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Sample records for alkaline earth salts

  1. Diclofenac salts. III. Alkaline and earth alkaline salts.

    PubMed

    Fini, Adamo; Fazio, Giuseppe; Rosetti, Francesca; Angeles Holgado, M; Iruín, Ana; Alvarez-Fuentes, Josefa

    2005-11-01

    Diclofenac salts containing the alkaline and two earth alkaline cations have been prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDAX spectroscopy; and by thermal and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA): all of them crystallize as hydrate when precipitated from water. The salts dehydrate at room temperature and more easily on heating, but recovery the hydration, when placed in a humid environment. X-ray diffraction spectra suggest that on dehydration new peaks appear on diffractograms and the lattice of the salts partially looses crystallinity. This phenomenon is readily visible in the case of the calcium and magnesium salts, whose thermograms display a crystallization exotherm, before melting or decomposing at temperatures near or above 200 degrees C; these last salts appear to form solvates, when prepared from methanol. The thermogram of each salt shows a complex endotherm of dehydration about 100 degrees C; the calcium salt displays two endotherms, well separated at about 120 and 160 degrees C, which disappear after prolonged heating. Decomposition exotherms, before or soon after the melting, appear below 300 degrees C. The ammonium salt is thermally unstable and, when heated to start dehydration, dissociates and leaves acidic diclofenac.

  2. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  7. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite

    DOEpatents

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

    1995-01-24

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  8. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite

    DOEpatents

    Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving; Palekar, Vishwesh M.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  9. Theoretical investigation of the structures, stabilities, and NLO responses of calcium-doped pyridazine: alkaline-earth-based alkaline salt electrides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin-Feng; Huang, Jiangen; Jia, Li; Zhou, Guangpei

    2014-02-01

    Currently, whether alkaline-earth-doped compounds with electride characteristics are novel candidates for high-performance nonlinear optical (NLO) materials is unknown. In this paper, using quantum chemical computations, we show that: when doping calcium atoms into a family of alkaline-substituted pyridazines, alkaline-earth-based alkaline salt electrides M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca (M=H, Li, and K) with distended excess electron clouds are formed. Interestingly, from the triplet to the singlet state, the chemical valence of calcium atom changes from +1 to 0, and the dipole moment direction (μ₀) of the molecule reverses for each M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca. Changing pyridazine from without (H₄C₄N₂⋯Ca) to with one alkaline substituent (M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca, M=Li and K), the ground state changes from the triplet to the singlet state. The alkaline earth metal doping effect (electride effect) and alkaline salt effect on the static first hyperpolarizabilities (β₀) demonstrates that (1) the β₀ value is increased approximately 1371-fold from 2 (pyridazine, H₄C₄N₂) to 2745au (Ca-doped pyridazine, H₄C₄N₂⋯Ca), (2) the β₀ value is increased approximately 1146-fold from 2 in pyridazine (H₄C₄N₂) to 2294au in an Li-substituted pyridazine (Li-H₃C₄N₂), and (3) the β₀ value is increased 324-(M=Li) and 106-(M=K) fold from 826 (MLi) and 2294au (MK) to 268,679 (M=Li) and 245,878au (M=K), respectively, from the alkalized pyridazine (M-H₃C₄N₂) to the Ca-doped pyridazine (M-H₃C₄N₂⋯Ca). These results may provide a new means for designing high-performance NLO materials.

  10. ION EXCHANGE IN FUSED SALTS. II. THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALKALI METAL AND ALKALINE EARTH IONS BETWEEN CHABAZITE AND FUSED LINO3, NANO3, AND KNO3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ION EXCHANGE, SALTS ), (*ALKALI METALS, ION EXCHANGE), (*ALKALINE EARTH METALS, ION EXCHANGE), (*NITRATES, ION EXCHANGE), SODIUM , CALCIUM, POTASSIUM...BARIUM, RUBIDIUM, CESIUM, LITHIUM COMPOUNDS, SODIUM COMPOUNDS, POTASSIUM COMPOUNDS, DISTRIBUTION, MINERALS, IONS

  11. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite for methanol synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving; Palekar, Vishwesh M.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  12. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    DOEpatents

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  13. CO2 gasification reactivity of biomass char: catalytic influence of alkali, alkaline earth and transition metal salts.

    PubMed

    Lahijani, Pooya; Zainal, Zainal Alimuddin; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman; Mohammadi, Maedeh

    2013-09-01

    This study investigates the influence of alkali (Na, K), alkaline earth (Ca, Mg) and transition (Fe) metal nitrates on CO2 gasification reactivity of pistachio nut shell (PNS) char. The preliminary gasification experiments were performed in thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and the results showed considerable improvement in carbon conversion; Na-char>Ca-char>Fe-char>K-char>Mg-char>raw char. Based on TGA studies, NaNO3 (with loadings of 3-7 wt%) was selected as the superior catalyst for further gasification studies in bench-scale reactor; the highest reactivity was devoted to 5 wt% Na loaded char. The data acquired for gasification rate of catalyzed char were fitted with several kinetic models, among which, random pore model was adopted as the best model. Based on obtained gasification rate constant and using the Arrhenius plot, activation energy of 5 wt% Na loaded char was calculated as 151.46 kJ/mol which was 53 kJ/mol lower than that of un-catalyzed char.

  14. The coordination complex structures and hydrogen bonding in the three-dimensional alkaline earth metal salts (Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) of (4-aminophenyl)arsonic acid.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graham; Wermuth, Urs D

    2017-01-01

    (4-Aminophenyl)arsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid) is used as an antihelminth in veterinary applications and was earlier used in the monosodium salt dihydrate form as the antisyphilitic drug atoxyl. Examples of complexes with this acid are rare. The structures of the alkaline earth metal (Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) complexes with (4-aminophenyl)arsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid) have been determined, viz. hexaaquamagnesium bis[hydrogen (4-aminophenyl)arsonate] tetrahydrate, [Mg(H2O)6](C6H7AsNO3)·4H2O, (I), catena-poly[[[diaquacalcium]-bis[μ2-hydrogen (4-aminophenyl)arsonato-κ(2)O:O']-[diaquacalcium]-bis[μ2-hydrogen (4-aminophenyl)arsonato-κ(2)O:O

  15. Heating temperature dependence of Cr(III) oxidation in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth salts and subsequent Cr(VI) leaching behavior.

    PubMed

    Verbinnen, Bram; Billen, Pieter; Van Coninckxloo, Michiel; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2013-06-04

    In this paper, the temperature dependence of Cr(III) oxidation in high temperature processes and the subsequent Cr(VI) leaching was studied using synthetic mixtures. It was experimentally shown that in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth salts, oxidation of Cr(III) takes place, consistent with thermodynamic calculations. Heating of synthetic mixtures of Cr2O3 and Na, K, or Ca salts led to elevated leaching of Cr(VI); in the presence of Na, more than 80% of the initial Cr(III) amount was converted to Cr(VI) at 600-800 °C. Kinetic experiments allowed explanation of the increase in Cr(VI) leaching for increasing temperatures up to 600-800 °C. After reaching a maximum in Cr(VI) leaching at temperatures around 600-800 °C, the leaching decreased again, which could be explained by the formation of a glassy phase that prevents leaching of the formed Cr(VI). By way of illustration, Cr(VI) formation and leaching was evaluated for a case study, the fabrication of ceramic material from contaminated sludge. Based on the proposed reaction mechanisms, countermeasures to prevent Cr oxidation (addition of NH4H2PO4, heating under inert atmosphere) were proposed and successfully tested for synthetic mixtures and for the case study.

  16. Kinetic study of the α-tocopherol-regeneration reaction of ubiquinol-10 in methanol and acetonitrile solutions: notable effect of the alkali and alkaline earth metal salts on the reaction rates.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Kazuo; Oi, Masanori; Ouchi, Aya; Nagaoka, Shin-ichi

    2012-03-01

    A kinetic study of regeneration reaction of α-tocopherol (α-TocH) by ubiquinol-10 has been performed in the presence of four kinds of alkali and alkaline earth metal salts (LiClO(4), NaClO(4), NaI, and Mg(ClO(4))(2)) in methanol and acetonitrile solutions, using double-mixing stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The second-order rate constants (k(r)'s) for the reaction of α-tocopheroxyl (α-Toc•) radical with ubiquinol-10 increased and decreased notably with increasing concentrations of metal salts in methanol and acetonitrile, respectively. The k(r) values increased in the order of no metal salt < NaClO(4) ~ NaI < LiClO(4) < Mg(ClO(4))(2) at the same concentration of metal salts in methanol. On the other hand, in acetonitrile, the k(r) values decreased in the order of no metal salt > NaClO(4) ~ NaI > LiClO(4) > Mg(ClO(4))(2) at the same concentration of metal salts. The metal salts having a smaller ionic radius of cation and a larger charge of cation gave a larger k(r) value in methanol, and a smaller k(r) value in acetonitrile. The effect of anion was almost negligible in both the solvents. Notable effects of metal cations on the UV-vis absorption spectrum of α-Toc• radical were observed in aprotic acetonitrile solution, suggesting complex formation between α-Toc• and metal cations. On the other hand, effects of metal cations were negligible in protic methanol, suggesting that the complex formation between α-Toc• and metal cations is hindered by the hydrogen bond between α-Toc• and methanol molecules. The difference between the reaction mechanisms in methanol and acetonitrile solutions was discussed on the basis of the results obtained. High concentrations of alkali and alkaline earth metal salts coexist with α-TocH and ubiquinol-10 in plasma, blood, and many tissues, suggesting the contribution of the metal salts to the above regeneration reaction in biological systems.

  17. Alkaline earth filled nickel skutterudite antimonide thermoelectrics

    DOEpatents

    Singh, David Joseph

    2013-07-16

    A thermoelectric material including a body centered cubic filled skutterudite having the formula A.sub.xFe.sub.yNi.sub.zSb.sub.12, where A is an alkaline earth element, x is no more than approximately 1.0, and the sum of y and z is approximately equal to 4.0. The alkaline earth element includes guest atoms selected from the group consisting of Be, Mb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra and combinations thereof. The filled skutterudite is shown to have properties suitable for a wide variety of thermoelectric applications.

  18. Alkaline earth metal catalysts for asymmetric reactions.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shū; Yamashita, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-18

    The group 2 alkaline earth metals calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr), and barium (Ba) are among the most common elements on Earth, abundant in both the sea and the Earth's crust. Although they are familiar in our daily lives, their application to organic synthesis has, so far, been limited. Some particularly useful properties of these elements include (i) low electronegativity, (ii) a stable oxidation state of +2, meaning that they can potentially form two covalent bonds with anions, and (iii) the ability to occupy a variety of coordination sites due to their large ionic radius. Furthermore, the alkaline earth metals, found between the group 1 and group 3 elements, show mild but significant Lewis acidity, which can be harnessed to control coordinative molecules via a Lewis acid-base interaction. Taken together, these characteristics make the metals Ca, Sr, and Ba very promising components of highly functionalized acid-base catalysts. In this Account, we describe the development of chiral alkaline earth metal catalysts for asymmetric carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions. Recently prepared chiral alkaline earth metal complexes have shown high diastereo- and enantioselectivities in fundamental and important chemical transformations. We chose chiral bisoxazoline (Box) derivatives bearing a methylene tether as a ligand for chiral modification. These molecules are very useful because they can covalently coordinate to alkaline earth metals in a bidentate fashion through deprotonation of the tether portion. It was found that chiral calcium-Box complexes could successfully promote catalytic asymmetric 1,4-addition and [3 + 2] cycloaddition reactions with high diastereo- and enantioselectivities. Both the calcium-Box complexes and chiral strontium-bis-sulfonamide and chiral barium-BINOLate complexes could catalyze asymmetric 1,4-addition reactions with high enantioselectivities. Furthermore, we designed a calcium-neutral coordinative ligand complex as a new type of chiral alkaline

  19. Counterion influence on the vibrational wavenumbers in ternary and quaternary metal hydride salts, A2MH6 (A = alkali metal, alkaline earth, and lanthanides; M = Ir, Fe, Ru, Os, Pt, Mn).

    PubMed

    Gilson, Denis F R; Moyer, Ralph O

    2012-02-06

    The wavenumbers of the ν(3) metal-hydrogen stretching mode (T(1u)) in the IR spectra of both ternary and quaternary hexahydrido salts of transition metals from groups 7 to 10 ([Mn(I)H(6)](5-), [Fe(II)H(6)](4-), [Ru(II)H(6)](4-), [Os(II)H(6)](4-), [Ir(III)H(6)](3-), and [Pt(IV)H(6)](2-)) depend linearly upon the ionization energies of the counterions (alkali metal, alkaline earth, and lanthanide) with a separate line for each metal. This relationship provides quantitative support for the charge-transfer mechanism for explaining the stabilities of these compounds.

  20. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  1. The alkaline earth intercalates of molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.; Samson, S.; Woollam, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide has been intercalated with calcium and strontium by means of the liquid ammonia technique. Chemical, X-ray, and superconductivity data are presented. The X-ray data reveal a lowering of crystal symmetry and increase of complexity of the structure upon intercalation with the alkaline earth metals. The Ca and Sr intercalates start to superconduct at 4 and 5.6 K, respectively, and show considerable anisotropy regarding the critical magnetic field.

  2. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Mark; Horwitz, E. Philip

    2003-01-01

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  3. Solubility of pllutonium in alkaline salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1993-02-26

    Plutonium solubility data from several studies have been evaluated. For each data set, a predictive model has been developed where appropriate. In addition, a statistical model and corresponding prediction intervals for plutonium solubility as a quadratic function of the hydroxide concentration have been developed. Because of the wide range of solution compositions, the solubility of plutonium can vary by as much as three orders of magnitude for any given hydroxide concentration and still remain within the prediction interval. Any nuclear safety assessments that depend on the maximum amount of plutonium dissolved in alkaline salt solutions should use concentrations at least as great as the upper prediction limits developed in this study. To increase the confidence in the prediction model, it is recommended that additional solubility tests be conducted at low hydroxide concentrations and with all of the other solution components involved. To validate the model for application to actual waste solutions, it is recommended that the plutonium solubilities in actual waste solutions be determined and compared to the values predicted by the quadratic model.

  4. Salt- and alkaline-tolerance are linked in Acacia.

    PubMed

    Bui, Elisabeth N; Thornhill, Andrew; Miller, Joseph T

    2014-07-01

    Saline or alkaline soils present a strong stress on plants that together may be even more deleterious than alone. Australia's soils are old and contain large, sometimes overlapping, areas of high salt and alkalinity. Acacia and other Australian plant lineages have evolved in this stressful soil environment and present an opportunity to understand the evolution of salt and alkalinity tolerance. We investigate this evolution by predicting the average soil salinity and pH for 503 Acacia species and mapping the response onto a maximum-likelihood phylogeny. We find that salinity and alkalinity tolerance have evolved repeatedly and often together over 25 Ma of the Acacia radiation in Australia. Geographically restricted species are often tolerant of extreme conditions. Distantly related species are sympatric in the most extreme soil environments, suggesting lack of niche saturation. There is strong evidence that many Acacia have distributions affected by salinity and alkalinity and that preference is lineage specific.

  5. Salt- and alkaline-tolerance are linked in Acacia

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Elisabeth N.; Thornhill, Andrew; Miller, Joseph T.

    2014-01-01

    Saline or alkaline soils present a strong stress on plants that together may be even more deleterious than alone. Australia's soils are old and contain large, sometimes overlapping, areas of high salt and alkalinity. Acacia and other Australian plant lineages have evolved in this stressful soil environment and present an opportunity to understand the evolution of salt and alkalinity tolerance. We investigate this evolution by predicting the average soil salinity and pH for 503 Acacia species and mapping the response onto a maximum-likelihood phylogeny. We find that salinity and alkalinity tolerance have evolved repeatedly and often together over 25 Ma of the Acacia radiation in Australia. Geographically restricted species are often tolerant of extreme conditions. Distantly related species are sympatric in the most extreme soil environments, suggesting lack of niche saturation. There is strong evidence that many Acacia have distributions affected by salinity and alkalinity and that preference is lineage specific. PMID:25079493

  6. Method of increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Shearer, J.A.; Turner, C.B.; Johnson, I.

    1980-03-13

    A system and method for increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth carbonates to scrub sulfur dioxide produced during the fluidized bed combustion of coal in which partially sulfated alkaline earth carbonates are hydrated in a fluidized bed to crack the sulfate coating and convert the alkaline earth oxide to the hydroxide. Subsequent dehydration of the sulfate-hydroxide to a sulfate-oxide particle produces particles having larger pore size, increased porosity, decreased grain size and additional sulfation capacity. A continuous process is disclosed.

  7. Method of increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Shearer, John A.; Turner, Clarence B.; Johnson, Irving

    1982-01-01

    A system and method for increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth carbonates to scrub sulfur dioxide produced during the fluidized bed combustion of coal in which partially sulfated alkaline earth carbonates are hydrated in a fluidized bed to crack the sulfate coating and convert the alkaline earth oxide to the hydroxide. Subsequent dehydration of the sulfate-hydroxide to a sulfate-oxide particle produces particles having larger pore size, increased porosity, decreased grain size and additional sulfation capacity. A continuous process is disclosed.

  8. Solubility of plutonium and uranium in alkaline salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.; Fleischman, S.D.

    1993-02-12

    The solubility of plutonium and uranium in alkaline salt solutions, which will be processed in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process, was investigated to screen for significant factors and interactions among the factors comprising the salt solutions. The factors included in the study were hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, sulfate, carbonate, and temperature. Over the range of factor concentrations studied, the level of hydroxide in the solution is not sufficient alone to predict the resulting concentration of plutonium and uranium in the solution. Other constituents of the salt solution play an important role in determining the amount of plutonium and uranium in solution. Statistical models predicting the plutonium and uranium concentrations over the range of salt solutions investigated are provided.

  9. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-11-28

    Electrolyte salts are disclosed for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts. 2 figs.

  10. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, Narayan; Ingersoll, David

    1995-01-01

    Electrolyte salts for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts.

  11. Study of point defects in alkaline-earth sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, R.; Kunz, A.B.; Vail, J.M.

    1988-11-01

    The results of a computer simulation study of point defects including vacancy, interstitial, and F/sup +/ center in alkaline-earth sulfides are presented. The study is based on ICECAP/HADES simulation procedures and uses empirical interionic potentials obtained from the analysis of macroscopic data for these materials. The results predict the dominance of Schottky disorder and suggest that vacancy migration predominates in alkaline-earth sulfides. Furthermore, the calculated F/sup +/ center absorption energy is in good agreement with the experimental data deduced from the optical stimulated studies in these materials.

  12. Tuning NaYF4 Nanoparticles through Alkaline Earth Doping

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xian; Peng, Dengfeng; Wang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Phase and size of lanthanide-doped nanoparticles are the most important characteristics that dictate optical properties of these nanoparticles and affect their technological applications. Herein, we present a systematic study to examine the effect of alkaline earth doping on the formation of NaYF4 upconversion nanoparticles. We show that alkaline earth doping has a dual function of tuning particle size of hexagonal phase NaYF4 nanoparticles and stabilizing cubic phase NaYF4 nanoparticles depending on composition and concentration of the dopant ions. The study described here represents a facile and general strategy to tuning the properties of NaYF4 upconversion nanoparticles. PMID:28348353

  13. Specialties of distributions of alkaline-earth metals in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Jinchuan; Fan Minqiang

    1997-12-31

    Four different ranks of coal have been sampled and separated into different density fractions by Float-Sink. The contents of some trace elements in each density fraction has been analyzed by ICAP. The analyzed data show that the alkaline-earth metals (Be, Sr, and Ba) have their special distributions in coal: Be and Sr may exist in the form of organic matter. Ba often has the highest content in the middle density fraction (1.4--1.5). The relative relationship between ash (or sulfur) and the trace element in a certain type of coal was obtained by using linear regression approach. Results show that there is no significant correlation between the contents of ash or sulfur and those of Be, Sr, and Ba. On the other hand, the linear regression was done among the trace elements of 17 types of coal. The results also show that there is no significant correlation between ash or sulfur and alkaline-earth metals.

  14. Theoretical study of the alkali and alkaline-earth monosulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Ab initio calculations have been used to obtain accurate spectroscopic constants for the X2Pi and A2Sigma(+) states of the alkali sulfides and the X1Sigma(+), a3Pi, and A1Pi states of the alkaline-earth sulfides. In contrast to the alkali oxides, the alkali sulfides are found to have X2Pi ground states, due to the larger electrostatic interaction. Dissociation energies of 3.27 eV for BeS, 2.32 eV for MgS, 3.29 eV for CaS, and 3.41 eV for SrS have been obtained for the X1Sigma(+) states of the alkaline-earth sulfides, in good agreement with experimental results. Core correlation is shown to increase the Te values for the a3Pi and A1Pi states of MgS, CaS, and SrS.

  15. Structure elucidation of alkaline earth impregnated MCM-41 type mesoporous materials obtained by direct synthesis: An experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz, Gizeuda L.; Silva, Francisco das Chagas M.; Araújo, Maciel M.; Lima, Francisco das Chagas A.; Luz, Geraldo E.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, MCM-41 were synthesized hydrothermally and functionalized with calcium and strontium salts by direct method, using the Si/M = 50 molar ratio, in order to elucidate the way as the alkaline earth is incorporated on MCM-41 molecular sieve. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption and theoretical calculations by DFT method. Experimental results and computer simulations showed that the alkaline earths were incorporated on MCM-41 through a complex structure, which negatively influences on basic sites formation.

  16. Steady-state superradiance with alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Meiser, D.; Holland, M. J.

    2010-03-15

    Alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms with ultranarrow transitions open the door to a new regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics. That regime is characterized by a critical photon number that is many orders of magnitude smaller than what can be achieved in conventional systems. We show that it is possible to achieve superradiance in steady state with such systems. We discuss the basic underlying mechanisms as well as the key experimental requirements.

  17. Advances in the growth of alkaline-Earth halide single crystals for scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Neal, J. S.; Cherepy, N. J.; Beck, P. R.; Payne, S. A.; Burger, A.; Rowe, E.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2014-09-01

    Alkaline-earth scintillators such as strontium iodide and other alkaline-earth halides activated with divalent europium represent some of the most efficient and highest energy resolution scintillators for use as gamma-ray detectors in a wide range of applications. These applications include the areas of nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, the detection of undeclared nuclear material, nuclear physics and materials science, medical diagnostics, space physics, high energy physics, and radiation monitoring systems for first responders, police, and fire/rescue personnel. Recent advances in the growth of large single crystals of these scintillator materials hold the promise of higher crystal yields and significantly lower detector production costs. In the present work, we describe new processing protocols that, when combined with our molten salt filtration methods, have led to advances in achieving a significant reduction of cracking effects during the growth of single crystals of SrI2:Eu2+. In particular, we have found that extended pumping on the molten crystalgrowth charge under vacuum for time periods extending up to 48 hours is generally beneficial in compensating for variations in the alkaline-earth halide purity and stoichiometry of the materials as initially supplied by commercial sources. These melt-pumping and processing techniques are now being applied to the purification of CaI2:Eu2+ and some mixed-anion europium-doped alkaline-earth halides prior to single-crystal growth by means of the vertical Bridgman technique. The results of initial studies of the effects of aliovalent doping of SrI2:Eu2+ on the scintillation characteristics of this material are also described.

  18. Advances in the growth of alkaline-earth halide single crystals for scintillator detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Kolopus, James A; Neal, John S; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Beck, P; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline-earth scintillators such as strontium iodide and other alkaline-earth halides activated with divalent europium represent some of the most efficient and highest energy resolution scintillators for use as gamma-ray detectors in a wide range of applications. These applications include the areas of nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, the detection of undeclared nuclear material, nuclear physics and materials science, medical diagnostics, space physics, high energy physics, and radiation monitoring systems for first responders, police, and fire/rescue personnel. Recent advances in the growth of large single crystals of these scintillator materials hold the promise of higher crystal yields and significantly lower detector production costs. In the present work, we describe new processing protocols that, when combined with our molten salt filtration methods, have led to advances in achieving a significant reduction of cracking effects during the growth of single crystals of SrI2:Eu2+. In particular, we have found that extended pumping on the molten crystal-growth charge under vacuum for time periods extending up to 48 hours is generally beneficial in compensating for variations in the alkaline-earth halide purity and stoichiometry of the materials as initially supplied by commercial sources. These melt-pumping and processing techniques are now being applied to the purification of CaI2:Eu2+ and some mixed-anion europium-doped alkaline-earth halides prior to single-crystal growth by means of the vertical Bridgman technique. The results of initial studies of the effects of aliovalent doping of SrI2:Eu2+ on the scintillation characteristics of this material are also described.

  19. Nano porous alkaline earth metal silicates as free fatty acid adsorbents from Crude Palm Oil (CPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masmur, Indra; Sembiring, Seri Bima; Bangun, Nimpan; Kaban, Jamaran; Putri, Nabila Karina

    2017-01-01

    Free fatty acids(FFA) from Crude Palm Oil (CPO) have been adsorbed by alkaline earth metal silicate (M-silicate : M = Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) adsorbents in ethanol using batch method. The adsorbents were prepared from the chloride salts of alkaline metals and Na2SiO3. The resulting white solid of the alkaline earth metal silicates were then heated at 800°C for 3 hours to enlarge their porosities. All adsorbents were characterized by SEM-EDX, XRD and BET. The EDX spectrum of SEM-EDX showed the appearance of all elements in the adsorbents, and the XRD spectrum of all adsorbents showed that they have crystobalite structure. The porosity of the adsorbents calculated by BET method showed that the porosities of the adsorbents range from 2.0884 - 2.0969 nm. All the adsorbents were used to adsorb the FFA from CPO containing 4.79%, 7.3%, 10.37% and 13.34% of FFA. The ratio of adsorbent to CPO to be used in adsorption of FFA from CPO were made 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3, with adsorption time of 1 hour. We found that the maximum adsorption of FFA from CPO was given by Ca-Silicate adsorbent which was between 69.86 - 94.78%, while the lowest adsorption was shown by Mg-silicate adsorbent which was 49.32 -74.53%.

  20. Elucidating how bamboo salt interacts with supported lipid membranes: influence of alkalinity on membrane fluidity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong Hee; Choi, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Min Chul; Park, Jae Hyeon; Herrin, Jason Scott; Kim, Seung Hyun; Lee, Haiwon; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-07-01

    Bamboo salt is a traditional medicine produced from sea salt. It is widely used in Oriental medicine and is an alkalizing agent with reported antiinflammatory, antimicrobial and chemotherapeutic properties. Notwithstanding, linking specific molecular mechanisms with these properties has been challenging to establish in biological systems. In part, this issue may be related to bamboo salt eliciting nonspecific effects on components found within these systems. Herein, we investigated the effects of bamboo salt solution on supported lipid bilayers as a model system to characterize the interaction between lipid membranes and bamboo salt. The atomic composition of unprocessed and processed bamboo salts was first analyzed by mass spectrometry, and we identified several elements that have not been previously reported in other bamboo salt preparations. The alkalinity of hydrated samples was also measured and determined to be between pH 10 and 11 for bamboo salts. The effect of processed bamboo salt solutions on the fluidic properties of a supported lipid bilayer on glass was next investigated by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis. It was demonstrated that, with increasing ionic strength of the bamboo salt solution, the fluidity of a lipid bilayer increased. On the contrary, increasing the ionic strength of near-neutral buffer solutions with sodium chloride salt diminished fluidity. To reconcile these two observations, we identified that solution alkalinity is critical for the effects of bamboo salt on membrane fluidity, as confirmed using three additional commercial bamboo salt preparations. Extended-DLVO model calculations support that the effects of bamboo salt on lipid membranes are due to the alkalinity imparting a stronger hydration force. Collectively, the results of this work demonstrate that processing of bamboo salt strongly affects its atomic composition and that the alkalinity of bamboo salt solutions contributes to its effect on membrane

  1. Proposal for Laser Cooling of Alkaline Earth Monoalkoxide Free Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Louis; Kozyryev, Ivan; Matsuda, Kyle; Doyle, John M.

    2016-05-01

    Cold samples of polyatomic molecules will open new avenues in physics, chemistry, and quantum science. Non-diagonal Franck-Condon factors, technically challenging wavelengths, and the lack of strong electronic transitions inhibit direct laser cooling of nonlinear molecules. We identify a scheme for optical cycling in certain molecules with six or more atoms. Replacing hydrogen in alcohols with an alkaline earth metal (M) leads to alkaline earth monoalkoxide free radicals (MOR), which have favorable properties for laser cooling. M-O bond is very ionic, so the metal orbitals are slightly affected by the nature of R on the ligand. Diagonal Franck-Condon factors, laser accessible transitions, and a small hyperfine structure make MOR molecules suitable for laser cooling. We explore a scheme for optical cycling on the A - X transition of SrOCH3 . Molecules lost to dark vibrational states will be repumped on the B - X transition. Extension to larger species is possible through expansion of the R group since transitions involve the promotion of the metal-centered nonbonding valence electron. We will detail our estimations of the Franck-Condon factors, simulations of the cooling process and describe progress towards the Doppler cooling of MOR polyatomics.

  2. Recent advances in Rydberg physics using alkaline-earth atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunning, F. B.; Killian, T. C.; Yoshida, S.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2016-06-01

    In this brief review, the opportunities that the alkaline-earth elements offer for studying new aspects of Rydberg physics are discussed. For example, the bosonic alkaline-earth isotopes have zero nuclear spin which eliminates many of the complexities present in alkali Rydberg atoms, permitting simpler and more direct comparison between theory and experiment. The presence of two valence electrons allows the production of singlet and triplet Rydberg states that can exhibit a variety of attractive or repulsive interactions. The availability of weak intercombination lines is advantageous for laser cooling and for applications such as Rydberg dressing. Excitation of one electron to a Rydberg state leaves behind an optically active core ion allowing, for high-L states, the optical imaging of Rydberg atoms and their (spatial) manipulation using light scattering. The second valence electron offers the possibility of engineering long-lived doubly excited states such as planetary atoms. Recent advances in both theory and experiment are highlighted together with a number of possible directions for the future.

  3. Measurement of thermophysical properties of molten salts: Mixtures of alkaline carbonate salts

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, N.; Matsuura, M.; Makino, A.; Hirata, T.; Kato, Y.

    1988-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop measuring methods for the thermal diffusivity, the specific heat capacity, and the density of molten salts, as well as to measure these properties of mixtures of alkaline carbonate salts. The thermal diffusivity is measured by the stepwise heating method. The sample salt is poured into a thin container, and as a result, a three-layered cell is formed. The thermal diffusivity is obtained from the ratio of temperature rises at different times measured at the rear surface of the cell when the front surface is heated by the stepwise energy from an iodine lamp. The specific heat capacity is measured using an adiabatic scanning calorimeter. The density is measured by Archimedes' principle. Thermal conductivity is determined from the above properties. Measured samples are Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ (42.7-57.3, 50.0-50.0, and 62.0-38.0 mol%).

  4. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading for Alkaline-Earth Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reschovsky, Benjamin J.; Barker, Daniel S.; Pisenti, Neal C.; Campbell, Gretchen K.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). This is achieved by adding a depumping laser addressing the 3P1 level. For the 3P1 -->3S1 (688-nm) transition in strontium, the depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65 % for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30 % for the fermionic isotope. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, intensity, and beam size. To understand the results, we develop a one-dimensional rate equation model of the system, which is in good agreement with the data. We discuss the use of other transitions in strontium for accelerated trap loading and the application of the technique to other alkaline-earth-like atoms.

  5. Structural diversity of alkaline-earth 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balendra; Ramanan, Arunachalam

    2017-03-01

    Exploration of the structural landscape of the system containing divalent alkaline-earth metal ion (Mg, Ca and Sr) with the rigid 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylic acid (TDC) under varying solvothermal condition (DMF, DMA and DEF) yielded five new crystals: [Mg(TDC) (DEF)2(H2O)1/2] (1), [Ca(TDC) (DMA)] (2), [Ca(TDC) (DMA) (H2O)] (3), [Sr(TDC) (DMA)] (4) and [Sr(TDC) (DMA) (H2O)] (5) and two known solids. Single crystal structures of all the solids are characteristic of extended coordination interaction between metal and carboxylate ions. While the smaller magnesium ion crystallized into a 2D coordination polymer, the larger calcium and strontium compounds resulted into the growth of 3D metal organic frameworks. All the solids show blue emission arising from intra ligand charge transfer.

  6. Atomic hydrogen in. gamma. -irradiated hydroxides of alkaline-earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Yurik, T.K.; Barsova, L.I.

    1982-04-01

    Atomic hydrogen is an important intermediate product formed in the radiolysis of compounds containing X-H bonds. H atoms have been detected in irradiated matrices of H/sub 2/ and inert gases at 4/sup 0/K, in irradiated ice and frozen solutions of acids in irradiated salts and in other systems. Here results are presented from a study of the ESR spectra of H atoms generated in polycrystalline hydroxides of alkaline-earth elements that have been ..gamma..-irradiated at 77/sup 0/K, after preliminary treatment at various temperatures. For the first time stabilization of atomic hydrogen in ..gamma..-irradiated polycrystalline alkaline-earth element hydroxides has been detected. Depending on the degree of dehydroxylation, several types of hydrogen atoms may be stabilized in the hydroxides, these hydrogen atoms having different radiospectroscopic parameters. In the magnesium-calcium-strontium-barium hydroxide series, a regular decrease has been found in the hfi constants for H atoms with the cations in the immediate surroundings. A direct proportionality has been found between the parameters ..delta..A/A/sub 0/ and the polarizability of the cation.

  7. Alkaline Earth Core Level Photoemission Spectroscopy of High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines photoemission measurements of the alkaline Earth core levels of high-temperature superconductors and related materials, models that seek to explain the large negative shifts observed relative to the corresponding alkaline Earth metals, and the effect of lattice site disorder on the core level spectra and the presence or absence of intrinsic surface peaks.

  8. Linear alkaline earth metal phosphinate coordination polymers: synthesis and structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Rood, Jeffrey A; Huttenstine, Ashley L; Schmidt, Zachery A; White, Michael R; Oliver, Allen G

    2014-06-01

    Reaction of alkaline earth metal salts with diphenylphosphinic acid in dimethylformamide solvent afforded four coordination polymers: [Mg3(O2PPh2)6(DMF)2]·2DMF (I), [Ca(O2PPh2)2(DMF)2] (II), [Sr(O2PPh2)2(DMF)2] (III) and [Ba(O2PPh2)2(DMF)2] (IV) (where DMF is N,N-dimethylformamide). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction revealed that all four compounds produce linear chain structures in the solid state, with the Ca, Sr and Ba forming isostructural crystals. The bulk materials were characterized by FT-IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy and elemental analyses.

  9. Improvement of thermoelectric properties of alkaline-earth hexaborides

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Masatoshi . E-mail: takeda@mech.nagaokaut.ac.jp; Terui, Manabu; Takahashi, Norihito; Ueda, Noriyoshi

    2006-09-15

    Thermoelectric (TE) and transport properties of alkaline-earth hexaborides were examined to investigate the possibility of improvement in their TE performance. As carrier concentration increased, electrical conductivity increased and the absolute value of the Seebeck coefficient decreased monotonically, while carrier mobility was almost unchanged. These results suggest that the electrical properties of the hexaboride depend largely on carrier concentration. Thermal conductivity of the hexaboride was higher than 10 W/m K even at 1073 K, which is relatively high among TE materials. Alloys of CaB{sub 6} and SrB{sub 6} were prepared in order to reduce lattice thermal conductivity. Whereas the Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity of the alloys were intermediate between those of CaB{sub 6} and SrB{sub 6} single phases, the thermal conductivities of the alloys were lower than those of both single phases. The highest TE performance was obtained in the vicinity of Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}B{sub 6}, indicating that alloying is effective in improving the performance. - Graphical abstract: Thermoelectric figure-of-merit, ZT, for (Ca,Sr)B{sub 6} alloys. The highest ZT value of 0.35 at 1073 K was obtained due to effective reduction of thermal conductivity by alloying.

  10. Effect of alkaline-earth ions on the dynamics of alkali ions in bismuthate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, A.; Ghosh, A.

    2005-12-01

    The effect of alkaline earth ions on the dynamics of Li+ ions in bismuthate glasses has been studied in the temperature range 353-503K and in the frequency range 10Hz-2MHz . The dc conductivity increases and activation energy decreases with the increase of a particular alkaline earth content for the glasses with a fixed alkali content. The increased modification of the network due to the increase in alkaline earth content in the compositions is responsible for the increasing conductivity. Also the compositions with smaller alkaline earth ions were found to exhibit higher conductivity. Although the conductivity increases with the decrease of ionic radii of alkaline earth ions, the activation energy shows a maximum for the Sr ion. The electric modulus and the conductivity formalisms have been employed to study the relaxation dynamics of charge carriers in these glasses. The alkali ions were observed to change their dynamics with the change of the alkaline earth ions. The same anomalous trend for activation energy for the conductivity relaxation frequency and the hopping frequency was also observed for glasses containing SrO. It was also observed that the mobile lithium ion concentrations are independent of nature of alkaline earth ions in these glasses.

  11. Physical and electrochemical properties of alkaline earth doped, rare earth vanadates

    SciTech Connect

    Adijanto, Lawrence; Balaji Padmanabhan, Venu; Holmes, Kevin J.; Gorte, Raymond J.; Vohs, John M.

    2012-06-15

    The effect of partial substitution of alkaline earth (AE) ions, Sr{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+}, for the rare earth (RE) ions, La{sup 3+}, Ce{sup 3+}, Pr{sup 3+}, and Sm{sup 3+}, on the physical properties of REVO{sub 4} compounds were investigated. The use of the Pechini method to synthesize the vanadates allowed for high levels of AE substitution to be obtained. Coulometric titration was used to measure redox isotherms for these materials and showed that the addition of the AE ions increased both reducibility and electronic conductivity under typical solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode conditions, through the formation of compounds with mixed vanadium valence. In spite of their high electronic conductivity, REVO{sub 4}-yttira stabilized zirconia (YSZ) composite anodes exhibited only modest performance when used in SOFCs operating with H{sub 2} fuel at 973 K due to their low catalytic activity. High performance was obtained, however, after the addition of a small amount of catalytically active Pd to the anode. - Graphical abstract: Coulometric titration isotherms for ({open_square}) LaVO{sub 4}, ( White-Circle ) PrVO{sub 4}, ( Lozenge ) CeVO{sub 4}, ( Black-Up-Pointing-Triangle ) Ce{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}VO{sub 3.85}, and ( Black-Square ) Ce{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}VO{sub 3.85}, at 973 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Infiltration procedures were used to prepare SOFC anodes from various vanadates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doping of Alkaline Earth to Rare Earth Vanadates showed to improve conductivity and chemical stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkaline Earth Doped Rare Earth Vanadates-YSZ composites showed conductivities as high as 5 S cm{sup -1} at 973 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As with other ceramic anodes, the addition of a catalyst was required to achieve low anode impedance.

  12. Physical and electrochemical properties of alkaline earth doped, rare earth vanadates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adijanto, Lawrence; Balaji Padmanabhan, Venu; Holmes, Kevin J.; Gorte, Raymond J.; Vohs, John M.

    2012-06-01

    The effect of partial substitution of alkaline earth (AE) ions, Sr2+ and Ca2+, for the rare earth (RE) ions, La3+, Ce3+, Pr3+, and Sm3+, on the physical properties of REVO4 compounds were investigated. The use of the Pechini method to synthesize the vanadates allowed for high levels of AE substitution to be obtained. Coulometric titration was used to measure redox isotherms for these materials and showed that the addition of the AE ions increased both reducibility and electronic conductivity under typical solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode conditions, through the formation of compounds with mixed vanadium valence. In spite of their high electronic conductivity, REVO4-yttira stabilized zirconia (YSZ) composite anodes exhibited only modest performance when used in SOFCs operating with H2 fuel at 973 K due to their low catalytic activity. High performance was obtained, however, after the addition of a small amount of catalytically active Pd to the anode.

  13. Bactericidal activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids towards bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of caproic, caprylic, capric, lauric, and myristic acids were determined using the agar diffusion assay. A 0.5M concentration of each fatty acid (FA) was dissolved in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH), and pH of the mixtures was adjusted to 10.5 with citric aci...

  14. Release characteristics of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species during biomass pyrolysis and steam gasification process.

    PubMed

    Long, Jiang; Song, Hu; Jun, Xiang; Sheng, Su; Lun-Shi, Sun; Kai, Xu; Yao, Yao

    2012-07-01

    Investigating the release characteristics of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) is of potential interest because of AAEM's possible useful service as catalysts in biomass thermal conversion. In this study, three kinds of typical Chinese biomass were selected to pyrolyse and their chars were subsequently steam gasified in a designed quartz fixed-bed reactor to investigate the release characteristics of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs). The results indicate that 53-76% of alkali metal and 27-40% of alkaline earth metal release in pyrolysis process, as well as 12-34% of alkali metal and 12-16% of alkaline earth metal evaporate in char gasification process, and temperature is not the only factor to impact AAEMs emission. The releasing characteristics of AAEMs during pyrolysis and char gasification process of three kinds of biomass were discussed in this paper.

  15. More arrows in the quiver: new pathways and old problems with heavy alkaline earth metal diphenylmethanides.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jacob S; Ruhlandt-Senge, Karin

    2004-03-05

    Progress in the field of sigma-bonded alkaline earth organometallics has been handicapped by numerous complications, such as high reactivity, low solubility, and the limited availability of suitable starting materials. Here we present two synthetic methods, hydrocarbon elimination and desilylation, as alternative routes into this chemistry. A novel barium diphenylmethanide was prepared using these routes delineating that both methods provide a powerful, versatile synthetic access route to an extended library of organometallic alkaline earth derivatives.

  16. Process for preparing higher oxides of the alkali and alkaline earth metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhukhan, P.; Bell, A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    High purity inorganic higher oxides of the alkali and alkaline earth metals are prepared by subjecting the hydroxide of the alkali and alkaline earth metal to a radio frequency discharge sustained in oxygen. The process is particulary adaptable to the production of high purity potassium superoxide by subjecting potassium hydroxide to glow discharge sustained in oxygen under the pressure of about 0.75 to 1.00 torr.

  17. Structure and ionic diffusion of alkaline-earth ions in mixed cation glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Sushko, Petr; Duffy, Dorothy M.

    2015-08-15

    A series of mixed cation silicate glasses of the composition A2O – 2MO – 4SiO2, with A=Li,Na,K and M=Ca,Sr,Ba has been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations in order to understand the effect of the nature of the cations on the mobility of the alkaline-earth ions within the glass network. The size of the alkaline-earth cation was found to affect the inter-atomic distances, the coordination number distributions and the bond angle distributions , whereas the medium-range order was almost unaffected by the type of the cation. All the alkaline-earth cations contribute to lower vibrational frequencies but it is observed that that there is a shift to smaller frequencies and the vibrational density of states distribution gets narrower as the size of the alkaline-earth increases. The results from our modeling for the ionic diffusion of the alkaline-earth cations are in a qualitative agreement with the experimental observations in that there is a distinct correlation between the activation energy for diffusion of alkaline earth-ions and the cation radii ratio. An asymmetrical linear behavior in the diffusion activation energy with increasing size difference is observed. The results can be described on the basis of a theoretical model that relates the diffusion activation energy to the electrostatic interactions of the cations with the oxygens and the elastic deformation of the silicate network.

  18. [Broad excitation band alkaline-earth silicate luminescent materials activated by rare earth and its applications].

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Lei, Ming-Kai; Luo, Xi-Xian; Xiao, Zhi-Guo

    2008-01-01

    Series of novel broad excitation band phosphors M2 MgSis O7 : Eu, Dy(M = Ca, Sr) were prepared by a high temperature solid-state reaction method. The crystal structure of compound was characterized. And the effects of part substitution of alkaline-earth on crystal structure, photoluminescence spectra and luminescence properties were also investigated. It is found that the excitation band of silicate luminescent materials extend to visible region and they exhibit yellow, green and blue long after-glow luminescence after excited by ultraviolet or visible light. Ca MgSi O7 : Eu, Dy luminescent materials can be excited effectively under the 450-480 nm range and exhibit a strong emission at 536 nm, nicely combining with blue light emitted by InGaN chips to produce white light. This promises the silicate luminescent materials a potential yellow phosphor for white LED.

  19. Effects of various salts on the steady-state enzymatic activity of E. coli alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Poe, R W; Sangadala, V S; Brewer, J M

    1993-05-15

    Seventeen salts were tested at various concentrations for their effects on E. coli alkaline phosphatase steady-state activity. Three effects were distinguished: a general ionic strength effect, and weaker cation and anion effects. 1. All salts tested, including those with "noninteracting" cations and anions, stimulate alkaline phosphatase activity usually ca. 100% at moderate (0.05-0.3 M) concentrations. 2. Cations such as Na+ and Li+ produce further increases in activity at concentrations up to 1 M. The noninteracting cations tetramethylammonium and tetrapropylammonium produce lower activities at these concentrations. These do not provide the secondary stimulatory effect of cations such as Na+ or Li+. 3. Anions associated with greater "salting in" effectiveness such as thiocyanate also reduce activity at ca. 1 M concentrations. These latter effects are not dependent on protein concentration so they probably do not involve subunit dissociation. There is little effect on the fluorescence or fluorescence-polarization spectrum of the enzyme so there is no general effect of 1 M salts on the conformation of the protein. The Michaelis constant for the substrate, p-nitrophenylphosphate, and inhibition constant for inorganic phosphate are increased to some extent by salts, but the increase in activity is due to an increase in Vmax. Our working hypothesis is that increased ionic strength weakens electrostatic interactions, enabling noncovalently bound phosphate to dissociate more rapidly.

  20. Identification of a major QTL allele from wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc.) for increasing alkaline salt tolerance in soybean.

    PubMed

    Tuyen, D D; Lal, S K; Xu, D H

    2010-07-01

    Salt-affected soils are generally classified into two main categories, sodic (alkaline) and saline. Our previous studies showed that the wild soybean accession JWS156-1 (Glycine soja) from the Kinki area of Japan was tolerant to NaCl salt, and the quantitative trait locus (QTL) for NaCl salt tolerance was located on soybean linkage group N (chromosome 3). Further investigation revealed that the wild soybean accession JWS156-1 also had a higher tolerance to alkaline salt stress. In the present study, an F(6) recombinant inbred line mapping population (n = 112) and an F(2) population (n = 149) derived from crosses between a cultivated soybean cultivar Jackson and JWS156-1 were used to identify QTL for alkaline salt tolerance in soybean. Evaluation of soybean alkaline salt tolerance was carried out based on salt tolerance rating (STR) and leaf chlorophyll content (SPAD value) after treatment with 180 mM NaHCO(3) for about 3 weeks under greenhouse conditions. In both populations, a significant QTL for alkaline salt tolerance was detected on the molecular linkage group D2 (chromosome 17), which accounted for 50.2 and 13.0% of the total variation for STR in the F(6) and the F(2) populations, respectively. The wild soybean contributed to the tolerance allele in the progenies. Our results suggest that QTL for alkaline salt tolerance is different from the QTL for NaCl salt tolerance found previously in this wild soybean genotype. The DNA markers closely associated with the QTLs might be useful for marker-assisted selection to pyramid tolerance genes in soybean for both alkaline and saline stresses.

  1. Dynamics of dipolar defects in rare earth-doped alkaline-earth fluoride crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnock, Forrest Taylor

    Alkaline-earth fluoride crystals such as SrF2 provide an excellent sample material for investigating the physics of point defects in crystal lattices. High quality crystals are easily grown, and they readily accept many dopant ions into the lattice, particularly rare earth ions. Rare earth dopant ions (typically trivalent) occupy substitutional sites in the lattice by replacing a Sr2+ ion. Due to the extra charge of the rare earth ion, charge compensation is often provided by an extra fluoride ion (F--) located in a nearby interstitial position. If located in the nearest-neighbor (nn) interstitial position, it forms a defect with C4n symmetry; if located in the next-nearest-neighbor (nnn) intersitial position, it forms a defect with C3n symmetry. Given sufficient thermal energy, this interstitial F ion can move to adjacent interstitial sites and hence reorient the defect. The rate w at which the ion moves from one interstitial site to another is well described by a simple Arrhenius expression: w=n0e-E/kT , where n0 is the attack frequency of the F-- and E is the activation energy. This motion can profoundly affect both the electronic polarizability of the material and the polarization of light emitted or absorbed by the rare earth ion. This thesis describes the normal mode motion of interstitial ions which may occupy either nn or nnn interstitial sites. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), I observed the relative populations of nn and nnn defects in SrF2 doped with Gd3+ as a function of temperature. These measurements show that dipolar reorientation of the nnn F occurs through the nn interstitial position. Not all interstitial F-- motion is thermally driven. Fluorescence depolarization measurements of SrF2:Pr3+ indicate that optically stimulating a Pr3+ may induce interstitial motion of a nn F--. Such motion was confirmed by showing that nn defects in SrF2:Pr3+ may be polarized at very low temperatures when the sample is illuminated with resonant light. I

  2. Rare-earth-doped bifunctional alkaline-earth metal fluoride nanocrystals via a facile microwave-assisted process.

    PubMed

    Pang, Min; Liu, Dapeng; Lei, Yongqian; Song, Shuyan; Feng, Jing; Fan, Weiqiang; Zhang, Hongjie

    2011-06-20

    Rare-earth-doped magnetic-optic bifunctional alkaline-earth metal fluoride nanocrystals have been successfully synthesized via a facile microwave-assisted process. The as-prepared nanocrystals were monodisperse and could form stable colloidal solutions in polar solvents, such as water and ethanol. They show bright-green fluorescence emisson. Furthermore, Gd(3+)-doped ones exhibit paramagnetic behavior at room temperature and superparamagnetic behavior at 2 K.

  3. 40 CFR 721.10550 - Rare earth salt of a carboxylic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rare earth salt of a carboxylic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10550 Rare earth salt of a carboxylic acid (generic). (a) Chemical... as rare earth salt of a carboxylic acid (PMN P-05-324) is subject to reporting under this section...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10550 - Rare earth salt of a carboxylic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rare earth salt of a carboxylic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10550 Rare earth salt of a carboxylic acid (generic). (a) Chemical... as rare earth salt of a carboxylic acid (PMN P-05-324) is subject to reporting under this section...

  5. Charge-separated and molecular heterobimetallic rare earth-rare earth and alkaline earth-rare earth aryloxo complexes featuring intramolecular metal-pi-arene interactions.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Glen B; Junk, Peter C; Moxey, Graeme J; Ruhlandt-Senge, Karin; St Prix, Courtney; Zuniga, Maria F

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of a rare earth metal (Ln) and a potential divalent rare earth metal (Ln') or an alkaline earth metal (Ae) with 2,6-diphenylphenol (HOdpp) at elevated temperatures (200-250 degrees C) afforded heterobimetallic aryloxo complexes, which were structurally characterised. A charge-separated species [(Ln'/Ae)(2)(Odpp)(3)][Ln(Odpp)(4)] was obtained for a range of metals, demonstrating the similarities between the chemistry of the divalent rare earth metals and the alkaline earth metals. The [(Ln'/Ae)(2)(Odpp)(3)](+) cation in the heterobimetallic structures is unusual in that it consists solely of bridging aryloxide ligands. A molecular heterobimetallic species [AeEu(Odpp)(4)] (Ae = Ca, Sr, Ba) was obtained by treating an alkaline earth metal and Eu metal with HOdpp at elevated temperatures. Similarly, [BaSr(Odpp)(4)] was prepared by treating Ba metal and Sr metal with HOdpp. Treatment of [Ba(2)(Odpp)(4)] with [Mg(Odpp)(2)(thf)(2)] in toluene afforded [Ba(2)(Odpp)(3)][Mg(Odpp)(3)(thf)]. Analogous solution-based syntheses were not possible for [(Ln'/Ae)(2)(Odpp)(3)][Ln(Odpp)(4)] complexes, for which the free-metal route was essential. As a result of the absence of additional donor ligands, the crystal structures of the heterobimetallic complexes feature extensive pi-Ph-metal interactions involving the pendant phenyl groups of the Odpp ligands, thus enabling the large electropositive metal atoms to attain coordination saturation. The charge-separated heterobimetallic species were purified by extraction with toluene/thf mixtures at ambient temperature (Ba-containing compounds) or by extraction with toluene under pressure above the boiling point of the solvent (other products). In donor solvents, heterobimetallic complexes other than those containing barium were found to fragment into homometallic species.

  6. Characterization of Laboratory Prepared Concrete Pastes Exposed to High Alkaline and High Sodium Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C. A.

    2016-06-30

    The objective of this study was to identify potential chemical degradation mechanisms for the Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) concretes, which over the performance life of the structures may be exposed to highly alkaline sodium salt solutions containing sulfate, hydroxide, and other potentially corrosive chemicals in salt solution and saltstone flush water, drain water, leachate and / or pore solution. The samples analyzed in this study were cement pastes prepared in the SIMCO Technologies, Inc. concrete laboratory. They were based on the paste fractions of the concretes used to construct the Saltstone Disposal Units (SDUs). SDU 1 and 4 concrete pastes were represented by the PV1 test specimens. The paste in the SDU 2, 3, 5, and 6 concrete was represented by the PV2 test specimens. SIMCO Technologies, Inc. selected the chemicals and proportions in the aggressive solutions to approximate proportions in the saltstone pore solution [2, 3, 5, and 6]. These test specimens were cured for 56 days in curing chamber before being immersed in aggressive solutions. After exposure, the samples were frozen to prevent additional chemical transport and reaction. Selected archived (retrieved from the freezer) samples were sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for additional characterization using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Characterization results are summarized in this report. In addition, a correlation between the oxide composition of the pastes and their chemical durability in the alkaline salt solutions is provided.

  7. Depolarizing collisions with hydrogen: Neutral and singly ionized alkaline earths

    SciTech Connect

    Manso Sainz, Rafael; Ramos, Andrés Asensio; Bueno, Javier Trujillo; Aguado, Alfredo

    2014-06-20

    Depolarizing collisions are elastic or quasielastic collisions that equalize the populations and destroy the coherence between the magnetic sublevels of atomic levels. In astrophysical plasmas, the main depolarizing collider is neutral hydrogen. We consider depolarizing rates on the lowest levels of neutral and singly ionized alkali earths Mg I, Sr I, Ba I, Mg II, Ca II, and Ba II, due to collisions with H°. We compute ab initio potential curves of the atom-H° system and solve the quantum mechanical dynamics. From the scattering amplitudes, we calculate the depolarizing rates for Maxwellian distributions of colliders at temperatures T ≤ 10,000 K. A comparative analysis of our results and previous calculations in the literature is completed. We discuss the effect of these rates on the formation of scattering polarization patterns of resonant lines of alkali earths in the solar atmosphere, and their effect on Hanle effect diagnostics of solar magnetic fields.

  8. Catalytic actions of alkaline salts in reactions between 1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid and cellulose: II. Esterification.

    PubMed

    Ji, Bolin; Tang, Peixin; Yan, Kelu; Sun, Gang

    2015-11-05

    1,2,3,4-Butanetetracarboxylic acid (BTCA) reacts with cellulose in two steps with catalysis of alkaline salts such as sodium hypophosphite: anhydride formation and esterification of anhydride with cellulose. The alkali metal ions were found effective in catalyzing formation of BTCA anhydride in a previous report. In this work, catalytic functions of the alkaline salts in the esterification reaction between BTCA anhydride and cellulose were investigated. Results revealed that acid anions play an important role in the esterification reaction by assisting removal of protons on intermediates and completion of the esterification between cellulose and BTCA. Besides, alkaline salts with lower pKa1 values of the corresponding acids are more effective ones for the reaction since addition of these salts could lead to lower pH values and higher acid anion concentrations in finishing baths. The mechanism explains the results of FTIR and wrinkle recovery angles of the fabrics cured under different temperatures and times.

  9. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 79. Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metal Pseudohalides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hála, Jiri

    2004-03-01

    This volume presents solubility data of azides, cyanides, cyanates, and thiocyanates of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, and ammonium. Covered are binary and ternary systems in all solvents. No solubility data have been found for some of the compounds of alkali metals, alkaline metals, and ammonium. These include beryllium and magnesium azides, lithium, rubidium cesium, ammonium, and alkaline earth cyanates and cyanides, and beryllium thiocyanate. Likewise, no solubility data seem to exist for selenocyanates of the mentioned metals and ammonium. The literature has been covered up to the middle of 2001, and there was a great effort to have the literature survey as complete as possible. The few documents which remained unavailable to the editor, and could not be included in the volume, are listed in the Appendix. For some compounds it was not possible to show the Chemical Abstracts registry numbers since these have not been assigned. For this reason, the registry number index is incomplete.

  10. Systematic studies of the mass spectrometric properties of alkaline earth metal cationized amino acids and peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küjckelmann, Ulrich; Müller, Dietrich; Weber, Carsten

    1997-07-01

    The results of a systematic study of the gas phase interactions of α-amino acids and peptides (4-15 amino acids) with alkaline earth metals, observed with mass spectrometric techniques, are presented. Furthermore, a model for the cationization with calcium at the C-terminal amino acid arginine in rotaviral polypeptides is presented.

  11. Recent developments in the field of organic heterobimetallic compounds of the alkaline-earth metals.

    PubMed

    Westerhausen, Matthias

    2006-10-28

    Heterobimetallic compounds of the alkaline-earth metals show a wide structural variety with strongly differing reactivity patterns. The combination of magnesium and alkali metal amides yields cyclic molecules with an extreme high reactivity which often are considered as "inverse crowns" with the metal atoms as coordination sites for Lewis bases. In other metallates of the alkaline-earth metals an activation of alkyl groups succeeds. In alkaline-earth metal zincates an inverse coordination of the type M(2)[(mu-R)(2)ZnR](2) is observed and the alkyl groups are in bridging positions between zinc and the s-block metals thus forming a very reactive M-C-Zn three-center-two-electron bond. Furthermore, the metals of the carbon group form alkaline-earth metal-silicon, -germanium and -tin bonds or, in the presence of very strong Lewis bases, even solvent-separated ion pairs. For electronegative substituents at tin an inverse coordination mode such as M[(mu-R)(2)SnR](2) is observed.

  12. Homoleptic alkaline earth metal bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide complex compounds obtained from an ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Babai, Arash; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2006-04-17

    The first homoleptic alkaline earth bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Tf2N) complexes [mppyr]2[Ca(Tf2N)4], [mppyr]2[Sr(Tf2N)4], and [mppyr][Ba(Tf2N)3] were crystallized from a solution of the respective alkaline earth bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide and the ionic liquid [mppyr][Tf2N] (mppyr = 1,1-N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium). In the calcium and strontium compounds, the alkaline earth metal (AE) is coordinated by four bidentately chelating Tf2N ligands to form isolated (distorted) square antiprismatic [AE(Tf2N)4]2- complexes which are separated by N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium cations. In contrast, the barium compound, [mppyr][Ba(Tf2N)3], forms an extended structure. Here the alkaline earth cation is surrounded by six oxygen atoms belonging to three Tf2N- anions which coordinate in a bidentate chelating fashion. Three further oxygen atoms of the same ligands are linking the Ba2+ cations to infinite (infinity)(1)[Ba(Tf2N)3] chains.

  13. Coordination Chemistry of Alkali and Alkaline-Earth Cations with Macrocyclic Ligands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Bernard

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (l) alkali and alkaline-earth cations in biology (considering naturally occurring lonophores, their X-ray structures, and physiochemical studies); (2) synthetic complexing agents for groups IA and IIA; and (3) ion transport across membranes (examining neutral macrobicyclic ligands as metal cation carriers, transport by anionic carriers,…

  14. Metal Based Synthetic Strategies and the Examination of Structure Determining Factors in Alkaline Earth Metal Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yuriko

    Last decades have witnessed a large expansion of the organometallic heavier alkaline earth metal species. However, continued growth of this promising area of chemistry has been slowed by severe restrictions and limitations in viable synthetic methodologies leading to difficulties in preparing and characterizing the target compounds. There is clearly a need for the further development of synthetic methodologies and detailed structure function analysis that will promote the further advancement of organoalkaline earth metal chemistry in applications as diverse as materials chemistry and catalysis. This thesis work greatly extends the synthetic options currently available towards organoalkaline earth metal species by introducing redox transmetallation protolysis (RTP), a reaction based on the readily available Ph3Bi as a non-toxic transmetallation agent. Based on a straightforward one-pot procedure and work-up, Ph3Bi based RTP presents a powerful synthetic alternative for the facile preparation of a large variety of heavy alkaline earth metal compounds. The second part of the thesis explores the effect of secondary non covalent interactions on the coordination chemistry as well as thermal properties of a series of novel alkali, alkaline earth, rare earth as well as heterobimetallic alkali/alkaline earth fluoroalkoxides. These compounds showcase the significance of non-covalent M···F-C and agostic interactions on metal stabilization and structural features, providing critical input on ligand design for the design of advanced metal organic vapor deposition (MOCVD) precursor materials. This work also showcases the impact of M···F-C interactions over M---co-ligand coordination, a critical precursor design element as well.

  15. Carbonatite and alkaline intrusion-related rare earth element deposits–A deposit model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, Philip L.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    The rare earth elements are not as rare in nature as their name implies, but economic deposits with these elements are not common and few deposits have been large producers. In the past 25 years, demand for rare earth elements has increased dramatically because of their wide and diverse use in high-technology applications. Yet, presently the global production and supply of rare earth elements come from only a few sources. China produces more than 95 percent of the world's supply of rare earth elements. Because of China's decision to restrict exports of these elements, the price of rare earth elements has increased and industrial countries are concerned about supply shortages. As a result, understanding the distribution and origin of rare earth elements deposits, and identifying and quantifying our nation's rare earth elements resources have become priorities. Carbonatite and alkaline intrusive complexes, as well as their weathering products, are the primary sources of rare earth elements. The general mineral deposit model summarized here is part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey's Mineral Resources Program to update existing models and develop new descriptive mineral deposit models to supplement previously published models for use in mineral-resource and mineral-environmental assessments. Carbonatite and alkaline intrusion-related REE deposits are discussed together because of their spatial association, common enrichment in incompatible elements, and similarities in genesis. A wide variety of commodities have been exploited from carbonatites and alkaline igneous rocks, such as rare earth elements, niobium, phosphate, titanium, vermiculite, barite, fluorite, copper, calcite, and zirconium. Other enrichments include manganese, strontium, tantalum, thorium, vanadium, and uranium.

  16. Ab initio study of the alkali and alkaline-earth monohydroxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Langhoff, S. R.; Partridge, H.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic study of the structures and dissociation energies of all the alkali and alkaline-earth monohydroxides is conducted. A theoretical model for determining accurate dissociation energies of ionic molecules is discussed. The obtained theoretical structures and dissociation energies of the alkali and alkaline-earth monohydroxides, respectively, are compared with experimental data. It is found that the theoretical studies of the bending potentials of BeOH, MgOH, and CaOH reveal the different admixture of covalent character in these systems. The BeOH molecule with the largest degree of covalent character is found to be bent (theta equals 147 deg). The MgOH is also linear. The theoretical dissociation energies for the alkali and akaline-earth hydroxides are thought to be accurate to 0.1 eV.

  17. Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters

    DOEpatents

    Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving; Palekar, Vishwesh M.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  18. Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters

    DOEpatents

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

    1995-01-31

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  19. Ab initio calculations on the positive ions of the alkaline-earth oxides, fluorides, and hydroxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, H.; Langhoff, S. R.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical dissociation energies are presented for the alkaline-earth fluoride, hydroxide, and oxide positive ions that are considered to be accurate to 0.1-0.2 eV. The r(e) for the positive ions are found to be consistently shorter than the corresponding neutrals by 0.07 + or -0.02 A. The bonding in the ground states is demonstrated to be of predominantly M + 2 X - character. The a 3 Pi and A 1 Pi are found to lie considerably above the X 1 Sigma + ground states of the alkaline-earth fluoride and hydroxide positive ions. The overall agreement of the theoretical ionization potentials with the available experimental appearance potentials is satisfactory; these values should represent the most accurate and consistent set available.

