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Sample records for alkaline hydrothermal solutions

  1. FTIR study of the photocatalytic degradation of gaseous benzene over UV-irradiated TiO{sub 2} nanoballs synthesized by hydrothermal treatment in alkaline solution

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zhengru; Li, Xinyong; Zhao, Qidong; Qu, Zhenping; Hou, Yang; Zhao, Ling; Liu, Shaomin; Chen, Guohua

    2010-12-15

    In this study, photocatalysts of TiO{sub 2} nanoballs were obtained via a hydrothermal treating of commercial P25 in alkaline solution, and then characterized with SEM, XRD, BET and surface photovoltage spectroscopy techniques. The UV-assisted photodegradation of gaseous benzene over P25 and the prepared TiO{sub 2} nanoballs was monitored by an in situ infrared technique. The results demonstrated that the prepared TiO{sub 2} nanoballs in anatase form were more active than commercial P25 in photocatalytic oxidation of gaseous benzene. The promoted activity of the hydrothermal-treated TiO{sub 2} is attributed to the increasing specific surface area and larger band gap induced by the reduced crystallite size. The spectra of FTIR indicated that weakly adsorbed phenol was formed as the reaction progress. Hydroxyl groups on the surface of TiO{sub 2} nanoballs are able to react with photo-produced phenol, which is then retained on the catalyst surface leading to the progressive deactivation of the catalyst in the gas-solid system.

  2. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids.

  3. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments.

    PubMed

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids. PMID:25796392

  4. RNA Oligomerization in Laboratory Analogues of Alkaline Hydrothermal Vent Systems.

    PubMed

    Burcar, Bradley T; Barge, Laura M; Trail, Dustin; Watson, E Bruce; Russell, Michael J; McGown, Linda B

    2015-07-01

    Discovering pathways leading to long-chain RNA formation under feasible prebiotic conditions is an essential step toward demonstrating the viability of the RNA World hypothesis. Intensive research efforts have provided evidence of RNA oligomerization by using circular ribonucleotides, imidazole-activated ribonucleotides with montmorillonite catalyst, and ribonucleotides in the presence of lipids. Additionally, mineral surfaces such as borates, apatite, and calcite have been shown to catalyze the formation of small organic compounds from inorganic precursors (Cleaves, 2008 ), pointing to possible geological sites for the origins of life. Indeed, the catalytic properties of these particular minerals provide compelling evidence for alkaline hydrothermal vents as a potential site for the origins of life since, at these vents, large metal-rich chimney structures can form that have been shown to be energetically favorable to diverse forms of life. Here, we test the ability of iron- and sulfur-rich chimneys to support RNA oligomerization reactions using imidazole-activated and non-activated ribonucleotides. The chimneys were synthesized in the laboratory in aqueous "ocean" solutions under conditions consistent with current understanding of early Earth. Effects of elemental composition, pH, inclusion of catalytic montmorillonite clay, doping of chimneys with small organic compounds, and in situ ribonucleotide activation on RNA polymerization were investigated. These experiments, under certain conditions, showed successful dimerization by using unmodified ribonucleotides, with the generation of RNA oligomers up to 4 units in length when imidazole-activated ribonucleotides were used instead. Elemental analysis of the chimney precipitates and the reaction solutions showed that most of the metal cations that were determined were preferentially partitioned into the chimneys. PMID:26154881

  5. Technetium recovery from high alkaline solution

    DOEpatents

    Nash, Charles A.

    2016-07-12

    Disclosed are methods for recovering technetium from a highly alkaline solution. The highly alkaline solution can be a liquid waste solution from a nuclear waste processing system. Methods can include combining the solution with a reductant capable of reducing technetium at the high pH of the solution and adding to or forming in the solution an adsorbent capable of adsorbing the precipitated technetium at the high pH of the solution.

  6. The Origin of Life in Alkaline Hydrothermal Vents.

    PubMed

    Sojo, Victor; Herschy, Barry; Whicher, Alexandra; Camprubí, Eloi; Lane, Nick

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 70 years, prebiotic chemists have been very successful in synthesizing the molecules of life, from amino acids to nucleotides. Yet there is strikingly little resemblance between much of this chemistry and the metabolic pathways of cells, in terms of substrates, catalysts, and synthetic pathways. In contrast, alkaline hydrothermal vents offer conditions similar to those harnessed by modern autotrophs, but there has been limited experimental evidence that such conditions could drive prebiotic chemistry. In the Hadean, in the absence of oxygen, alkaline vents are proposed to have acted as electrochemical flow reactors, in which alkaline fluids saturated in H2 mixed with relatively acidic ocean waters rich in CO2, through a labyrinth of interconnected micropores with thin inorganic walls containing catalytic Fe(Ni)S minerals. The difference in pH across these thin barriers produced natural proton gradients with equivalent magnitude and polarity to the proton-motive force required for carbon fixation in extant bacteria and archaea. How such gradients could have powered carbon reduction or energy flux before the advent of organic protocells with genes and proteins is unknown. Work over the last decade suggests several possible hypotheses that are currently being tested in laboratory experiments, field observations, and phylogenetic reconstructions of ancestral metabolism. We analyze the perplexing differences in carbon and energy metabolism in methanogenic archaea and acetogenic bacteria to propose a possible ancestral mechanism of CO2 reduction in alkaline hydrothermal vents. Based on this mechanism, we show that the evolution of active ion pumping could have driven the deep divergence of bacteria and archaea. PMID:26841066

  7. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, B.A.; Sachleben, R.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates generally to a process for extracting technetium from nuclear wastes and more particularly to a process for extracting technetium from alkaline waste solutions containing technetium and high concentrations of alkali metal nitrates. A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate comprises the steps of: contacting the aqueous alkaline solution with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent, the diluent being a water-immiscible organic liquid in which the crown ether is soluble, for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution into the solvent; separating the solvent containing the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution; and stripping the technetium values from the solvent by contacting the solvent with water.

  8. Effect of hydrothermal reaction time and alkaline conditions on the electrochemical properties of reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermisoglou, E. C.; Giannakopoulou, T.; Romanos, G.; Giannouri, M.; Boukos, N.; Lei, C.; Lekakou, C.; Trapalis, C.

    2015-12-01

    Reduced graphene oxide sheets (rGO) were prepared by hydrothermal treatment of aqueous dispersions of graphite oxide (GtO) applied for short (4 h) and prolonged reaction times (19-24 h). The effect of process duration as well as the alkaline conditions (pH ∼10) by addition of K2CO3 on the quality characteristics of the produced rGO materials was investigated. Both reduction and exfoliation occurred during this process as it was evidenced by FTIR and XRD data. SEM, TEM and HRTEM microscopy displayed highly exfoliated rGO materials. XPS verified that the re-establishment of the conjugated graphene network is more extensive for prolonged times of hydrothermal processing in accordance to Raman spectroscopy measurements. The sample produced under alkaline conditions bore fewer defects and almost 5 times higher BET surface area (∼181 m2/g) than the sample with no pH adjustment (∼34 m2/g) for the same hydrothermal reaction time (19 h), attributed to the developed microporosity. The specific capacitance of this material estimated by electrochemical impedance using three-electrode cell and KCl aqueous solution as an electrolyte was ∼400-500 F/g. When EDLC capacitors were fabricated from rGO materials the electrochemical testing in organic electrolyte i.e. TEABF4 in PC, revealed that the shortest hydrothermal reaction time (4 h) was more efficient resulting in capacitance around 60 F/g.

  9. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    1995-01-01

    A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

  10. Mackinawite and greigite in ancient alkaline hydrothermal chimneys: Identifying potential key catalysts for emergent life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Lauren M.; Bhartia, Rohit; Stucky, Galen D.; Kanik, Isik; Russell, Michael J.

    2015-11-01

    One model for the emergence of life posits that ancient, low temperature, submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents, partly composed of iron-sulfides, were capable of catalyzing the synthesis of prebiotic organic molecules from CO2, H2 and CH4. Specifically, hydrothermal mackinawite (FeIIS) and greigite (FeIIFeIII2S4) have been highlighted in previous studies as analogs of the active centers of hydrogenase, ferredoxin, acetyl coenzyme-A synthase and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase featured in the biochemistry of certain autotrophic prokaryotes that occupy the base of the evolutionary tree. Despite the proposed importance of iron sulfide minerals and clusters in the synthesis of abiotic organic molecules, the mechanisms for the formation of these sulfides from solution and their preservation under the anoxic and low temperature (below 100 °C) conditions expected in off-axis submarine alkaline vent systems is not well understood (Bourdoiseau et al., 2011; Rickard and Luther, 2007). To rectify this, single hydrothermal chimneys were precipitated using a unique apparatus to simulate growth at hydrothermal vents of moderate temperature under supposed Hadean ocean-bottom conditions. Iron sulfide phases were observed through Raman spectroscopy at growth temperatures ranging from 40° to 80 °C. Fe(III)-containing mackinawite is confirmed to be present with mackinawite and greigite, supporting an FeIII-mackinawite intermediate mechanism for the transformation of mackinawite to greigite below 100 °C. Raman spectroscopy of the chimneys revealed a maximum yield of greigite at 75 °C. These results suggest abiotic production of catalytically active mackinawite and greigite are possible under early Earth hydrothermal conditions as well as on other wet, rocky worlds geochemically similar to the Earth.

  11. Alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction of swine carcasses to bio-oil

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ji-Lu Zhu, Ming-Qiang; Wu, Hai-tang

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Swine carcasses can be converted to bio-oil by alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction. • It seems that the use of the bio-oil for heat or CHP is technically suitable. • Some valuable chemicals were found in the bio-oils. • The bio-oil and the solid residue constituted an energy efficiency of 93.63% for the feedstock. • The solid residue can be used as a soil amendment, to sequester C and for preparing activated carbon. - Abstract: It is imperative that swine carcasses are disposed of safely, practically and economically. Alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction of swine carcasses to bio-oil was performed. Firstly, the effects of temperature, reaction time and pH value on the yield of each liquefaction product were determined. Secondly, liquefaction products, including bio-oil and solid residue, were characterized. Finally, the energy recovery ratio (ERR), which was defined as the energy of the resultant products compared to the energy input of the material, was investigated. Our experiment shows that reaction time had certain influence on the yield of liquefaction products, but temperature and pH value had bigger influence on the yield of liquefaction products. Yields of 62.2 wt% bio-oil, having a high heating value of 32.35 MJ/kg and a viscosity of 305cp, and 22 wt% solid residue were realized at a liquefaction temperature of 250 °C, a reaction time of 60 min and a pH value of 9.0. The bio-oil contained up to hundreds of different chemical components that may be classified according to functional groups. Typical compound classes in the bio-oil were hydrocarbons, organic acids, esters, ketones and heterocyclics. The energy recovery ratio (ERR) reached 93.63%. The bio-oil is expected to contribute to fossil fuel replacement in stationary applications, including boilers and furnaces, and upgrading processes for the bio-oil may be used to obtain liquid transport fuels.

  12. Alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction of swine carcasses to bio-oil.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji-Lu; Zhu, Ming-Qiang; Wu, Hai-tang

    2015-09-01

    It is imperative that swine carcasses are disposed of safely, practically and economically. Alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction of swine carcasses to bio-oil was performed. Firstly, the effects of temperature, reaction time and pH value on the yield of each liquefaction product were determined. Secondly, liquefaction products, including bio-oil and solid residue, were characterized. Finally, the energy recovery ratio (ERR), which was defined as the energy of the resultant products compared to the energy input of the material, was investigated. Our experiment shows that reaction time had certain influence on the yield of liquefaction products, but temperature and pH value had bigger influence on the yield of liquefaction products. Yields of 62.2wt% bio-oil, having a high heating value of 32.35MJ/kg and a viscosity of 305cp, and 22wt% solid residue were realized at a liquefaction temperature of 250°C, a reaction time of 60min and a pH value of 9.0. The bio-oil contained up to hundreds of different chemical components that may be classified according to functional groups. Typical compound classes in the bio-oil were hydrocarbons, organic acids, esters, ketones and heterocyclics. The energy recovery ratio (ERR) reached 93.63%. The bio-oil is expected to contribute to fossil fuel replacement in stationary applications, including boilers and furnaces, and upgrading processes for the bio-oil may be used to obtain liquid transport fuels. PMID:26013692

  13. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Mark; Horwitz, E. Philip

    2003-01-01

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  14. Solubility of uranium in alkaline salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1994-03-29

    The solubility of uranium in alkaline salt solutions was investigated to screen for significant factors and interactions among the major salt components and temperature. The components included in the study were the sodium salts of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, sulfate, and carbonate. General findings from the study included: (1) uranium solubilities are very low (1-20 mg/L) for all solution compositions at hydroxide concentrations from 0.1 to 17 molar (2) carbonate, sulfate, and aluminate are not effective complexants for uranium at high hydroxide concentration, (3) uranium solubility decreases with increasing temperature for most alkaline salt solutions, and (4) uranium solubility increases with changes in solution chemistry that reflect aging of high level waste (increase in nitrite and carbonate concentrations, decrease in nitrate and hydroxide concentrations). A predictive model for the concentration of uranium as a function of component concentrations and temperature was fitted to the data. All of the solution components and temperature were found to be significant. There is a significant lack of fit for the model, which suggests that the dependence on the uranium solubility over the wide range of solution compositions is non-linear and/or that there are other uncontrolled parameters which are important to the uranium solubility.

  15. Pyrite Recrystallization Experiments With Circulating Hydrothermal Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, H.; Abe, A.; Tanaka, K.

    2007-12-01

    Pyrite is one of the most common sulfide minerals found in hydrothermal deposits and sea-floor sediments from hydrothermal fumaroles. Hydrothermal fluid flow plays an important role in crystallization of sulfide minerals. In this study, we tried to reproduce pyrite crystallization with one-way flowing hydrothermal fluid. We designed a circuit circulating hydrothermal fluid by thermal convection. A rectangular circuit (42.6 cm by 17.3 cm) of SUS316 pressure tubes with 5 mm in inner diameter was used as a reaction vessel. In the circuit, pyrite dissolves to acidic fluid in upstream region. Then, pyrite will crystallize again in downstream region as temperature decreases. The rectangular plane was held to be 20 degrees inclination to generate thermal convection. One of the long sides of the rectangular was heated by an electric furnace. Starting materials were put in a tube to be heated. Upper half, approximately 20 cm, of the tube was filled with quartz sand. Next quarter was filled with equivalent mass mixture of quartz sand and powdered pyrite crystals. The lowest quarter was filled with mixture of quartz sand, pyrite, anhydrite and sulfur, those mass are equivalent. The solution was a mixture of 0.5mol/l HCl and 3.0mol/l NaCl. Maximum temperature was controlled to approximately 350°C at the center of the heated tube. Experimental durations were up to 9 days. Fluid pressure increased to approximately 6 MPa as heating. After the experiments, the run products were fixed with resin in a sample tube, and vertical sections were observed by SEM. In the run products, pyrite dissolved at the lower part of the starting material. In the upper half of the sample tube, pyrite crystals precipitated on quartz surface. Crystallization density depends on temperature gradient of the fluid. Predominant morphology of the pyrite crystals consists (100) plains. Tiny framboidal aggregates and crystals with (210) plains also occur. In the run products of longer than 3 days run durations

  16. From Geochemistry to Biochemistry: Simulating Prebiotic Chemistry Driven by Geochemical Gradients in Alkaline Hydrothermal Vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barge, Laurie

    2016-07-01

    Planetary water-rock interfaces generate energy in the form of redox, pH, and thermal gradients, and these disequilibria are particularly focused in hydrothermal vent systems where the reducing, heated hydrothermal fluid feeds back into the more oxidizing ocean. Alkaline hydrothermal vents have been proposed as a likely location for the origin of life on the early Earth due to various factors: including the hydrothermal pH / Eh gradients that resemble the ubiquitous electrical / proton gradients in biology, the catalytic hydrothermal precipitates that resemble inorganic catalysts in enzymes, and the presence of electron donors and acceptors in hydrothermal systems (e.g. H2 + CH4 and CO2) that are thought to have been utilized in the earliest metabolisms. Of particular importance for the emergence of metabolism are the mineral "chimneys" that precipitate at the vent fluid / seawater interface. Hydrothermal chimneys are flow-through chemical reactors that form porous and permeable inorganic membranes transecting geochemical gradients; in some ways similar to biological membranes that transect proton / ion gradients and harness these disequilibria to drive metabolism. These emergent chimney structures in the far-from-equilibrium system of the alkaline vent have many properties of interest to the origin of life that can be simulated in the laboratory: for example, they can generate electrical energy and drive redox reactions, and produce catalytic minerals (in particular the metal sulfides and iron oxyhydroxides - "green rust") that can facilitate chemical reactions towards proto-metabolic cycles and biosynthesis. Many of the factors prompting interest in alkaline hydrothermal vents on Earth may also have been present on early Mars, or even presently within icy worlds such as Europa or Enceladus - thus, understanding the disequilibria and resulting prebiotic chemistry in these systems can be of great use in assessing the potential for other environments in the Solar

  17. Solubility of pllutonium in alkaline salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1993-02-26

    Plutonium solubility data from several studies have been evaluated. For each data set, a predictive model has been developed where appropriate. In addition, a statistical model and corresponding prediction intervals for plutonium solubility as a quadratic function of the hydroxide concentration have been developed. Because of the wide range of solution compositions, the solubility of plutonium can vary by as much as three orders of magnitude for any given hydroxide concentration and still remain within the prediction interval. Any nuclear safety assessments that depend on the maximum amount of plutonium dissolved in alkaline salt solutions should use concentrations at least as great as the upper prediction limits developed in this study. To increase the confidence in the prediction model, it is recommended that additional solubility tests be conducted at low hydroxide concentrations and with all of the other solution components involved. To validate the model for application to actual waste solutions, it is recommended that the plutonium solubilities in actual waste solutions be determined and compared to the values predicted by the quadratic model.

