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Sample records for alkaline bohr effect

  1. Alkaline Bohr effect of human hemoglobin Ao.

    PubMed

    Di Cera, E; Doyle, M L; Gill, S J

    1988-04-01

    Differential oxygen binding measurements obtained over the pH range 6.95 to 9.10 at 25 degrees C have allowed a detailed description of the alkaline Bohr effect of human hemoglobin Ao. Phenomenological analysis of the data in terms of the Adair equation shows that: (1) the oxygen binding curves are asymmetrical with the population of the triply oxygenated species being negligible throughout the pH range studied: (2) the shape of the oxygen binding curve is affected by pH, especially at low saturation; and (3) the maximum O2-proton linkage is -0.52 mole of proton per mole of oxygen at pH 7.4. A possible molecular mechanism of the Bohr effect is proposed within the framework of an allosteric model which accounts for the low population of triply oxygenated hemoglobin species. At least three Bohr groups are necessary for a quantitative description of the alkaline Bohr effect. Two of these groups titrate in the range of the His146 beta and Vall alpha residues, which have long been identified as the main alkaline Bohr groups, and altogether contribute 84% of the alkaline Bohr effect at physiological pH. A third ionizable group, linked to oxygenation presumably at the beta chains, is implicated and is titrated in a pH range characteristic of a surface histidyl residue.

  2. The BOHR Effect before Perutz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunori, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Before the outbreak of World War II, Jeffries Wyman postulated that the "Bohr effect" in hemoglobin demanded the oxygen linked dissociation of the imidazole of two histidines of the polypeptide. This proposal emerged from a rigorous analysis of the acid-base titration curves of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, at a time when the information on the…

  3. Hemoglobin Bohr effects: atomic origin of the histidine residue contributions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guishan; Schaefer, Michael; Karplus, Martin

    2013-11-26

    The Bohr effect in hemoglobin, which refers to the dependence of the oxygen affinity on the pH, plays an important role in its cooperativity and physiological function. The dominant contribution to the Bohr effect arises from the difference in the pKa values of His residues of the unliganded (deoxy) and liganded (carbonmonoxy) structures. Using recent high resolution structures, the residue pKa values corresponding to the two structures are calculated. The method is based on determining the electrostatic interactions between residues in the protein, relative to those of the residue in solution, by use of the linearized finite difference Poisson-Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo sampling of protonation states. Given that good agreement is obtained with the available experimental values for the contribution of His residues in HbA to the Bohr effect, the calculated results are used to determine the atomic origin of the pKa shift between deoxy and carbonmonoxy HbA. The contributions to the pKa shift calculated by means of the linear response approximation show that the salt bridge involving His146 plays an important role in the alkaline Bohr effect, as suggested by Perutz but that other interactions are significant as well. A corresponding analysis is made for the contribution of His143 to the acid Bohr effect for which there is no proposed explanation. The method used is summarized and the program by which it is implemented is described in the Appendix .

  4. Anion Bohr effect of human hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Bucci, E; Fronticelli, C

    1985-01-15

    The pH dependence of oxygen affinity of hemoglobin (Bohr effect) is due to ligand-linked pK shifts of ionizable groups. Attempt to identify these groups has produced controversial data and interpretations. In a further attempt to clarify the situation, we noticed that hemoglobin alkylated in its liganded form lost the Bohr effect while hemoglobin alkylated in its unliganded form showed the presence of a practically unmodified Bohr effect. In spite of this difference, analyses of the extent of alkylation of the two compounds failed to identify the presence of specific preferential alkylations. In particular, the alpha 1 valines and beta 146 histidines appeared to be alkylated to the same extent in the two proteins. Focusing our attention on the effect of the anions on the functional properties of hemoglobin, we measured the Bohr effect of untreated hemoglobin in buffers made with HEPES [N-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid], MES [2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid], and MOPS [3-(N-morpholino)propanesulfonic acid], which being zwitterions do not need addition of chlorides or other anions for reaching the desired pH. The shape acquired by the Bohr effect curves, either as pH dependence of oxygen affinity or as pH dependence of protons exchanged with the solution, was irreconcilable with that of the Bohr effect curves in usual buffers. This indicated the relevance of solvent components in determining the functional properties of hemoglobin. A new thermodynamic model is proposed for the Bohr effect that includes the interaction of hemoglobin with solvent components. The classic proton Bohr effect is a special case of the new theory.

  5. [Current conception of the Bohr effect].

    PubMed

    Poyart, C F; Bursaux, E

    1975-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of the Bohr effect is explained according to the molecular model proposed by Perutz et al. The Bohr effect is due to changes in the pK of specific carboxyl and amino groups of the four globin chains following the transition between the deoxy and oxy conformations of the molecule. Carbon dioxide binds to the N terminal valine of the 4 monomers to form carbamino compounds. This carbaminoformation depends upon pH, PCO2 and predominates on deoxygenated haemoglobin. It is lowered when O2 binds to the heme groups (O2 linked carbamino compounds). Through the carbamino compounds Carbon dioxide lowers both the affinity of haemoglobin for O2 and the Bohr effect. Diphosphoglycerate also binds to the haemoglogin molecule. This organophosphate lowers the affinity for O2 but increases the Bohr effect. In whole blood, the Bohr effect is therefore dependent upon pH, O2 saturation, PCO2 and DPG concentration into the red blood cells.

  6. Acid Bohr effect of a monomeric haemoglobin from Dicrocoelium dendriticum. Mechanism of the allosteric conformation transition.

    PubMed

    Smit, J D; Sick, H; Peterhans, A; Gersonde, K

    1986-03-01

    The dioxygen affinity of Dicrocoelium dendriticum haemoglobin was determined as a function of pH with a thin-layer diffusion technique. From the oxygen dissociation and association curves Hill coefficients h equal 1 were obtained throughout. Ultracentrifugation studies prove this haemoglobin to be monomeric irrespective of pH and ligation state. Thus, Dicrocoelium haemoglobin is a non-cooperative monomer. It has the highest O2 affinity so far known for any monomeric haemoglobin: its half-saturation pressure, p50 value, ranges at 25 degrees C from 0.016 mm Hg to 0.15 mm Hg (2.13-20.0 Pa) dependent on pH. Dicrocoelium haemoglobin shows an acid Bohr effect only and as such it constitutes a new class of haemoglobins. Its log p50 versus pH plot (Bohr effect curve) is characterized by a large amplitude, delta log p50 = 0.96, and an inflection point (Bohr effect pK) at pH 5.0. A model for the acid Bohr effect of D. dendriticum haemoglobin is proposed. By generalization, both the alkaline and the acid Bohr effect in various monomeric haemoglobins may arise from a single Bohr group complex (salt bridge).

  7. Molecular Basis of the Bohr Effect in Arthropod Hemocyanin

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, S.; Kawahara, T; Beltramini, M; Di Muro, P; Magliozzo, R; Peisach, J; Powers, L; Tanaka, N; Nagao, S; Bubacco, L

    2008-01-01

    Flash photolysis and K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) were used to investigate the functional and structural effects of pH on the oxygen affinity of three homologous arthropod hemocyanins (Hcs). Flash photolysis measurements showed that the well-characterized pH dependence of oxygen affinity (Bohr effect) is attributable to changes in the oxygen binding rate constant, kon, rather than changes in koff. In parallel, coordination geometry of copper in Hc was evaluated as a function of pH by XAS. It was found that the geometry of copper in the oxygenated protein is unchanged at all pH values investigated, while significant changes were observed for the deoxygenated protein as a function of pH. The interpretation of these changes was based on previously described correlations between spectral lineshape and coordination geometry obtained for model compounds of known structure A pH-dependent change in the geometry of cuprous copper in the active site of deoxyHc, from pseudotetrahedral toward trigonal was assigned from the observed intensity dependence of the 1s ? 4pz transition in x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra. The structural alteration correlated well with increase in oxygen affinity at alkaline pH determined in flash photolysis experiments. These results suggest that the oxygen binding rate in deoxyHc depends on the coordination geometry of Cu(I) and suggest a structural origin for the Bohr effect in arthropod Hcs.

  8. Bohr effect of hemoglobins: Accounting for differences in magnitude.

    PubMed

    Okonjo, Kehinde O

    2015-09-01

    The basis of the difference in the Bohr effect of various hemoglobins has remained enigmatic for decades. Fourteen amino acid residues, identical in pairs and located at specific 'Bohr group positions' in human hemoglobin, are implicated in the Bohr effect. All 14 are present in mouse, 11 in dog, eight in pigeon and 13 in guinea pig hemoglobin. The Bohr data for human and mouse hemoglobin are identical: the 14 Bohr groups appear at identical positions in both molecules. The dog data are different from the human because three Bohr group positions are occupied by non-ionizable groups in dog hemoglobin; the pigeon data are vastly different from the human because six Bohr group positions are occupied by non-ionizable groups in pigeon hemoglobin. The guinea pig data are quite complex. Quantitative analyses showed that only the pigeon data could be fitted with the Wyman equation for the Bohr effect. We demonstrate that, apart from guinea pig hemoglobin, the difference between the Bohr effect of each of the other hemoglobins and of pigeon hemoglobin can be accounted for quantitatively on the basis of the occupation of some of their Bohr group positions by non-ionizable groups in pigeon hemoglobin. We attribute the anomalous guinea pig result to a new salt-bridge formed in its R2 quaternary structure between the terminal NH3(+) group of one β-chain and the COO(-) terminal group of the partner β-chain in the same molecule. The pKas of this NH3(+) group are 6.33 in the R2 and 4.59 in the T state.

  9. Molecular basis of the Bohr effect in arthropod hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Shun; Kawahara, Takumi; Beltramini, Mariano; Di Muro, Paolo; Magliozzo, Richard S; Peisach, Jack; Powers, Linda S; Tanaka, Naoki; Nagao, Satoshi; Bubacco, Luigi

    2008-11-14

    Flash photolysis and K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) were used to investigate the functional and structural effects of pH on the oxygen affinity of three homologous arthropod hemocyanins (Hcs). Flash photolysis measurements showed that the well-characterized pH dependence of oxygen affinity (Bohr effect) is attributable to changes in the oxygen binding rate constant, k(on), rather than changes in k(off). In parallel, coordination geometry of copper in Hc was evaluated as a function of pH by XAS. It was found that the geometry of copper in the oxygenated protein is unchanged at all pH values investigated, while significant changes were observed for the deoxygenated protein as a function of pH. The interpretation of these changes was based on previously described correlations between spectral lineshape and coordination geometry obtained for model compounds of known structure (Blackburn, N. J., Strange, R. W., Reedijk, J., Volbeda, A., Farooq, A., Karlin, K. D., and Zubieta, J. (1989) Inorg. Chem., 28, 1349-1357). A pH-dependent change in the geometry of cuprous copper in the active site of deoxyHc, from pseudotetrahedral toward trigonal was assigned from the observed intensity dependence of the 1s --> 4p(z) transition in x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra. The structural alteration correlated well with increase in oxygen affinity at alkaline pH determined in flash photolysis experiments. These results suggest that the oxygen binding rate in deoxyHc depends on the coordination geometry of Cu(I) and suggest a structural origin for the Bohr effect in arthropod Hcs.

  10. Lamprey hemoglobin. Structural basis of the bohr effect.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Y; Maillett, D H; Knapp, J; Olson, J S; Riggs, A F

    2000-05-01

    Lampreys, among the most primitive living vertebrates, have hemoglobins (Hbs) with self-association and ligand-binding properties very different from those that characterize the alpha(2)beta(2) tetrameric Hbs of higher vertebrates. Monomeric, ligated lamprey Hb self-associates to dimers and tetramers upon deoxygenation. Dissociation to monomers upon oxygenation accounts for the cooperative binding of O(2) and its pH dependence. Honzatko and Hendrickson (Honzatko, R. B., and Hendrickson, W. A. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A 83, 8487-8491) proposed that the dimeric interface of the Hb resembles either the alpha(1)beta(2) interface of mammalian Hbs or the contacts in clam Hb where the E and F helices form the interface. Perutz (Perutz, M. F. (1989) Quart. Rev. Biophys. 2, 139- 236) proposed a version of the clam model in which the distal histidine swings out of the heme pocket upon deoxygenation to form a bond with a carboxyl group of a second monomer. The sedimentation behavior and oxygen equilibria of nine mutants of the major Hb component, PMII, from Petromyzon marinus have been measured to test these models. The results strongly support a critical role of the E helix and the AB corner in forming the subunit interface in the dimer and rule out the alpha(1)beta(2) model. The pH dependence of both the sedimentation equilibrium and the oxygen binding of the mutant E75Q indicate that Glu(75) is one of two groups responsible for the Bohr effect. Changing the distal histidine 73 to glutamine almost completely abolishes the self-association of the deoxy-Hb and causes a large increase in O(2) affinity. The recent x-ray crystallographic determination of the structure of deoxy lamprey Hb, reported after the completion of this work (Heaslet, H. A., and Royer, W. E. (1999) Structure 7, 517-526), shows that the dimer interface does involve the E helix and the AB corner, supporting the measurements and interpretations reported here.

  11. The theory of the Bohr-Weisskopf effect in the hyperfine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpeshin, F. F.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2015-09-01

    Description of the Bohr-Wesskopf effect in the hyperfine structure of few-electron heavy ions is a challenging problem, which can be used as a test of both QED and atomic calculations. However, for twenty years the research has actually been going in a wrong direction, aimed at fighting the Bohr-Weisskopf effect through its cancellation in specific differences. Alternatively, we propose the constructive model-independent way, which enables the nuclear radii and their momenta to be retrieved from the hyper-fine splitting (HFS). The way is based on analogy of HFS to internal conversion coefficients, and the Bohr-Weisskopf effect - to the anomalies in the internal conversion coefficients. It is shown that the parameters which can be extracted from the data are the even nuclear momenta of the magnetization distribution. The radii R2 and - for the first time - R4 are obtained in this way by analysis of the experimental HFS values for the H- and Li-like ions of 209Bi. The critical prediction concerning the HFS for the 2p1/2 state is made. The present analysis shows high sensitivity of the method to the QED effects, which offers a way of precision test of QED. Experimental recommendations are given, which are aimed at retrieving data on the HFS values for a set of a few-electron configurations of each atom.

  12. Bohr effect and temperature sensitivity of hemoglobins from highland and lowland deer mice.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Birgitte; Storz, Jay F; Fago, Angela

    2016-05-01

    An important means of physiological adaptation to environmental hypoxia is an increased oxygen (O2) affinity of the hemoglobin (Hb) that can help secure high O2 saturation of arterial blood. However, the trade-off associated with a high Hb-O2 affinity is that it can compromise O2 unloading in the systemic capillaries. High-altitude deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) have evolved an increased Hb-O2 affinity relative to lowland conspecifics, but it is not known whether they have also evolved compensatory mechanisms to facilitate O2 unloading to respiring tissues. Here we investigate the effects of pH (Bohr effect) and temperature on the O2-affinity of high- and low-altitude deer mouse Hb variants, as these properties can potentially facilitate O2 unloading to metabolizing tissues. Our experiments revealed that Bohr factors for the high- and low-altitude Hb variants are very similar in spite of the differences in O2-affinity. The Bohr factors of deer mouse Hbs are also comparable to those of other mammalian Hbs. In contrast, the high- and low-altitude variants of deer mouse Hb exhibited similarly low temperature sensitivities that were independent of red blood cell anionic cofactors, suggesting an appreciable endothermic allosteric transition upon oxygenation. In conclusion, high-altitude deer mice have evolved an adaptive increase in Hb-O2 affinity, but this is not associated with compensatory changes in sensitivity to changes in pH or temperature. Instead, it appears that the elevated Hb-O2 affinity in high-altitude deer mice is compensated by an associated increase in the tissue diffusion capacity of O2 (via increased muscle capillarization), which promotes O2 unloading. PMID:26808972

  13. Bohr effect and temperature sensitivity of hemoglobins from highland and lowland deer mice.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Birgitte; Storz, Jay F; Fago, Angela

    2016-05-01

    An important means of physiological adaptation to environmental hypoxia is an increased oxygen (O2) affinity of the hemoglobin (Hb) that can help secure high O2 saturation of arterial blood. However, the trade-off associated with a high Hb-O2 affinity is that it can compromise O2 unloading in the systemic capillaries. High-altitude deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) have evolved an increased Hb-O2 affinity relative to lowland conspecifics, but it is not known whether they have also evolved compensatory mechanisms to facilitate O2 unloading to respiring tissues. Here we investigate the effects of pH (Bohr effect) and temperature on the O2-affinity of high- and low-altitude deer mouse Hb variants, as these properties can potentially facilitate O2 unloading to metabolizing tissues. Our experiments revealed that Bohr factors for the high- and low-altitude Hb variants are very similar in spite of the differences in O2-affinity. The Bohr factors of deer mouse Hbs are also comparable to those of other mammalian Hbs. In contrast, the high- and low-altitude variants of deer mouse Hb exhibited similarly low temperature sensitivities that were independent of red blood cell anionic cofactors, suggesting an appreciable endothermic allosteric transition upon oxygenation. In conclusion, high-altitude deer mice have evolved an adaptive increase in Hb-O2 affinity, but this is not associated with compensatory changes in sensitivity to changes in pH or temperature. Instead, it appears that the elevated Hb-O2 affinity in high-altitude deer mice is compensated by an associated increase in the tissue diffusion capacity of O2 (via increased muscle capillarization), which promotes O2 unloading.

  14. Redox Bohr effects and the role of heme a in the proton pump of bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Capitanio, Giuseppe; Martino, Pietro Luca; Capitanio, Nazzareno; Papa, Sergio

    2011-10-01

    Structural and functional observations are reviewed which provide evidence for a central role of redox Bohr effect linked to the low-spin heme a in the proton pump of bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase. Data on the membrane sidedness of Bohr protons linked to anaerobic oxido-reduction of the individual metal centers in the liposome reconstituted oxidase are analysed. Redox Bohr protons coupled to anaerobic oxido-reduction of heme a (and Cu(A)) and Cu(B) exhibit membrane vectoriality, i.e. protons are taken up from the inner space upon reduction of these centers and released in the outer space upon their oxidation. Redox Bohr protons coupled to anaerobic oxido-reduction of heme a(3) do not, on the contrary, exhibit vectorial nature: protons are exchanged only with the outer space. A model of the proton pump of the oxidase, in which redox Bohr protons linked to the low-spin heme a play a central role, is described. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Allosteric cooperativity in respiratory proteins.

  15. Presenting the Bohr Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haendler, Blanca L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching the Bohr atom at both freshman and advanced levels. Focuses on the development of Bohr's ideas, derivation of the energies of the stationary states, and the Bohr atom in the chemistry curriculum. (SK)

  16. Contribution of cooperativity and the Bohr effect to efficient oxygen transport by hemoglobins from five mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Kobayashi, Keiko; Kitazawa, Kazuki; Imai, Kiyohiro; Kobayashi, Michiyori

    2006-01-01

    By using published experimental values of the standard oxygen (O2) equilibrium curve and the in vivo arterial and venous O2 pressure (PO2) of fetal and maternal blood in five mammalian species (human, cow, pig, sheep, and horse), we investigated the relationship between the efficiency of O2 delivery and the effectiveness of the Bohr shift, and discussed the significance of cooperativity for mammalian Hb. The O2 delivery of fetal blood was more efficient than that of maternal blood, and the effectiveness of the Bohr shift at both O2 loading and release sites of fetal blood was high. A linear relationship was observed between the efficiency of O2 delivery and the effectiveness of the Bohr shift at O2 loading sites of the five mammalian species. In both fetal and maternal blood, the theoretically obtained optimal P50 value for O2 delivery (optP50(OD)) was nearly equal to the optimal P50 value for the effectiveness of the Bohr shift at the O2 loading site (optP50(BS)(loading)). This phenomenon was favorable for fetal blood to uptake O2 from maternal blood with the aid of the Bohr shift and to deliver a large amount of O2 to the tissues. The optP50s for the effectiveness of the Bohr shift at given arterial PO2 (PaO2) and venous PO2 (PvO2) were derived as follows: optP50(BS)(loading) = PaO2((n+1)/(n-1))(1/n), and optP50(BS)(release) = PvO2((n+1)/(n-1))(1/n). The relationship between in vivo PO2s and n, PaO2/PvO2 = ((n+1)/(n-1))(2/n), was derived by letting optP50 for the efficiency of O2 delivery be equal to that for the effectiveness of the Bohr shift.

  17. Significance of the Bohr effect for tissue oxygenation in a model with counter-current blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H; Pelster, B; Piiper, J; Scheid, P

    1989-06-01

    Counter-current arrangement of afferent and efferent blood flow in tissues is commonly considered to be detrimental to tissue oxygenation, since O2 diffusion would shunt O2 away from the tissue. We have investigated the combined effects of counter-current CO2 and O2 exchange in a simple model, paying particular attention to the Bohr effect. We have obtained the following main results. (1) Back-diffusion of CO2 leads to increasing CO2 partial pressure (PCO2) and CO2 content along the afferent vessel. This is enhanced when fixed acid is released by the tissue into the venous blood, e.g. during hypoxia, which leads to a further PCO2 increase therein. (2) The increasing PCO2, with concomitant decrease in pH, in the afferent blood leads to a decrease in blood O2 affinity (Bohr effect) and thus results in increased PO2. (3) The resulting O2 diffusion shunt diminishes the O2 content in afferent blood, but for most conditions its PO2 remains higher than without the Bohr effect. (4) During hypoxia, both the PO2 in blood reaching the tissue (Pta) as well as in that leaving it (Ptv) are significantly elevated above the level without the Bohr effect. Moreover, with fixed acid release both Pta and Ptv for O2 can be higher than the arterial PO2 value. (5) During hyperoxia, O2 diffusion shunt prevents the tissue PO2 levels from increasing to levels that might be regarded as toxic. It is concluded that a diffusion shunt in tissues stabilizes the O2 partial pressure at the tissue when it varies in arterial blood (hypoxia or hyperoxia).

  18. An investigation of the nature of Bohr, Root, and Haldane effects in Octopus dofleini hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Miller, K I; Mangum, C P

    1988-01-01

    1. The pH dependence of Octopus dofleini hemocyanin oxygenation is so great that below pH 7.0 the molecule does not become fully oxygenated, even in pure O2 at 1 atm pressure. However, the curves describing percent oxygenation as a function of PO2 appear to be gradually increasing in oxygen saturation, rather than leveling out at less than full saturation. Hill plots indicate that at pH 6.6 and below the molecule is stabilized in its low affinity conformation. Thus, the low saturation of this hemocyanin in air is due to the very large Bohr shift, and not to the disabling of one or more functionally distinct O2 binding sites on the native molecule. 2. Experiments in which pH was monitored continuously while oxygenation was manipulated in the presence of CO2 provide no evidence of O2 linked binding of CO2. While CO2 does influence O2 affinity independently of pH, its effect may be due to high levels of HCO3- and CO3-, rather than molecular CO2, and it may entail a lowering of the activities of the allosteric effectors Mg2+ and Ca2+. PMID:3150406

  19. Bohr effect of human hemoglobin A: magnitude of negative contributions determined by the equilibrium between two tertiary structures.

    PubMed

    Okonjo, Kehinde O; Olatunde, Abimbola M; Fodeke, Adedayo A; Babalola, J Oyebamiji

    2014-06-01

    We have measured the affinity of the CysF9[93]β sulfhydryl group of human deoxyhemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin for 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate), DTNB, between pH ≈5.6 and 9 in order to understand the basis of the reported reduction of the Bohr effect induced by chemical modification of the sulfhydryl. We analyzed the results quantitatively on the basis of published data indicating that the sulfhydryl exists in two conformations that are coupled to the transition between two tertiary structures of hemoglobin in dynamic equilibrium. Our analyses show that the ionizable groups linked to the DTNB reaction have lower pKas of ionization in deoxyhemoglobin compared to oxyhemoglobin. So these ionizable groups should make negative contributions to the Bohr effect. We identify these groups as HisNA2[2]β, HisEF1[77]β and HisH21[143]β. We provide explanations for the finding that hemoglobin, chemically modified at CysF9[93]β, has a lower Bohr effect and a higher oxygen affinity than unmodified hemoglobin.

  20. The Bohr effect of the blood in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdnerii). A comparative study with human blood, using precise oxygen equilibrium curves and the Adair model.

    PubMed

    Vorger, P

    1985-01-01

    1. The Bohr effects of trout blood (which exhibits the Root effect) and of human blood were compared. Precise oxygen equilibria were measured with an automatic recording system, on normal trout red blood cell suspensions at pH 7.6 - 8.6, at 10 and 20 degrees C, and on normal human red blood cell suspensions at pH 6.8 - 8.0, at 37 degrees C. 2. The data were fitted to the Adair's stepwise oxygenation model which describes experimental curves with four constants ki (i = 1-4). 3. Adair's scheme successfully fits the equilibrium data for trout and human blood, in the range of conditions examined. 4. The R-state Bohr effect (d log k4/ d pH), is very large in trout blood, indicating a large pH dependence of the R structure, as opposed to human blood. 5. The T-state Bohr effect (d log k1/ d pH), and the overall Bohr effect (d log Pm/ d pH), are equivalent in trout and human blood. 6. The overall Bohr effect is essentially accounted for by the first and fourth oxygenation steps in trout blood and shows a significant effect of temperature. 7. The data attribute a major role to Hb4 in trout blood isotherms and confirm the importance of the C-termini of Beta chains in Bohr and Root effects.

  1. Why We Should Teach the Bohr Model and How to Teach it Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKagan, S. B.; Perkins, K. K.; Wieman, C. E.

    2008-01-01

    Some education researchers have claimed that we should not teach the Bohr model of the atom because it inhibits students' ability to learn the true quantum nature of electrons in atoms. Although the evidence for this claim is weak, many have accepted it. This claim has implications for how to present atoms in classes ranging from elementary school…

  2. The Bohr paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2008-05-01

    In his book Niels Bohr's Times, the physicist Abraham Pais captures a paradox in his subject's legacy by quoting three conflicting assessments. Pais cites Max Born, of the first generation of quantum physics, and Werner Heisenberg, of the second, as saying that Bohr had a greater influence on physics and physicists than any other scientist. Yet Pais also reports a distinguished younger colleague asking with puzzlement and scepticism "What did Bohr really do?".

  3. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  4. Bohr model as an algebraic collective model

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, D. J.; Welsh, T. A.; Caprio, M. A.

    2009-05-15

    Developments and applications are presented of an algebraic version of Bohr's collective model. Illustrative examples show that fully converged calculations can be performed quickly and easily for a large range of Hamiltonians. As a result, the Bohr model becomes an effective tool in the analysis of experimental data. The examples are chosen both to confirm the reliability of the algebraic collective model and to show the diversity of results that can be obtained by its use. The focus of the paper is to facilitate identification of the limitations of the Bohr model with a view to developing more realistic, computationally tractable models.

  5. Teaching Bohr Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latimer, Colin J.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses some lesser known examples of atomic phenomena to illustrate to students that the old quantum theory in its simplest (Bohr) form is not an antiquity but can still make an important contribution to understanding such phenomena. Topics include hydrogenic/non-hydrogenic spectra and atoms in strong electric and magnetic fields. (Author/JN)

  6. Global allostery model of hemoglobin. Modulation of O(2) affinity, cooperativity, and Bohr effect by heterotropic allosteric effectors.

    PubMed

    Yonetani, Takashi; Park, Sung-Ick; Tsuneshige, Antonio; Imai, Kiyohiro; Kanaori, Kenji

    2002-09-13

    The O(2) equilibria of human adult hemoglobin have been measured in a wide range of solution conditions in the presence and absence of various allosteric effectors in order to determine how far hemoglobin can modulate its O(2) affinity. The O(2) affinity, cooperative behavior, and the Bohr effect of hemoglobin are modulated principally by tertiary structural changes, which are induced by its interactions with heterotropic allosteric effectors. In their absence, hemoglobin is a high affinity, moderately cooperative O(2) carrier of limited functional flexibility, the behaviors of which are regulated by the homotropic, O(2)-linked T/R quaternary structural transition of the Monod-Wyman-Changeux/Perutz model. However, the interactions with allosteric effectors provide such "inert" hemoglobin unprecedented magnitudes of functional diversities not only of physiological relevance but also of extreme nature, by which hemoglobin can behave energetically beyond what can be explained by the Monod-Wyman-Changeux/Perutz model. Thus, the heterotropic effector-linked tertiary structural changes rather than the homotropic ligation-linked T/R quaternary structural transition are energetically more significant and primarily responsible for modulation of functions of hemoglobin.

  7. Einstein, Bohr, and Bell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellac, Michel Le

    2014-11-01

    The final form of quantum physics, in the particular case of wave mechanics, was established in the years 1925-1927 by Heisenberg, Schrödinger, Born and others, but the synthesis was the work of Bohr who gave an epistemological interpretation of all the technicalities built up over those years; this interpretation will be examined briefly in Chapter 10. Although Einstein acknowledged the success of quantum mechanics in atomic, molecular and solid state physics, he disagreed deeply with Bohr's interpretation. For many years, he tried to find flaws in the formulation of quantum theory as it had been more or less accepted by a large majority of physicists, but his objections were brushed away by Bohr. However, in an article published in 1935 with Podolsky and Rosen, universally known under the acronym EPR, Einstein thought he had identified a difficulty in the by then standard interpretation. Bohr's obscure, and in part beyond the point, answer showed that Einstein had hit a sensitive target. Nevertheless, until 1964, the so-called Bohr-Einstein debate stayed uniquely on a philosophical level, and it was actually forgotten by most physicists, as the few of them aware of it thought it had no practical implication. In 1964, the Northern Irish physicist John Bell realized that the assumptions contained in the EPR article could be tested experimentally. These assumptions led to inequalities, the Bell inequalities, which were in contradiction with quantum mechanical predictions: as we shall see later on, it is extremely likely that the assumptions of the EPR article are not consistent with experiment, which, on the contrary, vindicates the predictions of quantum physics. In Section 3.2, the origin of Bell's inequalities will be explained with an intuitive example, then they will be compared with the predictions of quantum theory in Section 3.3, and finally their experimental status will be reviewed in Section 3.4. The debate between Bohr and Einstein goes much beyond a

  8. Direct determination of protonation states of histidine residues in a 2 A neutron structure of deoxy-human normal adult hemoglobin and implications for the Bohr effect.

    PubMed

    Kovalevsky, Andrey Y; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Shibayama, Naoya; Park, Sam-Yong; Ishikawa, Takuya; Mustyakimov, Marat; Fisher, Zoe; Langan, Paul; Morimoto, Yukio

    2010-04-30

    We have investigated the protonation states of histidine residues (potential Bohr groups) in the deoxy form (T state) of human hemoglobin by direct determination of hydrogen (deuterium) positions with the neutron protein crystallography technique. The reversible binding of protons is key to the allosteric regulation of human hemoglobin. The protonation states of 35 of the 38 His residues were directly determined from neutron scattering omit maps, with 3 of the remaining residues being disordered. Protonation states of 5 equivalent His residues--alpha His20, alpha His50, alpha His89, beta His143, and beta His146--differ between the symmetry-related globin subunits. The distal His residues, alpha His58 and beta His63, are protonated in the alpha 1 beta 1 heterodimer and are neutral in alpha 2 beta 2. Buried residue alpha His103 is found to be protonated in both subunits. These distal and buried residues have the potential to act as Bohr groups. The observed protonation states of His residues are compared to changes in their pK(a) values during the transition from the T to the R state and the results provide some new insights into our understanding of the molecular mechanism of the Bohr effect.

  9. Rutherford-Bohr atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbron, J. L.

    1981-03-01

    Bohr used to introduce his attempts to explain clearly the principles of the quantum theory of the atom with an historical sketch, beginning invariably with the nuclear model proposed by Rutherford. That was sound pedagogy but bad history. The Rutherford-Bohr atom stands in the middle of a line of work initiated by J.J. Thomson and concluded by the invention of quantum mechanics. Thompson's program derived its inspiration from the peculiar emphasis on models characteristic of British physics of the 19th century. Rutherford's atom was a late product of the goals and conceptions of Victorian science. Bohr's modifications, although ultimately fatal to Thomson's program, initially gave further impetus to it. In the early 1920s the most promising approach to an adequate theory of the atom appeared to be the literal and detailed elaboration of the classical mechanics of multiply periodic orbits. The approach succeeded, demonstrating in an unexpected way the force of an argument often advanced by Thomson: because a mechanical model is richer in implications than the considerations for which it was advanced, it can suggest new directions of research that may lead to important discoveries.

  10. Bohr's way to defining complementarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gregorio, Alberto

    2014-02-01

    We go through Bohr's talk about complementary features of quantum theory at the Volta Conference in September 1927, by collating a manuscript that Bohr wrote in Como with the unpublished stenographic report of his talk. We conclude - also with the help of some unpublished letters - that Bohr gave a very concise speech in September. The formulation of his ideas became fully developed only between the fifth Solvay Conference, in Brussels in October, and early 1928. The unpublished stenographic reports of the Solvay Conference suggest that we reconsider the role that discussions with his colleagues possibly had on Bohr's final presentation of the complementary sides of atomic physics in his 1928 papers.

  11. A subtle point about Bohr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotson, Allen

    2013-07-01

    Jon Cartwright's interesting and informative article on quantum philosophy ("The life of psi", May pp26-31) mischaracterizes Niels Bohr's stance as anti-realist by suggesting (in the illustration on p29) that Bohr believed that "quantum theory [does not] describe an objective reality, independent of the observer".

  12. The effect of alkaline agents on retention of EOR chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, P.B.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes a literature survey on how alkaline agents reduce losses of surfactants and polymers in oil recovery by chemical injection. Data are reviewed for crude sulfonates, clean anionic surfactants, nonionic surfactants, and anionic and nonionic polymers. The role of mineral chemistry is briefly described. Specific effects of various alkaline anions are discussed. Investigations needed to improve the design of alkaline-surfactant-polymer floods are suggested. 62 refs., 28 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Revisiting Bohr's semiclassical quantum theory.

    PubMed

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2006-10-12

    Bohr's atomic theory is widely viewed as remarkable, both for its accuracy in predicting the observed optical transitions of one-electron atoms and for its failure to fully correspond with current electronic structure theory. What is not generally appreciated is that Bohr's original semiclassical conception differed significantly from the Bohr-Sommerfeld theory and offers an alternative semiclassical approximation scheme with remarkable attributes. More specifically, Bohr's original method did not impose action quantization constraints but rather obtained these as predictions by simply matching photon and classical orbital frequencies. In other words, the hydrogen atom was treated entirely classically and orbital quantized emerged directly from the Planck-Einstein photon quantization condition, E = h nu. Here, we revisit this early history of quantum theory and demonstrate the application of Bohr's original strategy to the three quintessential quantum systems: an electron in a box, an electron in a ring, and a dipolar harmonic oscillator. The usual energy-level spectra, and optical selection rules, emerge by solving an algebraic (quadratic) equation, rather than a Bohr-Sommerfeld integral (or Schroedinger) equation. However, the new predictions include a frozen (zero-kinetic-energy) state which in some (but not all) cases lies below the usual zero-point energy. In addition to raising provocative questions concerning the origin of quantum-chemical phenomena, the results may prove to be of pedagogical value in introducing students to quantum mechanics.

  14. Bohr's 1913 molecular model revisited.

    PubMed

    Svidzinsky, Anatoly A; Scully, Marlan O; Herschbach, Dudley R

    2005-08-23

    It is generally believed that the old quantum theory, as presented by Niels Bohr in 1913, fails when applied to few electron systems, such as the H(2) molecule. Here, we find previously undescribed solutions within the Bohr theory that describe the potential energy curve for the lowest singlet and triplet states of H(2) about as well as the early wave mechanical treatment of Heitler and London. We also develop an interpolation scheme that substantially improves the agreement with the exact ground-state potential curve of H(2) and provides a good description of more complicated molecules such as LiH, Li(2), BeH, and He(2).

  15. Is Bohr's Challenge Still Relevant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiatti, Leonardo

    We argue that not all the theoretical content of the Bohr model has been captured by the "definitive" quantum formalism currently in use. In particular, the notion of "quantum leap" seems to refer to non-dynamic features, closely related to non-locality, which have not yet been formalized in a satisfactory way.

  16. A Simple Relativistic Bohr Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzis, Andreas F.

    2008-01-01

    A simple concise relativistic modification of the standard Bohr model for hydrogen-like atoms with circular orbits is presented. As the derivation requires basic knowledge of classical and relativistic mechanics, it can be taught in standard courses in modern physics and introductory quantum mechanics. In addition, it can be shown in a class that…

  17. Coupling of electron transfer with proton transfer at heme a and Cu(A) (redox Bohr effects) in cytochrome c oxidase. Studies with the carbon monoxide inhibited enzyme.

    PubMed

    Capitanio, N; Capitanio, G; Minuto, M; De Nitto, E; Palese, L L; Nicholls, P; Papa, S

    2000-05-30

    A study is presented on the coupling of electron transfer with proton transfer at heme a and Cu(A) (redox Bohr effects) in carbon monoxide inhibited cytochrome c oxidase isolated from bovine heart mitochondria. Detailed analysis of the coupling number for H(+) release per heme a, Cu(A) oxidized (H(+)/heme a, Cu(A) ratio) was based on direct measurement of the balance between the oxidizing equivalents added as ferricyanide to the CO-inhibited fully reduced COX, the equivalents of heme a, Cu(A), and added cytochrome c oxidized and the H(+) released upon oxidation and all taken up back by the oxidase upon rereduction of the metal centers. One of two reductants was used, either succinate plus a trace of mitochondrial membranes (providing a source of succinate-c reductase) or hexaammineruthenium(II) as the chloride salt. The experimental H(+)/heme a, Cu(A) ratios varied between 0.65 and 0.90 in the pH range 6.0-8.5. The pH dependence of the H(+)/heme a, Cu(A) ratios could be best-fitted by a function involving two redox-linked acid-base groups with pK(o)-pK(r) of 5.4-6.9 and 7.3-9.0, respectively. Redox titrations in the same samples of the CO-inhibited oxidase showed that Cu(A) and heme a exhibited superimposed E'(m) values, which decreased, for both metals, by around 20 mV/pH unit increase in the range 6.0-8.5. A model in which oxido-reduction of heme a and Cu(A) are both linked to the pK shifts of the two acid-base groups, characterized by the analysis of the pH dependence of the H(+)/heme a, Cu(A) ratios, provided a satisfactory fit for the pH dependence of the E'(m) of heme a and Cu(A). The results presented are consistent with a primary involvement of the redox Bohr effects shared by heme a and Cu(A) in the proton-pumping activity of cytochrome c oxidase.

  18. Visualizing the Bohr effect in hemoglobin: neutron structure of equine cyanomethemoglobin in the R state and comparison with human deoxyhemoglobin in the T state.

    PubMed

    Dajnowicz, Steven; Seaver, Sean; Hanson, B Leif; Fisher, S Zoë; Langan, Paul; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y; Mueser, Timothy C

    2016-07-01

    Neutron crystallography provides direct visual evidence of the atomic positions of deuterium-exchanged H atoms, enabling the accurate determination of the protonation/deuteration state of hydrated biomolecules. Comparison of two neutron structures of hemoglobins, human deoxyhemoglobin (T state) and equine cyanomethemoglobin (R state), offers a direct observation of histidine residues that are likely to contribute to the Bohr effect. Previous studies have shown that the T-state N-terminal and C-terminal salt bridges appear to have a partial instead of a primary overall contribution. Four conserved histidine residues [αHis72(EF1), αHis103(G10), αHis89(FG1), αHis112(G19) and βHis97(FG4)] can become protonated/deuterated from the R to the T state, while two histidine residues [αHis20(B1) and βHis117(G19)] can lose a proton/deuteron. αHis103(G10), located in the α1:β1 dimer interface, appears to be a Bohr group that undergoes structural changes: in the R state it is singly protonated/deuterated and hydrogen-bonded through a water network to βAsn108(G10) and in the T state it is doubly protonated/deuterated with the network uncoupled. The very long-term H/D exchange of the amide protons identifies regions that are accessible to exchange as well as regions that are impermeable to exchange. The liganded relaxed state (R state) has comparable levels of exchange (17.1% non-exchanged) compared with the deoxy tense state (T state; 11.8% non-exchanged). Interestingly, the regions of non-exchanged protons shift from the tetramer interfaces in the T-state interface (α1:β2 and α2:β1) to the cores of the individual monomers and to the dimer interfaces (α1:β1 and α2:β2) in the R state. The comparison of regions of stability in the two states allows a visualization of the conservation of fold energy necessary for ligand binding and release.

  19. Visualizing the Bohr effect in hemoglobin: neutron structure of equine cyanomethemoglobin in the R state and comparison with human deoxyhemoglobin in the T state.

    PubMed

    Dajnowicz, Steven; Seaver, Sean; Hanson, B Leif; Fisher, S Zoë; Langan, Paul; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y; Mueser, Timothy C

    2016-07-01

    Neutron crystallography provides direct visual evidence of the atomic positions of deuterium-exchanged H atoms, enabling the accurate determination of the protonation/deuteration state of hydrated biomolecules. Comparison of two neutron structures of hemoglobins, human deoxyhemoglobin (T state) and equine cyanomethemoglobin (R state), offers a direct observation of histidine residues that are likely to contribute to the Bohr effect. Previous studies have shown that the T-state N-terminal and C-terminal salt bridges appear to have a partial instead of a primary overall contribution. Four conserved histidine residues [αHis72(EF1), αHis103(G10), αHis89(FG1), αHis112(G19) and βHis97(FG4)] can become protonated/deuterated from the R to the T state, while two histidine residues [αHis20(B1) and βHis117(G19)] can lose a proton/deuteron. αHis103(G10), located in the α1:β1 dimer interface, appears to be a Bohr group that undergoes structural changes: in the R state it is singly protonated/deuterated and hydrogen-bonded through a water network to βAsn108(G10) and in the T state it is doubly protonated/deuterated with the network uncoupled. The very long-term H/D exchange of the amide protons identifies regions that are accessible to exchange as well as regions that are impermeable to exchange. The liganded relaxed state (R state) has comparable levels of exchange (17.1% non-exchanged) compared with the deoxy tense state (T state; 11.8% non-exchanged). Interestingly, the regions of non-exchanged protons shift from the tetramer interfaces in the T-state interface (α1:β2 and α2:β1) to the cores of the individual monomers and to the dimer interfaces (α1:β1 and α2:β2) in the R state. The comparison of regions of stability in the two states allows a visualization of the conservation of fold energy necessary for ligand binding and release. PMID:27377386

  20. Visualizing the Bohr effect in hemoglobin: neutron structure of equine cyanomethemoglobin in the R state and comparison with human deoxyhemoglobin in the T state

    PubMed Central

    Dajnowicz, Steven; Seaver, Sean; Hanson, B. Leif; Fisher, S. Zoë; Langan, Paul; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Mueser, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron crystallography provides direct visual evidence of the atomic positions of deuterium-exchanged H atoms, enabling the accurate determination of the protonation/deuteration state of hydrated biomolecules. Comparison of two neutron structures of hemoglobins, human deoxyhemoglobin (T state) and equine cyanomethemoglobin (R state), offers a direct observation of histidine residues that are likely to contribute to the Bohr effect. Previous studies have shown that the T-state N-terminal and C-terminal salt bridges appear to have a partial instead of a primary overall contribution. Four conserved histidine residues [αHis72(EF1), αHis103(G10), αHis89(FG1), αHis112(G19) and βHis97(FG4)] can become protonated/deuterated from the R to the T state, while two histidine residues [αHis20(B1) and βHis117(G19)] can lose a proton/deuteron. αHis103(G10), located in the α1:β1 dimer interface, appears to be a Bohr group that undergoes structural changes: in the R state it is singly protonated/deuterated and hydrogen-bonded through a water network to βAsn108(G10) and in the T state it is doubly protonated/deuterated with the network uncoupled. The very long-term H/D exchange of the amide protons identifies regions that are accessible to exchange as well as regions that are impermeable to exchange. The liganded relaxed state (R state) has comparable levels of exchange (17.1% non-exchanged) compared with the deoxy tense state (T state; 11.8% non-exchanged). Interestingly, the regions of non-exchanged protons shift from the tetramer interfaces in the T-state interface (α1:β2 and α2:β1) to the cores of the individual monomers and to the dimer interfaces (α1:β1 and α2:β2) in the R state. The comparison of regions of stability in the two states allows a visualization of the conservation of fold energy necessary for ligand binding and release. PMID:27377386

  1. Magnetic hyperfine structure of the ground-state doublet in highly charged ions 89+,87+229Th and the Bohr-Weisskopf effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkalya, E. V.; Nikolaev, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    Background: The search for new opportunities to investigate the low-energy level in the 229Th nucleus, which is nowadays intensively studied experimentally, has motivated us to theoretical studies of the magnetic hyperfine (MHF) structure of the 5 /2+ (0.0 eV) ground state and the low-lying 3 /2+ (7.8 eV) isomeric state in highly charged 89+229Th and 87+229Th ions. Purpose: The aim is to calculate, with the maximal precision presently achievable, the energy of levels of the hyperfine structure of the 229Th ground-state doublet in highly charged ions and the probability of radiative transitions between these levels. Methods: The distribution of the nuclear magnetization (the Bohr-Weisskopf effect) is accounted for in the framework of the collective nuclear model with Nilsson model wave functions for the unpaired neutron. Numerical calculations using precise atomic density functional theory methods, with full account of the electron self-consistent field, have been performed for the electron structure inside and outside the nuclear region. Results: The deviations of the MHF structure for the ground and isomeric states from their values in a model of a pointlike nuclear magnetic dipole are calculated. The influence of the mixing of the states with the same quantum number F on the energy of sublevels is studied. Taking into account the mixing of states, the probabilities of the transitions between the components of the MHF structure are calculated. Conclusions: Our findings are relevant for experiments with highly ionized 229Th ions in a storage ring at an accelerator facility.

  2. Bohr-like black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Corda, Christian

    2015-03-10

    The idea that black holes (BHs) result in highly excited states representing both the “hydrogen atom” and the “quasi-thermal emission” in quantum gravity is today an intuitive but general conviction. In this paper it will be shown that such an intuitive picture is more than a picture. In fact, we will discuss a model of quantum BH somewhat similar to the historical semi-classical model of the structure of a hydrogen atom introduced by Bohr in 1913. The model is completely consistent with existing results in the literature, starting from the celebrated result of Bekenstein on the area quantization.

  3. What classicality? Decoherence and Bohr's classical concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosshauer, Maximilian; Camilleri, Kristian

    2011-03-01

    Niels Bohr famously insisted on the indispensability of what he termed "classical concepts." In the context of the decoherence program, on the other hand, it has become fashionable to talk about the "dynamical emergence of classicality" from the quantum formalism alone. Does this mean that decoherence challenges Bohr's dictum—for example, that classical concepts do not need to be assumed but can be derived? In this paper we'll try to shed some light down the murky waters where formalism and philosophy cohabitate. To begin, we'll clarify the notion of classicality in the decoherence description. We'll then discuss Bohr's and Heisenberg's take on the quantum—classical problem and reflect on different meanings of the terms "classicality" and "classical concepts" in the writings of Bohr and his followers. This analysis will allow us to put forward some tentative suggestions for how we may better understand the relation between decoherence-induced classicality and Bohr's classical concepts.

  4. [Christian Bohr and the Seven Little Devils].

    PubMed

    Gjedde, Albert

    2004-01-01

    The author explores novel lessons emerging from the oxygen diffusion controversy between Christian Bohr on one side and August and Marie Krogh on the other. THe controversy found its emphatic expression in August and Marie Krogh's "Seven Little Devils", a series of papers published back-to-back in the 1910 volume of Skandinavisches Archiv für Physiologie. The Devils unjustifiably sealed the fate of Christian Bohr's theory of active cellular participation in the transport of oxygen from the lungs to the pulmonary circulation. The author's renewed examination of the original papers of Bohr and the Kroghs reveals that Bohr's concept of active cellular participation in diffusion is entirely compatible with the mechanism of capillary recruitment, for the discovery of which Krogh was later awarded Nobel's Prize, years after Bohr's untimely and unexpected death in 1911.

  5. Ocean Acidification: Coccolithophore's Light Controlled Effect on Alkalinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbins, W.

    2015-12-01

    Coccolithophorids, which play a significant role in the flux of calcite and organic carbon from the photic region to deeper pelagic and benthic zones, are potentially far more useful than siliceous phytoplankton for ocean fertilization projects designed to sequester CO2. However, the production of H+ ions during calcification (HCO3 + Ca+ —> CaCO3 + H+) has resulted in localized acidification around coccolithophore blooms. It has been hypothesized that under the correct light conditions photosynthesis could proceed at a rate such that CO2 is removed in amounts equimolar or greater than the H+ produced by calcification, allowing stable or increasing alkalinity despite ongoing calcification. Previously, this effect had not been demonstrated under laboratory conditions. Fifteen Emiliania huxleyi cultures were separated into equal groups with each receiving: 0, 6, 12, 18, or 24 hours of light each day for 24 days. Daily pH, cell density, and temperature measurements revealed a strong positive correlation between light exposure and pH, and no significant decline in pH in any of the cultures. Alkalinity increases were temperature independent and not strongly correlated with cell density, implying photosynthetic removal of carbon dioxide as the root cause. The average pH across living cultures increased from 7.9 to 8.3 over the first week and changed little for the reminder of the 24-day period. The results demonstrate coccolithophorids can increase alkalinity across a broad range of cell densities, despite the acidification inherent to the calcification process. If the light-alkalinity effect reported here proves scalable to larger cultures, Emiliania huxleyi are a strong candidate for carbon sequestration via targeted ocean fertilization.

  6. Effective alkaline metal-catalyzed oxidative delignification of hybrid poplar

    DOE PAGES

    Bhalla, Aditya; Bansal, Namita; Stoklosa, Ryan J.; Fountain, Mackenzie; Ralph, John; Hodge, David B.; Hegg, Eric L.

    2016-02-09

    -batch, two-stage Cu-AHP pretreatment process was effective in pretreating hybrid poplar for its conversion into fermentable sugars. Results showed sugar yields near the theoretical maximum were achieved from enzymatically hydrolyzed hybrid poplar by incorporating an alkaline extraction step prior to pretreatment and by efficiently utilizing H2O2 during the Cu-AHP process. Significantly, this study reports high sugar yields from woody biomass treated with an AHP pretreatment under mild reaction conditions.« less

  7. Rapid, Effective DNA Isolation from Osmanthus via Modified Alkaline Lysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Variability of leaf structure and presence of secondary metabolites in mature leaf tissue present a challenge for reliable DNA extraction from Osmanthus species and cultivars. The objective of this study was to develop a universal rapid, effective, and cost-efficient method of DNA isolation for Osmanthus mature leaf tissue. Four different methods were used to isolate DNA from 8 cultivars of Osmanthus. Absorbance spectra, DNA concentration, appearance on agarose gel, and performance in PCR were used to analyze quality, quantity, and integrity of isolated DNA. Methods were ranked in order, based on total quantity, quality, and performance points as the following: 1) solid-phase extraction (SPE), 2) modified alkaline lysis (SDS), 3) cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) with chloroform (CHL), and 4) CTAB with phenol/chloroform (PHE). Total DNA, isolated via SPE, showed the least contamination but the lowest mean quantity (9.6 ± 3.4 μg) and highest cost. The highest quantity of DNA was isolated via SDS (117 ± 54.1 μg). SPE and SDS resolved the most individuals on agarose gel, whereas the 2 CTAB methods had poorly resolved gels. All methods except PHE performed well in PCR. Additions to the modified alkaline lysis method increased A260:A230 by up to 59% without affecting yield. With the use of SDS, an average of 1000 μg/g DNA was isolated from fresh leaf tissue of 18 samples in ∼1.5 h at a cost of 0.74 U.S. dollars (USD)/sample. We recommend improved alkaline lysis as a rapid, effective, and cost-efficient method of isolating DNA from Osmanthus species. PMID:26816495

  8. Bohr model and dimensional scaling analysis of atoms and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urtekin, Kerim

    It is generally believed that the old quantum theory, as presented by Niels Bohr in 1913, fails when applied to many-electron systems, such as molecules, and nonhydrogenic atoms. It is the central theme of this dissertation to display with examples and applications the implementation of a simple and successful extension of Bohr's planetary model of the hydrogenic atom, which has recently been developed by an atomic and molecular theory group from Texas A&M University. This "extended" Bohr model, which can be derived from quantum mechanics using the well-known dimentional scaling technique is used to yield potential energy curves of H2 and several more complicated molecules, such as LiH, Li2, BeH, He2 and H3, with accuracies strikingly comparable to those obtained from the more lengthy and rigorous "ab initio" computations, and the added advantage that it provides a rather insightful and pictorial description of how electrons behave to form chemical bonds, a theme not central to "ab initio" quantum chemistry. Further investigation directed to CH, and the four-atom system H4 (with both linear and square configurations), via the interpolated Bohr model, and the constrained Bohr model (with an effective potential), respectively, is reported. The extended model is also used to calculate correlation energies. The model is readily applicable to the study of molecular species in the presence of strong magnetic fields, as is the case in the vicinities of white dwarfs and neutron stars. We find that magnetic field increases the binding energy and decreases the bond length. Finally, an elaborative review of doubly coupled quantum dots for a derivation of the electron exchange energy, a straightforward application of Heitler-London method of quantum molecular chemistry, concludes the dissertation. The highlights of the research are (1) a bridging together of the pre- and post quantum mechanical descriptions of the chemical bond (Bohr-Sommerfeld vs. Heisenberg-Schrodinger), and

  9. Inhibitory effect of metal ions on alkaline mesentericopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Raykova, D; Dorovska-Taran, V; Blagoev, B

    1981-01-01

    The effect of AG+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ on the activity of alkaline mesentericopeptidase (EC 3.4.21.-) has been studied. Ag+, Cu2+ and Cd2+ were found to be reversible non-competitive inhibitors of the enzyme. The pH-dependence of Ki for Ag+-inhibition is sigmoidal with a pKa near 6. The Kilim values, calculated for the pH-independent region of the metal-enzyme inhibition, are close to the corresponding dissociation constants of metal-imidazole complexes, thus implying that the inhibitory effect of metal ions on enzyme activity is due to complex formation with the imidazole group of the active site histidine. The method of the two-component inhibition showed that Cu2+ and Ag+ bind to the same ligand of the enzyme molecule. The addition of Cu2+ decreases the rate of deacylation of the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl valerate, catalyzed by alkaline mesentericopeptidase in contrast to alpha-chymotrypsin where the acylation step is affected.

  10. Steering Quantum States Towards Classical Bohr-Like Orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, F. B.; Reinhold, Carlos O; Yoshida, S.; Burgdorfer, J.

    2010-01-01

    This article furnishes an introduction to the properties of time-dependent electronic wavefunctions in atoms and to physics at the interface between the quantum and classical worlds. We describe how, almost 100 years after the introduction of the Bohr model of the atom, it is now possible using pulsed electric fields to create in the laboratory localized wavepackets in high-n (n ~ 300) Rydberg atoms that travel in near-circular Bohr-like orbits mimicking the behavior of a classical electron. The control protocols employed are explained with the aid of quantum and classical dynamics. Remarkably, while many aspects of the underlying behavior can be described using classical arguments, even at n ~ 300 purely quantum effects such as revivals can be seen.

  11. Applications of Bohr's correspondence principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Frank S.

    1989-07-01

    The Bohr correspondence-principle (cp) formula dE/dn=ℏω is presented (ω is the classical angular frequency) and its predicted energy levels En are compared to those given by the stationary state solutions of the Schrödinger equation, first for several examples in one dimension (1D), including the ``quantum bouncer,'' and then for several examples in three dimensions (3D), including the hydrogen atom and the isotropic harmonic oscillator. For the 3-D cases, the cp predictions based on classical circular orbits are compared with the ``circlelike'' Schrödinger solutions (those with the lowest energy eigenvalue for a given l) and the cp predictions based on classical ``needle'' orbits (having zero angular momentum) with the Schrödinger l=0 solutions. For the H atom and the isotropic oscillator, the cp prediction does not depend on the classical orbit chosen because of a ``degeneracy'': the fact that for these systems ω is independent of the orbit. As a more stringent test of the cp, analogous nondegenerate systems V=-k/r3/2 in place of the H-atom potential V=-e2/r and V=kr4 in place of the oscillator potential V=(1/2)mω2r2 are therefore considered. An interesting anomaly that occurs for the harmonic oscillator and its nondegenerate analog V=kr4 is encountered (but not for the H atom nor its nondegenerate analog V=-k/r3/2), wherein half of the states predicted by application of the cp to the needle orbits are ``spurious'' in that there are no corresponding Schrödinger l=0 states. The assumption that generated the spurious cp states is uncovered—a plausible, but erroneous factor of 2 in calculating the classical frequency—and thus the spurious states are eliminated.

  12. Niels Bohr as philosopher of experiment: Does decoherence theory challenge Bohr's doctrine of classical concepts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilleri, Kristian; Schlosshauer, Maximilian

    2015-02-01

    Niels Bohr's doctrine of the primacy of "classical concepts" is arguably his most criticized and misunderstood view. We present a new, careful historical analysis that makes clear that Bohr's doctrine was primarily an epistemological thesis, derived from his understanding of the functional role of experiment. A hitherto largely overlooked disagreement between Bohr and Heisenberg about the movability of the "cut" between measuring apparatus and observed quantum system supports the view that, for Bohr, such a cut did not originate in dynamical (ontological) considerations, but rather in functional (epistemological) considerations. As such, both the motivation and the target of Bohr's doctrine of classical concepts are of a fundamentally different nature than what is understood as the dynamical problem of the quantum-to-classical transition. Our analysis suggests that, contrary to claims often found in the literature, Bohr's doctrine is not, and cannot be, at odds with proposed solutions to the dynamical problem of the quantum-classical transition that were pursued by several of Bohr's followers and culminated in the development of decoherence theory.

  13. The effects of alkaline and alkaline earth metal salts on the performance of a polymer actuator based on single-wal led carbon nanotube-ionic liquid gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasawa, Naohiro; Takeuchi, Ichiroh; Mukai, Ken; Asaka, Kinji

    We investigated an effect for alkaline metal salts or an alkaline earth metal salt on electrochemical and electromechanical properties of an actuator using a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-ionic liquid (IL) gel electrode, and much better performance of the actuator containing the metal salt/IL. The actuator containing the alkaline metal salt /IL or alkaline earth metal salt/IL performed much better than that containing only the IL. It is considered that the higher ionic conductivity of the gel electrolyte layer containing the alkaline metal salt /IL or alkaline earth metal salt/IL produces the quick response actuator, and that the large capacitance gives the large generated strain.

  14. Mixed alkaline earth effect in the compressibility of aluminosilicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Smedskjaer, Morten M; Rzoska, Sylwester J; Bockowski, Michal; Mauro, John C

    2014-02-01

    The mixed modifier effect (MME) in oxide glasses manifests itself as a non-additive variation in certain properties when one modifier oxide species is substituted by another one at constant total modifier content. However, the structural and topological origins of the MME are still under debate. This study provides new insights into the MME by investigating the effect of isostatic compression on density and hardness of mixed MgO/CaO sodium aluminosilicate glasses. This is done using a specially designed setup allowing isostatic compression of bulk glass samples up to 1 GPa at elevated temperature. A mixed alkaline earth effect is found in the compressibility and relative change of hardness, viz., a local maximum of density as a function of Mg/Ca ratio appears following compression, whereas a local minimum of hardness in the uncompressed glasses nearly disappears after compression. Moreover, the densification of these glasses is found to occur at temperatures much below the glass transition temperature, indicating that a non-viscous mechanism is at play. This is further supported by the fact that density relaxes in a stretched exponential manner upon subsequent annealing at ambient pressure with an exponent of ∼0.62. This is close to the Phillips value of 3/5 for relaxation in three dimensions when both short- and long-range interactions are activated.

  15. Priming effect of abscisic acid on alkaline stress tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Wei, Li-Xing; Lv, Bing-Sheng; Wang, Ming-Ming; Ma, Hong-Yuan; Yang, Hao-Yu; Liu, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Liang, Zheng-Wei

    2015-05-01

    Saline-alkaline stress is characterized by high salinity and high alkalinity (high pH); alkaline stress has been shown to be the primary factor inhibiting rice seedling growth. In this study, we investigated the potential priming effect of abscisic acid (ABA) on tolerance of rice seedlings to alkaline stress simulated by Na2CO3. Seedlings were pretreated with ABA at concentrations of 0 (control), 10, and 50 μM by root-drench for 24 h and then transferred to a Na2CO3 solution that did not contain ABA. Compared to control treatment, pretreatment with ABA substantially improved the survival rate of rice seedlings and increased biomass accumulation after 7 days under the alkaline condition. ABA application at 10 μM also alleviated the inhibitory effects of alkaline stress on the total root length and root surface area. Physiologically, ABA increased relative water content (RWC) and decreased cell membrane injury degree (MI) and Na(+)/K(+) ratios. In contrast, fluridone (an ABA biosynthesis inhibitor) decreased the RWC and increased MI in shoots under the alkaline conditions. These data suggest that ABA has a potent priming effect on the adaptive response to alkaline stress in rice and may be useful for improving rice growth in saline-alkaline paddy fields.

  16. Priming effect of abscisic acid on alkaline stress tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Wei, Li-Xing; Lv, Bing-Sheng; Wang, Ming-Ming; Ma, Hong-Yuan; Yang, Hao-Yu; Liu, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Liang, Zheng-Wei

    2015-05-01

    Saline-alkaline stress is characterized by high salinity and high alkalinity (high pH); alkaline stress has been shown to be the primary factor inhibiting rice seedling growth. In this study, we investigated the potential priming effect of abscisic acid (ABA) on tolerance of rice seedlings to alkaline stress simulated by Na2CO3. Seedlings were pretreated with ABA at concentrations of 0 (control), 10, and 50 μM by root-drench for 24 h and then transferred to a Na2CO3 solution that did not contain ABA. Compared to control treatment, pretreatment with ABA substantially improved the survival rate of rice seedlings and increased biomass accumulation after 7 days under the alkaline condition. ABA application at 10 μM also alleviated the inhibitory effects of alkaline stress on the total root length and root surface area. Physiologically, ABA increased relative water content (RWC) and decreased cell membrane injury degree (MI) and Na(+)/K(+) ratios. In contrast, fluridone (an ABA biosynthesis inhibitor) decreased the RWC and increased MI in shoots under the alkaline conditions. These data suggest that ABA has a potent priming effect on the adaptive response to alkaline stress in rice and may be useful for improving rice growth in saline-alkaline paddy fields. PMID:25780993

  17. Bohr Hamiltonian with time-dependent potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, L.; Hassanabadi, H.; Sobhani, H.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, Bohr Hamiltonian has been studied with the time-dependent potential. Using the Lewis-Riesenfeld dynamical invariant method appropriate dynamical invariant for this Hamiltonian has been constructed and the exact time-dependent wave functions of such a system have been derived due to this dynamical invariant.

  18. Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization of spin Hamiltonians.

    PubMed

    Garg, Anupam; Stone, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The Bohr-Sommerfeld rule for a spin system is obtained, including the first quantum corrections. The rule applies to both integer and half-integer spin. It is tested for various models, in particular, the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model, and found to agree very well with exact results.

  19. [Effect of calcium on medium alkalinization induced by salicylic acid in Salvia miltiorrhiza suspension cultures].

    PubMed

    Liu, Liancheng; Wang, Cong; Dong, Juan'e; Su, Hui; Zhuo, Zequn; Xue, Yaxin

    2013-07-01

    We studied medium alkalinization in Salvia miltiorrhiza suspension cultures treated with salicylic acid and the effect of Ca2+ in this process through application of calcium channel antagonists (Verapamil, LaCl3, LiCl, 2-APB) and ionophore A23187. The results show that salicylic acid could induce significant medium alkalinization in S. miltiorrhiza culture. Verapamil and LaCl3 or LiCl and 2-APB, two different groups of calcium channel antagonist, significantly inhibited the medium alkalinization induced by salicylic acid. However, the suppression effect of verapamil or LaCl3 on medium alkalinization induced by salicylic acid was higher than that of LiCl or 2-APB. When two types of calcium channel inhibitor (LaCl3 and 2-APB) were used together, the medium alkalinization induced by salicylic acid was completely suppressed and even reduced the pH in medium. On the other hand, A23187 could promote the medium alkalinization. Based on the results above, we speculated that salicylic acid could induce significant medium alkalinization in S. miltiorrhiza culture, depending on the calcium from both extracell and intracell. Moreover, calcium from extracell plays a more dominant role in this process. Reveal of relationship in this research between Ca2+ and medium alkalinization can provide theory evidence for mechanism of the plant secondary metabolism.

  20. A precise study on effects that trigger alkaline hemicellulose extraction efficiency.

    PubMed

    Hutterer, Christian; Schild, Gabriele; Potthast, Antje

    2016-08-01

    The conversion of paper-grade pulps into dissolving pulps requires efficient strategies and process steps to remove low-molecular noncellulosic macromolecules generally known as hemicelluloses. Current strategies include alkaline extractions and enzymatic treatments. This study focused on the evaluation of extraction efficiencies in alkaline extractions of three economically interesting hardwood species: beech (Fagus sylvatica), birch (Betula papyrifera), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus). Substrate pulps were subjected to alkaline treatments at different temperatures and alkalinities using white liquor as the alkali source, followed by analyses of both pulps and hemicellulose-containing extraction lyes. The extracted hardwood xylans have strong potential as an ingredient in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Subsequent analyses revealed strong dependencies of the extraction efficiencies and molar mass distributions of hemicelluloses on the process variables of temperature and effective alkalinity. The hemicellulose content of the initial pulps, the hardwood species, and the type of applied base played minor roles. PMID:27163434

  1. Niels Bohr and the Third Quantum Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldhaber, Alfred

    2013-04-01

    In the history of science few developments can rival the discovery of quantum mechanics, with its series of abrupt leaps in unexpected directions stretching over a quarter century. The result was a new world, even more strange than any previously imagined subterranean (or in this case submicroscopic) kingdom. Niels Bohr made the third of these leaps (following Planck and Einstein) when he realized that still-new quantum ideas were essential to account for atomic structure: Rutherford had deduced, using entirely classical-physics principles, that the positive charge in an atom is contained in a very small kernel or nucleus. This made the atom an analogue to the solar system. Classical physics implied that negatively charged electrons losing energy to electromagnetic radiation would ``dive in'' to the nucleus in a very short time. The chemistry of such tiny atoms would be trivial, and the sizes of solids made from these atoms would be much too small. Bohr initially got out of this dilemma by postulating that the angular momentum of an electron orbiting about the nucleus is quantized in integer multiples of the reduced quantum constant ℏ = h/2 π. Solving for the energy of such an orbit in equilibrium immediately produces the famous Balmer formula for the frequencies of visible light radiated from hydrogen as an electron jumps from any particular orbit to another of lower energy. There remained mysteries requiring explanation or at least exploration, including two to be discussed here: 1. Rutherford used classical mechanics to compute the trajectory and hence the scattering angle of an α particle impinging on a small positively charged target. How could this be consistent with Bohr's quantization of particle orbits about the nucleus? 2. Bohr excluded for his integer multiples of ℏ the value 0. How can one justify this exclusion, necessary to bar tiny atoms of the type mentioned earlier?

  2. Niels Bohr and the Third Quantum Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharff Goldhaber, Alfred

    2013-04-01

    In the history of science few developments can rival the discovery of quantum mechanics, with its series of abrupt leaps in unexpected directions stretching over a quarter century. The result was a new world, even more strange than any previously imagined subterranean (or in this case submicroscopic) kingdom. Niels Bohr made the third of these leaps (following Planck and Einstein) when he realized that still-new quantum ideas were essential to account for atomic structure: Rutherford had deduced, using entirely classical-physics principles, that the positive charge in an atom is contained in a very small kernel or nucleus. This made the atom an analogue to the solar system. Classical physics implied that negatively charged electrons losing energy to electromagnetic radiation would ``dive in'' to the nucleus in a very short time. The chemistry of such tiny atoms would be trivial, and the sizes of solids made from these atoms would be much too small. Bohr initially got out of this dilemma by postulating that the angular momentum of an electron orbiting about the nucleus is quantized in integer multiples of the reduced quantum constant = h/2π. Solving for the energy of such an orbit in equilibrium immediately produces the famous Balmer formula for the frequencies of visible light radiated from hydrogen as an electron jumps from any particular orbit to another of lower energy. There remained mysteries requiring explanation or at least exploration, including two to be discussed here: 1. Rutherford used classical mechanics to compute the trajectory and hence the scattering angle of an α particle impinging on a small positively charged target. How could this be consistent with Bohr's quantization of particle orbits about the nucleus? 2. Bohr excluded for his integer multiples of the value 0. How can one justify this exclusion, necessary to bar tiny atoms of the type mentioned earlier?

  3. Role of cooperative H(+)/e(-) linkage (redox bohr effect) at heme a/Cu(A) and heme a(3)/Cu(B) in the proton pump of cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Papa, S

    2005-02-01

    It is a pleasure to contribute to the special issue published in honor of Vladimir Skulachev, a distinguished scientist who greatly contributes to maintain a high standard of biochemical research in Russia. A more particular reason can be found in his work, where observations anticipating some ideas presented in my article were reported. Cytochrome c oxidase exhibits protonmotive, redox linked allosteric cooperativity. Experimental observations on soluble bovine cytochrome c oxidase are presented showing that oxido-reduction of heme a/Cu(A) and heme a(3)/Cu(B) is linked to deprotonation/protonation of two clusters of protolytic groups, A(1) and A(2), respectively. This cooperative linkage (redox Bohr effect) results in the translocation of 1 H(+)/oxidase molecule upon oxido-reduction of heme a/Cu(A) and heme a(3)/Cu(B), respectively. Results on liposome-reconstituted oxidase show that upon oxidation of heme a/Cu(A) and heme a(3)/Cu(B) protons from A(1) and A(2) are released in the outer aqueous phase. A(1) but not A(2) appears to take up protons from the inner aqueous space upon reduction of the respective redox center. A cooperative model is presented in which the A(1) and A(2) clusters, operating in close sequence, constitute together the gate of the proton pump in cytochrome c oxidase.

  4. [Effects of exogenous spermidine on mitochondrial function of tomato seedling roots under salinity-alkalinity stress].