  20. Effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Jiang, Long; Wang, Yi; Su, Sheng; Sun, Lushi; Xu, Boyang; He, Limo; Xiang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to investigate effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures. The yield of CO, H2 and C2H4 was increased and that of CO2 was suppressed with increasing temperature. Increasing temperature could also promote depolymerization and aromatization reactions of active tars, forming heavier polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, leading to decrease of tar yields and species diversity. Diverse performance of inherent AAEMs at different temperatures significantly affected the distribution of pyrolysis products. The presence of inherent AAEMs promoted water-gas shift reaction, and enhanced the yield of H2 and CO2. Additionally, inherent AAEMs not only promoted breakage and decarboxylation/decarbonylation reaction of thermally labile hetero atoms of the tar but also enhanced thermal decomposing of heavier aromatics. Inherent AAEMs could also significantly enhance the decomposition of levoglucosan, and alkaline earth metals showed greater effect than alkali metals.

  1. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 95. Alkaline Earth Carbonates in Aqueous Systems. Part 2. Ca

    SciTech Connect

    De Visscher, Alex; Vanderdeelen, Jan

    2012-06-15

    The alkaline earth carbonates are an important class of minerals. This article is part of a volume in the IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series that compiles and critically evaluates solubility data of the alkaline earth carbonates in water and in simple aqueous electrolyte solutions. Part 1 outlined the procedure adopted in this volume, and presented the beryllium and magnesium carbonates. Part 2, the current paper, compiles and critically evaluates the solubility data of calcium carbonate. The chemical forms included are the anhydrous CaCO{sub 3} types calcite, aragonite, and vaterite, the monohydrate monohydrocalcite (CaCO{sub 3}{center_dot} H{sub 2}O), the hexahydrate ikaite (CaCO{sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O), and an amorphous form. The data were analyzed with two model variants, and thermodynamic data of each form consistent with each of the models and with the CODATA key values for thermodynamics are presented.

  2. Surface energetics of alkaline-earth metal oxides: Trends in stability and adsorption of small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajdich, Michal; Nørskov, Jens K.; Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2015-04-01

    We present a systematic theoretical investigation of the surface properties, stability, and reactivity of rocksalt type alkaline-earth metal oxides including MgO, CaO, SrO, and BaO. The accuracy of commonly used exchange-correlation density functionals (LDA, PBE, RPBE, PBEsol, BEEF-vdW, and hybrid HSE) and random-phase approximation (RPA) is evaluated and compared to existing experimental values. Calculated surface energies of the four most stable surface facets under vacuum conditions, the (100) surface, the metal and oxygen terminated octopolar (111), and the (110) surfaces, exhibit a monotonic increase in stability from MgO to BaO. On the MgO(100) surface, adsorption of CO, NO, and CH4 is characterized by physisorption while H2O chemisorbs, which is in agreement with experimental findings. We further use the on-top metal adsorption of CO and NO molecules to map out the surface energetics of each alkaline-earth metal oxide surface. The considered functionals all qualitatively predict similar adsorption energy trends. The ordering between the adsorption energies on different surface facets can be attributed to differences in the local geometrical surface structure and the electronic structure of the metal constituent of the alkaline-earth metal oxide. The striking observation that CO adsorption strength is weaker than NO adsorption on the (100) terraces as the period of the alkaline-earth metal in the oxide increases is analyzed in detail in terms of charge redistribution within the σ and π channels of adsorbates. Finally, we also present oxygen adsorption and oxygen vacancy formation energies in these oxide systems.

  3. Properties of the triplet metastable states of the alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2004-11-01

    The static and dynamic properties of the alkaline-earth-metal atoms in their metastable state are computed in a configuration interaction approach with a semiempirical model potential for the core. Among the properties determined are the scalar and tensor polarizabilities, the quadrupole moment, some of the oscillator strengths, and the dispersion coefficients of the van der Waals interaction. A simple method for including the effect of the core on the dispersion parameters is described.

  4. Energetics of alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Hui; Wu, Di; Liu, Kefeng; ...

    2016-06-30

    Alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A samples were synthesized in aqueous exchange media. They were thoroughly studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe (EMPA), thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), and high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The hydration energetics and enthalpies of formation of these zeolite A materials from constituent oxides were determined. Specifically, the hydration level of zeolite A has a linear dependence on the average ionic potential (Z/r) of the cation, from 0.894 (Rb-A) to 1.317 per TO2 (Mg-A). The formation enthalpies from oxides (25 °C) range from –93.71 ± 1.77 (K-A) to –48.02more » ± 1.85 kJ/mol per TO2 (Li-A) for hydrated alkali ion-exchanged zeolite A, and from –47.99 ± 1.20 (Ba-A) to –26.41 ± 1.71 kJ/mol per TO2 (Mg-A) for hydrated alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A. As a result, the formation enthalpy from oxides generally becomes less exothermic as Z/r increases, but a distinct difference in slope is observed between the alkali and the alkaline earth series.« less

  5. Energetics of alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hui; Wu, Di; Liu, Kefeng; Guo, Xiaofeng; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2016-06-30

    Alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A samples were synthesized in aqueous exchange media. They were thoroughly studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe (EMPA), thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), and high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The hydration energetics and enthalpies of formation of these zeolite A materials from constituent oxides were determined. Specifically, the hydration level of zeolite A has a linear dependence on the average ionic potential (Z/r) of the cation, from 0.894 (Rb-A) to 1.317 per TO2 (Mg-A). The formation enthalpies from oxides (25 °C) range from –93.71 ± 1.77 (K-A) to –48.02 ± 1.85 kJ/mol per TO2 (Li-A) for hydrated alkali ion-exchanged zeolite A, and from –47.99 ± 1.20 (Ba-A) to –26.41 ± 1.71 kJ/mol per TO2 (Mg-A) for hydrated alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A. As a result, the formation enthalpy from oxides generally becomes less exothermic as Z/r increases, but a distinct difference in slope is observed between the alkali and the alkaline earth series.

  6. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide as a novel oxygen storage material

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Qiang; Yin, Shu; Yoshida, Mizuki; Wu, Xiaoyong; Liu, Bin; Miura, Akira; Takei, Takahiro; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Sato, Tsugio

    2015-09-15

    Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) hollow nanospheres with a diameter of 50 nm have been synthesized successfully via a facial solvothermal route in a very simple system composed of only ethanol, acetic acid, SnCl{sub 4}·5H{sub 2}O and A(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·xH{sub 2}O (A = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). The synthesized undoped SnO{sub 2} and A-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres were characterized by the oxygen storage capacity (OSC), X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and the Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) technique. The OSC values of all samples were measured using thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis. The incorporation of alkaline earth metal ion into tin oxide greatly enhanced the thermal stability and OSC. Especially, Ba-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres calcined at 1000 °C for 20 h with a BET surface area of 61 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} exhibited the considerably high OSC of 457 μmol-O g{sup −1} and good thermal stability. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide has the potential to be a novel oxygen storage material.

  7. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Studies at PNNL are directed toward new solvent formulation for the practical sodium pseudohydroxide extraction systems.

  8. Effect of pH alkaline salts of fatty acids on the inhibition of bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine the effect of pH on the ability of alkaline salts of three fatty acids (FA) to inhibit growth of bacteria associated with poultry processing. FA solutions were prepared by dissolving 0.5 M concentrations of caprylic, capric, or lauric acid in separate ali...

  9. The Effect of Alkaline Earth Metal on the Cesium Loading of Ionsiv(R) IE-910 and IE-911

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F.F.

    2001-01-16

    This study investigated the effect of variances in alkaline earth metal concentrations on cesium loading of IONSIV(R) IE-911. The study focused on Savannah River Site (SRS) ''average'' solution with varying amounts of calcium, barium and magnesium.

  10. Intermolecular hydroamination of vinylarenes by iminoanilide alkaline-earth catalysts: a computational scrutiny of mechanistic pathways.

    PubMed

    Tobisch, Sven

    2014-07-14

    A thorough computational exploration of the mechanistic intricacies of the intermolecular hydroamination (HA) of vinylarenes by a recently reported class of kinetically stabilised iminoanilide [{N^N}Ae{N(SiMe3)2}⋅(THF)n] alkaline-earth amido compounds (Ae = Ca, Sr, Ba) is presented. Two distinct mechanistic pathways for catalytic HA mediated by alkaline-earth and rare-earth compounds have emerged over the years that account equally well for the specific features of the process. On one hand, a concerted proton-assisted pathway to deliver the amine product in a single step can be invoked and, on the other, a stepwise σ-insertive pathway that comprises a rapid, reversible migratory olefin insertion step linked to a less facile, irreversible Ae-C alkyl bond aminolysis. The results of the study presented herein, which employed a heavily benchmarked and reliable DFT methodology, supports a stepwise σ-insertive pathway that involves fast and reversible migratory C=C bond insertion into the polar Ae-N pyrrolido σ bond. This proceeds with strict 2,1 regioselectivity via a highly polarised four-centre transition state (TS) structure, linked to irreversible intramolecular Ae-C bond aminolysis of the alkaline-earth alkyl intermediate as the energetically favourable mechanism. Turnover-limiting aminolysis is consistent with the significant KIE measured; the DFT-derived effective barrier matches the Eyring parameter empirically determined for the best-performing {N^N}Ba(NR2) catalyst gratifyingly well. It also predicts the observed trend in reactivity (Ca

  11. Quantum phase transition of alkaline-earth fermionic atoms confined in an optical superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Valencia, J.; Franco, R.; Figueira, M. S.

    2013-03-01

    Using the density matrix renormalization group method, we evaluate the spin and charge gaps of alkaline-earth fermionic atoms in a periodic one-dimensional optical superlattice. The number of delocalized atoms is equal to the lattice size and we consider an antiferromagnetic coupling between delocalized and localized atoms. We found a quantum phase transition from a Kondo insulator spin liquid state without confining potential to a charge-gapped antiferromagnetic state with nonzero potential. For each on-site coupling, there is a critical potential point for which the spin gap vanishes and its value increases linearly with the local interaction.

  12. Single-stage sub-Doppler cooling of alkaline earth atoms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinye; Loftus, Thomas H; Dunn, Josh W; Greene, Chris H; Hall, John L; Gallagher, Alan; Ye, Jun

    2003-05-16

    We report the first experimental study of sub-Doppler cooling in alkaline earth atoms (87Sr) enabled by the presence of nuclear spin-originated magnetic degeneracy in the atomic ground state. Sub-Doppler cooling in a sigma(+)-sigma(-) configuration is achieved despite the presence of multiple, closely spaced excited states. This surprising result is confirmed by an expanded multilevel theory of the radiative cooling force. Detailed investigations of system performance have shed new insights into (sigma(+)-sigma(-)) cooling dynamics and will likely play an important role in the future development of neutral atom-based optical frequency standards.

  13. Wide-band-gap, alkaline-earth-oxide semiconductor and devices utilizing same

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Marvin M.; Chen, Yok; Kernohan, Robert H.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to novel and comparatively inexpensive semiconductor devices utilizing semiconducting alkaline-earth-oxide crystals doped with alkali metal. The semiconducting crystals are produced by a simple and relatively inexpensive process. As a specific example, a high-purity lithium-doped MgO crystal is grown by conventional techniques. The crystal then is heated in an oxygen-containing atmosphere to form many [Li].degree. defects therein, and the resulting defect-rich hot crystal is promptly quenched to render the defects stable at room temperature and temperatures well above the same. Quenching can be effected conveniently by contacting the hot crystal with room-temperature air.

  14. Liquefaction process for solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates

    DOEpatents

    Epperly, William R.; Deane, Barry C.; Brunson, Roy J.

    1982-01-01

    An improved liquefaction process wherein wall scale and particulate agglomeration during the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates is reduced and/or eliminated by subjecting the solid carbonaceous materials to controlled cyclic cavitation during liquefaction. It is important that the solid carbonaceous material be slurried in a suitable solvent or diluent during liquefaction. The cyclic cavitation may be imparted via pressure cycling, cyclic agitation and the like. When pressure cycling or the like is employed an amplitude equivalent to at least 25 psia is required to effectively remove scale from the liquefaction vessel walls.

  15. Studies on the interactions between purified bovine caseins and alkaline-earth-metalions

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, I. R.; Perkins, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    1. Alkaline-earth-metal cations at low concentrations form soluble complexes with bovine caseins. The relative order of binding capacities is: Mg2+>Ca2+>Ba2+>Sr2+. 2. The cations interact with both free ionized carboxyl groups of aspartic acid and glutamic acid and with monoester phosphate groups covalently bound to serine and threonine; at low concentrations of the cations interactions are predominantly with the phosphate groups. 3. The order of binding capacities for purified components of the casein complex is: αs1-casein>β-casein>κ-casein. PMID:5166590

  16. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

  17. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Custelcean, Radu; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Engle, Nancy L.; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Keever, Tamara J.; Marchand, Alan P.; Gadthula, Srinivas; Gore, Vinayak K.; Huang, Zilin; Sivappa, Rasapalli; Tirunahari, Pavan K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2005-09-26

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

  18. Measurements of the mobility of alkaline earth ions in liquid xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, S.-C.; Fairbank, W. M., Jr.; Miyajima, M.

    2009-02-01

    The mobility of alkaline earth ions, Mg+, Ca+, Sr+ and Ba+, in liquid xenon is measured for the first time. The mobility of Tl+ is also determined for comparison with a measurement by other researchers. The Atkins cluster model for positive ions in non-polar liquids, based on the electrostriction effect, gives general agreement with the magnitude of the mobility values. This is some evidence that the positive ions form a snowball rather than a bubble structure in liquid xenon. However, the temperature dependence of the mobility does not match well with the Atkins theory, so there are still open theoretical questions on the nature of the environment of alkaline earth ions in liquid xenon. The lower mobility of Mg+ and Ba+ may be explained by a better size match to interstitial and substitutional sites, respectively, in solid Xe. These measurements are motivated by the development of a new technique to search for neutrino masses through 0νββ decay of 136Xe. A key component of one version of the proposed experiment is tagging of 136Ba+ daughter ions in liquid 136Xe by laser-induced fluorescence.

  19. Temperature-induced collapse of alkaline Earth cation-polyacrylate anion complexes.

    PubMed

    Lages, Sebastian; Schweins, Ralf; Huber, Klaus

    2007-09-06

    Polyacrylate anions are used to inhibit CaCO3 precipitation and may be a promising additive to control formation of inorganic nanoparticles. The origin of this applicability lies in specific interactions between the alkaline earth cations and the carboxylate functions along the polyacrylate chains. In the absence of CO32- anions, these interactions eventually cause precipitation of polyelectrolytes. Extended investigation of dilute sodium polyacrylate solutions approaching this precipitation threshold revealed a dramatic shrinking of the PA coil dimensions once the threshold is reached (Eur. Phys. J. E 2001, 5, 117). Recent isothermal calorimetric titration experiments by Antonietti et al. (Macromolecules 2004, 37, 3444) indicated that the driving force of this precipitation is entropic in nature. In the present work, we investigated the impact of temperature on the structural changes of dissolved polyacrylate chains decorated with alkaline earth cations. To this end, large polyacrylate chains were brought close to the precipitation threshold by the addition of distinct amounts of Ca2+ or Sr2+ cations. The resulting structural intermediates were then subjected to temperature variations in the range of 15 degrees C

  20. Tungstate-ferrates of some alkali and alkaline-earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gruba, A.I.; Danileiko, L.A.; Moroz, Ya.A.; Zyats, M.N.

    1988-02-01

    Tungstate-ferrates of some alkali and alkaline-earth metals with the ratio Fe:W = 2:11, the iron ions in which are found in two types of coordination, tetrahedral and octahedral, were synthesized. The similarity of the IR spectra of the compounds obtained and known compounds with the anion structure of the Keggin type with the composition M/sub X/(XZW/sub 11/O/sub 40/H/sub m/) x nH/sub 2/O indicates that their heteropolyanions are isostructural. The thermal stability of the compounds studied and the structure of the products of thermolysis depend on the charge and radius of the extrasphere cation. When the ratio of the radii of the extrasphere cation of the alkali or alkaline-earth metal to the radius of the ion of the central 3d element, appearing in the coordination sphere of the heteropolytungstates, exceeds 1.6, the most likely products of thermolysis of heteropolycompounds are the compounds of the pyrochlore family and tungsten bronzes.

  1. Matrix diffusion of some alkali- and alkaline earth-metals in granitic rock

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, H.; Byegaard, J.; Skarnemark, G.; Skaalberg, M.

    1997-12-31

    Static through-diffusion experiments were performed to study the diffusion of alkali- and alkaline earth-metals in fine-grained granite and medium-grained Aespoe-diorite. Tritiated water was used as an inert reference tracer. Radionuclides of the alkali- and alkaline earth-metals (mono- and divalent elements which are not influenced by hydrolysis in the pH-range studied) were used as tracers, i.e., {sup 22}Na{sup +}, {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} and {sup 85}Sr{sup 2+}. The effective diffusivity and the rock capacity factor were calculated by fitting the breakthrough curve to the one-dimensional solution of the diffusion equation. Sorption coefficients, K{sub d}, that were derived from the rock capacity factor (diffusion experiments) were compared with K{sub d} determined in batch experiments using crushed material of different size fractions. The results show that the tracers were retarded in the same order as was expected from the measured batch K{sub d}. Furthermore, the largest size fraction was the most representative when comparing batch K{sub d} with K{sub d} evaluated from the diffusion experiments. The observed effective diffusivities tended to decrease with increasing cell lengths, indicating that the transport porosity decreases with increasing sample lengths used in the diffusion experiments.

  2. Three-photon process for producing a degenerate gas of metastable alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, D. S.; Pisenti, N. C.; Reschovsky, B. J.; Campbell, G. K.

    2016-05-01

    We present a method for creating a quantum degenerate gas of metastable alkaline-earth-metal atoms. This has yet to be achieved due to inelastic collisions that limit evaporative cooling in the metastable states. Quantum degenerate samples prepared in the 1S0 ground state can be rapidly transferred to either the 3P2 or 3P0 state via a coherent three-photon process. Numerical integration of the density-matrix evolution for the fine structure of bosonic alkaline-earth-metal atoms shows that transfer efficiencies of ≃90 % can be achieved with experimentally feasible laser parameters in both Sr and Yb. Importantly, the three-photon process can be set up such that it imparts no net momentum to the degenerate gas during the excitation, which will allow for studies of metastable samples outside the Lamb-Dicke regime. We discuss several experimental challenges to successfully realizing our scheme, including the minimization of differential ac Stark shifts between the four states connected by the three-photon transition.

  3. A 3-photon process for producing degenerate gases of metastable alkaline-earth atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Daniel S.; Pisenti, Neal C.; Reschovsky, Benjamin J.; Campbell, Gretchen K.

    2016-05-01

    We present a method for creating quantum degenerate gases of metastable alkaline-earth atoms. A degenerate gas in any of the 3 P metastable states has not previously been obtained due to large inelastic collision rates, which are unfavorable for evaporative cooling. Samples prepared in the 1S0 ground state can be rapidly transferred to either the 3P2 or 3P0 state via a coherent 3-photon process. Numerical integration of the density matrix evolution for the fine structure of bosonic alkaline-earth atoms shows that transfer efficiencies of ~= 90 % can be achieved with experimentally feasible laser parameters in both Sr and Yb. Importantly, the 3-photon process does not impart momentum to the degenerate gas during excitation, which allows studies of these metastable samples outside the Lamb-Dicke regime. We discuss several experimental challenges to the successful realization of our scheme, including the minimization of differential AC Stark shifts between the four states connected by the 3-photon transition.

  4. Theoretical study of the alkaline-earth metal superoxides BeO2 through SrO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Sodupe, Mariona; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    Three competing bonding mechanisms have been identified for the alkaline-earth metal superoxides: these result in a change in the optimal structure and ground state as the alkaline-earth metal becomes heavier. For example, BeO2 has a linear 3Sigma(-)g ground-state structure, whereas both CaO2 and SrO2 have C(2v)1A1 structures. For MgO2, the theoretical calculations are less definitive, as the 3A2 C(2v) structure is computed to lie only about 3 kcal/mol above the 3Sigma(-)g linear structure. The bond dissociation energies for the alkaline-earth metal superoxides have been computed using extensive Gaussian basis sets and treating electron correlation at the modified coupled-pair functional or coupled-cluster singles and doubles level with a perturbational estimate of the triple excitations.

  5. Low-temperature hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO nanorods: Effects of zinc salt concentration, various solvents and alkaline mineralizers

    SciTech Connect

    Edalati, Khatereh; Shakiba, Atefeh; Vahdati-Khaki, Jalil; Zebarjad, Seyed Mojtaba

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • We synthesized ZnO nanorods by a simple hydrothermal process at 60 °C. • Effects of zinc salt concentration, solvent and alkaline mineralizer was studied. • Increasing concentration of zinc salt changed ZnO nucleation system. • NaOH yielded better results in the production of nanorods in both solvents. • Methanol performed better in the formation of nanorods using the two mineralizers. - Abstract: ZnO has been produced using various methods in the solid, gaseous, and liquid states, and the hydrothermal synthesis at low temperatures has been shown to be an environmentally-friendly one. The current work utilizes a low reaction temperature (60 °C) for the simple hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO nanorod morphologies. Furthermore, the effects of zinc salt concentration, solvent type and alkaline mineralizer type on ZnO nanorods synthesis at a low reaction temperature by hydrothermal processing was studied. Obtained samples were analyzed using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Increasing the concentration of the starting zinc salt from 0.02 to 0.2 M changed ZnO nucleation system from the homogeneous to the heterogeneous state. The XRD results confirmed the production hexagonal ZnO nanostructures of with a crystallite size of 40.4 nm. Varying the experimental parameters (mineralizer and solvent) yielded ZnO nanorods with diameters ranging from 90–250 nm and lengths of 1–2 μm.

  6. Bond-length distributions for ions bonded to oxygen: alkali and alkaline-earth metals

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Olivier Charles; Hawthorne, Frank Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Bond-length distributions have been examined for 55 configurations of alkali-metal ions and 29 configurations of alkaline-earth-metal ions bonded to oxygen, for 4859 coordination polyhedra and 38 594 bond distances (alkali metals), and for 3038 coordination polyhedra and 24 487 bond distances (alkaline-earth metals). Bond lengths generally show a positively skewed Gaussian distribution that originates from the variation in Born repulsion and Coulomb attraction as a function of interatomic distance. The skewness and kurtosis of these distributions generally decrease with increasing coordination number of the central cation, a result of decreasing Born repulsion with increasing coordination number. We confirm the following minimum coordination numbers: [3]Li+, [3]Na+, [4]K+, [4]Rb+, [6]Cs+, [3]Be2+, [4]Mg2+, [6]Ca2+, [6]Sr2+ and [6]Ba2+, but note that some reported examples are the result of extensive dynamic and/or positional short-range disorder and are not ordered arrangements. Some distributions of bond lengths are distinctly multi-modal. This is commonly due to the occurrence of large numbers of structure refinements of a particular structure type in which a particular cation is always present, leading to an over-representation of a specific range of bond lengths. Outliers in the distributions of mean bond lengths are often associated with anomalous values of atomic displacement of the constituent cations and/or anions. For a sample of [6]Na+, the ratio U eq(Na)/U eq(bonded anions) is partially correlated with 〈[6]Na+—O2−〉 (R 2 = 0.57), suggesting that the mean bond length is correlated with vibrational/displacement characteristics of the constituent ions for a fixed coordination number. Mean bond lengths also show a weak correlation with bond-length distortion from the mean value in general, although some coordination numbers show the widest variation in mean bond length for zero distortion, e.g. Li+ in [4]- and [6]-coordination, Na+ in [4]- and [6

  7. Impacts of artificial ocean alkalinization on the carbon cycle and climate in Earth system simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Miriam Ferrer; Ilyina, Tatiana

    2016-06-01

    Using the state-of-the-art emissions-driven Max Planck Institute Earth system model, we explore the impacts of artificial ocean alkalinization (AOA) with a scenario based on the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) framework. Addition of 114 Pmol of alkalinity to the surface ocean stabilizes atmospheric CO2 concentration to RCP4.5 levels under RCP8.5 emissions. This scenario removes 940 GtC from the atmosphere and mitigates 1.5 K of global warming within this century. The climate adjusts to the lower CO2 concentration preventing the loss of sea ice and high sea level rise. Seawater pH and the carbonate saturation state (Ω) rise substantially above levels of the current decade. Pronounced differences in regional sensitivities to AOA are projected, with the Arctic Ocean and tropical oceans emerging as hot spots for biogeochemical changes induced by AOA. Thus, the CO2 mitigation potential of AOA comes at a price of an unprecedented ocean biogeochemistry perturbation with unknown ecological consequences.

  8. Theoretical study of the alkaline-earth (LiBe)+ ion: structure, spectroscopy and dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanmi, C.; Farjallah, M.; Berriche, H.

    2017-03-01

    We study theoretically the structure and spectroscopic properties of the alkali alkaline-earth (LiBe)+ ion. The potential energy curves and their spectroscopic parameters, permanent and transition dipole moments are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The (LiBe)+ ion is modelled as two valence electron system moving in the field of Be2+ and Li+ cores, which are described by pseudopotentials. In addition, effective core-polarization potentials are included to correct the energy. The molecular calculations are performed using a standard quantum chemistry approach based on the pseudopotential model, Gaussian basis sets, effective core polarization potentials, and full configuration interaction (CI) calculations. The precision of our spectroscopic parameters are discussed by comparison with currently available theoretical results. A rather good agreement is observed for the ground and first excited states. The permanent dipole moments reveal many abrupt changes, which are localized at particular distances corresponding to the positions of the avoided crossings.

  9. Prolonged QT Syndrome and Seizure Secondary to Alkaline Earth Metal Deficiency: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    McKinney, A; Keegan, B C

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Alkaline earth metal deficiency is recognized as a cause of both seizure and long QT syndrome. Their deficiency can have significant repercussions on the function of cells, tissues, and organs of the body. An understanding of the role of electrolytes allows an appreciation of the significance of depleted levels on cell function. Case Report. A 65-year-old lady was admitted with symptoms of chest discomfort, vomiting, increased stoma output, and dizziness. Two days following admission she suffered a tonic-clonic seizure. ECG review demonstrated a prolonged QTc interval, raising the possibility of an underlying Torsades de Pointes as the precipitant. This was attributed to electrolyte disturbance arising as a result of multiple aetiologies. Discussion. This paper highlights the multisystem effects of electrolyte disturbance, with emphasis upon its role in precipitating cardiac arrhythmia and neurological symptoms.

  10. Alkaline earth metal cation exchange: effect of mobile counterion and dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Indarawis, Katrina; Boyer, Treavor H

    2012-04-17

    The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding of the interactions between alkaline earth metals and DOM under conditions that are encountered during drinking water treatment with particular focus on cation exchange. Both magnetically enhanced and nonmagnetic cation exchange resins were converted to Na, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba mobile counterion forms as a novel approach to investigate the exchange behavior between the cations and the interactions between the cations and DOM. The results show that cation exchange is a robust process for removal of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) considering competition with cations on the resin surface and presence of DOM. DOM was actively involved during the cation exchange process through complexation, adsorption, and coprecipitation reactions. In addition to advancing the understanding of ion exchange processes for water treatment, the results of this work are applicable to membrane pretreatment to minimize fouling, treatment of membrane concentrate, and precipitative softening.

  11. Hydration process of alkaline-earth metal atoms in water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, Nobuhiro; Ishikawa, Haruki; Fuke, Kiyokazu

    2005-10-01

    Ionization potentials (IPs) of water clusters containing alkaline-earth metal atoms are measured by a photoionization threshold method to examine the hydration process of the metal atoms in clusters. IPs of Mg(H 2O) n and Ca(H 2O) n are found to decrease with increasing n and become constant at 3.18 eV for n ⩾ 9 and n ⩾ 8, respectively. The observed constant IP agrees with an estimated photoelectric threshold (3.2 eV) of bulk ice. From the comparison with the results on the theoretical calculations as well as the IPs for alkali atom-water clusters, the anomalous size dependence of IPs is ascribed to the formation of an ion-pair state.

  12. Magnetic crystals and helical liquids in alkaline-earth fermionic gases

    PubMed Central

    Barbarino, Simone; Taddia, Luca; Rossini, Davide; Mazza, Leonardo; Fazio, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    The joint action of a magnetic field and of interactions is crucial for the appearance of exotic quantum phenomena, such as the quantum Hall effect. Owing to their rich nuclear structure, equivalent to an additional synthetic dimension, one-dimensional alkaline-earth(-like) fermionic gases with synthetic gauge potential and atomic contact repulsion may display similar related properties. Here we show the existence and the features of a hierarchy of fractional insulating and conducting states by means of analytical and numerical methods. We demonstrate that the gapped states are characterized by density and magnetic order emerging solely for gases with effective nuclear spin larger than 1/2, whereas the gapless phases can support helical modes. We finally argue that these states are related to an unconventional fractional quantum Hall effect in the thin-torus limit and that their properties can be studied in state-of-the-art laboratories. PMID:26350624

  13. Quantum Degenerate Mixtures of Alkali and Alkaline-Earth-Like Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Hideaki; Takasu, Yosuke; Yamaoka, Yoshifumi; Doyle, John M.; Takahashi, Yoshiro

    2011-05-20

    We realize simultaneous quantum degeneracy in mixtures consisting of the alkali and alkaline-earth-like atoms Li and Yb. This is accomplished within an optical trap by sympathetic cooling of the fermionic isotope {sup 6}Li with evaporatively cooled bosonic {sup 174}Yb and, separately, fermionic {sup 173}Yb. Using cross-thermalization studies, we also measure the elastic s-wave scattering lengths of both Li-Yb combinations, |a{sub {sup 6}Li-{sup 174}Yb}|=1.0{+-}0.2 nm and |a{sub {sup 6}Li-{sup 173}Yb}|=0.9{+-}0.2 nm. The equality of these lengths is found to be consistent with mass-scaling analysis. The quantum degenerate mixtures of Li and Yb, as realized here, can be the basis for creation of ultracold molecules with electron spin degrees of freedom, studies of novel Efimov trimers, and impurity probes of superfluid systems.

  14. First hyperpolarizability of cyclooctatetraene modulated by alkali and alkaline earth metals.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ria Sinha; Mondal, Avijit; Nandi, Prasanta K

    2017-03-01

    In the present investigation, the first hyperpolarizability of alkali and alkaline earth metal derivatives of cyclooctatetraene (COT) has been calculated using BHHLYP and CAM-B3LYP functional for 6-311++G(d,p), 6-311++G(3df,3pd), and aug-pc 2 basis sets. Introduction of Na/K atoms at the axial position of COT and Li, Na, K/Be, Mg, Ca metal atoms and cyanide groups at the equatorial sites leads to lager enhancement of first hyperpolarizability. The ring charge density can account for the variation of first hyperpolarizability. The two state model has been invoked to explain the variation of first hyperpolarizability.

  15. Alkaline-earth metal hydrides as novel host lattices for Eu(II) luminescence.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Nathalie; Kohlmann, Holger; Sayede, Adlane; Springborg, Michael

    2011-07-04

    Luminescence of divalent europium has been investigated for the first time in metal hydrides. A complete solid-solution series was found for the pseudobinary system Eu(x)Sr(1-x)H(2) [a = 637.6(1) pm -12.1(3)x pm, b = 387.0(1)-6.5(2)x pm, c = 732.2(2)-10.1(4)x pm]. Europium-doped alkaline-earth hydrides Eu(x)M(1-x)H(2) (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) with a small europium concentration (x = 0.005) exhibit luminescence with maximum emission wavelengths of 764 nm (M = Ca), 728 nm (M = Sr), and 750 nm (M = Ba); i.e., the emission energy of divalent europium shows an extremely large red shift compared to the emission energies of fluorides or oxides. Theoretical calculations (LDA+U) confirm decreasing band gaps with increasing europium content of the solid solutions.

  16. Relationship between microstructure and efficiency of lithium silicate scintillating glasses: The effect of alkaline earths

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Sunberg, D.S.; Weber, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Lithium silicate glasses containing Ce{sup 3+} are known to be scintillators. Glasses in this family in which the Li is enriched ({sup 6}Li) are used as neutron detectors. The addition of Mg to this glass is known to increase the scintillation efficiency. We have found that substituting other alkaline earths results in a monotonic decrease of the scintillation efficiency with increasing atomic number. The total variation in scintillation efficiency from Mg to Ba is nearly a factor of 3. Prior experiments with this glass family show small differences in Raman and fluorescence spectra; evidence from thermoluminescence experiments indicates that the scintillation efficiency is most strongly correlated with structural effects in the neighborhood of the Ce{sup 3+} activator ion. The results of low-temperature studies of fluorescence and thermoluminescence of these glasses will be reported.

  17. Effect of Composition and Impurities on the Phosphorescence of Green-Emitting Alkaline Earth Aluminate Phosphor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doory; Kim, Han-Eol; Kim, Chang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements to SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphors have enabled the use of luminescent hosts with a stable crystal structure and high physical and chemical stability, thus overcoming the bottleneck in the applicability of ZnS:Cu phosphors. However, enhancement of afterglow lifetime and brightness in SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ phosphors remains a challenging task. Here, we have improved the afterglow characteristics in terms of persistence time and brightness by a systematic investigation of the composition of Eu-doped alkaline earth aluminate SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ crystals. We found that a Dy3+/Eu2+ ratio of ~2.4 and ~0.935 mol Eu2+ (per mol of SrAl2O4) gave the brightest and longest emissions (11% and 9% increase for each). Doping with Si4+ also resulted in a slight increase in brightness up to ~15%. Doping with alkali metal or alkaline earth metal significantly enhanced the phosphorescence intensity. In particular, doping with 0.005 mol Li+ (per mol of SrAl2O4) alone boosted the phosphorescence intensity to 239% of the initial value, as compared to that observed for the non-doped crystal, while doping with 0.01 mol Mg2+ and 0.005 mol Li+ (per 1 mol SrAl2O4) boosted the phosphorescence intensity up to 313% of the initial value. The results of this investigation are expected to act as a guideline for the synthesis of bright and long persistent phosphors, and facilitate the development of persistent phosphors with afterglow characteristics superior to those of conventional phosphors. PMID:26731086

  18. Alkaline earth-based coordination polymers derived from a cyclotriphosphazene-functionalized hexacarboxylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yajing; Bai, Dongjie; Feng, Yunlong; He, Yabing

    2016-10-01

    Combination of hexakis(4-carboxylatephenoxy)cyclotriphosphazene with alkaline earth ions of increasing ionic radii (Mg2+, Ca2+ and Ba2+) under different solvothermal conditions yielded three new coordination polymers, and their crystal structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The magnesium compound displays a three dimensional (3D) network structure constructed from the deprotonated ligand and the secondary building block Mg(COO)4, which can be rationalized as a (4,6)-connected topological net with the Schläfli symbol of (44·62)3(49·66)2. The calcium compound consists of 1D infinite "Ca-O" inorganic chains connected by the deprotonated ligands to from a 3D framework. The barium compound exhibits a 3D framework in which 1D "Ba-O" inorganic chains are connected together by the deprotonated organic linkers. Due to the semi-rigid nature, the ligand adopts distinctly different conformations in the three compounds. The metal ions' influence exerted on the final structure of the resulting coordination polymers is also discussed. When the radii of alkaline earth ions increases descending down the group from Mg(II) to Ba(II), the coordination number becomes larger and more versatile: from 6 in the magnesium compound, to 6,7 and 10 in the calcium compound, and to 8 and 9 in the barium compound, thus substantially influencing the resulting final framework structures. Also, the photophysical properties were investigated systematically, revealing that the three compounds are photoluminscent in the solid state at room temperature. This work demonstrates that although the multiplicity of conformation in the hexacarboxylate ligand based on the inorganic scaffold cyclotriphosphazene makes it difficult to predict how this ligand will form extended network, but provides unique opportunities for the formation of diverse inorganic-organic hybrids exhibiting rich structural topologies.

  19. Toxicology of cupric salts on honeybees. V. Gluconate and sulfate action on gut alkaline and acid phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Bounias, M; Kruk, I; Nectoux, M; Popeskovic, D

    1996-10-01

    Some aspects of putative nontarget effects of cupric ions systemically fed to honeybees against their parasite mite Varroa jacobsoni have been investigated on the host phosphatases. The alkaline and acid forms extracted from the guts of worker bees exhibited substrate-inhibition features. Upon detailed kinetic analysis, cupric organic salts indicate activation effects at concentrations of about 1 mM. Concentrations up to 10 mM (alkaline form) and 25 mM (acid form) induced no important changes, except a partial quenching of the substrate-inhibition process, characterized by a wide increase in the constant of apparent inhibitory binding of substrate to the enzyme-substrate complex. Partial purification gave a single alkaline form with quite similar kinetic behavior in the absence of natural ions as in crude extracts. Cupric gluconate and sulfate demonstrated similar patterns, except an increase of the apparent Hill coefficient by sulfate only. The substrate constant of acid phosphatases was decreased at high cupric gluconate doses while its maximum velocity was biphasically increased (with observed maximum at 1 mM), resulting in a sustained activation. Chemiluminescence studies revealed that cupric ion activation is counteracted by oxygen radicals generated by cupric ions and also, in vitro, by the artificial substrate para-nitrophenylphosphate. The para-nitrophenol molecules released from the reaction are therefore responsible for biphasic effects selectively observed with gluconate salts. In apicultural practice, neither blockade of activity nor dramatic changes are to be expected at doses administered to bees against the parasite.

  20. Optical and electronic properties of conductive ternary nitrides with rare- or alkaline-earth elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassavetis, S.; Hodroj, A.; Metaxa, C.; Logothetidis, S.; Pierson, J. F.; Patsalas, P.

    2016-12-01

    Conductive nitrides, such as TiN, are key engineering materials for electronics, photonics, and plasmonics; one of the essential issues for such applications is the ability of tuning the conduction electron density, the resistivity, and the electron scattering. While enhancing the conduction electron density and blueshifting the intraband absorption towards the UV were easily achieved previously, reducing the conduction electron density and redshifting the intraband absorption into the infrared are still an open issue. The latter is achieved in this work by alloying TiN by rare earth (RE = Sc, Y, La) or alkaline earth (AE = Mg, Ca) atoms in Ti substitutional positions. The produced TixRE1-xN and TixAE1-xN thin film samples were grown by a hybrid arc evaporation/sputtering process, and most of them are stable in the B1 cubic structure. Their optical properties were studied in an extensive spectral range by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The ellipsometric spectra were analyzed and quantified by the Drude-Lorentz model, which provided the conduction electron density, the electron mean free path, and the resistivity. The observed interband transitions are firmly assigned, and the optical and electrical properties of TixRE1-xN and TixAE1-xN are quantitatively correlated with their composition and crystal structure.

  1. Effects of Cations on Corrosion of Inconel 625 in Molten Chloride Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ming; Ma, Hongfang; Wang, Mingjing; Wang, Zhihua; Sharif, Adel

    2016-04-01

    Hot corrosion of Inconel 625 in sodium chloride, potassium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride and their mixtures with different compositions is conducted at 900°C to investigate the effects of cations in chloride salts on corrosion behavior of the alloy. XRD, SEM/EDS were used to analyze the compositions, phases, and morphologies of the corrosion products. The results showed that Inconel 625 suffers more severe corrosion in alkaline earth metal chloride molten salts than alkaline metal chloride molten salts. For corrosion in mixture salts, the corrosion rate increased with increasing alkaline earth metal chloride salt content in the mixture. Cations in the chloride molten salts mainly affect the thermal and chemical properties of the salts such as vapor pressure and hydroscopicities, which can affect the basicity of the molten salt. Corrosion of Inconel 625 in alkaline earth metal chloride salts is accelerated with increasing basicity.

  2. Honeycomb-shaped coordination polymers based on the self-assembly of long flexible ligands and alkaline-earth ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Chen; Liu, Liu; Guo, Xu; Long, Yinshuang; Jia, Shanshan; Li, Huanhuan; Yang, Lirong

    2016-01-15

    Two novel coordination polymers, namely, [Ca(NCP){sub 2}]{sub ∞} (I) and [Sr(NCP){sub 2}]{sub ∞} (II) were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions based on 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)imidazo(4,5-f)-(1,10)phenanthroline (HNCP) and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectrometry, X-ray powder diffraction and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Findings indicate that I and II are isomorphous and isostructural, containing the unit of M(NCP{sup −}){sub 4} (M=Ca(II) and Sr(II)), based on which to assemble into three-dimensional (3D) porous 4-fold interpenetration honeycomb-shaped neutral coordination polymers (CPs). Between the adjacent lamellar structures in I and II, there exist π–π interactions between the pyridine rings belonging to phenanthroline of NCP{sup −} which stabilize the frameworks. Both I and II display stronger fluorescence emissions as well as high thermal stability. - Graphical abstract: One-dimensional nanotubular channels with the cross dimension of 37.1959(20)×23.6141(11)Å{sup 2} in the three-dimensional honeycomb-shaped coordination network of II are observed. The topological analysis of II indicates that there exists a typical diamond framework possessing large adamantanoid cages, which containing four cyclohexane-shaped patterns in chair conformations. - Highlights: • Two isomorphous and isostructural coordination polymers based on flexible ligand and two alkaline-earth metal salts have been synthesized and characterized. • Structural analysis indicates that I and II are assembled into 3D porous honeycomb-shaped metal-organic frameworks. • Both I and II display stronger fluorescence emissions and higher thermal stability.

  3. Alkaline earth metal fluxes for the growth of single crystal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Daniel

    Oxide ceramics are materials with a wide range of properties. Insulators are most common, however semiconductors, strongly correlated electron materials, and even superconductors are all relevant oxide materials. Here we seek to synthesize novel oxide single crystal phases and study their properties using an alkaline earth metal flux technique. The specific flux techniques are new, and we will seek to understand the capabilities of these fluxes as a novel synthesis tool. The use of a barium metal flux to grow single crystal oxides is rather counterintuitive, but is exemplified further with the growth of europium monoxide (Fm3¯m #225, Z = 4). Eu1-xBaxO single crystals (x = 0.01 - 0.25) are grown and studied for their ferromagnetic properties. A new oxide phase Ba2Eu2P2O (P4/mbm #127, Z = 2) has also been synthesized from the same method, and may potentially be studied as a ferromagnetic semiconductor based on preliminary observations. Other examples of single crystal oxide phases grown from barium metal flux includes Ba2TeO (P4/nmm #129, Z = 2), BaLn2O4 (Ln = La - Lu) (Pnma #62, Z = 4), and Ba3Yb2O 5Te (P4/mmm #123 Z = 1). The new crystal phases Ba3Ln2O5Cl 2 (Ln = Sm - Lu, Y) are synthesized using a reactive barium metal flux. Single crystal x-ray diffraction is used to determine their structures with space group (I4/mmm #139, Z = 2) related to the Ruddlesden-Popper structure type. The unit cell dimensions range from a = 4.46(6) A and c = 24.87(6) A for Ba3Gd2O5Cl2 to a = 4.35(6) A and c = 24.57(6) A for Ba3Lu2O 5Cl2 with the dimensions following the expected lanthanide contraction trends. The magnetic properties of these materials are studied and related to their structures. The use of alkaline earth fluxes such as magnesium or calcium based fluxes are also briefly considered for their capabilities to produce novel mixed anion phases. A calcium flux is shown to produce the novel semimetals Ca 4TeOH4 and Ca3Ca1-xEuxTeOH 4 (I4/mmm #139, Z = 2), and highly reducing

  4. Bond ionicity of alkaline-earth oxides studied by low-energy D+ scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souda, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Hayami, W.; Aizawa, T.; Ishizawa, Y.

    1994-08-01

    Low-energy D+ scattering is employed to explore the nature of the bonding of polycrystalline alkaline-earth oxides MgO, CaO, SrO, and BaO, with particular emphasis on the investigation of the ionicity of the topmost-layer atoms. Increasing ionicity as one goes to the heavier cations is concluded from the probability of the resonance neutraliztion of the D+ ions, which is consistent with the conventional chemical arguments based on electronegativity scales but is in apparent contradiction to the results of recent ab initio cluster-model calculations. It is also concluded that the metallic Ba layer is formed rather patchily on the BaO surface after the heat treatment up to 1000 °C. This is probably because free Ba atoms, being supplied by the reaction of BaO with the Ta substrate, are precipitated at the BaO surface. Another example is concerned with the interactions of the Ba adatoms with Si(001) and Pt(111) surfaces; Ba is found to have marked covalency with the substrate atoms.

  5. CP(N - 1) quantum field theories with alkaline-earth atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laflamme, C.; Evans, W.; Dalmonte, M.; Gerber, U.; Mejía-Díaz, H.; Bietenholz, W.; Wiese, U.-J.; Zoller, P.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a cold atom implementation to attain the continuum limit of (1 + 1) -d CP(N - 1) quantum field theories. These theories share important features with (3 + 1) -d QCD, such as asymptotic freedom and θ-vacua. Moreover, their continuum limit can be accessed via the mechanism of dimensional reduction. In our scheme, the CP(N - 1) degrees of freedom emerge at low energies from a ladder system of SU(N) quantum spins, where the N spin states are embodied by the nuclear Zeeman states of alkaline-earth atoms, trapped in an optical lattice. Based on Monte Carlo results, we establish that the continuum limit can be demonstrated by an atomic quantum simulation by employing the feature of asymptotic freedom. We discuss a protocol for the adiabatic preparation of the ground state of the system, the real-time evolution of a false θ-vacuum state after a quench, and we propose experiments to unravel the phase diagram at non-zero density.

  6. Crystal and defect chemistry influences on band gap trends in alkaline earth perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soonil; Woodford, William H.; Randall, Clive A.

    2008-05-19

    A number of perovskites with A-site alkaline earth chemistries being Ca, Sr, and Ba, and tetravalent cations including Ce, Zr, and Ti are measured for optical band gap and found to vary systematically with tolerance factor and lattice volume within limits defined by the chemistry of the octahedral site. This paper also focuses on the BaTiO{sub 3} system, considering equilibrated nonstoichiometries, and determines the changes in band gap with respect to Ba/Ti ratios. It was found that the optical band gap changes in the solid solution regime and is invariant in the second phase regions, as would be expected. In the cases of Ba/Ti<1.0, the variation in band gap scales with lattice volume, but in the Ba/Ti>1.0 stoichiometries, there is a distinct Urbach tail and the trend with lattice volume no longer holds. It is inferred that the V{sub Ti}{sup q}prime-2V{sub O} partial Schottky complex controls the band gap trend with Ba-rich nonstoichiometries.

  7. Collective non-equilibrium spin exchange in cold alkaline-earth atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, Oscar Leonardo; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-05-01

    Alkaline-earth atomic (AEA) clocks have recently been shown to be reliable simulators of two-orbital SU(N) quantum magnetism. In this work, we study the non-equilibrium spin exchange dynamics during the clock interrogation of AEAs confined in a deep one-dimensional optical lattice and prepared in two nuclear levels. The two clock states act as an orbital degree of freedom. Every site in the lattice can be thought as populated by a frozen set of vibrational modes collectively interacting via predominantly p-wave collisions. Due to the exchange coupling, orbital state transfer between atoms with different nuclear states is expected to happen. At the mean field level, we observe that in addition to the expected suppression of population transfer in the presence of a large magnetic field, that makes the single particle levels off-resonance, there is also an interaction induced suppression for initial orbital population imbalance. This suppression resembles the macroscopic self-trapping mechanism seen in bosonic systems. However, by performing exact numerical solutions and also by using the so-called Truncated Wigner Approximation, we show that quantum correlations can significantly modify the mean field suppression. Our predictions should be testable in optical clock experiments. Project supported by NSF-PHY-1521080, JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, ARO, AFOSR, and MURI-AFOSR.

  8. Process for depositing epitaxial alkaline earth oxide onto a substrate and structures prepared with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1996-01-01

    A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilize molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and/or electron beam evaporation methods and an ultra-high vacuum facility to grow a layup of epitaxial alkaline earth oxide films upon the substrate surface. By selecting metal constituents for the oxides and in the appropriate proportions so that the lattice parameter of each oxide grown closely approximates that of the substrate or base layer upon which oxide is grown, lattice strain at the film/film or film/substrate interface of adjacent films is appreciably reduced or relieved. Moreover, by selecting constituents for the oxides so that the lattice parameters of the materials of adjacent oxide films either increase or decrease in size from one parameter to another parameter, a graded layup of films can be grown (with reduced strain levels therebetween) so that the outer film has a lattice parameter which closely approximates that of, and thus accomodates the epitaxial growth of, a pervoskite chosen to be grown upon the outer film.

  9. The Characterization of Eu2+-Doped Mixed Alkaline-Earth Iodide Scintillator Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, John S; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Wisniewski, D.; Kolopus, James A; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    The high-performance inorganic scintillator, SrI2:Eu2+, when activated with divalent europium in the concentration range of 3 to 6%, has shown great promise for use in applications that require high-energy-resolution gamma-ray detection. We have recently grown and tested crystals in which other alkaline-earth ions have been partially substituted for Sr ions. Specifically, europium-doped single crystals have been grown in which up to 30 at % of the strontium ions have been substituted for either by barium, magnesium, or calcium ions. In the case of the strontium iodide scintillator host, a material that is characterized by an orthorhombic crystal structure, there are three other column IIA elements that are obvious choices for investigations whose purpose is to realize potential improvements in the performance of SrI2:Eu2+-based scintillators via the replacement of strontium ions with either Mg2+, Ca2+, or Ba2+. Light yields of up to 81,400 photons/MeV with an associated energy resolution of 3.7% (fwhm for 662 keV gamma-rays) have been observed in the case of a partial substitution of Ba2+ for Sr2+. The measured decay times ranged from 1.1 to 2.0 s, while the peak emission wavelengths ranged from 432 to 438 nm.

  10. Alkaline earth silicate wools - A new generation of high temperature insulation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert C; Harrison, Paul T C

    2012-11-01

    Intensive study of the natural asbestiform minerals that cause human diseases, and the consequent understanding of their hazardous characteristics, has enabled the development of manufactured fibres whose physical and/or chemical properties, in particular as they relate to biopersistence, have been adjusted to minimize possible harm to health. A strong driver for the developmentof new high temperature insulation materials wasthe perception of the toxicity of refractory ceramic fibres (RCF)and their classification in the EU as a category 2 carcinogen under Directive 67/548/EEC. Such classification carries with it the requirement for substitution by less hazardous materials. This paper focuses on the development of alkaline earth silicate (AES) wools as a new class of high temperature insulation with the capability of such substitution in a number of applications. These wools have only a low potential to cause harm because they do not persist in lung tissue once deposited, and have produced minimal effects in experimental test systems. AES wools are increasingly being used in a wide range of high temperature applications.

  11. Mixed alkali effect on the spectroscopic properties of alkali-alkaline earth oxide borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, G.; Ramesh, B.; Shareefuddin, Md.; Chary, M. N.; Sayanna, R.

    2016-05-01

    The mixed alkali and alkaline earth oxide borate glass with the composition xK2O - (25-x) Li2O-12.5BaO-12.5MgO-50B2O3 (x = 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25mol %) and doped with 1mol% CuO were prepared by the melt quenching technique. From the optical absorption spectra the optical band gap, electronic polarizability(α02-), interaction parameter (A), theoretical and experimental optical basicity (Λ) values were evaluated. From the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectral data the number of spins (N) and susceptibility (χ) were evaluated. The values of (α02-), and (Λ) increases with increasing of K2O content and electronic polarizability and interaction parameter show opposite behaviuor which may be due to the creation of non-bridging oxygens and expansion of borate network. The reciprocal of susceptibility (1/χ) and spin concentration (N) as a function of K2O content, varied nonlinearly which may be due to creation of non-bridging oxygens in the present glass system. This may be attributed to mixed alkali effect (MAE).

  12. Heavy water reactions with alkaline-earth metal dications in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feil, Stefan; Koyanagi, Greg K.; Bohme, Diethard K.

    2009-02-01

    Room temperature rate coefficients and product distributions are reported for the reactions initiated in D2O with dications of the alkaline-earth metals Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba. The measurements were performed with a selected-ion flow tube (SIFT) tandem mass spectrometer and electrospray ionization (ESI). Mg2+ reacts with water by a fast electron transfer leading to charge separation with a rate coefficient of 1.4 × 10-9 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Ca2+ reacts with D2O in a first step to form the adduct Ca2+(D2O), with an effective bimolecular rate coefficient of 2.3 × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, which then undergoes rapid charge separation by deuteron transfer to form CaOD+ and D3O+ in a second step with k = 7.9 × 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The CaOD+ ion reacts further by clustering up to five more D2O molecules. Sr2+ clusters up to eight D2O molecules and Ba2+ up to seven D2O molecules, with the first addition of D2O being rate determining in each case and the last addition being distinctly slower, as might be expected from a transition in the occupation of the added water molecules from an inner to an outer hydration shell.

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Aluminosilicate Gels Prepared in High-Alkaline and Salt-Concentrated Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li Q.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Parker, Kent E.; Hobbs, David T.; McCready, David E.

    2005-11-01

    Solid-state 29Si, 27Al, and 23Na MAS (magic angle spinning) NMR techniques in combination with x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) are used to characterize aluminosilicate gels as a function of composition, pH, and reaction times. These gels were prepared at 80 C using initial solutions with low Si/Al ratios, high alkaline and salt concentrations that are characteristic of nuclear tank wastes. XRD data show that cancrinite and sodalite are the main crystalline phases in the aluminosilicate gels produced. It is found that the pH and the salt content have significant effects on the nature of the aluminosilicate gels. Higher pH appears to increase the rate of crystallization, the degree of overall crystallinity and the percentage of cancrinite phases in aluminosilicate gels, whereas the high salt concentration promotes the formation of cancrinite and sodalite and prohibits the formation of other zeolites. Complementary to XRD, NMR is extremely useful for providing the information on the structure of amorphous intermediate gels with no long-range order.

  14. Optimizing the performance of bandpass photon detectors for inverse photoemission: Transmission of alkaline earth fluoride window crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Thiede, Christian Schmidt, Anke B.; Donath, Markus

    2015-08-15

    Bandpass photon detectors are widely used in inverse photoemission in the isochromat mode at energies in the vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range. The energy bandpass of gas-filled counters is usually formed by the ionization threshold of the counting gas as high-pass filter and the transmission cutoff of an alkaline earth fluoride window as low-pass filter. The transmission characteristics of the window have, therefore, a crucial impact on the detector performance. We present transmission measurements in the vacuum-ultraviolet spectral range for alkaline earth fluoride window crystals in the vicinity of the transmission cutoff as a function of crystal purity, surface finish, surface contamination, temperature, and thickness. Our findings reveal that the transmission characteristics of the window crystal and, thus, the detector performance depend critically on these window parameters.

  15. The contents of alkali and alkaline earth metals in soils of the southern Cis-Ural region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asylbaev, I. G.; Khabirov, I. K.

    2016-01-01

    The contents and distribution patterns of alkali and alkaline earth metals in soils and rocks of the southern Cis-Ural region were studied. A database on the contents of these metals was developed, the soils were classified with respect to their provision with these metals, and corresponding schematic maps showing their distribution in soils of the region were compiled. It was found that the contents of these metals decrease from east to west (from the Yuryuzan-Aisk Piedmont Plain to the Ufa Plateau and to the Belebeevsk Upland), and their distribution patterns change. Among alkali metals, the highest accumulation in the soils is typical of potassium, sodium, and cesium; among alkaline earth metals, of strontium and barium.

  16. Spin-Orbit-Coupled Correlated Metal Phase in Kondo Lattices: An Implementation with Alkaline-Earth Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, L.; Schachenmayer, J.; Rey, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    We show that an interplay between quantum effects, strong on-site ferromagnetic exchange interaction, and antiferromagnetic correlations in Kondo lattices can give rise to an exotic spin-orbit coupled metallic state in regimes where classical treatments predict a trivial insulating behavior. This phenomenon can be simulated with ultracold alkaline-earth fermionic atoms subject to a laser-induced magnetic field by observing dynamics of spin-charge excitations in quench experiments.

  17. The etching process of boron nitride by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides under high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, W.; Ma, H.A.; Jia, X.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Appropriate etch processes of hBN and cBN under HPHT are proposed. • The degree of the crystallization of hBN was decreased. • A special cBN growth mechanism with a triangular unit is proposed. • Plate-shape cBN crystals with large ratio of length to thickness were obtained. • A strategy provides useful guidance for controlling the cBN morphology. - Abstract: Some new etching processes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and cubic boron nitride (cBN) under high pressure and high temperature in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth fluorides have been discussed. It is found that hBN is etched distinctly by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides and the morphology of hBN is significantly changed from plate-shape to spherical-shape. Based on the “graphitization index” values of hBN, the degree of the crystallization of hBN under high pressure and high temperature decreases in the sequence of LiF > CaF{sub 2} > MgF{sub 2}. This facilitates the formation of high-quality cBN single crystals. Different etch steps, pits, and islands are observed on cBN surface, showing the strong etching by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides and the tendency of layer-by-layer growth. A special layer growth mechanism of cBN with a triangular unit has been found. Furthermore, the morphologies of cBN crystals are apparently affected by a preferential surface etching of LiF, CaF{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2}. Respectively, the plate-shape and tetrahedral cBN crystals can be obtained in the presence of different alkali and alkaline earth fluorides.

  18. The MCVD synthesis and characterization of water tolerant fiber optic waveguides based on alkaline earth-doped silicas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Kevin F.

    Optical fibers that transmit throughout the entire telecommunications spectrum (1.2--1.7 mum) are presently manufactured by the removal of hydrogen or OH from the host preform glass. Hydrogen-oxygen torches are utilized in the conventional preform manufacturing process, but result in the formation of hydroxyls in germanium-doped silica fiber. The hydroxyl species generate unacceptably high losses for long haul telecommunications systems. This thesis has explored an alternative strategy for reducing OH-related absorption in silica-based glasses. Alkaline earth modifiers have been introduced via the modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process to successfully damp out and dramatically reduce the extrinsic attenuation associated with both water and hydrogen. Specifically, alkaline earth ions were introduced into alumino-silicate glasses to form MgO-Al2O3-SiO2, CaO-Al 2O3-SiO2, and SrO-Al2O3-SiO 2 compositions. The utilization of halide precursors based on the vapor delivery of rare earths was incorporated into the existing MCVD set-up to fabricate these optical preforms. Both the bulk preforms and fibers drawn from them were characterized to determine relevant optical properties, including the attenuation, index profiles and extinction coefficients arising from OH in each host. The data indicate that modification of the silica glass structure through the additions of modifying ions can significantly reduce OH related absorption. For example, the doping of alkaline earth ions decreased the extinction coefficient measured at the 1.39 mum) OH overtone, to values < 0.2 L/(mol*cm). Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) measurements conducted at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) found OH concentrations in the glasses in the range from 10 to 27.5 ppm. The alkaline earth-doped fibers exhibited lower OH absorption at 1.39 mum) than germanium and aluminum-doped reference fibers. Fibers doped with either magnesium, calcium or strontium displayed up

  19. 5 d-4 f luminescence of Nd3+, Gd3+, Er3+, Tm3+, and Ho3+ ions in crystals of alkaline earth fluorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzhabov, E. A.; Prosekina, E. A.

    2011-09-01

    The vacuum ultraviolet emission spectra of alkaline-earth fluoride (CaF2, SrF2, BaF2) crystals with rare earth impurity ions (Nd, Gd, Er, Tm, Ho) have been investigated. The main luminescence bands are described well by the transitions from the lowest excited 5 d state to different 4 f levels of rare earth ions.

  20. The significance of secondary interactions during alkaline earth-promoted dehydrogenation of dialkylamine-boranes.

    PubMed

    Bellham, Peter; Anker, Mathew D; Hill, Michael S; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Mahon, Mary F

    2016-09-21

    a modified mechanism for group 2-mediated dimethylamine borane dehydrocoupling that is dependent on the intermediacy of key derivatives of the [NMe2·BH3](-) and [NMe2BH2NMe2BH3](-) anions but does not require the formation of high energy alkaline earth hydride intermediates. Although these results are specifically focussed on the applications of alkaline earth species, this mechanistic insight may also be relevant to other redox-inactive main group element-based systems and to our understanding of hydrogen evolution from saline derivatives of ammonia borane.

  1. Ocean-Based Alkalinity Enhancement: Mitigation Potential, Side Effects and the Fate of Added Alkalinity Assessed in an Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, M. F.; Ilyina, T.

    2014-12-01

    Artificial ocean alkalinization (AOA) has been proposed as a mean to mitigate climate change and ocean acidification. Whilst the mitigation potential of this geo-engineering technology may sound promising, it poses environmental risks. Within the Priority Program "Climate Engineering" of the German Science Foundation (DFG), we investigate the mitigation potential of AOA to reduce atmospheric CO2 and counteract the consequences of ocean acidification. We are particularly interested in the residence time of the added alkalinity at the ocean surface because it must stay in the upper ocean in order to increase the oceanic CO2 uptake. The mitigation potential, risks and the unintended consequences of this geo-engineering method are also exhaustively studied. These questions are tackled through the analysis of different alkalinity enhancement scenarios in the state-of-the-art Earth system model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPI-ESM) in a configuration based on the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Model scenarios are designed so that AOA is performed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentrations similar to values of the stabilization scenario RCP4.5, while fossil fuel CO2 emissions follow the pathway of the high-CO2 scenario RCP8.5. Alkalinity is added globally into the upper 12 meters of the ocean in different seasons and years. We found that on the time scale of relevance (i.e. from years to decades), season and location are key aspects to take into account in the implementation of AOA. This is because of inhomogeneous vertical mixing of added alkalinity due to the mixed layer depth which is established by the season. We also show that the rate of addition greatly determines impact and outcome of this geo-engineering method. Changes driven by the implementation of this method in the ocean biogeochemistry are also discussed. For instance, the associated changes in the carbon cycle, marine oxygen levels, saturation state of

  2. Novel alkaline earth copper germanates with ferro and antiferromagnetic S=1/2 chains

    SciTech Connect

    Brandao, Paula; Reis, Mario S; Gai, Zheng; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2013-01-01

    Two new alkaline earth copper(II) germanates were hydrothermally synthesized: CaCuGeO4 center dot H2O (1) and BaCu2Ge3O9 center dot H2O (2), and their structures determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound (1) crystallizes in space group P2(1)/c with a=5.1320(2) angstrom, b=16.1637(5) angstrom, c=5.4818(2) angstrom, beta=102.609(2)degrees, V=443.76(3) angstrom(3) and Z=4. This copper germanate contains layers of composition [CuGeO4](infinity)(2-) comprising CuO4 square planes and GeO4 tetrahedra with calcium and water molecules in the inter-layer space. Compound (2) crystallizes in the Cmcm space group with a=5.5593(3) angstrom, b=10.8606(9) angstrom, c=13.5409(8) angstrom, V=817.56(9) angstrom(3) and Z=4. This structure contains GeO6 and CuO6 octahedra as well as GeO4 tetrahedra, forming a three-dimensional network of interconnecting six-membered ring channels. The magnetic susceptibility for both samples can be interpreted as S=1/2 chains, in agreement with the copper topology observed in the crystal structure. The susceptibility of (1) exhibits a Bonner-Fisher type behavior, resulting from antiferromagnetic intra-chain interactions without three-dimensional ordering down to 5 K-the lowest measured temperature. This observation, together with the absence of super-exchange paths between the copper chains, make this system particularly promising for the study of low dimensional magnetism. The magnetic properties of (2) show a very weak ferromagnetic near-neighbor interaction along the chain. In this compound a peak the chi T plot seems to indicate the onset of interchain antiferromagentic correlations. However, no ordering temperature is detected in the susceptibility data.

