery--one with all of the above characteristics and will also withstand an infinite overcharge while providing an equally infinite cycle life. There are only compromises. Every battery selection is a compromise between the ideally required characteristics, the advantages, and the limitations of each battery type. General selection of a battery type to power a medical device is largely outside the purview of the biomed. Initially, these are engineering decisions made at the time of medical equipment design and are intended to be followed in perpetuity. However, since newer cell types evolve and the manufacturer's literature is fixed at the time of printing, some intelligent substitutions may be made as long as the biomed understands the characteristics of both the recommended cell and the replacement cell. For example, when the manufacturer recommends alkaline, it is usually because of the almost constant voltage it produces under the devices' design load. Over time, other battery types may be developed that will meet the intent of the manufacturer, at a lower cost, providing longer operational life, at a lower environmental cost, or with a combination of these advantages. In the Obstetrical Doppler cited at the beginning of this article, the user had put in carbon-zinc cells, and the biomed had unknowingly replaced them with carbonzinc cells. If the alkaline cells recommended by the manufacturer had been used, there would have been the proper output voltage at the battery terminals when the [table: see text] cells were at their half-life. Instead, the device refused to operate since the battery voltage was below presumed design voltage. While battery-type substitutions may be easily and relatively successfully made in disposable

  12. Batteries: from alkaline to zinc-air.

    PubMed

    Dondelinger, Robert M

    2004-01-01

    There is no perfect disposable battery--one that will sit on the shelf for 20 years, then continually provide unlimited current, at a completely constant voltage until exhausted, without producing heat. There is no perfect rechargeable battery--one with all of the above characteristics and will also withstand an infinite overcharge while providing an equally infinite cycle life. There are only compromises. Every battery selection is a compromise between the ideally required characteristics, the advantages, and the limitations of each battery type. General selection of a battery type to power a medical device is largely outside the purview of the biomed. Initially, these are engineering decisions made at the time of medical equipment design and are intended to be followed in perpetuity. However, since newer cell types evolve and the manufacturer's literature is fixed at the time of printing, some intelligent substitutions may be made as long as the biomed understands the characteristics of both the recommended cell and the replacement cell. For example, when the manufacturer recommends alkaline, it is usually because of the almost constant voltage it produces under the devices' design load. Over time, other battery types may be developed that will meet the intent of the manufacturer, at a lower cost, providing longer operational life, at a lower environmental cost, or with a combination of these advantages. In the Obstetrical Doppler cited at the beginning of this article, the user had put in carbon-zinc cells, and the biomed had unknowingly replaced them with carbonzinc cells. If the alkaline cells recommended by the manufacturer had been used, there would have been the proper output voltage at the battery terminals when the [table: see text] cells were at their half-life. Instead, the device refused to operate since the battery voltage was below presumed design voltage. While battery-type substitutions may be easily and relatively successfully made in disposable

  13. Polyvinyl alcohol battery separator containing inert filler. [alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Hsu, L. C.; Manzo, M. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol battery separator is disclosed. A particulate filler, inert to alkaline electrolyte of an alkaline battery, is incorporated in the separator in an amount of 1-20% by weight, based on the weight of the polyvinyl alcohol, and is dispersed throughout the product. Incorporation of the filler enhances performance and increases cycle life of alkaline batteries when compared with batteries containing a similar separator not containing filler. Suitable fillers include titanates, silicates, zirconates, aluminates, wood floor, lignin, and titania. Particle size is not greater than about 50 microns.

  14. Composite seal reduces alkaline battery leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clatterbuck, C. H.; Plitt, K. F.

    1965-01-01

    Composite seal consisting of rubber or plastic washers and a metal washer reduces alkaline battery leakage. Adhesive is applied to each washer interface, and the washers are held together mechanically.

  15. Inorganic-organic separators for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible separator is reported for use between the electrodes of Ni-Cd and Ni-Zn batteries using alkaline electrolytes. The separator was made by coating a porous substrate with a battery separator composition. The coating material included a rubber-based resin copolymer, a plasticizer and inorganic and organic fillers which comprised 55% by volume or less of the coating as finally dried. One or more of the filler materials, whether organic or inorganic, is preferably active with the alkaline electrolyte to produce pores in the separator coating. The plasticizer was an organic material which is hydrolyzed by the alkaline electrolyte to improve conductivity of the separator coating.

  16. Alkaline fuel cells applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, Karl; Hacker, Viktor; Gsellmann, Josef; Cifrain, Martin; Faleschini, Gottfried; Enzinger, Peter; Fankhauser, Robert; Ortner, Markus; Muhr, Michael; Aronson, Robert R.

    On the world-wide automobile market technical developments are increasingly determined by the dramatic restriction on emissions as well as the regimentation of fuel consumption by legislation. Therefore there is an increasing chance of a completely new technology breakthrough if it offers new opportunities, meeting the requirements of resource preservation and emission restrictions. Fuel cell technology offers the possibility to excel in today's motive power techniques in terms of environmental compatibility, consumer's profit, costs of maintenance and efficiency. The key question is economy. This will be decided by the costs of fuel cell systems if they are to be used as power generators for future electric vehicles. The alkaline hydrogen-air fuel cell system with circulating KOH electrolyte and low-cost catalysed carbon electrodes could be a promising alternative. Based on the experiences of Kordesch [K. Kordesch, Brennstoffbatterien, Springer, Wien, 1984, ISBN 3-387-81819-7; K. Kordesch, City car with H 2-air fuel cell and lead-battery, SAE Paper No. 719015, 6th IECEC, 1971], who operated a city car hybrid vehicle on public roads for 3 years in the early 1970s, improved air electrodes plus new variations of the bipolar stack assembly developed in Graz are investigated. Primary fuel choice will be a major issue until such time as cost-effective, on-board hydrogen storage is developed. Ammonia is an interesting option. The whole system, ammonia dissociator plus alkaline fuel cell (AFC), is characterised by a simple design and high efficiency.

  17. Polyvinyl alcohol membranes as alkaline battery separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O.; Manzo, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Polyvinly alcohol (PVA) cross-linked with aldehyde reagents yields membranes that demonstrate properties that make them suitable for use as alkaline battery separators. Film properties can be controlled by the choice of cross-linker, cross-link density and the method of cross-linking. Three methods of cross-linking and their effects on film properties are discussed. Film properties can also be modified by using a copolymer of vinyl alcohol and acrylic acid as the base for the separator and cross-linking it similarly to the PVA. Fillers can be incorporated into the films to further modify film properties. Results of separator screening tests and cell tests for several variations of PBA films are discussed.

  18. Electrocatalytic Activity of Transition Metal Oxide-Carbon Composites for Oxygen Reduction in Alkaline Batteries and Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Malkhandi, S; Trinh, P; Manohar, AK; Jayachandrababu, KC; Kindler, A; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2013-06-07

    Conductive transition metal oxides (perovskites, spinels and pyrochlores) are attractive as catalysts for the air electrode in alkaline rechargeable metal-air batteries and fuel cells. We have found that conductive carbon materials when added to transition metal oxides such as calcium-doped lanthanum cobalt oxide, nickel cobalt oxide and calcium-doped lanthanum manganese cobalt oxide increase the electrocatalytic activity of the oxide for oxygen reduction by a factor of five to ten. We have studied rotating ring-disk electrodes coated with (a) various mass ratios of carbon and transition metal oxide, (b) different types of carbon additives and (c) different types of transition metal oxides. Our experiments and analysis establish that in such composite catalysts, carbon is the primary electro- catalyst for the two-electron electro-reduction of oxygen to hydroperoxide while the transition metal oxide decomposes the hydroperoxide to generate additional oxygen that enhances the observed current resulting in an apparent four-electron process. These findings are significant in that they change the way we interpret previous reports in the scientific literature on the electrocatalytic activity of various transition metal oxide- carbon composites for oxygen reduction, especially where carbon is assumed to be an additive that just enhances the electronic conductivity of the oxide catalyst. (C) 2013 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Flexible separator for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Device is fabricated from low-cost readily-available commercial-materials by automated methods utilizing conventional paper coating processes. Flexibility of unit prevents cracking and disintegration caused by electrode warpage and dendrite growth, major causes of early battery failure with present separators.

  20. Separator Materials Used in Secondary Alkaline Batteries Characterized and Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Nickel-cadmium (Ni/Cd) and nickel-hydrogen (Ni/H2) secondary alkaline batteries are vital to aerospace applications. Battery performance and cycle life are significantly affected by the type of separators used in those batteries. A team from NASA Lewis Research Center's Electrochemical Technology Branch developed standardized testing procedures to characterize and evaluate new and existing separator materials to improve performance and cycle life of secondary alkaline batteries. Battery separators must function as good electronic insulators and as efficient electrolyte reservoirs. At present, new types of organic and inorganic separator materials are being developed for Ni/Cd and Ni/H2 batteries. The separator material previously used in the NASA standard Ni/Cd was Pellon 2505, a 100-percent nylon-6 polymer that must be treated with zinc chloride (ZnCl2) to bond the fibers. Because of stricter Environmental Protection Agency regulation of ZnCl2 emissions, the battery community has been searching for new separators to replace Pellon 2505. As of today, two candidate separator materials have been identified; however, neither of the two materials have performed as well as Pellon 2505. The separator test procedures that were devised at Lewis are being implemented to expedite the search for new battery separators. The new test procedures, which are being carried out in the Separator Laboratory at Lewis, have been designed to guarantee accurate evaluations of the properties that are critical for sustaining proper battery operation. These properties include physical and chemical stability, chemical purity, gas permeability, electrolyte retention and distribution, uniformity, porosity, and area resistivity. A manual containing a detailed description of 12 separator test procedures has been drafted and will be used by the battery community to evaluate candidate separator materials for specific applications. These standardized procedures will allow for consistent, uniform

  1. Imidazolium-based Block Copolymers as Solid-State Separators for Alkaline Fuel Cells and Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykaza, Jacob Richard

    In this study, polymerized ionic liquid (PIL) diblock copolymers were explored as solid-state polymer separators as an anion exchange membrane (AEM) for alkaline fuel cells AFCs and as a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) for lithium-ion batteries. Polymerized ionic liquid (PIL) block copolymers are a distinct set of block copolymers that combine the properties of both ionic liquids (e.g., high conductivity, high electrochemical stability) and block copolymers (e.g., self-assembly into various nanostructures), which provides the opportunity to design highly conductive robust solid-state electrolytes that can be tuned for various applications including AFCs and lithium-ion batteries via simple anion exchange. A series of bromide conducting PIL diblock copolymers with an undecyl alkyl side chain between the polymer backbone and the imidazolium moiety were first synthesized at various compositions comprising of a PIL component and a non-ionic component. Synthesis was achieved by post-functionalization from its non-ionic precursor PIL diblock copolymer, which was synthesized via the reverse addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) technique. This PIL diblock copolymer with long alkyl side chains resulted in flexible, transparent films with high mechanical strength and high bromide ion conductivity. The conductivity of the PIL diblock copolymer was three times higher than its analogous PIL homopolymer and an order of magnitude higher than a similar PIL diblock copolymer with shorter alkyl side chain length, which was due to the microphase separated morphology, more specifically, water/ion clusters within the PIL microdomains in the hydrated state. Due to the high conductivity and mechanical robustness of this novel PIL block copolymer, its application as both the ionomer and AEM in an AFC was investigated via anion exchange to hydroxide (OH-), where a maximum power density of 29.3 mW cm-1 (60 °C with H2/O2 at 25 psig (172 kPa) backpressure) was achieved. Rotating disk

  2. A method for making an alkaline battery electrode plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chida, K.; Ezaki, T.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for making an alkaline battery electrode plate where the desired active substances are filled into a nickel foam substrate. In this substrate an electrolytic oxidation reduction occurs in an alkaline solution containing lithium hydroxide.

  3. Advanced inorganic separators for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A flexible, porous battery separator comprising a coating applied to a porous, flexible substrate is described. The coating comprises: (1) a thermoplastic rubber-based resin which is insoluble and unreactive in the alkaline electrolyte; (2) a polar organic plasticizer which is reactive with the alkaline electrolyte to produce a reaction product which contains a hydroxyl group and/or a carboxylic acid group; and (3) a mixture of polar particulate filler materials which are unreactive with the electrolyte, the mixture comprising at least one first filler material having a surface area of greater than 25 meters sq/gram, at least one second filler material having a surface area of 10 to 25 sq meters/gram, wherein the volume of the mixture of filler materials is less than 45% of the total volume of the fillers and the binder, the filler surface area per gram of binder is about 20 to 60 sq meters/gram, and the amount of plasticizer is sufficient to coat each filler particle. A method of forming the battery separator is also described.

  4. Studies on the best alkaline electrolyte for aluminium/air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapali, V.; Venkatakrishna Iyer, S.; Balaramachandran, V.; Sarangapani, K. B.; Ganesan, M.; Anbu Kulandainathan, M.; Sheik Mideen, A.

    Two types of alkaline electrolyte, based on 4 M NaOH have been developed for use in aluminium/air cells or batteries. They contain either alkaline citrate or alkaline citrate cum stannate as an additive to suppress the self-corrosion of aluminium without any deleterious effects on the efficient functioning of aluminium anode at a high negative potential. The alkaline citrate cum stannate solution has been adjudged the best electrolyte in terms of electrochemical characteristics and electrolyte management. Hence, results pertaining to the use of alkaline citrate cum stannate are presented in this paper. An aluminium/air battery with this electrolyte can be used safely and effectively at ambient temperature. An added advantage is the employment of 99.8% pure aluminium for the preparation of alloy anodes. This is expected to reduce the cost of aluminium/air batteries. The best anode based on 99.8% pure aluminium is a quaternary alloy containing lead, gallium and indium.

  5. Alkaline galvanic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, T.; Maeda, Y.; Momose, K.; Wakahata, T.

    1983-10-04

    An alkaline galvanic cell is disclosed including a container serving for a cathode terminal, a sealing plate in the form of a layered clad plate serving for an anode terminal to be fitted into the container, and an insulating packing provided between the sealing plate and container for sealing the cell upon assembly. The cell is provided with a layer of epoxy adduct polyamide amine having amine valence in the range of 50 to 400 and disposed between the innermost copper layer of the sealing plate arranged to be readily amalgamated and the insulating packing so as to serve as a sealing agent or liquid leakage suppression agent.

  6. Cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol films as alkaline battery separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Manzo, M. A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1982-01-01

    Cross-linking methods were investigated to determine their effect on the performance of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films as alkaline battery separators. The following types of cross-linked PVA films are discussed: (1) PVA-dialdehyde blends post-treated with an acid or acid periodate solution (two-step method) and (2) PVA-dialdehyde blends cross-linked during film formation (drying) by using a reagent with both aldehyde and acid functionality (one-step method). Laboratory samples of each cross-linked type of film were prepared and evaluated in standard separator screening tests. The pilot-plant batches of films were prepared and compared to measure differences due to the cross-linking method. The pilot-plant materials were then tested in nickel oxide - zinc cells to compare the two methods with respect to performance characteristics and cycle life. Cell test results are compared with those from tests with Celgard.

  7. Cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol films as alkaline battery separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Manzo, M. A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1983-01-01

    Cross-linking methods have been investigated to determine their effect on the performance of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films as alkaline battery separators. The following types of cross-linked PVA films are discussed: (1) PVA-dialdehyde blends post-treated with an acid or acid periodate solution (two-step method) and (2) PVA-dialdehyde blends cross-linked during film formation (drying) by using a reagent with both aldehyde and acid functionality (one-step method). Laboratory samples of each cross-linked type of film were prepared and evaluated in standard separator screening tests. Then pilot-plant batches of films were prepared and compared to measure differences due to the cross-linking method. The pilot-plant materials were then tested in nickel oxide-zinc cells to compare the two methods with respect to performance characteristics and cycle life. Cell test results are compared with those from tests with Celgard.

  8. Rechargeable alkaline zinc/ferricyanide hybrid redox battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, G. B.; Hollandsworth, R. P.; Littauer, E. L.

    It is noted that the zinc/ferricyanide battery system is intended for utility load leveling and solar photovoltaic/wind applications, offering such advantages as high cell voltage, near-ambient temperature operation, flowing alkaline electrolyte, low-cost reactant storage, low toxicity, potentially long cycle life, and low projected capital costs. The system is found to demonstrate excellent electrochemical performance. Cell voltages are 1.94 V on charge and 1.78 V on discharge at 35 mA/sq cm, and the peak power density is of 4.5 kW/sq m. Cell polarization losses are due almost entirely to IR within the separator material. At 40 C a mean energy efficiency of 84% is obtained after 950 4-hour cycles. An economic analysis suggests a battery selling price of $32/kWh, an installed price of $230/kW, and a footprint of 8.7 kWh per square foot as realistic goals for a 20 MW, 100 MWh system.

  9. Separator for alkaline batteries and method of making same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    The preparation of membranes suitable for use as separators in concentrated alkaline battery cells by selective solvolysis of copolymers of methacrylate esters with acrylate esters followed by addition of a base and to the resultant products is described. The method of making copolymers by first copolymerizing a methacrylate ester (or esters) with a more readily hydrolyzable ester, followed by a selective saponification whereby the methacrylate ester moieties remain essentially intact and the readily hydrolyzable ester moiety is suponified and to the partial or complete neutralization of the relatively brittle copolymer acid with a base to make membranes which are sufficiently flexible in the dry state so that they may be wrapped around electrodes without damage by handling is described.

  10. Electrodeposited inorganic separators for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, W. N., Jr.; Consiglio, J. A.; Mc Quade, J. M.

    1970-01-01

    Coating electrodes of silver-cadmium cells with thermostable electrodeposits of calcium hydroxide or magnesium hydroxide reduces silver migration and increases cell life. Absence of organic matter enables assembled cells to be sterilized without oxidation of the material of the separators.

  11. Battery-package design provides for cell cooling and constraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, S.

    1968-01-01

    Lightweight battery-package provides for even cooling of individual alkaline cells, constraint against cell expansion, and convenient placement of cells. The battery package also provides for venting of the cells and includes instrumentation to measure cell temperature, pressure, and voltage.

  12. Silver composite cathodes for alkaline secondary batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrando, William A.

    1989-08-01

    This invention relates to electrochemical cells and more particularly to silver electrodes for electrochemical cells. Accordingly, an object of this invention is to provide a new, lighter weight silver electrode for secondary cells. Another object of this invention is to provide an electrode which requires less silver to operate. A further object of this invention is to provide a silver electrode which uses the silver more efficiently. Yet another object of the invention is to provide an easier, less expensive method of manufacturing silver electrodes for secondary cells.

  13. Real-time materials evolution visualized within intact cycling alkaline batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaway, JW; Erdonmez, CK; Zhong, Z; Croft, M; Sviridov, LA; Sholklapper, TZ; Turney, DE; Banerjee, S; Steingart, DA

    2014-01-01

    The scientific community has focused on the problem of inexpensive, safe, and sustainable large-scale electrical energy storage, which is needed for a number of emerging societal reasons such as stabilizing intermittent renewables-based generation like solar and wind power. The materials used for large-scale storage will need to be low cost, earth-abundant, and safe at the desired scale. The Zn-MnO2 "alkaline" battery chemistry is associated with one-time use, despite being rechargeable. This is due to material irreversibilities that can be triggered in either the anode or cathode. However, as Zn and MnO2 have high energy density and low cost, they are economically attractive even at limited depth of discharge. As received, a standard bobbin-type alkaline cell costs roughly $20 per kW h. The U. S. Department of Energy ARPA-E $100 per kW h cost target for grid storage is thus close to the cost of alkaline consumer primary cells if re-engineered and/or cycled at 5-20% nominal capacity. Herein we use a deeply-penetrating in situ technique to observe ZnO precipitation near the separator in an alkaline cell anode cycled at 5% DOD, which is consistent with cell failures observed at high cycle life. Alkaline cells designed to avoid such causes of cell failure could serve as a low-cost baseload for large-scale storage.

  14. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassovs research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herrings group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  15. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more that two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  16. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more than two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  17. All-solid-state Al-air batteries with polymer alkaline gel electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao; Zuo, Chuncheng; Liu, Zihui; Yu, Ying; Zuo, Yuxin; Song, Yu

    2014-04-01

    Aluminum-air (Al-air) battery is one of the most promising candidates for next-generation energy storage systems because of its high capacity and energy density, and abundance. The polyacrylic acid (PAA)-based alkaline gel electrolyte is used in all-solid-state Al-air batteries instead of aqueous electrolytes to prevent leakage. The optimal gel electrolyte exhibits an ionic conductivity of 460 mS cm-1, which is close to that of aqueous electrolytes. The Al-air battery peak capacity and energy density considering only Al can reach 1166 mAh g-1-Al and 1230 mWh g-1-Al, respectively, during constant current discharge. The battery prototype also exhibits a high power density of 91.13 mW cm-2. For the battery is a laminated structure, area densities of 29.2 mAh cm-2 and 30.8 mWh cm-2 are presented to appraise the performance of the whole cell. A novel design to inhibit anodic corrosion is proposed by separating the Al anode from the gel electrolyte when not in use, thereby effectively maintaining the available capacity of the battery.

  18. The design of alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, K.

    1990-01-01

    Alkaline fuel cells recently developed have yielded satisfactory operation even in the cases of their use of mobile and matrix-type electrolytes; the advantages of realistic operation have been demonstrated by a major West German manufacturer's 100 kW alkaline fuel cell apparatus, which was operated in the role of an air-independent propulsion system. Development has begun for a spacecraft alkaline fuel cell of the matrix-electrolyte configuration.

  19. Aqueous Rechargeable Alkaline CoxNi2-xS2/TiO2 Battery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jilei; Wang, Jin; Ku, Zhiliang; Wang, Huanhuan; Chen, Shi; Zhang, Lili; Lin, Jianyi; Shen, Ze Xiang

    2016-01-26

    An electrochemical energy storage system with high energy density, stringent safety, and reliability is highly desirable for next-generation energy storage devices. Here an aqueous rechargeable alkaline CoxNi2-xS2 // TiO2 battery system is designed by integrating two reversible electrode processes associated with OH(-) insertion/extraction in the cathode part and Li ion insertion/extraction in the anode part, respectively. The prototype CoxNi2-xS2 // TiO2 battery is able to deliver high energy/power densities of 83.7 Wh/kg at 609 W/kg (based on the total mass of active materials) and good cycling stabilities (capacity retention 75.2% after 1000 charge/discharge cycles). A maximum volumetric energy density of 21 Wh/l (based on the whole packaged cell) has been achieved, which is comparable to that of a thin-film battery and better than that of typical commercial supercapacitors, benefiting from the unique battery and hierarchical electrode design. This hybrid system would enrich the existing aqueous rechargeable LIB chemistry and be a promising battery technology for large-scale energy storage.

  20. Separator for alkaline electric batteries and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor); Hoyt, H. E.

    1970-01-01

    Battery separator membranes of high electrolytic conductivity comprising a cellulose ether and a compatible metallic salt of water soluble aliphatic acids and their hydroxy derivatives are described. It was found that methyl cellulose can be modified by another class of materials, nonpolymeric in nature, to form battery separator membranes of low electrolytic resistance but which have the flexibility of membranes made of unmodified methyl cellulose, and which in many cases enhance flexibility over membranes made with unmodified methyl cellulose. Separator membranes for electrochemical cells comprising a cellulose ether and a modified selected from the group consisting of metallic salts of water soluble alphatic acids and their hydroxy derivatives and to electrochemical cells utilizing said membranes are described.

  1. Simultaneous recovery of zinc and manganese dioxide from household alkaline batteries through hydrometallurgical processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Cleusa Cristina Bueno Martha; Tenório, Jorge Alberto Soares

    This paper describes the leaching experiments and the electrowinning tests to recover Zn and Mn from spent household alkaline batteries. After the dismantling of the batteries, the black powder was analyzed and found to contain 21 wt.% Zn and 45%wt. Mn. Therefore, it was considered that recovery of these metals would be interesting due to their relatively large amounts in this kind of waste. Batch laboratory experiments were carried out to develop an acid leaching procedure and to determine appropriate leaching conditions to maximize zinc extraction and to study the leaching behavior of Mn. An experimental study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of simultaneous recovery of zinc and particulate manganese dioxide using a laboratory cell. The results from these electrowinning experiments are also presented in this paper.

  2. The relationship between coefficient of restitution and state of charge of zinc alkaline primary LR6 batteries [Bouncing alkaline batteries: A basic solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bhadra, S.; Hertzberg, B. J.; Croft, M.; Gallaway, J. W.; Van Tassell, B. J.; Chamoun, M.; Erdonmez, C.; Zhong, Z.; Steingart, D. A.

    2015-03-13

    The coefficient of restitution of alkaline batteries had been shown to increase as a function of depth of discharge. In this work, using non-destructive mechanical testing, the change in coefficient of restitution is compared to in situ energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction data to determine the cause of the macroscopic change in coefficient of restitution. The increase in coefficient of restitution correlates to the formation of a percolation pathway of ZnO within the anode of the cell, and that the coefficient of restitution saturates at a value of 0.63 ± .05 at 50% state if charge when the anode has densified into porous ZnO solid. Of note is the sensitivity of coefficient of restitution to the amount of ZnO formation that rivals the sensitivity on in situ energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction spectroscopy.

  3. The relationship between coefficient of restitution and state of charge of zinc alkaline primary LR6 batteries [Bouncing alkaline batteries: A basic solution

    DOE PAGES

    Bhadra, S.; Hertzberg, B. J.; Croft, M.; Gallaway, J. W.; Van Tassell, B. J.; Chamoun, M.; Erdonmez, C.; Zhong, Z.; Steingart, D. A.

    2015-03-13

    The coefficient of restitution of alkaline batteries had been shown to increase as a function of depth of discharge. In this work, using non-destructive mechanical testing, the change in coefficient of restitution is compared to in situ energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction data to determine the cause of the macroscopic change in coefficient of restitution. The increase in coefficient of restitution correlates to the formation of a percolation pathway of ZnO within the anode of the cell, and that the coefficient of restitution saturates at a value of 0.63 ± .05 at 50% state if charge when the anode has densified intomore » porous ZnO solid. Of note is the sensitivity of coefficient of restitution to the amount of ZnO formation that rivals the sensitivity on in situ energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction spectroscopy.« less

  4. Thermodynamic framework for estimating the efficiencies of alkaline batteries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pound, B.; Sundararaj, B.; Singh, R.P.; Macdonald, D.D.

    1983-10-01

    A thermodynamic framework was developed to evaluate the efficiencies of alkaline battery systems for electrolyte concentrations from 1 to 8 mol kg/sup -1/ and over the temperature range -10 to 120/sup 0/C. An analysis of the thermodynamic properties of concentrated LiOH, NaOH, and KOH solutions was carried out to provide data for the activity of water, the activity coefficient of the hydroxide ion, and the pH of the electrolyte. Potential-pH relations were derived for various equilibrium phenomena for the metals Li, Al, Fe, Ni, and Zn in aqueous solutions, and using the thermodynamic data for the alkali metal hydroxides, equilibrium potentials were computed as a function of composition and temperature. These data have then been used to calculate reversible cell potentials for a number of battery systems, assuming a knowledge of the cell reactions. The calculated reversible cell voltages are then compared with observed cell voltages to compute voltage efficiencies for various alkaline batteries. The cell voltages varied with concentration of alkali metal hydroxide and temperature in a manner depending on the particular battery. In the case of the Al/air, Zn/air, and Zn/Ni systems, the cell voltage increased with concentration but decreased with an increase in temperature. In contrast, the Li/air and, to a lesser extent, the Fe/air cells exhibited the opposite behavior, while the cell potentials of the Fe/Ni system decrease with an increase in either concentration or temperature. The potential of the H/sub 2//Ni cell, however, is independent of concentration but does decrease with temperature. The efficiencies of H/sub 2//Ni, Fe/Ni, and Zn/Ni test cells were found to be between 90 to 100%, implying that, at least at open circuit, there is little, if any, contribution from parasitic redox couples to the cell potentials for these systems. The efficiency of an Fe/air test cell was relatively low (72%), but this may be determined by the nature of the redox couple at the

  5. Development of flexible secondary alkaline battery with carbon nanotube enhanced electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiqian; Mitra, Somenath

    2014-11-01

    We present the development of flexible secondary alkaline battery with rechargeability similar to that of conventional secondary alkaline batteries. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were added to both electrodes to reduce internal resistance, and a cathode containing carbon black and purified MWCNTs was found to be most effective. A polyvinyl alcohol-poly (acrylic acid) copolymer separator served the dual functions of electrolyte storage and enhancing flexibility. Additives to the anode and cathode were effective in reducing capacity fades and improving rechargeability.

  6. Temperature limitation of primary and secondary alkaline battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKubre, M. C. H.

    1983-05-01

    The results of studies of the mechanisms of dissolution and passivation of Fe and Zn electrodes in concentrated KOH, as these processes effect the charge/discharge characteristics of alkaline batteries are discussed. The experimental techniques principally employed were: potentiodynamic sweep voltammetry and coulometry, rotating disk and rotating ring disk electrode studies under constant velocity and constant acceleration rotation conditions, and AC impedance studies. The results obtained on Fe electrodes enabled a detailed mechanism for the formation and discharge of an oxide film on iron via a number of dissolved intermediate species. The mechanisms are different at high and low temperatures, but at all temperatures pathways via dissolved phase intermediates result in substantial dissolution of metal and oxide. At 750 C dissolution processes account for more than 7.5% of the total charge stored per cycle. AC impedance measurements were used to characterize the nature of the oxide film, and to determine an effective exchange current density for the Fe/Fe(2) Redox process.

  7. Alkaline composite PEO-PVA-glass-fibre-mat polymer electrolyte for Zn-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun-Chen; Lin, Sheng-Jen

    An alkaline composite PEO-PVA-glass-fibre-mat polymer electrolyte with high ionic conductivity (10 -2 S cm -1) at room temperature has been prepared and applied to solid-state primary Zn-air batteries. The electrolyte shows excellent mechanical strength. The electrochemical characteristics of the batteries were experimentally investigated by means of ac impedance spectroscopy and galvanostatic discharge. The results indicate that the PEO-PVA-glass-fibre-mat composite polymer electrolyte is a promising candidate for application in alkaline primary Zn-air batteries.

  8. Battery cell feedthrough apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1995-01-01

    A compact, hermetic feedthrough apparatus comprising interfitting sleeve portions constructed of chemically-stable materials to permit unique battery designs and increase battery life and performance.

  9. Corrosion and anodic behaviour of zinc and its ternary alloys in alkaline battery electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh Kannan, A. R.; Muralidharan, S.; Sarangapani, K. B.; Balaramachandran, V.; Kapali, V.

    Several attempts are being made to avoid the use of mercury-bearing zinc/zinc alloys as anodes in alkaline power sources. The work presented here suggests the possible use of some ternary alloys based on zinc of purity 99.9 to 99.95 wt.% as anodes in 10 M NaOH solution with sodium citrate, sodium stannate and calcium oxide as complexing agents and inhibitors. The corrosion of zinc and its alloys in 10 M NaOH solution is under cathodic control; in other alkaline electrolytes, it is under anodic control. Anode efficiency of up to 99.0% is achieved. The corrosion rates of zinc and its alloys are found to be comparable with those of mercury-bearing zinc in the chosen electrolytes. It is concluded that both dry cells and Zn-air batteries can be constructed with the above anodes and alkaline electrolytes. Thus, the presence of mercury, either in the anode or in the electrolyte, is avoided.

  10. Electrodeposition of preferentially oriented zinc for flow-assisted alkaline batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, D; Wei, X; Steingart, DA; Banerjee, S

    2014-06-15

    Preferred orientation of zinc deposits during charging is shown to significantly improve performance and cycle life in flow-assisted alkaline zinc batteries, which has not been demonstrated earlier. The preferred orientation of zinc deposits was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Compact zinc is found to have (11 (2) over bar2) preferred orientation on brass, which contributes to similar to 60% of the texture. The effect of charging current and zincate concentration on morphology was investigated in a rotating hull cell and correlated with anodic efficiency. Compact zinc deposits are found to have a fine-grained, bright finish and the highest anodic efficiency. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) proves that compact zinc corresponds to the minimum in the half-cell resistance. Morphological control using compact zinc could be accomplished using innovations such as pulse charging or enhanced mass-transfer to improve anode performance without affecting the cathode. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Rechargeability of alkaline Zn-MnO2 batteries: Experimental and mathematical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingale, Nilesh D.

    Batteries based on manganese dioxide (MnO2) cathodes are good candidates for grid-scale electrical energy storage, as MnO2 is low-cost, relatively energy dense, safe, water-compatible, and non-toxic. Alkaline Zn-MnO2 cells, if cycled at reduced depth of discharge (DOD), have been found to achieve substantial cycle life with battery costs projected to be in the range of $100 to 150/kWh (delivered). Commercialization of rechargeable Zn-MnO2 batteries has in the past been hampered due to poor cycle life. In view of this, the work reported here focuses on the long-term rechargeability of prismatic MnO2 cathodes at reduced DOD when exposed to the effects of Zn anodes and with no additives or specialty materials. Over 3000 cycles is shown to be obtainable at 10% DOD with energy efficiency >80%. The causes of capacity fade during long-term cycling are also investigated and appear to be mainly due to the formation of irreversible manganese oxides in the cathode. Analysis of the data indicates that capacity loss is rapid in the first 250 cycles, followed by a regime of stability that can last for thousands of cycles. A model has been developed that captures the behavior of the cells investigated using measured state of charge (SOC) data as input. An approximate economic analysis is also presented to evaluate the economic viability of Zn-MnO2 batteries based on the experiments reported here. The potential of Zn-MnO2 batteries as starting-lighting-ignition (SLI) batteries was also investigated. The impedance contributing parameters at high discharge rates were identified and their effect at high currents was investigated. It was found that prismatic configuration; optimized electrode thickness, electrolyte concentration and electrode size help to achieve high currents for short period of time. In this work, the potential of Zn-MnO 2 batteries for energy as well as power supply has been successfully investigated.

  12. Battery Cell Balancing System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Francis J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A battery cell balancing system is operable to utilize a relatively small number of transformers interconnected with a battery having a plurality of battery cells to selectively charge the battery cells. Windings of the transformers are simultaneously driven with a plurality of waveforms whereupon selected battery cells or groups of cells are selected and charged. A transformer drive circuit is operable to selectively vary the waveforms to thereby vary a weighted voltage associated with each of the battery cells.

  13. Environmental technology verification report: Rechargeable alkaline household battery system, Rayovac Corporation Renewal[trademark

    SciTech Connect

    Escarda, T.; Lewis, N.

    1999-03-01

    The EPA's ETV Program, in partnership with recognized testing organizations, objectively and systematically documents the performance of commercial ready technologies. Together, with the full participation of the technology developer, they develop plans, conduct tests, collect and analyze data, and report findings. Rayovac redesigned their alkaline household batteries so that they could be recharged. The additional charge cycles extend battery life by increasing the energy capacity, which benefits the environment by generating less waste. The design changes include increased void space, and addition of lead and silver. The Rayovac Renewal[trademark] Rechargeable Alkaline Battery System consists of rechargable alkaline zinc-manganese dioxide 1.5 volt batteries, in sizes AAA, AA, C, and D, and a recharging device for the batteries. Typical consumer applications of household batteries include toys and games, portable audio equipment, cameras, sporting goods equipment, test equipment, personal care products, hearing aids, portable data terminals, sub-notebook computers and personal digital assistants, watches, flashlights, lanterns, and cellular phones. Such applications typically require continuous currents of up to 400 milliamperes (mA), which is within the range of the Renewal[trademark] batteries, sized AA, C, and D. Size AAA can supply up to 150 mA continuous current, which is sufficient for applications such as clocks.

  14. Environmental technology verification report: Rechargeable alkaline household battery system, Rayovac Corporation Renewal{trademark}

    SciTech Connect

    Escarda, T.; Lewis, N.

    1999-03-01

    The EPA`s ETV Program, in partnership with recognized testing organizations, objectively and systematically documents the performance of commercial ready technologies. Together, with the full participation of the technology developer, they develop plans, conduct tests, collect and analyze data, and report findings. Rayovac redesigned their alkaline household batteries so that they could be recharged. The additional charge cycles extend battery life by increasing the energy capacity, which benefits the environment by generating less waste. The design changes include increased void space, and addition of lead and silver. The Rayovac Renewal{trademark} Rechargeable Alkaline Battery System consists of rechargable alkaline zinc-manganese dioxide 1.5 volt batteries, in sizes AAA, AA, C, and D, and a recharging device for the batteries. Typical consumer applications of household batteries include toys and games, portable audio equipment, cameras, sporting goods equipment, test equipment, personal care products, hearing aids, portable data terminals, sub-notebook computers and personal digital assistants, watches, flashlights, lanterns, and cellular phones. Such applications typically require continuous currents of up to 400 milliamperes (mA), which is within the range of the Renewal{trademark} batteries, sized AA, C, and D. Size AAA can supply up to 150 mA continuous current, which is sufficient for applications such as clocks.

  15. Battery cell feedthrough apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1995-03-14

    A compact, hermetic feedthrough apparatus is described comprising interfitting sleeve portions constructed of chemically-stable materials to permit unique battery designs and increase battery life and performance. 8 figs.

  16. Test Procedures for Characterizing, Evaluating, and Managing Separator Materials used in Secondary Alkaline Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guasp, Edwin; Manzo, Michelle A.

    1997-01-01

    Secondary alkaline batteries, such as nickel-cadmium and silver-zinc, are commonly used for aerospace applications. The uniform evaluation and comparison of separator properties for these systems is dependent upon the measurement techniques. This manual presents a series of standard test procedures that can be used to evaluate, compare, and select separator materials for use in alkaline batteries. Detailed test procedures evaluating the following characteristics are included in this manual: physical measurements of thickness and area weight, dimensional stability measurements, electrolyte retention, resistivity, permeability as measured via bubble pressure, surface evaluation via SEM, chemical stability, and tensile strength.

  17. Recovery of pure ZnO nanoparticles from spent Zn-MnO₂ alkaline batteries.

    PubMed

    Deep, Akash; Kumar, Kamal; Kumar, Parveen; Kumar, Pawan; Sharma, Amit L; Gupta, Bina; Bharadwaj, Lalit M

    2011-12-15

    The recovery of pure ZnO (zinc oxide) nanoparticles from spent Zn-Mn dry alkaline batteries is reported. Spent batteries were dismantled to separate the contained valuable metals of the cell electrodes in the form of black powder. Treatment of this black powder with 5 mol L(-1) HCl produced leach liquor, primarily containing 2.90 g L(-1) Zn and 2.02 g L(-1) Mn. Selective and quantitative liquid-liquid extraction of Zn(II) was then carried out in three counter current steps by using Cyanex 923 (0.10 mol L(-1) in n-hexane). Zn(II) distributed in the organic phase as complex ZnCl(2)·2R (R = Cyanex 923 molecule). The metal loaded organic phase was subjected to combust at 600 °C to yield pure ZnO nanoparticles (40-50 nm). Important characteristics of the synthesized nanoparticles were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), and atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  18. Fabrication of high-performance flexible alkaline batteries by implementing multiwalled carbon nanotubes and copolymer separator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqian; Wu, Zheqiong; Bramnik, Natalia; Mitra, Somenath

    2014-02-12

    A flexible alkaline battery with multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) enhanced composite electrodes and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) copolymer separator has been developed. Purified MWCNTs appear to be the most effective conductive additive, while the flexible copolymer separator not only enhances flexibility but also serves as electrolyte storage. PMID:24510667

  19. Alkaline electrochemical cells and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    Equilibrated cellulose ether membranes of increased electrolytic conductivity for use as separators in concentrated alkaline electrochemical cells are investigated. The method of making such membranes by equilibration to the degree desired in an aqueous alkali solution mantained at a temperature below about 10 C is described.

  20. Negative Electrode For An Alkaline Cell

    DOEpatents

    Coco, Isabelle; Cocciantelli, Jean-Michel; Villenave, Jean-Jacques

    1998-07-14

    The present invention concerns a negative electrode for an alkaline cell, comprising a current collector supporting a paste containing an electrochemically active material and a binder, characterized in that said binder is a polymer containing hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, said polymer being selected from an acrylic homopolymer, copolymer and terpolymer, an unsaturated organic acid copolymer and an unsaturated acid anhydride copolymer.

  1. A facile chemical route for recovery of high quality zinc oxide nanoparticles from spent alkaline batteries.

    PubMed

    Deep, Akash; Sharma, Amit L; Mohanta, Girish C; Kumar, Parveen; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    Recycling of spent domestic batteries has gained a great environmental significance. In the present research, we propose a new and simple technique for the recovery of high-purity zinc oxide nanoparticles from the electrode waste of spent alkaline Zn-MnO2 batteries. The electrode material was collected by the manual dismantling and mixed with 5M HCl for reaction with a phosphine oxide reagent Cyanex 923® at 250°C for 30min. The desired ZnO nanoparticles were restored from the Zn-Cyanex 923 complex through an ethanolic precipitation step. The recovered particle product with about 5nm diameter exhibited fluorescent properties (emission peak at 400nm) when excited by UV radiation (excitation energy of 300nm). Thus, the proposed technique offered a simple and efficient route for recovering high purity ZnO nanoparticles from spent alkaline batteries. PMID:26851168

  2. A facile chemical route for recovery of high quality zinc oxide nanoparticles from spent alkaline batteries.

    PubMed

    Deep, Akash; Sharma, Amit L; Mohanta, Girish C; Kumar, Parveen; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    Recycling of spent domestic batteries has gained a great environmental significance. In the present research, we propose a new and simple technique for the recovery of high-purity zinc oxide nanoparticles from the electrode waste of spent alkaline Zn-MnO2 batteries. The electrode material was collected by the manual dismantling and mixed with 5M HCl for reaction with a phosphine oxide reagent Cyanex 923® at 250°C for 30min. The desired ZnO nanoparticles were restored from the Zn-Cyanex 923 complex through an ethanolic precipitation step. The recovered particle product with about 5nm diameter exhibited fluorescent properties (emission peak at 400nm) when excited by UV radiation (excitation energy of 300nm). Thus, the proposed technique offered a simple and efficient route for recovering high purity ZnO nanoparticles from spent alkaline batteries.

  3. Improved alkaline hydrogen/air fuel cells for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J; Kissel, G; Kordesch, K V; Kulesa, F; Taylor, E J; Gannon, E; Srinivasan, S

    1980-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the last few years on improvement of alkaline air electrodes for air depolarized chlor-alkali cells. Some of these electrodes from Union Carbide Corporation have been evaluated at Brookhaven National Laboratory in alkaline hydrogen/air fuel cells. In initial tests with 289 cm/sup 2/ electrodes, power densities of 100 mW/cm/sup 2/ were obtained at 0.65 V. This compares with power densities of 27 mW/cm/sup 2/ obtained by Kordesch in his vehicle fuel cell in the late sixties. Further improvements in the air electrode flow field yielded power densities of 126 mW/cm/sup 2/ at 0.65 V at an operating temperature of 70/sup 0/C. At 30/sup 0/C, nearly 60% of this power could be obtained at 0.65 V. The 289 cm/sup 2/ cells were units in a 16-cell 0.5 kW module. This module yielded similar power densities, and its power/weight and power/volume are sufficiently attractive for it to be considered as a building block for a fuel cell power plant in a fuel cell/battery hybrid vehicle.

  4. Laboratory study on the behaviour of spent AA household alkaline batteries in incineration.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Manuel F; Xará, Susana M; Delgado, Julanda; Costa, Carlos A

    2009-01-01

    The quantitative evaluation of emissions from incineration is essential when Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies consider this process as an end-of-life solution for some wastes. Thus, the objective of this work is to quantify the main gaseous emissions produced when spent AA alkaline batteries are incinerated. With this aim, batteries were kept for 1h at 1273K in a refractory steel tube hold in a horizontal electric furnace with temperature control. At one end of the refractory steel tube, a constant air flow input assures the presence of oxygen in the atmosphere and guides the gaseous emissions to a filter system followed by a set of two bubbler flasks having an aqueous solution of 10% (v/v) nitric acid. After each set of experiments, sulphur, chlorides and metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Tl and Zn) were analyzed in both the solutions obtained from the steel tube washing and from the bubblers. Sulphur, chlorides and metals were quantified, respectively, using barium sulfate gravimetry, the Volhard method and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The emissions of zinc, the most emitted metal, represent about 6.5% of the zinc content in the batteries. Emissions of manganese (whose oxide is the main component of the cathode) and iron (from the cathode collector) are negligible when compared with their amount in AA alkaline batteries. Mercury is the metal with higher volatility in the composition of the batteries and was collected even in the second bubbler flask. The amount of chlorides collected corresponds to about 36% of the chlorine in the battery sleeve that is made from PVC. A considerable part of the HCl formed in PVC plastic sleeve incineration is neutralized with KOH, zinc and manganese oxides and, thus, it is not totally released in the gas. Some of the emissions are predictable through a thermodynamic data analysis at temperatures in the range of 1200-1300K taking into account the composition of the batteries. This analysis was done

  5. Laboratory study on the behaviour of spent AA household alkaline batteries in incineration

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, Manuel F. Xara, Susana M.; Delgado, Julanda; Costa, Carlos A.

    2009-01-15

    The quantitative evaluation of emissions from incineration is essential when Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies consider this process as an end-of-life solution for some wastes. Thus, the objective of this work is to quantify the main gaseous emissions produced when spent AA alkaline batteries are incinerated. With this aim, batteries were kept for 1 h at 1273 K in a refractory steel tube hold in a horizontal electric furnace with temperature control. At one end of the refractory steel tube, a constant air flow input assures the presence of oxygen in the atmosphere and guides the gaseous emissions to a filter system followed by a set of two bubbler flasks having an aqueous solution of 10% (v/v) nitric acid. After each set of experiments, sulphur, chlorides and metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Tl and Zn) were analyzed in both the solutions obtained from the steel tube washing and from the bubblers. Sulphur, chlorides and metals were quantified, respectively, using barium sulfate gravimetry, the Volhard method and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The emissions of zinc, the most emitted metal, represent about 6.5% of the zinc content in the batteries. Emissions of manganese (whose oxide is the main component of the cathode) and iron (from the cathode collector) are negligible when compared with their amount in AA alkaline batteries. Mercury is the metal with higher volatility in the composition of the batteries and was collected even in the second bubbler flask. The amount of chlorides collected corresponds to about 36% of the chlorine in the battery sleeve that is made from PVC. A considerable part of the HCl formed in PVC plastic sleeve incineration is neutralized with KOH, zinc and manganese oxides and, thus, it is not totally released in the gas. Some of the emissions are predictable through a thermodynamic data analysis at temperatures in the range of 1200-1300 K taking into account the composition of the batteries. This analysis was done

  6. Laboratory study on the behaviour of spent AA household alkaline batteries in incineration.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Manuel F; Xará, Susana M; Delgado, Julanda; Costa, Carlos A

    2009-01-01

    The quantitative evaluation of emissions from incineration is essential when Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies consider this process as an end-of-life solution for some wastes. Thus, the objective of this work is to quantify the main gaseous emissions produced when spent AA alkaline batteries are incinerated. With this aim, batteries were kept for 1h at 1273K in a refractory steel tube hold in a horizontal electric furnace with temperature control. At one end of the refractory steel tube, a constant air flow input assures the presence of oxygen in the atmosphere and guides the gaseous emissions to a filter system followed by a set of two bubbler flasks having an aqueous solution of 10% (v/v) nitric acid. After each set of experiments, sulphur, chlorides and metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Tl and Zn) were analyzed in both the solutions obtained from the steel tube washing and from the bubblers. Sulphur, chlorides and metals were quantified, respectively, using barium sulfate gravimetry, the Volhard method and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The emissions of zinc, the most emitted metal, represent about 6.5% of the zinc content in the batteries. Emissions of manganese (whose oxide is the main component of the cathode) and iron (from the cathode collector) are negligible when compared with their amount in AA alkaline batteries. Mercury is the metal with higher volatility in the composition of the batteries and was collected even in the second bubbler flask. The amount of chlorides collected corresponds to about 36% of the chlorine in the battery sleeve that is made from PVC. A considerable part of the HCl formed in PVC plastic sleeve incineration is neutralized with KOH, zinc and manganese oxides and, thus, it is not totally released in the gas. Some of the emissions are predictable through a thermodynamic data analysis at temperatures in the range of 1200-1300K taking into account the composition of the batteries. This analysis was done

  7. Design Principles for Nickel/Hydrogen Cells and Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, Lawrence H.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, Olga D.

    1987-01-01

    Individual-pressure-vessel (IPV) nickel/hydrogen cells and bipolar batteries developed for use as energy-storage subsystems for satelite applications. Design principles applied draw upon extensive background in separator technology, alkaline-fuel-cell technology and several alkaline-cell technology areas. Principals are rather straightforward applications of capillary-force formalisms, coupled with slowly developing data base resulting from careful post-test analyses. Based on preconceived assumptions relative to how devices work and how to be designed so they display longer cycle lives at deep discharge.

  8. Intrinsic borohydride fuel cell/battery hybrid power sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jian; Fang, Bin; Wang, Chunsheng; Currie, Kenneth

    The electrochemical oxidation behaviors of NaBH 4 on Zn, Zn-MH, and MH (metal-hydride) electrodes were investigated, and an intrinsic direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC)/battery hybrid power source using MH (or Zn-MH) as the anode and MnO 2 as the cathode was tested. Borohydride cannot be effectively oxidized on Zn electrodes at the Zn oxidation potential because of the poor electrocatalytic ability of Zn for borohydride oxidation and the high overpotential, even though borohydride has the same oxidation potential of Zn in an alkaline solution. The borohydride can be electrochemically oxidized on Ni and MH electrodes through a 4e reaction at a high overpotential. Simply adding borohydride into an alkaline electrolyte of a Zn/air or MH/air battery can greatly increase the capacity, while an intrinsic DBFC/MH(or Zn)-MnO 2 battery can deliver a higher peak power than regular DBFCs.

  9. Development of an alkaline fuel cell subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A two task program was initiated to develop advanced fuel cell components which could be assembled into an alkaline power section for the Space Station Prototype (SSP) fuel cell subsystem. The first task was to establish a preliminary SSP power section design to be representative of the 200 cell Space Station power section. The second task was to conduct tooling and fabrication trials and fabrication of selected cell stack components. A lightweight, reliable cell stack design suitable for the SSP regenerative fuel cell power plant was completed. The design meets NASA's preliminary requirements for future multikilowatt Space Station missions. Cell stack component fabrication and tooling trials demonstrated cell components of the SSP stack design of the 1.0 sq ft area can be manufactured using techniques and methods previously evaluated and developed.

  10. Design principles for nickel hydrogen cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    Nickel hydrogen cells, and more recently, bipolar batteries have been built by a variety of organizations. The design principles that have been used by the technology group at the Lewis Research Center draw upon their extensive background in separator technology, alkaline fuel cell technology, and several alkaline cell technology areas. These design principles have been incorporated into both the more contemporary individual pressure vessel (IPV) designs that were pioneered by other groups, as well as the more recent bipolar battery designs using active cooling that are being developed at LeRC and their contractors. These principles are rather straightforward applications of capillary force formalisms, coupled with the slowly developing data base resulting from careful post test analyses. The objective of this overall effort is directed towards the low Earth orbit (LEO) application where the cycle life requirements are much more severe than the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) application. Nickel hydrogen cells have already been successfully flown in an increasing number of GEO missions.

  11. Direct Solar Charging of an Organic-Inorganic, Stable, and Aqueous Alkaline Redox Flow Battery with a Hematite Photoanode.

    PubMed

    Wedege, Kristina; Azevedo, João; Khataee, Amirreza; Bentien, Anders; Mendes, Adélio

    2016-06-13

    The intermittent nature of the sunlight and its increasing contribution to electricity generation is fostering the energy storage research. Direct solar charging of an auspicious type of redox flow battery could make solar energy directly and efficiently dispatchable. The first solar aqueous alkaline redox flow battery using low cost and environmentally safe materials is demonstrated. The electrolytes consist of the redox couples ferrocyanide and anthraquinone-2,7-disulphonate in sodium hydroxide solution, yielding a standard cell potential of 0.74 V. Photovoltage enhancement strategies are demonstrated for the ferrocyanide-hematite junction by employing an annealing treatment and growing a layer of a conductive polyaniline polymer on the electrode surface, which decreases electron-hole recombination. PMID:27151516

  12. Direct Solar Charging of an Organic–Inorganic, Stable, and Aqueous Alkaline Redox Flow Battery with a Hematite Photoanode

    PubMed Central

    Wedege, Kristina; Azevedo, João; Khataee, Amirreza

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The intermittent nature of the sunlight and its increasing contribution to electricity generation is fostering the energy storage research. Direct solar charging of an auspicious type of redox flow battery could make solar energy directly and efficiently dispatchable. The first solar aqueous alkaline redox flow battery using low cost and environmentally safe materials is demonstrated. The electrolytes consist of the redox couples ferrocyanide and anthraquinone‐2,7‐disulphonate in sodium hydroxide solution, yielding a standard cell potential of 0.74 V. Photovoltage enhancement strategies are demonstrated for the ferrocyanide‐hematite junction by employing an annealing treatment and growing a layer of a conductive polyaniline polymer on the electrode surface, which decreases electron–hole recombination. PMID:27151516

  13. Direct Solar Charging of an Organic-Inorganic, Stable, and Aqueous Alkaline Redox Flow Battery with a Hematite Photoanode.

    PubMed

    Wedege, Kristina; Azevedo, João; Khataee, Amirreza; Bentien, Anders; Mendes, Adélio

    2016-06-13

    The intermittent nature of the sunlight and its increasing contribution to electricity generation is fostering the energy storage research. Direct solar charging of an auspicious type of redox flow battery could make solar energy directly and efficiently dispatchable. The first solar aqueous alkaline redox flow battery using low cost and environmentally safe materials is demonstrated. The electrolytes consist of the redox couples ferrocyanide and anthraquinone-2,7-disulphonate in sodium hydroxide solution, yielding a standard cell potential of 0.74 V. Photovoltage enhancement strategies are demonstrated for the ferrocyanide-hematite junction by employing an annealing treatment and growing a layer of a conductive polyaniline polymer on the electrode surface, which decreases electron-hole recombination.

  14. An unusual electrical burn caused by alkaline batteries.

    PubMed

    Roan, Tyng-Luen; Yeong, Eng-Kean; Tang, Yueh-Bih

    2015-02-01

    Electrical burns caused by low-voltage batteries are rarely reported. We recently encountered a male patient who suffered from a superficial second-degree burn over his left elbow and back. The total body surface area of the burn was estimated to be 6%. After interviewing the patient, the cause was suspected to be related to the explosion of a music player on the left-side of his waist, carried on his belt while he was painting a bathroom wall. Elevated creatine kinase levels and hematuria indicated rhabdomyolysis and suggested an electrical burn. Initial treatment was done in the burn intensive care unit with fluid challenge and wound care. The creatine kinase level decreased gradually and the hematuria was gone after 4 days in the intensive care unit. He was then transferred to the general ward for further wound management and discharged from our burn center after a total of 11 days without surgical intervention. PMID:25678181

  15. Factors influence flexibility resistivity and zinc dendrite penetration rate of inorganic separators for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Developmental work resulted in a formulation which can improve the flexibility of the inorganic-organic-type separator for silver-zinc and nickel-zinc alkaline batteries. The effects of various fillers and reactive organic additives on separator volume resistivity are described. The effects of various inert fillers on the zinc dendrite penetration rate of the separator are shown. Conclusions regarding the operating mechanism of the separator are presented.

  16. Status of ELENCO's alkaline fuel cell technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Broeck, H.; van Bogaert, G.; Vennekens, G.; Vermeeren, L.; Vlasselaer, F.

    Low-temperature alkaline fuel cells which can be operated with air, oxygen-enriched air, and pure oxygen are discussed. Aspects of the electrochemical stack development, including manufacturing techniques, performance levels, and reactant purity, are first reviewed. Design, engineering, and operating aspects of the 1.5 kW, 15 kW, and 50 kW prototype fuel cell systems are considered. An ejector device based on the venturi principle is used to improve the H2 gas circulation and to reduce the H2 losses. Various industrial and aerospace applications of the modules are discussed.

  17. Electrochemical behaviour of addition agents impregnated in cadmium hydroxide electrodes for alkaline batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaignan, G. Paruthimal; Umaprakatheeswaran, C.; Muralidharan, B.; Gopalan, A.; Vasudevan, T.

    The development of electrode additives for the cadmium electrode of the nickel/cadmium battery is aimed mainly at increasing the discharge capacity and minimizing self-discharge. The dissolution and passivation of porous cadmium electrodes containing hydroxide and the relative stability of oxides are of importance in understanding the reversible behaviour of the cadmium electrode. Under standard conditions, the equilibrium potential of Cd(OH) 2/Cd lies above the hydrogen-evolution reaction when the cell is not in use, and the active material of the cadmium electrode undergoes self-reductive dissolution (i.e., loss of active material) accompanied by oxygen evolution. The triangular potential sweep voltammetric technique is used to determine the reversibility of the cadmium electrode in alkaline solution. The role of additives such as Ni(NO 3) 2 (0.25-0.1 M) and FeSO 4 (0.1-0.4 M), TiO 2 (0.01-0.03 M) and Na 2S (0.01-0.03 M) in Cd(NO 3) 2 on the reversibility of the electrode are discussed. The effect of discharge rate on the cyclic efficiency is also investigated. Self-discharge currents are determined by potentiostatic polarization method.