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiong-bo; Xiang, Li-xia; Hu, Xiao-hui; Ren, Wen-qi; Zhang, Li; Ni, Xin-xin

    2016-02-01

    Two cultivars of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, cvs. 'Jinpengchaoguan' and 'Zhongza No. 9', with the former being more tolerant to saline-alkaline stress) seedlings grown hydroponically were subjected to salinity-alkalinity stress condition (NaCl: Na2SO4:NaHCO3:Na2CO3 = 1:9:9:1) without or with foliar application of 0.25 mmol . L-1 spermidine (Spd), and the root morphology and physiological characteristics of mitochondrial membrane were analyzed 8 days after treatment, to explore the protective effects of exogenous Spd on mitochondrial function in tomato roots under salinity-alkalinity stress. The results showed that the salinity-alkalinity stress increased the concentrations of both mitochondrial H2O2 and MDA as well as the mitochondrial membrane permeability in the roots of the two cultivars, while it decreased the mitochondrial membrane fluidity, membrane potential, Cyt c/a and H+-ATPase activity, which impaired the mitochondria and therefore inhibited the root growth; and these effects were more obvious in 'Zhongza No. 9' than in 'Jinpengechaoguan'. Under the salinity-alkalinity stress, foliar application Spd could effectively decrease the concentrations of mitochondrial H2O2 and MDA and mitochondrial membrane permeability, while increased the mitochondrial membrane fluidity, membrane potential, Cyt c/a and H+-ATPase activity. These results suggested that exogenous Spd could effectively mitigate the damage on mitochondria induced by salinity-alkalinity stress, and the alleviation effect was more obvious in 'Zhongza No. 9' than in 'Jinpengchaoguan'.

  5. Systemic and local effects of long-term exposure to alkaline drinking water in rats.

    PubMed

    Merne, M E; Syrjänen, K J; Syrjänen, S M

    2001-08-01

    Alkaline conditions in the oral cavity may be caused by a variety of stimuli, including tobacco products, antacids, alkaline drinking water or bicarbonate toothpaste. The effects of alkaline pH on oral mucosa have not been systematically studied. To assess the systemic (organ) and local (oral mucosal) effects of alkalinity, drinking water supplemented with Ca(OH)2 or NaOH, with pH 11.2 or 12 was administered to rats (n = 36) for 52 weeks. Tissues were subjected to histopathological examination; oral mucosal biopsy samples were also subjected to immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses for pankeratin, CK19, CK5, CK4, PCNA, ICAM-1, CD44, CD68, S-100, HSP 60, HSP70, and HSP90. At completion of the study, animals in the study groups had lower body weights (up to 29% less) than controls despite equal food and water intake, suggesting a systemic response to the alkaline treatment. The lowest body weight was found in rats exposed to water with the highest pH value and starting the experiment when young (6 weeks). No histological changes attributable to alkaline exposure occurred in the oral mucosa or other tissues studied. Alkaline exposure did not affect cell proliferation in the oral epithelium, as shown by the equal expression of PCNA in groups. The up-regulation of HSP70 protein expression in the oral mucosa of rats exposed to alkaline water, especially Ca(OH)2 treated rats, may indicate a protective response. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) positivity was lost in 6/12 rats treated with Ca(OH)2 with pH 11.2, and loss of CD44 expression was seen in 3/6 rats in both study groups exposed to alkaline water with pH 12. The results suggest that the oral mucosa in rats is resistant to the effects of highly alkaline drinking water. However, high alkalinity may have some unknown systemic effects leading to growth retardation, the cause of which remains to be determined.

  6. Realization of Localized Bohr-like Wavepackets

    SciTech Connect

    Mestayer, J. J.; Wyker, B.; Lancaster, J. C.; Dunning, F. B.; Reinhold, Carlos O; Yoshida, S.; Burgdorfer, J.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a protocol to create localized wavepackets in very-high-n Rydberg states which travel in nearly circular orbits around the nucleus. Although these wavepackets slowly dephase and eventually lose their localization, their motion can be monitored over several orbital periods. These wavepackets represent the closest analog yet achieved to the original Bohr model of the hydrogen atom, i.e., an electron in circular classical orbit around the nucleus. Possible extension of the approach to create so far elusive "planetary atoms" in highly correlated stable multiply-excited states is discussed.

  7. Bohr's Creation of his Quantum Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbron, John

    2013-04-01

    Fresh letters throw new light on the content and state of Bohr's mind before and during his creation of the quantum atom. His mental furniture then included the atomic models of the English school, the quantum puzzles of Continental theorists, and the results of his own studies of the electron theory of metals. It also included the poetry of Goethe, plays of Ibsen and Shakespeare, novels of Dickens, and rhapsodies of Kierkegaard and Carlyle. The mind that held these diverse ingredients together oscillated between enthusiasm and dejection during the year in which Bohr took up the problem of atomic structure. He spent most of that year in England, which separated him for extended periods from his close-knit family and friends. Correspondence with his fianc'ee, Margrethe Nørlund, soon to be published, reports his ups and downs as he adjusted to J.J. Thomson, Ernest Rutherford, the English language, and the uneven course of his work. In helping to smooth out his moods, Margrethe played an important and perhaps an enabling role in his creative process.

  8. 100th anniversary of Bohr's model of the atom.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, W H Eugen

    2013-11-18

    In the fall of 1913 Niels Bohr formulated his atomic models at the age of 27. This Essay traces Bohr's fundamental reasoning regarding atomic structure and spectra, the periodic table of the elements, and chemical bonding. His enduring insights and superseded suppositions are also discussed.

  9. Davidson potential and SUSYQM in the Bohr Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Georgoudis, P. E.

    2013-06-10

    The Bohr Hamiltonian is modified through the Shape Invariance principle of SUper-SYmmetric Quantum Mechanics for the Davidson potential. The modification is equivalent to a conformal transformation of Bohr's metric, generating a different {beta}-dependence of the moments of inertia.

  10. 100th anniversary of Bohr's model of the atom.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, W H Eugen

    2013-11-18

    In the fall of 1913 Niels Bohr formulated his atomic models at the age of 27. This Essay traces Bohr's fundamental reasoning regarding atomic structure and spectra, the periodic table of the elements, and chemical bonding. His enduring insights and superseded suppositions are also discussed. PMID:24123759

  11. Resisting the Bohr Atom: The Early British Opposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragh, Helge

    2011-03-01

    When Niels Bohr's theory of atomic structure appeared in the summer and fall of 1913, it quickly attracted attention among British physicists. While some of the attention was supportive, others was critical. I consider the opposition to Bohr's theory from 1913 to about 1915, including attempts to construct atomic theories on a classical basis as alternatives to Bohr's. I give particular attention to the astrophysicist John W. Nicholson, who was Bohr's most formidable and persistent opponent in the early years. Although in the long run Nicholson's objections were inconsequential, for a short period of time his atomic theory was considered to be a serious rival to Bohr's. Moreover, Nicholson's theory is of interest in its own right.

  12. Effects of alkalinity sources on the stability of anaerobic digestion from food waste.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shujun; Zhang, Jishi; Wang, Xikui

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of some alkalinity sources on the stability of anaerobic digestion (AD) from food waste (FW). Four alkalinity sources, namely lime mud from papermaking (LMP), waste eggshell (WES), CaCO3 and NaHCO3, were applied as buffer materials and their stability effects were evaluated in batch AD. The results showed that LMP and CaCO3 had more remarkable effects than NaHCO3 and WES on FW stabilization. The methane yields were 120.2, 197.0, 156.2, 251.0 and 194.8 ml g(-1) VS for the control and synergistic digestions of CaCO3, NaHCO3, LMP and WES added into FW, respectively. The corresponding final alkalinity reached 5906, 7307, 9504, 7820 and 6782 mg l(-1), while the final acidities were determined to be 501, 200, 50, 350 and 250 mg l(-1), respectively. This indicated that the synergism between alkalinity and inorganic micronutrients from different alkalinity sources played an important role in the process stability of AD from FW.

  13. Effects of alkalinity sources on the stability of anaerobic digestion from food waste.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shujun; Zhang, Jishi; Wang, Xikui

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of some alkalinity sources on the stability of anaerobic digestion (AD) from food waste (FW). Four alkalinity sources, namely lime mud from papermaking (LMP), waste eggshell (WES), CaCO3 and NaHCO3, were applied as buffer materials and their stability effects were evaluated in batch AD. The results showed that LMP and CaCO3 had more remarkable effects than NaHCO3 and WES on FW stabilization. The methane yields were 120.2, 197.0, 156.2, 251.0 and 194.8 ml g(-1) VS for the control and synergistic digestions of CaCO3, NaHCO3, LMP and WES added into FW, respectively. The corresponding final alkalinity reached 5906, 7307, 9504, 7820 and 6782 mg l(-1), while the final acidities were determined to be 501, 200, 50, 350 and 250 mg l(-1), respectively. This indicated that the synergism between alkalinity and inorganic micronutrients from different alkalinity sources played an important role in the process stability of AD from FW. PMID:26391806

  14. Effect of alkalinity on nitrite accumulation in treatment of coal chemical industry wastewater using moving bed biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Hou, Baolin; Han, Hongjun; Jia, Shengyong; Zhuang, Haifeng; Zhao, Qian; Xu, Peng

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen removal via nitrite (the nitrite pathway) is more suitable for carbon-limited industrial wastewater. Partial nitrification to nitrite is the primary step to achieve nitrogen removal via nitrite. The effect of alkalinity on nitrite accumulation in a continuous process was investigated by progressively increasing the alkalinity dosage ratio (amount of alkalinity to ammonia ratio, mol/mol). There is a close relationship among alkalinity, pH and the state of matter present in aqueous solution. When alkalinity was insufficient (compared to the theoretical alkalinity amount), ammonia removal efficiency increased first and then decreased at each alkalinity dosage ratio, with an abrupt removal efficiency peak. Generally, ammonia removal efficiency rose with increasing alkalinity dosage ratio. Ammonia removal efficiency reached to 88% from 23% when alkalinity addition was sufficient. Nitrite accumulation could be achieved by inhibiting nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) by free ammonia (FA) in the early period and free nitrous acid in the later period of nitrification when alkalinity was not adequate. Only FA worked to inhibit the activity of NOB when alkalinity addition was sufficient.

  15. Effect of thermal, acid, alkaline and alkaline-peroxide pretreatments on the biochemical methane potential and kinetics of the anaerobic digestion of wheat straw and sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Bolado-Rodríguez, Silvia; Toquero, Cristina; Martín-Juárez, Judit; Travaini, Rodolfo; García-Encina, Pedro Antonio

    2016-02-01

    The effect of thermal, acid, alkaline and alkaline-peroxide pretreatments on the methane produced by the anaerobic digestion of wheat straw (WS) and sugarcane bagasse (SCB) was studied, using whole slurry and solid fraction. All the pretreatments released formic and acetic acids and phenolic compounds, while 5-hydroxymetilfurfural (HMF) and furfural were generated only by acid pretreatment. A remarkable inhibition was found in most of the whole slurry experiments, except in thermal pretreatment which improved methane production compared to the raw materials (29% for WS and 11% for SCB). The alkaline pretreatment increased biodegradability (around 30%) and methane production rate of the solid fraction of both pretreated substrates. Methane production results were fitted using first order or modified Gompertz equations, or a novel model combining both equations. The model parameters provided information about substrate availability, controlling step and inhibitory effect of compounds generated by each pretreatment.

  16. [Effects of exogenous spermidine on mitochondrial function of tomato seedling roots under salinity-alkalinity stress].

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiong-bo; Xiang, Li-xia; Hu, Xiao-hui; Ren, Wen-qi; Zhang, Li; Ni, Xin-xin

    2016-02-01

    Two cultivars of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, cvs. 'Jinpengchaoguan' and 'Zhongza No. 9', with the former being more tolerant to saline-alkaline stress) seedlings grown hydroponically were subjected to salinity-alkalinity stress condition (NaCl: Na2SO4:NaHCO3:Na2CO3 = 1:9:9:1) without or with foliar application of 0.25 mmol . L-1 spermidine (Spd), and the root morphology and physiological characteristics of mitochondrial membrane were analyzed 8 days after treatment, to explore the protective effects of exogenous Spd on mitochondrial function in tomato roots under salinity-alkalinity stress. The results showed that the salinity-alkalinity stress increased the concentrations of both mitochondrial H2O2 and MDA as well as the mitochondrial membrane permeability in the roots of the two cultivars, while it decreased the mitochondrial membrane fluidity, membrane potential, Cyt c/a and H+-ATPase activity, which impaired the mitochondria and therefore inhibited the root growth; and these effects were more obvious in 'Zhongza No. 9' than in 'Jinpengechaoguan'. Under the salinity-alkalinity stress, foliar application Spd could effectively decrease the concentrations of mitochondrial H2O2 and MDA and mitochondrial membrane permeability, while increased the mitochondrial membrane fluidity, membrane potential, Cyt c/a and H+-ATPase activity. These results suggested that exogenous Spd could effectively mitigate the damage on mitochondria induced by salinity-alkalinity stress, and the alleviation effect was more obvious in 'Zhongza No. 9' than in 'Jinpengchaoguan'. PMID:27396122

  17. Effect of cobalt on synthesis and activation of Bacillus licheniformis alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, D B; Chen, C P; Hulett, F M

    1981-01-01

    The effect of CO2+ on the synthesis and activation of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 alkaline phosphatase has been shown by the development of a defined minimal salts medium in which this organism produces 35 times more (assayable) alkaline phosphatase than when grown in a low-phosphate complex medium or in the defined medium without cobalt. Stimulation of enzyme activity with cobalt is dependent on a low phosphate concentration in the medium (below 0.075 mM) and continued protein synthesis. Cobalt stimulation resulted in alkaline phosphate production being a major portion of total protein synthesized during late-logarithmic and early-stationary-phase culture growth. Cells cultured in the defined medium minus cobalt, or purified enzyme partially inactivated with a chelating agent, showed a 2.5-fold increase in activity when assayed in the presence of cobalt. Atomic spectral analysis indicated the presence of 3.65 +/- 0.45 g-atoms of cobalt associated with each mole of purified active alkaline phosphatase. A biochemical localization as a function of culture age in this medium showed that alkaline phosphatase was associated with the cytoplasmic membrane and was also found as a soluble enzyme in the periplasmic region and secreted into the growth medium. PMID:7462163

  18. Alkaline and acid hydrolytic processes in aerobic and anaerobic sludges: effect on total EPS and fractions.

    PubMed

    Cassini, S T; Andrade, M C E; Abreu, T A; Keller, R; Gonçalves, R F

    2006-01-01

    Sludge samples from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and four submerged aerated biofilters (BFs) of a wastewater treatment plant (1,000 inhab.) were processed at bench scale by alkaline and acid hydrolysis with the objective to evaluate the organic matter solubilization, volatile solids (VS) destruction and the effect of hydrolytic processes on the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) fraction of the sludge samples. The results showed that alkaline hydrolysis of sludge samples treatment with 1.0% total solids (TS) using NaOH 20 meq L(-1) was more efficient on organic matter solubilization and VS destruction than acid hydrolysis. The EPS sludge content was also affected by the alkaline treatment of anaerobic sludge samples. The EPS concentrations (mg EPS/gVSS) on the anaerobic sludge after the alkaline treatment were significantly lowered according to sample height in the UASB reactor. Data indicated that the EPS sludge fraction is the main component affected by the alkaline hydrolytic process of anaerobic sludge samples. PMID:16784189

  19. Niels Bohr and the dawn of quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, P.

    2014-09-01

    Bohr's atomic model, one of the very few pieces of physics known to the general public, turned a hundred in 2013: a very good reason to revisit Bohr's original publications in the Philosophical Magazine, in which he introduced this model. It is indeed rewarding to (re-)discover what ideas and concepts stood behind it, to see not only 'orbits', but also 'rings' and 'flat ellipses' as electron trajectories at work, and, in particular, to admire Bohr's strong belief in the importance of Planck's law.

  20. Paul Ehrenfest, Niels Bohr, and Albert Einstein: Colleagues and Friends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Martin J.

    2010-09-01

    In May 1918 Paul Ehrenfest received a monograph from Niels Bohr in which Bohr had used Ehrenfest's adiabatic principle as an essential assumption for understanding atomic structure. Ehrenfest responded by inviting Bohr, whom he had never met, to give a talk at a meeting in Leiden in late April 1919, which Bohr accepted; he lived with Ehrenfest, his mathematician wife Tatyana, and their young family for two weeks. Albert Einstein was unable to attend this meeting, but in October 1919 he visited his old friend Ehrenfest and his family in Leiden, where Ehrenfest told him how much he had enjoyed and profited from Bohr's visit. Einstein first met Bohr when Bohr gave a lecture in Berlin at the end of April 1920, and the two immediately proclaimed unbounded admiration for each other as physicists and as human beings. Ehrenfest hoped that he and they would meet at the Third Solvay Conference in Brussels in early April 1921, but his hope was unfulfilled. Einstein, the only physicist from Germany who was invited to it in this bitter postwar atmosphere, decided instead to accompany Chaim Weizmann on a trip to the United States to help raise money for the new Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Bohr became so overworked with the planning and construction of his new Institute for Theoretical Physics in Copenhagen that he could only draft the first part of his Solvay report and ask Ehrenfest to present it, which Ehrenfest agreed to do following the presentation of his own report. After recovering his strength, Bohr invited Ehrenfest to give a lecture in Copenhagen that fall, and Ehrenfest, battling his deep-seated self-doubts, spent three weeks in Copenhagen in December 1921 accompanied by his daughter Tanya and her future husband, the two Ehrenfests staying with the Bohrs in their apartment in Bohr's new Institute for Theoretical Physics. Immediately after leaving Copenhagen, Ehrenfest wrote to Einstein, telling him once again that Bohr was a prodigious physicist, and again

  1. Effect of various alkaline metal ions on electrochemical behavior of lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Nobumitsu; Yamamoto, Yui

    2015-10-01

    The effect of various alkaline metal ions on electrochemical behavior of lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution has been investigated. It was found that "the specific anodic oxidation peak" appears at the cathodic scan in cyclic voltammogram of lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution containing Li2SO4, K2SO4, Na2SO4, Rb2SO4, or Cs2SO4. The height of the specific anodic oxidation peak varies with the alkaline sulfate in the solution; K2SO4 >> Na2SO4 > Cs2SO4 > Rb2SO4 > Li2SO4. It should be note that alkaline ions exist in lead sulfate formed on lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution containing potassium sulfate when the electrode was immersed in the solution at the rest potential for more than 1 h.

  2. Relativistic Corrections to the Bohr Model of the Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, David W.

    1974-01-01

    Presents a simple means for extending the Bohr model to include relativistic corrections using a derivation similar to that for the non-relativistic case, except that the relativistic expressions for mass and kinetic energy are employed. (Author/GS)

  3. Solutions of the Bohr Hamiltonian, a compendium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, L.

    2005-10-01

    The Bohr Hamiltonian, also called collective Hamiltonian, is one of the cornerstones of nuclear physics and a wealth of solutions (analytic or approximated) of the associated eigenvalue equation have been proposed over more than half a century (confining ourselves to the quadrupole degree of freedom). Each particular solution is associated with a peculiar form for the V(β,γ) potential. The large number and the different details of the mathematical derivation of these solutions, as well as their increased and renewed importance for nuclear structure and spectroscopy, demand a thorough discussion. It is the aim of the present monograph to present in detail all the known solutions in γ-unstable and γ-stable cases, in a taxonomic and didactical way. In pursuing this task we especially stressed the mathematical side leaving the discussion of the physics to already published comprehensive material. The paper contains also a new approximate solution for the linear potential, and a new solution for prolate and oblate soft axial rotors, as well as some new formulae and comments. The quasi-dynamical SO(2) symmetry is proposed in connection with the labeling of bands in triaxial nuclei.

  4. Effect of organics and alkalinity on the sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB) biosensor.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sedky H A; Van Ginkel, Steven W; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2013-01-01

    The environmental risk assessment of toxic chemicals in stream water requires the use of a low cost standardized toxicity bioassay. Here, a biosensor for detection of toxic chemicals in stream water was studied using sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB) in continuous mode. The biosensor depends on the ability of SOB to oxidize sulfur particles under aerobic conditions to produce sulfuric acid. The reaction results in an increase in electrical conductivity (EC) and a decrease in pH. The biosensor is based on the inhibition of SOB in the presence of toxic chemicals by measuring changes in EC and pH. We found that the SOB biosensor can detect Cr(6+)at a low concentration (50 ppb) which is lower than many whole-cell biosensors. The effect of organic material in real stream water on SOB activity was studied. Due to the presence of mixotrophic SOB, we found that the presence of organic matter increases SOB activity which decreases the biosensor start up period. Low alkalinity (22 mg L(-1) CaCO(3)) increased effluent EC and decreased effluent pH which is optimal for biosensor operation. While at high alkalinity (820 mg L(-1) CaCO(3), the activity of SOB little decreased. We found that system can detect 50 ppb of Cr(6+) at low alkalinity (22 mg L(-1) CaCO(3)) in few hours while, complete inhibition was observed after 35 h of operation at high alkalinity (820 mg L(-1) CaCO(3)). PMID:22840537

  5. EFFECT OF CATIONS ON ALUMINUM SPECIATION UNDER ALKALINE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2012-07-31

    A series of experiments were performed to examine the effect of metal cations common to high level waste on the phase of aluminum formed. Experiments were performed at temperature of 150 C, 75 C, and room temperature, either without additional metal cation, or with 0.01-0.2 molar equivalents of either Ni{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Mn{sup 2+}, or Cr{sup 3+}. Results showed that temperature has the greatest effect on the phase obtained. At 150 C, boehmite is the only phase obtained, independent of the presence of other metal cations, with only one exception where a small amount of gibbsite was also detected in the product when 0.2 equivalents of Ni{sup 2+} was present. At 75 C, a mixture of phases is obtained, most commonly including bayerite and gibbsite; however, boehmite is also formed under some conditions, including in the absence of additional metal ion. At room temperature, in the absence of additional metal ion, a mixture of bayerite and gibbsite is obtained. The addition of another metal cation suppresses the formation of gibbsite, with a couple of exceptions (0.2 equivalents of Ni{sup 2+} or 0.01 equivalents of Cr{sup 3+}) where both phases are still obtained.

  6. Effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Jiang, Long; Wang, Yi; Su, Sheng; Sun, Lushi; Xu, Boyang; He, Limo; Xiang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to investigate effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures. The yield of CO, H2 and C2H4 was increased and that of CO2 was suppressed with increasing temperature. Increasing temperature could also promote depolymerization and aromatization reactions of active tars, forming heavier polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, leading to decrease of tar yields and species diversity. Diverse performance of inherent AAEMs at different temperatures significantly affected the distribution of pyrolysis products. The presence of inherent AAEMs promoted water-gas shift reaction, and enhanced the yield of H2 and CO2. Additionally, inherent AAEMs not only promoted breakage and decarboxylation/decarbonylation reaction of thermally labile hetero atoms of the tar but also enhanced thermal decomposing of heavier aromatics. Inherent AAEMs could also significantly enhance the decomposition of levoglucosan, and alkaline earth metals showed greater effect than alkali metals.

  7. Effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Jiang, Long; Wang, Yi; Su, Sheng; Sun, Lushi; Xu, Boyang; He, Limo; Xiang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to investigate effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures. The yield of CO, H2 and C2H4 was increased and that of CO2 was suppressed with increasing temperature. Increasing temperature could also promote depolymerization and aromatization reactions of active tars, forming heavier polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, leading to decrease of tar yields and species diversity. Diverse performance of inherent AAEMs at different temperatures significantly affected the distribution of pyrolysis products. The presence of inherent AAEMs promoted water-gas shift reaction, and enhanced the yield of H2 and CO2. Additionally, inherent AAEMs not only promoted breakage and decarboxylation/decarbonylation reaction of thermally labile hetero atoms of the tar but also enhanced thermal decomposing of heavier aromatics. Inherent AAEMs could also significantly enhance the decomposition of levoglucosan, and alkaline earth metals showed greater effect than alkali metals. PMID:26005925

  8. Localized corrosion effects and modifications of acidic and alkaline slurries on copper chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Tzu-Hsuan; Yen, Shi-Chern

    2003-04-01

    This study demonstrates the CMP performance can be enhanced by modifying the corrosion effects of acidic and alkaline slurries on copper. A corrosion test-cell with a polishing platform is connected with the potentiostat to investigate the corrosion behaviors of copper CMP in various alumina slurries. Experiments show that the slurry needs to be maintained in acidic pH<4.56 or alkaline pH>9.05 surroundings and thus better dispersion of alumina particles and less residual contaminant on copper surface can be obtained. The surface defects after copper CMP using acidic and alkaline slurries are described by pitting corrosion mechanisms, and these mechanisms can be regarded as a basis to modify their corrosion effects. Experimental results indicate that it is necessary to modify the dissolution of HNO 3 and oxidization of NH 4OH for copper CMP slurries. Consequently, the slurries of 5 wt.% HNO 3 by adding 0.1 wt.% BTA or 5 wt.% KNO 3 by adding 1 wt.% NH 4OH achieve good CMP performance for copper with higher CMP efficiency factor (CMPEF), 1460 and 486, and lower surface roughness ( Rq), 4.019 and 3.971 nm, respectively. It is found that AFM micrographs can support the effectiveness of corrosion modifications for copper CMP in various slurry chemistries.

  9. Assembly of a Cost-Effective Anode Using Palladium Nanoparticles for Alkaline Fuel Cell Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology allows the synthesis of nanoscale catalysts, which offer an efficient alternative for fuel cell applications. In this laboratory experiment, the student selects a cost-effective anode for fuel cells by comparing three different working electrodes. These are commercially available palladium (Pd) and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes, and a carbon paste (CP) electrode that is prepared by the students in the laboratory. The GC and CP were modified with palladium nanoparticles (PdNP) suspensions. The electrodes efficiencies were studied for ethanol oxidation in alkaline solution using cyclic voltammetry techniques. The ethanol oxidation currents obtained were used to determine the current density using the geometric and surface area of each electrode. Finally, students were able to choose the best electrode and relate catalytic activity to surface area for ethanol oxidation in alkaline solution by completing a critical analysis of the cyclic voltammetry results. With this activity, fundamental electrochemical concepts were reinforced. PMID:25691801

  10. How Sommerfeld extended Bohr's model of the atom (1913-1916)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Sommerfeld's extension of Bohr's atomic model was motivated by the quest for a theory of the Zeeman and Stark effects. The crucial idea was that a spectral line is made up of coinciding frequencies which are decomposed in an applied field. In October 1914 Johannes Stark had published the results of his experimental investigation on the splitting of spectral lines in hydrogen (Balmer lines) in electric fields, which showed that the frequency of each Balmer line becomes decomposed into a multiplet of frequencies. The number of lines in such a decomposition grows with the index of the line in the Balmer series. Sommerfeld concluded from this observation that the quantization in Bohr's model had to be altered in order to allow for such decompositions. He outlined this idea in a lecture in winter 1914/15, but did not publish it. The First World War further delayed its elaboration. When Bohr published new results in autumn 1915, Sommerfeld finally developed his theory in a provisional form in two memoirs which he presented in December 1915 and January 1916 to the Bavarian Academy of Science. In July 1916 he published the refined version in the Annalen der Physik. The focus here is on the preliminary Academy memoirs whose rudimentary form is better suited for a historical approach to Sommerfeld's atomic theory than the finished Annalen-paper. This introductory essay reconstructs the historical context (mainly based on Sommerfeld's correspondence). It will become clear that the extension of Bohr's model did not emerge in a singular stroke of genius but resulted from an evolving process.

  11. Seeking effective dyes for a mediated glucose-air alkaline battery/fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eustis, Ross; Tsang, Tsz Ming; Yang, Brigham; Scott, Daniel; Liaw, Bor Yann

    2014-02-01

    A significant level of power generation from an abiotic, air breathing, mediated reducing sugar-air alkaline battery/fuel cell has been achieved in our laboratories at room temperature without complicated catalysis or membrane separation in the reaction chamber. Our prior studies suggested that mass transport limitation by the mediator is a limiting factor in power generation. New and effective mediators were sought here to improve charge transfer and power density. Forty-five redox dyes were studied to identify if any can facilitate mass transport in alkaline electrolyte solution; namely, by increasing the solubility and mobility of the dye, and the valence charge carried per molecule. Indigo dyes were studied more closely to understand the complexity involved in mass transport. The viability of water-miscible co-solvents was also explored to understand their effect on solubility and mass transport of the dyes. Using a 2.0 mL solution, 20% methanol by volume, with 100 mM indigo carmine, 1.0 M glucose and 2.5 M sodium hydroxide, the glucose-air alkaline battery/fuel cell attained 8 mA cm-2 at short-circuit and 800 μW cm-2 at the maximum power point. This work shall aid future optimization of mediated charge transfer mechanism in batteries or fuel cells.

  12. Effect of thermal and alkaline pretreatment of giant miscanthus and Chinese fountaingrass on biogas production.

    PubMed

    Nkemka, Valentine Nkongndem; Li, Yongqiang; Hao, Xiying

    2016-01-01

    Giant miscanthus (Miscanthus × giganteus) and Chinese fountaingrass (Pennisetum alopecuroides (L.) Spreng), cultivated for landscaping and soil conservation, are potential energy crops. The study investigated the effect of combined thermal and alkaline pretreatments on biogas production of these energy crops. The pretreatment included two types of alkali (6% CaO and 6% NaOH) at 22, 70 and 100 °C. The alkaline pretreatment resulted in a greater breakdown of the hemicellulose fraction, with CaO more effective than NaOH. Pretreatment of giant miscanthus with 6% CaO at 100 °C for 24 h produced a CH4 yield (313 mL g(-1) volatile solids (VS)) that was 1.7 times that of the untreated sample (186 mL g(-1) VS). However, pretreatment of Chinese fountaingrass with 6% CaO or 6% NaOH at 70 °C for 24 h resulted in similar CH4 yields (328 and 302 mL g(-1) VS for CaO and NaOH pretreatments) as the untreated sample (311 mL g(-1) VS). Chinese fountaingrass was more easily digestible but had a low overall CH4 yield per hectare (1,831 m(3) ha(-1) y(-1)) compared to giant miscanthus (6,868 m(3) ha(-1) y(-1)). This study demonstrates the potential of thermal/alkaline pretreatment and the use of giant miscanthus and Chinese fountaingrass for biogas production.

  13. Effect of common ions on nitrate removal by zero-valent iron from alkaline soil.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cilai; Zhang, Zengqiang; Sun, Xining

    2012-09-15

    Zero-valent iron (Fe(0))-based permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology has been proved to be effective for soil and groundwater nitrate remediation under acidic or near neutral conditions. But few studies have been reported about it and the effects of coexistent ions under alkaline conditions. In this study, nitrate reduction by Fe(0) was evaluated via batch tests in the presence of alkaline soil and common cation (Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Cu(2+)) and anion (citrate, oxalate, acetate, SO(4)(2-), PO(4)(3-), Cl(-) and HCO(3)(-)). The results showed that cation significantly enhanced nitrate reduction with an order of Fe(3+)>Fe(2+)>Cu(2+) due to providing Fe(2+) directly or indirectly. Most anions enhanced nitrate reduction, but PO(4)(3-) behaved inhibition. The promotion decreased in the order of citrate>acetate>SO(4)(2-)>Cl(-)≈HCO(3)(-)≈oxalate≫PO(4)(3-). Ammonium was the major final product from nitrate reduction by Fe(0), while a little nitrite accumulated in the beginning of reaction. The nitrogen recovery in liquid and gas phase was only 56-78% after reaction due to ammonium adsorption onto soil. The solution pH and electric conductivity (EC) varied depending on the specific ion added. The results implied that PRB based Fe(0) is a potential approach for in situ remediation of soil and groundwater nitrate contamination in the alkaline conditions.

  14. Gravitational Bohr's model with Newton's and Weber's potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiandho, Yuant; Triyanta

    2015-09-01

    Similarity between Newtonian gravitational force and Coulomb's force leads one to define gravitational electric and magnetic fields or gravito-electromagnetic fields. Also, one may define a gravitational Bohr's theory in analogy with the electromagnetic Bohr's theory for which the latter is quite successful in explaining some properties of hydrogen atom. Unlike to the Coulomb's force, the Newton`s force is believed to be an approximated theory of gravity as it is unable to explain the Mercury's orbit. This paper discusses the gravitational Bohr's theory by taking into account the Newton's potential and Weber's potential; the later is a modified Newton's gravitational potential that conforms, to some degrees, to the anomaly of the Mercury's orbit.

  15. Laser-Induced Kondo Effect in Ultracold Alkaline-Earth Fermions.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masaya; Kawakami, Norio

    2015-10-16

    We demonstrate that laser excitations can coherently induce a novel Kondo effect in ultracold atoms in optical lattices. Using a model of alkaline-earth fermions with two orbitals, it is shown that the optically coupled two internal states are dynamically entangled to form the Kondo-singlet state, overcoming the heating effect due to the irradiation. Furthermore, a lack of SU(N) symmetry in the optical coupling provides a peculiar feature in the Kondo effect, which results in spin-selective renormalization of effective masses. We also discuss the effects of interorbital exchange interactions, and reveal that they induce novel crossover or reentrant behavior of the Kondo effect owing to control of the coupling anisotropy. The laser-induced Kondo effect is highly controllable by tuning the laser strength and the frequency, and thus offers a versatile platform to study the Kondo physics using ultracold atoms.

  16. "Bohr and Einstein": A Course for Nonscience Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlegel, Richard

    1976-01-01

    A study of the concepts of relativity and quantum physics through the work of Bohr and Einstein is the basis for this upper level course for nonscience students. Along with their scientific philosophies, the political and moral theories of the scientists are studied. (CP)

  17. Effects of 10-Year Management Regimes on the Soil Seed Bank in Saline-Alkaline Grassland

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongyuan; Yang, Haoyu; Liang, Zhengwei; Ooi, Mark K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Management regimes for vegetation restoration of degraded grasslands can significantly affect the process of ecological succession. However, few studies have focused on variation in the soil seed bank during vegetation restoration under different management regimes, especially in saline-alkaline grassland habitats. Our aim was to provide insights into the ecological effects of grassland management regimes on soil seed bank composition and vegetation establishment in mown, fenced, transplanted and natural grassland sites, all dominated by the perennial rhizomatous grass Leymus chinensis. Methodology We studied species composition and diversity in both the soil seed bank and aboveground vegetation in differently managed grasslands in Northeast China. An NMDS (nonmetric multidimensional scaling) was used to evaluate the relationship between species composition, soil seed banks, aboveground vegetation and soil properties. Principal Findings Fenced and mown grassland sites had high density and species richness in both the soil seed bank and aboveground vegetation. The Transplanted treatment exhibited the highest vegetation growth and seed production of the target species L. chinensis. Seeds of L. chinensis in the soil occurred only in transplanted and natural grassland. Based on the NMDS analysis, the number of species in both the soil seed bank and aboveground vegetation were significantly related to soil Na+, Cl-, RSC (residual sodium carbonate), alkalinity, ESP (exchangeable sodium percentage) and AP (available phosphorus). Conclusions Soil seed bank composition and diversity in the saline-alkaline grassland were significantly affected by the management regimes implemented, and were also significantly related to the aboveground vegetation and several soil properties. Based on vegetative growth, reproductive output and maintenance of soil seed bank, the transplanting was identified as the most effective method for relatively rapid restoration of the target

  18. Alkaline pretreatment and the synergic effect of water and tetralin enhances the liquefaction efficiency of bagasse.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhixia; Cao, Jiangfei; Huang, Kai; Hong, Yaming; Li, Cunlong; Zhou, Xinxin; Xie, Ning; Lai, Fang; Shen, Fang; Chen, Congjin

    2015-02-01

    Bagasse liquefaction (BL) in water, tetralin, and water/tetralin mixed solvents (WTMS) was investigated, and effects of tetralin content in WTMS, temperature, and alkaline pretreatment of bagasse on liquefaction efficiency were studied. At 300°C, bagasse conversion in WTMS with tetralin content higher than 50 wt% was 86-87 wt%, whereas bagasse conversion in water or tetralin was 67 wt% or 84 wt%, respectively. Because the solid conversion from liquefaction in WTMS with tetralin content higher than 50 wt% was always higher than that in water or tetralin at temperatures between 250 and 300°C, a synergic effect between water and tetralin is suggested. Alkaline pretreatment of bagasse resulted in significantly higher conversion and heavy oil yield from BL in water or WTMS. The effect of deoxygenation by the present liquefaction method is demonstrated by lower oxygen contents (16.01-19.59 wt%) and higher heating values (31.9-34.8 MJ/kg) in the produced oils.

  19. Sequential Washing with Electrolyzed Alkaline and Acidic Water Effectively Removes Pathogens from Metal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yuichiro; Akamatsu, Norihiko; Mori, Tsuyoshi; Sano, Kazunori; Satoh, Katsuya; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Yoshiaki; Sugio, Tomomi; Sakai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Eiji; Ichimiya, Kazuko; Hamada, Masahisa; Nakayama, Takehisa; Fujita, Yuhzo; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Removal of pathogenic organisms from reprocessed surgical instruments is essential to prevent iatrogenic infections. Some bacteria can make persistent biofilms on medical devices. Contamination of non-disposable equipment with prions also represents a serious risk to surgical patients. Efficient disinfection of prions from endoscopes and other instruments such as high-resolution cameras remains problematic because these instruments do not tolerate aggressive chemical or heat treatments. Herein, we develop a new washing system that uses both the alkaline and acidic water produced by electrolysis. Electrolyzed acidic water, containing HCl and HOCl as active substances, has been reported to be an effective disinfectant. A 0.15% NaCl solution was electrolyzed and used immediately to wash bio-contaminated stainless steel model systems with alkaline water (pH 11.9) with sonication, and then with acidic water (pH 2.7) without sonication. Two bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and a fungus (Candida albicans) were effectively removed or inactivated by the washing process. In addition, this process effectively removed or inactivated prions from the stainless steel surfaces. This washing system will be potentially useful for the disinfection of clinical devices such as neuroendoscopes because electrolyzed water is gentle to both patients and equipment and is environmentally sound.

  20. Sequential Washing with Electrolyzed Alkaline and Acidic Water Effectively Removes Pathogens from Metal Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Yuichiro; Akamatsu, Norihiko; Mori, Tsuyoshi; Sano, Kazunori; Satoh, Katsuya; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Yoshiaki; Sugio, Tomomi; Sakai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Eiji; Ichimiya, Kazuko; Hamada, Masahisa; Nakayama, Takehisa; Fujita, Yuhzo; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Removal of pathogenic organisms from reprocessed surgical instruments is essential to prevent iatrogenic infections. Some bacteria can make persistent biofilms on medical devices. Contamination of non-disposable equipment with prions also represents a serious risk to surgical patients. Efficient disinfection of prions from endoscopes and other instruments such as high-resolution cameras remains problematic because these instruments do not tolerate aggressive chemical or heat treatments. Herein, we develop a new washing system that uses both the alkaline and acidic water produced by electrolysis. Electrolyzed acidic water, containing HCl and HOCl as active substances, has been reported to be an effective disinfectant. A 0.15% NaCl solution was electrolyzed and used immediately to wash bio-contaminated stainless steel model systems with alkaline water (pH 11.9) with sonication, and then with acidic water (pH 2.7) without sonication. Two bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and a fungus (Candida albicans) were effectively removed or inactivated by the washing process. In addition, this process effectively removed or inactivated prions from the stainless steel surfaces. This washing system will be potentially useful for the disinfection of clinical devices such as neuroendoscopes because electrolyzed water is gentle to both patients and equipment and is environmentally sound. PMID:27223116

  1. The Effects of Alkaline pH on Microleakage of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Calcium Enriched Mixture Apical Plugs

    PubMed Central

    Mirhadi, Hossein; Moazzami, Fariborz; Rangani Jahromi, Saeed; Safarzade, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Alkaline pH can affect the physical and chemical properties and sealing ability of apical plug material. Calcium hydroxide is used as an intracanal medication to complete disinfection of root canals. It raises the pH of environment to alkaline value. Purpose The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effect of alkaline pH on the sealing ability of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) apical plugs. Materials and Method Seventy single-rooted human maxillary anterior teeth were randomly divided to two experimental groups for Angelus MTA and CEM cement (n=30) and two control groups (n=5). Each group was divided into two subgroups of 15 for neutral and alkaline pH, and 1 negative and 1 positive control groups of 5. The root canals were cleaned and shaped by using ProTaper rotary system (Dentsply Maillefer; Ballaigues, Switzerland) and the terminal 3mm of the roots were resected. Then, MTA and CEM cement were condensed in apical region with 3mm thickness. The samples were exposed to two environments with different pH values of 13 and 7.4. The leakage was assessed by using the fluid filtration technique at 1, 7, 14, 30 days intervals. Data were analyzed by the repeated measures MANOVA. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of microleakage between neutral and alkaline pH of CEM cement and MTA (p> 0.05). The sealing ability of MTA in an alkaline pH of 13 was significantly less than CEM cement in this pH (p< 0.05). Conclusion An environment with alkaline pH had no adverse effect on the sealing ability of MTA and CEM cement used as apical plugs. CEM cement had better sealing ability in alkaline pH. PMID:26966703

  2. Health Effects of Alkaline Diet and Water, Reduction of Digestive-tract Bacterial Load, and Earthing.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Haider Abdul-Lateef

    2016-04-01

    In the article, the author discusses the issue of chronic, low-grade acidosis that is thought to be brought about primarily by 2 factors: (1) advancing age, with a consequent decline in renal function; and (2) diet. An acid-forming diet can induce low-grade metabolic acidosis, which causes very small decreases in blood pH and plasma bicarbonate (HCO3-) that remain within the range considered to be normal. However, if the duration of the acidosis is prolonged or chronically present, even a low degree of acidosis can become significant. This article reviews supporting evidence in the literature that has shown that consumption of abundant alkaline-forming foods can result in improvement in bone mineral density (BMD) and muscle mass, protection from chronic illnesses, reduced tumor-cell invasion and metastasis, and effective excretion of toxins from the body. In addition, a large number of studies showing the benefits of alkaline water (mineral water) have revealed that people consuming water with a high level of total dissolved solids (TDS) (ie, with a high mineral content) have shown a lower incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer and lower total mortality rates. Consumption of alkaline water also may prevent osteoporosis and protect pancreatic beta cells with its antioxidant effects. In addition, this article discusses the literature that shows that reducing digestive-tract bacterial load can play an important role in increasing blood alkalinity toward the normal upper limit. That change occurs through good oral hygiene, flossing of teeth, perfect chewing of food, and bowel evacuation as soon as possible. Finally, the author reviews the literature that shows that earthing (ie, the direct contact of the human body with the earth) can supply a current of plentiful electrons. Earthing has been shown to reduce acute and chronic inflammation, blood glucose in patients with diabetes, red blood cell (RBC) aggregation, and blood

  3. Health Effects of Alkaline Diet and Water, Reduction of Digestive-tract Bacterial Load, and Earthing.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Haider Abdul-Lateef

    2016-04-01

    In the article, the author discusses the issue of chronic, low-grade acidosis that is thought to be brought about primarily by 2 factors: (1) advancing age, with a consequent decline in renal function; and (2) diet. An acid-forming diet can induce low-grade metabolic acidosis, which causes very small decreases in blood pH and plasma bicarbonate (HCO3-) that remain within the range considered to be normal. However, if the duration of the acidosis is prolonged or chronically present, even a low degree of acidosis can become significant. This article reviews supporting evidence in the literature that has shown that consumption of abundant alkaline-forming foods can result in improvement in bone mineral density (BMD) and muscle mass, protection from chronic illnesses, reduced tumor-cell invasion and metastasis, and effective excretion of toxins from the body. In addition, a large number of studies showing the benefits of alkaline water (mineral water) have revealed that people consuming water with a high level of total dissolved solids (TDS) (ie, with a high mineral content) have shown a lower incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer and lower total mortality rates. Consumption of alkaline water also may prevent osteoporosis and protect pancreatic beta cells with its antioxidant effects. In addition, this article discusses the literature that shows that reducing digestive-tract bacterial load can play an important role in increasing blood alkalinity toward the normal upper limit. That change occurs through good oral hygiene, flossing of teeth, perfect chewing of food, and bowel evacuation as soon as possible. Finally, the author reviews the literature that shows that earthing (ie, the direct contact of the human body with the earth) can supply a current of plentiful electrons. Earthing has been shown to reduce acute and chronic inflammation, blood glucose in patients with diabetes, red blood cell (RBC) aggregation, and blood

  4. Effect of salinity induced pH/alkalinity changes on benthic foraminifera: A laboratory culture experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraswat, Rajeev; Kouthanker, Mamata; Kurtarkar, Sujata R.; Nigam, Rajiv; Naqvi, S. W. A.; Linshy, V. N.

    2015-02-01

    The salinity of coastal waters in the vicinity of seasonally fresh water fed estuaries changes tremendously and reportedly affects the living calcite secreting organisms like foraminifera, as well as their dead remains. The precise mechanism of adverse effect of such seasonal salinity changes on calcite secreting organisms is, however not clear. The seasonal fresh water influx from the estuaries also affects the pH and alkalinity of the coastal seawater. Therefore, to understand the effect of salinity induced pH/alkalinity variations on benthic foraminifera, living specimens of Rosalina globularis were subjected to different salinity. Additionally, water samples were collected from an estuary during both monsoon and post monsoon season to understand the relationship between salinity, pH and total alkalinity (TA). The pH decreased with decreasing salinity during both the seasons. A similar decrease in TA with decreasing salinity was also observed but only till 20 psu salinity, below which the TA increased with decreasing salinity. Even though the maximum growth was reported in specimens kept at 35 psu salinity, growth of specimens maintained at >25 psu salinity, was same. Specimens kept at 10 psu and 15 psu salinity, however were much smaller and turned opaque within two days of lowering the salinity and later on their tests dissolved within 24 and 43 days, respectively. No specimen reproduced at 10 psu and 15 psu salinity, while only a few specimens (3%) reproduced at 20 psu salinity. As compared to 10-20 psu salinity, ∼60% reproduction was observed in specimens subjected to 25-40 salinity. The specimens maintained at 20 psu salinity took twice the time to reach maturity than those subjected to 25-40 psu salinity. Since a big drop in pH was observed at 10-15 psu salinity (pH 7.2 and 7.5, respectively), while the alkalinity was still higher, we suggest that fresh water influx induced drop in pH adversely affects calcification and reproduction in benthic

  5. Bohr and Ehrenfest: transformations and correspondences in the early 1920s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Enric; Valls, Blai Pié i.

    2016-06-01

    We analyze the collaboration between Bohr and Ehrenfest on the quantum theory in the early 1920s (1920-1923). We focus on their reflections and developments around the adiabatic principle and the correspondence principle, the two pillars of Bohr's quantum theory of 1922-23. We argue that the evolution of Bohr's ideas after 1918 brought the two principles closer, subordinating the former to the latter. The examination of the weight Bohr attributed to each principle along the years illustrates very clearly the vicissitudes of Bohr's theory before the emergence of quantum mechanics, especially with regards to its rejection/inclusion of mechanics.

  6. Planarization effect evaluation of acid and alkaline slurries in the copper interconnect process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hu; Yan, Li; Yuling, Liu; Yangang, He

    2015-03-01

    We observed and analyzed the acid and HEBUT alkaline of Cu chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) slurry to evaluate their effects. Material analysis has shown that the planarity surfaces and the removal rate of alkaline slurry are better than the acid slurry during metal CMP processes. The global surface roughness and the small-scale surface roughness by 10 × 10 μm2 of copper film polished by the SVTC slurry are 1.127 nm and 2.49 nm. However, it is found that the surface roughnesses of copper films polished by the HEBUT slurry are 0.728 nm and 0.215 nm. All other things being equal, the remaining step heights of copper films polished by the SVTC slurry and HEBUT slurry are respectively 150 nm and 50 nm. At the end of the polishing process, the dishing heights of the HEBUT slurry and the SVTC slurry are approximately both 30 nm, the erosion heights of the HEBUT slurry and the SVTC slurry are approximately both 20 nm. The surface states of the copper film after CMP are tested, and the AFM results of two samples are obviously seen. The surface polished by SVTC slurry shows many spikes. This indicates that the HEBUT alkaline slurry is promising for inter-level dielectric (ILD) applications in ultra large-scale integrated circuits (ULSI) technology. Project supported by the Special Project Items No. 2 in National Long-Term Technology Development Plan (No. 2009ZX02308), the Doctoral Program Foundation of Xinjiang Normal University Plan (No. XJNUBS1226), the Key Laboratory of Coal Gasification, Ministry of Education, and the Inorganic Chemistry Key Disciplines of Xinjiang Normal University.

  7. Alkaline "Permanent" Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Antony

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of paper manufacturing processes and their effects on library materials focuses on the promotion of alkaline "permanent" paper, with less acid, by Canadian library preservation specialists. Standards for paper acidity are explained; advantages of alkaline paper are described, including decreased manufacturing costs; and recyclability is…

  8. Effects of hardness and alkalinity in culture and test waters on reproduction of Ceriodaphnia dubia.

    PubMed

    Lasier, Peter J; Winger, Parley V; Hardin, Ian R

    2006-10-01

    Ceriodaphnia dubia were cultured in four reconstituted water formulations with hardness and alkalinity concentrations ranging from soft to the moderately hard water that is required by whole-effluent toxicity (WET) testing methods for culturing test organisms. The effects of these culture formulations alone and in combination with two levels of Cl-, SO4(2-), and HCO3- on reproduction of C. dubia were evaluated with the standard three-brood test. Reproduction was significantly reduced when test waters had lower hardness than culture waters. However, reproduction was not significantly different when animals cultured in low-hardness waters were exposed to moderately hard waters. The hardness of the culture water did not significantly affect the sensitivity of C. dubia to the three anions. Conversely, increased hardness in test waters significantly reduced the toxicities of Cl- and SO4(2-), with HCO3- toxicity following the same pattern. Alkalinity exhibited no consistent effect on Cl- and SO4(2-) toxicity. The physiological stress of placing animals cultured in moderately hard water into softer test waters might contribute to marginal failures of otherwise nontoxic effluents. The standard WET protocol should be revised to allow the culture of C. dubia under lower hardness conditions to better represent local surface water chemistries.

  9. Effects of hardness and alkalinity in culture and test waters on reproduction of Ceriodaphnia dubia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasier, P.J.; Winger, P.V.; Hardin, I.R.

    2006-01-01

    Ceriodaphnia dubia were cultured in four reconstituted water formulations with hardness and alkalinity concentrations ranging from soft to the moderately hard water that is required by whole-effluent toxicity (WET) testing methods for culturing test organisms. The effects of these culture formulations alone and in combination with two levels of Cl-, SO42, and HCO3- on reproduction of C. dubia were evaluated with the standard three-brood test. Reproduction was significantly reduced when test waters had lower hardness than culture waters. However, reproduction was not significantly different when animals cultured in low-hardness waters were exposed to moderately hard waters. The hardness of the culture water did not significantly affect the sensitivity of C. dubia to the three anions. Conversely, increased hardness in test waters significantly reduced the toxicities of Cl- and SO42-, with HCO3- toxicity following the same pattern. Alkalinity exhibited no consistent effect on Cl- and SO42- toxicity. The physiological stress of placing animals cultured in moderately hard water into softer test waters might contribute to marginal failures of otherwise nontoxic effluents. The standard WET protocol should be revised to allow the culture of C. dubia under lower hardness conditions to better represent local surface water chemistries.

  10. Effect of hydrothermal reaction time and alkaline conditions on the electrochemical properties of reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermisoglou, E. C.; Giannakopoulou, T.; Romanos, G.; Giannouri, M.; Boukos, N.; Lei, C.; Lekakou, C.; Trapalis, C.

    2015-12-01

    Reduced graphene oxide sheets (rGO) were prepared by hydrothermal treatment of aqueous dispersions of graphite oxide (GtO) applied for short (4 h) and prolonged reaction times (19-24 h). The effect of process duration as well as the alkaline conditions (pH ∼10) by addition of K2CO3 on the quality characteristics of the produced rGO materials was investigated. Both reduction and exfoliation occurred during this process as it was evidenced by FTIR and XRD data. SEM, TEM and HRTEM microscopy displayed highly exfoliated rGO materials. XPS verified that the re-establishment of the conjugated graphene network is more extensive for prolonged times of hydrothermal processing in accordance to Raman spectroscopy measurements. The sample produced under alkaline conditions bore fewer defects and almost 5 times higher BET surface area (∼181 m2/g) than the sample with no pH adjustment (∼34 m2/g) for the same hydrothermal reaction time (19 h), attributed to the developed microporosity. The specific capacitance of this material estimated by electrochemical impedance using three-electrode cell and KCl aqueous solution as an electrolyte was ∼400-500 F/g. When EDLC capacitors were fabricated from rGO materials the electrochemical testing in organic electrolyte i.e. TEABF4 in PC, revealed that the shortest hydrothermal reaction time (4 h) was more efficient resulting in capacitance around 60 F/g.

  11. Improved Performance of the Alkaline-Side CSEX Process for Cesium Extraction from Alkaline High-Level Waste Obtained by Characterization of the Effect of Surfactant Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.

    1999-11-04

    Improved understanding and performance of the alkaline-side CSEX process has been obtained through the characterization of impurity effects that hinder complete stripping of cesium from the solvent. It is shown in this report that tests of the alkaline-side CSEX process conducted in the summer and fall of 1998 were complicated by the presence of common surfactant anions, undecyl- and dodecylsulfonate, as trace impurities in the two simulants tested. This conclusion was drawn from the results of a series of systematic extraction tests followed by a definitive identification by electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS). Based on this understanding, a straightforward preventative measure involving the addition of a lipophilic tertiary amine extractant at a small concentration to the solvent is proposed and demonstrated. As part of the task ''Fission Product Solvent Extraction'' supported by the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program within the USDOE Office of Environmental Management, the alkaline-side CSEX process has been developed for removal of radio-cesium ({sup 137}Cs) from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site and Savannah River Site (SRS). As described in a previous report, tests conducted in Fiscal Year 1998 generally demonstrated performance meeting the requirements for cesium removal from the waste to be treated at the SRS. However, discrepancies in stripping behavior were shown to arise from unidentified differences ''in the batches of waste simulant employed for testing. Various effects such as solvent impurities, kinetics, contacting method, and counting method were eliminated as possible causes of the observed discrepancies. Tests in Fiscal Year 1999 reported herein confirmed the earlier suspicion that the simulants contained lipophilic anionic impurities. Extraction tests demonstrated that the impurities could be concentrated in the solvent, and by ES-MS in the negative-ion mode it was possible to

  12. Uricase alkaline enzymosomes with enhanced stabilities and anti-hyperuricemia effects induced by favorable microenvironmental changes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yunli; Zhang, Mi; He, Dan; Hu, Xueyuan; Xiong, Huarong; Wu, Jianyong; Zhu, Biyue; Zhang, Jingqing

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme therapy is an effective strategy to treat diseases. Three strategies were pursued to provide the favorable microenvironments for uricase (UCU) to eventually improve its features: using the right type of buffer to constitute the liquid media where catalyze reactions take place; entrapping UCU inside the selectively permeable lipid vesicle membranes; and entrapping catalase together with UCU inside the membranes. The nanosized alkaline enzymosomes containing UCU/(UCU and catalase) (ESU/ESUC) in bicine buffer had better thermal, hypothermal, acid-base and proteolytic stabilities, in vitro and in vivo kinetic characteristics, and uric acid lowering effects. The favorable microenvironments were conducive to the establishment of the enzymosomes with superior properties. It was the first time that two therapeutic enzymes were simultaneously entrapped into one enzymosome having the right type of buffer to achieve added treatment efficacy. The development of ESU/ESUC in bicine buffer provides valuable tactics in hypouricemic therapy and enzymosomal application. PMID:26823332

  13. Excitonic effects in the optical properties of alkaline earth chalcogenides from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejatipour, Hajar; Dadsetani, Mehrdad

    2015-08-01

    This paper studies excitonic effects in the optical properties of alkaline earth chalcogenides (AECs) by solving the equation of motion of the two-particle Green function, the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE). On the basis of quasi-particle states obtained by the GW approximation, (BSE + GW), the solution of BSE improves agreement with experiments. In these compounds, the main excitonic structures were reproduced appropriately. In the optical absorption spectra of AECs, the main excitonic structures originate in the direct transitions at X and Γ symmetry points, as confirmed by the experiments. In addition to real and imaginary parts of the dielectric functions, excitonic effects were studied in the electron energy loss functions of AECs. Moreover, the G0W0 approximation was used in order to determine the energy band gaps of AECs. This showed that except for MgO and BaO, the other AECs under study have indirect band gaps from Γ to X.

  14. Uricase alkaline enzymosomes with enhanced stabilities and anti-hyperuricemia effects induced by favorable microenvironmental changes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yunli; Zhang, Mi; He, Dan; Hu, Xueyuan; Xiong, Huarong; Wu, Jianyong; Zhu, Biyue; Zhang, Jingqing

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme therapy is an effective strategy to treat diseases. Three strategies were pursued to provide the favorable microenvironments for uricase (UCU) to eventually improve its features: using the right type of buffer to constitute the liquid media where catalyze reactions take place; entrapping UCU inside the selectively permeable lipid vesicle membranes; and entrapping catalase together with UCU inside the membranes. The nanosized alkaline enzymosomes containing UCU/(UCU and catalase) (ESU/ESUC) in bicine buffer had better thermal, hypothermal, acid-base and proteolytic stabilities, in vitro and in vivo kinetic characteristics, and uric acid lowering effects. The favorable microenvironments were conducive to the establishment of the enzymosomes with superior properties. It was the first time that two therapeutic enzymes were simultaneously entrapped into one enzymosome having the right type of buffer to achieve added treatment efficacy. The development of ESU/ESUC in bicine buffer provides valuable tactics in hypouricemic therapy and enzymosomal application. PMID:26823332

  15. Microscopic Uni-axial Bohr-Mottelson Rotational Model

    SciTech Connect

    Gulshani, P.

    2010-08-04

    A microscopic version of the phenomenological Bohr-Mottelson unified adiabatic rotational model is derived using only space-fixed particle coordinates, and without imposing any constraints on the particle coordinates or the intrinsic wavefunction. It is shown that this can done only for rigid flow. A collective-rotation velocity field is defined and is used to show that, although their Hamiltonians are closely related, the flows in a multi-fermion and single-particle system are inherently different.

  16. Creation of Non-dispersive Bohr-like Wavepackets

    SciTech Connect

    Mestayer, J. J.; Wyker, B.; Dunning, F. B.; Yoshida, S.; Reinhold, Carlos O; Burgdorfer, J.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of a periodic train of half-cycle pulses to maintain strongly-localized wavepackets in very-high-n (n~300) Rydberg atoms that travel in near circular orbits about the nucleus. This motion can be followed for hundreds of orbital periods and mimics the original Bohr model of the hydrogen atom which envisioned an electron in circular classical orbit about the nucleus.

  17. The effect of alkaline pretreatment methods on cellulose structure and accessibility

    DOE PAGES

    Bali, Garima; Meng, Xianzhi; Deneff, Jacob I.; Sun, Qining; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2014-11-24

    The effects of different alkaline pretreatments on cellulose structural features and accessibility are compared and correlated with the enzymatic hydrolysis of Populus. The pretreatments are shown to modify polysaccharides and lignin content to enhance the accessibility for cellulase enzymes. The highest increase in the cellulose accessibility was observed in dilute sodium hydroxide, followed by methods using ammonia soaking and lime (Ca(OH)2). The biggest increase of cellulose accessibility occurs during the first 10 min of pretreatment, with further increases at a slower rate as severity increases. Low temperature ammonia soaking at longer residence times dissolved a major portion of hemicellulose andmore » exhibited higher cellulose accessibility than high temperature soaking. Moreover, the most significant reduction of degree of polymerization (DP) occurred for dilute sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and ammonia pretreated Populus samples. The study thus identifies important cellulose structural features and relevant parameters related to biomass recalcitrance.« less

  18. The effect of alkaline pretreatment methods on cellulose structure and accessibility

    SciTech Connect

    Bali, Garima; Meng, Xianzhi; Deneff, Jacob I.; Sun, Qining; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2014-11-24

    The effects of different alkaline pretreatments on cellulose structural features and accessibility are compared and correlated with the enzymatic hydrolysis of Populus. The pretreatments are shown to modify polysaccharides and lignin content to enhance the accessibility for cellulase enzymes. The highest increase in the cellulose accessibility was observed in dilute sodium hydroxide, followed by methods using ammonia soaking and lime (Ca(OH)2). The biggest increase of cellulose accessibility occurs during the first 10 min of pretreatment, with further increases at a slower rate as severity increases. Low temperature ammonia soaking at longer residence times dissolved a major portion of hemicellulose and exhibited higher cellulose accessibility than high temperature soaking. Moreover, the most significant reduction of degree of polymerization (DP) occurred for dilute sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and ammonia pretreated Populus samples. The study thus identifies important cellulose structural features and relevant parameters related to biomass recalcitrance.

  19. Ozone inhalation in rats: effects on alkaline phosphatase and lactic dehydrogenase isoenzymes in lavage and plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nachtman, J.P.; Moon, H.L.; Miles, R.C.

    1988-10-01

    Ozone is found in urban and rural atmospheres and is produced from a variety of natural and man-made sources. Animal studies conducted at typical ambient levels result in reproducible morphological, biochemical and functional effects. Ozone damages type I epithelial cells, induces proliferation of type II cells and produces inflammation of the terminal bronchiolar-alveolar duct region. Ozone increases lung oxygen utilization and increases glutathione metabolism. Ozone increases airway resistance. The authors measured lactic dehydrogenase (LD) isoenzymes to ascertain the tissue giving rise to the increased LD activity in lavage. They also assayed acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, creatine kinase activities, and protein levels since these parameters were increased in rat lung lavage after particulate exposure. They determined white cell differential and red cell morphology parameters because previous investigators reported that ozone increased neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio.

  20. Relationship between microstructure and efficiency of lithium silicate scintillating glasses: The effect of alkaline earths

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Sunberg, D.S.; Weber, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Lithium silicate glasses containing Ce{sup 3+} are known to be scintillators. Glasses in this family in which the Li is enriched ({sup 6}Li) are used as neutron detectors. The addition of Mg to this glass is known to increase the scintillation efficiency. We have found that substituting other alkaline earths results in a monotonic decrease of the scintillation efficiency with increasing atomic number. The total variation in scintillation efficiency from Mg to Ba is nearly a factor of 3. Prior experiments with this glass family show small differences in Raman and fluorescence spectra; evidence from thermoluminescence experiments indicates that the scintillation efficiency is most strongly correlated with structural effects in the neighborhood of the Ce{sup 3+} activator ion. The results of low-temperature studies of fluorescence and thermoluminescence of these glasses will be reported.

  1. Substrate and Transition State Binding in Alkaline Phosphatase Analyzed by Computation of Oxygen Isotope Effects.

    PubMed

    Roston, Daniel; Cui, Qiang

    2016-09-14

    Enzymes are powerful catalysts, and a thorough understanding of the sources of their catalytic power will facilitate many medical and industrial applications. Here we have studied the catalytic mechanism of alkaline phosphatase (AP), which is one of the most catalytically proficient enzymes known. We have used quantum mechanics calculations and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to model a variety of isotope effects relevant to the reaction of AP. We have calculated equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs), binding isotope effects (BIEs), and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for a range of phosphate mono- and diester substrates. The results agree well with experimental values, but the model for the reaction's transition state (TS) differs from the original interpretation of those experiments. Our model indicates that isotope effects on binding make important contributions to measured KIEs on V/K, which complicated interpretation of the measured values. Our results provide a detailed interpretation of the measured isotope effects and make predictions that can test the proposed model. The model indicates that the substrate is deformed in the ground state (GS) of the reaction and partially resembles the TS. The highly preorganized active site preferentially binds conformations that resemble the TS and not the GS, which induces the substrate to adapt to the enzyme, rather than the other way around-as with classic "induced fit" models. The preferential stabilization of the TS over the GS is what lowers the barrier to the chemical step.

  2. Substrate and Transition State Binding in Alkaline Phosphatase Analyzed by Computation of Oxygen Isotope Effects.

    PubMed

    Roston, Daniel; Cui, Qiang

    2016-09-14

    Enzymes are powerful catalysts, and a thorough understanding of the sources of their catalytic power will facilitate many medical and industrial applications. Here we have studied the catalytic mechanism of alkaline phosphatase (AP), which is one of the most catalytically proficient enzymes known. We have used quantum mechanics calculations and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to model a variety of isotope effects relevant to the reaction of AP. We have calculated equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs), binding isotope effects (BIEs), and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for a range of phosphate mono- and diester substrates. The results agree well with experimental values, but the model for the reaction's transition state (TS) differs from the original interpretation of those experiments. Our model indicates that isotope effects on binding make important contributions to measured KIEs on V/K, which complicated interpretation of the measured values. Our results provide a detailed interpretation of the measured isotope effects and make predictions that can test the proposed model. The model indicates that the substrate is deformed in the ground state (GS) of the reaction and partially resembles the TS. The highly preorganized active site preferentially binds conformations that resemble the TS and not the GS, which induces the substrate to adapt to the enzyme, rather than the other way around-as with classic "induced fit" models. The preferential stabilization of the TS over the GS is what lowers the barrier to the chemical step. PMID:27541005

  3. Effect of alkaline-stabilized biosolids on alfalfa molybdenum and copper content.

    PubMed

    Stehouwer, Richard C; Macneal, Kirsten E

    2004-01-01

    Agricultural utilization of biosolids poses a potential risk to ruminant animals due to transfer of Mo from biosolids to forage to the animal in amounts large enough to suppress Cu uptake by the animal. Alkaline-stabilized biosolids (ASB) must be given particular consideration in assessment of Mo risk because the high pH of these biosolids could increase Mo and decrease Cu uptake by forage legumes. In this 3-yr field experiment, ASB and ground agricultural limestone (AL) were applied based on their alkalinity at rates equivalent to 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 times the lime requirement of the soil and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) was grown. Alfalfa yield was similar with AL and ASB except in the second year when ASB produced larger yields, apparently due to increased B availability with ASB. Application of ASB did not detectably increase extractable soil Mo (0- to 15-cm depth), but increased alfalfa Mo uptake in all cuttings with yield-weighted uptake coefficients (UCs) of 8.07 and 7.11 following the first and second ASB applications, respectively. Although ASB increased extractable soil Cu, and alfalfa Cu content was greater with ASB than with AL, yield-weighted alfalfa Cu to Mo ratio was decreased by ASB to levels near 3. These results suggest that ASB may have a greater effect on Mo uptake and Cu to Mo ratio of forage legumes than do other biosolids. Additional research is needed to determine implications of larger Mo cumulative loading with ASB for Mo risk, particularly in the soil pH range of 7 to 8. PMID:14964367

  4. The boundary conditions for Bohr's law: when is reacting faster than acting?

    PubMed

    Pinto, Yaïr; Otten, Marte; Cohen, Michael A; Wolfe, Jeremy M; Horowitz, Todd S

    2011-02-01

    In gunfights in Western movies, the hero typically wins, even though the villain draws first. Niels Bohr (Gamow, The great physicists from Galileo to Einstein. Chapter: The law of quantum, 1988) suggested that this reflected a psychophysical law, rather than a dramatic conceit. He hypothesized that reacting is faster than acting. Welchman, Stanley, Schomers, Miall, and Bülthoff (Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B: Biological Sciences, 277, 1667-1674, 2010) provided empirical evidence supporting "Bohr's law," showing that the time to complete simple manual actions was shorter when reacting than when initiating an action. Here we probe the limits of this effect. In three experiments, participants performed a simple manual action, which could either be self-initiated or executed following an external visual trigger. Inter-button time was reliably faster when the action was externally triggered. However, the effect disappeared for the second step in a two-step action. Furthermore, the effect reversed when a choice between two actions had to be made. Reacting is faster than acting, but only for simple, ballistic actions.

  5. Effect of starvation and sampling time on plasma alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium homeostasis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Thompson, C S; Mikhailidis, D P; Gill, D S; Jeremy, J Y; Bell, J L; Dandona, P

    1989-01-01

    The effect of starvation and sampling time on plasma alkaline phosphatase activity, total plasma calcium concentration and whole blood ionized calcium concentration was determined in the rat. Starvation caused a significant fall in total and ionized calcium concentrations as well as in alkaline phosphatase activity. These changes were accompanied by a fall in whole blood pH and an increase in the anion gap and a decrease in urinary excretion of calcium. These indices were restored to normal following refeeding. There was no change in serum 25-OH vitamin D concentrations following starvation for 3 days. Alkaline phosphatase activity showed a pattern compatible with the presence of a circadian rhythm when sampling took place between 0800 and 1800 h. Total and ionized calcium concentrations did not show such a rhythm when animals were fed the present diet. PMID:2786112

  6. On γ-rigid regime of the Bohr-Mottelson Hamiltonian in the presence of a minimal length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabab, M.; El Batoul, A.; Lahbas, A.; Oulne, M.

    2016-07-01

    A prolate γ-rigid regime of the Bohr-Mottelson Hamiltonian within the minimal length formalism, involving an infinite square well like potential in β collective shape variable, is developed and used to describe the spectra of a variety of vibrational-like nuclei. The effect of the minimal length on the energy spectrum and the wave function is duly investigated. Numerical calculations are performed for some nuclei revealing a qualitative agreement with the available experimental data.

  7. Effect of pH alkaline salts of fatty acids on the inhibition of bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine the effect of pH on the ability of alkaline salts of three fatty acids (FA) to inhibit growth of bacteria associated with poultry processing. FA solutions were prepared by dissolving 0.5 M concentrations of caprylic, capric, or lauric acid in separate ali...

  8. Anti-obesity effect of alkaline reduced water in high fat-fed obese mice.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Rosa Mistica Coles; Kang, Tae-Young; Kim, Cheol-Su; Kim, Soo-Ki; Yang, Young-Chul; Sohn, Joon-Hyung; Lee, Kyu-Jae

    2013-01-01

    Whether or not alkaline reduced water (ARW) has a positive effect on obesity is unclear. This study aims to prove the positive effect of ARW in high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity (DIO) in C57BL/6 mice model. Toward this, obesity was induced by feeding the C57BL/6 male mice with high-fat diet (w/w 45% fat) for 12 weeks. Thereafter, the animals were administered with either ARW or tap water. Next, the degree of adiposity and DIO-associated parameters were assessed: clinico-pathological parameters, biochemical measurements, histopathological analysis of liver, the expression of cholesterol metabolism-related genes in the liver, and serum levels of adipokine and cytokine. We found that ARW-fed mice significantly ameliorated adiposity: controlled body weight gain, reduced the accumulation of epididymal fats and decreased liver fats as compared to control mice. Accordingly, ARW coordinated the level of adiponectin and leptin. Further, mRNA expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP)7A1 was upregulated. In summary, our data shows that ARW intake inhibits the progression of HF-DIO in mice. This is the first note on anti-obesity effect of ARW, clinically implying the safer fluid remedy for obesity control.

  9. Synergistic Effect of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Pre-Treatment on Alkaline Etching of Polyethylene Terephthalate Fabrics and Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A. Elabid Amel, E.; Guo, Ying; Shi, Jianjun; Ding, Ke; Zhang, Jing

    2016-04-01

    Dyeing of PET materials by traditional methods presents several problems. Plasma technology has received enormous attention as a solution for the environmental problems related with textile surface modifications, and there has been a rapid development and commercialization of plasma technology over the past decade. In this work, the synergistic effect of atmospheric pressure plasma on alkaline etching and deep coloring of dyeing properties on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fabrics and films was investigated. The topographical changes of the PET surface were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) images, which revealed a smooth surface morphology of the untreated sample whereas a high surface roughness for the plasma and/or alkaline treated samples. The effects of atmospheric pressure plasma on alkaline etching of the structure and properties of PET were investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the main objective of performing DSC was to investigate the effect of the plasma pre-treatment on the Tg and Tm. Using a tensile strength tester YG065H and following a standard procedure the maximum force and elongation at maximum force of PET materials was investigated. Oxygen and argon plasma pre-treatment was found to increase the PET fabric weight loss rate. The color strength of PET fabrics was increased by various plasma pre-treatment times. The penetration of plasma and alkaline reactive species deep into the PET structure results in better dyeability and leaves a significant effect on the K/S values of the plasma pre-treated PET. It indicated that plasma pre-treatment has a great synergistic effect with the alkaline treatment of PET.