  3. Accumulation of alkaline earth metals by the green macroalga Bryopsis maxima.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shigekazu; Aizawa, Kyoko; Nakamura, Saki; Nakayama, Katsumi; Fujisaki, Shingo; Watanabe, Soichiro; Satoh, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    Twenty-five days after the disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in 2011, we collected samples of the green macroalga Bryopsis maxima from the Pacific coast of Japan. Bryopsis maxima is a unicellular, multinuclear, siphonous green macroalga. Radiation analysis revealed that B. maxima emitted remarkably high gamma radiation of (131)I, (134)Cs, (137)Cs, and (140)Ba as fission products of (235)U. Interestingly, B. maxima contained naturally occurring radionuclides derived from (226)Ra and (228)Ra. Analysis of element content revealed that B. maxima accumulates many ocean elements, especially high quantities of the alkaline earth metals Sr (15.9 g per dry-kg) and Ba (3.79 g per dry-kg), whereas Ca content (12.5 g per dry-kg) was lower than that of Sr and only 61 % of the mean content of 70 Japanese seaweed species. Time-course analysis determined the rate of radioactive (85)Sr incorporation into thalli to be approximately 0.13 g Sr per dry-kg of thallus per day. Subcellular fractionation of B. maxima cells showed that most of the (85)Sr was localized in the soluble fraction, predominantly in the vacuole or cytosol. Given that (85)Sr radioactivity was permeable through a dialysis membrane, the (85)Sr was considered to be a form of inorganic ion and/or bound with a small molecule. Precipitation analysis with sodium sulfate showed that more than 70% of the Sr did not precipitate as SrSO4, indicating that a proportion of the Sr may bind with small molecules in B. maxima.

  4. Alleviating salt stress in tomato seedlings using Arthrobacter and Bacillus megaterium isolated from the rhizosphere of wild plants grown on saline-alkaline lands.

    PubMed

    Fan, Pengfei; Chen, Daitao; He, Yanan; Zhou, Qingxia; Tian, Yongqiang; Gao, Lihong

    2016-11-01

    Salt-induced soil degradation is common in farmlands and limits the growth and development of numerous crop plants in the world. In this study, we isolated salt-tolerant bacteria from the rhizosphere of Tamarix chinensis, Suaeda salsa and Zoysia sinica, which are common wild plants grown on a saline-alkaline land, to test these bacteria's efficiency in alleviating salt stress in tomato plants. We screened out seven strains (TF1-7) that are efficient in reducing salt stress in tomato seedlings. The sequence data of 16S rRNA genes showed that these strains belong to Arthrobacter and Bacillus megaterium. All strains could hydrolyze casein and solubilize phosphate, and showed at least one plant growth promotion (PGP)-related gene, indicating their potential in promoting plant growth. The Arthrobacter strains TF1 and TF7 and the Bacillus megaterium strain TF2 and TF3 could produce indole acetic acid under salt stress, further demonstrating their PGP potential. Tomato seed germination, seedling length, vigor index, and plant fresh and dry weight were enhanced by inoculation of Arthrobacter and B. megaterium strains under salt stress. Our results demonstrated that salt-tolerant bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of wild plants grown on saline-alkaline lands could be used for alleviating salt stress in crop plants.

  5. Recent advances in tailoring the aggregation of heavier alkaline earth metal halides, alkoxides and aryloxides from non-aqueous solvents.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Katharina M

    2006-11-21

    This overview on one of the subjects treated in our group deals with the synthesis and study of low-dimensional polymer and molecular solid state structures formed with alkaline earth metal ions in non-aqueous solvents. We have chosen several synthetic approaches in order to obtain such compounds. The first concept deals with the "cutting out" of structural fragments from a solid state structure of a binary compound, which will be explained with reference to BaI2. Depending on the size and concentration of oxygen donor ligands, used as chemical scissors on BaI2, three-, two-, one- and zero-dimensional derived adducts of BaI2 are obtained, comparable to a structural genealogy tree for BaI2. A second part deals with the supramolecular approach for the synthesis of low dimensional polymeric compounds based on alkaline earth metal iodides, obtained by the combination of metal ion coordination with hydrogen bonding between the cationic complexes and their anions. Certain circumstances allow rules to be established for the prediction of the dimensionality of a given compound, contributing to the fundamental problem of structure prediction in crystal engineering. A third section describes a synthetic approach for generating pure alkaline earth metal cage compounds as well as alkali and alkaline earth mixed metal clusters. A first step deals with different molecular solvated alkaline earth metal iodides which are investigated as a function of the ligand size in non-aqueous solvents. These are then reacted with some alkali metal compound in order to partially or totally eliminate alkali iodide and to form the targeted clusters. These unique structures of ligand stabilized metal halide, hydroxide and/or alkoxide and aryloxide aggregates are of interest as potential precursors for oxide materials and as catalysts. Approaches to two synthetic methods of the latter, sol-gel and (MO)CVD (metal-organic chemical vapour deposition), are investigated with some of our compounds. (D

  6. Two planets: Earth and Mars - One salt model: The Hydrothermal SCRIW-Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovland, M. T.; Rueslaatten, H.; Johnsen, H. K.; Indreiten, T.

    2011-12-01

    One of the common characteristics of planets Earth and Mars is that both host water (H2O) and large accumulations of salt. Whereas Earth's surface-environment can be regarded as 'water-friendly' and 'salt hostile', the reverse can be said for the surface of Mars. This is because liquid water is stable on Earth, and the atmosphere transports humidity around the globe, whereas on planet Mars, liquid water is unstable, rendering the atmosphere dry and, therefore, 'salt-friendly'. The riddle as to how the salt accumulated in various locations on those two planets is one of long-lasting and great debate. The salt accumulations on Earth are traditionally termed 'evaporites', meaning that they formed by the evaporation of large masses of seawater. How the accumulations on Mars formed is much harder to explain, with a similar model, as surface water, representing a large ocean only existed briefly. Although water molecules and OH-groups may exist in abundance in bound form (crystal water, adsorbed water, etc.), the only place where free water is expected to be stable on Mars is within underground faults, fractures, and crevices. Here it likely occurs as brine or in the form of ice. Based on these conditions, a key to understanding the accumulation of large deposits of salt on both planets is linked to how brines behave in the subsurface when pressurized and heated beyond their supercritical point. At depths greater than about 3 km (i.e., a pressure, P>300 bars) water will no longer boil in a steam phase. Rather, it becomes supercritical and will form a supercritical water 'vapor' (SCRIW) with a specific gravity of typically 0.3 g/cm3. An important characteristic of SCRIW is its inability to dissolve the common sea salts. The salt dissolved in the brines will therefore precipitate as solid particles when brines (seawater on the Earth) move into the supercritical P&T-domain (above 400 C and 300 bars). Numerical modeling of a hydrothermal system in the Atlantis II Deep of the

  7. [Effect of bivalent alkaline earth fluorides introduction on thermal stability and spectroscopic properties of Er3+/Tm3+ /Yb3+ co-doped oxyfluorogermanate glasses].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue-bo; Zhang, Xin-na; Zhou, Da-li; Jiao, Qing; Wang, Rong-fei; Huang, Jin-feng; Long, Xiao-bo; Qiu, Jian-bei

    2012-01-01

    Transparent Er3+/Tm3+ /Yb3+ co-doped oxyfluorogermanate glasses alone containing MgF2, CaF2, SrF2 or BaF2 and nano-glass-ceramics only containing BaF2 were prepared. The thermal stabilities and the up-conversion emission properties of the samples were investigated. Analyses of absorbance spectra reveal that the UV cutoff band moves slightly to shortwave band with the doping bivalent cation mass increasing. The results show that the emission color can be adjusted by changing the alkaline earth cation species in the glass matrixes, especially as Mg2+ is concerned, and the emission intensity can increase notably by heating the glass containing alkaline-earth fluoride into glass ceramic containing alkaline-earth fluoride nanocrystals or increasing the content of bivalent alkaline earth fluorides.

  8. Use of agar diffusion assay to measure bactericidal activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids against bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of caproic, caprylic, capric, lauric, and myristic acids. A 0.5M concentration of each fatty acid was dissolved in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH), and pH of the mixtures was adjusted to 10.5 with citric acid. Solu...

  9. Use of agar diffusion assay to evaluate bactericidal activity of formulations of alkaline salts of fatty acids against bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids (FA). Wells in agar media seeded with bacteria were filled with FA-potassium hydroxide (KOH) solutions, plates were incubated, and zones of inhibition were measured. The relationship between bacteric...

  10. Monte Carlo simulations of electron thermalization in alkali iodide and alkaline-earth fluoride scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiguo; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien

    2012-07-01

    A Monte Carlo model of electron thermalization in inorganic scintillators, which was developed and applied to CsI in a previous publication [Wang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064903 (2011)], is extended to another material of the alkali halide class, NaI, and to two materials from the alkaline-earth halide class, CaF2 and BaF2. This model includes electron scattering with both longitudinal optical (LO) and acoustic phonons as well as the effects of internal electric fields. For the four pure materials, a significant fraction of the electrons recombine with self-trapped holes and the thermalization distance distributions of the electrons that do not recombine peak between approximately 25 and 50 nm and extend up to a few hundreds of nanometers. The thermalization time distributions of CaF2, BaF2, NaI, and CsI extend to approximately 0.5, 1, 2, and 7 ps, respectively. The simulations show that the LO phonon energy is a key factor that affects the electron thermalization process. Indeed, the higher the LO phonon energy is, the shorter the thermalization time and distance are. The thermalization time and distance distributions show no dependence on the incident γ-ray energy. The four materials also show different extents of electron-hole pair recombination due mostly to differences in their electron mean free paths (MFPs), LO phonon energies, initial densities of electron-hole pairs, and static dielectric constants. The effect of thallium doping is also investigated for CsI and NaI as these materials are often doped with activators. Comparison between CsI and NaI shows that both the larger size of Cs+ relative to Na+, i.e., the greater atomic density of NaI, and the longer electron mean free path in NaI compared to CsI contribute to an increased probability for electron trapping at Tl sites in NaI versus CsI.

  11. Influence of doping with alkaline earth metals on the optical properties of thermochromic VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Marc K.; Kramm, Benedikt G.; Becker, Martin; Meyer, Bruno K.; Polity, Angelika; Klar, Peter J.

    2015-05-01

    Thin films of doped VO2 were deposited, analyzed, and optimized with regard to their solar energy transmittance (Tsol) and visible/luminous light transmittance (Tlum) which are important parameters in the context of smart window applications in buildings. The doping with alkaline earth metals (AEM) like Mg, Ca, Sr, or Ba increased both Tsol and Tlum due to a bandgap widening and an associated absorption edge blue-shift. Thereby, the brown-yellowish color impression of pure VO2 thin films, which is one major hindrance limiting the usage of VO2 as thermochromic window coating, was overcome. Transparent thin films with excellent switching behavior were prepared by sputtering. Highly doped V1-xMexO2 (Me = Ca, Sr, Ba) kept its excellent thermochromic switching behavior up to x(Me) = Me/(Me + V) = 10 at. % doping level, while the optical bandgap energy was increased from 1.64 eV for undoped VO2 to 2.38 eV for x(Mg) = 7.7 at. %, 1.85 eV for x(Ca) = 7.4 at. %, 1.84 eV for x(Sr) = 6.4 at. % and 1.70 eV for x(Ba) = 6.8 at. %, as well as the absorption edge is blue shifted by increasing AEM contents. Also, the critical temperature ϑc, at which the semiconductor-to-metal transition (SMT) occurs, was decreased by AEM doping, which amounted to about -0.5 K/at. % for all AEM on average. The critical temperature was determined by transmittance-temperature hysteresis measurements. Furthermore, Tsol and Tlum were calculated and were found to be significantly enhanced by AEM doping. Tlum increased from 32.0% in undoped VO2 to 43.4% in VO2 doped with 6.4 at. % Sr. Similar improvements were found for other AEM. The modulation of the solar energy transmittance ΔTsol, which is the difference of the Tsol values in the low and high temperature phase, was almost constant or even slightly increased when the doping level was increased up to about 10 at. % Ca, Sr, or Ba.

  12. Overview of the crystal chemistry of the actinide chalcogenides: incorporation of the alkaline-earth elements.

    PubMed

    Mesbah, Adel; Prakash, Jai; Ibers, James A

    2016-10-18

    This review focuses on the results of exploratory syntheses of alkaline-earth-metal actinide chalcogenides Ak-An-Q (Ak = Ba, Sr; An = Th, U; Q = S, Se, and Te). About thirty new compounds are described. Although the basic building blocks of their structures are usually AnQ6 octahedra and AkQ8 bicapped trigonal prisms, these are combined in diverse ways to afford eleven new structure types. The structures reconfirm the prevailing presence of An(4+) in chalcogenides, although some of the compounds discovered are mixed An(4+)/An(5+) systems, and a few contain only An(5+). The tendency of the chalcogens to form Q-Q bonds is again evident from the presence of S-S single bonds and infinite Te-Te-Te linear chains. The latter possess interatomic distances of lengths greater than that of a Te-Te single bond but less than that of a Te-Te van der Waals interaction. Assignment of formal oxidation states in compounds containing these chains is arbitrary at best. Addition of metal atoms (M) affords quaternary structures, some of which show remarkable flexibility in the positions of the An and M atoms, and in such compounds the nature of the M elements influences directly the dimensionality of the resultant structure. The presence of adventitious oxygen, often from etching of the fused-silica tubes by oxyphilic An elements, results in new quintary compounds that show remarkable structural variations with change of M. The compounds discussed have shown transport and electronic structures that range from metallic-like to semiconducting. We find, with the exception of BaUSe3, when comparisons can be made that the values of the calculated band gaps are reasonably close but usually lower than the experimentally derived values. Thus the method used, in particular the HSE functional, has been generally successful on these 5f actinides. This is an important result because in the absence of suitable crystals, and hence experimental measurements, it still may be possible to offer credible

  13. Monte Carlo simulations of electron thermalization in alkali iodide and alkaline-earth fluoride scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhiguo; Gao Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien; Xie Yulong; Campbell, Luke W.

    2012-07-01

    A Monte Carlo model of electron thermalization in inorganic scintillators, which was developed and applied to CsI in a previous publication [Wang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064903 (2011)], is extended to another material of the alkali halide class, NaI, and to two materials from the alkaline-earth halide class, CaF{sub 2} and BaF{sub 2}. This model includes electron scattering with both longitudinal optical (LO) and acoustic phonons as well as the effects of internal electric fields. For the four pure materials, a significant fraction of the electrons recombine with self-trapped holes and the thermalization distance distributions of the electrons that do not recombine peak between approximately 25 and 50 nm and extend up to a few hundreds of nanometers. The thermalization time distributions of CaF{sub 2}, BaF{sub 2}, NaI, and CsI extend to approximately 0.5, 1, 2, and 7 ps, respectively. The simulations show that the LO phonon energy is a key factor that affects the electron thermalization process. Indeed, the higher the LO phonon energy is, the shorter the thermalization time and distance are. The thermalization time and distance distributions show no dependence on the incident {gamma}-ray energy. The four materials also show different extents of electron-hole pair recombination due mostly to differences in their electron mean free paths (MFPs), LO phonon energies, initial densities of electron-hole pairs, and static dielectric constants. The effect of thallium doping is also investigated for CsI and NaI as these materials are often doped with activators. Comparison between CsI and NaI shows that both the larger size of Cs{sup +} relative to Na{sup +}, i.e., the greater atomic density of NaI, and the longer electron mean free path in NaI compared to CsI contribute to an increased probability for electron trapping at Tl sites in NaI versus CsI.

  14. Salt precipitation in sea ice and its effect on albedo, with application to Snowball Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carns, Regina C.; Brandt, Richard E.; Warren, Stephen G.

    2015-11-01

    During the initial freezing of the tropical ocean on Snowball Earth, the first ice to form would be sea ice, which contains salt within inclusions of liquid brine. At temperatures below -23°C, significant amounts of the salt begin to crystallize, with the most abundant salt being hydrohalite (NaCl·2H2O). These crystals scatter light, increasing the ice albedo. In this paper, we present field measurements of the albedo of cold sea ice and laboratory measurements of hydrohalite precipitation. Precipitation of salt within brine inclusions was observed on windswept bare ice of McMurdo Sound at the coast of Antarctica (78°S) in early austral spring. Salinity and temperature were measured in ice cores. Spectral albedo was measured on several occasions during September and October. The albedo showed a gradual increase with decreasing temperature, consistent with salt precipitation. Laboratory examination of thin sections from the ice cores showed that the precipitation process exhibits hysteresis, with hydrohalite precipitating over a range of temperatures between -28°C and -35°C but dissolving at about -23°C. The causes of the hysteresis were investigated in experiments on laboratory-grown sea ice with different solute mixtures. All mixtures showed hysteresis, suggesting that it may be an inherent property of hydrohalite precipitation within brine inclusions rather than being due to biological macromolecules or interactions between various salts in seawater.

  15. Unified mechanism of alkali and alkaline earth catalyzed gasification reactions of carbon by CO2 and H2O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, S.G.; Yang, R.T.

    1997-01-01

    From molecular orbital calculations, a unified mechanism is proposed for the gasification reactions of graphite by CO2 and H2O, both uncatalyzed and catalyzed by alkali and alkaline earth catalysts. In this mechanism, there are two types of oxygen intermediates that are bonded to the active edge carbon atoms: an in-plane semiquinone type, Cf(O), and an off-plane oxygen bonded to two saturated carbon atoms that are adjacent to the semiquinone species, C(O)Cf(O). The rate-limiting step is the decomposition of these intermediates by breaking the C-C bonds that are connected to Cf(O). A new rate equation is derived for the uncatalyzed reactions, and that for the catalyzed reactions is readily available from the proposed mechanism. The proposed mechanism can account for several unresolved experimental observations: TPD and TK (transient kinetics) desorption results of the catalyzed systems, the similar activation energies for the uncatalyzed and catalyzed reactions, and the relative activities of the alkali and alkaline earth elements. The net charge of the edge carbon active site is substantially changed by gaining electron density from the alkali or alkaline earth element (by forming C-O-M, where M stands for metal). The relative catalytic activities of these elements can be correlated with their abilities of donating electrons and changing the net charge of the edge carbon atom. As shown previously (Chen, S. G.; Yang, R. T. J. Catal. 1993, 141, 102), only clusters of the alkali compounds are active. This derives from the ability of the clusters to dissociate CO2 and H2O to form O atoms and the mobility of the dissociated O atoms facilitated by the clusters.

  16. Tris(pyrazolyl)methanides of the alkaline earth metals: influence of the substitution pattern on stability and degradation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christoph; Koch, Alexander; Görls, Helmar; Krieck, Sven; Westerhausen, Matthias

    2015-01-20

    Trispyrazolylmethanides commonly act as strong tridentate bases toward metal ions. This expected coordination behavior has been observed for tris(3,4,5-trimethylpyrazolyl)methane (1a), which yields the alkaline-earth-metal bis[tris(3,4,5-trimethylpyrazolyl)methanides] of magnesium (1b), calcium (1c), strontium (1d), and barium (1e) via deprotonation of 1a with dibutylmagnesium and [Ae{N(SiMe3)2}2] (Ae = Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba, respectively). Barium complex 1e degrades during recrystallization that was attempted from aromatic hydrocarbons and ethers. In these scorpionate complexes, the metal ions are embedded in distorted octahedral coordination spheres. Contrarily, tris(3-thienylpyrazolyl)methane (2a) exhibits a strikingly different reactivity. Dibutylmagnesium is unable to deprotonate 2a, whereas [Ae{N(SiMe3)2}2] (Ae = Ca, Sr, and Ba) smoothly metalates 2a. However, the primary alkaline-earth-metal bis[tris(3-thienylpyrazolyl)methanides] of Ca (2c), Sr (2d), and Ba (2e) represent intermediates and degrade under the formation of the alkaline-earth-metal bis(3-thienylpyrazolates) of calcium (3c), strontium (3d), and barium (3e) and the elimination of tetrakis(3-thienylpyrazolyl)ethene (4). To isolate crystalline compounds, 3-thienylpyrazole has been metalated, and the corresponding derivatives [(HPz(Tp))4Mg(Pz(Tp))2] (3b), dinuclear [(tmeda)Ca(Pz(Tp))2]2 (3c), mononuclear [(pmdeta)Sr(Pz(Tp))2] (3d), and [(hmteta)Ba(Pz(Tp))2] (3e) have been structurally characterized. Regardless of the applied stoichiometry, magnesiation of thienylpyrazole 3a with dibutylmagnesium yields [(HPz(Tp))4Mg(Pz(Tp))2] (3b), which is stabilized in the solid state by intramolecular N-H···N···H-N hydrogen bridges. The degradation of [Ae{C(Pz(R))3}2] (R = Ph and Tp) has been studied by quantum chemical methods, the results of which propose an intermediate complex of the nature [{(Pz(R))2C}2Ca{Pz(R)}2]; thereafter, the singlet carbenes ([:C(Pz(R))2]) dimerize in the vicinity of the alkaline

  17. The effect of alkaline earth metal ion dopants on photocatalytic water splitting by NaTaO(3) powder.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Akihide; Kato, Hideki; Kudo, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    Alkaline earth metal ions (Ca, Sr, and Ba) are doped into a NaTaO(3) photocatalyst, yielding fine particles and surface structures with nanometer-scale "steps." The formation of the surface nanostep structure depends on the amount of doped Sr and Ba. The photocatalytic water splitting over NaTaO(3) is enhanced: NaTaO(3) doped with 0.5 and 1.0 mol % of Sr shows high activities for photocatalytic water splitting without loading of a co-catalyst, and the photocatalytic activity is further improved by loading with a NiO co-catalyst.

  18. Luminescence properties of Eu-activated alkaline and alkaline-earth silicate Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 6}O{sub 16}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Huang, Yanlin; Wang, Xigang; Qin, Lin; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • A novel yellow-emitting alkaline and alkaline-earth silicate Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 6}O{sub 16}:Eu{sup 2+} was first developed. • Under excitation with UV or near UV light the silicate presents broad emission band centered at 580 nm. - Abstract: Yellow-emitting phosphors of Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 6}O{sub 16}:Eu{sup 2+} was prepared by wet chemistry sol–gel method. X-ray powder diffraction and SEM measurements were applied to characterize the structure and morphology, respectively. The luminescence properties were investigated by the photoluminescence excitation and emission spectra, decay curve (lifetimes), CIE coordinates and the internal quantum efficiencies. The excitation spectra can match well with the emission light of near UV-LED chips (360–400 nm). Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 6}O{sub 16}:Eu{sup 2+} presents a symmetric emission band from 4f{sup 6}5d{sup 1} ⟶ 4f{sup 7}({sup 8}S{sub 7/2}) transitions of Eu{sup 2+} ions on doping below 3.0 mol%. On increasing Eu-doping levels, the sample contains two kinds of emission centers, i.e., Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} ions, which present the characteristic broad band (5d ⟶ 4f) and narrower (4f ⟶ 4f) luminescence lines, respectively. The energy transfer, the luminescence thermal stability (activation energy ΔE for thermal quenching) and luminescence mechanism of Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 6}O{sub 16}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphors were discussed by analyzing the relationship between the luminescence characteristics and the crystal structure.

  19. A Novel Multi-domain High Molecular, Salt-Stable Alkaline Xylanase from Alkalibacterium sp. SL3

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guozeng; Wu, Jingjing; Yan, Renxiang; Lin, Juan; Ye, Xiuyun

    2017-01-01

    A novel multi-domain high molecular xylanase coding gene (xynSL3) was cloned from Alkalibacterium sp. SL3, an alkaliphilic bacterial strain isolated from the sediment of soda lake Dabusu. The deduced XynSL3 is composed of a putative signal peptide, three tandem domains of carbohydrate binding module (CBM) family 22, a catalytic domain of glycosyl hydrolase (GH) family 10 and a domain of CBM9. XynSL3 shares the highest identity of 66% to a hypothetical protein from Alkalibacterium sp. AK22 and has low identities (33–45%) with other functionally characterized xylanases. The gene xynSL3 was expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and the recombinant enzyme demonstrated some particular characteristics. Purified recombinant XynSL3 (rXynSL3) was highly active and stable over the neutral and alkaline pH ranges from 7.0 to 12.0, with maximum activity at pH 9.0 and around 45% activity at pH 12.0. It had an apparent temperature optimum of 55°C and was stable at 50°C. The rXynSL3 was highly halotolerant, retaining more than 60% activity with 3 M NaCl and was stable at up to a 4 M concentration of NaCl. The hydrolysis products of rXynSL3 from corncob xylan were mainly xylobiose and xylotetraose. The activity of rXynSL3 was enhanced by Ca2+ and it has strong resistance to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). This multi-domain, alkaline and salt-tolerant enzyme has great potential for basic research and industrial applications such as the biobleaching of paper pulp and production of xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS). PMID:28101084

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Alkaline-Earth Metal (Ca, Sr, and Ba) Doped Nanodimensional LaMnO3 Rare-Earth Manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asma, Khalid; Saadat, Anwar Siddiqi; Affia, Aslam

    2013-07-01

    The substitution of divalent cations of alkaline-earth elements in nanodimensional structures of rare-earth manganites produces advanced materials with potential electrical and magnetic functionalities. A systematic investigation of La0.65A0.35MnO3 (A = Ca, Sr, Ba) materials synthesized with a modified citrate route adopting ethanol dehydration has been undertaken. The structural and morphological analyses are carried out by using x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Resistivity measurements are performed in variation with temperature to study the electrical transport properties which are found to vary with the size of the A-site cationic radius. Room temperature magnetic measurements are carried out to investigate the type of magnetic phase present in materials. The stability of the magnetic phase and coercivity are found to be dependent on the size of nanocrystallites.

  1. Thermodynamic stability of perovskites and related compounds in some alkaline earth-transition metal-oxygen systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokokawa, Harumi; Sakai, Natsuko; Kawada, Tatsuya; Dokiya, Masayuki

    1991-09-01

    The thermodynamic properties of some alkaline earth ( A)-transition metal ( M) perovskites and K 2NiF 4 compounds have been collected, analyzed, and utilized to examine their stabilities by constructing the chemical potential diagrams of a log [ {a(A)}/{a(M)}] vs log P(O 2) plot. A thermodynamic analysis was performed on the dissociation reaction of K 2NiF 4 compounds ( A2MO 4) into perovskites ( AMO 3) and alkaline earth oxides ( AO) using empirical correlations between stabilization energy and tolerance factor. It has been found that the softness of calcium ions, which shrink markedly with decreasing coordination number from 12 to 9, makes the calcium K 2NiF 4 compounds (Ca 2MO 4) relatively less stable with increasing radius of the transition metal ions, r( M4+). This destabilization related to the coordination-number-dependent radii implies that when compared with the strontium perovskites, the calcium analogous perovskites may have a smaller number of oxygen vacancies, because the formation of oxygen vacancies should be accompanied with a decrease in coordination number of A-site ions.

  2. Binding and selectivity of phenazino-18-crown-6-ether with alkali, alkaline earth and toxic metal species: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nasarul; Chimni, Swapandeep Singh

    2017-02-01

    The interactions of phenazino-crown ether ligands with alkali, alkaline earth and selected toxic species were investigated using density functional theory modelling by employing B3PW91/6-311G ++ (d, p) level of theory. The complex stability was analysed in terms of binding energies, perturbation energies, position of highest molecular orbital and energy gap values. In general, the complexes formed by P18C6-1a ligand with metal cations were found to be more stable than those with P18C6-1b. Among alkali and alkaline earth metals complexes having highest stability was observed for the complex formed by P18C6-1a with Be2+. Computational calculations of P18C6 ligand with toxic metal ions reveals that the P18C6-Cr6+ metal complexes acquire envelop like geometry, leading to higher binding energy values. Comparing the binding energies of neutral and monocations of Ag and Hg, the former had higher value both in neutral as well as monocation state. Thus, the stability of metal complexes is determined not only by the ligand but also by the type of metal ion. In solvent systems the stability constants of metal complexes were found increasing with decreasing permittivity of the solvent. This reflects the inherited polar character of the protic solvents stabilises the cation, resulting in decrease of effective interaction of ligand with the metal ion.

  3. Three interesting coordination compounds based on metalloligand and alkaline-earth ions: Syntheses, structures, thermal behaviors and magnetic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiang; Qian, Jun; Zhang, Chi

    2016-09-01

    Based on metalloligand LCu ([Cu(2,4-pydca)2]2-, 2,4-pydca2- = pyridine-2,4-dicarboxylate) and alkaline-earth ions (Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+), three interesting coordination compounds, [Ca(H2O)7][LCu·H2O]·H2O (1), {Sr[LCu·H2O]·4H2O}n (2), and {Ba[LCu·H2O]·8H2O}n (3), have been synthesized and well-characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. X-ray crystallographic studies reveal that 1 features a discrete 0D coordination compound, while 2 and 3 exhibit the 2D network and 1D chain structures, respectively. Compound 2 is constructed from {LCu}2 dimers connected with {Sr2} units, which is fabricated by two Sr2+ ions bridged via two μ2-O bridges, while compound 3 is formed by 1D {Ba}n chain linked with metalloligands LCu and exhibits an interesting sandwich like chain structure. It is noted that the coordination numbers of alkaline-earth ions are in positive correlation with their radiuses. Moreover, the magnetic property of compound 2 has been studied.

  4. Dissolution stoichiometry and adsorption of alkali and alkaline earth elements to the acid-reacted wollastonite surface at 25°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhixin; Walther, John V.

    1994-06-01

    The Ca 2+/H + exchange reaction on the wollastonite surface was investigated at 25°C with both short-term (<2.5 h) and long-term (>48 h) dissolution studies. In acidic solutions, the dissolution of wollastonite is nonstoichiometric with a greater release of Ca than Si relative to the wollastonite stoichiometry. Both short-term and long-term Ca 2+/H + exchange reaction stoichiometries are 0.5. Rapid desorption of Ca 2+ from the surface of untreated wollastonite caused a rise of the suspension pH to about 10 in a couple of minutes. Therefore, potentiometric titrations were performed with an acidreacted wollastonite where most surface detachable Ca 2+ had been removed. Addition of alkali and alkaline earth metal chloride solutions to the acid-reacted wollastonite suspension results in a pH decrease with K +> Na + > Ba 2+ > Mg 2+ > Ca 2+ in equal molal solutions. This suggests that the cations in these solutions are adsorbed to the wollastonite surface. Surface protonation properties of the acid-reacted wollastonite are found to be similar to those of microporous silica but with the point of zero salt effect (pzse) of 4.5-5.5 rather than the 3.0 of microporous silica. The surface protonation-deprotonation as a function of pH is modeled with a one-site double layer model which includes Na adsorption from the background electrolyte to reasonable accuracy. The adsorption of CrO 42-, MoO 42-, Ca 2+, Mg 2+, Ba 2+, and Na + from aqueous solutions to the acidreacted wollastonite/water interface was determined as a function of the pH and ionic strength of the solution. CrO 42- and MoO 42- were not adsorbed to the wollastonite surface at pH above 3. The extent of cation adsorption increases with increasing pH and decreases with increasing ionic strength. Ca 2+ adsorption depends on both the surface area of wollastonite and total amount of Ca 2+ in the suspension. For alkaline earth metals at the same concentration, the adsorption sequence is Ba 2+> Ca 2+> Mg 2+. At pH 8.5, the

  5. Oxidation behavior of Cr(III) during thermal treatment of chromium hydroxide in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth metal chlorides.

    PubMed

    Mao, Linqiang; Gao, Bingying; Deng, Ning; Liu, Lu; Cui, Hao

    2016-02-01

    The oxidation behavior of Cr(III) during the thermal treatment of chromium hydroxide in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth metal chlorides (NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2) was investigated. The amounts of Cr(III) oxidized at various temperatures and heating times were determined, and the Cr-containing species in the residues were characterized. During the transformation of chromium hydroxide to Cr2O3 at 300 °C approximately 5% of the Cr(III) was oxidized to form intermediate compounds containing Cr(VI) (i.e., CrO3), but these intermediates were reduced to Cr2O3 when the temperature was above 400 °C. Alkali and alkaline earth metals significantly promoted the oxidation of Cr(III) during the thermal drying process. Two pathways were involved in the influences the alkali and alkaline earth metals had on the formation of Cr(VI). In pathway I, the alkali and alkaline earth metals were found to act as electron transfer agents and to interfere with the dehydration process, causing more intermediate Cr(VI)-containing compounds (which were identified as being CrO3 and Cr5O12) to be formed. The reduction of intermediate compounds to Cr2O3 was also found to be hindered in pathway I. In pathway II, the alkali and alkaline earth metals were found to contribute to the oxidation of Cr(III) to form chromates. The results showed that the presence of alkali and alkaline earth metals significantly increases the degree to which Cr(III) is oxidized during the thermal drying of chromium-containing sludge.

  6. Solubility of some alkali and alkaline earth chlorides in water at moderate temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clynne, M.A.; Potter, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    Solubilities for the binary systems, salt-H2O, of the chlorides of lithium, rubidium, cesium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, and barium from near 0??C to the saturated boiling point are reported. The experimental data and coefficients of an equation for a smoothed curve describing each system are listed in the tables. The data are improvements on those previously reported in the literature, having a precision on the average of ??0.09%.

  7. Half metallic ferromagnetism in alkaline-earth metal nitrides XN (X=Ca, Sr and Ba): A first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanichamy, R. Rajeswara; Priyanga, G. Sudha; Cinthia, A. Jemmy; Murugan, A.; Meenaatci, A. T. Asvini; Iyakutti, K.

    2013-11-01

    The structural, electronic, mechanical and magnetic properties of 3 alkaline-earth metal nitrides (XN: X=Ca, Sr, and Ba) are investigated by the first principles calculations based on density functional theory using the Vienna ab-initio simulation code. At ambient pressure all the 3 nitrides are stable in the ferromagnetic state with a cubic NaCl structure. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available results. The electronic structure reveals that these materials are half metallic ferromagnets at normal pressure. A pressure-induced structural phase transition from NaCl (B1) to CsCl (B2) phase is observed in CaN, SrN and BaN. On further increasing the pressure, a half metallic to metallic transition is also observed in these nitrides. Ferromagnetism is quenched in all the 3 nitrides at high pressures.

  8. Two-band superfluidity and intrinsic Josephson effect in alkaline-earth-metal Fermi gases across an orbital Feshbach resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskin, M.

    2016-07-01

    We first show that the many-body Hamiltonian governing the physical properties of an alkaline-earth 173Yb Fermi gas across the recently realized orbital Feshbach resonance is exactly analogous to that of two-band s -wave superconductors with contact interactions; i.e., even though the free-particle bands have a tunable energy offset in between and are coupled by a Josephson-type attractive interband pair scattering, the intraband interactions have exactly the same strength. We then introduce two intraband order parameters within the BCS mean-field approximation and investigate the competition between their in-phase and out-of-phase (i.e., the so-called π -phase) solutions in the entire BCS-BEC evolution at zero temperature.

  9. High-T sub c thin films on low microwave loss alkaline-rare-earth-aluminate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolewski, R.; Gierlowski, P.; Kula, W.; Zarembinski, S.; Lewandowski, S.J.; Berkowski, M.; Pajaczkowska, A. ); Gorshunov, B.P.; Lyudmirsky, D.B.; Sirotinsky, O.I. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on the alkaline-rare-earth aluminates (K{sub 2}NiF{sub 4}-type perovskites) which are an excellent choice as the substrate material for the growth of high-T{sub c} thin films suitable for microwave and far-infrared applications. The CaNdAlO{sub 4}, and SrLaAlO{sub 4} single crystals have been grown by Czochralski pulling and fabricated into the form of (001) oriented wafers. The Y-Ba-Cu-O and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O films deposited on these substrates by a single-target magnetron sputtering exhibited very good superconducting and structural properties.

  10. Cyclotron dynamics of a Kondo singlet in a spin-orbit-coupled alkaline-earth-metal atomic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lv, Hao; Wang, Wen-Li; Du, Juan; Qian, Jun; Wang, Yu-Zhu

    2014-11-01

    We propose a scheme to investigate the interplay between the Kondo-exchange interaction and the quantum spin Hall effect with ultracold fermionic alkaline-earth-metal atoms trapped in two-dimensional optical lattices using ultracold collision and laser-assisted tunneling. In the strong Kondo-coupling regime, although the loop trajectory of the mobile atom disappears, collective dynamics of an atom pair in two clock states can exhibit an unexpected spin-dependent cyclotron orbit in a plaquette, realizing the quantum spin Hall effect of the Kondo singlet. We demonstrate that the collective cyclotron dynamics of the spin-zero Kondo singlet is governed by an effective Harper-Hofstadter model in addition to second-order diagonal tunneling.

  11. Physical and optical absorption studies of Fe3+ - ions doped lithium borate glasses containing certain alkaline earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhogi, Ashok; Kumar, R. Vijaya; Kistaiah, P.

    2016-05-01

    Iron ion doped lithium borate glasses with the composition 15RO-25Li2O-59B2O3-1Fe2O3 (where R= Ca, Sr and Ba) have been prepared by the conventional melt quenching technique and characterized to investigate the physical and optical properties using XRD, density, molar volume and UV-Visible spectroscopy. The optical absorption spectra exhibit a band at around 460 nm which is assigned to 6A1g(S) → 4Eg (G) of Fe3+ ions with distorted octahedral symmetry. From ultraviolet absorption edges, the optical band gap and Urbach energies have been evaluated. The effect of alkaline earths on these properties is discussed.

  12. Alkaline earth lead and tin compounds Ae2Pb, Ae2Sn, Ae = Ca, Sr, Ba, as thermoelectric materials.

    PubMed

    Parker, David; Singh, David J

    2013-10-01

    We present a detailed theoretical study of three alkaline earth compounds Ca2Pb, Sr2Pb and Ba2Pb, which have undergone little previous study, calculating electronic band structures and Boltzmann transport and bulk moduli using density functional theory. We also study the corresponding tin compounds Ca2Sn, Sr2Sn and Ba2Sn. We find that these are all narrow band gap semiconductors with an electronic structure favorable for thermoelectric performance, with substantial thermopowers for the lead compounds at temperature ranges from 300 to 800 K. For the lead compounds, we further find very low calculated bulk moduli-roughly half of the values for the lead chalcogenides, suggestive of soft phonons and hence low lattice thermal conductivity. All these facts indicate that these materials merit experimental investigation as potential high performance thermoelectrics. We find good potential for thermoelectric performance in the environmentally friendly stannide materials, particularly at high temperature.

  13. Dispersion coefficients for H and He interactions with alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mitroy, J.; Bromley, M.W.J.

    2003-12-01

    The van der Waals coefficients C{sub 6}, C{sub 8}, and C{sub 10} for H and He interactions with the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, and Rb) and alkaline-earth-metal (Be, Mg, Ca, and Sr) atoms are determined from oscillator strength sum rules. The oscillator strengths were computed using a combination of ab initio and semiempirical methods. The dispersion parameters generally agree with close to exact variational calculations for Li-H and Li-He at the 0.1% level of accuracy. For larger systems, there is agreement with relativistic many-body perturbation theory estimates of C{sub 6} at the 1% level. These validations for selected systems attest to the reliability of the present dispersion parameters. About half the present parameters lie within the recommended bounds of the Standard and Certain compilation [J. Chem. Phys. 83, 3002 (1985)].

  14. Alkaline earth lead and tin compounds Ae2Pb, Ae2Sn, Ae=Ca,Sr,Ba, as thermoelectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, David S; Singh, David J

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical study of three alkaline earth compounds Ca2Pb, Sr2Pb and Ba2Pb, which have undergone little previous study, calculating electronic band structures and Boltzmann transport and bulk moduli using density functional theory. We also study the corresponding tin compounds Ca2 Sn, Sr2 Sn and Ba2 Sn. We find that these are all narrow band gap semiconductors with an electronic structure favorable for thermoelectric performance, with substantial thermopowers for the lead compounds at temperature ranges from 300 to 800 K. For the lead compounds, we further find very low calculated bulk moduli - roughly half of the values for the lead chalcogenides, suggestive of soft phonons and hence low lattice thermal conductivity. All these facts indicate that these materials merit experimental investigation as potential high performance thermoelectrics. We find good potential for thermoelectric performance in the environmentally friendly stannide materials, particularly at high temperature.

  15. Degradation of azo dye methyl red by alkaliphilic, halotolerant Nesterenkonia lacusekhoensis EMLA3: application in alkaline and salt-rich dyeing effluent treatment.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Amrik; Goyal, Nidhi; Gupta, Anshu

    2017-03-02

    Effluents from textile industries are highly colored due to vast use of various azo dyes and color is the first visual indicator of pollution. Biological treatment of textile effluent is often hampered due to the alkaline pH and high salinity; a common characteristic of many textile industrial wastewaters. Considering this, the present study explores the potential of a newly isolated halotolerant and alkaliphilic bacterium Nesterenkonia lacusekhoensis EMLA3 for degradation of methyl red (MR) dye under alkaline condition. Strain EMLA3 showed 97% degradation of 50 mg L(-1) MR after 16 h at initial pH of 11.5 in nutrient medium. Dye degradation by the isolate is supported by the formation of low-molecular weight metabolites as divulge through GC-MS & FTIR studies Optimum dye degradation was observed in the pH range of 8.0-11.5 and temperature range of 30-35 °C. Significant MR degrading activity of the strain could be achieved in the presence of very high salt level (100-120 g L(-1) NaCl) and in co-presence of different heavy metals. Application of strain to alkaline pH, salt, and heavy metals laden-textile effluent resulted in overall 83% dye removal from the effluent after 120 h of treatment under static condition. Furthermore, the property of microbe to drop-down the pH of wastewater from 11.5 to 8.60 after treatment also lowers the need of additional neutralization treatment. The entire study thus comes out with novel application of N. lacusekhoensis-a less explored extremophilic bacterium-for treatment of alkaline and salt-rich azo dye-containing wastewaters.

  16. Heteroleptic alkyl and amide iminoanilide alkaline earth and divalent rare earth complexes for the catalysis of hydrophosphination and (cyclo)hydroamination reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Roisnel, Thierry; Carpentier, Jean-François; Sarazin, Yann

    2013-09-27

    [{N^N}M(X)(thf)n] alkyl (X=CH(SiMe3)2) and amide (X=N(SiMe3)2) complexes of alkaline earths (M=Ca, Sr, Ba) and divalent rare earths (Yb(II) and Eu(II) ) bearing an iminoanilide ligand ({N^N}(-)) are presented. Remarkably, these complexes proved to be kinetically stable in solution. X-ray diffraction studies allowed us to establish size-structure trends. Except for one case of oxidation with [{N^N}Yb(II){N(SiMe3)2}(thf)], all these complexes are stable under the catalytic conditions and constitute effective precatalysts for the cyclohydroamination of terminal aminoalkenes and the intermolecular hydroamination and intermolecular hydrophosphination of activated alkenes. Metals with equal sizes across alkaline earth and rare earth families display almost identical apparent catalytic activity and selectivity. Hydrocarbyl complexes are much better catalyst precursors than their amido analogues. In the case of cyclohydroamination, the apparent activity decreases with metal size: Ca>Sr>Ba, and the kinetic rate law agrees with R(CHA) =k[precatalyst](1)[aminoalkene](1). The intermolecular hydroamination and hydrophosphination of styrene are anti-Markovnikov regiospecific. In both cases, the apparent activity increases with the ionic radius (Ca

  17. EPR and optical absorption studies of Cu{sup 2+} ions in alkaline earth alumino borate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh Kumar, V.; Rao, J.L. . E-mail: jlrao46@yahoo.co.in; Gopal, N.O.

    2005-08-11

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical absorption spectra of Cu{sup 2+} ions in alkaline earth alumino borate glasses doped with different concentrations of CuO have been studied. The EPR spectra of all the glasses exhibit the resonance signals, characteristic of Cu{sup 2+} ions present in axially elongated octahedral sites. The number of spins participating in the resonance has been calculated as a function of temperature for calcium alumino borate (CaAB) glass doped with 0.1 mol% of CuO. From the EPR data, the paramagnetic susceptibility ({chi}) was calculated at different temperatures (T) and from the 1/{chi}-T graph, the Curie temperature of the glass has been evaluated. The optical absorption spectra of all the glasses show a single broad band, which has been assigned to the {sup 2}B{sub 1g} {yields} {sup 2}B{sub 2g} transition of the Cu{sup 2+} ions. The variation in the intensity of optical absorption with the ionic radius of the alkaline earth ion has been explained based on the Coulombic forces. By correlating the EPR and optical absorption spectral data, the nature of the in-plane {sigma} bonding between Cu{sup 2+} ion and the ligands is estimated. From the fundamental ultraviolet absorption edges of the glasses, the optical energy gap (E {sub opt}) and the Urbach energy ({delta}E) are evaluated. The variation in E {sub opt} and {delta}E is explained based on the number of defect centers in the glass.

  18. Structural, electronic and mechanical properties of alkaline earth metal oxides MO (M=Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinthia, A. Jemmy; Priyanga, G. Sudha; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R.; Iyakutti, K.

    2015-04-01

    The structural, electronic and mechanical properties of alkaline earth metal oxides MO (M=Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) in the cubic (B1, B2 and B3) phases and in the wurtzite (B4) phase are investigated using density functional theory calculations as implemented in VASP code. The lattice constants, cohesive energy, bulk modulus, band structures and the density of states are computed. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the experimental and the other available theoretical results. Electronic structure reveals that all the five alkaline earth metal oxides exhibit semiconducting behavior at zero pressure. The estimated band gaps for the stable wurtzite phase of BeO is 7.2 eV and for the stable cubic NaCl phases of MgO, CaO, SrO and BaO are 4.436 eV, 4.166 eV, 4.013 eV, and 2.274 eV respectively. A pressure induced structural phase transition occurs from wurtzite (B4) to NaCl (B1) phase in BeO at 112.1 GPa and from NaCl (B1) to CsCl (B2) phase in MgO at 514.9 GPa, in CaO at 61.3 GPa, in SrO at 42 GPa and in BaO at 14.5 GPa. The elastic constants are computed at zero and elevated pressures for the B4 and B1 phases for BeO and for the B1 and B2 phases in the case of the other oxides in order to investigate their mechanical stability, anisotropy and hardness. The sound velocities and the Debye temperatures are calculated for all the oxides using the computed elastic constants.

  19. Design of ternary alkaline-earth metal Sn(II) oxides with potential good p-type conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Mao -Hua; Singh, David J.; Zhang, Lijun; Li, Yuwei; Xu, Qiaoling; Ma, Yanming; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-04-19

    Oxides with good p-type conductivity have been long sought after to achieve high performance all-oxide optoelectronic devices. Divalent Sn(II) based oxides are promising candidates because of their rather dispersive upper valence bands caused by the Sn-5s/O-2p anti-bonding hybridization. There are so far few known Sn(II) oxides being p-type conductive suitable for device applications. Here, we present via first-principles global optimization structure searches a material design study for a hitherto unexplored Sn(II)-based system, ternary alkaline-earth metal Sn(II) oxides in the stoichiometry of MSn2O3 (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). We identify two stable compounds of SrSn2O3 and BaSn2O3, which can be stabilized by Sn-rich conditions in phase stability diagrams. Their structures follow the Zintl behaviour and consist of basic structural motifs of SnO3 tetrahedra. Unexpectedly they show distinct electronic properties with band gaps ranging from 1.90 (BaSn2O3) to 3.15 (SrSn2O3) eV, and hole effective masses ranging from 0.87 (BaSn2O3) to above 6.0 (SrSn2O3) m0. Further exploration of metastable phases indicates a wide tunability of electronic properties controlled by the details of the bonding between the basic structural motifs. Lastly, this suggests further exploration of alkaline-earth metal Sn(II) oxides for potential applications requiring good p-type conductivity such as transparent conductors and photovoltaic absorbers.

  20. Sign Changes in the Electric Dipole Moment of Excited States in Rubidium-Alkaline Earth Diatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pototschnig, Johann V.; Lackner, Florian; Hauser, Andreas W.; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2015-06-01

    In a recent series of combined experimental and theoretical studies we investigated the ground state and several excited states of the Rb-alkaline earth molecules RbSr and RbCa. The group of alkali-alkaline earth (AK-AKE) molecules has drawn attention for applications in ultracold molecular physics and the measurement of fundamental constants due to their large permanent electric and magnetic dipole moments in the ground state. These properties should allow for an easy manipulation of the molecules and simulations of spin models in optical lattices. In our studies we found that the permanent electric dipole moment points in different directions for certain electronically excited states, and changes the sign in some cases as a function of bond length. We summarize our results, give possible causes for the measured trends in terms of molecular orbital theory and extrapolate the tendencies to other combinations of AK and AKE - elements. F. Lackner, G. Krois, T. Buchsteiner, J. V. Pototschnig, and W. E. Ernst, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014, 113, 153001; G. Krois, F. Lackner, J. V. Pototschnig, T. Buchsteiner, and W. E. Ernst, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014, 16, 22373; J. V. Pototschnig, G. Krois, F. Lackner, and W. E. Ernst, J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 141, 234309 J. V. Pototschnig, G. Krois, F. Lackner, and W. E. Ernst, J. Mol. Spectrosc., in Press (2015), doi:10.1016/j.jms.2015.01.006 M. Kajita, G. Gopakumar, M. Abe, and M. Hada, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 2014, 300, 99-107 A. Micheli, G. K. Brennen, and P. Zoller, Nature Physics, 2006, 2, 341-347

  1. Design of ternary alkaline-earth metal Sn(II) oxides with potential good p-type conductivity

    DOE PAGES

    Du, Mao -Hua; Singh, David J.; Zhang, Lijun; ...

    2016-04-19

    Oxides with good p-type conductivity have been long sought after to achieve high performance all-oxide optoelectronic devices. Divalent Sn(II) based oxides are promising candidates because of their rather dispersive upper valence bands caused by the Sn-5s/O-2p anti-bonding hybridization. There are so far few known Sn(II) oxides being p-type conductive suitable for device applications. Here, we present via first-principles global optimization structure searches a material design study for a hitherto unexplored Sn(II)-based system, ternary alkaline-earth metal Sn(II) oxides in the stoichiometry of MSn2O3 (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). We identify two stable compounds of SrSn2O3 and BaSn2O3, which can bemore » stabilized by Sn-rich conditions in phase stability diagrams. Their structures follow the Zintl behaviour and consist of basic structural motifs of SnO3 tetrahedra. Unexpectedly they show distinct electronic properties with band gaps ranging from 1.90 (BaSn2O3) to 3.15 (SrSn2O3) eV, and hole effective masses ranging from 0.87 (BaSn2O3) to above 6.0 (SrSn2O3) m0. Further exploration of metastable phases indicates a wide tunability of electronic properties controlled by the details of the bonding between the basic structural motifs. Lastly, this suggests further exploration of alkaline-earth metal Sn(II) oxides for potential applications requiring good p-type conductivity such as transparent conductors and photovoltaic absorbers.« less

  2. Sensitivity of translation initiation factor eIF1 as a molecular target of salt toxicity to sodic-alkaline stress in the halophytic grass Leymus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan-Lin; Hong, Soon-Kwan

    2013-02-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs) have been shown to be critical in the initiation of protein synthesis. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of a novel gene, LceIF1, from a potentially interesting forage grass, Leymus chinensis (Trin.). The expression results show that LceIF1 is expressed in most organisms under normal conditions, but the transcription patterns differ under sodic-saline and sodic-alkaline stresses. Sodic-saline stress induced a persistent decrease, and sodic-alkaline stress induced overexpression of LceIF1. Potassic-saline and alkaline stresses did not cause any changes in expression of eIF1. These results indicate that not only pH but also Na(+) concentration affects overtranscription of LceIF1. The eIF1 transgenic lines showed relatively high eIF1 expression, resulting in potentially higher stress resistance. Combined with eIF1 transcription in transgenic lines, LceIF1 as a molecular target of salt toxicity is believed to help enhance salt tolerance.

  3. STS-48 ESC Earth observation of southwestern corner of the Great Salt Lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-48 Earth observation of the southwestern corner of the Great Salt Lake, 308 nautical miles below Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, was provided by the electronic still camera (ESC). While the image is mostly covered with a thin veil of cirrus clouds, many of the surface features can be recognized. The causeway linking the northern tip of the peninsula to the southwest shore of the lake is clearly visible as is the interstate highway. Considerable topographic detail is visible in the snow covered peaks to the south of the lake. The commercial salt pans between the peninsula and the interstate show high contrast with the brightness dependent on the concentration of the brackish water in the pan. Recent heavy rainfall has caused considerable runoff into the lake but the flooding hazard of a few years past no longer exists due to a pumping system that now transfers excess water to the Bonneville Salt Flats. The ESC image was stored on a removable hard disk or small optical disk and

  4. Theoretical Studies of the Spin Hamiltonian Parameters and Local Distortions for Cu2+ in Alkaline Earth Lead Zinc Phosphate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo-Kun; Wu, Shao-Yi; Yuan, Zi-Yi; Liu, Zi-Xuan; Jiang, Shi-Xin; Liu, Zheng; Yao, Zi-Jian; Teng, Bao-Hua; Wu, Ming-He

    2016-08-01

    The spin Hamiltonian parameters and local structures are theoretically studied for Cu2+-doped alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate (RPPZ, R=Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba) glasses based on the high-order perturbation calculations for a tetragonally elongated octahedral 3d9 cluster. The relative elongation ratios are found to be ρ≈3.2%, 4.4%, 4.6%, and 3.3% for R=Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba, respectively, because of the Jahn-Teller effect. The whole decreasing crystal-field strength Dq and orbital reduction factor k from Mg to Sr are ascribed to the weakening electrostatic coulombic interactions and the increasing probability of productivity of nonbridge oxygen (and hence increasing Cu2+-O2- electron cloud admixtures) under PbO addition, respectively, with increasing alkali earth ionic radius. The anomalies (the largest Dq and the next highest k among the systems) for R=Ba are attributed to the cross linkage of this large cation in the network. The overall increasing order (Mg≤Ba

  5. Structural diversity in binuclear complexes of alkaline earth metal ions with 4,6-diacetylresorcinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebl, Magdy; Khalil, Saied M. E.; Taha, A.; Mahdi, M. A. N.

    2012-11-01

    A new series of binuclear and mixed-ligand complexes with the general formula: [M 2(LO)yClz]; where M = Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II); H2L = 4,6-diacetylresorcinol, the secondary ligand L' = acetylacetone (acac), 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) or 2,2'-bipyridyl (Bipy), n = 0-2, m = 1, 2, x = 0, 1, 2, 4, y = 0, 2, 4, 5 and z = 0-2; have been synthesized. They have been characterized by the analytical and spectral methods (IR, 1H NMR and mass) as well as TGA and molar conductivity measurements. The spectroscopic and conductance data suggested that the H2L ligand behaves as a neutral, monobasic or dibasic tetradentate ligand, depending on the basicity of the secondary ligand, through the two phenolic and two carbonyl groups. Binuclear octahedral geometry has been assigned to all of the prepared complexes in various molar ratios 2:2; 2:2:2; 1:2:1 and 1:2:4 (L:M:L'). Molecular orbital calculations were performed for the ligands and their complexes using Hyperchem 7.52 program on the bases of PM3 level and the results were correlated with the experimental data. The ligand and some of its alkaline metal(II) complexes showed antibacterial activity towards some of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeast (Candida albicans) and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus).

  6. [A Contrastive Study on Salt-alkaline Resistance and Removal Efficiency of Nitrogen and Phosphorus by Phragmites australis and Typha angustifolia in Coastal Estuary Area].

    PubMed

    Chen, You-yuan; Sun, Ping; Chen, Guang-lin; Wang, Ning-ning

    2015-04-01

    The salt and alkali contents were so high that the ecological landscape was depressed in water body of a coastal estuary area. Screening some plants which could not only tolerate saline-alkaline but also effectively remove nitrogen and phosphorus was therefore in urgent need. The tolerance range and removal rate of nitrogen and phosphorus by Phragmites australis and Typha angustifolia under salt and pH stress were investigated by hydroponic experiments. The results showed that Phragmites australis could tolerate at least 10 per thousand salinity and pH 8.5, while Typha angustifolia tolerated 7.5 per thousand salinity and pH 8.0. Combined with the change of the growth and physiological indexes (relative conductivity, proline, chlorophyll and root activity), the salt resistance of Phragmites australis was stronger than that of Typha angustifolia. Under salt stress, the removal rate of ammonia nitrogen of Phragmites australis was higher. The removal rates of nitrate nitrogen and phosphorus of Typha angustifolia were 2.5% and 7.3% higher than those of Phragmites australis in average, respectively, because of the high biomass of Typha angustifolias. The total nitrogen removal rate was equivalent. Under pH stress, the removal rate of ammonia nitrogen and total phosphorus of Phragmites australis was a little higher than that of Typha angustifolia. However, Typha angustifolia had a higher removal rate of total nitrogen, which was 8.2% higher than that of Phragmites australis. All the analysis showed that both Phragmites australis and Typha angustifolia could be used as alternative plants to grow and remove nitrogen and phosphorus in the high salt-alkaline water body in coastal estuary area.

  7. A reactive distillation process for the treatment of LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt containing rare earth chlorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eun, H. C.; Choi, J. H.; Kim, N. Y.; Lee, T. K.; Han, S. Y.; Lee, K. R.; Park, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    The pyrochemical process, which recovers useful resources (U/TRU metals) from used nuclear fuel using an electrochemical method, generates LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt containing radioactive rare earth chlorides (RECl3). It is necessary to develop a simple process for the treatment of LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt in a hot-cell facility. For this reason, a reactive distillation process using a chemical agent was achieved as a method to separate rare earths from the LiCl-KCl waste salt. Before conducting the reactive distillation, thermodynamic equilibrium behaviors of the reactions between rare earth (Nd, La, Ce, Pr) chlorides and the chemical agent (K2CO3) were predicted using software. The addition of the chemical agent was determined to separate the rare earth chlorides into an oxide form using these equilibrium results. In the reactive distillation test, the rare earth chlorides in LiCl-KCl eutectic salt were decontaminated at a decontamination factor (DF) of more than 5000, and were mainly converted into oxide (Nd2O3, CeO2, La2O3, Pr2O3) or oxychloride (LaOCl, PrOCl) forms. The LiCl-KCl was purified into a form with a very low concentration (<1 ppm) for the rare earth chlorides.

  8. Recent progress on earth abundant hydrogen evolution reaction and oxygen evolution reaction bifunctional electrocatalyst for overall water splitting in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamesh, Mohammed Ibrahim

    2016-11-01

    Electrochemical water-splitting is one of the promising ways for producing clean chemical fuel (Hydrogen) while cheap-earth-abundant-bifunctional-electrocatalyst is one of the possible way for improving the overall cost efficiency of water-splitting. This paper reviews the chemical state, hydrogen and oxygen evolution reaction activity in alkaline media, overall water-splitting performance in alkaline media, stability, and possible-factors for improving its efficiency of various kinds of recently reported electrocatalyst such as Ni-P, Co-P, Ni-Co-P, graphene-Co-P, O/N/C-Co/Ni, Ni-S, B-Ni/Co, Ni-Co, Mo, Se, Fe, Mn/Zn/Ti, and metal-free based earth-abundant-bifunctional-electrocatalyst. This paper also reviews and highlights the remarkable water splitting performance of the earth-abundant-bifunctional-electrocatalyst those exhibit better or well comparable with Pt/C//RuO2.

  9. Rare earth and zinc layered hydroxide salts intercalated with the 2-aminobenzoate anion as organic luminescent sensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Cursino, Ana Cristina Trindade; Rives, Vicente; Trujillano, Raquel

    2015-10-15

    Rare earth (RE = Eu, Y and Tb) and zinc layered hydroxide salts intercalated with nitrate anions were synthesized, followed by exchange with 2-aminobenzoate. The UV absorption ability was improved after intercalation/grafting in relation to that shown by the parent material. - Highlights: • Rare earth (RE = Eu, Y and Tb) and zinc layered hydroxide were synthesized. • Intercalated nitrate anions were exchanged by 2-aminobenzoate. • In all the 2-aminobenzoate containing compounds, the grafting reaction was detected. • The UV absorption ability was improved after the exchange reactions. • Rare earth hydroxide salts are potential matrixes to produce luminescent materials. - Abstract: Rare earth (RE = Eu, Y and Tb) and zinc layered hydroxide salts intercalated with nitrate anions were synthesized, followed by exchange with 2-aminobenzoate. The obtained compounds were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet visible (UV–vis) spectroscopies, fluorescence measurements and thermal analysis (TGA/DTA). The results from FTIR spectroscopy suggest a direct coordination of 2-aminobenzoate to the metal cations of the inorganic layered structure. The organic derivative products from the intercalation reactions absorb a broader range of UV-light in relation to that shown by the parent material; the photoluminescence measurements present a strong violet, blue and green luminescence under UV-light excitation for layered compounds with, Zn, Y and Tb, respectively. Rare earth hydroxide salts (RE-LHS) are potential alternative matrices for the immobilization of organic species to produce luminescent materials.

  10. Halogen-abstraction reactions from chloromethane and bromomethane molecules by alkaline-earth monocations.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Pilar; Largo, Antonio; Rayón, Víctor Manuel; Molpeceres, Germán; Sordo, José Ángel; Barrientos, Carmen

    2014-08-14

    The reactions, in the gas phase, between alkali-earth monocations (Mg(+), Ca(+), Sr(+), Ba(+)) and CH3X (X = Cl, Br) have been theoretically studied. The stationary points on the potential energy surfaces were characterized at the Density Functional Theory level on the framework of the mPW1K functional with the QZVPP Ahlrichs's basis sets. A complementary kinetics study has also been performed using conventional/variational microcanonical transition state theory. In the reactions of Mg(+) with either chloro- or bromomethane the transition structure lies in energy clearly above the reactants rendering thermal activation of CH3Cl or CH3Br extremely improbable. The remaining reactions are exothermic and barrierless processes; thus carbon-halogen bonds in chloro- or bromomethane can be activated by calcium, strontium or barium monocations to obtain the metal halogen cation and the methyl radical. The Mulliken population analysis for the stationary points of the potential energy surfaces supports a "harpoon"-like mechanism for the halogen-atom abstraction processes. An analysis of the bonding situation for the stationary points on the potential energy surface has also been performed in the framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules.

  11. Alkaline earth complexes of silylated aminopyridinato ligands: homoleptic compounds and heterobimetallic coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Ortu, Fabrizio; Moxey, Graeme J; Blake, Alexander J; Lewis, William; Kays, Deborah L

    2013-11-04

    The synthesis and characterization of magnesium and calcium complexes of sterically demanding aminopyridinato ligands is reported. The reaction of the 2-Me3SiNH-6-MeC5H3N (L(1)H), 2-MePh2SiNH-6-MeC5H3N (L(2)H), and 2-Me3SiNH-6-PhC5H3N (L(3)H) with KH in tetrahydrofuran (THF) yielded potassium salts L(1)K(thf)0.5 (1), L(2)K (2), and L(3)K(thf)0.5 (3), which, through subsequent reaction with MgI2 and CaI2, afforded the homoleptic complexes (L)2Ae(thf)n [L = L(1), Ae = Mg, n = 1 (4); L = L(2), Ae = Mg, n = 0 (5); L = L(3), Ae = Mg, n = 0 (6); L = L(2), Ae = Ca, n = 2 (7)] and heterobimetallic calciates {[(L)3Ca]K}∞ [L = L(1) (8); L = L(2) (9)]. The solid state structure of 8 reveals a polymeric arrangement in which the calciate units are interlocked by bridging potassium ions. Metalation reactions between L(1)H or L(2)H and ((n)Bu)2Mg lead to the solvent-free compounds (L)2Mg [L = L(1) (10); L = L(2) (5)]. The bridged butyl mixed-metal complex [(L(1))Li(μ2-(n)Bu)Mg(L(1))]∞ (11) was also obtained via a cocomplexation reaction with (n)BuLi and ((n)Bu)2Mg. 11, which adopts a monodimensional polymeric array in the solid state, is a rare example of an alkyl-bridged Li/Mg complex and the first complex to feature an unsupported bridging butyl interaction between two metals. Changing the cocomplexation reaction conditions, the order of reagents added to the reactions mixture, and with the use of a coordinating solvent (tetrahydrofuran) formed the magnesiate complex (L(1))3MgLi(thf) (12).

  12. A new N-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid modified core-shell silica phase for chelation ion chromatography of alkaline earth, transition and rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    McGillicuddy, Nicola; Nesterenko, Ekaterina P; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Stack, Elaine M; Omamogho, Jesse O; Glennon, Jeremy D; Paull, Brett

    2013-12-20

    Bare core-shell silica (1.7μm) has been modified with iminodiacetic acid functional groups via standard silane chemistry, forming a new N-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid (HEIDA) functionalised core-shell stationary phase. The column was applied in high-performance chelation ion chromatography and evaluated for the retention of alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal cations. The influence of nitric acid eluent concentration, addition of complexing agent dipicolinic acid, eluent pH and column temperature on the column performance was investigated. The efficiencies obtained for transition and heavy metal cations (and resultant separations) were comparable or better than those previously obtained for alternative fully porous silica based chelation stationary phases, and a similarly modified monolithic silica column, ranging from ∼15 to 56μm HETP. Increasing the ionic strength of the eluent with the addition of KNO3 (0.75M) and increasing the column temperature (70°C) facilitated the isocratic separation of a mixture of 14 lanthanides and yttrium in under 12min, with HETP averaging 18μm (7μm for Ce(III)).