  18. 49 CFR 173.185 - Lithium cells and batteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lithium cells and batteries. 173.185 Section 173... Class 7 § 173.185 Lithium cells and batteries. (a) Cells and batteries. A lithium cell or battery, including a lithium polymer cell or battery and a lithium-ion cell or battery, must conform to all of...

  19. 49 CFR 173.185 - Lithium cells and batteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lithium cells and batteries. 173.185 Section 173... Class 7 § 173.185 Lithium cells and batteries. (a) Cells and batteries. A lithium cell or battery, including a lithium polymer cell or battery and a lithium-ion cell or battery, must conform to all of...

  20. 49 CFR 173.185 - Lithium cells and batteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lithium cells and batteries. 173.185 Section 173... Class 7 § 173.185 Lithium cells and batteries. (a) Cells and batteries. A lithium cell or battery, including a lithium polymer cell or battery and a lithium-ion cell or battery, must conform to all of...

  1. 49 CFR 173.185 - Lithium cells and batteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lithium cells and batteries. 173.185 Section 173... Class 7 § 173.185 Lithium cells and batteries. (a) Cells and batteries. A lithium cell or battery, including a lithium polymer cell or battery and a lithium-ion cell or battery, must conform to all of...

  2. Bipolar concept for alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülzow, E.; Schulze, M.; Gerke, U.

    Alkaline fuel cell stacks are mostly build in monopolar configuration of the cells. At the German Aerospace Center a bipolar plate for alkaline fuel cells has been developed and characterized in a short stack. As a consequence of the sealing concept of the stack two different bipolar plate types are needed. Therefore, the number of cells can only vary by 2 if the end plates are not changed. The single cell as well as the short stack is characterized by various methods, e.g. V- i characteristics, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). As a result of the specific electrodes used the differential pressure between electrolyte and gas phase is limited to a few 10 mbar. At higher differential pressures gas crossover through the electrodes and electrolyte takes place with the result that the electrolyte may flood the flow fields. In contrast to PEFC, electrode supported by a metal net as conductor and mechanical support can be used in the AFC. Therefore, the structure of the flow field can be quite simple, this means flow fields with channels with large width and depth are possible. Consequently, the pressure loss over the flow field is very low. The single cell as well as the short stack was operated at overpressures of a few 10 mbar. The AFC can be operated without a compression but with a simple fan. The developed cell design is also used for the characterization of the fuel cell components like electrodes and diaphragms. The test facility for the single cell and for the stack is fully computer controlled and allows the variation of the operation conditions, e.g. flow of the electrolyte, hydrogen flow, oxygen or air flow and cell temperature.

  3. Alkaline battery containing a separator of a cross-linked copolymer of vinyl alcohol and unsaturated carboxylic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, L. C.; Philipp, W. H.; Sheibley, D. W.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A battery separator for an alkaline battery is described. The separator comprises a cross linked copolymer of vinyl alcohol units and unsaturated carboxylic acid units. The cross linked copolymer is insoluble in water, has excellent zincate diffusion and oxygen gas barrier properties and a low electrical resistivity. Cross linking with a polyaldehyde cross linking agent is preferred.

  4. Alkaline polymer electrolyte membranes for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Jie; Qiao, Jinli; Baker, Ryan; Zhang, Jiujun

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we examine the most recent progress and research trends in the area of alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) development in terms of material selection, synthesis, characterization, and theoretical approach, as well as their fabrication into alkaline PEM-based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) and the corresponding performance/durability in alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Respective advantages and challenges are also reviewed. To overcome challenges hindering alkaline PEM technology advancement and commercialization, several research directions are then proposed.

  5. Propagation testing multi-cell batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Orendorff, Christopher J.; Lamb, Joshua; Steele, Leigh Anna Marie; Spangler, Scott Wilmer

    2014-10-01

    Propagation of single point or single cell failures in multi-cell batteries is a significant concern as batteries increase in scale for a variety of civilian and military applications. This report describes the procedure for testing failure propagation along with some representative test results to highlight the potential outcomes for different battery types and designs.

  6. Process for the recycling of alkaline and zinc-carbon spent batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferella, Francesco; De Michelis, Ida; Vegliò, Francesco

    In this paper a recycling process for the recovery of zinc and manganese from spent alkaline and zinc-carbon batteries is proposed. Laboratory tests are performed to obtain a purified pregnant solution from which metallic zinc (purity 99.6%) can be recovered by electrolysis; manganese is recovered as a mixture of oxides by roasting of solid residue coming from the leaching stage. Nearly 99% of zinc and 20% of manganese are extracted after 3 h, at 80 °C with 10% w/v pulp density and 1.5 M sulphuric acid concentration. The leach liquor is purified by a selective precipitation of iron, whereas metallic impurities, such as copper, nickel and cadmium are removed by cementation with zinc powder. The solid residue of leaching is roasted for 30 min at 900 °C, removing graphite completely and obtaining a mixture of Mn 3O 4 and Mn 2O 3 with 70% grade of Mn. After that a technical-economic assessment is carried out for a recycling plant with a feed capacity of 5000 t y -1 of only alkaline and zinc-carbon batteries. This analysis shows the economic feasibility of that plant, supposing a battery price surcharge of 0.5 € kg -1, with a return on investment of 34.5%, gross margin of 35.8% and around 3 years payback time.

  7. Life cycle assessment of three different management options for spent alkaline batteries.

    PubMed

    Xará, Susana; Almeida, Manuel Fonseca; Costa, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    The potential environmental impact of Landfilling, Incineration and Recycling of spent household alkaline batteries collected in continental Portugal was compared using LCA methodology and the Recipe Impact Assessment method. Major contributors and improvement opportunities for each system were identified and scenarios for 2012 and 2016 legislation targets were evaluated. For 13 out of the 18 impact categories, the Recycling system is the worst alternative, Incineration is the worst option for 4 and Landfill is the worst option only for one impact category. However if additionally in each system the recovery of materials and energy is taken into account there is a noticeable advantage of the Recycling system for all the impact categories. The environmental profiles for 2012 and 2016 scenarios (25% and 45% recycling rates, respectively) show the dominance of the Recycling system for most of the impact categories. Based on the results of this study, it is questioned whether there are environmental benefits of recycling abroad the household alkaline batteries collected in continental Portugal and, since the low environmental performance of the Recycling system is particularly due to the international transport of the batteries to the recycling plant, is foreseen that a recycling facility located in Portugal, could bring a positive contribution to the environmental impact of the legislation compliance. PMID:26119009

  8. Life cycle assessment of three different management options for spent alkaline batteries.

    PubMed

    Xará, Susana; Almeida, Manuel Fonseca; Costa, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    The potential environmental impact of Landfilling, Incineration and Recycling of spent household alkaline batteries collected in continental Portugal was compared using LCA methodology and the Recipe Impact Assessment method. Major contributors and improvement opportunities for each system were identified and scenarios for 2012 and 2016 legislation targets were evaluated. For 13 out of the 18 impact categories, the Recycling system is the worst alternative, Incineration is the worst option for 4 and Landfill is the worst option only for one impact category. However if additionally in each system the recovery of materials and energy is taken into account there is a noticeable advantage of the Recycling system for all the impact categories. The environmental profiles for 2012 and 2016 scenarios (25% and 45% recycling rates, respectively) show the dominance of the Recycling system for most of the impact categories. Based on the results of this study, it is questioned whether there are environmental benefits of recycling abroad the household alkaline batteries collected in continental Portugal and, since the low environmental performance of the Recycling system is particularly due to the international transport of the batteries to the recycling plant, is foreseen that a recycling facility located in Portugal, could bring a positive contribution to the environmental impact of the legislation compliance.

  9. High voltage battery cell scanner development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepisto, J. W.; Decker, D. K.; Graves, J.

    1983-01-01

    Battery cell voltage scanners have been previously used in low voltage spacecraft applications. In connection with future missions involving an employment of high-power high voltage power subsystems and/or autonomous power subsystem management for unattended operation, it will be necessary to utilize battery cell voltage scanners to provide battery cell voltage information for early detection of impending battery cell degradation/failures. In preparation for such missions, a novel battery cell voltage scanner design has been developed. The novel design makes use of low voltage circuit modules which can be applied to high voltage batteries in a building block fashion. A description is presented of the design concept and test results of the high voltage battery cell scanner, and its operation with an autonomously managed power subsystem is discussed.

  10. Multi-cell storage battery

    DOEpatents

    Brohm, Thomas; Bottcher, Friedhelm

    2000-01-01

    A multi-cell storage battery, in particular to a lithium storage battery, which contains a temperature control device and in which groups of one or more individual cells arranged alongside one another are separated from one another by a thermally insulating solid layer whose coefficient of thermal conductivity lies between 0.01 and 0.2 W/(m*K), the thermal resistance of the solid layer being greater by at least a factor .lambda. than the thermal resistance of the individual cell. The individual cell is connected, at least in a region free of insulating material, to a heat exchanger, the thermal resistance of the heat exchanger in the direction toward the neighboring cell being selected to be greater by at least a factor .lambda. than the thermal resistance of the individual cell and, in addition, the thermal resistance of the heat exchanger toward the temperature control medium being selected to be smaller by at least a factor of about 10 than the thermal resistance of the individual cell, and .lambda. being the ratio of the energy content of the individual cell to the amount of energy that is needed to trigger a thermally induced cell failure at a defined upper operating temperature limit.

  11. Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, Larry; Giner, Jose

    1987-01-01

    Electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature single unit rechargeable alkaline fuel cells were investigated and developed. The electrocatalysts are defined as the material with a higher activity for the oxygen electrode reaction than the support. Advanced development will require that the materials be prepared in high surface area forms, and may also entail integration of various candidate materials. Eight candidate support materials and seven electrocatalysts were investigated. Of the 8 support, 3 materials meet the preliminary requirements in terms of electrical conductivity and stability. Emphasis is now on preparing in high surface area form and testing under more severe corrosion stress conditions. Of the 7 electrocatalysts prepared and evaluated, at least 5 materials remain as potential candidates. The major emphasis remains on preparation, physical characterization and electrochemical performance testing.

  12. Development and testing of an economic grid-scale flow-assisted zinc/nickel-hydroxide alkaline battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turney, Damon E.; Shmukler, Michael; Galloway, Kevin; Klein, Martin; Ito, Yasumasa; Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua W.; Nyce, Michael; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2014-10-01

    An economic design for an alkaline zinc-anode flow-assisted battery without membrane separators was tested at grid-scale of 25 kWh with a string of thirty 833 Wh cells in series, and also at bench scale with individual 28 Wh cells. The bench-scale tests allowed optimization of parameters such as electrolyte flow, choice of hardware material, electrolyte composition, and charge/discharge protocol. The best-performing bench scale cell cycled for over 3300 cycles with energy efficiency above 80%, and was selected as the design basis for scale-up to the 25 kWh battery string. Testing of the grid-scale string demonstrated 1000+ cycles with round trip energy efficiency above 80%. Two challenges observed at the bench scale were overcome for successful scale-up, namely a) passivation of the anode surface, which occurred when the anode experienced voltages 100 mV above zinc's rest voltage, and b) zinc particulates that jammed the gap between the electrodes and caused cathode degradation and passivation of the anode surface. Best practices to overcome these challenges and achieve long cycle life are presented.

  13. The relationship between coefficient of restitution and state of charge of zinc alkaline primary LR6 batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Bhadra, S; Hertzberg, BJ; Hsieh, AG; Croft, M; Gallaway, JW; Van Tassell, BJ; Chamoun, M; Erdonmez, C; Zhong, Z; Sholklapper, T; Steingart, DA

    2015-01-01

    The coefficient of restitution of alkaline batteries has been shown to increase as a function of depth of discharge. In this work, using non-destructive mechanical testing, the change in coefficient of restitution is compared to in situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction data to determine the cause of the macroscopic change in coefficient of restitution. The increase in coefficient of restitution correlates to the formation of a percolation pathway of ZnO within the anode of the cell, and the coefficient of restitution levels off at a value of 0.66 +/- 0.02 at 50% state of charge when the anode has densified into porous ZnO solid. Of note is the sensitivity of coefficient of restitution to the amount of ZnO formation that rivals the sensitivity of in situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction.

  14. Light Weight Design Nickel-Alkaline Cells Using Fiber Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, David F.; Willis, Bob; Britton, Doris; Saelens, Johan

    2005-01-01

    Using fiber electrode technology, currently produced by Bekaert Corporation (Bekaert), Electro Energy, Inc., (EEI) Mobile Energy Products Group (formerly, Eagle-Picher Technologies, LLC., Power Systems Department) in Colorado Springs, CO has demonstrated that it is feasible to manufacture flight weight nickel-hydrogen cells having about twice the specific energy (80 vs. 40 watt-hr/kg) as state-of-the-art nickel-hydrogen cells that are flown on geosynchronous communications satellites. Although lithium-ion battery technology has made large in-roads to replace the nickel-alkaline technology (nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride), the technology offered here competes with lithium-ion weight and offers alternatives not present in the lithium-ion chemistry such as ability to undergo continuous overcharge, reversal on discharge and sustain rate capability sufficient to start automotive and aircraft engines at subzero temperatures. In development to date seven 50 ampere-hour nickel-hydrogen have been constructed, acceptance tested and briefly tested in a low earth orbit (LEO) cycle regime. The effort was jointly funded by Electro Energy, Inc. and NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH. Five of the seven cells have been shipped to NASA GRC for further cycle testing. Two of the cells experienced failure due to internal short circuits during initial cycle testing at EEL Destructive Physical Analysis (DPA) of one of the cells has shown the failure mode to be due to inadequate hydrogen catalyst electrodes that were not capacity balanced with the higher energy density nickel oxide electrodes. In the investigators opinion, rebuild of the cells using proper electrode balance would result in cells that could sustain over 30,000 cycles at moderate depths-of-discharge in a LEO regime or endure over 20 years of geosynchronous orbit (GEO) cycling while realizing a two-fold increase in specific energy for the battery or a 1.1 kg weight savings per 50 ampere-hour cell. Additional

  15. Understanding the Factors Affecting the Formation of Carbonyl Iron Electrodes in Rechargeable Alkaline Iron Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar, AK; Yang, CG; Malkhandi, S; Yang, B; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2012-01-01

    Rechargeable iron-based alkaline batteries such as iron - air and nickel - iron batteries are attractive for large-scale electrical energy storage because iron is inexpensive, globally-abundant and environmentally-friendly. Further, the iron electrode is known for its robustness to repeated charge/discharge cycling. During manufacturing these batteries are charged and discharged 20 to 50 times during which the discharge capacity of the iron electrode increases gradually and attains a stable value. This process of achieving stable capacity is called formation. In this study we have focused our efforts on understanding the effect of electrode design on formation. We have investigated the role of wetting agent, pore-former additive, and sulfide additive on the formation of carbonyl iron electrodes. The wetting agent increased the rate of formation while the pore-former additive increased the final capacity. Sodium sulfide added to the electrolyte worked as a de-passivation agent and increased the final discharge capacity. We have proposed a phenomenological model for the formation process that predicts the rate of formation and final discharge capacity given the design parameters for the electrode. The understanding gained here will be useful in reducing the time lost in formation and in maximizing the utilization of the iron electrode. (C) 2012 The Electrochemical Society. [DOI: 10.1149/2.021301jes] All rights reserved.

  16. The fabrication of a bifunctional oxygen electrode without carbon components for alkaline secondary batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Stephen W. T.; Thompson, Stephen J.; Li, Xiaohong; Gorman, Scott F.; Pletcher, Derek; Russell, Andrea E.; Walsh, Frank C.; Wills, Richard G. A.

    2014-08-01

    The fabrication of a gas diffusion electrode (GDE) without carbon components is described. It is therefore suitable for use as a bifunctional oxygen electrode in alkaline secondary batteries. The electrode is fabricated in two stages (a) the formation of a PTFE-bonded nickel powder layer on a nickel foam substrate and (b) the deposition of a NiCo2O4 spinel electrocatalyst layer by dip coating in a nitrate solution and thermal decomposition. The influence of modifications to the procedure on the performance of the GDEs in 8 M NaOH at 333 K is described. The GDEs can support current densities up to 100 mA cm-2 with state-of-the-art overpotentials for both oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction. Stable performance during >50 successive, 1 h oxygen reduction/evolution cycles at a current density of 50 mA cm-2 has been achieved.

  17. Phosphatidylinositol anchor of HeLa cell alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Jemmerson, R.; Low, M.G.

    1987-09-08

    Alkaline phosphatase from cancer cells, HeLa TCRC-1, was biosynthetically labeled with either /sup 3/H-fatty acids or (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitated material. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) released a substantial proportion of the /sup 3/H-fatty acid label from immunoaffinity-purified alkaline phosphatase but had no effect on the radioactivity of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled material. PI-PLC also liberated catalytically active alkaline phosphatase from viable cells, and this could be selectively blocked by monoclonal antibodies to alkaline phosphatase. However, the alkaline phosphatase released from /sup 3/H-fatty acid labeled cells by PI-PLC was not radioactive. By contrast, treatment with bromelain removed both the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from purified alkaline phosphatase. Subtilisin was also able to remove the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from the purified alkaline phosphatase. The /sup 3/H radioactivity in alkaline phosphatase purified from (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled cells comigrated with authentic (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine by anion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis. The data suggest that the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine are covalently attached to the carboxyl-terminal segment since bromelain and subtilisin both release alkaline phosphatase from the membrane by cleavage at that end of the polypeptide chain. The data are consistent with findings for other proteins recently shown to be anchored in the membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol structure and indicate that a similar structure contributes to the membrane anchoring of alkaline phosphatase.

  18. Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.

    1989-01-01

    Electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature single-unit rechargeable alkaline fuel cells are being investigated and developed. Candidate support materials were drawn from transition metal carbides, borides, nitrides and oxides which have high conductivity (greater than 1 ohm/cm). Candidate catalyst materials were selected largely from metal oxides of the form ABO sub x (where A = Pb, Cd, Mn, Ti, Zr, La, Sr, Na, and B = Pt, Pd, Ir, Ru, Ni (Co) which were investigated and/or developed for one function only, O2 reduction or O2 evolution. The electrical conductivity requirement for catalysts may be lower, especially if integrated with a higher conductivity support. All candidate materials of acceptable conductivity are subjected to corrosion testing. Materials that survive chemical testing are examined for electrochemical corrosion activity. For more stringent corrosion testing, and for further evaluation of electrocatalysts (which generally show significant O2 evolution at at 1.4 V), samples are held at 1.6 V or 0.6 V for about 100 hours. The surviving materials are then physically and chemically analyzed for signs of degradation. To evaluate the bifunctional oxygen activity of candidate catalysts, Teflon-bonded electrodes are fabricated and tested in a floating electrode configuration. Many of the experimental materials being studied have required development of a customized electrode fabrication procedure. In advanced development, the goal is to reduce the polarization to about 300 to 350 mV. Approximately six support materials and five catalyst materials were identified to date for further development. The test results will be described.

  19. A simple solvent method for the recovery of LixCoO2 and its applications in alkaline rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanan; Song, Dawei; Li, Li; An, Cuihua; Wang, Yijing; Jiao, LiFang; Yuan, Huatang

    2014-04-01

    A simple solvent method is proposed for the recovery of waste LixCoO2 from lithium-ion batteries, which employs inexpensive DMF to remove the binder of PVDF. This method is convenient to manipulate and low-cost to apply. Electrochemical investigations indicate that recovered LixCoO2 materials with a small amount of S-doping exhibit excellent properties as negative materials for alkaline rechargeable Ni/Co batteries. At the discharge current density of 100 mA g-1, the LixCoO2 + 1% S electrode displays the max discharge capacity of 357 mAh g-1 and outstanding capacity retention rate of 85.5% after 100 cycles. It could overcome not only the sophisticated, energy-intensive shortcomings of conventional recycling methods, but also the high-cost restriction on alkaline rechargeable Ni/Co batteries.

  20. Advanced inorganic separators for alkaline batteries and method of making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A flexible, porous battery separator includes a coating applied to a porous, flexible substrate. The coating comprises: (1) a thermoplastic rubber-based resin which is insoluble and unreactive in the alkaline electrolyte, (2) a polar organic plasticizer which is reactive with the alkaline electrolyte to produce a reaction product which contains a hydroxyl group and/or a carboxylic acid group, and (3) a mixture of polar particulate filler materials which are unreactive with the electrode. The mixture comprises at least one first filler material having a surface area of greater than 25 sq meters/gram, at last one second filler material having a surface area of 10 to 25 sq meters/gram. The volume of the mixture of filler materials is less than 45% of the total volume of the fillers and the binder. The filler surface area per gram of binder is about 20 to 60 sq meters/gram, and the amount of plasticizer is sufficient to coat each filler particle.

  1. What Do Battery Testers Test?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chagnon, Paul

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities to determine whether it is better to test dry cells with an ammeter than with a voltmeter and how best to test alkaline batteries. Discusses classification of disposable testers as instruments. Concludes that a laboratory voltmeter gives a good indication of the condition of an alkaline cell while carbon batteries are best…

  2. Battery testing device. [for testing cells of multiple-cell battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boshers, W. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A battery testing device is described for testing the cells of a multiple-cell battery, the battery having a cover plate with access holes to provide access to the connecting straps between cells. A panel of probe assembly receiving holes is located to correspond to the location of the access holes when the panel is positioned on top of the battery. A probe assembly is positioned within each probe assembly receiving hole, with a spring biased electrically conductive plunger to make electrical contact with the connecting strap through the corresponding access hole when the panel is pushed towards the top of the battery.

  3. 49 CFR 173.185 - Lithium cells and batteries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lithium cells and batteries. 173.185 Section 173... Class 7 § 173.185 Lithium cells and batteries. As used in this section, lithium cell(s) or battery(ies... the lithium cells or batteries will provide electrical power for its operation. (a) Classification....

  4. Thermal treatment for recovery of manganese and zinc from zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Belardi, G.; Lavecchia, R.; Medici, F.; Piga, L.

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We separated Zn from Mn in zinc-carbon and alkaline batteries after removal of Hg. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost total removal of Hg is achieved at low temperature in air. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen atmosphere is needed to reduce zinc and to permit its volatilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high grade Zn concentrate was obtained with a high recovery at 1000-1200 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The grade of Mn in the residue was enhanced with complete recovery. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is the recovery of manganese and zinc from a mixture of zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries, containing 40.9% of Mn and 30.1% of Zn, after preliminary physical treatment followed by removal of mercury. Separation of the metals has been carried out on the basis of their different boiling points, being 357 Degree-Sign C and 906 Degree-Sign C the boiling point of mercury and zinc and 1564 Degree-Sign C the melting point of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Characterization by chemical analysis, TGA/DTA and X-ray powder diffraction of the mixture has been carried out after comminution sieving and shaking table treatment to remove the anodic collectors and most of chlorides contained in the mixture. The mixture has been roasted at various temperatures and resident times in a flow of air to set the best conditions to remove mercury that were 400 Degree-Sign C and 10 min. After that, the flow of air has been turned into a nitrogen one (inert atmosphere) and the temperatures raised, thus permitting the zinc oxide to be reduced to metallic zinc by the carbon present in the original mixture and recovered after volatilization as a high grade concentrate, while manganese was left in the residue. The recovery and the grade of the two metals, at 1000 Degree-Sign C and 30 min residence time, were 84% and 100% for zinc and 85% and 63% for manganese, respectively. The recovery of zinc increased to 99% with a grade of 97% at

  5. Nitrogen-doped carbonaceous catalysts for gas-diffusion cathodes for alkaline aluminum-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydova, E. S.; Atamanyuk, I. N.; Ilyukhin, A. S.; Shkolnikov, E. I.; Zhuk, A. Z.

    2016-02-01

    Cobalt tetramethoxyphenyl porphyrin and polyacrylonitrile - based catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction were synthesized and characterized by means of SEM, TEM, XPS, BET, limited evaporation method, rotating disc and rotating ring-disc electrode methods. Half-cell and Al-air cell tests were carried out to determine the characteristics of gas-diffusion cathodes. Effect of active layer thickness and its composition on the characteristics of the gas-diffusion cathodes was investigated. Power density of 300 mW cm-2 was achieved for alkaline Al-air cell with an air-breathing polyacrylonitrile-based cathode.

  6. Characterization of the products attained from a thermal treatment of a mix of zinc-carbon and alkaline batteries.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yi-Ming; Lin, Chitsan; Wang, Jian-Wen; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Tsai, Cheng-Hsien; Wang, Chih-Ta

    2016-01-01

    This study applies a thermal separation process (TSP) to recover Fe, Mn, and Zn from hazardous spent zinc-carbon and alkaline batteries. In the TSP, the batteries were heated together with a reducing additive and the metals in batteries, according to their boiling points and densities, were found to move into three major output materials: slag, ingot (mainly Fe and Mn), and particulate (particularly Zn). The slag well encapsulated the heavy metals of interest and can be recycled for road pavement or building materials. The ingot had high levels of Fe (522,000 mg/kg) and Mn (253,000 mg/kg) and can serve as an additive for stainless steel-making processes. The particulate phase had a Zn level of 694,000 mg/kg which is high enough to be directly sold for refinement. Overall, the TSP effectively recovered valuable metals from the hazardous batteries. PMID:26582065

  7. Primary battery design and safety guidelines handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, Bobby J.; Casey, John E.; Trout, J. Barry

    1994-12-01

    This handbook provides engineers and safety personnel with guidelines for the safe design or selection and use of primary batteries in spaceflight programs. Types of primary batteries described are silver oxide zinc alkaline, carbon-zinc, zinc-air alkaline, manganese dioxide-zionc alkaline, mercuric oxide-zinc alkaline, and lithium anode cells. Along with typical applications, the discussions of the individual battery types include electrochemistry, construction, capacities and configurations, and appropriate safety measures. A chapter on general battery safety covers hazard sources and controls applicable to all battery types. Guidelines are given for qualification and acceptance testing that should precede space applications. Permissible failure levels for NASA applications are discussed.

  8. Primary battery design and safety guidelines handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Bobby J.; Casey, John E.; Trout, J. Barry

    1994-01-01

    This handbook provides engineers and safety personnel with guidelines for the safe design or selection and use of primary batteries in spaceflight programs. Types of primary batteries described are silver oxide zinc alkaline, carbon-zinc, zinc-air alkaline, manganese dioxide-zionc alkaline, mercuric oxide-zinc alkaline, and lithium anode cells. Along with typical applications, the discussions of the individual battery types include electrochemistry, construction, capacities and configurations, and appropriate safety measures. A chapter on general battery safety covers hazard sources and controls applicable to all battery types. Guidelines are given for qualification and acceptance testing that should precede space applications. Permissible failure levels for NASA applications are discussed.

  9. Regulation of alkaline phosphatase expression in human choriocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, T A; Tin, A W; Sussman, H H

    1979-01-01

    The coincident expression of two structurally distinct isoenzymes of human alkaline phosphatase was demonstrated in two independently derived gestational choriocarcinoma cell lines. These proteins were shown to have enzymatic, antigenic, and physical-chemical properties resembling those of isoenzymes from term placenta and adult liver. The regulation of these isoenzymes has been studied during the exposure of both cell lines to 5-bromodeoxyuridine and dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The responses of the alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes to these agents have also been compared with the response of another protein phenotypic to placenta, the alpha subunit of chorionic gonadotropin. The results show that (i) the separate structural genes coding for placental and liver alkaline phosphatases are regulated in a noncoordinate fashion; (ii) both alkaline phosphatase genes respond independently of the alpha subunit; and (iii) the induction of the placental type isoenzyme occurs via at least two independent pathways. Images PMID:218197

  10. Design principles for nickel-hydrogen cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.; Manzo, M. A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1985-01-01

    Nickel-hydrogen cells and, more recently, bipolar batteries have been built by a variety of organizations. The design principles that have been used by the technology group at the NASA Lewis Research Center draw upon their extensive background in separator technology, alkaline fuel cell technology, and several alkaline cell technology areas. These design principles have been incorporated into both the more contemporary individual pressure vessel (IPV) designs that were pioneered by other groups, as well as the more recent bipolar battery designs using active cooling that are being developed at NASA Lewis Research Center and under contract. These principles are rather straightforward applications of capillary force formalisms, coupled with the slowly developing data base resulting from careful post test analyses. The objective of this overall effort is directed towards the low-earth-orbit (LEO) application where the cycle life requirements are much more severe than the geosynchronous-orbit (GEO) application. A summary of the design principles employed is presented along with a discussion of the recommendations for component pore sizes and pore size distributions, as well as suggested materials of construction. These will be made based on our experience in these areas to show how these design principles have been translated into operating hardware.

  11. Design principles for nickel-hydrogen cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.; Manzo, M. A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1985-01-01

    Nickel-hydrogen cells and, more recently, bipolar batteries have been built by a variety of organizations. The design principles that have been used by the technology group at the NASA Lewis Research Center draw upon their extensive background in separator technology, alkaline fuel cell technology, and several alkaline cell technology areas. These design principles have been incorporated into both the more contemporary individual pressure vessel (IPV) designs that were pioneered by other groups, as well as the more recent bipolar battery designs using active cooling that are being developed at NASA Lewis Research Center and under contract. These principles are rather straightforward applications of capillary force formalisms, coupled with the slowly developing data base resulting from careful post test analyses. The objective of this overall effort is directed towards the low-Earth-orbit (LEO) application where the cycle life requirements are much more severe than the geosynchronous-orbit (GEO) application. A summary of the design principles employed is presented along with a discussion of the recommendations for component pore sizes and pore size distributions, as well as suggested materials of construction. These will be made based on our experience in these areas to show how these design principles have been translated into operating hardware.

  12. Recovery of manganese oxides from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries. An application as catalysts for VOCs elimination

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, María V.; Falco, Lorena R.; Peluso, Miguel A.; Sambeth, Jorge E.; Thomas, Horacio J.

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Manganese oxides were synthesized using spent batteries as raw materials. • Spent alkaline and zinc–carbon size AA batteries were used. • A biohydrometallurgical process was employed to bio-lixiviate batteries. • Manganese oxides were active in the oxidation of VOCs (ethanol and heptane). - Abstract: Manganese, in the form of oxide, was recovered from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries employing a biohydrometallurgy process, using a pilot plant consisting in: an air-lift bioreactor (containing an acid-reducing medium produced by an Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans bacteria immobilized on elemental sulfur); a leaching reactor (were battery powder is mixed with the acid-reducing medium) and a recovery reactor. Two different manganese oxides were recovered from the leachate liquor: one of them by electrolysis (EMO) and the other by a chemical precipitation with KMnO{sub 4} solution (CMO). The non-leached solid residue was also studied (RMO). The solids were compared with a MnO{sub x} synthesized in our laboratory. The characterization by XRD, FTIR and XPS reveal the presence of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the EMO and the CMO samples, together with some Mn{sup 4+} cations. In the solid not extracted by acidic leaching (RMO) the main phase detected was Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The catalytic performance of the oxides was studied in the complete oxidation of ethanol and heptane. Complete conversion of ethanol occurs at 200 °C, while heptane requires more than 400 °C. The CMO has the highest oxide selectivity to CO{sub 2}. The results show that manganese oxides obtained using spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries as raw materials, have an interesting performance as catalysts for elimination of VOCs.

  13. High Capacity Battery Cell Flight Qualified

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKissock, Barbara I.

    1997-01-01

    The High Capacity Battery Cell project is an effort equally funded by the NASA Lewis Research Center and Hughes Space and Communications Company (a unit of Hughes Aircraft Company) to develop and flight qualify a higher capacity nickel hydrogen battery for continuing use on commercial spacecraft. The larger diameter, individual pressure vessel cell will provide approximately twice the power, while occupying the same volume, as the current state-of-the-art nickel hydrogen cell. These cells are also anticipated to reduce battery cost by 20 percent. The battery is currently booked for use on 26 spacecraft, with the first flight scheduled in 1997. A strong requirement for batteries with higher power levels (6 to 12 kW), long life, and reduced cost was identified in studies of the needs of commercial communications spacecraft. With the design developed in this effort, the higher power level was accommodated without having to modify the rest of the existing spacecraft bus. This design scaled-up the existing state-of-the-art nickel hydrogen battery cell from a 3.5-in., 50-Ahr cell to a 5.5-in., 350-Ahr cell. An improvement in cycle life was also achieved by the use of the 26-percent KOH electrolyte design developed by NASA Lewis. The cell design was completed, and flight batteries were built and flight qualified by Hughes Space and Communications Company with input from NASA Lewis. Two batteries were shipped in September 1996 to undergo life cycle testing under the purview of NASA Lewis.

  14. Probing the electrochemical properties of biopolymer modified EMD nanoflakes through electrodeposition for high performance alkaline batteries.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Avijit; Minakshi, Manickam; Tripathy, Bankim Chandra

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, a novel biopolymer approach has been made to electrodeposit manganese dioxide from manganese sulphate in a sulphuric acid bath containing chitosan in the absence and presence of glutaraldehyde as a cross-linking agent. Galvanostatically synthesised electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) nanoflakes were used as electrode materials and their electrochemical properties with the influence of biopolymer chitosan were systematically characterized. The structural determination, surface morphology and porosity of nanostructured EMD were evaluated using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption techniques. The results obtained were compared with that of blank EMD (polymer free). The results indicated that the EMD having chitosan cross-linked with glutaraldehyde possesses a reduced particle size and more porous structure than the blank and EMDs synthesized in the presence of chitosan but without glutaraldehyde. The results revealed that chitosan was unable to play any significant role on its own but chitosan in the presence of glutaraldehyde forms a cross-linking structure, which in turn influences the nucleation and growth of the EMDs during electrodeposition. EMDs obtained in the presence of chitosan (1 g dm(-3)) and glutaraldehyde (1% glutaraldehyde) exhibited a reversible and better discharge capacity upon cycling than the blank which showed its typical capacity fading behaviour with cycling. In addition, EMD synthesized in the presence of 1 g dm(-3) chitosan and 2% glutaraldehyde exhibited a superior electrochemical performance than the blank and lower amounts (1%; 1.5%) of glutaraldehyde, showing a stable discharge capacity of 60 mA h g(-1) recorded up to 40 cycles in alkaline KOH electrolyte for a Zn-MnO2 system. Our results demonstrate the potential of using polymer modified EMDs as a new generation of alkaline battery materials. The XPS data show that

  15. Thermal treatment for recovery of manganese and zinc from zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries.

    PubMed

    Belardi, G; Lavecchia, R; Medici, F; Piga, L

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this paper is the recovery of manganese and zinc from a mixture of zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries, containing 40.9% of Mn and 30.1% of Zn, after preliminary physical treatment followed by removal of mercury. Separation of the metals has been carried out on the basis of their different boiling points, being 357°C and 906°C the boiling point of mercury and zinc and 1564°C the melting point of Mn(2)O(3). Characterization by chemical analysis, TGA/DTA and X-ray powder diffraction of the mixture has been carried out after comminution sieving and shaking table treatment to remove the anodic collectors and most of chlorides contained in the mixture. The mixture has been roasted at various temperatures and resident times in a flow of air to set the best conditions to remove mercury that were 400°C and 10 min. After that, the flow of air has been turned into a nitrogen one (inert atmosphere) and the temperatures raised, thus permitting the zinc oxide to be reduced to metallic zinc by the carbon present in the original mixture and recovered after volatilization as a high grade concentrate, while manganese was left in the residue. The recovery and the grade of the two metals, at 1000°C and 30 min residence time, were 84% and 100% for zinc and 85% and 63% for manganese, respectively. The recovery of zinc increased to 99% with a grade of 97% at 1200°C and 30 min residence time, while the recovery and grade of manganese were 86% and 87%, respectively, at that temperature. Moreover, the chlorinated compounds that could form by the combustion of the plastics contained in the spent batteries, are destroyed at the temperature required by the process.

  16. The effect of grain size on aluminum anodes for Al-air batteries in alkaline electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Liang; Lu, Huimin

    2015-06-01

    Aluminum is an ideal material for metallic fuel cells. In this research, different grain sizes of aluminum anodes are prepared by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) at room temperature. Microstructure of the anodes is examined by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in scanning electron microscope (SEM). Hydrogen corrosion rates of the Al anodes in 4 mol L-1 NaOH are determined by hydrogen collection method. The electrochemical properties of the aluminum anodes are investigated in the same electrolyte using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and polarization curves. Battery performance is also tested by constant current discharge at different current densities. Results confirm that the electrochemical properties of the aluminum anodes are related to grain size. Finer grain size anode restrains hydrogen evolution, improves electrochemical activity and increases anodic utilization rate. The proposed method is shown to effectively improve the performance of Al-air batteries.

  17. Alkaline direct alcohol fuel cells using an anion exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Koji; Iriyama, Yasutoshi; Abe, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Masao; Ogumi, Zempachi

    Alkaline direct alcohol fuel cells using an OH-form anion exchange membrane and polyhydric alcohols were studied. A high open circuit voltage of ca. 800 mV was obtained for a cell using Pt-Ru/C (anode) and Pt/C (cathode) at 323 K, which was about 100-200 mV higher than that for a DMFC using Nafion ®. The maximum power densities were in the order of ethylene glycol > glycerol > methanol > erythritol > xylitol. Silver catalysts were used as a cathode catalyst to fabricate alkaline fuel cells, since silver catalyst is almost inactive in the oxidation of polyhydric alcohols. Alkaline direct ethylene glycol fuel cells using silver as a cathode catalyst gave excellent performance because higher concentrations of fuel could be supplied to the anode.

  18. Cell for making secondary batteries

    DOEpatents

    Visco, S.J.; Liu, M.; DeJonghe, L.C.

    1992-11-10

    The present invention provides all solid-state lithium and sodium batteries operating in the approximate temperature range of ambient to 145 C (limited by melting points of electrodes/electrolyte), with demonstrated energy and power densities far in excess of state-of-the-art high-temperature battery systems. The preferred battery comprises a solid lithium or sodium electrode, a polymeric electrolyte such as polyethylene oxide doped with lithium trifluorate (PEO[sub 8]LiCF[sub 3]SO[sub 3]), and a solid-state composite positive electrode containing a polymeric organosulfur electrode, (SRS)[sub n], and carbon black, dispersed in a polymeric electrolyte. 2 figs.

  19. Cell for making secondary batteries

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J.; Liu, Meilin; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides all solid-state lithium and sodium batteries operating in the approximate temperature range of ambient to 145.degree. C. (limited by melting points of electrodes/electrolyte), with demonstrated energy and power densities far in excess of state-of-the-art high-temperature battery systems. The preferred battery comprises a solid lithium or sodium electrode, a polymeric electrolyte such as polyethylene oxide doped with lithium triflate (PEO.sub.8 LiCF.sub.3 SO.sub.3), and a solid-state composite positive electrode containing a polymeric organosulfur electrode, (SRS).sub.n, and carbon black, dispersed in a polymeric electrolyte.

  20. Advanced technology for extended endurance alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Martin, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced components have been developed for alkaline fuel cells with a view to the satisfaction of NASA Space Station design requirements for extended endurance. The components include a platinum-on-carbon catalyst anode, a potassium titanate-bonded electrolyte matrix, a lightweight graphite electrolyte reservoir plate, a gold-plated nickel-perforated foil electrode substrate, a polyphenylene sulfide cell edge frame material, and a nonmagnesium cooler concept. When incorporated into the alkaline fuel cell unit, these components are expected to yield regenerative operation in a low earth orbit Space Station with a design life greater than 5 years.

  1. Laboratory-scale evaluation of secondary alkaline zinc batteries for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striebel, Kathryn A.; McLarnon, Frank R.; Cairns, Elton J.

    Two types of secondary zinc cell have been evaluated in our laboratory to assess their suitability to power an electric van. Single cells were charged and discharged with constant-current cycles as well as with controlled-power discharge profiles, scaled to the predicted mass of a full-size battery. Both cells were able to meet the requirements for power discharge specified by the so-called Simplified Federal Urban Driving Schedule (SFUDS) early in life (the first 15 cycles). The Zn/air cell achieved an average of 72 SFUDS repetions (7.2 h) per discharge. The Zn/NiOOH cell achieved an average of 51 SFUDS repetitions (5.1 h) per discharge. The bifunctional air electrodes did not reach oxygen-evolution potentials during the 8-s regenerative breaking portions of the SFUDS cycle.

  2. An investigation of zincite from spent anodic portions of alkaline batteries: An industrial mineral approach for evaluating stock material for recycling potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Heather A.; Borkiewicz, Olaf; Krekeler, Mark P. S.

    The mineralogy of anodic portions of spent alkaline batteries from a leading brand (Duracell) that had been equilibrated in ambient air for approximately 4 months was investigated to determine if material generated from this low energy process may be suitable stock material for recycling. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) identified the bulk of the ambient air oxidized anodic material as zincite (ZnO). Scanning electron microscopy investigation indicates a variety of textures of zincite are present with euhedral hexagonal prisms being the most common crystal form. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis indicates that there are no minor amounts of Mn within the zincite. Transmission electron microscopy investigation indicates a variety of textures exist in the <2 μm size fraction including near euhedral prismatic crystals, crystals with step-fashion terminations and indentations, heavily corroded zincite and near amorphous aggregates of anastomozing zinc oxide. Impurities in the <2 μm size fraction include minor amounts of unidentified mixed sulfate materials and are interpreted as dominantly occurring as thin coatings on zincite particles. Discrete submicrometer-sized spherical and rhomboid particles of Zn-Mn oxides are also common impurities in the <2 μm size fraction but occurr at abundance of <1% by volume. This study provides new baseline information that can be used to develop large scale recycling of zincite from spent alkaline batteries. A promising applications of zincite are numerous, including the development of new solar cell materials. The spent alkaline battery waste stream may serve as promising resource for driving further development of this sector of the economy.

  3. Alkaline Comet Assay for Assessing DNA Damage in Individual Cells.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Wang, Zemin; Klaunig, James E

    2015-08-06

    Single-cell gel electrophoresis, commonly called a comet assay, is a simple and sensitive method for assessing DNA damage at the single-cell level. It is an important technique in genetic toxicological studies. The comet assay performed under alkaline conditions (pH >13) is considered the optimal version for identifying agents with genotoxic activity. The alkaline comet assay is capable of detecting DNA double-strand breaks, single-strand breaks, alkali-labile sites, DNA-DNA/DNA-protein cross-linking, and incomplete excision repair sites. The inclusion of digestion of lesion-specific DNA repair enzymes in the procedure allows the detection of various DNA base alterations, such as oxidative base damage. This unit describes alkaline comet assay procedures for assessing DNA strand breaks and oxidative base alterations. These methods can be applied in a variety of cells from in vitro and in vivo experiments, as well as human studies.

  4. Space Shuttle Upgrades: Long Life Alkaline Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCurdy, Kerri

    2004-01-01

    NASA has utilized the alkaline fuel cell technology to provide electrical power for manned launch vehicles such as Gemini, Apollo, and the Space Shuttle. The current Shuttle alkaline fuel cells are procured from UTC Fuel Cells, a United Technologies Company. The alkaline fuel cells are very reliable but the operating life is limited to 2600 hours due to voltage degradation of the individual cells. The main limiting factor in the life of the cells is corrosion of the cell's fiberglass/epoxy frame by the aqueous potassium hydroxide electrolyte. To reduce operating costs, the orbiter program office approved the Long Life Alkaline Fuel Cell (LLAFC) program as a shuttle upgrade in 1999 to increase the operating life of the fuel cell powerplant to 5000 hours. The LLAFC program incorporates improving the cell by extending the length of the corrosion path, which reduces the cell frame corrosion. UTCFC performed analysis to understand the fundamental mechanisms that drive the cell frame corrosion. The analysis indicated that the corrosion path started along the bond line between the cathode and the cell frame. Analysis also showed that the oxygen available at the cathode, the catalyst on the electrode, and the electrode substrate all supported or intensified the corrosion. The new cell design essentially doubled the corrosion path to mitigate the problem. A 10-cell stack was tested for 5000 hours during the development phase of this program to verify improved cell performance. A complete 96-cell stack was then tested for 5000 hours during the full manned-space qualification phase of this program. Additional upgrades to the powerplant under this program are: replacing the aluminum body in the pressure regulator with stainless steel to reduce corrosion, improving stack insulator plate with improved resistance to stress failure and improved temperature capability, and replacing separator plate elastomer seals with a more durable material and improved seal retention.

  5. Hierarchical Co@C Nanoflowers: Synthesis and Electrochemical Properties as an Advanced Negative Material for Alkaline Secondary Batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Ma, Jianmin; Zhang, Zichao; Cao, Bingqiang; Wang, Yijing; Jiao, Lifang; Yuan, Huatang

    2015-11-01

    Hierarchical Co@C nanoflowers have been facilely synthesized via a simple route based on a low-temperature solid-phase reaction. The obtained hierarchical Co@C nanoflowers, each constructed of a number of nanosheets, display a three-dimensional architecture with an average grain size of about 300 nm. The electrochemical properties of the Co@C nanoflowers as the negative material for Ni/Co cells have been systemically researched. In particular, Co@C material exhibits high discharge-specific capacity and good cycling stability. The discharge-specific capacity of our Co@C-3 electrode can reach 612.1 mA h g(-1), and the specific capacity of 415.3 mA h g(-1) is retained at a current density of 500 mA g(-1) after 120 cycles, indicating its great potential for high-performance Ni/Co batteries. Interestingly, the as-synthesized Co@C electrode also exhibits favorable rate capability. These desirable properties can be attributed to porous pathways, which allow fast transportation of ions and electrons and easy accessibility to the electrolyte. The dominant electrochemical mechanism of Co@C can be attributed to the reduction-oxidation reaction between metallic cobalt and cobalt hydroxide in alkaline solution. PMID:26460934

  6. Miniature fuel cells relieve gas pressure in sealed batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H. A.

    1971-01-01

    Miniature fuel cells within sealed silver zinc batteries consume evolved hydrogen and oxygen rapidly, preventing pressure rupturing. They do not significantly increase battery weight and they operate in all battery life phases. Complete gas pressure control requires two fuel cells during all phases of operation of silver zinc batteries.

  7. The effect of crystal orientation on the aluminum anodes of the aluminum-air batteries in alkaline electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Liang; Lu, Huimin; Leng, Jing; Sun, Zegao; Chen, Chunbo

    2015-12-01

    Recently, aluminum-air (Al-air) batteries have received attention from researchers as an exciting option for safe and efficient batteries. The electrochemical performance of Aluminum anode remains an active area of investigation. In this paper, the electrochemical properties of polycrystalline Al, Al (001), (110) and (111) single crystals are investigated using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 4 M NaOH and KOH. Hydrogen corrosion rates of the Al anodes are determined by hydrogen collection. Battery performance using the anodes is tested by constant current discharge at 10 mA cm-2. This is the first report showing that the electrochemical properties of Al are closely related to the crystallographic orientation in alkaline electrolytes. The (001) crystallographic plane has good corrosion resistance but (110) is more sensitive. Al (001) single crystals display higher anode efficiency and capacity density. Controlling the crystallographic orientation of the Al anode is another way to improve the performance of Al-air batteries in alkaline electrolytes.

  8. Production of zinc and manganese oxide particles by pyrolysis of alkaline and Zn-C battery waste.

    PubMed

    Ebin, Burçak; Petranikova, Martina; Steenari, Britt-Marie; Ekberg, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Production of zinc and manganese oxide particles from alkaline and zinc-carbon battery black mass was studied by a pyrolysis process at 850-950°C with various residence times under 1L/minN2(g) flow rate conditions without using any additive. The particular and chemical properties of the battery waste were characterized to investigate the possible reactions and effects on the properties of the reaction products. The thermodynamics of the pyrolysis process were studied using the HSC Chemistry 5.11 software. The carbothermic reduction reaction of battery black mass takes place and makes it possible to produce fine zinc particles by a rapid condensation, after the evaporation of zinc from a pyrolysis batch. The amount of zinc that can be separated from the black mass is increased by both pyrolysis temperature and residence time. Zinc recovery of 97% was achieved at 950°C and 1h residence time using the proposed alkaline battery recycling process. The pyrolysis residue is mainly MnO powder with a low amount of zinc, iron and potassium impurities and has an average particle size of 2.9μm. The obtained zinc particles have an average particle size of about 860nm and consist of hexagonal crystals around 110nm in size. The morphology of the zinc particles changes from a hexagonal shape to s spherical morphology by elevating the pyrolysis temperature.

  9. Production of zinc and manganese oxide particles by pyrolysis of alkaline and Zn-C battery waste.

    PubMed

    Ebin, Burçak; Petranikova, Martina; Steenari, Britt-Marie; Ekberg, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Production of zinc and manganese oxide particles from alkaline and zinc-carbon battery black mass was studied by a pyrolysis process at 850-950°C with various residence times under 1L/minN2(g) flow rate conditions without using any additive. The particular and chemical properties of the battery waste were characterized to investigate the possible reactions and effects on the properties of the reaction products. The thermodynamics of the pyrolysis process were studied using the HSC Chemistry 5.11 software. The carbothermic reduction reaction of battery black mass takes place and makes it possible to produce fine zinc particles by a rapid condensation, after the evaporation of zinc from a pyrolysis batch. The amount of zinc that can be separated from the black mass is increased by both pyrolysis temperature and residence time. Zinc recovery of 97% was achieved at 950°C and 1h residence time using the proposed alkaline battery recycling process. The pyrolysis residue is mainly MnO powder with a low amount of zinc, iron and potassium impurities and has an average particle size of 2.9μm. The obtained zinc particles have an average particle size of about 860nm and consist of hexagonal crystals around 110nm in size. The morphology of the zinc particles changes from a hexagonal shape to s spherical morphology by elevating the pyrolysis temperature. PMID:26547409

  10. High power bipolar battery/cells with enhanced overcharge tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1998-04-07

    A cell or battery of cells having improved overcharge tolerance and increased power capability, and methods for the construction of such cells or batteries, via electrolyte modification, are described. 5 figs.

  11. Performance characterization of sintered iron electrodes in nickel/iron alkaline batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periasamy, P.; Ramesh Babu, B.; Venkatakrishna Iyer, S.

    A nickel/iron storage battery with a porous, sintered, iron negative electrode and a nickel positive electrode is a high power system by virtue of its low internal resistance. A dry-powder sintering procedure is used to fabricate negative and positive electrodes. Negative iron electrodes are activated with various salt solutions such as CdSO 4, BaCl 2, HgCl 2 and sulfur. Positive electrodes are impregnated with nickel hydroxide by a chemical method. Tests are performed in 10 Ah capacity nickel/iron cells and two types of activated iron electrodes are used. The present work deals with electrode fabrication, charge/discharge studies, self-discharge, temperature performance and cycle life. Finally, the best iron electrodes are coupled with nickel electrodes to obtain a 1.37 V, 75 Ah nickel/iron cell. The performance of this cell is discussed.

  12. Endurance test and evaluation of alkaline water electrolysis cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, K. A.; Schubert, F. H.

    1981-01-01

    Utilization in the development of multi-kW low orbit power systems is discussed. The following technological developments of alkaline water electrolysis cells for space power application were demonstrated: (1) four 92.9 cm2 single water electrolysis cells, two using LST's advanced anodes and two using LST's super anodes; (2) four single cell endurance test stands for life testing of alkaline water electrolyte cells; (3) the solid performance of the advanced electrode and 355 K; (4) the breakthrough performance of the super electrode; (5) the four single cells for over 5,000 hours each significant cell deterioration or cell failure. It is concluded that the static feed water electrolysis concept is reliable and due to the inherent simplicity of the passive water feed mechanism coupled with the use of alkaline electrolyte has greater potential for regenerative fuel cell system applications than alternative electrolyzers. A rise in cell voltage occur after 2,000-3,000 hours which was attributed to deflection of the polysulfone end plates due to creepage of the thermoplastic. More end plate support was added, and the performance of the cells was restored to the initial performance level.

  13. Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.

    1989-01-01

    The primary objective of this program is the investigation and development of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature single-unit rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. Approximately six support materials and five catalyst materials have been identified to date for further development.

  14. Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells, 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.; Mccatty, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    The investigation and development of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature single unit rechargeable alkaline fuel cells is described. Focus is on chemical and electrochemical stability and O2 reduction/evolution activity of the electrode in question.

  15. Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of this program is the investigation and development of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature, single-unit, rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. Approximately six support materials and five catalyst materials have been identified to date for further development.

  16. Recovery of MnO2 from a spent alkaline battery leach solution via ozone treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Díaz, Martín R.; Arauz-Torres, Yennifer; Caballero, Francisco; Lapidus, Gretchen T.; González, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the reaction rate of Mn(II) to generate solid manganese dioxide (MnO2) as a function of the gaseous ozone mass flow rate (27.5-77 g h-1). The experimental studies were carried out in a semi-continuous reactor, using a synthetic solution (300 mL of 1 M H2SO4 with 6000 ppm of Mn(II) added as MnSO4) that simulated the composition of an acid leaching solution from spent alkaline battery material (SBM). It was observed that at 1.3-1.45 V/SHE and pH < 1.0 a selective formation of MnO2 powder was obtained; at values greater than 1.45 V/SHE, permanganate ion (MnO41-) was formed. On the other hand, a linear relation was perceived between the volumetric mass transfer coefficient (kLa) and the ozone mass flow rate (19.3-77 g h-1 in 600 mL of the 1 M H2SO4 solution). The rate constant (k) was determined in the presence and absence of nonporous plastic spheres (D = 3 mm). In both cases the rate of Mn(II) conversion increased proportionally with the ozone mass flow rate, although the conversions obtained with non-porous plastic spheres (x = 82%) were always higher than those without non-porous plastic spheres (x = 72%). A pseudo-homogenous mass transfer model adequately approximated the experimental data.

  17. SMS/GOES cell and battery data analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armantrout, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The nickel-cadmium battery design developed for the Synchronous Meteorological Satellite (SMS) and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) provided background and guidelines for future development, manufacture, and application of spacecraft batteries. SMS/GOES battery design, development, qualification testing, acceptance testing, and life testing/mission performance characteristics were evaluated for correlation with battery cell manufacturing process variables.

  18. Enhancing the Performance of the Rechargeable Iron Electrode in Alkaline Batteries with Bismuth Oxide and Iron Sulfide Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar, AK; Yang, CG; Malkhandi, S; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2013-09-07

    Iron-based alkaline rechargeable batteries have the potential of meeting the needs of large-scale electrical energy storage because of their low-cost, robustness and eco-friendliness. However, the widespread commercial deployment of iron-based batteries has been limited by the low charging efficiency and the poor discharge rate capability of the iron electrode. In this study, we have demonstrated iron electrodes containing bismuth oxide and iron sulfide with a charging efficiency of 92% and capable of being discharged at the 3C rate. Such a high value of charging efficiency combined with the ability to discharge at high rates is being reported for the first time. The bismuth oxide additive led to the in situ formation of elemental bismuth and a consequent increase in the overpotential for the hydrogen evolution reaction leading to an increase in the charging efficiency. We observed that the sulfide ions added to the electrolyte and iron sulfide added to the electrode mitigated-electrode passivation and allowed for continuous discharge at high rates. At the 3C discharge rate, a utilization of 0.2 Ah/g was achieved. The performance level of the rechargeable iron electrode demonstrated here is attractive for designing economically-viable large-scale energy storage systems based on alkaline nickel-iron and iron-air batteries. (C) 2013 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Recovery of manganese oxides from spent alkaline and zinc-carbon batteries. An application as catalysts for VOCs elimination.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, María V; Falco, Lorena R; Peluso, Miguel A; Sambeth, Jorge E; Thomas, Horacio J

    2013-06-01

    Manganese, in the form of oxide, was recovered from spent alkaline and zinc-carbon batteries employing a biohydrometallurgy process, using a pilot plant consisting in: an air-lift bioreactor (containing an acid-reducing medium produced by an Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans bacteria immobilized on elemental sulfur); a leaching reactor (were battery powder is mixed with the acid-reducing medium) and a recovery reactor. Two different manganese oxides were recovered from the leachate liquor: one of them by electrolysis (EMO) and the other by a chemical precipitation with KMnO4 solution (CMO). The non-leached solid residue was also studied (RMO). The solids were compared with a MnOx synthesized in our laboratory. The characterization by XRD, FTIR and XPS reveal the presence of Mn2O3 in the EMO and the CMO samples, together with some Mn(4+) cations. In the solid not extracted by acidic leaching (RMO) the main phase detected was Mn3O4. The catalytic performance of the oxides was studied in the complete oxidation of ethanol and heptane. Complete conversion of ethanol occurs at 200°C, while heptane requires more than 400°C. The CMO has the highest oxide selectivity to CO2. The results show that manganese oxides obtained using spent alkaline and zinc-carbon batteries as raw materials, have an interesting performance as catalysts for elimination of VOCs.