  10. Effect of organic load on phosphorus and bacteria removal from wastewater using alkaline filter materials.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Charlotte; Renman, Gunno; Westholm, Lena Johansson; Renman, Agnieszka; Drizo, Aleksandra

    2013-10-15

    The organic matter released from septic tanks can disturb the subsequent step in on-site wastewater treatment such as the innovative filters for phosphorus removal. This study investigated the effect of organic load on phosphorus (P) and bacteria removal by reactive filter materials under real-life treatment conditions. Two long-term column experiments were conducted at very short hydraulic residence times (average ~5.5 h), using wastewater with high (mean ~120 mg L(-1)) and low (mean ~20 mg L(-1)) BOD7 values. Two alkaline filter materials, the calcium-silicate material Polonite and blast furnace slag (BFS), were tested for the removal capacity of total P, total organic carbon (TOC) and Enterococci. Both experiments showed that Polonite removed P significantly (p < 0.01) better than BFS. An increase in P removal efficiency of 29.3% was observed for the Polonite filter at the lower concentration of BOD7 (p < 0.05). Polonite was also better than BFS with regard to removal of TOC, but there were no significant differences between the two filter materials with regard to removal of Enterococci. The reduction in Enterococci was greater in the experiment using wastewater with high BOD7, an effect attributable to the higher concentration of bacteria in that wastewater. Overall, the results demonstrate the importance of extensive pre-treatment of wastewater to achieve good phosphorus removal in reactive bed filters and prolonged filter life. PMID:24001604

  11. Effect of organic load on phosphorus and bacteria removal from wastewater using alkaline filter materials.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Charlotte; Renman, Gunno; Westholm, Lena Johansson; Renman, Agnieszka; Drizo, Aleksandra

    2013-10-15

    The organic matter released from septic tanks can disturb the subsequent step in on-site wastewater treatment such as the innovative filters for phosphorus removal. This study investigated the effect of organic load on phosphorus (P) and bacteria removal by reactive filter materials under real-life treatment conditions. Two long-term column experiments were conducted at very short hydraulic residence times (average ~5.5 h), using wastewater with high (mean ~120 mg L(-1)) and low (mean ~20 mg L(-1)) BOD7 values. Two alkaline filter materials, the calcium-silicate material Polonite and blast furnace slag (BFS), were tested for the removal capacity of total P, total organic carbon (TOC) and Enterococci. Both experiments showed that Polonite removed P significantly (p < 0.01) better than BFS. An increase in P removal efficiency of 29.3% was observed for the Polonite filter at the lower concentration of BOD7 (p < 0.05). Polonite was also better than BFS with regard to removal of TOC, but there were no significant differences between the two filter materials with regard to removal of Enterococci. The reduction in Enterococci was greater in the experiment using wastewater with high BOD7, an effect attributable to the higher concentration of bacteria in that wastewater. Overall, the results demonstrate the importance of extensive pre-treatment of wastewater to achieve good phosphorus removal in reactive bed filters and prolonged filter life.

  12. [Effects of mulberry-soybean intercropping on carbon-metabolic microbial diversity in saline-alkaline soil].

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Hui-Hui; Yue, Bing-Bing; Jin, Wei-Wei; Xu, Nan; Zhu, Wen-Xu; Sun, Guang-Yu

    2012-07-01

    Aiming at the characteristics that mulberry-soybean intercropping could alleviate the damage of saline-alkaline soil, Biolog technique was adopted to study the effects of this intercropping on the diversity of carbon-metabolic microbial community in the rhizosphere of saline-alkaline soil. Under mulberry-soybean intercropping, the average well color development (AWCD) symbolizing the metabolic activity of soil microbes was obviously higher, as compared with that under mulberry or soybean monocropping, being the lowest under mulberry monocropping. The McIntosh index was also higher under intercropping than under monocropping, but the Shannon index and Simpson index had less difference between intercropping and monocropping, indicating that intercropping changed the composition and enhanced the diversity of the microbial community in the rhizosphere of saline-alkaline soil. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the carbon source utilization mode of the soil microbial community differed between intercropping and monocropping, and the main carbon sources were carbohydrate, carboxylic acid, and polymers. Soil pH and salinity were the main factors limiting the diversity of the microbial community in saline-alkaline soil, and intercropping could effectively decrease the soil pH and salinity and promote the improvement of soil microbial community diversity.

  13. Bohr Hamiltonian with Eckart potential for triaxial nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, L.; Hassanabadi, H.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the Bohr Hamiltonian has been solved using the Eckart potential for the β-part and a harmonic oscillator for the γ-part of the Hamiltonian. The approximate separation of the variables has been possible by choosing the convenient form for the potential V(β,γ). Using the Nikiforov-Uvarov method the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the eigenequation for the β-part have been derived. An expression for the total energy of the levels has been represented.

  14. Realization of localized Bohr-like wave packets.

    PubMed

    Mestayer, J J; Wyker, B; Lancaster, J C; Dunning, F B; Reinhold, C O; Yoshida, S; Burgdörfer, J

    2008-06-20

    We demonstrate a protocol to create localized wave packets in very-high-n Rydberg states which travel in nearly circular orbits around the nucleus. Although these wave packets slowly dephase and eventually lose their localization, their motion can be monitored over several orbital periods. These wave packets represent the closest analog yet achieved to the original Bohr model of the hydrogen atom, i.e., an electron in a circular classical orbit around the nucleus. The possible extension of the approach to create "planetary atoms" in highly correlated stable multiply excited states is discussed.

  15. Challenges to Bohr's Wave-Particle Complementarity Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowitz, Mario

    2013-02-01

    Contrary to Bohr's complementarity principle, in 1995 Rabinowitz proposed that by using entangled particles from the source it would be possible to determine which slit a particle goes through while still preserving the interference pattern in the Young's two slit experiment. In 2000, Kim et al. used spontaneous parametric down conversion to prepare entangled photons as their source, and almost achieved this. In 2012, Menzel et al. experimentally succeeded in doing this. When the source emits entangled particle pairs, the traversed slit is inferred from measurement of the entangled particle's location by using triangulation. The violation of complementarity breaches the prevailing probabilistic interpretation of quantum mechanics, and benefits Bohm's pilot-wave theory.

  16. Interactive effects of temperature, ultraviolet radiation and food quality on zooplankton alkaline phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Wolinski, Laura; Modenutti, Beatriz; Souza, Maria Sol; Balseiro, Esteban

    2016-06-01

    Ultraviolet Radiation (UVR) is a stressor for aquatic organisms affecting enzyme activities in planktonic populations because of the increase in reactive oxygen species. In addition, UVR exposure combined with other environmental factors (i.e. temperature and food quality) could have even higher detrimental effects. In this work, we aimed to determine the effect of UVR on somatic Alkaline Phosphatase Activity (APA) and Glutathione S-Transferase (GST) activity on the cladoceran Daphnia commutata under two different temperatures (10 °C and 20 °C) and under three food qualities (carbon:phosphorus ratios: 1150, 850 and 550). APA is a biomarker that is considered as a P deficiency indicator in zooplankton. Since recovery from UVR damage under dark conditions is an ATP depending reaction we also measured APA during recovery phases. We carried out a laboratory experiment combining different temperatures and food qualities with exposition to UVR followed by luminic and dark phases for recovery. In addition, we exposed organisms to H2O2, to establish if the response on APA to UVR was a consequence of the reactive oxygen species produced these short wavelengths. Our results showed that somatic APA was negatively affected by UVR exposure and this effect was enhanced under high temperature and low food quality. Consistently, GST activity was higher when exposed to UVR under both temperatures. The H2O2 experiments showed the same trend as UVR exposure, indicating that APA is affected mainly by oxidative stress than by direct effect of UVR on the enzyme. Finally, APA was affected in the dark phase of recovery confirming the P demands. These results enlighten the importance of food quality in the interacting effect of UVR and temperature, showing that C:P food ratio could determine the success or failure of zooplanktonic populations in a context of global change. PMID:26895537

  17. Interactive effects of temperature, ultraviolet radiation and food quality on zooplankton alkaline phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Wolinski, Laura; Modenutti, Beatriz; Souza, Maria Sol; Balseiro, Esteban

    2016-06-01

    Ultraviolet Radiation (UVR) is a stressor for aquatic organisms affecting enzyme activities in planktonic populations because of the increase in reactive oxygen species. In addition, UVR exposure combined with other environmental factors (i.e. temperature and food quality) could have even higher detrimental effects. In this work, we aimed to determine the effect of UVR on somatic Alkaline Phosphatase Activity (APA) and Glutathione S-Transferase (GST) activity on the cladoceran Daphnia commutata under two different temperatures (10 °C and 20 °C) and under three food qualities (carbon:phosphorus ratios: 1150, 850 and 550). APA is a biomarker that is considered as a P deficiency indicator in zooplankton. Since recovery from UVR damage under dark conditions is an ATP depending reaction we also measured APA during recovery phases. We carried out a laboratory experiment combining different temperatures and food qualities with exposition to UVR followed by luminic and dark phases for recovery. In addition, we exposed organisms to H2O2, to establish if the response on APA to UVR was a consequence of the reactive oxygen species produced these short wavelengths. Our results showed that somatic APA was negatively affected by UVR exposure and this effect was enhanced under high temperature and low food quality. Consistently, GST activity was higher when exposed to UVR under both temperatures. The H2O2 experiments showed the same trend as UVR exposure, indicating that APA is affected mainly by oxidative stress than by direct effect of UVR on the enzyme. Finally, APA was affected in the dark phase of recovery confirming the P demands. These results enlighten the importance of food quality in the interacting effect of UVR and temperature, showing that C:P food ratio could determine the success or failure of zooplanktonic populations in a context of global change.

  18. The effect of salinity on waste activated sludge alkaline fermentation and kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Baodan; Wang, Shuying; Xing, Liqun; Li, Baikun; Peng, Yongzhen

    2016-05-01

    The effect of salinity on sludge alkaline fermentation at low temperature (20°C) was investigated, and a kinetic analysis was performed. Different doses of sodium chloride (NaCl, 0-25g/L) were added into the fermentation system. The batch-mode results showed that the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) increased with salinity. The hydrolysate (soluble protein, polysaccharide) and the acidification products (short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), NH4(+)-N, and PO4(3-)-P) increased with salinity initially, but slightly declined respectively at higher level salinity (20g/L or 20-25g/L). However, the hydrolytic acidification performance increased in the presence of salt compared to that without salt. Furthermore, the results of Haldane inhibition kinetics analysis showed that the salt enhanced the hydrolysis rate of particulate organic matter from sludge particulate and the specific utilization of hydrolysate, and decreased the specific utilization of SCFAs. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis indicated that the importance of polysaccharide on the accumulation of SCFAs was reduced with salt addition, but the importance of protein and NH4(+)-N on SCFA accumulation was increased. PMID:27155412

  19. Theoretical study of support effect of Au catalyst for glucose oxidation of alkaline fuel cell anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Hamatake, Yumi; Kazuno, Hiroki; Kishida, Takayuki; Koyama, Michihisa

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically analyzed the glucose oxidation reaction mechanism and reaction activity of Au catalyst supported by carbon (graphite(0 0 0 1), (1 0 1 bar 0), and (1 1 2 bar 0)) and oxide (ZrO2(1 1 1) and SnO2(1 1 0)) in alkaline solution environment by using density functional theory method. We observed large stabilization of Au catalyst on support materials due to the electron transfer in the case of graphite(1 1 2 bar 0) and SnO2(1 1 0) systems. The catalytic activity for glucose oxidation reaction over Au supported by graphite(1 0 1 bar 0) and (1 1 2 bar 0) is calculated to be low in comparison with those of unsupported system. We found that SnO2(1 1 0) supported Au catalyst shows high activity toward the glucose oxidation. One of the main factors for the observed high catalytic activity is charge transfer from Au catalyst to support materials. When the atomic charge of Au catalyst becomes positive by the support effect, the activity of glucose oxidation reaction on Au catalyst is improved.

  20. Volatile fatty acids production from anaerobic treatment of cassava waste water: effect of temperature and alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Salah Din Mahmud; Giongo, Citieli; Fiorese, Mônica Lady; Gomes, Simone Damasceno; Ferrari, Tatiane Caroline; Savoldi, Tarcio Enrico

    2015-01-01

    The production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs), intermediates in the anaerobic degradation process of organic matter from waste water, was evaluated in this work. A batch reactor was used to investigate the effect of temperature, and alkalinity in the production of VFAs, from the fermentation of industrial cassava waste water. Peak production of total volatile fatty acids (TVFAs) was observed in the first two days of acidogenesis. A central composite design was performed, and the highest yield (3400 mg L(-1) of TVFA) was obtained with 30°C and 3 g L(-1) of sodium bicarbonate. The peak of VFA was in 45 h (pH 5.9) with a predominance of acetic (63%) and butyric acid (22%), followed by propionic acid (12%). Decreases in amounts of cyanide (12.9%) and chemical oxygen demand (21.6%) were observed, in addition to the production of biogas (0.53 cm(3) h(-1)). The process was validated experimentally and 3400 g L(-1) of TVFA were obtained with a low relative standard deviation.

  1. Mixed alkali effect on the spectroscopic properties of alkali-alkaline earth oxide borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, G.; Ramesh, B.; Shareefuddin, Md.; Chary, M. N.; Sayanna, R.

    2016-05-01

    The mixed alkali and alkaline earth oxide borate glass with the composition xK2O - (25-x) Li2O-12.5BaO-12.5MgO-50B2O3 (x = 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25mol %) and doped with 1mol% CuO were prepared by the melt quenching technique. From the optical absorption spectra the optical band gap, electronic polarizability(α02-), interaction parameter (A), theoretical and experimental optical basicity (Λ) values were evaluated. From the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectral data the number of spins (N) and susceptibility (χ) were evaluated. The values of (α02-), and (Λ) increases with increasing of K2O content and electronic polarizability and interaction parameter show opposite behaviuor which may be due to the creation of non-bridging oxygens and expansion of borate network. The reciprocal of susceptibility (1/χ) and spin concentration (N) as a function of K2O content, varied nonlinearly which may be due to creation of non-bridging oxygens in the present glass system. This may be attributed to mixed alkali effect (MAE).

  2. Water miscible mono alcohols' effect on the proteolytic performance of Bacillus clausii serine alkaline protease.

    PubMed

    Duman, Yonca Avci; Kazan, Dilek; Denizci, Aziz Akin; Erarslan, Altan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, our investigations showed that the increasing concentrations of all examined mono alcohols caused a decrease in the Vm, kcat and kcat/Km values of Bacillus clausii GMBE 42 serine alkaline protease for casein hydrolysis. However, the Km value of the enzyme remained almost the same, which was an indicator of non-competitive inhibition. Whereas inhibition by methanol was partial non-competitive, inhibition by the rest of the alcohols tested was simple non-competitive. The inhibition constants (KI) were in the range of 1.32-3.10 M, and the order of the inhibitory effect was 1-propanol>2-propanol>methanol>ethanol. The ΔG(≠) and ΔG(≠)E-T values of the enzyme increased at increasing concentrations of all alcohols examined, but the ΔG(≠)ES value of the enzyme remained almost the same. The constant Km and ΔG(≠)ES values in the presence and absence of mono alcohols indicated the existence of different binding sites for mono alcohols and casein on enzyme the molecule. The kcat of the enzyme decreased linearly by increasing log P and decreasing dielectric constant (D) values, but the ΔG(≠) and ΔG(≠)E-T values of the enzyme increased by increasing log P and decreasing D values of the reaction medium containing mono alcohols. PMID:24092453

  3. In vitro assessment of genotoxic effects of electric arc furnace dust on human lymphocytes using the alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Orescanin, Visnja; Ruk, Damir; Gajski, Goran

    2009-02-15

    In vitro genotoxic effects of leachates of electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) on human peripheral lymphocytes, assessed prior and following the treatment with a strong alkaline solution were investigated using the alkaline comet assay. Prior and following the treatment, lymphocytes were incubated with leachate of EAFD for 6 and 24 hours at 37 degrees C. Negative controls were also included. Mean values of the tail lengths established in the samples treated with the leachate stemming from the original dust for 6 and 24 hours, were 15.70 microm and 16.78 microm, respectively, as compared to 12.33 microm found in the control sample. Slight, but significant increase in the tail length was also found with the dust treated with a strong alkaline solution (13.37 microm and 13.60 microm). In case of high heavy metal concentrations (the extract of the original furnace dust), the incubation period was revealed to be of significance as well. The obtained results lead to the conclusion that alkaline comet assay could be used as a rapid, sensitive and low-cost tool when assessing genotoxicity of various waste materials, such as leachates of the electric arc furnace dust.

  4. Effect of alkaline treatment on the characterization of zalacca midrib wastes fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raharjo, Wahyu Purwo; Soenoko, Rudy; Purnowidodo, Anindito; Choiron, Mochammad Agus; Triyono

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, the need for new materials is urgent due to the scarcity of conventional materials and energy resources. The environmental issue requires materials which are biodegradable. There are many composites, arranged from synthetic fibers and matrix, which cannot be recyclable after their lifetime. In this research, the utilization potency of zalacca midrib wastes for their fibers as composite reinforcement were investigated, especially after the alkaline treatment to improve their characteristics. The influence of alkaline treatment on the density, functional groups of the fiber surface, thermal stability and crystallinity were measured and/or analyzed by linear-density-and-diameter-calculation, FTIR, TGA-DTA and XRD, respectively. The result showed that the zalacca midrib fibers had lower density than synthetic fibers and several natural fibers. Analysis of FTIR spectra indicated that the alkaline treatment of NaOH slightly raised their density because it removed several functional groups which attributed to the hemicellulose and lignin. TGA-DTA analysis indicated that zalacca fibers had good thermal stability until temperature of 220°C and it was improved by alkaline treatment. XRD analysis showed that the crystallinity of zalacca fibers was higher than several natural fibers like rice straw, sorghum stem and wheat straw fibers. Their crystallinity index was higher than wheat straw fiber. The alkaline treatment increases the crystallinity and crystallinity index rather than untreated fibers.

  5. Effects of parathyroid hormone and calcitonin on alkaline phosphatase activity and matrix calcification in rabbit growth-plate chondrocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Y.; Shimazu, A.; Nakashima, K.; Suzuki, F.; Jikko, A.; Iwamoto, M. )

    1990-07-01

    The effects of PTH and calcitonin (CT) on the expression of mineralization-related phenotypes by chondrocytes were examined. In cultures of pelleted growth-plate chondrocytes. PTH caused 60-90% decreases in alkaline phosphatase activity, the incorporation of {sup 45}Ca into insoluble material, and the calcium content during the post-mitotic stage. These effects of PTH were dose-dependent and reversible. In contrast, CT increased alkaline phosphatase activity, {sup 45}Ca incorporation into insoluble material, and the calcium content by 1.4- to 1.8-fold. These observations suggest that PTH directly inhibits the expression of the mineralization-related phenotypes by growth-plate chondrocytes, and that CT has the opposite effects.

  6. Experimental Observation of Bohr's Nonlinear Fluidic Surface Oscillation.

    PubMed

    Moon, Songky; Shin, Younghoon; Kwak, Hojeong; Yang, Juhee; Lee, Sang-Bum; Kim, Soyun; An, Kyungwon

    2016-01-25

    Niels Bohr in the early stage of his career developed a nonlinear theory of fluidic surface oscillation in order to study surface tension of liquids. His theory includes the nonlinear interaction between multipolar surface oscillation modes, surpassing the linear theory of Rayleigh and Lamb. It predicts a specific normalized magnitude of 0.416η(2) for an octapolar component, nonlinearly induced by a quadrupolar one with a magnitude of η much less than unity. No experimental confirmation on this prediction has been reported. Nonetheless, accurate determination of multipolar components is important as in optical fiber spinning, film blowing and recently in optofluidic microcavities for ray and wave chaos studies and photonics applications. Here, we report experimental verification of his theory. By using optical forward diffraction, we measured the cross-sectional boundary profiles at extreme positions of a surface-oscillating liquid column ejected from a deformed microscopic orifice. We obtained a coefficient of 0.42 ± 0.08 consistently under various experimental conditions. We also measured the resonance mode spectrum of a two-dimensional cavity formed by the cross-sectional segment of the liquid jet. The observed spectra agree well with wave calculations assuming a coefficient of 0.414 ± 0.011. Our measurements establish the first experimental observation of Bohr's hydrodynamic theory.

  7. Experimental Observation of Bohr's Nonlinear Fluidic Surface Oscillation.

    PubMed

    Moon, Songky; Shin, Younghoon; Kwak, Hojeong; Yang, Juhee; Lee, Sang-Bum; Kim, Soyun; An, Kyungwon

    2016-01-01

    Niels Bohr in the early stage of his career developed a nonlinear theory of fluidic surface oscillation in order to study surface tension of liquids. His theory includes the nonlinear interaction between multipolar surface oscillation modes, surpassing the linear theory of Rayleigh and Lamb. It predicts a specific normalized magnitude of 0.416η(2) for an octapolar component, nonlinearly induced by a quadrupolar one with a magnitude of η much less than unity. No experimental confirmation on this prediction has been reported. Nonetheless, accurate determination of multipolar components is important as in optical fiber spinning, film blowing and recently in optofluidic microcavities for ray and wave chaos studies and photonics applications. Here, we report experimental verification of his theory. By using optical forward diffraction, we measured the cross-sectional boundary profiles at extreme positions of a surface-oscillating liquid column ejected from a deformed microscopic orifice. We obtained a coefficient of 0.42 ± 0.08 consistently under various experimental conditions. We also measured the resonance mode spectrum of a two-dimensional cavity formed by the cross-sectional segment of the liquid jet. The observed spectra agree well with wave calculations assuming a coefficient of 0.414 ± 0.011. Our measurements establish the first experimental observation of Bohr's hydrodynamic theory. PMID:26803911

  8. Alkaline treatment effect on the properties of in-situ synthesised ZnO nanoparticles on cotton fabric.

    PubMed

    Barani, Hossein; Boroumand, Majid Nasiri

    2016-06-01

    In this study, an in-situ approach was used to synthesise zinc oxide nanoparticles on the surface of cotton fabric. The effect of alkaline pre- and after-treatment and Zn(2+) concentration was studied on the morphological, structural, thermal, photocatalytic, and antibacterial properties of loaded cotton fabrics. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometer, thermogravimetric analysis, and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectrometer were used to characterise the properties of loaded cotton fabrics. Alkaline after-treatment of cotton fabric presented more dispersed zinc oxide nanoparticles, and an increase in Zn(2+) concentration led to form agglomerated nanoparticles on the surface of cotton fibres. The loaded cotton fabrics with zinc oxide nanoparticles presented an inhibition zone against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. In addition, the stain of methylene blue on the surface of loaded samples was degraded after irradiated under visible light. PMID:27256898

  9. Vibrational and rotational excited states within a Bohr Hamiltonian with a deformation-dependent mass formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabab, M.; Lahbas, A.; Oulne, M.

    2015-06-01

    In a recent work [Phys. Rev. C 84, 044321 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevC.84.044321] M. J. Ermamatov and P. R. Fraser have studied rotational and vibrational excited states of axially symmetric nuclei within the Bohr Hamiltonian with different mass parameters. However, the energy formula that the authors have used contains some inaccuracies. So the numerical results they obtained seem to be controversial. In this paper, we revisit all calculations related to this problem and determine the appropriate formula for the energy spectrum. Moreover, in order to improve such calculations, we reconsider this problem within the framework of the deformation-dependent mass formalism. Also, unlike the work of Bonatsos et al. [Phys. Rev. C 83, 044321 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevC.83.044321], in which the mass parameter has not been considered, we will show the importance of this parameter and its effect on numerical predictions.

  10. Effects of water hardness and alkalinity on the toxicity of uranium to a tropical freshwater hydra (Hydra viridissima).

    PubMed

    Riethmuller, N; Markich, S J; Van Dam, R A; Parry, D

    2001-01-01

    In tropical Australian freshwaters, uranium (U) is of potential ecotoxicological concern, largely as a consequence of mining activities. Although the toxicity of uranium to Australian freshwater biota is comprehensive, by world standards, few data are available on the effects of physicochemical variables, such as hardness, alkalinity, pH and organic matter, on uranium speciation and bioavailability. This study determined the individual effects of water hardness (6.6, 165 and 330 mg l(-1) as CaCO3) and alkalinity (4.0 and 102 mg l(-1) as CaCO3), at a constant pH (6.0), on the toxicity (96 h population growth) of uranium to Hydra viridissima (green hydra). A 50-fold increase in hardness (Ca and Mg concentration) resulted in a 92% (two-fold) decrease in the toxicity of uranium to H. viridissima [i.e. an increase in the EC50 value and 95% confidence interval from 114 (107-121) to 219 (192-246) µg l(-1)]. Conversely, at a constant hardness (165 mg l-1 as CaCO3), the toxicity of uranium to H. viridissima was not significantly (P > 0.05) affected by a 25-fold increase in alkalinity (carbonate concentration) [i.e. EC50 values of 177 (166-188) and 171 (150-192) µg l(-1) at 4.0 and 102 mg l(-1) as CaCO3, respectively]. A knowledge of the relationship between water chemistry variables, including hardness and alkalinity, and uranium toxicity is useful for predicting the potential ecological detriment in aquatic systems, and can be used to relax national water quality guidelines on a site-specific basis.

  11. Effects of treating wheat straw with pH-regulated solutions of alkaline hydrogen peroxide on nutrient digestion by sheep.

    PubMed

    Kerley, M S; Fahey, G C; Berger, L L; Merchen, N R; Gould, J M

    1987-10-01

    An experiment using a 4 X 4 Latin square design was to determine effects of treating wheat straw with pH-regulated (pH = 11.5) solutions of hydrogen peroxide on site and extent of nutrient digestion in multiple-fistulated sheep. Regulating reaction pH at 11.5 prevented solubilization of some cell wall hemicelluloses, resulting in improved retention of DM. Diets fed to sheep contained 33 or 70% wheat straw either untreated or treated with alkaline hydrogen peroxide. Sheep fed diets of treated wheat straw digested more DM, NDF, ADF, and cellulose anterior to the duodenum and in the total tract than when fed diets of untreated wheat straw. Apparent CP digestion before the duodenum was highest when sheep were fed the treated 33% wheat straw diet and untreated 70% wheat straw diet. Treatments did not affect apparent nutrient digestibilities in the large intestine. Ruminal pH was lower when sheep were fed the alkaline hydrogen peroxide-treated or diets containing 33% wheat straw. Ruminal ammonia concentrations were highest when sheep were fed the untreated 70% wheat straw diet. Molar proportions of ruminal acetic and propionic acids were unaffected by diet. Alkaline hydrogen peroxide treatment substantially increased susceptibility of structural carbohydrates of wheat straw to microbial degradation in the gastrointestinal tract of sheep.

  12. Effects of bryophytes on succession from alkaline marsh to Sphagnum bog

    SciTech Connect

    Glime, J.M.; Wetzel, R.G.; Kennedy, B.J.

    1982-10-01

    The alkaline eastern marsh of Lawrence Lake, a marl lake in southwestern Michigan, was sampled by randomly placed line transects to determine the bryophyte cover and corresponding vascular plant zones. Cluster analysis indicated three distinct bryophyte zones which correspond with the recognized vascular plant zones. Mosses occupied over 50% of the surface in some areas. Invasion of Sphagnum, vertical zonation of the mosses on hummocks, zonation with distance from the lake, the abundance of non-Sphagnum moss hummocks, and the ability of the non-Sphagnum species to lower the pH of marsh water during laboratory incubations are evidence that non-Sphagnum mosses facilitate succession from alkaline marsh to Sphagnum bog.

  13. Metabolism of poly- -hydroxybutyrate: effect of mild alkaline extraction on native poly- -hydroxybutyrate granules.

    PubMed

    Griebel, R J; Merrick, J M

    1971-11-01

    Mild alkaline extraction of native poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules results in the solubilization of a protein fraction. Both the solubilized protein fraction and the extracted granules are essentially devoid of PHB synthetase activity unless recombined. The protein fraction has been separated by chromatography into two components (A-I and A-II). A-I but not A-II can be recombined with extracted granules to give rise to PHB synthetase activity. Extracted granules no longer require pretreatment with activator or trypsin but are directly susceptible to hydrolysis by Rhodospirillum rubrum depolymerase. Addition of A-II or A-I prevents the direct hydrolysis by depolymerase. The inhibition is reversed by activator or trypsin. We conclude that native granules are associated with a protein inhibitor which prevents the hydrolysis of PHB by depolymerase unless the protein is destroyed by trypsin, removed by alkaline extraction, or modified by activator. PMID:5001870

  14. [Effects and mechanism of alkaline wastes application and zinc fertilizer addition on Cd bioavailability in contaminated soil].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao-Bing; Ji, Xiong-Hui; Tian, Fa-Xiang; Peng, Hua; Wu, Jia-Mei; Shi, Li-Hong

    2011-04-01

    The effects of paper mill sludge, red mud and zinc fertilizer addition on remediation of acid cadmium contaminated paddy soil were studied in a pot experiment, and their beneficial effects were verified in a field experiment, by using lime as comparison. The pot experiment results showed that a single application (2 g x kg(-1)) of lime, paper mill sludge or red mud increased soil pH significantly. Compared with no applying alkaline substances, the soil exchangeable Ca content was increased by 33.1%-76.0% at 7 days after applying alkaline substances and 31.0%-78.3% at 30 days after rice transplanting, respectively. The soil available Cd content was significantly decreased by 38.4%-45.0% at 7 days after the three alkaline substances applications, and was decreased by 37.4%-52.9% and 33.2%-38.7% at 30 days and 60 days after rice transplanting, respectively. The Cd content in rice root and brown rice was decreased by 24.0%-48.5% and 26.3%-44.7%, respectively. With equal applications of lime, paper mill sludge and red mud, the effects on increase of soil pH and decrease in Cd accumulation by rice was lime > red mud > paper mill sludge. Compared with a single application (2 g x kg(-1)) of paper mill sludge or red mud, Cd accumulation decreased significantly following the application of zinc fertilizer (0.2 g x kg(-1)) field experimental results were similar to the pot experiment that Cd accumulation apparently declined in the first and second crops (late rice and autumn rape) following the application of paper mill sludge, red mud and addition of zinc fertilizer. The Cd content in brown rice and rape seeds was decreased by 27.1-65.1% and 16.4%-41.6%, respectively, compared with no alkaline substances application. The Cd content in brown rice reached the National Hygienic Standard for Grains (GB 2715-2005). Therefore, combined application of paper mill sludge or red mud with zinc fertilizer was a feasible method to remediate acid cadmium contaminated paddy soil. Rice

  15. Effect of neonatal MSG treatment on day-night alkaline phosphatase activity in the rat duodenum.

    PubMed

    Martinková, A; Lenhardt, L; Mozes, S

    2000-01-01

    The day-night variation of food intake and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity was studied in the duodenum of rats neonatally treated with monosodium glutamate (MSG) and saline-treated (control) rats. The animals were kept under light-dark conditions (light phase from 09:00 h to 21:00 h) with free access to food. AP activity was cytophotometrically analyzed in the brush-border of enterocytes separated from the tip, middle and cryptal part of the villi every 6 h over a 24-hour period. In comparison with the controls, MSG-treated rats consumed about 40% less food during the dark period and their 24-hour food intake was thus significantly lowered (P<0.001). On the other hand, the nocturnal feeding habit showed a similar pattern: food consumption was high during the night (65% vs. 75%) and the lowest consumption was found during the light phase (35% vs. 25%) in MSG-treated and control rats, respectively. In agreement with the rhythm of food intake, the highest AP activity was observed during the dark phase and was lowest during the light phase in both groups of animals. These significant day-night variations showed nearly the same pattern in the enterocytes of all observed parts along the villus axis. In comparison with the controls, a permanent increase of AP activity was observed in neonatal MSG-treated rats. This increase was more expressive during the dark phase of the day in the cryptal (P<0.001) and middle part of the villus (P<0.01). From the viewpoint of feeding, this enzyme in MSG-treated rats was enhanced in an inverse relation to the amount of food eaten i.e. despite sustained hypophagia the mean AP activity in the enterocytes along the villus axis was higher than in the control animals during all investigated periods. The present results suggest that the increased AP activity in MSG-treated rats is probably not a consequence of actual day-night eating perturbations but could be a component of a more general effect of MSG. This information contributes to

  16. Ocean-Based Alkalinity Enhancement: Mitigation Potential, Side Effects and the Fate of Added Alkalinity Assessed in an Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, M. F.; Ilyina, T.

    2014-12-01

    Artificial ocean alkalinization (AOA) has been proposed as a mean to mitigate climate change and ocean acidification. Whilst the mitigation potential of this geo-engineering technology may sound promising, it poses environmental risks. Within the Priority Program "Climate Engineering" of the German Science Foundation (DFG), we investigate the mitigation potential of AOA to reduce atmospheric CO2 and counteract the consequences of ocean acidification. We are particularly interested in the residence time of the added alkalinity at the ocean surface because it must stay in the upper ocean in order to increase the oceanic CO2 uptake. The mitigation potential, risks and the unintended consequences of this geo-engineering method are also exhaustively studied. These questions are tackled through the analysis of different alkalinity enhancement scenarios in the state-of-the-art Earth system model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPI-ESM) in a configuration based on the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Model scenarios are designed so that AOA is performed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentrations similar to values of the stabilization scenario RCP4.5, while fossil fuel CO2 emissions follow the pathway of the high-CO2 scenario RCP8.5. Alkalinity is added globally into the upper 12 meters of the ocean in different seasons and years. We found that on the time scale of relevance (i.e. from years to decades), season and location are key aspects to take into account in the implementation of AOA. This is because of inhomogeneous vertical mixing of added alkalinity due to the mixed layer depth which is established by the season. We also show that the rate of addition greatly determines impact and outcome of this geo-engineering method. Changes driven by the implementation of this method in the ocean biogeochemistry are also discussed. For instance, the associated changes in the carbon cycle, marine oxygen levels, saturation state of

  17. The immobilization of all spermatozoa in vitro by bitter lemon drink and the effect of alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Nwoha, P U

    1992-12-01

    Researchers at Obafemi Awolowo University in Ile-Ife, Nigeria, collected semen samples from 7 healthy men 25-30 years old who had abstained from sex for at least 5 days in order to examine the spermicidal action of 4 soft drinks (Krest bitter lemon, Afri-Cola, Coca-Cola, and Pepsi-Cola), the effect of increased temperature of the drinks on spermicidal action, and the effect of changing the soft drinks from an acid, as it comes from the factory, (ph 2.4) to an alkaline (pH 7.5). Increasing the temperature of the soft drinks from room temperature (22 degrees Celsius) to body temperatures (37 degrees Celsius) did not significantly change the spermicidal action any of the soft drinks. All soft drinks with an acid pH, except Coca-Cola, had a significantly lower percent of sperm motility than those with an alkaline pH (0-42.3% vs. 20-52.1%; p .001). In fact, Krest bitter lemon in its factory form (acid pH) completely immobilized all spermatozoa within 1 minute after the researchers diluted the semen with the soft drink. Alkaline Coca-Cola had a significantly lower percent of sperm motility than did acid Coca-Cola (35.8% vs. 46.5%; p .001). Other than Krest bitter lemon, the significant decreases in sperm motility were not enough to prevent pregnancy. These findings indicated that researchers should test Krest bitter lemon for effectiveness as a postcoital contraceptive. If indeed it proves effective, it has great potential as such a contraceptive among the poor in the densely population developed countries since it is readily available and inexpensive.

  18. Effect of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium availability on emergence, nodulation and growth of Trifolium medium L. in alkaline soil.

    PubMed

    Chmelíková, L; Hejcman, M

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about the effects of nutrient availability on the growth of Trifolium medium in alkaline soil. In 2010, a pot experiment (10 N, P and K fertiliser treatments) with seeding of T. medium into alkaline soil was performed and emergence of seedlings, survival, aboveground and belowground organs were studied. The positive effects of increased nutrient availability on seedling emergence ranged from 5% in the control to 17% in the high P treatment. The lowest mortality was in treatments with P and K supply and the highest in treatments with N supply, due to the sensitivity of young plants to high N availability. The highest values of most measured aboveground plant traits were recorded in treatments with simultaneous application of N, P and K. There were highly positive effects of P supply alone or in combination with N and K on the development of belowground organs. Taproot length ranged from 11.5 in high N to 40.2 cm in P treatment. There was a negative effect of N application on nodulation, especially in N treatments, where growth of T. medium was limited by insufficient P supply. The number of nodules per plant ranged from 0.8 to 4.5 in the high N and P treatments. As demonstrated in this study, T. medium is a potentially suitable legume for alkaline soils. It requires a relatively high P and K supply as well as moderate mineral N supply to achieve its maximum growth potential. PMID:24355109

  19. Inhibitive effects of palm kernel oil on carbon steel corrosion by alkaline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkafli, M. Y.; Othman, N. K.; Lazim, A. M.; Jalar, A.

    2013-11-01

    The behavior of carbon steel SAE 1045 in 1 M NaOH solution containing different concentrations of palm kernel oil (PKO) has been studied by weight loss and polarization measurement. Results showed that the corrosion of carbon steel in NaOH solution was considerably reduced in presence of such inhibitors. The inhibition efficiency increases when concentration of inhibitor increase. Maximum inhibition efficiency (≈ 96.67%) is obtained at PKO concentration 8 v/v %. This result revealed that palm kernel oil can act as a corrosion inhibitor in an alkaline medium. Corrosion rates of carbon steel decrease as the concentration of inhibitor is increased.

  20. The effect of polymer-surfactant interaction on the rheological properties of surfactant enhanced alkaline flooding formulations

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1993-02-01

    Surfactant-enhanced, lower pH (weak) alkaline chemicals are effective for mobilizing residual oil. Polymer is used for mobility control because if mobility control is lost, then oil recovery is reduced. The ability to maintain mobility control during surfactant-alkaline flooding can be adversely affected by chemical interaction. In this work, interaction between polymers and surfactants was shown to be affected by pH, ionic strength, crude oil, and the properties of the polymers and surfactants. Polymer-surfactant interaction (phase separation, precipitation, and viscosity loss) occurred between most of the polymers and surfactants that were tested. Polymer-surfactant interaction is difficult to eliminate, and no method was found for completely eliminating interaction. Polymer-surfactant interaction occurred at optimal salinity and below optimal salinity. Polymer-surfactant interaction had an adverse effect on polymer rheology; however, the adverse effect of interaction on polymer rheology was lessened when oil was present. Increasing the pH of chemical systems further reduced the adverse effects of interaction on polymer rheology.

  1. Lightcurve Analysis of 3948 Bohr and 4874 Burke: An International Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinglesmith, Daniel A., III; Risley, Ethan; Turk, Janek; Vargas, Angelica; Warren, Curtis; Ferrero, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    An international collaboration provided complete coverage of the 24.884 ± 0.002 h period for 3948 Bohr and a confirmation of a 3.657 ± 0.001 h period for 4874 Burke. The amplitudes were A = 0.89 ± 0.10 mag for 3948 Bohr and A = 0.22 ± 0.07 mag for 4874 Burke.

  2. Use of highly alkaline conditions to improve cost-effectiveness of algal biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Canon-Rubio, Karen A; Sharp, Christine E; Bergerson, Joule; Strous, Marc; De la Hoz Siegler, Hector

    2016-02-01

    Phototrophic microorganisms have been proposed as an alternative to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) and to produce biofuels and other valuable products. Low CO2 absorption rates, low volumetric productivities, and inefficient downstream processing, however, currently make algal biotechnology highly energy intensive, expensive, and not economically competitive to produce biofuels. This mini-review summarizes advances made regarding the cultivation of phototrophic microorganisms at highly alkaline conditions, as well as other innovations oriented toward reducing the energy input into the cultivation and processing stages. An evaluation, in terms of energy requirements and energy return on energy invested, is performed for an integrated high-pH, high-alkalinity growth process that uses biofilms. Performance in terms of productivity and expected energy return on energy invested is presented for this process and is compared to previously reported life cycle assessments (LCAs) for systems at near-neutral pH. The cultivation of alkaliphilic phototrophic microorganisms in biofilms is shown to have a significant potential to reduce both energy requirements and capital costs.

  3. Effects of saline-alkaline stress on seed germination and seedling growth of Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanyun; Lu, Zhaohua; He, Lei

    2014-08-01

    In order to study the adaptation ability of sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) in the Yellow River Delta, the sweet sorghum variety Mart was used in this study to determine the roles of different saline-alkaline ratio stress treatment during seed germination to seedling stage. The results showed that Na+ concentration had a significant impact on the seed germination, seedling growth, and plant survival of sweet sorghum. Increasing Na+ concentration led to a decline in germination rate, final germination percentage, survival percentage, plant height, and dry weight per plant, a prolonged mean time of germination, as well as loss of improvement effect of low-Na+ concentration. The interaction effect of Na+ concentration and pH on the mean time of germination and germination rate was not significant (p<0.05). However, under the condition of low-Na+ concentration (100 mM), high pH reduced the mean time of germination and increased the germination rate, without decline in final germination percentage and survival percentage. Therefore, at least in the duration of seed germination to the harvest period in the research, the sweet sorghum was resistant to the pH stress (≥9.04) when the Na+ concentration was below 100 mM. When suffered from the saline-alkaline stress, the seedling of sweet sorghum was characterized by ecological adaptive features, such as decreased stem ratio and chlorophyll b content in leaves and increased root ratio and chlorophyll a content, in order to maintain the uptakes of water and nutrient, and carbon assimilation. When the stress intensified, the lipid oxidation products, e.g., malondialdehyde (MDA), increased in sweet sorghum seedlings. However, the increasing of soluble protein content and antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (POD), and gatalase (CAT)) was only founded in neutral low-Na+ concentration treatment (A1), which indicated that high-salt concentration and pH all elicited harmful effects

  4. Effects of saline-alkaline stress on seed germination and seedling growth of Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanyun; Lu, Zhaohua; He, Lei

    2014-08-01

    In order to study the adaptation ability of sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) in the Yellow River Delta, the sweet sorghum variety Mart was used in this study to determine the roles of different saline-alkaline ratio stress treatment during seed germination to seedling stage. The results showed that Na+ concentration had a significant impact on the seed germination, seedling growth, and plant survival of sweet sorghum. Increasing Na+ concentration led to a decline in germination rate, final germination percentage, survival percentage, plant height, and dry weight per plant, a prolonged mean time of germination, as well as loss of improvement effect of low-Na+ concentration. The interaction effect of Na+ concentration and pH on the mean time of germination and germination rate was not significant (p<0.05). However, under the condition of low-Na+ concentration (100 mM), high pH reduced the mean time of germination and increased the germination rate, without decline in final germination percentage and survival percentage. Therefore, at least in the duration of seed germination to the harvest period in the research, the sweet sorghum was resistant to the pH stress (≥9.04) when the Na+ concentration was below 100 mM. When suffered from the saline-alkaline stress, the seedling of sweet sorghum was characterized by ecological adaptive features, such as decreased stem ratio and chlorophyll b content in leaves and increased root ratio and chlorophyll a content, in order to maintain the uptakes of water and nutrient, and carbon assimilation. When the stress intensified, the lipid oxidation products, e.g., malondialdehyde (MDA), increased in sweet sorghum seedlings. However, the increasing of soluble protein content and antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (POD), and gatalase (CAT)) was only founded in neutral low-Na+ concentration treatment (A1), which indicated that high-salt concentration and pH all elicited harmful effects

  5. Niels Bohr on the wave function and the classical/quantum divide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinkernagel, Henrik

    2016-02-01

    It is well known that Niels Bohr insisted on the necessity of classical concepts in the account of quantum phenomena. But there is little consensus concerning his reasons, and what he exactly meant by this. In this paper, I re-examine Bohr's interpretation of quantum mechanics, and argue that the necessity of the classical can be seen as part of his response to the measurement problem. More generally, I attempt to clarify Bohr's view on the classical/quantum divide, arguing that the relation between the two theories is that of mutual dependence. An important element in this clarification consists in distinguishing Bohr's idea of the wave function as symbolic from both a purely epistemic and an ontological interpretation. Together with new evidence concerning Bohr's conception of the wave function collapse, this sets his interpretation apart from both standard versions of the Copenhagen interpretation, and from some of the reconstructions of his view found in the literature. I conclude with a few remarks on how Bohr's ideas make much sense also when modern developments in quantum gravity and early universe cosmology are taken into account.

  6. Placing molecules with Bohr radius resolution using DNA origami.

    PubMed

    Funke, Jonas J; Dietz, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly with nucleic acids can be used to fabricate discrete objects with defined sizes and arbitrary shapes. It relies on building blocks that are commensurate to those of biological macromolecular machines and should therefore be capable of delivering the atomic-scale placement accuracy known today only from natural and designed proteins. However, research in the field has predominantly focused on producing increasingly large and complex, but more coarsely defined, objects and placing them in an orderly manner on solid substrates. So far, few objects afford a design accuracy better than 5 nm, and the subnanometre scale has been reached only within the unit cells of designed DNA crystals. Here, we report a molecular positioning device made from a hinged DNA origami object in which the angle between the two structural units can be controlled with adjuster helices. To test the positioning capabilities of the device, we used photophysical and crosslinking assays that report the coordinate of interest directly with atomic resolution. Using this combination of placement and analysis, we rationally adjusted the average distance between fluorescent molecules and reactive groups from 1.5 to 9 nm in 123 discrete displacement steps. The smallest displacement step possible was 0.04 nm, which is slightly less than the Bohr radius. The fluctuation amplitudes in the distance coordinate were also small (±0.5 nm), and within a factor of two to three of the amplitudes found in protein structures. PMID:26479026

  7. Memories of Crisis: Bohr, Kuhn, and the Quantum Mechanical ``Revolution''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Suman

    2013-04-01

    ``The history of science, to my knowledge,'' wrote Thomas Kuhn, describing the years just prior to the development of matrix and wave mechanics, ``offers no equally clear, detailed, and cogent example of the creative functions of normal science and crisis.'' By 1924, most quantum theorists shared a sense that there was much wrong with all extant atomic models. Yet not all shared equally in the sense that the failure was either terribly surprising or particularly demoralizing. Not all agreed, that is, that a crisis for Bohr-like models was a crisis for quantum theory. This paper attempts to answer four questions: two about history, two about memory. First, which sub-groups of the quantum theoretical community saw themselves and their field in a state of crisis in the early 1920s? Second, why did they do so, and how was a sense of crisis related to their theoretical practices in physics? Third, do we regard the years before 1925 as a crisis because they were followed by the quantum mechanical revolution? And fourth, to reverse the last question, were we to call into the question the existence of a crisis (for some at least) does that make a subsequent revolution less revolutionary?

  8. Placing molecules with Bohr radius resolution using DNA origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funke, Jonas J.; Dietz, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly with nucleic acids can be used to fabricate discrete objects with defined sizes and arbitrary shapes. It relies on building blocks that are commensurate to those of biological macromolecular machines and should therefore be capable of delivering the atomic-scale placement accuracy known today only from natural and designed proteins. However, research in the field has predominantly focused on producing increasingly large and complex, but more coarsely defined, objects and placing them in an orderly manner on solid substrates. So far, few objects afford a design accuracy better than 5 nm, and the subnanometre scale has been reached only within the unit cells of designed DNA crystals. Here, we report a molecular positioning device made from a hinged DNA origami object in which the angle between the two structural units can be controlled with adjuster helices. To test the positioning capabilities of the device, we used photophysical and crosslinking assays that report the coordinate of interest directly with atomic resolution. Using this combination of placement and analysis, we rationally adjusted the average distance between fluorescent molecules and reactive groups from 1.5 to 9 nm in 123 discrete displacement steps. The smallest displacement step possible was 0.04 nm, which is slightly less than the Bohr radius. The fluctuation amplitudes in the distance coordinate were also small (±0.5 nm), and within a factor of two to three of the amplitudes found in protein structures.

  9. Placing molecules with Bohr radius resolution using DNA origami.

    PubMed

    Funke, Jonas J; Dietz, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly with nucleic acids can be used to fabricate discrete objects with defined sizes and arbitrary shapes. It relies on building blocks that are commensurate to those of biological macromolecular machines and should therefore be capable of delivering the atomic-scale placement accuracy known today only from natural and designed proteins. However, research in the field has predominantly focused on producing increasingly large and complex, but more coarsely defined, objects and placing them in an orderly manner on solid substrates. So far, few objects afford a design accuracy better than 5 nm, and the subnanometre scale has been reached only within the unit cells of designed DNA crystals. Here, we report a molecular positioning device made from a hinged DNA origami object in which the angle between the two structural units can be controlled with adjuster helices. To test the positioning capabilities of the device, we used photophysical and crosslinking assays that report the coordinate of interest directly with atomic resolution. Using this combination of placement and analysis, we rationally adjusted the average distance between fluorescent molecules and reactive groups from 1.5 to 9 nm in 123 discrete displacement steps. The smallest displacement step possible was 0.04 nm, which is slightly less than the Bohr radius. The fluctuation amplitudes in the distance coordinate were also small (±0.5 nm), and within a factor of two to three of the amplitudes found in protein structures.

  10. Branched poly(lactide) synthesized by enzymatic polymerization: effects of molecular branches and stereochemistry on enzymatic degradation and alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Numata, Keiji; Srivastava, Rajiv K; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Albertsson, Ann-Christine; Doi, Yoshiharu; Abe, Hideki

    2007-10-01

    In this article the effects of the number of molecular branches (chain ends) and the stereochemistry of poly(lactide)s (PLAs) on the enzymatic degradation and alkaline hydrolysis are studied. Various linear and branched PLAs were synthesized using lipase PS (Pseudomonas fluorescens)-catalyzed ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of lactide monomers having different stereochemistries (L-lactide, D-lactide, and D,L-lactide). Five different alcohols were used as initiators for the ROP, and the monomer-to-initiator molar feed ratio was varied from 10 to 100 and 1000 for each branch in the polymer architecture. The properties of branched PLAs that would affect the enzymatic and alkaline degradations, i.e., the glass transition temperature, the melting temperature, the melting enthalpy, and the advancing contact angle, were determined. The PLA films were degraded using proteinase K or 1.0 M NaOH solution, and the weight loss and changes in the number average molecular weight (Mn) of the polymer were studied during 12 h of degradation. The results suggest that an increase in the number of molecular branches of branched PLAs enhances its enzymatic degradability and alkali hydrolyzability. Moreover, the change in Mn of the branched poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) by alkaline hydrolysis indicated that the decrease in Mn was in the first place dependent on the number of molecular branches and thereafter on the length of the molecular branch of branched PLA. The branched PLLA, poly(D-lactide) (PDLA), and poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLLA) differed in weight loss and change in Mn of the PLA segment during the enzymatic degradation. It is suggested that the branched PDLLA was degraded preferentially by proteinase K.

  11. Effect of chelating agent concentration in alkaline Cu CMP process under the condition of different applied pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haobo, Yuan; Yuling, Liu; Mengting, Jiang; Weijuan, Liu; Guodong, Chen

    2014-11-01

    We propose the action mechanism of Cu chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) in an alkaline solution. Meanwhile, the effect of abrasive mass fraction on the copper removal rate and within wafer non-uniformity (WIWNU) have been researched. In addition, we have also investigated the synergistic effect between the applied pressure and the FA/O chelating agent on the copper removal rate and WIWNU in the CMP process. Based on the experimental results, we chose several concentrations of the FA/O chelating agent, which added in the slurry can obtain a relatively high removal rate and a low WIWNU after polishing, to investigate the planarization performance of the copper slurry under different applied pressure conditions. The results demonstrate that the copper removal rate can reach 6125 Å/min when the abrasive concentration is 3 wt.%. From the planarization experimental results, we can see that the residual step height is 562 Å after excessive copper of the wafer surface is eliminated. It denotes that a good polishing result is acquired when the FA/O chelating agent concentration and applied pressure are fixed at 3 vol% and 1 psi, respectively. All the results set forth here are very valuable for the research and development of alkaline slurry.

  12. Effect of alkaline pH-shift processing on in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of herring (Clupea harengus) fillets.

    PubMed

    Marmon, Sofia K; Undeland, Ingrid

    2013-05-01

    The effect of alkaline pH-shift processing on herring (Clupea harengus) protein oxidation, salt solubility and digestibility, has been evaluated. For the latter, herring mince and pH-shift produced herring protein isolate, both raw and heat-treated, were digested using a static gastrointestinal in vitro model. The pH-shift process resulted in drastically lowered protein salt solubility and increased lipid oxidation while protein carbonyl formation was unaffected. Yet, no significant differences in the degree of hydrolysis (DH) were observed between mince and isolates after completed gastrointestinal digestion, something which was confirmed by a similar release of proteinaceous material <3 kDa and similar free amino acid profiles. The polypeptide profiles of digested samples however revealed that two peptides (33 and 36 kDa) were present in larger amounts in the digested protein isolate compared to the digested herring mince. The results indicate that alkaline pH-shift processing had limited quantitative influence on the gastrointestinal digestibility of herring proteins despite its negative effects on protein salt solubility and lipid oxidation.

  13. Properties of metastable alkaline-earth-metal atoms calculated using an accurate effective core potential

    SciTech Connect

    Santra, Robin; Christ, Kevin V.; Greene, Chris H.

    2004-04-01

    The first three electronically excited states in the alkaline-earth-metal atoms magnesium, calcium, and strontium comprise the (nsnp){sup 3}P{sub J}{sup o}(J=0,1,2) fine-structure manifold. All three states are metastable and are of interest for optical atomic clocks as well as for cold-collision physics. An efficient technique--based on a physically motivated potential that models the presence of the ionic core--is employed to solve the Schroedinger equation for the two-electron valence shell. In this way, radiative lifetimes, laser-induced clock shifts, and long-range interaction parameters are calculated for metastable Mg, Ca, and Sr.

  14. Effects of Alkaline Phosphatase Activity on Nucleotide Measurements in Aquatic Microbial Communities †

    PubMed Central

    Karl, D. M.; Craven, D. B.

    1980-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (APase) activity was detected in aquatic microbial assemblages from the subtropics to Antarctica. The occurrence of APase in environmental nucleotide extracts was shown to significantly affect the measured concentrations of cellular nucleotides (adenosine triphosphate, adenosine diphosphate, adenosine monophosphate, guanosine triphosphate, uridine triphosphate, and cytidine triphosphate), adenylate energy charge, and guanosine triphosphate/adenosine triphosphate ratios, when conventional methods of nucleotide extraction were employed. Under the reaction conditions specified in this report, the initial rate of hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate was directly proportional to the activity of APase in the sample extracts and consequently can be used as a sensitive measure of APase activity. A method was devised for obtaining reliable nucleotide measurements in naturally occurring microbial populations containing elevated levels of APase activity. The metabolic significance of APase activity in microbial cells is discussed, and it is concluded that the occurrence and regulation of APase in nature is dependent upon microscale inorganic phosphate limitation of the autochthonous microbial communities. PMID:16345634

  15. Alkaline earth metal cation exchange: effect of mobile counterion and dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Indarawis, Katrina; Boyer, Treavor H

    2012-04-17

    The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding of the interactions between alkaline earth metals and DOM under conditions that are encountered during drinking water treatment with particular focus on cation exchange. Both magnetically enhanced and nonmagnetic cation exchange resins were converted to Na, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba mobile counterion forms as a novel approach to investigate the exchange behavior between the cations and the interactions between the cations and DOM. The results show that cation exchange is a robust process for removal of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) considering competition with cations on the resin surface and presence of DOM. DOM was actively involved during the cation exchange process through complexation, adsorption, and coprecipitation reactions. In addition to advancing the understanding of ion exchange processes for water treatment, the results of this work are applicable to membrane pretreatment to minimize fouling, treatment of membrane concentrate, and precipitative softening.

  16. Effect of Composition and Impurities on the Phosphorescence of Green-Emitting Alkaline Earth Aluminate Phosphor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Doory; Kim, Han-Eol; Kim, Chang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements to SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphors have enabled the use of luminescent hosts with a stable crystal structure and high physical and chemical stability, thus overcoming the bottleneck in the applicability of ZnS:Cu phosphors. However, enhancement of afterglow lifetime and brightness in SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphors remains a challenging task. Here, we have improved the afterglow characteristics in terms of persistence time and brightness by a systematic investigation of the composition of Eu-doped alkaline earth aluminate SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ crystals. We found that a Dy3+/Eu2+ ratio of ~2.4 and ~0.935 mol Eu2+ (per mol of SrAl2O4) gave the brightest and longest emissions (11% and 9% increase for each). Doping with Si4+ also resulted in a slight increase in brightness up to ~15%. Doping with alkali metal or alkaline earth metal significantly enhanced the phosphorescence intensity. In particular, doping with 0.005 mol Li+ (per mol of SrAl2O4) alone boosted the phosphorescence intensity to 239% of the initial value, as compared to that observed for the non-doped crystal, while doping with 0.01 mol Mg2+ and 0.005 mol Li+ (per 1 mol SrAl2O4) boosted the phosphorescence intensity up to 313% of the initial value. The results of this investigation are expected to act as a guideline for the synthesis of bright and long persistent phosphors, and facilitate the development of persistent phosphors with afterglow characteristics superior to those of conventional phosphors. PMID:26731086

  17. Effect of Composition and Impurities on the Phosphorescence of Green-Emitting Alkaline Earth Aluminate Phosphor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doory; Kim, Han-Eol; Kim, Chang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements to SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphors have enabled the use of luminescent hosts with a stable crystal structure and high physical and chemical stability, thus overcoming the bottleneck in the applicability of ZnS:Cu phosphors. However, enhancement of afterglow lifetime and brightness in SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphors remains a challenging task. Here, we have improved the afterglow characteristics in terms of persistence time and brightness by a systematic investigation of the composition of Eu-doped alkaline earth aluminate SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ crystals. We found that a Dy3+/Eu2+ ratio of ~2.4 and ~0.935 mol Eu2+ (per mol of SrAl2O4) gave the brightest and longest emissions (11% and 9% increase for each). Doping with Si4+ also resulted in a slight increase in brightness up to ~15%. Doping with alkali metal or alkaline earth metal significantly enhanced the phosphorescence intensity. In particular, doping with 0.005 mol Li+ (per mol of SrAl2O4) alone boosted the phosphorescence intensity to 239% of the initial value, as compared to that observed for the non-doped crystal, while doping with 0.01 mol Mg2+ and 0.005 mol Li+ (per 1 mol SrAl2O4) boosted the phosphorescence intensity up to 313% of the initial value. The results of this investigation are expected to act as a guideline for the synthesis of bright and long persistent phosphors, and facilitate the development of persistent phosphors with afterglow characteristics superior to those of conventional phosphors. PMID:26731086

  18. Effects of alkaline pretreatments and acid extraction conditions on the acid-soluble collagen from grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) skin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dasong; Wei, Guanmian; Li, Tiancheng; Hu, Jinhua; Lu, Naiyan; Regenstein, Joe M; Zhou, Peng

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of alkaline pretreatments and acid extraction conditions on the production of acid-soluble collagen (ASC) from grass carp skin. For alkaline pretreatment, 0.05 and 0.1M NaOH removed non-collagenous proteins without significant loss of ASC at 4, 10, 15 and 20 °C; while 0.2 and 0.5M NaOH caused significant loss of ASC, and 0.5M NaOH caused structural modification of ASC at 15 and 20 °C. For acid extraction at 4, 10, 15 and 20 °C, ASC was partly extracted by 0.1 and 0.2M acetic acid, while 0.5 and 1.0M acetic acid resulted in almost complete extraction. The processing conditions involving 0.05-0.1M NaOH for pretreatment, 0.5M acetic acid for extraction and 4-20 °C for both pretreatment and extraction, produced ASC with the structural integrity being well maintained and hence were recommended to prepare ASC from grass carp skin in practical application.

  19. Effects of applied potential on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of 7003 aluminum alloy in acid and alkaline chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-yan; Song, Ren-guo; Sun, Bin; Lu, Hai; Wang, Chao

    2016-07-01

    Potentiodynamic polarization tests and slow strain rate test (SSRT) in combination with fracture morphology observations were conducted to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of 7003 aluminum alloy (AA7003) in acid and alkaline chloride solutions under various applied potentials ( E a). The results show that AA7003 is to a certain extent susceptible to SCC via anodic dissolution (AD) at open-circuit potential (OCP) and is highly susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement (HE) at high negative E a in the solutions with pH levels of 4 and 11. The susceptibility increases with negative shift in the potential when E a is less than -1000 mV vs. SCE. However, the susceptibility distinctly decreases because of the inhibition of AD when E a is equal to -1000 mV vs. SCE. In addition, the SCC susceptibility of AA7003 in the acid chloride solution is higher than that in the alkaline solution at each potential. Moreover, the effect of hydrogen on SCC increases with increasing hydrogen ion concentration.

  20. Enhancing simultaneous nitritation and anammox in recirculating biofilters: effects of unsaturated zone depth and alkalinity dissolution of packing materials.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jianfeng; Tao, Wendong; Wang, Ziyuan; Pei, Yuansheng

    2013-01-15

    This study investigated effects of unsaturated zone depth on nitrogen removal via simultaneous nitritation and anammox in three vertical flow recirculating biofilters. The biofilters had different depths (25, 40, and 60 cm) of an unsaturated zone and the same depth (35 cm) of a saturated zone. Unsaturated zone depth could be regulated to maintain suitable dissolved oxygen concentrations and enhance entrapment of carbon dioxide for co-occurrence of aerobic ammonia oxidation and anammox in the saturated zones. The biofilters with the larger unsaturated zones had higher ammonium and total inorganic nitrogen removal rates (16.2-33.5 g N/m(3)/d and 4.6-16.7 g N/m(3)/d, respectively) than the biofilter with the smallest unsaturated zone (11.9-18.1 g N/m(3)/d and 4.4-7.9 g N/m(3)/d, respectively). Electric arc furnace slag and marble chips were packed in the unsaturated and saturated zones, respectively, as low-cost materials to supplement alkalinity and buffer pH. Laboratory experiments showed that the maximum alkalinity dissolution efficiency was 513 mg CaCO(3)/kg marble chips and 761 mg CaCO(3)/kg electric arc furnace slag. Marble chips and electric arc furnace slag could increase dairy wastewater pH up to 7 and 9, respectively. The laboratory results are also useful for utilization of furnace slag and marble chips in constructed wetlands.

  1. Individual and combined effects of waterlogging and alkalinity on yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) imposed at three critical stages.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Praveen Kumar; Sharma, S K; Choi, I Y

    2010-07-01

    Response of wheat genotype HD 2329 to individual and combined effects of alkalinity and waterlogging (WL) at tillering, panicle emergence and anthesis stage was studied. Both stresses increased Na accumulation and reduced K uptake which leads to higher Na(+)/K(+) ratio in the leaves. Yield was decreased under all the stress treatments and highly correlated with Na(+)/K(+) ratio at all the three growth stages (r = -0.83, -0.82 and -0.73, respectively) with maximum reduction under pH 9.4 + WL. Increase in pH from 7.2 to 9.1 and 9.4 delayed complete panicle emergence (4 and 8 days) and flowering (1 and 2 days) at both, tillering and panicle emergence stages. Dual stress further increased days, required for complete panicle emergence and flowering. These results suggested that high Na(+)/K(+) ratio of plant tissue may be the critical factor for growth and development of wheat under WL, alkalinity and dual stress. Due to this delay in flowering and panicle emergence, times required for maturity of grains shorten, resulted in lower grain yield. PMID:23572981

  2. Effects of grind size when alkaline treating corn residue and impact of ratio of alkaline-treated residue and distillers grains on performance of finishing cattle.

    PubMed

    Shreck, A L; Nuttelman, B L; Schneider, C J; Burken, D B; Harding, J L; Erickson, G E; Klopfenstein, T J; Cecava, M J

    2015-07-01

    Two studies were conducted to optimize use of alkaline-treated corn stover and wheat straw and distillers grains as partial corn replacements. In Exp. 1, a finishing experiment used 30 pens (12 steers/pen) of calf-fed steers (initial BW = 374 ± 23.9 kg) with a 2 × 2 + 1 factorial arrangement of treatments with 6 replications per treatment. Factors were grind size, where corn stover was processed through a 2.54- or 7.62-cm screen, and chemical treatment (corn stover either fed in native, non-treated form [NT; 93.4% DM] or alkaline treated [AT; 5% CaO hydrated to 50% DM]). No interactions (P ≥ 0.38) were noted between grind size and chemical treatment. Feeding AT compared with NT improved (P ≤ 0.02) final BW, ADG, and G:F. Reducing grind size improved (P ≤ 0.01) ADG and G:F, and no interaction with chemical treatment was observed. Steers fed AT had similar DMI, ADG, G:F, and carcass characteristics compared with a 5% roughage control that contained 15 percentage units (DM basis) more corn. In Exp. 2, 60 individually fed steers (initial BW = 402 ± 61.4 kg) were randomly assigned to 10 diets. Six treatments evaluated 10, 25, or 40% dry-rolled corn (DRC), which was replaced with either a 2:1 or 3:1 ratio (DM basis) of modified distillers grains plus solubles (MDGS) and treated corn stover analyzed as a 2 × 3 factorial. An additional 3 treatments were added where a 3:1 ratio of MDGS:straw were compared with a 3:1 ratio of MDGS:stover. As DRC increased, G:F (P = 0.06) quadratically increased for 3:1 MDGS:stover diets. Increasing DRC increased (P = 0.07) G:F in treated stover diets, regardless of ratio. Increasing DRC increased (P = 0.10) ADG for 3:1 ratios for both straw and stover. Reducing grind size, feeding a maximum of 20% treated crop residue, and maintaining at least 25% corn in the diet are strategies for optimizing cattle performance when replacing dry-rolled and high-moisture corn with treated crop residues and distillers grains. PMID:26440029

  3. Effects of grind size when alkaline treating corn residue and impact of ratio of alkaline-treated residue and distillers grains on performance of finishing cattle.

    PubMed

    Shreck, A L; Nuttelman, B L; Schneider, C J; Burken, D B; Harding, J L; Erickson, G E; Klopfenstein, T J; Cecava, M J

    2015-07-01

    Two studies were conducted to optimize use of alkaline-treated corn stover and wheat straw and distillers grains as partial corn replacements. In Exp. 1, a finishing experiment used 30 pens (12 steers/pen) of calf-fed steers (initial BW = 374 ± 23.9 kg) with a 2 × 2 + 1 factorial arrangement of treatments with 6 replications per treatment. Factors were grind size, where corn stover was processed through a 2.54- or 7.62-cm screen, and chemical treatment (corn stover either fed in native, non-treated form [NT; 93.4% DM] or alkaline treated [AT; 5% CaO hydrated to 50% DM]). No interactions (P ≥ 0.38) were noted between grind size and chemical treatment. Feeding AT compared with NT improved (P ≤ 0.02) final BW, ADG, and G:F. Reducing grind size improved (P ≤ 0.01) ADG and G:F, and no interaction with chemical treatment was observed. Steers fed AT had similar DMI, ADG, G:F, and carcass characteristics compared with a 5% roughage control that contained 15 percentage units (DM basis) more corn. In Exp. 2, 60 individually fed steers (initial BW = 402 ± 61.4 kg) were randomly assigned to 10 diets. Six treatments evaluated 10, 25, or 40% dry-rolled corn (DRC), which was replaced with either a 2:1 or 3:1 ratio (DM basis) of modified distillers grains plus solubles (MDGS) and treated corn stover analyzed as a 2 × 3 factorial. An additional 3 treatments were added where a 3:1 ratio of MDGS:straw were compared with a 3:1 ratio of MDGS:stover. As DRC increased, G:F (P = 0.06) quadratically increased for 3:1 MDGS:stover diets. Increasing DRC increased (P = 0.07) G:F in treated stover diets, regardless of ratio. Increasing DRC increased (P = 0.10) ADG for 3:1 ratios for both straw and stover. Reducing grind size, feeding a maximum of 20% treated crop residue, and maintaining at least 25% corn in the diet are strategies for optimizing cattle performance when replacing dry-rolled and high-moisture corn with treated crop residues and distillers grains.

  4. A Further Investigation of the Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields on Alkaline Phosphatase and Acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Silkstone, Gary; Wilson, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Using a custom build spectrophotometer equipped with Helmholtz coils and designed to study the effects of magnetic fields on enzyme reactions in real-time we have investigated the influence of fields, from 100 μT to 10 mT and at a variety of field frequencies, on the membrane bound enzymes alkaline phosphatase and acetylcholinesterase. We have also employed other methods to apply a magnetic field, e.g. Biostim. In contrast to earlier reports we have been unable to detect any field effects on these enzymes under any field/frequency regime. We discuss possible reasons for the discrepancy between this and earlier work and note the particularly complex influence of small temperature changes that may confound analysis. PMID:26963611

  5. A Further Investigation of the Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields on Alkaline Phosphatase and Acetylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Silkstone, Gary; Wilson, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Using a custom build spectrophotometer equipped with Helmholtz coils and designed to study the effects of magnetic fields on enzyme reactions in real-time we have investigated the influence of fields, from 100 μT to 10 mT and at a variety of field frequencies, on the membrane bound enzymes alkaline phosphatase and acetylcholinesterase. We have also employed other methods to apply a magnetic field, e.g. Biostim. In contrast to earlier reports we have been unable to detect any field effects on these enzymes under any field/frequency regime. We discuss possible reasons for the discrepancy between this and earlier work and note the particularly complex influence of small temperature changes that may confound analysis. PMID:26963611

  6. Synergetic effect of palladium-ruthenium nanostructures for ethanol electrooxidation in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monyoncho, Evans A.; Ntais, Spyridon; Soares, Felipo; Woo, Tom K.; Baranova, Elena A.

    2015-08-01

    Palladium-ruthenium nanoparticles supported on carbon PdxRu1-x/C (x = 1, 0.99, 0.95, 0.90, 0.80, 0.50) were prepared using a polyol method for ethanol electrooxidation in alkaline media. The resulting bimetallic catalysts were found to be primarily a mix of Pd metal, Ru oxides and Pd oxides. Their electrocatalytic activity towards ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) in 1M KOH was studied using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques. Addition of 1-10 at.% Ru to Pd not only lowers the onset oxidation potential for EOR but also produces higher current densities at lower potentials compared to Pd by itself. Thus, Pd90Ru10/C and Pd99Ru1/C provide the current densities of up to six times those of Pd/C at -0.96 V and -0.67 V vs MSE, respectively. The current density at different potentials was found to be dependent on the surface composition of PdxRu1-x/C nanostructures. Pd90Ru10/C catalyst with more surface oxides was found to be active at lower potential compared to Pd99Ru1/C with less surface oxides, which is active at higher potentials. The steady-state current densities of the two best catalysts, Pd90Ru10/C and Pd99Ru1/C, showed minimal surface deactivation from EOR intermediates/products during chronoamperometry.