  18. Investigation on phase transformation mechanism of zeolite NaY under alkaline hydrothermal conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng Ding, Tian Liu, Liping Xiong, Guang

    2013-12-15

    The phase transformation mechanism of zeolite NaY under alkaline hydrothermal conditions was investigated by UV Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The results revealed that the products and transformation rate are dependent on the alkalinities. All of the starting and resulting zeolites are constructed with the 4-ring and 6-ring secondary building units. The products have lower Si/Al ratio, higher framework density and smaller pore size, which are more stable under alkaline hydrothermal condition. During the phase transformation the fragments of faujasite are formed, then the fragments combine to form different zeolites depending on basicity. Zeolite NaY crystals are consumed as the reservoir for the transformation products during the recrystallization process. For the first time, a 4-membered ring intermediate was found at the early stage of the recrystallization process. A cooperative interaction of liquid and solid phases is required for inducing the phase transformation. - Graphical Abstract: Phase transformation of NaY zeolite under alkaline hydrothermal condition is achieved by the cooperative interaction of the liquid and solid phases. A 4-membered ring species is an intermediate for recrystallization process. Highlights: • The products and transformation rate are dependent on the alkalinity. • A 4-membered ring species is an intermediate for recrystallization process. • A cooperative interaction of liquid and solid phases is required.

  19. Removal of plutonium and americium from alkaline waste solutions

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Wallace W.

    1979-01-01

    High salt content, alkaline waste solutions containing plutonium and americium are contacted with a sodium titanate compound to effect removal of the plutonium and americium from the alkaline waste solution onto the sodium titanate and provide an effluent having a radiation level of less than 10 nCi per gram alpha emitters.

  20. Hydrothermal modification of titanium surface in calcium solutions.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Kenichi; Kon, Masayuki; Hanawa, Takao; Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Miyamoto, Youji; Asaoka, Kenzo

    2002-05-01

    Hydrothermal modification of a titanium surface in calcium solutions was performed. The apatite precipitation on the modified surface in Hanks' solution, as a simulated body fluid, was evaluated and the surface microstructure changes after the modification were characterized by thin-film X-ray diffractometry (TF-XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Hydrothermal modification in CaO solution enhanced the precipitation of apatite on the titanium surface. High pH, high pressure and high temperature of the CaO solution increased the thickness of the surface-modified layer and enhanced the synthesis of calcium titanate which possibly promoted the precipitation of apatite in Hanks' solution. Hydrothermal modification in CaCl2 solution, on the other hand, showed reverse effects. The modification of titanium in CaO solution with hydrothermal treatment is expected to result in excellent osteointegration and can be easily performed by using an autoclave, a clinical apparatus widely used. PMID:11962668

  1. Chemistry of hydrothermal solutions from Pele's Vents, Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Sedwick, P.N.; McMurtry, G.M. ); Macdougall, J.D. )

    1992-10-01

    Hydrothermal fluids were sampled from Pele's Vents on the summit of Loihi Seamount, an intraplate, hotspot volcano, on four occasions from February 1987 to September 1990. The warm ([le]31C) vent solutions are enriched in dissolved Si, CO[sub 2], H[sub 2]S, alkalinity, K[sup +], Li[sup +], Rb[sup +], Ca[sup 2+], Ba[sup 2+], Fe[sup 2+], Mn[sup 2+], NH[sup +][sub 4], and possibly Ni[sup 2+], and depleted in SO[sup 2-][sub 4], O[sub 2], Mg[sup 2+], [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr, NO[sup -][sub 3], and sometimes Cl[sup -] and Na[sup +] (calculated), relative to ambient seawater. Dissolved Si correlates linearly with sample temperature, suggesting that the solutions sampled from numerous vents in the [approximately]20 m diameter field have a common source and that Si can be used as a conservative tracer for mixing of the vent fluids with ambient seawater. These juvenile inputs likely reflect the shallow, hotspot setting of this hydrothermal system. A simple quantitative fluid-history model is considered and shown to be consistent with mass-balance constraints and saturation-state calculations, which suggest that the Si concentration of the fluids may be controlled by amorphous silica saturation at [approximately]31C. Observed temporal variations in fluid composition between expeditions - specifically, in Cl[sup -], A[sub T], C[sub T], Na[sup +] (calculated), Mg[sup 2+], Ca[sup 2+], Sr[sup 2+], [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr, Fe[sup 2+], Mn[sup 2+] and perhaps NH[sup +][sub 4], relative to Si - are, excepting Mg[sup 2+], [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr, and Mn[sup 2+], consistent with the effects of variable phase segregation at the proposed high-temperature endmember.

  2. Kinetics of the Fading of Phenolphthalein in Alkaline Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Lois

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment which illustrates pseudo-first-order kinetics in the fading of a common indicator in an alkaline solution. Included are background information, details of materials used, laboratory procedures, and sample results. (CW)

  3. Free energy distribution and hydrothermal mineral precipitation in Hadean submarine alkaline vent systems: Importance of iron redox reactions under anoxic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuya, Takazo; Russell, Michael J.; Takai, Ken

    2016-02-01

    Thermodynamic calculations of mixing between hypothetical seawater and hydrothermal fluid in the Hadean deep ocean were carried out to predict saturation states of mineral precipitates and redox reactions that could occur in Hadean submarine alkaline hydrothermal systems associated with the serpentinization of ultramafic rocks. In the calculations, the seawater was assumed to be weakly acidic (pH = 5.5) and to include carbon dioxide, ferrous iron and silica, with or without nitrate, while the Hadean hydrothermal fluid was assumed to be highly alkaline (pH = 11) and to contain abundant molecular hydrogen, methane and bisulfide, based on the Archean geologic record, the modern low-temperature alkaline hydrothermal vent fluid (Lost City field), and experimental and theoretical considerations. The modeling indicates that potential mineral precipitates in the mixing zone (hydrothermal chimney structures) could consist mainly of iron sulfides but also of ferrous serpentine and brucite, siderite, and ferric iron-bearing minerals such as goethite, hematite and/or magnetite as minor phases. The precipitation of ferric iron-bearing minerals suggests that chemical iron oxidation would be made possible by pH shift even under anoxic condition. In the mixing zone, comprising an inorganic barrier precipitated at the interface of the two contrasting solutions, various redox reactions release free energy with the potential to drive endergonic reactions, assuming the involvement of coupling inorganic protoenzymes. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and acetogenesis - long considered the most ancient forms of biological energy metabolisms - are able to achieve higher maximum energy yield (>0.5 kJ/kg hydrothermal fluid) than those in the modern serpentinization-associated seafloor hydrothermal systems (e.g., Kairei field). Furthermore, the recently proposed methanotrophic acetogenesis pathway was also thermodynamically investigated. It is known that methanotrophic acetogenesis would

  4. Extraction of the transplutonium elements from alkaline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Karalova, Z.K.; Bukina, T.I.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1986-03-01

    This paper investigates the extraction of transplutonium elements (TPE) and other elements using aliquat-336 and alkylpyrocatechol from strongly alkaline solutions in the presence of complexforming substances. It was shown by the methods of NMR and IR spectroscopy that elements can be extracted from alkaline solutions both in the form of coordination-saturated internal complex compounds and in the form of ionic associates, the anionic portion of which consists either of hydroxo-complexes of the cooresponding metals or their compounds with the complex-forming substance. Together with the TPE and REE the authors also studied the extraction of Fe(III), Ru(III), Zr(IV), Pu(IV), Pa(V), Nb(V), U(VI), Cs(I), and Th(IV) from alkaline solutions.

  5. Alkaline solution absorption of carbon dioxide method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides (or pH) in alkaline solutions, using the tendency of hydroxides to adsorb CO{sub 2}. The method comprises passing CO{sub 2} over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the CO{sub 2} concentration. Comparison of the measurements yields the adsorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to adsorption fraction. A schematic is given of a process system according to a preferred embodiment of the invention. 2 figs.

  6. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Aluminosilicate Gels Prepared in High-Alkaline and Salt-Concentrated Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li Q.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Parker, Kent E.; Hobbs, David T.; McCready, David E.

    2005-01-11

    We have examined the formation of aluminosilicate in high alkaline and salt concentrated solutions characteristic of nuclear tank wastes. Information on the mechanism and kinetics of the phase formation under hydrothermal conditions was obtained by characterization the structures of gel phases as a function of time and composition using multinuclear NMR techniques in combination with x-ray diffraction. This work offers a new insight into the aluminum and aluminosilicate chemistry in simulated nuclear tank wastes.

  7. The production of glucose from corn stalk using hydrothermal process with pre-treatment ultrasound assisted alkaline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yolanda, Dora; Prasutiyo, Indry; Trisanti, P. N.; Sumarno

    2015-12-01

    The production of glucose from corn stalk by using subcritical hydrothermal technology is studied in this work. Ultrasound-assisted alkaline delignification methods are used as pre-treatment. The corn stalk powder were pretreated with ultrasound-assisted alkaline (NaOH 2% w/w, solid to liquid ratio 1:22 w/v) at room temperature and 30 minutes. After pre-treatment, solid residue and liquid fractions are separated by filtration. Pretreated solids are further submitted to hydrothermal process for glucose production. Hydrothermal process was carried out at 100 Bar and 120°C in various times. The solid product was characterized by SEM and XRD. And liquid product was analysis using DNS method to determine percentage of glucose. From XRD analysis showed that crystallinity of material was lower than delignification product.

  8. Qualitative aspects of the degradation of mitomycins in alkaline solution.

    PubMed

    Beijnen, J H; den Hartigh, J; Underberg, W J

    1985-01-01

    The major degradation product in alkaline solution of mitomycin A, mitomycin C and porfiromycin is the corresponding 7-hydroxymitosane. The isolation and the physico-chemical and analytical properties of these compounds and their derivatized analogues are discussed. Data are presented on the degradation of mitomycin C at extremely high pH values. PMID:16867711

  9. Dynamic formation of zeolite synthesized from fly ash by alkaline hydrothermal conversion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, ZhiJian; Li, Jiangli; Li, Hongyi; Wang, Hang; Zhu, Jun; He, Qiang

    2013-11-01

    This study was designed to characterize the dynamic formation of zeolite synthesized from fly ash (ZFA) and to identify the zeolitization mechanisms during a 160-h-long hydrothermal alkaline conversion at 95°C by using fly ash (FA) samples collected from four typical thermoelectric power plants in China, with the purpose of improving ZFA quality. The process of synthesizing ZFA can be fundamentally divided into five stages: induction stage (0-0.5 h), accelerating dissolution stage (0.5-12 h), nucleation and/or crystallization stage (12-24 h), crystal growth stage (24-72 h) and crystal transformation stage (72-160 h). The crystal growth stage determined the quality of zeolite crystallization, coupled with functions of re-assembling the silicon-aluminium tetrahedral network and developing submicro- and/or nanometer microstructure. A 48-h-long hydrothermal conversion generated ZFAs that had a greater specific surface area (26.0-89.4 times) and cation exchange capacity (29.6-71.0 times) than FA, which successfully sequestrated 41-95% of ammonium and 75-98% of phosphate from swine manure. However, over-reaction resulted in more stable hydroxysodalite and/or sodalite, surface agglomeration and cracking, and energy wasting. This work suggests that the reuse of recycled synthesis materials should occur during the fourth step (24-72 h). PMID:24025368

  10. Actinide solubility and spectroscopic speciation in alkaline Hanford waste solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, L.; Felmy, A.R.; Rai, D.

    1996-10-01

    Information on the solubility and the speciation of actinide elements, especially plutonium and neptunium, in alkaline solutions is of importance in the development of separation techniques for the Hanford tank HLW supernatant. In the present study, experimental data on the solubilities of plutonium in simulated Hanford tank solutions were analyzed with Pitzer`s specific ion-interaction approach, which is applicable in dilute to highly concentrated electrolyte solutions. In order to investigate the formation of actinide species in alkaline solutions with ligands (e.g., hydroxide, aluminate and carbonate), spectroscopic measurements of neptunium (V), as a chemical analog of plutonium (V), were conducted. Based on the solubility data and available information on both solid and aqueous species, a thermodynamic model was proposed. The applicability and limitations of this model are discussed.

  11. Structural elucidation of sorghum lignins from an integrated biorefinery process based on hydrothermal and alkaline treatments.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shao-Long; Wen, Jia-Long; Ma, Ming-Guo; Sun, Run-Cang

    2014-08-13

    An integrated process based on hydrothermal pretreatment (HTP) (i.e., 110-230 °C, 0.5-2.0 h) and alkaline post-treatment (2% NaOH at 90 °C for 2.0 h) has been performed for the production of xylooligosaccharide, lignin, and digestible substrate from sweet sorghum stems. The yield, purity, dissociation mechanisms, structural features, and structural transformations of alkali lignins obtained from the integrated process were investigated. It was found that the HTP process facilitated the subsequent alkaline delignification, releasing lignin with the highest yield (79.3%) and purity from the HTP residue obtained at 190 °C for 0.5 h. All of the results indicated that the cleavage of the β-O-4 linkages and degradation of β-β and β-5 linkages occurred under the harsh HTP conditions. Depolymerization and condensation reactions simultaneously occurred at higher temperatures (≥ 170 °C). Moreover, the thermostability of lignin was positively related to its molecular weight, but was also affected by the inherent structures, such as β-O-4 linkages and condensed units. These findings will enhance the understanding of structural transformations of the lignins during the integrated process and maximize the potential utilizations of the lignins in a current biorefinery process. PMID:25090032

  12. Raman spectroscopic investigations of hydrothermal solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    There is still very little information about the stoichiometries, structures and stabilities of metal complexes at high temperatures and pressures. Raman spectroscopy is ideally suited to probe and study concentrated electrolyte solutions at the molecular level. This thesis includes the design and construction of a Raman cell operable up to 300C and 15MPa. In order to obtain quantitative thermodynamic information from Raman spectroscopic measurements, a chemically inert internal standard must be used. Perchlorate is commonly used for this purpose at low temperatures, but it may be unstable at high temperatures and its explosive properties make it undesirable. A new preferred internal standard; trifluoromethanesulfonic acid is introduced and its spectra p to 300C discussed. The use of this compound as a high temperature internal standard enabled stepwise stability constants of zinc-bromo complexes to be determined. Although bromide is not an important ligand in geologic systems, its chemical similarity to chloride can provide insights into the study of zinc-chloro species which do not have very informative Raman spectra. The importance of organic ligands in geologic settings such as the Mississippi-Valley Type Pb-Zn sulfide deposits is now being realized. Chapter four presents the first high temperature spectroscopic measurements of lead and zinc acetate aqueous solutions. Not only do these studies verify the stability of lead and zinc acetate complexes up to 250 C but they also show that the type of complex formed is a function of pH, metal-ligand ratio and temperature, thus having important implications for zoning of Pb-Zn sulfide deposits.

  13. Mobilization of Manufactured Gas Plant Tar with Alkaline Flushing Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Hauswirth, Scott C.; Birak, Pamela Schultz; Rylander, Seth C.; Miller, Cass T.