  20. Recovery of manganese oxides from spent alkaline and zinc-carbon batteries. An application as catalysts for VOCs elimination.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, María V; Falco, Lorena R; Peluso, Miguel A; Sambeth, Jorge E; Thomas, Horacio J

    2013-06-01

    Manganese, in the form of oxide, was recovered from spent alkaline and zinc-carbon batteries employing a biohydrometallurgy process, using a pilot plant consisting in: an air-lift bioreactor (containing an acid-reducing medium produced by an Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans bacteria immobilized on elemental sulfur); a leaching reactor (were battery powder is mixed with the acid-reducing medium) and a recovery reactor. Two different manganese oxides were recovered from the leachate liquor: one of them by electrolysis (EMO) and the other by a chemical precipitation with KMnO4 solution (CMO). The non-leached solid residue was also studied (RMO). The solids were compared with a MnOx synthesized in our laboratory. The characterization by XRD, FTIR and XPS reveal the presence of Mn2O3 in the EMO and the CMO samples, together with some Mn(4+) cations. In the solid not extracted by acidic leaching (RMO) the main phase detected was Mn3O4. The catalytic performance of the oxides was studied in the complete oxidation of ethanol and heptane. Complete conversion of ethanol occurs at 200°C, while heptane requires more than 400°C. The CMO has the highest oxide selectivity to CO2. The results show that manganese oxides obtained using spent alkaline and zinc-carbon batteries as raw materials, have an interesting performance as catalysts for elimination of VOCs. PMID:23562448

  1. Determination of the zincate diffusion coefficient and its application to alkaline battery problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Kautz, Harold E.

    1978-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient for the zincate ion at 24 C was found to be 9.9 X 10 to the minus 7th power squared cm per sec + or - 30 percent in 45 percent potassium hydroxide and 1.4 x 10 to the minus 7 squared cm per sec + or - 25 percent in 40 percent sodium hydroxide. Comparison of these values with literature values at different potassium hydroxide concentrations show that the Stokes-Einstein equation is obeyed. The diffusion coefficient is characteristic of the zincate ion (not the cation) and independent of its concentration. Calculations with the measured value of the diffusion coefficient show that the zinc concentration in an alkaline zincate half cell becomes uniform throughout in tens of hours by diffusion alone. Diffusion equations are derived which are applicable to finite size chambers. Details and discussion of the experimental method are also given.

  2. Determination of the zincate diffusion coefficient and its application to alkaline battery problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Kautz, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient for the zincate ion at 24 C was found to be 9.9 x 10 to the -7th power sq cm/sec + or - 30% in 45% potassium hydroxide and 1.4 x 10 to the -7th power sq cm/sec + or - 25% in 40% sodium hydroxide. Comparison of these values with literature values at different potassium hydroxide concentrations show that the Stokes-Einstein equation is obeyed. The diffusion coefficient is characteristic of the zincate ion (not the cation) and independent of its concentration. Calculations with the measured value of the diffusion coefficient show that the zinc concentration in an alkaline zincate half-cell becomes uniform throughout in tens of hours by diffusion alone. Diffusion equations are derived which are applicable to finite-size chambers. Details and discussion of the experimental method are also given.

  3. Involvement of membrane potential in alkaline band formation by internodal cells of Chara corallina.

    PubMed

    Shimmen, Teruo; Wakabayashi, Akiko

    2008-10-01

    Internodal cells of Chara corallina form alkaline bands on their surface upon illumination via photosynthesis. In the present study, the effect of KCl on alkaline band formation was analyzed. When the extracellular KCl concentration was increased, alkaline band formation was extensively inhibited. Electrophysiological analysis unequivocally showed the need for inner negative membrane potential for alkaline band formation.

  4. Modified carbon-free silver electrodes for the use as cathodes in lithium-air batteries with an aqueous alkaline electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmaier, Dennis; Wagner, Norbert; Friedrich, K. Andreas; Amin, Hatem M. A.; Baltruschat, Helmut

    2014-11-01

    Gas diffusion electrodes with silver catalysts show a high activity towards oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media but a rather poor activity towards oxygen evolution reaction. For the use in future lithium-air batteries with an aqueous alkaline electrolyte the activity of such electrodes must be improved significantly. As Co3O4 is a promising metal oxide catalyst for oxygen evolution in alkaline media, silver electrodes were modified with Co3O4. For comparison silver electrodes were also modified with IrO2. Due to the poor stability of carbon materials at high anodic potentials these gas diffusion electrodes were prepared without carbon support to improve especially the long-term stability. Gas diffusion electrodes were electrochemically investigated in an electrochemical half-cell arrangement. In addition to cyclic voltammograms electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was carried out. SEM and XRD were used for the physical and morphological investigations. Investigations showed that silver electrodes containing 20 wt.% Co3O4 exhibited the highest performance and highest long-term stability. For comparison, rotating - ring - disc - electrode experiments have been performed using model electrodes with thin catalyst layers, showing that the amount of hydrogen peroxide evolved is negligible.

  5. Performance of AA5052 alloy anode in alkaline ethylene glycol electrolyte with dicarboxylic acids additives for aluminium-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, DaPeng; Zhang, DaQuan; Lee, KangYong; Gao, LiXin

    2015-11-01

    Dicarboxylic acid compounds, i.e. succinic acid (SUA), adipic acid (ADA) and sebacic acid (SEA), are used as electrolyte additives in the alkaline ethylene glycol solution for AA5052 aluminium-air batteries. It shows that the addition of dicarboxylic acids lowers the hydrogen gas evolution rate of commercial AA5052 aluminium alloy anode. AA5052 aluminium alloy has wide potential window for electrochemical activity and better discharge performance in alkaline ethylene glycol solution containing dicarboxylic acid additives. ADA has the best inhibition effect for the self-corrosion of AA5052 anode among the three dicarboxylic acid additives. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) reveals that dicarboxylic acids and aluminium ions can form coordination complexes. Quantum chemical calculations shows that ADA has a smaller energy gap (ΔE, the energy difference between the lowest unoccupied orbital and the highest occupied orbital), indicating that ADA has the strongest interaction with aluminium ions.

  6. Stress-life interrelationships associated with alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, Lawrence H.; Martin, Ronald E.; Stedman, James K.

    1987-01-01

    A review is presented concerning the interrelationships between applied stress and the expected service life of alkaline fuel cells. Only the physical, chemical, and electrochemical phenomena that take place within the fuel cell stack portion of an overall fuel cell system will be discussed. A brief review will be given covering the significant improvements in performance and life over the past two decades as well as summarizing the more recent advances in understanding which can be used to predict the performance and life characteristics of fuel cell systems that have yet to be built.

  7. Rechargeable solid polymer electrolyte battery cell

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, Terji

    1985-01-01

    A rechargeable battery cell comprising first and second electrodes sandwiching a solid polymer electrolyte comprising a layer of a polymer blend of a highly conductive polymer and a solid polymer electrolyte adjacent said polymer blend and a layer of dry solid polymer electrolyte adjacent said layer of polymer blend and said second electrode.

  8. Multiple cell booster battery switch assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Mejia, S.

    1986-04-08

    A switch assembly is described for a multiple power cell battery unit, which have positive and negative terminals on each cell. The assembly consists of (a) a base connected to the battery unit and including a terminal connector for each battery terminal which is physically and electrically connected therewith, (b) a top plate which is relatively movable with respect to the base and on which a plurality of conducting bus members which have contact elements are mounted, (c) the terminal connectors having electrical contacts for engaging the contact element of the conducting bus member, (d) each contact element member being positioned with respect to and adapted to engage with the electrical contacts of one of the terminal connectors when the top plate is in one position, and to be disengaged therefrom when the top plate is in a second position, (e) each conducting bus member being electrically interconnected with at least one other conducting bus member so that when their respective contact elements are in engagement with the electrical contact members of the terminal connector with which it is associated, the two battery cell terminals are electrically interconnected with each other.

  9. Endurance Test and Evaluation of Alkaline Water Electrolysis Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, Andrew J.; Schubert, Franz H.; Chang, B. J.; Larkins, Jim T.

    1985-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to assess the state of alkaline water electrolysis cell technology and its potential as part of a Regenerative Fuel Cell System (RFCS) of a multikilowatt orbiting powerplant. The program evaluates the endurance capabilities of alkaline electrolyte water electrolysis cells under various operating conditions, including constant condition testing, cyclic testing and high pressure testing. The RFCS demanded the scale-up of existing cell hardware from 0.1 sq ft active electrode area to 1.0 sq ft active electrode area. A single water electrolysis cell and two six-cell modules of 1.0 sq ft active electrode area were designed and fabricated. The two six-cell 1.0 sq ft modules incorporate 1.0 sq ft utilized cores, which allow for minimization of module assembly complexity and increased tolerance to pressure differential. A water electrolysis subsystem was designed and fabricated to allow testing of the six-cell modules. After completing checkout, shakedown, design verification and parametric testing, a module was incorporated into the Regenerative Fuel Cell System Breadboard (RFCSB) for testing at Life Systems, Inc., and at NASA JSC.

  10. Thermal design of high temperature alkaline-earth vapor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Jordan L.; Lemke, Nathan D.; Martin, Kyle W.; Erickson, Christopher J.

    2016-03-01

    Europium doped calcium fluoride is a machinable and alkaline-earth resistant crystal that is suitable for constructing a calcium or strontium vapor cell. However, its heat capacity, emissivity, and high coefficient of thermal expansion make it challenging to achieve optically dense calcium vapors for laser spectroscopy on narrow linewidth transitions. We discuss a low size, weight and power heating package that is under development at the Air Force Research Laboratory.

  11. Corrosion testing of candidates for the alkaline fuel cell cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Joseph; Fielder, William L.

    1990-01-01

    Current/voltage data have been obtained for specially made corrosion electrodes of some oxides and of gold materials for the purpose of developing a screening test of catalysts and supports for use at the cathode of the alkaline fuel cell. The data consist of measurements of current at fixed potentials and cyclic voltammograms. These data will have to be correlated with longtime performance data in order to evaluate fully this approach to corrosion screening.

  12. Battery Cell By-Pass Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evers, Jeffrey (Inventor); Gelger, Ronald V. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The invention is a circuit and method of limiting the charging current voltage from a power supply net work applied to an individual cell of a plurality of cells making up a battery being charged in series. It is particularly designed for use with batteries that can be damaged by overcharging, such as Lithium-ion type batteries. In detail. the method includes the following steps: 1) sensing the actual voltage level of the individual cell; 2) comparing the actual voltage level of the individual cell with a reference value and providing an error signal representative thereof; and 3) by-passing the charging current around individual cell necessary to keep the individual cell voltage level generally equal a specific voltage level while continuing to charge the remaining cells. Preferably this is accomplished by by-passing the charging current around the individual cell if said actual voltage level is above the specific voltage level and allowing the charging current to the individual cell if the actual voltage level is equal or less than the specific voltage level. In the step of bypassing the charging current, the by-passed current is transferred at a proper voltage level to the power supply. The by-pass circuit a voltage comparison circuit is used to compare the actual voltage level of the individual cell with a reference value and to provide an error signal representative thereof. A third circuit, designed to be responsive to the error signal, is provided for maintaining the individual cell voltage level generally equal to the specific voltage level. Circuitry is provided in the third circuit for bypassing charging current around the individual cell if the actual voltage level is above the specific voltage level and transfers the excess charging current to the power supply net work. The circuitry also allows charging of the individual cell if the actual voltage level is equal or less than the specific voltage level.

  13. Molten salt electrolyte battery cell with overcharge tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.; Nelson, Paul A.

    1989-01-01

    A molten salt electrolyte battery having an increased overcharge tolerance employs a negative electrode with two lithium alloy phases of different electrochemical potential, one of which allows self-discharge rates which permits battery cell equalization.

  14. Reductive atmospheric acid leaching of spent alkaline batteries in H2SO4/Na2SO3 solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morcali, Mehmet Hakan

    2015-07-01

    This work studies the optimum reductive leaching process for manganese and zinc recovery from spent alkaline battery paste. The effects of reducing agents, acid concentration, pulp density, reaction temperature, and leaching time on the dissolution of manganese and zinc were investigated in detail. Manganese dissolution by reductive acidic media is an intermediate-controlled process with an activation energy of 12.28 kJ·mol-1. After being leached, manganese and zinc were selectively precipitated with sodium hydroxide. The zinc was entirely converted into zincate (Zn(OH){4/2-}) ions and thus did not co-precipitate with manganese hydroxide during this treatment (2.0 M NaOH, 90 min, 200 r/min, pH > 13). After the manganese was removed from the solution, the Zn(OH){4/2-} was precipitated as zinc sulfate in the presence of sulfuric acid. The results indicated that this process could be effective in recovering manganese and zinc from alkaline batteries.

  15. Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Yoong-Kee; Henson, Neil J.; Kim, Yu Seung

    2015-12-31

    Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). We have elucidated that the aryl-ether moiety of membranes is one of the weakest site against attack of hydroxide ions. The results of DFT calculations for hydroxide initiated aryl-ether cleavage indicated that the aryl-ether cleavage occurred prior to degradation of cationic functional group. Such a weak nature of the aryl-ether group arises from the electron deficiency of the aryl group as well as the low bond dissociation energy. The DFT results suggests that removal of the aryl-ether group in the membrane should enhance the stability of membranes under alkaline conditions. In fact, an ether fee poly(phenylene) membrane exhibits excellent stability against the attack from hydroxide ions.

  16. Alkaline regenerative fuel cell systems for energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Reid, M. A.; Martin, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    A description is presented of the results of a preliminary design study of a regenerative fuel cell energy storage system for application to future low-earth orbit space missions. The high energy density storage system is based on state-of-the-art alkaline electrolyte cell technology and incorporates dedicated fuel cell and electrolysis cell modules. In addition to providing energy storage, the system can provide hydrogen and oxygen for attitude control of the satellite and for life support. During the daylight portion of the orbit the electrolysis module uses power provided by the solar array to generate H2 and O2 from the product water produced by the fuel cell module. The fuel cell module supplies electrical power during the dark period of the orbit.

  17. Battery Cell Voltage Sensing and Balancing Using Addressable Transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Francis

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses the use of saturating transformers in a matrix arrangement to address individual cells in a high voltage battery. This arrangement is able to monitor and charge individual cells while limiting the complexity of circuitry in the battery. The arrangement has inherent galvanic isolation, low cell leakage currents, and allows a single bad cell in a battery of several hundred cells to be easily spotted.

  18. Assessment and reuse of secondary batteries cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, E. L.; Kindlein, W.; Souza, S.; Malfatti, C. F.

    The popularity of portable electronic devices and the ever-growing production of the same have led to an increase in the use of rechargeable batteries. These are often discarded even before the end of their useful life. This, in turn, leads to great waste in material and natural resources and to contamination of the environment. The objective of this study was thus to develop a methodology to assess and reuse NiMH battery cells that have been disposed of before the end of their life cycle, when they can still be used. For such, the capacity of these cells, which were still in good operating conditions when the batteries were discarded, was assessed, and the percentage was estimated. The results reveal that at the end of the assessment process, a considerable number of these cells still had reuse potential, with approximately 37% of all discarded and tested cells being approved for reuse. The methodology introduced in this study showed it is possible to establish an environmentally correct alternative to reduce the amount of this sort of electronic trash.

  19. Toroidal cell and battery. [Patent application

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, W.J.

    1981-04-01

    A toroidal storage battery designed to handle relatively high amp-hour loads is described. The cell includes a wound core disposed within a pair of toroidal channel shaped electrodes spaced apart by nylon insulator. The shape of the case electrodes of this toroidal cell allows a first planar doughnut shaped surface and the inner cylindrical case wall to be used as a first electrode and a second planar doughnut shaped surface and the outer cylindrical case wall to be used as a second electrode. Connectors may be used to stack two or more toroidal cells together by connecting substantially the entire surface area of the first electrode of a first cell to substantially the entire surface area of the second electrode of a second cell. The central cavity of each toroidal cell may be used as a conduit for pumping a fluid through the toroidal cell to thereby cool the cell. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

  20. Dynamic electrochemical model of an alkaline fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerr, Matthias; Gair, Sinclair; Cruden, Andrew; McDonald, Jim

    The Institute for Energy and Environment (IEE) at the University of Strathclyde has developed various fuel cell (FC) systems for stationary and vehicular applications. In particular the author is involved in the development of alkaline fuel cell (AFC) systems. To understand the dynamic behaviour of the system's key element, the alkaline fuel cell stack, a dynamic model was developed allowing the characterisation of the electrochemical parameters. The model is used to forecast the behaviour of the fuel cell stack under various dynamic operating conditions. The so-called Nernst potential, which describes the open circuit voltage of the stack, is calculated using thermodynamic theory. Electrochemistry theory has been used to model the sources of the electric losses within the FC, such as activation, ohmic and concentration losses. The achievable value of this paper is the first publication of a detailed dynamic AFC based on mass balance, thermodynamics and electrochemical theory. The effects of the load changes on various fuel cell parameters, such as electrolyte concentration and concentrations of dissolved hydrogen and oxygen were covered in this investigation using the author's model. The model allows a detailed understanding of the dynamic effects within the AFC during load change events, which lead to the experienced electric response of the overall FC stack.

  1. Evaluation parameters for the alkaline fuel cell oxygen electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, J.; Srinivasan, V.

    1985-01-01

    Studies were made of Pt- and Au-catalyzed porous electrodes, designed for the cathode of the alkaline H2/O2 fuel cell, employing cyclic voltammetry and the floating half-cell method. The purpose was to obtain parameters from the cyclic voltammograms which could predict performance in the fuel cell. It was found that a satisfactory relationship between these two types of measurement could not be established; however, useful observations were made of relative performance of several types of carbon used as supports for noble metal catalysts and of some Au catalysts. The best half-cell performance with H2/O2 in a 35 percent KOH electrolyte at 80 C was given by unsupported fine particle Au on Teflon; this electrode is used in the Orbiter fuel cell.

  2. Negative electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Vaughey, John T.; Fransson, Linda M.; Thackeray, Michael M.

    2005-02-15

    A negative electrode is disclosed for a non-aqueous electrochemical cell. The electrode has an intermetallic compound as its basic structural unit with the formula M.sub.2 M' in which M and M' are selected from two or more metal elements including Si, and the M.sub.2 M' structure is a Cu.sub.2 Sb-type structure. Preferably M is Cu, Mn and/or Li, and M' is Sb. Also disclosed is a non-aqueous electrochemical cell having a negative electrode of the type described, an electrolyte and a positive electrode. A plurality of cells may be arranged to form a battery.

  3. An Automated Classification Technique for Detecting Defects in Battery Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark; Gray, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Battery cell defect classification is primarily done manually by a human conducting a visual inspection to determine if the battery cell is acceptable for a particular use or device. Human visual inspection is a time consuming task when compared to an inspection process conducted by a machine vision system. Human inspection is also subject to human error and fatigue over time. We present a machine vision technique that can be used to automatically identify defective sections of battery cells via a morphological feature-based classifier using an adaptive two-dimensional fast Fourier transformation technique. The initial area of interest is automatically classified as either an anode or cathode cell view as well as classified as an acceptable or a defective battery cell. Each battery cell is labeled and cataloged for comparison and analysis. The result is the implementation of an automated machine vision technique that provides a highly repeatable and reproducible method of identifying and quantifying defects in battery cells.

  4. 2011 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovar, B.

    2012-02-01

    A workshop addressing the current state-of-the-art in alkaline membrane fuel cells (AMFCs) was held May 8-9, 2011, at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Virginia. This workshop was the second of its kind, with the first being held December 11-13, 2006, in Phoenix, Arizona. The 2011 workshop and associated workshop report were created to assess the current state of AMFC technology (taking into account recent advances), investigate the performance potential of AMFC systems across all possible power ranges and applications, and identify the key research needs for commercial competitiveness in a variety of areas.

  5. Lithium-Ion Small Cell Battery Shorting Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Chris; Curzon, David; Blackmore, Paul; Rao, Gopalakrishna

    2006-01-01

    Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC) provides adequate sustained hard short protection for AEA batteries with up to 8 cells in series. PTC cannot protect against sustained hard short in AEA batteries with 10 cells or more in series. Protective fused connector is a proven way to protect larger batteries from hard short damage: a) Hard short not credible in unmanned missions; b) However, recommended during ground handling; c) Inexpensive item. Preliminary diode protection scheme has passed manned space safety requirements for high voltage batteries. SCM confirmed fused connector did not affect battery health, however, this affect of hard short on the its long calendar and cycle life performance needs to be verified.

  6. Synthesis of cobalt oxide-reduced graphene nanocomposite and its enhanced electrochemical properties as negative material for alkaline secondary battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanan; Wang, Xiaofeng; An, Cuihua; Wang, Yijing; Jiao, Lifang; Yuan, Huatang

    2014-12-01

    A potential negative electrode material Co3O4@rGO is synthesized via a facile reflux condensation route. The electrochemical performances of Co3O4@rGO composite for alkaline rechargeable Ni/Co batteries have been systemically investigated for the first time. The reduced-graphene can remarkably enhance the electrochemical activity of Co3O4 materials, leading to a notable improvement of discharge capacity, cycle stability and rate capability. Interestingly, the maximum discharge capacity of Co3O4@rGO-20 (additive amount of GO is 20 mg) electrode can reach 511.4 mAh g-1 with the capacity retention of 89.1% after 100 cycles at a discharge current of 100 mA g-1. A properly electrochemical reaction mechanism of Co3O4@rGO electrode is also constructed in detail.

  7. Cell overcharge testing inside sodium metal halide battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frutschy, Kris; Chatwin, Troy; Bull, Roger

    2015-09-01

    Testing was conducted to measure electrical performance and safety of the General Electric Durathon™ E620 battery module (600 V class 20 kWh) during cell overcharge. Data gathered from this test was consistent with SAE Electric Vehicle Battery Abuse Testing specification J2464 [1]. After cell overcharge failure and 24 A current flow for additional 60 minutes, battery was then discharged at 7.5 KW average power to 12% state of charge (SOC) and recharged back to 100% SOC. This overcharging test was performed on two cells. No hydrogen chloride (HCl) gas was detected during front cell (B1) test, and small amount (6.2 ppm peak) was measured outside the battery after center cell (F13) overcharge. An additional overcharge test was performed per UL Standard 1973 - Batteries for Use in Light Electric Rail (LER) Applications and Stationary Applications[2]. With the battery at 11% SOC and 280 °C float temperature, an individual cell near the front (D1) was deliberately imbalanced by charging it to 62% SOC. The battery was then recharged to 100% SOC. In all three tests, the battery cell pack was stable and individual cell failure did not propagate to other cells. Battery discharge performance, charge performance, and electrical isolation were normal after all three tests.

  8. FeS/C composite as high-performance anode material for alkaline nickel-iron rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Enbo; Li, Fei; Li, Jing; Chang, Zhaorong; Li, Quanmin; Yuan, Xiao-Zi; Wang, Haijiang

    2015-09-01

    FeS and its composite, FeS/C, are synthesized via a simple calcination method followed by a co-precipitation process. The electrochemical properties of the bare FeS and FeS/C composite as anode materials for alkaline nickel-iron batteries are investigated. The results show that the FeS/C-3wt%Bi2O3-mixed electrode delivers a high specific capacity of 325 mAh g-1 at a current density of 300 mA g-1 with a faradaic efficiency of 90.3% and retains 99.2% of the initial capacity after 200 cycles. For the first time, it is demonstrated that even at a discharge rate as high as 1500 mA g-1 (5C) the FeS/C-3wt%Bi2O3-mixed electrode delivers a specific capacity of nearly 230 mAh g-1. SEM results confirm that after 200 discharge-charge cycles, the size of FeS/C particles reduces from 5 to 15 μm to less than 300 nm in diameter and the particles are highly dispersed on the surface of carbon black, which is likely caused by the dissolution-deposition process of Fe(OH)2 and Fe via intermediate iron species. As a result, the FeS/C composite exhibits considerably high charge efficiency, high discharge capacities, excellent rate capability and superior cycling stability. We believe that this composite is a potential candidate of high-performance anode materials for alkaline iron-based rechargeable batteries.

  9. Corrosion testing of candidates for the alkaline fuel cell cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Joseph; Fielder, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Current/voltage data was obtained for specially made corrosion electrodes of some oxides and of gold materials for the purpose of developing a screening test of catalysts and supports for use at the cathode of the alkaline fuel cell. The data consists of measurements of current at fixed potentials and cyclic voltammograms. These data will have to be correlated with longtime performance data in order to fully evaluate this approach to corrosion screening. Corrosion test screening of candidates for the oxygen reduction electrode of the alkaline fuel cell was applied to two substances, the pyrochlore Pb2Ru2O6.5 and the spinel NiCo2O4. The substrate gold screen and a sample of the IFC Orbiter Pt-Au performance electrode were included as blanks. The pyrochlore data indicate relative stability, although nothing yet can be said about long term stability. The spinel was plainly unstable. For this type of testing to be validated, comparisons will have to be made with long term performance tests.

  10. Sealed-cell nickel-cadmium battery applications manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. R.; Rusta, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    The design, procurement, testing, and application of aerospace quality, hermetically sealed nickel-cadmium cells and batteries are presented. Cell technology, cell and battery development, and spacecraft applications are emphasized. Long term performance is discussed in terms of the effect of initial design, process, and application variables. Design guidelines and practices are given.

  11. Block copolymers for alkaline fuel cell membrane materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yifan

    Alkaline fuel cells (AFCs) using anion exchange membranes (AEMs) as electrolyte have recently received considerable attention. AFCs offer some advantages over proton exchange membrane fuel cells, including the potential of non-noble metal (e.g. nickel, silver) catalyst on the cathode, which can dramatically lower the fuel cell cost. The main drawback of traditional AFCs is the use of liquid electrolyte (e.g. aqueous potassium hydroxide), which can result in the formation of carbonate precipitates by reaction with carbon dioxide. AEMs with tethered cations can overcome the precipitates formed in traditional AFCs. Our current research focuses on developing different polymer systems (blend, block, grafted, and crosslinked polymers) in order to understand alkaline fuel cell membrane in many aspects and design optimized anion exchange membranes with better alkaline stability, mechanical integrity and ionic conductivity. A number of distinct materials have been produced and characterized. A polymer blend system comprised of poly(vinylbenzyl chloride)-b-polystyrene (PVBC-b-PS) diblock copolymer, prepared by nitroxide mediated polymerization (NMP), with poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (PPO) or brominated PPO was studied for conversion into a blend membrane for AEM. The formation of a miscible blend matrix improved mechanical properties while maintaining high ionic conductivity through formation of phase separated ionic domains. Using anionic polymerization, a polyethylene based block copolymer was designed where the polyethylene-based block copolymer formed bicontinuous morphological structures to enhance the hydroxide conductivity (up to 94 mS/cm at 80 °C) while excellent mechanical properties (strain up to 205%) of the polyethylene block copolymer membrane was observed. A polymer system was designed and characterized with monomethoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG) as a hydrophilic polymer grafted through substitution of pendent benzyl chloride groups of a PVBC

  12. Bipolar battery with array of sealed cells

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.; Smaga, John A.

    1987-01-01

    A lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery as a dipolar battery is disclosed with an array of stacked cells with the anode and cathode electrode materials in each cell sealed in a confining structure and separated from one another except across separator material interposed therebetween. The separator material is contained in a module having separate perforated metallic sheets that sandwich opposite sides of the separator material for the cell and an annular insulating spacer that surrounds the separator material beyond the perforations and is also sandwiched between and sealed to the sheets. The peripheral edges of the sheets project outwardly beyond the spacer, traverse the side edges of the adjacent electrode material to form cup-like electrode holders, and are fused to the adjacent current collector or end face members of the array. Electrolyte is infused into the electrolyte cavity through the perforations of one of the metallic sheets with the perforations also functioning to allow ionic conductance across the separator material between the adjacent electrodes. A gas-tight housing provides an enclosure of the array.

  13. Life capability of the silver electrode in alkaline electrochemical cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H. A.

    1976-01-01

    Estimates of silver electrode degradation rates were made by comparing the recently measured capacities with the reported early life capacities. Chemical analyses were carried out to determine the extent of silver loss from the electrode and its distribution throughout the cell components. The results established that the silver electrode is very stable when stored at reduced temperatures in the range of 0 to -51 C, in which it exhibits a permanent degradation in capacity of 0.5%/year. The results also indicated that the silver electrode is not quite as stable when operated and stored at room temperature, where it exhibits permanent degradation in the range of 3% to 14%/year. These results were employed in predicting the life capability of the proposed new Ag-H2 cell and also in assessing the merits of employing silver electrodes in long-life probe batteries.

  14. A review of radiation-grafted polymer electrolyte membranes for alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tianchi; Shao, Rong; Chen, Song; He, Xuemei; Qiao, Jinli; Zhang, Jiujun

    2015-10-01

    The past two decades have witnessed many efforts to develop radiation-grafted alkaline membranes for alkaline PEM fuel cell applications, as such membranes have certain advantages over other kinds of alkaline membranes, including well-controlled composition, functionality, and other promising properties. To facilitate research and development in this area, the present paper reviews radiation-grafted alkaline membranes. We examine their synthesis/fabrication/characterization, membrane material selection, and theoretical approaches for fundamental understanding. We also present detailed examinations of their application in fuel cell in terms of the working principles of the radiation grafting process, the fabrication of MEAs using radiation-grafted membranes, the membranes' corresponding performance in alkaline PEM fuel cells, as well as performance optimization. The paper also summarizes the challenges and mitigation strategies for radiation-grafted alkaline membranes and their application in PEM fuel cells, presenting an overall picture of the technology as it presently stands.

  15. A Lemon Cell Battery for High-Power Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muske, Kenneth R.; Nigh, Christopher W.; Weinstein, Randy D.

    2007-01-01

    The use of lemon cell battery to run an electric DC motor is demonstrated for chemistry students. This demonstration aids the students in understanding principles behind the design and construction of the lemon cell battery and principles governing the electric DC motor and other basic principles.

  16. Nickel-cadmium Battery Cell Reversal from Resistive Network Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    During the individual cell short-down procedures often used for storing or reconditioning nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) batteries, it is possible for significant reversal of the lowest capacity cells to occur. The reversal is caused by the finite resistance of the common current-carrying leads in the resistive network that is generally used during short-down. A model is developed to evaluate the extent of such a reversal in any specific battery, and the model is verified by means of data from the short-down of a f-cell, 3.5-Ah battery. Computer simulations of short-down on a variety of battery configurations indicate the desirability of controlling capacity imbalances arising from cell configuration and battery management, limiting variability in the short-down resistors, minimizing lead resistances, and optimizing lead configurations.

  17. A Lemon Cell Battery for High-Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muske, Kenneth R.; Nigh, Christopher W.; Weinstein, Randy D.

    2007-04-01

    This article discusses the development of a lemon cell battery for high-power applications. The target application is the power source of a dc electric motor for a model car constructed by first-year engineering students as part of their introductory course design project and competition. The battery is composed of a series of lemon juice cells made from UV vis cuvets that use a magnesium anode and copper cathode. Dilution of the lemon juice to reduce the rate of corrosion of the magnesium anode and the addition of table salt to reduce the internal resistance of the cell are examined. Although our specific interest is the use of this lemon cell battery to run an electric dc motor, high-power applications such as radios, portable cassette or CD players, and other battery-powered toys are equally appropriate for demonstration and laboratory purposes using this battery.

  18. Electrogeneration of hydroperoxide ion using an alkaline fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaide, F.; Brillas, E.; Cabot, P.L.; Casado, J.

    1998-10-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a pollution-control chemical commonly used as a bleaching agent, as a disinfectant, and as a nonselective oxidant for water purification and in different industrial processes. This paper describes a novel electrochemical method for the generation of HO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} using an alkaline fuel cell (AFC). The system is formed by an undivided cell containing a H{sub 2}-diffusion anode, an O{sub 2}-diffusion cathode, and a KOH solution as electrolyte. It can work in batch or in continuous mode, cogenerating electricity and HO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, which is formed from the two-electron reduction of O{sub 2} at the cathode. The evolution of cell voltage, current density, HO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production, and current efficiency with time have been determined when the electrolyte remains quiescent, recirculates through the cell, or is continuously injected to it. This last device yields the best operative parameters, allowing current densities of 130 mA/cm{sup 2} and current efficiencies close to 100% using 1 mol/dm{sup 3} KOH at 20 C. The effect of HO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} upon the anodic and cathodic reactions has been studied by linear sweep voltammetry. Adsorption of this species on the cathode can explain the loss of performance of the AFC with working time using a quiescent electrolyte or under recirculation conditions. The O{sub 2}-diffusion cathode and the AFC showed good reversibility when the cell contained a fresh KOH solution with HO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}.

  19. The Effect of Variable End of Charge Battery Management on Small-Cell Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubauer, Jeremy; Simmons, Nick; Bennetti, Andrea; Pearson, Chris; Reid, Concha

    2007-01-01

    ABSL Space Products is the world leading supplier of Lithium-ion batteries for space applications and has pioneered the use of small capacity COTS cells within large arrays. This small-cell approach has provided many benefits to space application designers through increased flexibility and reliability over more traditional battery designs. The ABSL 18650HC cell has been used in most ABSL space battery applications to date and has a recommended End Of Charge Voltage (EOCV) of 4.2V per cell. For all space applications using the ABSL 18650HC so far, this EOCV has been used at all stages of battery life from ground checkout to in orbit operations. ABSL and NASA have identified that, by using a lower EOCV for the same equivalent Depth Of Discharge (DOD), battery capacity fade could be reduced. The intention of this paper is to compare battery performance for systems with fixed and variable EOCV. In particular, the effect of employing the blanket value of 4.2V per cell versus utilizing a lower EOCV at Beginning Of Life (BOL) before gradually increasing it (as the effects of capacity fade drive the End Of Discharge Voltage closer to the acceptable system level minimum) is analyzed. Data is compared from ABSL in-house and NASA GRC tests that have been run under fixed and variable EOCV conditions. Differences in capacity fade are discussed and projections are made as to potential life extension capability by utilizing a variable EOCV strategy.

  20. Degradation of nickel anodes in alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, M.; Gülzow, E.

    Alkaline fuel cells (AFC) are an interesting alternative to polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC), especially AFCs need neither expensive electrolytes nor expensive noble metal catalysts. For using of AFCs long-term stability of the components is decisive, in particular the stability of the electrodes, because the electrolyte can be easily exchanged. The long-term behavior of AFC anodes was investigated electrochemically by measuring U- i curves. The electrodes consisting of a mixture of a nickel catalyst, which is formed from an aluminium-nickel alloy by dissolving the aluminum, polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) as organic binder and with added copper powder, rolled onto a metal web. In addition, these electrodes were characterized physically after different operation times by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), porosimetry measurements by nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The electrochemical performance decreases with operating time. The decrease of the electrochemical performance can be described by combination of two exponential functions with different time constants. The physical characterization shows that the PTFE in the electrodes partially decomposes and the nickel catalysts disintegrates. The changes of the physical characteristics can be correlated with the electrochemical performance.

  1. Teach Battery Technology with Class-Built Wet Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    With some simple metal samples and common household liquids, teachers can build wet cell batteries and use them to teach students about batteries and how they work. In this article, the author offers information that is derived from some simple experiments he conducted in his basement workshop and can easily be applied in the classroom or lab. He…

  2. Effect of the length and surface area on electrochemical performance of cobalt oxide nanowires for alkaline secondary battery application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanan; Wang, Xiaofeng; An, Cuihua; Wang, Yijing; Jiao, Lifang; Yuan, Huatang

    2014-12-01

    One-dimensional porous Co3O4 nanowires with different length have been successfully synthesized by thermal decomposition of Co-NA polymer precursors at various hydrothermal reaction times. The positive effects of longer nanowires and larger surface area on electrochemical performance of Co3O4 samples were investigated systematically. All the as-prepared Co3O4 samples display excellent discharge capacities and cycle stability on account of large surface area and porous structure, indicating great potential application of porous Co3O4 nanowires for alkaline rechargeable batteries. The Co3O4-24 h sample with the longest length shows the most outstanding electrochemical performance, and displays the maximum discharge capacity of 450.1 mAh g-1 with the capacity retention of 90.4% after 100 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g-1. Electrochemical reactions between Co and Co(OH)2 occurring on the Co3O4 electrodes are investigated by XRD, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and charge-discharge measurements.

  3. FeS anchored reduced graphene oxide nanosheets as advanced anode material with superior high-rate performance for alkaline secondary batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, Enbo; Guo, Litan; Li, Fei; Wang, Qin; Li, Jing; Li, Quanmin; Chang, Zhaorong; Yuan, Xiao-Zi

    2016-09-01

    A new nanocomposite formulation of the iron-based anode for alkaline secondary batteries is proposed. For the first time, FeS nanoparticles anchored on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets are synthesized via a facile, environmentally friendly direct-precipitation approach. In this nanocomposite, FeS nanoparticles are anchored uniformly and tightly on the surface of RGO nanosheets. As an alkaline battery anode, the FeS@RGO electrode delivers a superior high-rate charge/discharge capability and outstanding cycling stability, even at a condition without any conductive additives and a high electrode loading of ∼40 mg cm-2. At high charge/discharge rates of 5C, 10C and 20C (6000 mA g-1), the FeS@RGO electrode presents a specific capacity of ∼288, 258 and 220 mAh g-1, respectively. Moreover, the FeS@RGO electrode exhibits an admirable long cycling stability with a superior capacity retention of 87.6% for 300 cycles at a charge/discharge rate of 2C. The excellent electrochemical properties of the FeS@RGO electrode can be stemmed from the high specific surface area, peculiar electric conductivity and robust sheet-anchored structure of the FeS@RGO nanocomposite. By virtue of its superior fast charge/discharge properties, the FeS@RGO nanocomposite is suitable as an advanced anode material for high-performance alkaline secondary batteries.

  4. Alkaline fuel cells for the regenerative fuel cell energy storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The development of the alkaline Regenerative Fuel Cell System, whose fuel cell module would be a derivative of the 12-kW fuel cell power plant currently being produced for the Space Shuttle Orbiter, is reviewed. Long-term endurance testing of full-size fuel cell modules has demonstrated: (1) the extended endurance capability of potassium titanate matrix cells, (2) the long-term performance stability of the anode catalyst, and (3) the suitability of a lightweight graphite structure for use at the anode. These approaches, developed in the NASA-sponsored fuel cell technology advancement program, would also reduce cell weight by nearly one half.

  5. Alkaline sodium borohydride gel as a hydrogen source for PEMFC or an energy carrier for NaBH 4-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. H.; Li, Z. P.; Chen, L. L.

    In this preliminary study, we tried to use sodium polyacrylate as the super absorbent polymer to form alkaline NaBH 4 gel and explored its possibilities for borohydride hydrolysis and borohydride electro-oxidation. It was found that the absorption capacity of sodium polyacrylate decreased with increasing NaBH 4 concentration. The formed gel was rather stable in the sealed vessel but tended to slowly decompose in open air. Hydrogen generation from the gel was carried out using CoCl 2 catalyst precursor solutions. Hydrogen generation rate from the alkaline NaBH 4 gel was found to be higher and impurities in hydrogen were less than that from the alkaline NaBH 4 solution. The NaBH 4 gel also successfully powered a NaBH 4-air battery.

  6. Controlled electrochemical etching of nanoporous Si anodes and its discharge behavior in alkaline Si-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Won; Kim, Soeun; Ocon, Joey D; Abrenica, Graniel Harne A; Lee, Jae Kwang; Lee, Jaeyoung

    2015-02-11

    We report the fabrication of nanoporous silicon (nPSi) electrodes via electrochemical etching to form a porous Si layer with controllable thickness and pore size. Varying the etching time and ethanolic HF concentration results in different surface morphologies, with various degrees of electrolyte access depending on the pore characteristics. Optimizing the etching condition leads to well-developed nPSi electrodes, which have thick porous layers and smaller pore diameter and exhibit improved discharge behavior as anodes in alkaline Si-air cells in contrast to flat Si anode. Although electrochemical etching is effective in improving the interfacial characteristics of Si in terms of high surface area, we observed that mild anodization occurs and produces an oxide overlayer. We then show that this oxide layer in nPSi anodes can be effectively removed to produce an nPSi anode with good discharge behavior in an actual alkaline Si-air cell. In the future, the combination of high surface area nPSi anodes with nonaqueous electrolytes (e.g., room-temperature ionic liquid electrolyte) to minimize the strong passivation behavior and self-discharge in Si could lead to Si-air cells with a stable voltage profile and high anode utilization.

  7. Controlled electrochemical etching of nanoporous Si anodes and its discharge behavior in alkaline Si-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Won; Kim, Soeun; Ocon, Joey D; Abrenica, Graniel Harne A; Lee, Jae Kwang; Lee, Jaeyoung

    2015-02-11

    We report the fabrication of nanoporous silicon (nPSi) electrodes via electrochemical etching to form a porous Si layer with controllable thickness and pore size. Varying the etching time and ethanolic HF concentration results in different surface morphologies, with various degrees of electrolyte access depending on the pore characteristics. Optimizing the etching condition leads to well-developed nPSi electrodes, which have thick porous layers and smaller pore diameter and exhibit improved discharge behavior as anodes in alkaline Si-air cells in contrast to flat Si anode. Although electrochemical etching is effective in improving the interfacial characteristics of Si in terms of high surface area, we observed that mild anodization occurs and produces an oxide overlayer. We then show that this oxide layer in nPSi anodes can be effectively removed to produce an nPSi anode with good discharge behavior in an actual alkaline Si-air cell. In the future, the combination of high surface area nPSi anodes with nonaqueous electrolytes (e.g., room-temperature ionic liquid electrolyte) to minimize the strong passivation behavior and self-discharge in Si could lead to Si-air cells with a stable voltage profile and high anode utilization. PMID:25594400

  8. Process of treating cellulosic membrane and alkaline with membrane separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    The improvement of water-soluble cellulose ether membranes for use as separators in concentrated alkaline battery cells is discussed. The process of contacting membranes with an aqueous alkali solution of concentration less than that of the alkali solution to be used in the battery but above that at which the membrane is soluble is described.

  9. Regan isoenzyme of alkaline phosphatase as a tumour marker for renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowczan, J; Pattman, S; Jenkinson, F; Quinton, R

    2014-09-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme present in all tissues of the human body. Several isoforms of this enzyme have been described with different catalytic nature, stability and antigenic structure. Rises in the activity of alkaline phosphatase are recognised in various states including bone diseases, liver disease, pregnancy, hyperthyroidism and malignant processes. The Regan isoenzyme, a rare variant of placental alkaline phosphatase, has been identified circulating in association with various tumours. The reported case describes a rising Regan isoform of alkaline phosphatase concentrations that led to a new diagnosis of occult renal cell carcinoma and persistently elevated activity postoperatively signposting persistent or recurrent disease.

  10. DNA polymorphism of alkaline phosphatase isozyme genes: Linkage disequilibria between placental and germ-cell alkaline phosphotase alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, G.; Beckman, L.; Sikstroem, C. ); Millan, J.L. )

    1992-11-01

    The use of human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) cDNA as a probe allows the detection and identification of restriction DNA fragments derived from three homologous genes, i.e., intestinal alkaline phosphatase (AP), germ-cell AP (GCAP), and PLAP. In previous RFLP studies the authors have reported linkage disequilibria between an RsaI and two PstI (a and b) polymorphic restriction sites and electrophoretic types of PLAP. In this report they present evidence that, in spite of the strong correlation with PLAP types, PstI(b) is an RFLP of GCAP. The data indicate close linkage between the PLAP and GCAP loci. 18 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of Nickel Hydrogen Battery Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frate, David T.; Nahra, Henry K.

    1996-01-01

    Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni/H2) battery cells have been used on several satellites and are planned for use on the International Space Station. In January 1992, the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) conducted hypervelocity impact testing on Ni/H2 cells to characterize their failure modes. The cell's outer construction was a 24 mil-thick Inconel 718 pressure vessel. A sheet of 1.27 cm thick honeycomb was placed in front of the battery cells during testing to simulate the on-orbit box enclosure. Testing was conducted at the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). The hypervelocity gun used was a 7.6 mm (0.30 caliber) two-stage light gas gun. Test were performed at speeds of 3, 6, and 7 km/sec using aluminum 2017 spherical particles of either 4.8 or 6.4 mm diameter as the projectile. The battery cells were electrically charged to about 75 percent of capacity, then back-filled with hydrogen gas to 900 psi simulating the full charge condition. High speed film at 10,000 frames/sec was taken of the impacts. Impacts in the dome area (top) and the electrode area (middle) of the battery cells were investigated. Five tests on battery cells were performed. The results revealed that in all of the test conditions investigated, the battery cells simply vented their hydrogen gas and some electrolyte, but did not burst or generate any large debris fragments.

  12. An improved alkaline direct formate paper microfluidic fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Vicente; Domalaon, Kryls; Tang, Catherine; Sotez, Samantha; Mendez, Alex; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Purohit, Krutarth; Pham, Linda; Haan, John; Gomez, Frank A

    2016-02-01

    Paper-based microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs) are a potential replacement for traditional FCs and batteries due to their low cost, portability, and simplicity to operate. In MFCs, separate solutions of fuel and oxidant migrate through paper due to capillary action and laminar flow and, upon contact with each other and catalyst, produce electricity. In the present work, we describe an improved microfluidic paper-based direct formate FC (DFFC) employing formate and hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. The dimensions of the lateral column, current collectors, and cathode were optimized. A maximum power density of 2.53 mW/cm(2) was achieved with a DFFC of surface area 3.0 cm(2) , steel mesh as current collector, 5% carbon to paint mass ratio for cathode electrode and, 30% hydrogen peroxide. The longevity of the MFC's detailed herein is greater than eight hours with continuous flow of streams. In a series configuration, the MFCs generate sufficient energy to power light-emitting diodes and a handheld calculator. PMID:26572774

  13. An improved alkaline direct formate paper microfluidic fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Vicente; Domalaon, Kryls; Tang, Catherine; Sotez, Samantha; Mendez, Alex; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Purohit, Krutarth; Pham, Linda; Haan, John; Gomez, Frank A

    2016-02-01

    Paper-based microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs) are a potential replacement for traditional FCs and batteries due to their low cost, portability, and simplicity to operate. In MFCs, separate solutions of fuel and oxidant migrate through paper due to capillary action and laminar flow and, upon contact with each other and catalyst, produce electricity. In the present work, we describe an improved microfluidic paper-based direct formate FC (DFFC) employing formate and hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. The dimensions of the lateral column, current collectors, and cathode were optimized. A maximum power density of 2.53 mW/cm(2) was achieved with a DFFC of surface area 3.0 cm(2) , steel mesh as current collector, 5% carbon to paint mass ratio for cathode electrode and, 30% hydrogen peroxide. The longevity of the MFC's detailed herein is greater than eight hours with continuous flow of streams. In a series configuration, the MFCs generate sufficient energy to power light-emitting diodes and a handheld calculator.

  14. Testing Conducted for Lithium-Ion Cell and Battery Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.; Miller, Thomas B.; Manzo, Michelle A.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has been conducting in-house testing in support of NASA's Lithium-Ion Cell Verification Test Program, which is evaluating the performance of lithium-ion cells and batteries for NASA mission operations. The test program is supported by NASA's Office of Aerospace Technology under the NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Program, which serves to bridge the gap between the development of technology advances and the realization of these advances into mission applications. During fiscal year 2003, much of the in-house testing effort focused on the evaluation of a flight battery originally intended for use on the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander. Results of this testing will be compared with the results for similar batteries being tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Air Force Research Laboratory, and the Naval Research Laboratory. Ultimately, this work will be used to validate lithium-ion battery technology for future space missions. The Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander battery was characterized at several different voltages and temperatures before life-cycle testing was begun. During characterization, the battery displayed excellent capacity and efficiency characteristics across a range of temperatures and charge/discharge conditions. Currently, the battery is undergoing lifecycle testing at 0 C and 40-percent depth of discharge under low-Earth-orbit (LEO) conditions.

  15. Battery system and method for sensing and balancing the charge state of battery cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Francis J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A battery system utilizes a plurality of transformers interconnected with the battery cells. The transformers each have at least one transformer core operable for magnetization in at least a first magnetic state with a magnetic flux in a first direction and a second magnetic state with a magnetic flux in a second direction. The transformer cores retain the first magnetic state and the second magnetic state without current flow through said plurality of transformers. Circuitry is utilized for switching a selected transformer core between the first and second magnetic states to sense voltage and/or balance particular cells or particular banks of cells.

  16. Increased performance of hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cells under alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Rago, Laura; Baeza, Juan A; Guisasola, Albert

    2016-06-01

    This work reports the first successful enrichment and operation of alkaline bioelectrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells, MFC, and microbial electrolysis cells, MEC). Alkaline (pH=9.3) bioelectrochemical hydrogen production presented better performance (+117%) compared to conventional neutral conditions (2.6 vs 1.2 litres of hydrogen gas per litre of reactor per day, LH2·L(-1)REACTOR·d(-1)). Pyrosequencing results of the anodic biofilm showed that while Geobacter was mainly detected under conventional neutral conditions, Geoalkalibacter sp. was highly detected in the alkaline MFC (21%) and MEC (48%). This is the first report of a high enrichment of Geoalkalibacter from an anaerobic mixed culture using alkaline conditions in an MEC. Moreover, Alkalibacter sp. was highly present in the anodic biofilm of the alkaline MFC (37%), which would indicate its potentiality as a new exoelectrogen.

  17. Increased performance of hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cells under alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Rago, Laura; Baeza, Juan A; Guisasola, Albert

    2016-06-01

    This work reports the first successful enrichment and operation of alkaline bioelectrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells, MFC, and microbial electrolysis cells, MEC). Alkaline (pH=9.3) bioelectrochemical hydrogen production presented better performance (+117%) compared to conventional neutral conditions (2.6 vs 1.2 litres of hydrogen gas per litre of reactor per day, LH2·L(-1)REACTOR·d(-1)). Pyrosequencing results of the anodic biofilm showed that while Geobacter was mainly detected under conventional neutral conditions, Geoalkalibacter sp. was highly detected in the alkaline MFC (21%) and MEC (48%). This is the first report of a high enrichment of Geoalkalibacter from an anaerobic mixed culture using alkaline conditions in an MEC. Moreover, Alkalibacter sp. was highly present in the anodic biofilm of the alkaline MFC (37%), which would indicate its potentiality as a new exoelectrogen. PMID:26855359

  18. Rechargeability and economic aspects of alkaline zinc-manganese dioxide cells for electrical storage and load leveling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingale, Nilesh D.; Gallaway, Joshua W.; Nyce, Michael; Couzis, Alexander; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2015-02-01

    Batteries based on manganese dioxide (MnO2) cathodes are good candidates for grid-scale electrical energy storage, as MnO2 is low-cost, relatively energy dense, safe, water-compatible, and non-toxic. Alkaline Zn-MnO2 cells, if cycled at reduced depth of discharge (DOD), have been found to achieve substantial cycle life with battery costs projected to be in the range of 100 to 150 per kWh (delivered). Commercialization of rechargeable Zn-MnO2 batteries has in the past been hampered due to poor cycle life. In view of this, the work reported here focuses on the long-term rechargeability of prismatic MnO2 cathodes at reduced DOD when exposed to the effects of Zn anodes and with no additives or specialty materials. Over 3000 cycles is shown to be obtainable at 10% DOD with energy efficiency >80%. The causes of capacity fade during long-term cycling are also investigated and appear to be mainly due to the formation of irreversible manganese oxides in the cathode. Analysis of the data indicates that capacity loss is rapid in the first 250 cycles, followed by a regime of stability that can last for thousands of cycles. A model has been developed that captures the behavior of the cells investigated using measured state of charge (SOC) data as input. An approximate economic analysis is also presented to evaluate the economic viability of Zn-MnO2 batteries based on the experiments reported here.

  19. Rechargeability and economic aspects of alkaline zinc-manganese dioxide cells for electrical storage and load leveling

    SciTech Connect

    Ingale, ND; Gallaway, JW; Nyce, M; Couzis, A; Banerjee, S

    2015-02-15

    Batteries based on manganese dioxide (MnO2) cathodes are good candidates for grid-scale electrical energy storage, as MnO2 is low-cost, relatively energy dense, safe, water-compatible, and non-toxic. Alkaline Zn-MnO2 cells, if cycled at reduced depth of discharge (DOD), have been found to achieve substantial cycle life with battery costs projected to be in the range of $100 to 150 per kWh (delivered). Commercialization of rechargeable Zn-MnO2 batteries has in the past been hampered due to poor cycle life. In view of this, the work reported here focuses on the long-term rechargeability of prismatic MnO2 cathodes at reduced DOD when exposed to the effects of Zn anodes and with no additives or specialty materials. Over 3000 cycles is shown to be obtainable at 10% DOD with energy efficiency >80%. The causes of capacity fade during long-term cycling are also investigated and appear to be mainly due to the formation of irreversible manganese oxides in the cathode. Analysis of the data indicates that capacity loss is rapid in the first 250 cycles, followed by a regime of stability that can last for thousands of cycles. A model has been developed that captures the behavior of the cells investigated using measured state of charge (SOC) data as input. An approximate economic analysis is also presented to evaluate the economic viability of Zn-MnO2 batteries based on the experiments reported here. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Battery selection for space experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francisco, David R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper will delineate the criteria required for the selection of batteries as a power source for space experiments. Four basic types of batteries will be explored, lead acid, silver zinc, alkaline manganese and nickel cadmium. A detailed description of the lead acid and silver zinc cells while a brief exploration of the alkaline manganese and nickel cadmium will be given. The factors involved in battery selection such as packaging, energy density, discharge voltage regulation, and cost will be thoroughly examined. The pros and cons of each battery type will be explored. Actual laboratory test data acquired for the lead acid and silver zinc cell will be discussed. This data will include discharging under various temperature conditions, after three months of storage and with different types of loads. A description of the required maintenance for each type of battery will be investigated. The lifetime and number of charge/discharge cycles will be discussed.

  1. Battery selection for space experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco, David R.

    1992-10-01

    This paper will delineate the criteria required for the selection of batteries as a power source for space experiments. Four basic types of batteries will be explored, lead acid, silver zinc, alkaline manganese and nickel cadmium. A detailed description of the lead acid and silver zinc cells while a brief exploration of the alkaline manganese and nickel cadmium will be given. The factors involved in battery selection such as packaging, energy density, discharge voltage regulation, and cost will be thoroughly examined. The pros and cons of each battery type will be explored. Actual laboratory test data acquired for the lead acid and silver zinc cell will be discussed. This data will include discharging under various temperature conditions, after three months of storage and with different types of loads. A description of the required maintenance for each type of battery will be investigated. The lifetime and number of charge/discharge cycles will be discussed.

  2. In situ preparation of 1D Co@C composite nanorods as negative materials for alkaline secondary batteries.

    PubMed

    An, Cuihua; Wang, Yijing; Xu, Yanan; Wang, Ying; Huang, Yanan; Jiao, Lifang; Yuan, Huatang

    2014-03-26

    Cobalt-based coordination compounds were successfully prepared via employing nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as a complexing agent through a mild surfactant-free solvothermal process. Cobalt ions are linked with the amino group or carboxyl groups of NTA to become one-dimensional nanorods that can be proved by Fourier transform infrared measurement findings. The morphologies of the precursor Co-NTA highly depend on the solvent composition, the reaction time and temperature. The probable growth mechanism has been proposed. After heat treatment, the Co-NTA precursor can be completely converted into Co@C nanorods assembled by numerous core-shell-like Co@C nanoparticles, which preserved the rodlike morphology. The as-prepared Co@C composites display a rodlike morphology with 4 μm length and 100 nm diameter. The electrochemical performances of this novel Co@C material as the alkaline secondary Ni/Co battery negative electrode have been systematically researched. The discharge capacity of the Co@C-1 composite electrode can attain 609 mAh g(-1) and retains about 383.3 mAh g(-1) after 120 cycles (the discharge current density of 500 mA g(-1)). The novel material exhibits a high discharge capacity of 610 and 470 mAh g(-1) at discharge currents of 100 and 1000 mA g(-1), respectively. This suggests that approximately 77% of the discharge capacity is kept when the discharge current density is increased to 1000 mA g(-1) (10 times the initial current density of 100 mA g(-1)). The excellent electrochemical properties could be ascribed to the porous channels of the novel Co@C materials, which is beneficial to electrolyte diffusion and electrons and ions transportation. PMID:24571638

  3. A flexible alkaline rechargeable Ni/Fe battery based on graphene foam/carbon nanotubes hybrid film.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jilei; Chen, Minghua; Zhang, Lili; Jiang, Jian; Yan, Jiaxu; Huang, Yizhong; Lin, Jianyi; Fan, Hong Jin; Shen, Ze Xiang

    2014-12-10

    The development of portable and wearable electronics has promoted increasing demand for high-performance power sources with high energy/power density, low cost, lightweight, as well as ultrathin and flexible features. Here, a new type of flexible Ni/Fe cell is designed and fabricated by employing Ni(OH)2 nanosheets and porous Fe2O3 nanorods grown on lightweight graphene foam (GF)/carbon nanotubes (CNTs) hybrid films as electrodes. The assembled f-Ni/Fe cells are able to deliver high energy/power densities (100.7 Wh/kg at 287 W/kg and 70.9 Wh/kg at 1.4 kW/kg, based on the total mass of active materials) and outstanding cycling stabilities (retention 89.1% after 1000 charge/discharge cycles). Benefiting from the use of ultralight and thin GF/CNTs hybrid films as current collectors, our f-Ni/Fe cell can exhibit a volumetric energy density of 16.6 Wh/l (based on the total volume of full cell), which is comparable to that of thin film battery and better than that of typical commercial supercapacitors. Moreover, the f-Ni/Fe cells can retain the electrochemical performance with repeated bendings. These features endow our f-Ni/Fe cells a highly promising candidate for next generation flexible energy storage systems.

  4. Recent progress in alkaline direct ethylene glycol fuel cells for sustainable energy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, L.; Chen, R.