  7. Alkaline deoxygenated graphene oxide for supercapacitor applications: An effective green alternative for chemically reduced graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Sanjaya D.; Mariano, Ruperto G.; Nijem, Nour; Chabal, Yves; Ferraris, John P.; Balkus, Kenneth J.

    2012-10-01

    Graphene is a promising electrode material for energy storage applications. The most successful method for preparing graphene from graphite involves the oxidation of graphite to graphene oxide (GO) and reduction back to graphene. Even though different chemical and thermal methods have been developed to reduce GO to graphene, the use of less toxic materials to generate graphene still remains a challenge. In this study we developed a facile one-pot synthesis of deoxygenated graphene (hGO) via alkaline hydrothermal process, which exhibits similar properties to the graphene obtained via hydrazine reduction (i.e. the same degree of deoxygenation found in hydrazine reduced GO). Moreover, the hGO formed freestanding, binder-free paper electrodes for supercapacitors. Coin cell type (CR2032) symmetric supercapacitors were assembled using the hGO electrodes. Electrochemical characterization of hGO was carried out using lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) and ethylmethylimidazolium bis-(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (EMITFSI) electrolytes. The results for the hGO electrodes were compared with the hydrazine reduced GO (rGO) electrode. The hGO electrode exhibits a energy density of 20 W h kg-1 and 50 W h kg-1 in LiTFSI and EMITFSI respectively, while delivering a maximum power density of 11 kW kg-1 and 14.7 kW kg-1 in LiTFSI and EMITFSI, respectively.

  8. Zein as biodegradable material for effective delivery of alkaline phosphatase and substrates in biokits and biosensors.

    PubMed

    Jornet-Martínez, N; Campíns-Falcó, P; Hall, E A H

    2016-12-15

    A biodegradable material, zein, is proposed as a reagent delivery platform for biokits and biosensors based on alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity/inhibition in the presence of phosphatase substrates. The immobilization and release of both the substrate and/or the active ALP, in a biodegradable and low-cost material such as zein, a prolamin from maize, and in combination with glycerol as plasticizer have been investigated. Three zein-based devices are proposed for several applications: (1) inorganic phosphorus estimation in water of different sources (river, lake, coastal water and tap water) with a detection limit of 0.2mg/L - compared to at least 1mg/L required by legislation, (2) estimation of ALP in saliva and (3) chlorpyrifos control in commercial preparations. The single-use kits developed are low cost, easy and fast to manufacture and are stable for at least 20 days at -20°C, so the zein film can preserve and deliver both the enzyme and substrates.

  9. M13 phage peptide ZL4 exerts its targeted binding effect on schistosoma japonicum via alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Yang, Shenghui; Xiao, Jianhua; Yu, Liang; Chen, Li; Zou, Ju; Wang, Kegeng; Tan, Sijie; Yu, Zhengyang; Zeng, Qingren

    2015-01-01

    The present study was to determine the targeting effect of M13 phage peptide ZL4 (MppZL4) on Schistosoma japonicum (S.j). Mice infected with S.j were injected with MppZL4. Real-time PCR was used to detect the distribution and metabolism of MppZL4 in the livers and lungs of mice. In vivo refusion test was performed to detect the targeting of MppZL4. Western blotting was employed to determine the expression of MppZL4. Live imaging was used to detect the distribution of oligopeptide MppZL4. Immunohistochemistry was employed to determine MppZL4 location on adult S.j body surface. Gomori method was employed to detect the influence of oligopeptide MppZL4 on alkaline phosphatase activity. The distribution and metabolism of MppZL4 and M13KE are not significantly different from each other at each time point. The abundance of MppZL4 is changed as S.j migrates in mice. The targeted binding effect of MppZL4 varies at different stages. ZL4 oligopeptide targets S.j in mice. The specific binding sites of MppZL4 on S.j body are mainly located in syncytial cells. The binding sites of MppZL4 on S.j body surface might be ALP or ALP-related proteins. MppZL4 had targeted binding effect on S.j with its binding site being associated with proteins related to S.j alkaline phosphatase. S.j tegument had a specifically binding site with exogenous peptides, offering new means to explore the interactions between hosts and parasites. Additionally, MppZL4 can possibly be used as targeting molecules in worm-resistant drugs or as tracing molecules in imaging diagnosis technologies.

  10. M13 phage peptide ZL4 exerts its targeted binding effect on schistosoma japonicum via alkaline phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Yang, Shenghui; Xiao, Jianhua; Yu, Liang; Chen, Li; Zou, Ju; Wang, Kegeng; Tan, Sijie; Yu, Zhengyang; Zeng, Qingren

    2015-01-01

    The present study was to determine the targeting effect of M13 phage peptide ZL4 (MppZL4) on Schistosoma japonicum (S.j). Mice infected with S.j were injected with MppZL4. Real-time PCR was used to detect the distribution and metabolism of MppZL4 in the livers and lungs of mice. In vivo refusion test was performed to detect the targeting of MppZL4. Western blotting was employed to determine the expression of MppZL4. Live imaging was used to detect the distribution of oligopeptide MppZL4. Immunohistochemistry was employed to determine MppZL4 location on adult S.j body surface. Gomori method was employed to detect the influence of oligopeptide MppZL4 on alkaline phosphatase activity. The distribution and metabolism of MppZL4 and M13KE are not significantly different from each other at each time point. The abundance of MppZL4 is changed as S.j migrates in mice. The targeted binding effect of MppZL4 varies at different stages. ZL4 oligopeptide targets S.j in mice. The specific binding sites of MppZL4 on S.j body are mainly located in syncytial cells. The binding sites of MppZL4 on S.j body surface might be ALP or ALP-related proteins. MppZL4 had targeted binding effect on S.j with its binding site being associated with proteins related to S.j alkaline phosphatase. S.j tegument had a specifically binding site with exogenous peptides, offering new means to explore the interactions between hosts and parasites. Additionally, MppZL4 can possibly be used as targeting molecules in worm-resistant drugs or as tracing molecules in imaging diagnosis technologies. PMID:25973009

  11. Bohr's Electron was Problematic for Einstein: String Theory Solved the Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, William

    2013-04-01

    Neils Bohr's 1913 model of the hydrogen electron was problematic for Albert Einstein. Bohr's electron rotates with positive kinetic energies +K but has addition negative potential energies - 2K. The total net energy is thus always negative with value - K. Einstein's special relativity requires energies to be positive. There's a Bohr negative energy conflict with Einstein's positive energy requirement. The two men debated the problem. Both would have preferred a different electron model having only positive energies. Bohr and Einstein couldn't find such a model. But Murray Gell-Mann did! In the 1960's, Gell-Mann introduced his loop-shaped string-like electron. Now, analysis with string theory shows that the hydrogen electron is a loop of string-like material with a length equal to the circumference of the circular orbit it occupies. It rotates like a lariat around its centered proton. This loop-shape has no negative potential energies: only positive +K relativistic kinetic energies. Waves induced on loop-shaped electrons propagate their energy at a speed matching the tangential speed of rotation. With matching wave speed and only positive kinetic energies, this loop-shaped electron model is uniquely suited to be governed by the Einstein relativistic equation for total mass-energy. Its calculated photon emissions are all in excellent agreement with experimental data and, of course, in agreement with those -K calculations by Neils Bohr 100 years ago. Problem solved!

  12. Why has the bohr-sommerfeld model of the atom been ignoredby general chemistry textbooks?

    PubMed

    Niaz, Mansoor; Cardellini, Liberato

    2011-12-01

    Bohr's model of the atom is considered to be important by general chemistry textbooks. A major shortcoming of this model was that it could not explain the spectra of atoms containing more than one electron. In order to increase the explanatory power of the model, Sommerfeld hypothesized the existence of elliptical orbits. This study has the following objectives: 1) Formulation of criteria based on a history and philosophy of science framework; and 2) Evaluation of university-level general chemistry textbooks based on the criteria, published in Italy and U.S.A. Presentation of a textbook was considered to be "satisfactory" if it included a description of the Bohr-Sommerfeld model along with diagrams of the elliptical orbits. Of the 28 textbooks published in Italy that were analyzed, only five were classified as "satisfactory". Of the 46 textbooks published in U.S.A., only three were classified as "satisfactory". This study has the following educational implications: a) Sommerfeld's innovation (auxiliary hypothesis) by introducing elliptical orbits, helped to restore the viability of Bohr's model; b) Bohr-Sommerfeld's model went no further than the alkali metals, which led scientists to look for other models; c) This clearly shows that scientific models are tentative in nature; d) Textbook authors and chemistry teachers do not consider the tentative nature of scientific knowledge to be important; e) Inclusion of the Bohr-Sommerfeld model in textbooks can help our students to understand how science progresses.

  13. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy. PMID:26404834

  14. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy.

  15. [Effects of Festuca arundinacea on the microbial community in crude oil-contaminated saline-alkaline soil].

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Hui-Hui; Yue, Bing-Bing; Xu, Nan; Zhu, Wen-Xu; Hu, Ju-Wei; Sun, Guang-Yu

    2012-12-01

    By using the routine soil physical and chemical analysis methods and the Biolog technique, this paper studied the effects of Festuca arundinacea growth on the pH value, total salt content, and microbial community in the rhizosphere of crude dil-contaminated saline-alkaline soil in Songnen Plain of Northeast China. Crude oil contamination resulted in the increases of average well color development (AWCD), Shannon index (H), and carbon source utilization richness index (S), and altered the utilization patterns of carbon sources by the microbes. F. arundinacea had greater potential to remediate crude oil-contaminated soil. This plant could decrease the soil pH and soil total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content, and increase the soil water content. The AWCD and S in F. arundinacea rhizosphere soil were obviously higher than those in the soil of naked land, providing a suitable environment for the growth and development of rhizosphere soil microbes.

  16. What is complementarity?: Niels Bohr and the architecture of quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnitsky, Arkady

    2014-12-01

    This article explores Bohr’s argument, advanced under the heading of ‘complementarity,’ concerning quantum phenomena and quantum mechanics, and its physical and philosophical implications. In Bohr, the term complementarity designates both a particular concept and an overall interpretation of quantum phenomena and quantum mechanics, in part grounded in this concept. While the argument of this article is primarily philosophical, it will also address, historically, the development and transformations of Bohr’s thinking, under the impact of the development of quantum theory and Bohr’s confrontation with Einstein, especially their exchange concerning the EPR experiment, proposed by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen in 1935. Bohr’s interpretation was progressively characterized by a more radical epistemology, in its ultimate form, which was developed in the 1930s and with which I shall be especially concerned here, defined by his new concepts of phenomenon and atomicity. According to this epistemology, quantum objects are seen as indescribable and possibly even as inconceivable, and as manifesting their existence only in the effects of their interactions with measuring instruments upon those instruments, effects that define phenomena in Bohr’s sense. The absence of causality is an automatic consequence of this epistemology. I shall also consider how probability and statistics work under these epistemological conditions.

  17. Effects of the low-temperature thermo-alkaline method on the rheological properties of sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruikun; Zhao, Zhenghui; Yin, Qianqian; Liu, Jianzhong

    2016-07-15

    Municipal sewage sludge (hereafter referred to as sludge) in increasing amounts is a serious threat to the environment and human health. Sludge is difficult to dispose because of its complex properties, such as high water content, viscosity, and hazardous compound concentration. The rheological properties of sludge also significantly influence treatment processes, including stirring, mixing, pumping, and conveying. Improving the rheological properties and reducing the apparent viscosity of sludge are conducive to economic and safe sludge treatment. In this study, the low-temperature thermo-alkaline (LTTA) method was used to modify sludge. Compared with the original sludge with an apparent viscosity at 100 s(-1) (η100) of 979.3 mPa s, the sludge modified under 90 °C-Ca(OH)2-1 h and 90 °C-NaOH-1 h conditions exhibited lower η100 values of 208.7 and 110.8 mPa s respectively. The original sludge exhibited a pseudoplastic behavior. After modification, the pseudoplastic behavior was weakened, and the sludge gradually tended to behave as Newton fluids. The hysteresis loop observed during the shear rate cycle was mainly caused by the viscoelasticity of the sludge. The hysteresis loop area (Hla) reflected to a certain extent the energy required to break the elastic solid structure of the sludge. The larger the Hla, the more energy was needed. However, this result should be evaluated comprehensively by considering other sludge parameters, such as yield stress and apparent viscosity. Hla may also reflect the damage degree of the sludge structure after shearing action. The irreversible destruction of the structure during shearing may also increase Hla. PMID:27082259

  18. Studies on alkaline band formation in Chara corallina: ameliorating effect of Ca2+ on inhibition induced by osmotic shock.

    PubMed

    Shimmen, Teruo; Yonemura, Satoko; Negoro, Mio; Lucas, William J

    2003-09-01

    Although the decrease in cell turgor by application of sorbitol to the external medium did not inhibit the alkaline band formation in Chara corallina, recovery of normal turgor severely inhibited it. Alkaline-loading analysis suggested that the inhibition of alkaline band formation was caused by inhibition of HCO(3)(-) influx but not that of OH(-) efflux. In the presence of 10 mM CaCl(2), the capacity of alkaline band formation was maintained during osmotic treatment. Cells could not form alkaline bands, when plasmolysis was induced by application of sorbitol at a higher concentration. Addition of 10 mM CaCl(2) could ameliorate the inhibition caused by plasmolyis.

  19. Cation effects in the oxidative coupling of methane on silica-supported binary alkali and alkaline earths

    SciTech Connect

    Voyatzis, R.; Moffat, J.B. )

    1993-07-01

    The oxidative coupling of methane has been investigated with a series of silica-supported binary oxide catalysts containing alkali or alkaline earths or combinations of the former and latter. The conversion of methane and the stability of the silica-supported binary alkali metal oxides were found to increase with decreasing cation mobility, while the selectivities and conversions observed with the binary alkaline earths increase with cation size. The selectivities and conversions of binary alkali/alkaline earths appear to depend upon the size of the alkali and alkaline earth cations, respectively. With small quantities of TCM (CCl[sub 4]) added continuously to the feedstream, catalysts containing small alkali and large alkaline earth cations produced the largest selectivities and conversions. 23 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Effect of gingival application of melatonin on alkaline and acid phosphatase, osteopontin and osteocalcin in patients with diabetes and periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    López-Valverde, Antonio; Gómez-de-Diego, Rafel; Arias-Santiago, Salvador; de Vicente-Jiménez, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effect of topical application of melatonin to the gingiva on salivary fluid concentrations of acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteocalcin. Study Design: Cross-sectional study of 30 patients with diabetes and periodontal disease and 30 healthy subjects. Diabetic patients were treated with topical application of melatonin (1% orabase cream formula) once daily for 20 days and controls with a placebo formulation. Results: Before treatment with melatonin, diabetic patients showed significantly higher mean salivary levels of alkaline and acid phosphatase, osteopontin and osteocalcin than healthy subjects (P < 0.01). After treatment with melatonin, there was a statistically significant decrease of the gingival index (15.84± 10.3 vs 5.6 ± 5.1) and pocket depth (28.3 ± 19.5 vs 11.9 ± 9.0) (P < 0.001). Also, use of melatonin was associated with a significant reduction of the four biomarkers. Changes of salivary acid phosphatase and osteopontin correlated significantly with changes in the gingival index, whereas changes of alkaline phosphatase and osteopontin correlated significantly with changes in the pocket depth. Conclusions: Treatment with topical melatonin was associated with an improvement in the gingival index and pocket depth, a reduction in salivary concentrations of acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin and osteocalcin. Key words:Melatonin, diabetes mellitus, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, osteopontin, osteocalcin. PMID:23524437

  1. Corrosion control in water supply systems: effect of pH, alkalinity, and orthophosphate on lead and copper leaching from brass plumbing.

    PubMed

    Tam, Y S; Elefsiniotis, P

    2009-10-01

    This study explored the potential of lead and copper leaching from brass plumbing in the Auckland region of New Zealand. A five-month field investigation, at six representative locations, indicated that Auckland's water can be characterized as soft and potentially corrosive, having low alkalinity and hardness levels and a moderately alkaline pH. More than 90% of the unflushed samples contained lead above the maximum acceptable value (MAV) of 10 microg/L (New Zealand Standards). In contrast, the copper level of unflushed samples remained consistently below the corresponding MAV of 2 mg/L. Flushing however reduced sharply metal concentrations, with lead values well below the MAV limit. Generally, metal leaching patterns showed a limited degree of correlation with the variations in temperature, dissolved oxygen and free chlorine residual at all sampling locations. Furthermore, a series of bench-scale experiments was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of pH and alkalinity adjustment, as well as orthophosphate addition as corrosion control tools regarding lead and copper dissolution. Results demonstrated that lead and copper leaching was predominant during the first 24 hr of stagnation, but reached an equilibrium state afterwards. Since the soluble fraction of both metals was small (12% for lead, 29% for copper), it is apparent that the non-soluble compounds play a predominant role in the dissolution process. The degree of leaching however was largely affected by the variations in pH and alkalinity. At pH around neutrality, an increase in alkalinity promoted metal dissolution, while at pH 9.0 the effect of alkalinity on leaching was marginal. Lastly, addition of orthophosphate as a corrosion inhibitor was more effective at pH 7.5 or higher, resulting in approximately 70% reduction in both lead and copper concentrations.

  2. Corrosion control in water supply systems: effect of pH, alkalinity, and orthophosphate on lead and copper leaching from brass plumbing.

    PubMed

    Tam, Y S; Elefsiniotis, P

    2009-10-01

    This study explored the potential of lead and copper leaching from brass plumbing in the Auckland region of New Zealand. A five-month field investigation, at six representative locations, indicated that Auckland's water can be characterized as soft and potentially corrosive, having low alkalinity and hardness levels and a moderately alkaline pH. More than 90% of the unflushed samples contained lead above the maximum acceptable value (MAV) of 10 microg/L (New Zealand Standards). In contrast, the copper level of unflushed samples remained consistently below the corresponding MAV of 2 mg/L. Flushing however reduced sharply metal concentrations, with lead values well below the MAV limit. Generally, metal leaching patterns showed a limited degree of correlation with the variations in temperature, dissolved oxygen and free chlorine residual at all sampling locations. Furthermore, a series of bench-scale experiments was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of pH and alkalinity adjustment, as well as orthophosphate addition as corrosion control tools regarding lead and copper dissolution. Results demonstrated that lead and copper leaching was predominant during the first 24 hr of stagnation, but reached an equilibrium state afterwards. Since the soluble fraction of both metals was small (12% for lead, 29% for copper), it is apparent that the non-soluble compounds play a predominant role in the dissolution process. The degree of leaching however was largely affected by the variations in pH and alkalinity. At pH around neutrality, an increase in alkalinity promoted metal dissolution, while at pH 9.0 the effect of alkalinity on leaching was marginal. Lastly, addition of orthophosphate as a corrosion inhibitor was more effective at pH 7.5 or higher, resulting in approximately 70% reduction in both lead and copper concentrations. PMID:19847713

  3. An effective approach for alleviating cation-induced backbone degradation in aromatic ether-based alkaline polymer electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Han, Juanjuan; Liu, Qiong; Li, Xueqi; Pan, Jing; Wei, Ling; Wu, Ying; Peng, Hanqing; Wang, Ying; Li, Guangwei; Chen, Chen; Xiao, Li; Lu, Juntao; Zhuang, Lin

    2015-02-01

    Aromatic ether-based alkaline polymer electrolytes (APEs) are one of the most popular types of APEs being used in fuel cells. However, recent studies have demonstrated that upon being grafted by proximal cations some polar groups in the backbone of such APEs can be attacked by OH(-), leading to backbone degradation in an alkaline environment. To resolve this issue, we performed a systematic study on six APEs. We first replaced the polysulfone (PS) backbone with polyphenylsulfone (PPSU) and polyphenylether (PPO), whose molecular structures contain fewer polar groups. Although improved stability was seen after this change, cation-induced degradation was still obvious. Thus, our second move was to replace the ordinary quaternary ammonia (QA) cation, which had been closely attached to the polymer backbone, with a pendant-type QA (pQA), which was linked to the backbone through a long side chain. After a stability test in a 1 mol/L KOH solution at 80 °C for 30 days, all pQA-type APEs (pQAPS, pQAPPSU, and pQAPPO) exhibited as low as 8 wt % weight loss, which is close to the level of the bare backbone (5 wt %) and remarkably lower than those of the QA-type APEs (QAPS, QAPPSU, and QAPPO), whose weight losses under the same conditions were >30%. The pQA-type APEs also possessed clear microphase segregation morphology, which led to ionic conductivities that were higher, and water uptakes and degrees of membrane swelling that were lower, than those of the QA-type APEs. These observations unambiguously indicate that designing pendant-type cations is an effective approach to increasing the chemical stability of aromatic ether-based APEs.

  4. An effective approach for alleviating cation-induced backbone degradation in aromatic ether-based alkaline polymer electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Han, Juanjuan; Liu, Qiong; Li, Xueqi; Pan, Jing; Wei, Ling; Wu, Ying; Peng, Hanqing; Wang, Ying; Li, Guangwei; Chen, Chen; Xiao, Li; Lu, Juntao; Zhuang, Lin

    2015-02-01

    Aromatic ether-based alkaline polymer electrolytes (APEs) are one of the most popular types of APEs being used in fuel cells. However, recent studies have demonstrated that upon being grafted by proximal cations some polar groups in the backbone of such APEs can be attacked by OH(-), leading to backbone degradation in an alkaline environment. To resolve this issue, we performed a systematic study on six APEs. We first replaced the polysulfone (PS) backbone with polyphenylsulfone (PPSU) and polyphenylether (PPO), whose molecular structures contain fewer polar groups. Although improved stability was seen after this change, cation-induced degradation was still obvious. Thus, our second move was to replace the ordinary quaternary ammonia (QA) cation, which had been closely attached to the polymer backbone, with a pendant-type QA (pQA), which was linked to the backbone through a long side chain. After a stability test in a 1 mol/L KOH solution at 80 °C for 30 days, all pQA-type APEs (pQAPS, pQAPPSU, and pQAPPO) exhibited as low as 8 wt % weight loss, which is close to the level of the bare backbone (5 wt %) and remarkably lower than those of the QA-type APEs (QAPS, QAPPSU, and QAPPO), whose weight losses under the same conditions were >30%. The pQA-type APEs also possessed clear microphase segregation morphology, which led to ionic conductivities that were higher, and water uptakes and degrees of membrane swelling that were lower, than those of the QA-type APEs. These observations unambiguously indicate that designing pendant-type cations is an effective approach to increasing the chemical stability of aromatic ether-based APEs. PMID:25594224

  5. Removal of titanium dioxide nanoparticles by coagulation: effects of coagulants, typical ions, alkalinity and natural organic matters.

    PubMed

    Wang, H T; Ye, Y Y; Qi, J; Li, F T; Tang, Y L

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of removing titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) from water by coagulation, as well as to find the optimal coagulant and experimental conditions for TiO2 NP removal, four types of coagulant were adopted: polyferric sulfate (PFS), ferric chloride (FeCl3), polyaluminum chloride (PACl), and alum (Al2(SO4)3). It was found that the removal of TiO2 NPs by coagulation was affected by ionic strength, alkalinity, as well as types and dosages of coagulants. PFS and FeCl3 achieved much higher removal efficiency of TiO2 NPs than PACl and Al2(SO4)3 did. For 30 mg/L TiO2 NPs, a dosage of 0.3 mM PFS (as Fe) achieved 84% removal after coagulation followed by 30 min settlement. Optimal ionic strength (0.1 M NaCl or 0.03 M CaCl2) is of vital importance for the performance of PFS. Na2SO4 is unfavorable for the performance of PFS. Optimal alkalinity (0.01-0.03 M NaHCO3) is necessary for FeCl3 to remove TiO2 NPs. Natural organic matter, as represented by humic acid (HA) up to 11 mg/L, reduces the removal of TiO2 NPs by coagulation. These findings indicate that coagulation is a good option for the removal of TiO2 NPs from water, and more attention should be paid to the effects of water quality when using coagulation to remove TiO2 NPs from aqueous matrices. This provides a possible solution to alleviate the potential hazard caused by TiO2 NPs.

  6. Acidic and alkaline pretreatments of activated carbon and their effects on the performance of air-cathodes in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Gao, Ningshengjie; Zhou, Qixing; Dong, Heng; Yu, Hongbing; Feng, Yujie

    2013-09-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is a high performing and cost effective catalyst for oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) of air-cathodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Acidic (HNO3) and alkaline (KOH) pretreatments on AC at low temperature (85°C) are conducted to enhance the performance of MFCs. The alkaline pretreatment increased the power density by 16% from 804±70 to 957±31 mW m(-2), possibly due to the decrease of ohmic resistance (from 20.58 to 19.20 Ω) and the increase of ORR activities provided by the adsorbed hydroxide ion and extra micropore area/volume after alkaline pretreatment. However, acidic pretreatment decreased the power output to 537±36 mW m(-2), which can be mainly attributed to the corrosion by adsorbed proton at the interface of AC powder and stainless steel mesh and the decreased pore area.

  7. Acidic and alkaline pretreatments of activated carbon and their effects on the performance of air-cathodes in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Gao, Ningshengjie; Zhou, Qixing; Dong, Heng; Yu, Hongbing; Feng, Yujie

    2013-09-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is a high performing and cost effective catalyst for oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) of air-cathodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Acidic (HNO3) and alkaline (KOH) pretreatments on AC at low temperature (85°C) are conducted to enhance the performance of MFCs. The alkaline pretreatment increased the power density by 16% from 804±70 to 957±31 mW m(-2), possibly due to the decrease of ohmic resistance (from 20.58 to 19.20 Ω) and the increase of ORR activities provided by the adsorbed hydroxide ion and extra micropore area/volume after alkaline pretreatment. However, acidic pretreatment decreased the power output to 537±36 mW m(-2), which can be mainly attributed to the corrosion by adsorbed proton at the interface of AC powder and stainless steel mesh and the decreased pore area. PMID:23890977

  8. Atomically thin spherical shell-shaped superscatterers based on a Bohr model.

    PubMed

    Li, Rujiang; Lin, Xiao; Lin, Shisheng; Liu, Xu; Chen, Hongsheng

    2015-12-18

    Graphene monolayers can be used for atomically thin three-dimensional shell-shaped superscatterer designs. Due to the excitation of the first-order resonance of transverse magnetic (TM) graphene plasmons, the scattering cross section of the bare subwavelength dielectric particle is enhanced significantly by five orders of magnitude. The superscattering phenomenon can be intuitively understood and interpreted with a Bohr model. In addition, based on the analysis of the Bohr model, it is shown that contrary to the TM case, superscattering is hard to achieve by exciting the resonance of transverse electric (TE) graphene plasmons due to their poor field confinements.

  9. Exactly separable Bohr Hamiltonian with the Killingbeck potential for triaxial nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyazi, H.; Rajabi, A. A.; Hassanabadi, H.

    2016-01-01

    After pioneering work by Bohr, Mottelson and their numerous colleagues, the essential framework for understanding collective model is introduced. One of the applications of this framework is the study of shape phase transition, vibrational and rotational energy spectrum of nuclei. We consider the Bohr Hamiltonian and solve the beta and gamma part equation of it, by considering that reduced potential and wave function are exactly separable. In the beta part equation we consider the Killingbeck potential and derive the wave function and energy spectrum of it.

  10. Generation of Quasiclassical Bohr-Like Wave Packets Using Half-Cycle Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mestayer, J. J.; Wyker, B.; Dunning, F. B.; Reinhold, Carlos O; Yoshida, S.; Burgdorfer, J.

    2008-08-01

    We demonstrate the experimental realization of Bohr-like atoms by applying a pulsed unidirectional field, termed a half-cycle pulse (HCP), to atoms in quasi-two-dimensional near-circular states. This leads to creation of localized wave packets that travel in near-circular orbits and mimic the dynamics of an electron in the original Bohr model of the hydrogen atom. This motion can be followed for several orbital periods before the localization of the wave packet is lost due to dephasing. We show, however, that localization can be recovered by application of further HCPs.

  11. Atomically thin spherical shell-shaped superscatterers based on a Bohr model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rujiang; Lin, Xiao; Lin, Shisheng; Liu, Xu; Chen, Hongsheng

    2015-12-01

    Graphene monolayers can be used for atomically thin three-dimensional shell-shaped superscatterer designs. Due to the excitation of the first-order resonance of transverse magnetic (TM) graphene plasmons, the scattering cross section of the bare subwavelength dielectric particle is enhanced significantly by five orders of magnitude. The superscattering phenomenon can be intuitively understood and interpreted with a Bohr model. In addition, based on the analysis of the Bohr model, it is shown that contrary to the TM case, superscattering is hard to achieve by exciting the resonance of transverse electric (TE) graphene plasmons due to their poor field confinements.

  12. Synergetic effect of alkaline earth metal oxides and iron oxides on the degradation of hexachlorobenzene and its degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Su, Guijin; Liu, Yexuan; Huang, Linyan; Shi, Yali; Zhang, Aiqian; Zhang, Lixia; Liu, Wenbin; Gao, Lirong; Zheng, Minghui

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was carried out over physical mixtures of a series of alkaline earth metal oxides (MO: M=Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) and iron oxides with different crystal types (Fe(x)O(y):Fe(2)O(3) or Fe(3)O(4)) at 300°C. These physical mixtures all showed a synergetic effect toward the degradation of HCB. A range of degradation products were identified by various methods, including tri- to penta-chlorobenzenes by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), tri- to penta-chlorophenols, tetrachlorocatechol (TCC) and tetrachlorohydroquinone (TCHQ) by GC-MS after derivatization, and formic and acetic acids by ion chromatography. Two degradation pathways, hydrodechlorination and oxidative degradation, appear to occur competitively. However, more sequential chlorinated benzene and phenol congeners were formed over mixed MO/Fe(3)O(4) than over mixed MO/Fe(2)O(3) under the same conditions. The oxidative reaction dominated over mixed MO/Fe(2)O(3) and was promoted as the major reaction by the synergetic effect, while both the oxidative and hydrodechlorination reactions were important over mixed MO/Fe(3)O(4), and both pathways are remarkably promoted by the synergetic effect. The enhanced hydrodechlorination may be attributed to free electrons generated by the transformation of Fe(3)O(4) into Fe(2)O(3), and hydrogen provided by water adsorbed on the MO.

  13. Effects of synthetic retinoids and retinoic acid isomers on the expression of alkaline phosphatase in F9 teratocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gianni, M; Zanotta, S; Terao, M; Garattini, S; Garattini, E

    1993-10-15

    Expression of ALP in F9 teratocarcinoma cells is induced by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) (Gianni' et al., Biochem. J. 274: 673-678, 1991). The specific ligand for retinoic acid related receptors (RXRs), 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cis RA), and three synthetic analogs binding to the alpha, beta and gamma forms of the retinoic acid receptors (RARs), AM580, CD2019, and CD437, were used to study their effects on alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzymatic activity and mRNA levels. At concentrations close to the Kd for their respective receptors, 9-cis RA, AM580 (the RAR alpha agonist) and CD437 (the RAR gamma agonist) clearly upregulate the expression of the ALP gene, whereas the effect of CD2019 (the RAR beta agonist) is very modest. A specific inhibitor of the RAR alpha, Ro 41-5253, completely blocks the induction of ALP triggered by AM580, while it has minor effects on the upregulation caused by ATRA, 9-cis RA, CD437 and CD2019. The induction of ALP observed with the various retinoids is inhibited by the contemporaneous treatment with dibutyryl cAMP. The levels of the RAR alpha and gamma transcripts are unaltered, while RAR beta mRNAs are induced by ATRA, AM580, CD437 and to a lower extent by 9-cis RA and CD2019.

  14. ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as: ALK PHOS; Alkp Formal name: Alkaline Phosphatase Related tests: AST ; ALT ; GGT ; Bilirubin ; Liver Panel ; Bone Markers ; Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes; Bone Specific ALP All content on Lab ...

  15. The characterization of soybean oil body integral oleosin isoforms and the effects of alkaline pH on them.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanyun; Zhao, Luping; Ying, Yusang; Kong, Xiangzhen; Hua, Yufei; Chen, Yeming

    2015-06-15

    Oil body, an organelle in seed cell (naturally pre-emulsified oil), has great potentials to be used in food, cosmetics, pharmaceutical and other applications requiring stable oil-in-water emulsions. Researchers have tried to extract oil body by alkaline buffers, which are beneficial for removing contaminated proteins. But it is not clear whether alkaline buffers could remove oil body integral proteins (mainly oleosins), which could keep oil body integrity and stability. In this study, seven oleosin isoforms were identified for soybean oil body (three isoforms, 24 kDa; three isoforms, 18 kDa; one isoform, 16kDa). Oleosins were not glycoproteins and 24 kDa oleosin isoforms possessed less thiol groups than 18 kDa ones. It was found that alkaline pH not only removed contaminated proteins but also oleosins, and more and more oleosins were removed with increasing alkaline pH.

  16. Emergence of complementarity and the Baconian roots of Niels Bohr's method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perovic, Slobodan

    2013-08-01

    I argue that instead of a rather narrow focus on N. Bohr's account of complementarity as a particular and perhaps obscure metaphysical or epistemological concept (or as being motivated by such a concept), we should consider it to result from pursuing a particular method of studying physical phenomena. More precisely, I identify a strong undercurrent of Baconian method of induction in Bohr's work that likely emerged during his experimental training and practice. When its development is analyzed in light of Baconian induction, complementarity emerges as a levelheaded rather than a controversial account, carefully elicited from a comprehensive grasp of the available experimental basis, shunning hasty metaphysically motivated generalizations based on partial experimental evidence. In fact, Bohr's insistence on the "classical" nature of observations in experiments, as well as the counterintuitive synthesis of wave and particle concepts that have puzzled scholars, seem a natural outcome (an updated instance) of the inductive method. Such analysis clarifies the intricacies of early Schrödinger's critique of the account as well as Bohr's response, which have been misinterpreted in the literature. If adequate, the analysis may lend considerable support to the view that Bacon explicated the general terms of an experimentally minded strand of the scientific method, developed and refined by scientists in the following three centuries.

  17. Quantum Explorers: Bohr, Jordan, and Delbrück Venturing into Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joaquim, Leyla; Freire, Olival; El-Hani, Charbel N.

    2015-09-01

    This paper disentangles selected intertwined aspects of two great scientific developments: quantum mechanics and molecular biology. We look at the contributions of three physicists who in the 1930s were protagonists of the quantum revolution and explorers of the field of biology: Niels Bohr, Pascual Jordan, and Max Delbrück. Their common platform was the defense of the Copenhagen interpretation in physics and the adoption of the principle of complementarity as a way of looking at biology. Bohr addressed the problem of how far the results reached in physics might influence our views about life. Jordan and Delbrück were followers of Bohr's ideas in the context of quantum mechanics and also of his tendency to expand the implications of the Copenhagen interpretation to biology. We propose that Bohr's perspective on biology was related to his epistemological views, as Jordan's was to his political positions. Delbrück's propensity to migrate was related to his transformation into a key figure in the history of twentieth-century molecular biology.

  18. Recent approaches to quadrupole collectivity: models, solutions and applications based on the Bohr hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buganu, Petricǎ; Fortunato, Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    We review and discuss several recent approaches to quadrupole collectivity and developments of collective models and their solutions with many applications, examples and references. We focus in particular on analytic and approximate solutions of the Bohr hamiltonian of the last decade, because most of the previously published material has been already reviewed in other publications.

  19. Exact diagonalization of the Bohr Hamiltonian for rotational nuclei: Dynamical {gamma} softness and triaxiality

    SciTech Connect

    Caprio, M. A.

    2011-06-15

    Detailed quantitative predictions are obtained for phonon and multiphonon excitations in well-deformed rotor nuclei within the geometric framework, by exact numerical diagonalization of the Bohr Hamiltonian in an SO(5) basis. Dynamical {gamma} deformation is found to significantly influence the predictions through its coupling to the rotational motion. Basic signatures for the onset of rigid triaxial deformation are also obtained.

  20. What Can the Bohr-Sommerfeld Model Show Students of Chemistry in the 21st Century?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor; Cardellini, Liberato

    2011-01-01

    Bohr's model of the atom is considered to be important by general chemistry textbooks. A shortcoming of this model was that it could not explain the spectra of atoms containing more than one electron. To increase the explanatory power of the model, Sommerfeld hypothesized the existence of elliptical orbits. This study aims to elaborate a framework…

  1. EPR before EPR: A 1930 Einstein-Bohr thought Experiment Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolic, Hrvoje

    2012-01-01

    In 1930, Einstein argued against the consistency of the time-energy uncertainty relation by discussing a thought experiment involving a measurement of the mass of the box which emitted a photon. Bohr seemingly prevailed over Einstein by arguing that Einstein's own general theory of relativity saves the consistency of quantum mechanics. We revisit…

  2. Combined effects of alkaline electrolyzed water and citric acid with mild heat to control microorganisms on cabbage.

    PubMed

    Rahman, S M E; Jin, Yong-Guo; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2010-03-01

    Effects of alkaline electrolyzed water (AlEW), acidic electrolyzed water (AcEW), 100 ppm sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), deionized water (DIW), 1% citric acid (CA) alone, and combinations of AlEW with 1% CA (AlEW + CA), in reducing the populations of spoilage bacteria and foodborne pathogens on cabbage were investigated at various dipping times (3, 5, and 10 min) with different dipping temperatures (1, 20, 40, and 50 degrees C). Inhibitory effect of the selected optimal treatment against Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157 : H7 on cabbage were also evaluated. Compared to the untreated control, AlEW treatment most effectively reduced the numbers of total bacteria, yeast, and mold, followed by AcEW and 100-ppm NaClO treatments. All treatments dip washed for 5 min significantly reduced the numbers of total bacteria, yeast, and mold on cabbage. With increasing dipping temperature from 1 to 50 degrees C, the reductions of total bacteria, yeast, and mold were significantly increased from 0.19 to 1.12 log CFU/g in the DIW wash treatment (P < 0.05). Combined 1% CA with AlEW treatment at 50 degrees C showed the reduction of around 3.98 and 3.45 log CFU/g on the total count, and yeast and mold, effective reduction of L. monocytogenes (3.99 log CFU/g), and E. coli O157 : H7 (4.19 log CFU/g) on cabbage. The results suggest that combining AlEW with CA could be a possible method to control foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria effectively on produce.

  3. The effect of Penicillium fungi on plant growth and phosphorus mobilization in neutral to alkaline soils from southern Australia.

    PubMed

    Wakelin, S A; Gupta, V V S R; Harvey, P R; Ryder, M H

    2007-01-01

    The phosphate solubilizing fungi Penicillium radicum, Penicillium bilaiae (strain RS7B-SD1), and an unidentified Penicillium sp. designated strain KC6-W2 were tested for their ability to increase the growth and phosphorus (P) nutrition of wheat, medic, and lentil in three soils of neutral to alkaline pH reaction. The strongest plant growth promoting (PGP) strain was Penicillium sp. KC6-W2, which stimulated significant increases in shoot growth and dry mass in seven of the nine experiments conducted. Levels of PGP by Penicillium sp. KC6-W2 ranged from 6.6% to 19% and were associated with increased uptake of P to the shoot. The PGP properties of Penicillium sp. KC6-W2 were evident on each of the three different plant species and soil types, a level of reliability not observed in other strains tested. Inoculation of seed with P. radicum increased lentil growth by 5.5% (P < 0.05) in soil from Tarlee but did not affect plant growth in the eight other experiments. Inoculation of plant seed with P. bilaiae RS7B-SD1 resulted in significant PGP in two of the nine experiments conducted. However, when significant, stimulation of PGP by P. bilaiae RS7B-SD1 was strong and resulted in increases in medic dry matter (19%) and lentil shoot dry matter (15%). A soil microcosm experiment investigated the effect of Penicillium fungi on cycling of soil P. Penicillium bilaiae RS7B-SD1 was the only fungus to significantly increase HCO3-extractable P (23% increase; P < 0.05). Production of phosphatase enzymes was not associated with increased HCO3-extractable P. Addition of carbon in the form of ryegrass seed significantly increased microbial respiration and movement of P to the microbial biomass (P < 0.05), but these parameters were irrespective of Penicillium treatment. This work has established the potential for use of Penicillium inoculants to increase plant growth on alkaline soils in Australia. The role of Penicillium fungi in plant P uptake and soil P cycling requires further

  4. FUNGUS INDEX AND RESIDUAL EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES IN ACID AND ALKALINE SOILS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil applied pesticides have profound effects on the population density and diversity of fungi, however, such information is lacking in tropical soils of the Amazon region. Field experiments were implemented at two experimental farms ("El Choclito", "Bello Horizonte”) of Tropical Crop Institute (ICT...

  5. Assembly of a Cost-Effective Anode Using Palladium Nanoparticles for Alkaline Fuel Cell Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feliciano-Ramos, Ileana; Casan~as-Montes, Barbara; García-Maldonado, María M.; Menendez, Christian L.; Mayol, Ana R.; Díaz-Vazquez, Liz M.; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology allows the synthesis of nanoscale catalysts, which offer an efficient alternative for fuel cell applications. In this laboratory experiment, the student selects a cost-effective anode for fuel cells by comparing three different working electrodes. These are commercially available palladium (Pd) and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes, and…

  6. Effect of the length and surface area on electrochemical performance of cobalt oxide nanowires for alkaline secondary battery application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanan; Wang, Xiaofeng; An, Cuihua; Wang, Yijing; Jiao, Lifang; Yuan, Huatang

    2014-12-01

    One-dimensional porous Co3O4 nanowires with different length have been successfully synthesized by thermal decomposition of Co-NA polymer precursors at various hydrothermal reaction times. The positive effects of longer nanowires and larger surface area on electrochemical performance of Co3O4 samples were investigated systematically. All the as-prepared Co3O4 samples display excellent discharge capacities and cycle stability on account of large surface area and porous structure, indicating great potential application of porous Co3O4 nanowires for alkaline rechargeable batteries. The Co3O4-24 h sample with the longest length shows the most outstanding electrochemical performance, and displays the maximum discharge capacity of 450.1 mAh g-1 with the capacity retention of 90.4% after 100 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g-1. Electrochemical reactions between Co and Co(OH)2 occurring on the Co3O4 electrodes are investigated by XRD, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and charge-discharge measurements.

  7. Arginine Coordination in Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer: Evaluation of the Effect of Arg166 Mutations in Escherichia Coli Alkaline Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, P.J.; Lassila, J.K.; Fenn, T.D.; Zalatan, J.G.; Herschlag, D.

    2009-05-22

    Arginine residues are commonly found in the active sites of enzymes catalyzing phosphoryl transfer reactions. Numerous site-directed mutagenesis experiments establish the importance of these residues for efficient catalysis, but their role in catalysis is not clear. To examine the role of arginine residues in the phosphoryl transfer reaction, we have measured the consequences of mutations to arginine 166 in Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase on hydrolysis of ethyl phosphate, on individual reaction steps in the hydrolysis of the covalent enzyme-phosphoryl intermediate, and on thio substitution effects. The results show that the role of the arginine side chain extends beyond its positive charge, as the Arg166Lys mutant is as compromised in activity as Arg166Ser. Through measurement of individual reaction steps, we construct a free energy profile for the hydrolysis of the enzyme-phosphate intermediate. This analysis indicates that the arginine side chain strengthens binding by {approx}3 kcal/mol and provides an additional 1-2 kcal/mol stabilization of the chemical transition state. A 2.1 {angstrom} X-ray diffraction structure of Arg166Ser AP is presented, which shows little difference in enzyme structure compared to the wild-type enzyme but shows a significant reorientation of the bound phosphate. Altogether, these results support a model in which the arginine contributes to catalysis through binding interactions and through additional transition state stabilization that may arise from complementarity of the guanidinum group to the geometry of the trigonal bipyramidal transition state.

  8. Kinetic isotope effects for alkaline phosphatase reactions: implications for the role of active-site metal ions in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zalatan, Jesse G; Catrina, Irina; Mitchell, Rebecca; Grzyska, Piotr K; O'brien, Patrick J; Herschlag, Daniel; Hengge, Alvan C

    2007-08-01

    Enzyme-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer reactions have frequently been suggested to proceed through transition states that are altered from their solution counterparts, with the alterations presumably arising from interactions with active-site functional groups. In particular, the phosphate monoester hydrolysis reaction catalyzed by Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) has been the subject of intensive scrutiny. Recent linear free energy relationship (LFER) studies suggest that AP catalyzes phosphate monoester hydrolysis through a loose transition state, similar to that in solution. To gain further insight into the nature of the transition state and active-site interactions, we have determined kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for AP-catalyzed hydrolysis reactions with several phosphate monoester substrates. The LFER and KIE data together provide a consistent picture for the nature of the transition state for AP-catalyzed phosphate monoester hydrolysis and support previous models suggesting that the enzymatic transition state is similar to that in solution. Moreover, the KIE data provides unique information regarding specific interactions between the transition state and the active-site Zn2+ ions. These results provide strong support for a model in which electrostatic interactions between the bimetallo Zn2+ site and a nonbridging phosphate ester oxygen atom make a significant contribution to the large rate enhancement observed for AP-catalyzed phosphate monoester hydrolysis.

  9. Host plant effects on alkaline phosphatase activity in the whiteflies, Bemisia tabaci Biotype B and Trialeurodes vaporariorum.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying; Peng, Lu; Liu, Wan-Xue; Wan, Fang-Hao; Harris, Marvin K

    2011-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) B-biotype and Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) often coexist on greenhouse-grown vegetable crops in northern China. The recent spread of B. tabaci B-biotype has largely replaced T. vaporariorum, and B-biotype now overlaps with T. vaporariorum where common hosts occur in most invaded areas. The impact of the B-biotype on the agro eco system appears to be widespread, and involves the ability to compete with and perhaps replace other phytophages like T. vaporariorum. An emerging hypothesis is that the B-biotype is physiologically superior due at least in part to an improved ability to metabolically utilize the alkaline phosphatase pathway. To test this hypothesis, alkaline phosphatase activity was studied in the B-biotype and T. vaporariorum after feeding on a number of different hosts for a range of durations, with and without host switching. Alkaline phosphatase activity in T. vaporariorum was 1.45 to 2.53-fold higher than that of the B-biotype when fed on tomato for 4 and 24 h, or switched from tomato to cotton and cabbage for the same durations. However, alkaline phosphatase activity in the B-biotype was 1.40 to 3.35-fold higher than that of T. vaporariorum when the host switching time was ∼72 and ∼120 h on the same plant. Both short-term (4 h) and long-term (72 h) switching of plant hosts can significantly affect the alkaline phosphatase activity in the two species. After ∼120 h, feeding on tomato and cotton alkaline phosphatase activity in the B-biotype was significantly higher than that of T. vaporariorum. It was shown that alkaline phosphatase aids the species feeding on different plant species, and that the B-biotype is physiologically superior to T. vaporariorum in utilizing the enzyme compared to T. vaporariorum over longer periods of feeding.

  10. Host plant effects on alkaline phosphatase activity in the whiteflies, Bemisia tabaci Biotype B and Trialeurodes vaporariorum.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying; Peng, Lu; Liu, Wan-Xue; Wan, Fang-Hao; Harris, Marvin K

    2011-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) B-biotype and Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) often coexist on greenhouse-grown vegetable crops in northern China. The recent spread of B. tabaci B-biotype has largely replaced T. vaporariorum, and B-biotype now overlaps with T. vaporariorum where common hosts occur in most invaded areas. The impact of the B-biotype on the agro eco system appears to be widespread, and involves the ability to compete with and perhaps replace other phytophages like T. vaporariorum. An emerging hypothesis is that the B-biotype is physiologically superior due at least in part to an improved ability to metabolically utilize the alkaline phosphatase pathway. To test this hypothesis, alkaline phosphatase activity was studied in the B-biotype and T. vaporariorum after feeding on a number of different hosts for a range of durations, with and without host switching. Alkaline phosphatase activity in T. vaporariorum was 1.45 to 2.53-fold higher than that of the B-biotype when fed on tomato for 4 and 24 h, or switched from tomato to cotton and cabbage for the same durations. However, alkaline phosphatase activity in the B-biotype was 1.40 to 3.35-fold higher than that of T. vaporariorum when the host switching time was ∼72 and ∼120 h on the same plant. Both short-term (4 h) and long-term (72 h) switching of plant hosts can significantly affect the alkaline phosphatase activity in the two species. After ∼120 h, feeding on tomato and cotton alkaline phosphatase activity in the B-biotype was significantly higher than that of T. vaporariorum. It was shown that alkaline phosphatase aids the species feeding on different plant species, and that the B-biotype is physiologically superior to T. vaporariorum in utilizing the enzyme compared to T. vaporariorum over longer periods of feeding. PMID:21521136

  11. Alkaline Water and Longevity: A Murine Study.

    PubMed

    Magro, Massimiliano; Corain, Livio; Ferro, Silvia; Baratella, Davide; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Terzo, Milo; Corraducci, Vittorino; Salmaso, Luigi; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The biological effect of alkaline water consumption is object of controversy. The present paper presents a 3-year survival study on a population of 150 mice, and the data were analyzed with accelerated failure time (AFT) model. Starting from the second year of life, nonparametric survival plots suggest that mice watered with alkaline water showed a better survival than control mice. Interestingly, statistical analysis revealed that alkaline water provides higher longevity in terms of "deceleration aging factor" as it increases the survival functions when compared with control group; namely, animals belonging to the population treated with alkaline water resulted in a longer lifespan. Histological examination of mice kidneys, intestine, heart, liver, and brain revealed that no significant differences emerged among the three groups indicating that no specific pathology resulted correlated with the consumption of alkaline water. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survival data as a function of watering with alkaline water of long-lived mouse models.

  12. Effects of adenosine triphosphate and alkaline phosphatase on solubilized 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Faure, R; Dussault, J H

    1988-09-01

    The T3-binding activity of salt-extractable nuclear proteins from rat liver was affected when ATP (2-10 mM; pH 8.0) was added concomitantly with T3 in the incubation medium. Scatchard analysis revealed that the equilibrium association constant was significantly reduced [5 mM ATP, 0.3 +/- 0.1 (+/- SE) 10(10) M-1; control, 1.1 +/- 0.15 X 10(10) M-1], but the maximum binding capacity remained unchanged. Similar values of inhibition were obtained when unbound receptors were preincubated with ATP. ATP achieved its maximal effect after 45 min of incubation at 30 C. Dilution experiments indicated that the effect of ATP was reversible. The inhibiting potency of nucleoside triphosphates at pH 8.0 was in the following order: ATP = CTP greater than GTP, whereas UTP had no effect. Nonhydrolyzable analogs of ATP were also inhibitory, and HPLC fractionation showed an approximately 98% recovery of ATP after incubation with nuclear extract. The adenine ring with at least two phosphates was essential, since ADP was as potent as ATP, whereas AMP had no effect. When the pH of the incubation medium was lowered to 7.3, the T3-binding activity was inhibited by ATP in the 0.1-1 mM range. Magnesium (3 mM) greatly increases the ATP effect at pH 7.3, but not at pH 8. The T3-binding activity was also drastically reduced when calf intestine alkaline phosphatase was added concomitantly in the incubation medium. Eight micrograms per ml enzyme were necessary to inhibit the T3 specific binding by 50% (30 C for 45 min). Scatchard analysis showed that the receptor affinity for T3 was decreased (control, 1.1 +/- 0.02 x 10(10) M-1; alkaline phosphatase, 0.41 +/- 0.03 x 10(10) M-1; n = 6), whereas the maximum binding capacity remained unchanged. Incubations performed with increasing concentrations of beta-mercaphoethanol (2.5, 5, 10, and 25 mM) revealed that the phosphatase inhibitory effect is thiol dependent. The inhibition was maximal at 2.5 mM and progressively decreased at 5 and 10 mM. No

  13. Effects of Dihydroartemisinin and Artemether on the Growth, Chlorophyll Fluorescence, and Extracellular Alkaline Phosphatase Activity of the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shoubing; Xu, Ziran

    2016-01-01

    Increased eutrophication in the recent years has resulted in considerable research focus on identification of methods for preventing cyanobacterial blooms that are rapid and efficient. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of dihydroartemisinin and artemether on the growth of Microcystis aeruginosa and to elucidate its mode of action. Variations in cell density, chlorophyll a, soluble protein, malondialdehyde, extracellular alkaline phosphatase activity (APA), and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters (Fv/Fm, ΦPSII, ETR, rapid light curves, fast chlorophyll fluorescence curves on fluorescence intensity, and relative variable fluorescence) were evaluated by lab-cultured experiments. Our results demonstrated that both dihydroartemisinin and artemether inhibited the growth of M.aeruginosa by impairing the photosynthetic center in photosystem II and reducing extracellular APA, with a higher sensitivity exhibited toward artemether. The inhibitory effects of dihydroartemisinin on M.aeruginosa increased with concentration, and the maximum growth inhibitory rate was 42.17% at 24 mg·L-1 after 120h exposure, whereas it was 55.72% at 6 mg·L-1 artemetherafter 120h exposure. Moreover, the chlorophyll fluorescence was significantly inhibited (p<0.05) after 120h exposure to 12 and 24 mg·L-1 dihydroartemisinin. Furthermore, after 120h exposure to 6 mg·L-1 artemether, Fv/Fm, ΦPSII, ETR and rETRmax showed a significant decrease (p<0.01) from initial values of 0.490, 0.516, 17.333, and 104.800, respectively, to 0. One-way analysis of variance showed that 6 mg·L-1 artemether and 24 mg·L-1 dihydroartemisinin had significant inhibitory effects on extracellular APA (p<0.01). The results of this study would be useful to further studies to validate the feasibility of dihydroartemisinin and artemether treatment to inhibit overall cyanobacterial growth in water bodies, before this can be put into practice. PMID:27755566

  14. Genotoxic effects of boric acid and borax in zebrafish, Danio rerio using alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Gülsoy, Nagihan; Yavas, Cüneyd; Mutlu, Özal

    2015-01-01

    The present study is conducted to determine the potential mechanisms of Boron compounds, boric acid (BA) and borax (BX), on genotoxicity of zebrafish Danio rerio for 24, 48, 72 and 96-hours acute exposure (level:1, 4, 16, 64 mg/l BA and BX) in semi-static bioassay experiment. For that purpose, peripheral erythrocytes were drawn from caudal vein and Comet assay was applied to assess genotoxicity. Acute (96 hours) exposure and high concentrations of boric acid and borax increases % tail DNA and Olive tail moment. Genotoxicity was found for BA as concentration-dependent and BX as concentration and time dependent manner. In general, significant effects (P < 0,05) on both concentrations and exposure times were observed in experimental groups. DNA damage was highest at 96 h and 24 h for all BX and BA concentrations, respectively in peripheral blood of D. rerio. For the first time, our study demonstrates the effect of waterborne BA and BX exposure on genotoxicity at the molecular level, which may contribute to understanding the mechanism of boric acid and borax-induced genotoxicity in fish. PMID:26862320

  15. Genotoxic effects of boric acid and borax in zebrafish, Danio rerio using alkaline comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Gülsoy, Nagihan; Yavas, Cüneyd; Mutlu, Özal

    2015-01-01

    The present study is conducted to determine the potential mechanisms of Boron compounds, boric acid (BA) and borax (BX), on genotoxicity of zebrafish Danio rerio for 24, 48, 72 and 96-hours acute exposure (level:1, 4, 16, 64 mg/l BA and BX) in semi-static bioassay experiment. For that purpose, peripheral erythrocytes were drawn from caudal vein and Comet assay was applied to assess genotoxicity. Acute (96 hours) exposure and high concentrations of boric acid and borax increases % tail DNA and Olive tail moment. Genotoxicity was found for BA as concentration-dependent and BX as concentration and time dependent manner. In general, significant effects (P < 0,05) on both concentrations and exposure times were observed in experimental groups. DNA damage was highest at 96 h and 24 h for all BX and BA concentrations, respectively in peripheral blood of D. rerio. For the first time, our study demonstrates the effect of waterborne BA and BX exposure on genotoxicity at the molecular level, which may contribute to understanding the mechanism of boric acid and borax-induced genotoxicity in fish. PMID:26862320

  16. Genotoxic effects of boric acid and borax in zebrafish, Danio rerio using alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Gülsoy, Nagihan; Yavas, Cüneyd; Mutlu, Özal

    2015-01-01

    The present study is conducted to determine the potential mechanisms of Boron compounds, boric acid (BA) and borax (BX), on genotoxicity of zebrafish Danio rerio for 24, 48, 72 and 96-hours acute exposure (level:1, 4, 16, 64 mg/l BA and BX) in semi-static bioassay experiment. For that purpose, peripheral erythrocytes were drawn from caudal vein and Comet assay was applied to assess genotoxicity. Acute (96 hours) exposure and high concentrations of boric acid and borax increases % tail DNA and Olive tail moment. Genotoxicity was found for BA as concentration-dependent and BX as concentration and time dependent manner. In general, significant effects (P < 0,05) on both concentrations and exposure times were observed in experimental groups. DNA damage was highest at 96 h and 24 h for all BX and BA concentrations, respectively in peripheral blood of D. rerio. For the first time, our study demonstrates the effect of waterborne BA and BX exposure on genotoxicity at the molecular level, which may contribute to understanding the mechanism of boric acid and borax-induced genotoxicity in fish.

  17. Effects on nano zero-valent iron reactivity of interactions between hardness, alkalinity, and natural organic matter in reverse osmosis concentrate.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yuhoon; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2013-11-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) is considered to have potential to reduce nitrate in the concentrate generated by high pressure membrane processes aimed at water reuse. However, it is necessary to verify the effect of the matrix components in the concentrates on NZVI reactivity. In this study, the influence of hardness, alkalinity, and organic matter on NZVI reactivity was evaluated by the response surface method (RSM). Hardness (Ca2+) had a positive effect on NZVI reactivity by accelerating iron corrosion. In contrast, alkalinity (bicarbonate; HCO-3) and organic matter (humic acid; HA) had negative effects on NZVI reactivity due to morphological change to carbonate green rust, and to competitive adsorption of HA, respectively. The validity of the statistical prediction model derived from RSM was confirmed by an additional confirmation experiment, and the experimental result was within the 95% confidential interval. Therefore, it can be indicated that the RSM model produced results that were statistically significant. PMID:24552045

  18. Effects on nano zero-valent iron reactivity of interactions between hardness, alkalinity, and natural organic matter in reverse osmosis concentrate.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yuhoon; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2013-11-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) is considered to have potential to reduce nitrate in the concentrate generated by high pressure membrane processes aimed at water reuse. However, it is necessary to verify the effect of the matrix components in the concentrates on NZVI reactivity. In this study, the influence of hardness, alkalinity, and organic matter on NZVI reactivity was evaluated by the response surface method (RSM). Hardness (Ca2+) had a positive effect on NZVI reactivity by accelerating iron corrosion. In contrast, alkalinity (bicarbonate; HCO-3) and organic matter (humic acid; HA) had negative effects on NZVI reactivity due to morphological change to carbonate green rust, and to competitive adsorption of HA, respectively. The validity of the statistical prediction model derived from RSM was confirmed by an additional confirmation experiment, and the experimental result was within the 95% confidential interval. Therefore, it can be indicated that the RSM model produced results that were statistically significant.

  19. Methylene blue adsorption from aqueous solution by activated carbon: effect of acidic and alkaline solution treatments.

    PubMed

    Ijagbemi, Christianah O; Chun, Ji I; Han, Da H; Cho, Hye Y; O, Se J; Kim, Dong S

    2010-01-01

    The removal of Methylene Blue (MB) from aqueous solution using activated carbon (AC) has been investigated. Adsorption experiments were conducted and the maximum adsorption capacity was determined. The effect of experimental parameters such as pH, dye concentration and temperature were studied on the adsorption process. Equilibrium data were mathematically modeled using the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models to describe the equilibrium isotherms at different dye concentrations and temperature. Parameters of best-fit model were calculated and discussed. To understand the mechanism of adsorption, kinetic models were employed to follow the adsorption processes; the pseudo-first-order best described the adsorption of MB onto AC. It was found that pH plays a major role in the adsorption process; adsorption capacity was influenced by the physical and surface chemical properties of carbon and the pH of the solution. 99.0% MB removal was achieved at equilibrium.

  20. The effect of grain size on aluminum anodes for Al-air batteries in alkaline electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Liang; Lu, Huimin

    2015-06-01

    Aluminum is an ideal material for metallic fuel cells. In this research, different grain sizes of aluminum anodes are prepared by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) at room temperature. Microstructure of the anodes is examined by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in scanning electron microscope (SEM). Hydrogen corrosion rates of the Al anodes in 4 mol L-1 NaOH are determined by hydrogen collection method. The electrochemical properties of the aluminum anodes are investigated in the same electrolyte using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and polarization curves. Battery performance is also tested by constant current discharge at different current densities. Results confirm that the electrochemical properties of the aluminum anodes are related to grain size. Finer grain size anode restrains hydrogen evolution, improves electrochemical activity and increases anodic utilization rate. The proposed method is shown to effectively improve the performance of Al-air batteries.

  1. Catalytically active alkaline molten globular enzyme: Effect of pH and temperature on the structural integrity of 5-aminolevulinate synthase.

    PubMed

    Stojanovski, Bosko M; Breydo, Leonid; Hunter, Gregory A; Uversky, Vladimir N; Ferreira, Gloria C

    2014-12-01

    5-Aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS), a pyridoxal-5'phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the first step of heme biosynthesis in mammals. Circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopies were used to examine the effects of pH (1.0-3.0 and 7.5-10.5) and temperature (20 and 37°C) on the structural integrity of ALAS. The secondary structure, as deduced from far-UV CD, is mostly resilient to pH and temperature changes. Partial unfolding was observed at pH2.0, but further decreasing pH resulted in acid-induced refolding of the secondary structure to nearly native levels. The tertiary structure rigidity, monitored by near-UV CD, is lost under acidic and specific alkaline conditions (pH10.5 and pH9.5/37°C), where ALAS populates a molten globule state. As the enzyme becomes less structured with increased alkalinity, the chiral environment of the internal aldimine is also modified, with a shift from a 420nm to 330nm dichroic band. Under acidic conditions, the PLP cofactor dissociates from ALAS. Reaction with 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid corroborates increased exposure of hydrophobic clusters in the alkaline and acidic molten globules, although the reaction is more pronounced with the latter. Furthermore, quenching the intrinsic fluorescence of ALAS with acrylamide at pH1.0 and 9.5 yielded subtly different dynamic quenching constants. The alkaline molten globule state of ALAS is catalytically active (pH9.5/37°C), although the kcat value is significantly decreased. Finally, the binding of 5-aminolevulinate restricts conformational fluctuations in the alkaline molten globule. Overall, our findings prove how the structural plasticity of ALAS contributes to reaching a functional enzyme.

  2. Catalytically active alkaline molten globular enzyme: Effect of pH and temperature on the structural integrity of 5-aminolevulinate synthase.

    PubMed

    Stojanovski, Bosko M; Breydo, Leonid; Hunter, Gregory A; Uversky, Vladimir N; Ferreira, Gloria C

    2014-12-01

    5-Aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS), a pyridoxal-5'phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the first step of heme biosynthesis in mammals. Circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopies were used to examine the effects of pH (1.0-3.0 and 7.5-10.5) and temperature (20 and 37°C) on the structural integrity of ALAS. The secondary structure, as deduced from far-UV CD, is mostly resilient to pH and temperature changes. Partial unfolding was observed at pH2.0, but further decreasing pH resulted in acid-induced refolding of the secondary structure to nearly native levels. The tertiary structure rigidity, monitored by near-UV CD, is lost under acidic and specific alkaline conditions (pH10.5 and pH9.5/37°C), where ALAS populates a molten globule state. As the enzyme becomes less structured with increased alkalinity, the chiral environment of the internal aldimine is also modified, with a shift from a 420nm to 330nm dichroic band. Under acidic conditions, the PLP cofactor dissociates from ALAS. Reaction with 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid corroborates increased exposure of hydrophobic clusters in the alkaline and acidic molten globules, although the reaction is more pronounced with the latter. Furthermore, quenching the intrinsic fluorescence of ALAS with acrylamide at pH1.0 and 9.5 yielded subtly different dynamic quenching constants. The alkaline molten globule state of ALAS is catalytically active (pH9.5/37°C), although the kcat value is significantly decreased. Finally, the binding of 5-aminolevulinate restricts conformational fluctuations in the alkaline molten globule. Overall, our findings prove how the structural plasticity of ALAS contributes to reaching a functional enzyme. PMID:25240868

  3. Effect of Modified Alkaline Supplementation on Syngenic Melanoma Growth in CB57/BL Mice

    PubMed Central

    Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Canese, Rossella; Gugliotta, Alessio; Fidanza, Stefano; Fais, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Tumor extracellular acidity is a hallmark of malignant cancers. Thus, in this study we evaluated the effects of the oral administration of a commercially available water alkalizer (Basenpulver®) (BP) on tumor growth in a syngenic melanoma mouse model. The alkalizer was administered daily by oral gavage starting one week after tumor implantation in CB57/BL mice. Tumors were calipered and their acidity measured by in vivo MRI guided 31P MRS. Furthermore, urine pH was monitored for potential metabolic alkalosis. BP administration significantly reduced melanoma growth in mice; the optimal dose in terms of tolerability and efficacy was 8 g/l (p< 0.05). The in vivo results were supported by in vitro experiments, wherein BP-treated human and murine melanoma cell cultures exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of tumor cell growth. This investigation provides the first proof of concept that systemic buffering can improve tumor control by itself and that this approach may represent a new strategy in prevention and/or treatment of cancers. PMID:27447181

  4. Gamma-irradiation effect on a commercial composite anticorrosive pigment and acidity-to-alkalinity conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Weiqiang; Niu, Kaihui; Wu, Longchao

    2016-05-01

    A commercial composite anticorrosive pigment based on aluminum dihydrogen tripolyphosphate was studied after exposure to gamma irradiation (Co60, 0, 20, 50, 100 and 150 kGy) using FTIR, XRD, TGA and acid-base titration technologies. Although the FTIR spectra showed that the effect of the irradiation on functional groups in the pigments was not obvious, the decrease in the crystal lattice parameters of the irradiated pigments was observed in the XRD spectra compared to the non-irradiated sample. But the extent of the lattice parameter decrease monotonically with the increase of absorbed dose from 20 to 150 kGy, which was attributed to the decomposition of water and the simultaneous occurrence of lattice damage when the pigments were exposed to gamma rays. Of particular significance was the displayed basicity of the aqueous solutions of the irradiated pigments compared to the acidity of the solution of the non-irradiated pigment, which was attributed to the decomposition of P-OH groups (combined water).

  5. Alkaline fuel cells applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, Karl; Hacker, Viktor; Gsellmann, Josef; Cifrain, Martin; Faleschini, Gottfried; Enzinger, Peter; Fankhauser, Robert; Ortner, Markus; Muhr, Michael; Aronson, Robert R.

    On the world-wide automobile market technical developments are increasingly determined by the dramatic restriction on emissions as well as the regimentation of fuel consumption by legislation. Therefore there is an increasing chance of a completely new technology breakthrough if it offers new opportunities, meeting the requirements of resource preservation and emission restrictions. Fuel cell technology offers the possibility to excel in today's motive power techniques in terms of environmental compatibility, consumer's profit, costs of maintenance and efficiency. The key question is economy. This will be decided by the costs of fuel cell systems if they are to be used as power generators for future electric vehicles. The alkaline hydrogen-air fuel cell system with circulating KOH electrolyte and low-cost catalysed carbon electrodes could be a promising alternative. Based on the experiences of Kordesch [K. Kordesch, Brennstoffbatterien, Springer, Wien, 1984, ISBN 3-387-81819-7; K. Kordesch, City car with H 2-air fuel cell and lead-battery, SAE Paper No. 719015, 6th IECEC, 1971], who operated a city car hybrid vehicle on public roads for 3 years in the early 1970s, improved air electrodes plus new variations of the bipolar stack assembly developed in Graz are investigated. Primary fuel choice will be a major issue until such time as cost-effective, on-board hydrogen storage is developed. Ammonia is an interesting option. The whole system, ammonia dissociator plus alkaline fuel cell (AFC), is characterised by a simple design and high efficiency.

  6. Effects of Different Saline-Alkaline Conditions on the Characteristics of Phytoplankton Communities in the Lakes of Songnen Plain, China

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Shuying; Fan, Yawen; Ye, Huaxiang

    2016-01-01

    Many lakes located in the Songnen Plain of China exhibit a high saline-alkaline level. 25 lakes in the Songnen Plain were selected as research objects in this study. Water samples in these lakes were collected from June to August in 2008. Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) and Total Alkalinity (TA) were measured to assess the saline-alkaline level, and partial canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was conducted as well. The results show that the majority of these lakes in the study area could be categorized into HCO3−-Na+-I type. According to the TDS assessment, of the total 25 lakes, there are 14 for freshwater, 7 for brackish water and 4 for saltwater; and the respective range of TA was from 0.98 to 40.52. The relationship between TA and TDS indicated significant linear relationship (R2 = 0.9292) in the HCO3−-Na+-I type lakes in the Songnen Plain. There was a general trend that cell density, genera richness and taxonomic diversity decreased with the increase of saline-alkaline gradient, whereas a contrary trend was observed for the proportion of dominant species. When the TDS values were above 3×103mg/L and the TA values were above 15mg/L, there was a significant reduction in cell density, genera richness and biodiversity, and their corresponding values were respectively below 10×106 (ind/L), 15 and approximately 2.5. Through the partial canonical correspondence analysis (CCA), 10.7% of the genera variation was explained by pure saline-alkaline variables. Cyclotella meneghiniana, Melosira ambigua and Melosira granulate were found to become the dominant species in most of these lakes, which indicated that there may be rather wide saline-alkaline niches for common dominant species. About one-quarters of the genera which have certain tolerance to salinity and alkalinity preferred to live in the regions with relatively higher saline-alkaline levels in this study. PMID:27749936

  7. Schrödinger's interpretation of quantum mechanics and the relevance of Bohr's experimental critique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perovic, Slobodan

    E. Schrödinger's ideas on interpreting quantum mechanics have been recently re-examined by historians and revived by philosophers of quantum mechanics. Such recent re-evaluations have focused on Schrödinger's retention of space-time continuity and his relinquishment of the corpuscularian understanding of microphysical systems. Several of these historical re-examinations claim that Schrödinger refrained from pursuing his 1926 wave-mechanical interpretation of quantum mechanics under pressure from the Copenhagen and Göttingen physicists, who misinterpreted his ideas in their dogmatic pursuit of the complementarity doctrine and the principle of uncertainty. My analysis points to very different reasons for Schrödinger's decision and, accordingly, to a rather different understanding of the dialogue between Schrödinger and N. Bohr, who refuted Schrödinger's arguments. Bohr's critique of Schrödinger's arguments predominantly focused on the results of experiments on the scattering of electrons performed by Bothe and Geiger, and by Compton and Simon. Although he shared Schrödinger's rejection of full-blown classical entities, Bohr argued that these results demonstrated the corpuscular nature of atomic interactions. I argue that it was Schrödinger's agreement with Bohr's critique, not the dogmatic pressure, which led him to give up pursuing his interpretation for 7 yr. Bohr's critique reflected his deep understanding of Schrödinger's ideas and motivated, at least in part, his own pursuit of his complementarity principle. However, in 1935 Schrödinger revived and reformulated the wave-mechanical interpretation. The revival reflected N. F. Mott's novel wave-mechanical treatment of particle-like properties. R. Shankland's experiment, which demonstrated an apparent conflict with the results of Bothe-Geiger and Compton-Simon, may have been additional motivation for the revival. Subsequent measurements have proven the original experimental results accurate, and I argue

  8. Rate limiting processes in the bohr shift in human red cells

    PubMed Central

    Forster, R. E.; Steen, J. B.