  13. Structures and stabilities of alkaline earth metal peroxides XO2 (X=Ca, Be, Mg) studied by a genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2013-09-17

    The structures and stabilities of alkaline earth metal peroxides XO2 (X = Ca, Be, Mg) were studied using an adaptive genetic algorithm (GA) for global structure optimization in combination with first-principles calculations. From the adaptive GA search, we obtained an orthorhombic structure for CaO2 with 12 atoms in the unit cell, which is energetically more favorable than the previously proposed structures. Reaction energy of the decomposition CaO2 → CaO + 1/2O2 determined by density functional theory (DFT) calculation shows that this orthorhombic calcium peroxide structure is thermodynamically stable. The simulated X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern using our predicted structure is in excellent agreement with experimental data. We also show that crystal phase BeO2 is unlikely to exist under normal conditions. MgO2 has a cubic pyrite structure, but it is not stable against decomposition: MgO2 → MgO + 1/2O2.

  14. X-ray Diffraction Studies of the Structure and Thermochemistry of Alkaline-Earth Oxide-Coated Thermionic Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karikari, E. K.; Bassey, E.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    1998-01-01

    NASA LeRC has a broad, active cathode technology development program in which both experimental and theoretical studies are being employed to further development of thermionic cathodes for use as electron sources in vacuum devices for communications and other space applications. One important type of thermionic cathode under development is the alkaline-earth oxide-coated (BaO, SrO, CaO) cathode. Significant improvements in the emission characteristics of this cathode have been obtained through modification of the chemical composition and morphology of the oxide coating, with the best result thus far coming from the addition of In2O3 and Sc2O3. Whereas the In2O3 produces a finer, more uniform particle structure, the exact chemical state and role of the Sc2O3 in the emission enhancement is unknown. The purpose of this cooperative agreement is to combine the studies of the surface chemistry and electron emission at NASA LeRC of chemically modified oxide coatings with a study of the thermochemistry and crystal structure using X-ray diffraction equipment and expertise at Clark Atlanta University (CAU). The study at CAU is intended to provide the description and understanding of the structure and thermochemistry needed for further improvement and optimization of the modified coatings. A description of the experimental procedure, preliminary X-ray diffraction test results, together with the design of an ultrahigh vacuum chamber necessary for high temperature thermochemistry studies will be presented.

  15. Selective oxidation of methanol to hydrogen over gold catalysts promoted by alkaline-earth-metal and lanthanum oxides.

    PubMed

    Hereijgers, Bart P C; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2009-01-01

    A series of alumina-supported gold catalysts was investigated for the CO-free production of hydrogen by partial oxidation of methanol. The addition of alkaline-earth metal oxide promoters resulted in a significant improvement of the catalytic performance. The methanol conversion was ca. 85 % with all studied catalyst materials, however, the selectivity for hydrogen increased from 15 % to 51 % when going from the unpromoted to a BaO-promoted catalyst. The formation of the undesired byproducts CO, methane, and dimethyl ether was considerably reduced as well. The observed trend in catalyst performance follows the trend in increasing basicity of the studied promoter elements, indicating a chemical effect of the promoter material. Superior catalytic performance, in terms of H(2) and CO selectivity, was obtained with a Au/La(2)O(3) catalyst. At 300 degrees C the hydrogen selectivity reached 80 % with only 2 % CO formation, and the catalyst displayed a stable performance over at least 24 h on-stream. Furthermore, the formation of CO was found to be independent of the oxygen concentration in the feed. The commercial lanthanum oxide used in this study had a low specific surface area, which led to the formation of relative large gold particles. Therefore, the catalytic activity could be enhanced by decreasing the gold particle size through deposition on lanthanum oxide supported on high-surface-area alumina.

  16. Synergetic effect of alkaline earth metal oxides and iron oxides on the degradation of hexachlorobenzene and its degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Su, Guijin; Liu, Yexuan; Huang, Linyan; Shi, Yali; Zhang, Aiqian; Zhang, Lixia; Liu, Wenbin; Gao, Lirong; Zheng, Minghui

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was carried out over physical mixtures of a series of alkaline earth metal oxides (MO: M=Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) and iron oxides with different crystal types (Fe(x)O(y):Fe(2)O(3) or Fe(3)O(4)) at 300°C. These physical mixtures all showed a synergetic effect toward the degradation of HCB. A range of degradation products were identified by various methods, including tri- to penta-chlorobenzenes by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), tri- to penta-chlorophenols, tetrachlorocatechol (TCC) and tetrachlorohydroquinone (TCHQ) by GC-MS after derivatization, and formic and acetic acids by ion chromatography. Two degradation pathways, hydrodechlorination and oxidative degradation, appear to occur competitively. However, more sequential chlorinated benzene and phenol congeners were formed over mixed MO/Fe(3)O(4) than over mixed MO/Fe(2)O(3) under the same conditions. The oxidative reaction dominated over mixed MO/Fe(2)O(3) and was promoted as the major reaction by the synergetic effect, while both the oxidative and hydrodechlorination reactions were important over mixed MO/Fe(3)O(4), and both pathways are remarkably promoted by the synergetic effect. The enhanced hydrodechlorination may be attributed to free electrons generated by the transformation of Fe(3)O(4) into Fe(2)O(3), and hydrogen provided by water adsorbed on the MO.

  17. Cardiac ryanodine receptor: Selectivity for alkaline earth metal cations points to the EF-hand nature of luminal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Gaburjakova, Jana; Gaburjakova, Marta

    2016-06-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the regulation of cardiac ryanodine receptor (RYR2) by luminal Ca(2+) is mediated by luminal binding sites located on the RYR2 channel itself and/or its auxiliary protein, calsequestrin. The localization and structure of RYR2-resident binding sites are not known because of the lack of a high-resolution structure of RYR2 luminal regions. To obtain the first structural insight, we probed the RYR2 luminal face stripped of calsequestrin by alkaline earth metal divalents (M(2+): Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+) or Ba(2+)). We show that the RYR2 response to caffeine at the single-channel level is significantly modified by the nature of luminal M(2+). Moreover, we performed competition experiments by varying the concentration of luminal M(2+) (Mg(2+), Sr(2+) or Ba(2+)) from 8 mM to 53 mM and investigated its ability to compete with 1mM luminal Ca(2+). We demonstrate that all tested M(2+) bind to exactly the same RYR2 luminal binding sites. Their affinities decrease in the order: Ca(2+)>Sr(2+)>Mg(2+)~Ba(2+), showing a strong correlation with the M(2+) affinity of the EF-hand motif. This indicates that the RYR2 luminal binding regions and the EF-hand motif likely share some structural similarities because the structure ties directly to the function.

  18. Dissolution of glass wool, rock wool and alkaline earth silicate wool: morphological and chemical changes in fibers.

    PubMed

    Campopiano, Antonella; Cannizzaro, Annapaola; Angelosanto, Federica; Astolfi, Maria Luisa; Ramires, Deborah; Olori, Angelo; Canepari, Silvia; Iavicoli, Sergio

    2014-10-01

    The behavior of alkaline earth silicate (AES) wool and of other biosoluble wools in saline solution simulating physiological fluids was compared with that of a traditional wool belonging to synthetic vitreous fibers. Morphological and size changes of fibers were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The elements extracted from fibers were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. SEM analysis showed a larger reduction of length-weighted geometric mean fiber diameter at 4.5 pH than at 7.4 pH. At the 7.4 pH, AES wool showed a higher dissolution rate and a dissolution time less than a few days. Their dissolution was highly non-congruent with rapid leaching of calcium. Unlike rock wool, glass wool dissolved more rapidly at physiological pH than at acid pH. Dissolution of AES and biosoluble rock wool is accompanied by a noticeable change in morphology while by no change for glass wool. Biosoluble rock wool developed a leached surface with porous honeycomb structure. SEM analysis showed the dissolution for glass wool is mainly due to breakage transverse of fiber at pH 7.4. AES dissolution constant (Kdis) was the highest at pH 7.4, while at pH 4.5 only biosoluble rockwool 1 showed a higher Kdis.

  19. First-Principles Calculation of Solution Energy of Alkaline-Earth Metal Elements to BaTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriwake, Hiroki; Hirayama, Tsukasa; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Tanaka, Isao

    2007-10-01

    Quantitative analysis of the solution energy of alkaline-earth metal elements to perovskite-type BaTiO3 was carried out by a first-principles calculation combined with thermodynamics theory. The solution energies of neutral solute and a compensated solute with an oxygen vacancy were systematically calculated. They were obtained for two cation sites and four thermodynamical conditions with different chemical potentials of constituent atoms. Both Ca and Sr preferably occupy the Ba site of BaTiO3. On the other hand, Mg occupies the Ti site. This corresponds well to the widely accepted experimental findings regarding site preference. Moreover, under the condition of coexising BaO, CaO and BaTiO3, energy difference between the Ba-site solution and O-vacancy compensated Ti-site solution of Ca ions has been found to be smaller than that of Sr. Under this condition, the O-vacancy compensated Ti-site solution of Ca should be favorable compared with that of Sr. The same number of oxygen vacancies as Ca ions occupying Ti sites can be introduced. This also explains well experimental feature of the Ca-doped BaTiO3-based nonreducible multilayer ceramics capacitor (MLCC) materials regarding solution site of the Ca ion and abundance of O-vacancy.

  20. A Density Functional Theory Study of Codoping Characteristics of Sulfur with Alkaline Earth in Delafossite CuAlO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi-Jun; Qin, Han; Liu, Zheng-Tang

    2016-04-01

    The structural, electronic properties and formation energies of sulfur and alkaline earth codoped delafossite CuAlO2 have been investigated using the first-principles density functional theory calculations. Our results reveal that the volume of codoping systems increases with the increasing atomic radius of metal atoms. The formation energies under different growth conditions have been calculated, showing that the codoping systems are formed easily under O-rich growth conditions. Electronic band structures and density of states have been obtained. The decreased bandgaps, enhanced covalence and appearance of electron acceptors after codoping are all good for p-type conductivity. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11347199, 51402244, and 11547311, the Specialized Research Fund for Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20130184120028, the Fundamental Research Fund for the Central Universities, China under Grant Nos. 2682014CX084, 2682014ZT30, and 2682014ZT31, and the fund of the State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing in NWPU under Grant No. SKLSP201511

  1. Amido-based potassium-alkaline earth metallates--synthesis and structures of heterobimetallic complexes of heavy s-block elements.

    PubMed

    Glock, Carsten; Görls, Helmar; Westerhausen, Matthias

    2011-08-28

    The metathesis reaction of potassium N-isopropylanilide with alkaline earth metal diiodides of calcium, strontium and barium in a molar ratio of 4:1 yields the corresponding alkaline earth metalates of the type [(THF)(n)K(μ-NPhiPr)(2)Ae(μ-NPhiPr)(2)K(THF)(n)] (1: Ae = Ca, n = 2). Stabilization and crystallization of such derivatives succeeds after exchange of the THF ligands by multidentate amino bases such as tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA) or pentamethyldiethylenetriamine (PMDETA). The influence of the size and hardness of the alkaline earth metal center on the molecular structures is studied with [(L)K(μ-NPhiPr)(2)Ae(μ-NPhiPr)(2)K(L)] (2: Ae = Ca, L = TMEDA; 3: Ae = Sr, L = TMEDA; 4: Ae = Sr, L = PMDETA; and 5: Ae = Ba, L = PMDETA). The molecular structures are dominated by (attractive and repulsive) electrostatic and steric factors leading to a shortening of the non-bonding AeK distances from calcium to barium.

  2. Monitoring of photoluminescence decay by alkali and alkaline earth metal cations using a photoluminescent bolaamphiphile self-assembly as an optical probe.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunhyung; Kwak, Jinyoung; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2014-05-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) decay induced by the displacement of an ionic fluorescence component, Tb(3+), with alkali and alkaline earth metal cations was investigated using photoluminescent spherical self-assemblies as optical probes. The photoluminescent spherical self-assembly was prepared by the self-organization of a tyrosine-containing bolaamphiphile molecule with a photosensitizer and Tb(3+) ion. The lanthanide ion, Tb(3+), electrically bound to the carboxyl group of the bolaamphiphile molecule, was displaced by alkali and alkaline earth metal cations that had stronger electrophilicity. The PL of the self-assembly decayed remarkably due to the substitution of lanthanide ions with alkali and alkaline earth metal cations. The PL decay showed a positive correlation with cation concentration and was sensitive to the cation valency. Generally, the PL decay was enhanced by the electrophilicity of the cations. However, Ca(2+) showed greater PL decay than Mg(2+) because Ca(2+) could create various complexes with the carboxyl groups of the bolaamphiphile molecule. Microscopic and spectroscopic investigations were conducted to study the photon energy transfer and displacement of Tb(3+) by the cation exchange. This study demonstrated that the PL decay by the displacement of the ionic fluorescent compound was applied to the detection of various cations in aqueous media and is applicable to the development of future optical sensors.

  3. Catalysis and stability of an alkaline protease from a haloalkaliphilic bacterium under non-aqueous conditions as a function of pH, salt and temperature.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sandeep; Rakholiya, Kalpna D; Raval, Vikram H; Singh, Satya P

    2012-09-01

    A haloalkaliphilic bacterium, isolated from Coastal Gujarat (India) was identified as Oceanobacillus sp. (GQ162111) based on 16S rRNA gene sequence. The organism grew and secreted extra cellular protease in presence of various organic solvents. At 30% (v/v) concentration of hexane, heptane, isooctane, dodecane and decane, significant growth and protease production was evident. The alkaline protease was purified in a single step on phenyl sepharose 6 FF with 28% yield. The molecular mass as judged by SDS-PAGE was 30 kDa. The temperature optimum of protease was 50°C and the enzyme retained 70% activity in 10% (v/v) isooctane. Effect of salt and pH was investigated in combination to assess the effect of isooctane. In organic solvents, the enzyme was considerably active at pH 8-11, with optimum activity at pH 10. Salt at 2 M was optimum for activity and enzyme maintained significant stability up to 18 h even at 3 M salt concentration. Patters of growth, protease production, catalysis and stability of the enzyme are presented. The study resumes significance as limited information is available on the interaction of haloalkaliphilic bacteria and their enzymes with organic solvents.

  4. Multidimensional (0D to 3D) Alkaline-Earth Metal Diphosphonates: Synthesis, Structural Diversity, and Luminescence Properties.

    PubMed

    Senthil Raja, Duraisamy; Lin, Pin-Chun; Liu, Wei-Ren; Zhan, Jun-Xiang; Fu, Xin-Yi; Lin, Chia-Her

    2015-05-04

    A series of new alkaline-earth metal diphosphonate frameworks were successfully synthesized under solvothermal reaction condition (160 °C, 3 d) using 1-hydroxyethylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid (CH3C(OH)(H2PO3)2, hedpH4) as a diphosphonate building block and Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II), or Ba(II) ions as alkaline-earth metal ion centers in water, dimethylformamide, and/or EtOH media. These diphosphonate frameworks, (H2NMe2)4[Mg(hedpH2)3]·3H2O (1), (H2NMe2)2[Ca(hedpH2)2] (2), (H2NMe2)2[Sr3(hedpH2)4(H2O)2] (3), and [Ba3(hedpH2)3]·H2O (4) exhibited interesting structural topologies (zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional (0D, 1D, 2D, and 3D, respectively)), which are mainly depending on the metal ions and the solvents used in the synthesis. The single-crystal analysis of these newly synthesized compounds revealed that 1 was a 0D molecule, 2 has 1D chains, 3 was a 3D molecule, and 4 has 2D layers. All compounds were further characterized using thermogravimetric analysis, solid-state (31)P NMR, powder X-ray diffraction analysis, UV-vis spectra, and infrared spectroscopy. In addition, Eu(III)- and Tb(III)-doped compounds of 1-4, namely, (H2NMe2)4[Ln(x)Mg(1-x)(hedpH2)2(hedpH(2-x))]·3H2O (1Ln), (H2NMe2)2[Ln(x)Ca(1-x)(hedpH2)(hedpH(2-x))] (2Ln), (H2NMe2)2[Ln(x)Sr(3-x)(hedpH2)3(hedpH(2-x))(H2O)2] (3Ln), and [Ln(x)Ba(3-x)(hedpH2)2(hedpH(2-x))]·H2O (4Ln) (where Ln = Eu, Tb), were synthesized, and their photoluminescence properties were studied. The quantum yield of 1Eu-4Eu was measured with reference to commercial red phosphor, Y2O2S:Eu(3+) (YE), and the quantum yield of terbium-doped compounds 1Tb-4Tb was measured with reference to commercial green-emitting phosphor CeMgAl10O17:Tb(3+). Interestingly, the compound 2Eu showed very high quantum yield of 92.2%, which is better than that of the reference commercial red phosphor, YE (90.8%).

  5. Separation of alkali, alkaline earth and rare earth cations by liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Third progress report, September 1, 1980-April 1, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J.J.

    1981-04-15

    The overall objective of this project is to study the use of liquid membrane systems employing macrocyclic ligand carriers in making separations among metal cations. During the third year of the project, work continued in the development of a mathematical model to describe cation transport. The model was originally developed to describe the relationship between cation transport rate (J/sub M/) and the cation-macrocycle stability constant (K). The model was tested by determining the rates of transport of alkali and alkaline earth cations through chloroform membranes containing carrier ligands where the stability constants for their reaction with cations in methanol were known. From the results, it is clear that the model correctly describes the dependence of J/sub M/ on log K. The model also correctly describes the effect of cation concentration and carrier concentration on cation transport rates, as detailed in the previous progress report. During the third year of the project, the transport model was expanded so as to apply to competitive transport of cations from mixtures of two cations in the source aqueous phase. Data were collected under these conditions and the ability of the model to predict the flux of each cation was tested. Representative data of this type are presented along with corresponding data which were obtained when each cation was transported by the same carrier from a source phase containing only that cation. Comparison of transport rates determined under the two experimental conditions indicates that the relationship between the two sets of data is complex. To date, a few of these data involving transport from binary cation mixtures have been tested against the transport model. It was found that the model correctly predicts the cation fluxes from cation mixtures. These preliminary results indicate that the transport model can successfully predict separation factors when cation mixtures are used.

  6. Discrete divalent rare-earth cationic ROP catalysts: ligand-dependent redox behavior and discrepancies with alkaline-earth analogues in a ligand-assisted activated monomer mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Roisnel, Thierry; Maron, Laurent; Carpentier, Jean-François; Sarazin, Yann

    2013-03-18

    The first solvent-free cationic complexes of the divalent rare-earth metals, [{RO}RE(II) ](+) [A](-) (RE(II) =Yb(II) , 1; Eu(II) , 2) and [{LO}RE(II) ](+) [A](-) ([A](-) =[H2 N{B(C6 F5 )3 }2 ](-) ; RE(II) =Yb(II) , 3; Eu(II) , 4), have been prepared by using highly chelating monoanionic aminoether-fluoroalkoxide ({RO}(-) ) and aminoether-phenolate ({LO}(-) ) ligands. Complexes 1 and 2 are structurally related to their alkaline-earth analogues [{RO}AE](+) [A](-) (AE=Ca, 5; Sr, 6). Yet, the two families behave very differently during catalysis of the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of L-lactide (L-LA) and trimethylene carbonate (TMC) performed under immortal conditions with excess BnOH as an exogenous chain-transfer agent. The ligand was found to strongly influence the behavior of the RE(II) complexes during ROP catalysis. The fluoroalkoxide RE(II) catalysts 1 and 2 are not oxidized under ROP conditions, and compare very favorably with their Ca and Sr congeners 5 and 6 in terms of activity (turnover frequency (TOF) in the range 200-400 molL-LA (molEu  h(-1) )) and control over the parameters during the immortal ROP of L-LA (Mn,theor ≈Mn,SEC , Mw /Mn <1.05). The Eu(II) -phenolate 4 provided one of the most effective ROP cationic systems known to date for L-LA polymerization, exhibiting high activity (TOF up to 1 880 molL-LA ⋅(molEu  h)(-1) ) and good control (Mw /Mn =1.05). By contrast, upon addition of L-LA the Yb(II) -phenolate 3 immediately oxidizes to inactive RE(III) species. Yet, the cyclic carbonate TMC was rapidly polymerized by combinations of 3 (or even 1) and BnOH, revealing excellent activities (TOF=5000-7000 molTMC ⋅(molEu  h)(-1) ) and unusually high control (Mn,theor ≈Mn,SEC , Mw /Mn <1.09); under identical conditions, the calcium derivative 5 was entirely inert toward TMC. Based on experimental and kinetic data, a new ligand-assisted activated monomer ROP mechanism is suggested, in which the so-called ancillary ligand plays a

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS COMPOSITIONS TO IMMOBILIZE ALKALI, ALKALINE EARTH, LANTHANIDE AND TRANSITION METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J.; Billings, A.

    2009-06-24

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) waste management strategy revolves around specific treatment of individual or groups of separated waste streams. A goal for the separations processes is to efficiently manage the waste to be dispositioned as high level radioactive waste. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) baseline technology for immobilization of the lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) wastes is vitrification into a borosilicate glass. A current interest is to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined waste streams to most cost effectively immobilize the wastes resulting from aqueous fuel reprocessing. Studies showed that high waste loadings are achievable for the Ln only (Option 1) stream. Waste loadings in excess of 60 wt % (on a calcined oxide basis) were demonstrated via a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass. The resulting glasses had excellent relative durability as determined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). For a combined Ln and TM waste stream glass (Option 2), noble metal solubility was found to limit waste loading. However, the measured PCT normalized elemental releases for this glass were at least an order of magnitude below that of Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. Current efforts to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined Ln, TM, alkali (Cs is the primary radionuclide of concern) and alkaline earth (Sr is the primary radionuclide of concern) wastes (Option 3) have shown that these approaches are feasible. However, waste loading limitations with respect to heat load (Cs/Sr loading), molybdenum solubility and/or noble metal solubility will likely be realized and must be considered in determining the cost effectiveness of these approaches.

  8. Halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica contains NapA-type Na+/H+ antiporters with novel ion specificity that are involved in salt tolerance at alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Wutipraditkul, Nuchanat; Waditee, Rungaroon; Incharoensakdi, Aran; Hibino, Takashi; Tanaka, Yoshito; Nakamura, Tatsunosuke; Shikata, Masamitsu; Takabe, Tetsuko; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2005-08-01

    Aphanothece halophytica is a halotolerant alkaliphilic cyanobacterium which can grow at NaCl concentrations up to 3.0 M and at pH values up to 11. The genome sequence revealed that the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 contains five putative Na+/H+ antiporters, two of which are homologous to NhaP of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and three of which are homologous to NapA of Enterococcus hirae. The physiological and functional properties of NapA-type antiporters are largely unknown. One of NapA-type antiporters in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 has been proposed to be essential for the survival of this organism. In this study, we examined the isolation and characterization of the homologous gene in Aphanothece halophytica. Two genes encoding polypeptides of the same size, designated Ap-napA1-1 and Ap-napA1-2, were isolated. Ap-NapA1-1 exhibited a higher level of homology to the Synechocystis ortholog (Syn-NapA1) than Ap-NapA1-2 exhibited. Ap-NapA1-1, Ap-NapA1-2, and Syn-NapA1 complemented the salt-sensitive phenotypes of an Escherichia coli mutant and exhibited strongly pH-dependent Na+/H+ and Li+/H+ exchange activities (the highest activities were at alkaline pH), although the activities of Ap-NapA1-2 were significantly lower than the activities of the other polypeptides. Only one these polypeptides, Ap-NapA1-2, complemented a K+ uptake-deficient E. coli mutant and exhibited K+ uptake activity. Mutagenesis experiments suggested the importance of Glu129, Asp225, and Asp226 in the putative transmembrane segment and Glu142 in the loop region for the activity. Overexpression of Ap-NapA1-1 in the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 enhanced the salt tolerance of cells, especially at alkaline pH. These findings indicate that A. halophytica has two NapA1-type antiporters which exhibit different ion specificities and play an important role in salt tolerance at alkaline pH.

  9. Experimental Investigations into U/TRU Recovery using a Liquid Cadmium Cathode and Salt Containing High Rare Earth Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Shelly X. Li; Steven D. Herrmann; Michael F. Simpson

    2009-09-01

    Experimental Investigations into U/TRU Recovery using a Liquid Cadmium Cathode and Salt Containing High Rare Earth Concentrations Shelly X. Li, Steven D. Herrmann, and Michael F. Simpson Pyroprocessing Technology Department Idaho National Laboratory P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 USA Abstract - A series of six bench-scale liquid cadmium cathode (LCC) tests was performed to obtain basic separation data with focus on the behavior of rare earth elements. The electrolyte used for the tests was a mixed salt from the Mk-IV and Mk-V electrorefiners, in which spent metal fuels from Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) had been processed. Rare earth (RE) chlorides, such as NdCl3, CeCl3, LaCl3, PrCl3, SmCl3, and YCl3, were spiked into the salt prior to the first test to create an extreme case for investigating rare earth contamination of the actinides collected by a LCC. For the first two LCC tests, an alloy with the nominal composition of 41U-30Pu-5Am-3Np-20Zr-1RE was loaded into the anode baskets as the feed material. The anode feed material for Runs 3 to 6 was spent ternary fuel (U-19Pu-10Zr). The Pu/U ratio in the salt varied from 0.6 to 1.3. Chemical and radiochemical analytical results confirmed that U and transuranics can be collected into the LCC as a group under the given run conditions. The RE contamination level in the LCC product was up to 6.7 wt% of the total metal collected. The detailed data for partitioning of actinides and REs in the salt and Cd phases are reported in the paper.

  10. [Isolation and functional analysis of GsTIFY11b relevant to salt and alkaline stress from Glycine soja].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Bai, Xi; Zhu, Yan-Ming; Cai, Hua; Li, Yong; Ji, Wei; Chen, Chao; An, Lin; Zhu, Yi

    2012-02-01

    Using homologous cloning and RT-PCR technology, we isolated a novel TIFY family gene, GsTIFY11b, from Glycine soja L. G07256, a species that is tolerant to saline and alkaline environments. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that GsTIFY11b was closely related to AtTIFY11a with 56% similarity in amino acid identity. Protein sequence analysis showed that GsTIFY11b protein also had conserved TIFY domain, N-terminal domain, and a C-terminal Jas motif. Quantitative realtime PCR analysis indicated that the expression of GsTIFY11b was induced by both saline and alkaline stresses. Two homozygous GsTIFY11b over-expressing transgenic Arabidopsis lines were obtained. Phenotypic analysis of the transgenic and wild-type Arabidopsis indicated that over-expressing GsTIFY11b in Arabidopsis did not enhance plant tolerance to saline and alkaline stresses, whereas it showed an increased sensitivity to saline stress during seed germination and seedling development. Expression analysis of saline stress response marker genes in transgenic and wild-type plants under stress condition indicated that GsTIFY11b regulated the expression of RD29B, KIN1, and DREB. The transient expression of a GsTIFY11b-GFP fusion protein in onion epidermal cells showed that GsTIFY11b was localized to the nucleus, suggesting a role as a transcriptional regulator in the saline stress response pathway.

  11. MD simulations of the formation of stable clusters in mixtures of alkaline salts and imidazolium-based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Carrete, Jesús; Bouzón-Capelo, Silvia; Pérez-Rodríguez, Martín; Cabeza, Óscar; Gallego, Luis J; Varela, Luis M

    2013-03-21

    Structural and dynamical properties of room-temperature ionic liquids containing the cation 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium ([BMIM](+)) and three different anions (hexafluorophosphate, [PF6](-), tetrafluoroborate, [BF4](-), and bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [NTf2](-)) doped with several molar fractions of lithium salts with a common anion at 298.15 K and 1 atm were investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The effect of the size of the salt cation was also analyzed by comparing these results with those for mixtures of [BMIM][PF6] with NaPF6. Lithium/sodium solvation and ionic mobilities were analyzed via the study of radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, cage autocorrelation functions, mean-square displacements (including the analysis of both ballistic and diffusive regimes), self-diffusion coefficients of all the ionic species, velocity and current autocorrelation functions, and ionic conductivity in all the ionic liquid/salt systems. We found that lithium and sodium cations are strongly coordinated in two different positions with the anion present in the mixture. Moreover, [Li](+) and [Na](+) cations were found to form bonded-like, long-lived aggregates with the anions in their first solvation shell, which act as very stable kinetic entities within which a marked rattling motion of salt ions takes place. With very long MD simulation runs, this phenomenon is proved to be on the basis of the decrease of self-diffusion coefficients and ionic conductivities previously reported in experimental and computational results.

  12. The synthesis and crystal structures of the first rare-earth alkaline-earth selenite chlorides MNd 10(SeO 3) 12Cl 8 ( M=Ca and Sr)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdonosov, P. S.; Olenev, A. V.; Dolgikh, V. A.; Lightfoot, P.

    2007-11-01

    Two new alkaline-earth Nd selenite chlorides MNd 10(SeO 3) 12Cl 8 ( M=Ca, Sr) were obtained using crystal growth from alkaline-earth chloride melts in quartz tubes. These new compounds crystallize in the orthorhombic system in space group C cca (#68). The compounds were studied by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction. It was shown that both compounds adopt the same structure type, constructed by complex [M 11(SeO 3) 12] 8+ slabs separated by chloride anion layers perpendicular to the longest cell parameter. The SeO 3 groups show a pyramidal shape and may be described as SeO 3E tetrahedra. Such SeO 3 groups decorate the Nd-O skeletons forming the [M 11(SeO 3) 12] 8+ slabs.

  13. Pyrolytic conversion of plastic and rubber waste to hydrocarbons with basic salt catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Wingfield, Jr., Robert C.; Braslaw, Jacob; Gealer, Roy L.

    1985-01-01

    The invention relates to a process for improving the pyrolytic conversion of waste selected from rubber and plastic to low molecular weight olefinic materials by employing basis salt catalysts in the waste mixture. The salts comprise alkali or alkaline earth compounds, particularly sodium carbonate, in an amount of greater than about 1 weight percent based on the waste feed.

  14. Chemical equilibrium model for interfacial activity of crude oil in aqueous alkaline solution: the effects of pH, alkali and salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.; Yen, T.F.

    1980-11-01

    A chemical equilibrium model for interfacial activity of crude in aqueous alkaline solution is proposed. The model predicts the observed effects of pH and concentrations of alkali and salt on the interfacial tension (IFT). The model proposed was shown to describe the observed effects of acid content, pH, and sodium ions on the interfacial activity of crude oil in water. Once the pH of the interface reaches the pKa of the acids, sometimes with the help of addition of some salt, the IFT experiences a sudden steep drop to the range of 10/sup -2/ dynes/cm. After that, further addition of sodium either in the form of NaOH or NaCl is going to increase the IFT due to a shift of equilibriumn to the formation of undissociated soap. This was confirmed by the difference in the observed effect of sodium on the IFT of the extracted soap molecules which are dissociated easily and those which are associated highly and precipitated easily. These soap molecules have dissociation constant values ranging from below 10/sup -2/ to above one. 13 references.

  15. High-pressure densified solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides (Ca/Sr, Ca/Ba, Sr/Ba) and their high-temperature thermoelectric properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gürsoy, M.; Takeda, M.; Albert, B.

    2015-01-15

    Solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides were synthesized and densified by spark plasma sintering at 100 MPa. The high-temperature thermoelectric properties (Seebeck coefficients, electrical and thermal diffusivities, heat capacities) were measured between room temperature and 1073 K. CaB{sub 6}, SrB{sub 6}, BaB{sub 6} and the ternary hexaborides Ca{sub x}Sr{sub 1−x}B{sub 6}, Ca{sub x}Ba{sub 1−x}B{sub 6}, Sr{sub x}Ba{sub 1−x}B{sub 6} (x = 0.25, 0.5, 0.75) are n-type conducting compounds over the whole compositional and thermal ranges. The values of the figure of merit ZT for CaB{sub 6} (ca. 0.3 at 1073 K) were found to be significantly increased compared to earlier investigations which is attributed to the densification process. - Highlights: • Solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides were synthesized. • High-temperature thermoelectric properties of mixed calcium borides are excellent. • Spark plasma source densification results in high ZT values. • Borides are rare-earth free and refractory materials.

  16. Removal of toxic and alkali/alkaline earth metals during co-thermal treatment of two types of MSWI fly ashes in China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Qiao, Yu; Jin, Limei; Ma, Chuan; Paterson, Nigel; Sun, Lushi

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to vaporize heavy metals and alkali/alkaline earth metals from two different types of fly ashes by thermal treatment method. Fly ash from a fluidized bed incinerator (HK fly ash) was mixed with one from a grate incinerator (HS fly ash) in various proportions and thermally treated under different temperatures. The melting of HS fly ash was avoided when treated with HK fly ash. Alkali/alkaline earth metals in HS fly ash served as Cl-donors to promote the vaporization of heavy metals during thermal treatment. With temperature increasing from 800 to 900°C, significant amounts of Cl, Na and K were vaporized. Up to 1000°C in air, less than 3% of Cl and Na and less than 5% of K were retained in ash. Under all conditions, Cd can be vaporized effectively. The vaporization of Pb was mildly improved when treated with HS fly ash, while the effect became less pronounced above 900°C. Alkali/alkaline earth metals can promote Cu vaporization by forming copper chlorides. Comparatively, Zn vaporization was low and only slightly improved by HS fly ash. The low vaporization of Zn could be caused by the formation of Zn2SiO4, ZnFe2O4 and ZnAl2O4. Under all conditions, less than 20% of Cr was vaporized. In a reductive atmosphere, the vaporization of Cd and Pb were as high as that in oxidative atmosphere. However, the vaporization of Zn was accelerated and that of Cu was hindered because the formation of Zn2SiO4, ZnFe2O4 and ZnAl2O4 and copper chloride was depressed in reductive atmosphere.

  17. Identifying calcium sources at an acid deposition-impacted spruce forest: A strontium isotope, alkaline earth element multi-tracer approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullen, T.D.; Bailey, S.W.

    2005-01-01

    Depletion of calcium from forest soils has important implications for forest productivity and health. Ca is available to fine feeder roots from a number of soil organic and mineral sources, but identifying the primary source or changes of sources in response to environmental change is problematic. We used strontium isotope and alkaline earth element concentration ratios of trees and soils to discern the record of Ca sources for red spruce at a base-poor, acid deposition-impacted watershed. We measured 87Sr/86Sr and chemical compositions of cross-sectional stemwood cores of red spruce, other spruce tissues and sequential extracts of co-located soil samples. 87Sr/86Sr and Sr/Ba ratios together provide a tracer of alkaline earth element sources that distinguishes the plant-available fraction of the shallow organic soils from those of deeper organic and mineral soils. Ca/Sr ratios proved less diagnostic, due to within-tree processes that fractionate these elements from each other. Over the growth period from 1870 to 1960, 87Sr/86Sr and Sr/Ba ratios of stemwood samples became progressively more variable and on average trended toward values that considered together are characteristic of the uppermost forest floor. In detail the stemwood chemistry revealed an episode of simultaneous enhanced uptake of all alkaline earth elements during the growth period from 1930 to 1960, coincident with reported local and regional increases in atmospheric inputs of inorganic acidity. We attribute the temporal trends in stemwood chemistry to progressive shallowing of the effective depth of alkaline earth element uptake by fine roots over this growth period, due to preferential concentration of fine roots in the upper forest floor coupled with reduced nutrient uptake by roots in the lower organic and upper mineral soils in response to acid-induced aluminum toxicity. Although both increased atmospheric deposition and selective weathering of Ca-rich minerals such as apatite provide possible

  18. Electronic structure, optical properties and bonding in alkaline earth halo-fluoride scintillators: BaClF, BaBrF and BaIF

    SciTech Connect

    Yedukondalu, N.; Babu, K. Ramesh; Bheemalingam, Ch.; Singh, David J; Vaitheeswaran, G.; Kanchana, V.

    2011-01-01

    We report first-principles studies of the structural, electronic, and optical properties of the alkaline-earth halofluorides, BaXF (X = Cl, Br, and I), including pressure dependence of structural properties. The band structures show clear separation of the halogen p derived valence bands into higher binding energy F and lower binding energy X derived manifolds reflecting the very high electronegativity of F relative to the other halogens. Implications of this for bonding and other properties are discussed. We find an anisotropic behavior of the structural parameters especially of BaIF under pressure. The optical properties on the other hand are almost isotropic, in spite of the anisotropic crystal structures.

  19. Speciation of dissolved silicates in natural waters containing alkaline and alkaline-earth ions. A case study--waters from arid lands (North West China).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Miho; Takahashi, Kazuya; Sahoo, Yu Vin

    2004-02-01

    The concentration of silica in water samples from the desert area of Xinjiang, N. W. China, has been measured by colorimetry with ammonium molybdate. The observed pattern of dependence of the concentration of silica on the concentration of sodium ion (Na(+)) in the water samples is consistent with the pattern obtained by experiments on in-vitro dissolution of silica gel in sodium chloride (NaCl) solution. This indicates that the dissolution of silica in the hydrologic system in this area depends on the concentration of Na(+). Calcium ion (Ca(2+)), which is known to play an important role on the dissolution of silica on the basis of in-vitro experiments, was observed to take little part in the dissolution of silica in actual natural water samples. This implies that the Ca(2+) is bound to the hydrogen carbonate anion or that the Ca(2+) content of natural water containing salts is very low, owing to precipitation. In these samples silicate-Na(+) was identified as the dissolution species of silica; it was also ascertained that Ca(2+) did not form complexes with silicate species. These observations resulted from direct identification of dissolved chemical species by use of FAB-MS (fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry). The research indicates that in water samples in this critically arid region the concentration of "dissolved" silica is basically determined by the concentration of Na(+), indicative of pure inorganic conditions in the desert area of Xinjiang, N.W. China.

  20. The spectral albedo of sea ice and salt crusts on the tropical ocean of Snowball Earth: 1. Laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Light, Bonnie; Carns, Regina C.; Warren, Stephen G.

    2016-07-01

    The ice-albedo feedback mechanism likely contributed to global glaciation during the Snowball Earth events of the Neoproterozoic era (1 Ga to 544 Ma). This feedback results from the albedo contrast between sea ice and open ocean. Little is known about the optical properties of some of the possible surface types that may have been present, including sea ice that is both snow-free and cold enough for salts to precipitate within brine inclusions. A proxy surface for such ice was grown in a freezer laboratory using the single salt NaCl and kept below the eutectic temperature (-21.2°C) of the NaCl-H2O binary system. The resulting ice cover was composed of ice and precipitated hydrohalite crystals (NaCl · 2H2O). As the cold ice sublimated, a thin lag-deposit of salt formed on the surface. To hasten its growth in the laboratory, the deposit was augmented by addition of a salt-enriched surface crust. Measurements of the spectral albedo of this surface were carried out over 90 days as the hydrohalite crust thickened due to sublimation of ice, and subsequently over several hours as the crust warmed and dissolved, finally resulting in a surface with puddled liquid brine. The all-wave solar albedo of the subeutectic crust is 0.93 (in contrast to 0.83 for fresh snow and 0.67 for melting bare sea ice). Incorporation of these processes into a climate model of Snowball Earth will result in a positive salt-albedo feedback operating between -21°C and -36°C.

  1. Cross-linked anion exchange membranes with pendent quaternary pyrrolidonium salts for alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chunhua; Fang, Jun; Guan, Yingjie; Zhou, Huili; Zhao, Jinbao

    2015-11-01

    Novel anion-exchange membranes based on two kinds of pyrrolidonium type ionic liquids, N-methyl-N-vinyl-pyrrolidonium (NVMP) and N-ethyl-N-vinyl-pyrrolidonium (NVEP), have been synthesized via polymerization and crosslinking treatment, followed by membrane casting. The covalent cross-linked structures of these membranes are confirmed by FT-IR. The obtained membranes are also characterized in terms of water uptake, ion exchange capacity (IEC), ionic conductivity as well as thermal, dimensional and chemical stability. The membranes display hydroxide conductivity of above 10-2 S cm-1 at 25 °C. Excellent thermal stability with onset degradation temperature above 235 °C, good alkaline stability in 6 mol L-1 NaOH at 60 °C for 168 h and remarkable dimensional stability of the resulting membranes have been proved. H2/air single fuel cells employed membrane M3 and N3 show the open-circuit voltage (OCV) of 0.953 V and 0.933 V, and the maximum power density of 88.90 mW cm-2 and 81.90 mW cm-2 at the current density of 175 mA cm-2 and 200 mA cm-2 at 65 °C, respectively.

  2. Fundamental Properties of Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Toni Y Gutknecht; Guy L Fredrickson

    2012-11-01

    Thermal properties of molten salt systems are of interest to electrorefining operations, pertaining to both the Fuel Cycle Research & Development Program (FCR&D) and Spent Fuel Treatment Mission, currently being pursued by the Department of Energy (DOE). The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely impacted by the build-up of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided, during electrorefining operations, include (i) fissile elements build up in the salt that might approach the criticality limits specified for the vessel, (ii) electrolyte freezing at the operating temperature of the electrorefiner due to changes in the liquidus temperature, and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution). The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can be monitored by studying the thermal characteristics of the molten salts as a function of impurity concentration. Simulated salt compositions consisting of the selected rare earth and alkaline earth chlorides, with a eutectic mixture of LiCl-KCl as the carrier electrolyte, were studied to determine the melting points (thermal characteristics) using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The experimental data were used to model the liquidus temperature. On the basis of the this data, it became possible to predict a spent fuel treatment processing scenario under which electrorefining could no longer be performed as a result of increasing liquidus temperatures of the electrolyte.

  3. Identifying the presence of a disulfide linkage in peptides by the selective elimination of hydrogen disulfide from collisionally activated alkali and alkaline earth metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hugh I; Beauchamp, J L

    2008-01-30

    We report a new method for identifying disulfide linkages in peptides using mass spectrometry. This is accomplished by collisional activation of singly charged cationic alkali and alkaline earth metal complexes, which results in the highly selective elimination of hydrogen disulfide (H2S2). Complexes of peptides possessing disulfide bonds with sodium and alkaline earth metal are generated using electrospray ionization (ESI). Isolation followed by collision induced dissociation (CID) of singly charged peptide complexes results in selective elimination of H2S2 to leave newly formed dehydroalanine residues in the peptide. Further activation of the product yields sequence information in the region previously short circuited by the disulfide bond. For example, singly charged magnesium and calcium ion bound complexes of [Lys8]-vasopressin exhibit selective elimination of H2S2 via low-energy CID. Further isolation of the product followed by CID yields major b- and z-type fragments revealing the peptide sequence in the region between the newly formed dehydroalanine residues. Numerous model peptides provide mechanistic details for the selective elimination of H2S2. The process is initiated starting with a metal stabilized enolate anion at Cys, followed by cleavage of the S-C bond. An examination of the peptic digest of insulin provides an example of the application of the selective elimination of H2S2 for the identification of peptides with disulfide linkages. The energetics and mechanisms of H2S2 elimination from model compounds are investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  4. Indirect ultraviolet detection of alkaline earth metal ions using an imidazolium ionic liquid as an ultraviolet absorption reagent in ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Hong

    2017-02-20

    A convenient and versatile method was developed for the separation and detection of alkaline earth metal ions by ion chromatography with indirect UV detection. The chromatographic separation of Mg(2+) , Ca(2+) , and Sr(2+) was performed on a carboxylic acid base cation exchange column using imidazolium ionic liquid/acid as the mobile phase, in which the imidazolium ionic liquid acted as an UV-absorption reagent. The effects of imidazolium ionic liquids, detection wavelength, acids in the mobile phase, and column temperature on the retention of Mg(2+) , Ca(2+) , and Sr(2+) were investigated. The main factors influencing the separation and detection were the background UV absorption reagent and the concentration of hydrogen ion in ion chromatography with indirect UV detection. The successful separation and detection of Mg(2+) , Ca(2+) , and Sr(2+) within 14 min were achieved using the selected chromatographic conditions, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) were 0.06, 0.12, and 0.23 mg/L, respectively. A new separation and detection method of alkaline earth metal ions by ion chromatography with indirect UV detection was developed, and the application range of ionic liquids was expanded.

  5. Origin of low sodium capacity in graphite and generally weak substrate binding of Na and Mg among alkali and alkaline earth metals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyue; Merinov, Boris V; Goddard, William A

    2016-04-05

    It is well known that graphite has a low capacity for Na but a high capacity for other alkali metals. The growing interest in alternative cation batteries beyond Li makes it particularly important to elucidate the origin of this behavior, which is not well understood. In examining this question, we find a quite general phenomenon: among the alkali and alkaline earth metals, Na and Mg generally have the weakest chemical binding to a given substrate, compared with the other elements in the same column of the periodic table. We demonstrate this with quantum mechanics calculations for a wide range of substrate materials (not limited to C) covering a variety of structures and chemical compositions. The phenomenon arises from the competition between trends in the ionization energy and the ion-substrate coupling, down the columns of the periodic table. Consequently, the cathodic voltage for Na and Mg is expected to be lower than those for other metals in the same column. This generality provides a basis for analyzing the binding of alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms over a broad range of systems.

  6. Origin of low sodium capacity in graphite and generally weak substrate binding of Na and Mg among alkali and alkaline earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyue; Merinov, Boris V.; Goddard, William A., III

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that graphite has a low capacity for Na but a high capacity for other alkali metals. The growing interest in alternative cation batteries beyond Li makes it particularly important to elucidate the origin of this behavior, which is not well understood. In examining this question, we find a quite general phenomenon: among the alkali and alkaline earth metals, Na and Mg generally have the weakest chemical binding to a given substrate, compared with the other elements in the same column of the periodic table. We demonstrate this with quantum mechanics calculations for a wide range of substrate materials (not limited to C) covering a variety of structures and chemical compositions. The phenomenon arises from the competition between trends in the ionization energy and the ion-substrate coupling, down the columns of the periodic table. Consequently, the cathodic voltage for Na and Mg is expected to be lower than those for other metals in the same column. This generality provides a basis for analyzing the binding of alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms over a broad range of systems.

  7. Effect of metal cation replacement on the electronic structure of metalorganic halide perovskites: Replacement of lead with alkaline-earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazoki, Meysam; Jacobsson, T. Jesper; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    Organic and inorganic lead halogen perovskites, and in particular, C H3N H3Pb I3 , have during the last years emerged as a class of highly efficient solar cell materials. Herein we introduce metalorganic halogen perovskite materials for energy-relevant applications based on alkaline-earth metals. Based on the classical notion of Goldschmidt's rules and quantum mechanical considerations, the three alkaline-earth metals, Ca, Sr, and Ba, are shown to be able to exchange lead in the perovskite structure. The three alkaline-earth perovskites, C H3N H3Ca I3,C H3N H3Sr I3 , and C H3N H3Ba I3 , as well as the reference compound, C H3N H3Pb I3 , are in this paper investigated with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, which predict these compounds to exist as stable perovskite materials, and their electronic properties are explored. A detailed analysis of the projected molecular orbital density of states and electronic band structure from DFT calculations were used for interpretation of the band-gap variations in these materials and for estimation of the effective masses of the electrons and holes. Neglecting spin-orbit effects, the band gap of MACa I3,MASr I3 , and MABa I3 were estimated to be 2.95, 3.6, and 3.3 eV, respectively, showing the relative change expected for metal cation exchange. The shifts in the conduction band (CB) edges for the alkaline-earth perovskites were quantified using scalar relativistic DFT calculations and tight-binding analysis, and were compared to the situation in the more extensively studied lead halide perovskite, C H3N H3Pb I3 , where the change in the work function of the metal is the single most important factor in tuning the CB edge and band gap. The results show that alkaline-earth-based organometallic perovskites will not work as an efficient light absorber in photovoltaic applications but instead could be applicable as charge-selective contact materials. The rather high CB edge and the wide band gap together with the large

  8. Alkaline earth imidazolate coordination polymers by solvent free melt synthesis as potential host lattices for rare earth photoluminescence: (x)(∞)[AE(Im)2(ImH)(2-3)], Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, x = 1-2.

    PubMed

    Zurawski, Alexander; Rybak, J-Christoph; Meyer, Larissa V; Matthes, Philipp R; Stepanenko, Vladimir; Dannenbauer, Nicole; Würthner, Frank; Müller-Buschbaum, Klaus

    2012-04-14

    The series of alkaline earth elements magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium yields single crystalline imidazolate coordination polymers by reactions of the metals with a melt of 1H-imidazole: (1)(∞)[Mg(Im)(2)(ImH)(3)] (1), (2)(∞)[AE(Im)(2)(ImH)(2)], AE = Ca (2), Sr (3), and (1)(∞)[Ba(Im)(2)(ImH)(2)] (4). No additional solvents were used for the reactions. Co-doping experiments by addition of the rare earth elements cerium, europium and terbium were carried out. They indicate (2)(∞)[Sr(Im)(2)(ImH)(2)] as a possible host lattice for cerium(III) photoluminescence showing a blue emission and thus a novel blue emitting hybrid material phosphor 3:Ce(3+). Co-doping with europium and terbium is also possible but resulted in formation of (3)(∞)[Sr(Im)(2)]:Ln, Ln = Eu and Tb (5), with both exhibiting green emission of either Eu(2+) or Tb(3+). The other alkaline earth elements do not show acceptance of the rare earth ions investigated and a different structural chemistry. For magnesium and barium one-dimensional strand structures are observed whereas calcium and strontium give two-dimensional network structures. Combined with an increase of the ionic radii of AE(2+) the coordinative demand is also increasing from Mg(2+) to Ba(2+), reflected by four different crystal structures for the four elements Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba in 1-4. Different linkages of the imidazolate ligands result in a change from complete σ-N coordination in 1 to additional η(5)-π coordination in 4. The success of co-doping with different lanthanide ions is based on a match in the chemical behaviour and cationic radii. The use of strontium for host lattices with imidazole is a rare example in coordination chemistry of co-doping with small amounts of luminescence centers and successfully reduces the amount of high price rare earth elements in hybrid materials while maintaining the properties. All compounds are examples of pure N-coordinated coordination polymers of the alkaline earth metals and were

  9. Evaluation of a membrane biological reactor for reclaiming water, alkalinity, salts, phosphorus, and protein contained in a high-strength aquacultural wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sharrer, Mark J; Rishel, Kata; Summerfelt, Steven T

    2010-06-01

    The capacity of a membrane biological reactor to provide nitrification, denitrification, and enhanced biological phosphorus removal of a high-strength aquaculture backwash flow (control condition), or the same flow amended with 100mg/L of NO(3)-N and 3mg/L of dissolved P (test condition), was assessed using only endogenous carbon. Permeate TSS and cBOD(5) concentrations were <1mg/L under control and test conditions, achieving 99.97-100% removal efficiencies, respectively. Permeate TN concentrations were 1.8+/-0.5mg/L and 2.1+/-1.4 mg/L, while permeate TP concentrations were 0.05+/-0.01 mg/L and 0.10+/-0.03 mg/L, respectively, under control and test conditions. Our findings suggest that permeate flow could be reclaimed to recycle alkalinity, salts, and heat for fish culture and that the waste activated sludge does not produce metals concentrations that would prevent its land application (reclaiming phosphorus) or prevent its use as a protein source in animal feeds.

  10. Enzymatic methods for the determination of pollution in seawater using salt resistant alkaline phosphatase from eggs of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Menzorova, Natalie I; Seitkalieva, Alexandra V; Rasskazov, Valerу A

    2014-02-15

    A new salt resistant alkaline phosphatase from eggs of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius (StAP) has been shown to have a unique property to hydrolyze substrate in seawater without loss of enzymatic activity. The enzyme has pH optimum at 8.0-8.5. Model experiments showed various concentrations of copper, zinc, cadmium and lead added to seawater or a standard buffer mixture to inhibit completely the enzyme activity at the concentrations of 15-150 μg/l. StAP sensitivity to the presence in seawater of metals, pesticides, detergents and oil products appears to be considerably less. Samples of seawater taken from aquatic areas of the Troitsy Bay of the Peter the Great Bay, Japan Sea have been shown to inhibit the enzyme activity; the same was shown for the samples of fresh waters. The phosphatase inhibition assay developed proved to be highly sensitive, technically easy-to use allowing to test a great number of samples.

  11. SEPARATION OF PROTACTINIUM FROM MOLTEN SALT REACTOR FUEL COMPOSITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.H.; Strain, J.E.; Cuneo, D.R.; Kelly, M.J.

    1963-11-12

    A method for selectively precipitating protactinium from a neutron- irradiated fused fluoride salt composition comprising at least one metal fluoride selected from the group consisting of an alkali metal fluoride and an alkaline earth metal fluoride containing dissolved thorium-232 values is presented. An inorganic metal oxide corresponding to any of the metal fluorides of the composition is also added. (AEC)

  12. Optimization of a Molten Salt Electrolytic Bath Geometry for Rare Earth Metal Recovery using a Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numata, Hiroo; Akatsuka, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Haruaki

    2013-02-01

    For a recycling procedure for rare earths from spent hydrogen absorbing alloys by rare earths electrodeposition in a molten salt, the electrolytic bath and the cathode accessories have been optimized by evaluating the appropriate secondary current distribution using finite element method (FEM) computer simulation. The desirable cathode dish as an accessory was designed to prevent drops of less adherent electrodeposits, which improved the current density distribution compared with an a priori determined one. In the bath optimization, a reciprocal proportionality of the difference between the maximum and minimum current densities vs. the ratio of volume to surface area (or electrolyte volume) was found. It was found by FEM that if a resistive floating mass is assumed on the electrolyte surface, the observed necking in the electrodeposit near the electrolyte surface can be analyzed.

  13. Dispersion coefficients for the interactions of the alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal ions and inert-gas atoms with a graphene layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-09-01

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the van der Waals dispersion coefficients C3 of the alkali-metal ions Li+,Na+,K+, and Rb+, the alkaline-earth-metal ions Ca+,Sr+,Ba+, and Ra+, and the inert-gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, and Kr with a graphene layer are determined precisely within the framework of the Dirac model. For these calculations, we evaluate the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atomic systems very accurately by evaluating the transition matrix elements employing relativistic many-body methods and using the experimental values of the excitation energies. The dispersion coefficients are given as functions of the separation distance of an atomic system from the graphene layer and the ambiance temperature during the interactions. For easy extraction of these coefficients, we give a logistic fit to the functional forms of the dispersion coefficients in terms of the separation distances at room temperature.

  14. Low pressure ion chromatography with a low cost paired emitter-detector diode based detector for the determination of alkaline earth metals in water samples.

    PubMed

    Barron, Leon; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Diamond, Dermot; O'Toole, Martina; Lau, King Tong; Paull, Brett

    2006-09-01

    The use of a low pressure ion chromatograph based upon short (25 mm x 4.6 mm) surfactant coated monolithic columns and a low cost paired emitter-detector diode (PEDD) based detector, for the determination of alkaline earth metals in aqueous matrices is presented. The system was applied to the separation of magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium in less than 7min using a 0.15M KCl mobile phase at pH 3, with post-column reaction detection at 570 nm using o-cresolphthalein complexone. A comparison of the performance of the PEDD detector with a standard laboratory absorbance detector is shown, with limits of detection for magnesium and calcium using the low cost PEDD detector equal to 0.16 and 0.23 mg L(-1), respectively. Finally, the developed system was used for the determination of calcium and magnesium in a commercial spring water sample.

  15. Alkaline earth metal-based metal-organic framework: hydrothermal synthesis, X-ray structure and heterogeneously catalyzed Claisen-Schmidt reaction.

    PubMed

    Saha, Debraj; Maity, Tanmoy; Koner, Subratanath

    2014-09-14

    Two alkaline earth metal-based carboxylate systems, [Mg(HL)(H2O)2]n (1) and [Ca(H2L)2]n (2) (H3L = chelidamic acid) have been hydrothermally synthesized, and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, IR, elemental analysis, and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Compound 1 has a 2D structure incorporating two water molecules. The dehydrated species, 1a, generated from 1 by removal of the coordinated water, has been characterized by thermo-gravimetric analysis, IR, elemental analysis and variable temperature powder X-ray diffraction. Both 1 and its dehydrated species 1a catalyze the Claisen-Schmidt reaction under heterogeneous conditions, but 1a is a more effective catalyst under environmentally friendly conditions. The catalyst can readily be recovered and reused in successive cycles without detectable loss of activity. Compound 2 has a 3D structure and is thermally stable up to 540 °C, but is inactive catalytically.

  16. Calculation of thermodynamic potentials with the inclusion of fractional occupation numbers and investigation of FCC-BCC structural phase transitions in alkaline-earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozhivatenko, V. V.

    2013-10-01

    The smearing near the Fermi level has been taken into account in the calculations of the thermodynamic characteristics of metals in order to improve the convergence of the performed calculations and to increase the quality of the obtained results. The choice of the smearing parameter usually has not been explained, although the results of the calculations differ significantly for different values of this parameter. Possible schemes for calculating the thermodynamic potentials with the inclusion of the smearing parameter and additional parameters of the volume and energy shifts have been considered. The influence of these parameters on the calculations of the thermodynamic properties of alkaline-earth metals under pressure and on the description of the structural phase transition has been analyzed.

  17. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, simple and 3d transition metal, and nonmetal atoms on monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. D.; Fang, Y. M.; Wu, S. Q. E-mail: wsq@xmu.edu.cn; Zhu, Z. Z. E-mail: wsq@xmu.edu.cn

    2015-05-15

    Single adsorption of different atoms on pristine two-dimensional monolayer MoS{sub 2} have been systematically investigated by using density functional calculations with van der Waals correction. The adatoms cover alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, main group metal, 3d-transition metals, coinage metal and nonmetal atoms. Depending on the adatom type, metallic, semimetallic or semiconducting behavior can be found in direct bandgap monolayer MoS{sub 2}. Additionally, local or long-range magnetic moments of two-dimensional MoS{sub 2} sheet can also attained through the adsorption. The detailed atomic-scale knowledge of single adsorption on MoS{sub 2} monolayer is important not only for the sake of a theoretical understanding, but also device level deposition technological application.

  18. Determination of rare earth elements, uranium and thorium in geological samples by ICP-MS, using an automatic fusion machine as an alkaline digestion tool.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granda, Luis; Rivera, Maria; Velasquez, Colon; Barona, Diego; Carpintero, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    At the present time, rare earth elements deposits have became in strategic resources for extraction of raw materials in order to manufacture high tech devices (computers, LCD, cell phones, batteries for hybrid vehicles, fiber optics and wind turbines) (1).The appropriate analytical determination of the REE ( rare earth elements) in sediment and rock samples , is important to find potential deposits and to recognize geological environments for identifying possible alterations and mineral occurrences. The alkaline fusion, which aim is to move the entire sample from solid to liquid state by forming water soluble complexes of boron and lithium, as a previous procedure for the determination of these elements, usually takes a lot of time due to the complexity of the analysis phase and by the addition of other reagents (Tm and HF ) (2) to compensate the lack of strict temperature control. The objective of this work is to develop an efficient alternative to alkaline digestion using an electrical fusion machine, which allows to create temperature programs with advanced process control and supports up to 5 samples simultaneously, which generates a reproducibility of the method and results during the melting step. Additionally, this new method permits the processing of a larger number of samples in a shorter time. The samples analyzed in this method were weighed into porcelain crucibles and subjected to calcination for 4 hours at 950 ° C in order to determine the Lost on Ignition (LOI ) , that serves to adjust the analytical results and to preserve the shelf life of the platinum ware. Subsequently, a fraction of the calcined sample was weighed into platinum crucibles and mixed with ultra-pure lithium metaborate ( flux ) 1:4 . The crucible was then placed in the fusion machine, which was programmed to take the sample from room temperature to 950 ° C in five minutes, make a small ramp to 970 ° C maintain that temperature for five minutes and download the melt in a 10 % v / v

  19. Syntheses and characterization of energetic compounds constructed from alkaline earth metal cations (Sr and Ba) and 1,2-bis(tetrazol-5-yl)ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Zhengqiang; Chen Sanping; Wei Qing; Qiao Chengfang

    2011-07-15

    Two new energetic compounds, [M(BTE)(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}]{sub n} (M=Sr(1), Ba(2)) [H{sub 2}BTE=1,2-bis(tetrazol-5-yl)ethane], have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that they are isomorphous and exhibit 2D (4,4) net framework, generated by 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs linked up by two independent binding modes of H{sub 2}BTE, and the resulting 2D structure is interconnected by hydrogen-bond and strong face to face {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions between two tetrazole rings to lead to a 3D supramolecular architecture. DSC measurements show that they have significant catalytic effects on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties, thermogravimetric analyses, and flame colors of the as-prepared compounds are also investigated in this paper. - Graphical abstract: Two novel 2D isomorphous alkaline earth metal complexes were assembled by 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs and two independent binding modes of H{sub 2}BTE ligands, and the catalytic performances toward thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate and photoluminescent properties of them were investigated. Highlights: > Two novel alkaline earth energetic coordination polymers have been prepared.{yields} Both structures are layered based on 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs and two distinct H{sub 2}BTE coordination modes.{yields} The dehydrated products of the compounds possess good thermostability and significant catalytic effects on thermal decomposition of AP.

  20. Purification strategies, characteristics and thermodynamic analysis of a highly thermostable alkaline protease from a salt-tolerant alkaliphilic actinomycete, Nocardiopsis alba OK-5.

    PubMed

    Gohel, Sangeeta D; Singh, Satya P

    2012-03-15

    An alkaline protease from salt tolerant alkaliphilic actinomycetes, Nocardiopsis alba strain OK-5 was purified to homogeneity by 27 and 13 fold with a yield of 35 and 13% using two-steps and one-step method, respectively. The purification methods involved hydrophobic interaction on phenyl sapharose matrix. The apparent molecular mass was 20 kDa. The temperature optimum shifted from 70 to 80°C in 4M NaCl and 30% Na-glutamate, with significant stability at 60-80°C in Na-glutamate. Deactivation rate constant (K(d)) increased and half life (t(1/2)) decreased with the increasing temperatures from 37 to 80°C. The order of stability was: 30% Na-glutamate>4M NaCl>2M NaCl>0M NaCl. The enzyme was stable even at 80°C in 30% Na-glutamate with K(d) 4.11 and t(1/2) 168.64 min. The activation energies (E), enthalpy (ΔH*) and entropy (ΔS*) for protease deactivation in with Na-glutamate were 31.97 kJ/mole, 29.23 kJ/mole and -211.83 J/mole, respectively. The change in free energy (ΔG*) for protease deactivation at 60°C in 30% Na-glutamate was 101.70 kJ/mole. Protease had the highest activity and stability at pH 10-11. While the enzyme was highly resistant against chemical denaturation, it had varied responses to metal ions. Complete inhibition by PMSF confirmed serine nature of the protease. Na-glutamate, H(2)O(2), β-mercaptoethanol and different surfactants enhanced the activity.