    2016-10-01

    Alkaline direct ethylene glycol fuel cells are one of the most promising power sources for portable, mobile and stationary power applications, primarily because this type of fuel cell runs on a sustainable fuel and the key materials that constitute the fuel cell are relatively inexpensive. This review article summarizes and discusses the past investigations on the development of alkaline direct ethylene glycol fuel cells, including the physical and chemical processes through the fuel cell structure, the electrocatalytic oxidation and electrocatalysts of ethylene glycol, the singe-cell performance, and innovative system designs.

  5. Inexpensive cross-linked polymeric separators made from water-soluble polymers. [for secondary alkaline nickel-zinc and silver-zinc cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, L.-C.; Sheibley, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), cross-linked chemically with aldehyde reagents, produces membranes which demonstrate oxidation resistance, dimensional stability, low ionic resistivity (less than 0.8 Ohms sq cm), low zincate diffusivity (less than 1 x 10 to the -7th mols/sq cm per min), and low zinc dendrite penetration rate (greater than 350 min) which make them suitable for use as alkaline battery separators. They are intrinsically low in cost, and environmental health and safety problems associated with commercial production appear minimal. Preparation, property measurements, and cell test results in Ni/Zn and Ag/Zn cells are described and discussed.

  6. Control of volume resistivity in inorganic-organic separators. [for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Manzo, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    Control of resistivity in NASA inorganic-organic separators is achieved by incorporating small percentages of high surface area, fine-particle silica with other ingredients in the separator coating. The volume resistivity appears to be predictable from coating composition, that is, from the surface area of filler particles in the coating. The approach has been applied to two polymer-'plasticizer'-filler coating systems, where the filler content of each is below the generally acknowledged critical pigment volume concentration of the coating. Application of these coating systems to 0.0254 cm thick (10 mil) fuel-cell grade asbestos sheet produces inexpensive, flexible, microporous separators that perform at least as well as the original inorganic-organic concept, the Astropower separator.

  7. Damage of cells and battery packs due to ground impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yong; Wierzbicki, Tomasz; Sahraei, Elham; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2014-12-01

    The present paper documents a comprehensive study on the ground impact of lithium-ion battery packs in electric vehicles. With the purpose of developing generic methodology, a hypothetic global finite element model is adopted. The force-displacement response of indentation process simulated by the global FE model is cross-validated with the earlier analytical solutions. The punching process after the armor plate perforation, the ensuing crack propagation of the armor plate as well as the local deformation modes of individual battery cells are clearly predicted by the global modeling. A parametric study is carried out, and a few underlying rules are revealed, providing important clues on the design of protective structure of battery packs against ground impact. In the next step, detailed FE models at the level of a single battery cell and shell casing are developed and simulations are performed using boundaries and loading conditions taken from the global solution. In the detailed modeling the failure of individual components is taken into account, which is an important indicator of electric short circuit of a battery cell and possible thermal runaway. The damage modes and the deformation tolerances of components in the battery cell under various loading conditions are observed and compared.

  8. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Unocic, Raymond R; Baggetto, Loïc; Veith, Gabriel M; Aguiar, Jeffery A; Unocic, Kinga A; Sacci, Robert L; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren L

    2015-11-25

    We demonstrate the ability to apply electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to follow the chemistry and oxidation states of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 battery electrodes within a battery solvent. This is significant as the use and importance of in situ electrochemical cells coupled with a scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) has expanded and been applied to follow changes in battery chemistry during electrochemical cycling. We discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity and provide a framework to apply this important analytical method to future in situ electrochemical studies.

  9. Probing Battery Chemistry with Liquid Cell Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren L.

    2015-11-25

    We demonstrate the ability to apply electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to follow the chemistry and oxidation states of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 battery electrodes within a battery solvent. The use and importance of in situ electrochemical cells coupled with a scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) has expanded and been applied to follow changes in battery chemistry during electrochemical cycling. Furthermore, we discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity and provide a framework to apply this important analytical method to future in situ electrochemical studies.

  10. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Unocic, Raymond R; Baggetto, Loïc; Veith, Gabriel M; Aguiar, Jeffery A; Unocic, Kinga A; Sacci, Robert L; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren L

    2015-11-25

    We demonstrate the ability to apply electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to follow the chemistry and oxidation states of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 battery electrodes within a battery solvent. This is significant as the use and importance of in situ electrochemical cells coupled with a scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) has expanded and been applied to follow changes in battery chemistry during electrochemical cycling. We discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity and provide a framework to apply this important analytical method to future in situ electrochemical studies. PMID:26404766

  11. Failure propagation in multi-cell lithium ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Lamb, Joshua; Orendorff, Christopher J.; Steele, Leigh Anna M.; Spangler, Scott W.

    2014-10-22

    Traditionally, safety and impact of failure concerns of lithium ion batteries have dealt with the field failure of single cells. However, large and complex battery systems require the consideration of how a single cell failure will impact the system as a whole. Initial failure that leads to the thermal runaway of other cells within the system creates a much more serious condition than the failure of a single cell. This work examines the behavior of small modules of cylindrical and stacked pouch cells after thermal runaway is induced in a single cell through nail penetration trigger [1] within the module.more » Cylindrical cells are observed to be less prone to propagate, if failure propagates at all, owing to the limited contact between neighboring cells. However, the electrical connectivity is found to be impactful as the 10S1P cylindrical cell module did not show failure propagation through the module, while the 1S10P module had an energetic thermal runaway consuming the module minutes after the initiation failure trigger. Modules built using pouch cells conversely showed the impact of strong heat transfer between cells. In this case, a large surface area of the cells was in direct contact with its neighbors, allowing failure to propagate through the entire battery within 60-80 seconds for all configurations (parallel or series) tested. This work demonstrates the increased severity possible when a point failure impacts the surrounding battery system.« less

  12. Failure propagation in multi-cell lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, Joshua; Orendorff, Christopher J.; Steele, Leigh Anna M.; Spangler, Scott W.

    2014-10-22

    Traditionally, safety and impact of failure concerns of lithium ion batteries have dealt with the field failure of single cells. However, large and complex battery systems require the consideration of how a single cell failure will impact the system as a whole. Initial failure that leads to the thermal runaway of other cells within the system creates a much more serious condition than the failure of a single cell. This work examines the behavior of small modules of cylindrical and stacked pouch cells after thermal runaway is induced in a single cell through nail penetration trigger [1] within the module. Cylindrical cells are observed to be less prone to propagate, if failure propagates at all, owing to the limited contact between neighboring cells. However, the electrical connectivity is found to be impactful as the 10S1P cylindrical cell module did not show failure propagation through the module, while the 1S10P module had an energetic thermal runaway consuming the module minutes after the initiation failure trigger. Modules built using pouch cells conversely showed the impact of strong heat transfer between cells. In this case, a large surface area of the cells was in direct contact with its neighbors, allowing failure to propagate through the entire battery within 60-80 seconds for all configurations (parallel or series) tested. This work demonstrates the increased severity possible when a point failure impacts the surrounding battery system.

  13. Fully Coupled Simulation of Lithium Ion Battery Cell Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Trembacki, Bradley L.; Murthy, Jayathi Y.; Roberts, Scott Alan

    2015-09-01

    Lithium-ion battery particle-scale (non-porous electrode) simulations applied to resolved electrode geometries predict localized phenomena and can lead to better informed decisions on electrode design and manufacturing. This work develops and implements a fully-coupled finite volume methodology for the simulation of the electrochemical equations in a lithium-ion battery cell. The model implementation is used to investigate 3D battery electrode architectures that offer potential energy density and power density improvements over traditional layer-by-layer particle bed battery geometries. Advancement of micro-scale additive manufacturing techniques has made it possible to fabricate these 3D electrode microarchitectures. A variety of 3D battery electrode geometries are simulated and compared across various battery discharge rates and length scales in order to quantify performance trends and investigate geometrical factors that improve battery performance. The energy density and power density of the 3D battery microstructures are compared in several ways, including a uniform surface area to volume ratio comparison as well as a comparison requiring a minimum manufacturable feature size. Significant performance improvements over traditional particle bed electrode designs are observed, and electrode microarchitectures derived from minimal surfaces are shown to be superior. A reduced-order volume-averaged porous electrode theory formulation for these unique 3D batteries is also developed, allowing simulations on the full-battery scale. Electrode concentration gradients are modeled using the diffusion length method, and results for plate and cylinder electrode geometries are compared to particle-scale simulation results. Additionally, effective diffusion lengths that minimize error with respect to particle-scale results for gyroid and Schwarz P electrode microstructures are determined.

  14. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kim, Jaekook

    2004-01-13

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2 M'O.sub.3 in which 0cells or batteries are disclosed with anode, cathode and electrolyte as are batteries of several cells connected in parallel or series or both.

  15. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kim, Jaekook

    2006-11-14

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2M'O.sub.3 in which 0cells or batteries are disclosed with anode, cathode and electrolyte as are batteries of several cells connected in parallel or series or both.

  16. Preparation and Electrochemical Performance of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 Cathode Materials for Lithium-ion Batteries from Spent Mixed Alkaline Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Xi, Guoxi

    2016-01-01

    LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cathode materials of lithium-ion batteries were successfully re-synthesized using mixed spent alkaline zinc-manganese batteries and spent lithium-ion batteries as the raw materials. These materials were synthesized by using a combination of dissolution, co-precipitation, calcination, battery preparation, and battery charge-discharge processes. The phase composition, morphology, and electrochemical performance of the products were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, infrared spectra, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy, and charge-discharge measurements. The results showed that LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cathode materials could be successfully re-synthesized at optimal preparation conditions of: co-precipitation, pH value of 8, calcination temperature of 850°C, and calcination time of 10 h. Furthermore, the electrochemical results showed that the re-synthesized sample could deliver an initial discharge capacity of up to 160.2 mAh g-1 and Coulomb efficiency of 99.8%.

  17. Flow-Assisted Alkaline Battery: Low-Cost Grid-Scale Electrical Storage using a Flow-Assisted Rechargeable Zinc-Manganese Dioxide Battery

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-15

    GRIDS Project: Traditional consumer-grade disposable batteries are made of Zinc and Manganese, 2 inexpensive, abundant, and non-toxic metals. But these disposable batteries can only be used once. If they are recharged, the Zinc in the battery develops filaments called dendrites that grow haphazardly and disrupt battery performance, while the Manganese quickly loses its ability to store energy. CUNY Energy Institute is working to tame dendrite formation and to enhance the lifetime of Manganese in order to create a long-lasting, fully rechargeable battery for grid-scale energy storage. CUNY Energy Institute is also working to reduce dendrite formation by pumping fluid through the battery, enabling researchers to fix the dendrites as they’re forming. The team has already tested its Zinc battery through 3,000 recharge cycles (and counting). CUNY Energy Institute aims to demonstrate a better cycle life than lithium-ion batteries, which can be up to 20 times more expensive than Zinc-based batteries.

  18. Separator for alkaline electric cells and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfluger, H. L.; Hoyt, H. E. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    Modified cellulose ether films having an increased electrolytic conductivity and a useable flexibility and in certain instances an increased flexibility are presented. Battery separator membranes comprising a cellulose ether and a minor proportion of a compatible water soluble base selected from the group consisting of alkali metal and ammonium hydroxides, aliphatic amines, and aliphatic hydroxyamines are used.

  19. Evaluation of AA5052 alloy anode in alkaline electrolyte with organic rare-earth complex additives for aluminium-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dapeng; Li, Heshun; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Daquan; Gao, Lixin; Tong, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Behaviours of the AA5052 aluminium alloy anode of the alkaline aluminium-air battery are studied by the hydrogen evolution test, the electrochemical measurements and the surface analysis method. The combination of amino-acid and rare earth as electrolyte additives effectively retards the self-corrosion of AA5052 aluminium alloy in 4 M NaOH solution. It shows that the combination of L-cysteine and cerium nitrate has a synergistic effect owing to the formation of a complex film on AA5052 alloy surface. The organic rare-earth complex can decrease the anodic polarisation, suppress the hydrogen evolution and increase the anodic utilization rate.

  20. A fuel cell-powered battery-charging station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhenhua

    Rechargeable batteries such as lithium-ion cells are playing an increasingly significant role in the utilization of portable electronic devices such as portable computers, cellular phones and camcorders. However, their advantages are partially restricted by the limited usable time. A fuel cell power battery-charging station provides a good solution for recharging these batteries in the fieldwork. This dissertation presents the work on the design, development, validation and implementation of a fuel cell power battery-charging station. The methodology used here is a five-stage research approach: conceptual design, detailed system analysis and design, software validation, hardware validation, and hardware implementation. An effective power processing circuit for the fuel cell powered battery-charging station is designed. Various possible control strategies (including static and real-time control strategies) for active power sharing in the fuel cell powered battery-charging station are discovered in order to minimize the total charging time. A simple method is proposed to estimate the state-of-charge of the battery by estimating the battery open-circuit voltage with current correction and linearly fitting between the open-circuit voltage and the state-of-charge of the battery. These control strategies are then implemented with appropriate approaches in MATLAB/SimulinkRTM. The performances of the various available control strategies are investigated and compared by conducting simulation studies and experiment tests. Experiment data validate the simulation results. Simulation and experiment results also show that the proposed state-of-charge estimation method is effective for the active power sharing strategies. Synergetic control theory is applied to synthesize the controller for buck converters to regulate the pulse current charging of the batteries. This method is completely analytical and uses the full non-linear model of the converter. In comparison to available

  1. Battery and Fuel Cell Development for NASA's Constellation Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's return to the moon will require advanced battery, fuel cell and regenerative fuel cell energy storage systems. This paper will provide an overview of the planned energy storage systems for the Orion Spacecraft and the Aries rockets that will be used in the return journey to the Moon. Technology development goals and approaches to provide batteries and fuel cells for the Altair Lunar Lander, the new space suit under development for extravehicular activities (EY A) on the Lunar surface, and the Lunar Surface Systems operations will also be discussed.

  2. Battery and Fuel Cell Development for NASA's Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.; Reid, Concha M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's return to the moon will require advanced battery, fuel cell and regenerative fuel cell energy storage systems. This paper will provide an overview of the planned energy storage systems for the Orion Spacecraft and the Aries rockets that will be used in the return journey to the Moon. Technology development goals and approaches to provide batteries and fuel cells for the Altair Lunar Lander, the new space suit under development for extravehicular activities (EVA) on the Lunar surface, and the Lunar Surface Systems operations will also be discussed.

  3. Reclaiming the spent alkaline zinc manganese dioxide batteries collected from the manufacturers to prepare valuable electrolytic zinc and LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 materials.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ya; Cui, Yan; Zuo, Xiaoxi; Huang, Shanna; Hu, Keshui; Xiao, Xin; Nan, Junmin

    2014-10-01

    A process for reclaiming the materials in spent alkaline zinc manganese dioxide (Zn-Mn) batteries collected from the manufacturers to prepare valuable electrolytic zinc and LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 materials is presented. After dismantling battery cans, the iron cans, covers, electric rods, organic separator, label, sealing materials, and electrolyte are separated through the washing, magnetic separation, filtrating, and sieving operations. Then, the powder residues react with H2SO4 (2 mol L(-1)) solution to dissolve zinc under a liquid/solid ratio of 3:1 at room temperature, and subsequently, the electrolytic Zn with purity of ⩾99.8% is recovered in an electrolytic cell with a cathode efficiency of ⩾85% under the conditions of 37-40°C and 300 A m(-2). The most of MnO2 and a small quantity of electrolytic MnO2 are recovered from the filtration residue and the electrodeposit on the anode of electrolytic cell, respectively. The recovered manganese oxides are used to synthesize LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 material of lithium-ion battery. The as-synthesized LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 discharges 118.3 mAh g(-1) capacity and 4.7 V voltage plateau, which is comparable to the sample synthesized using commercial electrolytic MnO2. This process can recover the substances in the spent Zn-Mn batteries and innocuously treat the wastewaters, indicating that it is environmentally acceptable and applicable. PMID:24906867

  4. Improved zinc electrode and rechargeable zinc-air battery

    DOEpatents

    Ross, P.N. Jr.

    1988-06-21

    The invention comprises an improved rechargeable zinc-air cell/battery having recirculating alkaline electrolyte and a zinc electrode comprising a porous foam support material which carries the active zinc electrode material. 5 figs.

  5. High Energy Lithium-Ion VES Cells And Batteries Performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castric, A.-F.; Lawson, S.; Borthomieu, Y.

    2011-10-01

    b Saft's Space VES range of lithium-ion cells have been designed specifically to meet the satellites on-board power need, while meeting the legitimate high levels of requirements for space products. The purpose of the paper is to develop how the VES batteries designs have progressively evolved in order to accommodate the needs, requirements and constraints evolutions. The following topics will be presented: - Description of the main design features of the VES Li- ion batteries. - How the optimised battery configuration is selected against the required EOL power need or other constraints. - Presentation of the batteries performances (electrical, mechanical, thermal, interface, weight, ...). - Measures implemented in order to maintain these performances, and to guarantee the best product quality as per space standards.

  6. Lithium-Sulfur Batteries: from Liquid to Solid Cells?

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Zhan; Liang, Chengdu

    2014-11-11

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries supply a theoretical specific energy 5 times higher than that of lithium-ion batteries (2,500 vs. ~500 Wh kg-1). However, the insulating properties and polysulfide shuttle effects of the sulfur cathode and the safety concerns of the lithium anode in liquid electrolytes are still key limitations to practical use of traditional Li-S batteries. In this review, we start with a brief discussion on fundamentals of Li-S batteries and key challenges associated with the conventional liquid cells. Then, we introduce the most recent progresses in the liquid systems, including the sulfur positive electrodes, the lithium negative electrodes, and themore » electrolytes and binders. We discuss the significance of investigating electrode reaction mechanisms in liquid cells using in-situ techniques to monitor the compositional and morphological changes. By moving from the traditional liquid cells to recent solid cells, we discuss the importance of this game-changing shift with positive advances in both solid electrolytes and electrode materials. Finally, the opportunities and perspectives for future research on Li-S batteries are presented.« less

  7. Lithium-Sulfur Batteries: from Liquid to Solid Cells?

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhan; Liang, Chengdu

    2014-11-11

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries supply a theoretical specific energy 5 times higher than that of lithium-ion batteries (2,500 vs. ~500 Wh kg-1). However, the insulating properties and polysulfide shuttle effects of the sulfur cathode and the safety concerns of the lithium anode in liquid electrolytes are still key limitations to practical use of traditional Li-S batteries. In this review, we start with a brief discussion on fundamentals of Li-S batteries and key challenges associated with the conventional liquid cells. Then, we introduce the most recent progresses in the liquid systems, including the sulfur positive electrodes, the lithium negative electrodes, and the electrolytes and binders. We discuss the significance of investigating electrode reaction mechanisms in liquid cells using in-situ techniques to monitor the compositional and morphological changes. By moving from the traditional liquid cells to recent solid cells, we discuss the importance of this game-changing shift with positive advances in both solid electrolytes and electrode materials. Finally, the opportunities and perspectives for future research on Li-S batteries are presented.

  8. Overview of NASA battery technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riebling, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Highlights of NASA's technology program in batteries for space applications are presented. Program elements include: (1) advanced ambient temperature alkaline secondaries, which are primarily nickel-cadmium cells in batteries; (2) a toroidal nickel cadmium secondaries with multi-kilowatt-hour storage capacity primarily for lower orbital applications; (3) ambient temperature lithium batteries, both primary and secondaries, primarily silver hydrogen and high-capacity nickel hydrogen.

  9. Battery paste compositions and electrochemical cells for use therewith

    DOEpatents

    Olson, John B.

    1999-12-07

    An improved battery paste composition and a lead-acid electrochemical cell which incorporates the composition. The cell includes a positive current collector and a negative current collector which are each coated with a paste containing one or more lead-containing compositions and a paste vehicle to form a positive plate and a negative plate. An absorbent electrolyte-containing separator member may also be positioned between the positive and negative plates. The paste on the positive current collector, the negative current collector, or both further includes a special additive consisting of polyvinylsulfonic acid or salts thereof which provides many benefits including improved battery cycle life, increased charge capacity, and enhanced overall stability. The additive also makes the pastes smoother and more adhesive, thereby improving the paste application process. The paste compositions of interest may be used in conventional flat-plate cells or in spirally wound batteries with equal effectiveness.

  10. Battery paste compositions and electrochemical cells for use therewith

    DOEpatents

    Olson, John B.

    1999-02-16

    An improved battery paste composition and a lead-acid electrochemical cell which incorporates the composition. The cell includes a positive current collector and a negative current collector which are each coated with a paste containing one or more lead-containing compositions and a paste vehicle to form a positive plate and a negative plate. An absorbent electrolyte-containing separator member may also be positioned between the positive and negative plates. The paste on the positive current collector, the negative current collector, or both further includes a special additive consisting of polyvinylsulfonic acid or salts thereof which provides many benefits including improved battery cycle life, increased charge capacity, and enhanced overall stability. The additive also makes the pastes smoother and more adhesive, thereby improving the paste application process. The paste compositions of interest may be used in conventional flat-plate cells or in spirally wound batteries with equal effectiveness.

  11. Battery paste compositions and electrochemical cells for use therewith

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.B.

    1999-02-16

    An improved battery paste composition and a lead-acid electrochemical cell which incorporates the composition are disclosed. The cell includes a positive current collector and a negative current collector which are each coated with a paste containing one or more lead-containing compositions and a paste vehicle to form a positive plate and a negative plate. An absorbent electrolyte-containing separator member may also be positioned between the positive and negative plates. The paste on the positive current collector, the negative current collector, or both further includes a special additive consisting of polyvinyl sulfonic acid or salts thereof which provides many benefits including improved battery cycle life, increased charge capacity, and enhanced overall stability. The additive also makes the pastes smoother and more adhesive, thereby improving the paste application process. The paste compositions of interest may be used in conventional flat-plate cells or in spirally wound batteries with equal effectiveness. 2 figs.

  12. Failure propagation in multi-cell lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Joshua; Orendorff, Christopher J.; Steele, Leigh Anna M.; Spangler, Scott W.

    2015-06-01

    Traditionally, safety and impact of failure concerns of lithium ion batteries have dealt with the field failure of single cells. However, large and complex battery systems require the consideration of how a single cell failure will impact the system as a whole. Initial failure that leads to the thermal runaway of other cells within the system creates a much more serious condition than the failure of a single cell. This work examines the behavior of small modules of cylindrical and stacked pouch cells after thermal runaway is induced in a single cell. Cylindrical cells are observed to be less prone to propagate owing to the limited contact between neighboring cells. The electrical connectivity is found to be impactful as the 10S1P cylindrical cell module did not show failure propagation through the module, while the 1S10P module had an energetic thermal runaway consuming the module minutes after the initiation failure trigger. Modules built using pouch cells conversely showed the impact of strong heat transfer between cells. In this case, a large surface area of the cells was in direct contact with its neighbors, allowing failure to propagate through the entire battery within 60-80 s for all configurations (parallel or series) tested.

  13. Alkaline phosphatase protein increases in response to prednisolone in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hanford, W C; Kottel, R H; Fishman, W H

    1981-01-01

    Quantification of term-placental alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme protein in HeLa TCRC-1 cells grown in the presence and absence of prednisolone indicates that there is a net increase in amount of enzyme-specific protein in prednisolone-stimulated cells. In a similar analysis of HeLa D98AH2 cells, prednisolone treatment causes the appearance of term-placental alkaline phosphatase protein and the loss of the intestinal isoenzyme protein. These results support the interpretation that the response of these cells to corticosteroids is the net accumulation of alkaline phosphatase protein rather than the modification of pre-existing enzyme to a more active state. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:7340849

  14. Reclaiming the spent alkaline zinc manganese dioxide batteries collected from the manufacturers to prepare valuable electrolytic zinc and LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Ya; Cui, Yan; Zuo, Xiaoxi; Huang, Shanna; Hu, Keshui; Xiao, Xin; Nan, Junmin

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The spent Zn–Mn batteries collected from manufacturers is the target waste. • A facile reclaiming process is presented. • The zinc is reclaimed to valuable electrolytic zinc by electrodepositing method. • The manganese elements are to produce valuable LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} battery material. • The reclamation process features environmental friendliness and saving resource. - Abstract: A process for reclaiming the materials in spent alkaline zinc manganese dioxide (Zn–Mn) batteries collected from the manufacturers to prepare valuable electrolytic zinc and LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} materials is presented. After dismantling battery cans, the iron cans, covers, electric rods, organic separator, label, sealing materials, and electrolyte are separated through the washing, magnetic separation, filtrating, and sieving operations. Then, the powder residues react with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (2 mol L{sup −1}) solution to dissolve zinc under a liquid/solid ratio of 3:1 at room temperature, and subsequently, the electrolytic Zn with purity of ⩾99.8% is recovered in an electrolytic cell with a cathode efficiency of ⩾85% under the conditions of 37–40 °C and 300 A m{sup −2}. The most of MnO{sub 2} and a small quantity of electrolytic MnO{sub 2} are recovered from the filtration residue and the electrodeposit on the anode of electrolytic cell, respectively. The recovered manganese oxides are used to synthesize LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} material of lithium-ion battery. The as-synthesized LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} discharges 118.3 mAh g{sup −1} capacity and 4.7 V voltage plateau, which is comparable to the sample synthesized using commercial electrolytic MnO{sub 2}. This process can recover the substances in the spent Zn–Mn batteries and innocuously treat the wastewaters, indicating that it is environmentally acceptable and applicable.

  15. Electrolyte management considerations in modern nickel hydrogen and nickel cadmium cell and battery designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.; Zimmerman, A. H.

    1995-01-01

    In the early 1980's the NASA Lewis group addressed the topic of designing nickel hydrogen cells for LEO applications. As published in 1984, the design addressed the topics of gas management, liquid management, plate expansion, and the recombination of oxygen during overcharge. This design effort followed principles set forth in an earlier Lewis paper that addressed the topic of pore size engineering. At about that same time, the beneficial effect on cycle life of lower electrolyte concentrations was verified by Hughes Aircraft as part of a Lewis funded study. A succession of life cycle tests of these concepts have been carried out that essentially verified all of this earlier work. During these past two decades, some of the mysteries involved in the active material of the nickel electrode have been resolved by careful research efforts carried out at several laboratories. At The Aerospace Corporation, Dr. Zimmerman has been developing a sophisticated model of an operating nickel hydrogen cell which will be used to model certain mechanisms that have contributed to premature failures in nickel hydrogen and nickel cadmium cells. During the course of trying to understand and model abnormal nickel hydrogen cell behaviors, we have noted that not enough attention has been paid to the potassium ion content in these cells, and more recently batteries. Several of these phenomenon have been well known in the area of alkaline fuel cells, but only recently have they been examined as they might impact alkaline cell designs. This paper will review three general areas where the potassium ion content can impact the performance and life of nickel hydrogen and nickel cadmium devices, Once these phenomenon are understood conceptually, the impact of potassium content on a potential cell design can be evaluated with the aid of an accurate model of an operating cell or battery. All three of these areas are directly related to the volume tolerance and pore size engineering aspects of the

  16. Alkaline phosphatase activity in salivary gland cells of Rhodnius neglectus and R. prolixus (Hemiptera, Triatominae).

    PubMed

    Lima-Oliveira, A P M; Alevi, K C C; Anhê, A C B; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V

    2016-07-29

    Alkaline phosphatase activity was detected in salivary gland cells of the Rhodnius neglectus Lent, 1954, and R. prolixus Stal, 1859, vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas, 1909 (etiological agent of Chagas disease) and T. rangeli Tejera, 1920 (pathogenic to insect). The Gomori technique was used to demonstrate alkaline phosphatase activity. Alkaline phosphatase activity was observed throughout the entire gland, with an increased activity in the posterior region of the principal gland. In particular, phosphatase activity was found in the nucleolar corpuscles, suggesting a relationship with the rRNA transcription and ribosomal biogenesis. Alkaline phosphatase was also detected in the nuclear membrane and nuclear matrix, suggesting an association with the nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of ribonucleoproteins and the mechanisms of cell cycle and DNA replication, respectively. This study highlights the importance of alkaline phosphatase in the salivary gland of R. prolixus and R. neglectus and emphasizes its importance in secretory activity. Secretory activity is directly involved in hematophagy and, consequently, in development during metamorphosis. The observed presence of alkaline phosphatase suggests its involvement in the production of saliva allowing feeding of these insects that are important vectors of Chagas disease.

  17. Alkaline phosphatase activity in salivary gland cells of Rhodnius neglectus and R. prolixus (Hemiptera, Triatominae).

    PubMed

    Lima-Oliveira, A P M; Alevi, K C C; Anhê, A C B; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V

    2016-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase activity was detected in salivary gland cells of the Rhodnius neglectus Lent, 1954, and R. prolixus Stal, 1859, vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas, 1909 (etiological agent of Chagas disease) and T. rangeli Tejera, 1920 (pathogenic to insect). The Gomori technique was used to demonstrate alkaline phosphatase activity. Alkaline phosphatase activity was observed throughout the entire gland, with an increased activity in the posterior region of the principal gland. In particular, phosphatase activity was found in the nucleolar corpuscles, suggesting a relationship with the rRNA transcription and ribosomal biogenesis. Alkaline phosphatase was also detected in the nuclear membrane and nuclear matrix, suggesting an association with the nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of ribonucleoproteins and the mechanisms of cell cycle and DNA replication, respectively. This study highlights the importance of alkaline phosphatase in the salivary gland of R. prolixus and R. neglectus and emphasizes its importance in secretory activity. Secretory activity is directly involved in hematophagy and, consequently, in development during metamorphosis. The observed presence of alkaline phosphatase suggests its involvement in the production of saliva allowing feeding of these insects that are important vectors of Chagas disease. PMID:27525888

  18. Sealed bipolar multi-cell battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A low maintenance battery comprises a sealed casing (102) having a cavity (204) receiving a stack (108) of monopolar and bipolar plates (110, 112) interspersed with mats (122) of fiberglass felt immobilizing electrolyte and forming a gas path for diffusion of oxygen to the negative electrode (112). The casing contains a single, resealable vent (202). During charging, oxygen generated at the positive plate (110) diffuses through the mat (122) and decomposes at the negative plate (112). The negative plate (112) has a larger capacity than the positive plate (110) to prevent evolution of hydrogen. Voltage potential is increased or decreased by placing one or more bipolar plates (120) in series relation between alternating positive and negative monopolar plates that are connected in parallel to respective positive and negative battery terminals (104, 106). The monoplates (110, 112) are connected in parallel to respective positive and negative battery terminals (104, 106) by way of bus plates (114, 116, 130, 132). The resealable vent permits operation by way of the oxygen cycle which prevents loss of electrolyte. The vent prevents invasion of oxygen from the ambient to discharge negative plates.

  19. Reliability Through Life of Internal Protection Devices in Small-Cell ABSL Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubauer, Jeremy; Ng, Ka Lok; Bennetti, Andrea; Pearson, Chris; Rao, gopal

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews a reliability analysis of small cell protection batteries. The contents include: 1) The s-p Topology; 2) Cell Level Protection Devices; 3) Battery Level Fault Protection; 4) Large Cell Comparison; and 5) Battery Level Testing and Results.

  20. 49 CFR 173.189 - Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Batteries containing sodium or cells containing... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.189 Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium. (a) Batteries and cells may not contain any hazardous material other than sodium, sulfur or sodium compounds...

  1. 49 CFR 173.189 - Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Batteries containing sodium or cells containing... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.189 Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium. (a) Batteries and cells may not contain any hazardous material other than sodium, sulfur or polysulfides....

  2. 49 CFR 173.189 - Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Batteries containing sodium or cells containing... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.189 Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium. (a) Batteries and cells may not contain any hazardous material other than sodium, sulfur or sodium compounds...

  3. 49 CFR 173.189 - Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Batteries containing sodium or cells containing... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.189 Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium. (a) Batteries and cells may not contain any hazardous material other than sodium, sulfur or sodium compounds...

  4. 49 CFR 173.189 - Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Batteries containing sodium or cells containing... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.189 Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium. (a) Batteries and cells may not contain any hazardous material other than sodium, sulfur or sodium compounds...

  5. Breakthrough Flow Battery Cell Stack: Transformative Electrochemical Flow Storage System (TEFSS)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-09

    GRIDS Project: UTRC is developing a flow battery with a unique design that provides significantly more power than today's flow battery systems. A flow battery is a cross between a traditional battery and a fuel cell. Flow batteries store their energy in external tanks instead of inside the cell itself. Flow batteries have traditionally been expensive because the battery cell stack, where the chemical reaction takes place, is costly. In this project, UTRC is developing a new stack design that achieves 10 times higher power than today’s flow batteries. This high power output means the size of the cell stack can be smaller, reducing the amount of expensive materials that are needed. UTRC’s flow battery will reduce the cost of storing electricity for the electric grid, making widespread use feasible.

  6. Toroidal cell and battery. [storage battery for high amp-hour load applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagle, W. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A toroidal storage battery designed to handle relatively high amp-hour loads is described. The cell includes a wound core disposed within a pair of toroidal channel shaped electrodes spaced apart by nylon insulator. The shape of the case electrodes of this toroidal cell allows a first planar doughnut shaped surface and the inner cylindrical case wall to be used as a first electrode and a second planar doughnut shaped surface and the outer cylindrical case wall to be used as a second electrode. Connectors may be used to stack two or more toroidal cells together by connecting substantially the entire surface area of the first electrode of a first cell to substantially the entire surface area of the second electrode of a second cell. The central cavity of each toroidal cell may be used as a conduit for pumping a fluid through the toroidal cell to thereby cool the cell.

  7. Laboratory evaluation of a pilot cell battery protection system for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, R. L.; Thomas, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    An energy storage method for the 3.5 kW battery power system was investigated. The Pilot Cell Battery Protection System was tested for use in photovoltaic power systems and results show that this is a viable method of storage battery control. The method of limiting battery depth of discharge has the following advantages: (1) temperature sensitivity; (2) rate sensitivity; and (3) state of charge indication. The pilot cell concept is of interest in remote stand alone photovoltaic power systems. The battery can be protected from damaging overdischarge by using the proper ratio of pilot cell capacities to main battery capacity.

  8. Poly(imide)/Organically-Modified Montmorillonite Nanocomposite as a Potential Membrane for Alkaline Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Battirola, Liliane C.; Gasparotto, Luiz H. S.; Rodrigues-Filho, Ubirajara P.; Tremiliosi-Filho, Germano

    2012-01-01

    In this work we evaluated the potentiality of a poly(imide) (PI)/organically-modified montmorillonite (O-MMT) nanocomposite membrane for the use in alkaline fuel cells. Both X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy revealed a good dispersion of O-MMT into the PI matrix and preservation of the O-MMT layered structure. When compared to the pure PI, the addition of O-MMT improved thermal stability and markedly increased the capability of absorbing electrolyte and ionic conductivity of the composite. The results show that the PI/O-MMT nanocomposite is a promising candidate for alkaline fuel cell applications. PMID:24958290

  9. Battery and cell testing at NASA. Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitt, Tom; Jackson, Lorna

    1992-01-01

    An overview covering the ten cell/battery tests ongoing at MSFC are presented. The presentation is not intended to give specific test results on any test. The purpose and related program that applies to each test is acknowledged. Except for the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES), all are energy-stored and retrieval devices at low earth orbit (LEO) cycles.

  10. Resource recovery of scrap silicon solar battery cell.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Hwa; Hung, Chi-En; Tsai, Shang-Lin; Popuri, Srinivasa R; Liao, Ching-Hua

    2013-05-01

    In order to minimize pollution problems and to conserve limited natural resources, a hydrometallurgical procedure was developed in this study to recover the valuable resources of silicon (Si), silver (Ag) and aluminum (Al) from scrap silicon solar battery cells. In this study, several methods of leaching, crystallization, precipitation, electrolysis and replacement were employed to investigate the recovery efficiency of Ag and Al from defective monocrystalline silicon solar battery cells. The defective solar battery cells were ground into powder followed by composition analysis with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The target metals Ag and Al weight percentage were found to be 1.67 and 7.68 respectively. A leaching process was adopted with nitric acid (HNO3), hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and sodium hydroxide as leaching reagent to recover Ag and Al from a ground solar battery cell. Aluminum was leached 100% with 18N H2SO4 at 70°C and Ag was leached 100% with 6N HNO3. Pure Si of 100% was achieved from the leaching solution after the recovery of Ag and Al, and was analyzed by scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectroscopy. Aluminum was recovered by crystallization process and silver was recovered by precipitation, electrolysis and replacement processes. These processes were applied successfully in the recovery of valuable metal Ag of 98-100%.

  11. Thermal modeling of a Ni-H2 battery cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Si-Ok; Dewitt, K. J.; Keith, T. G.

    1991-01-01

    The nickel-hydrogen secondary battery has many desirable features which make it attractive for satellite power systems. It can provide a significant improvement over the energy density of present spacecraft nickel-cadnium batteries, combined with longer life, tolerance to overcharge and possibility of state-of-charge indication. However, to realize these advantages, accurate thermal modeling of nickel-hydrogen cells is required in order to properly design the battery pack so that it operates within a specified temperature range during the operation. Maintenance of a low operating temperature and a uniform temperature profile within the cell will yield better reliability, improved cycle life and better charge/discharge efficiencies. This research has the objective of developing and testing a thermal model which can be used to characterize battery operation. Primarily, temperature distribution with the heat generation rates as a function of position and time will be evaluated for a Ni-H2 cell in the three operating modes: (1) charge cycle, (2) discharge cycle, and (3) overcharge condition, if applicable. Variables to be examined include charging current, discharge rates, state of charge, pressure and temperature. Once the thermal model has been developed, this resulting model will predict the actual operating temperature and temperature gradient for the specific cell geometry to be used.

  12. COTS Li-Ion Cells in High Voltage Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Francis; Darcy, Eric; Jeevarajan, Judy; Cowles, Phil

    2003-01-01

    Testing at NASA JSC and COMDEV shows that Commercial Off the Shelf (COTS) Li Ion cells can not be used in high voltage batteries safely without considering the voltage stresses that may be put on the protective devices in them during failure modes.

  13. Nongassing nickel-cadmium battery electrodes and cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luksha, E.; Gordy, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    The failure of nickel-cadmium storage batteries due to severe gassing during charging is discussed. In order to increase the life of such cells, nongassing positive and negative electrodes are used. The gassing characteristics of nickel electrodes were evaluated as a function of their loading, charge rate, and charge temperature.

  14. Lithium Metal Oxide Electrodes For Lithium Cells And Batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kim, Jaekook

    2004-01-20

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2 M'O.sub.3 in which 0cells or batteries are disclosed with anode, cathode and electrolyte as are batteries of several cells connected in parallel or series or both.

  15. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil

    2008-12-23

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2M'O.sub.3 in which 0cells or batteries are disclosed with anode, cathode and electrolyte as are batteries of several cells connected in parallel or series or both.

  16. Fabrication of free-standing NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoarrays via a facile modified hydrothermal synthesis method and their applications for lithium ion batteries and high-rate alkaline batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Qingyun Zhang, Xiangyang; Shen, Youming

    2015-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Hydrothermal-synthesized NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays exhibit porous structure and high capacity as well as good cycling life for lithium ion batteries and alkaline batteries. - Highlights: • Self-supported NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays are prepared by a hydrothermal method. • NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays show high capacity and good cycling life. • Porous nanoflake arrays structure is favorable for fast ion/electron transfer. - Abstract: Self-supported NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays on nickel foam are prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. The obtained NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflakes with thicknesses of ∼25 nm grow vertically to the nickel foam substrate and form an interconnected porous network with pore diameters of 50–500 nm. As anode material of LIBs, the NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays show a high initial coulombic efficiency of 76%, as well as good cycling stability with a capacity of 880 mAh g{sup −1} at 0.5 A g{sup −1}, and 523 mAh g{sup −1} at 1.5 A g{sup −1} after 50 cycles. As the cathode of alkaline batteries, a high capacity of 95 mAh g{sup −1} is achieved at 2 A g{sup −1} and 94% retention is maintained after 10,000 cycles. The superior electrochemical performance is mainly due to the unique nanoflake arrays structure with large surface area and shorter diffusion length for mass and charge transport.

  17. Improved alkaline earth-oxyhalide electrochemical cell for low-temperature use

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, M.; Walker, C.W.

    1988-05-20

    This invention relates in general to an alkaline earth-oxyhalide electrochemical cell and in particular, to an improved alkaline earth oxyhalide electrochemical cell for low temperature use. A typical cell includes a calcium anode, 1M Ca(AlCl/sub 4/)/sub 2/ thionyl chloride/75% Shawinigan - 25% acetone washed Black Pearls 2000 carbon black cathode. The improvement to this cell involves the addition of 10 vol. % bromine to the electrolyte. During discharge at about -30 C, cathode potential is raised by about 0.5 volt providing a cell voltage well above the 2.0 volt minimum which is a standard military specification. Without bromine, cell capacity is about one minute. With the addition of bromine, load voltage is initially 2.5 volts, then slowly decreases to 2.0 volts over about twelve minutes.

  18. The Arabidopsis alkaline ceramidase TOD1 is a key turgor pressure regulator in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Yu; Shi, Dong-Qiao; Zhang, Wen-Juan; Tang, Zuo-Shun; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2015-01-01

    Turgor pressure plays pivotal roles in the growth and movement of walled cells that make up plants and fungi. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating turgor pressure and the coordination between turgor pressure and cell wall remodelling for cell growth remain poorly understood. Here, we report the characterization of Arabidopsis TurgOr regulation Defect 1 (TOD1), which is preferentially expressed in pollen tubes and silique guard cells. We demonstrate that TOD1 is a Golgi-localized alkaline ceramidase. tod1 mutant pollen tubes have higher turgor than wild type and show growth retardation both in pistils and in agarose medium. In addition, tod1 guard cells are insensitive to abscisic acid (ABA)-induced stomatal closure, whereas sphingosine-1-phosphate, a putative downstream component of ABA signalling and product of alkaline ceramidases, promotes closure in both wild type and tod1. Our data suggest that TOD1 acts in turgor pressure regulation in both guard cells and pollen tubes.

  19. Battery selection for Space Shuttle experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francisco, David R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper will delineate the criteria required for the selection of batteries as a power source for space experiments. Four basic types of batteries will be explored, lead acid, silver zinc, alkaline manganese, and nickel cadmium. A detailed description of the lead acid and silver zinc cells and a brief exploration of the alkaline manganese and nickel cadmium will be given. The factors involved in battery selection such as packaging, energy density, discharge voltage regulation, and cost will be thoroughly examined. The pros and cons of each battery type will be explored. Actual laboratory test data acquired for the lead acid and silver zinc cell will be discussed. This data will include discharging under various temperature conditions, after three months of storage, and with different types of loads. The lifetime and number of charge/discharge cycles will also be discussed. A description of the required maintenance for each type of battery will be investigated.

  20. Battery selection for Space Shuttle experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco, David R.

    1993-04-01

    This paper will delineate the criteria required for the selection of batteries as a power source for space experiments. Four basic types of batteries will be explored, lead acid, silver zinc, alkaline manganese, and nickel cadmium. A detailed description of the lead acid and silver zinc cells and a brief exploration of the alkaline manganese and nickel cadmium will be given. The factors involved in battery selection such as packaging, energy density, discharge voltage regulation, and cost will be thoroughly examined. The pros and cons of each battery type will be explored. Actual laboratory test data acquired for the lead acid and silver zinc cell will be discussed. This data will include discharging under various temperature conditions, after three months of storage, and with different types of loads. The lifetime and number of charge/discharge cycles will also be discussed. A description of the required maintenance for each type of battery will be investigated.

  1. High temperature battery cell comprising stress free hollow fiber bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, J. N.; Revak, T. T.; Rossini, F. J.

    1985-04-16

    Thermal stressing of hollow fibers constituting the electrolyte-separator in a high temperature battery cell, and of certain other elements thereof, is avoided by suspending the assembly comprising the anolyte tank, the tube-sheet, the hollow fibers and a cathodic current collector-distributor within the casing and employing a limp connection between the collector-distributor and the cathode terminal of the cell.

  2. Increase in alkaline phosphatase activity in calvaria cells cultured with diphosphonates.

    PubMed Central

    Felix, R; Fleisch, H

    1979-01-01

    1. Dichloromethanediphosphonate and to a lesser degree 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonate, two compounds characterized by a P-C-P bond, increased the alkaline phosphatase activity of cultured rat calvaria cells up to 30 times in a dose-dependent fashion. 2. Both diphosphonates also slightly inhibited the protein synthesis in these cells. 3. Thymidine, an inhibitor of cell division, did not inhibit the induction of the enzyme, indicating that the increase in enzyme activity was not due to the formation of a specific population of cells with high alkaline phosphatase activity. 4. The effect on alkaline phosphatase was suppressed by the addition of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis. 5. After subculturing the stimulated cells in medium without diphosphonates, the enzyme activity fell almost to the control value. 6. Bovine parathyrin diminished the enzyme activity of the control cells and the cells treated with dichloromethanediphosphonate; however, at high concentration the effect of parathyrin was greater on the diphosphonate-treated cells than on the control cells. 7. The electrophoretic behaviour, heat inactivation, inhibition by bromotetramisole or by phenylalanine, and the Km value of the induced enzyme were identical with that of the control enzyme. PMID:534490

  3. Alkaline stable C2-substituted imidazolium-based cross-linked anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bencai; Chu, Fuqiang; Ren, Yurong; Jia, Baoping; Yuan, Ningyi; Shang, Hui; Feng, Tianying; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Ding, Jianning

    2014-11-01

    Novel C2-substituted imidazolium-based cross-linked anion exchange membranes (AEMs) are prepared via irradiation with ultraviolet light cross-linking of styrene, acrylonitrile and 1,3-diallyl-2-methyl imidazolium bromine ([DAMIm][Br]), and followed by anion exchange with hydroxide ions. [DAMIm][Br] is synthesized and used both as crosslinker and hydrophilic phase. The ionic conductivity of the AEMs increases with increasing [DAMIm][Br] content due to the hydrophilic regions and the continuous hydrophilic polymeric networks formed in the membranes. The imidazolium-based cross-linked AEMs show excellent thermal stabilities, and the membrane which containing 30% mass fraction of [DAMIm][Br] shows ionic conductivity up to 2.0 × 10-2 S cm-1 and good long-term chemical stability in 1 M KOH solution. The results of this study suggest that the C2-substituted imidazolium-based cross-linked AEMs have good perspectives for alkaline fuel cell applications.

  4. Copper nitride nanocubes: size-controlled synthesis and application as cathode catalyst in alkaline fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haibin; Chen, Wei

    2011-10-01

    Copper nitride nanocubes are synthesized in a facile one-phase process. The crystal size could be tuned easily by using different primary amines as capping agents. Such Pt-free nanocrystals exhibit electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction and appear to be promising cathodic electrocatalysts in alkaline fuel cells. PMID:21894995

  5. Overdischarge protection in high-temperature cells and batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redey, Laszlo

    1989-07-01

    Overdischarge indication and protection is provided in a lithium alloy-metal sulfide, secondary electrochemical cell and batteries of such cells through use of a low lithium activity phase that ordinarily is not matched with positive electrode material. Low lithium activity phases such as Li(0.1)Al(0.9) and LiAlSi in correspondence with positive electrode material cause a downward gradient in cell voltage as an indication of overdischarge prior to damage to the cell. Moreover, the low lithium activity phase contributes lithium into the electrolyte and provides a lithium shuttling current as overdischarge protection after all of the positive electrode material is discharged.

  6. Overdischarge protection in high-temperature cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Redey, Laszlo

    1990-01-01

    Overdischarge indication and protection is provided in a lithium alloy - metal sulfide, secondary electrochemical cell and batteries of such cells through use of a low lithium activity phase that ordinarily is not matched with positive electrode material. Low lithium activity phases such as Li.sub.0.1 Al.sub.0.9 and LiAlSi in correspondence with positive electrode material cause a downward gradient in cell voltage as an indication of overdischarge prior to damage to the cell. Moreover, the low lithium activity phase contributes lithium into the electrolyte and provides a lithium shuttling current as overdischarge protection after all of the positive electrode material is discharged.

  7. A study of the direct dimethyl ether fuel cell using alkaline anolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kan; Lao, Shao Jiang; Qin, Hai Ying; Liu, Bin Hong; Li, Zhou Peng

    The electrooxidation behavior of dimethyl ether (DME) dissolved in acidic, neutral or alkaline anolyte has been studied. The cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that DME in alkaline anolyte demonstrates higher electrooxidation reactivity than that in acidic or neutral anolyte. With increasing the NaOH concentration in the anolyte, the electrooxidation reactivity of DME can be further improved. Direct dimethyl ether fuel cells (DDFCs) are assembled by using Nafion membrane as the electrolyte, Pt/C as the cathode catalyst, and Pt-Ru/C as the anode catalyst. It is found that the use of alkaline anolyte can significantly improve the performance of DDFCs. A maximum power density of 60 mW cm -2 has been achieved when operating the DDFC at 80 °C under ambient pressure.

  8. Enhanced cell adhesion on bioinert ceramics mediated by the osteogenic cell membrane enzyme alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Aminian, Alieh; Shirzadi, Bahareh; Azizi, Zahra; Maedler, Kathrin; Volkmann, Eike; Hildebrand, Nils; Maas, Michael; Treccani, Laura; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2016-12-01

    Functional bone and dental implant materials are required to guide cell response, offering cues that provide specific instructions to cells at the implant/tissue interface while maintaining full biocompatibility as well as the desired structural requirements and functions. In this work we investigate the influence of covalently immobilized alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an enzyme involved in bone mineralization, on the first contact and initial cell adhesion. To this end, ALP is covalently immobilized by carbodiimide-mediated chemoligation on two highly bioinert ceramics, alpha-alumina (Al2O3) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) that are well-established for load-bearing applications. The physicochemical surface properties are evaluated by profilometry, zeta potential and water contact angle measurements. The initial cell adhesion of human osteoblasts (HOBs), human osteoblast-like cells (MG-63) and mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) was investigated. Cell adhesion was assessed at serum free condition via quantification of percentage of adherent cells, adhesion area and staining of the focal adhesion protein vinculin. Our findings show that after ALP immobilization, the Al2O3 and Y-TZP surfaces gained a negative charge and their hydrophilicity was increased. In the presence of surface-immobilized ALP, a higher cell adhesion, more pronounced cell spreading and a higher number of focal contact points were found. Thereby, this work gives evidence that surface functionalization with ALP can be utilized to modify inert materials for biological conversion and faster bone regeneration on inert and potentially load-bearing implant materials. PMID:27612703

  9. Alkaline regenerative fuel cell energy storage system for manned orbital satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Gitlow, B.; Sheibley, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that the alkaline regenerative fuel cell system represents a highly efficient, lightweight, reliable approach for providing energy storage in an orbiting satellite. In addition to its energy storage function, the system can supply hydrogen and oxygen for attitude control of the satellite and for life support. A summary is presented of the results to date obtained in connection with the NASA-sponsored fuel cell technology advancement program, giving particular attention to the requirements of the alkaline regenerative fuel cell and the low-earth mission. Attention is given to system design guidelines, weight considerations, gold-platinum cathode cell performance, matrix development, the electrolyte reservoir plate, and the cyclical load profile tests.

  10. Glucocorticoid hormones increase the activity of plasma membrane alkaline phosphodiesterase I in rat hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, G G; Amar-Costesec, A; Verhaegen, M; Granner, D K

    1980-01-01

    In rat hepatoma cells the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone causes a 3-fold increase in the activity of the plasma membrane enzyme alkaline phosphodiesterase I (oligonucleat 5'-nucleotidohydrolase, EC 3.1.4.1). The data are consistent with an induction phenomenon mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor involved in tyrosine aminotransferase induction. The effect on alkaline phosphodiesterase I is not a reflection of a general membrane effect of dexamethasone, because the activity of three other enzymes of the plasma membrane is unaffected. On the other hand, nucleoside diphosphatase (nucleoside diphosphate phosphohydrolase acting on ADP) activity is inhibited. Thus, two more enzymes sensitive to glucocorticoids have been identified in a cell line in which these hormones influence only very few gene products. This paper describes enzymatic changes in the plasma membrane of rat hepatoma cells in which glucocorticoids normalize a number of membrane-associated processes that are considered to be characteristic of transformed cells. PMID:6102383

  11. Non-gassing nickel-cadmium battery electrodes and cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luksha, E.; Gordy, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    The concept of a negative limited nongassing nickel-cadmium battery was demonstrated by constructing and testing practical size experimental cells of approximately 25 Ah capacity. These batteries operated in a gas-free manner and had measured energy densities of 10-11 Wh/lb. Thirty cells were constructed for extensive testing. Some small cells were tested for over 200 cycles at 100% depth. For example, a small cell with an electrodeposited cadmium active mass on a silver screen still had 55% of its theoretical capacity (initial efficiency was 85%). There was no evidence of deterioration of gassing properties with cycling of the nickel electrodes. The charge temperature was observed to be the most critical variable governing nickel electrode gassing. This variable was shown to be age dependent. Four types of cadmium electrodes were tested: an electrodeposited cadmium active mass on a cadmium or silver substrate, a porous sintered silver substrate based electrode, and a Teflon bonded pressed cadmium electrode. The electrodeposited cadmium mass on a silver screen was found to be the best all-around electrode from a performance point of view and from the point of view of manufacturing them in a size required for a 25 Ah size battery.

  12. Utilization of automotive shredder residues in a thermal process for recovery of manganese and zinc from zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, N M; Belardi, G; Medici, F; Piga, L

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study is the recovery by thermal treatment of manganese and zinc from a mixture of zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries, on the basis of the different phase change temperatures of the two metal-bearing phases. ASR (Automotive Shredder Residue), containing 68% of carbon, was added to the mixture to act as a reductant to metallic Zn of the zinc-bearing phases. The mixture was subsequently heated in different atmospheres (air, CO2 and N2) and at different temperatures (900°C, 1000°C and 1200°C) and stoichiometric excess of ASR (300%, 600% and 900%). Characterization of the mixture and of the residues of thermal treatment was carried out by chemical analysis, TGA/DTA, SEM and XRD. The results show that recovery of 99% of zinc (grade 97%) is achieved at 1000°C in N2 with a stoichiometric excess of car-fluff of 900%. This product could be suitable for production of new batteries after refining by hydrometallurgical way. Recovery of Mn around 98% in the residue of the treatment is achieved at any temperature and atmosphere tested with a grade of 57% at 900% excess of car-fluff. This residue is enriched in manganese oxide and could be used in the production of iron-manganese alloys. PMID:26777778

  13. Utilization of automotive shredder residues in a thermal process for recovery of manganese and zinc from zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, N M; Belardi, G; Medici, F; Piga, L

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study is the recovery by thermal treatment of manganese and zinc from a mixture of zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries, on the basis of the different phase change temperatures of the two metal-bearing phases. ASR (Automotive Shredder Residue), containing 68% of carbon, was added to the mixture to act as a reductant to metallic Zn of the zinc-bearing phases. The mixture was subsequently heated in different atmospheres (air, CO2 and N2) and at different temperatures (900°C, 1000°C and 1200°C) and stoichiometric excess of ASR (300%, 600% and 900%). Characterization of the mixture and of the residues of thermal treatment was carried out by chemical analysis, TGA/DTA, SEM and XRD. The results show that recovery of 99% of zinc (grade 97%) is achieved at 1000°C in N2 with a stoichiometric excess of car-fluff of 900%. This product could be suitable for production of new batteries after refining by hydrometallurgical way. Recovery of Mn around 98% in the residue of the treatment is achieved at any temperature and atmosphere tested with a grade of 57% at 900% excess of car-fluff. This residue is enriched in manganese oxide and could be used in the production of iron-manganese alloys.

  14. Thermal Imaging of Aerospace Battery Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shue, Jack; Ramirez, Julian B.; Sullivan, David; Lee, Leonine; Rao, Gopalakrishna

    2006-01-01

    Surface Thermal Profiles of Eagle Picher rabbit-ear 50Ah NiH2 and of Saft 40 Ah Li-ion cylindrical cells have been studied using ThermCAM S60 FLIR Systems. Popping Phenomenon in NiH2 cell is demonstrated Temperature gradient in NiH2 is slightly higher than normally considered, for example. Middle of stack to top or bottom is about 12.9 C compared to <7 C (may be due to passive cooling). Less than 1 C thermal gradient on the Li-Ion cell vessel surface. Significantly lower heat generation in Li-Ion cell compared to NiH2 cell. -May be due to a favorable charge method used for Li-Ion cell.

  15. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie; Aguiar, Jeffery A.

    2015-09-15

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to determine the chemistry and oxidation state of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 thin film battery electrodes in liquid cells for in situ scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM). Using the L2,3 white line intensity ratio method we determine the oxidation state of Mn and Ti in a liquid electrolyte solvent and discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity.

  16. Pyramidal texturing of silicon surface via inorganic-organic hybrid alkaline liquor for heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fengyou; Zhang, Xiaodan; Wang, Liguo; Jiang, Yuanjian; Wei, Changchun; Zhao, Ying

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate a new class of silicon texturing approach based on inorganic (sodium hydroxide, NaOH) and organic (tetramethylammonium hydroxide, TMAH) alkaline liquor etching processes for photovoltaic applications. The first stage of inorganic alkaline etching textures the silicon surface rapidly with large pyramids and reduces the cost. The subsequent organic alkaline second-etching improves the coverage of small pyramids on the silicon surface and strip off the metallic contaminants produced by the first etching step. In addition, it could smoothen the surface of the pyramids to yield good morphology. In this study, the texturing duration of both etching steps was controlled to optimize the optical and electrical properties as well as the surface morphology and passivation characteristics of the silicon substrates. Compared with traditional inorganic NaOH texturing, this hybrid process yields smoother (111) facets of the pyramids, fewer residual Na+ ions on the silicon surface, and a shorter processing period. It also offers the advantage of lower cost compared with the organic texturing method based on the use of only TMAH. We applied this hybrid texturing process to fabricate silicon heterojunction solar cells, which showed a remarkable improvement compared with the cells based on traditional alkaline texturing processes.