    1968-01-01

    1. The rates of the Bohr shift of human red cells and some of its constituent reactions have been studied with a modified Hartridge—Roughton rapid reaction apparatus using an oxygen electrode to measure the progress of the reaction. 2. The rate of the Bohr shift was compatible with the hypothesis that the transfer of H+ across the membrane by means of CO2 exchange and reaction with buffers is generally the rate-limiting step. (a) When the Bohr off-reaction was produced by a marked increase in PCO2 around the cells, the half-time at 37° C was 0·12 sec. In this case CO2 was available initially to diffuse into the cells, the process being predominantly limited by the rate of intracellular CO2 hydration. (b) When the Bohr off-shift was produced by an increase of [H+] outside the cell, PCO2 being low and equal within and outside the cells, the half time became 0·31 sec. In this case, even at the start, the H2CO3 formed by the almost instantaneous neutralization reaction of H+ and HCO3- had to dehydrate to form CO2 and this in turn had to diffuse into and react within the red cell before the [HbO2] could change. When a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor was added to slow the CO2 reaction inside the cell, the half-time rose to 10 sec. (c) The Bohr off-shift in a haemolysed cell suspension produced by an increase in PCO2 appeared to be limited by the rate at which the CO2 could hydrate to form H+. 3. The Bohr off-shift has an average Q10 of 2·5 between 42·5 and 28° C with an activation energy of 8000 cal. 4. The pronounced importance of the CO2-bicarbonate system for rapid intracellular pH changes is discussed in connexion with some physiological situations. PMID:5664232

  9. The Effects of Culture Conditions on the Glycosylation of Secreted Human Placental Alkaline Phosphatase Produced in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Jong Hyun; Zhang, Fuming; Ermonval, Myriam; Linhardt, Robert J.; Sharfstein, Susan T.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of different culture conditions, suspension and microcarrier culture and temperature reduction on the structures of N-linked glycans attached to secreted human placental alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) were investigated for CHO cells grown in a controlled bioreactor. Both mass spectrometry and anion-exchange chromatography were used to probe the N-linked glycan structures and distribution. Complex-type glycans were the dominant structures with small amounts of high mannose glycans observed in suspension and reduced temperature cultures. Biantennary glycans were the most common structures detected by mass spectrometry, but triantennary and tetraantennary forms were also detected. The amount of sialic acid present was relatively low, approximately 0.4 mol sialic acid/mol SEAP for suspension cultures. Microcarrier cultures exhibited a decrease in productivity compared with suspension culture due to a decrease in both maximum viable cell density (15-20%) and specific productivity (30-50%). In contrast, a biphasic suspension culture in which the temperature was reduced at the beginning of the stationary phase from 37 to 33°C, showed a 7% increase in maximum viable cell density, a 62% increase in integrated viable cell density, and a 133% increase in specific productivity, leading to greater than threefold increase in total productivity. Both microcarrier and reduced temperature cultures showed increased sialylation and decreased fucosylation when compared to suspension culture. Our results highlight the importance of glycoform analysis after process modification as even subtle changes (e.g., changing from one microcarrier to another) may affect glycan distributions. PMID:18553404

  10. HYDROXYL RADICAL/OZONE RATIOS DURING OZONATION PROCESSES. II. THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE, PH, ALKALINITY, AND DOM PROPERTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of temperature, pH, alkalinity, and type and concentration of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the rate of ozone (O3) decomposition, O3-exposure, .OH-exposure and the ratio Rct of the concentrations of .OH and O3 has been studied. For a standardized single ozon...

  11. Characterizing the Effects of Inorganic Acid and Alkaline Shock on the Staphylococcus aureus Transcriptome and Messenger RNA Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kelsi L.; Roux, Christelle M.; Olson, Matthew W.; Luong, Thanh T.; Lee, Chia Y.; Olson, Robert; Dunman, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis can be partially attributed to its ability to adapt to otherwise deleterious host-associated stresses. Here, Affymetrix GeneChips® were used to examine the S. aureus responses to inorganic acid and alkaline shock and to assess whether stress dependent changes in mRNA turnover are likely to facilitate the organism’s ability to tolerate pH challenge. Results indicate that S. aureus adapts to pH shock by eliciting responses expected of cells coping with pH alteration, including neutralizing cellular pH, DNA repair, amino acid biosynthesis and virulence factor expression. Further, the S. aureus response to alkaline conditions is strikingly similar to that of stringent response induced cells. Indeed, we show that alkaline shock stimulates accumulation of the stringent response activator (p)ppGpp. Results also revealed that pH shock significantly alters the mRNA properties of the cell. A comparison of the mRNA degradation properties of transcripts whose titers either increased or decreased in response to sudden pH change revealed that alterations in mRNA degradation may, in part, account for the changes in the mRNA levels of factors predicted to mediate pH tolerance. A set of small stable RNA molecules were induced in response to acid or alkaline shock conditions and may mediate adaptation to pH stress. PMID:21039920

  12. Effect of dietary carbohydrate and phenotype on sucrase, maltase, lactase, and alkaline phosphatase specific activity in SHR/N-cp rat.

    PubMed

    Wiesenfeld, P; Baldwin, J; Szepesi, B; Michaelis, O E

    1993-03-01

    The obese spontaneous hypertensive rat/NIH-corpulent (SHR/N-cp) rat exhibits some of the metabolic and pathologic alterations associated with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The current study was conducted to investigate the influence of phenotype (ob versus In) and source of dietary carbohydrate (sucrose versus starch) on intestinal sucrase, maltase, lactase, and alkaline phosphatase activity in SHR/N-cp rats. For 3 months, lean and obese male SHR/N-cp rats were fed isocaloric diets containing as the sole source of carbohydrate either 54% cooked corn starch or sucrose. Serum and urine markers for diabetes were observed in obese rats. Wet weight and length of intestines were significantly increased in obese rats compared with lean littermates. Among the intestinal enzymes measured, statistical tests confirmed that sucrase activity was significantly increased (P < 0.01) by both phenotype (ob > In) and feeding a sucrose diet. Diet alone (sucrose > starch) significantly increased (P < 0.05) maltase activity in obese rats, but had no effect on lean rats. Lactase activity was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in obese sucrose-fed rats compared with obese starch-fed and/or lean littermates. Statistical tests revealed that intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly altered (P < 0.05) by both phenotype and diet. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase was higher in starch-fed lean rats compared with lean littermates fed sucrose and to starch or sucrose-fed obese rats. These results are not indicative of a simple, nonspecific increase in intestinal enzyme activity, since the effects observed in intestinal alkaline phosphatase contrast the effects observed in intestinal sucrase, maltase, and lactase activity. These results indicate that both phenotype and diet alter structural and enzymatic intestinal activities of SHR/N-cp rats. Distinct variations in the observed intestinal enzymatic activities suggest that these enzymes are under the

  13. The effect of water on the physical and thermodynamic properties of calc-alkaline basalt and basaltic andesite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, G.; Whittington, A. G.; Stechern, A.; Behrens, H.

    2013-12-01

    We present corresponding viscosity and heat capacity data obtained on a series of hydrated glasses and supercooled melts for Fe-free calc-alkaline basaltic (sb, NBO/T = 0.67) and basaltic andesite analogues (sba, NBO/T = 0.40). Water contents range from nominally anhydrous to 3.76 wt.% H2O. Density measurements on relaxed (1 atm) hydrous glasses (post-viscometry) yield a partial molar volume of H2O of 12.9 and of 11.4 cm3mol-1 for sba and sb, respectively. Viscosity data were obtained at temperatures in the neighbourhood of the glass transition using the parallel-plate method, and at superliquidus temperatures using the concentric-cylinder and falling-sphere methods. The effect of water on viscosity is most dramatic at low temperatures, with the addition of ~2 wt.% H2O resulting in a reduction of the temperature at which the viscosity of the melt is 1012 Pa s (T12) of 170-180°C. The viscosity of a calc-alkaline basaltic andesite magma with 2 wt.% H2O at depth would increase by a factor of ~100 upon complete degassing during ascent. Calorimetric measurements were made with a Perkin-Elmer 8500 Differential Scanning Calorimeter up to 750°C, the limit of the instrument, depending on the sample water content. The increase in heat capacity associated with the transition from a glass to a supercooled liquid is on the order of ~25-30% and is higher in magnitude the more depolymerized the liquid. Our preliminary results suggest that the heat capacity of the hydrous sba and sb liquids decreases with increasing temperature immediately above the glass transition, similar to borosilicate and titanosilicate melts. In the anhydrous titano- and boro-silicate melts, this anomalous behaviour was linked to T-dependent mixing of B or Ti with Si. In sb and sba, the observed decrease in configurational heat capacity with increasing temperature may be related to the interplay of 'polymerizing' (viscosity-increasing) vs. 'depolymerizing' (viscosity-decreasing) solution mechanisms of

  14. Darwinism in disguise? A comparison between Bohr's view on quantum mechanics and QBism.

    PubMed

    Faye, Jan

    2016-05-28

    The Copenhagen interpretation is first and foremost associated with Niels Bohr's philosophy of quantum mechanics. In this paper, I attempt to lay out what I see as Bohr's pragmatic approach to science in general and to quantum physics in particular. A part of this approach is his claim that the classical concepts are indispensable for our understanding of all physical phenomena, and it seems as if the claim is grounded in his reflection upon how the evolution of language is adapted to experience. Another, recent interpretation, QBism, has also found support in Darwin's theory. It may therefore not be surprising that sometimes QBism is said to be of the same breed as the Copenhagen interpretation. By comparing the two interpretations, I conclude, nevertheless, that there are important differences.

  15. Quantum Humor: The Playful Side of Physics at Bohr's Institute for Theoretical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Paul

    2012-09-01

    From the 1930s to the 1950s, a period of pivotal developments in quantum, nuclear, and particle physics, physicists at Niels Bohr's Institute for Theoretical Physics in Copenhagen took time off from their research to write humorous articles, letters, and other works. Best known is the Blegdamsvej Faust, performed in April 1932 at the close of one of the Institute's annual conferences. I also focus on the Journal of Jocular Physics, a humorous tribute to Bohr published on the occasions of his 50th, 60th, and 70th birthdays in 1935, 1945, and 1955. Contributors included Léon Rosenfeld, Victor Weisskopf, George Gamow, Oskar Klein, and Hendrik Casimir. I examine their contributions along with letters and other writings to show that they offer a window into some issues in physics at the time, such as the interpretation of complementarity and the nature of the neutrino, as well as the politics of the period.

  16. On Quasi-Normal Modes, Area Quantization and Bohr Correspondence Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corda, Christian

    2015-10-01

    In (Int. Journ. Mod. Phys. D 14, 181 2005), the author Khriplovich verbatim claims that "the correspondence principle does not dictate any relation between the asymptotics of quasinormal modes and the spectrum of quantized black holes" and that "this belief is in conflict with simple physical arguments". In this paper we analyze Khriplovich's criticisms and realize that they work only for the original proposal by Hod, while they do not work for the improvements suggested by Maggiore and recently finalized by the author and collaborators through a connection between Hawking radiation and black hole (BH) quasi-normal modes (QNMs). This is a model of quantum BH somewhat similar to the historical semi-classical model of the structure of a hydrogen atom introduced by Bohr in 1913. Thus, QNMs can be really interpreted as BH quantum levels (the "electrons" of the "Bohr-like BH model").Our results have also important implications on the BH information puzzle.

  17. Conceptual objections to the Bohr atomic theory — do electrons have a "free will" ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragh, Helge

    2011-11-01

    The atomic model introduced by Bohr in 1913 dominated the development of the old quantum theory. Its main features, such as the radiationless stationary states and the discontinuous quantum jumps between the states, were hard to swallow for contemporary physicists. While acknowledging the empirical power of the theory, many scientists criticized its foundation or looked for ways to reconcile it with classical physics. Among the chief critics were A. Crehore, J.J. Thomson, E. Gehrcke and J. Stark. This paper examines from a historical perspective the conceptual objections to Bohr's atom, in particular the stationary states (where electrodynamics was annulled by fiat) and the mysterious, apparently teleological quantum jumps. Although few of the critics played a constructive role in the development of the old quantum theory, a history neglecting their presence would be incomplete and distorted.

  18. Darwinism in disguise? A comparison between Bohr's view on quantum mechanics and QBism.

    PubMed

    Faye, Jan

    2016-05-28

    The Copenhagen interpretation is first and foremost associated with Niels Bohr's philosophy of quantum mechanics. In this paper, I attempt to lay out what I see as Bohr's pragmatic approach to science in general and to quantum physics in particular. A part of this approach is his claim that the classical concepts are indispensable for our understanding of all physical phenomena, and it seems as if the claim is grounded in his reflection upon how the evolution of language is adapted to experience. Another, recent interpretation, QBism, has also found support in Darwin's theory. It may therefore not be surprising that sometimes QBism is said to be of the same breed as the Copenhagen interpretation. By comparing the two interpretations, I conclude, nevertheless, that there are important differences. PMID:27091172

  19. Microscopic derivation of the Bohr-Mottelson collective Hamiltonian and its application to quadrupole shape dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyanagi, Kenichi; Matsuo, Masayuki; Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Yoshida, Kenichi; Hinohara, Nobuo; Sato, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the nature of the low-frequency quadrupole vibrations from small-amplitude to large-amplitude regimes. We consider full five-dimensional quadrupole dynamics including three-dimensional rotations restoring the broken symmetries as well as axially symmetric and asymmetric shape fluctuations. Assuming that the time evolution of the self-consistent mean field is determined by five pairs of collective coordinates and collective momenta, we microscopically derive the collective Hamiltonian of Bohr and Mottelson, which describes low-frequency quadrupole dynamics. We show that the five-dimensional collective Schrödinger equation is capable of describing large-amplitude quadrupole shape dynamics seen as shape coexistence/mixing phenomena. We summarize the modern concepts of microscopic theory of large-amplitude collective motion, which is underlying the microscopic derivation of the Bohr-Mottelson collective Hamiltonian.

  20. Electric quadrupole transitions of the Bohr Hamiltonian with the Morse potential

    SciTech Connect

    Inci, I.; Bonatsos, D.; Boztosun, I.

    2011-08-15

    Eigenfunctions of the collective Bohr Hamiltonian with the Morse potential have been obtained by using the asymptotic iteration method (AIM) for both {gamma}-unstable and rotational structures. B(E2) transition rates have been calculated and compared to experimental data. Overall good agreement is obtained for transitions within the ground-state band, while some interband transitions appear to be systematically underpredicted in {gamma}-unstable nuclei and overpredicted in rotational nuclei.

  1. Closed analytical solutions of Bohr Hamiltonian with Manning-Rosen potential model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabab, M.; Lahbas, A.; Oulne, M.

    2015-11-01

    In the present paper, we have obtained closed analytical expressions for eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the Bohr Hamiltonian with the Manning-Rosen potential for γ-unstable nuclei as well as exactly separable rotational ones with γ ≈ 0. Some heavy nuclei with known β and γ bandheads have been fitted by using two parameters in the γ-unstable case and three parameters in the axially symmetric prolate deformed one. A good agreement with experimental data has been achieved.

  2. Bohr Hamiltonian with a deformation-dependent mass term: physical meaning of the free parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonatsos, Dennis; Minkov, N.; Petrellis, D.

    2015-09-01

    Embedding the five-dimensional (5D) space of the Bohr Hamiltonian with a deformation-dependent mass (DDM) into a six-dimensional (6D) space shows that the free parameter in the dependence of the mass on the deformation is connected to the curvature of the 5D space, with the special case of constant mass corresponding to a flat 5D space. Comparison of the DDM Bohr Hamiltonian to the 5D classical limit of Hamiltonians of the 6D interacting boson model (IBM), shows that the DDM parameter is proportional to the strength of the pairing interaction in the U(5) (vibrational) symmetry limit, while it is proportional to the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction in the SU(3) (rotational) symmetry limit, and to the difference of the pairing interactions among s, d bosons and d bosons alone in the O(6) (γ-soft) limit. The presence of these interactions leads to a curved 5D space in the classical limit of IBM, in contrast to the flat 5D space of the original Bohr Hamiltonian, which is made curved by the introduction of the DDM.

  3. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  4. Effects of saline-alkaline stress on benzo[a]pyrene biotransformation and ligninolytic enzyme expression by Bjerkandera adusta SM46.

    PubMed

    Andriani, Ade; Tachibana, Sanro; Itoh, Kazutaka

    2016-03-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) accumulates in marine organisms and contaminated coastal areas. The biotreatment of waste water using saline-alkaline-tolerant white rot fungi (WRF) represents a promising method for removing BaP under saline-alkaline conditions based on WRF's ability to produce ligninolytic enzymes. In a pre-screening for degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of 82 fungal strains using Remazol brilliant blue R, Bjerkandera adusta SM46 exhibited the highest tolerance to saline-alkaline stress. Moreover, a B. adusta culture grown in BaP-containing liquid medium exhibited resistance to salinities up to 20 g l(-1). These conditions did not inhibit fungal growth or the expression of manganese peroxidase (MnP) or lignin peroxidase (LiP). The degradation rate also became higher as salinity increased to 20 g l(-1). Fungal growth and enzyme expression were inhibited at a salinity of 35 g l(-1). These inhibitory effects directly decreased the degradation rate (>24%). The presence of MnSO4 as an inducer improved the degradation rate and enzyme expression. MnP and LiP activity also increased by seven- and fivefold, respectively. SM46 degraded BaP (38-89% over 30 days) in an acidic environment (pH 4.5) and under saline-alkaline stress conditions (pH 8.2). Investigating the metabolites produced revealed BaP-1,6-dione as the main product, indicating the important role of ligninolytic enzymes in initializing BaP cleavage. The other metabolites detected, naphthalene acetic acid, hydroxybenzoic acid, benzoic acid, and catechol, may have been ring fission products. The wide range of activities observed suggests that B. adusta SM46 is a potential agent for biodegrading BaP under saline conditions. PMID:26867600

  5. Effect of endosulfan on acid and alkaline phosphatase activity in liver, kidney, and muscles of Channa gachua

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.M. )

    1990-03-01

    The widespread use of a great many toxic chemicals to eliminate unwanted plant or animal species has resulted in the contamination of most aquatic habitats with these substances on a regular basis. Endosulfan, a polycyclic chlorinated hydrocarbon of cyclodien group, is a well known organochlorine insecticide on the activity of acid and alkaline phosphatase in liver, kidney and muscles of a freshwater teleost, Channa gachua.

  6. The effect of ultrasound on the catalytic activity of alkaline carbons: preparation of N-alkyl imidazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durán-Valle, C. J.; Ferrera-Escudero, S.; Calvino-Casilda, V.; Díaz-Terán, J.; Martín-Aranda, R. M.

    2004-11-01

    N-Alkyl imidazoles have been prepared by sonochemical irradiation of imidazole and 1-bromobutane using alkaline promoted carbons. Under the experimental conditions, N-alkyl imidazoles can be prepared with a high activity and selectivity. It is observed that imidazole conversion increases in parallel with increasing basicity of the catalyst. For comparison, the alkylation of imidazole has also been performed in a batch reactor system under thermal activation.

  7. Effects of Intercropping with Potato Onion on the Growth of Tomato and Rhizosphere Alkaline Phosphatase Genes Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xia; Wu, Fengzhi; Zhou, Xingang; Fu, Xuepeng; Tao, Yue; Xu, Weihui; Pan, Kai; Liu, Shouwei

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: In China, excessive fertilization has resulted in phosphorus (P) accumulation in most greenhouse soils. Intercropping can improve the efficiency of nutrient utilization in crop production. In this study, pot experiments were performed to investigate the effects of intercropping with potato onion (Allium cepa L. var. aggregatum G. Don) on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings growth and P uptake, the diversity of rhizosphere phosphobacteria and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) genes in phosphorus-rich soil. Methods: The experiment included three treatments, namely tomato monoculture (TM), potato onion monoculture (OM), and tomato/potato onion intercropping (TI-tomato intercropping and OI-potato onion intercropping). The growth and P uptake of tomato and potato onion seedlings were evaluated. The dilution plating method was used to determine the population of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) and phosphate-mineralizing bacteria (PMB). The genomic DNAs of PSB and PMB in the rhizosphere of tomato and potato onions were extracted and purified, and then, with the primer set of 338f /518r, the PCR amplification of partial bacterial 16S rDNA sequence was performed and sequenced to determine the diversities of PSB and PMB. After extracting the total genomic DNAs from the rhizosphere, the copy numbers and diversities of ALP genes were investigated using real-time PCR and PCR-DGGE, respectively. Results: Intercropping with potato onion promoted the growth and P uptake of tomato seedlings, but inhibited those of potato onion. After 37 days of transplanting, compared to the rhizosphere of TM, the soil pH increased, while the electrolytic conductivity and Olsen P content decreased (p < 0.05) in the rhizosphere of TI. The populations and diversities of PSB, PMB, and ALP genes increased significantly in the rhizosphere of TI, compared to the rhizosphere of TM. Conclusion: The results indicated that intercropping with potato onion promoted the growth and P

  8. Effect of heme modification on oxygen affinity of myoglobin and equilibrium of the acid-alkaline transition in metmyoglobin.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Tomokazu; Nagao, Satoshi; Fukaya, Masashi; Tai, Hulin; Nagatomo, Shigenori; Morihashi, Kenji; Matsuo, Takashi; Hirota, Shun; Suzuki, Akihiro; Imai, Kiyohiro; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

    2010-05-01

    Functional regulation of myoglobin (Mb) is thought to be achieved through the heme environment furnished by nearby amino acid residues, and subtle tuning of the intrinsic heme Fe reactivity. We have performed substitution of strongly electron-withdrawing perfluoromethyl (CF(3)) group(s) as heme side chain(s) of Mb to obtain large alterations of the heme electronic structure in order to elucidate the relationship between the O(2) affinity of Mb and the electronic properties of heme peripheral side chains. We have utilized the equilibrium constant (pK(a)) of the "acid-alkaline transition" in metmyoglobin in order to quantitatively assess the effects of the CF(3) substitutions for the electron density of heme Fe atom (rho(Fe)) of the protein. The pK(a) value of the protein was found to decrease by approximately 1 pH unit upon the introduction of one CF(3) group, and the decrease in the pK(a) value with decreasing the rho(Fe) value was confirmed by density functional theory calculations on some model compounds. The O(2) affinity of Mb was found to correlate well with the pK(a) value in such a manner that the P(50) value, which is the partial pressure of O(2) required to achieve 50% oxygenation, increases by a factor of 2.7 with a decrease of 1 pK(a) unit. Kinetic studies on the proteins revealed that the decrease in O(2) affinity upon the introduction of an electron-withdrawing CF(3) group is due to an increase in the O(2) dissociation rate. Since the introduction of a CF(3) group substitution is thought to prevent further Fe(2+)-O(2) bond polarization and hence formation of a putative Fe(3+)-O(2)(-)-like species of the oxy form of the protein [Maxwell, J. C.; Volpe, J. A.; Barlow, C. H.; Caughey, W. S. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 1974, 58, 166-171], the O(2) dissociation is expected to be enhanced by the substitution of electron-withdrawing groups as heme side chains. We also found that, in sharp contrast to the case of the O(2) binding to the protein, the CO

  9. Effects of Aging on PuO2∙xH2O Particle Size in Alkaline Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, Calvin H.

    2013-05-01

    Between 1944 and 1989, 54.5 metric tons of the United States’ weapons-grade plutonium and an additional 12.9 metric tons of fuel-grade plutonium were produced and separated from irradiated fuel at the Hanford Site. Acidic high-activity wastes containing around 600 kg of plutonium were made alkaline and discharged to underground storage tanks from separations, isolation, and recycle processes to yield average plutonium concentration of about 0.003 grams per liter (or ~0.0002 wt%) in the ~200 million liter tank waste volume. The plutonium is largely associated with low-solubility metal hydroxide/oxide sludges where its low concentration and intimate mixture with neutron-absorbing elements (e.g., iron) are credited in nuclear criticality safety. However, concerns have been expressed that plutonium, in the form of plutonium hydrous oxide, PuO2∙xH2O, could undergo sufficient crystal growth through dissolution and reprecipitation in the alkaline tank waste to potentially become separable from neutron absorbing constituents by settling or sedimentation. Thermodynamic considerations and laboratory studies of systems chemically analogous to tank waste show that the plutonium formed in the alkaline tank waste by precipitation through neutralization from acid solution probably entered as 2–4-nm PuO2∙xH2O crystallite particles that, because of their low solubility and opposition from radiolytic processes, grow from that point at exceedingly slow rates, thus posing no risk of physical segregation.

  10. Effects of cement alkalinity, exposure conditions and steel-concrete interface on the time-to-corrosion and chloride threshold for reinforcing steel in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Jingak

    Effects of (1) cement alkalinity (low, normal and high), (2) exposure conditions (RH and temperature), (3) rebar surface condition (as-received versus cleaned) and (4) density and distribution of air voids at the steel-concrete interface on the chloride threshold and time-to-corrosion for reinforcing steel in concrete have been studied. Also, experiments were performed to evaluate effects of RH and temperature on the diffusion of chloride in concrete and develop a method for ex-situ pH measurement of concrete pore water. Once specimens were fabricated and exposed to a corrosive chloride solution, various experimental techniques were employed to determine time-to-corrosion, chloride threshold, diffusion coefficient and void density along the rebar trace as well as pore water pH. Based upon the resultant data, several findings related to the above parameters have been obtained as summarized below. First, time for the corrosion initiation was longest for G109 concrete specimens with high alkalinity cement (HA). Also, chloride threshold increased with increasing time-to-corrosion and cement alkalinity. Consequently, the HA specimens exhibited the highest chloride threshold compared to low and normal alkalinity ones. Second, high temperature and temperature variations reduced time-to-corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete since chloride diffusion was accelerated at higher temperature and possibly by temperature variations. The lowest chloride threshold values were found for outdoor exposed specimens suggesting that variation of RH or temperature (or both) facilitated rapid chloride diffusion. Third, an elevated time-to-corrosion and chloride threshold values were found for the wire brushed steel specimens compared to as-received ones. The higher ratio of [OH-]/[Fe n+] on the wire brushed steel surface compared to that of as-received case can be the possible cause because the higher ratio of this parameter enables the formation of a more protective passive film on

  11. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    DOEpatents

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  12. Effects of alkalinity on ammonia removal, carbon dioxide stripping, and system pH in semi-commercial scale water recirculating aquaculture systems operated with moving bed bioreactors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When operating water recirculating systems (RAS) with high make-up water flushing rates in locations that have low alkalinity in the raw water, such as Norway, knowledge about the required RAS alkalinity concentration is important. Flushing RAS with make-up water containing low alkalinity washes out...

  13. The effect of polymer-surfactant interaction on the rheological properties of surfactant enhanced alkaline flooding formulations. [Phase separation, precipitation and viscosity loss

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1993-02-01

    Surfactant-enhanced, lower pH (weak) alkaline chemicals are effective for mobilizing residual oil. Polymer is used for mobility control because if mobility control is lost, then oil recovery is reduced. The ability to maintain mobility control during surfactant-alkaline flooding can be adversely affected by chemical interaction. In this work, interaction between polymers and surfactants was shown to be affected by pH, ionic strength, crude oil, and the properties of the polymers and surfactants. Polymer-surfactant interaction (phase separation, precipitation, and viscosity loss) occurred between most of the polymers and surfactants that were tested. Polymer-surfactant interaction is difficult to eliminate, and no method was found for completely eliminating interaction. Polymer-surfactant interaction occurred at optimal salinity and below optimal salinity. Polymer-surfactant interaction had an adverse effect on polymer rheology; however, the adverse effect of interaction on polymer rheology was lessened when oil was present. Increasing the pH of chemical systems further reduced the adverse effects of interaction on polymer rheology.

  14. [Effect of Residual Hydrogen Peroxide on Hydrolysis Acidification of Sludge Pretreated by Microwave -H2O2-Alkaline Process].

    PubMed

    Jia, Rui-lai; Liu, Ji-bao; Wei, Yuan-song; Cai, Xing

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have found that in the hydrolysis acidification process, sludge after microwave -H2O2-alkaline (MW-H2O2-OH, pH = 10) pretreatment had an acid production lag due to the residual hydrogen peroxide. In this study, effects of residual hydrogen peroxide after MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10 or pH = 11) pretreatment on the sludge hydrolysis acidification were investigated through batch experiments. Our results showed that catalase had a higher catalytic efficiency than manganese dioxide for hydrogen peroxide, which could completely degraded hydrogen peroxide within 10 min. During the 8 d of hydrolysis acidification time, both SCOD concentrations and the total VFAs concentrations of four groups were firstly increased and then decreased. The optimized hydrolysis times were 0.5 d for four groups, and the optimized hydrolysis acidification times were 3 d for MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) group, MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) + catalase group and MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 11) + catalase group. The optimized hydrolysis acidification time for MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 11) group was 4 d. Residual hydrogen peroxide inhibited acid production for sludge after MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) pretreatment, resulting in a lag in acidification stage. Compared with MW-H2O2-OH ( pH = 10) pretreatment, MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 11 ) pretreatment released more SCOD by 19.29% and more organic matters, which resulted in the increase of total VFAs production significantly by 84.80% at 5 d of hydrolysis acidification time and MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 11) group could shorten the lag time slightly. Dosing catalase (100 mg x -L(-1)) after the MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10 or pH = 11) pretreatment not only significantly shortened the lag time (0.5 d) in acidification stage, but also produced more total VFAs by 23.61% and 50.12% in the MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) + catalase group and MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 11) + catalase group, compared with MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) group at 3d of hydrolysis acidification time. For MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) group, MW-H2O2-OH (pH = 10) + catalase group and

  15. Short-chain fatty acids production and microbial community in sludge alkaline fermentation: Long-term effect of temperature.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yue; Liu, Ye; Li, Baikun; Wang, Bo; Wang, Shuying; Peng, Yongzhen

    2016-07-01

    Sludge alkaline fermentation has been reported to achieve efficient short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) production. Temperature played important role in further improved SCFAs production. Long-term SCFAs production from sludge alkaline fermentation was compared between mesotherm (30±2°C) and microtherm (15±2°C). The study of 90days showed that mesotherm led to 2.2-folds production of SCFAs as microtherm and enhanced the production of acetic acid as major component of SCFAs. Soluble protein and carbohydrate at mesotherm was 2.63-folds as that at microtherm due to higher activities of protease and α-glucosidase, guaranteeing efficient substrates to produce SCFAs. Illumina MiSeq sequencing revealed that microtherm increased the abundance of Corynebacterium, Alkaliflexus, Pseudomonas and Guggenheimella, capable of enhancing hydrolysis. Hydrolytic bacteria, i.e. Alcaligenes, Anaerolinea and Ottowia, were enriched at mesotherm. Meanwhile, acidogenic bacteria showed higher abundance at mesotherm than microtherm. Therefore, enrichment of functional bacteria and higher microbial activities resulted in the improved SCFAs at mesotherm. PMID:27060243

  16. The effect of crystal orientation on the aluminum anodes of the aluminum-air batteries in alkaline electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Liang; Lu, Huimin; Leng, Jing; Sun, Zegao; Chen, Chunbo

    2015-12-01

    Recently, aluminum-air (Al-air) batteries have received attention from researchers as an exciting option for safe and efficient batteries. The electrochemical performance of Aluminum anode remains an active area of investigation. In this paper, the electrochemical properties of polycrystalline Al, Al (001), (110) and (111) single crystals are investigated using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 4 M NaOH and KOH. Hydrogen corrosion rates of the Al anodes are determined by hydrogen collection. Battery performance using the anodes is tested by constant current discharge at 10 mA cm-2. This is the first report showing that the electrochemical properties of Al are closely related to the crystallographic orientation in alkaline electrolytes. The (001) crystallographic plane has good corrosion resistance but (110) is more sensitive. Al (001) single crystals display higher anode efficiency and capacity density. Controlling the crystallographic orientation of the Al anode is another way to improve the performance of Al-air batteries in alkaline electrolytes.

  17. Effect of thermal-alkaline pretreatment on the anaerobic digestion of streptomycin bacterial residues for methane production.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weizhang; Li, Zaixing; Yang, Jingliang; Liu, Chun; Tian, Baokuo; Wang, Yongjun; Chen, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic digestion of streptomycin bacterial residues, solutions with hazardous waste treatments and bioenergy recovery, was tested in laboratory-scale digesters at 35°C at various organic loading rates (OLRs). The methane production and biomass digestion were efficient at OLRs below 2.33 gVS L(-1) d(-1) but were deteriorated as OLR increased because of the increased total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) concentration from cell protein decay. The thermal-alkaline pretreatment with 0.10 NaOH/TS at 70°C for 2 h significantly improved the digestion performance. With the thermal-alkaline pretreatment, the volumetric reactor productivity and specific methane yield of the pretreated streptomycin bacterial residue increased by 22.08-27.08% compared with those of the unpretreated streptomycin bacterial residue at an OLR of 2.33 gVS L(-1) d(-1). The volatile solid removal was 64.09%, with less accumulation of TAN and total volatile fatty acid.

  18. Alkalinity and pH effects on nitrification in a membrane aerated bioreactor: an experimental and model analysis.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, John W; Semmens, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    A nitrifying biofilm was grown in a laboratory-scale membrane aerated bioreactor (MABR) to calibrate and test a one-dimensional biofilm model incorporating chemical equilibria to calculate local pH values. A previously developed model (Shanahan and Semmens, 2004) based upon AQUASIM was modified to incorporate the impact of local pH changes within the biofilm on the kinetics of nitrification. Shielded microelectrodes were used to measure the concentration profiles of dissolved oxygen, ammonium, nitrate, and pH within the biofilm and the overlying boundary layer under actual operating conditions. Operating conditions were varied to assess the impact of bicarbonate loading (alkalinity), ammonium loading, and intra-membrane oxygen partial pressure on biofilm performance. Nitrification performance improved with increased ammonium and bicarbonate loadings over the range of operating conditions tested, but declined when the intra-membrane oxygen partial pressure was increased. Minor discrepancies between the measured and predicted concentration profiles within the biofilm were attributed to changes in biofilm density and vertical heterogeneities in biofilm structure not accounted for by the model. Nevertheless, predicted concentration profiles within the biofilm agreed well with experimental results over the range of conditions studied and highlight the fact that pH changes in the biofilm are significant especially in low alkalinity waters. The influent pH and buffer capacity of a wastewater may therefore have a significant impact on the performance of a membrane-aerated bioreactor with respect to nitrification, and nitrogen removal.

  19. AGU's historical records move to the Niels Bohr Library and Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Kristine C.

    2012-11-01

    As scientists, AGU members understand the important role data play in finding the answers to their research questions: no data—no answers. The same holds true for the historians posing research questions concerning the development of the geophysical sciences, but their data are found in archival collections comprising the personal papers of geophysicists and scientific organizations. Now historians of geophysics—due to the efforts of the AGU History of Geophysics Committee, the American Institute of Physics (AIP), and the archivists of the Niels Bohr Library and Archives at AIP—have an extensive new data source: the AGU manuscript collection.

  20. The divine clockwork: Bohr's correspondence principle and Nelson's stochastic mechanics for the atomic elliptic state

    SciTech Connect

    Durran, Richard; Neate, Andrew; Truman, Aubrey

    2008-03-15

    We consider the Bohr correspondence limit of the Schroedinger wave function for an atomic elliptic state. We analyze this limit in the context of Nelson's stochastic mechanics, exposing an underlying deterministic dynamical system in which trajectories converge to Keplerian motion on an ellipse. This solves the long standing problem of obtaining Kepler's laws of planetary motion in a quantum mechanical setting. In this quantum mechanical setting, local mild instabilities occur in the Keplerian orbit for eccentricities greater than (1/{radical}(2)) which do not occur classically.

  1. Electric quadrupole transitions of the Bohr Hamiltonian with Manning-Rosen potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabab, M.; El Batoul, A.; Lahbas, A.; Oulne, M.

    2016-09-01

    Analytical expressions of the wave functions are derived for a Bohr Hamiltonian with the Manning-Rosen potential in the cases of γ-unstable nuclei and axially symmetric prolate deformed ones with γ ≈ 0. By exploiting the results we have obtained in a recent work on the same theme Ref. [1], we have calculated the B (E 2) transition rates for 34 γ-unstable and 38 rotational nuclei and compared to experimental data, revealing a qualitative agreement with the experiment and phase transitions within the ground state band and showing also that the Manning-Rosen potential is more appropriate for such calculations than other potentials.

  2. Effects of alkaline or liquid-ammonia treatment on crystalline cellulose: changes in crystalline structure and effects on enzymatic digestibility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In converting biomass to bioethanol, pretreatment is a key step intended to render cellulose more amenable and accessible to cellulase enzymes and thus increase glucose yields. In this study, four cellulose samples with different degrees of polymerization and crystallinity indexes were subjected to aqueous sodium hydroxide and anhydrous liquid ammonia treatments. The effects of the treatments on cellulose crystalline structure were studied, in addition to the effects on the digestibility of the celluloses by a cellulase complex. Results From X-ray diffractograms and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, it was revealed that treatment with liquid ammonia produced the cellulose IIII allomorph; however, crystallinity depended on treatment conditions. Treatment at a low temperature (25°C) resulted in a less crystalline product, whereas treatment at elevated temperatures (130°C or 140°C) gave a more crystalline product. Treatment of cellulose I with aqueous sodium hydroxide (16.5 percent by weight) resulted in formation of cellulose II, but also produced a much less crystalline cellulose. The relative digestibilities of the different cellulose allomorphs were tested by exposing the treated and untreated cellulose samples to a commercial enzyme mixture (Genencor-Danisco; GC 220). The digestibility results showed that the starting cellulose I samples were the least digestible (except for corn stover cellulose, which had a high amorphous content). Treatment with sodium hydroxide produced the most digestible cellulose, followed by treatment with liquid ammonia at a low temperature. Factor analysis indicated that initial rates of digestion (up to 24 hours) were most strongly correlated with amorphous content. Correlation of allomorph type with digestibility was weak, but was strongest with cellulose conversion at later times. The cellulose IIII samples produced at higher temperatures had comparable crystallinities to the initial cellulose I samples, but achieved

  3. Enhanced Electroresponse of Alkaline Earth Metal-Doped Silica/Titania Spheres by Synergetic Effect of Dispersion Stability and Dielectric Property.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Chang-Min; Lee, Seungae; Cheong, Oug Jae; Jang, Jyongsik

    2015-09-01

    A series of alkaline earth metal-doped hollow SiO2/TiO2 spheres (EM-HST) are prepared as electrorheological (ER) materials via sonication-mediated etching method with various alkaline earth metal hydroxides as the etchant. The EM-HST spheres are assessed to determine how their hollow interior and metal-doping affects the ER activity. Both the dispersion stability and the dielectric properties of these materials are greatly enhanced by the proposed one-step etching method, which results in significant enhancement of ER activity. These improvements are attributed to increased particle mobility and interfacial polarization originating from the hollow nature of the EM-HST spheres and the effects of EM metal-doping. In particular, Ca-HST-based ER fluid exhibits ER performance which is 7.1-fold and 3.1-fold higher than those of nonhollow core/shell silica/titania (CS/ST) and undoped hollow silica/titania (HST)-based ER fluids, respectively. This study develops a versatile and simple approach to enhancing ER activity through synergetic effects arising from the combination of dispersion stability and the unique dielectric properties of hollow EM-HST spheres. In addition, the multigram scale production described in this experiment can be an excellent advantage for practical and commercial ER application.

  4. Insights into the effect of dilute acid, hot water and alkaline pretreatment on cellulose accessible surface area and overall porosity of Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xianzhi; Wells, Tyrone; Sun, Qining; Huang, Fang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-06-19

    Pretreatment is known to render biomass more reactive to cellulase by altering the chemical compositions as well as physical structures of biomass. Simons stain technique along with mercury porosimetry were applied on the acid, neutral, and alkaline pretreated materials to measure the accessible surface area of cellulose and pore size distribution of Populus. Results indicated that acid pretreatment is much more effective than water and alkaline pretreatment in terms of cellulose accessibility increase. Further investigation suggests that lignin does not dictate cellulose accessibility to the extent that hemicellulose does, but it does restrict xylan accessibility which in turn controls the access of cellulase to cellulose. The most interesting finding is that severe acid pretreatment significantly decreases the average pore size, i.e., 90% average size decrease could be observed after 60 min dilute acid pretreatment at 160 °C; moreover, the nano-pore space formed between coated microfibrils is increased after pretreatment, especially for the acid pretreatment, suggesting this particular type of biomass porosity is probably the most fundamental barrier to effective enzymatic hydrolysis.

  5. Insights into the effect of dilute acid, hot water and alkaline pretreatment on cellulose accessible surface area and overall porosity of Populus

    DOE PAGES

    Meng, Xianzhi; Wells, Tyrone; Sun, Qining; Huang, Fang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-06-19

    Pretreatment is known to render biomass more reactive to cellulase by altering the chemical compositions as well as physical structures of biomass. Simons stain technique along with mercury porosimetry were applied on the acid, neutral, and alkaline pretreated materials to measure the accessible surface area of cellulose and pore size distribution of Populus. Results indicated that acid pretreatment is much more effective than water and alkaline pretreatment in terms of cellulose accessibility increase. Further investigation suggests that lignin does not dictate cellulose accessibility to the extent that hemicellulose does, but it does restrict xylan accessibility which in turn controls themore » access of cellulase to cellulose. The most interesting finding is that severe acid pretreatment significantly decreases the average pore size, i.e., 90% average size decrease could be observed after 60 min dilute acid pretreatment at 160 °C; moreover, the nano-pore space formed between coated microfibrils is increased after pretreatment, especially for the acid pretreatment, suggesting this particular type of biomass porosity is probably the most fundamental barrier to effective enzymatic hydrolysis.« less

  6. The influence of Niels Bohr on Max Delbrück: revisiting the hopes inspired by "light and life".

    PubMed

    McKaughan, Daniel J

    2005-12-01

    The impact of Niels Bohr's 1932 "Light and Life" lecture on Max Delbrück's lifelong search for a form of "complementarity" in biology is well documented and much discussed, but the precise nature of that influence remains subject to misunderstanding. The standard reading, which sees Delbrück's transition from physics into biology as inspired by the hope that investigation of biological phenomena might lead to a breakthrough discovery of new laws of physics, is colored much more by Erwin Schrödinger's What Is Life? (1944) than is often acknowledged. Bohr's view was that teleological and mechanistic descriptions are mutually exclusive yet jointly necessary for an exhaustive understanding of life. Although Delbrück's approach was empirical and less self-consciously philosophical, he shared Bohr's hope that scientific investigation would vindicate the view that at least some aspects of life are not reducible to physico-chemical terms.

  7. Clinical Management of Patients with ASXL1 Mutations and Bohring-Opitz Syndrome, Emphasizing the Need for Wilms Tumor Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Bianca; Johnston, Jennifer J; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Kramer, Nancy; Pickart, Angela; Rhead, William; Tan, Wen-Hann; Brownstein, Catherine A; Clarkson, L Kate; Dobson, Amy; Rosenberg, Avi Z; Schrier Vergano, Samantha A.; Helm, Benjamin M.; Harrison, Rachel E; Graham, John M

    2016-01-01

    Bohring-Opitz syndrome is a rare genetic condition characterized by distinctive facial features, variable microcephaly, hypertrichosis, nevus flammeus, severe myopia, unusual posture (flexion at the elbows with ulnar deviation, and flexion of the wrists and metacarpophalangeal joints), severe intellectual disability, and feeding issues. Nine patients with Bohring-Opitz syndrome have been identified as having a mutation in ASXL1. We report on eight previously unpublished patients with Bohring-Opitz syndrome caused by an apparent or confirmed de novo mutation in ASXL1. Of note, two patients developed bilateral Wilms tumors. Somatic mutations in ASXL1 are associated with myeloid malignancies, and these reports emphasize the need for Wilms tumor screening in patients with ASXL1 mutations. We discuss clinical management with a focus on their feeding issues, cyclic vomiting, respiratory infections, insomnia, and tumor predisposition. Many patients are noted to have distinctive personalities (interactive, happy, and curious) and rapid hair growth; features not previously reported. PMID:25921057

  8. Synergistic benefits of ionic liquid and alkaline pretreatments of poplar wood. Part 1: effect of integrated pretreatment on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Tong-Qi; Wang, Wei; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2013-09-01

    An environmentally friendly pretreatment process was developed to fractionate hemicelluloses and lignin from poplar wood by ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment coupled with mild alkaline extraction. Hemicellulosic and lignin fractions were obtained in high yields, amounting to 59.3% and 74.4%, respectively, which can served as raw materials for production of value-added products. The yield of glucose for the integrated pretreated poplar wood was 99.2%, while it was just 19.2% for the untreated material. The synergistic benefits of the removal of lignin and hemicelluloses, the increase of the cellulose surface area, and the conversion of cellulose fibers from the cellulose I to the cellulose II crystal phase resulted in the high glucose yield for the integrated pretreated substrate. Therefore, the IL based biorefining strategy proposed can integrate biofuels production into a biorefinery scheme in which the major components of poplar wood can be converted into value-added products.

  9. Two-band superfluidity and intrinsic Josephson effect in alkaline-earth-metal Fermi gases across an orbital Feshbach resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskin, M.

    2016-07-01

    We first show that the many-body Hamiltonian governing the physical properties of an alkaline-earth 173Yb Fermi gas across the recently realized orbital Feshbach resonance is exactly analogous to that of two-band s -wave superconductors with contact interactions; i.e., even though the free-particle bands have a tunable energy offset in between and are coupled by a Josephson-type attractive interband pair scattering, the intraband interactions have exactly the same strength. We then introduce two intraband order parameters within the BCS mean-field approximation and investigate the competition between their in-phase and out-of-phase (i.e., the so-called π -phase) solutions in the entire BCS-BEC evolution at zero temperature.

  10. Effect of different carbon sources on decolourisation of an industrial textile dye under alkaline-saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Ottoni, Cristiane; Lima, Luis; Santos, Cledir; Lima, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    White-rot fungal strains of Trametes versicolor and Phanerochaete chrysosporium were selected to study the decolourisation of the textile dye, Reactive Black 5, under alkaline-saline conditions. Free and immobilised T. versicolor cells showed 100 % decolourisation in the growth medium supplemented with 15 g l(-1) NaCl, pH 9.5 at 30 °C in liquid batch culture. Continuous culture experiments were performed in a fixed-bed reactor using free and immobilised T. versicolor cells and allowed 85-100 % dye decolourisation. The immobilisation conditions for the biomass and the additional supply of carbon sources improved the decolourisation performance during a long-term trial of 40 days. Lignin peroxidase, laccase and glyoxal oxidase activities were detected during the experiments. The laccase activity varied depending on carbon source utilized and glycerol-enhanced laccase activity compared to sucrose during extended growth.

  11. Effect of stabilizers on the synthesis of palladium-nickel nanoparticles supported on carbon for ethanol oxidation in alkaline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huijuan; Wang, Hui; Li, Hao; Ji, Shan; Davids, Moegamat Wafeeq; Wang, Rongfang

    2014-08-01

    PdNi/C electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation in alkaline medium are fabricated using four stabilizers, i.e., glycine (G), ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), sodium citrate (SC), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) with the same reducing process and reaction parameters. X-ray diffraction characterization shows PdNi nanoparticles for all PdNi/C electrocatalysts possess face-centered cubic structure with different alloying degree. TEM results show that PdNi/C-G and PdNi/C-SC have uniform dispersion with ellipse morphology, while particle agglomeration occurs on PdNi/C-EDTA and PdNi/C-SDS. Electrocatalytic activities of these PdNi/C electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation are measured by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques. The electrocatalytic activities of PdNi/C change with the different lattice contraction. PdNi/C-SC electrocatalyst exhibits the best activity among the four electrocatalysts, which is ascribed to an appropriate lattice contraction.

  12. Cost-Effective Production and Optimization of Alkaline Xylanase by Indigenous Bacillus mojavensis AG137 Fermented on Agricultural Waste

    PubMed Central

    Akhavan Sepahy, Abbas; Ghazi, Shokoofeh; Akhavan Sepahy, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    A xylanase producer Bacillus mojavensis strain, called AG137, isolated from cotton farm (Kashan-Iran). The optimal xylanase activity reached at 55°C & pH 9.0. Enzyme yield was studied using a medium with different agricultural wastes as inducers. Xylanase production of about 249.308 IU/mL was achieved at pH 8 and 37°C, within 48 h submerged fermentation in enzyme production medium supplemented with 2% (w/v) oat bran as an optimum carbon source. A mixture of 1% (w/v) yeast extract and 1% (w/v) tryptone as optimum nitrogen sources, agitation speed 200 rpm, and inoculum size 2% (v/v) were the optimums for maximum production. Accordingly, xylanase yield from 194.68 IU/mL under non-optimized fermentation condition enhanced to 302.466 IU/mL in optimized condition. Screened xylanase is thermostable, presenting 70% stability at 60°C during 30 min. Further enzyme incubation in higher temperature caused a decrease in the residual enzyme activity, yet it retained 68%–50% of its activity after 1 hour from 45°C to 55°C. Besides, it is stable in pH 9 and 10, maintaining over 70% of its activity for 2 h. The enzyme also could preserve 71% and 63% of its initial activity after 3 hours of pre-incubation in the same alkaline condition. Produced xylanase therefore was introduced as an alkaline-active and stable one, displaying suitable thermostability feature, confirmed by HPLC analysis. Hence, all xylanase properties highlight its promising uses in industrial scale. PMID:21904670

  13. Exactly separable version of the Bohr Hamiltonian with the Davidson potential

    SciTech Connect

    Bonatsos, Dennis; Lenis, D.; Petrellis, D.; McCutchan, E. A.; Casten, R. F.; Minkov, N.; Yotov, P.; Yigitoglu, I.

    2007-12-15

    An exactly separable version of the Bohr Hamiltonian is developed using a potential of the form u({beta})+u({gamma})/{beta}{sup 2}, with the Davidson potential u({beta})={beta}{sup 2}+{beta}{sub 0}{sup 4}/{beta}{sup 2} (where {beta}{sub 0} is the position of the minimum) and a stiff harmonic oscillator for u({gamma}) centered at {gamma}=0 deg. In the resulting solution, called the exactly separable Davidson (ES-D) solution, the ground-state, {gamma}, and 0{sub 2}{sup +} bands are all treated on an equal footing. The bandheads, energy spacings within bands, and a number of interband and intraband B(E2) transition rates are well reproduced for almost all well-deformed rare-earth and actinide nuclei using two parameters ({beta}{sub 0},{gamma} stiffness). Insights are also obtained regarding the recently found correlation between {gamma} stiffness and the {gamma}-bandhead energy, as well as the long-standing problem of producing a level scheme with interacting boson approximation SU(3) degeneracies from the Bohr Hamiltonian.

  14. Einstein-Bohr recoiling double-slit gedanken experiment performed at the molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Miao, Quan; Gel'Mukhanov, Faris; Patanen, Minna; Travnikova, Oksana; Nicolas, Christophe; Ågren, Hans; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Miron, Catalin

    2015-02-01

    Double-slit experiments illustrate the quintessential proof for wave-particle complementarity. If information is missing about which slit the particle has traversed, the particle, behaving as a wave, passes simultaneously through both slits. This wave-like behaviour and corresponding interference is absent if ‘which-slit’ information exists. The essence of Einstein-Bohr's debate about wave-particle duality was whether the momentum transfer between a particle and a recoiling slit could mark the path, thus destroying the interference. To measure the recoil of a slit, the slits should move independently. We showcase a materialization of this recoiling double-slit gedanken experiment by resonant X-ray photoemission from molecular oxygen for geometries near equilibrium (coupled slits) and in a dissociative state far away from equilibrium (decoupled slits). Interference is observed in the former case, while the electron momentum transfer quenches the interference in the latter case owing to Doppler labelling of the counter-propagating atomic slits, in full agreement with Bohr's complementarity.

  15. Effect of zinc phosphate chemical conversion coating on corrosion behaviour of mild steel in alkaline medium: protection of rebars in reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simescu, Florica; Idrissi, Hassane

    2008-12-01

    We outline the ability of zinc phosphate coatings, obtained by chemical conversion, to protect mild steel rebars against localized corrosion, generated by chloride ions in alkaline media. The corrosion resistance of coated steel, in comparison with uncoated rebars and coated and uncoated steel rebars embedded in mortar, were evaluated by open-circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization, cronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The coated surfaces were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. First, coated mild steel rebars were studied in an alkaline solution with and without chloride simulating a concrete pore solution. The results showed that the slow dissolution of the coating generates hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. After a long immersion, the coating became dense and provided an effective corrosion resistance compared with the mild steel rebar. Secondly, the coated and uncoated steel rebars embedded in mortar and immersed in chloride solution showed no corrosion or deterioration of the coated steel. Corrosion rate is considerably lowered by this phosphate coating.

  16. Effect of metal cation replacement on the electronic structure of metalorganic halide perovskites: Replacement of lead with alkaline-earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazoki, Meysam; Jacobsson, T. Jesper; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    Organic and inorganic lead halogen perovskites, and in particular, C H3N H3Pb I3 , have during the last years emerged as a class of highly efficient solar cell materials. Herein we introduce metalorganic halogen perovskite materials for energy-relevant applications based on alkaline-earth metals. Based on the classical notion of Goldschmidt's rules and quantum mechanical considerations, the three alkaline-earth metals, Ca, Sr, and Ba, are shown to be able to exchange lead in the perovskite structure. The three alkaline-earth perovskites, C H3N H3Ca I3,C H3N H3Sr I3 , and C H3N H3Ba I3 , as well as the reference compound, C H3N H3Pb I3 , are in this paper investigated with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, which predict these compounds to exist as stable perovskite materials, and their electronic properties are explored. A detailed analysis of the projected molecular orbital density of states and electronic band structure from DFT calculations were used for interpretation of the band-gap variations in these materials and for estimation of the effective masses of the electrons and holes. Neglecting spin-orbit effects, the band gap of MACa I3,MASr I3 , and MABa I3 were estimated to be 2.95, 3.6, and 3.3 eV, respectively, showing the relative change expected for metal cation exchange. The shifts in the conduction band (CB) edges for the alkaline-earth perovskites were quantified using scalar relativistic DFT calculations and tight-binding analysis, and were compared to the situation in the more extensively studied lead halide perovskite, C H3N H3Pb I3 , where the change in the work function of the metal is the single most important factor in tuning the CB edge and band gap. The results show that alkaline-earth-based organometallic perovskites will not work as an efficient light absorber in photovoltaic applications but instead could be applicable as charge-selective contact materials. The rather high CB edge and the wide band gap together with the large

  17. Involvement of membrane potential in alkaline band formation by internodal cells of Chara corallina.

    PubMed

    Shimmen, Teruo; Wakabayashi, Akiko

    2008-10-01

    Internodal cells of Chara corallina form alkaline bands on their surface upon illumination via photosynthesis. In the present study, the effect of KCl on alkaline band formation was analyzed. When the extracellular KCl concentration was increased, alkaline band formation was extensively inhibited. Electrophysiological analysis unequivocally showed the need for inner negative membrane potential for alkaline band formation.

  18. Bound Phenolics of Quinoa Seeds Released by Acid, Alkaline, and Enzymatic Treatments and Their Antioxidant and α-Glucosidase and Pancreatic Lipase Inhibitory Effects.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yao; Zhang, Bing; Li, Xihong; Chen, Peter X; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Ronghua; Tsao, Rong

    2016-03-01

    Unextractable phenolics from plant foods and their role in health benefits have become increasingly important. Meal residues of three quinoa seeds free of fat and extractable phenolics were subjected to acid, alkaline, and enzymatic hydrolyses. The total and individual phenolic compounds released were analyzed, and 19 phenolics, predominantly phenolic acids and several flavonoids, were identified. The concentration of bound phenolics was highest in black quinoa followed by red and white, regardless of the hydrolysis method. Higher phenolic contents also showed stronger antioxidant activities and inhibition of α-glucosidase and pancreatic lipase activities. Carbohydrases, that is, pectinase, xylanase and feruloyl esterase, which effectively liberated bound phenolics are known to be secreted by colonic bacteria, suggesting potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects by these compounds in the large intestine during colonic fermentation. These results can also be applied to treat foods high in bound phenolics to enhance bioaccessibility.

  19. Bound Phenolics of Quinoa Seeds Released by Acid, Alkaline, and Enzymatic Treatments and Their Antioxidant and α-Glucosidase and Pancreatic Lipase Inhibitory Effects.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yao; Zhang, Bing; Li, Xihong; Chen, Peter X; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Ronghua; Tsao, Rong

    2016-03-01

    Unextractable phenolics from plant foods and their role in health benefits have become increasingly important. Meal residues of three quinoa seeds free of fat and extractable phenolics were subjected to acid, alkaline, and enzymatic hydrolyses. The total and individual phenolic compounds released were analyzed, and 19 phenolics, predominantly phenolic acids and several flavonoids, were identified. The concentration of bound phenolics was highest in black quinoa followed by red and white, regardless of the hydrolysis method. Higher phenolic contents also showed stronger antioxidant activities and inhibition of α-glucosidase and pancreatic lipase activities. Carbohydrases, that is, pectinase, xylanase and feruloyl esterase, which effectively liberated bound phenolics are known to be secreted by colonic bacteria, suggesting potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects by these compounds in the large intestine during colonic fermentation. These results can also be applied to treat foods high in bound phenolics to enhance bioaccessibility. PMID:26853559

  20. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more that two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  1. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more than two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  2. Influence of alkaline earth metals on molecular structure of 3-nitrobenzoic acid in comparison with alkali metals effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonowicz, M.; Regulska, E.; Lewandowski, W.

    2011-11-01

    The influence of beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium cations on the electronic system of 3-nitrobenzoic acid was studied in comparison with studied earlier alkali metal ions [1]. The vibrational FT-IR (in KBr and ATR techniques) and 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded for 3-nitrobenzoic acid and its salts. Characteristic shifts in IR and NMR spectra along 3-nitrobenzoates of divalent metal series Mg → Ba were compared with series of univalent metal Li → Cs salts. Good correlations between the wavenumbers of the vibrational bands in the IR spectra for 3-nitrobenzoates and ionic potential, electronegativity, inverse of atomic mass, atomic radius and ionization energy of metals were found for alkaline earth metals as well as for alkali metals. The density functional (DFT) hybrid method B3LYP with two basis sets: 6-311++G** and LANL2DZ were used to calculate optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds. The theoretical wavenumbers and intensities of IR spectra as well as chemical shifts in NMR spectra were obtained. Geometric aromaticity indices, atomic charges, dipole moments and energies were also calculated. The calculated parameters were compared to experimental characteristic of studied compounds.

  3. Saccharification of microalgae biomass obtained from wastewater treatment by enzymatic hydrolysis. Effect of alkaline-peroxide pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Martín Juárez, Judit; Lorenzo Hernando, Ana; Muñoz Torre, Raúl; Blanco Lanza, Saúl; Bolado Rodríguez, Silvia

    2016-10-01

    An enzymatic method for the carbohydrate hydrolysis of different microalgae biomass cultivated in domestic (DWB) and pig manure (PMWB) wastewaters, at different storage conditions (fresh, freeze-dried and reconstituted), was evaluated. The DWB provided sugars yields between 40 and 63%, although low xylose yields (< 23.5%). Approximately 2% of this biomass was converted to byproducts as succinic, acetic and formic acids. For PMWB, a high fraction of the sugars (up to 87%) was extracted, but mainly converted into acetic, butyric and formic acids, which was attributed to the bacterial action. In addition, the performance of an alkaline-peroxide pretreatment, conducted for 1h, 50°C and H2O2 concentrations from 1 to 7.5% (w/w), was essayed. The hydrolysis of pretreated microalgae supported a wide range of sugars extraction for DWB (55-90%), and 100% for PMWB. Nevertheless, a large fraction of these sugars (∼30% for DWB and 100% for PMWB) was transformed to byproducts. PMID:27372005

  4. Effect of alkaline earth metals on the liquid-phase hydrogenation of hydroquinone over Ru-based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongwei; Ji, Dong; Li, Yu; Liang, Yalan; Li, Gui Xian

    2015-12-01

    A series of Ru-based catalysts modified by alkaline earth metals were prepared by the impregnation-precipitation method and characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, ICP optical emission spectroscopy, Infrared Spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine analysis and surface area analysis. The performance of the catalysts was measured via liquid-phase hydroquinone hydrogenation reaction. Results show that the Ru-Sr/NaY catalyst has the best activity and selectivity among those Ru-based catalysts. The conversion of hydroquinone and the selectivity to 1,4-cyclohexanediol reached up to 99.6% and 89.6% at optimum reaction condition (700 r/min, 423 K and 5 MPa pressure of H2 in 3 h). This may be attributed to the fact that the right amount of Strontium is beneficial to the good dispersion of the ruthenium nanoclusters on the surface of NaY and modify the acidic properties of the catalyst. Moreover, IR of adsorbed pyridine analysis suggested the proper ratio of L/B acid of the catalysts played an important role in the performance of the hydroquinone hydrogenation reaction.

  5. Effect of Lignin Removal by Alkaline Peroxide Pretreatment on the Susceptibility of Corn Stover to Purified Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, M. J.; Vinzant, T. B.; Himmel, M. E.; Decker, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    Pretreatment of corn stover with alkaline peroxide (AP) at pH 11.5 resulted in reduction of lignin content in the residual solids as a function of increasing batch temperature. Scanning electron microscopy of these materials revealed notably more textured surfaces on the plant cell walls as a result of the delignifying pretreatment. As expected, digestion of the delignified samples with commercial cellulase preparations showed an inverse relationship between the content of lignin present in the residual solids after pretreatment and the extent of both glucan and xylan conversion achievable. Digestions with purified enzymes revealed that decreased lignin content in the pretreated solids did not significantly impact the extent of glucan conversion achievable by cellulases alone. Not until purified xylanolytic activities were included with the cellulases were significant improvements in glucan conversion realized. In addition, an inverse relationship was observed between lignin content after pretreatment and the extent of xylan conversion achievable in a 24-h period with the xylanolytic enzymes in the absence of the cellulases. This observation, coupled with the direct relationship between enzymatic xylan and glucan conversion observed in a number of cases, suggests that the presence of lignins may not directly occlude cellulose present in lignocelluloses but rather impact cellulase action indirectly by its association with xylan.

  6. Saccharification of microalgae biomass obtained from wastewater treatment by enzymatic hydrolysis. Effect of alkaline-peroxide pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Martín Juárez, Judit; Lorenzo Hernando, Ana; Muñoz Torre, Raúl; Blanco Lanza, Saúl; Bolado Rodríguez, Silvia

    2016-10-01

    An enzymatic method for the carbohydrate hydrolysis of different microalgae biomass cultivated in domestic (DWB) and pig manure (PMWB) wastewaters, at different storage conditions (fresh, freeze-dried and reconstituted), was evaluated. The DWB provided sugars yields between 40 and 63%, although low xylose yields (< 23.5%). Approximately 2% of this biomass was converted to byproducts as succinic, acetic and formic acids. For PMWB, a high fraction of the sugars (up to 87%) was extracted, but mainly converted into acetic, butyric and formic acids, which was attributed to the bacterial action. In addition, the performance of an alkaline-peroxide pretreatment, conducted for 1h, 50°C and H2O2 concentrations from 1 to 7.5% (w/w), was essayed. The hydrolysis of pretreated microalgae supported a wide range of sugars extraction for DWB (55-90%), and 100% for PMWB. Nevertheless, a large fraction of these sugars (∼30% for DWB and 100% for PMWB) was transformed to byproducts.

  7. Effect of Strongly Alkaline Electrolyzed Water on Silk Degumming and the Physical Properties of the Fibroin Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ting-Ting; Wang, Yuan-Jing; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Strongly alkaline electrolyzed water (SAEW) was prepared by electrolysis of tap water in a laboratory-made water electrolyzer. The pH of stored SAEW was stable for more than one month. The hardness of the electrolyzed water was 30% lower and the Na+ concentration was 18% higher than those of the tap water. Silkworm cocoon shells were boiled in pH 11.50 SAEW at a ratio of 1∶40∼80 (W/V) for 20 min and the sericin layers around the silk fibroin fibers were removed completely. The tensile properties and thermal decomposition temperature of a single filament of silk fibroin obtained by the SAEW method were almost the same as those for the fiber obtained by the neutral soap, and much higher than those for the fiber obtained by Na2CO3 degumming. The results demonstrate that SAEW is an environmentally friendly and pollution-free silk degumming agent that allows highly efficient, low cost recovery of sericin. PMID:23824061

  8. Effect of Strongly Alkaline Electrolyzed Water on Silk Degumming and the Physical Properties of the Fibroin Fiber.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ting-Ting; Wang, Yuan-Jing; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Strongly alkaline electrolyzed water (SAEW) was prepared by electrolysis of tap water in a laboratory-made water electrolyzer. The pH of stored SAEW was stable for more than one month. The hardness of the electrolyzed water was 30% lower and the Na(+) concentration was 18% higher than those of the tap water. Silkworm cocoon shells were boiled in pH 11.50 SAEW at a ratio of 1∶40∼80 (W/V) for 20 min and the sericin layers around the silk fibroin fibers were removed completely. The tensile properties and thermal decomposition temperature of a single filament of silk fibroin obtained by the SAEW method were almost the same as those for the fiber obtained by the neutral soap, and much higher than those for the fiber obtained by Na2CO3 degumming. The results demonstrate that SAEW is an environmentally friendly and pollution-free silk degumming agent that allows highly efficient, low cost recovery of sericin.

  9. Alkaline Water and Longevity: A Murine Study

    PubMed Central

    Magro, Massimiliano; Corain, Livio; Ferro, Silvia; Baratella, Davide; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Terzo, Milo; Corraducci, Vittorino; Salmaso, Luigi; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The biological effect of alkaline water consumption is object of controversy. The present paper presents a 3-year survival study on a population of 150 mice, and the data were analyzed with accelerated failure time (AFT) model. Starting from the second year of life, nonparametric survival plots suggest that mice watered with alkaline water showed a better survival than control mice. Interestingly, statistical analysis revealed that alkaline water provides higher longevity in terms of “deceleration aging factor” as it increases the survival functions when compared with control group; namely, animals belonging to the population treated with alkaline water resulted in a longer lifespan. Histological examination of mice kidneys, intestine, heart, liver, and brain revealed that no significant differences emerged among the three groups indicating that no specific pathology resulted correlated with the consumption of alkaline water. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survival data as a function of watering with alkaline water of long-lived mouse models. PMID:27340414

  10. Selective and cost-effective protocol to separate bioactive triterpene acids from plant matrices using alkalinized ethanol: Application to leaves of Myrtaceae species

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Adélia M. Belem; Siani, Antonio Carlos; Nakamura, Marcos Jun; D’Avila, Luiz Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Triterpenes as betulinic (BA), oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) have increasingly gained therapeutic relevance due to their wide scope of pharmacological activities. To fit large-scale demands, exploitable sources of these compounds have to be found and simple, cost-effective methods to extract them developed. Leaf material represents the best plant sustainable raw material. To obtain triterpene acid-rich extracts from leaves of Eugenia, Psidium and Syzygium species (Myrtaceae) by directly treating the dry plant material with alkalinized hydrated ethanol. This procedure was adapted from earlier methods to effect depolymerization of the leaf cutin. Materials and Methods: Extracts were prepared by shaking the milled dry leaves in freshly prepared 2% NaOH in 95% EtOH solution (1:4 w/v) at room temperature for 6 h. Working up the product in acidic aqueous medium led to clear precipitates in which BA, OA and UA were quantified by gas chromatography. Results: Pigment-free and low-polyphenol content extracts (1.2–2.8%) containing 6–50% of total triterpene acids were obtained for the six species assayed. UA (7–20%) predominated in most extracts, but BA preponderated in Eugenia florida (39%). Carried out in parallel, n-hexane defatted leaves led to up to 9% enhancement of total acids in the extracts. The hydroalcoholate treatment of Myrtaceae species dry leaves proved to be a cost-effective and environmentally friendly method to obtain triterpene acids, providing them be resistant to alkaline medium. These combined techniques might be applicable to other plant species and tissues. PMID:26246721

  11. Diffusive Insights: On the Disagreement of Christian Bohr and August Krogh at the Centennial of the Seven Little Devils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjedde, Albert

    2010-01-01

    The year 2010 is the centennial of the publication of the "Seven Little Devils" in the predecessor of "Acta Physiologica". In these seven papers, August and Marie Krogh sought to refute Christian Bohr's theory that oxygen diffusion from the lungs to the circulation is not entirely passive but rather facilitated by a specific cellular activity…

  12. The Bohr Hamiltonian Solution with the Morse Potential for the {gamma}-unstable and the Rotational Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Inci, I.; Boztosun, I.; Bonatsos, D.

    2008-11-11

    Analytical solutions of the collective Bohr Hamiltonian with the Morse potential have been obtained for the U(5)-O(6) and U(5)-SU(3) transition regions through the Asymptotic Iteration Method (AIM). The obtained energy eigenvalue equations have been used to get the experimental excitation energy spectrum of Xe and Yb isotopes. The results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  13. The effect of sorbitol on the morphological characteristics of lead-tin films electrodeposited from an alkaline bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, J. L. P.; Carlos, I. A.

    An alkaline Pb-Sn plating bath containing sorbitol as additive has been developed, which has the advantage of low toxicity and ease of handling relative to fluoborate baths, etc. The Pb-Sn deposition voltammetric curve from this bath revealed two deposition processes, at -0.87 and -1.17 V. The voltammetric studies at various sweep rates indicate that the Pb-Sn deposition process is controlled by mass transport. The joint diffusion coefficient of the Pb(II) and Sn(II) sorbitate complex species is 1.15 × 10 -6 cm 2 s -1. SEM analysis showed that the films produced at -0.87 and -1.17 V are, respectively, composed of dendritic or hexagonal crystals, showing that co-deposition of tin hindered dendritic growth. EDS of the Pb-Sn films showed that the deposit obtained at -0.87 V is pure lead, while that at -1.17 V, with 5.0 or 10.0 C cm -2, has 19.10 wt% Sn or 26.35 wt% Sn, respectively. It was observed that the Pb-Sn electrodeposited films were grey at both deposition potentials (-0.87 and -1.17 V) and deposition charges (5.0 and 10.0 C cm -2). X-ray spectra showed that at the potential -0.87 V a mixture of Pb, PbPt 4 and Pb 2PtO 4 were deposited, while at -1.17 V, Pb, β-Sn, and PbSnO 3 were deposited.