    2011-01-01

    This experimental study investigates the use of alkaline and alkaline-polymer solutions for the mobilization of former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) tars. Tar-aqueous interfacial tensions (IFTs) and contact angles were measured, and column flushing experiments were conducted. NaOH solutions (0.01–1 wt.%) were found to significantly reduce tar-aqueous IFT. Contact angles indicated a shift to strongly water-wet, then to tar-wet conditions as NaOH concentration increased. Column experiments were conducted with flushing solutions containing 0.2, 0.35, and 0.5% NaOH, both with and without xanthan gum (XG). Between 10 and 44% of the residual tar was removed by solutions containing only NaOH, while solutions containing both NaOH and XG removed 81–93% of the tar with final tar saturations as low as 0.018. The mechanism responsible for the tar removal is likely a combination of reduced IFT, a favorable viscosity ratio, and tar bank formation. Such an approach may have practical applications and would be significantly less expensive than surfactant-based methods. PMID:22091957

  14. Alkaline deoxygenated graphene oxide as adsorbent for cadmium ions removal from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Du, Hongyan; Yuan, Shaowei; He, Wanxia; Yan, Pengju; Liu, Zhanhong

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline deoxygenated graphene oxide (aGO) was prepared through alkaline hydrothermal treatment and used as adsorbent to remove Cd(II) ions from aqueous solutions for the first time. The characterization results of transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra indicate that aGO was successfully synthesized. The batch adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption kinetics could be described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the isotherms equilibrium data were well fitted with the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacity of Cd(II) on aGO was 156 mg/g at pH 5 and T=293 K. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption process was a spontaneous and endothermic reaction. The mainly adsorption mechanism speculated from FT-IR results may be attributed to the electrostatic attraction between Cd2+ and negatively charged groups (-CO-) of aGO and cation-π interaction between Cd2+ and the graphene planes. The findings of this study demonstrate the potential utility of the nanomaterial aGO as an effective adsorbent for Cd(II) removal from aqueous solutions. PMID:26038925

  15. Investigation of aluminum gate CMP in a novel alkaline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuiyue, Feng; Yuling, Liu; Ming, Sun; Wenqian, Zhang; Jin, Zhang; Shuai, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Beyond 45 nm, due to the superior CMP performance requirements with the metal gate of aluminum in the advanced CMOS process, a novel alkaline slurry for an aluminum gate CMP with poly-amine alkali slurry is investigated. The aluminum gate CMP under alkaline conditions has two steps: stock polishing and fine polishing. A controllable removal rate, the uniformity of aluminum gate and low corrosion are the key challenges for the alkaline polishing slurry of the aluminum gate CMP. This work utilizes the complexation-soluble function of FA/O II and the preference adsorption mechanism of FA/O I nonionic surfactant to improve the uniformity of the surface chemistry function with the electrochemical corrosion research, such as OCP-TIME curves, Tafel curves and AC impedance. The result is that the stock polishing slurry (with SiO2 abrasive) contains 1 wt.% H2O2,0.5 wt.% FA/O II and 1.0 wt.% FA/O I nonionic surfactant. For a fine polishing process, 1.5 wt.% H2O2, 0.4 wt.% FA/O II and 2.0 wt.% FA/O I nonionic surfactant are added. The polishing experiments show that the removal rates are 3000 ± 50 Å/min and 1600 ± 60 Å/min, respectively. The surface roughnesses are 2.05 ± 0.128 nm and 1.59 ± 0.081 nm, respectively. A combination of the functions of FA/O II and FA/O I nonionic surfactant obtains a controllable removal rate and a better surface roughness in alkaline solution.

  16. Corrosion of silicon nitride in high temperature alkaline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Liyan; Guzonas, Dave A.; Qian, Jing

    2016-08-01

    The corrosion of silicon nitride (Si3N4) in alkaline solutions was studied at temperatures from 60 to 300 °C. Si3N4 experienced significant corrosion above 100 °C. The release rates of silicon and nitrogen follow zero order reaction kinetics and increase with increasing temperature. The molar ratio of dissolved silicon and nitrogen species in the high temperature solutions is the same as that in the solid phase (congruent dissolution). The activation energy for silicon and nitrogen release rates is 75 kJ/mol which agrees well with that of silica dissolution. At 300 °C, the release of aluminum is observed and follows first order reaction kinetics while other minor constituents including Ti and Y are highly enriched on the corrosion films due to the low solubility of their oxides.

  17. Massive sulfide deposits and hydrothermal solutions: incremental reaction modeling of mineral precipitation and sulfur isotopic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Janecky, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Incremental reaction path modeling of chemical and sulfur isotopic reactions occurring in active hydrothermal vents on the seafloor, in combination with chemical and petrographic data from sulfide samples from the seafloor and massive sulfide ore deposits, allows a detailed examination of the processes involved. This paper presents theoretical models of reactions of two types: (1) adiabatic mixing between hydrothermal solution and seawater, and (2) reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit materials. In addition, reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit minerals and basalt in feeder zones is discussed.

  18. Singlet-Oxygen Generation in Alkaline Periodate Solution.

    PubMed

    Bokare, Alok D; Choi, Wonyong

    2015-12-15

    A nonphotochemical generation of singlet oxygen ((1)O2) using potassium periodate (KIO4) in alkaline condition (pH > 8) was investigated for selective oxidation of aqueous organic pollutants. The generation of (1)O2 was initiated by the spontaneous reaction between IO4(-) and hydroxyl ions, along with a stoichiometric conversion of IO4(-) to iodate (IO3(-)). The reactivity of in-situ-generated (1)O2 was monitored by using furfuryl alcohol (FFA) as a model substrate. The formation of (1)O2 in the KIO4/KOH system was experimentally confirmed using electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements in corroboration with quenching studies using azide as a selective (1)O2 scavenger. The reaction in the KIO4/KOH solution in both oxic and anoxic conditions initiated the generation of superoxide ion as a precursor of the singlet oxygen (confirmed by using superoxide scavengers), and the presence of molecular oxygen was not required as a precursor of (1)O2. Although hydrogen peroxide had no direct influence on the FFA oxidation process, the presence of natural organic matter, such as humic and fulvic acids, enhanced the oxidation efficiency. Using the oxidation of simple organic diols as model compounds, the enhanced (1)O2 formation is attributed to periodate-mediated oxidation of vicinal hydroxyl groups present in humic and fulvic constituent moieties. The efficient and simple generation of (1)O2 using the KIO4/KOH system without any light irradiation can be employed for the selective oxidation of aqueous organic compounds under neutral and near-alkaline conditions. PMID:26594871

  19. Experimental investigation of As, Sb and Cs behavior during olivine serpentinization in hydrothermal alkaline systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafay, Romain; Montes-Hernandez, German; Janots, Emilie; Munoz, Manuel; Auzende, Anne Line; Gehin, Antoine; Chiriac, Rodica; Proux, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    While Fluid-Mobile Elements (FMEs) such as B, Sb, Li, As or Cs are particularly concentrated in serpentinites, data on FME fluid-serpentine partitioning, distribution, and sequestration mechanisms are missing. In the present experimental study, the behavior of Sb, As and Cs during San Carlos olivine serpentinization was investigated using accurate mineralogical, geochemical, and spectroscopic characterization. Static-batch experiments were conducted at 200 °C, under saturated vapor pressure (≈1.6 MPa), for initial olivine grain sizes of <30 μm (As), 30-56 μm (As, Cs, Sb) and 56-150 μm (Cs) and for periods comprised between 3 and 90 days. High-hydroxyl-alkaline fluid enriched with 200 mg L-1 of a single FME was used and a fluid/solid weight ratio of 15. For these particular conditions, olivine is favorably replaced by a mixture of chrysotile, polygonal serpentine and brucite. Arsenic, Cs or Sb reaction product content was determined as a function of reaction advancement for the different initial olivine grain sizes investigated. The results confirm that serpentinization products have a high FME uptake capacity with the partitioning coefficient increasing such as CsDp/fl = 1.5-1.6 < AsDp/fl = 3.5-4.5 < SbDp/fl = 28 after complete reaction of the 30-56 μm grain-sized olivine. The sequestration pathways of the three elements are however substantially different. While the As partition coefficient remains constant throughout the serpentinization reaction, the Cs partition coefficient decreases abruptly in the first stages of the reaction to reach a constant value after the reaction is 40-60% complete. Both As and Cs partitioning appear to decrease with increasing initial olivine grain size, but there is no significant difference in the partitioning coefficient between the 30-56 and 56-150 μm grain size after complete serpentinization. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements combined with X-ray chemical measurements reveal that the As(V) is mainly

  20. Hydrothermal Carbonization: a feasible solution to convert biomass to soil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesch, Walter; Tesch, Petra; Pfeifer, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    The erosion of fertile soil is a severe problem arising right after peak oil (Myers 1996). That this issue is not only a problem of arid countries is shown by the fact that even the European Commission defined certain milestones to address the problem of soil erosion in Europe (European Commission 2011). The application of bio-char produced by torrefaction or pyrolysis for the remediation, revegetation and restoration of depleted soils started to gain momentum recently (Rillig 2010, Lehmann 2011, Beesley 2011). Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a promising thermo-chemical process that can be applied to convert organic feedstock into fertile soil and water, two resources which are of high value in regions being vulnerable to erosion. The great advantage of HTC is that organic feedstock (e.g. organic waste) can be used without any special pretreatment (e.g. drying) and so far no restrictions have been found regarding the composition of the organic matter. By applying HTC the organic material is processed along a defined pathway in the Van Krevelen plot (Behrendt 2006). By stopping the process at an early stage a nutritious rich material can be obtained, which is known to be similar to terra preta. Considering that HTC-coal is rich in functional groups and can be derived from the process under "wet" conditions, it can be expected that it shall allow soil bacteria to settle more easily compared to the bio-char derived by torrefaction or pyrolysis. In addition, up to 10 tons process water per ton organic waste can be gained (Vorlop 2009). Thus, as organic waste, loss of fertile soil and water scarcity becomes a serious issue within the European Union, hydrothermal carbonization can provide a feasible solution to address these issues of our near future. The presentation reviews the different types of feedstock investigated for the HTC-Process so far and gives an overview on the current stage of development of this technology. References Beesley L., Moreno-Jiménez E

  1. The electrochemistry of SIMFUEL in dilute alkaline hydrogen peroxide solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldik, Jon

    The work described in this thesis is a study of the electrochemistry of SIMFUEL (SIMulated nuclear FUEL) in dilute, alkaline hydrogen peroxide solutions. In the first set of experiments, the reaction of H2O 2 on SIMFUEL electrodes was studied electrochemically and under open circuit conditions in 0.1 mol L-1 NaCl solutions at pH 9.8. The composition of the oxidized UO2 surface was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Hydrogen peroxide reduction was found to be catalyzed by the formation of a mixed UIV/UV (UO 2+x) surface layer, but to be blocked by the accumulation of UVI species (UO3· yH2O or adsorbed (UO2)2+) on the electrode surface. The formation of this UVI layer blocks both H2O2 reduction and oxidation, thereby inhibiting the potentially rapid H2O2 decomposition reaction to H2O and O2. Decomposition is found to proceed at a rate controlled by the desorption of the adsorbed (UO2)2+ or reduction of adsorbed O2 species. Reduction of (O2) ads is coupled to the slow oxidative dissolution of UO2 and formation of a corrosion product deposit of UO3· yH2O. In the second series of experiments, the electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide on SIMFUEL was studied using the steady-state polarization technique. Kinetic parameters for the reaction, such as Tafel slopes and reaction orders, were determined. The results were interpreted in terms of a chemical-electrochemical mechanism involving UIV/UV donor-acceptor reduction sites. The large values of the Tafel slopes and the fractional reaction orders with respect to H2O2 can be understood in terms of the potential-dependent surface coverage of active sites, similar to that observed in the reduction of hydrogen peroxide on oxidized copper surfaces. The effects of pH over the range 10-13 were also investigated. The H2O 2 reduction currents were nearly independent of pH in the range 10-11, but were slowed at more alkaline values. The change in pH dependence appears to be related to the acid-base properties

  2. Decomposition Studies of Triphenylboron, Diphenylborinic Acid and Phenylboric Acid in Aqueous Alkaline Solutions Containing Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.; Peterson, R. A.

    1997-02-11

    This report documents the copper-catalyzed chemical kinetics of triphenylboron, diphenylborinic acid and phenylboric acid (3PB, 2PB and PBA) in aqueous alkaline solution contained in carbon-steel vessels between 40 and 70 degrees C.

  3. Formation of Lactic Acid from Cellulosic Biomass by Alkaline Hydrothermal Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X.; Jini, F.; Kishita, A.; Enomoto, H.; Tohji, K.

    2008-02-01

    Glucose, as a model compound of cellulosic biomass, was used as a test material. Ca(OH)2 and NaOH were selected as alkali. Results showed that both NaOH and Ca(OH)2, can promote the formation of lactic acid in a hydrothermal reaction of glucose. In the case of the addition of NaOH, lactic acid was obtained with a good yield of 27% based on a carbon base at 300 °C for 60 s with a NaOH concentration of 2.5 M. In the case of the addition of Ca(OH)2, the highest yield of lactic acid is 20%, which occurred at 300 °C for 60 s with a Ca(OH)2 concentration of 0.32 M. The formation mechanisms of lactic acid from glucose were also discussed according to intermediate products identified. Lactic acid may be generated via formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde besides via the aldose having three carbon atoms in hydrothermal reaction which all formed by the reverse aldol condensation of hexoses.

  4. Development of alkaline solution separations for potential partitioning of used nuclear fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, Gordon D; Runde, Wolfgang H; Goff, George S

    2009-01-01

    The processing of used nuclear fuel in alkaline solution provides potentially useful new selectivity for separating the actinides from each other and f rom the fission products. Over the ast decade, several research teams around the world have considered dissolution of used fuel in alkaline solution and further partitioning in this medium as an alternative to acid dissolution. The chemistry of the actinides and fission products in alkaline soilltion requires extensive investigation to more carefully evaluate its potential for developing useful separation methods for used nuclear fueI.

  5. Methanol oxidation on Pd/Pt(poly) in alkaline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksic, A.; Rakocevic, Z.; Smiljanic, M.; Nenadovic, M.; Strbac, S.

    2015-01-01

    Bimetallic electrodes prepared by Pd nanoislands spontaneously deposited on polycrystalline platinum, Pt(poly), at submonolayer coverage were explored for methanol oxidation in alkaline media. Characterization of obtained Pd/Pt(poly) nanostructures was performed ex situ by AFM imaging, spectroscopic ellipsometry and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In situ characterization of the obtained electrodes and subsequent methanol oxidation measurements were performed by cyclic voltammetry in 0.1 M KOH. Platinum surface with 35% Pd coverage exhibited the highest catalytic activity for methanol oxidation in alkaline media, exceeding those of bare Pt and Pd. Both synergistic and electronic effects are responsible for such enhanced catalysis. The origin of the synergistic effect and possible reaction pathways for methanol oxidation were discussed taking into account the activity of obtained bimetallic electrodes for the oxidation of CO and formaldehyde, as the most probable reaction intermediates.

  6. Upwelling of hydrothermal solutions through ridge flank sediments shown by pore water profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Maris, C.R.P.; Bender, M.L.

    1982-05-07

    High calcium ion and low magnesium ion concentrations in sediment pore waters in cores from the Galapagos Mounds Hydrothermal Field on the flank of the Galapagos Spreading Center are believed to be due to a calcium-magnesium exchange reaction between circulating seawater and basement basalt. The nonlinearity of the calcium ions and magnesium ion gradients indicates that these discharging hydrothermal solutions on the ridge flank are upwelling at the rate of about 1 centimeter per year through the pelagic sediments of the Mounds Field and at about 20 centimeters per year through the hydrothermal mounds themselves.

  7. The alkaline solution to the emergence of life: energy, entropy and early evolution.

    PubMed

    Russell, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    The Earth agglomerates and heats. Convection cells within the planetary interior expedite the cooling process. Volcanoes evolve steam, carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide and pyrophosphate. An acidulous Hadean ocean condenses from the carbon dioxide atmosphere. Dusts and stratospheric sulfurous smogs absorb a proportion of the Sun's rays. The cooled ocean leaks into the stressed crust and also convects. High temperature acid springs, coupled to magmatic plumes and spreading centers, emit iron, manganese, zinc, cobalt and nickel ions to the ocean. Away from the spreading centers cooler alkaline spring waters emanate from the ocean floor. These bear hydrogen, formate, ammonia, hydrosulfide and minor methane thiol. The thermal potential begins to be dissipated but the chemical potential is dammed. The exhaling alkaline solutions are frustrated in their further attempt to mix thoroughly with their oceanic source by the spontaneous precipitation of biomorphic barriers of colloidal iron compounds and other minerals. It is here we surmise that organic molecules are synthesized, filtered, concentrated and adsorbed, while acetate and methane--separate products of the precursor to the reductive acetyl-coenzyme-A pathway-are exhaled as waste. Reactions in mineral compartments produce acetate, amino acids, and the components of nucleosides. Short peptides, condensed from the simple amino acids, sequester 'ready-made' iron sulfide clusters to form protoferredoxins, and also bind phosphates. Nucleotides are assembled from amino acids, simple phosphates carbon dioxide and ribose phosphate upon nanocrystalline mineral surfaces. The side chains of particular amino acids register to fitting nucleotide triplet clefts. Keyed in, the amino acids are polymerized, through acid-base catalysis, to alpha chains. Peptides, the tenuous outer-most filaments of the nanocrysts, continually peel away from bound RNA. The polymers are concentrated at cooler regions of the mineral compartments through

  8. Effect of various alkaline metal ions on electrochemical behavior of lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Nobumitsu; Yamamoto, Yui

    2015-10-01

    The effect of various alkaline metal ions on electrochemical behavior of lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution has been investigated. It was found that "the specific anodic oxidation peak" appears at the cathodic scan in cyclic voltammogram of lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution containing Li2SO4, K2SO4, Na2SO4, Rb2SO4, or Cs2SO4. The height of the specific anodic oxidation peak varies with the alkaline sulfate in the solution; K2SO4 >> Na2SO4 > Cs2SO4 > Rb2SO4 > Li2SO4. It should be note that alkaline ions exist in lead sulfate formed on lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution containing potassium sulfate when the electrode was immersed in the solution at the rest potential for more than 1 h.