  1. Separation of alkali, alkaline earth and rare earth cations by liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Fourth progress report, 1 November 1981-31 July 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J J; Izatt, R M

    1982-07-31

    The H/sub 2/O-CHCl/sub 3/-H/sub 2/O liquid membrane system was characterized with respect to the effect on cation (K/sup +/) transport rate of salt concentration and anion type. A bulk liquid membrane cell was used. A mathematical model for cation flux is being developed for several cations, several macrocycles, and mixtures of two or three cations. Eu/sup 3 +/ was not transported by 18-crown-6, but its reduced from Eu/sup 2 +/ was. Cation transport properties of calixarenes are also being investigated. Emulsion membrane systems were studied as a way of increasing the cation transport. Pb/sup 2 +/ was found to be transported by dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 through the liquid membrane. Transport rates of metal cation nitrates were measured in a water-toluene-water emulsion membrane system. 14 figures, 7 tables. (DLC)

  2. Rapid hydrolysis of model phosphate diesters by alkaline-earth cations in aqueous DMSO: speciation and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Taran, Olga; Medrano, Felipe; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K

    2008-12-14

    Kinetics of the cleavage of two phosphate diesters, bis(4-nitrophenyl) phosphate and 2-hydroxypropyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate and a triester, 4-nitrophenyl diphenyl phosphate, in the presence of Mg(II), Ca(II) and Sr(II) were studied in 90% vol. DMSO at 37 degrees C. The alkaline hydrolysis of the triester was inhibited by all cations, but with both phosphodiesters strong catalytic effects were observed. Potentiometric titrations of metal perchlorates by Bu4N(OH) revealed formation of M2(OH)3+, M(OH)+, M(OH)2 and M2(OH)5- species. Rate constants for phosphodiester cleavage by individual species were obtained from analysis of rate-concentration profiles. Observed first-order rate constants in the presence of 1-2 mM Mg(II) or Ca(II) in neutral and weakly basic solutions were 10(8)-10(11) times higher than those for background hydrolysis at the same pH while in water additions of up to 50 mM metal produced <100-fold accelerations. Possible structures of DMSO solvated catalyst-substrate complexes were modeled by DFT calculations with Mg(II). The increased catalytic activity in 90% DMSO is attributed to stronger association of hydroxide ions and anionic phosphodiesters with metal ions and to preferable solvation of cations by DMSO, which creates favorable for reaction anhydrous microenvironment in the coordination sphere of the catalyst.

  3. Salt balance: From space experiments to revolutionizing new clinical concepts on earth - A historical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerzer, Rupert

    2014-11-01

    For a long time, sodium balance appeared to be a “done deal” and was thought to be well understood. However, experiments in preparation of space missions showed that the concept of osmotic sodium storage and close correlations of sodium with water balance are only part of the regulatory mechanisms of body salt. By now it has turned out that the human skin is an important storage place and regulator for sodium, that sodium storage involves macrophages which in turn salt-dependently co-regulate blood pressure, that body sodium also strongly influences bone and protein metabolism, and that immune functions are also strongly influenced by sodium. In addition, the aging process appears to lead to increased body sodium storage, which in turn might influence the aging process of the human body. The current review article summarizes the developments that have led to these revolutionizing new findings and concepts as well as consequences deriving from these findings. Therefore, it is not intended in this article to give a complete literature overview over the whole field but to focus on such key literature and considerations that led to the respective developments.

  4. Lack of marked cyto- and genotoxicity of cristobalite in devitrified (heated) alkaline earth silicate wools in short-term assays with cultured primary rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ziemann, Christina; Harrison, Paul T C; Bellmann, Bernd; Brown, Robert C; Zoitos, Bruce K; Class, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    Alkaline earth silicate (AES) wools are low-biopersistence high-temperature insulation wools. Following prolonged periods at high temperatures they may devitrify, producing crystalline silica (CS) polymorphs, including cristobalite, classified as carcinogenic to humans. Here we investigated the cytotoxic and genotoxic significance of cristobalite present in heated AES wools. Primary rat alveolar macrophages were incubated in vitro for 2 h with 200 µg/cm² unheated/heated calcium magnesium silicate wools (CMS1, CMS2, CMS3; heat-treated for 1 week at, or 4 weeks 150 °C below, their respective classification temperatures) or magnesium silicate wool (MS; heated for 24 h at 1260 °C). Types and quantities of CS formed, and fiber size distribution and shape were determined by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. Lactate dehydrogenase release and alkaline and hOGG1-modified comet assays were used, ± aluminum lactate (known to quench CS effects), for cytotoxicity/genotoxicity screening. Cristobalite content of wools increased with heating temperature and duration, paralleled by decreases in fiber length and changes in fiber shape. No marked cytotoxicity, and nearly no (CMS) or only slight (MS) DNA-strand break induction was observed, compared to the CS-negative control Al₂O₃, whereas DQ12 as CS-positive control was highly active. Some samples induced slight oxidative DNA damage, but no biological endpoint significantly correlated with free CS, quartz, or cristobalite. In conclusion, heating of AES wools mediates changes in CS content and fiber length/shape. While changes in fiber morphology can impact biological activity, cristobalite content appears minor or of no relevance to the intrinsic toxicity of heated AES wools in short-term assays with rat alveolar macrophages.

  5. Alternative Waste Forms for Electro-Chemical Salt Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Riley, Brian J.; Matyas, Josef; Arreguin, Shelly A.; Vienna, John D.

    2009-10-28

    This study was undertaken to examine alternate crystalline (ceramic/mineral) and glass waste forms for immobilizing spent salt from the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) electrochemical separations process. The AFCI is a program sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and demonstrate a process for recycling spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The electrochemical process is a molten salt process for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel in an electrorefiner and generates spent salt that is contaminated with alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanide fission products (FP) that must either be cleaned of fission products or eventually replaced with new salt to maintain separations efficiency. Currently, these spent salts are mixed with zeolite to form sodalite in a glass-bonded waste form. The focus of this study was to investigate alternate waste forms to immobilize spent salt. On a mole basis, the spent salt is dominated by alkali and Cl with minor amounts of alkaline earth and lanthanides. In the study reported here, we made an effort to explore glass systems that are more compatible with Cl and have not been previously considered for use as waste forms. In addition, alternate methods were explored with the hope of finding a way to produce a sodalite that is more accepting of as many FP present in the spent salt as possible. This study was done to investigate two different options: (1) alternate glass families that incorporate increased concentrations of Cl; and (2) alternate methods to produce a mineral waste form.

  6. Coordination chemistry of the alkaline earth metal ions with Zwitterionic forms of the Schift bases. X-Ray studies and other spectroscopic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajmir-Riahi, H. A.; Lotfipoor, M.

    The non-ionized forms of tetradentate Schiff bases NN'-ethylenebis(salicylideneimine), H 2L and NN'-propane-1,3-diylbis(salicylideneimine), H 2L' react with hydrated alkaline earth halide and nitrate to give complexes of the type: M(H 2L)Cl 2· nH 2O [M = Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II); n = 0-4], M(H 2L) 2Cl 2 [M = Ca(II), Sr(II), M(H 2L) nBr 2 [M = Ca(II), Sr(II); n = 2, 3 and Mg 2(H 2L) 3Br 4], M(H 2L) nI 2 [M = Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II), Ba(II); n = 2, 3)], M(H 2L) n(NO 3) 2 and M(H 2L') n(NO 1) 2[M = Mg(II), Ca(II); n = 1, 2)]. Because of distinct spectral similarities with structurally known Ca(H 2L')(NO 3) 2 compound, the Schiff bases are coordinated through the negatively charged phenolic oxygen atoms and not the nitrogen atoms of the azomethine groups, which carry the protons transferred from phenolic groups on complexation. Halide and nitrate are coordinated to the central metal ion except in 2:1 nitrato complexes where the presence of both ionic and coordinated nitrate groups are evident and also in 3:1 halide complexes where the presence of non-coordinated halide cannot be excluded. X-Ray powder photographs showed no marked similarities between Ca(H 2L')(NO 3) 2 and Mg(H 2L')(NO 3) 2 while there are some isomorphic features between the same types of halide complexes. Infrared spectra and other structural information revealed the polymeric nature of the complexes. Therefore the coordination numbers exhibited by the alkaline earth metal cations would be 4, 6 or 8 in these series of Schiff base complexes.

  7. The long-range non-additive three-body dispersion interactions for the rare gases, alkali, and alkaline-earth atoms.

    PubMed

    Tang, Li-Yan; Yan, Zong-Chao; Shi, Ting-Yun; Babb, James F; Mitroy, J

    2012-03-14

    The long-range non-additive three-body dispersion interaction coefficients Z(111), Z(112), Z(113), and Z(122) are computed for many atomic combinations using standard expressions. The atoms considered include hydrogen, the rare gases, the alkali atoms (up to Rb), and the alkaline-earth atoms (up to Sr). The term Z(111) arising from three mutual dipole interactions is known as the Axilrod-Teller-Muto coefficient or the DDD (dipole-dipole-dipole) coefficient. Similarly, the terms Z(112), Z(113), and Z(122) arise from the mutual combinations of dipole (1), quadrupole (2), and octupole (3) interactions between atoms and they are sometimes known, respectively, as dipole-dipole-quadrupole, dipole-dipole-octupole, and dipole-quadrupole-quadrupole coefficients. Results for the four Z coefficients are given for the homonuclear trimers, for the trimers involving two like-rare-gas atoms, and for the trimers with all combinations of the H, He, and Li atoms. An exhaustive compilation of all coefficients between all possible atomic combinations is presented as supplementary data.

  8. CO2 capture properties of alkaline earth metal oxides and hydroxides: A combined density functional theory and lattice phonon dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yuhua; Sorescu, Dan C.

    2010-08-01

    By combining density functional theory and lattice phonon dynamics, the thermodynamic properties of CO2 absorption/desorption reactions with alkaline earth metal oxides MO and hydroxides M(OH)2 (where M=Be,Mg,Ca,Sr,Ba) are analyzed. The heats of reaction and the chemical potential changes of these solids upon CO2 capture reactions have been calculated and used to evaluate the energy costs. Relative to CaO, a widely used system in practical applications, MgO and Mg(OH)2 systems were found to be better candidates for CO2 sorbent applications due to their lower operating temperatures (600-700 K). In the presence of H2O, MgCO3 can be regenerated into Mg(OH)2 at low temperatures or into MgO at high temperatures. This transition temperature depends not only on the CO2 pressure but also on the H2O pressure. Based on our calculated results and by comparing with available experimental data, we propose a general computational search methodology which can be used as a general scheme for screening a large number of solids for use as CO2 sorbents.

  9. Volatilisation of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species during the pyrolysis of biomass: differences between sugar cane bagasse and cane trash.

    PubMed

    Keown, Daniel M; Favas, George; Hayashi, Jun-ichiro; Li, Chun-Zhu

    2005-09-01

    Sugar cane bagasse and cane trash were pyrolysed in a novel quartz fluidised-bed/fixed-bed reactor. Quantification of the Na, K, Mg and Ca in chars revealed that pyrolysis temperature, heating rate, valence and biomass type were important factors influencing the volatilisation of these alkali and alkaline earth metallic (AAEM) species. Pyrolysis at a slow heating rate (approximately 10 K min(-1)) led to minimal (often <20%) volatilisation of AAEM species from these biomass samples. Fast heating rates (>1000 K s(-1)), encouraging volatile-char interactions with the current reactor configuration, resulted in the volatilisation of around 80% of Na, K, Mg and Ca from bagasse during pyrolysis at 900 degrees C. Similar behaviour was observed for monovalent Na and K with cane trash, but the volatilisation of Mg and Ca from cane trash was always restricted. The difference in Cl content between bagasse and cane trash was not sufficient to fully explain the difference in the volatilisation of Mg and Ca.

  10. Mechanochemical synthesis, structure, and properties of solid solutions of alkaline earth metal fluorides: Ma1-xMbxF2 (M: Ca, Sr, Ba)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, M.; Scholz, G.; Düvel, A.; Heitjans, P.; Kemnitz, E.

    2016-10-01

    The capability of mechanochemical synthesis for the formation of solid solutions of alkaline earth metal fluorides Ma1-xMbxF2 (M: Ca, Sr, Ba) was tested by fluorination of metal acetates and metal hydroxides with ammonium fluoride directly at milling. Evidence was found for a mutual substitution of cations on their lattice positions in Ca1-xSrxF2 and Ba1-xSrxF2 samples. For the Ba/Ca-system this synthesis route is only partially successful. X-ray diffraction and 19F MAS NMR spectroscopy were used to characterize all samples concerning their crystal structure and local fluorine coordination. Calculations of 19F chemical shifts with the superposition model along with probability calculations for the intensity of the individual 19F lines, performed in dependence on the molar composition of the samples, perfectly agree with the experimental findings. The fluoride ion conductivity of as-prepared samples, determined by temperature dependent DC conductivity measurements, is significantly higher than those of crystalline binary fluorides. Moreover, a higher F- ion conductivity is observed for samples with higher mixing grade in the Ca/Sr-and the Ba/Sr-systems.

  11. High-temperature corrosion of metals in the salt and metallic melts containing rare earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, V. V.; Abramov, A. V.; Zhilyakov, A. Yu.; Belikov, S. V.; Volkovich, V. A.; Polovov, I. B.; Rebrin, O. I.

    2016-09-01

    A complex of independent methods was employed to study the corrosion resistance of molybdenum, zirconium, tantalum and tungsten in chloride, chloride-fluoride and fluoride-oxide melts based on LiCl, CaCl2, NaCl- KCl, LiF, and containing rare earths. Tests were conducted for 30 h at 750-1050 °C. The metals showed excellent corrosion resistance in fused chlorides (the corrosion rates were below 0.0005 g/(m2 h). Despite the presence of chemically active fluoride ions in the chloride-fluoride melts, the metals studied also showed very low corrosion rates, except molybdenum, for which the rate of corrosion was 0,8 g/(m2 h). The corrosion resistance of tantalum was considerably reduced in the fluoride-oxide melts; the corrosion rate was over 1 g/(m2 h) corresponding to the 8-th grade of stability and placing tantalum to the group of "low stability" materials.

  12. EVIDENCE OF CORROSIVE GAS FORMED BY RADIOLYSIS OF CHLORIDE SALTS IN PLUTONIUM-BEARING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.; Louthan, M.

    2010-02-01

    Corrosion and pitting have been observed in headspace regions of stainless steel containers enclosing plutonium oxide/salt mixtures. These observations are consistent with the formation of a corrosive gas, probably HCl, and transport of that gas to the headspace regions of sealed containers. The NH{sub 4}Cl films found on the walls of the sealed containers is also indicative of the presence of HCl gas. Radiolysis of hydrated alkaline earth salts is the probable source of HCl.

  13. Ca12InC13-x and Ba12InC18H4: alkaline-earth indium allenylides synthesized in AE/Li flux (AE = Ca, Ba).

    PubMed

    Blankenship, Trevor V; Dickman, Matthew J; van de Burgt, Lambertus J; Latturner, Susan E

    2015-02-02

    Two new complex main-group metal carbides were synthesized from reactions of indium, carbon, and a metal hydride in metal flux mixtures of an alkaline earth (AE = Ca, Ba) and lithium. Ca(12)InC(13-x) and Ba(12)InC(18)H(4) both crystallize in cubic space group Im3̅ [a = 9.6055(8) and 11.1447(7) Å, respectively]. Their related structures are both built on a body-centered-cubic array of icosahedral clusters comprised of an indium atom and 12 surrounding alkaline-earth cations; these clusters are connected by bridging monatomic anions (either H(-) or C(4-)) and allenylide anions, C(3)(4-). The allenylide anions were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and hydrolysis studies. Density of states and crystal orbital Hamilton population calculations confirm that both compounds are metallic.

  14. Extraction of transplutionium and rare-earth elements, molybdenum and iron with zirconium salt of dibutyl phosphoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilberman, B. Ya.; Fedorov, Yu. S.; Shmidt, O. V.; Goletsky, N. D.; Sukhareva, S. Yu.; Puzikov, E. A.; Suglobov, D. N.; Mashirov, L. G.; Choppin, G. R.

    2003-01-01

    Zirconium salt of dibutyl phosphoric acid (ZS-HDBP) dissolved in dilute tributyl phosphate (TBP) is proposed as a solvent for separation of transplutonium and rare-earth elements (TPE, RE), including yttrium, from high-level waste in the presence of molybdenum and iron. The optimum HDBP:Zr ratio is 9 for RE and TPE extraction and is 12.5 for Mo. IR spectra indicate formation of Zr(DBP)4(HDBP)4 complex as a base of solvation. HNO3 depresses RE and TPE extraction, while Mo extraction is characterised by a minimum at 2.5 mol/L HNO3. Presence of TBP in the solvent, independently of the used diluent, leads to reduction of the distribution coefficients, but ZS-HDBP extraction capacity for the above elements is increased, as well as solubility of their solvates. Two types of complexes M(DBP)3 and MNO3(DBP)2 are formed at RE and TPE extraction by ZS-HDBP in dilute TBP. Molybdenum extraction is based both on cation exchange and on Mo solvation with HDBP as a neutral ligand. Iron extraction is formally similar to that of Mo, being influenced by the latter if both metals are present in the solution.

  15. Interaction of Rydberg atoms in circular states with the alkaline-earth Ca(4s{sup 2}) and Sr(5s{sup 2}) atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mironchuk, E. S.; Narits, A. A.; Lebedev, V. S.

    2015-11-15

    The resonant mechanism of interaction of alkaline-earth atoms having a low electron affinity to Rydberg atoms in circular (l = vertical bar m vertical bar = n–1) and near-circular states has been studied. To describe the dynamics of resonant processes accompanied by nonadiabatic transitions between ionic and Rydberg covalent terms of a quasimolecule, an approach based on the integration of coupled equations for the probability amplitudes has been developed taking into account the possibility of the decay of an anion in the Coulomb field of the positive ionic core of a highly excited atom. The approach involves the specific features of the problem associated with the structure of the wavefunction of a Rydberg electron in states with high orbital angular momenta l ∼ n–1. This approach provides a much more accurate description of the dynamics of electronic transitions at collisions between atoms than that within the modified semiclassical Landau–Zener model. In addition, this approach makes it possible to effectively take into account many channels of the problem. The cross sections for resonant quenching of Rydberg states of the Li(nlm) atom with given principal n, orbital l = n–1, and magnetic m quantum numbers at thermal collisions with the Ca(4s{sup 2}) and Sr(5s{sup 2}) atoms have been calculated. The dependences of the results on n, m, and angle α between the relative velocity of the atoms and the normal to the plane of the orbit of the Rydberg electron have been obtained. The influence of orientational effects on the efficiency of the collisional destruction of circular and near-circular states has been studied. The results indicate a higher stability of such states to their perturbations by neutral particles as compared to usually studied nl states with low values of l (l ≪ n)

  16. Fullerene-C60 and crown ether doped on C60 sensors for high sensitive detection of alkali and alkaline earth cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghmarzi, Fatemeh Alipour; Zahedi, Mansour; Mola, Adeleh; Abedini, Saboora; Arshadi, Sattar; Ahmadzadeh, Saeed; Etminan, Nazanin; Younesi, Omran; Rahmanifar, Elham; Yoosefian, Mehdi

    2017-03-01

    Fullerenes are effective acceptor components with high electron affinity for charge transfer. The significant influences of chemical adsorption of the cations on the electrical sensitivity of pristine C60 and 15-(C2H4O)5/C60 nanocages could be the basis of new generation of electronic sensor design. The density functional theory calculation for alkali and alkaline earth cations detection by pristine C60 and 15-(C2H4O)5/C60 nanocages are considered at B3LYP level of theory with 6-31 G(d) basis set. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules analysis have been performed to understand the nature of intermolecular interactions between the cations and nanocages. Also, the natural bond orbital analysis have been performed to assess the intermolecular interactions in detail. Furthermore, the frontier molecular orbital, energy gap, work function, electronegativity, number of transferred electron (∆N), dipole moment as well as the related chemical hardness and softness are investigated and calculated in this study. The results show that the adsorption of cations (M=Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) are exothermic and the binding energy in pristine C60 nanocage and 15-(C2H4O)5/C60 increases with respect to the cations charge. The results also denote a decrease in the energy gap and an increase in the electrical conductivity upon the adsorption process. In order to validate the obtained results, the density of state calculations are employed and presented in the end as well.

  17. Unimolecular and hydrolysis channels for the detachment of water from microsolvated alkaline earth dication (Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+) clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2014-02-07

    We examine theoretically the three channels that are associated with the detachment of a single water molecule from the aqueous clusters of the alkaline earth dications, [M(H2O)n]2+, M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, n ≤ 6. These are the unimolecular water loss (M2+(H2O)n-1 + H2O) and the two hydrolysis channels resulting to the loss of hydronium ([MOH(H2O)n-2]+ + H3O+) and Zundel ([MOH(H2O)n-3]+ + H3O+(H2O)) cations. The Potential Energy Curves (PECs) corresponding to those three channels were constructed at the Møller-Plesset second order perturbation (MP2) level of theory with basis sets of double- and triple-ζ quality. We furthermore investigated the water and hydronium loss channels from the mono-hydroxide water clusters with up to four water molecules, [MOH(H2O)n]+, 1 ≤ n ≤ 4. Our results indicate the preference of the hydronium loss and possibly the Zundel cation loss channels for the smallest size clusters, whereas the unimolecular water loss channel is preferred for the larger ones as well as the mono-hydroxide clusters. Although the charge separation (hydronium and Zundel cation loss) channels produce more stable products when compared to the ones for the unimolecular water loss, they also require the surmounting of high energy barriers, a fact that makes the experimental observation of fragments related to these hydrolysis channels difficult.

  18. Absorption spectroscopy of heavy alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in rare gas matrices—CCSD(T) calculations and atomic site occupancies

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Barry M.; McCaffrey, John G.

    2016-01-28

    Isolation of the heavier alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in the solid rare gases (RGs) Ar, Kr, and Xe is analysed with absorption spectroscopy and interpreted partly with the assistance of ab initio calculations of the diatomic M ⋅ RG ground state interaction potentials. The y{sup 1}P←a{sup 1}S resonance transitions in the visible spectral region are used to compare the isolation conditions of these two metal atom systems and calcium. Complex absorption bands were recorded in all three metal atom systems even after extensive sample annealing. Coupled cluster calculations conducted on the ground states of the nine M ⋅ RG diatomics (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba; RG = Ar, Kr, and Xe) at the coupled cluster single, double, and non-iterative triple level of theory revealed long bond lengths (>5 Å) and shallow bound regions (<130 cm{sup −1}). All of the M ⋅ RG diatomics have bond lengths considerably longer than those of the rare gas dimers, with the consequence that isolation of these metal atoms in a single substitutional site of the solid rare gas is unlikely, with the possible exception of Ca/Xe. The luminescence of metal dimer bands has been recorded for Ba and Sr revealing very different behaviours. Resonance fluorescence with a lifetime of 15 ns is observed for the lowest energy transition of Sr{sub 2} while this transition is quenched in Ba{sub 2}. This behaviour is consistent with the absence of vibrational structure on the dimer absorption band in Ba{sub 2} indicating lifetime broadening arising from efficient relaxation to low-lying molecular states. More extensive 2D excitation-emission data recorded for the complex site structures present on the absorption bands of the atomic Ba and Sr systems will be presented in future publications.

  19. Absorption spectroscopy of heavy alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in rare gas matrices--CCSD(T) calculations and atomic site occupancies.

    PubMed

    Davis, Barry M; McCaffrey, John G

    2016-01-28

    Isolation of the heavier alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in the solid rare gases (RGs) Ar, Kr, and Xe is analysed with absorption spectroscopy and interpreted partly with the assistance of ab initio calculations of the diatomic M ⋅ RG ground state interaction potentials. The y(1)P ← a(1)S resonance transitions in the visible spectral region are used to compare the isolation conditions of these two metal atom systems and calcium. Complex absorption bands were recorded in all three metal atom systems even after extensive sample annealing. Coupled cluster calculations conducted on the ground states of the nine M ⋅ RG diatomics (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba; RG = Ar, Kr, and Xe) at the coupled cluster single, double, and non-iterative triple level of theory revealed long bond lengths (>5 Å) and shallow bound regions (<130 cm(-1)). All of the M ⋅ RG diatomics have bond lengths considerably longer than those of the rare gas dimers, with the consequence that isolation of these metal atoms in a single substitutional site of the solid rare gas is unlikely, with the possible exception of Ca/Xe. The luminescence of metal dimer bands has been recorded for Ba and Sr revealing very different behaviours. Resonance fluorescence with a lifetime of 15 ns is observed for the lowest energy transition of Sr2 while this transition is quenched in Ba2. This behaviour is consistent with the absence of vibrational structure on the dimer absorption band in Ba2 indicating lifetime broadening arising from efficient relaxation to low-lying molecular states. More extensive 2D excitation-emission data recorded for the complex site structures present on the absorption bands of the atomic Ba and Sr systems will be presented in future publications.

  20. Characterization of Surface and Bulk Nitrates of γ-Al2O3-Supported Alkaline Earth Oxides using Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Ge, Qingfeng; Kwak, Ja Hun; Kim, Do Heui; Verrier, Christelle M.; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2009-05-14

    “Surface" and "bulk" nitrates formed on a series of alkaline earth oxides (AEOs), AE(NO3)2, were investigated using first-principles density functional theory calculations. The formation of these surface and bulk nitrates was modeled by the adsorption of NO2+NO3 pairs on gamma-Al2O3-supported monomeric AEOs (MgO, CaO, SrO, and BaO) and on the extended AEO(001) surfaces, respectively. The calculated vibrational frequencies of the surface and bulk nitrates based on our proposed models are in good agreement with experimental measurements of AEO/gamma-Al2O3 materials after prolonged NO2 exposure. This indicates that experimentally observed "surface" nitrates are most likely formed with isolated two dimensional (including monomeric) AEO clusters on the gamma-Al2O3 substrate, while the "bulk" nitrates are formed on exposed (including (001)) surfaces (and likely in the bulk as well) of large three dimensional AEO particles supported on the gamma-Al2O3 substrate. Also in line with the experiments, our calculations show that the low and high frequency components of the vibrations for both surface and bulk nitrates are systematically red shifted with the increasing basicity and cationic size of the AEOs. The adsorption strengths of NO2+NO3 pairs are nearly the same for the series of alumina-supported monomeric AEOs, while the adsorption strengths of NO2+NO3 pairs on the AEO surfaces increase in the order of MgO < CaO < SrO ~ BaO. Compared to the NO2+NO3 pair that only interacts with monomeric AEOs, the stability of NO2+NO3 pairs that interact with both the monomeric AEO and the gamma-Al2O3 substrate is enhanced by about 0.5 eV. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  1. Alkaline Earth Metal Zirconate Perovskites MZrO3 (M=Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Ca(2+)) Derived from Molecular Precursors and Doped with Eu(3+) Ions.

    PubMed

    Drąg-Jarząbek, Anna; John, Łukasz; Petrus, Rafał; Kosińska-Klähn, Magdalena; Sobota, Piotr

    2016-03-24

    The effect of alkaline earth metal alkoxides on the protonation of zirconocene dichloride was investigated. This approach enabled the design of compounds with preset molecular structures for generating high-purity binary metal oxide perovskites MZrO3 (M=Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Ca(2+)). Single-source molecular precursors [Ba4 Zr2 (μ6 -O)(μ3 ,η(2)-OR)8 (OR)2(η(2) -HOR)2 (HOR)2 Cl4], [Sr4 Zr2 (μ6 -O)(μ3 ,η(2)-OR)8 (OR)2 (HOR)4 Cl4], [Ca4 Zr2 (μ6-O)(μ3 ,η(2)-OR)8 (OR)2 Cl4], and [Ca6 Zr2 (μ2 ,η(2)-OR)12 (μ-Cl)2 (η(2) -HOR)4 Cl6 ]⋅8 CH2 Cl2 were prepared via elimination of the cyclopentadienyl ring from Cp2 ZrCl2 as CpH in the presence of M(OR)2 and alcohol ROH (ROH=CH3OCH2 CH2OH) as a source of protons. The resulting complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR and NMR spectroscopy, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The compounds were then thermally decomposed to MCl2 /MZrO3 mixtures. Leaching of MCl2 from the raw powder with deionized water produced highly pure perovskite-like oxide particles of 40-80 nm in size. Luminescence studies on Eu(3+)-doped MZrO3 revealed that the perovskites are attractive host lattices for potential applications in display technology.

  2. Selective trans-membrane transport of alkali and alkaline earth cations through graphene oxide membranes based on cation-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengzhan; Zheng, Feng; Zhu, Miao; Song, Zhigong; Wang, Kunlin; Zhong, Minlin; Wu, Dehai; Little, Reginald B; Xu, Zhiping; Zhu, Hongwei

    2014-01-28

    Graphene and graphene oxide (G-O) have been demonstrated to be excellent filters for various gases and liquids, showing potential applications in areas such as molecular sieving and water desalination. In this paper, the selective trans-membrane transport properties of alkali and alkaline earth cations through a membrane composed of stacked and overlapped G-O sheets ("G-O membrane") are investigated. The thermodynamics of the ion transport process reveal that the competition between the generated thermal motions and the interactions of cations with the G-O sheets results in the different penetration behaviors to temperature variations for the considered cations (K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Ba(2+)). The interactions between the studied metal atoms and graphene are quantified by first-principles calculations based on the plane-wave-basis-set density functional theory (DFT) approach. The mechanism of the selective ion trans-membrane transportation is discussed further and found to be consistent with the concept of cation-π interactions involved in biological systems. The balance between cation-π interactions of the cations considered with the sp(2) clusters of G-O membranes and the desolvation effect of the ions is responsible for the selectivity of G-O membranes toward the penetration of different ions. These results help us better understand the ion transport process through G-O membranes, from which the possibility of modeling the ion transport behavior of cellular membrane using G-O can be discussed further. The selectivity toward different ions also makes G-O membrane a promising candidate in areas of membrane separations.

  3. Promoting alkali and alkaline-earth metals on MgO for enhancing CO2 capture by first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kiwoong; Han, Jeong Woo; Lee, Kwang Soon; Lee, Won Bo

    2014-12-07

    Developing next-generation solid sorbents to improve the economy of pre- and post-combustion carbon capture processes has been challenging for many researchers. Magnesium oxide (MgO) is a promising sorbent because of its moderate sorption-desorption temperature and low heat of sorption. However, its low sorption capacity and thermal instability need to be improved. Various metal-promoted MgO sorbents have been experimentally developed to enhance the CO2 sorption capacities. Nevertheless, rigorous computational studies to screen an optimal metal promoter have been limited to date. We conducted first-principles calculations to select metal promoters of MgO sorbents. Five alkali (Li-, Na-, K-, Rb-, and Cs-) and 4 alkaline earth metals (Be-, Ca-, Sr-, and Ba-) were chosen as a set of promoters. Compared with the CO2 adsorption energy on pure MgO, the adsorption energy on the metal-promoted MgO sorbents is higher, except for the Na-promoter, which indicates that metal promotion on MgO is an efficient approach to enhance the sorption capacities. Based on the stabilized binding of promoters on the MgO surface and the regenerability of sorbents, Li, Ca, and Sr were identified as adequate promoters among the 9 metals on the basis of PW91/GGA augmented with DFT+D2. The adsorption energies of CO2 on metal-promoted MgO sorbents for Li, Ca, and Sr atoms are -1.13, -1.68, and -1.48 eV, respectively.

  4. Observation of vapor pressure enhancement of rare-earth metal-halide salts in the temperature range relevant to metal-halide lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, J. J.; Henins, A.; Hardis, J. E.; Estupinan, E. G.; Lapatovich, W. P.; Shastri, S. D.

    2012-02-20

    Total vapor-phase densities of Dy in equilibrium with a DyI{sub 3}/InI condensate and Tm in equilibrium with a TmI{sub 3}/TlI condensate have been measured for temperatures between 900 K and 1400 K. The measurements show strong enhancements in rare-earth vapor densities compared to vapors in equilibrium with the pure rare-earth metal-halides. The measurements were made with x-ray induced fluorescence on the sector 1-ID beam line at the Advanced Photon Source. The temperature range and salt mixtures are relevant to the operation of metal-halide high-intensity discharge lamps.

  5. Usage of Dibutyl Phosphoric Acid and Its Zirconium Salt for Extraction of Transplutonium Elements and Rare Earths with Their Partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Zilberman, B.Ya.; Fedorov, Yu.S.; Shmidt, O.V.; Goletskiy, N.D.; Shishkin, D.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Rodionov, S.A.; Egorova, O.N.; Palenik, Yu.V.

    2007-07-01

    Dibutyl phosphoric acid (HDBP) formed by tributyl phosphate (TBP) destruction is soluble both in aqueous alkaline solutions and in organic solvents in acidic media. So, the solvent based on HDBP and its zirconium salt (ZS-HDBP) dissolved in polar diluent, e.g. in diluted TBP, is interesting for radwaste treatment, minimizing the amount of secondary organic wastes. Addition of Zr to 0.2 mol/L HDBP dissolved in 30% TBP results in successful extraction of lanthanides and actinides at the optimum ratio Zr:HDBP=1:(8-9) from 1.5 mol/L HNO{sub 3}, followed by their back-washing with 5 mol/L HNO{sub 3}. Partitioning of yttrium and cerium RE subgroups (the latter together with TPE) with the separation factor from 5 to 50 is also possible with purification from molybdenum. Strontium is extracted by 0.4 mol/L ZS HDBP from 0.3 mol/L HNO{sub 3} and stripped with 1.5 mol/L HNO{sub 3}. ZS-HDBP solution in 30% TBP is also capable of extraction of residual Np, Pu and corrosion-born iron. Stripping of these elements requires salt-free complexants. Solvents containing ZS-HDBP have high capacity, while TBP presence doubles it because of synergetic effect. The maximum solvent loading of 0.2 mol/L ZSHDBP in xylene was found as 8.0 g/L Eu and {approx}6 g/L Mo. The mixture of DTPA and formic acid is suitable for TPE/RE partitioning using ZS-HDBP as a solvent with separation factors for Ce/Am and Eu/Am of 67 and 9, respectively. Two variants of two-cycle flowsheet for TPE and RE partitioning after their joint recovery have been proposed, which differs by order of the cycles with acidic and buffer media at the partitioning. Both variants were successfully tested using simulate solutions on the centrifugal contactor rig with TPE/RE separation factor being {approx}60, the major impurity being Nd. Correction of the solvent composition because of HDBP loss due to its solubility in aqueous phase, especially at acidity less than 0.2 mol/L HNO{sub 3}, was also taken into consideration. Further

  6. Chloride-inducible transient apoplastic alkalinizations induce stomata closure by controlling abscisic acid distribution between leaf apoplast and guard cells in salt-stressed Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Geilfus, Christoph-Martin; Mithöfer, Axel; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Zörb, Christian; Muehling, Karl H

    2015-11-01

    Chloride stress causes the leaf apoplast transiently to alkalize, an event that is presumed to contribute to the ability of plants to adapt to saline conditions. However, the initiation of coordinated processes downstream of the alkalinization is unknown. We hypothesize that chloride-inducible pH dynamics are a key chemical feature modulating the compartmental distribution of abscisic acid (ABA) and, as a consequence, affecting stomata aperture. Apoplastic pH and stomata aperture dynamics in intact Vicia faba leaves were monitored by microscopy-based ratio imaging and porometric measurements of stomatal conductance. ABA concentrations in leaf apoplast and guard cells were compared with pH dynamics by gas-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid-chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results demonstrate that, upon chloride addition to roots, an alkalizing factor that initiates the pH dynamic propagates from root to leaf in a way similar to xylem-distributed water. In leaves, it induces a systemic transient apoplastic alkalinization that causes apoplastic ABA concentration to increase, followed by an elevation of endogenous guard cell ABA. We conclude that the transient alkalinization, which is a remote effect of chloride stress, modulates the compartmental distribution of ABA between the leaf apoplast and the guard cells and, in this way, is instrumental in inducing stomata closure during the beginning of salinity.

  7. Chemical composition of modern and fossil Hippopotamid teeth and implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions and enamel formation - Part 2: Alkaline earth elements as tracers of watershed hydrochemistry and provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brügmann, G.; Krause, J.; Brachert, T. C.; Stoll, B.; Weis, U.; Kullmer, O.; Ssemmanda, I.; Mertz, D. F.

    2012-03-01

    For reconstructing environmental change in terrestrial realms the geochemistry of fossil bioapatite in bones and teeth is among the most promising applications. This study demonstrates that alkaline earth elements in enamel of Hippopotamids, in particular Ba and Sr are tracers for water provenance and hydrochemistry. The studied specimens are molar teeth from Hippopotamids found in modern and fossil lacustrine settings of the Western Branch of the East African Rift system (Lake Kikorongo, Lake Albert, and Lake Malawi) and from modern fluvial environments of the Nile River. Concentrations in enamel vary by ca. two orders of magnitude for Ba (120-9336 μg g-1) as well as for Sr (9-2150 μg g-1). Concentration variations in enamel are partly induced during post-mortem alteration and during amelogenesis, but the major contribution originates from the variable water chemistry in the habitats of the Hippopotamids which is dominated by the lithologies and weathering processes in the watershed areas. Amelogenesis causes a distinct distribution of Ba and Sr in modern and fossil enamel, in that element concentrations increase along profiles from the outer rim towards the enamel-dentin junction by a factor of 1.3-1.5. These elements are well correlated with MgO and Na2O in single specimens, thus suggesting that their distribution is determined by a common, single process. Presuming that the shape of the tooth is established at the end of the secretion process and apatite composition is in equilibrium with the enamel fluid, the maturation process can be modeled by closed system Rayleigh crystallization. Enamel from many Hippopotamid specimens has Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca which are typical for herbivores, but the compositions extend well into the levels of plants and carnivores. Within enamel from single specimens these element ratios covary and provide a specific fingerprint of the Hippopotamid habitat. All specimens together, however, define subparallel trends with different Ba

  8. Chemical composition of modern and fossil hippopotamid teeth and implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions and enamel formation - Part 2: Alkaline earth elements as tracers of watershed hydrochemistry and provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brügmann, G.; Krause, J.; Brachert, T. C.; Stoll, B.; Weis, U.; Kullmer, O.; Ssemmanda, I.; Mertz, D. F.

    2012-11-01

    This study demonstrates that alkaline earth elements in enamel of hippopotamids, in particular Ba and Sr, are tracers for water provenance and hydrochemistry in terrestrial settings. The studied specimens are permanent premolar and molar teeth found in modern and fossil lacustrine sediments of the Western Branch of the East African Rift system (Lake Kikorongo, Lake Albert, and Lake Malawi) and from modern fluvial environments of the Nile River. Concentrations in enamel vary by two orders of magnitude for Ba (120-9336 μg g-1) as well as for Sr (9-2150 μg g-1). The variations are partially induced during post-mortem alteration and during amelogenesis, but the major contribution originates ultimately from the variable water chemistry in the habitats of the hippopotamids which is controlled by the lithologies and weathering processes in the watershed areas. Amelogenesis causes a distinct distribution of MgO, Ba and Sr in modern and fossil enamel, in that element concentrations increase along profiles from the outer rim towards the enamel-dentin junction by a factor of 1.3-1.9. These elements are well correlated in single specimens, thus suggesting that their distribution is determined by a common, single process, which can be described by closed system Rayleigh crystallization of bioapatite in vivo. Enamel from most hippopotamid specimens has Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca which are typical for herbivores. However, Ba/Sr ranges from 0.1 to 3 and varies on spatial and temporal scales. Thus, Sr concentrations and Ba/Sr in enamel differentiate between habitats having basaltic mantle rocks or Archean crustal rocks as the ultimate sources of Sr and Ba. This provenance signal is modulated by climate change. In Miocene to Pleistocene enamel from the Lake Albert region, Ba/Sr decreases systematically with time from 2 to 0.5. This trend can be correlated with changes in climate from humid to arid, in vegetation from C3 to C4 biomass as well as with increasing evaporation of the lake water

  9. Charge Compensation in RE3+ (RE = Eu, Gd) and M+ (M = Li, Na, K) Co-Doped Alkaline Earth Nanofluorides Obtained by Microwave Reaction with Reactive Ionic Liquids Leading to Improved Optical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lorbeer, C; Behrends, F; Cybinska, J; Eckert, H; Mudring, Anja -V

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline earth fluorides are extraordinarily promising host matrices for phosphor materials with regard to rare earth doping. In particular, quantum cutting materials, which might considerably enhance the efficiency of mercury-free fluorescent lamps or SC solar cells, are often based on rare earth containing crystalline fluorides such as NaGdF4, GdF3 or LaF3. Substituting most of the precious rare earth ions and simultaneously retaining the efficiency of the phosphor is a major goal. Alkaline earth fluoride nanoparticles doped with trivalent lanthanide ions (which are required for the quantum cutting phenomenon) were prepared via a microwave assisted method in ionic liquids. As doping trivalent ions into a host with divalent cations requires charge compensation, this effect was thoroughly studied by powder X-ray and electron diffraction, luminescence spectroscopy and 23Na, 139La and 19F solid state NMR spectroscopy. Monovalent alkali ions were codoped with the trivalent lanthanide ions to relieve stress and achieve a better crystallinity and higher quantum cutting abilities of the prepared material. 19F-magic angle spinning (MAS)-NMR-spectra, assisted by 19F{23Na} rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) studies, reveal distinct local fluoride environments, the populations of which are discussed in relation to spatial distribution and clustering models. In the co-doped samples, fluoride species having both Na+ and La3+ ions within their coordination sphere can be identified and quantified. This interplay of mono- and trivalent ions in the CaF2 lattice appears to be an efficient charge compensation mechanism that allows for improved performance characteristics of such co-doped phosphor materials.

  10. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  11. Electrolytic recycling of a carbonate salt in a process with a dissolution of spent nuclear fuel in a strong alkaline carbonate media

    SciTech Connect

    Kwang-Wook Kim; In-Tae Kim; Seong-Min Kim; Yeon-Hwa Kim; Eil-Hee Lee; Kwang-Yong Jee

    2007-07-01

    A removal of only uranium from spent nuclear fuel with the concepts of a high proliferation-resistance and a minimal generation of waste is helpful for a spent fuel management in view of a volume reduction of the high level radioactive waste generated from the spent fuel treatment. That can be accomplished by a process using a selective oxidative dissolution of the spent fuel in a carbonate solution of high alkalinity. In this work, an electrolytic method for a de-carbonation and a recovery of CO{sub 2} for recycling the used carbonate solution contaminated with some impurity metal ions generated in such a process with a concept of zero-release of waste solution was studied. A carbonate solution generated from such a system was confirmed to be completely recycled within the system, while the impurity ions being separated from the carbonate solution. (authors)

  12. Separation of rare earths from transition metals by liquid-liquid extraction from a molten salt hydrate to an ionic liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Rout, Alok; Binnemans, Koen

    2014-02-28

    The solvent extraction of trivalent rare-earth ions and their separation from divalent transition metal ions using molten salt hydrates as the feed phase and an undiluted fluorine-free ionic liquid as the extracting phase were investigated in detail. The extractant was tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate, [A336][NO3], and the hydrated melt was calcium nitrate tetrahydrate, Ca(NO3)2·4H2O. The extraction behavior of rare-earth ions was studied for solutions of individual elements, as well as for mixtures of rare earths in the hydrated melt. The influence of different extraction parameters was investigated: the initial metal loading in the feed phase, percentage of water in the feed solution, equilibration time, and the type of hydrated melt. The extraction of rare earths from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O was compared with extraction from CaCl2·4H2O by [A336][Cl] (Aliquat 336). The nitrate system was found to be the better one. The extraction and separation of rare earths from the transition metals nickel, cobalt and zinc were also investigated. Remarkably high separation factors of rare-earth ions over transition metal ions were observed for extraction from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O by the [A336][NO3] extracting phase. Furthermore, rare-earth ions could be separated efficiently from transition metal ions, even in melts with very high concentrations of transition metal ions. Rare-earth oxides could be directly dissolved in the Ca(NO3)2·4H2O phase in the presence of small amounts of Al(NO3)3·9H2O or concentrated nitric acid. The efficiency of extraction after dissolving the rare-earth oxides in the hydrated nitrate melt was identical to extraction from solutions with rare-earth nitrates dissolved in the molten phase. The stripping of the rare-earth ions from the loaded ionic liquid phase and the reuse of the recycled ionic liquid were also investigated in detail.

  13. Topography of the Flattest Surface on Earth: using ICESAT, GPS, and MISR to Measure Salt Surface Topography on Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, Robert L.; Bills, Bruce G.

    2004-01-01

    Salt flats are aptly named: they are composed largely of salt, and are maintained as nearly equipotential surfaces via frequent flooding. The salar de Uyuni, on the Altiplano in southwestern Bolivia, is the largest salt flat on Earth, with an area of 9,800 sq km. Except for a few bedrock islands, it has less than 40 cm of relief. The upper-most salt unit averages 5 m thick and contains 50 cu km of nearly pure halite. It includes most of the salt that was in solution in paleolake Minchin, which attained a maximum area of 60,000 sq km and a maximum depth of 150 m, roughly 15 kyr ago. Despite approx. 10 m of differential isostatic rebound since deposition, the salar surface has been actively maintained as an extraordinarily flat and smooth surface by annual flooding during the rainy season. We have used the strong optical absorption properties of water in the visible band to map spatial variations in water depth during a time when the salar was flooded. As water depth increases, the initially pure white surface appears both darker and bluer. We utilized MISR images taken during the interval from April to November 2001. The red and infra-red bands (672 and 867 nm wavelength) were most useful since the water depth is small and the absorption at those wavelengths is quite strong. Nadir pointed MISR images have 275 m spatial resolution. To aid in our evaluation of water depth variations over the saiar surface, we utilized two sources of direct topographic measurements: several ICESAT altimetry tracks cross the area, and a 40x50 km GPS grid was surveyed to calibrate ICESAT. A difficulty in using these data types is that both give salt surface elevations relative to the ellipsoid, whereas the water surface will, in the absence of wind or tidal disturbances, follow an equipotential surface. Geoid height is not known to the required accuracy of a few cm in the central Andes. As a result, before comparing optical absorption from MISR to salt surface topography from GPS or

  14. First-principles study of fission product (Xe, Cs, Sr) incorporation and segregation in alkaline earth metal oxides, HfO2, and MgO-HfO2 interface

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiang-yang; Uberuaga, Blas P; Sickafus, Kurt E

    2008-01-01

    In order to close the nuclear fuel cycle, advanced concepts for separating out fission products are necessary. One approach is to use a dispersion fuel form in which a fissile core is surrounded by an inert matrix that captures and immobilizes the fission products from the core. If this inert matrix can be easily separated from the fuel, via e.g. solution chemistry, the fission products can be separated from the fissile material. We examine a surrogate dispersion fuel composition, in which hafnia (HfO{sub 2}) is a surrogate for the fissile core and alkaline earth metal oxides are used as the inert matrix. The questions of fission product incorporation in these oxides and possible segregation behavior at interfaces are considered. Density functional theory based calculations for fission product elements (Xe, Sr, and Cs) in these oxides are carried out. We find smaller incorporation energy in hafnia than in MgO for Cs and Sr, and Xe if variation of charge state is allowed. We also find that this trend is reversed or reduced for alkaline earth metal oxides with large cation sizes. Model interfacial calculations show a strong tendency of segregation from bulk MgO to MgO-HfO{sub 2} interfaces.

  15. Influences of alkaline earth metal substitution on the crystal structure and physical properties of magnetic RuSr1.9A0.1GdCu2O8 (A = Ca, Sr, and Ba) superconductors.

    PubMed

    Hur, Su Gil; Park, Dae Hoon; Hwang, Seong-Ju; Kim, Seung Joo; Lee, J H; Lee, Sang Young

    2005-11-24

    We have investigated the effect of alkaline earth metal substitution on the crystal structure and physical properties of magnetic superconductors RuSr(1.9)A(0.1)GdCu(2)O(8) (A = Ca, Sr, and Ba) in order to probe an interaction between the magnetic coupling of the RuO(2) layer and the superconductivity of the CuO(2) layer. X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses demonstrate that the isovalent substitution of Sr ions with Ca or Ba ions makes it possible to tune the interlayer distance between the CuO(2) and the RuO(2) layers. From the measurements of electrical resistance and magnetic susceptibility, it was found that, in contrast to negligible change of magnetization, both of the alkaline earth metal substitutions lead to a notable depression of zero-resistance temperature T(c) (DeltaT(c) approximately 17-19 K). On the basis of the absence of a systematic correlation between the T(c) and the interlayer distance/magnetization, we have concluded that the internal magnetic field of the RuO(2) layer has insignificant influence on the superconducting property of the CuO(2) layer in the ruthenocuprate.

  16. Detergent-, solvent- and salt-compatible thermoactive alkaline serine protease from halotolerant alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. NPST-AK15: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Abdelnasser S S; Al-Salamah, Ali A; El-Badawi, Yahya B; El-Tayeb, Mohamed A; Antranikian, Garabed

    2015-09-01

    Alkaline protease produced by the halotolerant alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. strain NPST-AK15 was purified to homogeneity by the combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation, anion-exchange and gel permeation chromatography. The purified enzyme was a monomeric protein with an estimated molecular weight of 32 kDa. NPST-AK15 protease was highly active and stable over a wide pH range, with a maximal activity at pH 10.5. The enzyme showed optimum activity at 60 °C and was stable at 30-50 °C for at least 1 h. Thermal stability of the purified protease was substantially improved by CaCl2 (1.1- to 6.6-fold). The K m, V max and k cat values for the enzyme were 2.5 mg ml(-1), 42.5 µM min(-1) mg(-1), and 392.46 × 10(3) min(-1), respectively. NPST-AK15 protease activity was strongly inhibited by PMSF, suggesting that the enzyme is a serine protease. The enzyme was highly stable in NaCl up to 20 % (w/v). Moreover, the purified enzyme was stable in several organic solvents such as diethyl ether, benzene, toluene, and chloroform. In addition, it showed high stability and compatibility with a wide range of surfactants and commercial detergents and was slightly activated by hydrogen peroxide. These features of NPST-AK15 protease make this enzyme a promising candidate for application in the laundry and pharmaceutical industries.

  17. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy.

  18. A chronoamperometric screen printed carbon biosensor based on alkaline phosphatase inhibition for W(IV) determination in water, using 2-phospho-L-ascorbic acid trisodium salt as a substrate.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Gámez, Ana Lorena; Alonso-Lomillo, María Asunción; Domínguez-Renedo, Olga; Arcos-Martínez, María Julia

    2015-01-22

    This paper presents a chronoamperometric method to determine tungsten in water using screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with gold nanoparticles and cross linked alkaline phosphatase immobilized in the working electrode. Enzymatic activity over 2-phospho-l-ascorbic acid trisodium salt, used as substrate, was affected by tungsten ions, which resulted in a decrease of chronoamperometric current, when a potential of 200 mV was applied on 10 mM of substrate in a Tris HCl buffer pH 8.00 and 0.36 M of KCl. Calibration curves for the electrochemical method validation, give a reproducibility of 5.2% (n = 3), a repeatability of 9.4% (n = 3) and a detection limit of 0.29 ± 0.01 µM. Enriched tap water, purified laboratory water and bottled drinking water, with a certified tungsten reference solution traceable to NIST, gave a recovery of 97.1%, 99.1% and 99.1% respectively (n = 4 in each case) and a dynamic range from 0.6 to 30 µM. This study was performed by means of a Lineweaver-Burk plot, showing a mixed kinetic inhibition.

  19. A Chronoamperometric Screen Printed Carbon Biosensor Based on Alkaline Phosphatase Inhibition for W(VI) Determination in Water, Using 2-Phospho-l-Ascorbic Acid Trisodium Salt as a Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Gámez, Ana Lorena; Alonso-Lomillo, María Asunción; Domínguez-Renedo, Olga; Arcos-Martínez, María Julia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a chronoamperometric method to determine tungsten in water using screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with gold nanoparticles and cross linked alkaline phosphatase immobilized in the working electrode. Enzymatic activity over 2-phospho-l-ascorbic acid trisodium salt, used as substrate, was affected by tungsten ions, which resulted in a decrease of chronoamperometric current, when a potential of 200 mV was applied on 10 mM of substrate in a Tris HCl buffer pH 8.00 and 0.36 M of KCl. Calibration curves for the electrochemical method validation, give a reproducibility of 5.2% (n = 3), a repeatability of 9.4% (n = 3) and a detection limit of 0.29 ± 0.01 μM. Enriched tap water, purified laboratory water and bottled drinking water, with a certified tungsten reference solution traceable to NIST, gave a recovery of 97.1%, 99.1% and 99.1% respectively (n = 4 in each case) and a dynamic range from 0.6 to 30 μM. This study was performed by means of a Lineweaver–Burk plot, showing a mixed kinetic inhibition. PMID:25621602

  20. Regulation of body fluid and salt homeostasis--from observations in space to new concepts on Earth.

    PubMed

    Gerzer, R; Heer, M

    2005-08-01

    The present manuscript summarizes recent discoveries that were made by studying salt and fluid homeostasis in weightlessness. These data indicate that 1. atrial natriuretic peptide appears not to play an important role in natriuresis in physiology, 2. the distribution of body fluids appears to be tightly coupled with hunger and thirst regulation, 3. intrathoracic pressure may be an important co-regulator of body fluid homeostasis, 4. a so far unknown low-affinity, high capacity osmotically inactive sodium storage mechanism appears to be present in humans that is acting through sodium/hydrogen exchange on glycosaminoglycans and might explain the pathophysiology, e.g., of salt sensitive hypertension. The surprising and unexpected data underline that weightlessness is an excellent tool to investigate the physiology of our human body: If we knew it, we should be able to predict changes that occur when gravity is absent. But, as data from space demonstrate, we do not.

  1. A set of alkali and alkaline-earth coordination polymers based on the ligand 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl) acetic acid: Effects the radius of metal ions on structures and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jin-Hua; Tang, Gui-Mei; Qin, Ting-Xiao; Yan, Shi-Chen; Wang, Yong-Tao; Cui, Yue-Zhi; Weng Ng, Seik

    2014-11-15

    Four new metal coordination complexes, namely, [Na(BTA)]{sub n} (1), [K{sub 2}(BTA){sub 2}(μ{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (2), and [M(BTA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} (M=Ca(II) and Sr(II) for 3 and 4, respectively) [BTA=2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl) acetic anion], have been obtained under hydrothermal condition, by reacting the different alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydroxides with HBTA. Complexes 1–4 were structurally characterized by X-ray single-crystal diffraction, EA, IR, PXRD, and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). These complexes display low-dimensional features displaying various two-dimensional (2D) and one-dimensional (1D) coordination motifs. Complex 1 displays a 2D layer with the thickness of 1.5 nm and possesses a topologic structure of a 11 nodal net with Schläfli symbol of (3{sup 18}). Complex 2 also shows a thick 2D sheet and its topologic structure is a 9 nodes with Schläfli symbol of (3{sup 11}×4{sup 2}). Complexes 3 and 4 possess a 1D linear chain and further stack via hydrogen bonding interactions to generate a three-dimensional supramolecular architecture. These results suggest that both the coordination preferences of the metal ions and the versatile nature of this flexible ligand play a critical role in the final structures. The luminescent spectra show strong emission intensities in complexes 1–4, which display violet photoluminescence. Additionally, ferroelectric, dielectric and nonlinear optic (NLO) second-harmonic generation (SHG) properties of 2 are discussed in detail. - Graphical abstract: A set of alkali and alkaline-earth metal coordination polymers were hydrothermally synthesized by 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)acetic acid, displaying interesting topologic motifs from two-dimension to one-dimension and specific physical properties. - Highlights: • Alkali and alkaline-earth metal coordination polymers have been obtained. • The ligand 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)acetic acid has been adopted. • The two-dimensional and one

  2. Topography of the Flattest Surface on Earth: Using ICESAT, GPS, and MISR to Measure Salt Surface Morphology on Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comstock, R. L.; Bills, B. G.

    2004-12-01

    Salt flats are aptly named: they are composed largely of salt, and are maintained as nearly equipotential surfaces via frequent flooding. The salar de Uyuni, on the Altiplano in southwestern Bolivia, is the largest salt flat on Earth, with an area of 9,800 km2. Except for a few bedrock islands, it has less than 40 cm of relief. The upper-most salt unit averages 5 m thick and contains 50 km3 of nearly pure halite. It includes most of the salt that was in solution in paleolake Minchin, which attained a maximum area of 60,000 km2 and a maximum depth of 150 m, roughly 15 kyr ago. Despite ~10 m of differential isostatic rebound since deposition, the salar surface has been actively maintained as an extraordinarily flat and smooth surface by annual flooding during the rainy season. We have used the strong optical absorption properties of water in the visible band to map spatial variations in water depth during a time when the salar was flooded. As water depth increases, the initially pure white surface appears both darker and bluer. We utilized MISR images taken during the interval from April to November 2001. The red and infra-red bands (672 and 867 nm wavelength) were most useful since the water depth is small and the absorption at those wavelengths is quite strong. Nadir pointed MISR images have 275 m spatial resolution. Optical absorption of water has been used previously for bathymetric mapping, but usually in much deeper water. Our application was particularly well suited to obtaining high accuracy results, since the water clarity is high, the substrate reflectivity is high and quite uniform, and we can measure it directly when the surface water is gone. To aid in our evaluation of water depth variations over the salar surface, we utilized two sources of direct topographic measurements: several ICESAT altimetry tracks cross the area, and a 40 x 50 km GPS grid was surveyed to calibrate ICESAT. A difficulty in using these data types is that both give salt surface

  3. Alkaline battery, separator therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An improved battery separator for alkaline battery cells has low resistance to electrolyte ion transfer and high resistance to electrode ion transfer. The separator is formed by applying an improved coating to an electrolyte absorber. The absorber, preferably, is a flexible, fibrous, and porous substrate that is resistant to strong alkali and oxidation. The coating composition includes an admixture of a polymeric binder, a hydrolyzable polymeric ester and inert fillers. The coating composition is substantially free of reactive fillers and plasticizers commonly employed as porosity promoting agents in separator coatings. When the separator is immersed in electrolyte, the polymeric ester of the film coating reacts with the electrolyte forming a salt and an alcohol. The alcohol goes into solution with the electrolyte while the salt imbibes electrolyte into the coating composition. When the salt is formed, it expands the polymeric chains of the binder to provide a film coating substantially permeable to electrolyte ion transfer but relatively impermeable to electrode ion transfer during use.

  4. Effect of alkaline earth oxides on the physical and spectroscopic properties of Dy3+- doped Li2O-B2O3 glasses for white emitting material application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshad, L.; Rooh, G.; Kirdsiri, K.; Srisittipokakun, N.; Damdee, B.; Kim, H. J.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2017-02-01

    Li2O-MO-B2O3:0.5Dy2O3 glasses mixed with four different alkaline earth modifier oxides MgO, CaO, SrO and BaO were synthesized by melt quench technique. Their physical properties like density, molar volume and refractive index were measured at room temperature and the effect of alkaline earth modifier oxides were studied. Also, optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra of these glasses have been acquired at room temperature. The Judd-Ofelt theory was effectively used to characterize these spectra and spectral intensities (ƒcal), Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters (Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6) and certain radiative properties have been determined. Radiative life-times (τR), branching ratios (βcal), and emission cross-sections (σp) and optical gain parameters (σp × τR) were calculated from the Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters and the variation in these parameters with the variation of glass matrix are discussed. Yellow/Blue (Y/B) ratio and chromacity color coordinates (x,y) are calculated from the emission spectra which indicates the white light generation from all the investigated samples. The correlated color temperature (CCT) for the studied glasses is found to be 4418 K. The fluorescence decay time (τexp) of the 4F9/2 level of Dy3+ has been measured from the decay profiles and compared with calculated lifetimes (τcal). Among all the studied glass matrices, the glass containing BaO exhibits high value of branching ratio, large emission cross-section and high optical gain parameter for 6F9/2 → 6H13 at 575 nm. The results indicates the suitability of all the studied glasses for laser action and white light generation.

  5. High-temperature molten salt thermal energy storage systems for solar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petri, R. J.; Claar, T. D.

    1980-01-01

    Alkali and alkaline earth carbonate latent-heat storage salts, metallic containment materials, and thermal conductivity enhancement materials were investigated to satisfy the high temperature (704 to 871 C) thermal energy storage requirements of advanced solar-thermal power generation concepts are described. Properties of the following six salts selected for compatibility studies are given: three pure carbonates, K2CO3, Li2CO3 and Na2CO3; two eutectic mixtures, BaCO3/Na2CO3 and K2CO3/NaCO3, and one off-eutectic mixture of Na2CO3/K2CO3.

  6. High-temperature molten salt thermal energy storage systems for solar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, R. J.; Claar, T. D.

    1980-03-01

    Alkali and alkaline earth carbonate latent-heat storage salts, metallic containment materials, and thermal conductivity enhancement materials were investigated to satisfy the high temperature (704 to 871 C) thermal energy storage requirements of advanced solar-thermal power generation concepts are described. Properties of the following six salts selected for compatibility studies are given: three pure carbonates, K2CO3, Li2CO3 and Na2CO3; two eutectic mixtures, BaCO3/Na2CO3 and K2CO3/NaCO3, and one off-eutectic mixture of Na2CO3/K2CO3.

  7. Enrichment of rare earth elements as environmental tracers of contamination by acid mine drainage in salt marshes: a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Joaquín; Pérez-López, Rafael; Galván, Laura; Nieto, José Miguel; Boski, Tomasz

    2012-09-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) were analyzed in surface sediments from the Guadiana Estuary (SW Iberian Pyrite Belt). NASC (North American Shale Composite) normalized REE patterns show clearly convex curvatures in middle-REE (MREE) with respect to light- and heavy-REE, indicating acid-mixing processes between fluvial waters affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) and seawater. However, REE distributions in the mouth (closer to the coastal area) show slightly LREE-enriched and flat patterns, indicating saline-mixing processes typical of the coastal zone. NASC-normalized ratios (La/Gd and La/Yb) do not discriminate between both mixing processes in the estuary. Instead, a new parameter (E(MREE)) has been applied to measure the curvature in the MREE segment. The values of E(MREE)>0 are indicative of acid signatures and their spatial distribution reveal the existence of two decantation zones from flocculation processes related to drought periods and flood events. Studying REE fractionation through the E(MREE) may serve as a good proxy for AMD-pollution in estuarine environments in relation to the traditional methods.

  8. Effect of hygroscopicity of the metal salt on the formation and air stability of lyotropic liquid crystalline mesophases in hydrated salt-surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Cemal; Barım, Gözde; Dag, Ömer

    2014-11-01

    It is known that alkali, transition metal and lanthanide salts can form lyotropic liquid crystalline (LLC) mesophases with non-ionic surfactants (such as CiH2i+1(OCH2CH2)jOH, denoted as CiEj). Here we combine several salt systems and show that the percent deliquescence relative humidity (%DRH) value of a salt is the determining parameter in the formation and stability of the mesophases and that the other parameters are secondary and less significant. Accordingly, salts can be divided into 3 categories: Type I salts (such as LiCl, LiBr, LiI, LiNO3, LiClO4, CaCl2, Ca(NO3)2, MgCl2, and some transition metal nitrates) have low %DRH and form stable salt-surfactant LLC mesophases in the presence of a small amount of water, type II salts (such as some sodium and potassium salts) that are moderately hygroscopic form disordered stable mesophases, and type III salts that have high %DRH values, do not form stable LLC mesophases and leach out salt crystals. To illustrate this effect, a large group of salts from alkali and alkaline earth metals were investigated using XRD, POM, FTIR, and Raman techniques. Among the different salts investigated in this study, the LiX (where X is Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), NO3(-), and ClO4(-)) and CaX2 (X is Cl(-), and NO3(-)) salts were more prone to establish LLC mesophases because of their lower %DRH values. The phase behavior with respect to concentration, stability, and thermal behavior of Li(I) systems were investigated further. It is seen that the phase transitions among different anions in the Li(I) systems follow the Hofmeister series.

  9. Vapor-liquid partitioning of alkaline earth and transition metals in NaCl-dominated hydrothermal fluids: An experimental study from 360 to 465 °C, near-critical to halite saturated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pester, Nicholas J.; Ding, Kang; Seyfried, William E.