  14. Effects of the use of ultrasonic waves on biodiesel production in alkaline transesterification of bleached tallow and vegetable oils: Cavitation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alape Benitez, Fabio

    Experiments of biodiesel production via methanolysis were performed at methanol/triglyceride molar ratios of 3, 4.5, and 6 and temperatures of 25°C, 40°C and 60°C; the reaction was monitored by HPLC, X-Ray, and GC-MS until equilibrium. A mathematical model called CAVITATION MODEL was developed to deal with mass transfer aspects of the alkaline transesterification reaction of vegetable oils; a comparison between the cavitation model and diffusion through spherical pores was made. Gas-vapor bubble dynamics for the methanol-soybean oil and methanol-tallow system were examined at 40°C and 42°C, respectively. The Rayleight-Plesset equations were used to describe the isothermal growth and adiabatic collapse of the bubble formed when a field of ultrasound at 20 KHz is applied. Temperatures of 2265 K and 426 K were estimated for a bubble in soybean oil-methanol and tallow-methanol systems, respectively. These "Hot Spots" could be responsible for the increment of the temperature occurred and the acoustic streaming observed during the alkaline transesterification reaction. Also, a diffusion analysis with the pore model was made to predict the concentration profile of the triglycerides within the liquid drops of alcohol created after the collapse of the gas-vapor bubbles; spherical shapes were studied. A computational model was made in MathCad to evaluate the effectiveness at different Thiele modulus values in order to estimate mass transfer coefficients for the most critical conditions of pure diffusion and these coefficients were compared with those found by the cavitation model estimation. Pictures of the reactant system soybean oil-methanol-potassium hydroxide, with the red dyed methanol using phenolphthalein, showed that the alkalinity of the system represented by potassium hydroxide remains in the interface alcohol-oil and then is displaced into the glycerol or down layer. The present study serves as a basis for the analysis of heterogeneous reactions with

  15. Combined effects of carbonate alkalinity and pH on survival, growth and haemocyte parameters of the Venus clam Cyclina sinensis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tingting; Lai, Qifang; Yao, Zongli; Lu, Jianxue; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Hui

    2013-08-01

    Carbonate alkalinity (CA) and pH are considered to be two important stress factors that determine the response of aquatic animals to sudden transfers into saline-alkaline water. To evaluate the potential for aquaculture production of Venus clams (Cyclina sinensis) farmed in saline-alkaline water, the combined effects of CA (2.5 (control), 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 meq/l) and pH (8.0 (control), 8.5, 9.0 and 9.5) on survival rate was monitored every day for 10 days. Length gain rate (LGR) and weight gain rate (WGR) were also monitored for two months, and total haemocyte count (THC), phagocytic rate (PR) and haemocyte mortality (HM) were measured for 3, 6, 12 and 24 days under the same water temperature (20 °C) and salinity (15‰) conditions. The results showed that survival rates in treatments of CA ≤ 20.0, combined with pH ≤ 9.0, were 100%. LGR and WGR in treatments of CA 2.5 & pH 8.0 (control), CA 2.5 & pH 8.5 and CA 10.0 & pH 8.0 exhibited the largest values (P > 0.05), while in other treatments, they showed a decreasing trend with an increase in either CA or pH or both (P < 0.05). Similarly, for THC, PR and HM, no significant differences were observed among the fast growth treatments during the entire experimental period (P > 0.05), however, in other treatments, they presented significant differences, especially on day 3 and 6 (P < 0.05), most notably with increases in CA or pH, but returned to control levels on day 12. In conclusion, in this study, a strong interaction between CA and pH was observed. Additionally, it was ascertained that the Venus clam C. sinensis can withstand the stress of CA 20.0 combined pH 9.0, although individuals grows slowly and may take approximately 12 days to recover to the unstressed condition.

  16. Inspirations from the theories of Bohr and Mottelson: a Canadian perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D.; Waddington, J. C.; Svensson, C. E.

    2016-03-01

    The theories developed by Bohr and Mottelson have inspired much of the world-wide experimental investigation into the structure of the atomic nucleus. On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the awarding of their Nobel prize, we reflect on some of the experimental developments made in understanding the structure of nuclei. We have chosen to focus on experiments performed in Canada, or having strong ties to Canada, and the work included here spans virtually the whole of the second half of the 20th century. The 8π Spectrometer, which figures prominently in this story, was a novel departure for funding science in Canada that involved an intimate collaboration between a Crown Corporation (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd) and University research, and enabled many of the insights discussed here.

  17. Bohr Hamiltonian with a deformation-dependent mass term for the Davidson potential

    SciTech Connect

    Bonatsos, Dennis; Georgoudis, P. E.; Lenis, D.; Minkov, N.; Quesne, C.

    2011-04-15

    Analytical expressions for spectra and wave functions are derived for a Bohr Hamiltonian, describing the collective motion of deformed nuclei, in which the mass is allowed to depend on the nuclear deformation. Solutions are obtained for separable potentials consisting of a Davidson potential in the {beta} variable, in the cases of {gamma}-unstable nuclei, axially symmetric prolate deformed nuclei, and triaxial nuclei, implementing the usual approximations in each case. The solution, called the deformation-dependent mass (DDM) Davidson model, is achieved by using techniques of supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSYQM), involving a deformed shape invariance condition. Spectra and B(E2) transition rates are compared to experimental data. The dependence of the mass on the deformation, dictated by SUSYQM for the potential used, reduces the rate of increase of the moment of inertia with deformation, removing a main drawback of the model.

  18. Mass tensor in the Bohr Hamiltonian from the nondiagonal energy weighted sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Jolos, R. V.; Brentano, P. von

    2009-04-15

    Relations are derived in the framework of the Bohr Hamiltonian that express the matrix elements of the deformation-dependent components of the mass tensor through the experimental data on the energies and the E2 transitions relating the low-lying collective states. These relations extend the previously obtained results for the intrinsic mass coefficients of the well-deformed axially symmetric nuclei on nuclei of arbitrary shape. The expression for the mass tensor is suggested, which is sufficient to satisfy the existing experimental data on the energy weighted sum rules for the E2 transitions for the low-lying collective quadrupole excitations. The mass tensor is determined for {sup 106,108}Pd, {sup 108-112}Cd, {sup 134}Ba, {sup 150}Nd, {sup 150-154}Sm, {sup 154-160}Gd, {sup 164}Dy, {sup 172}Yb, {sup 178}Hf, {sup 188-192}Os, and {sup 194-196}Pt.

  19. Diffusive insights: on the disagreement of Christian Bohr and August Krogh at the Centennial of the Seven Little Devils.

    PubMed

    Gjedde, Albert

    2010-12-01

    The year 2010 is the centennial of the publication of the "Seven Little Devils" in the predecessor of Acta Physiologica. In these seven papers, August and Marie Krogh sought to refute Christian Bohr's theory that oxygen diffusion from the lungs to the circulation is not entirely passive but rather facilitated by a specific cellular activity substitute to secretion. The subjects of the present reevaluation of this controversy are Christian Bohr, Professor and Doctor of Medicine (1855-1911), nominated three times for the Nobel Prize; August Krogh, Doctor of Philosophy (1874-1949), Christian Bohr's assistant and later Nobel Prize laureate (1920); and Marie Krogh, née Jørgensen, Doctor of Medicine and wife of August Krogh (1874-1943). The controversy concerned is the transport of oxygen from the lungs into the bloodstream: are passive transport and diffusion capacity together sufficient to secure the oxygen supply in all circumstances or is there an additional specific ("energy consuming" or "active") mechanism responsible for the transport of oxygen from the alveoli into the bloodstream? The present discussion purports to show that the contestants' views were closer than the parties themselves and posterity recognized. Posterity has judged the dispute unilaterally from the Nobel laureate's point of view, but it is evident that August Krogh's Nobel Prize was awarded for the discovery of a cellular activity (Christian Bohr's expression), represented by Krogh's discovery of capillary recruitment. Christian Bohr appears to have been correct in the narrower sense that the diffusion capacity at rest is not great enough to explain the transport during work; a special mechanism intervenes and optimizes the conditions under which diffusion acts. August Krogh, of course, was right in the wider sense that the transport mechanism itself is always entirely passive.

  20. Low serum alkaline phosphatase activity in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shaver, W A; Bhatt, H; Combes, B

    1986-01-01

    Low values for serum alkaline phosphatase activity were observed early in the course of two patients with Wilson's disease presenting with the combination of severe liver disease and Coombs' negative acute hemolytic anemia. A review of other cases of Wilson's disease revealed that 11 of 12 patients presenting with hemolytic anemia had values for serum alkaline phosphatase less than their respective sex- and age-adjusted mean values; in eight, serum alkaline phosphatase activity was less than the lower value for the normal range of the test. Low values for serum alkaline phosphatase were much less common in Wilson's disease patients with more chronic forms of presentation. Copper added in high concentration to serum in vitro did not have an important effect on serum alkaline phosphatase activity. The mechanism responsible for the decrease in serum alkaline phosphatase activity in patients is uncertain.

  1. An effective and practical immunohistochemical protocol for bone specimens characterized by hyaluronidase and pepsin predigestion combined with alkaline phosphatase-mediated chromogenic detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Shangfu; Liu, Bin; Tian, Ming; Zhang, Liangming; Tickner, Jennifer; Xu, Jiake; Rong, Limin

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an effective procedure for immunohistochemistry (IHC) investigations of bone specimens. Samples from rat femoral and human vertebral bone were processed with a detailed and effective IHC protocol summarized here. First, a novel antigen retrieval (AR) method of hyaluronidase combined pepsin predigestion (H+P) was established and the optimal concentration and pH value for AR of bone specimens were determined. Second, the newly developed method was compared with existing AR methods (boiling in sodium citrate, hyaluronidase predigestion (H) and pepsin predigestion (P), with PBS only as the negative control) using two chromogenic detection systems (horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and alkaline phosphatase (AP)) to evaluate their efficacy in obtaining the best IHC results for bone samples. Considering the drawbacks of significant shrinking and detachment from slide for heat retrieval methods and the only moderate immunolabeling for H and P, H+P was the optimal AR method for IHC of bone specimens with the advantages of both good morphological preservation and strong immunoreactivity. Moreover, AP-mediated chromogenic detection was superior to HRP-labeled chromogenic detection due to significantly less non-specific staining. In conclusion, we presented an effective and practical IHC protocol for bone specimens characterized by H+P predigestion combined with AP-mediated chromogenic detection. Finally, a detailed troubleshooting guide was provided for common mistakes that occur during IHC processing of the bone tissue samples.

  2. Chemical equilibrium model for interfacial activity of crude oil in aqueous alkaline solution: the effects of pH, alkali and salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.; Yen, T.F.

    1980-11-01

    A chemical equilibrium model for interfacial activity of crude in aqueous alkaline solution is proposed. The model predicts the observed effects of pH and concentrations of alkali and salt on the interfacial tension (IFT). The model proposed was shown to describe the observed effects of acid content, pH, and sodium ions on the interfacial activity of crude oil in water. Once the pH of the interface reaches the pKa of the acids, sometimes with the help of addition of some salt, the IFT experiences a sudden steep drop to the range of 10/sup -2/ dynes/cm. After that, further addition of sodium either in the form of NaOH or NaCl is going to increase the IFT due to a shift of equilibriumn to the formation of undissociated soap. This was confirmed by the difference in the observed effect of sodium on the IFT of the extracted soap molecules which are dissociated easily and those which are associated highly and precipitated easily. These soap molecules have dissociation constant values ranging from below 10/sup -2/ to above one. 13 references.

  3. Alkaline galvanic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, T.; Maeda, Y.; Momose, K.; Wakahata, T.

    1983-10-04

    An alkaline galvanic cell is disclosed including a container serving for a cathode terminal, a sealing plate in the form of a layered clad plate serving for an anode terminal to be fitted into the container, and an insulating packing provided between the sealing plate and container for sealing the cell upon assembly. The cell is provided with a layer of epoxy adduct polyamide amine having amine valence in the range of 50 to 400 and disposed between the innermost copper layer of the sealing plate arranged to be readily amalgamated and the insulating packing so as to serve as a sealing agent or liquid leakage suppression agent.

  4. Effective treatment of alkaline Cr(VI) contaminated leachate using a novel Pd-bionanocatalyst: Impact of electron donor and aqueous geochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Mathew P.; Coker, Victoria S.; Parry, Stephen A.; Thomas, Russell A.P.; Kalin, Robert; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Palladium catalysts offer the potential for the effective treatment of a variety of priority reducible pollutants in natural waters. In this study, microbially synthesized magnetite nanoparticles were functionalized with Pd(0), creating a highly reactive, magnetically recoverable, nano-scale catalyst (Pd-BnM). This was then investigated for the treatment of model Cr(VI) contaminated solutions at a range of pH values, and also alkaline Cr(VI) contaminated leachates from chromite ore processing residue (COPR); a contaminant issue of global concern. The sample of COPR used in this study was obtained from a site in Glasgow, UK, where extensive Cr(VI) contamination has been reported. In initial experiments Pd-BnM was supplied with H2 gas or formate as electron donors, and Cr(VI) removal from model synthetic solutions was quantified at various pH values (2–12). Effective removal was noted at neutral to environmentally relevant alkaline (pH 12) pH values, while the use of formate as an electron donor resulted in loss of performance under acidic conditions (pH 2). Reaction kinetics were then assessed with increasing Pd-BnM loading in both model pH 12 Cr(VI) solutions and the COPR leachate. When formate was used as the electron donor for Pd-BnM, to treat COPR leachate, there was significant inhibition of Cr(VI) removal. In contrast, a promotion of reaction rate, was observed when H2 was employed. Upon sustained reaction with model Cr(VI) solutions, in the presence of excess electron donor (formate or H2), appreciable quantities of Cr(VI) were removed before eventual inactivation of the catalyst. Faster onset of inactivation was reported in the COPR leachates, removing 4% and 64% of Cr(VI) observed from model Cr(VI) solutions, when formate and H2 were used as electron donors, respectively. XAS, TEM-EDX and XPS analysis of the catalysts that had been inactivated in the model solution, showed that the surface had an extensive covering of reduced Cr(III), most likely as a Cr

  5. Effects of Various Dental Materials on Alkaline Phosphatase Extracted from Pulp: An Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Lorin R.

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory experiment that demonstrates the effects of various dental materials on a representative enzyme from the pulp is outlined. The experiment encourages students to consider the effects that various restorative materials and techniques might have on enzymes in the living pulp. (Author/MLW)

  6. Stabilizing effects of hydrated fullerenes C₆₀ in a wide range of concentrations on luciferase, alkaline phosphatase, and peroxidase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Voeikov, Vladimir L; Yablonskaya, Olga I

    2015-01-01

    Hydrated fullerene (HyFnC60) is a highly hydrophilic supra-molecular complex consisting of unmodified С60 fullerene molecule enclosed into a hydrated shell. It has been shown in numerous experiments that aqueous solutions of HyFnC60 manifest a wide range of biological activities both in vivo and in vitro even at very low concentrations of HyFnC60. We used a spectrophotometric method and a method of biochemoluminescence to demonstrate that HyFnC60 in concentrations below 10(-9) M down to 10(-23) M stabilizes peroxidase, alkaline phosphatase, and bacterial luciferase against inactivation due to long-term incubation of the enzymes at room temperature and also against heat inactivation. In addition, HyFnC60 was able to "revive" heat inactivated enzymes. These effects cannot be explained by the direct action of the fullerene molecules upon the enzymes. We suggest that the effects of HyFnC60 on the enzymes are related to the ability of hydrated fullerene C60 molecules to organize thick aqueous shells around them. One of the specific properties of water phase in these shells is its ability to optimize redox reactions, which can support enzyme stability against factors deteriorating their structure.

  7. Differential effect of age, gender and puberty on bone formation rate assessed by measurement of bone-specific alkaline phosphatase in healthy Italian children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mora, Stefano; Cafarelli, Laura; Erba, Paola; Puzzovio, Maria; Zamproni, Ilaria; Giacomet, Vania; Viganò, Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    Bones undergo intensive modeling during growth, a process involving both formation and resorption processes. Bone formation can be accurately monitored by measurements of bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) in serum. The lack of appropriate reference values has hampered the use of BAP in pediatric subjects. The purposes of the present study were to verify the effect of age, gender, and puberty on BAP concentration in healthy children, and to generate reference curves. Morning blood samples were collected from 239 healthy children and adolescents (113 boys), aged 4.5-20.9 years. Anthropometric measurements and pubertal stage were recorded. Blood samples were also obtained from 37 healthy young adults (13 men), aged 21.5-30.2 years. BAP concentration varied significantly with age, showing a peak at age 10-12 years in girls and 12-14 years in boys. Prepubertal concentration of BAP was six- to sevenfold higher than in healthy adults. We observed significantly higher BAP values at the beginning of puberty (stage II) compared to prepubertal stage in both sexes. The effect of puberty was independent from age and gender. We demonstrated that BAP serum concentration varies with age in children and adolescents, and we provided equations to calculate reference values. Because BAP concentrations vary markedly according to the pubertal stage, the values of BAP obtained in single patients should be compared to reference considering not only age and sex, but also the stage of pubertal development.

  8. Effect of dietary caraway (Carum carvi L.) on aberrant crypt foci development, fecal steroids, and intestinal alkaline phosphatase activities in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kamaleeswari, Muthaiyan; Deeptha, Kumaraswami; Sengottuvelan, Murugan; Nalini, Namasivayam

    2006-08-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common malignancies in many regions of the world and is thought to arise from the accumulation of mutations in a single epithelial cell of the colon and rectum. Caraway (Carum carvi L. Umbelliferae) is a shrub with a long history as a medicinal plant since ancient times. The effect of different doses of caraway (CC) on the formation of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and the levels of fecal bile acids, neutral sterols, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities were studied in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon cancer in rats. Animals were randomized into 6 groups. Group 1 served as control, and group 2 received 90 mg/kg body weight caraway orally everyday. Groups 3-6 rats were given subcutaneous injections of DMH (20 mg/kg body weight) once a week for the first 4 weeks to induce ACF. Rats in groups 4-6, in addition to DMH injections, received caraway at 30, 60, and 90 mg/kg body weight respectively p.o. everyday until the end of whole experimental period of 15 weeks. Caraway supplementation significantly reduced ACF development and also decreased the levels of fecal bile acids, neutral sterols, and tissue ALP activities. The histological alterations induced by DMH were also significantly improved. Overall, our results showed that all 3 doses of caraway inhibited tumorigenesis though the effect of the intermediary dose of 60 mg/kg body weight was more pronounced.

  9. Removal of plutonium and americium from alkaline waste solutions

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Wallace W.

    1979-01-01

    High salt content, alkaline waste solutions containing plutonium and americium are contacted with a sodium titanate compound to effect removal of the plutonium and americium from the alkaline waste solution onto the sodium titanate and provide an effluent having a radiation level of less than 10 nCi per gram alpha emitters.

  10. Multilevel fitting of {sup 235}U resonance data sensitive to Bohr-and Brosa-fission channels

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.S.

    1995-05-01

    The recent determination of the K, J dependence of the neutron induced fission cross section of {sup 235}U by the Dubna group has led to a renewed interest in the mechanism of fission from saddle to scission. The K quantum numbers designate the so-called Bohr fission channels, which describe the fission properties at the saddle point. Certain other fission properties, e.g., the fragment mass and kinetic-energy distribution, are related to the properties of the scission point. The neutron energy dependence of the fragment kinetic energies has been measured by Hambsch et al., who analyzed their data according to a channel description of Brosa et al. How these two channel descriptions, the saddle-point Bohr channels and the scission-point Brosa channels, relate to one another is an open question, and is the subject matter of the present paper. We use the correlation coefficient between various data sets, in which variations are reported from resonance to resonance, as a measure of both-the statistical reliability of the data and of the degree to which different scission variables relate to different Bohr channels. We have carried out an adjustment of the ENDF/B-VI multilevel evaluation of the fission cross section of {sup 235}U, one that provides a reasonably good fit to the energy dependence of the fission, capture, and total cross sections below 100 eV, and to the Bohr-channel structure deduced from an earlier measurement by Pattenden and Postma. We have also further explored the possibility of describing the data of Hambsch et al. in the Brosa-channel framework with the same set of fission-width vectors, only in a different reference system. While this approach shows promise, it is clear that better data are also needed for the neutron energy variation of the scission-point variables.

  11. Cell-specific effects of TNF-α and IL-1β on alkaline phosphatase: implication for syndesmophyte formation and vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Lencel, Philippe; Delplace, Séverine; Pilet, Paul; Leterme, Damien; Miellot, Flore; Sourice, Sophie; Caudrillier, Axelle; Hardouin, Pierre; Guicheux, Jérome; Magne, David

    2011-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β stimulate tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) activity and mineralization in cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). They are, therefore, considered as stimulators of vascular calcification in the context of atherosclerosis and diabetes type 2. In contrast, although ankylosing spondylitis (AS) leads to the formation of syndesmophytes, which are ectopic ossifications from entheses (where ligaments, tendons and capsules are attached to bone), anti-TNF-α therapies fail to block bone formation in this disease. In this context, our aims were to compare the effects of TNF-α and IL-1β on TNAP activity and mineralization in entheseal cells and VSMCs. Organotypic cultures of mouse ankle entheses were treated or not with TNF-α and IL-1β for 5 days. Micro-computed tomography was performed to determine trabecular bone parameters, and histology to assess TNAP activity and mineralization. Human mesenchymal stem cells cultured in pellets in chondrogenic conditions and human VSMCs were also used to determine the effects of cytokines on TNAP activity and expression, measured by quantitative PCR. In organotypic cultures, TNF-α and IL-1β significantly reduced the tibia BV/TV ratio. They also inhibited TNAP activity in entheseal chondrocytes in situ, and in mouse and human chondrocytes in vitro. In contrast, TNF-α stimulated TNAP expression and activity in human VSMCs. These differences were likely due to cell-specific effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), which is inhibited by TNF-α. Indeed, in human chondrocytes and VSMCs, the PPARγ inhibitor GW-9662 displayed the same opposite effects as TNF-α on TNAP expression. In conclusion, whereas TNF-α and IL-1β stimulate TNAP activity in VSMCs, they inhibit it in entheseal cells in situ and on chondrocytes in vitro. The identification of PPARγ as a likely mediator of cytokine effects deserves consideration for future

  12. Straddling the tholeiitic/calc-alkaline transition: the effects of modest amounts of water on magmatic differentiation at Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandler, Ben E.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Grove, Timothy L.

    2014-10-01

    Melting experiments have been performed at 1 bar (anhydrous) and 1- and 2-kbar H2O-saturated conditions to study the effect of water on the differentiation of a basaltic andesite. The starting material was a mafic pumice from the compositionally zoned tuff deposited during the ~75 ka caldera-forming eruption of Newberry Volcano, a rear-arc volcanic center in the central Oregon Cascades. Pumices in the tuff of Newberry caldera (TNC) span a continuous silica range from 53 to 74 wt% and feature an unusually high-Na2O content of 6.5 wt% at 67 wt% SiO2. This wide range of magmatic compositions erupted in a single event makes the TNC an excellent natural laboratory in which to study the conditions of magmatic differentiation. Our experimental results and mineral-melt hygrometers/thermometers yield similar estimates of pre-eruptive H2O contents and temperatures of the TNC liquids. The most primitive (mafic) basaltic andesites record a pre-eruptive H2O content of 1.5 wt% and a liquidus temperature of 1,060-1,070 °C at upper crustal pressure. This modest H2O content produces a distinctive fractionation trend that is much more enriched in Na, Fe, and Ti than the calc-alkaline trend typical of wetter arc magmas, but slightly less enriched in Fe and Ti than the tholeiitic trend of dry magmas. Modest H2O contents might be expected at Newberry Volcano given its location in the Cascade rear arc, and the same fractionation trend is also observed in the rim andesites of the rear-arc Medicine Lake volcano in the southern Cascades. However, the Na-Fe-Ti enrichment characteristic of modest H2O (1-2 wt%) is also observed to the west of Newberry in magmas erupted from the arc axis, such as the Shevlin Park Tuff and several lava flows from the Three Sisters. This shows that modest-H2O magmas are being generated directly beneath the arc axis as well as in the rear arc. Because liquid lines of descent are particularly sensitive to water content in the range of 0-3 wt% H2O, they provide a

  13. Niels Bohr's discussions with Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, and Erwin Schroedinger: the origins of the principles of uncertainty and complementarity

    SciTech Connect

    Mehra, J.

    1987-05-01

    In this paper, the main outlines of the discussions between Niels Bohr with Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, and Erwin Schroedinger during 1920-1927 are treated. From the formulation of quantum mechanics in 1925-1926 and wave mechanics in 1926, there emerged Born's statistical interpretation of the wave function in summer 1926, and on the basis of the quantum mechanical transformation theory - formulated in fall 1926 by Dirac, London, and Jordan - Heisenberg formulated the uncertainty principle in early 1927. At the Volta Conference in Como in September 1927 and at the fifth Solvay Conference in Brussels the following month, Bohr publicly enunciated his complementarity principle, which had been developing in his mind for several years. The Bohr-Einstein discussions about the consistency and completeness of quantum mechanics and of physical theory as such - formally begun in October 1927 at the fifth Solvay Conference and carried on at the sixth Solvay Conference in October 1930 - were continued during the next decades. All these aspects are briefly summarized.

  14. Effect of temperature on short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) accumulation and microbiological transformation in sludge alkaline fermentation with Ca(OH)₂ adjustment.

    PubMed

    Li, XiaoLing; Peng, YongZhen; Ren, NanQi; Li, BaiKun; Chai, TongZhi; Zhang, Liang

    2014-09-15

    The effects of temperatures (15-55 °C) on the alkaline fermentation of sewage sludge were investigated in semi-continuous stirred tank reactors (semi - CSTR) at the pH of 10. The highest soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) yield was obtained at 55 °C (764.2 mg/(gVS L d)), while the highest short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) yield was observed at 35 °C (319.8 mg/(gVS L d)), 1.5 times higher than SCFAs yield at 55 °C (209.5 mg/(gVS L d)). The proportion of the intercellular organic substances being transferred to the slime layer of sludge flocs increased from 29% at 15 °C to 54% at 55 °C. But only a small part of soluble organic substances in the slime layers was converted to SCFAs at 55 °C. The dewaterability of sludge was better at 35 °C than that at 55 °C. Microbiological community analysis showed the acid-producing microorganisms at the medium temperatures (25 °C and 35 °C) were more diverse and abundant than those at the low (15 °C) and high temperatures (55 °C). Clodtridium and Bacillus in Firmicutes and Gamma proteobacterium in Proteobacteria were the dominant functional bacterial species for high SCFA accumulation.

  15. Effects of alkalinity and co-substrate on the performance of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor through decolorization of Congo Red azo dye.

    PubMed

    Işik, Mustafa; Sponza, Delia Teresa

    2005-03-01

    The effect of substrate (glucose) concentrations and alkalinitiy (NaHCO3) on the decolorization of a synthetic wastewater containing Congo Red (CR) azo dye was performed in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). Color removal efficiencies approaching 100% were obtained at glucose-COD concentrations varying between 0 and 3000 mg/l. The methane production rate and total aromatic amine (TAA) removal efficiencies were found to be 120 ml per day and 43%, respectively, while the color was completely removed during glucose-COD free operation of the UASB reactor. The complete decolorization of CR dye under co-substrate free operation could be attributed to TAA metabolism which may provide the electrons required for the cleavage of azo bond in CR dye exist in the UASB reactor. No significant differences in pH levels (6.6-7.4), methane production rates (2000-2700 ml/day) and COD removal efficiencies (82-90%) were obtained for NAHCO3 concentrations ranging between 550 and 3000 mg/l. However, decolorization efficiency remained at 100% with decreasing NaHCO3 concentrations as low as 250 mg/l in the feed. An alkalinity/COD ratio of 0.163 in the feed was suggested for simultaneous optimum COD and color removal. PMID:15501672

  16. Effects of dietary vitamin E on mucosal maltase and alkaline phosphatase enzyme activities and on the amount of mucosal malonyldialdehyde in broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhifar, Seyed Hamid; Ali Jafari, Ramezan; Erfani Majd, Naeem; Fatemi Tabatabaee, Seyed Reza; Mayahi, Mansour

    2013-01-01

    The effects of dietary vitamin E levels on mucosal maltase and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzyme activities and on the amount of mucosal malonyldialdehyde (MDA) in broiler chickens were studied in the present study. One hundred and eighty of male day old broiler chicks (Ross 308 strain) were randomly assigned into five groups, each with three replicates and 12 chicks in each replicate. Chickens in group A were fed corn-soy- based diet, while those in groups B, C, D and E were fed the same diet with 20, 60, 180, and 540 mg kg-1 vitamin E supplement (d-alpha tocopherol), respectively. Six birds were randomly chosen from each group, and were euthanized on days 10, 21, 32, and 42 of age. One segment of small intestine outset was homogenized and mucosal ALP and maltase activity were measured. Moreover, mucosal lipid peroxidate amount was measured to reveal the impact of vitamin E on oxidative stress. Maltase activity was increased with the increase of vitamin E up to 60 mg kg-1 of diet while with further levels, it was decreased. Addition of 60 mg kg-1 of vitamin E to the diet significantly increased ALP enzyme activity (p ≤ 0.001). Addition of 540 mg kg-1 of vitamin E supplement to the diet led to the minimum amount of MDA at 32 days of age. It may be concluded that supplementation of broiler's diet with 60 mg kg-1 of vitamin E can increase mucosal maltase and ALP enzyme activity. PMID:25568675

  17. Effects of hardness and alkalinity on the removal of arsenic(V) from humic acid-deficient and humic acid-rich groundwater by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Mak, Mark S H; Rao, Pinhua; Lo, Irene M C

    2009-09-01

    The effects of hardness (Ca(2+)) and alkalinity (HCO(3)(-)) on arsenic(V) removal from humic acid (HA)-deficient and HA-rich groundwater by zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) were investigated using batch experiments. Arsenic, in general, is removed from groundwater possibly by adsorption and co-precipitation with the iron corrosion products. However, in the co-presence of HCO(3)(-) and Ca(2+), the removal rate of arsenic increased with increasing concentrations of either Ca(2+) or HCO(3)(-). It was observed that the removal of arsenic was significantly enhanced by the formation of CaCO(3) as a nucleation seed for the growth of large iron (hydr)oxide particles. In the co-existence of Ca(2+), HCO(3)(-) and HA, the presence of HA diminished the positive role of Ca(2+) due to the formation of Fe-humate complexes in solution and delaying of the formation of CaCO(3). As a result, the formation of the large iron (hydr)oxide particles was inhibited in the earlier stage which, in turn, affected the removal of arsenic. However, after the formation of CaCO(3) and the subsequent growth of such particles, the presence of large iron (hydr)oxide particles resulted in the rapid removing of arsenic and Fe-humate by adsorption and/or co-precipitation.

  18. Effects of water hardness, alkalinity, and dissolved organic carbon on the toxicity of copper to the lateral line of developing fish.

    PubMed

    Linbo, Tiffany L; Baldwin, David H; McIntyre, Jenifer K; Scholz, Nathaniel L

    2009-07-01

    Conventional water chemistry parameters such as hardness, alkalinity, and organic carbon are known to affect the acutely lethal toxicity of copper to fish and other aquatic organisms. In the present study, we investigate the influence of these water chemistry parameters on short-term (3 h), sublethal (0-40 microg/L) copper toxicity to the peripheral mechanosensory system of larval zebrafish (Danio rerio) using an in vivo fluorescent marker of lateral line sensory neuron (hair cell) integrity. We studied the influence of hardness (via CaCl2, MgSO4, or both at a 2:1 molar ratio), sodium (via NaHCO3 or NaCl), and organic carbon on copper-induced neurotoxicity to zebrafish lateral line neurons over a range of environmentally relevant water chemistries. For all water parameters but organic carbon, the reductions in copper toxicity, although statistically significant, were small. Increasing organic carbon across a range of environmentally relevant concentrations (0.1-4.3 mg/L) increased the EC50 for copper toxicity (the effective concentration resulting in a 50% loss of hair cells) from approximately 12 microg/L to approximately 50 microg/L. Finally, we used an ionoregulatory-based biotic ligand model to compare copper toxicity mediated by targets in the fish gill and lateral line. Relative to copper toxicity via the gill, we find that individual water chemistry parameters are less influential in terms of reducing cytotoxic impacts to the mechanosensory system.

  19. Effect of magnesium on the aluminothermic reduction rate of zinc oxide obtained from spent alkaline battery anodes for the preparation of Al-Zn-Mg alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Rocio; Flores, Alfredo; Torres, Jesus

    2016-04-01

    The aluminothermic reduction of zinc oxide (ZnO) from alkaline battery anodes using molten Al may be a good option for the elaboration of secondary 7000-series alloys. This process is affected by the initial content of Mg within molten Al, which decreases the surface tension of the molten metal and conversely increases the wettability of ZnO particles. The effect of initial Mg concentration on the aluminothermic reduction rate of ZnO was analyzed at the following values: 0.90wt%, 1.20wt%, 4.00t%, 4.25wt%, and 4.40wt%. The ZnO particles were incorporated by mechanical agitation using a graphite paddle inside a bath of molten Al maintained at a constant temperature of 1123 K and at a constant agitation speed of 250 r/min, the treatment time was 240 min and the ZnO particle size was 450-500 mesh. The results show an increase in Zn concentration in the prepared alloys up to 5.43wt% for the highest initial concentration of Mg. The reaction products obtained were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, and the efficiency of the reaction was measured on the basis of the different concentrations of Mg studied.

  20. Effects of hydrogen sulfide on the expression of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and collagen type I in human periodontal ligament cells induced by tension force stimulation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jing; Hua, Yongmei

    2016-10-01

    Periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) are important in homeostasis and remodeling in the mechanically‑stimulated periodontium. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on periodontal tissue remodeling by examining the mRNA and protein expression levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OCN) and collagen type I (COL‑1) in human (h)PDLCs induced by tension force application. Cultured hPDLCs were treated with H2S for 24 h, followed by application of a tension force for 1, 3 and 6 h. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined using a Cell Counting Kit 8 assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. The mRNA expression levels of ALP, OCN and COL‑1 were quantified using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis, and western blot analysis was used to detect the protein levels of ALP, OCN and COL‑1. The results demonstrated that the mRNA and protein expression levels of ALP, OCN and COL‑1 increased with H2S treatment in a concentration‑dependent manner, which was enhanced by the application of tension force in a relatively short period of time. These findings suggested that H2S may be important in periodontal tissue remodeling during orthodontic tooth movement via increasing hPDLC differentiation, tissue mineralization, bone formation and collagen synthesis. PMID:27573279

  1. Antischistosomal effects of praziquantel, its alkaline hydrolysis and sun decomposed products on experimentally S. mansoni infected albino mice. (A) Efficacy assessment based on clinicopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, M I; Akarim, E I; Ibrahim, K E E; Saad, A M; Mohammed, A E; Ahmed, B M; Sulaiman, S M

    2004-04-01

    The antischistosomal activity of praziquantel (PZQ), its alkaline hydrolysis product (HP) and its sun-decomposed (SD) products was investigated in S. mansoni experimentally infected mice. The evaluation was made depending on the degree of clinico-pathological changes. The results obtained revealed that, PZQ, HP and the SD have induced partial suppression of worm fecundity as judged by the significant reduction in eggs per gram of faeces in comparison with the infected untreated control. The effect on tissue egg deposition in the treated groups was comparable to the infection of untrea ted control. Worm recovery showed large reduction in the number of worms for SD (47.6%) and HP (28.6%) compared to PZQ (16.6%) treated groups. So, the former two compounds have the superior antischistosomal activities. Glutamate pyruvate transominase (GPT) and glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) concentrations were measured. The GOT values for all treated groups were significantly higher than those for the healthy control group (p=0.01). The SD group enzyme concentration was even higher than the infected untreated control. The GPT values of all groups were greater than the uninfected control and the difference was significant for the infected untreated, PZQ and the SD treated groups (p=0.05). PMID:15143740

  2. Nanosecond transient processes in the triethylamine quenching of benzophenone triplets in aqueous alkaline media. Substituent effect, ketyl radical deprotonation, and secondary photoreduction kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, K.; Das, P.K.

    1986-08-14

    In the course of benzophenone triplet quenching by triethylamine (TEA) at high concentrations in alkaline aqueous acetonitrile, two temporally distinct processes are observed for ketyl radical anion formation. The fast component occurs on a nanosecond time scale, has kinetics sensitive to basicity and water content of the medium, and is ascribed to the deprotonation of the diphenylhydroxymethyl radical initially produced as a result of subnanosecond intra-ion-pair proton transfer. The slow process occurs on a microsecond time scale and is characterized by pseudo-first-order rate constants linearly dependent on ketone ground-state concentration; this is assigned to the one-electron reduction of the ketone by the methyl(diethylamino)methyl radical (derived from TEA). Substituent effects on the kinetics of the two processes follow trends expected from those of the acidity of diarylhydroxymethyl radicals and of the behavior of diaryl ketones as oxidants. Neither of the two processes is observed with N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA) and 1,4-diazabicyclo(2.2.2)octane (DABCO) as quenchers. The electron or hydrogen transfer yields in the course of diaryl ketone triplet quenching by the three amines are all close to unity, suggesting that the back electron transfer in the triplet ion pairs is relatively unimportant.

  3. Thermo-alkaline pretreatment of waste activated sludge at low-temperatures: effects on sludge disintegration, methane production, and methanogen community structure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaai; Yu, Youngseob; Lee, Changsoo

    2013-09-01

    Low-temperature thermo-alkaline pretreatment of waste activated sludge (WAS) was studied, within the region of 0-0.2 M NaOH and 60-90°C, for the effects of NaOH concentration and temperature on sludge degradability in anaerobic digestion (AD). Significant disintegration of sludge solids (up to 75.6%) and an increase in methane production (up to 70.6%) were observed in the pretreatment trials. Two quadratic models were successfully generated by response surface analysis (R(2)>0.9, p<0.05) to approximate how the degree of sludge disintegration (SD) and methane production (MP) respond to changes in the pretreatment conditions. The maximum responses of SD (77.8%) and MP (73.9% increase over the control) were shown at [0.16 M NaOH, 90°C] and [0.10 M NaOH, 73.7°C], respectively. NaOH addition showed a significant influence on the evolution of methanogen community structure during AD, whereas temperature did not. Aceticlastic Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina speceies were likely the major methanogens.

  4. Effect of dilute alkaline pretreatment on the conversion of different parts of corn stalk to fermentable sugars and its application in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Di; Li, Ping; Luo, Zhangfeng; Qin, Peiyong; Chen, Changjing; Wang, Yong; Wang, Zheng; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effect of dilute alkaline pretreatment on different parts of biomass, corn stalk was separated into flower, leaf, cob, husk and stem, which were treated by NaOH in range of temperature and chemical loading. The NaOH-pretreated solid was then enzymatic hydrolysis and used as the substrate for batch acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. The results demonstrated the five parts of corn stalk could be used as potential feedstock separately, with vivid performances in solvents production. Under the optimized conditions towards high product titer, 7.5g/L, 7.6g/L, 9.4g/L, 7g/L and 7.6g/L of butanol was obtained in the fermentation broth of flower, leaf, cob, husk and stem hydrolysate, respectively. Under the optimized conditions towards high product yield, 143.7g/kg, 126.3g/kg, 169.1g/kg, 107.7g/kg and 116.4g/kg of ABE solvent were generated, respectively. PMID:27010341

  5. Effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on alkaline phosphatase activity and matrix mineralization of odontoblast and osteoblast cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lee, D H; Lim, B-S; Lee, Y-K; Yang, H-C

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), an oxidizing agent, has been widely used as a disinfectant. Recently, because of its reactive properties, H(2)O(2) has also been used as a tooth bleaching agent in dental care. This is a cause for concern because of adverse biological effects on the soft and hard tissues of the oral environment. To investigate the influence of H(2)O(2) on odontoblasts, the cells producing dentin in the pulp, we assessed cellular viability, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and nodule formation of an odontoblastic cell line (MDPC-23) after treatment with H(2)O(2), and compared those with the effects on preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. Cytotoxic effects of H(2)O(2) began to appear at 0.3 mmol/L in both MDPC-23 and MC3T3-E1 cells. At that concentration, the accumulation of intracellular ROS was confirmed by a fluorescent probe, DCFH-DA. Although more ROS were detected in MDPC-23, the increasing pattern and rate are similar between the two cells. When the cells were treated with H(2)O(2) at concentrations below 0.3 mmol/L, MDPC-23 displayed a significant increase in ALP activity and mineralized bone matrix, while MC3T3-E1 cells showed adverse effects of H(2)O(2). It is known that ROS are generally harmful by-products of aerobic life and represent the primary cause of aging and numerous diseases. These data, however, suggest that ROS can induce in vitro cell differentiation, and that they play a more complex role in cell physiology than simply causing oxidative damage.

  6. A rigorous proof of the Bohr-van Leeuwen theorem in the semiclassical limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoie, Baptiste

    2015-10-01

    The original formulation of the Bohr-van Leeuwen (BvL) theorem states that, in a uniform magnetic field and in thermal equilibrium, the magnetization of an electron gas in the classical Drude-Lorentz model vanishes identically. This stems from classical statistics which assign the canonical momenta all values ranging from -∞ to ∞ that makes the free energy density magnetic-field-independent. When considering a classical (Maxwell-Boltzmann) interacting electron gas, it is usually admitted that the BvL theorem holds upon condition that the potentials modeling the interactions are particle-velocities-independent and do not cause the system to rotate after turning on the magnetic field. From a rigorous viewpoint, when treating large macroscopic systems, one expects the BvL theorem to hold provided the thermodynamic limit of the free energy density exists (and the equivalence of ensemble holds). This requires suitable assumptions on the many-body interactions potential and on the possible external potentials to prevent the system from collapsing or flying apart. Starting from quantum statistical mechanics, the purpose of this paper is to give, within the linear-response theory, a proof of the BvL theorem in the semiclassical limit when considering a dilute electron gas in the canonical conditions subjected to a class of translational invariant external potentials.

  7. Titanium corrosion in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Been, Jantje

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion of Grade 2 titanium in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments has been studied by weight loss corrosion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and potentiodynamic polarography. Calcium ions and wood pulp were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. In alkaline peroxide, the titanium corrosion rate increased with increasing pH, temperature, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The corrosion controlling mechanism is thought to be the reaction of the oxide with the perhydroxyl ion. No evidence of thermodynamically stable calcium titanate was found in the surface film of test coupons exposed to calcium-inhibited alkaline peroxide solutions. Calcium inhibition is probably the result of low local alkali and peroxide concentrations at the metal surface produced by reaction of adsorbed calcium with hydrogen peroxide. It has been shown that the inhibiting effect of calcium is temporary, possibly through an effect of calcium on the chemical and/or physical stability of the surface oxide. Pulp is an effective and stable corrosion inhibitor. Raising the pulp concentration decreased the corrosion rate. The inhibiting effect of pulp may be related to the adsorption and interaction of the pulp fibers with H 2O2, thereby decreasing the peroxide concentration and rendering the solution less corrosive. The presence of both pulp and calcium led to higher corrosion rates than obtained by either one inhibitor alone. Replacement of hydrofluoric acid with alkaline peroxide for pickling of titanium was investigated. Titanium corrosion rates in alkaline peroxide exceeded those obtained in the conventional hydrofluoric acid bath. General corrosion was observed with extensive roughening of the surface giving a dull gray appearance. Preferred dissolution of certain crystallographic planes was investigated through the corrosion of a titanium single crystal. Whereas the overall effect on the corrosion rate was small

  8. Eco-toxicological effects of two kinds of lead compounds on forest tree seed in alkaline soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Zhou, Fu-Rong; Wang, Jin-Xin

    2016-03-01

    In order to compare the different eco-toxicological effects of lead nitrate and lead acetate on forest tree seed, a biological incubation experiment was conducted to testify the inhibition effects of two lead compounds on rates of seed germination, root and stem elongation, and seedling fresh weight for six plants (Amaorpha fruticosa L., Robinia psedoacacia L., Pinus tabuliformis Carr., Platycladus orientalis L., Koelreuteria paniculata Laxm., Hippophae rhamnoides L.) in soil. The results indicate that the inhibition effects of the two lead compounds on the rates of root elongation of plants were greater than other indices; root elongation can possibly be used as indices to investigate the relationship between lead toxicity and plant response. The response of trees to lead toxicity varied significantly, and the order of tolerance to lead pollution was as follows: Amaorpha fruticosa L. > Platycladus orientalis L. > Koelreuteria paniculata Laxm. > Robinia psedoacacia L. > Pinus tabuliformis Carr. > Hippophae rhamnoides L. Therefore, we suggest that Amaorpha fruticosa L. and Platycladus orientalis L. be used as tolerant plants for soil phytoremediation and Hippophae rhamnoides L. as an indicative plant to diagnose the toxicity of lead pollution on soil quality. Lead nitrate and lead acetate differentially restrain seeds, with seeds being more sensitive to lead nitrate than lead acetate in the soil. Thus, the characteristics of lead compounds should be taken into full consideration to appraise its impact on the environment.

  9. Eco-toxicological effects of two kinds of lead compounds on forest tree seed in alkaline soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Zhou, Fu-Rong; Wang, Jin-Xin

    2016-03-01

    In order to compare the different eco-toxicological effects of lead nitrate and lead acetate on forest tree seed, a biological incubation experiment was conducted to testify the inhibition effects of two lead compounds on rates of seed germination, root and stem elongation, and seedling fresh weight for six plants (Amaorpha fruticosa L., Robinia psedoacacia L., Pinus tabuliformis Carr., Platycladus orientalis L., Koelreuteria paniculata Laxm., Hippophae rhamnoides L.) in soil. The results indicate that the inhibition effects of the two lead compounds on the rates of root elongation of plants were greater than other indices; root elongation can possibly be used as indices to investigate the relationship between lead toxicity and plant response. The response of trees to lead toxicity varied significantly, and the order of tolerance to lead pollution was as follows: Amaorpha fruticosa L. > Platycladus orientalis L. > Koelreuteria paniculata Laxm. > Robinia psedoacacia L. > Pinus tabuliformis Carr. > Hippophae rhamnoides L. Therefore, we suggest that Amaorpha fruticosa L. and Platycladus orientalis L. be used as tolerant plants for soil phytoremediation and Hippophae rhamnoides L. as an indicative plant to diagnose the toxicity of lead pollution on soil quality. Lead nitrate and lead acetate differentially restrain seeds, with seeds being more sensitive to lead nitrate than lead acetate in the soil. Thus, the characteristics of lead compounds should be taken into full consideration to appraise its impact on the environment. PMID:26927657

  10. Silica in alkaline brines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, B.F.; Rettig, S.L.; Eugster, H.P.

    1967-01-01

    Analysis of sodium carbonate-bicarbonate brines from closed basins in volcanic terranes of Oregon and Kenya reveals silica contents of up to 2700 parts per million at pH's higher than 10. These high concentrations of SiO 2 can be attributed to reaction of waters with silicates, and subsequent evaporative concentration accompanied by a rise in pH. Supersaturation with respect to amorphous silica may occur and persist for brines that are out of contact with silicate muds and undersaturated with respect to trona; correlation of SiO2 with concentration of Na and total CO2 support this interpretation. Addition of moredilute waters to alkaline brines may lower the pH and cause inorganic precipitation of substantial amounts of silica.

  11. Bifunctional alkaline oxygen electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.; Mccatty, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the identification and testing of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate-temperature, single-unit, rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. Recent work on Na(x)Pt3O4, a potential bifunctional catalyst, is described, as well as the application of novel approaches to the development of more efficient bifunctional electrode structures. The three dual-character electrodes considered here showed similar superior performance; the Pt/RhO2 and Rh/RhO2 electrodes showed slightly better performance than the Pt/IrO2 electrode. It is concluded that Na(x)Pt3O4 continues to be a promising bifunctional oxygen electrode catalyst but requires further investigation and development.

  12. Effect of Frozen Storage on the Gel-Forming Ability of Surimi Treated by Acid and Alkaline Solubilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo-Deaño, L.; Tovar, C. A.

    2008-07-01

    Rheological changes during five months of frozen storage of horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus) surimi elaborated by acid (Type A) and alkali (Type B) treatment, and their ability to form gels were evaluated. Frozen storage provoked a sligthly increase of rigidity and toughness in surimi B due to the loss of water holding capacity. This effect on surimi B disrupts the gel forming ability of muscle proteins, and the resulting gel experiments an increase of viscoelastic moduli, maximum stress and gel strength, showing a more increment in the network firmness after five months of frozen storage, however it is still better gel than that from method A.

  13. Effects of seawater alkalinity on calcium and acid-base regulation in juvenile European lobster (Homarus gammarus) during a moult cycle.

    PubMed

    Middlemiss, Karen L; Urbina, Mauricio A; Wilson, Rod W

    2016-03-01

    Fluxes of NH4(+) (acid) and HCO3(-) (base), and whole body calcium content were measured in European lobster (Homarus gammarus) during intermoult (megalopae stage), and during the first 24h for postmoult juveniles under control (~2000 μeq/L) and low seawater alkalinity (~830 μeq/L). Immediately after moulting, animals lost 45% of the total body calcium via the shed exoskeleton (exuvia), and only 11% was retained in the uncalcified body. At 24h postmoult, exoskeleton calcium increased to ~46% of the intermoult stage. Ammonia excretion was not affected by seawater alkalinity. After moulting, bicarbonate excretion was immediately reversed from excretion to uptake (~4-6 fold higher rates than intermoult) over the whole 24h postmoult period, peaking at 3-6h. These data suggest that exoskeleton calcification is not completed by 24h postmoult. Low seawater alkalinity reduced postmoult bicarbonate uptake by 29% on average. Net acid-base flux (equivalent to net base uptake) followed the same pattern as HCO3(-) fluxes, and was 22% lower in low alkalinity seawater over the whole 24h postmoult period. The common occurrence of low alkalinity in intensive aquaculture systems may slow postmoult calcification in juvenile H. gammarus, increasing the risk of mortalities through cannibalism.

  14. Effects of seawater alkalinity on calcium and acid-base regulation in juvenile European lobster (Homarus gammarus) during a moult cycle.

    PubMed

    Middlemiss, Karen L; Urbina, Mauricio A; Wilson, Rod W

    2016-03-01

    Fluxes of NH4(+) (acid) and HCO3(-) (base), and whole body calcium content were measured in European lobster (Homarus gammarus) during intermoult (megalopae stage), and during the first 24h for postmoult juveniles under control (~2000 μeq/L) and low seawater alkalinity (~830 μeq/L). Immediately after moulting, animals lost 45% of the total body calcium via the shed exoskeleton (exuvia), and only 11% was retained in the uncalcified body. At 24h postmoult, exoskeleton calcium increased to ~46% of the intermoult stage. Ammonia excretion was not affected by seawater alkalinity. After moulting, bicarbonate excretion was immediately reversed from excretion to uptake (~4-6 fold higher rates than intermoult) over the whole 24h postmoult period, peaking at 3-6h. These data suggest that exoskeleton calcification is not completed by 24h postmoult. Low seawater alkalinity reduced postmoult bicarbonate uptake by 29% on average. Net acid-base flux (equivalent to net base uptake) followed the same pattern as HCO3(-) fluxes, and was 22% lower in low alkalinity seawater over the whole 24h postmoult period. The common occurrence of low alkalinity in intensive aquaculture systems may slow postmoult calcification in juvenile H. gammarus, increasing the risk of mortalities through cannibalism. PMID:26691956

  15. Effects of changes in straw chemical properties and alkaline soils on bacterial communities engaged in straw decomposition at different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guixiang; Zhang, Jiabao; Zhang, Congzhi; Feng, Youzhi; Chen, Lin; Yu, Zhenghong; Xin, Xiuli; Zhao, Bingzi

    2016-01-01

    Differences in the composition of a bacterial community engaged in decomposing wheat straw in a fluvo-aquic soil at 15 °C, 25 °C, and 35 °C were identified using barcode pyrosequencing. Functional carbon groups in the decomposing wheat straw were evaluated by 13C-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance). Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were more abundant, whereas Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were less abundant, at higher temperatures during the later stages of decomposition. Differences in the chemical properties of straw accounted for 19.3% of the variation in the community composition, whereas soil properties accounted for more (24.0%) and temperature, for less (7.4%). Carbon content of the soil microbial biomass and nitrogen content of straw were significantly correlated with the abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. The chemical properties of straw, especially the NCH/OCH3, alkyl O-C-O, and O-alkyl functional groups, exercised a significant effect on the composition of the bacterial community at different temperatures during decomposition—results that extend our understanding of bacterial communities associated with the decomposition of straw in agro-ecosystems and of the effects of temperature and chemical properties of the decomposing straw and soil on such communities. PMID:26916902

  16. Effect of alkaline cooking of maize on the content of fumonisins B1 and B2 and their hydrolysed forms.

    PubMed

    De Girolamo, A; Lattanzio, V M T; Schena, R; Visconti, A; Pascale, M

    2016-02-01

    The effect of nixtamalization on the content of fumonisins (FBs), hydrolysed (HFBs) and partially hydrolysed (PHFBs) fumonisins in maize was investigated at laboratory-scale. Maize naturally contaminated with FBs and PHFBs was cooked with lime. Starting raw maize, steeping and washing waters and final masa fractions were analysed for toxin content. Control-cooking experiments without lime were also carried out. The nixtamalization reduced the amount of FBs and PHFBs in masa and converted them to HFBs. However, the three forms of fumonisins collected in all fractions amounted to 183%, indicating that nixtamalization made available forms of matrix-associated fumonisins that were then converted to their hydrolysed forms. Control-cooking enhanced FBs and PHFBs reduction, due to the solubility of fumonisins in water during the steeping process, but did not form HFBs. These findings indicate that benefits associated with enhancing the nutritional value of nixtamalized maize are also associated with a safer product in terms of fumonisin contamination.

  17. Effective rates of heavy metal release from alkaline wastes — Quantified by column outflow experiments and inverse simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrer, Markus; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2008-10-01

    Column outflow experiments operated at steady state flow conditions do not allow the identification of rate limited release processes. This requires an alternative experimental methodology. In this study, the aim was to apply such a methodology in order to identify and quantify effective release rates of heavy metals from granular wastes. Column experiments were conducted with demolition waste and municipal waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash using different flow velocities and multiple flow interruptions. The effluent was analyzed for heavy metals, DOC, electrical conductivity and pH. The breakthrough-curves were inversely modeled with a numerical code based on the advection-dispersion equation with first order mass-transfer and nonlinear interaction terms. Chromium, Copper, Nickel and Arsenic are usually released under non-equilibrium conditions. DOC might play a role as carrier for those trace metals. By inverse simulations, generally good model fits are derived. Although some parameters are correlated and some model deficiencies can be revealed, we are able to deduce physically reasonable release-mass-transfer time scales. Applying forward simulations, the parameter space with equifinal parameter sets was delineated. The results demonstrate that the presented experimental design is capable of identifying and quantifying non-equilibrium conditions. They show also that the possibility of rate limited release must not be neglected in release and transport studies involving inorganic contaminants.

  18. Effect of nonmagnetic alkaline-earth dopants on magnetic properties of BiFeO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pai; Lin, Yuan-Hua; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2011-08-01

    Bi0.95A0.05FeO3 (A = Ba, Sr, Ca) thin films were deposited on (111) Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrates via chemical solution deposition. The magnetization of the doped specimens increases sharply as compared to that of pure BiFeO3, and it increases as the doped ionic radius gets larger. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that the films are single phase, and no other extra magnetic phases are detected. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis suggests that the content of Fe3+ increases and that that of Fe2+ decreases. According to the x-ray diffraction and Raman analyses, there are corresponding changes in the lattice parameters and the Raman spectra as the doped ionic radius gets larger. These results indicate that neither the magnetic coupling of Fe2+ nor the parasitic magnetic phases could be the origin of the magnetization improvement, and we consider that the magnetization improvement mainly originates from the doped ionic radius size effect.

  19. Effect of alkaline treatment ('akanwu') and supplementary value of corn or crayfish on the protein quality of breadfruit (Treculia Africana).

    PubMed

    Nzomiwu, N R

    1990-04-01

    The effect of treatment and supplementary value of corn (C) or crayfish (CR) on the protein quality of breadfruit (Treculia Africana) flours were studied in eighteen young rats. The 70:30 or 70:15:15 (Protein basis) combinations of breadfruit flours and corn or crayfish or both provided 1.6 g N/100 g diet for the 35 day study. The addition of 'akanwu' to the cooking water reduced cooking time and crude protein and saved fuel. The addition of 'akanwu' and replacement of CR with C was not beneficial as judged by the parameters tested except for the wt. gain and PER. On the other hand, when crayfish was the only source of supplementary protein (30%) to breadfruit cooked without 'akanwu' there were increases in all parameters tested over those with added 'akanwu' except for the N intake, wt. gain, and PER. These results appear to suggest that addition of 'akanwu' to TA was detrimental to its protein utilization and that TA appears to be an economic source of N in areas where it is a staple. Based on the results of this study, one would suggest that the use of 'akanwu' as a tenderizer should be seriously looked into before further use.

  20. Corrosion of Sn-Co alloy in alkaline media and the effect of Cl - and Br - ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refaey, S. A. M.

    1999-05-01

    Sn-Co electrodeposits alloy of approximate composition 80% Sn-20% Co (wt%) can be obtained from a gluconate bath as single phase CoSn 2, which is similar in appearance to decorative chromium. The potentiodynamic and cyclic voltammogram techniques were used to study the corrosion behaviour of CoSn 2 in sodium borate solutions (Na 2B 4O 7) at pH=9.6. The effect of different factors such as concentration of borate ions, pH, potential scan rate, successive cyclic voltammetry, and progressive addition of halide ions (Cl - and Br -) on the electrochemical behaviour of CoSn 2 alloys are discussed. The observed corrosion resistance of electrodeposited CoSn 2 alloy is due to the formation of a thin passive film, which is examined by X-ray spectroscopy and believed to be mainly tin and cobalt oxides. The voltammograms involve four anodic peaks, the first and second of which correspond to the formation of SnO and SnO 2 and the third and fourth related to the formation of cobalt oxides. SEM examination confirms that pitting corrosion takes place in presence of borax and is increased by adding halide ions.

  1. Effects of ultrasonic agitation and surfactant additive on surface roughness of Si (111) crystal plane in alkaline KOH solution.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qingbin; Tan, Xin; Zhu, Jiwei; Feng, Shulong; Gao, Jianxiang

    2016-07-01

    In the silicon wet etching process, the "pseudo-mask" formed by the hydrogen bubbles generated during the etching process is the reason causing high surface roughness and poor surface quality. Based upon the ultrasonic mechanical effect and wettability enhanced by isopropyl alcohol (IPA), ultrasonic agitation and IPA were used to improve surface quality of Si (111) crystal plane during silicon wet etching process. The surface roughness Rq is smaller than 15 nm when using ultrasonic agitation and Rq is smaller than 7 nm when using IPA. When the range of IPA concentration (mass fraction, wt%) is 5-20%, the ultrasonic frequency is 100 kHz and the ultrasound intensity is 30-50 W/L, the surface roughness Rq is smaller than 2 nm when combining ultrasonic agitation and IPA. The surface roughness Rq is equal to 1 nm when the mass fraction of IPA, ultrasound intensity and the ultrasonic frequency is 20%, 50 W and 100 kHz respectively. The experimental results indicated that the combination of ultrasonic agitation and IPA could obtain a lower surface roughness of Si (111) crystal plane in silicon wet etching process.

  2. Remediation of PAHs in a saline-alkaline soil amended with wastewater sludge and the effect on dynamics of C and N.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Luqueño, F; Marsch, R; Espinosa-Victoria, D; Thalasso, F; Hidalgo Lara, M E; Munive, A; Luna-Guido, M L; Dendooven, L

    2008-08-25

    Contamination of soil with hydrocarbons occurs frequently and organic material, such as sludge, is often applied to accelerate their dissipation. Little is known, however, how sludge characteristics affect removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from alkaline-saline soil. Soil of the former lake Texcoco with pH 9 and electrolytic conductivity 7 dS m(-1) was contaminated with phenanthrene and anthracene and amended with sludge, sterilized sludge, sludge adjusted to maintain pH in contaminated soil or glucose plus an inorganic N and P source while emission of CO2 and concentrations of NH4+, NO3-, NO2-, extractable P, phenanthrene and anthracene were monitored in an aerobic incubation experiment of 112 days. An agricultural soil from Acolman treated in the same way served as control. Contaminating the Texcoco soil increased emission of CO2 significantly, but not in the Acolman soil. After 112 days, the largest concentration of anthracene and phenanthrene was found in the Acolman soil added with glucose and the lowest in the sludge-amended soil. The largest concentration of anthracene in the Texcoco soil was found in soil added with sterile sludge and the lowest in the sludge-amended soil. The largest concentration of phenanthrene in the Texcoco soil was found in the glucose-amended soil and the lowest in the sludge-amended soil. It was found that addition of sludge removed more phenanthrene, but not anthracene from soil compared to the unamended contaminated soil, glucose inhibited dissipation of PAHs while microorganisms in the sludge contributed to their removal, and adjustment of soil pH had no effect. Organic material can be used to accelerate removal of hydrocarbons from soil, but the effect is controlled by soil type, contaminant and organic material characteristics. PMID:18538824

  3. Effects of sediment and turbulence on alkaline phosphatase activity and photosynthetic activity of phytoplankton in the shallow hyper-eutrophic Lake Taihu, China.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yanqing; Qin, Boqiang; Xu, Hai; Wang, Xiaodong

    2016-08-01

    Sediments play important roles, as nutrient reservoir, especially in shallow lake ecosystem. The water column of large shallow lakes is often stable but also disturbed by turbulence causing resuspension of sediments. While considerable research has been carried out to investigate the influence of sediment resuspension on nutrient release, fewer studies have been done to understand the contribution of alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) in water as a response to the two conditions (turbulence and stability). Also, effects of the two lake conditions on photosynthetic efficiency of phytoplankton are still poorly understood. This study will evaluate the effect of these two conditions on photosynthetic efficiency and APA. Sediments used in the indoor experiments were collected from Zhushan Bay in Lake Taihu. Turbulence was generated by rotors to simulate the strong wind-induced disturbance in Lake Taihu. Results of the experiments showed that TN and TP in the stable and episodically turbulent conditions were not significantly different, with TN ranging from 1.34 to 1.90 mg/L and TP from 0.08 to 0.18 mg/L. Whereas, the soluble reactive phosphorus in the episodically turbulent condition was significantly higher than in the stable condition. Episodic turbulence could enhance P cycling by resuspending sediment-associated P, which alleviated algal P limitation. In stable conditions, P deficiency induced the production of high APA, which enhanced the availability of P. Although episodic turbulence could also cause increased algal biomass, photosynthetic efficiency of the algae was also affected not only by the nutrients but also by many other factors, especially light availability. Our results suggest that episodic turbulence is an important driver of biogeochemical cycling in large shallow hypertrophic lake ecosystem.

  4. Effects of sediment and turbulence on alkaline phosphatase activity and photosynthetic activity of phytoplankton in the shallow hyper-eutrophic Lake Taihu, China.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yanqing; Qin, Boqiang; Xu, Hai; Wang, Xiaodong

    2016-08-01

    Sediments play important roles, as nutrient reservoir, especially in shallow lake ecosystem. The water column of large shallow lakes is often stable but also disturbed by turbulence causing resuspension of sediments. While considerable research has been carried out to investigate the influence of sediment resuspension on nutrient release, fewer studies have been done to understand the contribution of alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) in water as a response to the two conditions (turbulence and stability). Also, effects of the two lake conditions on photosynthetic efficiency of phytoplankton are still poorly understood. This study will evaluate the effect of these two conditions on photosynthetic efficiency and APA. Sediments used in the indoor experiments were collected from Zhushan Bay in Lake Taihu. Turbulence was generated by rotors to simulate the strong wind-induced disturbance in Lake Taihu. Results of the experiments showed that TN and TP in the stable and episodically turbulent conditions were not significantly different, with TN ranging from 1.34 to 1.90 mg/L and TP from 0.08 to 0.18 mg/L. Whereas, the soluble reactive phosphorus in the episodically turbulent condition was significantly higher than in the stable condition. Episodic turbulence could enhance P cycling by resuspending sediment-associated P, which alleviated algal P limitation. In stable conditions, P deficiency induced the production of high APA, which enhanced the availability of P. Although episodic turbulence could also cause increased algal biomass, photosynthetic efficiency of the algae was also affected not only by the nutrients but also by many other factors, especially light availability. Our results suggest that episodic turbulence is an important driver of biogeochemical cycling in large shallow hypertrophic lake ecosystem. PMID:27151245

  5. Remediation of PAHs in a saline-alkaline soil amended with wastewater sludge and the effect on dynamics of C and N.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Luqueño, F; Marsch, R; Espinosa-Victoria, D; Thalasso, F; Hidalgo Lara, M E; Munive, A; Luna-Guido, M L; Dendooven, L

    2008-08-25

    Contamination of soil with hydrocarbons occurs frequently and organic material, such as sludge, is often applied to accelerate their dissipation. Little is known, however, how sludge characteristics affect removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from alkaline-saline soil. Soil of the former lake Texcoco with pH 9 and electrolytic conductivity 7 dS m(-1) was contaminated with phenanthrene and anthracene and amended with sludge, sterilized sludge, sludge adjusted to maintain pH in contaminated soil or glucose plus an inorganic N and P source while emission of CO2 and concentrations of NH4+, NO3-, NO2-, extractable P, phenanthrene and anthracene were monitored in an aerobic incubation experiment of 112 days. An agricultural soil from Acolman treated in the same way served as control. Contaminating the Texcoco soil increased emission of CO2 significantly, but not in the Acolman soil. After 112 days, the largest concentration of anthracene and phenanthrene was found in the Acolman soil added with glucose and the lowest in the sludge-amended soil. The largest concentration of anthracene in the Texcoco soil was found in soil added with sterile sludge and the lowest in the sludge-amended soil. The largest concentration of phenanthrene in the Texcoco soil was found in the glucose-amended soil and the lowest in the sludge-amended soil. It was found that addition of sludge removed more phenanthrene, but not anthracene from soil compared to the unamended contaminated soil, glucose inhibited dissipation of PAHs while microorganisms in the sludge contributed to their removal, and adjustment of soil pH had no effect. Organic material can be used to accelerate removal of hydrocarbons from soil, but the effect is controlled by soil type, contaminant and organic material characteristics.

  6. Use Alkalinity Monitoring to Optimize Bioreactor Performance.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher S; Kult, Keegan J

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the agricultural community has reduced flow of nitrogen from farmed landscapes to stream networks through the use of woodchip denitrification bioreactors. Although deployment of this practice is becoming more common to treat high-nitrate water from agricultural drainage pipes, information about bioreactor management strategies is sparse. This study focuses on the use of water monitoring, and especially the use of alkalinity monitoring, in five Iowa woodchip bioreactors to provide insights into and to help manage bioreactor chemistry in ways that will produce desirable outcomes. Results reported here for the five bioreactors show average annual nitrate load reductions between 50 and 80%, which is acceptable according to established practice standards. Alkalinity data, however, imply that nitrous oxide formation may have regularly occurred in at least three of the bioreactors that are considered to be closed systems. Nitrous oxide measurements of influent and effluent water provide evidence that alkalinity may be an important indicator of bioreactor performance. Bioreactor chemistry can be managed by manipulation of water throughput in ways that produce adequate nitrate removal while preventing undesirable side effects. We conclude that (i) water should be retained for longer periods of time in bioreactors where nitrous oxide formation is indicated, (ii) measuring only nitrate and sulfate concentrations is insufficient for proper bioreactor operation, and (iii) alkalinity monitoring should be implemented into protocols for bioreactor management. PMID:27136151

  7. Use Alkalinity Monitoring to Optimize Bioreactor Performance.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher S; Kult, Keegan J

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the agricultural community has reduced flow of nitrogen from farmed landscapes to stream networks through the use of woodchip denitrification bioreactors. Although deployment of this practice is becoming more common to treat high-nitrate water from agricultural drainage pipes, information about bioreactor management strategies is sparse. This study focuses on the use of water monitoring, and especially the use of alkalinity monitoring, in five Iowa woodchip bioreactors to provide insights into and to help manage bioreactor chemistry in ways that will produce desirable outcomes. Results reported here for the five bioreactors show average annual nitrate load reductions between 50 and 80%, which is acceptable according to established practice standards. Alkalinity data, however, imply that nitrous oxide formation may have regularly occurred in at least three of the bioreactors that are considered to be closed systems. Nitrous oxide measurements of influent and effluent water provide evidence that alkalinity may be an important indicator of bioreactor performance. Bioreactor chemistry can be managed by manipulation of water throughput in ways that produce adequate nitrate removal while preventing undesirable side effects. We conclude that (i) water should be retained for longer periods of time in bioreactors where nitrous oxide formation is indicated, (ii) measuring only nitrate and sulfate concentrations is insufficient for proper bioreactor operation, and (iii) alkalinity monitoring should be implemented into protocols for bioreactor management.

  8. Effects of high pressure homogenisation of raw bovine milk on alkaline phosphatase and microbial inactivation. A comparison with continuous short-time thermal treatments.

    PubMed

    Picart, Laëtitia; Thiebaud, Maryse; René, Malika; Pierre Guiraud, Joseph; Cheftel, Jean Claude; Dumay, Eliane

    2006-11-01

    Raw whole milk of high microbial quality (effects of homogenisation between 100 and 300 MPa (HP valve) with an initial milk temperature Tin=4 degrees C or 24 degrees C was investigated on the inactivation of: (i) endogenous alkaline phosphatase (ALP); (ii) endogenous milk flora and (iii) two Gram positive (Listeria innocua and Micrococcus luteus) and one Gram negative (Pseudomonas fluorescens) strains inoculated into milk. Temperatures T1 and T2 measured before and immediately after the HP valve, and fat globule size distributions were also determined. ALP activity slightly decreased after homogenisation above 250 MPa when Tin=4 degrees C (corresponding T2>58 degrees C), but markedly decreased above 200 MPa when Tin=24 degrees C (T2>60 degrees C). In contrast to inactivation induced by continuous short-time thermal treatments, ALP inactivation induced by HP homogenisation was clearly due to mechanical forces (shear, cavitation and/or impact) in the HP valve and not to the short (<1 s) residence time at temperature T2 in the same valve. Inactivation of the three exogenous microorganisms led to similar conclusions. Homogenisation at 250 MPa or 300 MPa (Tin=24 degrees C) induced a 2-3 log cycle reduction of the total endogenous milk flora and a 1.5-1.8 log cycle reduction of inoculated List. innocua. Higher reduction ratios (2-4 log cycles) were obtained for the two other microorganisms. The highest levels of ALP inactivation corresponded to the highest extents of microbial reduction. Running the milk twice or three times through the homogeniser (recycling), keeping temperature T1 approximately 29 degrees C and pressure=200 MPa, increased homogenisation efficiency. PMID:16834813

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity of a Hawaiian fringing reef: chemical techniques for monitoring the effects of ocean acidification on coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, C. A.; Atkinson, M. J.; Winn, C. W.; Kahng, S. E.