  9. Vallitalea pronyensis sp. nov., isolated from a marine alkaline hydrothermal chimney.

    PubMed

    Ben Aissa, Fatma; Postec, Anne; Erauso, Gaël; Payri, Claude; Pelletier, Bernard; Hamdi, Moktar; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2014-04-01

    A novel thermotolerant, anaerobic, Gram-stain-positive, spore-forming bacterium was isolated from a hydrothermal chimney in Prony Bay, New Caledonia. This strain, designated FatNI3(T), grew at 15-55 °C (optimum 30 °C) and at pH 5.8-8.9 (optimum 7.7). It was slightly halophilic, requiring at least 0.5 % NaCl for growth (optimum 2.5-3.0 %), and was able to grow at up to 6 % NaCl. Sulfate, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite, nitrate and nitrite were not used as terminal electron acceptors. Growth of strain FatNI3(T) was inhibited in the presence of sulfite (2 mM) or nitrite (2 mM). Strain FatNI3(T) fermented cellobiose, glucose, mannose, maltose, sucrose, galactose, lactose, ribose, fructose, rhamnose, raffinose, xylose, yeast extract, peptone and biotrypticase. The main fermentation products from glucose metabolism were acetate, ethanol, H2 and CO2. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0 and anteiso-C15 : 0. The main polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, and unknown glycolipids and phospholipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 36.6 mol%. On the basis of phylogenetic and physiological properties, strain FatNI3(T) ( = DSM 25904 = JCM 18391) belonging to the phylum Firmicutes, class Clostridia, order Clostridiales, is proposed as the type strain of a novel species of the genus Vallitalea, for which the name Vallitalea pronyensis sp. nov. is proposed. PMID:24408522

  10. Vapor-liquid partitioning of alkaline earth and transition metals in NaCl-dominated hydrothermal fluids: An experimental study from 360 to 465 °C, near-critical to halite saturated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pester, Nicholas J.; Ding, Kang; Seyfried, William E.

    2015-11-01

    Multi-phase fluid flow is a common occurrence in magmatic hydrothermal systems; and extensive modeling efforts using currently established P-V-T-x properties of the NaCl-H2O system are impending. We have therefore performed hydrothermal flow experiments (360-465 °C) to observe vapor-liquid partitioning of alkaline earth and first row transition metals in NaCl-dominated source solutions. The data allow extraction of partition coefficients related to the intrinsic changes in both chlorinity and density along the two-phase solvus. The coefficients yield an overall decrease in vapor affinity in the order Cu(I) > Na > Fe(II) > Zn > Ni(II) ⩾ Mg ⩾ Mn(II) > Co(II) > Ca > Sr > Ba, distinguished with 95% confidence for vapor densities greater than ∼0.2 g/cm3. The alkaline earth metals are limited to purely electrostatic interactions with Cl ligands, resulting in an excellent linear correlation (R2 > 0.99) between their partition coefficients and respective ionic radii. Though broadly consistent with this relationship, relative behavior of the transition metals is not well resolved, being likely obscured by complex bonding processes and the potential participation of Na in the formation of tetra-chloro species. At lower densities (at/near halite saturation) partitioning behavior of all metals becomes highly non-linear, where M/Cl ratios in the vapor begin to increase despite continued decreases in chlorinity and density. We refer to this phenomenon as "volatility", which is broadly associated with substantial increases in the HCl/NaCl ratio (eventually to >1) due to hydrolysis of NaCl. Some transition metals (e.g., Fe, Zn) exhibit volatility prior to halite stability, suggesting a potential shift in vapor speciation relative to nearer critical regions of the vapor-liquid solvus. The chemistry of deep-sea hydrothermal fluids appears affected by this process during magmatic events, however, our results do not support suggestions of subseafloor halite precipitation

  11. Hydrothermal Solute Flux from Ebeko Volcanic Center, Paramushir, Kuril Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Y.; Kalacheva, E.; Kotenko, T.; Chaplygin, I.

    2014-12-01

    Ebeko volcano on the northern part of Paramushir Island, Northern Kurils, is characterized by frequent phreatic eruptions, a strong low-temperature fumarolic activity at the summit and was the object of comprehensive volcanological and geochemical studies during the last half a century. The volcanic center is composed of several Pleistocene volcanic structures aadjacent to Ebeko and hosts a hydrothermal system with a high outflow rate of hot SO4-Cl acidic water (Upper Yurieva springs) with the current maximum temperature of ~85oC, pH 1.3 and TDS ~ 10 g/L. All discharging thermal waters are drained by the Yurieva River to the Sea of Okhotsk. The hot springs have been changing in time, generally decreasing their activity from near boiling in 1960s, with TDS ~ 20 g/L and the presence of a small steaming field at the upper part of the ~ 700 m long discharging area, to a much lower discharge rate of main vents, lower temperature and the absence of the steaming ground. The spring chemistry did not react to the Ebeko volcanic activity (14 strong phreato-magmatic events during the last 60 years).The total measured outputs of chloride and sulfur from the system last time (2006-2010) were estimated on average as 730 g/s and 980 g/s, respectively, which corresponds to the equivalent fluxes of 64 t/d of HCl and 169 t/d of SO2. These values are higher than the fumarolic volatile output from Ebeko. The estimated discharge rate of hot (85oC) water from the system with ~ 3500 ppm of chloride is about 0.3 m3/s which is much higher than the thermal water discharge from El Chichon or Copahue volcano-hydrothermal systems and among the highest hot water natural outputs ever measured for a volcano-hydrothermal system. We also report the chemical composition (major and ~ 60 trace elements including REE) of water from the main hot spring vents and the Yurieva river mouth.

  12. Extraction of starch from wheat flour by alkaline solution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Separation of starch from wheat flour with high purity is very important for the analysis of starch such as amylose and amylopectin determination by size exclusion HPLC (SE-HPLC). A procedure that extracts starch from flour by ethanol precipitation after dissolving flour in KOH and urea solution wa...

  13. A Special Issue (Part-II): Mafic-ultramafic rocks and alkaline-carbonatitic magmatism and associated hydrothermal mineralization - dedication to Lia Nikolaevna Kogarko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogarko, Lia N.; Gwalani, Lalchand G.; Downes, Peter J.; Randive, Kirtikumar R.

    2015-10-01

    This is the second part of a two-volumespecial issue of Open Geoscience (formerly Central European Journal of Geosciences) that aims to be instrumental in providing an update of Mafic-Ultramafic Rocks and Alkaline- Carbonatitic Magmatism and Associated Hydrothermal Mineralization. Together, these two volumes provide a detailed and comprehensive coverage of the subjects that are relevant to the research work of P.Comin-Chiaramonti (Italy) and LiaN. Kogarko (Russia) towhomPart-I and Part- II have been respectively dedicated. To a significant extent, the development of advanced sampling technologies related to alkaline and carbonatitic magmatism by Lia N. Kogarko, has allowed geoscientists to measure and sample the deep crust of the planet not only for the exploration for the mineral deposits, but also to answer basic scientific questions about the origin and evolution of alkaline rocks (kimberlites, lamproites and related rocks associated with carbonatites). The papers presented in this Part-II of the special issue cover the petrology and geochemistry of the rocks collected from the surface and penetrated by drilling. Lia Kogarko proposed a new theory for the evolution of alkaline magmatism in the geological history of the Earth - that the appearance of alkaline magmatism at the Archaean-Proterozoic boundary (~2.5 - 2.7 Ga), and its growing intensity, was related to changes in the geodynamic regime of the Earth and oxidation of the mantle due to mantle-crust interaction.

  14. Calixarene crown ether solvent composition and use thereof for extraction of cesium from alkaline waste solutions

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Presley, Derek J.

    2001-01-01

    A solvent composition and corresponding method for extracting cesium (Cs) from aqueous neutral and alkaline solutions containing Cs and perhaps other competing metal ions is described. The method entails contacting an aqueous Cs-containing solution with a solvent consisting of a specific class of lipophilic calix[4]arene-crown ether extractants dissolved in a hydrocarbon-based diluent containing a specific class of alkyl-aromatic ether alcohols as modifiers. The cesium values are subsequently recovered from the extractant, and the solvent subsequently recycled, by contacting the Cs-containing organic solution with an aqueous stripping solution. This combined extraction and stripping method is especially useful as a process for removal of the radionuclide cesium-137 from highly alkaline waste solutions which are also very concentrated in sodium and potassium. No pre-treatment of the waste solution is necessary, and the cesium can be recovered using a safe and inexpensive stripping process using water, dilute (millimolar) acid solutions, or dilute (millimolar) salt solutions. An important application for this invention would be treatment of alkaline nuclear tank wastes. Alternatively, the invention could be applied to decontamination of acidic reprocessing wastes containing cesium-137.

  15. Autoclave leaching kinetics of a leucoxene concentrate with alkaline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zablotskaya, Yu. V.; Sadykhov, G. B.; Gocharenko, T. V.

    2015-01-01

    The autoclave leaching kinetics of a leucoxene concentrate from the Yaregskoe deposit (Komi Republic, Russia) with NaOH and Na2SiO3 solutions is studied. The changes in the activation energy and reaction order are determined as a function of the degree of desiliconization of a leucoxene concentrate. A steplike character of quartz leaching is shown: "internal" quartz dissolves at the first stage and then free quartz dissolves.

  16. Solid / solution interaction: The effect of carbonate alkalinity on adsorbed thorium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFlamme, Brian D.; Murray, James W.

    1987-02-01

    Elevated activities of dissolved Th have been found in Soap Lake, an alkaline lake in Eastern Washington. Dissolved 232Th ranges from less than 0.001 to 4.9 dpm/L compared to about 1.3 × 10 -5 dpm/ L in sea water. The enhanced activity in the lake coincides with an increase in carbonate alkalinity. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of pH, ionic strength and carbonate alkalinity on Th adsorption on goethite. Thorium (10 -13 M total) in the presence of 5.22 mg/L α-FeOOH and 0.1 M NaNO 3 has an adsorption edge from pH 2-5. At pH 9.0 ± 0.6 the percent Th absorbed on the solid began to decrease from 100% at 100 meq/L carbonate alkalinity and exhibited no adsorption above 300 meq/L. The experimental data were modeled to obtain the intrinsic adsorption equilibrium constants for Th hydrolysis species. These adsorption constants were incorporated in the model to interpret the observed effect of carbonate alkalinity on Th adsorption. There are two main effects of the alkalinity. To a significant degree the decrease in Th adsorption is due to competition of HCO -3 and CO 2-3 ions for surface sites. Dissolved Th carbonate complexes also contribute to the increase of Th in solution.

  17. USING CERAMIC MEMBRANES TO RECYCLE TWO NONIONIC ALKALINE METAL-CLEANING SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One ZrO2 ultrafilter (0.05 um pore size) and two a-Al2O3 microfilters (0.2 and 0.8 um) were used to remove one synthetic ester oil and two polyalphaolefin-based and two petroleum hydrocarbon-based oils and greases from two nonionic alkaline cleaning solutions (e.g., Turco 4215-NC...

  18. Characterization and Oxidation of Chromium(III) by Sodium Hypochlorite in Alkaline Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Huijian; Rao, Linfeng; Zhang, Zhicheng; Rai, Dhanpat

    2006-07-01

    Chromium exists in nuclear waste sludges and is a problematic element in the vitrification process of high-level nuclear wastes. It is therefore necessary to treat the waste sludges to remove chromium prior to vitrification, by caustic leaching or oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI). The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of oligomerization of Cr(III) on its oxidation by hypochlorite in alkaline solutions. Monomeric, dimeric and trimeric Cr(III) species in solution were separated by ion exchange. The kinetics of the oxidation of the separated species by hypochlorite in alkaline solutions was studied by UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy, and compared with the oxidation by hydrogen peroxide previously studied. Results indicate that hypochlorite can oxidize Cr(III) to Cr(VI) in alkaline solutions, but the rate of oxidation by hypochlorite is slower than that by hydrogen peroxide at the same alkalinity and concentrations of oxidants. The rate of oxidation of Cr(III) by both oxidants decreases as the concentration of sodium hydroxide is increased, but the oxidation by hypochlorite seems less affected by the degree of oligomerization of Cr(III) than that by peroxide. Compared with the oxidation by hydrogen peroxide where the major reaction pathway has an inverse order with respect to CNaOH, the oxidation by hypochlorite has a significant reaction pathway independent of [OH?].

  19. Pitting corrosion of iron in weakly alkaline chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Makar, G.L.; Tromans, D.

    1996-04-01

    Chloride-induced pitting corrosion of iron at pH 10.5 and 25 C was examined by conducting quasi-steady-state (potentiostatic) polarization experiments in borate-buffered 0.1 M sodium chloride solutions with buffer concentrations from 0 M to 0.075 M. Values of the film breakdown potential (E{sub b}) were scattered at each buffer concentration, and the scatter band moved to higher potentials with increasing concentrations, indicating increased resistance to pitting. Consistent with this, pitting did not always occur at the higher buffer concentrations. E{sub b} measurements, optical and electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, and supplementary polarization experiments in lower-pH borate solutions suggested pitting in the iron -Cl{sup {minus}} system initiated within occluded regions, such as matrix-inclusion interfaces and exposed voids, where pH control was lost because of an inadequate local supply of buffer species. Pitting behavior was consistent with a mechanism dominated by mass transport, in which the presence of Cl{sup {minus}} prevented buffering of occluded regions by the borate specie H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, allowing the ph to be driven into an acidic domain where the solubilities of ferrous hydroxide and ferric hydroxide are high.

  20. Dual fluorescence of naphthylamines in alkaline aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Li-Hua; Wen, Zhen-Chang; Lin, Li-Rong; Jiang, Yun-Bao

    2001-10-01

    Dual fluorescence was observed with N-(1-naphthyl)aminoacetate (1-NAA) in aqueous solution of pH 13.0 in the presence of cationic surfactants, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and chloride (CTAC), below and after the critical micelle concentration (CMC). Similar dual fluorescence was also found with 1- and 2-naphthylamine (1-NA, 2-NA), N-(2-naphthyl)aminoacetate (2-NAA) and (1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (1-NEDA), in the presence and absence of the cationic surfactants, but not with N, N-disubstituted 1- and 2-NAs. We concluded that the dual fluorescence was due to the excited-state deprotonation of the amino group in these NAs. The p Ka*s of the dual fluorescent NAs were estimated to be around 14 from the dual fluorescence pH titrations. No clear correlation was found for p Ka* with the amino substitution and the presence of cationic micelle.

  1. [Degradation of the absorbed methyl mercaptan by persulfate in alkaline solution].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-Ying; Wang, Lei-Lei; Feng, Lin-Yu; Zhao, La-Juan; Shi, Chao

    2013-11-01

    Methyl mercaptan (CH3SH) is considered to be an important contributor to odors. It is a toxic, corrosive and acid gas. The absorption of CH3SH by alkaline solution is one of the most widely used processes, but the remained solution should be further treated. The degradation of dissolved CH3S- by persulfate (PS) oxidation has not been reported. CH3SH is absorbed in alkaline solution and degraded by PS oxidation using a recycling continuous system for absorption and degradation. The stability of PS under alkaline conditions is discussed. The influence of different reaction conditions on the absorption rate and degradation rate is also studied. It was observed that PS was relatively stability under alkaline conditions and the dissolved CH3S- could be degraded effectively by PS. The absorption rate of CH3SH first increased and then decreased with the increasing concentration of PS. The degradation rate of CH3S- increased with the increasing concentration of PS. It was also observed that the efficiency between absorption and degradation had been significantly increased with the increasing of pH. In the conditions of pH = 12, fixed CH3SH concentration of 80 mg x m(-3) with a fixed gas flow rate of 1.5 L x min(-1), 1.4 g x L(-1) PS, 90% of the dissolved CH3S- can be degraded. PMID:24455922

  2. A portable air-aluminum power source with an alkaline electrolytic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, S. V.; Galkin, P. S.; Kashinskii, O. N.; Markovich, D. M.; Novopashin, S. A.; Randin, V. V.; Kharlamov, S. M.

    2014-04-01

    The results from development of a portable air-aluminum chemical power source (AA CPS) with an alkaline electrolytic solution without any additional service circuits are presented. The feasibility of making air cathodes on the basis of a metal-carbon composite produced by the plasma method has been shown. Special features of the operational conditions of a portable AA CPS have been investigated. It has been found that the aluminum cathode passivation when aluminum hydroxide precipitates from a solution significantly restricts the specific capacity of such power sources. It was shown that it is possible to overcome the anode passivation and to considerably increase the specific capacity of an AA CPS with an alkaline electrolytic solution by means of modifying an anode alloy.

  3. Oxidative Dissolution of Nickel Metal in Hydrogenated Hydrothermal Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemniak, S. E.; Guilmette, P. A.; Turcotte, R. A.; Tunison, H. M.