    2015-11-01

    Multi-phase fluid flow is a common occurrence in magmatic hydrothermal systems; and extensive modeling efforts using currently established P-V-T-x properties of the NaCl-H2O system are impending. We have therefore performed hydrothermal flow experiments (360-465 °C) to observe vapor-liquid partitioning of alkaline earth and first row transition metals in NaCl-dominated source solutions. The data allow extraction of partition coefficients related to the intrinsic changes in both chlorinity and density along the two-phase solvus. The coefficients yield an overall decrease in vapor affinity in the order Cu(I) > Na > Fe(II) > Zn > Ni(II) ⩾ Mg ⩾ Mn(II) > Co(II) > Ca > Sr > Ba, distinguished with 95% confidence for vapor densities greater than ∼0.2 g/cm3. The alkaline earth metals are limited to purely electrostatic interactions with Cl ligands, resulting in an excellent linear correlation (R2 > 0.99) between their partition coefficients and respective ionic radii. Though broadly consistent with this relationship, relative behavior of the transition metals is not well resolved, being likely obscured by complex bonding processes and the potential participation of Na in the formation of tetra-chloro species. At lower densities (at/near halite saturation) partitioning behavior of all metals becomes highly non-linear, where M/Cl ratios in the vapor begin to increase despite continued decreases in chlorinity and density. We refer to this phenomenon as "volatility", which is broadly associated with substantial increases in the HCl/NaCl ratio (eventually to >1) due to hydrolysis of NaCl. Some transition metals (e.g., Fe, Zn) exhibit volatility prior to halite stability, suggesting a potential shift in vapor speciation relative to nearer critical regions of the vapor-liquid solvus. The chemistry of deep-sea hydrothermal fluids appears affected by this process during magmatic events, however, our results do not support suggestions of subseafloor halite precipitation

  10. Synthesis, crystal and band structures, and optical properties of a new lanthanide-alkaline earth tellurium(IV) oxide: La{sub 2}Ba(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Hailong; Kong Fang; Mao Jianggao

    2007-05-15

    A new quaternary lanthanide alkaline-earth tellurium(IV) oxide, La{sub 2}Ba(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2}, has been prepared by the solid-state reaction and structurally characterized. The compound crystallizes in monoclinic space group C2/c with a=19.119(3), b=5.9923(5), c=13.2970(19) A, {beta}=107.646(8){sup o}, V=1451.7(3) A{sup 3} and Z=4. La{sub 2}Ba(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2} features a 3D network structure in which the cationic [La{sub 2}Ba(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 4+} layers are cross-linked by Te{sub 3}O{sub 8} {sup 4-} anions. Both band structure calculation by the DFT method and optical diffuse reflectance spectrum measurements indicate that La{sub 2}Ba(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2} is a wide band-gap semiconductor. - Graphical abstract: A new quaternary lanthanide alkaline-earth tellurium(IV) oxide, La{sub 2}Ba(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2}, has been prepared by the solid-state reaction and structurally characterized. The structure of La{sub 2}Ba(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2} is 3D network in which the cationic [La{sub 2}Ba(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 4+} layers are cross-linked by Te{sub 3}O{sub 8} {sup 4-} anions. Both band structure calculation by the DFT method and optical diffuse reflectance spectrum measurements indicate that La{sub 2}Ba(Te{sub 3}O{sub 8})(TeO{sub 3}){sub 2} is a wide band-gap semiconductor.

  11. Salt tectonics on Venus

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, C.A.; Amsbury, D.

    1986-05-01

    The discovery of a surprisingly high deuterium/hydrogen ratio on Venus immediately led to the speculation that Venus may have once had a volume of surface water comparable to that of the terrestrial oceans. The authors propose that the evaporation of this putative ocean may have yielded residual salt deposits that formed various terrain features depicted in Venera 15 and 16 radar images. By analogy with models for the total evaporation of the terrestrial oceans, evaporite deposits on Venus should be at least tens to hundreds of meters thick. From photogeologic evidence and in-situ chemical analyses, it appears that the salt plains were later buried by lava flows. On Earth, salt diapirism leads to the formation of salt domes, anticlines, and elongated salt intrusions - features having dimensions of roughly 1 to 100 km. Due to the rapid erosion of salt by water, surface evaporite landforms are only common in dry regions such as the Zagros Mountains of Iran, where salt plugs and glaciers exist. Venus is far drier than Iran; extruded salt should be preserved, although the high surface temperature (470/sup 0/C) would probably stimulate rapid salt flow. Venus possesses a variety of circular landforms, tens to hundreds of kilometers wide, which could be either megasalt domes or salt intrusions colonizing impact craters. Additionally, arcurate bands seen in the Maxwell area of Venus could be salt intrusions formed in a region of tectonic stress. These large structures may not be salt features; nonetheless, salt features should exist on Venus.

  12. Removal of plutonium and americium from alkaline waste solutions

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Wallace W.

    1979-01-01

    High salt content, alkaline waste solutions containing plutonium and americium are contacted with a sodium titanate compound to effect removal of the plutonium and americium from the alkaline waste solution onto the sodium titanate and provide an effluent having a radiation level of less than 10 nCi per gram alpha emitters.

  13. Eu(2+)-Activated Alkaline-Earth Halophosphates, M5(PO4)3X:Eu(2+) (M = Ca, Sr, Ba; X = F, Cl, Br) for NUV-LEDs: Site-Selective Crystal Field Effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyeon; Kim, Sung-Chul; Bae, Jong-Seong; Kim, Sungyun; Kim, Seung-Joo; Park, Jung-Chul

    2016-09-06

    Eu(2+)-activated M5(PO4)3X (M = Ca, Sr, Ba; X = F, Cl, Br) compounds providing different alkaline-earth metal and halide ions were successfully synthesized and characterized. The emission peak maxima of the M5(PO4)3Cl:Eu(2+) (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) compounds were blue-shifted from Ca to Ba (454 nm for Ca, 444 nm for Sr, and 434 nm for Ba), and those of the Sr5(PO4)3X:Eu(2+) (X = F, Cl, Br) compounds were red-shifted along the series of halides, F → Cl → Br (437 nm for F, 444 nm for Cl, and 448 nm for Br). The site selectivity and occupancy of the activator ions (Eu(2+)) in the M5(PO4)3X:Eu(2+) (M = Ca, Sr, Ba; X = F, Cl, Br) crystal lattices were estimated based on theoretical calculation of the 5d → 4f transition energies of Eu(2+) using LCAO. In combination with the photoluminescence measurements and theoretical calculation, it was elucidated that the Eu(2+) ions preferably enter the fully oxygen-coordinated sites in the M5(PO4)3X:Eu(2+) (M = Ca, Sr, Ba; X = F, Cl, Br) compounds. This trend can be well explained by "Pauling's rules". These compounds may provide a platform for modeling a new phosphor and application in the solid-state lighting field.

  14. Hydrothermal synthesis and crystal structure of two new hydrated alkaline earth metal borates Sr3B6O11(OH)2 and Ba3B6O11(OH)2.

    PubMed

    Heyward, Carla; McMillen, Colin; Kolis, Joseph

    2012-04-02

    Two new hydrated borates Sr(3)B(6)O(11)(OH)(2) (1) and Ba(3)B(6)O(11)(OH)(2) (2) were hydrothermally synthesized. Their structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and further characterized by IR, powder XRD, and DSC/TGA. Compound 1 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P-1 with unit cell parameters of a = 6.6275(13) Å, b = 6.6706(13) Å, c = 11.393(2) Å, α = 91.06(3)°, β = 94.50(3)°, and γ = 93.12(3)°, while compound 2 crystallizes in the noncentrosymmetric monoclinic space group Pc with a = 6.958(14) Å, b = 7.024(14) Å, c = 11.346(2) Å, and β = 90.10(3)°. In spite of the differences in symmetry and packing of the borate chains, both structures consist of the same fundamental building block (FBB) of a [B(6)O(11)(OH)(2)](-6) unit and three unique alkaline earth metal atoms.

  15. Spin-Spin Interactions in the Oxides A(3)M'MO(6) (M = Rh, Ir; A = Ca, Sr; M' = Alkaline Earth, Zn, Cd, Na) of the K(4)CdCl(6) Structure Type Examined by Electronic Structure Calculations.

    PubMed

    Lee, K.-S.; Koo, H.-J.; Whangbo, M.-H.

    1999-05-03

    The oxides A(3)M'MO(6) (M = Rh, Ir; A = Ca, Sr; M' = alkaline earth, Zn, Cd) of the K(4)CdCl(6) structure type consist of isolated (MO(6))(8)(-) octahedral anions and exhibit an antiferromagnetic ordering at low temperatures. The spin-spin interactions in these oxides, Ca(3)NaMO(6) (M = Ir, Ru), and Sr(3)NaRuO(6) were examined by calculating how strongly the t(2g)-block levels of adjacent (MO(6))((6+)(n)()())(-) (n = 1, 2) anions interact in the presence and absence of the intervening cations A(2+) and M' (n)()(+) (n = 1, 2). Our calculations show that the spin-spin interactions in these oxides are three-dimensional, and the superexchange interactions occur mainly through the short intrachain and interchain M-O.O-M linkages. When the M(n)()(+) cation is very small compared with the A(2+) cation, the intrachain interaction is substantially stronger than the interchain interaction. The opposite is found when the sizes of the M(n)()(+) and A(2+) cations become similar.

  16. Binding to Redox-Inactive Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metal Ions Strongly Deactivates the C-H Bonds of Tertiary Amides toward Hydrogen Atom Transfer to Reactive Oxygen Centered Radicals.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Michela; Carboni, Giulia; Mangiacapra, Livia; Bietti, Massimo

    2015-09-18

    The effect of alkali and alkaline earth metal ions on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) with N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) was studied by laser flash photolysis. In acetonitrile, a >2 order of magnitude decrease in the rate constant for hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the C-H bonds of these substrates (kH) was measured after addition of Li(+). This behavior was explained in terms of a strong interaction between Li(+) and the oxygen atom of both DMF and DMA that increases the extent of positive charge on the amide, leading to C-H bond deactivation toward HAT to the electrophilic radical CumO(•). Similar effects were observed after addition of Ca(2+), which was shown to strongly bind up to four equivalents of the amide substrates. With Mg(2+), weak C-H deactivation was observed for the first two substrate equivalents followed by stronger deactivation for two additional equivalents. No C-H deactivation was observed in DMSO after addition of Li(+) and Mg(2+). These results point toward the important role played by metal ion Lewis acidity and solvent Lewis basicity, indicating that C-H deactivation can be modulated by varying the nature of the metal cation and solvent and allowing for careful control over the HAT reactivity of amide substrates.

  17. Effect of high-energy electron irradiation in an electron microscope column on fluorides of alkaline earth elements (CaF2, SrF2, and BaF2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaichik, V. I.; Sobolev, B. P.; Zaporozhets, M. A.; Avilov, A. S.

    2012-03-01

    The effect of high-energy (150 eV) electron irradiation in an electron microscope column on crystals of fluorides of alkaline earth elements CaF2, SrF2, and BaF2 is studied. During structural investigations by electron diffraction and electron microscopy, the electron irradiation causes chemical changes in MF2 crystals such as the desorption of fluorine and the accumulation of oxygen in the irradiated area with the formation of oxide MO. The fluorine desorption rate increases significantly when the electron-beam density exceeds the threshold value of ˜2 × 103 pA/cm2). In BaF2 samples, the transformation of BaO into Ba(OH)2 was observed when irradiation stopped. The renewal of irradiation is accompanied by the inverse transformation of Ba(OH)2 into BaO. In the initial stage of irradiation of all MF2 compounds, the oxide phase is in the single-crystal state with a lattice highly matched with the MF2 matrix. When the irradiation dose is increased, the oxide phase passes to the polycrystalline phase. Gaseous products of MF2 destruction (in the form of bubbles several nanometers in diameter) form a rectangular array with a period of ˜20 nm in the sample.

  18. Vibronic transitions in the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, Rb) - alkaline-earth-metal (Ca, Sr) series: A systematic analysis of de-excitation mechanisms based on the graphical mapping of Frank-Condon integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pototschnig, Johann V.; Meyer, Ralf; Hauser, Andreas W.; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2017-02-01

    Research on ultracold molecules has seen a growing interest recently in the context of high-resolution spectroscopy and quantum computation. After forming weakly bound molecules from atoms in cold collisions, the preparation of molecules in low vibrational levels of the ground state is experimentally challenging, and typically achieved by population transfer using excited electronic states. Accurate potential energy surfaces are needed for a correct description of processes such as the coherent de-excitation from the highest and therefore weakly bound vibrational levels in the electronic ground state via couplings to electronically excited states. This paper is dedicated to the vibrational analysis of potentially relevant electronically excited states in the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, Rb)- alkaline-earth metal (Ca,Sr) diatomic series. Graphical maps of Frank-Condon overlap integrals are presented for all molecules of the group. By comparison to overlap graphics produced for idealized potential surfaces, we judge the usability of the selected states for future experiments on laser-enhanced molecular formation from mixtures of quantum degenerate gases.

  19. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  20. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  1. Salt Weathering on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagoutz, E.

    2006-12-01

    Large well rounded boulders and angular rock fragments characterizes the Martian landscape as seen on the recent excellent quality photos. Analyzing the different rock-shapes indicates a time sequence of emplacement, fragmentation and transport of different rocks on Mars, which might give interesting insight into transport and weathering processes. Larger commonly well rounded boulders were emplaced onto gravel plains. After emplacement, these rocks were fragmented and disassembled. Nests of angular rock fragments are marking the locations of preexisting larger rocks. Frequently it is possible to reconstruct larger rounded rocks from smaller angular fragments. In other cases transport after fragmentation obscured the relationship of the fragments. However, a strewn field of fragments is still reminiscent of the preexisting rock. Mechanical salt weathering could be a plausible explanation for the insitu fragmentation of larger rounded blocks into angular fragments. Impact or secondary air fall induced fragmentation produces very different patterns, as observed around impact crates on Earth. Salt weathering of rocks is a common process in terrestrial environments. Salt crystallization in capillaries causes fragmentation of rocks, irrespective of the process of salt transportation and concentration. On Earth significant salt weathering can be observed in different climatic environments: in the transition zone of alluvial aprons and salt playas in desserts and in dry valleys of Antarctica. In terrestrial semi-arid areas the salt is transported by salt solution, which is progressively concentrated by evaporation. In Antarctic dry valleys freeze-thaw cycles causes salt transportation and crystallization resulting in rock fragmentation. This salt induced process can lead to complete destruction of rocks and converts rocks to fine sand. The efficient breakdown of rocks is dominating the landscape in some dry valleys of the Earth but possibly also on Mars. (Malin, 1974

  2. Alkali-metal/alkaline-earth-metal fluorine beryllium borate NaSr3Be3B3O9F4 with large nonlinear optical properties in the deep-ultraviolet region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshak, A. H.; Huang, Hongwei; Kamarudin, H.; Auluck, S.

    2015-02-01

    The linear optical response and second harmonic generation (SHG) in alkali-metal/alkaline-earth-metal fluorine beryllium borate NaSr3Be3B3O9F4 are investigated by means of density functional theory. Calculations are performed using four types of exchange correlations: Ceperley-Alder local density approximation, Perdew Burke and Ernzerhof general gradient approximation, Engel-Vosko generalized gradient approximation, and the recently modified Becke-Johnson potential (mBJ). The mBJ approach brings the calculated band gap (7.20 eV) in excellent agreement with the experimental one (7.28 eV). The calculated values of the uniaxial anisotropy δɛ=-0.076 and the birefringence Δn (0 ) =0.052 indicate considerable anisotropy in the linear optical properties, which makes it favorable for the second harmonic generation. The dominant component of the second harmonic generation is χ111(2)(ω) . The value of |χ111(2)(ω) | is about 1.2 pm/V at λ = 1064 nm in agreement with previous calculations. To analyze the origin of the high SHG of NaSr3Be3B3O9F4 single crystals, we have correlated the features of |χ111(2)(ω) | spectra with the features of ɛ2(ω) spectra as a function of ω/2 and ω. From the calculated dominant component |χ111(2)(ω) | , we find that the microscopic first hyperpolarizability, β111 , the vector components along the dipole moment direction is 0.5 × 10-30 esu at static limit and 0.6 × 10-30 esu at λ = 1064 nm.

  3. The influence of different alkaline earth oxides on the structural and optical properties of undoped, Ce-doped, Sm-doped, and Sm/Ce co-doped lithium alumino-phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, H. A.; Arzumanyan, G. M.; Möncke, D.

    2016-12-01

    Undoped, singly Sm doped, Ce doped, and Sm/Ce co-doped lithium alumino-phosphate glasses with different alkaline earth modifiers were prepared by melt quenching. The structure of the prepared glasses was investigated by FT-IR and Raman, as well as by optical spectroscopy. The effect of the optical basicity of the host glass matrix on the added active dopants was studied, as was the effect doping had on the phosphate structural units. The optical edge shifts toward higher wavelengths with an increase in the optical basicity due to the increased polarizability of the glass matrix, but also with increasing CeO2 concentration as a result of Ce3+/Ce4+ inter valence charge transfer (IV-CT) absorption. The optical band gap for direct and indirect allowed transitions was calculated for the undoped glasses. The glass sample containing Mg2+ modifier ions is found to have the highest value (4.16 eV) for the optical band gap while Ba2+ has the lowest value (3.61 eV). The change in the optical band gap arises from the structural changes and the overall polarizability (optical basicity). Refractive index, molar refractivity Rm and molar polarizability αm values increase with increasing optical basicity of the glasses. The characteristic absorption peaks of Sm3+ were also investigated. For Sm/Ce co-doped glasses, especially at high concentration of CeO2, the absorption of Ce3+ hinders the high energy absorption of Sm3+ and this effect becomes more obvious with increasing optical basicity.

  4. Fast Pyrolysis of Poplar Using a Captive Sample Reactor: Effects of Inorganic Salts on Primary Pyrolysis Products

    SciTech Connect

    Mukarakate, C.; Robichaud, D.; Donohoe, B.; Jarvis, M.; Mino, K.; Bahng, M. K.; Nimlos, M.

    2012-01-01

    We have constructed a captive sample reactor (CSR) to study fast pyrolysis of biomass. The reactor uses a stainless steel wire mesh to surround biomass materials with an isothermal environment by independent controlling of heating rates and pyrolysis temperatures. The vapors produced during pyrolysis are immediately entrained and transported in He carrier gas to a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS). Formation of secondary products is minimized by rapidly quenching the sample support with liquid nitrogen. A range of alkali and alkaline earth metal (AAEM) and transition metal salts were tested to study their effect on composition of primary pyrolysis products. Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) analysis of the MBMS data shows that transition metal salts enhance pyrolysis of carbohydrates and AAEM salts enhances pyrolysis of lignin. This was supported by performing similar separate studies on cellulose, hemicellulose and extracted lignin. The effect of salts on char formation is also discussed.

  5. Positron elastic scattering from alkaline earth targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveda, Luis A.; Assafrão, Denise; Mohallem, José R.

    2016-07-01

    A previously reported model potential approach [Poveda et al., Phys. Rev. A 87, 052702 (2013)] was extended to study low energy positron elastic scattering from beryllium and magnesium. The cross sections were computed for energies ranging from 10-5 eV up to well above the positronium formation threshold. The present results are in good agreement with previous reports, including the prediction of a p-wave resonance in the cross section for magnesium. The emergence of this shape resonance is connected to a trend observed in the evolution of the partial wave cross section in going from Be to Mg target. This trend lead us to speculate that a sharp d-wave resonance should be observed in positron elastic scattering from calcium. The positron-target binding energies are investigated in detail, both using the scattering information and by direct computation of the bound state energies using the model potentials. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2016-70120-y

  6. Alkaline earth stannates: The next silicon?

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab Ahn, Charles H.; Walker, Frederick J.; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Rabe, Karin M.

    2015-06-01

    Semiconductor materials are being used in an increasingly diverse array of applications, with new device concepts being proposed each year for solar cells, flat-panel displays, sensors, memory, and spin transport. This rapid progress of invention outpaces the development of new semiconductor materials with the required properties and performance. In many applications, high carrier mobility at room temperature is required in addition to specific functional properties critical to the device concept. We review recent developments on high mobility stannate perovskite oxide materials and devices.

  7. Electrical Resistivity of Alkaline Earth Elements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    and Alloys ," Volume 12 of Thermophysical Properties of Matter - The TPRC Data Series, Plenum Press, New York, 1440 pp., 1975. (T80643) 2. Matthiessen, A...1964. (E17556) 48. Seth, R. S. and Woods, S. B., "Electrical Resistivity and Deviations from Matthiessen’s Rule in Dilute Alloys of Aluminum , Cadmium...Resistance of Dilute Magnesium and Aluminum Alloys at Low Temperature," Can. J. of Phys. 38(3), 376-84, 1960. (E14737) 57. Schofield, F. H., "The

  8. PARAMAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF THE ALKALINE EARTH FLUORIDES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    constants for Mn(2+) in CaF2 and SrF2 were measured over the temperature range 77 to 850K. In both cases the magnitude of the hyperfine coupling constant...decreases with increasing temperature; and the temperature dependance is stronger for SrF2 . The results have been interpreted using the Simanek-Orbach theory of a phonon-induced hyperfine field. (Author)

  9. Absorption Coefficient of Alkaline Earth Halides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    levels . As a natural consequence, the magnitude of the absorption coefficient is the key parameter in selecting laser window materials. Over the past...of as can be achieved through improved crystal growing techniques and surface polishing. 2.5. Urbach’s Rule A central question for the development of...high absorption levels , inaccuracies progressively increasing with decreasing absorption level , a natural consequence of decreasing in instrumental

  10. New alkaline earth-zirconium oxalates M2Zr(C 2O 4) 4· nH 2O ( M=Ba, Sr, Ca) synthesis, crystal structure and thermal behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapelet-Arab, B.; Nowogrocki, G.; Abraham, F.; Grandjean, S.

    2004-11-01

    Three new alkaline earth-zirconium oxalates M2Zr(C 2O 4) 4· nH 2O have been synthesized by precipitation methods for M=Ba, Sr, Ca. For each compound the crystal structure was determined from single crystals obtained by controlled diffusion of M 2+ and Zr 4+ ions through silica gel containing oxalic acid. Ba 2Zr(C 2O 4) 4·7H 2O, monoclinic, space group C2/c, a=9.830(2), b=29.019(6), c=9.178(2) Å, β=122.248(4) °, V=2214.2(8) Å, Z=4, R=0.0427; Sr 2Zr(C 2O 4) 4·11H 2O, tetragonal, space group I41/acd, a=16.139(4), c=18.247(6) Å, V=4753(2) Å,Z=8, R=0.0403; Ca 2Zr(C 2O 4) 4·5H 2O, orthorhombic, space group Pna2 1, a=8.4181(5), b=15.8885(8), c=15.8885(8) Å, V=2125(2) Å, Z=4, R=0.0622. The structures of the three compounds consist of chains of edge-shared MO 6(H 2O) x ( x=2 or 3) polyhedra connected to ZrO 8 polyhedra through oxalate groups. Depending on the arrangement of chains, the ZrO 8 polyhedron geometry (dodecahedron or square antiprism) and the connectivity, two types of three-dimensional frameworks are obtained. For the smallest M2+ cations (Sr 2+, Ca 2+), large tunnels are obtained, running down the c direction of the unit cell, which can accommodate zeolitic water molecules. For the largest Ba 2+ cation, the second framework is formed and is closely related to that of Pb 2Zr(C 2O 4) 4· nH 2O. The decomposition at 800°C into strontium carbonate, barium carbonate or calcium oxide and MZrO 3 ( M=Sr, Ba, Ca) perovskite is reported from thermal analyses studies and high temperature X-ray powder diffraction.

  11. New alkaline earth-zirconium oxalates M{sub 2}Zr(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 4}.nH{sub 2}O (M=Ba, Sr, Ca) synthesis, crystal structure and thermal behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Chapelet-Arab, B.; Abraham, F. . E-mail: francis.abraham@ensc-lille.fr; Grandjean, S.

    2004-11-01

    Three new alkaline earth-zirconium oxalates M{sub 2}Zr(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 4}.nH{sub 2}O have been synthesized by precipitation methods for M=Ba, Sr, Ca. For each compound the crystal structure was determined from single crystals obtained by controlled diffusion of M{sup 2+} and Zr{sup 4+} ions through silica gel containing oxalic acid. Ba{sub 2}Zr(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 4}.7H{sub 2}O, monoclinic, space group C2/c, a=9.830(2), b=29.019(6), c=9.178(2)A, {beta}=122.248(4){sup o}, V=2214.2(8)A3, Z=4, R=0.0427; Sr{sub 2}Zr(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 4}.11H{sub 2}O, tetragonal, space group I41/acd, a=16.139(4), c=18.247(6)A, V=4753(2)A3, Z=8, R=0.0403; Ca{sub 2}Zr(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O, orthorhombic, space group Pna2{sub 1}, a=8.4181(5), b=15.8885(8), c=15.8885(8)A, V=2125(2)A3, Z=4, R=0.0622. The structures of the three compounds consist of chains of edge-shared MO{sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub x} (x=2 or 3) polyhedra connected to ZrO{sub 8} polyhedra through oxalate groups. Depending on the arrangement of chains, the ZrO{sub 8} polyhedron geometry (dodecahedron or square antiprism) and the connectivity, two types of three-dimensional frameworks are obtained. For the smallest M{sup 2+} cations (Sr{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}), large tunnels are obtained, running down the c direction of the unit cell, which can accommodate zeolitic water molecules. For the largest Ba{sup 2+} cation, the second framework is formed and is closely related to that of Pb{sub 2}Zr(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 4}.nH{sub 2}O. The decomposition at 800{sup o}C into strontium carbonate, barium carbonate or calcium oxide and MZrO{sub 3} (M=Sr, Ba, Ca) perovskite is reported from thermal analyses studies and high temperature X-ray powder diffraction.

  12. Evaluation of p-phenylenediamine, o-phenylphenol sodium salt, and 2,4-diaminotoluene in the rat comet assay as part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiated international validation study of in vivo rat alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Marlies; van der Leede, Bas-jan; De Vlieger, Kathleen; Geys, Helena; Vynckier, An; Van Gompel, Jacky

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiated international validation study of in vivo rat alkaline comet assay (comet assay), p-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (PPD), o-phenylphenol sodium salt (OPP), and 2,4-diaminotoluene (2,4-DAT), were analyzed in this laboratory as coded test chemicals. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (7-9 weeks of age) were given three oral doses of the test compounds, 24 and 21 h apart and liver and stomach were sampled 3h after the final dose administration. Under the conditions of the test, no increases in DNA damage were observed in liver and stomach with PPD and OPP up to 100 and 1000 mg/kg/day, respectively. 2,4-DAT, a known genotoxic carcinogen, induced a weak but reproducible, dose-related and statistically significant increase in DNA damage in liver cells while no increases were observed in stomach cells.

  13. IR spectroscopy of aqueous alkali halide solutions: Pure salt-solvated water spectra and hydration numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Jean-Joseph; Chapados, Camille

    2001-08-01

    Extrapolation techniques were used to obtain pure salt-solvated water spectra from the attenuated total reflection infrared spectra (ATR-IR) of aqueous solutions of the nine alkali halide salts LiCl, NaCl, KCl, CsCl, NaBr, KBr, NaI, KI, and CsI and the alkaline-earth chloride salt MgCl2. These salts ionize completely in water. The ions by themselves do not absorb in the IR, but their interactions with water can be observed and analyzed. A pure salt-solvated water spectrum is easier to analyze than that of a combined solution of pure water and salt-solvated water. Although the salt-solvated water spectra examined have distinctive signatures, they can be classified in three categories: those similar to NaCl; those not similar to NaCl; and MgCl2, in a class by itself. Each of the pure salt-solvated water spectra differs from that of liquid water, though the number of bands is the same. From the Gaussian band fitting, we found that the positions of the bands were fairly constant, whereas their intensities differed. The salt hydration numbers were determined: for NaCl, KCl, NaBr, KBr, and CsI solutions it is 5; for KI and MgCL2 it is 4; for NaI it is 3.5; for CsCl it is 3; and for LiCl it is 2. From these results we found that each pair of ions (monoatomic ions) of the ten salt solutions studied are close bound and form a complex in a cluster organization with a fixed number of water molecules.

  14. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  15. Salt weathering on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagoutz, E.

    Large well rounded boulders and angular rock fragments characterizes the Martian landscape as seen on the recent excellent quality photos. Analyzing the different rock-shapes indicates a time sequence of emplacement, fragmentation and transport of different rocks on Mars, which might give interesting insight into transport and weathering processes. Larger commonly well rounded boulders were emplaced onto gravel plains. After emplacement, these rocks were fragmented and disassembled. Nests of angular rock fragments are marking the locations of preexisting larger rocks. Frequently it is possible to reconstruct larger rounded rocks from smaller angular fragments. In other cases transport after fragmentation obscured the relationship of the fragments. However, a strewn field of fragments is still reminiscent of the preexisting rock. Mechanical salt weathering could be a plausible explanation for the insitu fragmentation of larger rounded blocks into angular fragments. Impact or secondary air fall induced fragmentation produces very different patterns, as observed around impact crates on Earth. Salt weathering of rocks is a common process in terrestrial environments. Salt crystallization in capillaries causes fragmentation of rocks, irrespective of the process of salt transportation and concentration. On Earth significant salt weathering can be observed in different climatic environments: in the transition zone of alluvial aprons and salt playas in desserts and in dry valleys of Antarctica. In terrestrial semi-arid areas the salt is transported by salt solution, which is progressively concentrated by evaporation. In Antarctic dry valleys freeze-thaw cycles causes salt transportation and crystallization resulting in rock fragmentation. This salt induced process can lead to complete destruction of rocks and converts rocks to fine sand. The efficient breakdown of rocks is dominating the landscape in some dry valleys of the Earth but possibly also on Mars. (Malin, 1974

  16. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    DOEpatents

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  17. Solution-derived sodalite made with Si- and Ge-ethoxide precursors for immobilizing electrorefiner salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Brian J.; Lepry, William C.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorosodalite has the general form of Na8(AlSiO4)6Cl2 and this paper describes experiments conducted to synthesize sodalite with a solution-based approach to immobilize a simulated spent electrorefiner salt solution containing a mixture of alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide chlorides. The reactants used were the salt solution, NaAlO2, and either Si(OC2H5)4 or Ge(OC2H5)4. Additionally, seven different glass sintering aids (at loadings of 5 mass%) were evaluated as sintering aids for consolidating the as-made powders using a cold-press-and-sinter technique. This process of using alkoxide additives for the Group IV component can be used to produce large quantities of sodalite at near-room temperature as compared to a method where colloidal silica was used as the silica source. However, the small particle sizes inhibited densification during heat treatments.

  18. Solution-derived sodalite made with Si- and Ge-ethoxide precursors for immobilizing electrorefiner salt

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Lepry, William C.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorosodalite has the general form of Na8(AlSiO4)6Cl2 and this paper describes experiments conducted to synthesize sodalite to immobilize a mixed chloride salt using solution-based techniques. Sodalites were made using different Group IV contributions from either Si(OC2H5)4 or Ge(OC2H5)4, NaAlO2, and a simulated spent electrorefiner salt solution containing a mixture of alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide chlorides. Additionally, 6 glass binders at low loadings of 5 mass% were evaluated as sintering aids for the consolidation process. The approach of using the organic Group IV additives can be used to produce large quantities of sodalite at room temperature and shows promise over a method where colloidal silica is used as the silica source. However, the small particle sizes inhibited densification during pressure-less sintering.

  19. New rare earth metal complexes with nitrogen-rich ligands: 5,5'-bitetrazolate and 1,3-bis(tetrazol-5-yl)triazenate-on the borderline between coordination and the formation of salt-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Eulgem, Patrick J; Klein, Axel; Maggiarosa, Nicola; Naumann, Dieter; Pohl, Roland W H

    2008-01-01

    From the two nitrogen-rich ligands BT(2-) (BT=5,5'-bitetrazole) and BTT(3-) (BTT=1,3-bis(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)triazene), a series of novel rare earth metal complexes were synthesised. For the BT ligand, a vast number of these complexes could be structurally characterised by single-crystal XRD, revealing structures ranging from discrete molecular aggregates to salt-like compounds. The isomorphous complexes [La2(BT)3]14 H2O (1) and [Ce2(BT)3]14 H2O (2) reveal discrete molecules in which one BT(2-) acts as a bridging ligand and two BT groups as chelating ligands. The complexes, [M(BT)(H2O)7]2[BT] x (x) H2O (3-5), (M=Nd (3), Sm (4), and Eu (5)), are also isomorphous and consist of [M(BT)(H2O)7]+ ions in which only one BT(2-) acts as a chelate ligand for each metal centre. [Tb(H2O)8]2[BT]3 x H2O (6) and [Er(H2O)8](2)[BT](3)x H2O (7) are salt-like compounds that do not exhibit any significant metal-nitrogen contacts. In the BTT-samarium compound 9, discrete molecules were found in which BTT(3-) acts as a tridentate ligand with three Sm--N bonds.

  20. Glutathione-coordinated [2Fe-2S] cluster is stabilized by intramolecular salt bridges.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingwei; Pearson, Stephen A; Fenk, Kevin D; Cowan, J A

    2015-12-01

    Halide salts of alkali and alkaline earth metals were used to probe the contributions of intramolecular salt bridge formation on the stability of glutathione-coordinated [2Fe-2S] cluster toward hydrolysis. The effect of ionic strength on cluster stability was quantitatively investigated by application of Debye-Hückel theory to the rates of hydrolysis. Results from this study demonstrate that ionic strength influences the stability of the cluster, with the rate of cluster degradation depending on the charge density, hydrated ionic radius, and hydration energy. The identity of the salt ions was also observed to be correlated with the binding affinity toward the cluster. Based on the modified Debye-Hückel equation and counterion screening effect, these results suggest that interactions between glutathione molecules in the [2Fe-2S](GS)4 cluster is via salt bridges, in agreement with our previous results where modifications of glutathione carboxylates and amines prevented solution aggregation and cluster formation. These results not only provide a rationale for the stability of such clusters under physiological conditions, but also suggest that the formation of glutathione-complexed [2Fe-2S] cluster from a glutathione tetramer may be facilitated by salt bridge interactions between glutathione molecules prior to cluster assembly, in a manner consistent with Nature's equivalent of dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

  1. Candidate waste forms for immobilisation of waste chloride salt from pyroprocessing of spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, E. R.; Davis, J.; Olufson, K.; Chironi, I.; Karatchevtseva, I.; Farnan, I.

    2012-01-01

    Sodalite/glass bodies prepared by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) at ˜850 °C/100 MPa are candidates for immobilising fission product-bearing waste KCl-LiCl pyroprocessing salts. To study the capacity of sodalite to structurally incorporate such pyroprocessing salts, K, Li, Cs, Sr, Ba and La were individually targeted for substitution in a Na site in sodalite (Na vacancies targeted as charge compensators for alkaline and rare earths) and studied by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy after sintering in the range of 800-1000 °C. K and Li appeared to enter the sodalite, but Cs, Sr and Ba formed aluminosilicate phases and La formed an oxyapatite phase. However these non-sodalite phases have reasonable resistance to water leaching. Pure chlorapatite gives superior leach resistance to sodalite, and alkalis, alkaline and rare earth ions are generally known to enter chlorapatite, but attempts to incorporate simulated waste salt formulations into HIPed chlorapatite-based preparations or to substitute Cs alone into the structure of Ca-based chlorapatite were not successful on the basis of scanning electron microscopy. The materials exhibited severe water leachability, mainly in regard to Cs release. Attempts to substitute Cs into Ba- and Sr-based chlorapatites also did not look encouraging. Consequently the use of apatite alone to retain fission product-bearing waste pyroprocessing salts from electrolytic nuclear fuel reprocessing is problematical, but chlorapatite glass-ceramics may be feasible, albeit with reduced waste loadings. Spodiosite, Ca 2(PO 4)Cl, does not appear to be suitable for incorporation of Cl-bearing waste containing fission products.

  2. Catalytic Gasification of Coal using Eutectic Salt Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Atul Sheth; Pradeep Agrawal; Yaw D. Yeboah.

    1998-12-04

    The objectives of this study are to: identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process. A review of the collected literature was carried out. The catalysts which have been used for gasification can be roughly classified under the following five groups: alkali metal salts; alkaline earth metal oxides and salts; mineral substances or ash in coal; transition metals and their oxides and salts; and eutectic salt mixtures. Studies involving the use of gasification catalysts have been conducted. However, most of the studies focused on the application of individual catalysts. Only two publications have reported the study of gasification of coal char in CO2 and steam catalyzed by eutectic salt mixture catalysts. By using the eutectic mixtures of salts that show good activity as individual compounds, the gasification temperature can be reduced possibly with still better activity and gasification rates due to improved dispersion of the molten catalyst on the coal particles. For similar metal/carbon atomic ratios, eutectic catalysts were found to be consistently more active than their respective single salts. But the exact roles that the eutectic salt mixtures play in these are not well understood and details of the mechanisms remain unclear. The effects of the surface property of coals and the application methods of eutectic salt mixture catalysts with coal chars on the reactivity of gasification will be studied. Based on our preliminary evaluation of the literature, a ternary

  3. Alkaline flooding injection strategy

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to improved alkali-surfactant flooding methods, and this includes determining the proper design of injection strategy. Several different injection strategies have been used or suggested for recovering heavy oils with surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding methods. Oil recovery was compared for four different injection strategies: (1) surfactant followed by polymer, (2) surfactant followed by alkaline polymer, (3) alkaline surfactant followed by polymer, and (4) alkali, surfactant, and polymer mixed in a single formulation. The effect of alkaline preflush was also studied under two different conditions. All of the oil recovery experiments were conducted under optimal conditions with a viscous, non-acidic oil from Hepler (KS) oil field. The coreflood experiments were conducted with Berea sandstone cores since field core was not available in sufficient quantity for coreflood tests. The Tucker sand of Hepler field is a Class I fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir, as classified by the Department of Energy, which has been selected as the site of a DOE-sponsored field pilot test.

  4. Biosorption of metal and salt tolerant microbial isolates from a former uranium mining area. Their impact on changes in rare earth element patterns in acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Haferburg, Götz; Merten, Dirk; Büchel, Georg; Kothe, Erika

    2007-12-01

    The concentration of metals in microbial habitats influenced by mining operations can reach enormous values. Worldwide, much emphasis is placed on the research of resistance and biosorptive capacities of microorganisms suitable for bioremediation purposes. Using a collection of isolates from a former uranium mining area in Eastern Thuringia, Germany, this study presents three Gram-positive bacterial strains with distinct metal tolerances. These strains were identified as members of the genera Bacillus, Micrococcus and Streptomyces. Acid mine drainage (AMD) originating from the same mining area is characterized by high metal concentrations of a broad range of elements and a very low pH. AMD was analyzed and used as incubation solution. The sorption of rare earth elements (REE), aluminum, cobalt, copper, manganese, nickel, strontium, and uranium through selected strains was studied during a time course of four weeks. Biosorption was investigated after one hour, one week and four weeks by analyzing the concentrations of metals in supernatant and biomass. Additionally, dead biomass was investigated after four weeks of incubation. The maximum of metal removal was reached after one week. Up to 80% of both Al and Cu, and more than 60% of U was shown to be removed from the solution. High concentrations of metals could be bound to the biomass, as for example 2.2 mg/g U. The strains could survive four weeks of incubation. Distinct and different patterns of rare earth elements of the inoculated and non-inoculated AMD water were observed. Changes in REE patterns hint at different binding types of heavy metals regarding incubation time and metabolic activity of the cells.

  5. Alkaline phosphatase of Physarum polycephalum is insoluble.

    PubMed

    Furuhashi, Kiyoshi

    2008-02-01

    The plasmodia of Physarum polycephalum grow as multinucleated cells in the presence of sufficient humidity and nutriment. Under non-illuminating conditions, stresses such as low temperature or high concentrations of salts transform the plasmodia into spherules whereas dehydration induces sclerotization. Some phosphatases including protein phosphatase and acid phosphatase have been purified from the plasmodia, but alkaline phosphatase remains to be elucidated. Phosphatase of the plasmodia, spherules and sclerotia was visualized by electrophoresis gel-staining assay using 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate. Insoluble fractions of the sclerotia were abundant in phosphatase activity. The phosphatase which was extracted by nonionic detergent was subjected to column chromatography and preparative electrophoresis. Purified phosphatase showed the highest activity at pH 8.8, indicating that this enzyme belongs to alkaline phosphatase. The apparent molecular mass from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under non-reducing condition was estimated to be 100 kDa whereas that under reducing was 105 kDa. An amount of 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate or 0.5 M NaCl had no effects on the activity although the phosphatase showed heat instability, Mg(2+)-dependency and sensitivity to 2-glycerophosphate or NaF. The extracting conditions and enzymatic properties suggest that this alkaline phosphatase which is in a membrane-bound form plays important roles in phosphate metabolism.

  6. Nitrogen isotope evidence for alkaline lakes on late Archean continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüeken, E. E.; Buick, R.; Schauer, A. J.

    2015-02-01

    Nitrogen isotope ratios in ancient sedimentary rocks are generally interpreted as a proxy for metabolic nitrogen pathways and the redox state of the water column. Fractionation processes occurring under anoxic, alkaline conditions during the dissociation of NH4+ to H+ and volatile NH3 are frequently overlooked, although this mechanism imparts large isotopic fractionations. Here we propose that NH3 volatilization is largely responsible for δ15N values of up to + 50 ‰ at high C/N ratios in the late Archean Tumbiana Formation. This sequence of sedimentary rocks represents a system of lakes that formed on subaerial flood basalts and were partly filled by basaltic volcanic ash. Aqueous alteration of volcanic glass followed by evaporative concentration of ions should have led to the development of high alkalinity with a pH of 9 or higher, as in modern analogues. In this sedimentologically unusual setting, nitrogen isotope ratios thus provide indirect evidence for the oldest alkaline lake system in the rock record. These very heavy lacustrine δ15N values contrast markedly with those of Archean marine sedimentary rocks, making a Precambrian "soda ocean" unlikely. Today, alkaline lakes are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth. Some nutrients, in particular molybdenum, are more soluble at high pH, and certain prebiotic reactions would likely have been favored under alkaline conditions in similar settings earlier in Earth's history. Hence alkaline lakes in the Archean could have been significant for the origin and early evolution of life.

  7. Advanced alkaline water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, N.; Torikai, E.; Kawami, Y.; Takenaka, H.

    Results are presented of experimental studies of possible separators and electrodes for use in advanced, high-temperature, high-pressure alkaline water electrolyzers. Material evaluations in alkaline water electrolyzers at temperatures from 100 to 120 C have shown a new type polytetrafluoroethylene membrane impregnated with potassium titanate to be the most promising when the separator is prepared by the hydrothermal treatment of a porous PFTE membrane impregnated with hydrated titanium oxide. Measurements of cell voltages in 30% KOH at current densities from 5 to 100 A/sq dm at temperatures up to 120 C with nickel electrodes of various structures have shown the foamed nickel electrode, with an average pore size of 1-1.5 mm, to have the best performance. When the foamed nickel is coated by fine powdered nickel, carbonyl nickel or Raney nickel to increase electrode surface areas, even lower cell voltages were found, indicating better performance.

  8. The sulphate-reduction alkalinity pump tested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Patrick; Petrishcheva, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate precipitation has been suggested to be induced by alkalinity increase during sulphate reduction under anoxic conditions. This mechanism may explain the formation of carbonate deposits in shallow marine environments, either within a redox stratified sediment inhabited by phototrophic microbial mats or in shallow water within the photic zone where sulphidic water is upwelling onto the shelf. The alkalinity pump may work as long as the sulphide is not reoxidized to sulphate, a process that would acidify the surrounding. The alkalinity effect of sulphate reduction was recently tested by Aloisi (2008) for microbial mats using a model approach. He found that sulphate reduction does not significantly increase or even decrease carbonate saturation and is unlikely to have played a significant role through Earth history. The model considers many environmental factors, including the effect of carbonate precipitation itself on the carbonate equilbrium and on the alkalinity. We used a modified version of Aloisi's (2008) model to simulate the saturation states of aragonite, calcite and dolomite without the effects of carbonate precipitation. This is necessary to evaluate the effect of microbial metabolisms exclusively on carbonate saturation, since carbonate precipitation is only the consequence, but not the cause of oversaturation. First results show that the saturation state is increased in the zone of phototrophic CO2 uptake. In contrast, the saturation state is strongly decreased in the zone where dissolved oxygen overlaps with dissolved sulphide. Aerobic sulphide oxidation consumes most of the HS- and dissipates most of the alkalinity produced in the sulphate reduction zone below. Hence, our results are consistent with the findings of Aloisi (2008), and they even more clearly show that sulphate reduction does not induce carbonate precipitation nor contributes to carbonate precipitation in combination with phototrophic CO2 uptake. The alkalinity effect of sulphate

  9. SEPARATION OF METAL SALTS BY ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.

    1959-01-20

    It has been found that certain metal salts, particularly the halides of iron, cobalt, nickel, and the actinide metals, arc readily absorbed on aluminum oxide, while certain other salts, particularly rare earth metal halides, are not so absorbed. Use is made of this discovery to separate uranium from the rare earths. The metal salts are first dissolved in a molten mixture of alkali metal nitrates, e.g., the eutectic mixture of lithium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and then the molten salt solution is contacted with alumina, either by slurrying or by passing the salt solution through an absorption tower. The process is particularly valuable for the separation of actinides from lanthanum-group rare earths.

  10. Adsorption of sulfur dioxide on natural clinoptilolite chemically modified with salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Emilia; Koumanova, Bogdana

    2009-08-15

    Various ion exchange forms of preliminary partly decationised zeolite (hydrogen forms) were obtained by indirect modification with metal salt solutions, as well as by direct treatment of natural clinoptilolite taken from Bulgarian deposits. Direct modification leads to a higher extent of samples enrichment with corresponding ion. Independently of the conditions, the alkaline and alkaline earth metal ions (especially sodium and calcium) were inserted at a greater extent, while the transitional metals-at a comparatively lower extent. The cationic forms of clinoptilolite were used for adsorption and desorption experiments. The breakthrough adsorption curves and the concentration curves at temperature-programmed desorption were obtained and compared. The breakthrough and saturation times, the adsorption capacity, the distribution coefficient, the adsorbed SO(2), the portions desorbed as SO(2) and SO(3), respectively, as well as the not desorbed portion of SO(2), were determined using these curves. It was established that a definite quantity of undesorbed SO(2) has remained in the zeolite forms modified with transitional metal cations. This statement was proved not only by the comparison between the adsorbed and desorbed quantities, but also by three-cycle adsorption-desorption experiments for the Cu(2+)-form. The results demonstrate a decrease in the capacity for each following cycle in an extent similar to the undesorbed SO(2) quantity. It was not observed a visible difference in the values of the distribution coefficients for adsorption on identical cation forms, directly or indirectly obtained. However, the breakthrough time of the samples obtained by ion exchange of the hydrogen form was longer in all cases. Definite quantities of desorbed SO(3) were registered for all forms, except for the natural clinoptilolite and the samples enriched with alkaline and alkaline earth metal cations.

  11. Alkaline regenerative fuel cell systems for energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, F.H.; Reid, M.A.; Martin, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary design study of a Regenerative Fuel Cell Energy Storage system for application to future low-earth orbit space missions. This high energy density storage system is based on state-of-the-art alkaline electrolyte cell technology and incorporates dedicated fuel cell and electrolysis cell modules. 11 refs.

  12. The alkalinizing effects of metabolizable bases in the healthy calf.

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, J M; Forsyth, G W

    1986-01-01

    The alkalinizing effect of citrate, acetate, propionate, gluconate, L and DL-lactate were compared in healthy neonatal calves. The calves were infused for a 3.5 hour period with 150 mmol/L solutions of the sodium salts of the various bases. Blood pH, base excess, and metabolite concentrations were measured and the responses compared with sodium bicarbonate and sodium chloride infusion. D-gluconate and D-lactate had poor alkalinizing abilities and accumulated in blood during infusion suggesting that they are poorly metabolized by the calf. Acetate, L-lactate and propionate had alkalinizing effects similar to bicarbonate, although those of acetate had a slightly better alkalinizing effect than L-lactate. Acetate was more effectively metabolized because blood acetate concentrations were lower than L-lactate concentrations. There was a tendency for a small improvement in metabolism of acetate and lactate with age. Sodium citrate infusion produced signs of hypocalcemia, presumably because it removed ionized calcium from the circulation. D-gluconate, D-lactate and citrate are unsuitable for use as alkalinizing agents in intravenous fluids. Propionate, acetate and L-lactate are all good alkalinizing agents in healthy calves but will not be as effective in situations where tissue metabolism is impaired. PMID:3024796

  13. Carbon cycling and snowball Earth.

    PubMed

    Goddéris, Yves; Donnadieu, Yannick

    2008-12-18

    The possibility that Earth witnessed episodes of global glaciation during the latest Precambrian challenges our understanding of the physical processes controlling the Earth's climate. Peltier et al. suggest that a 'hard snowball Earth' state may have been prevented owing to the release of CO(2) from the oxidation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the ocean as the temperature decreased. Here we show that the model of Peltier et al. is not self-consistent as it implies large fluctuations of the ocean alkalinity content without providing any processes to account for it. Our findings suggest that the hard snowball Earth hypothesis is still valid.

  14. Phosphate salts

    MedlinePlus

    ... sodium if you have heart disease. Fluid retention (edema): Avoid using phosphate salts that contain sodium if ... heart failure, or other conditions that can cause edema. High levels of calcium in the blood (hypercalcemia): ...

  15. Bath Salts

    MedlinePlus

    ... panic attacks depression suicidal thoughts paranoia delusions and hallucinations distorted sense of reality decreased ability to think ... of bath salts may cause people to have hallucinations, hear voices, feel paranoid, and develop a psychosis ...

  16. High-temperature molten salt thermal energy storage systems for solar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petri, R. J.; Claar, T. D.; Ong, E.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental results of compatibility screening studies of 100 salt/containment/thermal conductivity enhancement (TCE) combinations for the high temperature solar thermal application range of 704 deg to 871 C (1300 to 1600 F) are presented. Nine candidate containment/HX alloy materials and two TCE materials were tested with six candidate solar thermal alkali and alkaline earth carbonate storage salts (both reagent and technical grade of each). Compatibility tests were conducted with salt encapsulated in approx. 6.0 inch x 1 inch welded containers of test material from 300 to 3000 hours. Compatibility evaluations were end application oriented, considering the potential 30 year lifetime requirement of solar thermal power plant components. Analyses were based on depth and nature of salt side corrosion of materials, containment alloy thermal aging effects, weld integrity in salt environment, air side containment oxidation, and chemical and physical analyses of the salt. A need for more reliable, and in some cases first time determined thermophysical and transport property data was also identified for molten carbonates in the 704 to 871 C temperature range. In particular, accurate melting point (mp) measurements were performed for Li2CO3 and Na2CO3 while melting point, heat of fusion, and specific heat determinations were conducted on 81.3 weight percent Na2CO3-18.7 weight percent K2CO3 and 52.2 weight percent BaCO3-47.8 weight percent Na2CO3 to support future TES system design and ultimate scale up of solar thermal energy storage (TES) subsystems.

  17. High-temperature molten salt thermal energy storage systems for solar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, R. J.; Claar, T. D.; Ong, E.

    1983-07-01

    Experimental results of compatibility screening studies of 100 salt/containment/thermal conductivity enhancement (TCE) combinations for the high temperature solar thermal application range of 704 deg to 871 C (1300 to 1600 F) are presented. Nine candidate containment/HX alloy materials and two TCE materials were tested with six candidate solar thermal alkali and alkaline earth carbonate storage salts (both reagent and technical grade of each). Compatibility tests were conducted with salt encapsulated in approx. 6.0 inch x 1 inch welded containers of test material from 300 to 3000 hours. Compatibility evaluations were end application oriented, considering the potential 30 year lifetime requirement of solar thermal power plant components. Analyses were based on depth and nature of salt side corrosion of materials, containment alloy thermal aging effects, weld integrity in salt environment, air side containment oxidation, and chemical and physical analyses of the salt. A need for more reliable, and in some cases first time determined thermophysical and transport property data was also identified for molten carbonates in the 704 to 871 C temperature range. In particular, accurate melting point (mp) measurements were performed for Li2CO3 and Na2CO3 while melting point, heat of fusion, and specific heat determinations were conducted on 81.3 weight percent Na2CO3-18.7 weight percent K2CO3 and 52.2 weight percent BaCO3-47.8 weight percent Na2CO3 to support future TES system design and ultimate scale up of solar thermal energy storage (TES) subsystems.

  18. Electrochemical Recovery of Sodium Hydroxide from Alkaline Salt Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1996-10-01

    A statistically designed set of tests determined the effects of current density, temperature, and the concentrations of nitrate/nitrite, hydroxide and aluminate on the recovery of sodium as sodium hydroxide (caustic) from solutions simulating those produced from the Savannah River Site (SRS) In-Tank Precipitation process. These tests included low nitrate and nitrite concentrations which would be produced by electrolytic nitrate/nitrite destruction. The tests used a two compartment electrochemical cell with a Nafion Type 324 ion-exchange membrane. Caustic was successfully recovered from the waste solutions. Evaluation of the testing results indicated that the transport of sodium across the membrane was not significantly affected by any of the varied parameters. The observed variance in the sodium flux is attributed to experimental errors and variations in the performance characteristics of individual pieces of the organic-based Nafion membrane.Additional testing is recommended to determine the maximum current density, to evaluate the chemical durability of the organic membrane as a function of current density and to compare the durability and performance characteristics of the organic-based Nafion membrane with that of other commercially available organic membranes and the inorganic class of membranes under development by Ceramatec and PNNL.

  19. Formulating poultry processing sanitizers from alkaline salts of fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Though some poultry processing operations remove microorganisms from carcasses; other processing operations cause cross-contamination that spreads microorganisms between carcasses, processing water, and processing equipment. One method used by commercial poultry processors to reduce microbial contam...

  20. Liquidus temperature and chemical durability of selected glasses to immobilize rare earth oxides waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Fadzil, Syazwani; Hrma, Pavel; Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.

    2015-10-01

    Pyroprocessing is are processing method for managing and reusing used nuclear fuel (UNF) by dissolving it in an electrorefiner with a molten alkali or alkaline earth chloride salt mixture while avoiding wet reprocessing. Pyroprocessing UNF with a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt releases the fission products from the fuel and generates a variety of metallic and salt-based species, including rare earth (RE) chlorides. If the RE-chlorides are converted to oxides, borosilicate glass is a prime candidate for their immobilization because of its durability and ability to dissolve almost any RE waste component into the glass matrix at high loadings. Crystallization that occurs in waste glasses as the waste loading increases may complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. This work compares three types of borosilicate glasses in terms of liquidus temperature (TL): the International Simple Glass designed by the International Working Group, sodium borosilicate glass developed by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, and the lanthanide aluminoborosilicate (LABS) glass established in the United States. The LABS glass allows the highest waste loadings (over 50 mass% RE2O3) while possessing an acceptable chemical durability.

  1. Liquidus temperature and chemical durability of selected glasses to immobilize rare earth oxides waste

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd Fadzil, Syazwani Binti; Hrma, Pavel R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.

    2015-06-30

    Pyroprocessing is a reprocessing method for managing and reusing used nuclear fuel (UNF) by dissolving it in an electrorefiner with a molten alkali or alkaline earth chloride salt mixture while avoiding wet reprocessing. Pyroprocessing UNF with a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt releases the fission products from the fuel and generates a variety of metallic and salt-based species, including rare earth (RE) chlorides. If the RE-chlorides are converted to oxides, borosilicate glass is a prime candidate for their immobilization because of its durability and ability to dissolve almost any RE waste component into the matrix at high loadings. Crystallization that occurs in waste glasses as the waste loading increases may complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. This work compares three types of borosilicate glasses in terms of liquidus temperature (TL): the International Simple Glass designed by the International Working Group, sodium borosilicate glass developed by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, and the lanthanide aluminoborosilicate (LABS) glass established in the United States. The LABS glass allows the highest waste loadings (over 50 mass% RE2O3) while possessing an acceptable chemical durability.

  2. Advanced technology for extended endurance alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Martin, R. A.

    Advanced components have been developed for alkaline fuel cells with a view to the satisfaction of NASA Space Station design requirements for extended endurance. The components include a platinum-on-carbon catalyst anode, a potassium titanate-bonded electrolyte matrix, a lightweight graphite electrolyte reservoir plate, a gold-plated nickel-perforated foil electrode substrate, a polyphenylene sulfide cell edge frame material, and a nonmagnesium cooler concept. When incorporated into the alkaline fuel cell unit, these components are expected to yield regenerative operation in a low earth orbit Space Station with a design life greater than 5 years.

  3. Advanced technology for extended endurance alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Martin, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced components have been developed for alkaline fuel cells with a view to the satisfaction of NASA Space Station design requirements for extended endurance. The components include a platinum-on-carbon catalyst anode, a potassium titanate-bonded electrolyte matrix, a lightweight graphite electrolyte reservoir plate, a gold-plated nickel-perforated foil electrode substrate, a polyphenylene sulfide cell edge frame material, and a nonmagnesium cooler concept. When incorporated into the alkaline fuel cell unit, these components are expected to yield regenerative operation in a low earth orbit Space Station with a design life greater than 5 years.

  4. Alkaline oxide conversion coatings for aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.

    1996-02-01

    Three related conversion coating methods are described that are based on film formation which occurs when aluminum alloys are exposed to alkaline Li salt solutions. Representative examples of the processing methods, resulting coating structure, composition and morphology are presented. The corrosion resistance of these coatings to aerated 0.5 M NaCl solution has been evaluated as a function of total processing time using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). This evaluation shows that excellent corrosion resistance can be uniformly achieved using no more than 20 minutes of process time for 6061-T6. Using current methods a minimum of 80 minutes of process time is required to get marginally acceptable corrosion resistance for 2024-T3. Longer processing times are required to achieve uniformly good corrosion resistance.

  5. ESW 2009: Salt of the Earth

    NASA Video Gallery

    The extent to which salinity impacts our global ocean circulation is still relatively unknown, but NASA's new Aquarius mission will help advance that understanding by painting a global picture of o...

  6. Salting the landscapes in Transbaikalia: natural and technogenic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peryazeva, E. G.; Plyusnin, A. M.; Chinavlev, A. M.

    2010-05-01

    Salting the soils, surface and subsurface waters is widespread in Transbaikalia. Hearths of salting occur within intermountain depressions of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic age both in the steppe arid and forest humid landscapes. Total water mineralization reaches 80 g/dm3 in lakes and 4-5 g/dm3 in subsurface waters. The waters belong to hydrocarbonate sodium and sulfate sodium types by chemical composition. The soda type of waters is widely spread through the whole area. Sulfate waters are found in several hearths of salting. Deposition of salts takes place in some lakes. Mirabilite and soda depositions are most commonly observed in muds of salt lakes. Deposition of salts occurs both as a result of evaporative concentrating and during freezing out the solvent. In the winter period, efflorescences of salts, where decawater soda is main mineral, are observed on ice surface. Solonchaks are spread in areas of shallow ground waters (1-2m). Soil salting is most intense in the lower parts of depressions, where surface of ground waters is at depth 0.5-1.0m. In soil cover of solonchaks, salt horizon is of various thicknesses, and it has various morphological forms of occurrence, i.e. as thick deposits of salts on soil surface and salting the surficial horizons. The soil has low alkaline reaction of medium and is characterized by high content of exchangeable bases with significant content of exchangeable sodium in the absorbing complex. Total amount of salts varies from 0.7 to 1.3%. Their maximal quantity (3.1%) is confined to the surficial layer. Sulfate-sodium type of salting is noted in the solonchak upper horizons and sulfate-magnesium-calcium one in the lower ones (Ubugunov et al, 2009). Formation of salting hearths is associated with natural and technogenic conditions. The Mesozoic depressions of Transbaikalia are characterized by intense volcanism. Covers of alkaline and moderately alkaline basalts that are enriched in potassium, sodium, carbon dioxide, fluorine, chlorine

  7. The measurement of alkaline phosphatase at nanomolar concentration within 70 s using a disposable microelectrochemical transistor.

    PubMed

    Astier, Y; Bartlett, P N

    2004-08-01

    We report a new approach to the measurement of alkaline phosphatase concentration based on the use of a disposable poly(aniline) microelectrochemical transistor. The measurement is carried out in a two cell configuration in which the poly(aniline) microelectrochemical transistor operates in acid solution and is connected to the alkaline buffer solution containing the analyte by a salt bridge. Disposable microelectrochemical transistors were reproducibly fabricated by electrochemical deposition of poly(aniline) onto photolithographically fabricated gold microband arrays. Using these devices alkaline phosphatase was detected by employing p-aminophenyl phosphate as the substrate for the enzyme and using glucose and glucose oxidase to recycle the p-aminophenol generated upon enzyme catalysed hydrolysis of the phosphate. Recycling the p-aminophenol with glucose and glucose oxidase amplified the detection of alkaline phosphatase approximately tenfold. Using this approach we obtain linear calibration curves for alkaline phosphatase up to 5 nM within 70 s on single use devices.

  8. View of the Salt Lake City, Utah area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An oblique view of the Salt Lake City, Utah area as photographed from Earth orbit by one of the six lenses of the Itek-furnished S190-A Multispectral Photographic Facility Experiment aboard the Skylab space station. Approximately two-thirds of the Great Salt Lake is in view. The smaller body of water south of Salt Lake City is Utah Lake. The Wasatch Range is on the east side of the Great Salt Lake.

  9. Conditioning matrices from high level waste resulting from pyrochemical processing in fluorine salt

    SciTech Connect

    Grandjean, Agnes; Advocat, Thierry; Bousquet, Nicolas; Jegou, Christophe

    2007-07-01

    Separating the actinides from the fission products through reductive extraction by aluminium in a LiF/AlF{sub 3} medium is a process investigated for pyrometallurgical reprocessing of spent fuel. The process involves separation by reductive salt-metal extraction. After dissolving the fuel or the transmutation target in a salt bath, the noble metal fission products are first extracted by contacting them with a slightly reducing metal. After extracting the metal fission products, then the actinides are selectively separated from the remaining fission products. In this hypothesis, all the unrecoverable fission products would be conditioned as fluorides. Therefore, this process will generate first a metallic waste containing the 'reducible' fission products (Pd, Mo, Ru, Rh, Tc, etc.) and a fluorine waste containing alkali-metal, alkaline-earth and rare earth fission products. Immobilization of these wastes in classical borosilicate glasses is not feasible due to the very low solubility of noble metals, and of fluoride in these hosts. Alternative candidates have therefore been developed including silicate glass/ceramic system for fluoride fission products and metallic ones for noble metal fission products. These waste-forms were evaluated for their confinement properties like homogeneity, waste loading, volatility during the elaboration process, chemical durability, etc. using appropriate techniques. (authors)

  10. Identification of differentially expressed genes in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) under saline-alkaline stress by digital gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Huang, Wengong; Chen, Hongyu; Wu, Guangwen; Yuan, Hongmei; Song, Xixia; Kang, Qinghua; Zhao, Dongsheng; Jiang, Weidong; Liu, Yan; Wu, Jianzhong; Cheng, Lili; Yao, Yubo; Guan, Fengzhi

    2014-10-01

    The salinization and alkalization of soil are widespread environmental problems, and alkaline salt stress is more destructive than neutral salt stress. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of plant tolerance to saline-alkaline stress has become a major challenge. However, little attention has been paid to the mechanism of plant alkaline salt tolerance. In this study, gene expression profiling of flax was analyzed under alkaline-salt stress (AS2), neutral salt stress (NSS) and alkaline stress (AS) by digital gene expression. Three-week-old flax seedlings were placed in 25 mM Na2CO3 (pH11.6) (AS2), 50mM NaCl (NSS) and NaOH (pH11.6) (AS) for 18 h. There were 7736, 1566 and 454 differentially expressed genes in AS2, NSS and AS compared to CK, respectively. The GO category gene enrichment analysis revealed that photosynthesis was particularly affected in AS2, carbohydrate metabolism was particularly affected in NSS, and the response to biotic stimulus was particularly affected in AS. We also analyzed the expression pattern of five categories of genes including transcription factors, signaling transduction proteins, phytohormones, reactive oxygen species proteins and transporters under these three stresses. Some key regulatory gene families involved in abiotic stress, such as WRKY, MAPKKK, ABA, PrxR and ion channels, were differentially expressed. Compared with NSS and AS, AS2 triggered more differentially expressed genes and special pathways, indicating that the mechanism of AS2 was more complex than NSS and AS. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first transcriptome analysis of flax in response to saline-alkaline stress. These data indicate that common and diverse features of saline-alkaline stress provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of plant saline-alkaline tolerance and offer a number of candidate genes as potential markers of tolerance to saline-alkaline stress.