    2014-03-01

    There is an interest in developing approaches to "ecosystem-based" management for coral reefs. One aspect of ecosystem performance is to monitor carbon metabolism of whole communities. In an effort to explore robust techniques to monitor the metabolism of fringing reefs, especially considering the possible effects of ocean acidification, a yearlong study of the carbonate chemistry of a nearshore fringing reef in Hawaii was conducted. Diurnal changes in seawater carbonate chemistry were measured once a week in an algal-dominated and a coral-dominated reef flat on the Waimanalo fringing reef, Hawaii, from April of 2010 until May of 2011. Calculated rates of gross primary production (GPP) and net community calcification ( G) were similar to previous estimates of community metabolism for other coral reefs (GPP 971 mmol C m-2 d-1; G 186 mmol CaCO3 m-2 d-1) and indicated that this reef was balanced in terms of organic metabolism, exhibited net calcification, and was a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Average slopes of total alkalinity versus dissolved inorganic carbon (TA-DIC slope) for the coral-dominated reef flat exhibited a greater calcification-to-net photosynthesis ratio than for the algal-dominated reef flat (coral slope vs. algal slope). Over the course of the time series, TA-DIC slopes remained significantly different between sites and were not correlated with diurnal averages in reef-water residence time or solar irradiance. These characteristic slopes for each reef flat reflect the relationship between carbon and carbonate community metabolism and can be used as a tool to monitor ecosystem function in response to ocean acidification.

  10. Short-term effect of vermicompost application on biological properties of an alkaline soil with high lime content from Mediterranean region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Uz, Ilker; Tavali, Ismail Emrah

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate direct short-term impact of vermicompost on some soil biological properties by monitoring changes after addition of vermicompost as compared to farmyard manure in an alkaline soil with high lime content from semiarid Mediterranean region of Turkey. For this purpose, mixtures of soil and organic fertilizers in different doses were incubated under greenhouse condition. Soil samples collected in regular intervals were analyzed for biological parameters including dehydrogenase, β-glucosidase, urease, alkaline phosphatase activities, and total number of aerobic mesophilic bacteria. Even though soil dehydrogenase activity appeared to be dose-independent based on overall evaluation, organic amendments were found to elevate dehydrogenase activity when sampling periods are evaluated individually. β-glucosidase, urease, alkaline phosphatase activity, and aerobic mesophilic bacterial numbers in vermicompost treatments fluctuated but remained significantly above the control. A slight but statistically significant difference was detected between organic amendments in terms of urease activity. Vermicompost appeared to more significantly increase bacterial number in soil. Clearly, vermicompost has a potential to be used as an alternative to farmyard manure to improve and maintain soil biological activity in alkaline calcareous soils from the Mediterranean region of Turkey. Further studies are needed to assess its full potential for these soils. PMID:25254238

  11. Short-term effect of vermicompost application on biological properties of an alkaline soil with high lime content from Mediterranean region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Uz, Ilker; Tavali, Ismail Emrah

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate direct short-term impact of vermicompost on some soil biological properties by monitoring changes after addition of vermicompost as compared to farmyard manure in an alkaline soil with high lime content from semiarid Mediterranean region of Turkey. For this purpose, mixtures of soil and organic fertilizers in different doses were incubated under greenhouse condition. Soil samples collected in regular intervals were analyzed for biological parameters including dehydrogenase, β-glucosidase, urease, alkaline phosphatase activities, and total number of aerobic mesophilic bacteria. Even though soil dehydrogenase activity appeared to be dose-independent based on overall evaluation, organic amendments were found to elevate dehydrogenase activity when sampling periods are evaluated individually. β-glucosidase, urease, alkaline phosphatase activity, and aerobic mesophilic bacterial numbers in vermicompost treatments fluctuated but remained significantly above the control. A slight but statistically significant difference was detected between organic amendments in terms of urease activity. Vermicompost appeared to more significantly increase bacterial number in soil. Clearly, vermicompost has a potential to be used as an alternative to farmyard manure to improve and maintain soil biological activity in alkaline calcareous soils from the Mediterranean region of Turkey. Further studies are needed to assess its full potential for these soils.

  12. Short-Term Effect of Vermicompost Application on Biological Properties of an Alkaline Soil with High Lime Content from Mediterranean Region of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Uz, Ilker; Tavali, Ismail Emrah

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate direct short-term impact of vermicompost on some soil biological properties by monitoring changes after addition of vermicompost as compared to farmyard manure in an alkaline soil with high lime content from semiarid Mediterranean region of Turkey. For this purpose, mixtures of soil and organic fertilizers in different doses were incubated under greenhouse condition. Soil samples collected in regular intervals were analyzed for biological parameters including dehydrogenase, β-glucosidase, urease, alkaline phosphatase activities, and total number of aerobic mesophilic bacteria. Even though soil dehydrogenase activity appeared to be dose-independent based on overall evaluation, organic amendments were found to elevate dehydrogenase activity when sampling periods are evaluated individually. β-glucosidase, urease, alkaline phosphatase activity, and aerobic mesophilic bacterial numbers in vermicompost treatments fluctuated but remained significantly above the control. A slight but statistically significant difference was detected between organic amendments in terms of urease activity. Vermicompost appeared to more significantly increase bacterial number in soil. Clearly, vermicompost has a potential to be used as an alternative to farmyard manure to improve and maintain soil biological activity in alkaline calcareous soils from the Mediterranean region of Turkey. Further studies are needed to assess its full potential for these soils. PMID:25254238

  13. The sulphate-reduction alkalinity pump tested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Patrick; Petrishcheva, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate precipitation has been suggested to be induced by alkalinity increase during sulphate reduction under anoxic conditions. This mechanism may explain the formation of carbonate deposits in shallow marine environments, either within a redox stratified sediment inhabited by phototrophic microbial mats or in shallow water within the photic zone where sulphidic water is upwelling onto the shelf. The alkalinity pump may work as long as the sulphide is not reoxidized to sulphate, a process that would acidify the surrounding. The alkalinity effect of sulphate reduction was recently tested by Aloisi (2008) for microbial mats using a model approach. He found that sulphate reduction does not significantly increase or even decrease carbonate saturation and is unlikely to have played a significant role through Earth history. The model considers many environmental factors, including the effect of carbonate precipitation itself on the carbonate equilbrium and on the alkalinity. We used a modified version of Aloisi's (2008) model to simulate the saturation states of aragonite, calcite and dolomite without the effects of carbonate precipitation. This is necessary to evaluate the effect of microbial metabolisms exclusively on carbonate saturation, since carbonate precipitation is only the consequence, but not the cause of oversaturation. First results show that the saturation state is increased in the zone of phototrophic CO2 uptake. In contrast, the saturation state is strongly decreased in the zone where dissolved oxygen overlaps with dissolved sulphide. Aerobic sulphide oxidation consumes most of the HS- and dissipates most of the alkalinity produced in the sulphate reduction zone below. Hence, our results are consistent with the findings of Aloisi (2008), and they even more clearly show that sulphate reduction does not induce carbonate precipitation nor contributes to carbonate precipitation in combination with phototrophic CO2 uptake. The alkalinity effect of sulphate

  14. Alkaline battery, separator therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An improved battery separator for alkaline battery cells has low resistance to electrolyte ion transfer and high resistance to electrode ion transfer. The separator is formed by applying an improved coating to an electrolyte absorber. The absorber, preferably, is a flexible, fibrous, and porous substrate that is resistant to strong alkali and oxidation. The coating composition includes an admixture of a polymeric binder, a hydrolyzable polymeric ester and inert fillers. The coating composition is substantially free of reactive fillers and plasticizers commonly employed as porosity promoting agents in separator coatings. When the separator is immersed in electrolyte, the polymeric ester of the film coating reacts with the electrolyte forming a salt and an alcohol. The alcohol goes into solution with the electrolyte while the salt imbibes electrolyte into the coating composition. When the salt is formed, it expands the polymeric chains of the binder to provide a film coating substantially permeable to electrolyte ion transfer but relatively impermeable to electrode ion transfer during use.

  15. Alkaline and ultrasound assisted alkaline pretreatment for intensification of delignification process from sustainable raw-material.

    PubMed

    Subhedar, Preeti B; Gogate, Parag R

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline and ultrasound-assisted alkaline pretreatment under mild operating conditions have been investigated for intensification of delignification. The effect of NaOH concentration, biomass loading, temperature, ultrasonic power and duty cycle on the delignification has been studied. Most favorable conditions for only alkaline pretreatment were alkali concentration of 1.75 N, solid loading of 0.8% (w/v), temperature of 353 K and pretreatment time of 6 h and under these conditions, 40.2% delignification was obtained. In case of ultrasound-assisted alkaline approach, most favorable conditions obtained were alkali concentration of 1N, paper loading of 0.5% (w/v), sonication power of 100 W, duty cycle of 80% and pretreatment time of 70 min and the delignification obtained in ultrasound-assisted alkaline approach under these conditions was 80%. The material samples were characterized by FTIR, SEM, XRD and TGA technique. The lignin was recovered from solution by precipitation method and was characterized by FTIR, GPC and TGA technique.

  16. Alkaline solution/binder ratio as a determining factor in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Santaquiteria, C.; Fernandez-Jimenez, A.; Palomo, A.

    2012-09-15

    This study investigates the effect of the alkaline solution/binder (S/B) ratio on the composition and nanostructure of the reaction products generated in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates. The experiments used two mixtures of fly ash and dehydroxylated white clay and for each of these, varying proportions of the solution components. The alkali activator was an 8 M NaOH solution (with and without sodium silicate) used at three S/B ratios: 0.50, 0.75 and 1.25. The {sup 29}Si, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and XRD characterisation of the reaction products reveal that for ratios nearest the value delivering suitable paste workability, the reaction-product composition and structure depend primarily on the nature and composition of the starting materials and the alkaline activator used. However, when an excess alkaline activator is present in the system, the reaction products tend to exhibit SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratios of approximately 1, irrespective of the composition of the starting binder or the alkaline activator.

  17. Evaluation of Alkaline Cleaner Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partz, Earl

    1998-01-01

    Alkaline cleaners used to process aluminum substrates have contained chromium as the corrosion inhibitor. Chromium is a hazardous substance whose use and control are described by environmental laws. Replacement materials that have the characteristics of chromated alkaline cleaners need to be found that address both the cleaning requirements and environmental impacts. This report will review environmentally friendly candidates evaluated as non-chromium alkaline cleaner replacements and methods used to compare those candidates one versus another. The report will also list characteristics used to select candidates based on their declared contents. It will also describe and evaluate methods used to discriminate among the large number of prospective candidates.

  18. Phosphatidylinositol anchor of HeLa cell alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Jemmerson, R.; Low, M.G.

    1987-09-08

    Alkaline phosphatase from cancer cells, HeLa TCRC-1, was biosynthetically labeled with either /sup 3/H-fatty acids or (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitated material. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) released a substantial proportion of the /sup 3/H-fatty acid label from immunoaffinity-purified alkaline phosphatase but had no effect on the radioactivity of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled material. PI-PLC also liberated catalytically active alkaline phosphatase from viable cells, and this could be selectively blocked by monoclonal antibodies to alkaline phosphatase. However, the alkaline phosphatase released from /sup 3/H-fatty acid labeled cells by PI-PLC was not radioactive. By contrast, treatment with bromelain removed both the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from purified alkaline phosphatase. Subtilisin was also able to remove the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from the purified alkaline phosphatase. The /sup 3/H radioactivity in alkaline phosphatase purified from (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled cells comigrated with authentic (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine by anion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis. The data suggest that the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine are covalently attached to the carboxyl-terminal segment since bromelain and subtilisin both release alkaline phosphatase from the membrane by cleavage at that end of the polypeptide chain. The data are consistent with findings for other proteins recently shown to be anchored in the membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol structure and indicate that a similar structure contributes to the membrane anchoring of alkaline phosphatase.

  19. Effect of chronic low dose natural radiation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: Evaluation of DNA damage and repair using the alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P R Vivek; Seshadri, M; Jaikrishan, G; Das, Birajalaxmi

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from inhabitants of Kerala in southwest India, exposed to chronic low dose natural radiation in vivo (>1 mSv year(-1)), respond with a radioadaptive response to a challenging dose of gamma radiation. Toward this goal, PBMCs isolated from 77 subjects from high-level natural radiation areas (HLNRA) and 37 subjects from a nearby normal level natural radiation area (NLNRA) were challenged with 2 Gy and 4 Gy gamma radiation. Subjects from HLNRA were classified based on the mean annual effective dose received, into low dose group (LDG) and high dose group (HDG) with mean annual effective doses of 2.69 mSv (N=43, range 1.07 mSv year(-1) to 5.55 mSv year(-1)) and 9.62 mSv (N = 34, range 6.07 mSv year(-1) to 17.41 mSv year(-1)), respectively. DNA strand breaks and repair kinetics (at 7 min, 15 min and 30 min after 4 Gy) were evaluated using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. Initial levels of DNA strand breaks observed after either a 2 Gy or a 4 Gy challenging dose were significantly lower in subjects of the HDG from HLNRA compared to subjects of NLNRA (2 Gy, P = 0.01; 4 Gy, P = 0.02) and LDG (2 Gy P = 0.01; 4 Gy, P=0.05). Subjects of HDG from HLNRA showed enhanced rejoining of DNA strand breaks (HDG/NLNRA, P = 0.06) during the early stage of repair (within 7 min). However at later times a similar rate of rejoining of strand breaks was observed across the groups (HDG, LDG and NLNRA). Preliminary results from our study suggest in vivo chronic low-level natural radiation provides an initial exposure that allows an adaptation to a subsequent higher radiation exposure, perhaps through improving DNA repair via an unknown mechanism. Therefore, further investigations would be necessary in this population to understand the biological and health effects of chronic low-level natural radiation exposures.

  20. Investigation on the coprecipitation of transuranium elements from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents. Study of the effects of waste components on decontamination from Np(IV) and Pu(IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Bessonov, A.A.; Budantseva, N.A.; Gelis, A.V.; Nikonov, M.V.; Shilov, V.P.

    1997-09-01

    The third stage of the study on the homogeneous coprecipitation of neptunium and plutonium from alkaline high-level radioactive waste solutions by the Method of Appearing Reagents has been completed. Alkaline radioactive wastes exist at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The recent studies investigated the effects of neptunium chemical reductants, plutonium(IV) concentration, and the presence of bulk tank waste solution components on the decontamination from tetravalent neptunium and plutonium achieved by homogeneous coprecipitation. Data on neptunium reduction to its tetravalent state in alkaline solution of different NaOH concentrations are given. Eleven reductants were tested to find those most suited to remove neptunium, through chemical reduction, from alkaline solution by homogeneous coprecipitation. Hydrazine, VOSO{sub 4}, and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 4} were found to be the most effective reductants. The rates of reduction with these reductants were comparable with the kinetics of carrier formation. Solution decontamination factors of about 400 were attained for 10{sup -6}M neptunium. Coprecipitation of plutonium(IV) with carriers obtained as products of thermal hydrolysis, redox transformations, and catalytic decomposition of [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+}, [Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]{sup 2-}, Cr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, KMnO{sub 4}, and Li{sub 4}UO{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 3} was studied and results are described. Under optimum conditions, a 100-fold decrease of plutonium concentration was possible with each of these reagents.

  1. Momentum transfer to a free floating double slit: realization of a thought experiment from the Einstein-Bohr debates.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, L Ph H; Lower, J; Jahnke, T; Schößler, S; Schöffler, M S; Menssen, A; Lévêque, C; Sisourat, N; Taïeb, R; Schmidt-Böcking, H; Dörner, R

    2013-09-01

    We simultaneously measured the momentum transferred to a free-floating molecular double slit and the momentum change of the atom scattering from it. Our experimental results are compared to quantum mechanical and semiclassical models. The results reveal that a classical description of the slits, which was used by Einstein in his debate with Bohr, provides a surprisingly good description of the experimental results, even for a microscopic system, if momentum transfer is not ascribed to a specific pathway but shared coherently and simultaneously between both.

  2. Improving the alkaline stability of imidazolium cations by substitution.

    PubMed

    Dong, Huilong; Gu, Fenglou; Li, Min; Lin, Bencai; Si, Zhihong; Hou, Tingjun; Yan, Feng; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Li, Youyong

    2014-10-01

    Imidazolium cations are promising candidates for preparing anion-exchange membranes because of their good alkaline stability. Substitution of imidazolium cations is an efficient way to improve their alkaline stability. By combining density functional theory calculations with experimental results, it is found that the LUMO energy correlates with the alkaline stability of imidazolium cations. The results indicate that alkyl groups are the most suitable substituents for the N3 position of imidazolium cations, and the LUMO energies of alkyl-substituted imidazolium cations depend on the electron-donating effect and the hyperconjugation effect. Comparing 1,2-dimethylimidazolium cations (1,2-DMIm+) and 1,3-dimethylimidazolium cations (1,3-DMIm+) with the same substituents reveals that the hyperconjugation effect is more significant in influencing the LUMO energy of 1,3-DMIms. This investigation reveals that LUMO energy is a helpful aid in predicting the alkaline stability of imidazolium cations.

  3. Design considerations and construction techniques for successive alkalinity producing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Skovran, G.A.; Clouser, C.R.

    1998-12-31

    Successive Alkalinity Producing Systems (SAPS) have been utilized for several years for the passive treatment of acid mine drainage. The SAPS technology is an effective method for inducing alkalinity to neutralize acid mine water and promote the precipitation of contaminating metals. Several design considerations and construction techniques are important for proper system function and longevity. This paper discusses SAPS design, water collection and introduction to the SAPS, hydraulics of SAPS, construction, operation and maintenance, and safety, and found that these factors were critical to obtaining maximum alkalinity at several SAPS treatment sites in Southwestern Pennsylvania. Taking care to incorporate these factors into future SAPS will aid effective treatment, reduce maintenance costs, and maximize long term effectiveness of successive alkalinity producing systems.

  4. The alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite magmatism from Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberti, E.; Gomes, C. D. B.; Comin-Chiaramonti, P.

    2015-12-01

    Early to Late Cretaceous lasting to Paleocene alkaline magmatism from southern Brazil is found associated with major extensional structural features in and around the Paraná Basin and grouped into various provinces on the basis of several data. Magmatism is variable in size, mode of occurrence and composition. The alkaline rocks are dominantly potassic, a few occurrences showing sodic affinity. The more abundant silicate rocks are evolved undersaturated to saturated in silica syenites, displaying large variation in igneous forms. Less evolved types are restricted to subvolcanic environments and outcrops of effusive suites occur rarely. Cumulatic mafic and ultramafic rock types are very common, particularly in the alkali-carbonatitic complexes. Carbonatite bodies are represented by Ca-carbonatites and Mg-carbonatites and more scarcely by Fe-carbonatites. Available radiometric ages for the alkaline rocks fit on three main chronological groups: around 130 Ma, subcoveal with the Early Cretaceous flood tholeiites of the Paraná Basin, 100-110 Ma and 80-90 Ma (Late Cretaceous). The alkaline magmatism also extends into Paleocene times, as indicated by ages from some volcanic lavas. Geochemically, alkaline potassic and sodic rock types are distinguished by their negative and positive Nb-Ta anomalies, respectively. Negative spikes in Nb-Ta are also a feature common to the associated tholeiitic rocks. Sr-Nd-Pb systematics confirm the contribution of both HIMU and EMI mantle components in the formation of the alkaline rocks. Notably, Early and Late Cretaceous carbonatites have the same isotopic Sr-Nd initial ratios of the associated alkaline rocks. C-O isotopic Sr-Nd isotopic ratios indicate typical mantle signature for some carbonatites and the influence of post-magmatic processes in others. Immiscibility of liquids of phonolitic composition, derived from mafic alkaline parental magmas, has been responsible for the origin of the carbonatites. Close association of alkaline

  5. Francisella DnaK Inhibits Tissue-nonspecific Alkaline Phosphatase*

    PubMed Central

    Arulanandam, Bernard P.; Chetty, Senthilnath Lakshmana; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Leonard, Sean; Klose, Karl; Seshu, Janakiram; Cap, Andrew; Valdes, James J.; Chambers, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Following pulmonary infection with Francisella tularensis, we observed an unexpected but significant reduction of alkaline phosphatase, an enzyme normally up-regulated following inflammation. However, no reduction was observed in mice infected with a closely related Gram-negative pneumonic organism (Klebsiella pneumoniae) suggesting the inhibition may be Francisella-specific. In similar fashion to in vivo observations, addition of Francisella lysate to exogenous alkaline phosphatase (tissue-nonspecific isozyme) was inhibitory. Partial purification and subsequent proteomic analysis indicated the inhibitory factor to be the heat shock protein DnaK. Incubation with increasing amounts of anti-DnaK antibody reduced the inhibitory effect in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, DnaK contains an adenosine triphosphate binding domain at its N terminus, and addition of adenosine triphosphate enhances dissociation of DnaK with its target protein, e.g. alkaline phosphatase. Addition of adenosine triphosphate resulted in decreased DnaK co-immunoprecipitated with alkaline phosphatase as well as reduction of Francisella-mediated alkaline phosphatase inhibition further supporting the binding of Francisella DnaK to alkaline phosphatase. Release of DnaK via secretion and/or bacterial cell lysis into the extracellular milieu and inhibition of plasma alkaline phosphatase could promote an orchestrated, inflammatory response advantageous to Francisella. PMID:22923614

  6. Bohr-effect and buffering capacity of hemocyanin from the tarantula E. californicum.

    PubMed

    Hellmann, Nadja

    2004-04-01

    A previous report showed that binding of oxygen to the 24-meric hemocyanin from E. californicum does not correlate linearly with the release of protons as known from hemoglobin. However, this unusual complex phenomenological observation could not be explained at that time. Here, I present a full analysis of the thermodynamic coupling between protons and oxygen for the 24-meric tarantula hemocyanin in Ringer-solution based on the Nested-MWC-model. A strategy is presented which allows to reduce the number of free parameters when fitting the model to the data by including explicitly the equilibrium constants for binding of protons to the different conformations. The results show that the Nested-MWC-model presents a good description of the cooperative and allosteric properties of spider hemocyanin also under physiological conditions and additional constraints imposed by proton-binding data. The analysis allowed to estimate the average number of allosteric proton-binding sites per subunit and the corresponding pK for each conformation. Furthermore, an estimate of the number and affinity of proton buffering binding sites could be given. Approximately 80% of all proton-binding sites are non-allosteric buffering binding sites. The results obtained in this study allow to predict the relative contribution of the four different conformations under conditions found in vivo. The conformational distribution indicates that the conformation with the highest proton affinity (tR) might be important for the proton transport in the hemolymph.

  7. Comparison of the E(5) Critical Point Symmetry to the {gamma}-Rigid Solution of The Bohr Hamiltonian for {gamma} =30 deg

    SciTech Connect

    Bonatsos, D.; Lenis, D.; Petrellis, D.; Terziev, P. A.; Yigitoglu, I.

    2007-04-23

    A {gamma}-rigid solution of the Bohr Hamiltonian for {gamma}=30 deg. is derived. Bohr Hamiltonians {beta}-part being related to the second order Casimir operator of the Euclidean algebra E(4). The solution is called Z(4) since it is corresponds to the Z(5) model with the {gamma} variable ''frozen''. Parameter-free (up to overall scale factors) predictions for spectra and B(E2) transition rates are in close agreement to the E(5) critical point symmetry as well as to the experimental data in the Xe region around A=130.

  8. The effects of alkaline dosage and Si/Al ratio on the immobilization of heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration fly ash-based geopolymer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Wang, Wei; Shi, Yunchun

    2010-04-01

    The present research explored the application of geopolymerization for the immobilization and solidification of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash. The influence of alkaline activator dosage and Si/Al molar ratio on the compressive strength and microstructure of MSWI fly ash-based geopolymer was investigated. A geopolymer with the highest strength was identified to occur at an intermediate alkaline activator dosage and Si/Al ratio, and the optimal Na/MSWI fly ash and Si/Al molar ratio was close to 2.8 mol kg(-1) and 2.0, respectively. IR spectra showed that higher alkaline activator dosage enhanced the structural disruption of the original aluminosilicate phases and a higher degree of polymerization of the geopolymer networks. At low Si/Al ratio, there was an increasing number of tetrahedral Al incorporating into the silicate backbone. As the Na/MSWI fly ash ratio increased, the microstructure changed from containing large macropores to more mesopores and micropores, indicating that more geopolymers are formed. Furthermore, the pore volume distribution of geopolymers was observed to shift to larger pores as the Si/Al ratio increased, which suggests that the soluble silicon content serves to reduce the amount of geopolymers. Heavy metal leaching was successfully elucidated using the first-order reaction/reaction-diffusion model. Combining the results from the microstructure of samples with the kinetic analysis, the immobilization mechanism of Cr, Cu, and Zn was inferred in this study. The methodologies described could provide a powerful set of tools for the systematic evaluation of element release from geopolymers.

  9. Synthesis of benzofuran derivatives as selective inhibitors of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase: effects on cell toxicity and osteoblast-induced mineralization.

    PubMed

    Marquès, Stéphanie; Buchet, René; Popowycz, Florence; Lemaire, Marc; Mebarek, Saïda

    2016-03-01

    Tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) by hydrolyzing pyrophosphate, an inhibitor of apatite formation, promotes extracellular matrix calcification during bone formation and growth, as well as during ectopic calcification under pathological conditions. TNAP is a target for the treatment of soft tissue pathological ossification. We synthesized a series of benzofuran derivatives. Among these, SMA14, displayed TNAP activity better than levamisole. SMA14 was found to be not toxic at doses of up to 40μM in osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells and primary osteoblasts. As probed by Alizarin Red staining, this compound inhibited mineral formation in murine primary osteoblast and in osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells.

  10. Computation of interactive effects and optimization of process parameters for alkaline lipase production by mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Bisht, Deepali; Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Darmwal, Nandan Singh

    2013-01-01

    Alkaline lipase production by mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 10,055 was optimized in shake flask batch fermentation using response surface methodology. An empirical model was developed through Box-Behnken experimental design to describe the relationship among tested variables (pH, temperature, castor oil, starch and triton-X-100). The second-order quadratic model determined the optimum conditions as castor oil, 1.77 mL.L−1; starch, 15.0 g.L−1; triton-X-100, 0.93 mL.L−1; incubation temperature, 34.12 °C and pH 8.1 resulting into maximum alkaline lipase production (3142.57 U.mL−1). The quadratic model was in satisfactory adjustment with the experimental data as evidenced by a high coefficient of determination (R2) value (0.9987). The RSM facilitated the analysis and interpretation of experimental data to ascertain the optimum conditions of the variables for the process and recognized the contribution of individual variables to assess the response under optimal conditions. Hence Box-Behnken approach could fruitfully be applied for process optimization. PMID:24159311

  11. Effects of the surface mobility on the oxidation of adsorbed CO on platinum electrodes in alkaline media. The role of the adlayer and surface defects.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Enrique; Chen, Qing-Song; Hernández, Javier; Sun, Shi-Gang; Feliu, Juan M

    2011-10-01

    The oxidation of adsorbed CO on Pt single crystal electrodes has been studied in alkaline media. The surfaces used in this study were the Pt(111) electrode and vicinal stepped and kinked surfaces with (111) terraces. The kinked surfaces have either (110) steps broken by (100) kinks or (100) steps broken by (110) kinks and different kink densities. The voltammetric profiles for the CO stripping on those electrodes show peaks corresponding to the oxidation of CO on the (111) terraces, on the (100) steps/kinks and on the (110) steps/kinks at very distinctive potentials. Additionally, the stripping voltammograms always present a prewave. The analysis of the results with the different stepped and kinked surfaces indicates that the presence of the prewave is not associated with defects or kinks in the electrode surface. Also, the clear separation of the CO stripping process in different peak contributions indicates that the mobility of CO on the surface is very low. Using partial CO stripping experiments and studies at different pH, it has been proposed that the low mobility is a consequence of the negative absolute potential at which the adlayers are formed in alkaline media. Also, the surface diffusion coefficient for CO in these media has been estimated from the dependence of the stripping charge of the peaks with the scan rate of the voltammetry. PMID:21863178

  12. The Bohr Model and the Fifth Grade: A New Standards-Based Hands-On Physics Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Jeff; Springer, Russell; Goldberg, Bennett

    2004-03-01

    A semester-long, standards-based, hands-on physics curriculum appropriate for the fifth grade was developed. Previously available curricula were successful in using hands-on activities to teach basic fifth-grade physics skills and concepts, but did not attempt to foster understanding of the fundamental underlying physics. We expanded the role of inquiry-based instruction to expose students to the fundamental physics behind electricity, forces, energy, light and sound. Central to the course, the Bohr model of the atom was used as a key tool both to motivate exploration of these topics as well as to develop basic conceptual understanding of fundamental ideas in quantum and electromagnetic physics. The curriculum was designed to be compatible with both district and state-mandated standards in a high-stakes test environment. This work was supported by NSF grant DGE-0231909.

  13. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  14. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  15. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassovs research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herrings group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  16. Eco-physiological characteristics of alfalfa seedlings in response to various mixed salt-alkaline stresses.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yong-Lin; Gao, Zhan-Wu; Gao, Ying; Liu, Guo-Fang; Sheng, Lian-Xi; Wang, De-Li

    2008-01-01

    Soil salinization and alkalization frequently co-occur in nature, but little is known about the mixed effects of salt-alkaline stresses on plants. An experiment with mixed salts (NaCl, Na(2)SO(4), NaHCO(3) and Na(2)CO(3)) and 30 salt-alkaline combinations (salinity 24-120 mmol/L and pH 7.03-10.32) treating Medicago sativa seedlings was conducted. The results demonstrated that salinity and alkalinity significantly affected total biomass and biomass components of seedlings. There were interactive effects of salt composition and concentration on biomass (Palkalinity stresses led to changes in the root activity along the salinity gradient (Peffects of alkalinity on seedling survival rate were more significant than those of salinity, and the seedlings demonstrated some physiological responses (leaf electrolyte leakage rate and proline content) in order to adapt to mixed salt-alkaline stresses. It was concluded that the mixed salt-alkaline stresses, which differ from either salt or alkali stress, emphasize the significant interaction between salt concentration (salinity) and salt component (alkalinity). Further, the effects of the interaction between high alkalinity and salinity are more severe than those of either salt or alkali stress, and such a cooperative interaction results in more sensitive responses of ecological and physiological characteristics in plants. PMID:18666949

  17. Molecular modeling of human alkaline sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Panneer Selvam; Olubiyi, Olujide; Thirunavukkarasu, Chinnasamy; Strodel, Birgit; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Alkaline sphingomyelinase, which is expressed in the human intestine and hydrolyses sphingomyelin, is a component of the plasma and the lysosomal membranes. Hydrolase of sphingomyelin generates ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate that have regulatory effects on vital cellular functions such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The enzyme belongs to the Nucleotide Pyrophosphatase/Phosphodiesterase family and it differs in structural similarity with acidic and neutral sphingomyelinase. In the present study we modeled alkaline sphingomyelinase using homology modeling based on the structure of Nucleotide Pyrophosphatase/Phosphodiesterase from Xanthomonas axonopodis with which it shares 34% identity. Homology modeling was performed using Modeller9v7. We found that Cys78 and Cys394 form a disulphide bond. Further analysis shows that Ser76 may be important for the function of this enzyme, which is supported by the findings of Wu et al. (2005), that S76F abolishes the activity completely. We found that the residues bound to Zn(2+) are conserved and geometrically similar with the template. Molecular Dynamics simulations were carried out for the modeled protein to observe the effect of Zinc metal ions. It was observed that the metal ion has little effect with regard to the stability but induces increased fluctuations in the protein. These analyses showed that Zinc ions play an important role in stabilizing the secondary structure and in maintaining the compactness of the active site. PMID:21544170

  18. Alkaline biofiltration of H2S odors.

    PubMed

    González-Sánchez, Armando; Revah, Sergio; Deshusses, Marc A

    2008-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a very common odor nuisance which is best controlled by chemical or biological scrubbing. Under alkaline pH, the amount of H2S that can be solubilized in a scrubbing liquid increases significantly, and therefore, gas-liquid mass transfer limitations can be reduced. To date, biological scrubbing of H2S has been limited to neutral or acidic pH, despite the potential benefit of reduced mass transfer limitations at alkaline pH. In the present paper, an alkaliphilic sulfoxidizing bacterial consortium was deployed in a laboratory-scale biotrickling filter treating H2S at pH 10. The gas contact time ranged from 1 to 6 s, and H2S inlet concentrations, from 2.5 to 18 ppm(v). The results showed that under most conditions, H2S removal exceeded 98% and the degradation end-product was sulfate. At the highest H2S concentrations and shortest gas contacttimes, when the loading exceeded 30 g m(-3) h(-1), the H2S removal efficiency decreased significantly due to biological reaction limitation, and incompletely oxidized sulfides were measured in the trickling liquid. An analysis of the process demonstrated that operating the biotrickling filter at high pH results in an enhancement of the mass transfer by a factor of 1700-11 000. Overall, alkaline biotrickling filtration was shown to be very effective at low concentration of H2S and very short gas contact time. This is the first demonstration of a biotrickling filter for air pollution control operated at high pH.

  19. Investigating Mechanisms of Alkalinization for Reducing Primary Breast Tumor Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Robey, Ian F.; Nesbit, Lance A.

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular pH (pHe) of many solid tumors is acidic as a result of glycolytic metabolism and poor perfusion. Acidity promotes invasion and enhances metastatic potential. Tumor acidity can be buffered by systemic administration of an alkaline agent such as sodium bicarbonate. Tumor-bearing mice maintained on sodium bicarbonate drinking water exhibit fewer metastases and survive longer than untreated controls. We predict this effect is due to inhibition of tumor invasion. Reducing tumor invasion should result in fewer circulating tumor cells (CTCs). We report that bicarbonate-treated MDA-MB-231 tumor-bearing mice exhibited significantly lower numbers of CTCs than untreated mice (P < 0.01). Tumor pHe buffering may reduce optimal conditions for enzymes involved in tumor invasion such as cathepsins and matrix metalloproteases (MMPs). To address this, we tested the effect of transient alkalinization on cathepsin and MMP activity using enzyme activatable fluorescence agents in mice bearing MDA-MB-231 mammary xenografts. Transient alkalinization significantly reduced the fluorescent signal of protease-specific activatable agents in vivo (P ≤ 0.003). Alkalinization, however, did not affect expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX). The findings suggest a possible mechanism in a live model system for breast cancer where systemic alkalinization slows the rate of invasion. PMID:23936808

  20. Copper(II) complexes with cyanoguanidine and o-phenanthroline: Theoretical studies, in vitro antimicrobial activity and alkaline phosphatase inhibitory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Medina, Juan J.; Islas, María S.; López Tévez, Libertad L.; Ferrer, Evelina G.; Okulik, Nora B.; Williams, Patricia A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Calculations based on density functional methods are carried out for two Cu(II) complexes with cyanoguanidine (cnge) and o-phenanthroline (o-phen): [Cu(o-phen)2(cnge)](NO3)2ṡ2H2O (1) and [Cu(o-phen)(cnge)(H2O)(NO3)2] (2). The calculated geometrical parameters are in agreement with the experimental values. The results of Atoms in Molecules (AIM) topological analysis of the electron density indicate that the Cu-N(phen) bonds in complex (1) have lower electron density, suggesting that those bonds are stronger in complex (2). Moreover, the ionic character of the Cu-N bond in the complex (1) is slightly stronger than that in the complex (2) and this situation would explain the fact that only complex (2) was stable in water solution. For this reason, the antimicrobial and enzymatic assays were performed using complex (2). It is well known that the increased use of antibiotics has resulted in the development of resistant bacterial and fungal strains. In this context, the study of novel antimicrobial agents has an enormous importance and metal complexes represent an interesting alternative for the treatment of infectious diseases. The aim of this work is to prove the modification of some biological properties like antimicrobial activity or alkaline phosphatase inhibitory activity upon copper complexation.

  1. Composition effects of spinel MnxCo3-xO4 nanoparticles on their electrocatalytic properties in oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eunjik; Jang, Ji-Hoon; Kwon, Young-Uk

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we synthesized a series of manganese cobalt spinel oxide (MnxCo3-xO4) nanoparticles (NPs) covering the whole composition range (x = 0.0. 0.4, 0.8, 1.4, 1.9, and 3.0) and investigated their electrocatalytic properties in relation with the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. The NP samples were synthesized by sonochemical reactions of Mn(OAc)2 and Co(OAc)2 (Ac = acetyl) in a water-dimethylformamide mixed solvent. The four samples in the Co-rich side have the cubic structure whereas the other two samples in the Mn-rich side have the tetragonal structure. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electrochemical analyses data indicate that the distribution of manganese and cobalt ions between the two metal ion sites of the spinel structure in our NP samples conforms to that of the bulk counterparts in the literature. The electrocatalytic data show that the ORR mechanism is changed when the structure is changed from cubic to tetragonal. The highest ORR activity was observed with the x = 0.4 sample. The electrochemical stability of this sample is higher than that of commercial Pt/C.

  2. Photocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic degradation of the drug omeprazole on nanocrystalline titania films in alkaline media: Effect of applied electrical bias on degradation and transformation products.

    PubMed

    Tantis, Iosif; Bousiakou, Leda; Frontistis, Zacharias; Mantzavinos, Dionissios; Konstantinou, Ioannis; Antonopoulou, Maria; Karikas, George-Albert; Lianos, Panagiotis

    2015-08-30

    Photocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic degradation of the drug omeprazole has been studied in the presence of nanocrystalline titania films supported on glass slides or transparent FTO electrodes in alkaline environment. Its photocatalytic degradation rate was assessed by its UV absorbance and by HPLC, while its transformation products were analyzed by HR-LC-MS. Based on UV absorbance, omeprazole can be photocatalytically degraded at an average rate of 6.7×10(-4)min(-1) under low intensity UVA irradiation of 1.5mWcm(-2) in the presence of a nanoparticulate titania film. This corresponds to degradation of 1.4mg of omeprazole per gram of the photocatalyst per liter of solution per hour. The photodegradation rate can be accelerated in a photoelectrochemical cell by applying a forward bias. In this case, the maximum rate reached under the present conditions was 11.6×10(-4)min(-1) by applying a forward bias of +0.6V vs. Ag/AgCl. Four major transformation products were successfully identified and their profiles were followed by HR-LC-MS. The major degradation path includes the scission of the sulfoxide bridge into the corresponding pyridine and benzimidazole ring derivates and this is accompanied by the release of sulfate anions in the reaction mixture.

  3. Photocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic degradation of the drug omeprazole on nanocrystalline titania films in alkaline media: Effect of applied electrical bias on degradation and transformation products.

    PubMed

    Tantis, Iosif; Bousiakou, Leda; Frontistis, Zacharias; Mantzavinos, Dionissios; Konstantinou, Ioannis; Antonopoulou, Maria; Karikas, George-Albert; Lianos, Panagiotis

    2015-08-30

    Photocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic degradation of the drug omeprazole has been studied in the presence of nanocrystalline titania films supported on glass slides or transparent FTO electrodes in alkaline environment. Its photocatalytic degradation rate was assessed by its UV absorbance and by HPLC, while its transformation products were analyzed by HR-LC-MS. Based on UV absorbance, omeprazole can be photocatalytically degraded at an average rate of 6.7×10(-4)min(-1) under low intensity UVA irradiation of 1.5mWcm(-2) in the presence of a nanoparticulate titania film. This corresponds to degradation of 1.4mg of omeprazole per gram of the photocatalyst per liter of solution per hour. The photodegradation rate can be accelerated in a photoelectrochemical cell by applying a forward bias. In this case, the maximum rate reached under the present conditions was 11.6×10(-4)min(-1) by applying a forward bias of +0.6V vs. Ag/AgCl. Four major transformation products were successfully identified and their profiles were followed by HR-LC-MS. The major degradation path includes the scission of the sulfoxide bridge into the corresponding pyridine and benzimidazole ring derivates and this is accompanied by the release of sulfate anions in the reaction mixture. PMID:25855613

  4. Reduction of nitrobenzene with alkaline ascorbic acid: Kinetics and pathways.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chenju; Lin, Ya-Ting; Shiu, Jia-Wei

    2016-01-25

    Alkaline ascorbic acid (AA) exhibits the potential to reductively degrade nitrobenzene (NB), which is the simplest of the nitroaromatic compounds. The nitro group (NO2(-)) of NB has a +III oxidation state of the N atom and tends to gain electrons. The effect of alkaline pH ranging from 9 to 13 was initially assessed and the results demonstrated that the solution pH, when approaching or above the pKa2 of AA (11.79), would increase reductive electron transfer to NB. The rate equation for the reactions between NB and AA at pH 12 can be described as r=((0.89±0.11)×10(-4) mM(1-(a+b))h(-1))×[NB](a=1.35±0.10)[AA](b=0.89±0.01). The GC/MS analytical method identified nitrosobenzene, azoxybenzene, and azobenzene as NB reduction intermediates, and aniline (AN) as a final product. These experimental results indicate that the alkaline AA reduction of NB to AN mainly proceeds via the direct route, consisting of a series of two-electron or four-electron transfers, and the condensation reaction plays a minor route. Preliminary evaluation of the remediation of spiked NB contaminated soils revealed that maintenance of alkaline pH and a higher water to soil ratio are essential for a successful alkaline AA application.

  5. Autonomous in situ measurements of seawater alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Reggie S; DeGrandpre, Michael D; Beck, James C; Hart, Robert D; Peterson, Brittany; De Carlo, Eric H; Drupp, Patrick S; Hammar, Terry R

    2014-08-19

    Total alkalinity (AT) is an important parameter for describing the marine inorganic carbon system and understanding the effects of atmospheric CO2 on the oceans. Measurements of AT are limited, however, because of the laborious process of collecting and analyzing samples. In this work we evaluate the performance of an autonomous instrument for high temporal resolution measurements of seawater AT. The Submersible Autonomous Moored Instrument for alkalinity (SAMI-alk) uses a novel tracer monitored titration method where a colorimetric pH indicator quantifies both pH and relative volumes of sample and titrant, circumventing the need for gravimetric or volumetric measurements. The SAMI-alk performance was validated in the laboratory and in situ during two field studies. Overall in situ accuracy was -2.2 ± 13.1 μmol kg(-1) (n = 86), on the basis of comparison to discrete samples. Precision on duplicate analyses of a carbonate standard was ±4.7 μmol kg(-1) (n = 22). This prototype instrument can measure in situ AT hourly for one month, limited by consumption of reagent and standard solutions.

  6. Autonomous in situ measurements of seawater alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Reggie S; DeGrandpre, Michael D; Beck, James C; Hart, Robert D; Peterson, Brittany; De Carlo, Eric H; Drupp, Patrick S; Hammar, Terry R

    2014-08-19

    Total alkalinity (AT) is an important parameter for describing the marine inorganic carbon system and understanding the effects of atmospheric CO2 on the oceans. Measurements of AT are limited, however, because of the laborious process of collecting and analyzing samples. In this work we evaluate the performance of an autonomous instrument for high temporal resolution measurements of seawater AT. The Submersible Autonomous Moored Instrument for alkalinity (SAMI-alk) uses a novel tracer monitored titration method where a colorimetric pH indicator quantifies both pH and relative volumes of sample and titrant, circumventing the need for gravimetric or volumetric measurements. The SAMI-alk performance was validated in the laboratory and in situ during two field studies. Overall in situ accuracy was -2.2 ± 13.1 μmol kg(-1) (n = 86), on the basis of comparison to discrete samples. Precision on duplicate analyses of a carbonate standard was ±4.7 μmol kg(-1) (n = 22). This prototype instrument can measure in situ AT hourly for one month, limited by consumption of reagent and standard solutions. PMID:25051401

  7. Effect of crowding by dextrans and Ficolls on the rate of alkaline phosphatase-catalyzed hydrolysis: a size-dependent investigation.

    PubMed

    Homchaudhuri, L; Sarma, Navanita; Swaminathan, Rajaram

    2006-12-01

    The cell cytosol is crowded with macromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, and membranes. The consequences of such crowding remain unclear. How is the rate of a typical enzymatic reaction, involving a freely diffusing enzyme and substrate, affected by the presence of macromolecules of different sizes, shapes, and concentrations? Here, we mimic the cytosolic crowding in vitro, using dextrans and Ficolls, for the first time in a variety of sizes ranging from 15 to 500 kDa, in a concentration range 0-30% w/w. Alkaline phosphatase-catalyzed hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (PNPP) was chosen as the model reaction. A pronounced decrease in the rate with increase in fractional volume occupancy of dextran is observed for larger dextrans (200 and 500 kDa) in contrast to smaller dextrans (15-70 kDa). Our results indicate that, at 20% w/w, smaller dextrans (15-70 kDa) reduce the initial rate moderately (1.4- to 2.4-fold slowing), while larger dextrans (>200 kDa) slow the reaction considerably (>5-fold). Ficolls (70 and 400 kDa) slow the reaction moderately (1.3- to 2.3-fold). The influence of smaller dextrans was accounted by a combination of increase in viscosity as sensed by PNPP and a minor offsetting increase in enzyme activity due to crowding. Larger dextrans apparently reduce the frequency of enzyme substrate encounter. The reduced influence of Ficolls is attributed to their compact and quasispherical shape, much unlike the dextrans.

  8. Alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment of softwood: hemicellulose degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Vasco, Carlos; Zhang, Xiao

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated softwood hemicelluloses degradation pathways during alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment of Douglas fir. It was found that glucomannan is much more susceptible to alkaline pretreatment than xylan. Organic acids, including lactic, succinic, glycolic and formic acid are the predominant products from glucomannan degradation. At low treatment temperature (90°C), a small amount of formic acid is produced from glucomannan, whereas glucomannan degradation to lactic acid and succinic acid becomes the main reactions at 140°C and 180°C. The addition of H2O2 during alkaline pretreatment of D. fir led to a significant removal of lignin, which subsequently facilitated glucomannan solubilization. However, H2O2 has little direct effect on the glucomannan degradation reaction. The main degradation pathways involved in glucomannan conversion to organics acids are elucidated. The results from this study demonstrate the potential to optimize pretreatment conditions to maximize the value of biomass hemicellulose.

  9. Surfactant-enhanced low-pH alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Peru, D.A. and Co., Columbia, MD . Research Div.); Lorenz, P.B. )

    1990-08-01

    This paper reports sodium bicarbonate investigated as a potential alkaline agent in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding because it has very little tendency to dissolve silicate minerals. In experiments performed with Wilmington, CA, crude oil and three types of surfactants, the bicarbonate/surfactant combination caused a marked lowering of interfacial tension (IFT). Bicarbonate protected the surfactant against divalent cations and reduced adsorption of surfactant and polymer on various minerals. Coreflood test confirm that sodium bicarbonate plus surfactant can be an effective alternative to the high-pH flooding process.

  10. A New Contribution for WYP 2005: The Golden Ratio, Bohr Radius, Planck's Constant, Fine-Structure Constant and g-Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyrovska, R.; Narayan, S.

    2005-10-01

    Recently, the ground state Bohr radius (aB) of hydrogen was shown to be divided into two Golden sections, aB,p = aB/ø2 and aB,e = aB/ø at the point of electrical neutrality, where ø = 1.618 is the Golden ratio (R. Heyrovska, Molecular Physics 103: 877-882, and the literature cited therein). The origin of the difference of two energy terms in the Rydberg equation was thus shown to be in the ground state energy itself, as shown below: EH = (1/2)e2/(κaB) = (1/2)(e2/κ) [(1/aB,p - (1/aB,e)] (1). This work brings some new results that 1) a unit charge in vacuum has a magnetic moment, 2) (e2/2κ) in eq. (1) is an electromagnetic condenser constant, 3) the de Broglie wavelengths of the proton and electron correspond to the Golden arcs of a circle with the Bohr radius, 4) the fine structure constant (α) is the ratio of the Planck's constants without and with the interaction of light with matter, 5) the g-factors of the electron and proton, ge/2 and gp/2 divide the Bohr radius at the magnetic center and 6) the ``mysterious'' value (137.036) of α -1 = (360/ø2) - (2/ø3), where (2/ø3) arises from the difference, (gp - ge).

  11. Niels Bohr's discussions with Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, and Erwin Schrödinger: The origins of the principles of uncertainty and complementarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehra, Jagdish

    1987-05-01

    In this paper, the main outlines of the discussions between Niels Bohr with Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, and Erwin Schrödinger during 1920 1927 are treated. From the formulation of quantum mechanics in 1925 1926 and wave mechanics in 1926, there emerged Born's statistical interpretation of the wave function in summer 1926, and on the basis of the quantum mechanical transformation theory—formulated in fall 1926 by Dirac, London, and Jordan—Heisenberg formulated the uncertainty principle in early 1927. At the Volta Conference in Como in September 1927 and at the fifth Solvay Conference in Brussels the following month, Bohr publicly enunciated his complementarity principle, which had been developing in his mind for several years. The Bohr-Einstein discussions about the consistency and completeness of qnautum mechanics and of physical theory as such—formally begun in October 1927 at the fifth Solvay Conference and carried on at the sixth Solvay Conference in October 1930—were continued during the next decades. All these aspects are briefly summarized.

  12. Alkaline Earth Core Level Photoemission Spectroscopy of High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines photoemission measurements of the alkaline Earth core levels of high-temperature superconductors and related materials, models that seek to explain the large negative shifts observed relative to the corresponding alkaline Earth metals, and the effect of lattice site disorder on the core level spectra and the presence or absence of intrinsic surface peaks.

  13. Survival and stress responses of E. coli exposed to alkaline cleaners

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were undertaken to evaluate the effects of alkaline cleaners commonly used in food processing environments on survival and stress responses of the foodborne pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7. Alkaline cleaners containing either sodium hydroxide or potassium hydroxide and hypochlorite had gre...

  14. Alkaline detergent recycling via ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-06-01

    The metal finishing industry uses alkaline cleaners and detergents to remove oils and dirt from manufactured parts, often before they are painted or plated. The use of these cleaners has grown because environmental regulations are phasing out ozone depleting substances and placing restrictions on the use and disposal of many hazardous solvents. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is examining ultrafiltration as a cleaning approach that reclaims the cleaning solutions and minimizes wastes. The ultrafiltration membrane is made from sheets of polymerized organic film. The sheets are rolled onto a supporting frame and installed in a tube. Spent cleaning solution is pumped into a filter chamber and filtered through the membrane that captures oils and dirt and allows water and detergent to pass. The membrane is monitored and when pressure builds from oil and dirt, an automatic system cleans the surface to maintain solution flow and filtration quality. The results show that the ultrafiltration does not disturb the detergent concentration or alkalinity but removed almost all the oils and dirt leaving the solution in condition to be reused.

  15. Grace DAKASEP alkaline battery separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovannoni, R. T.; Lundquist, J. T.; Choi, W. M.

    1987-01-01

    The Grace DAKASEP separator was originally developed as a wicking layer for nickel-zinc alkaline batteries. The DAKASEP is a filled non-woven separator which is flexible and heat sealable. Through modification of formulation and processing variables, products with a variety of properties can be produced. Variations of DAKASEP were tested in Ni-H2, Ni-Zn, Ni-Cd, and primary alkaline batteries with good results. The properties of DAKASEP which are optimized for Hg-Zn primary batteries are shown in tabular form. This separator has high tensile strength, 12 micron average pore size, relatively low porosity at 46-48 percent, and consequently moderately high resistivity. Versions were produced with greater than 70 percent porosity and resistivities in 33 wt percent KOH as low as 3 ohm cm. Performance data for Hg-Zn E-1 size cells containing DAKASEP with the properties shown in tabular form, are more reproducible than data obtained with a competitive polypropylene non-woven separator. In addition, utilization of active material is in general considerably improved.

  16. The design of alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, K.

    1990-01-01

    Alkaline fuel cells recently developed have yielded satisfactory operation even in the cases of their use of mobile and matrix-type electrolytes; the advantages of realistic operation have been demonstrated by a major West German manufacturer's 100 kW alkaline fuel cell apparatus, which was operated in the role of an air-independent propulsion system. Development has begun for a spacecraft alkaline fuel cell of the matrix-electrolyte configuration.

  17. Effect of estrogen in relation to dietary vitamin D3 and calcium on activity of intestinal alkaline phosphatase and Ca-ATPase in immature chicks.

    PubMed

    Qin, X; Klandorf, H

    1993-06-01

    The interaction between 17 beta-estradiol (E2), vitamin D3 (D3), and dietary Ca on the activities of Ca-ATPase and alkaline phosphatase (AP) was determined in the intestine of young female chicks. Chicks (n = 36) were assigned to two groups, one of which was transferred to a low Ca (0.2%) diet and the other maintained on a regular diet. One week later, each group was further divided into three subgroups and given daily injections of 0(oil), 0.25, or 0.5 mg E2/kg body wt for 14 days. E2 treatment as well as low dietary Ca significantly increased AP activity (P < 0.05), whereas the highest E2 dose decreased jejunal Ca-ATPase (P < 0.05). In a separate study, day-old chicks (n = 40) fed a purified diet supplemented with or without D3 for 24 days were divided into two subgroups and administered daily injections of either 0 or 0.25 mg estrogen 3-benzoate/kg body wt for 5 days. E2 alone or in combination with D3 failed to change Ca-ATPase activity in either the duodenum or the jejunum. However, E2 enhanced the D3-stimulated AP activity measured in the supernatant of duodenum (D3, P < 0.001; E2, P > 0.05; E2 x D3, P < 0.05) and jejunum (D3, P < 0.001; E2, P > 0.05; E2 x D3, P = 0.06). Daily injections of 0.5 mg E2/kg body wt for 6 days to 6-week-old D3-adequate chicks (n = 16) significantly increased AP activity in jejunum but not in liver and kidney (P < 0.05). In conclusion, E2 treatment enhanced the activity of intestinal AP but not Ca-ATPase. This enhancement was independent of dietary Ca, but was D3-dependent and tissue specific. The results suggest that the pubertal increase in plasma E2 can affect Ca absorption from the intestine by increasing the activity of AP.

  18. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  19. Alkalinity production in intertidal sands intensified by lugworm bioirrigation.

    PubMed

    Rao, Alexandra M F; Malkin, Sairah Y; Montserrat, Francesc; Meysman, Filip J R

    2014-07-01

    Porewater profiles and sediment-water fluxes of oxygen, nutrients, pH, calcium, alkalinity, and sulfide were measured in intertidal sandflat sediments from the Oosterschelde mesotidal lagoon (The Netherlands). The influence of bioturbation and bioirrigation by the deep-burrowing polychaete Arenicola marina on the rates and sources of benthic alkalinity generation was examined by comparing measurements in intact and defaunated sediment cores before and after the addition of A. marina in summer and fall 2011. Higher organic matter remineralization rates, shallower O2 penetration, and greater sediment-water solute fluxes were observed in summer, consistent with higher sediment community metabolic rates at a higher temperature. Lugworm activity stimulated porewater exchange (5.1 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), organic matter remineralization (6.2 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), aerobic respiration (2.4 × in summer, 2.1 × in fall), alkalinity release (4.7 × in summer, 4.0 × in fall), nutrient regeneration, and iron cycling. The effects of lugworm activity on net sediment-water fluxes were similar but more pronounced in summer than in fall. Alkalinity release in fall was entirely driven by metabolic carbonate dissolution, while this process explained between 22 and 69% of total alkalinity production in summer, indicating the importance of other processes in this season. By enhancing organic matter remineralization and the reoxidation of reduced metabolites by the sediment microbial community, lugworm activity stimulated the production of dissolved inorganic carbon and metabolic acidity, which in turn enhanced metabolic CaCO3 dissolution efficiency. In summer, evidence of microbial long distance electron transport (LDET) was observed in defaunated sediment. Thus, alkalinity production by net carbonate dissolution was likely supplemented by anaerobic respiration and LDET in summer. PMID:25431515

  20. Alkalinity production in intertidal sands intensified by lugworm bioirrigation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Alexandra M.F.; Malkin, Sairah Y.; Montserrat, Francesc; Meysman, Filip J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Porewater profiles and sediment-water fluxes of oxygen, nutrients, pH, calcium, alkalinity, and sulfide were measured in intertidal sandflat sediments from the Oosterschelde mesotidal lagoon (The Netherlands). The influence of bioturbation and bioirrigation by the deep-burrowing polychaete Arenicola marina on the rates and sources of benthic alkalinity generation was examined by comparing measurements in intact and defaunated sediment cores before and after the addition of A. marina in summer and fall 2011. Higher organic matter remineralization rates, shallower O2 penetration, and greater sediment-water solute fluxes were observed in summer, consistent with higher sediment community metabolic rates at a higher temperature. Lugworm activity stimulated porewater exchange (5.1 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), organic matter remineralization (6.2 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), aerobic respiration (2.4 × in summer, 2.1 × in fall), alkalinity release (4.7 × in summer, 4.0 × in fall), nutrient regeneration, and iron cycling. The effects of lugworm activity on net sediment-water fluxes were similar but more pronounced in summer than in fall. Alkalinity release in fall was entirely driven by metabolic carbonate dissolution, while this process explained between 22 and 69% of total alkalinity production in summer, indicating the importance of other processes in this season. By enhancing organic matter remineralization and the reoxidation of reduced metabolites by the sediment microbial community, lugworm activity stimulated the production of dissolved inorganic carbon and metabolic acidity, which in turn enhanced metabolic CaCO3 dissolution efficiency. In summer, evidence of microbial long distance electron transport (LDET) was observed in defaunated sediment. Thus, alkalinity production by net carbonate dissolution was likely supplemented by anaerobic respiration and LDET in summer. PMID:25431515

  1. Design factors and performance efficiencies of successive alkalinity producing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jage, C.R.; Zipper, C.E.

    1999-07-01

    Successive Alkalinity Producing Systems (SAPS) are passive treatment wetlands that have been used successfully in renovating acidic mine drainage (AMD) for several years. Unfortunately, design parameters and treatment efficiency of these systems vary widely due to a lack of clear, consistent design and construction guidelines. This study is investigating ten operating SAPS systems in Virginia and West Virginia for the purpose of identifying the relationship of design and construction factors to system performance. Influent and effluent water samples were collected for a period of two years or longer by the operators of each system. Each sample was analyzed for pH, alkalinity, acidity, sulfate, total iron, total manganese, and aluminum. The individual systems were also characterized according to system age, size, and construction materials. Residence times for the ten systems ranged from 4.5 hours to 13.31 days. On average, they were able to raise the pH 0.65 units and generate a net alkalinity of 84.84 mg/l as CaCO{sub 3}. Iron and manganese removal did occur in the SAPS cells, but the majority of the removal took place in post-SAPS settling ponds. Net alkalinity generation was positively correlated with residence time and iron removal rates suggesting a synergistic effect. Seasonal variation in alkalinity production was also noted, possibly indicating changes in alkalinity generation rates by dissimilatory sulfate reduction. These data provide the foundation for the development of a user-oriented SAPS design model based solely on influent AMD chemistry and final treatment goals as input parameters.

  2. Alkalinity production in intertidal sands intensified by lugworm bioirrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Alexandra M. F.; Malkin, Sairah Y.; Montserrat, Francesc; Meysman, Filip J. R.

    2014-07-01

    Porewater profiles and sediment-water fluxes of oxygen, nutrients, pH, calcium, alkalinity, and sulfide were measured in intertidal sandflat sediments from the Oosterschelde mesotidal lagoon (The Netherlands). The influence of bioturbation and bioirrigation by the deep-burrowing polychaete Arenicola marina on the rates and sources of benthic alkalinity generation was examined by comparing measurements in intact and defaunated sediment cores before and after the addition of A. marina in summer and fall 2011. Higher organic matter remineralization rates, shallower O2 penetration, and greater sediment-water solute fluxes were observed in summer, consistent with higher sediment community metabolic rates at a higher temperature. Lugworm activity stimulated porewater exchange (5.1 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), organic matter remineralization (6.2 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), aerobic respiration (2.4 × in summer, 2.1 × in fall), alkalinity release (4.7 × in summer, 4.0 × in fall), nutrient regeneration, and iron cycling. The effects of lugworm activity on net sediment-water fluxes were similar but more pronounced in summer than in fall. Alkalinity release in fall was entirely driven by metabolic carbonate dissolution, while this process explained between 22 and 69% of total alkalinity production in summer, indicating the importance of other processes in this season. By enhancing organic matter remineralization and the reoxidation of reduced metabolites by the sediment microbial community, lugworm activity stimulated the production of dissolved inorganic carbon and metabolic acidity, which in turn enhanced metabolic CaCO3 dissolution efficiency. In summer, evidence of microbial long distance electron transport (LDET) was observed in defaunated sediment. Thus, alkalinity production by net carbonate dissolution was likely supplemented by anaerobic respiration and LDET in summer.

  3. Studies on the best alkaline electrolyte for aluminium/air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapali, V.; Venkatakrishna Iyer, S.; Balaramachandran, V.; Sarangapani, K. B.; Ganesan, M.; Anbu Kulandainathan, M.; Sheik Mideen, A.

    Two types of alkaline electrolyte, based on 4 M NaOH have been developed for use in aluminium/air cells or batteries. They contain either alkaline citrate or alkaline citrate cum stannate as an additive to suppress the self-corrosion of aluminium without any deleterious effects on the efficient functioning of aluminium anode at a high negative potential. The alkaline citrate cum stannate solution has been adjudged the best electrolyte in terms of electrochemical characteristics and electrolyte management. Hence, results pertaining to the use of alkaline citrate cum stannate are presented in this paper. An aluminium/air battery with this electrolyte can be used safely and effectively at ambient temperature. An added advantage is the employment of 99.8% pure aluminium for the preparation of alloy anodes. This is expected to reduce the cost of aluminium/air batteries. The best anode based on 99.8% pure aluminium is a quaternary alloy containing lead, gallium and indium.

  4. Polyvinyl alcohol membranes as alkaline battery separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O.; Manzo, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Polyvinly alcohol (PVA) cross-linked with aldehyde reagents yields membranes that demonstrate properties that make them suitable for use as alkaline battery separators. Film properties can be controlled by the choice of cross-linker, cross-link density and the method of cross-linking. Three methods of cross-linking and their effects on film properties are discussed. Film properties can also be modified by using a copolymer of vinyl alcohol and acrylic acid as the base for the separator and cross-linking it similarly to the PVA. Fillers can be incorporated into the films to further modify film properties. Results of separator screening tests and cell tests for several variations of PBA films are discussed.

  5. Alkaline Phosphatase, Soluble Extracellular Adenine Nucleotides, and Adenosine Production after Infant Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Jesse A.; Urban, Tracy; Tong, Suhong; Twite, Mark; Woodruff, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Decreased alkaline phosphatase activity after infant cardiac surgery is associated with increased post-operative cardiovascular support requirements. In adults undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, alkaline phosphatase infusion may reduce inflammation. Mechanisms underlying these effects have not been explored but may include decreased conversion of extracellular adenine nucleotides to adenosine. Objectives 1) Evaluate the association between alkaline phosphatase activity and serum conversion of adenosine monophosphate to adenosine after infant cardiac surgery; 2) assess if inhibition/supplementation of serum alkaline phosphatase modulates this conversion. Methods and Research Pre/post-bypass serum samples were obtained from 75 infants <4 months of age. Serum conversion of 13C5-adenosine monophosphate to 13C5-adenosine was assessed with/without selective inhibition of alkaline phosphatase and CD73. Low and high concentration 13C5-adenosine monophosphate (simulating normal/stress concentrations) were used. Effects of alkaline phosphatase supplementation on adenosine monophosphate clearance were also assessed. Changes in serum alkaline phosphatase activity were strongly correlated with changes in 13C5-adenosine production with or without CD73 inhibition (r = 0.83; p<0.0001). Serum with low alkaline phosphatase activity (≤80 U/L) generated significantly less 13C5-adenosine, particularly in the presence of high concentration 13C5-adenosine monophosphate (10.4μmol/L vs 12.9μmol/L; p = 0.0004). Inhibition of alkaline phosphatase led to a marked decrease in 13C5-adenosine production (11.9μmol/L vs 2.7μmol/L; p<0.0001). Supplementation with physiologic dose human tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase or high dose bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase doubled 13C5-adenosine monophosphate conversion to 13C5-adenosine (p<0.0001). Conclusions Alkaline phosphatase represents the primary serum ectonucleotidase after infant cardiac surgery and low post

  6. Alkaline pH sensor molecules.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichiro N

    2015-11-01

    Animals can survive only within a narrow pH range. This requires continual monitoring of environmental and body-fluid pH. Although a variety of acidic pH sensor molecules have been reported, alkaline pH sensor function is not well understood. This Review describes neuronal alkaline pH sensors, grouped according to whether they monitor extracellular or intracellular alkaline pH. Extracellular sensors include the receptor-type guanylyl cyclase, the insulin receptor-related receptor, ligand-gated Cl- channels, connexin hemichannels, two-pore-domain K+ channels, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Intracellular sensors include TRP channels and gap junction channels. Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying alkaline pH sensing is crucial for understanding how animals respond to environmental alkaline pH and how body-fluid pH is maintained within a narrow range.

  7. Evaluation of the Combined Effect of 2ME2 and 60Co on the Inducement of DNA Damage by IUdR in a Spheroid Model of the U87MG Glioblastoma Cancer Cell Line Using Alkaline Comet Assay

    PubMed Central

    Khoei, Samideh; Delfan, Sara; Neshasteh-Riz, Ali; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we investigated the combined effect of 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2) and 60Co on the cytogenetic damage of iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) in the spheroid model of U87MG glioblastoma cancer cell lines by alkaline comet assay. Materials and Methods: U87MG cells were cultured as spheroids with diameters of 350 µm. As control, the spheroids of one plate were not treated. Other cultures were pretreated with 2ME2 (250 µM) for one volume doubling time (1 VDT). After this time, the subsequent treatments were performed according to the following groups: Vehicle (this sample was not treated in the 2nd VDT) Treated with 2ME2 (250 µM) for 1 VDT Treated simultaneously with 2ME2 (250 µM) and IUdR (1 µM) for 1 VDT Treated with 2ME2 (250 µM) for 1 VDT then irradiated with 60Co (2 Gy) Treated simultaneously with 2ME2 (250 µM) and IUdR (1 µM) for 1 VDT then irradiated with 60Co (2 Gy) Then the DNA damage was evaluated using the alkaline comet assay method. Results: The results showed that 2ME2 in combination with gamma irradiation of 60Co significantly (p<0.001) increased the DNA damage by IUdR as compared to the control group. Thus the combination of these two agents increased the cytogenetic effects of IUdR in the spheroid culture model of U87MG glioblastoma cell lines. Conclusion: By inhibiting the HIF-1α protein and preventing the G0 phase arrest, 2ME2 causes an increased progression into S phase and increases the IUdR absorption. Then the DNA damage in the spheroid cells increases as the uptake of IUdR is increased. These results suggest that the combined use of 2ME2 and 60Co can increase the radiosensitization effect of IUdR. PMID:23508289

  8. Screening of CD96 and ASXL1 in 11 patients with Opitz C or Bohring-Opitz syndromes.

    PubMed

    Urreizti, Roser; Roca-Ayats, Neus; Trepat, Judith; Garcia-Garcia, Francisco; Aleman, Alejandro; Orteschi, Daniela; Marangi, Giuseppe; Neri, Giovanni; Opitz, John M; Dopazo, Joaquin; Cormand, Bru; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Balcells, Susana; Grinberg, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Opitz C trigonocephaly (or Opitz C syndrome, OTCS) and Bohring-Opitz syndrome (BOS or C-like syndrome) are two rare genetic disorders with phenotypic overlap. The genetic causes of these diseases are not understood. However, two genes have been associated with OTCS or BOS with dominantly inherited de novo mutations. Whereas CD96 has been related to OTCS (one case) and to BOS (one case), ASXL1 has been related to BOS only (several cases). In this study we analyze CD96 and ASXL1 in a group of 11 affected individuals, including 2 sibs, 10 of them were diagnosed with OTCS, and one had a BOS phenotype. Exome sequences were available on six patients with OTCS and three parent pairs. Thus, we could analyze the CD96 and ASXL1 sequences in these patients bioinformatically. Sanger sequencing of all exons of CD96 and ASXL1 was carried out in the remaining patients. Detailed scrutiny of the sequences and assessment of variants allowed us to exclude putative pathogenic and private mutations in all but one of the patients. In this patient (with BOS) we identified a de novo mutation in ASXL1 (c.2100dupT). By nature and location within the gene, this mutation resembles those previously described in other BOS patients and we conclude that it may be responsible for the condition. Our results indicate that in 10 of 11, the disease (OTCS or BOS) cannot be explained by small changes in CD96 or ASXL1. However, the cohort is too small to make generalizations about the genetic etiology of these diseases.

  9. Alkaline-resistance model of subtilisin ALP I, a novel alkaline subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Maeda, H; Mizutani, O; Yamagata, Y; Ichishima, E; Nakajima, T

    2001-05-01

    The alkaline-resistance mechanism of the alkaline-stable enzymes is not yet known. To clarify the mechanism of alkaline-resistance of alkaline subtilisin, structural changes of two typical subtilisins, subtilisin ALP I (ALP I) and subtilisin Sendai (Sendai), were studied by means of physicochemical methods. Subtilisin NAT (NAT), which exhibits no alkaline resistance, was examined as a control. ALP I gradually lost its activity, accompanied by protein degradation, but, on the contrary, Sendai was stable under alkaline conditions. CD spectral measurements at neutral and alkaline pH indicated no apparent differences between ALP I and Sendai. A significant difference was observed on measurement of fluorescence emission spectra of the tryptophan residues of ALP I that were exposed on the enzyme surface. The fluorescence intensity of ALP I was greatly reduced under alkaline conditions; moreover, the reduction was reversed when alkaline-treated ALP I was neutralized. The fluorescence spectrum of Sendai remained unchanged. The enzymatic and optical activities of NAT were lost at high pH, indicating a lack of functional and structural stability in an alkaline environment. Judging from these results, the alkaline resistance is closely related to the surface structure of the enzyme molecule.

  10. Bactericidal and virucidal mechanisms in the alkaline disinfection of compost using calcium lime and ash.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, Nowaki; Tezuka, Rui; Kazama, Shinobu; Otaki, Masahiro; Ushijima, Ken; Ito, Ryusei; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke; Funamizu, Naoyuki

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, the bactericidal and virucidal mechanisms in the alkaline disinfection of compost with calcium lime and ash were investigated. Two indicator microorganisms, Escherichia coli and MS2 coliphage, were used as surrogates for enteric pathogens. The alkaline-treated compost with calcium oxide (CaO) or ash resulted primarily in damage to the outer membrane and enzyme activities of E. coli. The alkaline treatment of compost also led to the infectivity loss of the coliphage because of the partial capsid damage and RNA exteriorization due to a raised pH, which is proportional to the amount of alkaline agents added. These results indicate that the alkaline treatment of compost using calcium oxide and ash is effective and can contribute to the safe usage of compost from a mixing type dry toilet. PMID:27562698

  11. The water barrier function of the skin in relation to the water content of stratum corneum, pH and skin lipids. The effect of alkaline soap and syndet on dry skin in elderly, non-atopic patients.