    2007-03-27

    A platinum-lined, flowing autoclave facility is used to investigate the solubility behavior of metallic nickel in hydrogenated ammonia and sodium hydroxide solutions between 175 and 315 C. The solubility measurements were interpreted by means of an oxidative dissolution reaction followed by a sequence of Ni(II) ion hydrolysis reactions: Ni(s) + 2H+(aq) = Ni2+(aq) + H2(g) and Ni{sup 2+}(aq) + nH{sub 2}O = Ni(OH){sub n}{sup 2-n}(aq) + nH{sup +}(aq) where n = 1 and 2. Gibbs energies associated with these reaction equilibria were determined from a least-squares analysis of the data. The extracted thermochemical properties ({Delta}fG{sup 0}, {Delta}fH{sup 0} and S{sup 0}) for Ni2{sup +}(aq), Ni(OH){sup +}(aq) and Ni(OH){sub 2}(aq) were found to be consistent with those determined in a previous solubility study of NiO/Ni(OH){sub 2} conducted in our laboratory. The thermodynamic basis of the Ni/NiO phase boundary in aqueous solutions is examined to show that Ni(s) is stable relative to NiO(s) in solutions saturated at 25 C with 1 atm H{sub 2} for temperatures below 309 C.

  4. Inhibition of Brass Corrosion by 2-Mercapto-1-methylimidazole in Weakly Alkaline Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovanovic, Milan B.; Antonijevic, Milan M.

    2016-03-01

    The electrochemical behavior of brass and anticorrosion effect of 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole (2-MMI) in weakly alkaline solution with and without presence of chloride ions was investigated using electrochemical techniques in addition to SEM-EDS analysis. Results show that inhibition efficiency depended on inhibitor concentration and immersion time of brass electrode in inhibitor solution. Inhibition mechanism of 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole includes adsorption of inhibitor on active sites on electrode surface which was confirmed by SEM-EDS analysis of the brass. Adsorption of the 2-MMI in sodium tetraborate solution obeys Flory-Huggins adsorption isotherm, while in the presence of chloride, ions adsorption of inhibitor obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm.

  5. Measurement and control of pH in hydrothermal solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wesolowski, D.J.; Palmer, D.A.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrogen-electrode concentration cells with liquid junction are routinely used to measure the pH of aqueous solutions from 0 to 300 C. Results include the dissociation constants of common acids and bases and the hydrolysis and complexation of metal ions in aqueous electrolytes over a wide range of salinities. Recently, we have utilized these cells to examine the sorption of H{sup +} on mineral surfaces, the solubility of minerals with continuous in situ pH measurement, and the thermal decompositon rates of organic acids.

  6. Thermodynamics of NaOH(aq) in hydrothermal solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pabalan, R.T.; Pitzer, K.S.

    1987-04-01

    Apparent molar volumes and osmotic coefficients of NaOH solutions, calculated from critically evaluated literature data on volumes and vapor pressures, were used to fit the Pitzer equations to yield ion-interaction parameters as a function of temperature and pressure. These parameters allow the calculation of osmotic activity coefficients from 0-350/sup 0/C, saturation pressure to about 400 bars and 0-10 molal NaOH, and volumetric properties at saturation pressure over the same temperature and concentration range. Because the parameters for osmotic and activity coefficients above 300/sup 0/C are based on less precise data, and because of possible ion-pairing above this temperature, calculated values above 300/sup 0/C are considered only as best estimates available at this time. Partial molar volumes at infinite dilution calculated for NaOH are combined with literature data for NaCl, HCl, and H/sub 2/O to yield the pressure dependence of the ionization of water to 200/sup 0/C, and are also combined with the potentiometric data of SWEETON et al. (1974) on the ionization of water to calculate the infinitely dilute partial molar volume of HCl to 300/sup 0/C. Specific volumes of NaOH solutions at saturation pressure and up to 350/sup 0/C are also calculated and tabulated.

  7. Temperature dependence of the absorbance of alkaline solutions of 4-nitrophenyl phosphate--a potential source of error in the measurement of alkaline phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Burtis, C A; Seibert, L E; Baird, M A; Sampson, E J

    1977-09-01

    The absorbance of an alkaline solution of 4-nitrophenyl phosphate is a function of temperature. Quantitative evaluation of this phenomenon indicates that it (a) depends on the concentration of the compound and is independent of source, buffer concentration, and pH above 9.0; (b) is reversible; (c) is not a result of alkaline hydrolysis or 4-nitrophenol contamination; and (d) correlates with a temperature-induced shift of its absorbance spectrum. The phenomenon may represent a potential analytical problem in methods for alkaline phosphatase in which this compound is the substrate. If thermal equilibrium is not reached and maintained during an alkaline phosphatase assay, the thermochromic response will be included in the measured rate. The magnitude of this error depends on the thermal response and control characteristics of each particular instrument and the reaction conditions under which such an analysis is performed. PMID:19164

  8. Hydrothermal Dehydration of Aqueous Fructose Solutions in a Closed System

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Chunhua; Shin, Yongsoon; Wang, Li Q.; Windisch, Charles F.; Samuels, William D.; Arey, Bruce W.; Wang, Chong M.; Risen Jr., William M.; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    2007-10-25

    The synthesis of materials with targeted size and shape has attracted much attention. Specifically, colloidal spheres with targeted and uniform sizes have opened the door for a variety of applications associated with drug delivery, and manipulation of light (photonic band-gap crystals). Surface modification is a key to realizing many of these applications owing to the inherent inert surface.The remarkable transformation of carbohydrate molecules including sugars to homogeneous carbon spheres is found to readily occur by a dehydration mechanism and subsequent sequestering in aqueous solutions that are heated at 160-180oC in a pressurized vessel. Under such conditions, these molecules actually dehydrate even though they are dissolved in water. Size-tunable metal and metal oxides with uniform shells have also been prepared by using carbon spheres as templates.

  9. MODELING AN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR CESIUM REMOVAL FROM ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F; Luther Hamm, L; Sebastian Aleman, S; Johnston Michael, J

    2008-08-26

    The performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde ion-exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline radioactive waste solutions has been investigated through computer modeling. Cesium adsorption isotherms were obtained by fitting experimental data using a thermodynamic framework. Results show that ion-exchange is an efficient method for cesium removal from highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions. On average, two 1300 liter columns operating in series are able to treat 690,000 liters of waste with an initial cesium concentration of 0.09 mM in 11 days achieving a decontamination factor of over 50,000. The study also tested the sensitivity of ion-exchange column performance to variations in flow rate, temperature and column dimensions. Modeling results can be used to optimize design of the ion exchange system.

  10. Unique chemistry of the hydrothermal solution in the mid-Okinawa Trough Backarc Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, H.; Gamo, T.; Kim, E.S.; Shitashima, K.; Yanagisawa, F.; Tsutsumi, M.; Ishibashi, J.; Sano, Y.; Wakita, H. ); Tanaka, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Naganuma, T.; Mitsuzawa, K. )

    1990-11-01

    Submarine hydrothermal fluids from JADE and CLAM sites in the mid-Okinawa Trough Backarc Basin are highly enriched in CO{sub 2}, K, Li, NH{sub 4}, CH{sub 4} and titration alkalinity compared to MOR fluids so far studied, while their H{sub 2}S and {sup 3}He contents are similar. The He and C isotropic ratios as well as these chemical features indicate that the hydrothermal systems are controlled by reaction between seawater and CO{sub 2}-rich intermediate to acid volcanic rocks of island-arc type, with strong influence of organic matter and are consistent with its initial stage of rifting on a continental plate margin. While the endmember JADE fluid is nearly devoid of Mg and SO{sub 4}, the CLAM fluid has definite concentrations of Mg (upper limit 22 {plus minus} 5 mM) and, most interestingly of {sup 34}S-enriched SO{sub 4} (upper limit 10 {plus minus} 2 mM, {delta}{sup 34}S = 27 to 39{per thousand}).

  11. The effects of 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde solution on the elastic properties of elastomeric chain.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, C L; von Fraunhofer, J A

    1991-01-01

    The effect of two proprietary alkaline gluteraldehyde solutions on the strength (failure load) and the required displacement or stretching to achieve a force of 500g was studied for six types of elastomeric chains. The effect of disinfection (short-term exposure) and sterilization (long-term exposure) as well as repeated immersion cycles on these parameters was evaluated. The findings showed that exposure to gluteraldehyde solution affected the strength and the distention required to deliver a force of 500g of certain elastomeric chains. However, the resultant changes were relatively small and are probably insignificant in the clinical setting. PMID:1901464

  12. Complex formation of alkaline-earth cations with crown ethers and cryptands in methanol solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Buschman, H.J.

    1986-06-01

    The complexation of alkaline-earth cations by different crown ethers, azacrown ethers, and cryptands has been studied in methanol solutions by means of calorimetric and potentiometric titrations. The smallest monocyclic ligands examined from 2:1 complexes (ratio of ligand to cation) with cations which are too large to fit into the ligand cavity. With the smallest cryptand, only Sr/sup 2 +/ and Ba/sup 2 +/ ions are able to form exclusive complexes. In the case of the reaction of cryptand (211) with Ca/sup 2 +/, a separate estimation of stability constants for the formation of exclusive and inclusive complexes was possible for the first time. Higher values for stability constants are found for the reaction of alkaline-earth cations with cryptands compared to the reaction with alkali ions. This increase is only caused by favorable entropic contributions.

  13. Interactions of N,N'-dimethylaminoethanol with steel surfaces in alkaline and chlorine containing solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welle, A.; Liao, J. D.; Kaiser, K.; Grunze, M.; Mäder, U.; Blank, N.

    1997-10-01

    Formulations based on dilute aqueous solutions of N,N'-dimethylethanolamine (DMEA) are used to protect reinforcement steel bars ('rebar') in concrete from corrosion. In a previous paper we discussed the usefulness of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to detect DMEA adsorbed from solution and the application of secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) to study migration of DMEA through a cement matrix. In this report we present XPS data of DMEA adsorbed on steel surfaces from alkaline and chlorine containing solutions of variable concentration range and discuss models for the interaction of DMEA with the oxidized steel surface and the mechanism of corrosion inhibition of DMEA. DMEA is strongly bonded to the steel surface and displaces ionic species from the substrate/solution interface hence protecting the ironoxide surface from ionic attack.

  14. Recovering lead from cathode ray tube funnel glass by mechano-chemical extraction in alkaline solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenglong; Wang, Jingwei; Bai, Jianfeng; Guan, Jie; Wu, Wenjie; Guo, Cuixiang

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluates the efficiency of lead (Pb) extraction from cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass in strongly alkaline solution using mechanical activation in a ball mill as the chemical breakage and defects formed in the inner structures will contribute to the easy dissolution of the activated Pb glass. The combination of mechanical activation and a chemical leaching process in a single operation (mechano-chemical leaching) is more effective than the mechanical activation and subsequent chemical leaching. More than 97% of Pb in the CRT funnel glass can be extracted with a stirring ball mill leaching process in 5 M sodium hydroxide at 70°C. The diameter of the stainless steel balls as the activation medium is 5 mm; the mass ratio of ball to raw materials is 25:1. Pb powder with a purity of 97% can be obtained by electrowinning from the leaching solution. The Pb-depleted solution can be recycled into the leaching step. After Pb is removed, the solid leaching residues can be used for preparation of foam glass. Thus, a novel hydrometallurgical process for recovering Pb from CRT funnel glass in alkaline solution is proposed. PMID:23592759

  15. Recrystallization Experiments of Pyrite From Circulating Hydrothermal Solution by Thermal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Isobe, H.

    2005-12-01

    Pyrite is one of the most common accessory minerals in many rocks and generally occurs in hydrothermal deposit. However, pyrite morphology and association with other sulfide minerals is not well known with respect to the solution condition, especially with the hydrothermal solution under circulation. In this study, recrystallization experiments of pyrite from circulating hydrothermal solution by thermal convection were carried out. A rectangular circuit (42.6 cm by 17.3 cm) of SUS316 pressure tubing with 5 mm in inner diameter was used as a reaction vessel. The volume of the circuit is approximately 24 ml. Long sides of the rectangular circuit were held to be 20 degrees inclination. One of the long sides was heated by an electric furnace. Solution in the circuit evaporates in the high temperature tubing and the vapor condenses in room temperature tubing. The solution backs to the bottom of the high temperature tubing. Thus, thermal convection of the solution produces circulation in the circuit. Starting material was filled in the high temperature tubing. The lower half was filled with mixture of 2 g of powdered natural pyrite and 4 g of quartz grains. The upper half was filled with quartz grains only. 9 ml of 5 mol/l NH4Cl solution was sealed in the circuit with the starting material. Temperature gradient of the sample was monitored by 6 thermocouples. Maximum temperature was controlled at 350°C. Experimental durations are 3, 5, 10 and 30 days. After the experiments, the run products are fixed with resin and cut every 2 cm. Thin sections of vertical cross-sections are made and observed by microscope and SEM. Tiny pyrite crystals occurred at the upper outside of the furnace, where temperature should be much lower than 200°C. In the lower half of the starting material, pyrite decomposed and pyrrhotite formed around pyrite grains. At higher temperature area, pyrite decomposition and pyrrhotite formation is remarkable. Circulating sulfur-bearing solution provided by

  16. Development of Cobalt Hydroxide as a Bifunctional Catalyst for Oxygen Electrocatalysis in Alkaline Solution.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yi; Du, Guojun; Yang, Shiliu; Xu, Chaohe; Lu, Meihua; Liu, Zhaolin; Lee, Jim Yang

    2015-06-17

    Co(OH)2 in the form of hexagonal nanoplates synthesized by a simple hydrothermal reaction has shown even greater activity than cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4) in oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions (ORR and OER) under alkaline conditions. The bifunctionality for oxygen electrocatalysis as shown by the OER-ORR potential difference (ΔE) could be reduced to as low as 0.87 V, comparable to the state-of-the-art non-noble bifunctional catalysts, when the Co(OH)2 nanoplates were compounded with nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-rGO). The good performance was attributed to the nanosizing of Co(OH)2 and the synergistic interaction between Co(OH)2 and N-rGO. A zinc-air cell assembled with a Co(OH)2-air electrode also showed a performance comparable to that of the state-of-the-art zinc-air cells. The combination of bifunctional activity and operational stability establishes Co(OH)2 as an effective low-cost alternative to the platinum group metal catalysts. PMID:25997179

  17. Actinides in Hanford Tank Waste Simulants: Chemistry of Selected Species in Oxidizing Alkaline Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Kenneth L.; Laszak, Ivan; Borkowski, Marian; Hancock, Melissa; Rao, Linfeng; Reed, Wendy

    2004-03-30

    To enhance removal of selected troublesome nonradioactive matrix elements (P, Cr, Al, S) from the sludges in radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford site, various chemical washing procedures have been evaluated. It is intended that leaching should leave the actinides in the residual sludge phase for direct vitrification. Oxidative treatment with strongly alkaline solutions has emerged as the best approach to accomplishing this feat. However, because the most important actinide ions in the sludge can exist in multiple oxidation states, it is conceivable that changes in actinide oxidation state speciation could interfere with hopes and plans for actinide insolubility. In this presentation, we discuss both the impact of oxidative alkaline leachants on actinide oxidation state speciation and the chemistry of oxidized actinide species in the solution phase. Actinide oxidation does occur during leaching, but the solubility behavior is complex. Mixed ligand complexes may dominate solution phase speciation of actinides under some circumstances. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Offices of Science and Waste Management, Environmental Management Science Program under Contract DEAC03- 76SF0098 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Contract W-31-109- ENG-38 at Argonne National Laboratory.

  18. Combined pretreatment using alkaline hydrothermal and ball milling to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis of oil palm mesocarp fiber.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Mohd Rafein; Hirata, Satoshi; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2014-10-01

    Hydrothermal pretreatment of oil palm mesocarp fiber was conducted in tube reactor at treatment severity ranges of log Ro = 3.66-4.83 and partial removal of hemicellulose with migration of lignin was obtained. Concerning maximal recovery of glucose and xylose, 1.5% NaOH was impregnated in the system and subsequent ball milling treatment was employed to improve the conversion yield. The effects of combined hydrothermal and ball milling pretreatments were evaluated by chemical composition changes by using FT-IR, WAXD and morphological alterations by SEM. The successful of pretreatments were assessed by the degree of enzymatic digestibility of treated samples. The highest xylose and glucose yields obtained were 63.2% and 97.3% respectively at cellulase loadings of 10 FPU/g-substrate which is the highest conversion from OPMF ever reported. PMID:25058299

  19. Sulfate Separation from Aqueous Alkaline Solutions by Selective Crystallization of Alkali Metal Coordination Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Rajbanshi, Arbin; Moyer, Bruce A; Custelcean, Radu

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembly of a tris(urea) anion receptor with Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} yields crystalline capsules held together by coordinating Na{sup +} or K{sup +} cations and hydrogen-bonding water bridges, with the sulfate anions encapsulated inside urea-lined cavities. The sodium-based capsules can be selectively crystallized in excellent yield from highly competitive aqueous alkaline solutions ({approx}6 M Na{sup +}, pH 14), thereby providing for the first time a viable approach to sulfate separation from nuclear wastes.