  11. Alternative Electrochemical Salt Waste Forms, Summary of FY11-FY12 Results

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Mccloy, John S.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Lepry, William C.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Windisch, Charles F.; Matyas, Josef; Westman, Matthew P.; Rieck, Bennett T.; Lang, Jesse B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Pierce, David A.

    2014-01-17

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, is currently investigating alternative waste forms for wastes generated from nuclear fuel processing. One such waste results from an electrochemical separations process, called the “Echem” process. The Echem process utilizes a molten KCl-LiCl salt to dissolve the fuel. This process results in a spent salt containing alkali, alkaline earth, lanthanide halides and small quantities of actinide halides, where the primary halide is chloride with a minor iodide fraction. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is concurrently investigating two candidate waste forms for the Echem spent-salt: high-halide minerals (i.e., sodalite and cancrinite) and tellurite (TeO2)-based glasses. Both of these candidates showed promise in fiscal year (FY) 2009 and FY2010 with a simplified nonradioactive simulant of the Echem waste. Further testing was performed on these waste forms in FY2011 and FY2012 to assess the possibility of their use in a sustainable fuel cycle. This report summarizes the combined results from FY2011 and FY2012 efforts.

  12. Mesozoic mafic alkaline magmatism of southern Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappe, Sebastian

    2004-11-01

    More than 100 volcanic necks in central Scania (southern Sweden) are the product of Jurassic continental rift-related mafic alkaline magmatism at the southwest margin of the Baltic Shield. They are mainly basanites, with rarer melanephelinites. Both rock groups display overlapping primitive Mg-numbers, Cr and Ni contents, steep chondrite-normalized rare earth element patterns (LaN /YbN = 17 27) and an overall enrichment in incompatible elements. However, the melanephelinites are more alkaline and have stronger high field strength element enrichment than the basanites. The existence of distinct primary magmas is also indicated by heterogeneity in highly incompatible element ratios (e.g. Zr/Nb, La/Nb). Trace element modelling indicates that the magmas were generated by comparably low degrees of melting of a heterogeneous mantle source. Such a source can best be explained by a metasomatic overprint of the mantle lithosphere by percolating evolved melts. The former existence of such alkaline trace element-enriched melts can be demonstrated by inversion of the trace element content of green-core clinopyroxenes and anorthoclase which occur as xenocrysts in the melanephelinites and are interpreted as being derived from crystallization of evolved mantle melts. Jurassic magmatic activity in Scania was coeval with the generation of nephelinites in the nearby Egersund Basin (Norwegian North Sea). Both Scanian and North Sea alkaline magmas share similar trace element characteristics. Mantle enrichment processes at the southwest margin of the Baltic Shield and the North Sea Basin generated trace element signatures similar to those of ocean island basalts (e.g. low Zr/Nb and La/Nb) but there are no indications of plume activity during the Mesozoic in this area. On the contrary, the short duration of rifting, absence of extensive lithospheric thinning, and low magma volumes argue against a Mesozoic mantle plume. It seems likely that the metasomatic imprint resulted from the

  13. Combination of alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP)- and avidin-biotin-alkaline phosphatase complex (ABAP)-techniques for amplification of immunocytochemical staining of human testicular tissue.

    PubMed

    Davidoff, M S; Schulze, W; Holstein, A F

    1991-01-01

    An amplification procedure was developed for the visualization of antigens in human testis using monoclonal antibodies against desmin and vimentin. The technique combines the high sensitive and specific APAAP- and ABAP-methods. Depending on the quality of the antibodies used and the processing of the material prior to the immunocytochemical staining the amplification technique may be applied either as a single APAAP and ABAP- or as a double APAAP and ABAP-combination. Especially after the double amplification reaction a distinct increase of the staining intensity of the vimentin- (in Sertoli cells, myofibroblasts of the lamina propria, and fibroblasts of the interstitium) and desmin- (in myofibroblasts of the lamina propria and smooth muscle cells of the blood vessels) like immunoreactivity was observed. If different diazonium salts were used for the visualization of the alkaline phosphatase activity (e.g. Fast Red TR Salt, Fast Blue BB Salt) desmin- and vimentin-like immunoreactivity can be demonstrated in the same tissue section in a double sequential staining approach. For double staining, the alkaline phosphatase technique may be combined successfully with a technique or a combination that uses peroxidase as a marker.

  14. Early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.

    2015-05-01

    Earth has continents, subduction and mobile lid plate tectonics, but details of the early evolution are poorly understood. Here I summarize the Hadean-Archean record, review evidence for a hotter Earth and consider geodynamic models for early Earth.

  15. The Alkaline Dissolution Rate of Calcite.

    PubMed

    Colombani, Jean

    2016-07-07

    Due to the widespread presence of calcium carbonate on Earth, several geochemical systems, among which is the global CO2 cycle, are controlled to a large extent by the dissolution and precipitation of this mineral. For this reason, the dissolution of calcite has been thoroughly investigated for decades. Despite this intense activity, a consensual value of the dissolution rate of calcite has not been found yet. We show here that the inconsistency between the reported values stems mainly from the variability of the chemical and hydrodynamic conditions of measurement. The spreading of the values, when compared in identical conditions, is much less than expected and is interpreted in terms of sample surface topography. This analysis leads us to propose benchmark values of the alkaline dissolution rate of calcite compatible with all the published values, and a method to use them in various chemical and hydrodynamic contexts.

  16. Alkaline Waterflooding Demonstration Project, Ranger Zone, Long Beach Unit, Wilmington Field, California. Fourth annual report, June 1979-May 1980. Volume 3. Appendices II-XVII

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, J.D.

    1981-03-01

    Volume 3 contains Appendices II through XVII: mixing instructions for sodium orthosilicate; oil displacement studies using THUMS C-331 crude oil and extracted reservoir core material from well B-110; clay mineral analysis of B-827-A cores; sieve analysis of 4 Fo sand samples from B-110-IA and 4 Fo sand samples from B-827-A; core record; delayed secondary caustic consumption tests; long-term alkaline consumption in reservoir sands; demulsification study for THUMS Long Beach Company, Island White; operating plans and instructions for DOE injection demonstration project, alkaline injection; caustic pilot-produced water test graphs; well test irregularities (6/1/79-5/31/80); alkaline flood pump changes (6/1/79-5/31/80); monthly DOE pilot chemical waterflood injection reports (preflush injection, alkaline-salt injection, and alkaline injection without salt); and caustic safety procedures-alkaline chemicals.

  17. The alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite magmatism from Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberti, E.; Gomes, C. D. B.; Comin-Chiaramonti, P.

    2015-12-01

    Early to Late Cretaceous lasting to Paleocene alkaline magmatism from southern Brazil is found associated with major extensional structural features in and around the Paraná Basin and grouped into various provinces on the basis of several data. Magmatism is variable in size, mode of occurrence and composition. The alkaline rocks are dominantly potassic, a few occurrences showing sodic affinity. The more abundant silicate rocks are evolved undersaturated to saturated in silica syenites, displaying large variation in igneous forms. Less evolved types are restricted to subvolcanic environments and outcrops of effusive suites occur rarely. Cumulatic mafic and ultramafic rock types are very common, particularly in the alkali-carbonatitic complexes. Carbonatite bodies are represented by Ca-carbonatites and Mg-carbonatites and more scarcely by Fe-carbonatites. Available radiometric ages for the alkaline rocks fit on three main chronological groups: around 130 Ma, subcoveal with the Early Cretaceous flood tholeiites of the Paraná Basin, 100-110 Ma and 80-90 Ma (Late Cretaceous). The alkaline magmatism also extends into Paleocene times, as indicated by ages from some volcanic lavas. Geochemically, alkaline potassic and sodic rock types are distinguished by their negative and positive Nb-Ta anomalies, respectively. Negative spikes in Nb-Ta are also a feature common to the associated tholeiitic rocks. Sr-Nd-Pb systematics confirm the contribution of both HIMU and EMI mantle components in the formation of the alkaline rocks. Notably, Early and Late Cretaceous carbonatites have the same isotopic Sr-Nd initial ratios of the associated alkaline rocks. C-O isotopic Sr-Nd isotopic ratios indicate typical mantle signature for some carbonatites and the influence of post-magmatic processes in others. Immiscibility of liquids of phonolitic composition, derived from mafic alkaline parental magmas, has been responsible for the origin of the carbonatites. Close association of alkaline

  18. Optical Properties of Alkaline Earth Ions Doped Bismuth Borate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Virender; Dhiman, R. L.; Maan, A. S.; Goyal, D. R.

    2011-07-15

    The optical properties of glasses with composition xLi{sub 2}O(30-x)Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-70B{sub 2}O{sub 3}; x = 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 mol %, prepared by normal melt quench technique were investigated by means of UV-VIS measurement. It was observed that the optical band gap of the present glass system decreases with increasing Li{sub 2}O content up to 15 mol%, and with further increase in lithium oxide content i.e. x>15 mol% the optical band gap increases. It was also observed that the present glass system behaves as an indirect band gap semiconductor.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Alkaline-Earth Indium Sulfides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    CaS and In2S3 in an evacuated silica ampule, has the normal spinel structure (a = 10.77 ).1 This report is surprising, since the large Ca 2 + ion would...Ca3.1In6.6S13, 4 has been synthesized as yellow whiskers by iodine transport of a mixture of CaS and In2S3 . An X-ray single-crystal structure determination 5...mixture of CaS (Cerac 99.99%) and In2S3 (prepared from In(NO3)3 and H2S at 750’C) was pre-reacted in a graphite crucible in an evacuated silica

  20. Dissolution of alkaline earth sulfates in the presence of montmorillonite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Landa, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    In a study of the effect of montmorillonite on the dissolution of BaSO4 (barite), SrSO4 (celestite), and 226Ra from U mill tailings, it was found that: (1) More of these substances dissolve in an aqueous system that contains montmorillonite than dissolve in a similar system without clay, due to the ion exchange properties of the clay; (2) Na-montmorillonite is more effective in aiding dissolution than is Ca-montmorillonite; (3) the amount of Ra that moves from mill tailings to an exchanger increases as solution sulfate activity decreases. Leaching experiments suggest that 226Ra from H2SO4-circuit U mill tailings from Edgemont, South Dakota, is not present as pure Ra sulfate or as an impurity in anhydrite or gypsum; it is less soluble, and probably occurs as a trace constituent in barite.

  1. Aluminum/alkaline earth metal composites and method for producing

    DOEpatents

    Russell, Alan M; Anderson, Iver E; Kim, Hyong J; Freichs, Andrew E

    2014-02-11

    A composite is provided having an electrically conducting Al matrix and elongated filaments comprising Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba disposed in the matrix and extending along a longitudinal axis of the composite. The filaments initially comprise Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba metal or allow and then may be reacted with the Al matrix to form a strengthening intermetallic compound comprising Al and Ca and/or Sr and/or Ba. The composite is useful as a long-distance, high voltage power transmission conductor.

  2. Atomistic simulation of defects in alkaline-earth fluorohalide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baetzold, Roger C.

    1987-12-01

    Defect properties of BaFBr, BaFCl, and SrFCl were calculated using the atomistic simulation technique. Two-body potentials were developed starting from potentials in related crystals or calculated by the electron-gas method and then fit to minimize strain in the equilibrium structure. Agreement of calculated elastic, dielectric, and cohesive properties with available experimental and theoretical data was reasonable. Generally, Frenkel energies for the larger-size halogen ion were less than for the fluorine ion and less than the Schottky energy for the metal, fluoride, and other halide ions set. A Schottky energy for vacancies of the metal ion and two of the larger-size halide ions was small. Energies of formation of Vk and H centers were computed with the aid of thermodynamic cycles. The most stable Vk center forms on the halide ion site where the Madelung potential is most favorable for holes. H centers occupy off-center sites in these low-symmetry materials. Stable geometries are discussed.

  3. Soft-mode transitions of alkaline-earth 122 pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widom, Michael; Quader, Khandker

    A -122 pnictides (A=Ca, Sr, Ba) exhibit three pressure-driven transitions: a first order enthalpic transition at PH from the striped AFM orthorhombic (OR) to a tetragonal (T) or a collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase; a transition at PM >PH from the metastable AFM OR to a T or cT phase; a Lifshitz transition at PL that causes T to collapse to a cT phase. Transitions at PH and PL were previously examined through total energy and band structure calculations. Here we address the transition at PM, beyond which the metastable AFM OR state ceases to exist. We show this transition occurs through a loss of elastic stability caused by softening of a shear mode associated with stretching along the c-axis. Simultaneously, magnetism and orthorhombicity approach limiting values with an approximately square-root singularity. Together these suggest a strong magneto-elastic coupling that may be relevant to a further understanding of the A-122-pnictides under pressure. This work was supported in part by the DOE under Grant DE-SC0014506.

  4. Synthesis and acid digestion of biomorphic ceramics: determination of alkaline and alkaline earth ions.

    PubMed

    Bosch Ojeda, Catalina; Sánchez Rojas, Fuensanta; Cano Pavón, José Manuel

    2007-09-01

    Ceramic and glass are some of the more recent engineering materials and those that are most resistant to environmental conditions. They belong to advanced materials in that they are being developed for the aerospace and electronics industries. In the last decade, a new class of ceramic materials has been the focus of particular attention. The materials were produced with natural, renewable resources (wood or wood-based products). In this work, we have synthesised a new biomorphic ceramic material from oak wood and Si infiltration. After the material characterization, we have optimized the dissolution of the sample by acid attack in an oven under microwave irradiation. Experimental designs were used as a multivariate strategy for the evaluation of the effects of varying several variables at the same time. The optimization was performed in two steps using factorial design for preliminary evaluation and a Draper-Lin design for determination of the critical experimental conditions. Five variables (time, power, volume of HNO3, volume H2SO4 and volume of HF) were considered as factors and as a response the concentration of different metal ions in the optimization process. Interactions between analytical factors and their optimal levels were investigated using a Draper-Lin design.

  5. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This simulated natural color image presents a late spring view of north central Utah that includes all of the Olympic sites. The image extends from Ogden in the north, to Provo in the south; and includes the snow-capped Wasatch Mountains and the eastern part of the Great Salt Lake.

    This image was acquired on May 28, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution

  6. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments.

    PubMed

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids.

  7. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids.

  8. Catalytic Diversity in Alkaline Hydrothermal Vent Systems on Ocean Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Ryan D.; Barge, Laura; Chin, Keith B.; Doloboff, Ivria J.; Flores, Erika; Hammer, Arden C.; Sobron, Pablo; Russell, Michael J.; Kanik, Isik

    2016-10-01

    Hydrothermal systems formed by serpentinization can create moderate-temperature, alkaline systems and it is possible that this type of vent could exist on icy worlds such as Europa which have water-rock interfaces. It has been proposed that some prebiotic chemistry responsible for the emergence of life on Earth and possibly other wet and icy worlds could occur as a result ofredox potential and pH gradients in submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents (Russell et al., 2014). Hydrothermal chimneys formed in laboratory simulations of alkaline vents under early Earth conditions have precipitate membranes that contain minerals such as iron sulfides, which are hypothesized to catalyze reduction of CO2 (Yamaguchi et al. 2014, Roldan et al. 2014) leading to further organic synthesis. This CO2 reduction process may be affected by other trace components in the chimney, e.g. nickel or organic molecules. We have conducted experiments to investigate catalytic properties of iron and iron-nickel sulfides containing organic dopants in slightly acidic ocean simulants relevant to early Earth or possibly ocean worlds. We find that the electrochemical properties of the chimney as well as the morphology/chemistry of the precipitate are affected by the concentration and type of organics present. These results imply that synthesis of organics in water-rock systems on ocean worlds may lead to hydrothermal precipitates which can incorporate these organic into the mineral matrix and may affect the role of gradients in alkaline vent systems.Therefore, further understanding on the electroactive roles of various organic species within hydrothermal chimneys will have important implications for habitability as well as prebiotic chemistry. This work is funded by NASA Astrobiology Institute JPL Icy Worlds Team and a NAI Director's Discretionary Fund award.Yamaguchi A. et al. (2014) Electrochimica Acta, 141, 311-318.Russell, M. J. et al. (2014), Astrobiology, 14, 308-43.Roldan, A. (2014) Chem. Comm. 51

  9. CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah; Dr. Yong Xu; Dr. Atul Sheth; Dr. Pradeep Agrawal

    2001-12-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) estimates that by the year 2010, 40% or more of U.S. gas supply will be provided by supplements including substitute natural gas (SNG) from coal. These supplements must be cost competitive with other energy sources. The first generation technologies for coal gasification e.g. the Lurgi Pressure Gasification Process and the relatively newer technologies e.g. the KBW (Westinghouse) Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, U-Gas Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, British Gas Corporation/Lurgi Slagging Gasifier, Texaco Moving-Bed Gasifier, and Dow and Shell Gasification Processes, have several disadvantages. These disadvantages include high severities of gasification conditions, low methane production, high oxygen consumption, inability to handle caking coals, and unattractive economics. Another problem encountered in catalytic coal gasification is deactivation of hydroxide forms of alkali and alkaline earth metal catalysts by oxides of carbon (CO{sub x}). To seek solutions to these problems, a team consisting of Clark Atlanta University (CAU, a Historically Black College and University, HBCU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) proposed to identify suitable low melting eutectic salt mixtures for improved coal gasification. The research objectives of this project were to: Identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; Assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; Evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; Determine catalyst dispersion at high carbon conversion levels; Evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; Evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and Conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process.

  10. Salt Acclimation of Cyanobacteria and Their Application in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Pade, Nadin; Hagemann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The long evolutionary history and photo-autotrophic lifestyle of cyanobacteria has allowed them to colonize almost all photic habitats on Earth, including environments with high or fluctuating salinity. Their basal salt acclimation strategy includes two principal reactions, the active export of ions and the accumulation of compatible solutes. Cyanobacterial salt acclimation has been characterized in much detail using selected model cyanobacteria, but their salt sensing and regulatory mechanisms are less well understood. Here, we briefly review recent advances in the identification of salt acclimation processes and the essential genes/proteins involved in acclimation to high salt. This knowledge is of increasing importance because the necessary mass cultivation of cyanobacteria for future use in biotechnology will be performed in sea water. In addition, cyanobacterial salt resistance genes also can be applied to improve the salt tolerance of salt sensitive organisms, such as crop plants. PMID:25551682

  11. Low-salt diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... you cook, replace salt with other seasonings. Pepper, garlic, herbs, and lemon are good choices. Avoid packaged spice blends. They often contain salt. Use garlic and onion powder, not garlic and onion salt. ...

  12. New salt-inclusion borate, Li3Ca9(BO3)7·2[LiF]: a promising UV NLO material with the coplanar and high density BO3 triangles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongwei; Wu, Hongping; Pan, Shilie; Wang, Ying; Yang, Zhihua; Su, Xin

    2013-05-06

    Introduction of the coplanar BO3 triangles in the alkali metal and alkaline-earth metal mixed fluoborate generates a new UV nonlinear optical material [Li3Ca9(BO3)7]·2[LiF] (LCBF), which possesses a moderate SHG response as large as that of the KDP and a wide transparent region with a UV cutoff edge at 230 nm. The first-principle theoretical calculation suggests that LCBF has a relatively large birefringence (0.07; 532 nm). These properties make it a potential UV nonlinear optical material. And interestingly, LCBF is a salt-inclusion borate with the Li-F chains residing in the one-dimensional open framework, which caters to the development of the salt-inclusion compound in borate.

  13. When can ocean acidification impacts be detected from decadal alkalinity measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, B. R.; Frölicher, T. L.; Dunne, J. P.; Rodgers, K. B.; Slater, R. D.; Sarmiento, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    We use a large initial condition suite of simulations (30 runs) with an Earth system model to assess the detectability of biogeochemical impacts of ocean acidification (OA) on the marine alkalinity distribution from decadally repeated hydrographic measurements such as those produced by the Global Ship-Based Hydrographic Investigations Program (GO-SHIP). Detection of these impacts is complicated by alkalinity changes from variability and long-term trends in freshwater and organic matter cycling and ocean circulation. In our ensemble simulation, variability in freshwater cycling generates large changes in alkalinity that obscure the changes of interest and prevent the attribution of observed alkalinity redistribution to OA. These complications from freshwater cycling can be mostly avoided through salinity normalization of alkalinity. With the salinity-normalized alkalinity, modeled OA impacts are broadly detectable in the surface of the subtropical gyres by 2030. Discrepancies between this finding and the finding of an earlier analysis suggest that these estimates are strongly sensitive to the patterns of calcium carbonate export simulated by the model. OA impacts are detectable later in the subpolar and equatorial regions due to slower responses of alkalinity to OA in these regions and greater seasonal equatorial alkalinity variability. OA impacts are detectable later at depth despite lower variability due to smaller rates of change and consistent measurement uncertainty.

  14. Alkali-metal/alkaline-earth-metal fluorine beryllium borate NaSr{sub 3}Be{sub 3}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}F{sub 4} with large nonlinear optical properties in the deep-ultraviolet region

    SciTech Connect

    Reshak, A. H.; Huang, Hongwei; Kamarudin, H.; Auluck, S.

    2015-02-28

    The linear optical response and second harmonic generation (SHG) in alkali-metal/alkaline-earth-metal fluorine beryllium borate NaSr{sub 3}Be{sub 3}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}F{sub 4} are investigated by means of density functional theory. Calculations are performed using four types of exchange correlations: Ceperley-Alder local density approximation, Perdew Burke and Ernzerhof general gradient approximation, Engel-Vosko generalized gradient approximation, and the recently modified Becke-Johnson potential (mBJ). The mBJ approach brings the calculated band gap (7.20 eV) in excellent agreement with the experimental one (7.28 eV). The calculated values of the uniaxial anisotropy δε=−0.076 and the birefringence Δn(0)=0.052 indicate considerable anisotropy in the linear optical properties, which makes it favorable for the second harmonic generation. The dominant component of the second harmonic generation is χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω). The value of |χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω)| is about 1.2 pm/V at λ = 1064 nm in agreement with previous calculations. To analyze the origin of the high SHG of NaSr{sub 3}Be{sub 3}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}F{sub 4} single crystals, we have correlated the features of |χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω)| spectra with the features of ε{sub 2}(ω) spectra as a function of ω/2 and ω. From the calculated dominant component |χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω)|, we find that the microscopic first hyperpolarizability, β{sub 111}, the vector components along the dipole moment direction is 0.5 × 10{sup −30} esu at static limit and 0.6 × 10{sup −30} esu at λ = 1064 nm.

  15. TMC-1 Mediates Alkaline Sensation in C. elegans through Nociceptive Neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Li, Guang; Liu, Jie; Liu, Jianfeng; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2016-07-06

    Noxious pH triggers pungent taste and nocifensive behavior. While the mechanisms underlying acidic pH sensation have been extensively characterized, little is known about how animals sense alkaline pH in the environment. TMC genes encode a family of evolutionarily conserved membrane proteins whose functions are largely unknown. Here, we characterize C. elegans TMC-1, which was suggested to form a Na(+)-sensitive channel mediating salt chemosensation. Interestingly, we find that TMC-1 is required for worms to avoid noxious alkaline environment. Alkaline pH evokes an inward current in nociceptive neurons, which is primarily mediated by TMC-1 and to a lesser extent by the TRP channel OSM-9. However, unlike OSM-9, which is sensitive to both acidic and alkaline pH, TMC-1 is only required for alkali-activated current, revealing a specificity for alkaline sensation. Ectopic expression of TMC-1 confers alkaline sensitivity to alkali-insensitive cells. Our results identify an unexpected role for TMCs in alkaline sensation and nociception.

  16. Zinc electrode in alkaline electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J.

    1995-12-31

    The zinc electrode in alkaline electrolyte is unusual in that supersaturated zincate solutions can form during discharge and spongy or mossy zinc deposits can form on charge at low overvoltages. The effect of additives on regular pasted ZnO electrodes and calcium zincate electrodes is discussed. The paper also reports on in situ x-ray absorption (XAS) results on mossy zinc deposits.

  17. Earth Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Tom

    1970-01-01

    Reviews some of the more concerted, large-scale efforts in the earth resources areas" in order to help the computer community obtain insights into the activities it can jointly particpate in withthe earth resources community." (Author)

  18. A universal salt model based on under-ground precipitation of solid salts due to supercritical water `out-salting'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueslåtten, H.; Hovland, M. T.

    2010-12-01

    One of the common characteristics of planets Earth and Mars is that both host water (H2O) and large accumulations of salt. Whereas Earth’s surface-environment can be regarded as ‘water-friendly’ and ‘salt hostile’, the reverse can be said for the surface of Mars. This is because liquid water is stable on Earth, and the atmosphere transports humidity around the globe, whereas on planet Mars, liquid water is unstable, rendering the atmosphere dry and, therefore, ‘salt-friendly’. The riddle as to how the salt accumulated in various locations on those two planets, is one of long-lasting and great debate. The salt accumulations on Earth are traditionally termed ‘evaporites’, meaning that they formed as a consequence of the evaporation of large masses of seawater. How the accumulations on Mars formed is much harder to explain, as an ocean only existed briefly. Although water molecules and OH-groups may exist in abundance in bound form (crystal water, adsorbed water, etc.), the only place where free water is expected to be stable on Mars is within underground faults, fractures, and crevices. Here it likely occurs as brine or in the form of ice. Based on these conditions, a key to understanding the accumulation of large deposits of salt on both planets is linked to how brines behave in the subsurface when pressurized and heated beyond their supercritical point. At depths greater than about 3 km (P>300 bars) water will no longer boil in a steam phase. Rather, it becomes supercritical and will attain the phase of supercritical water vapor (SCRIW) with a specific gravity of typically 0.3 g/cm3. An important characteristic of SCRIW is its inability to dissolve the common sea salts. The salt dissolved in the brines will therefore precipitate as solid particles when brines (seawater on the Earth) move into the supercritical P&T-domain (T>400°C, P>300 bars). Numerical modeling of a hydrothermal system in the Atlantis II Deep of the Red Sea indicates that a

  19. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  20. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  1. Alkaline flocculation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum induced by brucite and calcite

    DOE PAGES

    Vandamme, Dries; Pohl, Philip I.; Beuckels, Annelies; ...

    2015-08-20

    Alkaline flocculation holds great potential as a low-cost harvesting method for marine microalgae biomass production. Alkaline flocculation is induced by an increase in pH and is related to precipitation of calcium and magnesium salts. In this study, we used the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum as model organism to study alkaline flocculation of marine microalgae cultured in seawater medium. Flocculation started when pH was increased to 10 and flocculation efficiency reached 90% when pH was 10.5, which was consistent with precipitation modeling for brucite or Mg(OH)2. Compared to freshwater species, more magnesium is needed to achieve flocculation (>7.5 mM). Zeta potential measurementsmore » suggest that brucite precipitation caused flocculation by charge neutralization. When calcium concentration was 12.5 mM, flocculation was also observed at a pH of 10. Furthermore, zeta potential remained negative up to pH 11.5, suggesting that precipitated calcite caused flocculation by a sweeping coagulation mechanism.« less

  2. The secondary alkaline zinc electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLarnon, Frank R.; Cairns, Elton J.

    1991-02-01

    The worldwide studies conducted between 1975 and 1990 with the aim of improving cell lifetimes of secondary alkaline zinc electrodes are overviewed. Attention is given the design features and characteristics of various secondary alkaline zinc cells, including four types of zinc/nickel oxide cell designs (vented static-electrolyte, sealed static-electrolyte, vibrating-electrode, and flowing-electrolyte); two types of zinc/air cells (mechanically rechargeable consolidated-electrode and mechanically rechargeable particulate-electrode); zinc/silver oxide battery; zinc/manganese dioxide cell; and zinc/ferric cyanide battery. Particular consideration is given to recent research in the fields of cell thermodynamics, zinc electrodeposition, zinc electrodissolution, zinc corrosion, electrolyte properties, mathematical and phenomenological models, osmotic pumping, nonuniform current distribution, and cell cycle-life perforamnce.

  3. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassovs research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herrings group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  4. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Colleen

    1998-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-sponsored project for teachers of grades 5-12, designed to: (1) enhance understanding of the Earth as an integrated system; (2) enhance the interdisciplinary approach to science instruction; and (3) provide classroom materials that focus on those goals. Discover Earth is conducted by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in collaboration with Dr. Eric Barron, Director, Earth System Science Center, The Pennsylvania State University; and Dr. Robert Hudson, Chair, the Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland at College Park. The enclosed materials: (1) represent only part of the Discover Earth materials; (2) were developed by classroom teachers who are participating in the Discover Earth project; (3) utilize an investigative approach and on-line data; and (4) can be effectively adjusted to classrooms with greater/without technology access. The Discover Earth classroom materials focus on the Earth system and key issues of global climate change including topics such as the greenhouse effect, clouds and Earth's radiation balance, surface hydrology and land cover, and volcanoes and climate change. All the materials developed to date are available on line at (http://www.strategies.org) You are encouraged to submit comments and recommendations about these materials to the Discover Earth project manager, contact information is listed below. You are welcome to duplicate all these materials.

  5. Studies on the stability of iodine compounds in iodized salt.

    PubMed

    KELLY, F C

    1953-01-01

    Contributions made by five groups of investigators to the knowledge of the stability of different iodine compounds in salt, and of the extent of the losses of iodine which may occur when iodized salt is exposed to different conditions of storage and use, are discussed by the author.STABILITY OF THE IODINE COMPONENT IN IODIZED SALT IS DETERMINED BY: (1) moisture content of the salt and humidity of the atmosphere; (2) light, heat, and other meteorological factors; (3) impurities in the salt; (4) acidity or alkalinity of the mixture; and (5) the form in which iodine is present.When potassium iodide or sodium iodide is used as the iodizing agent, the iodide content of the salt will remain constant and its distribution will remain uniform for many months if the salt is packed dry in a container with an impervious lining and kept dry, preferably in a cool place and away from strong light. When these conditions cannot be met, it is desirable to iodize salt with potassium iodate. Under adverse conditions of moisture, heat, and sunlight, the iodine content of salt iodized with potassium iodate remains relatively constant.

  6. Studies on the stability of iodine compounds in iodized salt*

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, F. C.

    1953-01-01

    Contributions made by five groups of investigators to the knowledge of the stability of different iodine compounds in salt, and of the extent of the losses of iodine which may occur when iodized salt is exposed to different conditions of storage and use, are discussed by the author. Stability of the iodine component in iodized salt is determined by: (1) moisture content of the salt and humidity of the atmosphere; (2) light, heat, and other meteorological factors; (3) impurities in the salt; (4) acidity or alkalinity of the mixture; and (5) the form in which iodine is present. When potassium iodide or sodium iodide is used as the iodizing agent, the iodide content of the salt will remain constant and its distribution will remain uniform for many months if the salt is packed dry in a container with an impervious lining and kept dry, preferably in a cool place and away from strong light. When these conditions cannot be met, it is desirable to iodize salt with potassium iodate. Under adverse conditions of moisture, heat, and sunlight, the iodine content of salt iodized with potassium iodate remains relatively constant. PMID:13094510

  7. Molten Metal Treatment by Salt Fluxing with Low Environmental Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Yogeshwar Sahai

    2007-07-31

    Abstract: Chlorine gas is traditionally used for fluxing of aluminum melt for removal of alkali and alkaline earth elements. However this results in undesirable emissions of particulate matter and gases such as HCl and chlorine, which are often at unacceptable levels. Additionally, chlorine gas is highly toxic and its handling, storage, and use pose risks to employees and the local community. Holding of even minimal amounts of chlorine necessitates extensive training for all plant employees. Fugitive emissions from chlorine usage within the plant cause accelerated corrosion of plant equipment. The Secondary Aluminum Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) under the Clean Air Act, finalized in March 2000 has set very tough new limits on particulate matter (PM) and total hydrogen chloride emissions from aluminum melting and holding furnaces. These limits are 0.4 and 0.1 lbs per ton of aluminum for hydrogen chloride and particulate emissions, respectively. Assuming new technologies for meeting these limits can be found, additional requirements under the Clean Air Act (Prevention of Significant Deterioration and New Source Review) trigger Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for new sources with annual emissions (net emissions not expressed per ton of production) over specified amounts. BACT currently is lime coated bag-houses for control of particulate and HCl emissions. These controls are expensive, difficult to operate and maintain, and result in reduced American competitiveness in the global economy. Solid salt fluxing is emerging as a viable option for the replacement of chlorine gas fluxing, provided emissions can be consistently maintained below the required levels. This project was a cooperative effort between the Ohio State University and Alcoa to investigate and optimize the effects of solid chloride flux addition in molten metal for alkali impurity and non-metallic inclusion removal minimizing dust and toxic emissions and maximizing energy

  8. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

  9. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1994-08-09

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner. 1 fig.

  10. Alkaline phytase from lily pollen: Investigation of biochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Jog, Sonali P; Garchow, Barry G; Mehta, Bakul Dhagat; Murthy, Pushpalatha P N

    2005-08-15

    Phytases catalyze the hydrolysis of phytic acid (InsP6, myo-inositol hexakisphosphate), the most abundant inositol phosphate in cells. In cereal grains and legumes, it constitutes 3-5% of the dry weight of seeds. The inability of humans and monogastric animals such as swine and poultry to absorb complexed InsP6 has led to nutritional and environmental problems. The efficacy of supplemental phytases to address these issues is well established; thus, there is a need for phytases with a range of biochemical and biophysical properties for numerous applications. An alkaline phytase that shows unique catalytic properties was isolated from plant tissues. In this paper, we report on the biochemical properties of an alkaline phytase from pollen grains of Lilium longiflorum. The enzyme exhibits narrow substrate specificity, it hydrolyzed InsP6 and para-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP). Alkaline phytase followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a K(m) of 81 microM and V(max) of 217 nmol Pi/min/mg with InsP6 and a K(m) of 372 microM and V(max) of 1272 nmol Pi/min/mg with pNPP. The pH optimum was 8.0 with InsP6 as the substrate and 7.0 with pNPP. Alkaline phytase was activated by calcium and inactivated by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid; however, the enzyme retained a low level of activity even in Ca2+-free medium. Fluoride as well as myo-inositol hexasulfate did not have any inhibitory affect, whereas vanadate inhibited the enzyme. The enzyme was activated by sodium chloride and potassium chloride and inactivated by magnesium chloride; the activation by salts followed the Hofmeister series. The temperature optimum for hydrolysis is 55 degrees C; the enzyme was stable at 55 degrees C for about 30 min. The enzyme has unique properties that suggest the potential to be useful as a feed supplement.

  11. Salt splitting using ceramic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, D.E.

    1997-10-01

    Many radioactive aqueous wastes in the DOE complex have high concentrations of sodium that can negatively affect waste treatment and disposal operations. Sodium can decrease the durability of waste forms such as glass and is the primary contributor to large disposal volumes. Waste treatment processes such as cesium ion exchange, sludge washing, and calcination are made less efficient and more expensive because of the high sodium concentrations. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City UT) are developing an electrochemical salt splitting process based on inorganic ceramic sodium (Na), super-ionic conductor (NaSICON) membranes that shows promise for mitigating the impact of sodium. In this process, the waste is added to the anode compartment, and an electrical potential is applied to the cell. This drives sodium ions through the membrane, but the membrane rejects most other cations (e.g., Sr{sup +2}, Cs{sup +}). The charge balance in the anode compartment is maintained by generating H{sup +} from the electrolysis of water. The charge balance in the cathode is maintained by generating OH{sup {minus}}, either from the electrolysis of water or from oxygen and water using an oxygen cathode. The normal gaseous products of the electrolysis of water are oxygen at the anode and hydrogen at the cathode. Potentially flammable gas mixtures can be prevented by providing adequate volumes of a sweep gas, using an alternative reductant or destruction of the hydrogen as it is generated. As H{sup +} is generated in the anode compartment, the pH drops. The process may be operated with either an alkaline (pH>12) or an acidic anolyte (pH <1). The benefits of salt splitting using ceramic membranes are (1) waste volume reduction and reduced chemical procurement costs by recycling of NaOH; and (2) direct reduction of sodium in process streams, which enhances subsequent operations such as cesium ion exchange, calcination, and vitrification.

  12. Dechlorination and stabilization of radioactive chloride salt waste in a molten state

    SciTech Connect

    In-Tae Kim; Hwan-Seo Park; Yong-Jun Cho; Hwan-Young Kim; Seong-Won Park; Eung-Ho Kim

    2007-07-01

    This study suggests a new method to stabilize the molten salt wastes generated from he pyro-processing of a LWR spent fuel. Using a conventional sol-gel process, an inorganic material (SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, SAP) reactive to metal chlorides was prepared. In this paper, the reactivity of the SAP on the metal chlorides at 650-850 deg. C, the thermal stability of the reaction products and their leach-resistance under the PCT-A leach test were investigated. In the SAP, three different kinds of chains are available; Si-O-Si (main chain), Si-O-Al (side chain) and Al-O-P/P-O-P (reactive chain). Alkali metal chlorides were converted into metal aluminosilicate (Li{sub x}Al{sub x}Si{sub 1-x}O{sub 2-x}) and metal phosphate(Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and Cs{sub 2}AlP{sub 3}O{sub 10}) while the alkaline earth and rare earth chlorides were changed into only metal phosphates (Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl and CePO{sub 4}). The conversion rate was about 96% at a salt waste/SAP weight ratio of 0.5 and a weight loss up to 1100 deg. C measured by the thermo-gravimetric analysis was below 1 Wt%. The leach rates of Cs and Sr under the PCT-A leaching condition were about 10{sup -2} and 10{sup -4} g/m{sup 3}.day, respectively. From these results, it could be concluded that the SAP developed in this study can be considered as an effective stabilizer for metal chlorides and the method of using the SAP could provide a chance to minimize the final waste volume to be disposed off. (authors)

  13. Petrogenesis of coeval silica-saturated and silica-undersaturated alkaline rocks: Mineralogical and geochemical evidence from the Saima alkaline complex, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu-Sheng; Yang, Jin-Hui; Sun, Jin-Feng; Zhang, Ji-Heng; Wu, Fu-Yuan

    2016-03-01

    A combined study of zircon U-Pb ages, mineral chemistry, whole-rock elements and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes was carried out for the Saima alkaline complex in the northeastern China, in order to investigate the source and petrogenesis of coeval silica-saturated and silica-undersaturated alkaline rocks. The Saima alkaline complex consists of nepheline syenites, quartz-bearing syenites and alkaline volcanic rocks (i.e., phonolite and trachyte), with minor mafic dikes and carbonatitic veins. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) zircon U-Pb dating gives consistent ages of 230-224 Ma for these rocks, suggesting that they are coeval. All alkaline rocks in the Saima complex are enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs) and light rare earth elements (LREEs), and depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs) with significant negative Nb, Ta and Ti anomalies. Geochemical data and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions indicate that the various alkaline rocks were all derived from partial melting of an ancient, re-enriched lithospheric mantle in the garnet stability field, but experienced variable siliceous- or carbonate-rich crustal contamination. Based on petrographic evidence, mineral compositions, and whole-rock geochemical data, two distinct magmatic evolutionary trends are proposed to explain the coeval emplacement of the various rock types within the Saima alkaline complex. The silica-undersaturated rocks (nepheline syenites and phonolites) result from alkali feldspar + apatite + titanite crystal fractionation of an alkaline mafic parental melt combined with assimilation of marine carbonate host rocks. In contrast, the generation of silica-saturated rocks (quartz-bearing syenites and trachytes) may be attributed to subsequent and continued clinopyroxene + apatite + biotite crystal fractionation coupled with assimilation of siliceous sediments.

  14. De Novo Transcriptional Analysis of Alfalfa in Response to Saline-Alkaline Stress

    PubMed Central

    An, Yi-Min; Song, Li-Li; Liu, Ying-Rui; Shu, Yong-Jun; Guo, Chang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Saline-alkaline stress, caused by high levels of harmful carbonate salts and high soil pH, is a major abiotic stress that affects crop productivity. Alfalfa is a widely cultivated perennial forage legume with some tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses, especially to saline-alkaline stress. To elucidate the mechanism underlying plant saline-alkaline tolerance, we conducted transcriptome analysis of whole alfalfa seedlings treated with saline-alkaline solutions for 0 day (control), 1 day (short-term treatment), and 7 days (long-term treatment) using ion torrent sequencing technology. A transcriptome database dataset of 53,853 unigenes was generated, and 2,286 and 2,233 genes were differentially expressed in the short-term and long-term treatment, respectively. Gene ontology analysis revealed 14 highly enriched pathways and demonstrated the differential response of metabolic pathways between the short-term and long-term treatment. The expression levels of 109 and 96 transcription factors were significantly altered significantly after 1 day and 7 days of treatment, respectively. Specific responses of peroxidase, flavonoids, and the light pathway component indicated that the antioxidant capacity was one of the central mechanisms of saline-alkaline stress tolerance response in alfalfa. Among the 18 differentially expressed genes examined by real time PCR, the expression levels of eight genes, including inositol transporter, DNA binding protein, raffinose synthase, ferritin, aldo/keto reductase, glutathione S-transferase, xyloglucan endotrans glucosylase, and a NAC transcription factor, exhibited different patterns in response to saline and alkaline stress. The expression levels of the NAC transcription factor and glutathione S-transferase were altered significantly under saline stress and saline-alkaline stress; they were upregulated under saline-alkaline stress and downregulated under salt stress. Physiology assays showed an increased concentration of reactive oxygen

  15. Alkaline Waterflooding Demonstration Project, Ranger Zone, Long Beach Unit, Wilmington Field, California. Fourth annual report, June 1979-May 1980. Volume 1. Body of report

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, J.D.

    1981-03-01

    Comparative core flood testing of preserved Ranger Zone core rock samples was completed; the past year's results were discouraging. In contrast, Ranger sand pack alkaline flood tests gave encouraging results. New insights were gained on in-situ alkaline consumption. Dehydration of sodium orthosilicate water-produced water-crude oil systems does not appear to create any operational problems. The alkaline injection facilities were completed and placed in operation on March 27, 1980. The preflush injection, which was composed of 11.5 million barrels of softened fresh water with an average 0.96% of salt, was completed at that time. The total preflush amounted to approximately 10 pore volume percent. The 0.4% sodium orthosilicate-1.0% salt-soft fresh water injection started at the end of the preflush. A loss of injectivity began at the same time as alkaline injection, which is attributed to divalent ions in the salt brine. Salt was removed temporarily from the system on May 30, 1980. No injection wells were redrilled during the year. Other than plug back of one injector and one producer because of bad liners and repair of one injection well with an inner liner, well work was routine and minor in nature. Dual injection strings were transferred from one well to another. One of the injection wells whose injectivity was damaged by the alkaline-salt injection was successfully stimulated. The pilot was self certified under the tertiary incentive program and cost recoupments obtained. Preparations are underway for making the alkaline flood simulator performance prediction for the pilot. Laboratory testing is actively underway in an attempt to quickly find a remedy for the floc formation that occurs on mixing the salt brine and dilute alkaline solution. Volume 1 describes the activities for this period. Volumes 2 and 3 contain appendices.

  16. Rainbow Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Library and Archives, Phoenix.

    The environment is a great concern in the 1990s, and everyone needs to work at maintaining our planet. The 1992 Arizona State Library Reading Program, "Rainbow Earth," provides children with many techniques they can use to help the Earth. This reading program guide provides information on the following: goals, objectives, and evaluation;…

  17. Earth tides

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Nineteen papers on gravity, tilt, and strain tides are compiled into this volume. Detailed chapters cover the calculation of the tidal forces and of the Earth's response to them, as well as actual observations of earth tides. Partial Contents: On Earth tides. The tidal forces: Tidal Forces. New Computations of the Tide-Generating Potential. Corrected Tables of Tidal Harmonics. The Theory of Tidal Deformations. Body Tides on an Elliptical, Rotating, Elastic and Oceanless Earth, Deformation of the Earth by Surface Loads. Gravimetric Tidal Loading Computed from Integrated Green's Functions. Tidal Friction in the Solid Earth. Loading Tides Versus Body Tides. Lunar Tidal Acceleration from Earth Satellite Orbit Analysis. Observations: gravity. Tidal Gravity in Britain: Tidal Loading and the Spatial Distribution of the Marine Tide. Tidal Loading along a Profile Europe-East Africa-South Asia-Australia and the Pacific Ocean. Detailed Gravity-Tide Spectrum between One and Four Cycles per Day. Observations: tilt and strain. Cavity and Topographic Effects in Tilt and Strain Measurement. Observations of Local Elastic Effects on Earth Tide Tilts and Strains.

  18. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more that two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  19. METHOD OF MAKING ALLOYS OF SECOND RARE EARTH SERIES METALS

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R.D.; Hayward, B.R.

    1963-01-01

    >This invention relates to a process for alloying the second rare earth series metals with Mo, Nb, or Zr. A halide of the rare earth metal is mixed with about 1 to 20 at.% of an oxide of Mo, Nb, or Zr. Iodine and an alkali or alkaline earth metal are added, and the resulting mixture is heated in an inert atmosphere to 350 deg C. (AEC)

  20. Molten salt electrolyte separator

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    A molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication.

  1. What Are Bath Salts?

    MedlinePlus

    ... risks of using synthetic cathinones (bath salts)? Another danger of bath salts is that they might contain ... Drugs: Is There a Way to Reduce the Dangers? June 09, 2015 / The NIDA Blog Team Concert ...

  2. Utah: Salt Lake Region

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Winter and Summer Views of the Salt Lake Region     View Larger Image Magnificent views of the region surrounding Salt Lake City, Utah are captured in these winter and summer images from the ...

  3. Retrospective salt tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.P.A.

    1996-12-31

    The conceptual breakthroughs in understanding salt tectonics can be recognized by reviewing the history of salt tectonics, which divides naturally into three parts: the pioneering era, the fluid era, and the brittle era. The pioneering era (1856-1933) featured the search for a general hypothesis of salt diapirism, initially dominated by bizarre, erroneous notions of igneous activity, residual islands, in situ crystallization, osmotic pressures, and expansive crystallization. Gradually data from oil exploration constrained speculation. The effects of buoyancy versus orogeny were debated, contact relations were characterized, salt glaciers were discovered, and the concepts of downbuilding and differential loading were proposed as diapiric mechanisms. The fluid era (1933-{approximately}1989) was dominated by the view that salt tectonics resulted from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in which a dense fluid overburden having negligible yield strength sinks into a less dense fluid salt layer, displacing it upward. Density contrasts, viscosity contrasts, and dominant wavelengths were emphasized, whereas strength and faulting of the overburden were ignored. During this era, palinspastic reconstructions were attempted; salt upwelling below thin overburdens was recognized; internal structures of mined diapirs were discovered; peripheral sinks, turtle structures, and diapir families were comprehended; flow laws for dry salt were formulated; and contractional belts on divergent margins and allochthonous salt sheets were recognized. The 1970s revealed the basic driving force of salt allochthons, intrasalt minibasins, finite strains in diapirs, the possibility of thermal convection in salt, direct measurement of salt glacial flow stimulated by rainfall, and the internal structure of convecting evaporites and salt glaciers. The 1980`s revealed salt rollers, subtle traps, flow laws for damp salt, salt canopies, and mushroom diapirs.

  4. Latest Mesozoic-Early Cenozoic Continental Extension and Related Alkaline Magmatism in Central Anatolia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadioglu, Y. K.

    2009-04-01

    The Central Anatolian crystalline complex (CACC) in Turkey includes a suite of latest Mesozoic-early Cenozoic plutonic rocks intruding the metamorphic and ophiolitic basement rocks. The intrusive rocks consist of three groups of granitoid, syenitoid, and gabbroids plutons. The granitoid units occur around the periphery of the CACC as large plutonic bodies, whereas the syenitoid assemblages crop out in the inner part of the CACC as small plutons. All the felsic plutons are crosscut by the gabbroid rocks in the region. The alkaline rocks of the CACC change in composition from nordmarkite through pulaskite to lusitanite, and are made of silica-saturated and silica-undersaturated magmas. The silica under-saturated alkaline rocks have gradual contacts with the silica-saturated alkaline rocks and constitute the main component of the alkaline rocks in the CACC. Nepheline, pseudoleucite, cancrinite, nosean, melanite and arfvedsonite are the main typical mineral compositions of the silica-undersaturated alkaline rocks. The leucite- and pseudoleucite-bearing rocks have porphyritic textures intruding the other main subunits of the alkaline rocks at high topographic elevations in the region. They are mostly composed of foid syenite, monzosyenite, monzodiorite and include rare amount of monzogabbro and foidolite. Each subunit has a transitional contact with the others and is crosscut by alkali feldspar foid syenite veins. Felsic dykes intrude the alkaline rock units and fluorite-bearing hydrothermal veins, which manifest themselves as alteration zones. The alkaline rocks have an abundance of xenolithic enclaves but lack any magma mixing-mingling produced enclaves. Normalized elemental patterns of the analyzed alkaline rocks show a slight enrichment in large ion lithophile elements (LILE) and light rare earth elements relatively to high field strength elements (HFSE) and heavy rare earth elements (HREE). The less fluid mobile, LILE and LREE concentration in the alkaline rocks

  5. Alkaline detergent recycling via ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-06-01

    The metal finishing industry uses alkaline cleaners and detergents to remove oils and dirt from manufactured parts, often before they are painted or plated. The use of these cleaners has grown because environmental regulations are phasing out ozone depleting substances and placing restrictions on the use and disposal of many hazardous solvents. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is examining ultrafiltration as a cleaning approach that reclaims the cleaning solutions and minimizes wastes. The ultrafiltration membrane is made from sheets of polymerized organic film. The sheets are rolled onto a supporting frame and installed in a tube. Spent cleaning solution is pumped into a filter chamber and filtered through the membrane that captures oils and dirt and allows water and detergent to pass. The membrane is monitored and when pressure builds from oil and dirt, an automatic system cleans the surface to maintain solution flow and filtration quality. The results show that the ultrafiltration does not disturb the detergent concentration or alkalinity but removed almost all the oils and dirt leaving the solution in condition to be reused.

  6. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  7. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  8. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  9. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  10. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the term iodized salt or iodized table salt is...

  11. Predicting species’ tolerance to salinity and alkalinity using distribution data and geochemical modelling: a case study using Australian grasses

    PubMed Central

    Saslis-Lagoudakis, C. Haris; Hua, Xia; Bui, Elisabeth; Moray, Camile; Bromham, Lindell

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Salt tolerance has evolved many times independently in different plant groups. One possible explanation for this pattern is that it builds upon a general suite of stress-tolerance traits. If this is the case, then we might expect a correlation between salt tolerance and other tolerances to different environmental stresses. This association has been hypothesized for salt and alkalinity tolerance. However, a major limitation in investigating large-scale patterns of these tolerances is that lists of known tolerant species are incomplete. This study explores whether species’ salt and alkalinity tolerance can be predicted using geochemical modelling for Australian grasses. The correlation between taxa found in conditions of high predicted salinity and alkalinity is then assessed. Methods Extensive occurrence data for Australian grasses is used together with geochemical modelling to predict values of pH and electrical conductivity to which species are exposed in their natural distributions. Using parametric and phylogeny-corrected tests, the geochemical predictions are evaluated using a list of known halophytes as a control, and it is determined whether taxa that occur in conditions of high predicted salinity are also found in conditions of high predicted alkalinity. Key Results It is shown that genera containing known halophytes have higher predicted salinity conditions than those not containing known halophytes. Additionally, taxa occurring in high predicted salinity tend to also occur in high predicted alkalinity. Conclusions Geochemical modelling using species’ occurrence data is a potentially useful approach to predict species’ relative natural tolerance to challenging environmental conditions. The findings also demonstrate a correlation between salinity tolerance and alkalinity tolerance. Further investigations can consider the phylogenetic distribution of specific traits involved in these ecophysiological strategies, ideally by

  12. Centuries of Human-Driven Change in Salt Marsh Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedan, K. Bromberg; Silliman, B. R.; Bertness, M. D.

    2009-01-01

    Salt marshes are among the most abundant, fertile, and accessible coastal habitats on earth, and they provide more ecosystem services to coastal populations than any other environment. Since the Middle Ages, humans have manipulated salt marshes at a grand scale, altering species composition, distribution, and ecosystem function. Here, we review historic and contemporary human activities in marsh ecosystems—exploitation of plant products; conversion to farmland, salt works, and urban land; introduction of non-native species; alteration of coastal hydrology; and metal and nutrient pollution. Unexpectedly, diverse types of impacts can have a similar consequence, turning salt marsh food webs upside down, dramatically increasing top down control. Of the various impacts, invasive species, runaway consumer effects, and sea level rise represent the greatest threats to salt marsh ecosystems. We conclude that the best way to protect salt marshes and the services they provide is through the integrated approach of ecosystem-based management.

  13. Centuries of human-driven change in salt marsh ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Gedan, K Bromberg; Silliman, B R; Bertness, M D

    2009-01-01

    Salt marshes are among the most abundant, fertile, and accessible coastal habitats on earth, and they provide more ecosystem services to coastal populations than any other environment. Since the Middle Ages, humans have manipulated salt marshes at a grand scale, altering species composition, distribution, and ecosystem function. Here, we review historic and contemporary human activities in marsh ecosystems--exploitation of plant products; conversion to farmland, salt works, and urban land; introduction of non-native species; alteration of coastal hydrology; and metal and nutrient pollution. Unexpectedly, diverse types of impacts can have a similar consequence, turning salt marsh food webs upside down, dramatically increasing top down control. Of the various impacts, invasive species, runaway consumer effects, and sea level rise represent the greatest threats to salt marsh ecosystems. We conclude that the best way to protect salt marshes and the services they provide is through the integrated approach of ecosystem-based management.

  14. Martian alkaline basites chemically resemble basic rocks of the Lovozero alkaline massif, Kola peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    The comparative wave planetology [1, 5] successfully overcomes the most principal martian test having now analyses of alkaline rocks from Columbia Hills [2, 3, 4]. This kind of rocks was predicted earlier on basis of the wave paradigm having stated that "the higher planetary relief range - the higher density difference between lithologies composing hypsometrically (tectonically) contrasting blocks [5]. This paradigm declares that "celestial bodies are dichotomic"(Theorem 1), "celestial bodies are sectoral" (Theorem 2), "celestial bodies are granular"(Theorem 3), "angular momenta of different level blocks tend to be equal" (Theorem 4)[1, 5]. Mars is a typical terrestrial planet but the farthest from Sun and thus with the smallest tide effects. Nevertheless it has the highest relief range and seems to be most distorted (ellipsoid in shape) and broken by deep fissures. The wave approach explains this by a warping action of standing waves of 4 ortho- and diagonal directions - they are the longest and highest in the martian case. These interfering warping waves caused by the elliptic keplerian orbits implying periodically changing accelerations and inertia-gravity forces produce inevitable tectonic dichotomy (the fundamental wave 1 long 2πR), sectoring (wave 2, πR, and other overtones), granulation. A granule size depends on an orbital frequency: the higher frequency the smaller granule. The Earth's granule, as a scale, is πR/4 (see it in NASA's PIA04159), Venus ` πR/6, Mercury's πR/16, Mars' πR/2 (the sizes are strictly tied to orb. fr.). Along with the granule sizes increase relief ranges ( Mercury ˜5 km, Venus 14, Earth 20, Mars ˜30) and compositional (density) difference between lowland and highland lithologies [5]. The lowland compositions become Fericher and denser: enstatite (Mercury), Mg-basalt (Venus), tholeiite (Earth), Fe-basalt (Mars). The highland compositions get less dense, lighter: anorthosite, alkaline basalt, andesite and conditional "albitite

  15. Discover Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Discover Earth is a NASA-funded project for teachers of grades 5-12 who want to expand their knowledge of the Earth system, and prepare to become master teachers who promote Earth system science in their own schools, counties, and throughout their state. Participants from the following states are invited to apply: Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, DC. Teachers selected for the project participate in a two-week summer workshop conducted at the University of Maryland, College Park; develop classroom-ready materials during the workshop for broad dissemination; conduct a minimum of two peer training activities during the coming school year; and participate in other enrichment/education opportunities as available and desired. Discover Earth is a team effort that utilizes expertise from a range of contributors, and balances science content with hands-on classroom applications.

  16. Alkaline buffers release EDRF from bovine cultured aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J. A.; de Nucci, G.; Warner, T. D.; Vane, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    1. Release of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) and prostacyclin (PGI2) from bovine cultured aortic endothelial cells (EC) was measured by bioassay and radioimmunoassay, respectively. 2. Bradykinin (BK, 3-30 pmol), adenosine diphosphate (ADP, 2-6 nmol) or the sodium ionophore monensin (40-100 nmol) injected through a column of EC released EDRF. L-Arginine free base (FB; 10-20 mumol) or D-arginine FB (10-20 mumol) injected through the column of EC released similar amounts of EDRF and also caused an increase in pH of the Krebs solution perfusing the EC from 7.5-8.0 to 8.6-9.5. Sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) an alkaline buffer which caused the same changes in the pH of the Krebs solution also induced the same release of EDRF. The hydrochloride salts of L- or D-arginine did not cause either release of EDRF when injected through the column of EC or increases in the pH of the Krebs solution. 3. Inhibitors of either diacylglycerol lipase (RHC 80267) or kinase (R59022) inhibited the release of EDRF induced by BK or ADP but potentiated the release induced by L-arginine FB, monensin (40-100 nmol) or alkaline buffer (Na2CO3). R59022 and RHC 80267 infused through the EC increased the basal release of EDRF. 4. When calcium chloride was omitted from the Krebs solution the release of EDRF induced by alkaline buffer (Na2CO3; pH 8.6-9.5) or L-arginine FB (10-20 mumol) was selectively inhibited when compared to that induced by BK (3-30 pmol) or ADP (2-6 nmol). This inhibition was reversed when calcium (2.5 mM) was restored. 5. NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA; 30 microM) inhibited release of EDRF induced by BK (10-30 pmol) or alkaline buffers (Na2CO3 or D-arginine FB; pH 8.6-9.5). This inhibition was partially reversed by L- but not D-arginine FB or HCl (30-100 microM). 6. Prostacyclin was released when BK (10 pmol), ADP (2 nmol) or arachidonic acid (30 nmol) were injected through the column of EC. However, monensin (40 nmol) or alkaline buffers (pH 8.6-9.5) did not release

  17. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  18. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T.

    2000-11-01

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  19. Digital Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Beaujardiere, J.

    2001-05-01

    Digital Earth (DE) seeks to make geospatial information broadly and easily available. Vast amounts of natural and cultural information are gathered about the Earth, but it is often difficult to find needed data, to share knowledge across disciplines, and to combine information from several sources. DE defines a framework for interoperability by selecting relevant open standards from the information technology community. These standards specify the technical means by which publishers can provide or sell their data, and by which client applications can find and access data in an automated fashion. The standardized DE framework enables many types of clients--from web browsers to museum kiosks to research-grade virtual environments--to use a common geospatial information infrastructure. Digital Earth can benefit Earth system education in general, and DLESE in particular, in several ways. First, educators, students and creators of instructional material will benefit from standardized access to georeferenced data. Secondly, educational lesson plans that focus on a region or aspect of the Earth can themselves be considered geospatial information resources that could be cataloged and retrieved through DE. Finally, general public knowledge about our planet will by increased by Digital Earth.

  20. Closed type alkaline storage battery

    SciTech Connect

    Hayama, H.

    1980-06-10

    The alkaline storage battery employs a metallic hat shaped terminal closure which has a piercing needle as well as a puncturable metallic diaphragm positioned below the piercing needle. The needle is fixed by caulking at its peripheral edge portion to a edge of the closure. A comparatively thick and hard metal plate is placed on the inner surface of the diaphragm and is applied to an open portion of a tubular metallic container which has a battery element. A peripheral edge portion of the closure, the diaphragm and the metallic plate are clamped in airtight relationship through a packing between the caulked end portion and an inner annular step portion of the metallic container of the battery. A lead wire extends from one polarity electrode of the battery element and is connected to a central portion of the metallic plate.

  1. Constructing and Screening a Metagenomic Library of a Cold and Alkaline Extreme Environment.

    PubMed

    Glaring, Mikkel A; Vester, Jan K; Stougaard, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Natural cold or alkaline environments are common on Earth. A rare combination of these two extremes is found in the permanently cold (less than 6 °C) and alkaline (pH above 10) ikaite columns in the Ikka Fjord in Southern Greenland. Bioprospecting efforts have established the ikaite columns as a source of bacteria and enzymes adapted to these conditions. They have also highlighted the limitations of cultivation-based methods in this extreme environment and metagenomic approaches may provide access to novel extremophilic enzymes from the uncultured majority of bacteria. Here, we describe the construction and screening of a metagenomic library of the prokaryotic community inhabiting the ikaite columns.

  2. Regenerative fuel cell energy storage system for a low Earth orbit space station

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.E.; Garow, J.; Michaels, K.B.

    1984-08-01

    Results of a study to define the characteristics of a regenerative fuel cell energy storage system for a large space station operating in low earth orbit (LEO) are presented. The regenerative fuel cell system employs an alkaline electrolyte fuel cell with the option of employing either an alkaline or a solid polymer electrolyte electrolyzer.

  3. Anaglyph, Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This anaglyph image provides a stereoscopic map view of north central Utah that includes all of these Olympic sites. In the south, next to Utah Lake, Provo hosts the ice hockey competition. In the north, northeast of the Great Salt Lake, Ogden hosts curling and the nearby Snowbasin ski area hosts the downhill events. In between, southeast of the Great Salt Lake, Salt Lake City hosts the Olympic Village and the various skating events. Further east, across the Wasatch Mountains, the Park City ski resort hosts the bobsled, ski jumping, and snowboarding events. The Winter Olympics are always hosted in mountainous terrain. This view shows the dramatic landscape that makes the Salt Lake City region a world-class center for winter sports.

    The stereoscopic effect of this anaglyph was created by first draping a Landsat satellite image over a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM

  4. Earth: Earth Science and Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2001-01-01

    A major new NASA initiative on environmental change and health has been established to promote the application of Earth science remote sensing data, information, observations, and technologies to issues of human health. NASA's Earth Sciences suite of Earth observing instruments are now providing improved observations science, data, and advanced technologies about the Earth's land, atmosphere, and oceans. These new space-based resources are being combined with other agency and university resources, data integration and fusion technologies, geographic information systems (GIS), and the spectrum of tools available from the public health community, making it possible to better understand how the environment and climate are linked to specific diseases, to improve outbreak prediction, and to minimize disease risk. This presentation is an overview of NASA's tools, capabilities, and research advances in this initiative.

  5. SALT Science Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, David; Schroeder, Anja

    2015-06-01

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) has seen great changes in the last years following the beginning of full time science operations in 2011. The three first generation instruments, namely the SALTICAM imager, the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) and its multiple modes and finally in 2014, the new High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS), have commissioned it. The SALT community now eagerly anticipate the installation and commissioning of the near-infrared arm of RSS, likely to commence in 2016. The the third "Science with SALT" conference was held at the Stellenbosch Institute of Advanced Study from 1-5 June 2015. The goals of this conference were to: -Present and discuss recent results from SALT observations; -Anticipate scientific programs that will be carried out with new SALT instrumentation such as RSS-NIR; -Provide a scientific environment in which to foster inter-institutional and inter-facility collaborations between scientists at the different SALT partners; -Provide an opportunity for students and postdocs to become more engaged in SALT science and operations; -Encourage the scientific strategic planning that will be necessary to insure an important role for SALT in an era of large astronomical facilities in the southern hemisphere such as MeerKAT, the SKA, LSST, and ALMA; -Consider options for future instrumentation and technical development of SALT; and, -Present, discuss, and engage in the SALT Collateral Benefits program led by SAAO. Conference proceedings editors: David Buckley and Anja Schroeder

  6. Enhanced Thermostability of a Fungal Alkaline Protease by Different Additives

    PubMed Central

    Nirmal, Nilesh P.; Laxman, R. Seeta

    2014-01-01

    A fungal strain (Conidiobolus brefeldianus MTCC 5184) isolated from plant detritus secreted a high activity alkaline protease. Thermostability studies of the fungal alkaline protease (FAP) revealed that the protease is stable up to 50°C with 40% residual activity after one hour. Effect of various additives such as sugars, sugar alcohols, polyols, and salts, on the thermostability of FAP was evaluated. Among the additives tested, glycerol, mannitol, xylitol, sorbitol, and trehalose were found to be very effective in increasing the stability of FAP, which was found to be concentration dependent. Fivefold increase in residual activity of FAP was observed in the presence of trehalose (50%) and sorbitol (50%) at 50°C for 4 h, compared to FAP without additive. Other additives like calcium at 20 mM and 10–15% ammonium sulphate showed lower stability improvement than trehalose and sorbitol. NaCl, MgCl2, K2HPO4, and glycine were found to be poor stabilizers and showed only a marginal improvement. PEG 6000 did not show any increase in stability but was found to be slightly inhibitory. PMID:25105022

  7. Interfacial activity in alkaline flooding enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization of long-chained organic acids in the crude oil to form soaps was shown to be primarily responsible for the lowering of oil-water interfacial tension at alkaline pH. These active acids can be concentrated by silica gel chromatography into a minor polar fraction. An equilibrium chemical model was proposed based on 2 competing reactions: the ionization of acids to form active anions, and the formation of undissociated soap between acid anions and sodium ions. It correlates the interfacial activity with the interfacial concentration of active acid anions which is expressed in terms of the concentrations of the chemical species in the system. The model successfully predicts the observed oil-alkaline solution interfacial phenomenon, including its dependence on pH, alkali and salt concentrations, type of acid present and type of soap formed. Flooding at different alkali concentrations to activate different acid species present in the crude was shown to give better recovery than flooding at a single high alkali concentration. Treating the crude oil with a dilute solution of mineral acids liberates additional free active acids and yields better interfacial activity during subsequent alkali contact.