  17. The direct formate fuel cell with an alkaline anion exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartrom, Amy M.; Haan, John L.

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate for the first time an operating Direct Formate Fuel Cell employing formate salts as the anode fuel, air or oxygen as the oxidant, a polymer anion exchange membrane, and metal catalysts at the anode and cathode. Operation of the DFFC at 60 °C using 1 M KOOCH and 2 M KOH as the anode fuel and electrolyte and oxygen gas at the cathode produces 144 mW cm-2 of peak power density, 181 mA cm-2 current density at 0.6 V, and an open circuit voltage of 0.931 V. This performance is competitive with alkaline Direct Liquid Fuel Cells (DLFCs) previously reported in the literature and demonstrates that formate fuel is a legitimate contender with alcohol fuels for alkaline DLFCs. A survey of the literature shows that a formate-oxygen fuel cell has a high theoretical potential, and the safe, renewable formate fuel does not poison the anode catalyst.

  18. Cell design concepts for aqueous lithium-oxygen batteries: A model-based assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grübl, Daniel; Bessler, Wolfgang G.

    2015-11-01

    Seven cell design concepts for aqueous (alkaline) lithium-oxygen batteries are investigated using a multi-physics continuum model for predicting cell behavior and performance in terms of the specific energy and specific power. Two different silver-based cathode designs (a gas diffusion electrode and a flooded cathode) and three different separator designs (a porous separator, a stirred separator chamber, and a redox-flow separator) are compared. Cathode and separator thicknesses are varied over a wide range (50 μm-20 mm) in order to identify optimum configurations. All designs show a considerable capacity-rate effect due to spatiotemporally inhomogeneous precipitation of solid discharge product LiOH·H2O. In addition, a cell design with flooded cathode and redox-flow separator including oxygen uptake within the external tank is suggested. For this design, the model predicts specific power up to 33 W/kg and specific energy up to 570 Wh/kg (gravimetric values of discharged cell including all cell components and catholyte except housing and piping).

  19. Porous matrix structures for alkaline electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vine, R. W.; Narsavage, S. T.

    1975-01-01

    A number of advancements have been realized by a continuing research program to develop higher chemically stable porous matrix structures with high bubble pressure (crossover resistance) for use as separators in potassium hydroxide electrolyte fuel cells. More uniform, higher-bubble-pressure asbestos matrices were produced by reconstituting Johns-Manville asbestos paper; Fybex potassium titanate which was found compatible with 42% KOH at 250 F for up to 3000 hr; good agreement was found between bubble pressures predicted by an analytical study and those measured with filtered structures; Teflon-bonded Fybex matrices with bubble pressures greater than 30 psi were obtained by filtering a water slurry of the mixture directly onto fuel cell electrodes; and PBI fibers have satisfactory compatibility with 42% KOH at 250 F.

  20. Construction and testing of coin cells of lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Kayyar, Archana; Huang, Jiajia; Samiee, Mojtaba; Luo, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have wide applications in electronics, where customers always demand more capacity and longer lifetime. Lithium ion batteries have also been considered to be used in electric and hybrid vehicles or even electrical grid stabilization systems. All these applications simulate a dramatic increase in the research and development of battery materials, including new materials, doping, nanostructuring, coatings or surface modifications and novel binders. Consequently, an increasing number of physicists, chemists and materials scientists have recently ventured into this area. Coin cells are widely used in research laboratories to test new battery materials; even for the research and development that target large-scale and high-power applications, small coin cells are often used to test the capacities and rate capabilities of new materials in the initial stage. In 2010, we started a National Science Foundation (NSF) sponsored research project to investigate the surface adsorption and disordering in battery materials (grant no. DMR-1006515). In the initial stage of this project, we have struggled to learn the techniques of assembling and testing coin cells, which cannot be achieved without numerous help of other researchers in other universities (through frequent calls, email exchanges and two site visits). Thus, we feel that it is beneficial to document, by both text and video, a protocol of assembling and testing a coin cell, which will help other new researchers in this field. This effort represents the "Broader Impact" activities of our NSF project, and it will also help to educate and inspire students. In this video article, we document a protocol to assemble a CR2032 coin cell with a LiCoO2 working electrode, a Li counter electrode, and (the mostly commonly used) polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) binder. To ensure new learners to readily repeat the protocol, we keep the protocol as specific and explicit as we can. However, it is important

  1. Construction and testing of coin cells of lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Kayyar, Archana; Huang, Jiajia; Samiee, Mojtaba; Luo, Jian

    2012-08-02

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have wide applications in electronics, where customers always demand more capacity and longer lifetime. Lithium ion batteries have also been considered to be used in electric and hybrid vehicles or even electrical grid stabilization systems. All these applications simulate a dramatic increase in the research and development of battery materials, including new materials, doping, nanostructuring, coatings or surface modifications and novel binders. Consequently, an increasing number of physicists, chemists and materials scientists have recently ventured into this area. Coin cells are widely used in research laboratories to test new battery materials; even for the research and development that target large-scale and high-power applications, small coin cells are often used to test the capacities and rate capabilities of new materials in the initial stage. In 2010, we started a National Science Foundation (NSF) sponsored research project to investigate the surface adsorption and disordering in battery materials (grant no. DMR-1006515). In the initial stage of this project, we have struggled to learn the techniques of assembling and testing coin cells, which cannot be achieved without numerous help of other researchers in other universities (through frequent calls, email exchanges and two site visits). Thus, we feel that it is beneficial to document, by both text and video, a protocol of assembling and testing a coin cell, which will help other new researchers in this field. This effort represents the "Broader Impact" activities of our NSF project, and it will also help to educate and inspire students. In this video article, we document a protocol to assemble a CR2032 coin cell with a LiCoO2 working electrode, a Li counter electrode, and (the mostly commonly used) polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) binder. To ensure new learners to readily repeat the protocol, we keep the protocol as specific and explicit as we can. However, it is important

  2. Highly Stable, Anion Conductive, Comb-Shaped Copolymers for Alkaline Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, NW; Leng, YJ; Hickner, MA; Wang, CY

    2013-07-10

    To produce an anion-conductive and durable polymer electrolyte for alkaline fuel cell applications, a series of quaternized poly(2,6-dimethyl phenylene oxide)s containing long alkyl side chains pendant to the nitrogen-centered cation were synthesized using a Menshutkin reaction to form comb-shaped structures. The pendant alkyl chains were responsible for the development of highly conductive ionic domains, as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The comb-shaped polymers having one alkyl side chain showed higher hydroxide conductivities than those with benzyltrimethyl ammonium moieties or structures with more than one alkyl side chain per cationic site. The highest conductivity was observed for comb-shaped polymers with benzyldimethylhexadecyl ammonium cations. The chemical stabilities of the comb-shaped membranes were evaluated under severe, accelerated-aging conditions, and degradation was observed by measuring IEC and ion conductivity changes during aging. The comb-shaped membranes retained their high ion conductivity in 1 M NaOH at 80 degrees C for 2000 h. These cationic polymers were employed as ionomers in catalyst layers for alkaline fuel cells. The results indicated that the C-16 alkyl side chain ionomer had a slightly better initial performance, despite its low IEC value, but very poor durability in the fuel cell. In contrast, 90% of the initial performance was retained for the alkaline fuel cell with electrodes containing the C-6 side chain after 60 h of fuel cell operation.

  3. Implementation of a real option in a sustainable supply chain: an empirical study of alkaline battery recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchiella, Federica; D'Adamo, Idiano; Gastaldi, Massimo; Lenny Koh, S. C.

    2014-06-01

    Green supply chain management (GSCM) has emerged as a key approach for enterprises seeking to become environmentally sustainable. This paper aims to evaluate and describe the advantages of a GSCM approach by analysing practices and performance consequences in the battery recycling sector. It seeks to integrate works in supply chain management (SCM), environmental management, performance management and real option (RO) theory into one framework. In particular, life cycle assessment (LCA) is applied to evaluate the environmental impact of a battery recycling plant project, and life cycle costing (LCC) is applied to evaluate its economic impact. Firms, also understanding the relevance of GSCM, have often avoided applying the green principles because of the elevated costs that such management involved. Such costs could also seem superior to the potential advantages since standard performance measurement systems are internally and business focused; for these reasons, we consider all the possible value deriving also by uncertainty associated to a green project using the RO theory. This work is one of the few and pioneering efforts to investigate GSCM practices in the battery recycling sector.

  4. Nickel hydrogen battery cell storage matrix test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.; Dodson, Gary W.

    1993-01-01

    Test were conducted to evaluate post storage performance of nickel hydrogen cells with various design variables, the most significant being nickel precharge versus hydrogen precharge. Test procedures and results are presented in outline and graphic form.

  5. Layered electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Christopher S.; Thackeray, Michael M.; Vaughey, John T.; Kahaian, Arthur J.; Kim, Jeom-Soo

    2008-04-15

    Lithium metal oxide compounds of nominal formula Li.sub.2MO.sub.2, in which M represents two or more positively charged metal ions, selected predominantly and preferably from the first row of transition metals are disclosed herein. The Li.sub.2MO.sub.2 compounds have a layered-type structure, which can be used as positive electrodes for lithium electrochemical cells, or as a precursor for the in-situ electrochemical fabrication of LiMO.sub.2 electrodes. The Li.sub.2MO.sub.2 compounds of the invention may have additional functions in lithium cells, for example, as end-of-discharge indicators, or as negative electrodes for lithium cells.

  6. Magnum(R) NiCd advanced nickel-cadmium battery cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoles, Darren

    1995-01-01

    The Power Systems Department of Eagle-Picher Industries, Inc., located in Colorado Springs, Colorado, had developed a long-life advanced Nickel-Cadmium battery cell for aerospace applications. This battery cell, known as the MAGNUM NiCd cell, offers significant life expectancy increase over traditional NiCd battery cells. In addition, it offers significant cost reduction from the Super NiCd battery cell (developed by Hughes Aircraft Company and manufactured by the Power Systems Department of Eagle-Picher Industries, Inc.).

  7. Acid and Alkaline Invertases in Suspension Cultures of Sugar Beet Cells

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Toshimasa; Sugawara, Shiro

    1988-01-01

    Alkaline invertase was induced during the initiation of suspension cultures of single cells from leaf explants of sugar beets in Murashige-Skoog liquid medium which contained benzyladenine. This activity was barely detectable in the leaves themselves. In suspension cultures, the presence of both acid and alkaline invertases was detected; alkaline invertase was only present in the cytoplasm of the cultured cells, whereas acid invertase was present in the cytoplasm and cell walls, and was also detected in the culture medium. The cell wall contained at least three types of acid invertase; two of these activities were solubilized by saline (saline-released) and EDTA (EDTA-released), respectively, and the third remained tightly associated with the cell wall. Saline-released and EDTA-released invertases from the cell wall showed the significant differences in their properties: the saline-released enzyme had the highest affinity for sucrose among the invertases tested, and was easily bound to cell walls, to DNA, and to a cation exchanger, unlike the EDTA-released enzyme. Sucrose is the source of carbon for plant cells in suspension culture and is probably degraded in the cell wall by the saline-released invertase, which had the highest activity and the highest affinity for sucrose. Hexose products of this degradation would be transported to cytoplasm. Soluble invertase, EDTA-released invertase from the cell wall, and one of two extracellular invertases behaved similarly upon chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. They had similar activity profiles with changing pH, and similar Km values for sucrose. Thus it appears that they are identical. Two extracellular invertases found in the growth medium of the suspension cultures were probably identical with those in the soluble fraction of callus and seedlings of sugar beets, because they showed similar behaviors during chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, and had similar activity profiles with changing pH and Km values for sucrose. PMID

  8. DEVELOPMENT AND SELECTION OF IONIC LIQUID ELECTROLYTES FOR HYDROXIDE CONDUCTING POLYBENZIMIDAZOLE MEMBRANES IN ALKALINE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, E.

    2012-05-01

    Alkaline fuel cell (AFC) operation is currently limited to specialty applications such as low temperatures and pure HO due to the corrosive nature of the electrolyte and formation of carbonates. AFCs are the cheapest and potentially most efficient (approaching 70%) fuel cells. The fact that non-Pt catalysts can be used, makes them an ideal low cost alternative for power production. The anode and cathode are separated by and solid electrolyte or alkaline porous media saturated with KOH. However, CO from the atmosphere or fuel feed severely poisons the electrolyte by forming insoluble carbonates. The corrosivity of KOH (electrolyte) limits operating temperatures to no more than 80°C. This chapter examines the development of ionic liquids electrolytes that are less corrosive, have higher operating temperatures, do not chemically bond to CO and enable alternative fuels. Work is detailed on the IL selection and characterization as well as casting methods within the polybenzimidazole based solid membrane. This approach is novel as it targets the root of the problem (the electrolyte) unlike other current work in alkaline fuel cells which focus on making the fuel cell components more durable.

  9. A high selectivity quaternized polysulfone membrane for alkaline direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuin, Graciela C.; Franceschini, Esteban A.; Nonjola, Patrick; Mathe, Mkhulu K.; Modibedi, Mmalewane; Corti, Horacio R.

    2015-04-01

    Alkaline membranes based on quaternized poly(arylene ether sulfone) (QPAES) were characterized in relation to their water and methanol uptake, methanol permeability, electrical conductivity, and mechanical properties. The performance of QPAES as electrolyte in alkaline direct methanol fuel cells was studied using a free-breathing single fuel cell at room temperature. Methanol uptake by QPAES membranes is lower than water, while their methanol permeability, determined in the temperature range from 30 °C to 75 °C, was much lower than for Nafion membranes. Young modulus of QPAES membranes decrease with the degree of alkalization of the membrane, although mechanical properties are still satisfactory for fuel cell applications for membrane alkalized with 2 M KOH, which additionally exhibit optimal hydroxide conductivity. Although the specific conductivity of QPAES membranes was lower than that reported for Nafion, its methanol selectivity (conductivity/methanol permeability ratio), is much higher than that reported for Nafion 117, and a commercial amminated polysulfone. In view of these results, QPAES membranes are expected to exhibit promising performance as an electrolyte in alkaline direct methanol fuel cells.

  10. Assembly of a Cost-Effective Anode Using Palladium Nanoparticles for Alkaline Fuel Cell Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology allows the synthesis of nanoscale catalysts, which offer an efficient alternative for fuel cell applications. In this laboratory experiment, the student selects a cost-effective anode for fuel cells by comparing three different working electrodes. These are commercially available palladium (Pd) and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes, and a carbon paste (CP) electrode that is prepared by the students in the laboratory. The GC and CP were modified with palladium nanoparticles (PdNP) suspensions. The electrodes efficiencies were studied for ethanol oxidation in alkaline solution using cyclic voltammetry techniques. The ethanol oxidation currents obtained were used to determine the current density using the geometric and surface area of each electrode. Finally, students were able to choose the best electrode and relate catalytic activity to surface area for ethanol oxidation in alkaline solution by completing a critical analysis of the cyclic voltammetry results. With this activity, fundamental electrochemical concepts were reinforced. PMID:25691801

  11. Corrosion testing of candidates for the alkaline fuel cell cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Joseph; Fielder, William L.

    1989-01-01

    It is desirable to employ a corrosion screening test for catalyst or support candidates for the fuel cell cathode before entering upon optimization of the candidate or of the catalytic electrode. To this end, corrosion test electrodes, intended for complete immersion and maximum wetting, have been made with 30 to 40 vol. pct Teflon; with perovskites this is about 10 to 15 pct. The candidates were synthesized by methods intended for single-phase product without special emphasis on high surface area, although the substances tested were no coarser than 2 m squared/g. A typical loading was 25 mg/cm sq of the pure substance, usually on gold screen, a few mm squared of which were left bare for contacting. Contact to the gold lead wire was made by welding with a micro-torch or a spot-welder. Corrosion testing consisted of obtaining current-voltage data under flowing inert gas in the potential region for reduction of O2. The electrode was immersed in 30 pct KOH. Observations were made at 20 C and 80 C, and the results compared with data from gold standards. Results with some perovskites, pyrochlores, spinels, and interstitial compounds will be discussed.

  12. Alkaline water electrolysis technology for Space Station regenerative fuel cell energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Hoberecht, M. A.; Le, M.

    1986-01-01

    The regenerative fuel cell system (RFCS), designed for application to the Space Station energy storage system, is based on state-of-the-art alkaline electrolyte technology and incorporates a dedicated fuel cell system (FCS) and water electrolysis subsystem (WES). In the present study, emphasis is placed on the WES portion of the RFCS. To ensure RFCS availability for the Space Station, the RFCS Space Station Prototype design was undertaken which included a 46-cell 0.93 cu m static feed water electrolysis module and three integrated mechanical components.

  13. Control of placental alkaline phosphatase gene expression in HeLa cells: induction of synthesis by prednisolone and sodium butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.Y.; Takahashi, S.

    1987-06-16

    HeLa S/sub 3/ cells produce an alkaline phosphatase indistinguishable from the enzyme from human term placenta. The phosphatase activity in these cells was induced by both prednisolone and sodium butyrate. Both agents stimulated de novo synthesis of the enzyme. The increase in phosphatase activity paralleled the increase in immunoactivity and biosynthesis of placental alkaline phosphatase. The fully processed phosphatase monomer in control, prednisolone-treated or butyrate-treated cells was a 64.5 K polypeptide, measured by both incorporation of L-(/sup 35/S)methionine into enzyme protein and active-site labeling. The 64.5K polypeptide was formed by the incorporation of additional N-acetylneuraminic acid moieties to a precursor polypeptide of 61.5K. However, this biosynthetic pathway was identified only in butyrate-treated cells. In prednisolone-treated cells, the processing of 61.5K to 64.5K monomer was accelerated, and the presence of the 61.5 precursor could only be detected by either neuraminidase or monensin treatment. Phosphatase mRNA which comigrated with the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA of 2.7 kilobases was induced in the presence of either prednisolone or butyrate. Alkaline phosphatase mRNA is untreated HeLa S/sub 3/ cells migrated slightly faster than the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Butyrate also induced a second still faster migrating alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Both prednisolone and butyrate increased the steady-state levels of placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. The data indicate that the increase in phosphatase mRNA by prednisolone and butyrate resulted in the induction of alkaline phosphatase activity and biosynthesis in HeLa S/sub 3/ cells. Furthermore, both agents induced the expression of different alkaline phosphatase gene transcripts without altering its protein product.

  14. Accelerated test program for sealed nickel-cadmium spacecraft batteries/cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility was examined of inducing an accelerated test on sealed Nickel-Cadmium batteries or cells as a tool for spacecraft projects and battery users to determine: (1) the prediction of life capability; (2) a method of evaluating the effect of design and component changes in cells; and (3) a means of reducing time and cost of cell testing.

  15. Lithium-ion cell-to-cell variation during battery electric vehicle operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Simon F.; Brand, Martin J.; Berg, Philipp; Gleissenberger, Markus; Jossen, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    484 new and 1908 aged lithium-ion cells out of two identical battery electric vehicles (i.e. 954 cells each) were characterized by capacity and impedance measurements to yield a broad set of data for distribution fit analysis. Results prove alteration from normal to Weibull distribution for the parameters of lithium-ion cells with the progress of aging. Cells with abnormal characteristics in the aged state mostly exhibit lower capacities as compared to the distribution mode which is typical for the left-skewed Weibull shape. In addition, the strength of variation and the amount of outliers both are generally increased with the aging progress. Obtained results are compared to vehicles' operational data to provide recommendations with the aim to minimize the increasing parameter spread. However, neither temperature gradients in the battery pack nor an insufficient balancing procedure were determined. As the appearance of cells with suspicious parameters could not be assigned to local weak spots of the battery pack, a random and inevitable type of origin is assumed. Hence, the battery management system must ensure to detect outliers in a reliable manner and to balance resulting drifts of cells' states of charge to guarantee a safe battery storage operation.

  16. Enhanced test methods to characterise automotive battery cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, Grietus; Omar, Noshin; Pauwels, Stijn; Leemans, Filip; Verbrugge, Bavo; De Nijs, Wouter; Van den Bossche, Peter; Six, Daan; Van Mierlo, Joeri

    This article evaluates the methods to characterise the behaviour of lithium ion cells of several chemistries and a nickel metal hydride cell for automotive applications like (plug-in) hybrid vehicles and battery electric vehicles. Although existing characterisation test methods are used, it was also indicated to combine test methods in order to speed up the test time and to create an improved comparability of the test results. Also, the existing capacity tests ignore that cells can be charged at several current rates. However, this is of interest for, e.g. fast charging and regenerative braking. Tests for high power and high energy application have been integrated in the enhanced method. The article explains the rationale to ameliorate the test methods. The test plan should make it possible to make an initial division in a group of cells purchased from several suppliers.

  17. Overdischarge protection in high-temperature cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Redey, L.

    1990-06-19

    Overdischarge indication and protection is provided in a lithium alloy metal sulfide, secondary electrochemical cell and batteries of such cells through use of a low lithium activity phase that ordinarily is not matched with positive electrode material. Low lithium activity phases such as Li[sub 0.1]Al[sub 0.9] and LiAlSi in correspondence with positive electrode material cause a downward gradient in cell voltage as an indication of overdischarge prior to damage to the cell. Moreover, the low lithium activity phase contributes lithium into the electrolyte and provides a lithium shuttling current as overdischarge protection after all of the positive electrode material is discharged. 8 figs.

  18. Advanced Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) nickel-hydrogen spacecraft cell and battery design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, Dwaine; Wright, Doug; Repplinger, Ron

    1995-01-01

    The dependent pressure vessel (DPV) nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) battery is being developed as a potential spacecraft battery design for both military and commercial satellites. Individual pressure vessel (IPV) NiH2 batteries are currently flying on more than 70 Earth orbital satellites and have accumulated more than 140,000,000 cell-hours in actual spacecraft operation. The limitations of standard NiH2 IPV flight battery technology are primarily related to the internal cell design and the battery packaging issues associated with grouping multiple cylindrical cells. The DPV cell design offers higher specific energy and reduced cost, while retaining the established IPV NiH2 technology flight heritage and database. The advanced cell design offers a more efficient mechanical, electrical and thermal cell configuration and a reduced parts count. The internal electrode stack is a prismatic flat-plate arrangement. The flat individual cell pressure vessel provides a maximum direct thermal path for removing heat from the electrode stack. The cell geometry also minimizes multiple-cell battery packaging constraints by using an established end-plateltie-rod battery design. A major design advantage is that the battery support structure is efficiently required to restrain only the force applied to a portion of the end cell. As the cells are stacked in series to achieve the desired system voltage, this increment of the total battery weight becomes small. The geometry of the DPV cell promotes compact, minimum volume packaging and places all cell terminals along the length of the battery. The resulting ability to minimize intercell wiring offers additional design simplicity and significant weight savings. The DPV battery design offers significant cost and weight savings advantages while providing minimal design risks. Cell and battery level design issues will be addressed including mechanical, electrical and thermal design aspects. A design performance analysis will be presented at both

  19. Ag/C nanoparticles as an cathode catalyst for a zinc-air battery with a flowing alkaline electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jia-Jun; Li, Ning; Zhang, Tian-Yun

    The cyclic voltammetry indicated that the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) proceeded by the four-electron pathway mechanism on larger Ag particles (174 nm), and that the ORR proceeded by the four-electron pathway and the two-electron pathway mechanisms on finer Ag particles (4.1 nm), simultaneously. The kinetics towards ORR was measured at a rotating disk electrode (RDE) with Ag/C electrode. The number of exchanged electrons for the ORR was found to be close to four on larger Ag particles (174 nm) and close to three on finer Ag particles (4.1 nm). The zinc-air battery with Ag/C catalysts (25.9 nm) was fabricated and examined.

  20. Automatic online buffer capacity (alkalinity) measurement of wastewater using an electrochemical cell.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Charles, Wipa; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    The use of an automatic online electrochemical cell (EC) for measuring the buffer capacity of wastewater is presented. pH titration curves of different solutions (NaHCO3, Na2HPO4, real municipal wastewater, and anaerobic digester liquid) were obtained by conventional chemical titration and compared to the online EC measurements. The results show that the pH titration curves from the EC were comparable to that of the conventional chemical titration. The results show a linear relationship between the response of the online EC detection system and the titrimetric partial alkalinity and total alkalinity of all tested samples. This suggests that an EC can be used as a simple online titration device for monitoring the buffer capacity of different industrial processes including wastewater treatment and anaerobic digestion processes. PMID:26935968

  1. Electrochemical Thermal Network Model for Multi-Cell Lithium Ion Battery

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-28

    Increasing the numbers and size of cells in a battery pack complicates electrical and thermal control of the system. In addition to keeping a battery pack in the optimal temperature range, maintaining temperature uniformity among all cells in a pack is important to prolong life and enhance safety. Electrical, electrochemical, and thermal responses of a lithium ion battery are closely coupled through macroscopic design factors of the cells and module or pack. The model has to resolve complex interaction between cell characteristics, pack design, and load conditions. Safe and durable battery pack design requires a battery thermal model that can be coupled with a battery performance more and/or safety model with good accuracy and simulation time. The model is proposed to be used for various technical purposes: Design optimization for safety and/or performance, On-board control.

  2. Electrochemical Thermal Network Model for Multi-Cell Lithium Ion Battery

    2009-02-28

    Increasing the numbers and size of cells in a battery pack complicates electrical and thermal control of the system. In addition to keeping a battery pack in the optimal temperature range, maintaining temperature uniformity among all cells in a pack is important to prolong life and enhance safety. Electrical, electrochemical, and thermal responses of a lithium ion battery are closely coupled through macroscopic design factors of the cells and module or pack. The model hasmore » to resolve complex interaction between cell characteristics, pack design, and load conditions. Safe and durable battery pack design requires a battery thermal model that can be coupled with a battery performance more and/or safety model with good accuracy and simulation time. The model is proposed to be used for various technical purposes: Design optimization for safety and/or performance, On-board control.« less

  3. Cell-balancing currents in parallel strings of a battery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubarry, Matthieu; Devie, Arnaud; Liaw, Bor Yann

    2016-07-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are attractive for vehicle electrification or grid modernization applications. In these applications, battery packs are required to have multiple-cell configurations and battery management system to operate properly and safely. Here, a useful equivalent circuit model was developed to simulate the spontaneous transient balancing currents among parallel strings in a battery system. The simulation results were validated with experimental data to illustrate the accuracy and validity of the model predictions. Understanding the transient behavior of such cell and string balancing in a parallel circuit configuration is very important to assess the impacts of current fluctuation and cell variability on a battery system's performance, regarding durability, reliability, safety, abuse tolerance and failure prevention, including possible short circuit or open circuit conditions. Additional features and advantages, including the ability to assessing impacts on the performance of the string assemblies from string swapping or cell/module replacement in the strings, could be realized to aid battery management, maintenance and repair.

  4. Alkaline polymer electrolyte fuel cells completely free from noble metal catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shanfu; Pan, Jing; Huang, Aibin; Zhuang, Lin; Lu, Juntao

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades, fuel cell technology has been undergoing revolutionary developments, with fundamental progress being the replacement of electrolyte solutions with polymer electrolytes, making the device more compact in size and higher in power density. Nowadays, acidic polymer electrolytes, typically Nafion, are widely used. Despite great success, fuel cells based on acidic polyelectrolyte still depend heavily on noble metal catalysts, predominantly platinum (Pt), thus increasing the cost and hampering the widespread application of fuel cells. Here, we report a type of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) employing a hydroxide ion-conductive polymer, quaternary ammonium polysulphone, as alkaline electrolyte and nonprecious metals, chromium-decorated nickel and silver, as the catalyst for the negative and positive electrodes, respectively. In addition to the development of a high-performance alkaline polymer electrolyte particularly suitable for fuel cells, key progress has been achieved in catalyst tailoring: The surface electronic structure of nickel has been tuned to suppress selectively the surface oxidative passivation with retained activity toward hydrogen oxidation. This report of a H2–O2 PEFC completely free from noble metal catalysts in both the positive and negative electrodes represents an important advancement in the research and development of fuel cells.

  5. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie; Aguiar, Jeffery A.

    2015-09-15

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to determine the chemistry and oxidation state of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 thin film battery electrodes in liquid cells for in situ scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM). Using the L2,3 white line intensity ratio method we determine the oxidation state of Mn and Ti in a liquid electrolyte solvent and discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity.

  6. Energy Storage: Batteries and Fuel Cells for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.; Miller, Thomas B.; Hoberecht, Mark A.; Baumann, Eric D.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Vision for Exploration requires safe, human-rated, energy storage technologies with high energy density, high specific energy and the ability to perform in a variety of unique environments. The Exploration Technology Development Program is currently supporting the development of battery and fuel cell systems that address these critical technology areas. Specific technology efforts that advance these systems and optimize their operation in various space environments are addressed in this overview of the Energy Storage Technology Development Project. These technologies will support a new generation of more affordable, more reliable, and more effective space systems.

  7. Recovering metal values hydrometallurgically from spent dry battery cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabah, M. A.; Barakat, M. A.; Mahrous, Y. Sh.

    1999-12-01

    A hydro-pyrometallurgical method was used to recover metal values from spent dry battery cells. Water-soluble ingredients were filtered, and solid residue was sorted by magnetic separation and water flotation. Parameters affecting the recovery efficiency were also studied. Results revealed that metallic parts, carbon rods, and paper were safely recovered; pure NH4Cl, MnO2, and ZnCl2 salts were obtained. Maximum recovery efficiencies reached 93 percent for manganese and 99.5 percent for zinc and NH4.

  8. Hydroponics gel as a new electrolyte gelling agent for alkaline zinc-air cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, R.; Basirun, W. J.; Yahaya, A. H.; Arof, A. K.

    The viability of hydroponics gel as a new alkaline electrolyte gelling agent is investigated. Zinc-air cells are fabricated employing 12 wt.% KOH electrolyte immobilised with hydroponics gel. The cells are discharged at constant currents of 5, 50 and 100 mA. XRD and SEM analysis of the anode plates after discharge show that the failure mode is due to the formation of zinc oxide insulating layers and not due to any side reactions between the gel and the plate or the electrolyte.

  9. The Effect of Variable End of Charge Battery Management on Small-Cell Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubauer, Jeremy S.; Bennetti, Andrea; Pearson, Chris; Simmons, Nick; Reid, Concha; Manzo, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    Batteries are critical components for spacecraft, supplying power to all electrical systems during solar eclipse. These components must be lightweight due to launch vehicle limitations and the desire to fly heavier, more capable payloads, and must show excellent capacity retention with age to support the ever growing durations of space missions. ABSL's heritage Lithium Ion cell, the ABSL 18650HC, is an excellent low mass solution to this problem that has been proven capable of supporting long mission durations. The NASA Glenn Research Center recently proposed and initiated a test to study the effects of reduced end of charge voltage on aging of the ABSL 18650HC and other Lithium Ion cells. This paper presents the testing details, a method to analyze and compare capacity fade between the different cases, and a preliminary analysis of the to-date performance of ABSL s cells. This initial analysis indicates that employing reduced end of charge techniques could double the life capabilities of the ABSL 18650HC cell. Accordingly, continued investigation is recommended, particularly at higher depths of discharge to better assess the method s potential mass savings for short duration missions.

  10. Transient removal of alkaline zones after excitation of Chara cells is associated with inactivation of high conductance in the plasmalemma.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Alexander A; Krupenina, Natalia A

    2009-08-01

    The action potential (AP) of excitable plant cells is a multifunctional physiological signal. Its generation in characean algae suppresses the pH banding for 15-30 min and enhances the heterogeneity of spatial distribution of photosynthetic activity. This suppression is largely due to the cessation of H(+) influx (OH(-) efflux) in the alkaline cell regions. Measurements of local pH and membrane conductance in individual space-clamped alkaline zones (small cell areas bathed in an isolated pool of external medium) showed that the AP generation is followed by the transient disappearance of alkaline zone in parallel with a large decrease in membrane conductance. These changes, specific to alkaline zones, were only observed under continuous illumination following a relaxation period of at least 15 min after previous excitation. The excitation of dark-adapted cells produced no conductance changes in the post-excitation period. The results indicate that the origin of alkaline zones in characean cells is not due to operation of electroneutral H(+)/HCO(3)(-) symport or OH(-)/HCO(3)(-) antiport. It is concluded that the membrane excitation is associated with inactivation of plasmalemma high conductance in the alkaline cell regions. PMID:19820298

  11. Transient removal of alkaline zones after excitation of Chara cells is associated with inactivation of high conductance in the plasmalemma.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Alexander A; Krupenina, Natalia A

    2009-08-01

    The action potential (AP) of excitable plant cells is a multifunctional physiological signal. Its generation in characean algae suppresses the pH banding for 15-30 min and enhances the heterogeneity of spatial distribution of photosynthetic activity. This suppression is largely due to the cessation of H(+) influx (OH(-) efflux) in the alkaline cell regions. Measurements of local pH and membrane conductance in individual space-clamped alkaline zones (small cell areas bathed in an isolated pool of external medium) showed that the AP generation is followed by the transient disappearance of alkaline zone in parallel with a large decrease in membrane conductance. These changes, specific to alkaline zones, were only observed under continuous illumination following a relaxation period of at least 15 min after previous excitation. The excitation of dark-adapted cells produced no conductance changes in the post-excitation period. The results indicate that the origin of alkaline zones in characean cells is not due to operation of electroneutral H(+)/HCO(3)(-) symport or OH(-)/HCO(3)(-) antiport. It is concluded that the membrane excitation is associated with inactivation of plasmalemma high conductance in the alkaline cell regions.

  12. Effect of magnesium on the aluminothermic reduction rate of zinc oxide obtained from spent alkaline battery anodes for the preparation of Al-Zn-Mg alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Rocio; Flores, Alfredo; Torres, Jesus

    2016-04-01

    The aluminothermic reduction of zinc oxide (ZnO) from alkaline battery anodes using molten Al may be a good option for the elaboration of secondary 7000-series alloys. This process is affected by the initial content of Mg within molten Al, which decreases the surface tension of the molten metal and conversely increases the wettability of ZnO particles. The effect of initial Mg concentration on the aluminothermic reduction rate of ZnO was analyzed at the following values: 0.90wt%, 1.20wt%, 4.00t%, 4.25wt%, and 4.40wt%. The ZnO particles were incorporated by mechanical agitation using a graphite paddle inside a bath of molten Al maintained at a constant temperature of 1123 K and at a constant agitation speed of 250 r/min, the treatment time was 240 min and the ZnO particle size was 450-500 mesh. The results show an increase in Zn concentration in the prepared alloys up to 5.43wt% for the highest initial concentration of Mg. The reaction products obtained were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, and the efficiency of the reaction was measured on the basis of the different concentrations of Mg studied.

  13. Tunable high performance cross-linked alkaline anion exchange membranes for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Nicholas J; Kostalik, Henry A; Clark, Timothy J; Mutolo, Paul F; Abruña, Héctor D; Coates, Geoffrey W

    2010-03-17

    Fuel cells are energy conversion devices that show great potential in numerous applications ranging from automobiles to portable electronics. However, further development of fuel cell components is necessary for them to become commercially viable. One component critical to their performance is the polymer electrolyte membrane, which is an ion conductive medium separating the two electrodes. While proton conducting membranes are well established (e.g., Nafion), hydroxide conducting membranes (alkaline anion exchange membranes, AAEMs) have been relatively unexplored by comparison. Operating under alkaline conditions offers significant efficiency benefits, especially for the oxygen reduction reaction; therefore, effective AAEMs could significantly advance fuel cell technologies. Here we demonstrate the use of ring-opening metathesis polymerization to generate new cross-linked membrane materials exhibiting high hydroxide ion conductivity and good mechanical properties. Cross-linking allows for increased ion incorporation, which, in turn supports high conductivities. This facile synthetic approach enables the preparation of cross-linked materials with the potential to meet the demands of hydrogen-powered fuel cells as well as direct methanol fuel cells. PMID:20178312

  14. A self-humidifying acidic-alkaline bipolar membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Sikan; Xu, Xin; Lu, Shanfu; Sui, Pang-Chieh; Djilali, Ned; Xiang, Yan

    2015-12-01

    To maintain membrane hydration and operate effectively, polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) require elaborate water management, which significantly increases the complexity and cost of the fuel cell system. Here we propose a novel and entirely different approach to membrane hydration by exploiting the concept of bipolar membranes. Bipolar membrane (BPM) fuel cells utilize a composite membrane consisting of an acidic polymer electrolyte membrane on the anode side and an alkaline electrolyte membrane on the cathode side. We present a novel membrane electrode assembly (MEA) fabrication method and demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that BPM fuel cells can (a) self-humidify to ensure high ionic conductivity; and (b) allow use of non-platinum catalysts due to inherently faster oxygen reduction kinetics on an alkaline cathode. Our Pt-based BPM fuel cell achieves a two orders of magnitude gain in power density of 327 mW cm-2 at 323 K under dry gas feed, the highest power output achieved under anhydrous operation conditions. A theoretical analysis and in situ measurements are presented to characterize the unique interfacial water generation and transport behavior that make self-humidification possible during operation. Further optimization of these features and advances in fabricating bipolar MEAs would open the way for a new generation of self-humidifying and water-management-free PEMFCs.

  15. Tunable High Performance Cross-Linked Alkaline Anion Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Nicholas J.; Kostalik, IV, Henry A.; Clark, Timothy J.; Mutolo, Paul F.; Abruña, Héctor D.; Coates, Geoffrey W.

    2010-02-23

    Fuel cells are energy conversion devices that show great potential in numerous applications ranging from automobiles to portable electronics. However, further development of fuel cell components is necessary for them to become commercially viable. One component critical to their performance is the polymer electrolyte membrane, which is an ion conductive medium separating the two electrodes. While proton conducting membranes are well established (e.g., Nafion), hydroxide conducting membranes (alkaline anion exchange membranes, AAEMs) have been relatively unexplored by comparison. Operating under alkaline conditions offers significant efficiency benefits, especially for the oxygen reduction reaction; therefore, effective AAEMs could significantly advance fuel cell technologies. Here we demonstrate the use of ring-opening metathesis polymerization to generate new cross-linked membrane materials exhibiting high hydroxide ion conductivity and good mechanical properties. Cross-linking allows for increased ion incorporation, which, in turn supports high conductivities. This facile synthetic approach enables the preparation of cross-linked materials with the potential to meet the demands of hydrogen-powered fuel cells as well as direct methanol fuel cells.

  16. NASA standard 50Ah nickel cadmium battery cell: Cell-level performance history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toft, Mark R.

    1992-01-01

    The concept and design for a NASA standard Nickel-Cadmium (NiCd) battery was developed from 1975 to 1977. The cell was first manufactured in 1977-1978. A performance history of this cell design is presented in viewgraph form.

  17. High-Efficiency Artificial Photosynthesis Using a Novel Alkaline Membrane Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Sri; Haines, Brennan; Blosiu, Julian; Marzwell, Neville

    2009-01-01

    A new cell designed to mimic the photosynthetic processes of plants to convert carbon dioxide into carbonaceous products and oxygen at high efficiency, has an improved configuration using a polymer membrane electrolyte and an alkaline medium. This increases efficiency of the artificial photosynthetic process, achieves high conversion rates, permits the use of inexpensive catalysts, and widens the range of products generated by this type of process. The alkaline membrane electrolyte allows for the continuous generation of sodium formate without the need for any additional separation system. The electrolyte type, pH, electrocatalyst type, and cell voltage were found to have a strong effect on the efficiency of conversion of carbon dioxide to formate. Indium electrodes were found to have higher conversion efficiency compared to lead. Bicarbonate electrolyte offers higher conversion efficiency and higher rates than water solutions saturated with carbon dioxide. pH values between 8 and 9 lead to the maximum values of efficiency. The operating cell voltage of 2.5 V, or higher, ensures conversion of the carbon dioxide to formate, although the hydrogen evolution reaction begins to compete strongly with the formate production reaction at higher cell voltages. Formate is produced at indium and lead electrodes at a conversion efficiency of 48 mg of CO2/kilojoule of energy input. This efficiency is about eight times that of natural photosynthesis in green plants. The electrochemical method of artificial photosynthesis is a promising approach for the conversion, separation and sequestration of carbon dioxide for confined environments as in space habitats, and also for carbon dioxide management in the terrestrial context. The heart of the reactor is a membrane cell fabricated from an alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane and catalyst- coated electrodes. This cell is assembled and held in compression in gold-plated hardware. The cathode side of the cell is supplied with carbon

  18. Strong alkalinization of Chara cell surface in the area of cell wall incision as an early event in mechanoperception.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Alexander A; Alova, Anna V; Bibikova, Tatiana N

    2013-11-01

    Mechanical wounding of cell walls occurring in plants under the impact of pathogens or herbivores can be mimicked by cell wall incision with a glass micropipette. Measurements of pH at the surface of Chara corallina internodes following microperforation of cell wall revealed a rapid (10-30s) localized alkalinization of the apoplast after a lag period of 10-20s. The pH increase induced by incision could be as large as 3 pH units and relaxed slowly, with a halftime up to 20min. The axial pH profile around the incision zone was bell-shaped and localized to a small area, extending over a distance of about 100μm. The pH response was suppressed by lowering cell turgor upon the replacement of artificial pond water (APW) with APW containing 50mM sorbitol. Stretching of the plasma membrane during its impression into the cell wall defect is likely to activate the Ca(2+) channels, as evidenced from sensitivity of the incision-induced alkalinization to the external calcium concentration and to the addition of Ca(2+)-channel blockers, such as La(3+), Gd(3+), and Zn(2+). The maximal pH values attained at the incision site (~10.0) were close to pH in light-dependent alkaline zones of Chara cells. The involvement of cytoskeleton in the origin of alkaline patch was documented by observations that the incision-induced pH transients were suppressed by the inhibitors of microtubules (oryzalin and taxol) and, to a lesser extent, by the actin inhibitor (cytochalasin B). The results indicate that the localized increase in apoplastic pH is an early event in mechanoperception and depends on light, cytoskeleton, and intracellular calcium.

  19. Strong alkalinization of Chara cell surface in the area of cell wall incision as an early event in mechanoperception.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Alexander A; Alova, Anna V; Bibikova, Tatiana N

    2013-11-01

    Mechanical wounding of cell walls occurring in plants under the impact of pathogens or herbivores can be mimicked by cell wall incision with a glass micropipette. Measurements of pH at the surface of Chara corallina internodes following microperforation of cell wall revealed a rapid (10-30s) localized alkalinization of the apoplast after a lag period of 10-20s. The pH increase induced by incision could be as large as 3 pH units and relaxed slowly, with a halftime up to 20min. The axial pH profile around the incision zone was bell-shaped and localized to a small area, extending over a distance of about 100μm. The pH response was suppressed by lowering cell turgor upon the replacement of artificial pond water (APW) with APW containing 50mM sorbitol. Stretching of the plasma membrane during its impression into the cell wall defect is likely to activate the Ca(2+) channels, as evidenced from sensitivity of the incision-induced alkalinization to the external calcium concentration and to the addition of Ca(2+)-channel blockers, such as La(3+), Gd(3+), and Zn(2+). The maximal pH values attained at the incision site (~10.0) were close to pH in light-dependent alkaline zones of Chara cells. The involvement of cytoskeleton in the origin of alkaline patch was documented by observations that the incision-induced pH transients were suppressed by the inhibitors of microtubules (oryzalin and taxol) and, to a lesser extent, by the actin inhibitor (cytochalasin B). The results indicate that the localized increase in apoplastic pH is an early event in mechanoperception and depends on light, cytoskeleton, and intracellular calcium. PMID:23850637

  20. Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 1, Cell and battery safety

    SciTech Connect

    Ohi, J M

    1992-09-01

    This report is the first of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues involved in using sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles that may affect the commercialization of Na/S batteries. This and the other reports on recycling, shipping, and vehicle safety are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD&D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers cell design and engineering as the basis of safety for Na/S batteries and describes and assesses the potential chemical, electrical, and thermal hazards and risks of Na/S cells and batteries as well as the RD&D performed, under way, or to address these hazards and risks. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, universities, and private industry. Subsequent volumes will address environmental, health, and safety issues involved in shipping cells and batteries, using batteries to propel electric vehicles, and recycling and disposing of spent batteries. The remainder of this volume is divided into two major sections on safety at the cell and battery levels. The section on Na/S cells describes major component and potential failure modes, design, life testing and failure testing, thermal cycling, and the safety status of Na/S cells. The section on batteries describes battery design, testing, and safety status. Additional EH&S information on Na/S batteries is provided in the appendices.

  1. Can Cell to Cell Thermal Runaway Propagation be Prevented in a Li-ion Battery Module?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith; Lopez, Carlos; Orieukwu, Josephat

    2014-01-01

    Increasing cell spacing decreased adjacent cell damage center dotElectrically connected adjacent cells drained more than physically adjacent cells center dotRadiant barrier prevents propagation when fully installed between BP cells center dotBP cells vent rapidly and expel contents at 100% SOC -Slower vent with flame/smoke at 50% -Thermal runaway event typically occurs at 160 degC center dotLG cells vent but do not expel contents -Thermal runaway event typically occurs at 200 degC center dotSKC LFP modules did not propagate; fuses on negative terminal of cell may provide a benefit in reducing cell to cell damage propagation. New requirement in NASA-Battery Safety Requirements document: JSC 20793 Rev C 5.1.5.1 Requirements - Thermal Runaway Propagation a. For battery designs greater than a 80-Wh energy employing high specific energy cells (greater than 80 watt-hours/kg, for example, lithium-ion chemistries) with catastrophic failure modes, the battery shall be evaluated to ascertain the severity of a worst-case single-cell thermal runaway event and the propensity of the design to demonstrate cell-to-cell propagation in the intended application and environment. NASA has traditionally addressed the threat of thermal runaway incidents in its battery deployments through comprehensive prevention protocols. This prevention-centered approach has included extensive screening for manufacturing defects, as well as robust battery management controls that prevent abuse-induced runaway even in the face of multiple system failures. This focused strategy has made the likelihood of occurrence of such an event highly improbable. b. The evaluation shall include all necessary analysis and test to quantify the severity (consequence) of the event in the intended application and environment as well as to identify design modifications to the battery or the system that could appreciably reduce that severity. In addition to prevention protocols, programs developing battery designs with

  2. Aluminum-ferricyanide battery

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, C.; Licht, S.L.

    1993-11-29

    A battery capable of producing high current densities with high charge capacity is described which includes an aluminum anode, a ferricyanide electrolyte and a second electrode capable of reducing ferricyanide electrolyte which is either dissolved in an alkaline solution or alkaline seawater solution. The performance of the battery is enhanced by high temperature and high electrolyte flow rates.

  3. NASA Glenn Research Center Electrochemistry Branch Battery and Fuel Cell Development Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation covers an overview of NASA Glenn s history and heritage in the development of electrochemical systems for aerospace applications. Current developments related to batteries and fuel cells are addressed. Specific areas of focus are Li-ion batteries and Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel cells systems and their development for future Exploration missions.

  4. Alkaline membrane fuel cells with in-situ cross-linked ionomers

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, YJ; Wang, LZ; Hickner, MA; Wang, CY

    2015-01-10

    Improving cell performance and durability through both new materials and membrane electrode processing optimization is needed for the commercialization of alkaline membrane fuel cell (AMFC) technologies. In this work, we adopted an in-situ cross-linking strategy of an anion-conducting block copolymer to prepare durable ionomers for use in alkaline membrane fuel cells (AMFCs). Our goal was to use new ionomers and binders with an aim at improving long-term stability of AMFCs, especially at high operation temperatures. At 80 degrees C, AMFCs with in-situ cross-linked ionomers showed promising stability with an operating life time of more than 350 hours at 100 mA/cm(2). We found that the optimized electrode fabrication process and operating conditions can significantly improve the durability performance of AMFCs. For example, a suitable electrode binder in addition to the ion-conducting ionomer can greatly enhance the durability performance of AMFCs. Operating fuel cells under a cathode over-humification condition can also enhance the long-term stability of AMFCs. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Expression of a human placental alkaline phosphatase gene in transfected cells: Use as a reporter for studies of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Henthorn, P.; Zervos, P.; Raducha, M.; Harris, H.; Kadesch, T.

    1988-09-01

    The human placental alkaline phosphatase gene has been cloned and reintroduced into mammalian cells. When a plasmid carrying the gene under control of the simian virus 40 early promoter (pSV2Apap) is transfected into a variety of different cell types, placental alkaline phosphatase activity can readily be detected by using whole cell suspensions or cell lysates. Alkaline phosphatase activity can also be visualized directly in individual transfected cells by histochemical staining. The gene is appropriate for use as a reporter in studies of gene regulation since its expression is dependent on the presence of exogenous transcription control elements. The overall assay to detect the expression of the gene is quantitative, very rapid, and inexpensive. Cotransfections of cells with pSV2Apap and a related plasmid carrying the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (pSV2Acat) indicate that transcription of these two genes is detected with roughly the same sensitivity.

  6. Towards high conductivity in anion-exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Nanwen; Guiver, Michael D; Binder, Wolfgang H

    2013-08-01

    Quaternized poly(2,6-dimethylphenylene oxide) materials (PPOs) containing clicked 1,2,3-triazoles were first prepared through Cu(I) -catalyzed "click chemistry" to improve the anion transport in anion-exchange membranes (AEMs). Clicked 1,2,3-triazoles incorporated into AEMs provided more sites to form efficient and continuous hydrogen-bond networks between the water/hydroxide and the triazole for anion transport. Higher water uptake was observed for these triazole membranes. Thus, the membranes showed an impressive enhancement of the hydroxide diffusion coefficient and, therefore, the anion conductivities. The recorded hydroxide conductivity was 27.8-62 mS cm(-1) at 20 °C in water, which was several times higher than that of a typical PPO-based AEM (TMA-20) derived from trimethylamine (5 mS cm(-1) ). Even at reduced relative humidity, the clicked membrane showed superior conductivity to a trimethylamine-based membrane. Moreover, similar alkaline stabilities at 80 °C in 1 M NaOH were observed for the clicked and non-clicked membranes. The performance of a H2 /O2 single cell assembled with a clicked AEM was much improved compared to that of a non-clicked TMA-20 membrane. The peak power density achieved for an alkaline fuel cell with the synthesized membrane 1a(20) was 188.7 mW cm(-2) at 50 °C. These results indicated that clicked AEM could be a viable strategy for improving the performance of alkaline fuel cells.

  7. Cellulose nanocrystal-based composite electrolyte with superior dimensional stability for alkaline fuel cell membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Yuan; Artmentrout, Aaron A.; Li, Juchuan; Tekinalp, Halil L.; Nanda, Jagjit; Ozcan, Soydan

    2015-05-13

    Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC)-based composite films were prepared as a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells. Poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and silica gel hybrid was used to bind the CNCs to form a robust composite film. The mass ratio (i.e., 1 : 1, 1 : 2) of PVA and silica gel was tuned to control the hydrophobicity of the resulting films. Composite films with a range of CNC content (i.e., 20 to 60%) were prepared to demonstrate the impact of CNC on the performance of these materials as a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells. Different from previously reported cross-linked polymermore » films, CNC-based composite films with 40% hydrophobic binder (i.e., PVA : silica gel=1 : 2) exhibited simultaneous low water swelling (e.g., ~5%) and high water uptake (e.g., ~80%) due to the hydrophilicity and extraordinary dimensional stability of CNC. It also showed a conductivity of 0.044 and 0.065 S/cm at 20 and 60 oC, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the film with 60% CNC and 40% binder is characterized by the lowest hydroxide conductivity-normalized swelling ratio. Decreased CNC content (i.e., 40 and 20%) resulted in comparable hydroxide conductivity but a greater swelling ratio. These results demonstrate the advantage of CNC as a key component for a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells over conventional polymers, suggesting the great potential of CNCs in improving the dimensional stability while maintaining the conductivity of existing anion exchange membranes.« less

  8. Cellulose nanocrystal-based composite electrolyte with superior dimensional stability for alkaline fuel cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yuan; Artmentrout, Aaron A.; Li, Juchuan; Tekinalp, Halil L.; Nanda, Jagjit; Ozcan, Soydan

    2015-05-13

    Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC)-based composite films were prepared as a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells. Poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and silica gel hybrid was used to bind the CNCs to form a robust composite film. The mass ratio (i.e., 1 : 1, 1 : 2) of PVA and silica gel was tuned to control the hydrophobicity of the resulting films. Composite films with a range of CNC content (i.e., 20 to 60%) were prepared to demonstrate the impact of CNC on the performance of these materials as a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells. Different from previously reported cross-linked polymer films, CNC-based composite films with 40% hydrophobic binder (i.e., PVA : silica gel=1 : 2) exhibited simultaneous low water swelling (e.g., ~5%) and high water uptake (e.g., ~80%) due to the hydrophilicity and extraordinary dimensional stability of CNC. It also showed a conductivity of 0.044 and 0.065 S/cm at 20 and 60 oC, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the film with 60% CNC and 40% binder is characterized by the lowest hydroxide conductivity-normalized swelling ratio. Decreased CNC content (i.e., 40 and 20%) resulted in comparable hydroxide conductivity but a greater swelling ratio. These results demonstrate the advantage of CNC as a key component for a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells over conventional polymers, suggesting the great potential of CNCs in improving the dimensional stability while maintaining the conductivity of existing anion exchange membranes.

  9. Advanced Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) Nickel-Hydrogen Spacecraft Cell and Battery Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, Dwaine K.; Wright, R. Doug; Repplinger, Ron S.

    1996-01-01

    The dependent pressure vessel (DPV) nickel-hydrogen (Ni-H2) battery is being developed as a potential spacecraft battery design for both military and commercial satellites. Individual pressure vessel (IPV) Ni-H2 batteries are currently flying on more than 70 Earth-orbiting satellites and have accumulated more that 140,000,000 cell-hours in actual spacecraft operation. The limitations of standard Ni-H2 IPV flight battery technology are primarily related to the internal cell design and the battery packaging issues associated with grouping multiple cylindrical cells. The DPV cell design offers higher specific energy and reduced cost, while retaining the established IPV Ni-H2 technology flight heritage and database. A design performance analysis is presented at both the cell and battery level. The DPV is capable of delivering up to 76 Watthours per kilogram (Wh/kg) at the cell level and 70 Wh/kg at the full battery level. This represents a 40 percent increase in specific energy at the cell level and a 60 percent increase in specific energy at the battery level compared to current IPV Ni-H2 technology.

  10. Hydrophilic Electrode For An Alkaline Electrochemical Cell, And Method Of Manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Senyarich, Stephane; Cocciantelli, Jean-Michel

    2000-03-07

    A negative electrode for an alkaline electrochemical cell. The electrode comprises an active material and a hydrophilic agent constituted by small cylindrical rods of polyolefin provided with hydrophilic groups. The mean length of the rods is less than 50 microns and the mean diameter thereof is less than 20 microns. A method of manufacturing a negative electrode in which hydrophilic rods are made by fragmenting long polyolefin fibers having a mean diameter of less than 20 microns by oxidizing them, with the rods being mixed with the active material and the mixture being applied to a current conductor.

  11. Efficiently photo-charging lithium-ion battery by perovskite solar cell.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiantie; Chen, Yonghua; Dai, Liming

    2015-08-27

    Electric vehicles using lithium-ion battery pack(s) for propulsion have recently attracted a great deal of interest. The large-scale practical application of battery electric vehicles may not be realized unless lithium-ion batteries with self-charging suppliers will be developed. Solar cells offer an attractive option for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries. Here we demonstrate the use of perovskite solar cell packs with four single CH3NH3PbI3 based solar cells connected in series for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries assembled with a LiFePO4 cathode and a Li4Ti5O12 anode. Our device shows a high overall photo-electric conversion and storage efficiency of 7.80% and excellent cycling stability, which outperforms other reported lithium-ion batteries, lithium-air batteries, flow batteries and super-capacitors integrated with a photo-charging component. The newly developed self-chargeable units based on integrated perovskite solar cells and lithium-ion batteries hold promise for various potential applications.