  20. Kinetics of leaching of the aluminum hydroxide in bauxites by alkaline solutions at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtsev, A. V.; Lainer, Yu. A.; Gorichev, I. G.; Kipriyanov, N. A.; Izotov, A. D.

    2011-11-01

    The kinetics of leaching of the aluminum hydroxide from the gibbsite bauxites of Guinea (Kindia deposit) is studied under atmospheric conditions. The activation energy of the process is found to be 34.75 kJ/mol, which indicates that the process proceeds in a kinetic mode. The leaching of the aluminum hydroxide from bauxite in an alkaline solution is simulated using acid-base equilibria (ion exchange) and the electrochemical theory of the structure of a double electrical layer (Gram-Parsons theory).

  1. A water-ethanol mixed-solution hydrothermal route to silicates nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xun . E-mail: wangxun@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Zhuang Jing; Peng Qing; Li Yadong . E-mail: ydli@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2005-07-15

    In this manuscript, series of silicates nanowires, such as calcium silicate, strontium silicate, barium silicate, zinc silicate and cadmium silicate, etc., have been successfully prepared from a water-ethanol mixed solution system through a hydrothermal synthetic way. The formation process of these silicates nanowires has been studied in detail. Due to their rich sources and possible novel properties from reduced dimensionalities, we believe that the synthesis of these silicates nanowires may bring some new opportunity in the solid state chemistry and nanoscience and technology fields, etc.

  2. Influence of acidic and alkaline waste solution properties on uranium migration in subsurface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szecsody, Jim E.; Truex, Mike J.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Resch, Tom; Zhong, Lirong

    2013-08-01

    This study shows that acidic and alkaline wastes co-disposed with uranium into subsurface sediments have significant impact on changes in uranium retardation, concentration, and mass during downward migration. For uranium co-disposal with acidic wastes, significant rapid (i.e., hours) carbonate and slow (i.e., 100 s of hours) clay dissolution resulted, releasing significant sediment-associated uranium, but the extent of uranium release and mobility change was controlled by the acid mass added relative to the sediment proton adsorption capacity. Mineral dissolution in acidic solutions (pH 2) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in aqueous carbonate (with Ca2 +, Mg2 +) and phosphate and a slow (100 s of hours) increase in silica, Al3 +, and K+, likely from 2:1 clay dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong acid resulted in significant shallow uranium mineral dissolution and deeper uranium precipitation (likely as phosphates and carbonates) with downward uranium migration of three times greater mass at a faster velocity relative to uranium infiltration in pH neutral groundwater. In contrast, mineral dissolution in an alkaline environment (pH 13) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in carbonate, followed by a slow (10 s to 100 s of hours) increase in silica concentration, likely from montmorillonite, muscovite, and kaolinite dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong base resulted in not only uranium-silicate precipitation (presumed Na-boltwoodite) but also desorption of natural uranium on the sediment due to the high ionic strength solution, or 60% greater mass with greater retardation compared with groundwater. Overall, these results show that acidic or alkaline co-contaminant disposal with uranium can result in complex depth- and time-dependent changes in uranium dissolution/precipitation reactions and uranium sorption, which alter the uranium migration mass, concentration, and velocity.

  3. Influence of Acidic and Alkaline Waste Solution Properties on Uranium Migration in Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Wellman, Dawn M.; Resch, Charles T.; Zhong, Lirong

    2013-08-01

    This study shows that acidic and alkaline wastes co-disposed with uranium into subsurface sediments has significant impact on changes in uranium retardation, concentration, and mass during downward migration. For uranium co-disposal with acidic wastes, significant rapid (i.e., hours) carbonate and slow (i.e., 100s of hours) clay dissolution resulted, releasing significant sediment-associated uranium, but the extent of uranium release and mobility change was controlled by the acid mass added relative to the sediment proton adsorption capacity. Mineral dissolution in acidic solutions (pH 2) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in aqueous carbonate (with Ca2+, Mg2+) and phosphate and a slow (100s of hours) increase in silica, Al3+, and K+, likely from 2:1 clay dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong acid resulted in significant shallow uranium mineral dissolution and deeper uranium precipitation (likely as phosphates and carbonates) with downward uranium migration of three times greater mass at a faster velocity relative to uranium infiltration in pH neutral groundwater. In contrast, mineral dissolution in an alkaline environment (pH 13) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in carbonate, followed by a slow (10s to 100s of hours) increase in silica concentration, likely from montmorillonite, muscovite, and kaolinite dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong base resulted in uranium-silicate precipitation (presumed Na-boltwoodite) but also desorption of natural uranium on the sediment due to the high ionic strength solution, or 60% greater mass with greater retardation compared with groundwater. Overall, these results show that acidic or alkaline co-contaminant disposal with uranium can result in complex depth- and time-dependent changes in uranium dissolution/precipitation reactions and uranium sorption, which alter the uranium migration mass, concentration, and velocity.

  4. Influence of acidic and alkaline waste solution properties on uranium migration in subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Szecsody, Jim E; Truex, Mike J; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Wellman, Dawn M; Resch, Tom; Zhong, Lirong

    2013-08-01

    This study shows that acidic and alkaline wastes co-disposed with uranium into subsurface sediments have significant impact on changes in uranium retardation, concentration, and mass during downward migration. For uranium co-disposal with acidic wastes, significant rapid (i.e., hours) carbonate and slow (i.e., 100 s of hours) clay dissolution resulted, releasing significant sediment-associated uranium, but the extent of uranium release and mobility change was controlled by the acid mass added relative to the sediment proton adsorption capacity. Mineral dissolution in acidic solutions (pH2) resulted in a rapid (<10 h) increase in aqueous carbonate (with Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) and phosphate and a slow (100 s of hours) increase in silica, Al(3+), and K(+), likely from 2:1 clay dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong acid resulted in significant shallow uranium mineral dissolution and deeper uranium precipitation (likely as phosphates and carbonates) with downward uranium migration of three times greater mass at a faster velocity relative to uranium infiltration in pH neutral groundwater. In contrast, mineral dissolution in an alkaline environment (pH13) resulted in a rapid (<10h) increase in carbonate, followed by a slow (10 s to 100 s of hours) increase in silica concentration, likely from montmorillonite, muscovite, and kaolinite dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong base resulted in not only uranium-silicate precipitation (presumed Na-boltwoodite) but also desorption of natural uranium on the sediment due to the high ionic strength solution, or 60% greater mass with greater retardation compared with groundwater. Overall, these results show that acidic or alkaline co-contaminant disposal with uranium can result in complex depth- and time-dependent changes in uranium dissolution/precipitation reactions and uranium sorption, which alter the uranium migration mass, concentration, and velocity. PMID:23851265

  5. On the complex structural diffusion of proton holes in nanoconfined alkaline solutions within slit pores

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Santiburcio, Daniel; Marx, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    The hydroxide anion OH−(aq) in homogeneous bulk water, that is, the solvated proton hole, is known to feature peculiar properties compared with excess protons solvated therein. In this work, it is disclosed that nanoconfinement of such alkaline aqueous solutions strongly affects the key structural and dynamical properties of OH−(aq) compared with the bulk limit. The combined effect of the preferred hypercoordinated solvation pattern of OH−(aq), its preferred perpendicular orientation relative to the confining surfaces, the pronounced layering of nanoconfined water and the topology of the hydrogen bond network required for proton hole transfer lead to major changes of the charge transport mechanism, in such a way that the proton hole migration mechanism depends exquisitely on the width of the confined space that hosts the water film. Moreover, the anionic Zundel complex, which is of transient nature in homogeneous bulk solutions, can be dynamically trapped as a shallow intermediate species by suitable nanoconfinement conditions. PMID:27550616

  6. On the complex structural diffusion of proton holes in nanoconfined alkaline solutions within slit pores.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Santiburcio, Daniel; Marx, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    The hydroxide anion OH(-)(aq) in homogeneous bulk water, that is, the solvated proton hole, is known to feature peculiar properties compared with excess protons solvated therein. In this work, it is disclosed that nanoconfinement of such alkaline aqueous solutions strongly affects the key structural and dynamical properties of OH(-)(aq) compared with the bulk limit. The combined effect of the preferred hypercoordinated solvation pattern of OH(-)(aq), its preferred perpendicular orientation relative to the confining surfaces, the pronounced layering of nanoconfined water and the topology of the hydrogen bond network required for proton hole transfer lead to major changes of the charge transport mechanism, in such a way that the proton hole migration mechanism depends exquisitely on the width of the confined space that hosts the water film. Moreover, the anionic Zundel complex, which is of transient nature in homogeneous bulk solutions, can be dynamically trapped as a shallow intermediate species by suitable nanoconfinement conditions. PMID:27550616

  7. Thiols in Hydrothermal Solution: Standard Partial Molal Properties and Their Role in the Organic Geochemistry of Hydrothermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, Mitchell D.; Rogers, Karyn L.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Modern seafloor hydrothermal systems are locations where great varieties of geochemistry occur due to the enormous disequilibrium between vent fluids and seawater. The disequilibrium geochemistry has been hypothesized to include reactions to synthesize organic compounds. Despite the incomplete understanding of the carbon budget in hydrothermal systems, the organic geochemistry of these sites has received little attention. Experimental simulations of these environments, however, indicate that organic compounds may have difficulty forming in a purely aqueous environment. On the other hand, thiols, thioesters and disulfides have been implicated as reaction intermediates between CO or CO2 in experiments of carbon reduction in hydrothermal environments, as well as in a variety of biological processes and other abiotic reactions. The reduction of CO2 to thesis, for example, is observed using the FeS-H2S/FeS2 couple to provide the reducing power. We have used recent advances in theoretical geochemistry to estimate the standard partial moral thermodynamic properties and parameters for the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equation of state for aqueous straight-chain alkyl thesis. With these data and parameters we have evaluated the role that organic sulfur compounds may play as reaction intermediates during organic compound synthesis. We conclude that organic sulfur compounds may hold the key to the organic chemistry leading to the origin of life in hydrothermal settings. These results may also explain the presence of sulfur in a number of biomolecules present in ancient thermophilic microorganisms.

  8. Surface charge density on silica in alkali and alkaline earth chloride electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, Patricia M.; Craven, Colin M.

    2005-11-01

    The surface charge density of colloidal SiO 2 (Aerosil 380) was measured in alkali chloride (0.067 and 0.20 M LiCl, NaCl, and KCl) and alkaline earth chloride (0.067 M MgCl 2, CaCl 2, SrCl 2, BaCl 2) solutions. Measurements were conducted at 25°C by potentiometric titrations using the constant ionic medium method in a CO 2-free system. The experimental design measured surface charge for solutions with constant ionic strength as well as constant cation concentration. Alkali chloride solutions promote negative surface charge density in the order LiCl < NaCl < KCl to give the "regular" lyotropic behavior previously reported. In contrast, the alkaline earth chloride solutions exhibit a reversed lyotropic trend with increasing crystallographic radius where increasing negative charge is promoted in the order BaCl 2 < SrCl 2 < CaCl 2 < MgCl 2. The origin of the opposing affinity trends is probed by testing the hypothesis that this reversal is rooted in the differing solvent structuring characteristics of the IA and IIA cations at the silica-water interface. This idea arises from earlier postulations that solvent structuring effects increase entropy through solvent disordering and these gains must be much greater than the small, positive enthalpy associated with electrostatic interactions. By correlating measured charge density with a proxy for the solvent-structuring ability of cations, this study shows that silica surface charge density is maximized by those electrolytes that have the strongest effects on solvent structuring. We suggest that for a given solid material, solvation entropy has a role in determining the ionic specificity of electrostatic interactions and reiterate the idea that the concept of lyotropy is rooted in the solvent-structuring ability of cations at the interface.

  9. Spatial distribution of microbial communities in the shallow submarine alkaline hydrothermal field of the Prony Bay, New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Quéméneur, Marianne; Bes, Méline; Postec, Anne; Mei, Nan; Hamelin, Jérôme; Monnin, Christophe; Chavagnac, Valérie; Payri, Claude; Pelletier, Bernard; Guentas-Dombrowsky, Linda; Gérard, Martine; Pisapia, Céline; Gérard, Emmanuelle; Ménez, Bénédicte; Ollivier, Bernard; Erauso, Gaël

    2014-12-01

    The shallow submarine hydrothermal field of the Prony Bay (New Caledonia) discharges hydrogen- and methane-rich fluids with low salinity, temperature (< 40°C) and high pH (11) produced by the serpentinization reactions of the ultramafic basement into the lagoon seawater. They are responsible for the formation of carbonate chimneys at the lagoon seafloor. Capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism fingerprinting, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes revealed changes in microbial community structure, abundance and diversity depending on the location, water depth, and structure of the carbonate chimneys. The low archaeal diversity was dominated by few uncultured Methanosarcinales similar to those found in other serpentinization-driven submarine and subterrestrial ecosystems (e.g. Lost City, The Cedars). The most abundant and diverse bacterial communities were mainly composed of Chloroflexi, Deinococcus-Thermus, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Functional gene analysis revealed similar abundance and diversity of both Methanosarcinales methanoarchaea, and Desulfovibrionales and Desulfobacterales sulfate-reducers in the studied sites. Molecular studies suggest that redox reactions involving hydrogen, methane and sulfur compounds (e.g. sulfate) are the energy driving forces of the microbial communities inhabiting the Prony hydrothermal system. PMID:25756120

  10. Hexavalent uranium diffusion into soils from concentrated acidic and alkaline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Pena, Jasquelin; Sutton, Stephen R.; Newville, Matthew

    2004-03-29

    Uranium contamination of soils and sediments often originates from acidic or alkaline waste sources, with diffusion being a major transport mechanism. Measurements of U(VI) diffusion from initially pH 2 and pH 11 solutions into a slightly alkaline Altamont soil and a neutral Oak Ridge soil were obtained through monitoring uptake from boundary reservoirs and from U concentration profiles within soil columns. The soils provided pH buffering, resulting in diffusion at nearly constant pH. Micro x-ray absorption near edge structure spectra confirmed that U remained in U(VI) forms in all soils. Time trends of U(VI) depletion from reservoirs, and U(VI) concentration profiles within soil columns yielded K{sub d} values consistent with those determined in batch tests at similar concentrations ({approx} 1 mM), and much lower than values for sorption at much lower concentrations (nM to {mu}M). These results show that U(VI) transport at high concentrations can be relatively fast at non-neutral pH, with negligible surface diffusion, because of weak sorption.

  11. XANES Demonstrates the Release of Calcium Phosphates from Alkaline Vertisols to Moderately Acidified Solution.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Karl O; Tighe, Matthew K; Guppy, Christopher N; Milham, Paul J; McLaren, Timothy I; Schefe, Cassandra R; Lombi, Enzo

    2016-04-19

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) minerals may comprise the main phosphorus (P) reserve in alkaline soils, with solubility dependent on pH and the concentration of Ca and/or P in solution. Combining several techniques in a novel way, we studied these phenomena by progressively depleting P from suspensions of two soils (low P) using an anion-exchange membrane (AEM) and from a third soil (high P) with AEM together with a cation-exchange membrane. Depletions commenced on untreated soil, then continued as pH was manipulated and maintained at three constant pH levels: the initial pH (pHi) and pH 6.5 and 5.5. Bulk P K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed that the main forms of inorganic P in each soil were apatite, a second more soluble CaP mineral, and smectite-sorbed P. With moderate depletion of P at pHi or pH 6.5, CaP minerals became more prominent in the spectra compared to sorbed species. The more soluble CaP minerals were depleted at pH 6.5, and all CaP minerals were exhausted at pH 5.5, showing that the CaP species present in these alkaline soils are soluble with decreases of pH in the range achievable by rhizosphere acidification. PMID:26974327

  12. A chelating ion exchanger for gallium recovery from alkaline solution using 5-palmitoyl-8-hydroxyquinoline immobilized on a nonpolar adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Filik, H.; Apak, R.

    1998-06-01

    The recently developed method of gallium recovery from alkaline solution by alkanoyl oxine/chloroform extraction has been improved by immobilizing palmitoyl oxine on hydrophobic macroporous styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer Amberlite XAD-2 and passing the GA-containing alkaline solution of pH 13.5 through the synthesized resin column. The developed column showed reasonable efficiency after successive passages, and the selectivity of Ga over Al was very high, suggesting the utilizibility of the method in Ga recovery from the basic aluminate liquor of the Bayer process. The Ga capacity of the oxine-based resin was 3.94 {micro}mol/g. Two mg Ga retained on 10 g resin could be eluted with 25 mL of 2 N HCl at a throughput rate of 2 mL/min. The developed process has prospective use in Ga separation from Al in a strongly alkaline solution.