  8. Evolution of alkaline phosphatases in primates.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, D J; Rogers, C; Harris, H

    1982-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase [orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum), EC 3.1.3.1] in placenta, intestine, liver, kidney, bone, and lung from a variety of primate species has been characterized by quantitative inhibition, thermostability, and immunological studies. Characteristic human placental-type alkaline phosphatase occurs in placentas of great apes (chimpanzee and orangutan) but not in placentas of other primates, including gibbon. It is also present in trace amounts in human lung but not in lung or other tissues of various Old and New World monkeys. However, a distinctive alkaline phosphatase resembling it occurs in substantial amounts in lungs from Old World monkeys but not New World monkeys. It appears that duplication of alkaline phosphatase genes and mutations of genetic elements controlling their tissue expression have occurred relatively recently in mammalian evolution. Images PMID:6950431

  9. Alkaline pH sensor molecules.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichiro N

    2015-11-01

    Animals can survive only within a narrow pH range. This requires continual monitoring of environmental and body-fluid pH. Although a variety of acidic pH sensor molecules have been reported, alkaline pH sensor function is not well understood. This Review describes neuronal alkaline pH sensors, grouped according to whether they monitor extracellular or intracellular alkaline pH. Extracellular sensors include the receptor-type guanylyl cyclase, the insulin receptor-related receptor, ligand-gated Cl- channels, connexin hemichannels, two-pore-domain K+ channels, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Intracellular sensors include TRP channels and gap junction channels. Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying alkaline pH sensing is crucial for understanding how animals respond to environmental alkaline pH and how body-fluid pH is maintained within a narrow range.

  10. Biochemical Localization of Alkaline Phosphatase in the Cell Wall of a Marine Pseudomonad

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Linda M. M.; MacLeod, Robert A

    1974-01-01

    The various layers of the cell envelope of marine pseudomonad B-16 (ATCC 19855) have been separated from the cells and assayed directly for alkaline phosphatase activity under conditions established previously to be optimum for maintenance of the activity of the enzyme. Under conditions known to lead to the release of the contents of the periplasmic space from the cells, over 90% of the alkaline phosphatase was released into the medium. Neither the loosely bound outer layer nor the outer double-track layer (cell wall membrane) showed significant activity. A small amount of the alkaline phosphatase activity of the cells remained associated with the mureinoplasts when the outer layers of the cell wall were removed. Upon treatment of the mureinoplasts with lysozyme, some alkaline phosphatase was released into the medium and some remained with the protoplasts formed. Cells washed and suspended in 0.5 M NaCl were lysed by treatment with 2% toluene, and 95% of the alkaline phosphatase in the cells was released into the medium. Cells washed and suspended in complete salts solution (0.3 M NaCl, 0.05 M MgSO4, and 0.01 M KCl) or 0.05 M MgSO4 appeared intact after treatment with toluene but lost 50 and 10%, respectively, of their alkaline phosphatase. The results suggest that the presence of Mg2+ in the cell wall is necessary to prevent disruption of the cells by toluene and may also be required to prevent the release of alkaline phosphatase by toluene when disruption of the cells by toluene does not take place. PMID:4811547

  11. Photochemistry of triarylsulfonium salts

    SciTech Connect

    Dektar, J.L.; Hacker, N.P. )

    1990-08-01

    The photolysis of triphenylsulfonium, tris(4-methylphenyl)sulfonium, tris(4-chlorophenyl)sulfonium, several monosubstituted (4-F, 4-Cl, 4-Me, 4-MeO, 4-PhS, and 4-PhCO), and disubstituted (4,4{prime}-Me{sub 2} and 4,4{prime}-(MeO){sub 2}) triphenylsulfonium salts was examined in solution. It was found that direct irradiation of triphenylsulfonium salts produced new rearrangement products, phenylthiobiphenyls, along with diphenyl sulfide, which had been previously reported. Similarly, the triarylsulfonium salts, with the exception of the (4-(phenylthio)phenyl)diphenylsulfonium salts produced new rearrangement products, phenylthiobiphenyls, along with diphenyl sulfide, which had been previously reported. Similarly, the triarylsulfonium salts, with the exception of the (4-(phenylthio)phenyl)diphenylsulfonium salts, gave the new rearrangement products. The mechanism for direct photolysis is proposed to occur from the singlet excited states to give a predominant heterolytic cleavage along with some homolytic cleavage.

  12. Molten Salt Electrochemical Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-31

    metal tetrafluoroborates were examined for similar behavior. Commercial samples of the lithium, sodium and potassium salts were used, while the...REPORT a PERID C £0 inal, 1 June 1980-31 March Molten Salt Electrochemical Systems 1983 6 PERFORMING OŘG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(a) I CONTRACT OR...dilfferent from Reporl) IS. KEY WORDS (Continue ora ow... side 55 n~cssay and Identify by block number ) Molten Salt , Phase Diagram, Electrolyte 30

  13. A history of salt.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, M; Capasso, G; Di Leo, V A; De Santo, N G

    1994-01-01

    The medical history of salt begins in ancient times and is closely related to different aspects of human history. Salt may be extracted from sea water, mineral deposits, surface encrustations, saline lakes and brine springs. In many inland areas, wood was used as a fuel source for evaporation of brine and this practice led to major deafforestation in central Europe. Salt played a central role in the economies of many regions, and is often reflected in place names. Salt was also used as a basis for population censuses and taxation, and salt monopolies were practised in many states. Salt was sometimes implicated in the outbreak of conflict, e.g. the French Revolution and the Indian War of Independence. Salt has also been invested with many cultural and religious meanings, from the ancient Egyptians to the Middle Ages. Man's innate appetite for salt may be related to his evolution from predominantly vegetarian anthropoids, and it is noteworthy that those people who live mainly on protein and milk or who drink salty water do not generally salt their food, whereas those who live mainly on vegetables, rice and cereals use much more salt. Medicinal use tended to emphasize the positive aspects of salt, e.g. prevention of putrefaction, reduction of tissue swelling, treatment of diarrhea. Evidence was also available to ancient peoples of its relationship to fertility, particularly in domestic animals. The history of salt thus represents a unique example for studying the impact of a widely used dietary substance on different important aspects of man's life, including medical philosophy.

  14. The Story of the Oceans and Salt. What We Take from Our Environment. Science and Technology Education in Philippine Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philippines Univ., Quezon City. Science Education Center.

    This module provides information on: (1) the origin of the oceans; (2) sources of minerals and salt found in the sea; and (3) the role and uses of salt in various cultures (stating, for example, that the expression "salt of the earth" describes a person who is considered one of the best). (JN)

  15. Dosimetry using silver salts

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.

    2003-06-24

    The present invention provides a method for detecting ionizing radiation. Exposure of silver salt AgX to ionizing radiation results in the partial reduction of the salt to a mixture of silver salt and silver metal. The mixture is further reduced by a reducing agent, which causes the production of acid (HX) and the oxidized form of the reducing agent (R). Detection of HX indicates that the silver salt has been exposed to ionizing radiation. The oxidized form of the reducing agent (R) may also be detected. The invention also includes dosimeters employing the above method for detecting ionizing radiation.

  16. Anditalea andensis ANESC-ST--An Alkaliphilic Halotolerant Bacterium Capable of Electricity Generation under Alkaline-Saline Conditions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Wang, Victor Bochuan; Zhao, Cui-E; Zhang, Qichun; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Yang, Liang; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-01-01

    A great challenge in wastewater bioremediation is the sustained activity of viable microorganisms, which can contribute to the breakdown of waste contaminants, especially in alkaline pH conditions. Identification of extremophiles with bioremediation capability can improve the efficiency of wastewater treatment. Here, we report the discovery of an electrochemically active alkaliphilic halotolerant bacterium, Anditalea andensis ANESC-ST (=CICC10485T=NCCB 100412T), which is capable of generating bioelectricity in alkaline-saline conditions. A. andensis ANESC-ST was shown to grow in alkaline conditions between pH 7.0-11.0 and also under high salt condition (up to 4 wt% NaCl). Electrical output was further demonstrated in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with an average current density of ~0.5 µA/cm2, even under the harsh condition of 4 wt% NaCl and pH 9.0. Subsequent introduction of secreted extracellular metabolites into MFCs inoculated with Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa yielded enhanced electrical output. The ability of A. andensis ANESC-ST to generate energy under alkaline-saline conditions points towards a solution for bioelectricity recovery from alkaline-saline wastewater. This is the first report of A.andensis ANESC-ST producing bioelectricity at high salt concentration and pH.

  17. Digital Earth - A sustainable Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahavir

    2014-02-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth.

  18. Salt transport extraction of transuranium elements from lwr fuel

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, R. Dean; Ackerman, John P.; Battles, James E.; Johnson, Terry R.; Miller, William E.

    1992-01-01

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl.sub.2 and a Cu--Mg alloy containing not less than about 25% by weight Mg at a temperature in the range of from about 750.degree. C. to about 850.degree. C. to precipitate uranium metal and some of the noble metal fission products leaving the Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and some of the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl.sub.2 having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO.sub.2. The Ca metal and CaCl.sub.2 is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with a transport salt including Mg Cl.sub.2 to transfer Mg values from the transport salt to the Cu--Mg alloy while transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product metals transfer from the Cu--Mg alloy to the transport salt. Then the transport salt is mixed with a Mg--Zn alloy to transfer Mg values from the alloy to the transport salt while the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product values dissolved in the salt are reduced and transferred to the Mg--Zn alloy.

  19. Salt transport extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Miller, W.E.

    1992-11-03

    A process is described for separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl[sub 2] and a Cu--Mg alloy containing not less than about 25% by weight Mg at a temperature in the range of from about 750 C to about 850 C to precipitate uranium metal and some of the noble metal fission products leaving the Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and some of the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl[sub 2] having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO[sub 2]. The Ca metal and CaCl[sub 2] is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with a transport salt including MgCl[sub 2] to transfer Mg values from the transport salt to the Cu--Mg alloy while transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product metals transfer from the Cu--Mg alloy to the transport salt. Then the transport salt is mixed with a Mg--Zn alloy to transfer Mg values from the alloy to the transport salt while the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product values dissolved in the salt are reduced and transferred to the Mg--Zn alloy. 2 figs.

  20. Think Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedermeyer, Fred; Ice, Kay

    1992-01-01

    Describes a series of environmental education instructional units for grades K-6 developed by the Think Earth Consortium that cover topics such as conservation, pollution control, and waste reduction. Provides testimony from one sixth-grade teacher that field tested the second-grade unit. (MDH)

  1. Rare earths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, J.

    2013-01-01

    Global mine production of rare earths was estimated to have declined slightly in 2012 relative to 2011 (Fig. 1). Production in China was estimated to have decreased to 95 from 105 kt (104,700 from 115,700 st) in 2011, while new mine production in the United States and Australia increased.

  2. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    1995-01-01

    A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

  3. Earth meandering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadiyan, H.; Zamani, A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we try to put away current Global Tectonic Model to look the tectonic evolution of the earth from new point of view. Our new dynamic model is based on study of river meandering (RM) which infer new concept as Earth meandering(EM). In a universal gravitational field if we consider a clockwise spiral galaxy model rotate above Ninety East Ridge (geotectonic axis GA), this system with applying torsion field (likes geomagnetic field) in side direction from Rocky Mt. (west geotectonic pole WGP) to Tibetan plateau TP (east geotectonic pole EGP),it seems that pulled mass from WGP and pushed it in EGP due to it's rolling dynamics. According to this idea we see in topographic map that North America and Green land like a tongue pulled from Pacific mouth toward TP. Actually this system rolled or meander the earth over itself fractaly from small scale to big scale and what we see in the river meandering and Earth meandering are two faces of one coin. River transport water and sediments from high elevation to lower elevation and also in EM, mass transport from high altitude-Rocky Mt. to lower altitude Himalaya Mt. along 'S' shape geodetic line-optimum path which connect points from high altitude to lower altitude as kind of Euler Elastica(EE). These curves are responsible for mass spreading (source) and mass concentration (sink). In this regard, tiltness of earth spin axis plays an important role, 'S' are part of sigmoidal shape which formed due to intersection of Earth rolling with the Earth glob and actual feature of transform fault and river meandering. Longitudinal profile in mature rivers as a part of 'S' curve also is a kind of EE. 'S' which bound the whole earth is named S-1(S order 1) and cube corresponding to this which represent Earth fracturing in global scale named C-1(cube order 1 or side vergence cube SVC), C-1 is a biggest cycle of spiral polygon, so it is not completely closed and it has separation about diameter of C-7. Inside SVC we introduce cone

  4. Integrated Salt Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, Janos L.; Kukla, Peter A.

    2015-04-01

    The growing importance of salt in the energy, subsurface storage, and chemical and food industries also increases the challenges with prediction of geometries, kinematics, stress and transport in salt. This requires an approach, which integrates a broader range of knowledge than is traditionally available in the different scientific and engineering disciplines. We aim to provide a starting point for a more integrated understanding of salt, by presenting an overview of the state of the art in a wide range of salt-related topics, from (i) the formation and metamorphism of evaporites, (ii) rheology and transport properties, (iii) salt tectonics and basin evolution, (iv) internal structure of evaporites, (v) fluid flow through salt, to (vi) salt engineering. With selected case studies we show how integration of these domains of knowledge can bring better predictions of (i) sediment architecture and reservoir distribution, (ii) internal structure of salt for optimized drilling and better cavern design, (iii) reliable long-term predictions of deformations and fluid flow in subsurface storage. A fully integrated workflow is based on geomechanical models, which include all laboratory and natural observations and links macro- and micro-scale studies. We present emerging concepts for (i) the initiation dynamics of halokinesis, (ii) the rheology and deformation of the evaporites by brittle and ductile processes, (iii) the coupling of processes in evaporites and the under- and overburden, and (iv) the impact of the layered evaporite rheology on the structural evolution.

  5. Molten salt electrolyte separator

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-09

    The patent describes a molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication. 5 figs.

  6. SALT for Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bancroft, W. Jane

    1996-01-01

    Discusses Schuster's Suggestive-Accelerative Learning Techniques (SALT) Method, which combines Lozanov's Suggestopedia with such American methods as Asher's Total Physical Response and Galyean's Confluent Education. The article argues that students trained with the SALT Method have higher achievement scores and better attitudes than others. (14…

  7. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  8. Progress in Studying Salt Secretion from the Salt Glands in Recretohalophytes: How Do Plants Secrete Salt?

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fang; Leng, Bingying; Wang, Baoshan

    2016-01-01

    To survive in a saline environment, halophytes have evolved many strategies to resist salt stress. The salt glands of recretohalophytes are exceptional features for directly secreting salt out of a plant. Knowledge of the pathway(s) of salt secretion in relation to the function of salt glands may help us to change the salt-tolerance of crops and to cultivate the extensive saline lands that are available. Recently, ultrastructural studies of salt glands and the mechanism of salt secretion, particularly the candidate genes involved in salt secretion, have been illustrated in detail. In this review, we summarize current researches on salt gland structure, salt secretion mechanism and candidate genes involved, and provide an overview of the salt secretion pathway and the asymmetric ion transport of the salt gland. A new model recretohalophyte is also proposed. PMID:27446195

  9. [Salt and cancer].

    PubMed

    Strnad, Marija

    2010-05-01

    Besides cardiovascular disease, a high salt intake causes other adverse health effects, i.e., gastric and some other cancers, obesity (risk factor for many cancer sites), Meniere's disease, worsening of renal disease, triggering an asthma attack, osteoporosis, exacerbation of fluid retention, renal calculi, etc. Diets containing high amounts of food preserved by salting and pickling are associated with an increased risk of cancers of the stomach, nose and throat. Because gastric cancer is still the most common cancer in some countries (especially in Japan), its prevention is one of the most important aspects of cancer control strategy. Observations among Japanese immigrants in the U.S.A. and Brazil based on the geographic differences, the trend in cancer incidence with time, and change in the incidence patterns indicate that gastric cancer is closely associated with dietary factors such as the intake of salt and salted food. The findings of many epidemiological studies suggest that high dietary salt intake is a significant risk factor for gastric cancer and this association was found to be strong in the presence of Helicobacter (H.) pylori infection with atrophic gastritis. A high-salt intake strips the lining of the stomach and may make infection with H. pylori more likely or may exacerbate the infection. Salting, pickling and smoking are traditionally popular ways of preparing food in Japan and some parts of Asia. In addition to salt intake, cigarette smoking and low consumption of fruit and vegetables increase the risk of stomach cancer. However, it is not known whether it is specifically the salt in these foods or a combination of salt and other chemicals that can cause cancer. One study identified a mutagen in nitrite-treated Japanese salted fish, and chemical structure of this mutagen suggests that it is derived from methionine and that salt and nitrite are precursors for its formation. Working under conditions of heat stress greatly increased the workers

  10. Salt and nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Ticinesi, Andrea; Nouvenne, Antonio; Maalouf, Naim M; Borghi, Loris; Meschi, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Dietary sodium chloride intake is nowadays globally known as one of the major threats for cardiovascular health. However, there is also important evidence that it may influence idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis onset and recurrence. Higher salt intake has been associated with hypercalciuria and hypocitraturia, which are major risk factors for calcium stone formation. Dietary salt restriction can be an effective means for secondary prevention of nephrolithiasis as well. Thus in this paper, we review the complex relationship between salt and nephrolithiasis, pointing out the difference between dietary sodium and salt intake and the best methods to assess them, highlighting the main findings of epidemiologic, laboratory and intervention studies and focusing on open issues such as the role of dietary salt in secondary causes of nephrolithiasis.

  11. Alkaline tolerant dextranase from streptomyces anulatus

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Stephen R.; Adney, William S.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    A process for production of an alkaline tolerant dextranase enzyme comprises culturing a dextran-producing microorganism Streptomyces anulatus having accession no. ATCC PTA-3866 to produce an alkaline tolerant dextranase, Dex 1 wherein the protein in said enzyme is characterized by a MW of 63.3 kDa and Dex 2 wherein its protein is characterized by a MW of 81.8 kDa.

  12. Technetium recovery from high alkaline solution

    DOEpatents

    Nash, Charles A.

    2016-07-12

    Disclosed are methods for recovering technetium from a highly alkaline solution. The highly alkaline solution can be a liquid waste solution from a nuclear waste processing system. Methods can include combining the solution with a reductant capable of reducing technetium at the high pH of the solution and adding to or forming in the solution an adsorbent capable of adsorbing the precipitated technetium at the high pH of the solution.

  13. Toxicity of alkalinity to Hyalella azteca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasier, P.J.; Winger, P.V.; Reinert, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    Toxicity testing and chemical analyses of sediment pore water have been suggested for use in sediment quality assessments and sediment toxicity identification evaluations. However, caution should be exercised in interpreting pore-water chemistry and toxicity due to inherent chemical characteristics and confounding relationships. High concentrations of alkalinity, which are typical of sediment pore waters from many regions, have been shown to be toxic to test animals. A series of tests were conducted to assess the significance of elevated alkalinity concentrations to Hyalella azteca, an amphipod commonly used for sediment and pore-water toxicity testing. Toxicity tests with 14-d old and 7-d old animals were conducted in serial dilutions of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solutions producing alkalinities ranging between 250 to 2000 mg/L as CaCO3. A sodium chloride (NaCl) toxicity test was also conducted to verify that toxicity was due to bicarbonate and not sodium. Alkalinity was toxic at concentrations frequently encountered in sediment pore water. There was also a significant difference in the toxicity of alkalinity between 14-d old and 7-d old animals. The average 96-h LC50 for alkalinity was 1212 mg/L (as CaCO3) for 14-d old animals and 662 mg/L for the younger animals. Sodium was not toxic at levels present in the NaHCO3 toxicity tests. Alkalinity should be routinely measured in pore-water toxicity tests, and interpretation of toxicity should consider alkalinity concentration and test-organism tolerance.

  14. Prebiotic Synthesis of Glycine from Ethanolamine in Simulated Archean Alkaline Hydrothermal Vents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianlong; Tian, Ge; Gao, Jing; Han, Mei; Su, Rui; Wang, Yanxiang; Feng, Shouhua

    2016-09-23

    Submarine hydrothermal vents are generally considered as the likely habitats for the origin and evolution of early life on Earth. In recent years, a novel hydrothermal system in Archean subseafloor has been proposed. In this model, highly alkaline and high temperature hydrothermal fluids were generated in basalt-hosted hydrothermal vents, where H2 and CO2 could be abundantly provided. These extreme conditions could have played an irreplaceable role in the early evolution of life. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the abiotic synthesis of amino acids, which are indispensable components of life, at high temperature and alkaline condition. This study aims to propose a new method for the synthesis of glycine in simulated Archean submarine alkaline vent systems. We investigated the formation of glycine from ethanolamine under conditions of high temperature (80-160 °C) and highly alkaline solutions (pH = 9.70). Experiments were performed in an anaerobic environment under mild pressure (0.1-8.0 MPa) at the same time. The results suggested that the formation of glycine from ethanolamine occurred rapidly and efficiently in the presence of metal powders, and was favored by high temperatures and high pressures. The experiment provides a new pathway for prebiotic glycine formation and points out the phenomenal influence of high-temperature alkaline hydrothermal vents in origin of life in the early ocean.

  15. Prebiotic Synthesis of Glycine from Ethanolamine in Simulated Archean Alkaline Hydrothermal Vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianlong; Tian, Ge; Gao, Jing; Han, Mei; Su, Rui; Wang, Yanxiang; Feng, Shouhua

    2016-09-01

    Submarine hydrothermal vents are generally considered as the likely habitats for the origin and evolution of early life on Earth. In recent years, a novel hydrothermal system in Archean subseafloor has been proposed. In this model, highly alkaline and high temperature hydrothermal fluids were generated in basalt-hosted hydrothermal vents, where H2 and CO2 could be abundantly provided. These extreme conditions could have played an irreplaceable role in the early evolution of life. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the abiotic synthesis of amino acids, which are indispensable components of life, at high temperature and alkaline condition. This study aims to propose a new method for the synthesis of glycine in simulated Archean submarine alkaline vent systems. We investigated the formation of glycine from ethanolamine under conditions of high temperature (80-160 °C) and highly alkaline solutions (pH = 9.70). Experiments were performed in an anaerobic environment under mild pressure (0.1-8.0 MPa) at the same time. The results suggested that the formation of glycine from ethanolamine occurred rapidly and efficiently in the presence of metal powders, and was favored by high temperatures and high pressures. The experiment provides a new pathway for prebiotic glycine formation and points out the phenomenal influence of high-temperature alkaline hydrothermal vents in origin of life in the early ocean.

  16. Real-time materials evolution visualized within intact cycling alkaline batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaway, JW; Erdonmez, CK; Zhong, Z; Croft, M; Sviridov, LA; Sholklapper, TZ; Turney, DE; Banerjee, S; Steingart, DA

    2014-01-01

    The scientific community has focused on the problem of inexpensive, safe, and sustainable large-scale electrical energy storage, which is needed for a number of emerging societal reasons such as stabilizing intermittent renewables-based generation like solar and wind power. The materials used for large-scale storage will need to be low cost, earth-abundant, and safe at the desired scale. The Zn-MnO2 "alkaline" battery chemistry is associated with one-time use, despite being rechargeable. This is due to material irreversibilities that can be triggered in either the anode or cathode. However, as Zn and MnO2 have high energy density and low cost, they are economically attractive even at limited depth of discharge. As received, a standard bobbin-type alkaline cell costs roughly $20 per kW h. The U. S. Department of Energy ARPA-E $100 per kW h cost target for grid storage is thus close to the cost of alkaline consumer primary cells if re-engineered and/or cycled at 5-20% nominal capacity. Herein we use a deeply-penetrating in situ technique to observe ZnO precipitation near the separator in an alkaline cell anode cycled at 5% DOD, which is consistent with cell failures observed at high cycle life. Alkaline cells designed to avoid such causes of cell failure could serve as a low-cost baseload for large-scale storage.

  17. Water purification using organic salts

    DOEpatents

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  18. Alkaline Water and Longevity: A Murine Study

    PubMed Central

    Magro, Massimiliano; Corain, Livio; Ferro, Silvia; Baratella, Davide; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Terzo, Milo; Corraducci, Vittorino; Salmaso, Luigi; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The biological effect of alkaline water consumption is object of controversy. The present paper presents a 3-year survival study on a population of 150 mice, and the data were analyzed with accelerated failure time (AFT) model. Starting from the second year of life, nonparametric survival plots suggest that mice watered with alkaline water showed a better survival than control mice. Interestingly, statistical analysis revealed that alkaline water provides higher longevity in terms of “deceleration aging factor” as it increases the survival functions when compared with control group; namely, animals belonging to the population treated with alkaline water resulted in a longer lifespan. Histological examination of mice kidneys, intestine, heart, liver, and brain revealed that no significant differences emerged among the three groups indicating that no specific pathology resulted correlated with the consumption of alkaline water. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survival data as a function of watering with alkaline water of long-lived mouse models. PMID:27340414

  19. Performed surfactant-optimized aqueous alkaline flood

    SciTech Connect

    Thigpen, D.R.; Lawson, J.B.; Nelson, R.C.

    1991-11-26

    This paper describes improvement in a process for recovering oil from an acidic oil reservoir by injecting an aqueous alkaline solution comprising water, sodium chloride, and alkaline material for reacting with the reservoir oil forming a petroleum acid soap to form an in-situ surfactant system. The improvement comprises: selecting a preformed cosurfactant which is soluble in both the aqueous solution and the reservoir oil and has a solubility ratio which is grater than the solubility ratio of the petroleum acid soap where the solubility ratio is the ratio of solubility in the aqueous alkaline solution to the solubility in the reservoir oil; combining with the alkaline solution an amount of the preformed cosurfactant which will result in the in-situ surfacant system having a salinity about equal to a salinity which results in minimal interfacial tension between the oil in the reservoir and the in-situ surfactant system at reservoir temperature, wherein the amount of the preformed cosurfactant is about 0.3 percent by weight in the aqueous alkaline solution; and injecting the cosurfactant-aqueous alkaline solution mixture into the reservoir to displace oil toward a fluid production location.

  20. Alkaline regenerative fuel cell systems for energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Reid, M. A.; Martin, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    A description is presented of the results of a preliminary design study of a regenerative fuel cell energy storage system for application to future low-earth orbit space missions. The high energy density storage system is based on state-of-the-art alkaline electrolyte cell technology and incorporates dedicated fuel cell and electrolysis cell modules. In addition to providing energy storage, the system can provide hydrogen and oxygen for attitude control of the satellite and for life support. During the daylight portion of the orbit the electrolysis module uses power provided by the solar array to generate H2 and O2 from the product water produced by the fuel cell module. The fuel cell module supplies electrical power during the dark period of the orbit.

  1. Mechanism of Pitting Corrosion Prevention by Nitrite in Carbon Steel Exposed to Dilute Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.E.

    2002-05-02

    The overall goal of this project was to develop a detailed understanding of the role of nitrite in preventing the breakdown of protective oxide on steel and on the onset of pitting, by considering the interactions of the oxidation and reduction reactions that may occur in alkaline salt solutions.

  2. SALICYLATE PROCESS FOR THORIUM SEPARATION FROM RARE EARTHS

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, G.A.

    1959-08-25

    The separation of thorium from rare earths is accomplished by forming an aqueous solution of salts of thorium and rare earths and sufficient acetate buffer to provide a pH of between 2 and 5, adding an ammonium salicylate to the aqueous buffered solution, contacting the resultant solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent mixture of an ether and an ester, and separating the solvent extract phase containing thorium salicylate from the aqueous phase containing the rare earths.

  3. [Alkaline phosphatase in Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    2005-01-01

    In free-living Amoeba proteus (strain B), 3 phosphatase were found after disc-electrophoresis of 10 microg of protein in PAGE and using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a substrate a pH 9.0. These phosphatases differed in their electrophoretic mobilities - "slow" (1-3 bands), "middle" (one band) and "fast" (one band). In addition to 1-naphthyl phosphate, "slow" phosphatases were able to hydrolyse 2-naphthyl phosphate and p-nitrophenyl phosphate. They were slightly activated by Mg2+, completely inhibited by 3 chelators (EDTA, EGTA and 1,10-phenanthroline), L-cysteine, sodium dodecyl sulfate and Fe2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+ (50 mM), considerably inactivated by orthovanadate, molybdate, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 1, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, Na2HPO4, DL-dithiothreitol and urea and partly inhibited by H2O2, DL-phenylalanine, 2-mercaptoethanol, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 2 and Ca2+. Imidazole, L-(+)-tartrate, okadaic acid, NaF and sulfhydryl reagents -p-(hydroxy-mercuri)benzoate and N-ethylmaleimide - had no influence on the activity of "slow" phosphatases. "Middle" and "fast" phosphatases, in contrast to "slow" ones, were not inactivated by 3 chelators. The "middle" phosphatase differed from the "fast" one by smaller resistance to urea, Ca2+, Mn2+, phosphates and H2O2 and greater resistance to dithiothreitol and L-(+)-tartrate. In addition, the "fast" phosphatase was inhibited by L-cysteine but the "middle" one was activated by it. Of 5 tested ions (Mg2+, Cu2+, Mn2+, Ca2+ and Zn2+), only Zn2+ reactivated "slow" phosphatases after their inactivation by EDTA treatment. The reactivation of apoenzyme was only partial (about 35 %). Thus, among phosphatases found in amoebae at pH 9.0, only "slow" ones are Zn-metalloenzymes and may be considered as alkaline phosphatases (EC 3.1.3.1). It still remains uncertain, to which particular phosphatase class "middle" and "fast" phosphatases (pH 9.0) may belong.

  4. Stress, salt and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Henry, J P

    1988-01-01

    Reasons are given why calcium, obesity and genetics cannot be considered primary factors in the etiology of essential hypertension. This leaves the major protagonists as salt and neuroendocrine responses to the emotions aroused by the social environment. Most essential hypertension is renin dependent and associated with the physiological changes induced by arousal of the defence response. The psychosocial stimulation associated with this arousal induces an increase in salt appetite. This makes the salt consumption of society a measure of the social stress to which it is exposed. Primitive people whose blood pressure remains normal throughout their lives may lack modern societies' physically protective achievements but their religiously prescribed social solidarity may protect them from psychosocial stress. Our chronic suppression of awareness of emotional arousal together with loss of the ritualized support of affiliative behavior may result in repressed emotional responses which find somatic expression in diseases such as essential hypertension. Hypertensiologist George Pickering proposed that the primitive's ritual and taboo (the equivalent in our society might be the Alcoholic's Anonymous belief in a 'Higher Power') protect them from much anger and despair. He gave this precedence over salt as the primary factor in essential hypertension. New evidence supports this. Despite a high salt diet the blood pressure of socially adjusted rodents remains normal throughout their lifespan. On the other hand, the hypertension that develops when they are psychosocially stimulated is not abated by a low salt diet. In humans, the blood pressure of cloistered, secluded Italian nuns on a high salt diet has remained normal for 20 years while that of nearby village women has risen at a startling 2 mmHg/annum during the same period. On the other hand, in rapidly changing Malawi mature adult, rural and urban blood pressures are rising fast despite a low salt intake. Thus the

  5. Electrophoretic separation of alkaline and acid phosphatase isoenzymes from the pulp of monkey teeth.

    PubMed

    Franzén, A; Hasselgren, G

    1978-01-01

    Monkey pulps were homogenized in a Triton tris solution. After three centrifugation steps (800, 20000, and 105000 g) the supernatant was applied on acryl amide columns at pH 7.5 in a tris-diethyl barbituric acid buffer. Electrophoresis was performed at a constant current of 2.5 mA per gel column at 18--20 degrees C. Incubations for alkaline phosphatase (E.C. 3.1.3.1) were carried out at pH 8.3 using naphthol-AS-MX-phosphate as substrate and Fast Red Violet LB salt as coupler. Incubations for acid phosphatase (E.C. 3.1.3.2) were undertaken at pH 5.0 using alpha-naphtyl phosphate as substrate and hexazotized pararosanilin as coupling agent. After the incubations for alkaline phosphatase as well as acid phosphatase two bands showing enzyme activity were demonstrated. By means of treatment with heat (56 degrees C) prior to incubation or addition of vanadate or pyrophosphate to the incubation medium it was shown that the main part of the fast moving alkaline phosphatase band was sensitive to these procedures. The alkaline phosphatase of the slow moving band appeared to be resistant to heat or the addition of inhibitors.

  6. Advanced Thermal Storage System with Novel Molten Salt: December 8, 2011 - April 30, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Jonemann, M.

    2013-05-01

    Final technical progress report of Halotechnics Subcontract No. NEU-2-11979-01. Halotechnics has demonstrated an advanced thermal energy storage system with a novel molten salt operating at 700 degrees C. The molten salt and storage system will enable the use of advanced power cycles such as supercritical steam and supercritical carbon dioxide in next generation CSP plants. The salt consists of low cost, earth abundant materials.

  7. Amine salts of nitroazoles

    DOEpatents

    Kienyin Lee; Stinecipher, M.M.

    1993-10-26

    Compositions of matter, a method of providing chemical energy by burning said compositions, and methods of making said compositions are described. These compositions are amine salts of nitroazoles. 1 figure.

  8. Cooking without salt

    MedlinePlus

    ... flavor and nutrition. Plant-based foods -- carrots, spinach, apples, and peaches -- are naturally salt-free. Sun-dried ... types of pepper, including black, white, green, and red. Experiment with vinegars (white and red wine, rice ...

  9. Electrodialysis technology for salt recovery from aluminum salt cake

    SciTech Connect

    Hryn, J. N.; Krumdick, G.; Graziano, D.; Sreenivasarao, K.

    2000-02-02

    Electrodialysis technology for recovering salt from aluminum salt cake is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. Salt cake, a slag-like aluminum-industry waste stream, contains aluminum metal, salt (NaCl and KCl), and nonmetallics (primarily aluminum oxide). Salt cake can be recycled by digesting with water and filtering to recover the metal and oxide values. A major obstacle to widespread salt cake recycling is the cost of recovering salt from the process brine. Electrodialysis technology developed at Argonne appears to be a cost-effective approach to handling the salt brines, compared to evaporation or disposal. In Argonne's technology, the salt brine is concentrated until salt crystals are precipitated in the electrodialysis stack; the crystals are recovered downstream. The technology is being evaluated on the pilot scale using Eurodia's EUR 40-76-5 stack.

  10. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Salt Lake City, Utah, will host the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The city is located on the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake and sits to the west of the Wasatch Mountains, which rise more than 3,500 meters (10,000 feet) above sea level. The city was first settled in 1847 by pioneers seeking relief from religious persecution. Today Salt Lake City, the capital of Utah, is home to more than 170,000 residents. This true-color image of Salt Lake City was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard Landsat 7, on May 26, 2000. The southeastern tip of the Great Salt Lake is visible in the upper left of the image. The furrowed green and brown landscape running north-south is a portion of the Wasatch Mountains, some of which are snow-capped (white pixels). The greyish pixels in the center of the image show the developed areas of the city. A number of water reservoirs can be seen east of the mountain range. Salt Lake City International Airport is visible on the northwestern edge of the city. About 20 miles south of the airport is the Bingham Canyon Copper Mine (tan pixels), the world's largest open pit excavation. See also this MODIS image of Utah. Image courtesy NASA Landsat7 Science Team and USGS Eros Data Center

  11. Chromatographic resolution of a salt into its parent acid and base constituents.

    PubMed

    Davankov, Vadim; Tsyurupa, Maria

    2006-12-08

    Based on the results of the earlier proposed process of separation of mixtures of mineral electrolytes by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), it has been suggested that a mineral salt must spontaneously resolve, at least partially, into its parent acid and base constituents, provided that the separating media discriminates the anion and cation of the salt according to their size. Indeed, migration of a zone of an aqueous salt solution through a bed of neutral nanoporous hypercrosslinked polystyrene-type packing was shown to result in the generation of acidic and alkaline effluent fractions. The principle of spontaneous salt resolution has been extended to other types of discriminating interactions between the stationary phase and the two ions of the salt. The idea was exemplified by the resolution of ammonium acetate, due to hydrophobic retention of the acetate, into fractions enriched in ammoniac and then acetic acid.

  12. Sulfur Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  13. Intermediate range order in alkaline borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crupi, C.; Carini, G.; Ruello, G.; D'Angelo, G.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the neutron diffraction patterns of a series of alkaline borate glasses at different metal oxide content. Strong differences are observed in the intermediate range order as a function of the specific alkaline ion and of its concentration. On these results, we propose that the first sharp diffraction peak arises from correlations of atoms of voids and show that the compositional variation of this peak intensity in alkaline borate glasses is due to changes in the distribution of void sizes within the three-dimensional network. We argue that our interpretation in terms of interstitial (empty and/or filled) voids, having different sizes, provides a general explanation for all anomalous behaviours revealed for the first sharp diffraction peak.

  14. Transition from alkaline to calc-alkaline volcanism during evolution of the Paleoproterozoic Francevillian basin of eastern Gabon (Western Central Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiéblemont, Denis; Bouton, Pascal; Préat, Alain; Goujou, Jean-Christian; Tegyey, Monique; Weber, Francis; Ebang Obiang, Michel; Joron, Jean Louis; Treuil, Michel

    2014-11-01

    We report new geochemical data for the volcanic and subvolcanic rocks associated with the evolution of the Francevillian basin of eastern Gabon during Paleoproterozoic times (c. 2.1-2 Ga). Filling of this basin has proceeded through four main sedimentary or volcano-sedimentary episodes, namely FA, FB, FC and FD. Volcanism started during the FB episode being present only in the northern part of the basin (Okondja sub-basin). This volcanism is ultramafic to trachytic in composition and displays a rather constant alkaline geochemical signature. This signature is typical of a within-plate environment, consistent with the rift-setting generally postulated for the Francevillian basin during the FB period. Following FB, the FC unit is 10-20 m-thick silicic horizon (jasper) attesting for a massive input of silica in the basin. Following FC, the FD unit is a c. 200-400 m-thick volcano-sedimentary sequence including felsic tuffs and epiclastic rocks. The geochemical signatures of these rocks are totally distinct from those of the FB alkaline lavas. High Th/Ta and La/Ta ratios attest for a calc-alkaline signature and slight fractionation between heavy rare-earth suggests melting at a rather low pressure. Such characteristics are comparable to those of felsic lavas associated with the Taupo zone of New Zealand, a modern ensialic back-arc basin. Following FD, the FE detrital unit is defined only in the Okondja region, probably associated with a late-stage collapse of the northern part of the basin. It is suggested that the alkaline to calc-alkaline volcanic transition reflects the evolution of the Francevillian basin from a diverging to a converging setting, in response to the onset of converging movements in the Eburnean Belt of Central Africa.

  15. Isolation and Identification of Myxobacteria from Saline-Alkaline Soils in Xinjiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianjiao; Yao, Qing; Cai, Zhuoping; Xie, Xiaolin; Zhu, Honghui

    2013-01-01

    Fifty-eight terrestrial and salt-tolerant myxobacteria were isolated from the saline-alkaline soils collected from Xinjiang, China. Based on the morphologies and the 16S rRNA gene sequences, these isolates were assigned into 6 genera, Myxococcus, Cystobacter, Corallococcus, Sorangium, Nannocystis and Polyangium. All the strains grew better with 1% NaCl than without NaCl. Some Myxococcus strains were able to grow at 2% NaCl concentration, suggesting that these strains may be particular type of terrestrial myxobacteria. PMID:23936436

  16. Asymmetric Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, Carlo; Carminati, Eugenio; Crespi, Mattia; Cuffaro, Marco; Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Levshin, Anatoli; Panza, Giuliano F.; Riguzzi, Federica

    2010-05-01

    The net rotation, or so-called W-ward drift of the lithosphere, implies a decoupling of the plates relative to the underlying asthenosphere, and a relative "E-ward" mantle flow. This polarized flow can account for a number of asymmetries. When comparing the W-directed versus the E- to NE-directed subduction zones, as a general observation, they have the subduction hinge diverging versus converging relative to the upper plate; low versus high topography and structural elevation respectively; deep versus shallow trenches and foreland basins; shallow versus deep decollement; low versus high basement involvement; high versus low heat flow and gravity anomaly; shallow versus deep asthenosphere; etc. The western limbs of rift zones show S-waves faster in the lithosphere and slower in the asthenosphere with respect to the eastern limb. The asymmetry can be recognized when moving along the "tectonic equator", which describes the fastest flow of plates relative to the mantle, and it undulates relative to the geographic equator. In our reconstructions, the best fit for the tectonic equator has a pole of rotation at latitude -56.4° and longitude 136.7°, with an angular velocity of 1.2036°/Ma. Shear-wave splitting alignments tend to parallel the tectonic flow, apart along the subduction zones where they become orthogonal, as a flow encountering an obstacle. The tectonic equator lies close to the revolution plane of the Moon about the Earth. All these data and interpretations point for an asymmetric Earth, whose nature appears to be related to the rotation and its tidal despinning, combined with the thermal cooling of the planet. However, this model has been questioned on the basis of the high viscosity so far inferred in the asthenosphere. Preliminary modelling shows that the tidal oscillation can generate gravitational wave propagation in the lithosphere, and the wave velocity can increase with the decrease of the asthenospheric viscosity.

  17. Multi proxy approach for the formation of calcium carbonates in alkaline man-made environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinder, T.; Dietzel, M.; Leis, A.

    2009-04-01

    The formation of calcium carbonates, e.g. in drainage systems of tunnels, may be induced by degassing of CO2-rich groundwater which enters the building. However, the dissolution of portlandite (Ca(OH)2) from cements or the shotcrete of the tunnel wall bears an additional and immense potential for the formation of carbonates from alkaline solutions. Variations in trace element incorporation and distribution of the stable isotopes of carbon and oxygen in the precipitated calcium carbonates may represent powerful tools to identify individual mechanisms for carbonate formation. As portlandite dissolves, highly alkaline solutions are obtained. In this case, precipitation of calcium carbonate can be related to the absorption of CO2 from the atmosphere. Isotopic analyses of the calcite show that fixation of CO2 from the Earth's atmosphere leads to significantly lighter ^13Ccalcite values (down to -25 o/oo, VPDB) as expected for the fixation of groundwater carbonate (typical ^13Ccalcite values between -10 and -16o/oo, VPDB). The evolution of Sr/Ca ratios in the alkaline drainage solutions and in the corresponding calcium carbonate precipitation provides insight into the dissolution process at the concrete with respect to the amount of primarily dissolved portlandite from the cement. Moreover, an inverse relationship between Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios is observed due to the liberation of aqueous strontium by the dissolution of portlandite and the formation of brucite (Mg(OH)2) at alkaline conditions. Less incorporation of magnesium in the calcite structure is a strong indicator for carbonate precipitation from highly alkaline environments. Applications of such multi proxy approaches are discussed with case studies. Main tasks are the reconstruction of the environmental conditions during primary CaCO3 formation and monitoring of ongoing precipitation of calcium carbonates and cement-water interaction in alkaline man-made environments.

  18. Laser direct write of planar alkaline microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, C. B.; Kim, H.; Piqué, A.

    We are developing a laser engineering approach to fabricate and optimize alkaline microbatteries in planar geometries. The laser direct-write technique enables multicapability for adding, removing and processing material and provides the ability to pattern complicated structures needed for fabricating complete microbattery assemblies. In this paper, we demonstrate the production of planar zinc-silver oxide alkaline cells under ambient conditions. The microbattery cells exhibit 1.55-V open-circuit potentials, as expected for the battery chemistry, and show a flat discharge behavior under constant-current loads. High capacities of over 450 μAhcm-2 are obtained for 5-mm2 microbatteries.

  19. Alkaline Capacitors Based on Nitride Nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldissi, Matt

    2003-01-01

    High-energy-density alkaline electrochemical capacitors based on electrodes made of transition-metal nitride nanoparticles are undergoing development. Transition- metal nitrides (in particular, Fe3N and TiN) offer a desirable combination of high electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability in aqueous alkaline electrolytes like KOH. The high energy densities of these capacitors are attributable mainly to their high capacitance densities, which, in turn, are attributable mainly to the large specific surface areas of the electrode nanoparticles. Capacitors of this type could be useful as energy-storage components in such diverse equipment as digital communication systems, implanted medical devices, computers, portable consumer electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  20. Salt-induced rock fragmentation on Mars: The role of salt in the weathering of Martian rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagoutz, Emil

    2006-01-01

    Large well rounded boulders and angular rock fragments characterizes the Martian landscape as seen on the recent excellent quality photos (except: Meridiani landing side, which formed by different processes, and is therefore not considered in this paper). Analyzing the different rock-shapes indicates a time sequence of emplacement, fragmentation and transport of different rocks on Mars, which might give interesting insight into transport and weathering processes. Larger commonly well rounded boulders were emplaced onto gravel plains. After emplacement, these rocks were fragmented and disassembled. Nests of angular rock fragments are marking the locations of preexisting larger rocks. Frequently, it is possible to reconstruct larger rounded rocks from smaller angular fragments. In other cases, transport after fragmentation obscured the relationship of the fragments. However, a strewn field of fragments is still reminiscent of the preexisting rock. Mechanical salt weathering could be a plausible explanation for the in situ fragmentation of larger rounded blocks into angular fragments. Impact or secondary air fall induced fragmentation produces very different patterns. Salt weathering of rocks is a common process in terrestrial environments. Salt crystallization in capillaries causes fragmentation of rocks, irrespective of the process of salt transportation and concentration. On Earth significant salt weathering can be observed in different climatic environments: in the transition zone of alluvial aprons and salt playas in deserts and in dry valleys of Antarctica. In terrestrial semi-arid areas the salt is transported by salt solution, which is progressively concentrated by evaporation. In Antarctic dry valleys freeze thaw cycles causes salt transportation and crystallization resulting in rock fragmentation. This salt induced process can lead to complete destruction of rocks and converts rocks to fine sand. The efficient breakdown of rocks is dominating the landscape

  1. Great Salt Lake, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Gardner, Joe F.

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended as a source of general information and facts about Great Salt Lake, Utah. This U.S. Geological Survey information sheet answers frequently asked questions about Great Salt Lake. Topics include: History, salinity, brine shrimp, brine flies, migratory birds, and recreation. Great Salt Lake, the shrunken remnant of prehistoric Lake Bonneville, has no outlet. Dissolved salts accumulate in the lake by evaporation. Salinity south of the causeway has ranged from 6 percent to 27 percent over a period of 22 years (2 to 7 times saltier than the ocean). The high salinity supports a mineral industry that extracts about 2 million tons of salt from the lake each year. The aquatic ecosystem consists of more than 30 species of organisms. Harvest of its best-known species, the brine shrimp, annually supplies millions of pounds of food for the aquaculture industry worldwide. The lake is used extensively by millions of migratory and nesting birds and is a place of solitude for people. All this occurs in a lake that is located at the bottom of a 35,000-square-mile drainage basin that has a human population of more than 1.5 million.

  2. Chloroaluminate molten salt electrolytes and vanadium pentoxide xerogel cathodes for high energy density batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jian

    The work presented here is part of an effort to develop a new type of battery which uses an alkali metal such as lithium or sodium or the alkaline earth magnesium, as the anode, a V2O5 xerogel as cathode, and a 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride/aluminum chloride room temperature molten salt as electrolyte. First, the stability of the electrolyte was studied. The electrochemistry of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EMIC), the organic component of the 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride/aluminum chloride molten salt, was examined in acetonitrile. Cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry were used to study the reduction of EMI+, the cation of EMIC. Controlled potential coulometry was used to determine the number of electrons involved in the EMI+ reduction process. EMI+ reduction was found to be a one-electron, diffusion controlled process occurring at -2.35V (vs. a reference electrode consisting of a Ag wire in 0.1 M tetra-n-butylammonium perchlorate (TBAP)/acetonitrile solution) in 0.1M TBAP/acetonitrile solution. Two products were generated from the reduction, which are oxidized at about -0.45 and -0.65V. Mass spectroscopy data for these two products suggest that they are degradation products of EMI+. The major products of EMI+ reduction are not electrochemically active within the available potential window. Thus, small amounts of these species should not have a serious effect on the operation of a cell using an EMIC/AlCl3 electrolyte. The second project was to develop a method for buffering a melt which contains free Mg2+ ion for insertion into a V2O 5 xerogel cathode. The buffering of melts with MgCl2 and Mg metal was investigated starting with both acidic and basic melts. The following reaction is proposed for the Mg ribbon in acidic melt: 8Al2Cl - 7+3Mg→2Al+3Mg2++14AlCl -4 This was verified by electrochemical and atomic emission spectroscopy inductively coupled plasma (AES/ICP) data. Finally, the intercalation of Li+, Na+, and Mg2+ ions

  3. The Alkaline Diet: Is There Evidence That an Alkaline pH Diet Benefits Health?

    PubMed Central

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K.

    2012-01-01

    This review looks at the role of an alkaline diet in health. Pubmed was searched looking for articles on pH, potential renal acid loads, bone health, muscle, growth hormone, back pain, vitamin D and chemotherapy. Many books written in the lay literature on the alkaline diet were also reviewed and evaluated in light of the published medical literature. There may be some value in considering an alkaline diet in reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases and further studies are warranted in this area of medicine. PMID:22013455

  4. The alkaline diet: is there evidence that an alkaline pH diet benefits health?

    PubMed

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K

    2012-01-01

    This review looks at the role of an alkaline diet in health. Pubmed was searched looking for articles on pH, potential renal acid loads, bone health, muscle, growth hormone, back pain, vitamin D and chemotherapy. Many books written in the lay literature on the alkaline diet were also reviewed and evaluated in light of the published medical literature. There may be some value in considering an alkaline diet in reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases and further studies are warranted in this area of medicine.

  5. Clean Salt integrated flowsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, T.R.

    1994-09-27

    The Clean Salt Process (CSP) is a novel waste management scheme that removes sodium nitrate and aluminum nitrate nonahydrate as decontaminated (low specific activity) salts from Hanford`s high-level waste (HLW). The full scale process will separate the bulk of the waste that exists as sodium salts from the small portion of the waste that is by definition radioactive and dangerous. This report presents initial conceptual CSP flowsheets and demonstrates the benefit of integrating the process into the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Reference Flowsheet. Total HLW and low-level (LLW) volumes are reported for two different CSP integration options and are compared to the TWRS Reference Flowsheet values. The results for a single glass option eliminating LLW disposal are also reported.

  6. Mineral resource of the month: salt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kostick, Dennis S.

    2010-01-01

    The article presents information on various types of salt. Rock salt is either found from underground halite deposits or near the surface. Other types of salt include solar salt, salt brine, and vacuum pan salt. The different uses of salt are also given including its use as a flavor enhancer, as a road deicing agent, and to manufacture sodium hydroxide.

  7. Negative Electrode For An Alkaline Cell

    DOEpatents

    Coco, Isabelle; Cocciantelli, Jean-Michel; Villenave, Jean-Jacques

    1998-07-14

    The present invention concerns a negative electrode for an alkaline cell, comprising a current collector supporting a paste containing an electrochemically active material and a binder, characterized in that said binder is a polymer containing hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, said polymer being selected from an acrylic homopolymer, copolymer and terpolymer, an unsaturated organic acid copolymer and an unsaturated acid anhydride copolymer.

  8. Alkaline electrochemical cells and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    Equilibrated cellulose ether membranes of increased electrolytic conductivity for use as separators in concentrated alkaline electrochemical cells are investigated. The method of making such membranes by equilibration to the degree desired in an aqueous alkali solution mantained at a temperature below about 10 C is described.

  9. Kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Christodoulatos, C; Su, T L; Koutsospyros, A

    2001-01-01

    Cellulose nitrate (nitrocellulose) is an explosive solid substance used in large quantities in various formulations of rocket and gun propellants. Safe destruction of nitrocellulose can be achieved by alkaline hydrolysis, which converts it to biodegradable products that can then be treated by conventional biological processes. The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of munitions-grade nitrocellulose in sodium hydroxide solutions were investigated in completely mixed batch reactors. Experiments were conducted using solutions of alkaline strength ranging from 0.1 to 15% by mass and temperatures in the range of 30 to 90 degrees C. Regression analysis of the kinetic data revealed that alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose is of the order 1.0 and 1.5 with respect to nitrocellulose and hydroxide concentration, respectively. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction was found to be 100.9 kJ/mol with a preexponential Arrhenius constant of 4.73 x 10(13). Nitrite and nitrate, in a 3:1 ratio, were the primary nitrogen species present in the posthydrolysis solution. The kinetic information is pertinent to the development and optimization of nitrocellulose chemical-biological treatment systems.

  10. MERCURIC CHLORIDE CAPTURE BY ALKALINE SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of bench-scale mechanistic studies of mercury/sorbent reactions that showed that mercuric chloride (HgC12) is readily adsorbed by alkaline sorbents, which may offers a less expensive alternative to the use of activated carbons. A laboratory-scale, fixed-b...

  11. ISSUES WITH ALKALINE TREATMENT OF SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation begins with a discussion of the use of lime and other alkaline materials from the very earliest times to the present for killing bacteria, viruses and parasites and for controlling odors in wastewaters and sludge. It answers the question "How did EPA arrive at i...

  12. Gas releases from salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

    1998-06-01

    The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

  13. The Great Salt Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hassibe, W.R.; Keck, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    The western part of the conterminous United States is often thought of as being a desert without any large bodies of water. In the desert area of western Utah, however, lies Great Salt Lake, which in 1986 covered approximately 2,300 square miles and contained 30 million acre-feet of water (an acre-foot is the amount of water necessary to cover 1 acre of land with water 1 foot in depth or about 326,000 gallons). To emphasize its size, the Great Salt Lake is the largest lake west of the Mississippi River, larger than the states of Rhode Island and Delaware.

  14. [Salt intake in children].

    PubMed

    Girardet, J-P; Rieu, D; Bocquet, A; Bresson, J-L; Briend, A; Chouraqui, J-P; Darmaun, D; Dupont, C; Frelut, M-L; Hankard, R; Goulet, O; Simeoni, U; Turck, D; Vidailhet, M

    2014-05-01

    Very early in life, sodium intake correlates with blood pressure level. This warrants limiting the consumption of sodium by children. However, evidence regarding exact sodium requirements in that age range is lacking. This article focuses on the desirable sodium intake according to age as suggested by various groups of experts, on the levels of sodium intake recorded in consumption surveys, and on the public health strategies implemented to reduce salt consumption in the pediatric population. Practical recommendations are given by the Committee on nutrition of the French Society of Pediatrics in order to limit salt intake in children.

  15. Mechanism for salt scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, John J., II

    Salt scaling is superficial damage caused by freezing a saline solution on the surface of a cementitious body. The damage consists of the removal of small chips or flakes of binder. The discovery of this phenomenon in the early 1950's prompted hundreds of experimental studies, which clearly elucidated the characteristics of this damage. In particular it was shown that a pessimum salt concentration exists, where a moderate salt concentration (˜3%) results in the most damage. Despite the numerous studies, the mechanism responsible for salt scaling has not been identified. In this work it is shown that salt scaling is a result of the large thermal expansion mismatch between ice and the cementitious body, and that the mechanism responsible for damage is analogous to glue-spalling. When ice forms on a cementitious body a bi-material composite is formed. The thermal expansion coefficient of the ice is ˜5 times that of the underlying body, so when the temperature of the composite is lowered below the melting point, the ice goes into tension. Once this stress exceeds the strength of the ice, cracks initiate in the ice and propagate into the surface of the cementitious body, removing a flake of material. The glue-spall mechanism accounts for all of the characteristics of salt scaling. In particular, a theoretical analysis is presented which shows that the pessimum concentration is a consequence of the effect of brine pockets on the mechanical properties of ice, and that the damage morphology is accounted for by fracture mechanics. Finally, empirical evidence is presented that proves that the glue-small mechanism is the primary cause of salt scaling. The primary experimental tool used in this study is a novel warping experiment, where a pool of liquid is formed on top of a thin (˜3 mm) plate of cement paste. Stresses in the plate, including thermal expansion mismatch, result in warping of the plate, which is easily detected. This technique revealed the existence of

  16. Alkaline twin-screw extrusion pretreatment for fermentable sugar production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The inevitable depletion of fossil fuels has resulted in an increasing worldwide interest in exploring alternative and sustainable energy sources. Lignocellulose, which is the most abundant biomass on earth, is widely regarded as a promising raw material to produce fuel ethanol. Pretreatment is an essential step to disrupt the recalcitrance of lignocellulosic matrix for enzymatic saccharification and bioethanol production. This paper established an ATSE (alkaline twin-screw extrusion pretreatment) process using a specially designed twin-screw extruder in the presence of alkaline solution to improve the enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency of corn stover for the production of fermentable sugars. Results The ATSE pretreatment was conducted with a biomass/liquid ratio of 1/2 (w/w) at a temperature of 99°C without heating equipment. The results indicated that ATSE pretreatment is effective in improving the enzymatic digestibility of corn stover. Sodium hydroxide loading is more influential factor affecting both sugar yield and lignin degradation than heat preservation time. After ATSE pretreatment under the proper conditions (NaOH loading of 0.06 g/g biomass during ATSE and 1 hour heat preservation after extrusion), 71% lignin removal was achieved and the conversions of glucan and xylan in the pretreated biomass can reach to 83% and 89% respectively via subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis (cellulase loading of 20 FPU/g-biomass and substrate consistency of 2%). About 78% of the original polysaccharides were converted into fermentable sugars. Conclusions With the physicochemical functions in extrusion, the ATSE method can effectively overcome the recalcitrance of lignocellulose for the production of fermentable sugars from corn stover. This process can be considered as a promising pretreatment method due to its relatively low temperature (99°C), high biomass/liquid ratio (1/2) and satisfied total sugar yield (78%), despite further study is needed for process

  17. The effect of salinity on waste activated sludge alkaline fermentation and kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Baodan; Wang, Shuying; Xing, Liqun; Li, Baikun; Peng, Yongzhen

    2016-05-01

    The effect of salinity on sludge alkaline fermentation at low temperature (20°C) was investigated, and a kinetic analysis was performed. Different doses of sodium chloride (NaCl, 0-25g/L) were added into the fermentation system. The batch-mode results showed that the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) increased with salinity. The hydrolysate (soluble protein, polysaccharide) and the acidification products (short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), NH4(+)-N, and PO4(3-)-P) increased with salinity initially, but slightly declined respectively at higher level salinity (20g/L or 20-25g/L). However, the hydrolytic acidification performance increased in the presence of salt compared to that without salt. Furthermore, the results of Haldane inhibition kinetics analysis showed that the salt enhanced the hydrolysis rate of particulate organic matter from sludge particulate and the specific utilization of hydrolysate, and decreased the specific utilization of SCFAs. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis indicated that the importance of polysaccharide on the accumulation of SCFAs was reduced with salt addition, but the importance of protein and NH4(+)-N on SCFA accumulation was increased.

  18. Crystal structure of alkaline cellulase K: insight into the alkaline adaptation of an industrial enzyme.

    PubMed

    Shirai, T; Ishida, H; Noda, J; Yamane, T; Ozaki, K; Hakamada, Y; Ito, S

    2001-07-27

    The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of alkaline cellulase K was determined at 1.9 A resolution. Because of the most alkaliphilic nature and it's highest activity at pH 9.5, it is used commercially in laundry detergents. An analysis of the structural bases of the alkaliphilic character of the enzyme suggested a mechanism similar to that previously proposed for alkaline proteases, that is, an increase in the number of Arg, His, and Gln residues, and a decrease in Asp and Lys residues. Some ion pairs were formed by the gained Arg residues, which is similar to what has been found in the alkaline proteases. Lys-Asp ion pairs are disfavored and partly replaced with Arg-Asp ion pairs. The alkaline adaptation appeared to be a remodeling of ion pairs so that the charge balance is kept in the high pH range.

  19. Notable effects of the metal salts on the formation and decay reactions of α-tocopheroxyl radical in acetonitrile solution. The complex formation between α-tocopheroxyl and metal cations.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Yutaro; Fujii, Miyabi; Matsuoka, Chihiro; Hashimoto, Haruka; Ouchi, Aya; Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Mukai, Kazuo

    2011-08-18

    The measurement of the UV-vis absorption spectrum of α-tocopheroxyl (α-Toc(•)) radical was performed by reacting aroxyl (ArO(•)) radical with α-tocopherol (α-TocH) in acetonitrile solution including four kinds of alkali and alkaline earth metal salts (MX or MX(2)) (LiClO(4), LiI, NaClO(4), and Mg(ClO(4))(2)), using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The maximum wavelength (λ(max)) of the absorption spectrum of the α-Toc(•) at 425.0 nm increased with increasing concentration of metal salts (0-0.500 M) in acetonitrile, and it approached constant values, suggesting an [α-Toc(•)-M(+) (or M(2+))] complex formation. The stability constants (K) were determined to be 9.2, 2.8, and 45 M(-1) for LiClO(4), NaClO(4), and Mg(ClO(4))(2), respectively. By reacting ArO(•) with α-TocH in acetonitrile, the absorption of ArO(•) disappeared rapidly, while that of α-Toc(•) appeared and then decreased gradually as a result of the bimolecular self-reaction of α-Toc(•) after passing through the maximum. The second-order rate constants (k(s)) obtained for the reaction of α-TocH with ArO(•) increased linearly with an increasing concentration of metal salts. The results indicate that the hydrogen transfer reaction of α-TocH proceeds via an electron transfer intermediate from α-TocH to ArO(•) radicals followed by proton transfer. Both the coordination of metal cations to the one-electron reduced anions of ArO(•) (ArO:(-)) and the coordination of counteranions to the one-electron oxidized cations of α-TocH (α-TocH(•)(+)) may stabilize the intermediate, resulting in the acceleration of electron transfer. A remarkable effect of metal salts on the rate of bimolecular self-reaction (2k(d)) of the α-Toc(•) radical was also observed. The rate constant (2k(d)) decreased rapidly with increasing concentrations of the metal salts. The 2k(d) value decreased at the same concentration of the metal salts in the following order: no metal salt > NaClO(4) > LiClO(4) > Mg

  20. Solution-based approaches for making high-density sodalite waste forms to immobilize spent electrochemical salts

    SciTech Connect

    Lepry, William C.; Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Pierce, David A.

    2013-08-29

    Three different solution-based approaches were taken to make sodalite minerals as a host for a mixed salt simulating the waste generated during the electrochemical separations process of nuclear fuel reprocessing that contains alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide chlorides plus trace iodine and actinides. All of the approaches included an aqueous solution of mixed chlorides (simulated waste) but the other reactants varied: (1) Al(OH)3 + NaOH + CS, (2) NaAlO2 + CS, and (3) Al2Si2O7 + NaOH, (CS = colloidal silica). The products were dried, ground, pressed into pellets, fired (650–950 °C), and characterized. Both 5 and 10 mass% of a Si-Na-B glass binder were introduced at different stages in the process. Route (2) proved the most successful at producing high sodalite fractions (up to 100%) with minimal glass binder additions and showed high consolidation potential (up to 91.4% of theoretical density). Detailed comparisons are provided of the results.