  12. Efficiently photo-charging lithium-ion battery by perovskite solar cell

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiantie; Chen, Yonghua; Dai, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Electric vehicles using lithium-ion battery pack(s) for propulsion have recently attracted a great deal of interest. The large-scale practical application of battery electric vehicles may not be realized unless lithium-ion batteries with self-charging suppliers will be developed. Solar cells offer an attractive option for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries. Here we demonstrate the use of perovskite solar cell packs with four single CH3NH3PbI3 based solar cells connected in series for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries assembled with a LiFePO4 cathode and a Li4Ti5O12 anode. Our device shows a high overall photo-electric conversion and storage efficiency of 7.80% and excellent cycling stability, which outperforms other reported lithium-ion batteries, lithium–air batteries, flow batteries and super-capacitors integrated with a photo-charging component. The newly developed self-chargeable units based on integrated perovskite solar cells and lithium-ion batteries hold promise for various potential applications. PMID:26311589

  13. Efficiently photo-charging lithium-ion battery by perovskite solar cell.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiantie; Chen, Yonghua; Dai, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Electric vehicles using lithium-ion battery pack(s) for propulsion have recently attracted a great deal of interest. The large-scale practical application of battery electric vehicles may not be realized unless lithium-ion batteries with self-charging suppliers will be developed. Solar cells offer an attractive option for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries. Here we demonstrate the use of perovskite solar cell packs with four single CH3NH3PbI3 based solar cells connected in series for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries assembled with a LiFePO4 cathode and a Li4Ti5O12 anode. Our device shows a high overall photo-electric conversion and storage efficiency of 7.80% and excellent cycling stability, which outperforms other reported lithium-ion batteries, lithium-air batteries, flow batteries and super-capacitors integrated with a photo-charging component. The newly developed self-chargeable units based on integrated perovskite solar cells and lithium-ion batteries hold promise for various potential applications. PMID:26311589

  14. Efficiently photo-charging lithium-ion battery by perovskite solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiantie; Chen, Yonghua; Dai, Liming

    2015-08-01

    Electric vehicles using lithium-ion battery pack(s) for propulsion have recently attracted a great deal of interest. The large-scale practical application of battery electric vehicles may not be realized unless lithium-ion batteries with self-charging suppliers will be developed. Solar cells offer an attractive option for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries. Here we demonstrate the use of perovskite solar cell packs with four single CH3NH3PbI3 based solar cells connected in series for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries assembled with a LiFePO4 cathode and a Li4Ti5O12 anode. Our device shows a high overall photo-electric conversion and storage efficiency of 7.80% and excellent cycling stability, which outperforms other reported lithium-ion batteries, lithium-air batteries, flow batteries and super-capacitors integrated with a photo-charging component. The newly developed self-chargeable units based on integrated perovskite solar cells and lithium-ion batteries hold promise for various potential applications.

  15. Wnt5a attenuates Wnt3a-induced alkaline phosphatase expression in dental follicle cells.

    PubMed

    Sakisaka, Yukihiko; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Tamura, Masato; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi; Nemoto, Eiji

    2015-08-01

    Wnt signaling regulates multiple cellular events such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis through β-catenin-dependent canonical and β-catenin-independent noncanonical pathways. Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling can promote the differentiation of dental follicle cells, putative progenitor cells for cementoblasts, osteoblasts, and periodontal ligament cells, toward a cementoblast/osteoblast phenotype during root formation, but little is known about the biological significance of noncanonical Wnt signaling in this process. We identified the expression of Wnt5a, a representative noncanonical Wnt ligand, in tooth root lining cells (i.e. precementoblasts/cementoblasts) and dental follicle cells during mouse tooth root development, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Silencing expression of the Wnt5a gene in a dental follicle cell line resulted in enhancement of the Wnt3a (a representative canonical Wnt ligand)-mediated increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression. Conversely, treatment with recombinant Wnt5a inhibited the increase in ALP expression, suggesting that Wnt5a signaling functions as a negative regulator of canonical Wnt-mediated ALP expression of dental follicle cells. Wnt5a did not affect the nuclear translocation of β-catenin as well as β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activation of T-cell factor (Tcf) triggered by Wnt3a, suggesting that Wnt5a inhibits the downstream part of the β-catenin-Tcf pathway. These findings suggest the existence of a feedback mechanism between canonical and noncanonical Wnt signaling during the differentiation of dental follicle cells.

  16. The Comparative Performance of Batteries: The Lead-Acid and the Aluminum-Air Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, Xavier; Ottewill, Gerry A.; Walsh, Frank C.

    1996-08-01

    An experimental program designed to convey, to students aged 16 through undergraduate, the principles of battery electrochemistry through a comparative study of two different systems, the lead acid cell and aluminum air cell, is described.

  17. Imidazolium-Based Polymeric Materials as Alkaline Anion-Exchange Fuel Cell Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Sri R.; Yen, Shiao-Ping S.; Reddy, Prakash V.; Nair, Nanditha

    2012-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes that conduct hydroxide ions have potential use in fuel cells. A variety of polystyrene-based quaternary ammonium hydroxides have been reported as anion exchange fuel cell membranes. However, the hydrolytic stability and conductivity of the commercially available membranes are not adequate to meet the requirements of fuel cell applications. When compared with commercially available membranes, polystyrene-imidazolium alkaline membrane electrolytes are more stable and more highly conducting. At the time of this reporting, this has been the first such usage for imidazolium-based polymeric materials for fuel cells. Imidazolium salts are known to be electrochemically stable over wide potential ranges. By controlling the relative ratio of imidazolium groups in polystyrene-imidazolium salts, their physiochemical properties could be modulated. Alkaline anion exchange membranes based on polystyrene-imidazolium hydroxide materials have been developed. The first step was to synthesize the poly(styrene-co-(1-((4-vinyl)methyl)-3- methylimidazolium) chloride through a free-radical polymerization. Casting of this material followed by in situ treatment of the membranes with sodium hydroxide solutions provided the corresponding hydroxide salts. Various ratios of the monomers 4-chloromoethylvinylbenzine (CMVB) and vinylbenzine (VB) provided various compositions of the polymer. The preferred material, due to the relative ease of casting the film, and its relatively low hygroscopic nature, was a 2:1 ratio of CMVB to VB. Testing confirmed that at room temperature, the new membranes outperformed commercially available membranes by a large margin. With fuel cells now in use at NASA and in transportation, and with defense potential, any improvement to fuel cell efficiency is a significant development.

  18. A Comparison of Two Panasonic Lithium-Ion Batteries and Cells for the IBM Thinkpad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith A.; Cook, Joseph S.; Davies, Francis J.; Collins, Jacob; Bragg, Bobby J.

    2003-01-01

    The IBM Thinkpad 760XD has been used in the Orbiter and International Space Station since 2000. The Thinkpad is powered by a Panasonic Li-ion battery that has a voltage of 10.8 V and 3.0 Ah capacity. This Thinkpad is now being replaced by the IBM Thinkpad A31P which has a Panasonic Li-ion battery that has a voltage of 10.8 V and 4.0 Ah capacity. Both batteries have protective circuit boards. The Panasonic battery for the Thinkpad 760XD had 12 Panasonic 17500 cells of 0.75 Ah capacity in a 4P3S cOnfiguration. The new Panasonic battery has 6 Panasonic 18650 cells of 2.0 Ah capacity in a 2P3S configuration. The batteries and cells for both models have been evaluated for performance and safety. A comparison of the cells under similar test conditions will be presented. The performance of the cells has been evaluated under different rates of charge and discharge and different temperatures. The cells have been tested under abuse conditions and the safety features in the cells evaluated. The protective circuit board in the battery was also tested under conditions of overcharge, overdischarge, short circuit and unbalanced cell configurations. The results of the studies will be presented in this paper.

  19. Electrochemical kinetic and mass transfer model for direct ethanol alkaline fuel cell (DEAFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, S.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Hasran, U. A.; Masdar, M. S.; Daud, W. R. W.

    2016-07-01

    A mathematical model is developed for a liquid-feed DEAFC incorporating an alkaline anion-exchange membrane. The one-dimensional mass transport of chemical species is modelled using isothermal, single-phase and steady-state assumptions. The anode and cathode electrochemical reactions use the Tafel kinetics approach, with two limiting cases, for the reaction order. The model fully accounts for the mixed potential effects of ethanol oxidation at the cathode due to ethanol crossover via an alkaline anion-exchange membrane. In contrast to a polymer electrolyte membrane model, the current model considers the flux of ethanol at the membrane as the difference between diffusive and electroosmotic effects. The model is used to investigate the effects of the ethanol and alkali inlet feed concentrations at the anode. The model predicts that the cell performance is almost identical for different ethanol concentrations at a low current density. Moreover, the model results show that feeding the DEAFC with 5 M NaOH and 3 M ethanol at specific operating conditions yields a better performance at a higher current density. Furthermore, the model indicates that crossover effects on the DEAFC performance are significant. The cell performance decrease from its theoretical value when a parasitic current is enabled in the model.

  20. Development of composite membranes of PVA-TEOS doped KOH for alkaline membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haryadi, Sugianto, D.; Ristopan, E.

    2015-12-01

    Anion exchange membranes (AEMs) play an important role in separating fuel and oxygen (or air) in the Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells. Preparation of hybrid organic inorganic materials of Polyvinylalcohol (PVA) - Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) composite membrane doped KOH for direct alcohol alkaline fuel cell application has been investigated. The sol-gel method has been used to prepare the composite membrane of PVA-TEOS through crosslinking step and catalyzed by concentrated of hydrochloric acid. The gel solution was cast on the membrane plastic plate to obtain membrane sheets. The dry membranes were then doped by immersing in various concentrations of KOH solutions for about 4 hours. Investigations of the cross-linking process and the presence of hydroxyl group were conducted by FTIR as shown for frequency at about 1600 cm-1 and 3300 cm-1 respectively. The degree of swelling in ethanol decreased as the KOH concentration for membrane soaking process increased. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) of the membrane was 0.25meq/g. This composite membranes display significant ionic conductivity of 3.23 x 10-2 S/cm in deionized water at room temperature. In addition, the morphology observation by scanning electron microscope (SEM) of the membrane indicates that soaking process of membrane in KOH increased thermal resistant.

  1. Development of composite membranes of PVA-TEOS doped KOH for alkaline membrane fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Haryadi, Sugianto, D.; Ristopan, E.

    2015-12-29

    Anion exchange membranes (AEMs) play an important role in separating fuel and oxygen (or air) in the Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells. Preparation of hybrid organic inorganic materials of Polyvinylalcohol (PVA) - Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) composite membrane doped KOH for direct alcohol alkaline fuel cell application has been investigated. The sol-gel method has been used to prepare the composite membrane of PVA-TEOS through crosslinking step and catalyzed by concentrated of hydrochloric acid. The gel solution was cast on the membrane plastic plate to obtain membrane sheets. The dry membranes were then doped by immersing in various concentrations of KOH solutions for about 4 hours. Investigations of the cross-linking process and the presence of hydroxyl group were conducted by FTIR as shown for frequency at about 1600 cm{sup −1} and 3300 cm{sup −1} respectively. The degree of swelling in ethanol decreased as the KOH concentration for membrane soaking process increased. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) of the membrane was 0.25meq/g. This composite membranes display significant ionic conductivity of 3.23 x 10{sup −2} S/cm in deionized water at room temperature. In addition, the morphology observation by scanning electron microscope (SEM) of the membrane indicates that soaking process of membrane in KOH increased thermal resistant.

  2. Palladium/nickel bifunctional electrocatalyst for hydrogen oxidation reaction in alkaline membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesker, Maria; Page, Miles; Shviro, Meital; Paska, Yair; Gershinsky, Gregory; Dekel, Dario R.; Zitoun, David

    2016-02-01

    Investigation of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) in alkaline media has been pursued in the past few years side by side with the development of alkaline membrane fuel cells (AMFCs), also called anion exchange membrane fuel cells (AEM-FCs). In this communication, we present the synthesis, electrochemistry and AMFC test of a platinum-free HOR catalyst. The anode catalyst is prepared by growing palladium nanoparticles onto nanoparticles of an oxophilic metal (nickel), resulting in nano-dispersed, interconnected crystalline phases of Ni and Pd. When used in the anode of a hydrogen/air AMFC, such Pd/Ni catalyst exhibits high HOR activity, resulting in record high performance for a platinum-free AMFC (0.4 A cm-2 at 0.6 V vs RHE). The enhancement of HOR catalytic activity vs. that observed at Pd (or Ni) alone is revealed directly in rotating disc electrode tests of this Pd/Ni catalyst that shows a significant negative shift (200 mV) of the onset potential for the HOR current vs. the case of Pd.

  3. Cell-level battery charge/discharge protection system. [electronic control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, R. L.; Imamura, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes three design approaches to individual cell monitoring and control for sealed secondary battery cells. One technique involves a modular strap-on single cell protector which contains all the electronics required for monitoring cell voltage, responding to external commands, and forming a bypass circuit for the cell. A second technique, the multiplexed cell protector, uses common circuitry to monitor and control each cell in a battery pack. The third technique, the computerized cell protector, by replacing the hard-wired logic of the multiplexed cell protector with a microprocessor, achieves greatest control flexibility and inherent computational capability with a minimum parts count implementation.

  4. Epigallocatechin gallate incorporation into lignin enhances the alkaline delignification and enzymatic saccharification of cell walls

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lignin is an integral component of the plant cell wall matrix but impedes the conversion of biomass into biofuels. The plasticity of lignin biosynthesis should permit the inclusion of new compatible phenolic monomers such as flavonoids into cell wall lignins that are consequently less recalcitrant to biomass processing. In the present study, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) was evaluated as a potential lignin bioengineering target for rendering biomass more amenable to processing for biofuel production. Results In vitro peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization experiments revealed that both gallate and pyrogallyl (B-ring) moieties in EGCG underwent radical cross-coupling with monolignols mainly by β–O–4-type cross-coupling, producing benzodioxane units following rearomatization reactions. Biomimetic lignification of maize cell walls with a 3:1 molar ratio of monolignols and EGCG permitted extensive alkaline delignification of cell walls (72 to 92%) that far exceeded that for lignified controls (44 to 62%). Alkali-insoluble residues from EGCG-lignified walls yielded up to 34% more glucose and total sugars following enzymatic saccharification than lignified controls. Conclusions It was found that EGCG readily copolymerized with monolignols to become integrally cross-coupled into cell wall lignins, where it greatly enhanced alkaline delignification and subsequent enzymatic saccharification. Improved delignification may be attributed to internal trapping of quinone-methide intermediates to prevent benzyl ether cross-linking of lignin to structural polysaccharides during lignification, and to the cleavage of ester intra-unit linkages within EGCG during pretreatment. Overall, our results suggest that apoplastic deposition of EGCG for incorporation into lignin would be a promising plant genetic engineering target for improving the delignification and saccharification of biomass crops. PMID:22889353

  5. Symposium on Batteries and Fuel Cells for Stationary and Electric Vehicle Applications, Honolulu, HI, May 16-21, 1993, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landgrebe, Albert R.; Takehara, Zen-Ichiro

    The present conference discusses the development status of vehicular batteries in Japan, the effects of the solvent for electropolymerization of aniline on the charge/discharge characteristics of polyaniline, the charge/discharge mechanism of the amorphous FeOOH, including aniline as a cathode for a rechargeable Li battery, the effect of mesocarbon microbead structure on the electrochemistry of Li secondary batteries' negative electrode, and novel aluminum batteries. Also discussed are a room-temperature molten salt electrolyte for the Na/iron chloride battery, portable cells for redox batteries, the development status of lead-acid batteries for electric vehicles, mechanically refuelable zinc/air vehicular cells, polymer electrolyte fuel cells for transportation applications, proton exchange membrane fuel cells using gas-fed methanol, and a phosphotic acid fuel cell/battery.

  6. Probing the chemistry of nickel/metal hydride battery cells using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaac, Bryan J.

    1994-01-01

    Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is a valuable tool for investigating the chemical and physical processes occurring at electrode surfaces. It offers information about electron transfer at interfaces, kinetics of reactions, and diffusion characteristics of the bulk phase between the electrodes. For battery cells, this technique offers another advantage in that it can be done without taking the battery apart. This non-destructive analysis technique can thus be used to gain a better understanding of the processes occurring within a battery cell. This also raises the possibility of improvements in battery design and identification or prediction of battery characteristics useful in industry and aerospace applications. EIS as a technique is powerful and capable of yielding significant information about the cell, but it also requires that the many parameters under investigation can be resolved. This implies an understanding of the processes occurring in a battery cell. Many battery types were surveyed in this work, but the main emphasis was on nickel/metal hydride batteries.

  7. The Long-Term Performance of SONY Small Batteries without Cell-Balancing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Chris; Thwaite, Carl; Curzon, David; Rao, Gopalakrishna

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the investigation of individual cell voltage dispersion under LEO and GEO cycling profiles. The contents cover: 1) Background; 2) Test Outline; 3) Single String Test Battery; 4) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 5Ah Battery; 5) Impedance; 6) Conclusions.

  8. Improved lysis of single bacterial cells by a modified alkaline-thermal shock procedure.

    PubMed

    He, Jian; Du, Shiyu; Tan, Xiaohua; Arefin, Ayesha; Han, Cliff S

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell genomics (SCG) is a recently developed tool to study the genomes of unculturable bacterial species. SCG relies on multiple-strand displacement amplification (MDA), PCR, and next-generation sequencing (NGS); however, obtaining sufficient amounts of high-quality DNA from samples is a major challenge when performing this technique. Here we present an improved bacterial cell lysing procedure that combines incubation in an alkaline buffer with a thermal shock (freezing/heating) treatment to yield highly intact genomic DNA with high efficiency. This procedure is more efficient in lysing Bacillus subtilis and Synechocystis cells compared with two other frequently used lysis methods. Furthermore, 16S ribosomal RNA gene and overall genome recovery were found to be improved by this method using single cells from a Utah desert soil community or Escherichia coli single cells, respectively. The efficiency of genome recovery for E. coli single cells using our procedure is comparable with that of the REPLI-g Single Cell (sc) Kit, but our method is much more economical. By providing high-quality genome templates suitable for downstream applications, our procedure will be a promising improvement for SCG research. PMID:26956090

  9. Mathematical model of water transport in Bacon and alkaline matrix-type hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, P. R.; Easter, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Based on general mass continuity and diffusive transport equations, a mathematical model was developed that simulates the transport of water in Bacon and alkaline-matrix fuel cells. The derived model was validated by using it to analytically reproduce various Bacon and matrix-cell experimental water transport transients.

  10. Device and Method for Continuously Equalizing the Charge State of Lithium Ion Battery Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Paul D. (Inventor); Martin, Mark N. (Inventor); Roufberg, Lewis M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method of equalizing charge states of individual cells in a battery includes measuring a previous cell voltage for each cell, measuring a previous shunt current for each cell, calculating, based on the previous cell voltage and the previous shunt current, an adjusted cell voltage for each cell, determining a lowest adjusted cell voltage from among the calculated adjusted cell voltages, and calculating a new shunt current for each cell.

  11. Wnt5a attenuates Wnt3a-induced alkaline phosphatase expression in dental follicle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakisaka, Yukihiko; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Tamura, Masato; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi; Nemoto, Eiji

    2015-08-01

    Wnt signaling regulates multiple cellular events such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis through β-catenin-dependent canonical and β-catenin-independent noncanonical pathways. Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling can promote the differentiation of dental follicle cells, putative progenitor cells for cementoblasts, osteoblasts, and periodontal ligament cells, toward a cementoblast/osteoblast phenotype during root formation, but little is known about the biological significance of noncanonical Wnt signaling in this process. We identified the expression of Wnt5a, a representative noncanonical Wnt ligand, in tooth root lining cells (i.e. precementoblasts/cementoblasts) and dental follicle cells during mouse tooth root development, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Silencing expression of the Wnt5a gene in a dental follicle cell line resulted in enhancement of the Wnt3a (a representative canonical Wnt ligand)-mediated increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression. Conversely, treatment with recombinant Wnt5a inhibited the increase in ALP expression, suggesting that Wnt5a signaling functions as a negative regulator of canonical Wnt-mediated ALP expression of dental follicle cells. Wnt5a did not affect the nuclear translocation of β-catenin as well as β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activation of T-cell factor (Tcf) triggered by Wnt3a, suggesting that Wnt5a inhibits the downstream part of the β-catenin-Tcf pathway. These findings suggest the existence of a feedback mechanism between canonical and noncanonical Wnt signaling during the differentiation of dental follicle cells. - Highlights: • Dental follicle cells express Wnt5a during tooth root development. • Silencing of Wnt5a enhances Wnt3a-mediated ALP expression of dental follicle cells. • Conversely, treatment with rWnt5a inhibited the increase in ALP expression. • Wnt5a functions as a negative regulator of Wnt3a-mediated ALP expression.

  12. Performance of Li-Ion Cells Under Battery Voltage Charge Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A study consisting of electrochemical characterization and Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) cycling of Li-Ion cells from three vendors was initiated in 1999 to determine the cycling performance and to infuse the new technology in the future NASA missions. The 8-cell batteries included in this evaluation are prismatic cells manufactured by Mine Safety Appliances Company (MSA), cylindrical cells manufactured by SAFT and prismatic cells manufactured by Yardney Technical Products, Inc. (YTP). The three batteries were cycle tested in the LEO regime at 40% depth of discharge, and under a charge control technique that consists of battery voltage clamp with a current taper. The initial testing was conducted at 20 C; however, the batteries were cycled also intermittently at low temperatures. YTP 20 Ah cells consisted of mixed-oxide (Co and Ni) positive, graphitic carbon negative, LIPF6 salt mixed with organic carbonate solvents. The battery voltage clamp was 32 V. The low temperature cycling tests started after 4575 cycles at 20 C. The cells were not capable of cycling. at low temperature since the charge acceptance at battery level was poor. There was a cell in the battery that showed too high an end-of-charge (EOC) voltage thereby limiting the ability to charge the rest of the cells in the battery. The battery has completed 6714 cycles. SAFT 12 Ah cells consisted of mixed-oxide (Co and NO positive, graphitic carbon negative, LiPF6 salt mixed with organic carbonate solvents. The battery voltage clamp was for 30.8 V. The low temperature cycling tests started after 4594 cycles at 20 C. A cell that showed low end of discharge (EOD) and EOC voltages and three other cells that showed higher EOC voltages limited the charge acceptance at the selected voltage limit during charge. The cells were capable of cycling at 10 C and 0 C but the charge voltage limit had to be increased to 34.3 V (4.3 V per cell). The low temperature cycling may have induced poor chargeability since the voltage had to

  13. Electrodes for sealed secondary batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boies, D. B.; Child, F. T.

    1972-01-01

    Self-supporting membrane electrode structures, in which active ingredients and graphite are incorporated in a polymeric matrix, improve performance of electrodes in miniature, sealed, alkaline storage batteries.

  14. Regulation of alkaline phosphatase expression in a neonatal rat clonal calvarial cell strain by retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Ng, K W; Gummer, P R; Michelangeli, V P; Bateman, J F; Mascara, T; Cole, W G; Martin, T J

    1988-02-01

    A clonal cell strain, UMR 201, was established from a culture of rat calvarial cells by the process of limiting dilution on a collagen substratum. One-day-old neonatal rat calvaria stripped of periosteum were placed on collagen in alpha-MEM with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Cells that grew out from the calvaria were passaged eight times to select cells with the ability to proliferate in culture before cloning was attempted. Cells from the clonal strain were homogeneous in appearance with a doubling time in culture of about 24 hours. The UMR 201 cells formed predominantly type 1 collagen. When treated with retinoic acid (RA), all cells showed an intense staining for alkaline phosphatase (ALP). This effect of RA on the expression of ALP activity was reversible and was time and dose dependent. The earliest change was observed within 6 hours. In contrast, single and isolated clumps of untreated cells stained positively for ALP only when they were confluent. Coincubation with dactinomycin up to 3 hours after the addition of RA completely prevented the expression of ALP, whereas dactinomycin became progressively less effective when added at later times. This is interpreted as indicating a regulatory role of RA on the gene expression of ALP. Other hormones acting on bone, such as 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D3 and dexamethasone, also modulate ALP activity. The cells showed morphologic evidence of senescence after passage 12. Our preliminary studies showed that the UMR 201 cells had the characteristics of relatively undifferentiated mesenchymal cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Comparative costs of flexible package cells and rigid cells for lithium-ionhybrid electric vehicle batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, P. A.; Jansen, A. N.

    2006-11-28

    We conducted a design study to compare the manufacturing costs at a level of 100,000 hybrid vehicle batteries per year for flexible package (Flex) cells and for rigid aluminum container (Rigid) cells. Initially, the Rigid cells were considered to have welded closures and to be deep-drawn containers of about the same shape as the Flex cells. As the study progressed, the method of fabricating and sealing the Rigid cells was expanded to include lower cost options including double seaming and other mechanically fastened closures with polymer sealants. Both types of batteries were designed with positive electrodes containing Li(Ni{sub 1/3}Co{sub 1/3}Mn{sub 1/3})O{sub 2} and graphite negative electrodes. The use of a different combination of lithium-ion electrodes would have little effect on the difference in costs for the two types of cells. We found that 20-Ah cells could be designed with excellent performance and heat rejection capabilities for either type of cell. Many parts in the design of the Flex cells are identical or nearly identical to those of the Rigid Cell, so for these features there would be no difference in the cost of manufacturing the two types of batteries. We judged the performance, size and weight of the batteries to be sufficiently similar that the batteries would have the same value for their application. Some of the design features of the Flex cells were markedly different than those of the deep-drawn and welded Rigid cells and would result in significant cost savings. Fabrication and processing steps for which the Flex cells appear to have a cost advantage over these Rigid cells are (1) container fabrication and sealing, (2) terminal fabrication and sealing, and (3) intercell connections. The costs of providing cooling channels adjacent to the cells and for module and battery hardware appear to favor Rigid cell batteries slightly. Overall, Flex cell batteries appear to have an advantage of about $1.20-$3.70 per cell for a 25-kW Battery of 20

  16. Electrochemical characterization of flat-plate rechargeable alkaline manganese dioxide-zinc cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberge, P. R.; Farahani, M.; Tomantschger, K.; Oran, E.

    The electrochemical characterization of flat-plate rechargeable alkaline manganese/dioxide-zinc (RAM) cells was made with various techniques throughout their cycle life. The two chemistries evaluated in this study behave quite differently throughout their cycle life. While the chemistry commonly used in cylindrical cells provided an excellent first cycle, its capacity diminished quite rapidly during the following cycles. The cells containing a Ca(OH) 2 anode additive, on the other hand, delivered rather poor initial cycles but their performance improved towards the third cycle and remained at that level throughout a much longer practical cycle life. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements performed at regular intervals of the cycle life of the flat-plate cells indicated that the overall impedance of cells containing a Ca(OH) 2 additive was controlled by charge-transfer processes at the negative electrode. Electrochemical noise measurements were also carried out at regular intervals with very sensitive equipment and the results obtained permitted to confirm that the electrochemical noise generated by the flat-plate cells can be completely explained by stochastic processes.

  17. Development of flat plate rechargeable alkaline manganese dioxide-zinc cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stani, Andreas; Taucher-Mautner, Waltraud; Kordesch, Karl; Daniel-Ivad, Josef

    This paper was focused on the development of prototypes for flat plate RAM™ (rechargeable alkaline manganese dioxide) cells. In contrast to cathodes used in cylindrical RAM™ cells, the mechanical stability is a significant issue for the preparation of flat plate cathodes. Therefore, the choice of an appropriate binder, e.g. Oppanol, is very important. In this work, an improved preparation process of flat plate RAM™ cathodes was developed by investigating the single steps of the preparation method. It was further demonstrated that the most critical factor of zinc electrode performance was the electrolyte content of the anode gel. Best overall cell performance was achieved at 40% zinc amount and a Zn/ZnO ratio of 5.0, in combination with an electrolyte content of 50.5%. In order to stabilise the γ-structure of manganese dioxide and to enhance rechargeability, the addition of barium compounds was also studied. Cell cycling has shown that flat plate RAM™ cells with BaSO 4-modified cathodes outperformed control cells by 24%, mainly because of the minimised fade of discharge capacity. Moreover, the admixture of barium manganate to the cathode yielded more than 15% capacity improvement after 25 cycles, compared to the barium sulfate additive.

  18. Platinum- and membrane-free swiss-roll mixed-reactant alkaline fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Aziznia, Amin; Oloman, Colin W; Gyenge, Előd L

    2013-05-01

    Eliminating the expensive and failure-prone proton exchange membrane (PEM) together with the platinum-based anode and cathode catalysts would significantly reduce the high capital and operating costs of low-temperature (<373 K) fuel cells. We recently introduced the Swiss-roll mixed-reactant fuel cell (SR-MRFC) concept for borohydride-oxygen alkaline fuel cells. We now present advances in anode electrocatalysis for borohydride electrooxidation through the development of osmium nanoparticulate catalysts supported on porous monolithic carbon fiber materials (referred to as an osmium 3D anode). The borohydride-oxygen SR-MRFC operates at 323 K and near atmospheric pressure, generating a peak power density of 1880 W m(-2) in a single-cell configuration by using an osmium-based anode (with an osmium loading of 0.32 mg cm(-2)) and a manganese dioxide gas-diffusion cathode. To the best of our knowledge, 1880 W m(-2) is the highest power density ever reported for a mixed-reactant fuel cell operating under similar conditions. Furthermore, the performance matches the highest reported power densities for conventional dual chamber PEM direct borohydride fuel cells. PMID:23589385

  19. Platinum- and membrane-free swiss-roll mixed-reactant alkaline fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Aziznia, Amin; Oloman, Colin W; Gyenge, Előd L

    2013-05-01

    Eliminating the expensive and failure-prone proton exchange membrane (PEM) together with the platinum-based anode and cathode catalysts would significantly reduce the high capital and operating costs of low-temperature (<373 K) fuel cells. We recently introduced the Swiss-roll mixed-reactant fuel cell (SR-MRFC) concept for borohydride-oxygen alkaline fuel cells. We now present advances in anode electrocatalysis for borohydride electrooxidation through the development of osmium nanoparticulate catalysts supported on porous monolithic carbon fiber materials (referred to as an osmium 3D anode). The borohydride-oxygen SR-MRFC operates at 323 K and near atmospheric pressure, generating a peak power density of 1880 W m(-2) in a single-cell configuration by using an osmium-based anode (with an osmium loading of 0.32 mg cm(-2)) and a manganese dioxide gas-diffusion cathode. To the best of our knowledge, 1880 W m(-2) is the highest power density ever reported for a mixed-reactant fuel cell operating under similar conditions. Furthermore, the performance matches the highest reported power densities for conventional dual chamber PEM direct borohydride fuel cells.

  20. A mathematical model of the maximum power density attainable in an alkaline hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Michael C.; White, Ralph E.

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model of a hydrogen/oxygen alkaline fuel cell is presented that can be used to predict the polarization behavior under various power loads. The major limitations to achieving high power densities are indicated and methods to increase the maximum attainable power density are suggested. The alkaline fuel cell model describes the phenomena occurring in the solid, liquid, and gaseous phases of the anode, separator, and cathode regions based on porous electrode theory applied to three phases. Fundamental equations of chemical engineering that describe conservation of mass and charge, species transport, and kinetic phenomena are used to develop the model by treating all phases as a homogeneous continuum.

  1. The dissolution of carbon dioxide and the diffusion of carbonate ions in alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deruiter, B.

    If alkaline fuel cells are used, it is more economical to get the necessary oxygen from the air, instead of using pure oxygen. A problem that arises, when air is used, is the dissolution of carbon dioxide into the electrolyte solution (in the form of carbonate). After a certain period the carbonate concentration can be so high that potassium carbonate crystals are formed. This research consists of two parts. A mathematical model was made to describe the diffusion of carbon dioxide and carbonate ions in the air electrode. Second, long run tests were carried out (38 days) with two fuel cells. One cell was connected to a current source which aplied a current density of 50 mA/sq cm. The other cell was not connected to a current source. During the tests, the increase of carbonate concentration was measured. The carbonate concentration was measured by titration with HCl. The precision titration equipment made it possible to analyze very small samples (30 microns). The loss of elecrolyte was therefore negligible. The data are presented in Gran plots. The mathematical model resulted in a set of three partial differential equations which have to be solved numerically. The long run tests showed that the increase of carbonate concentration was the same in both fuel cells. The test also showed that the carbonate concentration increases linearly with respect to time.

  2. Use of lithium batteries in biomedical devices. Technical report No. 8, July 1988-June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, B.B.

    1989-06-15

    Lithium batteries have played an important role in the development of useful implantable biomedical devices. The cardiac pacemaker is the most well known of these devices and high-energy, long-life reliable lithium primary cells have effectively replaced all of the alkaline cells previously used in these electronic systems. The recent development of higher-power devices such as drug pumps and cardiac defibrillators require the use of batteries with higher energy and power capabilities. High rate rechargeable batteries that can be configured as flat prismatic cells would be especially useful in some of these new applications. Lithium polymer electrolyte-batteries may find a useful role in these new areas.

  3. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  4. Further studies on the detection of chemical agents using an alkaline energy cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shewchun, John

    2008-04-01

    The detection, classification and tracking of chemical agents (explosives) being surreptitiously smuggled into public areas, such as airports, for destructive purposes is difficult to solve by unobtrusive means. We propose the use of a novel Alkaline Energy Cell (AEC) with gas/vapor sniffing capability as a potential solution. Variants of such devices are routinely used by police to detect alcohol emanating from the breath of suspected impaired vehicle drivers. We reported previously at the SPIE Symposium in 2007 the details of our technology and results. We have continued to advanced this capability with the development of an AEC which is capable of detecting gaseous emissions ultimately in the parts per billion range. Our work is described in terms of detecting TATP (acetone peroxide). Other explosive materials have also been investigated and will be reported on.

  5. Assembly and electrochemical properties of novel alkaline rechargeable Ni/Bi battery using Ni(OH)2 and (BiO)4CO3(OH)2 microspheres as electrode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jinfeng; Wang, Jinqing; Li, Zhangpeng; Niu, Lengyuan; Hong, Wei; Yang, Shengrong

    2015-01-01

    In this work, Ni(OH)2 and (BiO)4CO3(OH)2 microspheres are synthesized by solvothermal method. Then, a novel alkaline rechargeable Ni/Bi battery is assembled for the first time using the synthesized Ni(OH)2 and (BiO)4CO3(OH)2 as the positive electrode and negative electrode materials, respectively. As a result, the assembled Ni/Bi battery delivers a high specific capacity of 113 mAh g-1 at a discharge rate of 0.2C based on the total mass of the electrode materials, as well as a high energy density of 92 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 27.3 W kg-1.

  6. Alkaline single-cell gel (comet) assay and genotoxicity monitoring using two species of tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Ralph, S; Petras, M; Pandrangi, R; Vrzoc, M

    1996-01-01

    Small bodies of water (e.g., creeks, ponds, and drainage ditches) have received very little attention in genotoxicity studies, yet these areas are important because they are often the first to be affected by industrial effluents, sewage contaminants, accidental spills, internal combustion engine emissions, landfill runoffs, and pesticide uses. To address this deficiency, we examined erythrocytes in two species of tadpoles, Rana clamitans and Bufo americanus, using the alkaline single-cell gel (SCG) ("comet") assay. This approach involves detection, under alkaline conditions, of cell DNA fragments, which on electrophoresis migrate from the nuclear core, resulting in a "comet-with-tail" formation. Exposure of R. clamitans todpoles to a range of concentrations of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) produced a linear increase in DNA length to DNA core width ratios. This is consistent with findings in a number of other species. Time-dose experiments using MMS suggest that the peak level of DNA damage in R. clamitans todpoles occurred 42 hr after exposure. B. americanus tadpoles exposed to 6.25 mg/l of MMS for 12 hours had a significant increase in DNA damage over that seen in the controls. Freshly caught R. clamitans tadpoles from Highgate and B. americanus tadpoles from Duart, both on the north shore of Lake Erie, gave ratios of 2.78 and 2.07, respectively. This region of Ontario is a prime agricultural area and pesticide use is extensive. Tadpoles from Highgate and Duart, maintained in the laboratory for 4 months and 6 weeks, respectively, gave ratios of 1.29 and 1.44. The results of the SCG procedure in tadpoles indicate that this assay is extremely sensitive and suitable for detecting genotoxicity in the environment.

  7. Electronic integration of fuel cell and battery system in novel hybrid vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Peter; Jostins, John; Hilmansen, Stuart; Kendall, Kevin

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this work was to integrate a lithium ion battery pack, together with its management system, into a hydrogen fuel cell drive train contained in a lightweight city car. Electronic units were designed to link the drive train components using conventional circuitry. These were built, tested and shown to perform according to the design. These circuits allowed start-up of battery management system, motor controller, fuel cell warm-up and torque monitoring. After assembling the fuel cell and battery in the vehicle, full system tests were performed. Analysis of results from vehicle demonstrations showed operation was satisfactory. The conclusion was that the electronic integration was successful, but the design needed optimisation and fine tuning. Eight vehicles were then fitted with the electronically integrated fuel cell-battery power pack. Trials were then started to test the integration more fully, with a duration of 12 months from 2011 to 2012 in the CABLED project.

  8. Engineering and Abuse Testing of Panasonic Lithium-Ion Battery and Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith A.; Bragg, Bobby J.

    2000-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the performance testing of Lithium Ion batteries and cells under different conditions of charge and discharge. The tests show that the 0.5 C rate of charge and discharge might be the ideal condition for long term cycling. It reviews the issues of overcharge and overdischarge of the cells. The cells and the battery have adequate protection under both conditions to prevent any catastrophic occurrences. Temperatures above 150 C are required to vent the cells or cause a thermal runaway, Since this situation is non-credible in the cabin of the Space Shuffle or ISS this should not pose a problem. The presentation includes graphs and charts showing the charge and discharge capacities of the battery and also the current and voltage profiles. A view of a circuit board which contains the controlling mechanism for the battery is also shown.

  9. High-rate lithium/manganese dioxide batteries; the double cell concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, Jürgen; Wolf, Rüdiger; Fehrmann, Gerd; Staub, Roland

    An implantable defibrillator battery has to provide pulse-power capabilities as well as high energy density. Low self-discharge rates are mandatory and an ability to check the state of charge is required. To accomplish these requirements, a lithium/manganese dioxide battery with a modified active cathode mass has been developed. Usage of a double cell design increases significantly the battery performance within an implantable defibrillator. The design features of a high-rate, pulse-power, manganese dioxide double cell are described.

  10. New Developments in Nickel-Hydrogen Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) Cell and Battery Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, Dwight B.; Fox, Chris L.; Miller, Lee E.

    1997-01-01

    THe Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) Nickel-Hydrogen (NiH2) design is being developed as an advanced battery for military and commercial, aerospace and terrestrial applications. The DPV cell design offers high specific energy and energy density as well as reduced cost, while retaining the established Individual Pressure Vessel (IPV) technology flight heritage and database. This advanced DPV design also offers a more efficient mechanical, electrical and thermal cell and battery configuration and a reduced part count. The DPV battery design promotes compact, minimum volume packaging and weight efficiency, and delivers cost and weight savings with minimal design risk.

  11. Manufacturing methods of a composite cell case for a Ni-Cd battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, J. L.; Bogner, R. S.; Lowe, E. P.; Orlowski, E.

    1979-01-01

    Graphite epoxy material for a nickel cadmium battery cell case has been evaluated and determined to perform in the simulated environment of the battery. The basic manufacturing method requires refinement to demonstrate production feasibility. The various facets of production scale-up, i.e., process and tooling development together with material and process control, have been integrated into a comprehensive manufacturing process that assures production reproducibility and product uniformity. Test results substantiate that a battery cell case produced from graphite epoxy pre-impregnated material utilizing internal pressure bag fabrication method is feasible.

  12. Modular Approach for Continuous Cell-Level Balancing to Improve Performance of Large Battery Packs: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Muneed ur Rehman, M.; Evzelman, M.; Hathaway, K.; Zane, R.; Plett, G. L.; Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Maksimovic, D.

    2014-10-01

    Energy storage systems require battery cell balancing circuits to avoid divergence of cell state of charge (SOC). A modular approach based on distributed continuous cell-level control is presented that extends the balancing function to higher level pack performance objectives such as improving power capability and increasing pack lifetime. This is achieved by adding DC-DC converters in parallel with cells and using state estimation and control to autonomously bias individual cell SOC and SOC range, forcing healthier cells to be cycled deeper than weaker cells. The result is a pack with improved degradation characteristics and extended lifetime. The modular architecture and control concepts are developed and hardware results are demonstrated for a 91.2-Wh battery pack consisting of four series Li-ion battery cells and four dual active bridge (DAB) bypass DC-DC converters.

  13. Manufacturing methods of a composite cell case for a Ni-Cd battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    Basic manufacturing method refinements for using graphite epoxy material for a nickel cadmium battery cell case were performed to demonstrate production feasibility. The various facets of production scale-up, i.e., process and tooling development, together with material and process control, were integrated into a comprehensive manufacturing process that assures production reproducibility and product uniformity. Test results substantiate that a battery cell case produced from graphite epoxy pre-impregnated material, utilizing the internal pressure bag fabrication method, is feasible.

  14. Human prostatic acid phosphatase directly stimulates collagen synthesis and alkaline phosphatase content of isolated bone cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibe, M.; Rosier, R.N.; Puzas, J.E. )

    1991-10-01

    Human prostatic acid phosphatase (hPAP) directly enhances the differentiated characteristics of isolated bone cells in vitro. This enzyme, when added to cell cultures for 24 h in vitro stimulates collagen synthesis and the production of alkaline phosphatase. The effects are dose dependent, with statistically significant effects occurring from 0.1-100 nM hPAP. Concentrations higher than 100 nM do not evoke greater effects. The maximal effect of hPAP occurs between 12 and 24 h of exposure. The cells stimulated to the greatest degree are osteoprogenitor cells and osteoblasts. Fibroblasts isolated from the same tissue show a lesser sensitivity to hPAP. hPAP has no detectable effect on cell proliferation, as measured by radiolabeled thymidine incorporation or total DNA synthesis. None of the observations reported in this work can be attributed to contaminating proteins in the hPAP preparation. hPAP was radiolabeled with 125I and was used for affinity binding and cross-linking studies. Scatchard analysis of specific binding indicated the presence of 1.0 X 10(5) high affinity binding sites/cell, with a Kd of 6.5 nM. Cross-linking studies demonstrated the presence of one 320-kDa binding complex. The pH profile and kinetic determinations of Km and maximum velocity for hPAP were similar to those previously reported, except for the finding of positive cooperativity of the substrate with the enzyme under the conditions of our assay. We believe that the direct stimulation of bone-forming cells by hPAP may contribute to the sclerotic nature of skeletal bone around sites of neoplastic prostatic metastases and that the effect of the enzyme is probably mediated by a plasma membrane receptor.

  15. Assessment of the status of fuel cell/battery vehicle power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, W.J.D.; Foster, R.W.

    1980-02-01

    An assessment of the status of the integrated fuel cell/battery power system concept for electric vehicle propulsion is reported. The fuel cell, operating on hydrogen or methanol (indirectly), acts as a very high capacity energy battery for vehicle sustaining operation, while a special power battery provides over-capacity transient power on demand, being recharged by the fuel cell, e.g., during cruising. A focused literature search and a set of industrial and Government contacts were carried out to establish views, outlooks, and general status concerning the concept. It is evident that, although vehicle battery R and D is being actively pursued, little of today's fuel cell work is directed to transportation usage. Only very limited attention has been, and is being, given to the fuel cell/battery power system concept itself. However, judging largely from computer-simulated driving cycle results, the concept can provide needed range capabilities and general operating flexibility to electric vehicles. New transportation applications, conventionally viewed as beyond the capability of electric vehicles, may thereby be practical, e.g., rail, trucks. In view of these potential and important benefits, and the absence of any comprehensive research, development, and demonstration activities which are supportive of the fuel cell/battery system concept, the initiation of an appropriate effort is recommended by the Assessment Team. This general recommendation is supported by applicable findings, observations, and conclusions.

  16. Estimating the organic acid contribution to coastal seawater alkalinity by potentiometric titrations in a closed cell.

    PubMed

    Muller, François L L; Bleie, Bjørn

    2008-07-01

    This paper examines the performance of a previously reported, closed cell, potentiometric titration technique [J.M. Hernández-Ayón, S.L. Belli, A. Zirino, Anal. Chim. Acta 394 (1999) 101] for the simultaneous determination of pH, total inorganic carbon (TCO2), total alkalinity (TA), and organic alkalinity (OA) in coastal seawater samples. A novel interpretation of the titration data, as recently proposed by Hernández-Ayón et al. [J.M. Hernández-Ayón, A. Zirino, A.G. Dickson, T. Camiro-Vagas, E. Valenzuela-Espinoza, Limnol. Oceanogr.: Methods 5 (2007) 225] who applied it to waters of unusually high organic matter content, was applied here to fjord surface waters collected over the duration of a phytoplankton bloom. The parameters pH and TCO2--combined with knowledge of boric, phosphate and silicate species concentrations--allowed calculation of all inorganic species that contributed to TA. This inorganic alkalinity term was then subtracted from TA to produce an estimation of OA. Although the OA values obtained were very small (2-22+/-3 micromol L(-1)), they showed a reproducible trend over time in two simultaneous experiments. The organic acids that may have contributed to OA were characterised in back titrations of acidified and CO2-stripped samples with CO2-free NaOH. Two classes of organic titratable species, with pK(a) values around 4.0+/-0.2 and 9.1+/-0.2 were detected. The first occurred in concentrations that co-varied linearly (r2=0.75) with protein-like fluorescence, indicating a marine biological source, but were only weakly correlated (r2=0.46) to OA. By contrast, Class 2 organic species were not significantly correlated to any fluorescence component of either marine or terrestrial origin but were linearly correlated to OA (r2=0.69). These new results reveal that the method proposed by Hernández-Ayón et al. [J.M. Hernández-Ayón, A. Zirino, A.G. Dickson, T. Camiro-Vagas, E. Valenzuela-Espinoza, Limnol. Oceanogr.: Methods 5 (2007) 225] for

  17. Electrocatalysis for dioxygen reduction by a μ-oxo decavanadium complex in alkaline medium and its application to a cathode catalyst in air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewi, Eniya Listiani; Oyaizu, Kenichi; Nishide, Hiroyuki; Tsuchida, Eishun

    The redox behavior of a decavanadium complex [(VO) 10(μ 2-O) 9(μ 3-O) 3(C 5H 7O 2) 6] ( 1) was studied using cyclic voltammetry under acidic and basic conditions. The reduction potential of V(V) was found at less positive potentials for higher pH electrolyte solutions. The oxygen reduction at complex 1 immobilized on a modified electrode was examined using cyclic voltammetry and rotating ring-disk electrode techniques in the 1 M KOH solutions. On the basis of measurements using a rotating disk electrode (RDE), the complex 1 was found to be highly active for the direct four-electron reduction of dioxygen at -0.2 V versus saturated calomel electrode (SCE). The complex 1 as a reduction catalyst of O 2 with a high selectivity was demonstrated using rotating ring-disk voltammograms in alkaline solutions. The application of complex 1 as an oxygen reduction catalyst at the cathode of zinc-air cell was also examined. The zinc-air cell with the modified electrode showed a stable discharge potential at approximately 1 V with discharge capacity of 80 mAh g -1 which was about five times larger than that obtained with the commonly used manganese dioxide catalyst.

  18. Differential alkaline phosphatase responses of rat and human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells to 45S5 bioactive glass

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Gwendolen C.; Radin, Shula; Chen, Andrew T.; Ducheyne, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Bioactive glass is used as both a bone filler and as a coating on implants, and has been advocated as a potential osteogenic scaffold for tissue engineering. Rat derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) show elevated levels of levels of alkaline phosphatase activity when grown on 45S5 bioactive glass as compared to standard tissue culture plastic. Similarly, exposure to the dissolution products of 45S5 elevates alkaline phosphatase activity and other osteogenic markers in these cells. We investigated whether human MSCs grown under the same laboratory conditions as rat MSCs would exhibit similar responses. In general, human MSCs produce markedly less alkaline phosphatase activity than rat MSCs, regardless of cell culture conditions, and do not respond to the growth factor BMP-2 in the same way as rat MSCs. In our experiments there was no difference in alkaline phosphatase activity between human MSCs grown on 45S5 bioactive glass or tissue culture plastic, in samples from five different orthopaedic patients, regardless of culture media composition. Neither was there any consistent effect of 45S5 dissolution products on human MSCs from three different donors. These results suggest that the positive effects of bioactive glass on bone growth in human patients are not mediated by accelerated differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:17586040

  19. The Long-Term Performance of Small-Cell Batteries Without Cell-Balancing Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, C.; Thwaite, C.; Curzon, D.; Rao, G.

    2006-01-01

    Tests approx.8 yrs ago showed Sony HC do not imbalance. AEA developed a theory (ESPC 2002): a) Self-discharge (SD) decreases with state-of-charge (SOC); b) Cells diverge to a state of dynamic equilibrium; c) Equilibrium spread depends on cell SD uniformity. Balancing model verified against test data. Short-term measures of SD difficult in Sony cells and very small values, depends on technique. Long-term evidence supports lower SD at low SD. Battery testing best proof of performance, typically mission specific tests.

  20. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of electrochemical cells: batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Frédéric; Leskes, Michal; Grey, Clare P

    2013-09-17

    Electrochemical cells, in the form of batteries (or supercapacitors) and fuel cells, are efficient devices for energy storage and conversion. These devices show considerable promise for use in portable and static devices to power electronics and various modes of transport and to produce and store electricity both locally and on the grid. For example, high power and energy density lithium-ion batteries are being developed for use in hybrid electric vehicles where they improve the efficiency of fuel use and help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To gain insight into the chemical reactions involving the multiple components (electrodes, electrolytes, interfaces) in the electrochemical cells and to determine how cells operate and how they fail, researchers ideally should employ techniques that allow real-time characterization of the behavior of the cells under operating conditions. This Account reviews the recent use of in situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that probes local structure and dynamics, to study these devices. In situ NMR studies of lithium-ion batteries are performed on the entire battery, by using a coin cell design, a flat sealed plastic bag, or a cylindrical cell. The battery is placed inside the NMR coil, leads are connected to a potentiostat, and the NMR spectra are recorded as a function of state of charge. (7)Li is used for many of these experiments because of its high sensitivity, straightforward spectral interpretation, and relevance to these devices. For example, (7)Li spectroscopy was used to detect intermediates formed during electrochemical cycling such as LixC and LiySiz species in batteries with carbon and silicon anodes, respectively. It was also used to observe and quantify the formation and growth of metallic lithium microstructures, which can cause short circuits and battery failure. This approach can be utilized to identify conditions that promote dendrite formation and whether different electrolytes and additives can help

  1. Studies of a granular aluminum anode in an alkaline fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovich, Neil A.; Govind, Rakesh

    A granular aluminum anode was investigated for use in an alkaline aluminum/hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. The fuel cell utilizes granules of aluminum (8-12 mm in diameter) as an anode, potassium hydroxide (KOH) as an anolyte and hydrogen peroxide as a catholyte. Granular anodes have a significantly higher surface area than planar surfaces, thereby resulting in higher utilization of the anode material. Polarization experiments were performed as well as closed circuit power production experiments. KOH concentrations were varied in the experiments. Polarization experiments achieved a current density of 10.02 mA/cm 2 using 2 M KOH and granular aluminum with a surface area of 205.6 cm 2. Power production experiments sustained a current density of 0.05 mA/cm 2 using 1.5 M KOH and granular aluminum with a surface area of 59.8 cm 2. Results indicate that granular metal anodes have potential for use in high energy density fuel cells.

  2. Computational modeling of alkaline air-breathing microfluidic fuel cells with an array of cylinder anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Ding-Ding; Zhang, Biao; Zhu, Xun; Sui, Pang-Chieh; Djilali, Ned; Liao, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    A three-dimensional computational model is developed for an alkaline air-breathing microfluidic fuel cell (AMFC) with an array of cylinder anodes. The model is validated against experimental data from an in-house prototype AMFC. The distributions of fluid velocity, fuel concentration and current density of the fuel cell are analyzed in detail. The effect of reactant flow rate on the cell performance and electrode potentials is also studied. The model results suggest that fuel crossover is minimized by the fast electrolyte flow in the vicinity of the cathode. The current production of each anode is uneven and is well correlated with internal ohmic resistance. Fuel transfer limitation occurs at low flow rates (<100 μL min-1) but diminishes at high flow rates. The model results also indicate that cathode potential reversal takes place at combined low flow rate and high current density conditions, mainly due to the improved overpotential downstream where fuel starvation occurs. The anode reaction current distribution is found to be relatively uniform, which is a result of a compensating mechanism that improves the current production of the bottom anodes downstream.

  3. Rechargeable Zn-air batteries: Progress in electrolyte development and cell configuration advancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.; Ivey, D. G.; Xie, Z.; Qu, W.

    2015-06-01

    Zn-air batteries, which are cost-effective and have high energy density, are promising energy storage devices for renewable energy and power sources for electric transportation. Nevertheless, limited charge and discharge cycles and low round-trip efficiency have long been barriers preventing the large-scale deployment of Zn-air batteries in the marketplace. Technology advancements for each battery component and the whole battery/cell assembly are being pursued, with some key milestones reached during the past 20 years. As an example, commercial Zn-air battery products with long lifetimes and high energy efficiencies are being considered for grid-scale energy storage and for automotive markets. In this review, we present our perspectives on improvements in Zn-air battery technology through the exploration and utilization of different electrolyte systems. Recent studies ranging from aqueous electrolytes to nonaqueous electrolytes, including solid polymer electrolytes and ionic liquids, as well as hybrid electrolyte systems adopted in Zn-air batteries have been evaluated. Understanding the benefits and drawbacks of each electrolyte, as well as the fundamental electrochemistry of Zn and air electrodes in different electrolytes, are the focus of this paper. Further consideration is given to detailed Zn-air battery configurations that have been studied and applied in commercial or nearing commercial products, with the purpose of exposing state-of-the-art technology innovations and providing insights into future advancements.

  4. Placental alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme expression by the non-HeLa DoT cervical-carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Kottel, R H; Fishman, W H

    1981-01-01

    Expression of the oncodevelopmental protein, placental alkaline phosphatase, was observed in DoT cells, an epidermoid cell line derived from cervical carcinoma. Under normal conditions of growth in vitro, biochemical inhibition, cytochemical and immunological studies revealed that these cells express the term-placental (Regan) isoenzyme. Thus alkaline phosphatase activity was observed to be heat-stable and inhibited by L-phenylalanine. These properties, supported by immunoelectrophoretic analysis using antisera specific for liver, intestinal or term-placental isoenzymes, identified the isoenzyme as placental type. DoT cells treated with prednisolone (1 microgram/ml) increased total alkaline phosphatase specific activity. This activity was also identified as term-placental phosphatase isoenzyme. On the other hand, treatment of the same cells with sodium butyrate (1 mM) did not induce increased activity of the term-placental isoenzyme, an unexpected observation. As a result of these studies, DoT cells are proposed as a representative cell line for studies of the regulation of oncodevelopmental gene expression in human tumour cells of cervical origin. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:7342975

  5. Electrolyte Management Considerations in Modern Nickel Hydrogen and Nickel Cadmium Cell and Battery Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, Lawrence H.; Zimmerman, Albert H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews three general areas where the potassium ion content can impact the performance and life of nickel hydrogen and nickel cadmium cells. Sample calculations of the concentration or volume changes that can take place within operating cells are presented. With the aid of an accurate model of an operating cell or battery, the impact of changes of potassium ion content within a potential cell design can be estimated. All three of these areas are directly related to the volume tolerance and pore size engineering aspects of the components used in the cell or battery design.

  6. Modelling and experimental evaluation of parallel connected lithium ion cells for an electric vehicle battery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruen, Thomas; Marco, James

    2016-04-01

    Variations in cell properties are unavoidable and can be caused by manufacturing tolerances and usage conditions. As a result of this, cells connected in series may have different voltages and states of charge that limit the energy and power capability of the complete battery pack. Methods of removing this energy imbalance have been extensively reported within literature. However, there has been little discussion around the effect that such variation has when cells are connected electrically in parallel. This work aims to explore the impact of connecting cells, with varied properties, in parallel and the issues regarding energy imbalance and battery management that may arise. This has been achieved through analysing experimental data and a validated model. The main results from this study highlight that significant differences in current flow can occur between cells within a parallel stack that will affect how the cells age and the temperature distribution within the battery assembly.

  7. Advanced Modular "All in One" Battery System with Intelligent Autonomous Cell Balancing Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitdidier, X.; Pasquier, E.; Defer, M.; Koch, M.; Knorr, W.

    2008-09-01

    A new generation of energy storage systems based on Li-ion technology emerged at the end of the last century.To perform the first tests in safe conditions, Saft designed a simple electronic.Today, all Li-ion batteries for autonomous applications such as drones, launchers, missiles, torpedoes and "human" applications such as cellular, laptop, hybrid vehicle and nearly sub-marines need a Battery Management System.The minimum in terms of functions is the overcharge and over-discharge protections.For a battery made of 2 cells connected in series or more, a balancing system is added to maintain the available energy during all the life of the battery. For stringent/demanding applications, the state of charge and state of health are calculated by one or more computers.It is now time to take benefit of the past 10 years of Saft's experience in the domain to re-evaluate the constraints of Li-ion batteries and provide customers with improved products by optimizing the battery management.Benefits of electronic for satellite applications:• Full control over battery.• Confidence whatever the possible change of conditions in environment.• The battery system can resist long exposure to gradient conditions with mitigated and stabilized impact on performances.• The balancing function allow to use all the energy of all the cells: optimize of installed energy (compact design, mass saving). It started out with the basic fact that electrochemists are not intended to be space rated electronic experts and vice versa, even if Saft has a good heritage in the electronic battery management system. Consequently, considering heritage and expertise in their respective core businesses, Saft and ASP teamed up.It became necessary to provide an "all in one" modular energy storage system with intelligent autonomous cell balancing management.