  13. Oxygen Reduction on Ag(100) in Alkaline Solutions--A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Goduljan, Aleksej; de Campos Pinto, Leandro Moreira; Juarez, Fernanda; Santos, Elizabeth; Schmickler, Wolfgang

    2016-02-16

    Silver is much more reactive to oxygen than gold; nevertheless, in alkaline solutions, the rates of oxygen reduction on both metals are similar. To explain this phenomenon, the first, rate-determining step of oxygen reduction on Ag(100) is determined by a combination of DFT, molecular dynamics, and electrocatalysis theory. In vacuum, oxygen is adsorbed on Ag(100), but in the electrochemical environment, the adsorption energy is offset by the loss of hydration energy as the molecule approaches the surface. As a result, the first electron transfer should take place in an outer-sphere mode. Previously, the same mechanism for oxygen reduction on Au(100) has been predicted, and these calculations have been repeated by using a more advanced version of the electrocatalysis theory discussed herein to confirm previous conclusions. The theoretical results compare well with experimental data. PMID:26698629

  14. Development of anion-conducting ionomer binder solutions for electrodes of solid alkaline fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mun-Sik; Kang, Moon-Sung; Park, Jin-Soo

    2014-10-01

    For solid alkaline fuel cell applications, membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs) should be prepared. Thus, in this study, anion-conducting ionomer binder was prepared for electrodes of MEAs. Specifically, we synthesized water soluble anionic binder solutions based on quaternized chitosan derivatives (QCDs) and cross-linked QCDs and prepared a novel electrode. The electrochemical and physicochemical properties of ionomer binder and electrode were investigated by FT-IR, NMR and ionic conductivity. The ionic conductivity of these cross-linked QCDs was 9.7 x 10(-3) S cm(-1) in deionized water at room temperature. The membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were prepared by a spray method and were investigated in terms of cyclic voltammetry, impedance and fuel cell performance. The MEA with the 35 wt% QCD ionomer showed the highest performance and confirmed the successful formation of ionomer binder at the electrode of the MEA by the on-site crosslinking reaction. PMID:25942868

  15. Purification and concentration of alkaline phosphatase by selective permeabilization of Escherichia coli using reverse micellar solutions.

    PubMed

    Bansal-Mutalik, Ritu; Gaikar, Vilas G

    2003-01-01

    Recovery of alkaline phosphatase (AP) from the periplasm of Escherichia coli using reverse micellar solutions (RMSs) of sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (AOT) in aliphatic hydrocarbons has been attempted. A variety of surface-active agents, solvents, and reverse micellar conditions were screened, and an excellent recovery of the enzyme in a concentrated form, with a high purification factor, was obtained in a single-step process. The permeabilization process strongly depended on the water content of the RMS as well as on the amount of water coating the microbial cell surface. The product was almost free from nucleic acids. In addition, because of the low affinity of AOT and the organic solvent for the aqueous phase, contamination by the permeabilizing agents would also be negligible. PMID:14656146

  16. Speciation and the structure of lead(II) in hyper-alkaline aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Bajnóczi, Eva G; Pálinkó, István; Körtvélyesi, Tamás; Bálint, Szabolcs; Bakó, Imre; Sipos, Pál; Persson, Ingmar

    2014-12-14

    The identity of the predominating lead(ii) species in hyper-alkaline aqueous solution has been determined by Raman spectroscopy, and ab initio quantum chemical calculations and its structure has been determined by EXAFS. The observed and calculated Raman spectra for the [Pb(OH)3](-) complex are in agreement while they are different for two-coordinated complexes and complexes containing Pb[double bond, length as m-dash]O double bonds. Predicted bond lengths are also consistent with the presence of [Pb(OH)3](-) and exclude the formation of Pb[double bond, length as m-dash]O double bond(s). These observations together with experimentally established analogies between lead(ii) and tin(ii) in hyper-alkaline aqueous solutions suggest that the last stepwise hydroxido complex of lead(ii) is [Pb(OH)3](-). The Pb-O bond distance in the [Pb(OH)3](-) complex as determined is remarkably short, 2.216 Å, and has low symmetry as no multiple back-scattering is observed. The [Pb(OH)3](-) complex has most likely trigonal pyramidal geometry as all reported three-coordinated lead(ii) complexes in the solid state. From single crystal X-ray data, the bond lengths for O-coordinated lead(ii) complexes with low coordination numbers are spread over an unusually wide interval, 2.216-2.464 Å for N = 3. The Pb-O bond distance is at the short side and within the range of three coordinated complexes, as also observed for the trihydroxidostannate(ii) complex indicating that the hydroxide ion forms short bonds with d(10)s(2) metal ions with occupied anti-bonding orbitals. PMID:25347136

  17. Removal of copper and cadmium from aqueous solution using switchgrass biochar produced via hydrothermal carbonization process.

    PubMed

    Regmi, Pusker; Garcia Moscoso, Jose Luis; Kumar, Sandeep; Cao, Xiaoyan; Mao, Jingdong; Schafran, Gary

    2012-10-30

    Biochar produced from switchgrass via hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) was used as a sorbent for the removal of copper and cadmium from aqueous solution. The cold activation process using KOH at room temperature was developed to enhance the porous structure and sorption properties of the HTC biochar. The sorption efficiency of HTC biochar and alkali activated HTC biochar (HTCB) for removing copper and cadmium from aqueous solution were compared with commercially available powdered activated carbon (PAC). The present batch adsorption study describes the effects of solution pH, biochar dose, and contact time on copper and cadmium removal efficiency from single metal ion aqueous solutions. The activated HTCB exhibited a higher adsorption potential for copper and cadmium than HTC biochar and PAC. Experiments conducted with an initial metal concentration of 40 mg/L at pH 5.0 and contact time of 24 h resulted in close to 100% copper and cadmium removal by activated HTCB at 2 g/L, far greater than what was observed for HTC biochar (16% and 5.6%) and PAC (4% and 7.7%). The adsorption capacities of activated HTCB for cadmium removal were 34 mg/g (0.313 mmol/g) and copper removal was 31 mg/g (0.503 mmol/g). PMID:22687632

  18. Optical characterization of synthetic faceted gem materials grown from hydrothermal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Taijin; Shigley, James E.

    1998-10-01

    Various non-destructive optical characterization techniques have been used to characterize and identify synthetic gem materials grown from hydrothermal solutions, to include ruby, sapphire, emerald, amethyst and ametrine (amethyst-citrine), from their natural counterparts. The ability to observe internal features, such as inclusions, dislocations, twins, color bands, and growth zoning in gem materials is strongly dependent on the observation techniques and conditions, since faceted gemstones have many polished surfaces which can reflect and scatter light in various directions which can make observation difficult. However, diagnostic gemological properties of these faceted synthetic gem materials can be obtained by choosing effective optical characterization methods, and by modifying optical instruments. Examples of some of the distinctive features of synthetic amethyst, ametrine, pink quartz, ruby and emerald are presented to illustrate means of optical characterization of gemstones. The ability to observe defects by light scattering techniques is discussed.

  19. Reactive transport modeling of column experiments on the evolution of saline alkaline waste solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zuoping; Zhang, Guoxiang; Wan, Jiamin

    2008-04-01

    Leakage of saline-alkaline tank waste solutions often creates a serious environmental contamination problem. To better understand the mechanisms controlling the fate of such waste solutions in the Hanford vadose zone, we simulated reactive transport in columns designed to represent local site conditions. The Pitzer ion interaction module was used, with principal geochemical processes considered in the simulation including quartz dissolution, precipitation of brucite, calcite, and portlandite, multi-component cation exchange, and aqueous complexation reactions. Good matches were observed between the simulated and measured column data at ambient temperature (˜ 21 °C). Relatively good agreement was also obtained at high temperature (˜ 70 °C). The decrease of pH at the plume front is examined through formation of secondary mineral phases and/or quartz dissolution. Substantial formation of secondary mineral phases resulting from multi-component cation exchange suggests that these phases are responsible for a decrease in pH within the plume front. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was conducted with respect to cation exchange capacity, selectivity coefficient, mineral assemblage, temperature, and ionic strength. This study could serve as a useful guide to subsequent experimental work, to thermodynamic models developed for the concentrated solutions at high ionic strength and to other types of waste plume studies.

  20. Reactive transport modeling of column experiments on the evolution of saline-alkaline waste solutions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zuoping; Zhang, Guoxiang; Wan, Jiamin

    2008-04-01

    Leakage of saline-alkaline tank waste solutions often creates a serious environmental contamination problem. To better understand the mechanisms controlling the fate of such waste solutions in the Hanford vadose zone, we simulated reactive transport in columns designed to represent local site conditions. The Pitzer ion interaction module was used, with principal geochemical processes considered in the simulation including quartz dissolution, precipitation of brucite, calcite, and portlandite, multi-component cation exchange, and aqueous complexation reactions. Good matches were observed between the simulated and measured column data at ambient temperature ( approximately 21 degrees C). Relatively good agreement was also obtained at high temperature ( approximately 70 degrees C). The decrease of pH at the plume front is examined through formation of secondary mineral phases and/or quartz dissolution. Substantial formation of secondary mineral phases resulting from multi-component cation exchange suggests that these phases are responsible for a decrease in pH within the plume front. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was conducted with respect to cation exchange capacity, selectivity coefficient, mineral assemblage, temperature, and ionic strength. This study could serve as a useful guide to subsequent experimental work, to thermodynamic models developed for the concentrated solutions at high ionic strength and to other types of waste plume studies. PMID:18313795

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis of silico-manganese nanohybrid for Cu(II) adsorption from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiufeng; Wang, Liting; An, Zehuan; Ye, Hong; Feng, Xudong

    2016-05-01

    A novel silico-manganese nanohybrid adsorbent (SMNA) was synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method, and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and zeta potential measurement. The adsorption of Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution on the SMNA was investigated with variations in contact time, pH and initial Cu(II) concentration. The results showed that hydrothermal method would generate nanowire/nanorod incomplete crystallite (δ-MnO2) adsorbent. The adsorption of Cu(II) onto SMNA increased sharply within 25 min and reached equilibrium gradually. The maximum adsorption capacities of SMNA for Cu(II) were ∼40-88 mg g-1, which was lower than δ-MnO2 (92.42 mg g-1) but had a lower pH dependency. As compared with δ-MnO2, higher adsorption capacities of SMNA (7.5-15 wt% of silica doping amount) for Cu(II) could be observed when pH of the aqueous solution was low (<4). The pseudo-second-order model was the best choice to describe the adsorption behavior of Cu(II) onto SMNA, suggesting that the removal of Cu(II) by the as-prepared adsorbents was dominated by migration of Cu(II). The possibility of Cu(II) recovery was also investigated and it revealed that SMNA was a promising recyclable adsorbent for removal of heavy metal ions in water and wastewater treatment.

  2. Differences on the conversion of celestite in solutions bearing monovalent ions under hydrothermal conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rendon-Angeles, J.C. . E-mail: jcarlos.rendon@cinvestav.edu.mx; Pech-Canul, M.I.; Lopez-Cuevas, J.; Matamoros-Veloza, Z.; Yanagisawa, K.

    2006-12-15

    The replacement of SO{sub 4} {sup 2-} ions by monovalent ions in mineral SrSO{sub 4} crystals was investigated under hydrothermal conditions by using aqueous solutions bearing F{sup -} and OH{sup -} ions. Experiments were conducted at various temperatures (150-250 {sup o}C) for different reaction intervals (1-96 h), with M {sup -}/SO{sub 4} {sup 2-} molar ratios of 1, 5 and 10, where M {sup -}=F{sup -} or OH{sup -}. The celestite crystals were completely converted into SrF{sub 2} crystals, at 200 {sup o}C using a F{sup -}/SO{sub 4} {sup 2-} molar ratio=5 for 24 h. The morphology of the converted SrF{sub 2} crystals indicated that the heteroionic conversion proceeded by a pseudomorphic replacement process, because the transformed crystals maintained their original shape and dimensions. In contrast, the SrSO{sub 4} crystals were instantaneously converted into the Sr(OH){sub 2} phase by a bulk dissolution-recrystallization mechanism, resulting in the formation of large transparent acicular Sr(OH){sub 2} crystals. The differences on the conversion process are mainly associated with the chemical interaction between the mineral crystal and the hydrothermal fluid. In addition, the chemical stability of the converted phase with low solubility is also essential for the heteroionic conversion to proceed by the pseudomorphic replacement process. - Graphical abstract: Typical SEM image of the reaction interface determined on partially converted SrSO{sub 4} crystals obtained at 250 {sup o}C after 6 h in a NaF solution with a F{sup -}/SO{sub 4} {sup 2-} molar ratio=10.

  3. River solute fluxes reflecting active hydrothermal chemical weathering of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurwitz, S.; Evans, William C.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    In the past few decades numerous studies have quantified the load of dissolved solids in large rivers to determine chemical weathering rates in orogenic belts and volcanic areas, mainly motivated by the notion that over timescales greater than ~100kyr, silicate hydrolysis may be the dominant sink for atmospheric CO2, thus creating a feedback between climate and weathering. Here, we report the results of a detailed study during water year 2007 (October 1, 2006 to September 30, 2007) in the major rivers of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field (YPVF) which hosts Earth's largest "restless" caldera and over 10,000 thermal features. The chemical compositions of rivers that drain thermal areas in the YPVF differ significantly from the compositions of rivers that drain non-thermal areas. There are large seasonal variations in river chemistry and solute flux, which increases with increasing water discharge. The river chemistry and discharge data collected periodically over an entire year allow us to constrain the annual solute fluxes and to distinguish between low-temperature weathering and hydrothermal flux components. The TDS flux from Yellowstone Caldera in water year 2007 was 93t/km2/year. Extensive magma degassing and hydrothermal interaction with rocks accounts for at least 82% of this TDS flux, 83% of the cation flux and 72% of the HCO3- flux. The low-temperature chemical weathering rate (17t/km2/year), calculated on the assumption that all the Cl- is of thermal origin, could include a component from low-temperature hydrolysis reactions induced by CO2 ascending from depth rather than by atmospheric CO2. Although this uncertainty remains, the calculated low-temperature weathering rate of the young rhyolitic rocks in the Yellowstone Caldera is comparable to the world average of large watersheds that drain also more soluble carbonates and evaporates but is slightly lower than calculated rates in other, less-silicic volcanic regions. Long-term average fluxes at

  4. Americium/Lanthanide Separations in Alkaline Solutions for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, George S.; Long, Kristy Marie; Reilly, Sean D.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Runde, Wolfgang H.

    2012-06-11

    Project goals: Can used nuclear fuel be partitioned by dissolution in alkaline aqueous solution to give a solution of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium and a filterable solid containing nearly all of the lanthanide fission products and certain other fission products? What is the chemistry of Am/Cm/Ln in oxidative carbonate solutions? Can higher oxidation states of Am be stabilized and exploited? Conclusions: Am(VI) is kinetically stable in 0.5-2.0 M carbonate solutions for hours. Aliquat 336 in toluene has been successfully shown to extract U(VI) and Pu(VI) from carbonate solutions. (Stepanov et al 2011). Higher carbonate concentration gives lower D, SF{sub U/Eu} for = 4 in 1 M K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Experiments with Am(VI) were unsuccessful due to reduction by the organics. Multiple sources of reducing organics...more optimization. Reduction experiments of Am(VI) in dodecane/octanol/Aliquat 336 show that after 5 minutes of contact, only 30-40% of the Am(VI) has been reduced. Long enough to perform an extraction. Shorter contact times, lower T, and lower Aliquat 336 concentration still did not result in any significant extraction of Am. Anion exchange experiments using a strong base anion exchanger show uptake of U(VI) with minimal uptake of Nd(III). Experiments with Am(VI) indicate Am sorption with a Kd of 9 (10 minute contact) but sorption mechanism is not yet understood. SF{sub U/Nd} for = 7 and SF{sub U/Eu} for = 19 after 24 hours in 1 M K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.

  5. Addition and elimination kinetics in OH radical induced oxidation of phenol and cresols in acidic and alkaline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roder, M.; Wojnárovits, L.; Földiák, G.; Emmi, S. S.; Beggiato, G.; D'Angelantonio, M.

    1999-05-01

    The rates of the two consecutive reactions, OH radical addition and H 2O/OH - elimination, were studied by pulse radiolysis in highly acidic (pH=1.3-1.9) and alkaline (pH≈11) solutions, respectively, for phenol and for the three cresol isomers. The rate coefficient of the addition as measured by the build-up of phenoxyl radical absorbance and by a competitive method is the same (1.4±0.1)×10 10 mol -1 dm 3 s -1 both in acidic and alkaline solution. The rate coefficient of the H 2O elimination in acidic solution is (1.6±0.2)×10 6 s -1, whereas the coefficient of the OH - elimination in alkaline solutions is 6-8 times higher. The kinetics of the phenoxyl radical formation was described by the two-exponential equation of the consecutive reactions: the first exponential is related to the pseudo-first-order addition, while the second to the elimination reaction. No considerable structure dependence was found in the rate coefficients, indicating that the methyl substitutent in these highly acidic or alkaline solutions influences neither the addition nor the elimination rate.