    PubMed

    Thune, P; Nilsen, T; Hanstad, I K; Gustavsen, T; Lövig Dahl, H

    1988-01-01

    Clinical dryness of the skin is a common problem among elderly, dermatological patients. In the present investigation, hydration, surface lipids, skin pH and water barrier function as expressed by the transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were studied in both dry and normal skin. Using these parameters, a comparison of the local effects of acid and alkaline cleansing products was made. In non-atopic elderly patients with dry skin, the TEWL values were lower than in the younger control group but higher than in the older controls. Following one week's topical therapy, the TEWL values in the patient group decreased further and approached the lower values of the older control group. At the same time the skin hydration values increased, indicating a beneficial effect on the skin barrier. An inverse relationship was demonstrated between TEWL and skin hydration. The study indicates that high TEWL values are frequently correlated with high pH, low hydration of the stratum corneum and reduced skin surface lipid content. Despite the intensive use of an acid syndet and lotion, the pH-readings increased but were still within the 'confidence limits' of the control groups.

  12. [Granulocyte alkaline phosphatase--a biomarker of chronic benzene exposure].

    PubMed

    Khristeva, V; Meshkov, T

    1994-01-01

    In tracing the cellular population status in the peripheral blood of workers, exposed to benzene, was included and cytochemical determination of the alkaline phosphatase activity in leucocytes. This enzyme is accepted as marker of the neutrophilic granulocytes, as maturation of the cells and their antibacterial activity are parallel to the cytochemical activity of the enzyme. 78 workers from the coke-chemical production from state firm "Kremikovtsi" and 41 workers from the production "Benzene" and "Isopropylbenzene"--Oil Chemical Plant, Burgas are included. The benzene concentrations in the air of the working places in all productions are in the range of 5 to 50 mg/m3. For cytochemical determination of the alkaline phosphatase activity is used the method of L. Kaplow and phosphatase index was calculated. It was established that in 98.4% of all examined the alkaline phosphatase activity is inhibited to different rate, as from 46.5% [61 workers] it is zero. In considerably lower percentage of workers were established and other deviations: leucocytosis or leucopenia, neutropenia, increased percent of band neutrophils and toxic granules. The results of the investigation of the granulocyte population show that from all indices, the activity of granulocyte alkaline phosphatase demonstrates most convincing the early myelotoxic effect of benzene.

  13. Alkaline nanoparticle coatings improve resin bonding of 10-methacryloyloxydecyldihydrogenphosphate-conditioned zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Mengke; Lu, Zhicen; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Huaiqin; Xie, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Creating an alkaline environment prior to 10-methacryloyloxydecyldihydrogenphosphate (MDP) conditioning improves the resin bonding of zirconia. The present study evaluated the effects of four alkaline coatings with different water solubilities and pH values on resin bonding of MDP-conditioned zirconia. Two alkaline nanoparticle coatings were studied in particular. Thermodynamics calculations were performed to evaluate the strengths of MDP-tetragonal phase zirconia chemical bonds at different pH values. Zirconia surfaces with and without alkaline coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM)/energy dispersive spectrometer and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; alkaline coatings included NaOH, Ca(OH)2, nano-MgO, and nano-Zr(OH)4. A shear bond strength (SBS) test was performed to evaluate the effects of the four alkaline coatings on bonding; the alkaline coatings were applied to the surfaces prior to conditioning the zirconia with MDP-containing primers. Gibbs free energies of the MDP-tetragonal zirconia crystal model coordination reaction in different pH environments were −583.892 (NaOH), −569.048 [Ca(OH)2], −547.393 (MgO), and −530.279 kJ/mol [Zr(OH)4]. Thermodynamic calculations indicated that the alkaline coatings improved bonding in the following order: NaOH > Ca(OH)2 > MgO > Zr(OH)4. Statistical analysis of SBS tests showed a different result. SBSs were significantly different in groups that had different alkaline coatings, but it was not influenced by different primers. All four alkaline coatings increased SBS compared to control groups. Of the four coatings, nano-Zr(OH)4 and -MgO showed higher SBS. Therefore, preparing nano-Zr(OH)4 or -MgO coatings prior to conditioning with MDP-containing primers may potentially improve resin bonding of zirconia in the clinic. PMID:27785013

  14. Decrease of time for pathogen inactivation in alkaline disinfection systems using pressure.

    PubMed

    Fitzmorris, Kari B; Reimers, Robert S; Oleszkiewicz, Jan A; Little, M Dale

    2007-04-01

    From field studies conducted by Tulane University (New Orleans, Louisiana), efficiency of advanced alkaline disinfection in closed systems was found to depend on ammonia concentration, pH, exposure time, temperature, total solids content, pretreatment storage time, and mixing effectiveness. In this study of a closed alkaline system, an additional pathogen stressor pressure was tested. The effect of the alkaline dosing has been assessed for dewatered raw and aerobically and anaerobically digested municipal sludge cake that produce un-ionized ammonia at concentrations of 0.05 to 2% on a dry-weight basis. Inactivation of Ascaris suum eggs increased from 50 to 99% as the temperature was increased from 40 to 55 degrees C, thus achieving Class A levels. The systems studied were compared with an alkaline process operated under open conditions, which limited the concentrations of ammonia available because of Henry's Law. Under a closed pressurized system, the effect of un-ionized ammonia was greatly increased, and the resulting time required for inactivation was reduced from hours or days to minutes. In the next few years, it is expected that alkaline disinfection of biosolids will be optimized in relation to the factors stated above, at much lower doses of the alkaline agents. The closed-system alkaline processes that will be developed will be more energy-efficient, cost-effective, and have full control of potential odorous emissions.

  15. Reduction of persulfate ion by carbon monoxide in alkaline medium: the effect of stoichiometric and astoichiometric components on the reaction Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Abilov, M.T.; Golodov, V.A.

    1986-06-01

    The effect of the concentration of oxidant, cadalyst, and various ligands on the kinetics of the oxidation of CO have been studied kinetically, potentiometrically, and spectrometrically, and a general mechanism for the process is proposed.

  16. Influence of different acid and alkaline cleaning agents on the effects of irrigation of synthetic dairy factory effluent on soil quality, ryegrass growth and nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y-Y; Haynes, R J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of replacement of phosphoric acid with nitric or acetic acid, and replacement of NaOH with KOH, as cleaning agents in dairy factories, on the effects that irrigation of dairy factory effluent (DFE) has on the soil-plant system. A 16-week greenhouse study was carried out in which the effects of addition of synthetic dairy factory effluent containing (a) milk residues alone or milk residues plus (b) H(3)PO(4)/NaOH, (c) H(3)PO(4)/HNO(3)/NaOH or (d) CH(3)COOH/KOH, on soil's chemical, physical and microbial properties and perennial ryegrass growth and nutrient uptake were investigated. The cumulative effect of DFE addition was to increase exchangeable Na, K, Ca, Mg, exchangeable sodium percentage, microbial biomass C and N and basal respiration in the soil. Dry matter yields of ryegrass were increased by additions of DFE other than that containing CH(3)COOH. Plant uptake of P, Ca and Mg was in the same order as their inputs in DFE but for Na; inputs were an order of magnitude greater than plant uptake. Replacement of NaOH by KOH resulted in increased accumulation of exchangeable K. The effects of added NaOH and KOH on promoting breakdown of soil aggregates during wet sieving (and formation of a < 0.25 mm size class) were similar. Replacement of H(2)PO(4) by HNO(3) is a viable but CH(3)COOH appears to have detrimental effects on plant growth. Replacement of NaOH by KOH lowers the likelihood of phytotoxic effects of Na, but K and Na have similar effects on disaggregation. PMID:22707204

  17. Influence of different acid and alkaline cleaning agents on the effects of irrigation of synthetic dairy factory effluent on soil quality, ryegrass growth and nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y-Y; Haynes, R J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of replacement of phosphoric acid with nitric or acetic acid, and replacement of NaOH with KOH, as cleaning agents in dairy factories, on the effects that irrigation of dairy factory effluent (DFE) has on the soil-plant system. A 16-week greenhouse study was carried out in which the effects of addition of synthetic dairy factory effluent containing (a) milk residues alone or milk residues plus (b) H(3)PO(4)/NaOH, (c) H(3)PO(4)/HNO(3)/NaOH or (d) CH(3)COOH/KOH, on soil's chemical, physical and microbial properties and perennial ryegrass growth and nutrient uptake were investigated. The cumulative effect of DFE addition was to increase exchangeable Na, K, Ca, Mg, exchangeable sodium percentage, microbial biomass C and N and basal respiration in the soil. Dry matter yields of ryegrass were increased by additions of DFE other than that containing CH(3)COOH. Plant uptake of P, Ca and Mg was in the same order as their inputs in DFE but for Na; inputs were an order of magnitude greater than plant uptake. Replacement of NaOH by KOH resulted in increased accumulation of exchangeable K. The effects of added NaOH and KOH on promoting breakdown of soil aggregates during wet sieving (and formation of a < 0.25 mm size class) were similar. Replacement of H(2)PO(4) by HNO(3) is a viable but CH(3)COOH appears to have detrimental effects on plant growth. Replacement of NaOH by KOH lowers the likelihood of phytotoxic effects of Na, but K and Na have similar effects on disaggregation.

  18. Fragmentation of molecules sliding along surfaces in the speed range above thermal and below Bohr velocity.

    PubMed

    Jungclas, H; Wieghaus, A; Schmidt, L; Popova, A M; Komarov, V V

    1999-06-01

    A theoretical model and experimental time-of-flight mass spectrometric data for the fragmentation of molecules grazing along surfaces at velocities v = 10(5)-10(6) cm/s are presented. The effect of enhanced surface-induced dissociation at grazing incidence (GI-SID) is shown for hexadecylpyridine ions. The velocity dependence of the GI-SID fragmentation probability is studied in experiments with adduct ions of cyclodextrin derivatives. Surfaces used in the various collision experiments are aluminum oxide, gold, and a liquid film of perfluorinated polyether. In the theoretical model of the GI-SID effect we consider polyatomic molecules with substructures consisting of chains of identical biatomic dipoles. Because of the interaction with the periodic Coulomb field of the surface, collective vibrational excitations (excimols) are induced in these chains. Energy accumulation of several excimols and a subsequent energy transfer to a trap bond can induce its dissociation. An analytical expression for the velocity dependent GI-SID fragmentation probability is given, which is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    1995-01-01

    A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

  20. Inorganic-organic separators for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible separator is reported for use between the electrodes of Ni-Cd and Ni-Zn batteries using alkaline electrolytes. The separator was made by coating a porous substrate with a battery separator composition. The coating material included a rubber-based resin copolymer, a plasticizer and inorganic and organic fillers which comprised 55% by volume or less of the coating as finally dried. One or more of the filler materials, whether organic or inorganic, is preferably active with the alkaline electrolyte to produce pores in the separator coating. The plasticizer was an organic material which is hydrolyzed by the alkaline electrolyte to improve conductivity of the separator coating.

  1. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  2. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  3. Investigation of Bohr Hamiltonian in the presence of time-dependent Manning-Rosen, harmonic oscillator and double ring shaped potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhani, Hadi; Hassanabadi, Hassan

    2016-08-01

    This paper contains study of Bohr Hamiltonian considering time-dependent form of two important and famous nuclear potentials and harmonic oscillator. Dependence on time in interactions is considered in general form. In order to investigate this system, a powerful mathematical method has been employed, so-called Lewis-Riesenfeld dynamical invariant method. Appropriate dynamical invariant for considered system has been constructed. Then its eigen functions and the wave function are derived. At the end, we discussed about physical meaning of the results.

  4. Analysis of Cocoa Proanthocyanidins Using Reversed Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Electrochemical Detection: Application to Studies on the Effect of Alkaline Processing.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Todd H; Smithson, Andrew T; Neilson, Andrew P; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C; Lambert, Joshua D

    2015-07-01

    Flavan-3-ols and proanthocyanidins play a key role in the health beneficial effects of cocoa. Here, we developed a new reversed phased high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) method for the analysis of flavan-3-ols and proanthocyanidins of degree of polymerization (DP) 2-7. We used this method to examine the effect of alkalization on polyphenol composition of cocoa powder. Treatment of cocoa powder with NaOH (final pH 8.0) at 92 °C for up to 1 h increased catechin content by 40%, but reduced epicatechin and proanthocyanidins by 23-66%. Proanthocyanidin loss could be modeled using a two-phase exponential decay model (R(2) > 0.7 for epicatchin and proanthocyanidins of odd DP). Alkalization resulted in a significant color change and 20% loss of total polyphenols. The present work demonstrates the first use of HPLC-ECD for the detection of proanthocyanidins up to DP 7 and provides an initial predictive model for the effect of alkali treatment on cocoa polyphenols.

  5. Analysis of Cocoa Proanthocyanidins Using Reversed Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Electrochemical Detection: Application to Studies on the Effect of Alkaline Processing.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Todd H; Smithson, Andrew T; Neilson, Andrew P; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C; Lambert, Joshua D

    2015-07-01

    Flavan-3-ols and proanthocyanidins play a key role in the health beneficial effects of cocoa. Here, we developed a new reversed phased high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) method for the analysis of flavan-3-ols and proanthocyanidins of degree of polymerization (DP) 2-7. We used this method to examine the effect of alkalization on polyphenol composition of cocoa powder. Treatment of cocoa powder with NaOH (final pH 8.0) at 92 °C for up to 1 h increased catechin content by 40%, but reduced epicatechin and proanthocyanidins by 23-66%. Proanthocyanidin loss could be modeled using a two-phase exponential decay model (R(2) > 0.7 for epicatchin and proanthocyanidins of odd DP). Alkalization resulted in a significant color change and 20% loss of total polyphenols. The present work demonstrates the first use of HPLC-ECD for the detection of proanthocyanidins up to DP 7 and provides an initial predictive model for the effect of alkali treatment on cocoa polyphenols. PMID:26042917

  6. Composite seal reduces alkaline battery leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clatterbuck, C. H.; Plitt, K. F.

    1965-01-01

    Composite seal consisting of rubber or plastic washers and a metal washer reduces alkaline battery leakage. Adhesive is applied to each washer interface, and the washers are held together mechanically.

  7. Ratiometric electrochemical detection of alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Goggins, Sean; Naz, Christophe; Marsh, Barrie J; Frost, Christopher G

    2015-01-11

    A novel ferrocene-derived substrate for the ratiometric electrochemical detection of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was designed and synthesised. It was demonstrated to be an excellent electrochemical substrate for the ALP-labelled enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

  8. Seasonal patterns of alkalinity in the San Francisco Bay estuarine system, California, during 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schemel, L.E.

    1984-01-01

    Salinity and alkalinity were measured in the near-surface waters of San Francisco Bay estuarine system at two-week intervals during 1980. Results are presented in figures and as numerical values, and the analytical methods are detailed. The transport of alkalinity to the Bay from the delta during 1980 was 3.8 x 10 to Ohe 10th power equivalents; this estimate is based on the freshwater alkalinity concentrations predicted by the north San Francisco Bay salinity-alkalinity distributions. North San Francisco Bay distributions are primarily the result of conservative mixing of freshwater from the Delta with Pacific Ocean water. Nonlinear distributions are the consequence of alkalinity variations in the freshwater rather than the effects of in-estuary processes or sources. Seasonal inflow of agricultural waste water is a major cause of freshwater alkalinity variations. South San Francisco Bay salinity-alkalinity distributions show the effects of variations in Delta outflow rate, local streams, and municipal waste-water inflows. (USGS)

  9. Development of flexible secondary alkaline battery with carbon nanotube enhanced electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiqian; Mitra, Somenath

    2014-11-01

    We present the development of flexible secondary alkaline battery with rechargeability similar to that of conventional secondary alkaline batteries. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were added to both electrodes to reduce internal resistance, and a cathode containing carbon black and purified MWCNTs was found to be most effective. A polyvinyl alcohol-poly (acrylic acid) copolymer separator served the dual functions of electrolyte storage and enhancing flexibility. Additives to the anode and cathode were effective in reducing capacity fades and improving rechargeability.

  10. Evaluation of the alkaline electrolysis of zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Meisenhelder, J.H.; Brown, A.P.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1981-05-01

    The alkaline leach and electrolysis process for zinc production is compared to the conventional acid-sulfate process in terms of both energy saving and technical merit. In addition, the potential for industrial application of the alkaline process is discussed on the basis of present market conditions, possible future zinc market scenarios, and the probability of increased secondary zinc recovery. In primary zinc production, the energy-saving potential for the alkaline process was estimated to be greater than 10%, even when significantly larger electrolysis current densities than those required for the sulfate process are used. The principal technical advantages of the alkaline process are that it can handle low-grade, high-iron-content or oxidized ores (like most of those found in the US) in a more cost- and energy-efficient manner than can the sulfate process. Additionally, in the electrowinning operation, the alkaline process should be technically superior because a dendritic or sponge deposit is formed that is amenable to automated collection without interruption of the electrolysis. Also, use of the higher current densities would result in significant capital cost reductions. Alkaline-based electrolytic recovery processes were considered for the recycling of zinc from smelter baghouse dusts and from the potential source of nickel/zinc electric-vehicle batteries. In all comparisons, an alkaline process was shown to be technically superior and, particularly for the baghouse dusts, energetically and economically superior to alternatively proposed recovery methods based on sulfate electrolysis. It is concluded that the alkaline zinc method is an important alternative technology to the conventional acid zinc process. (WHK)

  11. Toxicity of alkalinity to Hyalella azteca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasier, P.J.; Winger, P.V.; Reinert, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    Toxicity testing and chemical analyses of sediment pore water have been suggested for use in sediment quality assessments and sediment toxicity identification evaluations. However, caution should be exercised in interpreting pore-water chemistry and toxicity due to inherent chemical characteristics and confounding relationships. High concentrations of alkalinity, which are typical of sediment pore waters from many regions, have been shown to be toxic to test animals. A series of tests were conducted to assess the significance of elevated alkalinity concentrations to Hyalella azteca, an amphipod commonly used for sediment and pore-water toxicity testing. Toxicity tests with 14-d old and 7-d old animals were conducted in serial dilutions of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solutions producing alkalinities ranging between 250 to 2000 mg/L as CaCO3. A sodium chloride (NaCl) toxicity test was also conducted to verify that toxicity was due to bicarbonate and not sodium. Alkalinity was toxic at concentrations frequently encountered in sediment pore water. There was also a significant difference in the toxicity of alkalinity between 14-d old and 7-d old animals. The average 96-h LC50 for alkalinity was 1212 mg/L (as CaCO3) for 14-d old animals and 662 mg/L for the younger animals. Sodium was not toxic at levels present in the NaHCO3 toxicity tests. Alkalinity should be routinely measured in pore-water toxicity tests, and interpretation of toxicity should consider alkalinity concentration and test-organism tolerance.

  12. Technetium recovery from high alkaline solution

    DOEpatents

    Nash, Charles A.

    2016-07-12

    Disclosed are methods for recovering technetium from a highly alkaline solution. The highly alkaline solution can be a liquid waste solution from a nuclear waste processing system. Methods can include combining the solution with a reductant capable of reducing technetium at the high pH of the solution and adding to or forming in the solution an adsorbent capable of adsorbing the precipitated technetium at the high pH of the solution.

  13. Alkaline tolerant dextranase from streptomyces anulatus

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Stephen R.; Adney, William S.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    A process for production of an alkaline tolerant dextranase enzyme comprises culturing a dextran-producing microorganism Streptomyces anulatus having accession no. ATCC PTA-3866 to produce an alkaline tolerant dextranase, Dex 1 wherein the protein in said enzyme is characterized by a MW of 63.3 kDa and Dex 2 wherein its protein is characterized by a MW of 81.8 kDa.

  14. Performed surfactant-optimized aqueous alkaline flood

    SciTech Connect

    Thigpen, D.R.; Lawson, J.B.; Nelson, R.C.

    1991-11-26

    This paper describes improvement in a process for recovering oil from an acidic oil reservoir by injecting an aqueous alkaline solution comprising water, sodium chloride, and alkaline material for reacting with the reservoir oil forming a petroleum acid soap to form an in-situ surfactant system. The improvement comprises: selecting a preformed cosurfactant which is soluble in both the aqueous solution and the reservoir oil and has a solubility ratio which is grater than the solubility ratio of the petroleum acid soap where the solubility ratio is the ratio of solubility in the aqueous alkaline solution to the solubility in the reservoir oil; combining with the alkaline solution an amount of the preformed cosurfactant which will result in the in-situ surfacant system having a salinity about equal to a salinity which results in minimal interfacial tension between the oil in the reservoir and the in-situ surfactant system at reservoir temperature, wherein the amount of the preformed cosurfactant is about 0.3 percent by weight in the aqueous alkaline solution; and injecting the cosurfactant-aqueous alkaline solution mixture into the reservoir to displace oil toward a fluid production location.

  15. Effects of Acidification and Alkalinization on the Lipid Emulsion-Mediated Reversal of Toxic Dose Levobupivacaine-Induced Vasodilation in the Isolated Rat Aorta.

    PubMed

    Ok, Seong-Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Yu, Jongsun; Lee, Youngju; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Lim, Dong Hoon; Hwang, Yeran; Kim, Yeon A; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this in vitro study was to examine the effects of pre-acidification and pre-akalinization on the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of toxic dose levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in isolated rat aorta. Isolated aortic rings with and without the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) were exposed to four types of Krebs solution (pH 7.0, 7.2, 7.4, and 7.6), followed by the addition of 60 mM potassium chloride. When the toxic dose of levobupivacaine (3 × 10(-4) M) produced a stable and sustained vasodilation in the isolated aortic rings that were precontracted with 60 mM potassium chloride, increasing lipid emulsion concentrations (SMOFlipid(®): 0.24, 0.48, 0.95 and 1.39%) were added to generate concentration-response curves. The effects of mild pre-acidification alone and mild pre-acidification in combination with a lipid emulsion on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells were investigated by Western blotting. Mild pre-acidification caused by the pH 7.2 Krebs solution enhanced the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in isolated endothelium-intact aortic rings, whereas mild pre-acidification caused by the pH 7.2 Krebs solution did not significantly alter the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of the levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in isolated endothelium-denuded aortic rings or endothelium-intact aortic rings with L-NAME. A lipid emulsion attenuated the increased eNOS phosphorylation induced by the pH 7.2 Krebs solution. Taken together, these results suggest that mild pre-acidification enhances the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of toxic dose levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in the endothelium-intact aorta via the inhibition of nitric oxide.

  16. Effects of Acidification and Alkalinization on the Lipid Emulsion-Mediated Reversal of Toxic Dose Levobupivacaine-Induced Vasodilation in the Isolated Rat Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Ok, Seong-Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Yu, Jongsun; Lee, Youngju; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Lim, Dong Hoon; Hwang, Yeran; Kim, Yeon A; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this in vitro study was to examine the effects of pre-acidification and pre-akalinization on the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of toxic dose levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in isolated rat aorta. Isolated aortic rings with and without the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) were exposed to four types of Krebs solution (pH 7.0, 7.2, 7.4, and 7.6), followed by the addition of 60 mM potassium chloride. When the toxic dose of levobupivacaine (3 × 10-4 M) produced a stable and sustained vasodilation in the isolated aortic rings that were precontracted with 60 mM potassium chloride, increasing lipid emulsion concentrations (SMOFlipid®: 0.24, 0.48, 0.95 and 1.39%) were added to generate concentration-response curves. The effects of mild pre-acidification alone and mild pre-acidification in combination with a lipid emulsion on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells were investigated by Western blotting. Mild pre-acidification caused by the pH 7.2 Krebs solution enhanced the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in isolated endothelium-intact aortic rings, whereas mild pre-acidification caused by the pH 7.2 Krebs solution did not significantly alter the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of the levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in isolated endothelium-denuded aortic rings or endothelium-intact aortic rings with L-NAME. A lipid emulsion attenuated the increased eNOS phosphorylation induced by the pH 7.2 Krebs solution. Taken together, these results suggest that mild pre-acidification enhances the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of toxic dose levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in the endothelium-intact aorta via the inhibition of nitric oxide. PMID:26917987

  17. Effect of the alkaline cation size on the conductivity in gel polymer electrolytes and their influence on photo electrochemical solar cells.

    PubMed

    Bandara, T M W J; Fernando, H D N S; Furlani, M; Albinsson, I; Dissanayake, M A K L; Ratnasekera, J L; Mellander, B-E

    2016-04-28

    The nature and concentration of cationic species in the electrolyte exert a profound influence on the efficiency of nanocrystalline dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). A series of DSSCs based on gel electrolytes containing five alkali iodide salts (LiI, NaI, KI, RbI and CsI) and polyacrylonitrile with plasticizers were fabricated and studied, in order to investigate the dependence of solar cell performance on the cation size. The ionic conductivity of electrolytes with relatively large cations, K(+), Rb(+) and Cs(+), was higher and essentially constant, while for the electrolytes containing the two smaller cations, Na(+) and Li(+), the conductivity values were lower. The temperature dependence of conductivity in this series appears to follow the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher equation. The sample containing the smallest cation shows the lowest conductivity and the highest activation energy of ∼36.5 meV, while K(+), Rb(+) and Cs(+) containing samples show an activation energy of ∼30.5 meV. DSSCs based on the gel electrolyte and a TiO2 double layer with the N719 dye exhibited an enhancement in the open circuit voltage with increasing cation size. This can be attributed to the decrease in the recombination rate of electrons and to the conduction band shift resulting from cation adsorption by TiO2. The maximum efficiency value, 3.48%, was obtained for the CsI containing cell. The efficiencies shown in this study are lower compared to values reported in the literature, and this can be attributed to the use of a single salt and the absence of other additives, since the focus of the present study was to analyze the cation effect. The highest short circuit current density of 9.43 mA cm(-2) was shown by the RbI containing cell. The enhancement of the solar cell performance with increasing size of the cation is discussed in terms of the effect of the cations on the TiO2 anode and ion transport in the electrolyte. In liquid electrolyte based DSSCs, the short circuit current density

  18. An empirical study into the effect of long term storage (-36±2 °C) of electron-beamed ETFE on the properties of radiation-grafted alkaline anion-exchange membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizewski, Jamie Peter; Mudri, Nurul H.; Varcoe, John R.

    2013-08-01

    The application of alkaline anion-exchange membranes (AAEM) in solid alkaline fuel cells is growing in prominence mainly due to enhanced tolerance to carbon dioxide, compared to alkaline fuel cells containing aqueous electrolytes, and the potential for using non precious metal catalysts. Radiation grafting is a common methodology for the production of functional polymers and membranes. This statistical study examines the synthesis of radiation grafted AAEMs that are formed from electron beam irradiated poly(ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethylene), EB-ETFE. It is shown that EB-ETFE can be cold stored for at least 16 months and still be used to produce ionically conductive AAEMs. The limitations of routine measurements of properties, such as dimensional increases, ion-exchange capacity, water uptakes and ionic conductivities, are also highlighted.

  19. Effects of Alkali and Alkaline Earth Cocations on the Activity and Hydrothermal Stability of Cu/SSZ-13 NH3-SCR Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng; Wang, Yilin; Washton, Nancy M.; Kollar, Marton; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-10-13

    Using a three-step aqueous solution ion-exchange method, cocation modified Cu/SSZ-13 SCR catalysts were synthesized. These catalysts, in both fresh and hydrothermally aged forms, were characterized with several methods including temperature-programmed reduction by H2 (H2-TPR), temperature-programmed desorption of NH3 (NH3-TPD), and 27Al solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and diffuse reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopies. Their catalytic performance was probed using steady-state standard NH3-SCR. Characterization results indicate that cocations weaken interactions between Cu-ions and the CHA framework making them more readily reducible. By removing a portion of Brønsted acid sites, cocations also help to mitigate hydrolysis of the zeolite catalysts during hydrothermal aging as evidenced from 27Al NMR. Reaction tests show that certain cocations, especially Li+ and Na+, promote low-temperature SCR rates while others show much less pronounced effects. In terms of applications, our results indicate that introducing cocations can be a viable strategy to improve both low- and high-temperature performance of Cu/SSZ-13 SCR catalysts.

  20. The effects of acid and alkaline solutions on cut marks and on the structure of bone: An experimental study on porcine ribs.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Camici, Arianna; Sironi, Luca; Profumo, Antonella; Merli, Davide; Mazzarelli, Debora; Porta, Davide; Duday, Henri; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-11-01

    Among taphonomical modifications during decomposition processes, little is known about the action of high or low pH to human tissues and bones. Moreover, acid or basic solutions are seldom used to ease decomposition and wrecking of the body. In this study a total of 60 samples of porcine bones on which two cut marks were produced before the beginning of the experiment, were put in six different solutions with different pH (1, 3, 5, 9, 12, 14) and analyzed every five days over a period of 70 days. Surveys were carried out macroscopically, with stereomicroscopy and with light microscopy on thin sections. Only the specimens exposed to extremely acid (<1) or basic (>12) pH showed evident modifications of the bone's structure, as witnessed by the analyses with stereomicroscopy as well. Many samples showed a detachment of the periosteum; cut marks became soon unrecognizable with pH 14 but still detectable in all the other samples. The information gained from the present study can be of great help in detecting the exposure of human tissues to high or low environmental pH and in understanding the effects that these solutions can exert on human bones. PMID:26593998

  1. Novel alkaline earth silicate sealing glass for SOFC, Part I: the effect of nickel oxide on the thermal and mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Gow, Robert N.

    2007-06-01

    This is a two-part study of a novel Sr-Ca-Ni-Y-B silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). In this paper (Part I), the effect of NiO on glass forming, thermal, and mechanical properties was studied with two different approaches: glass making and composite glass. In the following paper (Part II), sealing and interfacial microstructure of candidate composite glass with 10v percent NiO will be addressed. In Part I, higher NiO content in the glass resulted in precipitation during the glass making process, and the sintered powder compacts of these glasses showed extensive macro- and micro-cracks. Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) showed large decrease for glass with higher NiO contents. On the other hand, glass-based composites showed no fracture even with NiO content as high as 15 percent. The CTE of the composite glass, which increased with increasing NiO content (consistent with the rule of mixtures prediction), could be adjusted to match the CTE of SOFC components. Phase characterization by XRD identified phases of YBO3 and NiO in the glass, which were likely responsible for the poor mechanical and thermal properties for the glass making approach.

  2. Raw agro-industrial orange peel waste as a low cost effective inducer for alkaline polygalacturonase production from Bacillus licheniformis SHG10.

    PubMed

    Embaby, Amira M; Masoud, Aliaa A; Marey, Heba S; Shaban, Nadia Z; Ghonaim, Tayssir M

    2014-01-01

    The current study underlines biotechnological valorization of the accumulated and the non-efficiently utilized agro-industrial orange peel waste to produce polygalacturonase (PGase), an industrially important enzyme with augmented demands in enzymes markets, from Bacillus licheniformis SHG10. Sequential statistical optimization of PGase production was performed through one variable at a time (OVAT) approach, Plackett-Burman (PB) and response surface methodology (RSM). The impact of introduction of six raw agro-industrial wastes (orange, lemon, banana, pomegranate, artichoke peel wastes and wheat bran) and other synthetic carbon sources separately into the fermentation broth on PGase productivity was studied through OVAT approach. Orange peel waste as sole raw carbon source in basal medium proved to be the best PGase inducer. It promoted PGase productivity with relative specific activity of 166% comparable with the effect imposed by synthetic citrus pectin as a reference inducer. Three key determinants (orange peel waste, pH of the production medium and incubation temperature) had RSM optimal levels of 1.76% (w/v), 8.0 and 37.8°C, respectively along with maximal PGase level (2.69 μg galacturonic acid. min(-1). mg(-1)) within 48 hrs. Moreover, SHG10 PGase exhibited activity over a wide range of pH (3-11) and an optimal activity at 50°C. Data greatly encourage pilot scale PGase production from B. licheniformis SHG10. PMID:25077057

  3. The effects of acid and alkaline solutions on cut marks and on the structure of bone: An experimental study on porcine ribs.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Camici, Arianna; Sironi, Luca; Profumo, Antonella; Merli, Davide; Mazzarelli, Debora; Porta, Davide; Duday, Henri; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-11-01

    Among taphonomical modifications during decomposition processes, little is known about the action of high or low pH to human tissues and bones. Moreover, acid or basic solutions are seldom used to ease decomposition and wrecking of the body. In this study a total of 60 samples of porcine bones on which two cut marks were produced before the beginning of the experiment, were put in six different solutions with different pH (1, 3, 5, 9, 12, 14) and analyzed every five days over a period of 70 days. Surveys were carried out macroscopically, with stereomicroscopy and with light microscopy on thin sections. Only the specimens exposed to extremely acid (<1) or basic (>12) pH showed evident modifications of the bone's structure, as witnessed by the analyses with stereomicroscopy as well. Many samples showed a detachment of the periosteum; cut marks became soon unrecognizable with pH 14 but still detectable in all the other samples. The information gained from the present study can be of great help in detecting the exposure of human tissues to high or low environmental pH and in understanding the effects that these solutions can exert on human bones.

  4. Effects of Fok-I polymorphism in vitamin D receptor gene on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and calcaneal quantitative ultrasound parameters in young adults.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Rieko; Kawamura, Yuka; Tsugawa, Naoko; Haraikawa, Mayu; Sogabe, Natsuko; Okano, Toshio; Hosoi, Takayuki; Goseki-Sone, Masae

    2015-01-01

    Several genes have been implicated as genetic determinants of osteoporosis. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is an intracellular hormone receptor that specifically binds to the biologically active form of vitamin D, 1-alpha, 25- dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1, 25(OH)2D], and mediates its effects. One of the most frequently studied single nucleotide polymorphisms is the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) Fok-I (rs2228570). The presence of a Fok-I site, designated f, allows protein translation to initiate from the first ATG. An allele lacking the site (ATG>ACG: designated F), initiates from a second ATG site. In the present study, we explored the effect of the VDR Fok-I genotype on associations among serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (ALP), 25- hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D], 1, 25(OH)2D, and the dietary nutrient intake in healthy young Japanese subjects (n=193). Dietary nutrient intakes were calculated based on 3-day food records before the day of blood examinations. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters at the right calcaneus (heel bone) were measured. The allele frequencies were 0.622 for the F allele and 0.378 for the f allele in all subjects. Grouped by the VDR genotype, a significant positive correlation between the levels of serum bone-specific ALP and 25(OH)D was observed in the FF-type (p=0.005), but not in the ff-type. In addition, there was a significant positive correlation between the level of serum 25(OH)D and osteo-sono assessment index (OSI) in the FF-type (p=0.008), but not in the ff-type. These results suggest that the level of circulating 25(OH)D is an important factor when assessing the VDR Fok-I polymorphism to prevent osteoporosis. PMID:26078251

  5. Effects of Fok-I polymorphism in vitamin D receptor gene on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and calcaneal quantitative ultrasound parameters in young adults.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Rieko; Kawamura, Yuka; Tsugawa, Naoko; Haraikawa, Mayu; Sogabe, Natsuko; Okano, Toshio; Hosoi, Takayuki; Goseki-Sone, Masae

    2015-01-01

    Several genes have been implicated as genetic determinants of osteoporosis. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is an intracellular hormone receptor that specifically binds to the biologically active form of vitamin D, 1-alpha, 25- dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1, 25(OH)2D], and mediates its effects. One of the most frequently studied single nucleotide polymorphisms is the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) Fok-I (rs2228570). The presence of a Fok-I site, designated f, allows protein translation to initiate from the first ATG. An allele lacking the site (ATG>ACG: designated F), initiates from a second ATG site. In the present study, we explored the effect of the VDR Fok-I genotype on associations among serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (ALP), 25- hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D], 1, 25(OH)2D, and the dietary nutrient intake in healthy young Japanese subjects (n=193). Dietary nutrient intakes were calculated based on 3-day food records before the day of blood examinations. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters at the right calcaneus (heel bone) were measured. The allele frequencies were 0.622 for the F allele and 0.378 for the f allele in all subjects. Grouped by the VDR genotype, a significant positive correlation between the levels of serum bone-specific ALP and 25(OH)D was observed in the FF-type (p=0.005), but not in the ff-type. In addition, there was a significant positive correlation between the level of serum 25(OH)D and osteo-sono assessment index (OSI) in the FF-type (p=0.008), but not in the ff-type. These results suggest that the level of circulating 25(OH)D is an important factor when assessing the VDR Fok-I polymorphism to prevent osteoporosis.

  6. Modeling the effects of biomass accumulation on the performance of a biotrickling filter packed with PUF support for the alkaline biotreatment of dimethyl disulfide vapors in air.

    PubMed

    Arellano-García, Luis; Dorado, Antonio D; Morales-Guadarrama, Axayacatl; Sacristan, Emilio; Gamisans, Xavier; Revah, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Excess biomass buildup in biotrickling filters leads to low performance. The effect of biomass accumulation in a biotrickling filter (BTF) packed with polyurethane foam (PUF) was assessed in terms of hydrodynamics and void space availability in a system treating dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) vapors with an alkaliphilic consortium. A sample of colonized support from a BTF having been operating for over a year was analyzed, and it was found that the BTF void bed fraction was reduced to almost half of that calculated initially without biomass. Liquid flow through the examined BTF yielded dispersion coefficient values of 0.30 and 0.72 m(2) h(-1), for clean or colonized PUF, respectively. 3D images of attached biomass obtained with magnetic resonance imaging allowed to calculate the superficial area and the biofilm volume percentage and depth as 650 m(2) m(-3), 35%, and 0.6 mm respectively. A simplified geometric approximation of the complex PUF structure was proposed using an orthogonal 3D mesh that predicted 600 m(2) m(-3) for the same biomass content. With this simplified model, it is suggested that the optimum biomass content would be around 20% of bed volume. The activity of the microorganisms was evaluated by respirometry and the kinetics represented with a Haldane equation type. Experimentally determined parameters were used in a mathematical model to simulate the DMDS elimination capacity (EC), and better description was found when the removal experimental data were matched with a model including liquid axial dispersion in contrast to an ideal plug flow model. PMID:25056290

  7. Modeling the effects of biomass accumulation on the performance of a biotrickling filter packed with PUF support for the alkaline biotreatment of dimethyl disulfide vapors in air.

    PubMed

    Arellano-García, Luis; Dorado, Antonio D; Morales-Guadarrama, Axayacatl; Sacristan, Emilio; Gamisans, Xavier; Revah, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Excess biomass buildup in biotrickling filters leads to low performance. The effect of biomass accumulation in a biotrickling filter (BTF) packed with polyurethane foam (PUF) was assessed in terms of hydrodynamics and void space availability in a system treating dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) vapors with an alkaliphilic consortium. A sample of colonized support from a BTF having been operating for over a year was analyzed, and it was found that the BTF void bed fraction was reduced to almost half of that calculated initially without biomass. Liquid flow through the examined BTF yielded dispersion coefficient values of 0.30 and 0.72 m(2) h(-1), for clean or colonized PUF, respectively. 3D images of attached biomass obtained with magnetic resonance imaging allowed to calculate the superficial area and the biofilm volume percentage and depth as 650 m(2) m(-3), 35%, and 0.6 mm respectively. A simplified geometric approximation of the complex PUF structure was proposed using an orthogonal 3D mesh that predicted 600 m(2) m(-3) for the same biomass content. With this simplified model, it is suggested that the optimum biomass content would be around 20% of bed volume. The activity of the microorganisms was evaluated by respirometry and the kinetics represented with a Haldane equation type. Experimentally determined parameters were used in a mathematical model to simulate the DMDS elimination capacity (EC), and better description was found when the removal experimental data were matched with a model including liquid axial dispersion in contrast to an ideal plug flow model.

  8. Batteries: from alkaline to zinc-air.

    PubMed

    Dondelinger, Robert M

    2004-01-01

    applications (for example, zinc-air for alkaline--if it is cost-effective), this is absolutely forbidden for secondary cells. Because of the differing cell voltages, charge characteristics and overcharge tolerance between different types of secondary cells, substituting a nickel-cadmium battery pack for the more expensive lithium-ion pack (if it is physically able to fit into the battery compartment), might appear to save money (e.g. $50 vs. $100) but it would be very ill advised. Since the cell characteristics are very different, it would be downright fatal to anyone within the 'kill radius' when the pack explodes. Those outside the kill radius would receive chemical burns from the electrolyte. Substitutions of secondary cell battery packs are generally not a good idea for biomeds to engage in. These are engineering decisions best left to either aftermarket battery pack manufacturers or the medical device manufacturer as a design engineering change.

  9. Batteries: from alkaline to zinc-air.

    PubMed

    Dondelinger, Robert M

    2004-01-01

    applications (for example, zinc-air for alkaline--if it is cost-effective), this is absolutely forbidden for secondary cells. Because of the differing cell voltages, charge characteristics and overcharge tolerance between different types of secondary cells, substituting a nickel-cadmium battery pack for the more expensive lithium-ion pack (if it is physically able to fit into the battery compartment), might appear to save money (e.g. $50 vs. $100) but it would be very ill advised. Since the cell characteristics are very different, it would be downright fatal to anyone within the 'kill radius' when the pack explodes. Those outside the kill radius would receive chemical burns from the electrolyte. Substitutions of secondary cell battery packs are generally not a good idea for biomeds to engage in. These are engineering decisions best left to either aftermarket battery pack manufacturers or the medical device manufacturer as a design engineering change. PMID:15106428

  10. Production of alkaline protease from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans

    PubMed Central

    Ferracini-Santos, Luciana; Sato, Hélia H

    2009-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans is one of the microorganisms that produces a wide variety of yeast cell wall-degrading enzymes, β-1,3-glucanase, protease and chitinase. Dried cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used as carbon and nitrogen source for cell growth and protease production. The medium components KH2PO4, KOH and dried yeast cells showed a significant effect (p<0.05) on the factorial fractional design. A second design was prepared using two factors: pH and percentage of dried yeast cells. The results showed that the culture medium for the maximum production of protease was 0.2 g/l of MgSO4.7H2O, 2.0 g/l of (NH4)2SO4 and 8% of dried yeast cells in 0.15M phosphate buffer at pH 8.0. The maximum alkaline protease production was 7.0 ± 0.27 U/ml over the center point. Crude protease showed best activity at 50ºC and pH 7.0-8.0, and was stable at 50ºC. PMID:24031317

  11. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Chia-lin W.

    1994-01-01

    According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention is a process for treating alkaline waste materials, including high level radioactive wastes, for vitrification. The process involves adjusting the pH of the wastes with nitric acid, adding formic acid (or a process stream containing formic acid) to reduce mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion, and mixing with class formers to produce a melter feed. The process minimizes production of hydrogen due to noble metal-catalyzed formic acid decomposition during, treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. An important feature of the present invention is the use of different acidifying and reducing, agents to treat the wastes. The nitric acid acidifies the wastes to improve yield stress and supplies acid for various reactions; then the formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2}) to the Mn(II) ion. When the pH of the waste is lower, reduction of mercury compounds and MnO{sub 2}) is faster and less formic acid is needed, and the production of hydrogen caused by catalytically-active noble metals is decreased.

  12. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, C.L.W.

    1995-07-25

    A process is described for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO{sub 2}, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. 4 figs.

  13. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Chia-lin W.

    1995-01-01

    A process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO.sub.2 to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO.sub.2, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product.

  14. Ab Initio Thermochemistry and Elastic Properties of Alkaline Earth Hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hector, Louis, Jr.; Herbst, Jan; Wolf, Walter; Saxe, Paul

    2006-03-01

    In addition to comprising a scientifically interesting class of materials, the binary alkaline earth hydrides are important components of hydrogen sorption/desorption reactions. Of critical importance for predicting the thermodynamic stability of hydrides is the enthalpy of hydride formation, δH, which links the temperature and pressure of hydrogen sorption via the van't Hoff relation. We compare LDA and GGA predictions of the heats of formation and elastic properties of alkaline earth metals and their binary hydrides BeH2, MgH2, CaH2, SrH2, and BaH2 using a plane wave density functional method. Phonon calculations using the direct method enabled prediction of the zero point energies of each material and the 0K and 298K heats of formation. We also computed the 0K and 298K cohesive energies for the alkaline earth metals. Born effective charge tensors were computed via the Berry phase method and enabled prediction of the phonon dispersion curves with LO/TO zone center splittings. It was found that the LO/TO splittings have no effect on the computed zero point energies and heats of formation. The elastic constants were computed with a least squares fitting method using a set of sequentially-applied strains to improve the accuracy of each calculation. Comparison of results from the least squares methodology with prior results using the Hartree-Fock method suggest that the former is substantially more accurate for predicting hydride elastic properties.

  15. Uptake of arsenic by alkaline soils near alkaline coal fly ash disposal facilities.

    PubMed

    Khodadoust, Amid P; Theis, Thomas L; Murarka, Ishwar P; Naithani, Pratibha; Babaeivelni, Kamel

    2013-12-01

    The attenuation of arsenic in groundwater near alkaline coal fly ash disposal facilities was evaluated by determining the uptake of arsenic from ash leachates by surrounding alkaline soils. Ten different alkaline soils near a retired coal fly ash impoundment were used in this study with pH ranging from 7.6 to 9.0, while representative coal fly ash samples from two different locations in the coal fly ash impoundment were used to produce two alkaline ash leachates with pH 7.4 and 8.2. The arsenic found in the ash leachates was present as arsenate [As(V)]. Adsorption isotherm experiments were carried out to determine the adsorption parameters required for predicting the uptake of arsenic from the ash leachates. For all soils and leachates, the adsorption of arsenic followed the Langmuir and Freundlich equations, indicative of the favorable adsorption of arsenic from leachates onto all soils. The uptake of arsenic was evaluated as a function of ash leachate characteristics and the soil components. The uptake of arsenic from alkaline ash leachates, which occurred mainly as calcium hydrogen arsenate, increased with increasing clay fraction of soil and with increasing soil organic matter of the alkaline soils. Appreciable uptake of arsenic from alkaline ash leachates with different pH and arsenic concentration was observed for the alkaline soils, thus attenuating the contamination of groundwater downstream of the retired coal fly ash impoundment.

  16. Theoretical investigation of the structures, stabilities, and NLO responses of calcium-doped pyridazine: alkaline-earth-based alkaline salt electrides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin-Feng; Huang, Jiangen; Jia, Li; Zhou, Guangpei

    2014-02-01

    Currently, whether alkaline-earth-doped compounds with electride characteristics are novel candidates for high-performance nonlinear optical (NLO) materials is unknown. In this paper, using quantum chemical computations, we show that: when doping calcium atoms into a family of alkaline-substituted pyridazines, alkaline-earth-based alkaline salt electrides M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca (M=H, Li, and K) with distended excess electron clouds are formed. Interestingly, from the triplet to the singlet state, the chemical valence of calcium atom changes from +1 to 0, and the dipole moment direction (μ₀) of the molecule reverses for each M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca. Changing pyridazine from without (H₄C₄N₂⋯Ca) to with one alkaline substituent (M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca, M=Li and K), the ground state changes from the triplet to the singlet state. The alkaline earth metal doping effect (electride effect) and alkaline salt effect on the static first hyperpolarizabilities (β₀) demonstrates that (1) the β₀ value is increased approximately 1371-fold from 2 (pyridazine, H₄C₄N₂) to 2745au (Ca-doped pyridazine, H₄C₄N₂⋯Ca), (2) the β₀ value is increased approximately 1146-fold from 2 in pyridazine (H₄C₄N₂) to 2294au in an Li-substituted pyridazine (Li-H₃C₄N₂), and (3) the β₀ value is increased 324-(M=Li) and 106-(M=K) fold from 826 (MLi) and 2294au (MK) to 268,679 (M=Li) and 245,878au (M=K), respectively, from the alkalized pyridazine (M-H₃C₄N₂) to the Ca-doped pyridazine (M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca). These results may provide a new means for designing high-performance NLO materials.

  17. Enhancing alkaline hydrogen evolution reaction activity through Ni-Mn3O4 nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Liu, Peng Fei; Zhang, Le; Zu, Meng Yang; Yang, Yun Xia; Yang, Hua Gui

    2016-08-18

    Developing efficient, stable and cost-effective electrocatalysts towards hydrogen production in alkaline environments is vital to improve energy efficiency for water splitting. In this work, we prepared Ni-Mn3O4 nanocomposites on Ni foam which exhibit an excellent hydrogen evolution reaction catalytic activity with a current density (j) of 10 mA cm(-2) at an overpotential (η) of 91 mV and show good stability in an alkaline medium. PMID:27500290

  18. Release of alkaline phosphatase from membranes by a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Low, M G; Finean, J B

    1977-10-01

    Purified phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from Staphylococcus aureus released a substantial proportion of the total alkaline phosphatase activity from a wide range of tissues from several mammalian species. Co-purification of the phospholipase C and alkaline phosphatase-releasing activities and the inhibition of both these activities by iso-osmotic salt solutions suggested that the releasing effect was unlikely to be due to a contaminant.

  19. Low-heat, mild alkaline pretreatment of switchgrass for anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guang; Bierma, Tom; Walker, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of alkaline pretreatment under mild heat conditions (100°C or 212°F) on the anaerobic co-digestion of switchgrass. The effects of alkaline concentration, types of alkaline, heating time and rinsing were evaluated. In addition to batch studies, continuous-feed studies were performed in triplicate to identify potential digester operational problems caused by switchgrass co-digestion while accounting for uncertainty due to digester variability. Few studies have examined anaerobic digestion of switchgrass or the effects of mild heating to enhance alkaline pretreatment prior to biomass digestion. Results indicate that pretreatment can significantly enhance digestion of coarse-ground (≤ 0.78 cm particle size) switchgrass. Energy conversion efficiency as high as 63% was observed, and was comparable or superior to fine-grinding as a pretreatment method. The optimal NaOH concentration was found to be 5.5% (wt/wt alkaline/biomass) with a 91.7% moisture level. No evidence of operational problems such as solids build-up, poor mixing, or floating materials were observed. These results suggest the use of waste heat from a generator could reduce the concentration of alkaline required to adequately pretreat lignocellulosic feedstock prior to anaerobic digestion.

  20. Low-heat, mild alkaline pretreatment of switchgrass for anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guang; Bierma, Tom; Walker, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of alkaline pretreatment under mild heat conditions (100°C or 212°F) on the anaerobic co-digestion of switchgrass. The effects of alkaline concentration, types of alkaline, heating time and rinsing were evaluated. In addition to batch studies, continuous-feed studies were performed in triplicate to identify potential digester operational problems caused by switchgrass co-digestion while accounting for uncertainty due to digester variability. Few studies have examined anaerobic digestion of switchgrass or the effects of mild heating to enhance alkaline pretreatment prior to biomass digestion. Results indicate that pretreatment can significantly enhance digestion of coarse-ground (≤ 0.78 cm particle size) switchgrass. Energy conversion efficiency as high as 63% was observed, and was comparable or superior to fine-grinding as a pretreatment method. The optimal NaOH concentration was found to be 5.5% (wt/wt alkaline/biomass) with a 91.7% moisture level. No evidence of operational problems such as solids build-up, poor mixing, or floating materials were observed. These results suggest the use of waste heat from a generator could reduce the concentration of alkaline required to adequately pretreat lignocellulosic feedstock prior to anaerobic digestion. PMID:24410687

  1. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-04-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent

  2. Cementitious porous pavement in stormwater quality control: pH and alkalinity elevation.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Xuheng; Sansalone, John

    2011-01-01

    A certain level of alkalinity acts as a buffer and maintains the pH value in a stable range in water bodies. With rapid urban development, more and more acidic pollutants flow to watersheds with runoff and drop alkalinity to a very low level and ultimately degrade the water environment. Cementitious porous pavement is an effective tool for stormwater acidic neutralization. When stormwater infiltrates cement porous pavement (CPP) materials, alkalinity and pH will be elevated due to the basic characteristics of cement concrete. The elevated alkalinity will neutralize acids in water bodies and maintain the pH in a stable level as a buffer. It is expected that CPP materials still have a certain capability of alkalinity elevation after years of service, which is important for CPP as an effective tool for stormwater management. However, few previous studies have reported on how CPP structures would elevate runoff alkalinity and pH after being exposed to rainfall-runoff for years. In this study, three groups of CPP specimens, all exposed to rainfall-runoff for 3 years, were used to test the pH and alkalinity elevation properties. It was found that runoff pH values were elevated from 7.4 to the range of 7.8-8.6 after infiltrating through the uncoated specimens, and from 7.4 to 8.5-10.7 after infiltrating through aluminum-coated specimens. Runoff alkalinity elevation efficiencies are 11.5-14.5% for uncoated specimens and 42.2% for coated specimens. The study shows that CPP is an effective passive unit operation for stormwater acid neutralization in our built environment.

  3. Photoelastic response of alkaline earth aluminosilicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Smedskjaer, Morten M; Saxton, Scott A; Ellison, Adam J; Mauro, John C

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the structural origins of the photoelastic response in oxide glasses is important for discovering new families of zero-stress optic glasses and for developing a predictive physical model. In this Letter, we have investigated the composition dependence of the stress optic coefficient C of 32 sodium aluminosilicate glasses with different types of alkaline earth oxides (MgO, CaO, SrO, and BaO). We find that most of the composition dependence of the stress optic response can be captured by a linear regression model and that the individual contributions from the alkaline earths to C depend on the alkaline earth-oxygen bond metallicity. High bond metallicity is required to allow bonds to be distorted along both the bonding direction and perpendicular to it. These findings are valuable for understanding the photoelastic response of oxide glasses.

  4. An alkaline phosphatase reporter for use in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Adrianne N; Pascual, Ricardo A; Childress, Kevin O; Nawrocki, Kathryn L; Woods, Emily C; McBride, Shonna M

    2015-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive pathogen that causes severe gastrointestinal disease in humans and other mammals. C. difficile is notoriously difficult to work with and, until recently, few tools were available for genetic manipulation and molecular analyses. Despite the recent advances in the field, there is no simple or cost-effective technique for measuring gene transcription in C. difficile other than direct transcriptional analyses (e.g., quantitative real-time PCR and RNA-seq), which are time-consuming, expensive and difficult to scale-up. We describe the development of an in vivo reporter assay that can provide qualitative and quantitative measurements of C. difficile gene expression. Using the Enterococcus faecalis alkaline phosphatase gene, phoZ, we measured expression of C. difficile genes using a colorimetric alkaline phosphatase assay. We show that inducible alkaline phosphatase activity correlates directly with native gene expression. The ability to analyze gene expression using a standard reporter is an important and critically needed tool to study gene regulation and design genetic screens for C. difficile and other anaerobic clostridia.

  5. Silicon improves maize photosynthesis in saline-alkaline soils.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhiming; Song, Ri; Shao, Hongbo; Song, Fengbin; Xu, Hongwen; Lu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The research aimed to determine the effects of Si application on photosynthetic characteristics of maize on saline-alkaline soil, including photosynthetic rate (P n ), stomatal conductance (g s ), transpiration rate (E), and intercellular CO2 concentration (C i ) of maize in the field with five levels (0, 45, 90, 150, and 225 kg · ha(-1)) of Si supplying. Experimental results showed that the values of P n, g s, and C i of maize were significantly enhanced while the values of E of maize were dramatically decreased by certain doses of silicon fertilizers, which meant that Si application with proper doses significantly increased photosynthetic efficiency of maize in different growth stages under stressing environment of saline-alkaline soil. The optimal dose of Si application in this experiment was 150 kg · ha(-1) Si. It indicated that increase in maize photosynthesis under saline-alkaline stress took place by Si application with proper doses, which is helpful to improve growth and yield of maize. PMID:25629083

  6. A novel alkaline oxidation pretreatment for spruce, birch and sugar cane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Kallioinen, Anne; Hakola, Maija; Riekkola, Tiina; Repo, Timo; Leskelä, Markku; von Weymarn, Niklas; Siika-aho, Matti

    2013-07-01

    Alkaline oxidation pretreatment was developed for spruce, birch and sugar cane bagasse. The reaction was carried out in alkaline water solution under 10 bar oxygen pressure and at mild reaction temperature of 120-140°C. Most of the lignin was solubilised by the alkaline oxidation pretreatment and an easily hydrolysable carbohydrate fraction was obtained. After 72 h hydrolysis with a 10 FPU/g enzyme dosage, glucose yields of 80%, 91%, and 97%, for spruce, birch and bagasse, respectively, were achieved. The enzyme dosage could be decreased to 4 FPU/g without a major effect in terms of the hydrolysis performance. Compared to steam explosion alkaline oxidation was found to be significantly better in the conditions tested, especially for the pretreatment of spruce. In hydrolysis and fermentation at 12% d.m. consistency an ethanol yield of 80% could be obtained with both bagasse and spruce in 1-3 days.

  7. A novel alkaline oxidation pretreatment for spruce, birch and sugar cane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Kallioinen, Anne; Hakola, Maija; Riekkola, Tiina; Repo, Timo; Leskelä, Markku; von Weymarn, Niklas; Siika-aho, Matti

    2013-07-01

    Alkaline oxidation pretreatment was developed for spruce, birch and sugar cane bagasse. The reaction was carried out in alkaline water solution under 10 bar oxygen pressure and at mild reaction temperature of 120-140°C. Most of the lignin was solubilised by the alkaline oxidation pretreatment and an easily hydrolysable carbohydrate fraction was obtained. After 72 h hydrolysis with a 10 FPU/g enzyme dosage, glucose yields of 80%, 91%, and 97%, for spruce, birch and bagasse, respectively, were achieved. The enzyme dosage could be decreased to 4 FPU/g without a major effect in terms of the hydrolysis performance. Compared to steam explosion alkaline oxidation was found to be significantly better in the conditions tested, especially for the pretreatment of spruce. In hydrolysis and fermentation at 12% d.m. consistency an ethanol yield of 80% could be obtained with both bagasse and spruce in 1-3 days. PMID:23711947

  8. Alkaline Capacitors Based on Nitride Nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldissi, Matt

    2003-01-01

    High-energy-density alkaline electrochemical capacitors based on electrodes made of transition-metal nitride nanoparticles are undergoing development. Transition- metal nitrides (in particular, Fe3N and TiN) offer a desirable combination of high electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability in aqueous alkaline electrolytes like KOH. The high energy densities of these capacitors are attributable mainly to their high capacitance densities, which, in turn, are attributable mainly to the large specific surface areas of the electrode nanoparticles. Capacitors of this type could be useful as energy-storage components in such diverse equipment as digital communication systems, implanted medical devices, computers, portable consumer electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  9. Alkaline earth filled nickel skutterudite antimonide thermoelectrics

    DOEpatents

    Singh, David Joseph

    2013-07-16

    A thermoelectric material including a body centered cubic filled skutterudite having the formula A.sub.xFe.sub.yNi.sub.zSb.sub.12, where A is an alkaline earth element, x is no more than approximately 1.0, and the sum of y and z is approximately equal to 4.0. The alkaline earth element includes guest atoms selected from the group consisting of Be, Mb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra and combinations thereof. The filled skutterudite is shown to have properties suitable for a wide variety of thermoelectric applications.

  10. Mutual effects of proton and sodium chloride on oxygenation of liganded human hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Lepeshkevich, Sergei V; Dzhagarov, Boris M

    2005-12-01

    The different effects of pH and NaCl on individual O2-binding properties of alpha and beta subunits within liganded tetramer and dimer of human hemoglobin (HbA) were examined in a number of laser time-resolved spectroscopic measurements. A previously proposed approach [Dzhagarov BM & Lepeshkevich SV (2004) Chem Phys Lett390, 59-64] was used to determine the extent of subunit dissociation rate constant difference and subunit affinity difference from a single flash photolysis experiment. To investigate the effect of NaCl concentration on the association and dissociation rate constants we carried out a series of experiments at four different concentrations (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 m NaCl) over the pH range of the alkaline Bohr effect. As the data suggest, the individual properties of the alpha and beta subunits within the completely liganded tetrameric hemoglobin did not depend on pH under salt-free conditions. However, different effects NaCl on the individual kinetic properties of the alpha and beta subunits were revealed. Regulation of the O2-binding properties of the alpha and beta subunits within the liganded tetramer is proposed to be attained in two quite different ways.

  11. Clonal Integration Enhances the Performance of a Clonal Plant Species under Soil Alkalinity Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Juanjuan; Chen, Jishan; Zhang, Yingjun

    2015-01-01

    Clonal plants have been shown to successfully survive in stressful environments, including salinity stress, drought and depleted nutrients through clonal integration between original and subsequent ramets. However, relatively little is known about whether clonal integration can enhance the performance of clonal plants under alkalinity stress. We investigated the effect of clonal integration on the performance of a typical rhizomatous clonal plant, Leymus chinensis, using a factorial experimental design with four levels of alkalinity and two levels of rhizome connection treatments, connected (allowing integration) and severed (preventing integration). Clonal integration was estimated by comparing physiological and biomass features between the rhizome-connected and rhizome-severed treatments. We found that rhizome-connected treatment increased the biomass, height and leaf water potential of subsequent ramets at highly alkalinity treatments but did not affect them at low alkalinity treatments. However, rhizome-connected treatment decreased the root biomass of subsequent ramets and did not influence the photosynthetic rates of subsequent ramets. The biomass of original ramets was reduced by rhizome-connected treatment at the highest alkalinity level. These results suggest that clonal integration can increase the performance of clonal plants under alkalinity stress. Rhizome-connected plants showed dramatically increased survival of buds with negative effects on root weight, indicating that clonal integration influenced the resource allocation pattern of clonal plants. A cost-benefit analysis based on biomass measures showed that original and subsequent ramets significantly benefited from clonal integration in highly alkalinity stress, indicating that clonal integration is an important adaptive strategy by which clonal plants could survive in local alkalinity soil. PMID:25790352

  12. Clonal integration enhances the performance of a clonal plant species under soil alkalinity stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjun; Yang, Gaowen; Sun, Juanjuan; Chen, Jishan; Zhang, Yingjun

    2015-01-01

    Clonal plants have been shown to successfully survive in stressful environments, including salinity stress, drought and depleted nutrients through clonal integration between original and subsequent ramets. However, relatively little is known about whether clonal integration can enhance the performance of clonal plants under alkalinity stress. We investigated the effect of clonal integration on the performance of a typical rhizomatous clonal plant, Leymus chinensis, using a factorial experimental design with four levels of alkalinity and two levels of rhizome connection treatments, connected (allowing integration) and severed (preventing integration). Clonal integration was estimated by comparing physiological and biomass features between the rhizome-connected and rhizome-severed treatments. We found that rhizome-connected treatment increased the biomass, height and leaf water potential of subsequent ramets at highly alkalinity treatments but did not affect them at low alkalinity treatments. However, rhizome-connected treatment decreased the root biomass of subsequent ramets and did not influence the photosynthetic rates of subsequent ramets. The biomass of original ramets was reduced by rhizome-connected treatment at the highest alkalinity level. These results suggest that clonal integration can increase the performance of clonal plants under alkalinity stress. Rhizome-connected plants showed dramatically increased survival of buds with negative effects on root weight, indicating that clonal integration influenced the resource allocation pattern of clonal plants. A cost-benefit analysis based on biomass measures showed that original and subsequent ramets significantly benefited from clonal integration in highly alkalinity stress, indicating that clonal integration is an important adaptive strategy by which clonal plants could survive in local alkalinity soil. PMID:25790352

  13. Martian alkaline basites chemically resemble basic rocks of the Lovozero alkaline massif, Kola peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    The comparative wave planetology [1, 5] successfully overcomes the most principal martian test having now analyses of alkaline rocks from Columbia Hills [2, 3, 4]. This kind of rocks was predicted earlier on basis of the wave paradigm having stated that "the higher planetary relief range - the higher density difference between lithologies composing hypsometrically (tectonically) contrasting blocks [5]. This paradigm declares that "celestial bodies are dichotomic"(Theorem 1), "celestial bodies are sectoral" (Theorem 2), "celestial bodies are granular"(Theorem 3), "angular momenta of different level blocks tend to be equal" (Theorem 4)[1, 5]. Mars is a typical terrestrial planet but the farthest from Sun and thus with the smallest tide effects. Nevertheless it has the highest relief range and seems to be most distorted (ellipsoid in shape) and broken by deep fissures. The wave approach explains this by a warping action of standing waves of 4 ortho- and diagonal directions - they are the longest and highest in the martian case. These interfering warping waves caused by the elliptic keplerian orbits implying periodically changing accelerations and inertia-gravity forces produce inevitable tectonic dichotomy (the fundamental wave 1 long 2πR), sectoring (wave 2, πR, and other overtones), granulation. A granule size depends on an orbital frequency: the higher frequency the smaller granule. The Earth's granule, as a scale, is πR/4 (see it in NASA's PIA04159), Venus ` πR/6, Mercury's πR/16, Mars' πR/2 (the sizes are strictly tied to orb. fr.). Along with the granule sizes increase relief ranges ( Mercury ˜5 km, Venus 14, Earth 20, Mars ˜30) and compositional (density) difference between lowland and highland lithologies [5]. The lowland compositions become Fericher and denser: enstatite (Mercury), Mg-basalt (Venus), tholeiite (Earth), Fe-basalt (Mars). The highland compositions get less dense, lighter: anorthosite, alkaline basalt, andesite and conditional "albitite

  14. Critique of Quantum Optical Experimental Refutations of Bohr's Principle of Complementarity, of the Wootters-Zurek Principle of Complementarity, and of the Particle-Wave Duality Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloyerou, P. N.

    2016-02-01

    I argue that quantum optical experiments that purport to refute Bohr's principle of complementarity (BPC) fail in their aim. Some of these experiments try to refute complementarity by refuting the so called particle-wave duality relations, which evolved from the Wootters-Zurek reformulation of BPC (WZPC). I therefore consider it important for my forgoing arguments to first recall the essential tenets of BPC, and to clearly separate BPC from WZPC, which I will argue is a direct contradiction of BPC. This leads to a need to consider the meaning of particle-wave duality relations and to question their fundamental status. I further argue (albeit, in opposition to BPC) that particle and wave complementary concepts are on a different footing than other pairs of complementary concepts.

  15. The Alkaline Diet: Is There Evidence That an Alkaline pH Diet Benefits Health?

    PubMed Central

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K.

    2012-01-01

    This review looks at the role of an alkaline diet in health. Pubmed was searched looking for articles on pH, potential renal acid loads, bone health, muscle, growth hormone, back pain, vitamin D and chemotherapy. Many books written in the lay literature on the alkaline diet were also reviewed and evaluated in light of the published medical literature. There may be some value in considering an alkaline diet in reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases and further studies are warranted in this area of medicine. PMID:22013455

  16. The Martian ocean: First acid, then alkaline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, M. W.

    1992-01-01

    In Mars' distant past, carbon dioxide and water may have been plentiful. Values of total outgassed CO2 from several to about 10 bar are consistent with present knowledge, and this amount of CO2 implies an amount of water outgassed equal to an equivalent depth of 500 to 1000 m. It is quite reasonable, therefore, to envision an early Mars in which there was a body or bodies of liquid water, perhaps in the northern plains, and a dense carbon dioxide atmosphere. Under such conditions, the pH of the water will be low, due to the dissolution of carbon dioxide in the water to form carbonic acid. This acidic water is capable of weathering the available rock quite intensely, particularly because this rock is likely to be heavily fractured (from meteorite bombardment) or even consist of fine particles (such as pyroclastic deposits). As time goes on, however, the carbon dioxide atmosphere will rapidly pass through the ocean to form carbonate deposits. As the density of the atmosphere decreases, so will the flux of carbonic acid into the ocean. Without this input of carbonic acid, the effect of the dissolved weathering products will be to increase the pH of the water. The ocean will then become alkaline. To study this process, I have developed a geochemical cycle model for the atmosphere-hydrosphere-regolith system of Mars. The treatment of geochemical cycles as complex kinetic chemical reactions has been undertaken for terrestrial systems in recent years with much success. This method is capable of elegantly handling the interactions between the simultaneous chemical reactions needed to understand such a system.

  17. The Martian ocean: First acid, then alkaline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, M. W.

    1993-09-01

    In Mars' distant past, carbon dioxide and water may have been plentiful. Values of total outgassed CO2 from several to about 10 bar are consistent with present knowledge, and this amount of CO2 implies an amount of water outgassed equal to an equivalent depth of 500 to 1000 m. It is quite reasonable, therefore, to envision an early Mars in which there was a body or bodies of liquid water, perhaps in the northern plains, and a dense carbon dioxide atmosphere. Under such conditions, the pH of the water will be low, due to the dissolution of carbon dioxide in the water to form carbonic acid. This acidic water is capable of weathering the available rock quite intensely, particularly because this rock is likely to be heavily fractured (from meteorite bombardment) or even consist of fine particles (such as pyroclastic deposits). As time goes on, however, the carbon dioxide atmosphere will rapidly pass through the ocean to form carbonate deposits. As the density of the atmosphere decreases, so will the flux of carbonic acid into the ocean. Without this input of carbonic acid, the effect of the dissolved weathering products will be to increase the pH of the water. The ocean will then become alkaline. To study this process, I have developed a geochemical cycle model for the atmosphere-hydrosphere-regolith system of Mars. The treatment of geochemical cycles as complex kinetic chemical reactions has been undertaken for terrestrial systems in recent years with much success. This method is capable of elegantly handling the interactions between the simultaneous chemical reactions needed to understand such a system.

  18. ISSUES WITH ALKALINE TREATMENT OF SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation begins with a discussion of the use of lime and other alkaline materials from the very earliest times to the present for killing bacteria, viruses and parasites and for controlling odors in wastewaters and sludge. It answers the question "How did EPA arrive at i...

  19. Alkaline electrochemical cells and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    Equilibrated cellulose ether membranes of increased electrolytic conductivity for use as separators in concentrated alkaline electrochemical cells are investigated. The method of making such membranes by equilibration to the degree desired in an aqueous alkali solution mantained at a temperature below about 10 C is described.

  20. Kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Christodoulatos, C; Su, T L; Koutsospyros, A

    2001-01-01

    Cellulose nitrate (nitrocellulose) is an explosive solid substance used in large quantities in various formulations of rocket and gun propellants. Safe destruction of nitrocellulose can be achieved by alkaline hydrolysis, which converts it to biodegradable products that can then be treated by conventional biological processes. The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of munitions-grade nitrocellulose in sodium hydroxide solutions were investigated in completely mixed batch reactors. Experiments were conducted using solutions of alkaline strength ranging from 0.1 to 15% by mass and temperatures in the range of 30 to 90 degrees C. Regression analysis of the kinetic data revealed that alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose is of the order 1.0 and 1.5 with respect to nitrocellulose and hydroxide concentration, respectively. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction was found to be 100.9 kJ/mol with a preexponential Arrhenius constant of 4.73 x 10(13). Nitrite and nitrate, in a 3:1 ratio, were the primary nitrogen species present in the posthydrolysis solution. The kinetic information is pertinent to the development and optimization of nitrocellulose chemical-biological treatment systems.