  8. Highly active nitrogen-doped nanocarbon electrocatalysts for alkaline direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruusenberg, Ivar; Ratso, Sander; Vikkisk, Merilin; Kanninen, Petri; Kallio, Tanja; Kannan, Arunachala M.; Tammeveski, Kaido

    2015-05-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells are assembled and evaluated using Fumatech FAA3 alkaline anion exchange membrane. Two novel metal-free cathode catalysts are synthesised, investigated and compared with the commercial Pt-based catalyst. In this work nitrogen-doped few-layer graphene/multi-walled carbon nanotube (N-FLG/MWCNT) composite and nitrogen-doped MWCNT (N-MWCNT) catalyst are prepared by pyrolysing the mixture of dicyandiamide (DCDA) and carbon nanomaterials at 800 °C. The resulting cathode catalyst material shows a remarkable electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M KOH solution employing the rotating disk electrode (RDE) method. Fuel cell tests are performed by using 1 M methanol as anode and pure oxygen gas cathode feed. The maximum power density obtained with the N-FLG/MWCNT material (0.72 mW cm-2) is similar to that of the Pt/C catalyst (0.72 mW cm-2), whereas the N-MWCNT material shows higher peak power density (0.92 mW cm-2) than the commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  9. The mechanism of capacity fade of rechargeable alkaline manganese dioxide zinc cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuwei; Kordesch, Karl

    Recent experiments showed, that in contrast to traditional opinion, if the cathode was protected by anode limitation the capacity fade of Rechargeable Alkaline Manganese Dioxide Zinc (RAM™) cells was not caused by the EMD cathode, but by the gelled zinc anode. The key is the electrolyte. The cathode competition for the electrolyte and the increasing requirement of chemically formed ZnO for more electrolyte caused an electrolyte deficiency at the front face of the anode and finally caused precipitation of zincate and passivation of zinc. The crust is a mixed material of precipitation and passivation products. The low solubility ZnO is formed by decomposition of electrochemically generated zincate ions [Zn(OH) 4] 2- and also by recombination of zinc with oxygen during overcharge. The progressively thickened "crust" at the front face of the anode increases the resistance, then finally causes the cell to fade. The crusting is a redistribution of active material and electrolyte between the front and rear of the cylindrical gelled zinc anode. More electrolyte and proper charging can delay such a "crusting" phenomenon.

  10. Fibrous zinc anodes for high power batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. Gregory

    This paper introduces newly developed solid zinc anodes using fibrous material for high power applications in alkaline and large size zinc-air battery systems. The improved performance of the anodes in these two battery systems is demonstrated. The possibilities for control of electrode porosity and for anode/battery design using fibrous materials are discussed in light of experimental data. Because of its mechanical integrity and connectivity, the fibrous solid anode has good electrical conductivity, mechanical stability, and design flexibility for controlling mass distribution, porosity and effective surface area. Experimental data indicated that alkaline cells made of such anodes can have a larger capacity at high discharging currents than commercially available cells. It showed even greater improvement over commercial cells with a non-conventional cell design. Large capacity anodes for a zinc-air battery have also been made and have shown excellent material utilization at various discharge rates. The zinc-air battery was used to power an electric bicycle and demonstrated good results.

  11. A novel phenomenological multi-physics model of Li-ion battery cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Ki-Yong; Samad, Nassim A.; Kim, Youngki; Siegel, Jason B.; Stefanopoulou, Anna G.; Epureanu, Bogdan I.

    2016-09-01

    A novel phenomenological multi-physics model of Lithium-ion battery cells is developed for control and state estimation purposes. The model can capture electrical, thermal, and mechanical behaviors of battery cells under constrained conditions, e.g., battery pack conditions. Specifically, the proposed model predicts the core and surface temperatures and reaction force induced from the volume change of battery cells because of electrochemically- and thermally-induced swelling. Moreover, the model incorporates the influences of changes in preload and ambient temperature on the force considering severe environmental conditions electrified vehicles face. Intensive experimental validation demonstrates that the proposed multi-physics model accurately predicts the surface temperature and reaction force for a wide operational range of preload and ambient temperature. This high fidelity model can be useful for more accurate and robust state of charge estimation considering the complex dynamic behaviors of the battery cell. Furthermore, the inherent simplicity of the mechanical measurements offers distinct advantages to improve the existing power and thermal management strategies for battery management.

  12. β₂ adrenergic receptor activation suppresses bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-induced alkaline phosphatase expression in osteoblast-like MC3T3E1 cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takayuki; Ezura, Yoichi; Hayata, Tadayoshi; Moriya, Shuichi; Shirakawa, Jumpei; Notomi, Takuya; Arayal, Smriti; Kawasaki, Makiri; Izu, Yayoi; Harada, Kiyoshi; Noda, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    β adrenergic stimulation suppresses bone formation in vivo while its actions in osteoblastic differentiation are still incompletely understood. We therefore examined the effects of β2 adrenergic stimulation on osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells focusing on BMP-induced alkaline phosphatase expression. Morphologically, isoproterenol treatment suppresses BMP-induced increase in the numbers of alkaline phosphatase-positive small foci in the cultures of MC3T3-E1 cells. Biochemically, isoproterenol treatment suppresses BMP-induced enzymatic activity of alkaline phosphatase in a dose-dependent manner. Isoproterenol suppression of alkaline phosphatase activity is observed even when the cells are treated with high concentrations of BMP. With respect to cell density, isoproterenol treatment tends to suppress BMP-induced increase in alkaline phosphatase expression more in osteoblasts cultured at higher cell density. In terms of treatment protocol, continuous isoproterenol treatment is compared to cyclic treatment. Continuous isoproterenol treatment is more suppressive against BMP-induced increase in alkaline phosphatase expression than cyclic regimen. At molecular level, isoproterenol treatment suppresses BMP-induced enhancement of alkaline phosphatase mRNA expression. Regarding the mode of isoproterenol action, isoproterenol suppresses BMP-induced BRE-luciferase activity. These data indicate that isoproterenol regulates BMP-induced alkaline phosphatase expression in osteoblast-like MC3T3E1 cells.

  13. The Comparative Performance of Batteries: The Lead-Acid and the Aluminum-Air Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeRoux, Xavier; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a teaching program that shows how electrochemical principles can be conveyed by means of hands-on experiences of student-centered teaching experiments. Employs the readily available lead-acid cell and the simple aluminum-air cell. Discusses the batteries, equilibrium cell potential, performance comparison, current, electrode separation,…

  14. Synthesis and characterization of alkaline polyvinyl alcohol and poly(epichlorohydrin) blend polymer electrolytes and performance in electrochemical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun-Chen; Lin, Sheng-Jen; Hsu, Sung-Ting

    Alkaline SPE was obtained from a blend of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and poly(epichlorohydrin) (PECH), PVA-PECH, by a solution-cast technique. The PVA host polymer is blended with PECH polymer to provide a polymer electrolyte with improved chemical and mechanical properties. The ionic conductivity of the PVA-PECH polymer electrolytes is between 10 -2 and 10 -3 S cm -1 at room temperature when the blend ratio is varied from 1:0.2 to 1:1. The PVA-PECH polymer was characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, stress-strain test, cyclic voltammetry, and a.c. impedance spectroscopy. It is found that the polymer electrolytes exhibit good mechanical strength and excellent chemical stability. The electrochemical performance of solid-state Zn-air batteries with various types of the blended polymer electrolyte films is examined by a galvanostatic discharge method.

  15. A study on lithium/air secondary batteries-Stability of the NASICON-type lithium ion conducting solid electrolyte in alkaline aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimonishi, Yuta; Zhang, Tao; Imanishi, Nobuyuki; Im, Dongmin; Lee, Dong Joon; Hirano, Atsushi; Takeda, Yasuo; Yamamoto, Osamu; Sammes, Nigel

    The stability of the high lithium ion conducting glass ceramics, Li 1+ x+ yTi 2- xAl xSi yP 3- yO 12 (LTAP) in alkaline aqueous solutions with and without LiCl has been examined. A significant conductivity decrease of the LTAP plate immersed in 0.057 M LiOH aqueous solution at 50 °C for 3 weeks was observed. However, no conductivity change of the LTAP plate immersed in LiCl saturated LiOH aqueous solutions at 50 °C for 3 weeks was observed. The pH value of the LiCl-LiOH-H 2O solution with saturated LiCl was in a range of 7-9. The molarity of LiOH and LiCl in the LiOH and LiCl saturated aqueous solution were estimated to be 5.12 and 11.57 M, respectively, by analysis of Li + and OH -. The high concentration of LiOH and the low pH value of 8.14 in this solution suggested that the dissociation of LiOH into Li + and OH - is too low in the solution with a high concentration of Li +. These results suggest that the water stable LTAP could be used as a protect layer of the lithium metal anode in the lithium/air cell with LiCl saturated aqueous solution as the electrolyte, because the content of OH - ions in the LiCl saturated aqueous solution does not increase via the cell reaction of Li + 1/2O 2 + H 2O → 2LiOH, and LTAP is stable under a deep discharge state.

  16. Evaluation of electricity production from alkaline pretreated sludge using two-chamber microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Benyi; Yang, Fang; Liu, Junxin

    2013-06-15

    Electricity production from alkaline pretreated sludge was evaluated using a two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC). The electricity production was found to be stable over a long period of time (approximately 17 d) with voltage outputs and power densities of 0.47-0.52 V and 46.80-55.88 mW/m(2), respectively. The anode resistance was the main internal resistance (73.2%) of MFC in the stable stage. Most soluble organic matters (proteins and carbohydrates) in the anode chamber were first degraded and converted into volatile fatty acids (0-15 d), which were then degraded and converted into electricity and methane (15-29 d). The insoluble organics were solubilized thereby decreasing the sludge concentration and reducing the sludge mass. Methane was produced in the anode chamber owing to the growth of methanogens, which did not obviously affect the electricity production. The change in humic-like substances displayed a positive correlation with the electricity production of the MFC. Microbial analysis showed that methanogens and electricity-producing bacteria co-existed mostly on the surface as well as inside the anode. Decreasing the anode resistance and increasing the anode utilization could enhance the electricity production.

  17. A membraneless alkaline direct liquid fuel cell (DLFC) platform developed with a catalyst-selective strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xingwen; Pascual, Emilio J.; Wauson, Joshua C.; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2016-11-01

    With a logical management of the catalyst selectivity, we present a scalable, membraneless alkaline direct liquid fuel cell (DLFC) platform. The uniqueness of this innovation is that the inexpensive (non-platinum) cathode catalysts, based on strongly coupled transition-metal-oxide nanocrystals and nano-structured carbon materials (e. g., NiCo2O4 nano-particles on a nitrogen-doped graphene and MnNiCoO4 nano-particles on a nitrogen-doped multi-wall carbon nanotube), exhibit high activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) but without activity for the anode fuel oxidation reaction (FOR). Therefore, operation of the DLFCs allows the anode fuel to freely enter the cathode. This strategy avoids the reliance on expensive or difficult-to-develop cation- or anion-exchange membranes and circumvents the scalability concerns of the conventional membraneless DLFCs that are operated under a laminar-flow principle. With proper catalyst selectivity, a variety of organic liquids can be used as anode fuels. The high power density delivered by the membraneless DLFCs with inexpensive components and safe fuels can enable the development of not only small-scale portable power sources but also large-scale energy generation systems for transportation and stationary storage.

  18. Influence of Hydration Level on Polymer and Water Dynamics in Alkaline Anion Exchange Fuel Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Jacob; Kim, Jenny; Tyagi, Madhu; Soles, Christopher; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Coughlin, Bryan

    2015-03-01

    Triblock copolymers based on poly(chloromethylstyrene)-b-poly(ethylene)-b-poly(chloromethylstyrene) can be quaternized to different extents to yield anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cells. In the absence of moisture, these membranes demonstrate bilayer lamellar morphology. Upon high levels of hydration, however, in-situ small angle neutron scattering reveals the emergence of higher-order diffraction peaks. This phenomena has previously been observed in analogous diblock copolymer-based membranes and has been attributed to the induction of a multilayer lamellar morphology in which selective striping of water occurs in the center of the ion-rich domain. By conducting humidity-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements using deuterated water, we are able to isolate differences in the pico- to nanosecond timescale dynamics of the hydrogenated membrane upon hydration. QENS measurements in the presence of a hydrogenated water source subsequently permit deconvolution and isolation of the translational and rotational dynamics of water as a function of relative humidity, revealing spatial and temporal changes in polymer and water motion at high levels of hydration.

  19. Synthesis and Physical Behavior of Model Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Alkaline Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Rick; Price, Samuel; Jackson, Aaron; Gold, Christopher; Ye, Yuesheng; Elabd, Yossef

    2012-02-01

    Alkaline fuel cell (AFC) technology holds significant promise for portable power supplies because AFCs are very efficient at temperatures under 200 C, but also because AFCs can use relatively inexpensive, non-noble metals (Ni, Fe, Co) as the catalyst material. Wide-spread use of the AFC has been prevented by the use of aqueous KOH liquid as the electrolyte, which is easily poisoned by the formation of K2CO3. Development of an semipermeable polymeric alkali anion exchange membrane (AEM) would significantly improve the usefulness of AFCs by eliminating carbonate poisoning and the engineering problems associate with a liquid electrolyte. We have been exploring model copolymers containing phosphonium cations as candidate materials for AEMs. Recent findings on the transport properties and stability of random copolymers of styrene and p-vinylbenzyl-trimethylphosphonium chloride will be presented, as well as ongoing efforts to study the effect of polymer morphology on transport and stability in ionomers based on both phosphonium and ammonium cations.

  20. Life cycle assessment of gas atomised sponge nickel for use in alkaline hydrogen fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Benjamin P.; Lavery, Nicholas P.; Jarvis, David J.; Anttila, Tomi; Rantanen, Jyri; Brown, Stephen G. R.; Adkins, Nicholas J.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a cradle-to-grave comparative Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of new gas atomised (GA) sponge nickel catalysts and evaluates their performance against the both cast and crush (CC) sponge nickel and platinum standards currently used in commercial alkaline fuel cells (AFC). The LCA takes into account the energy used and emissions throughout the entire life cycle of sponge nickel catalysts - ranging from the upstream production of materials (mainly aluminium and nickel), to the manufacturing, to the operation and finally to the recycling and disposal. Through this assessment it was found that the energy and emissions during the operational phase associated with a given catalyst considerably outweigh the primary production, manufacturing and recycling. Primary production of the nickel (and to a lesser extent dopant materials) also has a significant environmental impact but this is offset by operational energy savings over the electrode's estimated lifetime and end of life recyclability. From the results it can be concluded that higher activity spongy nickel catalysts produced by gas atomisation could have a significantly lower environmental impact than either CC nickel or platinum. Doped GA sponge nickel in particular showed comparable performance to that of the standard platinum electrode used in AFCs.

  1. Bleb formation is induced by alkaline but not acidic pH in estrogen receptor silenced breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Khajah, Maitham A; Mathew, Princy M; Alam-Eldin, Nada S; Luqmani, Yunus A

    2015-04-01

    De novo and acquired resistance to endocrine-based therapies in breast cancer occurs in parallel with epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is associated with enhanced proliferative and metastatic potential, and poor clinical outcome. We have established several endocrine insensitive breast cancer lines by shRNA-induced depletion of estrogen receptor (ER) by transfection of MCF7 cells. All of these exhibit EMT. We have previously reported that brief exposure of specifically ER- breast cancer cells, to extracellular alkaline pH, results in cell rounding and segregation, and leads to enhanced invasive potential. In this study we describe more detailed morphological changes and compare these with cell exposure to acidic pH. Morphological changes and localization of various molecules critical for cell adhesion and motility, associated with pH effects, were assessed by live cell microscopy, electron microscopy, and immunofluorescence. Exposure of either ER- or ER+ breast cancer cells to extracellular acidic pH did not induce significant changes in morphological appearance. Conversely, brief exposure of specifically ER silenced cells, to alkaline pH, resulted in cell contractolation and formation of bleb-like actin-rich structures which were evenly distributed on the outer membrane. Integrin α2, FAK, and JAM-1 were found in the cytoplasm streaming into the newly formed blebs. These blebs appear to be related to cell polarity and movement. Pre-treatment with cytochalasin-D or inhibitors of Rho or MLCK prevented both contractolation and bleb formation. Our data suggest that the effect of pH on the microenvironment of endocrine resistant breast cancer cells needs to be more extensively investigated. Alkaline, rather than acidic pH, appears to induce dramatic morphological changes, and enhances their invasive capabilities, through re-organization of cortical actin. PMID:25672508

  2. Cell Design for Electrochemical Characterizations of Metal-Ion Batteries in Organic and Aqueous Electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Bani Hashemi, Amir; La Mantia, Fabio

    2016-08-16

    Understanding the gas evolution in batteries, caused by decomposition of the electrolyte, is of fundamental importance for improving the long-time performances and cycle life of the battery systems. In general, this phenomenon causes simultaneously an irreversible energy and charge loss, as well as an increase of the internal resistance. Here, we introduce a new cell design capable of performing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and differential electrochemical mass spectroscopy (DEMS) with high resolution. Detailed aspects of the cell fabrication and the different components of the cell are extensively explained. Impedance measurements were validated by using symmetric electrodes. The possibility of performing long-term DEMS measurements was tested on graphite electrodes in Ethylene Carbonate/Dimethyl Carbonate (1:1), 1 M LiPF6 as an electrolyte. Finally, the cell was used to detect hydrogen evolution on the zinc negative electrode of a zinc-ion battery based on copper hexacyanoferrate. PMID:27439309

  3. Dynamic behaviour of Li batteries in hydrogen fuel cell power trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veneri, O.; Migliardini, F.; Capasso, C.; Corbo, P.

    A Li ion polymer battery pack for road vehicles (48 V, 20 Ah) was tested by charging/discharging tests at different current values, in order to evaluate its performance in comparison with a conventional Pb acid battery pack. The comparative analysis was also performed integrating the two storage systems in a hydrogen fuel cell power train for moped applications. The propulsion system comprised a fuel cell generator based on a 2.5 kW polymeric electrolyte membrane (PEM) stack, fuelled with compressed hydrogen, an electric drive of 1.8 kW as nominal power, of the same typology of that installed on commercial electric scooters (brushless electric machine and controlled bidirectional inverter). The power train was characterized making use of a test bench able to simulate the vehicle behaviour and road characteristics on driving cycles with different acceleration/deceleration rates and lengths. The power flows between fuel cell system, electric energy storage system and electric drive during the different cycles were analyzed, evidencing the effect of high battery currents on the vehicle driving range. The use of Li batteries in the fuel cell power train, adopting a range extender configuration, determined a hydrogen consumption lower than the correspondent Pb battery/fuel cell hybrid vehicle, with a major flexibility in the power management.

  4. Overcharge Protection And Cell Voltage Monitoring For Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altemose, George; Salim, Abbas

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes a new Battery Interface and Electronics (BIE) assembly used to monitor battery and cell voltages, as well as provide overvoltage (overcharge) protection for Lithium Ion batteries with up to 8-cells in series. The BIE performs accurate measurement of the individual cell voltages, the total battery voltage, and the individual cell temperatures. In addition, the BIE provides an independent over-charge protection (OCP) circuit that terminates the charging process by isolating the battery from the charging source in the event that the voltage of any cell exceeds a preset limit of +4.500V. The OCP circuit utilizes dual redundancy, and is immune to single-point failures in the sense that no single-point failure can cause the battery to become isolated inadvertently. A typical application of the BIE in a spacecraft electrical power subsystem is shown in Figure 1. The BIE circuits have been designed with Chip On Board (COB) technology. Using this technology, integrated circuit die, Field Effect Transistors (FETs) and diodes are mounted and wired directly on a multi-layer printed wiring board (PWB). For those applications where long term reliability can be achieved without hermeticity, COB technology provides many benefits such as size and weight reduction while lowering production costs. The BIE was designed, fabricated and tested to meet the specifications provided by Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC) for use with Lithium-Ion batteries in the Commercial Orbital Transportation System (COTS). COTS will be used to deliver cargo to the International Space Station at low earth orbit (LEO). Aeroflex has completed the electrical and mechanical design of the BIE and fabricated and tested the Engineering Model (EM), as well as the Engineering Qualification Model (EQM). Flight units have also been fabricated, tested and delivered to OSC.

  5. Battery and Fuel Cell Development Goals for the Lunar Surface and Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.

    2008-01-01

    NASA is planning a return to the moon and requires advances in energy storage technology for its planned lunar lander and lunar outpost. This presentation describes NASA s overall mission goals and technical goals for batteries and fuel cells to support the mission. Goals are given for secondary batteries for the lander s ascent stage and suits for extravehicular activity on the lunar surface, and for fuel cells for the lander s descent stage and regenerative fuel cells for outpost power. An overall approach to meeting these goals is also presented.

  6. Facile Alkaline Lysis of Escherichia coli Cells in High-Throughput Mode for Screening Enzyme Mutants: Arylsulfatase as an Example.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Mei; Yang, Xiaolan; Li, Yuwei; Liu, Hongbo; Pu, Jun; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Liao, Fei

    2016-06-01

    Facile alkaline lysis of Escherichia coli cells in high-throughput (HTP) mode for screening enzyme mutants was tested with Pseudomonas aeruginosa arylsulfatase (PAAS). The alkaline lysis buffer was 1.0 M Tris-HCl at pH 9.0 plus 0.1 % Tween-20 and 2.0 mM 4-aminobenzamidine, mixed with cell suspension at 8:1 to 12:1 ratio for continuous agitation of mixtures in 96-well plates under room temperature; enzymatic activity in lysates was measured with 96-well microplate. PAAS activity tolerated final 0.1 % Tween-20. Individual clones were amplified for 12 h in 0.50 mL TB medium with 48-well plates to enhance the repeatability of induced expression. During continuous agitation of the mixture of cells and the lysis buffer, PAAS activities in lysates were steady from 3 to 9 h and comparable to sonication treatment but better than freezing-thawing. Coefficients of variation of activities of PAAS/mutants in lysates after treatment for 7 h reached ∼22 %. The mutant M72Q had specific activity 2-fold of G138S. By HTP lysis of cells, M72Q was recognized as a positive mutant over G138S with the area under the curve of 0.873. Therefore, for enzymes tolerating concentrated alkaline buffers, the proposed alkaline lysis approach may be generally applicable for HTP lysis of host cells during directed evolution. PMID:26899233

  7. A novel active battery equalization control with on-line unhealthy cell detection and cell change decision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo-Lozano, Javier; Romero-Cadaval, Enrique; Milanes-Montero, M. Isabel; Guerrero-Martinez, Miguel A.

    2015-12-01

    Battery Equalization systems are necessary as cell imbalance can lead to poor performance and safety hazards. In this paper we present a novel active battery equalization control, based on the Shunt Transistor method, which is feasible for EV battery equalization. Unlike the actual Shunt Transistor control methods that can only operate at the end of the charging process, the proposed smart control is able to accomplish the equalization during both driving and charging EV operations (optimizing time and performance) with a high final efficiency. Balancing is not enough when battery aging manifests; therefore, health management is essential. By taking advantage of the proposed system, a novel on-line unhealthy cell detection and cell change decision function is implemented. The proposed health analysis can be performed during normal driving, without the need for numerous charging/discharging cycles, a considerable data set, or complex models or estimations. Simulation results and experimental validation, in a battery pack made up with three cells, first prove the correct equalization during driving (with a real driving profile) and charging/discharging operations, with high efficiency (over 95%); and secondly, validates the cell health analysis, obtaining a cell health map and detecting the unhealthy cell placed on purpose.

  8. Defects in nsutite (gamma-MnO2) and dry-cell battery efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, S.; Buseck, P. R.

    1983-07-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscocpy (HRTEM) was used to examine the structure of MnO2 cathodic material to determine correlations between structure and dry-cell battery efficiency. The HRTEM studies revealed that the two key nsutite structures are single chains of octahedra composed of pyrolusite and ramsdellite in lined double chains. Nsutite is characterized by a coherent intergrowth of tunnel structures, within which the octahedra and double chains were found to alternate, forming irregularities that could enhance proton diffusion and thereby battery efficiency. The structures displayed a seam where they joined at every twelfth double chain, suggesting a semicoherent intergrowth. It is recommended that the structural characteristics be examined before and after use in batteries, such as button batteries, to assay any changes occurring with discharge.

  9. Modeling of batteries and fuel cells; Proceedings of the Symposium, Phoenix, AZ, Oct. 13-19, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.E.; Verbrugge, M.W.; Stockel, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on modeling of batteries and fuel cells discusses the significance of the effectiveness factor for flooded porous electrodes, active pore distribution spectroscopy for characterizing porous battery electrodes, the agglomerate model for porous electrodes, and dynamic-performance measurements of battery cells for electric vehicles and other applications. Attention is given to mathematical modeling of a primary zinc/air battery, mathematical modeling of Grace Li-TiS2 cells, modeling of electrocrystallization processes in battery systems, and rotating disk electrode studies in molten Li/K carbonate eutectic. Topics addressed include the variability of nickel oxide cathode dissolution in molten carbonate fuel cells, water transport properties of fuel cell ionomers, modeling water content effects in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, and computer algebra applied in electrochemistry and fuel cell modeling.

  10. High temperature battery cell comprising stress-free hollow fiber bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, J.N.; Revak, T.T.; Rossini, F.J.

    1982-06-01

    Thermal stressing of hollow fibers constituting the electrolyteseparator in a high temperature battery cell, and of certain other elements thereof, is avoided by suspending the assembly comprising the anolyte tank, the tubesheet, the hollow fibers and a cathodic current collector-distributing means, within the casing and employing a limp connection between the latter means and the cathode terminal of the cell.

  11. Multi-mission Ni-H2 battery cells for the 1990's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Lee; Brill, Jack; Dodson, Gary

    1989-01-01

    A sufficient production, test and operational database is now available to permit design technology optimization for the next decade. The evolved battery cell design features standardized technology intended to support multiple type missions (e.g., both GEO and LEO). Design analysis and validation test cells demonstrate that improved performance plus attractive specific-energy characteristics will be achieved.

  12. Sodium Sulfur Battery Cell Experiment (NaSBE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, J. Christopher

    1997-01-01

    The Ford Motor Company published papers describing new types of secondary battery comprised of: solid, sodium ion conducting electrolyte; liquid metal electrode; redox electrode; operating temperature between 300 and 400 deg. C; specific energy of 150 Wh/kg; and a nominal voltage of 2.0 V.

  13. Investigation of novel electrolyte systems for advanced metal/air batteries and fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui

    It is a worldwide challenge to develop advanced green power sources for modern portable devices, transportation and stationary power generation. Metal/air batteries and fuel cells clearly stand out in view of their high specific energy, high energy efficiency and environment-friendliness. Advanced metal/air batteries based on metal ion conductors and proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells operated at elevated temperatures (>120°C) can circumvent the limitations of current technologies and bring considerable advantages. The key is to develop suitable electrolytes to enable these new technologies. In this thesis research, investigation of novel electrolytes systems for advanced metal/air batteries and PEM fuel cells is conducted. Novel polymer gel electrolyte systems, [metal salt/ionic liquid/polymer] and [metal salt/liquid polyether/polymer] are prepared. Such systems contain no volatile solvents, conduct metal ions (Li+ or Zn 2+) with high ionic conductivity, possess wide electrochemical stability windows, and exhibit wide operating temperature ranges. They promise to enable non-aqueous, all-solid-state, thin-film Li/air batteries and Zn/air batteries. They are advantageous for application in other battery systems as well, such as rechargeable lithium and lithium ion batteries. In the case of proton exchange membranes, polymer gel electrolyte systems [acid/ionic liquid/polymer] are prepared. Especially, H3PO4/PMIH2PO 4/PBI is demonstrated as prospective proton exchange membranes for PEM fuel cells operating at elevated temperatures. Comprehensive electrochemical characterization, thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) and spectroscopy analysis (NMR and FTIR) are carried out to investigate these novel electrolyte systems and their ion transport mechanisms. The design and synthesis of novel ionic liquids and electrolyte systems based on them for advantageous application in various electrochemical power sources are highlighted in this work.

  14. Generating power from cellulose in an alkaline fuel cell enhanced by methyl viologen as an electron-transfer catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Miaoqing; Liu, Xianhua; Feng, Mengnan; Zhang, Pingping; Wang, Guangyi

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we developed a single-compartment direct cellulose alkaline fuel cell by using nickel foam as the anode and methyl viologen as an electron transfer catalyst. The maximum power density of the fuel cell at optimal conditions is 450 mW m-2. High-performance liquid chromatography detected short-chain aliphatic carboxylic acids in the oxidation products. Using common reed and red algae as fuels, the fuel cell achieved maximum power densities of 295 mW m-2 and 154 mW m-2, respectively.

  15. Alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell performance using alkali-impregnated polyvinyl alcohol/functionalized carbon nano-tube solid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Yi; Lin, Jia-Shiun; Pan, Wen-Han; Shih, Chao-Ming; Liu, Ying-Ling; Lue, Shingjiang Jessie

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the application of a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/functionalized carbon nano-tubes (m-CNTs) composite in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells (ADEFC). The m-CNTs are functionalized with PVA using the ozone mediation method, and the PVA composite containing the modified CNTs is prepared. Adding m-CNT into the PVA matrix enhances the alkaline uptake and the ionic conductivity of the KOH-doped electrolyte. Meanwhile, the m-CNT-containing membrane exhibited a lower swelling ratio and suppressed ethanol permeability compared to the pristine PVA film. The optimal condition for the ADEFC is determined to be under operation at an anode feed of 3 M ethanol in a 5 M KOH solution (at a flow rate of 5 cm3 min-1) with a cathode feed of moisturized oxygen (with a flow rate of 100 cm3 min-1) and the KOH-doped PVA/m-CNT electrolyte. We achieved a peak power density value of 65 mW cm-2 at 60 °C, which is the highest among the ADEFC literature data and several times higher than the proton-exchange direct ethanol fuel cells using sulfonated membrane electrolytes. Therefore, the KOH-doped PVA/m-CNT electrolyte is a suitable solid electrolyte for ADEFCs and has potential for commercialization in alkaline fuel cell applications.

  16. Reduced L/B/K alkaline phosphatase gene expression in renal cell carcinoma: plausible role in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ujjawal; Pal, Deeksha; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Kakkar, Nandita; Prasad, Rajendra

    2014-09-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common kidney cancer in adults. Although several genes have been found to be involved in carcinogenesis of RCC, more great efforts are needed to identify new genes which are responsible for the process. Clear cell RCC, originates from proximal tubule cells, is the most common pathological type of RCC. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is a marker enzyme of brush border membrane of proximal tubular cells. Our previous studies showed a significant decreased activity of Liver/Bone/Kidney (L/B/K) alkaline phosphatase in RCC. In the present study, we explored the molecular basis of the decreased activity of ALP in RCC. Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analysis showed decreased ALP protein in RCC. Additionally, real time PCR documented significantly reduced ALP gene expression (P = 0.009). Moreover, RCC cell lines (ACHN and A498) transfected with full length L/B/K cDNA showed decreased migratory property as well as viability of these cells as compared with controls (P = 0.000). Further, L/B/K ALP cDNA transfected cells (ACHN and A498) showed significant increased apoptosis as compared to control (P = 0.000). These findings suggest the new role of ALP in cell viability and apoptosis and involvement in RCC tumorigenesis. However, further studies are needed to explore the exact molecular mechanism.

  17. Development of electrolysis-cell separator for 125/sup 0/C operation. Advanced alkaline electrolysis cell development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J N

    1983-03-01

    This report contains the findings of a seven-month contracted effort. The major technical task involved a 125/sup 0/C operating temperature test of the 20 v/o polybenzimidazole (PBI) - 80 v/o potassium titanate (K/sub 2/TiO/sub 3/) separator in combination with the nickel-molybdenum cathode electrocatalyst system dubbed the C-AN cathode using the ARIES test system which was developed previously. The test of the PBI-K/sub 2/TiO/sub 3/ separator was only partially successful. The anticipated 1.85 (75/sup 0/C) and 1.75 volt per cell (100/sup 0/C) input requirement at 550 ma/cm/sup 2/ were surpassed slightly. The test module operated stably for about 550 hr. Although there were some mechanical difficulties with the ARIES test unit, testing at 125/sup 0/C proceeded from 745 hr on test until the test was terminated at 2318 operating hours to allow diagnostic disassembly. The input voltage degraded to a value of 1.82 volt per cell at 125/sup 0/C which is unacceptable. Diagnostic disassembly showed the PBI portion of the separator was no longer present. PBI had been shown to be stable in 123/sup 0/C, 45 w/o KOH solutions in a 1000-hr test. The attack is suggested to be attributable to a peroxide or perchlorate type oxidizer which would be unique to the electrolysis mode and probably not present in alkaline fuel cell applications. Recommendations for further testing include an evaluation of the chemical compatibility of PBI with alkaline/oxidizer solutions and endurance testing the C-AN cathode with new improved anode structures at 125/sup 0/C using asbestos separators in combination with a silicate saturated KOH electrolyte. Demonstration of the stability of this 1.65 volt per cell (90% voltage efficiency) technology at 500 ma/cm/sup 2/ will document an inexpensive and intelligent hydrogen production process which will satisfy the needs of the United States in the 1990s.

  18. Detection of ghost cells in the standard alkaline comet assay is not a good measure of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Meintières, Sophie; Nesslany, Fabrice; Pallardy, Marc; Marzin, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The single cell gel electrophoresis assay, or Comet assay, is a powerful tool for measurement of DNA strands breaks, oxidative damage, and alkali labile sites, and the assay was recently modified to detect DNA cross-links. It has also been proposed as a measure of apoptosis since apoptotic cells are suspected to result in total migration of the DNA from the nucleus into the tail. Cells with this appearance are called ghost cells, clouds, hedgehogs, or NDCN (nondetectable cell nuclei). The aim of this study was to determine if ghost cells can be used to measure apoptosis in the standard alkaline comet assay. To answer this question, we made use of two cell lines: CTLL-2 cells that can enter apoptosis upon addition of apoptosis stimuli or IL-2 deprivation, and CTLL-2 bcl2 cells that are protected from apoptosis due to the overexpression of the apoptosis inhibitor gene bcl2. The two cell lines were treated with cytotoxins (nongenotoxic apoptosis inducers, nongenotoxic necrotic agents) or genotoxins. They were also subjected to growth factor withdrawal, which induced apoptosis in the CTLL-2 cell line. The level of apoptosis was measured by the Annexin V-FITC method in parallel with performing the Comet assay. The results obtained in the two cell lines suggest that apoptotic or necrotic death does not correlate well with the detection of ghost cells, presumably because these cells are lost upon electrophoresis. A variant of the alkaline Comet assay that was performed without electrophoresis (halo method) was able to efficiently detect cells undergoing apoptosis, but it was unable to clearly distinguish between apoptosis and genotoxic damage.

  19. Semi-Solid Flowable Battery Electrodes: Semi-Solid Flow Cells for Automotive and Grid-Level Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    BEEST Project: Scientists at 24M are crossing a Li-Ion battery with a fuel cell to develop a semi-solid flow battery. This system relies on some of the same basic chemistry as a standard Li-Ion battery, but in a flow battery the energy storage material is held in external tanks, so storage capacity is not limited by the size of the battery itself. The design makes it easier to add storage capacity by simply increasing the size of the tanks and adding more paste. In addition, 24M's design also is able to extract more energy from the semi-solid paste than conventional Li-Ion batteries. This creates a cost-effective, energy-dense battery that can improve the driving range of EVs or be used to store energy on the electric grid.

  20. Performance of thermal cells and batteries made with plasma-sprayed cathodes and anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidotti, R. A.; Reinhardt, F. W.; Dai, J.; Reisner, D. E.

    Cathodes for thermally activated ("thermal") batteries based on CoS 2 and LiCl-LiBr-LiF electrolyte and FeS 2 (pyrite) and LiCl-KCl eutectic were prepared by thermal spraying catholyte mixtures onto graphite-paper substrates. Composite separator-cathode deposits were also prepared in the same manner by sequential thermal spraying of LiCl-KCl-based separator material onto a pyrite-cathode substrate. These materials were then tested in single cells over a temperature range of 400-600 °C and in 5-cell and 15-cell batteries. A limited number of battery tests were conducted with the separator-cathode composites and plasma-sprayed Li(Si) anodes-the first report of an all-plasma-sprayed thermal battery. Thermal-spraying offers distinct advantages over conventional pressed-powder parts for fabrication of thin electrodes for short-life thermal batteries. The plasma-sprayed electrodes have lower impedances than the corresponding pressed-powder parts due to improved particle-particle contact.

  1. Performance Testing of Yardney Li-Ion Cells and Batteries in Support of Future NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Whitcanack, L. D.; Puglia, F. J.; Santee, S.; Gitzendanner, R.

    2009-01-01

    NASA requires lightweight rechargeable batteries for future missions to Mars and the outer planets that are capable of operating over a wide range of temperatures, with high specific energy and energy densities. Due to the attractive performance characteristics, Li-ion batteries have been identified as the battery chemistry of choice for a number of future applications. For example, JPL is planning to launch another unmanned rover mission to the planet Mars. This mission, referred to as the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), will involve the use of a rover that is much larger than the previously developed Spirit and Opportunity Rovers for the 2003 Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission, that are currently still in operation on the surface of the planet after more than five years. Part of the reason that the MER rovers have operated so successfully, far exceeding the required mission duration of 90 sols, is that they possess robust Li-ion batteries, manufactured by Yardney Technical Products, which have demonstrated excellent life characteristics. Given the excellent performance characteristics displayed, similar Li-ion batteries have been projected to successfully meet the mission requirements of the up-coming MSL mission. In addition to future missions to Mars, Li-ion technology is attractive for a number of other future NASA applications which require high specific energy, rechargeable batteries. To ascertain the viability of using Li-ion batteries for these applications, a number of performance validation tests have been performed on both Yardney cells and batteries of various sizes. These tests include mission simulation tests, charge and discharge rate characterization testing, cycle life testing under various conditions, and storage testing.

  2. Structural analysis and experimental characterization of cylindrical lithium-ion battery cells subject to lateral impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdeev, Ilya; Gilaki, Mehdi

    2014-12-01

    We report on modeling mechanical response of cylindrical lithium-ion battery cells that are commonly used in automotive applications when subjected to impact testing. The developed homogenized model that accurately captures mechanical response of a cell to lateral crash is reported. The proposed model was validated using static and dynamic experimental testing. Highly nonlinear mechanical deformations of the cells were captured experimentally using a high-speed camera and later characterized through computer tomography. Numerically, we have investigated the feasibility of using explicit finite element code for accurate modeling of impact on one cell, so it can be used for an entire battery pack that consists of hundreds or thousands of cells. In this study, we have developed and compared two homogenization methods for the jellyroll in a cylindrical lithium-ion battery cell. Homogenization was conducted in a lateral/radial direction. Based on the results of the homogenization, the material model utilizing crushable foam constitutive behavior was then developed for simulations. Experimental results showed a very good agreement with simulations, thus validating the proposed approach and giving us confidence to move forward with the crush simulations of an entire battery pack. Zones of potential electric shortages were determined based on the experiments and simulations.

  3. Cathodes for lithium-air battery cells with acid electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Xing, Yangchuan; Huang, Kan; Li, Yunfeng

    2016-07-19

    In various embodiments, the present disclosure provides a layered metal-air cathode for a metal-air battery. Generally, the layered metal-air cathode comprises an active catalyst layer, a transition layer bonded to the active catalyst layer, and a backing layer bonded to the transition layer such that the transition layer is disposed between the active catalyst layer and the backing layer.

  4. Glucose metabolism and glutamate analog acutely alkalinize pH of insulin secretory vesicles of pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Eto, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Tokuyuki; Hirose, Kenzo; Tsubamoto, Yoshiharu; Ainscow, Edward K; Rutter, Guy A; Kimura, Satoshi; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Iino, Masamitsu; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2003-08-01

    We studied acute changes of secretory vesicle pH in pancreatic beta-cells with a fluorescent pH indicator, lysosensor green DND-189. Fluorescence was decreased by 0.66 +/- 0.10% at 149 +/- 16 s with 22.2 mM glucose stimulation, indicating that vesicular pH was alkalinized by approximately 0.016 unit. Glucose-responsive pH increase was observed when cytosolic Ca2+ influx was blocked but disappeared when an inhibitor of glycolysis or mitochondrial ATP synthase was present. Glutamate dimethyl ester (GME), a plasma membrane-permeable analog of glutamate, potentiated glucose-stimulated insulin secretion at 5 mM without changing cellular ATP content or cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]). Application of GME at basal glucose concentration decreased DND-189 fluorescence by 0.83 +/- 0.19% at 38 +/- 2 s. These results indicated that the acutely alkalinizing effect of glucose on beta-cell secretory vesicle pH was dependent on glucose metabolism but independent of modulations of cytosolic [Ca2+]. Moreover, glutamate derived from glucose may be one of the mediators of this alkalinizing effect of glucose, which may have potential relevance to the alteration of secretory function by glutamate.

  5. Physical and chemical analysis of lithium-ion battery cell-to-cell failure events inside custom fire chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinner, Neil S.; Field, Christopher R.; Hammond, Mark H.; Williams, Bradley A.; Myers, Kristina M.; Lubrano, Adam L.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.; Tuttle, Steven G.

    2015-04-01

    A 5-cubic meter decompression chamber was re-purposed as a fire test chamber to conduct failure and abuse experiments on lithium-ion batteries. Various modifications were performed to enable remote control and monitoring of chamber functions, along with collection of data from instrumentation during tests including high speed and infrared cameras, a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, real-time gas analyzers, and compact reconfigurable input and output devices. Single- and multi-cell packages of LiCoO2 chemistry 18650 lithium-ion batteries were constructed and data was obtained and analyzed for abuse and failure tests. Surrogate 18650 cells were designed and fabricated for multi-cell packages that mimicked the thermal behavior of real cells without using any active components, enabling internal temperature monitoring of cells adjacent to the active cell undergoing failure. Heat propagation and video recordings before, during, and after energetic failure events revealed a high degree of heterogeneity; some batteries exhibited short burst of sparks while others experienced a longer, sustained flame during failure. Carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, dimethyl carbonate, and ethylene carbonate were detected via gas analysis, and the presence of these species was consistent throughout all failure events. These results highlight the inherent danger in large format lithium-ion battery packs with regards to cell-to-cell failure, and illustrate the need for effective safety features.

  6. Mild alkaline hydrolysis of lipopolysaccharide endotoxin enhances its mitogencity for murine B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, G W; Sultzer, B M

    1977-01-01

    Mild alkaline hydrolysis was found to enhance the mitogenicity of lipopolysaccharide endotoxin for murine B lymphocytes. Alkaline treated lipopolysaccharide also retained its property as a polyclonal activator. Whereas this treatment reduced the lethality of endotoxin for mice, its toxicity for lymphocytes cultured in the absence of fetal calf serum was increased. Lipid analysis indicated that there were no significant changes in the fatty acids of lipid A, but particle size was significantly reduced and the material was more homogeneous and soluble than untreated lipopolysaccharide. The relationship of these effect on the structure of lipopolysaccharide endotoxin to the mechanism of B-lymphocyte activation is discussed. Images PMID:18405

  7. Performance of Li-Ion Cells Under Battery Voltage Charge Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Hari; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.

    2002-01-01

    Li-ion cells manufactured by YTP, SAFT, and MSA have completed 6714, 6226, and 3441 cycles, respectively. An increase in the charge voltage limit was required in all cases to maintain the discharge voltage. SAFT and MSA cells were capable of cycling at -10 C and 0 C with an increase in the charge voltage limit, whereas Yardney cells could not be cycled. Reconditioning improved the discharge voltage of SAFT and MSA cells; it is important to note that the effect has been temporary as in Ni-H and Ni-Cd batteries. It was demonstrated that the charge operation with VT clamp at battery rather than at cell level is feasible. Continuation of testing depends on the health of the cells and on the funding situation.

  8. Prospects of fuel cells with alkaline, solid-polymer, and superacid electrolytes as power sources for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, S.

    1981-01-01

    The state of the art and expected progress with fuel cells using alternatives to phosphoric acid as the electrolyte, that is, alkaline, solid polymer, and superacid electrolytes is reviewed. Alkaline fuel cells are appealing because of the good performance at less than 1000 C and potential for finding nonnoble metal catalysts, but are handicapped by the fact that pure hydrogen will have to be stored and used as the fuel. The solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell has the best prospect for attaining the highest power densities, which are important from the point of view of reducing cost, weight, and volume of the power plant. However, this type of fuel cell uses an expensive electrolyte membrane and has a difficult water management problem. Enthusiasm is growing for the development of fuel cells using organic superacids as the electrolyte. The bulk of the studies to date are with aqueous trifluoromethanesulfonic acid. Electrode kinetics of the oxygen reduction action are sufficiently enhanced in the superracids as compared with phosphoric acid. The noble metal content of the electrodes can be minimized and perhaps eliminated in fuel cells with such electrolytes.

  9. Chemically and compositionally modified solid solution disordered multiphase nickel hydroxide positive electrode for alkaline rechargeable electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Ovshinsky, Stanford R.; Corrigan, Dennis; Venkatesan, Srini; Young, Rosa; Fierro, Christian; Fetcenko, Michael A.

    1994-01-01

    A high capacity, long cycle life positive electrode for use in an alkaline rechargeable electrochemical cell comprising: a solid solution nickel hydroxide material having a multiphase structure that comprises at least one polycrystalline .gamma.-phase including a polycrystalline .gamma.-phase unit cell comprising spacedly disposed plates with at least one chemical modifier incorporated around the plates, the plates having a range of stable intersheet distances corresponding to a 2.sup.+ oxidation state and a 3.5.sup.+, or greater, oxidation state; and at least one compositional modifier incorporated into the solid solution nickel hydroxide material to promote the multiphase structure.

  10. Life-cycle cost analysis of conventional and fuel cell/battery powered urban passenger vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-11-01

    This Final Report summarizes the work on the life cycle cost (LCC) analysis of conventional and fuel cell/battery powered urban passenger vehicles. The purpose of the work is to support the Division in making sound economic comparisons between conventional and fuel cell/battery powered buses, passenger vans, and cars for strategic analysis of programmatic R&D goals. The LCC analysis can indicate whether paying a relatively high initial capital cost for advanced technology with low operating and/or environmental costs is advantageous over paying a lower initial cost for conventional technology with higher operating and/or environmental costs. While minimizing life cycle cost is an important consideration, it does not always result in technology penetration in the marketplace. The LCC analysis model developed under this contract facilitates consideration of all perspectives. Over 100 studies have been acquired and analyzed for their applicability. Drawing on prior work by JPL and Los Alamos National Laboratory as primary sources, specific analytical relationships and cost/performance data relevant to fuel cell/battery and intemal combustion engine (ICE) powered vehicles were selected for development of an LCC analysis model. The completed LCC model is structured around twelve integrated modules. Comparative analysis is made between conventional gasoline and diesel vehicles and fuel cell/battery vehicles using either phosphoric acid fuel cells or proton-exchange membrane fuel cells. In all, seven base vehicle configuration cases with a total of 21 vehicle class/powertrain/fuel combinations are analyzed. The LCC model represents a significant advance in comparative economic analysis of conventional and fuel cell/battery powered vehicle technologies embodying several unique features which were not included in prior models.

  11. Combinatorial electrochemical cell array for high throughput screening of micro-fuel-cells and metal/air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Rongzhong

    2007-07-01

    An electrochemical cell array was designed that contains a common air electrode and 16 microanodes for high throughput screening of both fuel cells (based on polymer electrolyte membrane) and metal/air batteries (based on liquid electrolyte). Electrode materials can easily be coated on the anodes of the electrochemical cell array and screened by switching a graphite probe from one cell to the others. The electrochemical cell array was used to study direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), including high throughput screening of electrode catalysts and determination of optimum operating conditions. For screening of DMFCs, there is about 6% relative standard deviation (percentage of standard deviation versus mean value) for discharge current from 10to20mA/cm2. The electrochemical cell array was also used to study tin/air batteries. The effect of Cu content in the anode electrode on the discharge performance of the tin/air battery was investigated. The relative standard deviations for screening of metal/air battery (based on zinc/air) are 2.4%, 3.6%, and 5.1% for discharge current at 50, 100, and 150mA/cm2, respectively.

  12. Combinatorial electrochemical cell array for high throughput screening of micro-fuel-cells and metal/air batteries.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rongzhong

    2007-07-01

    An electrochemical cell array was designed that contains a common air electrode and 16 microanodes for high throughput screening of both fuel cells (based on polymer electrolyte membrane) and metal/air batteries (based on liquid electrolyte). Electrode materials can easily be coated on the anodes of the electrochemical cell array and screened by switching a graphite probe from one cell to the others. The electrochemical cell array was used to study direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), including high throughput screening of electrode catalysts and determination of optimum operating conditions. For screening of DMFCs, there is about 6% relative standard deviation (percentage of standard deviation versus mean value) for discharge current from 10 to 20 mAcm(2). The electrochemical cell array was also used to study tin/air batteries. The effect of Cu content in the anode electrode on the discharge performance of the tin/air battery was investigated. The relative standard deviations for screening of metal/air battery (based on zinc/air) are 2.4%, 3.6%, and 5.1% for discharge current at 50, 100, and 150 mAcm(2), respectively. PMID:17672740

  13. An overview—Functional nanomaterials for lithium rechargeable batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, and fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hua Kun

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanomaterials play important role in lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage and fuel cells. - Highlights: • Nanomaterials play important role for lithium rechargeable batteries. • Nanostructured materials increase the capacitance of supercapacitors. • Nanostructure improves the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of hydrogen storage materials. • Nanomaterials enhance the electrocatalytic activity of the catalysts in fuel cells. - Abstract: There is tremendous worldwide interest in functional nanostructured materials, which are the advanced nanotechnology materials with internal or external dimensions on the order of nanometers. Their extremely small dimensions make these materials unique and promising for clean energy applications such as lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, fuel cells, and other applications. This paper will highlight the development of new approaches to study the relationships between the structure and the physical, chemical, and electrochemical properties of functional nanostructured materials. The Energy Materials Research Programme at the Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, the University of Wollongong, has been focused on the synthesis, characterization, and applications of functional nanomaterials, including nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanowires, nanoporous materials, and nanocomposites. The emphases are placed on advanced nanotechnology, design, and control of the composition, morphology, nanostructure, and functionality of the nanomaterials, and on the subsequent applications of these materials to areas including lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, and fuel cells.

  14. Hazards, Safety and Design Considerations for Commercial Lithium-ion Cells and Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the features of the Lithium-ion batteries, particularly in reference to the hazards and safety of the battery. Some of the characteristics of the Lithium-ion cell are: Highest Energy Density of Rechargeable Battery Chemistries, No metallic lithium, Leading edge technology, Contains flammable electrolyte, Charge cut-off voltage is critical (overcharge can result in fire), Open circuit voltage higher than metallic lithium anode types with similar organic electrolytes. Intercalation is a process that places small ions in crystal lattice. Small ions (such as lithium, sodium, and the other alkali metals) can fit in the interstitial spaces in a graphite lattice. These metallic ions can go farther and force the graphitic planes apart to fit two, three, or more layers of metallic ions between the carbon sheets. Other features of the battery/cell are: The graphite is conductive, Very high energy density compared to NiMH or NiCd, Corrosion of aluminum occurs very quickly in the presence of air and electrolyte due to the formation of HF from LiPF6 and HF is highly corrosive. Slides showing the Intercalation/Deintercalation and the chemical reactions are shown along with the typical charge/discharge for a cylindrical cell. There are several graphs that review the hazards of the cells.

  15. A Trypanosoma cruzi alkaline antigen induces polyclonal B-cell activation of normal murine spleen cells by T-cell-independent, BCR-directed stimulation.

    PubMed

    Montes, C L; Zuñiga, E; Minoprio, P; Vottero-Cima, E; Gruppi, A

    1999-08-01

    We have previously reported that a cytosolic alkaline fraction (FI) obtained from epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi promotes the activation, proliferation and differentiation of normal murine B cells into antibody-secreting plasmocytes. Neither the mechanism nor the cells involved in the FI-induced polyclonal B-cell activation were established. In this work we report that accessory cells are required for FI-induced polyclonal B-cell activation as no proliferative responses were obtained following treatment of normal spleen mononuclear cells (NSMC) with L-leucine methyl ester. Furthermore, FI did not induce the expression of CD25 on T cells and it promoted the proliferation of a T-cell-depleted population, indicating that it acts in a T-independent manner. We observed that NSMC were stimulated in vitro by FI-released cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6 and IL-10, which are involved in B-cell proliferation and differentiation. Interestingly, while significant amounts of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) were found in culture supernatants we did not observe detectable levels of IL-2. Additionally, we found that B-cell receptor (BCR) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens were involved in the proliferative response induced by FI because antibodies directed against cell-surface immunoglobulin M (IgM), CD45 and MHC class II molecules inhibited the FI-induced B-cell proliferation. CD40 ligand (CD40L) did not participate in such a phenomenon.

  16. Electrochemical characteristic of based on carbon mixed with organic metal complex (Co(mqph)) in alkaline media Li-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Chang-ho; Okada, Tatsuhiro; Ishida, Masayoshi; Yoo, Eunjoo; Zhou, Haoshen

    2016-03-01

    The electrochemical performance of RGO-Co(mqph) electrocatalyst for Li-air batteries with hybrid electrolyte was investigated. The RGO-Co(mqph) showed high onset potential (-0.09 V vs. Ag/AgCl) under oxygen condition in the rotating disk electrode system for oxygen reduction reaction, which was higher than that of RGO (-0.17 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Furthermore, the ORR mechanism of RGO-Co(mqph) showed 3.52 electron pathway. On the other hand, the RGO only exhibited the electron transfer number of 2.22 for ORR. Moreover, the electrochemical performance of Li-air batteries with hybrid electrolyte showed that the RGO-Co(mqph) provided good discharge performance and cycle performance. It was thus considered that the Co(mqph) strongly affected ORR activity for cathode electrode. This was ascribed to synergic effect due to combination between RGO and Co(mqph).

  17. Lightweight nickel electrode for nickel hydrogen cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    The nickel electrode was identified as the heaviest component of the nickel hydrogen (NiH2) battery. The NASA Lewis Research Center is developing nickel electrodes for NiH2 battery devices which will be lighter in weight and have higher energy densities when cycled under a low Earth orbit regime at deep depths of discharge. Lightweight plaques are first exposed to 31 percent potassium hydroxide for 3 months to determine their suitability for use as electrode substrates from a chemical corrosion standpoint. Pore size distribution and porosity of the plaques are then measured. The lightweight plaques examined are nickel foam, nickel felt, nickel plastic and nickel plated graphite. Plaques are then electrochemically impregnated in an aqueous solution. Initial characterization tests of the impregnated plaques are performed at five discharge levels, C/2, 1.0 C, 1.37 C, 2.0C, and 2.74 C rates. Electrodes that passed the initial characterization screening test will be life cycle tested. Lightweight electrodes are approximately 30 to 50 percent lighter in weight than the sintered nickel electrode.

  18. Lightweight nickel electrode for nickel hydrogen cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Doris L.

    1986-01-01

    The nickel electrode was identified as the heaviest component of the nickel hydrogen (NiH2) battery. The NASA Lewis Research Center is developing nickel electrodes for NiH2 battery devices which will be lighter in weight and have higher energy densities when cycled under a low Earth orbit regime at deep depths of discharge. Lightweight plaques are first exposed to 31 percent potassium hydroxide for 3 months to determine their suitability for use as electrode substrates from a chemical corrosion standpoint. Pore size distribution and porosity of the plaques are then measured. The lightweight plaques examined are nickel foam, nickel felt, nickel plastic and nickel plated graphite. Plaques are then electrochemically impregnated in an aqueous solution. Initial characterization tests of the impregnated plaques are performed at five discharge levels, C/2, 1.0 C, 1.37 C, 2.0 C, and 2.74 C rates. Electrodes that passed the initial characterization screening test will be life cycle tested. Lightweight electrodes are approximately 30 to 50 percent lighter in weight than the sintered nickel electrode.

  19. Plasma membranes modified by plasma treatment or deposition as solid electrolytes for potential application in solid alkaline fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Reinholdt, Marc; Ilie, Alina; Roualdès, Stéphanie; Frugier, Jérémy; Schieda, Mauricio; Coutanceau, Christophe; Martemianov, Serguei; Flaud, Valérie; Beche, Eric; Durand, Jean

    2012-07-30

    In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol) and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, commercial ADP-Morgane® fluorinated polymer membranes and a new brand of cross-linked poly(aryl-ether) polymer membranes, named AMELI-32®, both containing quaternary ammonium functionalities, have been modified by argon plasma treatment or triallylamine-based plasma deposit. Under the concomitant etching/cross-linking/oxidation effects inherent to the plasma modification, transport properties (ionic exchange capacity, water uptake, ionic conductivity and fuel retention) of membranes have been improved. Consequently, using plasma modified ADP-Morgane® membrane as electrolyte in a solid alkaline fuel cell operating with glycerol as fuel has allowed increasing the maximum power density by a factor 3 when compared to the untreated membrane.

  20. Plasma Membranes Modified by Plasma Treatment or Deposition as Solid Electrolytes for Potential Application in Solid Alkaline Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinholdt, Marc; Ilie, Alina; Roualdès, Stéphanie; Frugier, Jérémy; Schieda, Mauricio; Coutanceau, Christophe; Martemianov, Serguei; Flaud, Valérie; Beche, Eric; Durand, Jean

    2012-01-01

    In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol) and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, commercial ADP-Morgane® fluorinated polymer membranes and a new brand of cross-linked poly(aryl-ether) polymer membranes, named AMELI-32®, both containing quaternary ammonium functionalities, have been modified by argon plasma treatment or triallylamine-based plasma deposit. Under the concomitant etching/cross-linking/oxidation effects inherent to the plasma modification, transport properties (ionic exchange capacity, water uptake, ionic conductivity and fuel retention) of membranes have been improved. Consequently, using plasma modified ADP-Morgane® membrane as electrolyte in a solid alkaline fuel cell operating with glycerol as fuel has allowed increasing the maximum power density by a factor 3 when compared to the untreated membrane. PMID:24958295

  1. Plasma membranes modified by plasma treatment or deposition as solid electrolytes for potential application in solid alkaline fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Reinholdt, Marc; Ilie, Alina; Roualdès, Stéphanie; Frugier, Jérémy; Schieda, Mauricio; Coutanceau, Christophe; Martemianov, Serguei; Flaud, Valérie; Beche, Eric; Durand, Jean

    2012-01-01

    In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol) and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, commercial ADP-Morgane® fluorinated polymer membranes and a new brand of cross-linked poly(aryl-ether) polymer membranes, named AMELI-32®, both containing quaternary ammonium functionalities, have been modified by argon plasma treatment or triallylamine-based plasma deposit. Under the concomitant etching/cross-linking/oxidation effects inherent to the plasma modification, transport properties (ionic exchange capacity, water uptake, ionic conductivity and fuel retention) of membranes have been improved. Consequently, using plasma modified ADP-Morgane® membrane as electrolyte in a solid alkaline fuel cell operating with glycerol as fuel has allowed increasing the maximum power density by a factor 3 when compared to the untreated membrane. PMID:24958295

  2. Chemical recycling of cell phone Li-ion batteries: Application in environmental remediation.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Mariana C Abreu; Garcia, Eric M; Taroco, Hosane A; Gorgulho, Honória F; Melo, Júlio O F; Silva, Rafael R A; Souza, Amauri G

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents, for the first time, the recycling and use of spent Li-ion battery cathode tape as a catalyst in the degradation of an organic dye. In our proposal, two major environmental problems can be solved: the secure disposal of cell phone batteries and the treatment of effluents with potentially toxic organic dyes. The spent Li-ion battery cathode investigated in this paper corresponds to 29% of the mass of Li-ion batteries and is made up of 83% LiCoO2, 14.5% C and less than 2.5% Al, Al2O3 and Co3O4. The use of spent Li-ion battery cathode tape increased the degradation velocity constant of methylene blue in the absence of light by about 200 times in relation to pure H2O2. This increase can be explained by a reduction in the activation energy from 83 kJ mol(-1) to 26 kJ mol(-1). The mechanism of degradation promoted by LiCoO2 is probably related to the generation of superoxide radical (O2(-)). The rupture of the aromatic rings of methylene blue was analyzed by ESI-MS.

  3. Power sources for portable electronics and hybrid cars: lithium batteries and fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Scrosati, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    The activities in progress in our laboratory for the development of batteries and fuel cells for portable electronics and hybrid car applications are reviewed and discussed. In the case of lithium batteries, the research has been mainly focused on the characterization of new electrode and electrolyte materials. Results related to disordered carbon anodes and improved, solvent-free, as well as gel-type, polymer electrolytes are particularly stressed. It is shown that the use of proper gel electrolytes, in combination with suitable electrode couples, allows the development of new types of safe, reliable, and low-cost lithium ion batteries which appear to be very promising power sources for hybrid vehicles. Some of the technologies proven to be successful in the lithium battery area are readapted for use in fuel cells. In particular, this approach has been followed for the preparation of low-cost and stable protonic membranes to be proposed as an alternative to the expensive, perfluorosulfonic membranes presently used in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs).

  4. Power sources for portable electronics and hybrid cars: lithium batteries and fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Scrosati, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    The activities in progress in our laboratory for the development of batteries and fuel cells for portable electronics and hybrid car applications are reviewed and discussed. In the case of lithium batteries, the research has been mainly focused on the characterization of new electrode and electrolyte materials. Results related to disordered carbon anodes and improved, solvent-free, as well as gel-type, polymer electrolytes are particularly stressed. It is shown that the use of proper gel electrolytes, in combination with suitable electrode couples, allows the development of new types of safe, reliable, and low-cost lithium ion batteries which appear to be very promising power sources for hybrid vehicles. Some of the technologies proven to be successful in the lithium battery area are readapted for use in fuel cells. In particular, this approach has been followed for the preparation of low-cost and stable protonic membranes to be proposed as an alternative to the expensive, perfluorosulfonic membranes presently used in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). PMID:16211622

  5. Zinc air refuelable battery: alternative zinc fuel morphologies and cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.F.; Krueger, R.

    1997-01-01

    Multicell zinc/air batteries have been tested previously in the laboratory and as part of the propulsion system of an electric bus; cut zinc wire was used as the anode material. This battery is refueled by a hydraulic transport of 0.5-1 mm zinc particles into hoppers above each cell. We report an investigation concerning alternative zinc fuel morphologies, and energy losses associated with refueling and with overnight or prolonged standby. Three types of fuel pellets were fabricated, tested and compared with results for cut wire: spheres produced in a fluidized bed electrolysis cell; elongated particles produced by gas-atomization; and pellets produced by chopping 1 mm porous plates made of compacted zinc fines. Relative sizes of the particles and cell gap dimensions are critical. All three types transported within the cell 1553 and showed acceptable discharge characteristics, but a fluidized bed approach appears especially attractive for owner/user recovery operations.

  6. Method of optimizing the charging of a battery of storage cells, and apparatus for performing the method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busson, Guy

    1993-10-01

    The invention relates to a method enabling a battery of storage cells to be charged in a charging mode for compensating for discharging to an external circuit, or in a maintenance mode for compensating for self-discharging of the battery. The method consists in: determine the charging capacity of the battery, as a function of the temperature (Tb) of the battery, the charging capacity decreasing and becoming less than the reference capacity when the temperature increases during a charging period; calculating the electricity balance between the quantity of electricity received by the battery and the quantity of electricity supplied by the battery to an external circuit; and deciding to switch from maintenance mode to charging mode each time that the electricity balance is less than the charging capacity.

  7. Making a Lightweight Battery Plaque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, M. A.; Post, R. E.; Soltis, D.

    1986-01-01

    Plaque formed in porous plastic by electroless plating. Lightweight plaque prepared by electroless plating of porous plastic contains embedded wire or expanded metal grid. Plastic may or may not be filled with soluble pore former. If it contains soluble pore former, treated to remove soluble pore former and increase porosity. Porous plastic then clamped into rig that allows plating solutions to flow through plastic. Lightweight nickel plaque used as electrode substrate for alkaline batteries, chiefly Ni and Cd electrodes, and for use as electrolyte-reservoir plates for fuel cells.

  8. Nicotine inhibits collagen synthesis and alkaline phosphatase activity, but stimulates DNA synthesis in osteoblast-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ramp, W.K.; Lenz, L.G.; Galvin, R.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Use of smokeless tobacco is associated with various oral lesions including periodontal damage and alveolar bone loss. This study was performed to test the effects of nicotine on bone-forming cells at concentrations that occur in the saliva of smokeless tobacco users. Confluent cultures of osteoblast-like cells isolated from chick embryo calvariae were incubated for 2 days with nicotine added to the culture medium (25-600 micrograms/ml). Nicotine inhibited alkaline phosphatase in the cell layer and released to the medium, whereas glycolysis (as indexed by lactate production) was unaffected or slightly elevated. The effects on medium and cell layer alkaline phosphatase were concentration dependent with maximal inhibition occurring at 600 micrograms nicotine/ml. Nicotine essentially did not affect the noncollagenous protein content of the cell layer, but did inhibit collagen synthesis (hydroxylation of ({sup 3}H)proline and collagenase-digestible protein) at 100, 300, and 600 micrograms/ml. Release of ({sup 3}H)hydroxyproline to the medium was also decreased in a dose-dependent manner, as was the collagenase-digestible protein for both the medium and cell layer. In contrast, DNA synthesis (incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine) was more than doubled by the alkaloid, whereas total DNA content was slightly inhibited at 600 micrograms/ml, suggesting stimulated cell turnover. Morphologic changes occurred in nicotine-treated cells including rounding up, detachment, and the occurrence of numerous large vacuoles. These results suggest that steps to reduce the salivary concentration of nicotine in smokeless tobacco users might diminish damaging effects of this product on alveolar bone.

  9. Retrieval of air temperatures from crowd-sourced battery temperatures of cell phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, Aart; Robinson, James; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan; Horn, Berthold K. P.

    2013-04-01

    Accurate air temperature observations are important for urban meteorology, for example to study the urban heat island and adverse effects of high temperatures on human health. The number of available temperature observations is often relatively limited. A new development is presented to derive temperature information for the urban canopy from an alternative source: cell phones. Battery temperature data were collected by users of an Android application for cell phones (opensignal.com). The application automatically sends battery temperature data to a server for storage. In this study, battery temperatures are averaged in space and time to obtain daily averaged battery temperatures for each city separately. A regression model, which can be related to a physical model, is employed to retrieve daily air temperatures from battery temperatures. The model is calibrated with observed air temperatures from a meteorological station of an airport located in or near the city. Time series of air temperatures are obtained for each city for a period of several months, where 50% of the data is for independent verification. Results are presented for Buenos Aires, London, Los Angeles, Paris, Mexico City, Moscow, Rome, and Sao Paulo. The evolution of the retrieved air temperatures often correspond well with the observed ones. The mean absolute error of daily air temperatures is less than 2 degrees Celsius, and the bias is within 1 degree Celsius. This shows that monitoring air temperatures employing an Android application holds great promise. Since 75% of the world's population has a cell phone, 20% of the land surface of the earth has cellular telephone coverage, and 500 million devices use the Android operating system, there is a huge potential for measuring air temperatures employing cell phones. This could eventually lead to real-time world-wide temperature maps.

  10. Sealing L-alloys/FeS(x) cells for a bipolar battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaun, T. D.; Gillie, K. R.; Duoba, M. J.; Smaga, J. A.

    1989-10-01

    Progress in cell design and materials development has led to the initial tests of sealed Li-alloy/metal sulfide cells for a bipolar battery configuration. Earlier efforts attempted to contain the molten electrolyte by a compressed peripheral gasket. The innovative design approach is to build the cell around a hermetic peripheral seal. This seal consists of metal components bonded to an insulating ceramic ring (e.g., MgO). Prototypic seals maintained secure bonds and showed little apparent reactivity in compatibility tests conducted for more than 1000 h at 450 C in melts with high lithium or sulfur activity. Single sealed FeS bipolar cells were operated for 1000 h and 100 cycles. Efforts are now being concentrated on the Li-alloy/FeS2 bipolar cell with molybdenum positive electrode current collector. Seal compositions that have a good matching of thermal expansion coefficient with molybdenum were developed. Over a dozen seals consisting of steel/ceramic/molybdenum were fabricated based on a 3 cm diameter, bipolar cell design. The bipolar battery is expected to double specific power and increase specific energy by 30 percent over the monopolar battery configuration for (gt)500 W/kg and 200 Wh/kg in an electric-vehicle application.

  11. Sealing Li-alloys/FeS(x) cells for a bipolar battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaun, T. D.; Gillie, K. R.; Duoba, M. J.; Smaga, J. A.

    Progress in cell design and materials development has led to the initial tests of sealed Li-alloy/metal sulfide cells for a bipolar battery configuration. Earlier efforts attempted to contain the molten electrolyte by a compressed peripheral gasket. The innovative design approach is to build the cell around a hermetic peripheral seal. This seal consists of metal components bonded to an insulating ceramic ring (e.g., MgO). Prototypic seals maintained secure bonds and showed little apparent reactivity in compatibility tests conducted for more than 1000 h at 450 C in melts with high lithium or sulfur activity. Single sealed FeS bipolar cells were operated for 1000 h and 100 cycles. Efforts are now being concentrated on the Li-alloy/FeS2 bipolar cell with molybdenum positive electrode current collector. Seal compositions that have a good matching of thermal expansion coefficient with molybdenum were developed. Over a dozen seals consisting of steel/ceramic/molybdenum were fabricated based on a 3 cm diameter, bipolar cell design. The bipolar battery is expected to double specific power and increase specific energy by 30 percent over the monopolar battery configuration for (gt)500 W/kg and 200 Wh/kg in an electric-vehicle application.

  12. Manganese dioxide as a cathode catalyst for a direct alcohol or sodium borohydride fuel cell with a flowing alkaline electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, A.; Jha, A. K.; Basu, S.

    The oxygen reduction reaction at a manganese dioxide cathode in alkaline medium is studied using cyclic voltammetry and by measuring volume of oxygen consumed at the cathode. The performance of the manganese dioxide cathode is also determined in the presence of fuel and an alkali mixture with a standard Pt/Ni anode in a flowing alkaline-electrolyte fuel cell. The fuels tested are methanol, ethanol and sodium borohydride (1 M), while 3 M KOH is used as the electrolyte. The performance of the fuel cell is measured in terms of open-circuit voltage and current-potential characteristics. A single peak in the cyclic voltammogram suggests that a four-electron pathway mechanism prevails during oxygen reduction. This is substantiated by calculating the number of electrons involved per molecule of oxygen that are reacted at the MnO 2 cathode from the oxygen consumption data for different fuels. The results show that the power density of the fuel cell increases with increase in MnO 2 loading to a certain limit but then decreases with further loading. The maximum power density is obtained at 3 mg cm -2 of MnO 2 for each of the three different fuels.

  13. Structural Integration of Silicon Solar Cells and Lithium-ion Batteries Using Printed Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jin Sung

    Inkjet printing of electrode using copper nanoparticle ink is presented. Electrode was printed on a flexible glass epoxy composite substrate using drop on demand piezoelectric dispenser and was sintered at 200°C in N 2 gas condition. The printed electrodes were made with various widths and thicknesses. Surface morphology of electrode was analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). Reliable dimensions for printed electronics were found from this study. Single-crystalline silicon solar cells were tested under four-point bending to find the feasibility of directly integrating them onto a carbon fiber/epoxy composite laminate. These solar cells were not able to withstand 0.2% strain. On the other hand, thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells were subjected to flexural fatigue loadings. The current density-voltage curves were analyzed at different cycles, and there was no noticeable degradation on its performance up to 100 cycles. A multifunctional composite laminate which can harvest and store solar energy was fabricated using printed electrodes. The integrated printed circuit board (PCB) was co-cured with a carbon/epoxy composite laminate by the vacuum bag molding process in an autoclave; an amorphous silicon solar cell and a thin-film solid state lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery were adhesively joined and electrically connected to a thin flexible PCB; and then the passive components such as resistors and diodes were electrically connected to the printed circuit board by silver pasting. Since a thin-film solid state Li-ion battery was not able to withstand tensile strain above 0.4%, thin Li-ion polymer batteries were tested under various mechanical loadings and environmental conditions to find the feasibility of using the polymer batteries for our multifunctional purpose. It was found that the Li-ion polymer batteries were stable under pressure and tensile loading without any noticeable degradation on its charge and discharge

  14. Thin-film silicon for flexible metal-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Garamoun, Ahmed; Schubert, Markus B; Werner, Jürgen H

    2014-12-01

    Due to its high energy density, theoretical studies propose silicon as a promising candidate material for metal-air batteries. Herein, for the first time, experimental results detail the use of n-type doped amorphous silicon and silicon carbide as fuel in Si-air batteries. Thin-film silicon is particularly interesting for flexible and rolled batteries with high specific energies. Our Si-air batteries exhibit a specific capacity of 269 Ah kg(-1) and an average cell voltage of 0.85 V at a discharge current density of 7.9 μA cm(-2) , corresponding to a specific energy of 229 Wh kg(-1) . Favorably in terms of safety, low concentrated alkaline solution serves as electrolyte. Discharging of the Si-air cells continues as long as there is silicon available for oxidation.

  15. Thin-film silicon for flexible metal-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Garamoun, Ahmed; Schubert, Markus B; Werner, Jürgen H

    2014-12-01

    Due to its high energy density, theoretical studies propose silicon as a promising candidate material for metal-air batteries. Herein, for the first time, experimental results detail the use of n-type doped amorphous silicon and silicon carbide as fuel in Si-air batteries. Thin-film silicon is particularly interesting for flexible and rolled batteries with high specific energies. Our Si-air batteries exhibit a specific capacity of 269 Ah kg(-1) and an average cell voltage of 0.85 V at a discharge current density of 7.9 μA cm(-2) , corresponding to a specific energy of 229 Wh kg(-1) . Favorably in terms of safety, low concentrated alkaline solution serves as electrolyte. Discharging of the Si-air cells continues as long as there is silicon available for oxidation. PMID:25251223

  16. Nickel-Hydrogen Battery Cell Life Test Program Update for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Thomas B.

    2000-01-01

    NASA and Boeing North America are responsible for constructing the electrical power system for the International Space Station (ISS), which circles the Earth every 90 minutes in a low Earth orbit (LEO). For approximately 55 minutes of this orbit, the ISS is in sunlight, and for the remaining 35 minutes, the ISS is in the Earth s shadow (eclipse). The electrical power system must not only provide power during the sunlight portion by means of the solar arrays, but also store energy for use during the eclipse. Nickel-hydrogen (Ni/H2) battery cells were selected as the energy storage systems for ISS. Each battery Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) comprises 38 individual series-connected Ni/H2 battery cells, and there are 48 battery ORU s on the ISS. On the basis of a limited Ni/H2 LEO data base on life and performance characteristics, the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field commenced testing through two test programs: one in-house and one at the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Crane, Indiana.

  17. Conceptual designs for utility load-leveling battery with Li/FeS cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zivi, S. M.; Kacinskas, H.; Pollack, I.; Chilenskas, A. A.; Grieve, W.; McFarland, B. L.; Sudar, S.

    1980-07-01

    In 1978, a conceptual design of a 100 MW-h load-leveling battery system having Li alloy/FeS cells was developed as a result of a joint effort between ANL and Rockwell International. In this conceptual design, the submodule, which was the basic replaceable unit for the system, had a capacity of 240 kW-h and consisted of ninety-six 2.5 kW-h cells. However, a study by Rockwell indicated that the cost for battery hardware, $60 to 80/kW-h (cells and converters not included), was too high. Most of this cost was contributed by the submodule structure and the charge equalization scheme, which was the same as that developed for electric-vehicle batteries. In 1979, subsequent efforts were concentrated on lowering these hardware costs and resulted in the development of three modified designs, which are presented in this report. The first, developed at ANL, consisted of a 30 kW-h cell/submodule and the electric-vehicle equalization scheme. The hardware cost for this modified design was quite low, about $25/kW-h; however, this design was eventually rejected owing to the apparent impracticality of such a large cell. The two other modified designs had more conservative cell designs. One of them, developed at ANL, consisted of a 120 kW-h submodule consisting of one hundred 1.2 kW-h cells; the other, developed at Rockwell, consisted of a 1020 kW-h submodule consisting of four hundred and eight 2.5 kW-h cells. For both of these designs, an alternative method of equalization, in which fixed resistance shunts are used on each cell, was proposed; this equalization method adds little equipment cost to the system and only sacrifices about 4% of the coulombic and energy efficiencies. The cost of battery hardware for these two designs was estimated to be acceptable, about $22 to 60/kW-h. Some questions remain on the assumed capabilities of the cells and the feasibility of the battery hardware.

  18. Zebra batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudworth, J. L.

    By using molten sodium chloroaluminate as secondary electrolyte, a series of solid transition metal chlorides can be used as positive electrodes in cells with sodium as the negative and beta-alumina as the solid electrlyte. Nickel chloride is preferred and Zebra batteries based on this cell reaction have been developed to the pilot-line production stage. The batteries have a number of features which make them attractive for electric-vehicle applications. Thus, the cells can be assebled in the discharged state eliminating the need to handle liquid sodium. By locating the positive electrode inside the beta-alumina tube, square cell cases can be used giving maximum packing efficiency in batteries. The absence of corrosion in the cell leads to a long life and high reliability. For electric-vehicle applications safety is very imporant, and crash testing has shown that even serious damage to the battery in a crash situation would not present a significant additional hazard to the driver or passengers. The remaining technical challenges are to increase the specific power of the battery towards the end of discharge and to demonstrate that the processes, which have been developed for cell and battery production, are capable of meeting the cost targets.

  19. Preliminary study of genotoxicity evaluation of orthodontic miniscrews on mucosa oral cells by the alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cameán, Ana; Puerto, María; Jos, Ángeles; Azqueta, Amaya; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Solano, Enrique; Cameán, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    Miniscrew implants are widely used nowadays in orthodontic treatments due to their good results in clinical practice. However, data regarding the biocompatibility of commercially available orthodontic miniscrews and temporary devices are very scarce, and their role as genotoxicity inducers has been not previously evaluated with the alkaline comet assay. The aim of this study was to investigate the DNA damage in buccal cells of patients subjected to orthodontic treatments. The alkaline comet assay has been applied in oral mucosa cells from patients treated with conventional orthodontic treatment in comparison to patients treated additionally with miniscrews, non-treated volunteers (control) and smoking volunteers (positive control). The application of orthodontic appliances and miniscrews induced significant and similar (2-fold) increases of %DNA in tail in comparison to control group. Females experienced a significant increase in %DNA in all the treatments in comparison to the control group, whereas males showed significant damage only with the combined orthodontic and miniscrew treatment. In conclusion, conventional orthodontic appliances induced genotoxicity, and the incorporation of miniscrews assayed did not imply any additional increase of DNA damage. PMID:26062010

  20. Palladium and palladium-tin supported on multi wall carbon nanotubes or carbon for alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldes, Adriana Napoleão; Furtunato da Silva, Dionisio; Martins da Silva, Júlio César; Antonio de Sá, Osvaldo; Spinacé, Estevam Vitório; Neto, Almir Oliveira; Coelho dos Santos, Mauro

    2015-02-01

    Pd and PdSn (Pd:Sn atomic ratios of 90:10), supported on Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) or Carbon (C), are prepared by an electron beam irradiation reduction method. The obtained materials are characterized by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), Transmission electron Microscopy (TEM) and Cyclic Voltammetry (CV). The activity for ethanol electro-oxidation is tested in alkaline medium, at room temperature, using Cyclic Voltammetry and Chronoamperometry (CA) and in a single alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (ADEFC), in the temperature range of 60-90 °C. CV analysis finds that Pd/MWCNT and PdSn/MWCNT presents onset potentials changing to negative values and high current values, compared to Pd/C and PdSn/C electrocatalysts. ATR-FTIR analysis, performed during the CV, identifies acetate and acetaldehyde as principal products formed during the ethanol electro-oxidation, with low conversion to CO2. In single fuel cell tests, at 85 °C, using 2.0 mol L-1 ethanol in 2.0 mol L-1 KOH solutions, the electrocatalysts supported on MWCNT, also, show higher power densities, compared to the materials supported on carbon: PdSn/MWCNT, presents the best result (36 mW cm-2). The results show that the use of MWCNT, instead of carbon, as support, plus the addition of small amounts of Sn to Pd, improves the electrocatalytic activity for Ethanol Oxidation Reaction (EOR).

  1. Genotoxicity of select herbicides in Rana catesbeiana tadpoles using the alkaline single-cell gel DNA electrophoresis (comet) assay.

    PubMed

    Clements, C; Ralph, S; Petras, M

    1997-01-01

    Pesticides are broadly used for pest control in agriculture despite possible negative impacts they may pose to the environment. Thus, we examined the DNA damage caused by five herbicides commonly used in southern Ontario (Canada). Erythrocytes from Rana catesbeiana (bullfrog) tadpoles were evaluated for DNA damage following exposure to selected herbicides, using the alkaline single-cell gel DNA electrophoresis (SCG) or "comet" assay [Singh et al. (1988): Exp Cell Res 175:184-191; Ralph et al. (1996): Eviron Mol Mutagen 28:112-120]. This approach involves detection, under alkaline conditions, of DNA fragments that upon electrophoresis migrate from the nuclear care, resulting in a comet formation. The herbicides tested, along with their active ingredients, were AAtrex Nine-O (atrazine), Dual-960E (metalochlor), Roundup (glyphosate), Sencor-500F (metribuzin), and Amsol (2,4-D amine). Tadpoles were exposed in the laboratory for a 24-hr period to several concentrations of the herbicides dissolved in dechlorinated water. Methyl methanesulphonate was used as a positive control. The herbicides AAtrex Nine-O-, Dual-960E-, Roundup-, and Sencor-500F-treated tadpoles showed significant DNA damage when compared with unexposed control animals, whereas, Amsol-treated tadpoles did not. Unlike the other responding herbicides, Sencor-500F did not show a relationship between dosage and DNA damage. In summary, the results indicate that at least some of the herbicides currently used in southern Ontario are capable of inducing DNA damage in tadpoles.

  2. Preliminary study of genotoxicity evaluation of orthodontic miniscrews on mucosa oral cells by the alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cameán, Ana; Puerto, María; Jos, Ángeles; Azqueta, Amaya; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Solano, Enrique; Cameán, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    Miniscrew implants are widely used nowadays in orthodontic treatments due to their good results in clinical practice. However, data regarding the biocompatibility of commercially available orthodontic miniscrews and temporary devices are very scarce, and their role as genotoxicity inducers has been not previously evaluated with the alkaline comet assay. The aim of this study was to investigate the DNA damage in buccal cells of patients subjected to orthodontic treatments. The alkaline comet assay has been applied in oral mucosa cells from patients treated with conventional orthodontic treatment in comparison to patients treated additionally with miniscrews, non-treated volunteers (control) and smoking volunteers (positive control). The application of orthodontic appliances and miniscrews induced significant and similar (2-fold) increases of %DNA in tail in comparison to control group. Females experienced a significant increase in %DNA in all the treatments in comparison to the control group, whereas males showed significant damage only with the combined orthodontic and miniscrew treatment. In conclusion, conventional orthodontic appliances induced genotoxicity, and the incorporation of miniscrews assayed did not imply any additional increase of DNA damage.

  3. Paintable battery.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neelam; Galande, Charudatta; Miranda, Andrea; Mathkar, Akshay; Gao, Wei; Reddy, Arava Leela Mohana; Vlad, Alexandru; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2012-01-01

    If the components of a battery, including electrodes, separator, electrolyte and the current collectors can be designed as paints and applied sequentially to build a complete battery, on any arbitrary surface, it would have significant impact on the design, implementation and integration of energy storage devices. Here, we establish a paradigm change in battery assembly by fabricating rechargeable Li-ion batteries solely by multi-step spray painting of its components on a variety of materials such as metals, glass, glazed ceramics and flexible polymer substrates. We also demonstrate the possibility of interconnected modular spray painted battery units to be coupled to energy conversion devices such as solar cells, with possibilities of building standalone energy capture-storage hybrid devices in different configurations.

  4. Paintable Battery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Neelam; Galande, Charudatta; Miranda, Andrea; Mathkar, Akshay; Gao, Wei; Reddy, Arava Leela Mohana; Vlad, Alexandru; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2012-01-01

    If the components of a battery, including electrodes, separator, electrolyte and the current collectors can be designed as paints and applied sequentially to build a complete battery, on any arbitrary surface, it would have significant impact on the design, implementation and integration of energy storage devices. Here, we establish a paradigm change in battery assembly by fabricating rechargeable Li-ion batteries solely by multi-step spray painting of its components on a variety of materials such as metals, glass, glazed ceramics and flexible polymer substrates. We also demonstrate the possibility of interconnected modular spray painted battery units to be coupled to energy conversion devices such as solar cells, with possibilities of building standalone energy capture-storage hybrid devices in different configurations. PMID:22745900

  5. Paintable Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Neelam; Galande, Charudatta; Miranda, Andrea; Mathkar, Akshay; Gao, Wei; Reddy, Arava Leela Mohana; Vlad, Alexandru; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2012-06-01

    If the components of a battery, including electrodes, separator, electrolyte and the current collectors can be designed as paints and applied sequentially to build a complete battery, on any arbitrary surface, it would have significant impact on the design, implementation and integration of energy storage devices. Here, we establish a paradigm change in battery assembly by fabricating rechargeable Li-ion batteries solely by multi-step spray painting of its components on a variety of materials such as metals, glass, glazed ceramics and flexible polymer substrates. We also demonstrate the possibility of interconnected modular spray painted battery units to be coupled to energy conversion devices such as solar cells, with possibilities of building standalone energy capture-storage hybrid devices in different configurations.

  6. Electroactive materials for rechargeable batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huiming; Amine, Khalil; Abouimrane, Ali

    2015-04-21

    An as-prepared cathode for a secondary battery, the cathode including an alkaline source material including an alkali metal oxide, an alkali metal sulfide, an alkali metal salt, or a combination of any two or more thereof.

  7. Identification of alkaline proteins that are differentially expressed in an overgrowth-mediated growth arrest and cell death of Escherichia coli by proteomic methodologies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sanying; Zhu, Rui; Peng, Bo; Liu, Mingming; Lou, Yun; Ye, Xintai; Xu, Zhengzheng; Liu, Dong; Peng, Xuanxian

    2006-10-01

    The available Escherichia coli genome sequences offer an opportunity to further expand our understanding of this bacterium. In the current study, we present a rapid method for the isolation of bacterial alkaline proteins using acid incubation, purification and protein array by 2-DE, followed by protein identification using MS. Fifty-seven proteins were randomly chosen, in which 55 were identified by a database searching of MS data. The searching results showed that most of these alkaline proteins were involved in special functions within the cell, suggesting that alkaline proteome is an ideal fraction for an understanding of their special functions. Furthermore, alkaline proteomes were compared between the period of majority live bacteria (18-h culture), the period of similar amount of live and dead bacteria (30-h culture) and the period of majority dead bacteria (48-h culture). Six proteins were identified as differentially expressed targets, in which putative transcriptional regulator and superoxide dismutase genes were cloned and expressed for antiserum preparations. The antisera were applied for the confirmation of results obtained from 2-DE. The presented data clearly reveal that alkaline proteome analysis by 2-DE with MS plays an important role in the understanding of protein functions within the cell, and six alkaline proteins are determined as key ones in an overgrowth-mediated growth cycle of E. coli.

  8. An Electronic Measurement Instrumentation of the Impedance of a Loaded Fuel Cell or Battery

    PubMed Central

    Aglzim, El-Hassane; Rouane, Amar; El-Moznine, Reddad

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present an inexpensive electronic measurement instrumentation developed in our laboratory, to measure and plot the impedance of a loaded fuel cell or battery. Impedance measurements were taken by using the load modulation method. This instrumentation has been developed around a VXI system stand which controls electronic cards. Software under Hpvee® was developed for automatic measurements and the layout of the impedance of the fuel cell on load. The measurement environment, like the ambient temperature, the fuel cell temperature, the level of the hydrogen, etc…, were taken with several sensors that enable us to control the measurement. To filter the noise and the influence of the 50Hz, we have implemented a synchronous detection which filters in a very narrow way around the useful signal. The theoretical result obtained by a simulation under Pspice® of the method used consolidates the choice of this method and the possibility of obtaining correct and exploitable results. The experimental results are preliminary results on a 12V vehicle battery, having an inrush current of 330A and a capacity of 40Ah (impedance measurements on a fuel cell are in progress, and will be the subject of a forthcoming paper). The results were plotted at various nominal voltages of the battery (12.7V, 10V, 8V and 5V) and with two imposed currents (0.6A and 4A). The Nyquist diagram resulting from the experimental data enable us to show an influence of the load of the battery on its internal impedance. The similitude in the graph form and in order of magnitude of the values obtained (both theoretical and practical) enables us to validate our electronic measurement instrumentation. One of the future uses for this instrumentation is to integrate it with several control sensors, on a vehicle as an embedded system to monitor the degradation of fuel cell membranes.

  9. Seismic-fragility tests of new and accelerated-aged Class 1E battery cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonzon, L.L.; Janis, W.J.; Black, D.A.; Paulsen, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    The seismic-fragility response of naturally-aged nuclear station safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and thresholds and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the potential survivability of a battery given a seismic event. Prior reports in this series discussed the seismic-fragility tests and results for three specific naturally-aged cell types: 12-year old NCX-2250, 10-year old LCU-13, and 10-year old FHC-19. This report focuses on the complementary approach, namely, the seismic-fragility response of accelerated-aged batteries. Of particular interest is the degree to which such approaches accurately reproduce the actual failure modes and thresholds. In these tests the significant aging effects observed, in terms of seismic survivability, were: embrittlement of cell cases, positive bus material and positive plate grids; and excessive sulphation of positive plate active material causing hardening and expansion of positive plates. The IEEE Standard 535 accelerated aging method successfully reproduced seismically significant aging effects in new cells but accelerated grid embrittlement an estimated five years beyond the conditional age of other components.

  10. EXAFS: New tool for study of battery and fuel cell materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbreen, James; Ogrady, William E.; Pandya, Kaumudi I.

    1987-01-01

    Extended X ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) is a powerful technique for probing the local atomic structure of battery and fuel cell materials. The major advantages of EXAFS are that both the probe and the signal are X rays and the technique is element selective and applicable to all states of matter. This permits in situ studies of electrodes and determination of the structure of single components in composite electrodes, or even complete cells. EXAFS specifically probes short range order and yields coordination numbers, bond distances, and chemical identity of nearest neighbors. Thus, it is ideal for structural studies of ions in solution and the poorly crystallized materials that are often the active materials or catalysts in batteries and fuel cells. Studies on typical battery and fuel cell components are used to describe the technique and the capability of EXAFS as a structural tool in these applications. Typical experimental and data analysis procedures are outlined. The advantages and limitations of the technique are also briefly discussed.

  11. Primary lithium batteries, some consumer considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bro, P.

    1983-01-01

    In order to determine whether larger size lithium batteries would be commercially marketable, the performance of several D size lithium batteries was compared with that of an equivalent alkaline manganese battery, and the relative costs of the different systems were compared. It is concluded that opportunities exist in the consumer market for the larger sizes of the low rate and moderate rate lithium batteries, and that the high rate lithium batteries need further improvements before they can be recommended for consumer applications.

  12. SSTI- Lewis Spacecraft Nickel-Hydrogen Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, R. F.

    1997-01-01

    Topics considered include: NASA-Small Spacecraft Technology Initiative (SSTI) objectives, SSTI-Lewis overview, battery requirement, two cells Common Pressure Vessel (CPV) design summary, CPV electric performance, battery design summary, battery functional description, battery performance.

  13. Study of the preparation of NI-Mn-Zn ferrite using spent NI-MH and alkaline Zn-Mn batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Guoxi; Xi, Yuebin; Xu, Huidao; Wang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles of Ni-Mn-Zn ferrite have been prepared by a sol-gel method making use of spent Ni-MH and Zn-Mn batteries as source materials. Characterization by X-ray diffraction was carried out to study the particle size. The presence of functional groups was identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. From studies by thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, crystallization occurred at temperatures above 560 °C. The magnetic properties of the final products were found to be directly influenced by the average particle size of the product. The Ms values increase and the Hc values decrease as the size of the Ni-Mn-Zn ferrite particles increases.

  14. Mesocrystalline coordination polymer as a promising cathode for sodium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qi; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Ming; Jiang, Ji-Sen

    2016-01-31

    Prussian blue (PB) mesocrystals with Na as the alkaline metal were synthesized and used as cathode materials in Na-ion batteries. The mesocrystalline structure endowed PB with very different phase change behavior and electrochemical performance in contrast to PB single-crystals in cyclic voltammograms and galvanostatic discharge/charge voltage profiles of PB/Na half-cells. PMID:26688489

  15. Enhancement of cell viability and alkaline polygalacturonate lyase production by sorbitol co-feeding with methanol in Pichia pastoris fermentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihao; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Dongxu; Li, Jianghua; Hua, Zhaozhe; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2010-02-01

    Alkaline polygalacturonate lyase (PGL) production by Pichia pastoris GS115 was used as a model to study the mechanism and strategy for enhancing heterologous protein production. In order to enhance cell viability and volumetric recombinant protein productivity, sorbitol, which had been confirmed to be a non-repressive carbon source, was added together with methanol during the induction phase. The resultant PGL activity was up to 1593 U mL(-1), which was enhanced 1.85-fold compared to the control (863 U mL(-1)) cultured with sorbitol added at a constant rate of 3.6 g h(-1)L(-1) after an induction period of 100 h. Further results revealed that an appropriate sorbitol co-feeding strategy not only decreased the cell mortality to 8.8% (the control is about 23.1%) in the end of fermentation, but also reduced the proteolytic degradation of PGL.

  16. EXAMINER executive function battery and neurologic morbidity in pediatric sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Jeffrey; Stancil, Melita; Katz, Tal; Sanchez, Carmen E

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is blood disorder with a high risk for cerebral vascular morbidities that impact neurocognitive functioning. Specific cognitive abilities are known to be more sensitive to neurologic effects of SCD than IQ scores, yet there is little consensus about which measures to use to assess neurocognitive functioning. We evaluated the ability of the Executive Abilities: Methods and Instruments for Neurobehavioral Evaluation and Research (EXAMINER) Battery to detect neurologic effects in SCD. Thirty-two youth with SCD and sixty demographically-matched comparison youth completed the EXAMINER Battery and selected tests from the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Ability, 3rd edition (WJ-III). Neurologic severity was examined via clinical history for morbidities and midsagittal corpus callosum (CC) area. Results indicated cognitive performance decreased with increasing neurologic morbidity across all cognitive measures; two of four EXAMINER factors were related to CC area. The association with clinical history and midsagittal CC area appeared at least as large for the Examiner Battery scores as for the WJ-III measures. The Examiner Battery showed sensitivity to neurologic history and white matter effects in SCD; this new measure compares favorably to established measures of disease-related neurocognitive effects, but would benefit from further development. PMID:24280593

  17. Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries, which use a new battery chemistry, are being developed under cooperative agreements between Lockheed Martin, Ultralife Battery, and the NASA Lewis Research Center. The unit cells are made in flat (prismatic) shapes that can be connected in series and parallel to achieve desired voltages and capacities. These batteries will soon be marketed to commercial original-equipment manufacturers and thereafter will be available for military and space use. Current NiCd batteries offer about 35 W-hr/kg compared with 110 W-hr/kg for current lithium ion batteries. Our ultimate target for these batteries is 200 W-hr/kg.

  18. A Novel Range-Extended Strategy for Fuel Cell/Battery Electric Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jenn-Jiang; Hu, Jia-Sheng; Lin, Chih-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The range-extended electric vehicle is proposed to improve the range anxiety drivers have of electric vehicles. Conventionally, a gasoline/diesel generator increases the range of an electric vehicle. Due to the zero-CO2 emission stipulations, utilizing fuel cells as generators raises concerns in society. This paper presents a novel charging strategy for fuel cell/battery electric vehicles. In comparison to the conventional switch control, a fuzzy control approach is employed to enhance the battery's state of charge (SOC). This approach improves the quick loss problem of the system's SOC and thus can achieve an extended driving range. Smooth steering experience and range extension are the main indexes for development of fuzzy rules, which are mainly based on the energy management in the urban driving model. Evaluation of the entire control system is performed by simulation, which demonstrates its effectiveness and feasibility. PMID:26236771

  19. Development of Li-Metal Battery Cell Chemistries at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lvovich, Vadim F.

    2015-01-01

    State-of-the-Art lithium-ion battery technology is limited by specific energy and thus not sufficiently advanced to support the energy storage necessary for aerospace needs, such as all-electric aircraft and many deep space NASA exploration missions. In response to this technological gap, our research team at NASA Glenn Research Center has been active in formulating concepts and developing testing hardware and components for Li-metal battery cell chemistries. Lithium metal anodes combined with advanced cathode materials could provide up to five times the specific energy versus state-of-the-art lithium-ion cells (1000 Whkg versus 200 Whkg). Although Lithium metal anodes offer very high theoretical capacity, they have not been shown to successfully operate reversibly.

  20. A Novel Range-Extended Strategy for Fuel Cell/Battery Electric Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jenn-Jiang; Hu, Jia-Sheng; Lin, Chih-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The range-extended electric vehicle is proposed to improve the range anxiety drivers have of electric vehicles. Conventionally, a gasoline/diesel generator increases the range of an electric vehicle. Due to the zero-CO2 emission stipulations, utilizing fuel cells as generators raises concerns in society. This paper presents a novel charging strategy for fuel cell/battery electric vehicles. In comparison to the conventional switch control, a fuzzy control approach is employed to enhance the battery's state of charge (SOC). This approach improves the quick loss problem of the system's SOC and thus can achieve an extended driving range. Smooth steering experience and range extension are the main indexes for development of fuzzy rules, which are mainly based on the energy management in the urban driving model. Evaluation of the entire control system is performed by simulation, which demonstrates its effectiveness and feasibility.

  1. A Novel Range-Extended Strategy for Fuel Cell/Battery Electric Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jenn-Jiang; Hu, Jia-Sheng; Lin, Chih-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The range-extended electric vehicle is proposed to improve the range anxiety drivers have of electric vehicles. Conventionally, a gasoline/diesel generator increases the range of an electric vehicle. Due to the zero-CO2 emission stipulations, utilizing fuel cells as generators raises concerns in society. This paper presents a novel charging strategy for fuel cell/battery electric vehicles. In comparison to the conventional switch control, a fuzzy control approach is employed to enhance the battery's state of charge (SOC). This approach improves the quick loss problem of the system's SOC and thus can achieve an extended driving range. Smooth steering experience and range extension are the main indexes for development of fuzzy rules, which are mainly based on the energy management in the urban driving model. Evaluation of the entire control system is performed by simulation, which demonstrates its effectiveness and feasibility. PMID:26236771

  2. Transitions from alkaline spots to regular bands during pH pattern formation at the plasmalemma of Chara cells.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, A A; Zykov, S V; Rubin, A B; Müller, S C

    2003-05-01

    A scanning pH-microprobe was used to study pH patterns near the surface of Chara corallina cells at various light intensities and during light-induced transitions from homogeneous pH distribution to alternating pH bands. In the irradiance (PAR) range 4-400 micromol quanta m(-2) s(-1), the sustained pH profiles consisted of alternating acid and alkaline bands with a characteristic length of 7-10 mm and pH shifts as large as 2-3 units. At lower irradiance, the number of alkaline bands decreased while the amplitude of remaining peaks stayed high. On cyclic changes in light intensity, a hysteresis of pH banding was observed: the pH bands tolerated low irradiance in weakening light, but higher irradiance was required for their emergence after dark adaptation of the cell. The pH profiles measured for different paths of electrode scanning suggest that the pH pattern at low light level represents patches coexisting with bands. The exposure of the cell to high-intensity light led to formation of radially symmetrical bands. Transformations of the pH pattern induced by lowering the light intensity were similar to those induced by transcellular electric current (1.5-3 microA). The data suggest that band formation at the plasmalemma of Chara cells proceeds through the initial appearance of multiple patches with a localized H(+)-transporting activity and subsequent spot rearrangements (fusion, deletions, widening), leading to establishment of alternating bands.

  3. Electrolyte Suitable for Use in a Lithium Ion Cell or Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Electrolyte suitable for use in a lithium ion cell or battery. According to one embodiment, the electrolyte includes a fluorinated lithium ion salt and a solvent system that solvates lithium ions and that yields a high dielectric constant, a low viscosity and a high flashpoint. In one embodiment, the solvent system includes a mixture of an aprotic lithium ion solvating solvent and an aprotic fluorinated solvent.

  4. Modeling Lithium Ion Battery Safety: Venting of Pouch Cells; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Santhanagopalan, Shriram.; Yang, Chuanbo.; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2013-07-01

    This report documents the successful completion of the NREL July milestone entitled “Modeling Lithium-Ion Battery Safety - Complete Case-Studies on Pouch Cell Venting,” as part of the 2013 Vehicle Technologies Annual Operating Plan with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This work aims to bridge the gap between materials modeling, usually carried out at the sub-continuum scale, and the

  5. Cost and performance prospects for composite bipolar plates in fuel cells and redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minke, Christine; Hickmann, Thorsten; dos Santos, Antonio R.; Kunz, Ulrich; Turek, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Carbon-polymer-composite bipolar plates (BPP) are suitable for fuel cell and flow battery applications. The advantages of both components are combined in a product with high electrical conductivity and good processability in convenient polymer forming processes. In a comprehensive techno-economic analysis of materials and production processes cost factors are quantified. For the first time a technical cost model for BPP is set up with tight integration of material characterization measurements.

  6. High performance nano-Ni/Graphite electrode for electro-oxidation in direct alkaline ethanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Ahmed B.; Abdel-Samad, Hesham S.; Abdel Rehim, Sayed S.; Ahmed, Mohamed A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.

    2016-09-01

    Ni/Graphite electrocatalysts (Ni/G) are successfully prepared through electrodeposition of Ni from acidic (pH = 0.8) and feebly acidic (pH = 5.5) aqueous Ni (II) baths. The efficiencies of such electrodes are investigated as anodes for direct alkaline ethanol fuel cells through their ethanol electrooxidation cyclic voltammetric (CV) response in alkaline medium. A direct proportionality between the amount of the electrodeposited Ni and its CV response is found. The amounts of the deposited Ni from the two baths are recorded using the Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance (eQCM). The Ni/G electrodes prepared from the feebly acidic bath show a higher electrocatalytic response than those prepared from the acidic bath. Surface morphology of the Ni particles electrodeposited from feebly acidic bath appears in a nano-scale dimension. Various electrochemical experiments are conducted to confirm that the Ni/G ethanol electrooxidation CV response greatly depends on the pH rather than nickel ion concentration of the deposition bath. The eQCM technique is used to detect the crystalline phases of nickel as α-Ni(OH)2/γ-NiOOH and β-Ni(OH)2/β-NiOOH and their in-situ inter-transformations during the potentiodynamic polarization.

  7. Bio-batteries and bio-fuel cells: leveraging on electronic charge transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Kannan, A M; Renugopalakrishnan, V; Filipek, S; Li, P; Audette, G F; Munukutla, L

    2009-03-01

    Bio-fuel cells are alternative energy devises based on bio-electrocatalysis of natural substrates by enzymes or microorganisms. Here we review bio-fuel cells and bio-batteries based on the recent literature. In general, the bio-fuel cells are classified based on the type of electron transfer; mediated electron transfer and direct electron transfer or electronic charge transfer (ECT). The ECT of the bio-fuel cells is critically reviewed and a variety of possible applications are considered. The technical challenges of the bio-fuel cells, like bioelectrocatalysis, immobilization of bioelectrocatalysts, protein denaturation etc. are highlighted and future research directions are discussed leveraging on the use of electron charge transfer proteins. In addition, the packaging aspects of the bio-fuel cells are also analyzed and the found that relatively little work has been done in the engineering development of bio-fuel cells.

  8. Improved cell design for lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1984-03-30

    The disclosed lithium alloy/iron sulfide cell design provides loop-like positive and negative sheet metal current collectors electrically insulated from one another by separator means, the positive collector being located outwardly of the negative collector. The collectors are initially secured within an open-ended cell housing, which allows for collector pretesting for electrical shorts prior to adding any electrode materials and/or electrolyte to the cell. Separate chambers are defined outwardly of the positive collector and inwardly of the negative collector open respectively in opposite directions toward the open ends of the cell housing; and positive and negative electrode materials can be extruded into these respective chambers via the opposite open housing ends. The chambers and cell housing ends can then be sealed closed. A cross wall structurally reinforces the cell housing and also thereby defines two cavities, and paired positive and negative collectors are disposed in each cavity and electrically connected in parallel. The cell design provides for a high specific energy output and improved operating life in that any charge-discharge cycle swelling of the positive electrode material will be inwardly against only the positive collector to minimize shorts caused by the collectors shifting relative to one another.

  9. Cell design for lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosed lithium alloy/iron sulfide cell design provides loop-like positive and negative sheet metal current collectors electrically insulated from one another by separator means, the positive collector being located outwardly of the negative collector. The collectors are initially secured within an open-ended cell housing, which allows for collector pretesting for electrical shorts prior to adding any electrode materials and/or electrolyte to the cell. Separate chambers are defined outwardly of the positive collector and inwardly of the negative collector open respectively in opposite directions toward the open ends of the cell housing; and positive and negative electrode materials can be extruded into these respective chambers via the opposite open housing ends. The chambers and cell housing ends can then be sealed closed. A cross wall structurally reinforces the cell housing and also thereby defines two cavities, and paired positive and negative collectors are disposed in each cavity and electrically connected in parallel. The cell design provides for a high specific energy output and improved operating life in that any charge-discharge cycle swelling of the positive electrode material will be inwardly against only the positive collector to minimize shorts caused by the collectors shifting relative to one another.

  10. Enhanced production of alkaline thermostable keratinolytic protease from calcium alginate immobilized cells of thermoalkalophilic Bacillus halodurans JB 99 exhibiting dehairing activity.

    PubMed

    Shrinivas, Dengeti; Kumar, Raghwendra; Naik, G R

    2012-01-01

    The thermoalkalophilic Bacillus halodurans JB 99 cells known for production of novel thermostable alkaline keratinolytic protease were immobilized in calcium alginate matrix. Batch and repeated batch cultivation using calcium alginate immobilized cells were studied for alkaline protease production in submerged fermentation. Immobilized cells with 2.5% alginate and 350 beads/flask of initial cell loading showed enhanced production of alkaline protease by 23.2% (5,275 ± 39.4 U/ml) as compared to free cells (4,280 ± 35.4 U/ml) after 24 h. In the semicontinuous mode of cultivation, immobilized cells under optimized conditions produced an appreciable level of alkaline protease in up to nine cycles and reached a maximal value of 5,975 U/ml after the seventh cycle. The enzyme produced from immobilized cells efficiently degraded chicken feathers in the presence of a reducing agent which can help the poultry industry in the management of keratin-rich waste and obtaining value-added products.

  11. Test Series 2: seismic-fragility tests of naturally-aged Class 1E Exide FHC-19 battery cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonzon, L. L.; Hente, D. B.; Kukreti, B. M.; Schendel, J.; Tulk, J. D.; Janis, W. J.; Black, D. A.; Paulsen, G. D.; Aucoin, B. D.

    1985-03-01

    The seismic-fragility of naturally-aged nuclear station safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and their thresholds and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the ''end-of-life'' of a battery if subjected to a seismic event. This report, the second in a test series of an extensive seismic research program, covers the testing of 10-year old lead-calcium Exide FHC-19 cells from the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station operated by the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company. The Exide cells were tested in two configurations using a triaxial shake table: single-cell tests, both rigidly and loosely mounted; and multicell (three-cell) tests, mounted in a typical battery rack. A total of six electrically active cells was used in the two different cell configurations.

  12. Alkaline RFC Space Station prototype - 'Next step Space Station'. [Regenerative Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackler, I. M.

    1986-01-01

    The regenerative fuel cell, a candidate technology for the Space Station's energy storage system, is described. An advanced development program was initiated to design, manufacture, and integrate a regenerative fuel cell Space Station prototype (RFC SSP). The RFC SSP incorporates long-life fuel cell technology, increased cell area for the fuel cells, and high voltage cell stacks for both units. The RFC SSP's potential for integration with the Space Station's life support and propulsion systems is discussed.

  13. Pore size engineering applied to starved electrochemical cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbey, K. M.; Thaller, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    To maximize performance in starved, multiplate cells, the cell design should rely on techniques which widen the volume tolerance characteristics. These involve engineering capillary pressure differences between the components of an electrochemical cell and using these forces to promote redistribution of electrolyte to the desired optimum values. This can be implemented in practice by prescribing pore size distributions for porous back-up plates, reservoirs, and electrodes. In addition, electrolyte volume management can be controlled by incorporating different pore size distributions into the separator. In a nickel/hydrogen cell, the separator must contain pores similar in size to the small pores of both the nickel and hydrogen electrodes in order to maintain an optimum conductive path for the electrolyte. The pore size distributions of all components should overlap in such a way as to prevent drying of the separator and/or flooding of the hydrogen electrode.

  14. Lithium-Ion Small Cell Battery Shorting Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Chris; Curzon, David; Blackmore, Paul; Rao, Gopalakrishna

    2004-01-01

    AEA performed a hard short study on various cell configurations whilst monitoring voltage, current and temperature. Video recording was also done to verify the evidence for cell venting. The presentation summarizes the results of the study including video footage of typical samples. Need for the diode protection in manned applications is identified. The standard AEA approach of using fused connectors during AIT for unmanned applications is also described.

  15. Lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabano, J.-P.

    The physical principles and technology of commercial Li batteries operating at ambient temperatures are reviewed in chapters contributed by international specialists. An overview of Li battery systems is presented, and organic and inorganic electrolytes are characterized in terms of properties, structure, conductivity, Li stability, and film formation. Individual chapters are devoted to Li/CuO cells; cells with Pb, Bi, Pb/Bi, or Bi/Cu oxides; Li/FeS2, Li/CuS, Li/MnO2, Li/CF, Li/Ag2CrO4, Li/AgBi(CrO4)2, Li/V2O5, Li/SO2, and Li/oxyhalide cells, secondary Li cells, and solid-electrolyte Li cells. Graphs and tables of performance parameters and drawings and photographs of typical batteries are included. No individual items are abstracted in this volume

  16. Bipolar battery

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1992-01-01

    A bipolar battery having a plurality of cells. The bipolar battery includes: a negative electrode; a positive electrode and a separator element disposed between the negative electrode and the positive electrode, the separator element electrically insulating the electrodes from one another; an electrolyte disposed within at least one of the negative electrode, the positive electrode and the separator element; and an electrode containment structure including a cup-like electrode holder.

  17. Novel electrolyte chemistries for Mg-Ni rechargeable batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Diaz, Brenda; Kane, Marie; Au, Ming

    2010-10-01

    Commercial hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) and battery electric vehicles (BEV) serve as means to reduce the nation's dependence on oil. Current electric vehicles use relatively heavy nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) rechargeable batteries. Li-ion rechargeable batteries have been developed extensively as the replacement; however, the high cost and safety concerns are still issues to be resolved before large-scale production. In this study, we propose a new highly conductive solid polymer electrolyte for Mg-Ni high electrochemical capacity batteries. The traditional corrosive alkaline aqueous electrolyte (KOH) is replaced with a dry polymer with conductivity on the order of 10{sup -2} S/cm, as measured by impedance spectroscopy. Several potential novel polymer and polymer composite candidates are presented with the best-performing electrolyte results for full cell testing and cycling.

  18. In situ X-ray absorption fine structure studies of a manganese dioxide electrode in a rechargeable MnO{sub 2}/Zn alkaline battery environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Y.; Hu, Y.; Bae, I.T.; Miller, B.; Scherson, D.A.; Antonio, M.R.

    1996-12-31

    Electronic and structural aspects of a MnO{sub 2} electrode in a rechargeable MnO{sub 2}/Zn battery environment have been investigated by in situ Mn K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The relative amplitudes of the three major Fourier transform shells of the EXAFS (extended XAFS) function of the rechargeable MnO{sub 2} electrode in the undischarged state were found to be similar to those found for ramsdellite, a MnO{sub 2} polymorph with substantial corner-sharing linkages among the basic MnO{sub 6} octahedral units. The analyses of the background-subtracted pre-edge peaks and absorption edge regions for the nominally 1-e{sup {minus}} discharged electrode were consistent with Mn{sup 3+} as being the predominant constituent species, rather than a mixture of Mn{sup 4+} and Mn{sup 2+} sites. Furthermore, careful inspection of both the XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) and EXAFS indicated that the full recharge of MnO, which had been previously discharged either by a 1- or 2-equivalent corner-sharing linkages compared to the original undischarged MnO{sub 2}.

  19. Detection of metastatic tumour cells in routine bone marrow smears by immuno-alkaline phosphatase labelling with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A K; Erber, W N; Hatton, C S; O'Connor, N T; Falini, B; Osborn, M; Mason, D Y

    1985-09-01

    The present study describes 11 cases (10 carcinomas, one rhabdomyosarcoma) in which immuno-alkaline phosphatase labelling with monoclonal antibodies was used to demonstrate metastatic cells in routine smears of aspirated bone marrow. Carcinoma cells were detected using antibodies against epithelial cytokeratins, milk fat globule membrane antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen, and rhabdomyosarcoma cells with monoclonal anti-desmin. In four of the carcinoma cases it had not been possible to identify malignant cells in routinely stained marrow smears, whilst the case of disseminated rhabdomyosarcoma had initially been diagnosed (and treated) as a case of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. The anti-cytokeratin antibody was found to be the most valuable of the anti-epithelial reagents used, since it labelled malignant cells in all of the 10 cases of carcinoma and gave the strongest reactions. These results suggest that immunocytochemical labelling should be used in cases of suspected carcinoma whenever conventional examination of marrow smears yields negative results, and furthermore (as illustrated by the case of rhabdomyosarcoma) that the technique is of value for identifying the true nature of poorly differentiated neoplasms in bone marrow.

  20. Overcharge tolerant high-temperature cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Redey, Laszlo; Nelson, Paul A.

    1989-01-01

    In a lithium-alloy/metal sulfide high temperature electrochemical cell, cell damage caused by overcharging is avoided by providing excess lithium in a high-lithium solubility phase alloy in the negative electrode and a specified ratio maximum of the capacity of a matrix metal of the negative electrode in the working phase to the capacity of a transition metal of the positive electrode. In charging the cell, or a plurality of such cells in series and/or parallel, chemical transfer of elemental lithium from the negative electrode through the electrolyte to the positive electrode provides sufficient lithium to support an increased self-charge current to avoid anodic dissolution of the positive electrode components above a critical potential. The lithium is subsequently electrochemically transferred back to the negative electrode in an electrochemical/chemical cycle which maintains high self-discharge currents on the order of 3-15 mA/cm.sup.2 in the cell to prevent overcharging.