  6. Mechanisms of pyrite and marcasite formation from solution: 3. Hydrothermal processes

    SciTech Connect

    Schoonen, M.A.A.; Barnes, H.L. )

    1991-12-01

    The formation of pyrite and marcasite from solutions between 100 and 300C has been examined experimentally, and the solubility product for the initial precipitate upon mixing of Fe{sup 2+} and H{sub 2}S solutions has been determined. Below 300C, pyrite and marcasite form via an FeS precursor. The precursor phase is crystalline, nearly stoichiometric FeS with a solubility product of 10{sup 2.9{plus minus}0.2} (K = a{sub Fe{sup 2+}}a{sub H{sub 2}S}/(a{sub H+}){sup 2}). It reacts progressively to mackinawite, hexagonal pyrrhotite, and/or greigite before forming pyrite or marcasite. In the presence of elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, or polysulfides, the rate of reaction is extremely fast (minutes at 150C). Without these sulfur species and only hydrogen sulfide or bisulfide present, the conversion rate drops significantly (1 h at 300C). In the absence of any aqueous sulfur source, the conversion proceeds at an indetectably slow rate. Because the rate of direct FeS{sub 2} nucleation is insignificant in (slightly) acidic solutions below 300C, most pyrite and marcasite in hydrothermal ores form via the conversion of an FeS precursor.

  7. Experimentally determined swelling pressures and geochemical interactions of compacted Wyoming bentonite with highly alkaline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnland, Ola; Olsson, Siv; Nilsson, Ulf; Sellin, Patrik

    The estimated quantity of cement for construction and sealing purposes is around 9E5 kg in the planned Swedish KBS3 repository for nuclear waste. The highly alkaline cement pore fluid (pH > 12) may affect other components in the repository, and especially the bentonite buffer is of concern. In this study, we simulated possible interactions between cement and bentonite by contacting highly compacted bentonite with high molar hydroxide solutions in a series of laboratory experiments. Wyoming bentonite (MX-80) and purified homo-ionic Na- and Ca-montmorillonite were used for tests with 0.1, 0.3 and 1.0 M NaOH, and saturated Ca(OH) 2 solutions. Pressure cells with permeable filters were loaded with compacted discs of bentonite at the proposed buffer density (2000 kg/m 3 at full water saturation). A hydroxide solution was circulated on one side of the cell and an isotonic chloride solution on the other during a minimum of 45 days. Swelling pressure and solution pH were monitored during the tests and the change in the solution composition and bentonite mineralogy were determined after completed tests. No effect on swelling pressure was observed in tests with 0.1 M NaOH (pH 12.9) or saturated Ca(OH) 2 solutions (pH 12.4) and the mineralogical/chemical changes of the clay were minimal. The bentonite swelling pressure was significantly reduced in the tests with 0.3 (pH 13.3) and 1.0 M (pH 13.8) NaOH solutions. The reduction seems to be due to an instant osmotic effect, and to a continuous dissolution of silica minerals, resulting in mass loss and, consequently, a decrease in density. At these high pH, the release of silica was dominating and the CEC of the clay increased by 20-25%. The structural formula of the smectite and X-ray diffraction tests for non-expandability (Greene-Kelly test) provided strong evidence that the dissolution of montmorillonite proceeds incongruently through an initial step of beidellitization. The calculated rate of silica release from

  8. Towards the question of the movement of hydrothermal solutions: The case of the Schlema-Alberoda vein deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, G. B.; Vlasov, B. P.; Mironova, O. F.

    2014-09-01

    The paths of the movements of hydrothermal solutions are considered in the case of one of the world's largest uranium vein deposits, the Schlema-Alberoda, which was mined by the Soviet-German corporation Wismut JSC in the second half of the 20th century. Detailed geological exploration to a depth of 2 km was accompanied by specialized research, the results of which have remained practically unpublished due to confidentiality. The data obtained show that the region adjoining the largest fault was draining rather than ore-conducting. This circumstance specifies and supplements the current concept concerning the movement of hydrothermal fluids.

  9. Effects of Alkali and Alkaline Earth Cocations on the Activity and Hydrothermal Stability of Cu/SSZ-13 NH3-SCR Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng; Wang, Yilin; Washton, Nancy M.; Kollar, Marton; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2015-10-13

    Using a three-step aqueous solution ion-exchange method, cocation modified Cu/SSZ-13 SCR catalysts were synthesized. These catalysts, in both fresh and hydrothermally aged forms, were characterized with several methods including temperature-programmed reduction by H2 (H2-TPR), temperature-programmed desorption of NH3 (NH3-TPD), and 27Al solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and diffuse reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopies. Their catalytic performance was probed using steady-state standard NH3-SCR. Characterization results indicate that cocations weaken interactions between Cu-ions and the CHA framework making them more readily reducible. By removing a portion of Brønsted acid sites, cocations also help to mitigate hydrolysis of the zeolite catalysts during hydrothermal aging as evidenced from 27Al NMR. Reaction tests show that certain cocations, especially Li+ and Na+, promote low-temperature SCR rates while others show much less pronounced effects. In terms of applications, our results indicate that introducing cocations can be a viable strategy to improve both low- and high-temperature performance of Cu/SSZ-13 SCR catalysts.

  10. Mercury(II) Complex Formation With Glutathione in Alkaline Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mah, V.; Jalilehvand, F.

    2009-05-19

    The structure and speciation of the complexes formed between mercury(II) ions and glutathione (GSH = L-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine) have been studied for a series of alkaline aqueous solutions (C{sub Hg{sup 2+}} {approx} 18 mmol dm{sup -3} and C{sub GSH} = 40-200 mmol dm{sup -3} at pH {approx} 10.5) by means of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and {sup 199}Hg NMR spectroscopy at ambient temperature. The dominant complexes are [Hg(GS){sub 2}]{sup 4-} and [Hg(GS){sub 3}]{sup 7-}, with mean Hg-S bond distances of 2.32(1) and 2.42(2) {angstrom} observed in digonal and trigonal Hg-S coordination, respectively. The proportions of the Hg{sup 2+}-glutathione complexes were evaluated by fitting linear combinations of model EXAFS oscillations representing each species to the experimental EXAFS spectra. The [Hg(GS){sub 4}]{sup 10-} complex, with four sulfur atoms coordinated at a mean Hg-S bond distance of 2.52(2) {angstrom}, is present in minor amounts (<30%) in solutions containing a large excess of glutathione (C{sub GSH} {ge} 160 mmol dm{sup -3}). Comparable alkaline mercury(II) cysteine (H{sub 2}Cys) solutions were also investigated and a reduced tendency to form higher complexes was observed, because the deprotonated amino group of Cys{sup 2-} allows the stable [Hg(S,N-Cys){sub 2}]{sup 2-} chelate to form. The effect of temperature on the distribution of the Hg{sup 2+}-glutathione complexes was studied by comparing the EXAFS spectra at ambient temperature and at 25 K of a series of glycerol/water (33/67, v/v) frozen glasses with and C{sub Hg{sup 2+}} {approx} 7 mmol dm{sup -3} and C{sub GSH} = 16-81 mmol dm{sup -3}. Complexes with high Hg-S coordination numbers, [Hg(GS){sub 3}]{sup 7-} and [Hg(GS){sub 4}]{sup 10-}, became strongly favored when just a moderate excess of glutathione (C{sub GSH} {ge} 28 mmol dm{sup -3}) was used in the glassy samples, as expected for a stepwise exothermic bond formation. Addition of glycerol had no effect on the Hg

  11. Recovery of MnO2 from a spent alkaline battery leach solution via ozone treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Díaz, Martín R.; Arauz-Torres, Yennifer; Caballero, Francisco; Lapidus, Gretchen T.; González, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the reaction rate of Mn(II) to generate solid manganese dioxide (MnO2) as a function of the gaseous ozone mass flow rate (27.5-77 g h-1). The experimental studies were carried out in a semi-continuous reactor, using a synthetic solution (300 mL of 1 M H2SO4 with 6000 ppm of Mn(II) added as MnSO4) that simulated the composition of an acid leaching solution from spent alkaline battery material (SBM). It was observed that at 1.3-1.45 V/SHE and pH < 1.0 a selective formation of MnO2 powder was obtained; at values greater than 1.45 V/SHE, permanganate ion (MnO41-) was formed. On the other hand, a linear relation was perceived between the volumetric mass transfer coefficient (kLa) and the ozone mass flow rate (19.3-77 g h-1 in 600 mL of the 1 M H2SO4 solution). The rate constant (k) was determined in the presence and absence of nonporous plastic spheres (D = 3 mm). In both cases the rate of Mn(II) conversion increased proportionally with the ozone mass flow rate, although the conversions obtained with non-porous plastic spheres (x = 82%) were always higher than those without non-porous plastic spheres (x = 72%). A pseudo-homogenous mass transfer model adequately approximated the experimental data.

  12. Uranium mobility during interaction of rhyolitic glass with alkaline solutions: dissolution of glass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zielinski, Robert A.

    1977-01-01

    This report concerns investigations designed to identify the important physical and chemical parameters influencing the rate of release of uranium from glass shards of rhyolitic air-fall ash. Oxidizing, silica undersaturated, alkaline solutions are eluted through a column of rhyolitic glass shards at a carefully controlled temperature, pressure, and flow rate. The solutions are monitored for the concentration of uranium and selected additional elements (Si, K, Li, F), and the glass is recovered and examined for physical and/or chemical evidence of attack. The flushing mode is designed to mimic leaching of glass shards by intermittent, near-surface waters with which the glass is not in equilibrium. Reported rates are applicable only to the experimental conditions (120?C, 7,000 psi), but it is assumed that the reaction mechanisms and the relative importance of rate-influencing parameters remain unchanged, at reduced temperature and pressure. Results of the above experiment indicate that silica and uranium are released from glass shards at comparable rates, while lithium and potassium are released faster and fluorine slower than either Si or U. Rates of release of silica and uranium correlate positively with the surface area of the shards. Rhyolitic shards release uranium at faster rates than rhyodacitic shards of comparable surface area. Changes in the shards resulting from experimental treatment and observed in the original glass separates from an Oligocene ash (compared to a Pleistocene ash) include; surface pitting, increased surface area, devitrification rinds (<1l micron wide) and reduced lithium contents. Future investigations will study the effect of temperature, pressure, solution composition, and flow rate on the relative mobility of U, Si, Li, F, and K.

  13. Reuse of ozonated alkaline solutions as fermentation brines in Spanish green table olives.

    PubMed

    Segovia-Bravo, K A; Arroyo-López, F N; García-García, P; Durán-Quintana, M C; Garrido-Fernández, A

    2007-05-01

    The water used to reduce the excess NaOH after the immersion of green olives in lye becomes a heavily polluted, alkaline wastewater (AW) once it has come into contact with the fruits. Its treatment with ozonated air for 72 h (TAW) destroyed all polyphenols in the solution. A comparison of the microbial, physicochemical, and organoleptic characteristics of olives processed in the traditional way (W) and those reusing AW or TAW was made. The reuse of TAW or diluted TAW (TAW + W) as fermentation brines led to a shorter lag phase, higher maximum specific growth of lactobacillus, and higher lactic acid accumulation (in TAW) than the traditional process; differences among other physicochemical characteristics were not relevant, except that reused brines (AW) always had higher polyphenol contents. The organoleptic panel test did not detect significant differences among treatments in acidic taste, firmness, pit detachment, or olive color. Overall quality was fairly similar for olives from the traditional process and those from the reused TAW. Direct (or diluted) reuse of AW was also possible but produced a more bitter tasting olive. PMID:17995780

  14. Critical anomalies of alkaline fading of phenolphthalein in the critical solution of 2-butoxyethanol + water.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhongyu; Yin, Handi; Hao, Zhiguo; Zheng, Peizhu; Shen, Weiguo

    2013-12-14

    We have used three-wavelength UV-spectrophotometry to study the reaction of the alkaline fading of phenolphthalein in the critical solution of 2-butoxyethanol + water. It was found that when the temperature was far away from the critical point, the values of the natural logarithm of the rate constant k and the natural logarithm of the chemical equilibrium K determined in our experiments had good linear relationships with the reciprocal of temperature, which served as the backgrounds and were used for correcting k and K in the critical region. The critical slowing down of the reaction and the critical anomaly of the chemical equilibrium were detected near the critical point. The value of the critical exponent characterizing the slowing down effect of the reaction rate was obtained to be 0.156, which was close to the value 0.11 associated with the heat capacity divergence and agreed with the theoretical prediction. The experimental result also confirmed the theoretical prediction of 0.11 for the critical exponent characterizing the weak divergence of the singularity of the chemical equilibrium. PMID:24329072

  15. Phase Stability of Chromium(III) Oxide Hydroxide in Alkaline Sodium Phosphate Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Ziemniak; E.P. Opalka

    2003-07-08

    Grimaldiite ({alpha}-CrOOH) is shown to transform to a sodium-chromium(III)-hydroxyphosphate compound (SCHP) in alkaline sodium phosphate solutions at elevated temperatures via CrOOH(s) + 4Na{sup +} + 2HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} = Na{sub 4}Cr(OH)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(s) + H{sub 2}O. X-ray diffraction analyses indicate that SCHP possesses an orthorhombic lattice having the same space group symmetry (Ibam, No.72) as sodium ferric hydroxyphosphate. A structurally-consistent designation for SCHP is Na{sub 3}Cr(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} NaOH; the molar volume of SCHP is estimated to be 1552 cm{sup 3}. The thermodynamic equilibrium for the above reaction was defined in the system Na{sub 2}O-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O for Na/P molar ratios between 2.0 and 2.4. On the basis of observed reaction threshold values for sodium phosphate concentration and temperature, the standard molar entropy (S{sup o}), heat capacity (C{sub p}{sup o}) and free energy of formation ({Delta}G{sub f}{sup o}) for SCHP were calculated to be 690 J/(mol-K), 622 J/(mol-K) and -3509.97 kJ/mol, respectively.

  16. The inhibition of the spongy electrocrystallization of zinc from doped flowing alkaline zincate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yue-hua; Cheng, Jie; Zhang, Li; Yan, Xu; Yang, Yu-sheng

    The effects of the presence of additives like lead and tungstate ions in flowing alkaline zincate solutions on suppressing spongy zinc electrogrowth are examined. The results show that the two additives with optimal concentrations in flowing electrolytes can suppress spongy zinc initiation and propagation. And, the two additives can bring about more uniform and compact deposits and, thereby, reduce spongy zinc growth. The influence of lead and tungstate ions on the zinc deposition/dissolution is evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. It also shows that the addition of the two additives is largely a blocking action, and the co-deposition of lead and zinc ions may occur. The performance of the zinc-air flow battery with zinc regeneration electrolysis is determined. It shows that by the addition of 0.6 M Na 2WO 4 or 10 -4 M to 10 -3 M lead, compact or mixed compact-spongy zinc deposits are created and the favorable charge/discharge performance of the battery is achieved with an energy efficiency of approximately 60%.

  17. Effect of carbon nanofiber surface functional groups on oxygen reduction in alkaline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Ren-Sheng; Qin, Yuan-Hang; Niu, Dong-Fang; Tian, Jing-Wei; Zhang, Xin-Sheng; Zhou, Xin-Gui; Sun, Shi-Gang; Yuan, Wei-Kang

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with different content of surface functional groups which are carboxyl groups (CNF-OX), carbonyl groups (CNF-CO) and hydroxyl groups (CNF-OH) and nitrogen-containing groups (CNF-ON) are synthesized, and their electrocatalytic activities toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline solution are investigated. The result of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization indicates that a higher concentration of carboxyl groups, carbonyl groups and hydroxyl groups are imported onto the CNF-OX, CNF-CO and CNF-OH, respectively. Cyclic voltammetry shows that both the oxygen- and nitrogen-containing groups can improve the electrocatalytic activity of CNFs for ORR. The CNF-ON/GC electrode, which has nitrogen-containing groups, exhibits the highest current density of ORR. Rotating disk electrode (RDE) characterization shows that the oxygen reduction on CNF-ON/GC electrode proceeds almost entirely through the four-electron reduction pathway, the CNF-OX/GC, CNF-CO/GC and CNF-OH/GC electrodes proceed a two-electron reduction pathway at low potentials (-0.2 V to -0.6 V) followed by a gradual four-electron reduction pathway at more negative potentials, while the untreated carbon nanofiber (CNF-P/GC) electrode proceeds predominantly by a two-electron reduction pathway within the whole range of potential studied.

  18. Two new frameworks of potassium saccharate obtained from acidic and alkaline solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Yao-Kang; Feng, Yun-Long; Liu, Ji-Wei; Jiang, Zhan-Guo

    2011-05-15

    Two chiral K(I) complexes based on D-saccharic acid (H{sub 2}sac), [K(Hsac)]{sub n} (1) and [K{sub 2}(sac)]{sub n} (2) were obtained from acidic and alkaline solution. The 3D framework of 1 includes K(I) polyhedral rods and typical pairwise coaxial right- and left-handed helical chains, and displays binodal 6-connected pcu topology. 2 contains 2D polyhedral sheets consisting of left-handed helical chains, and generates 3D network with an unprecedented (7,11)-connected net. Cyclic voltammetry tests and charge-discharge tests indicate that the addition of complex 2 to the electrolyte could improve the electrochemical properties of the nickel hydroxide electrode. -- Graphical abstract: Two K(I) complexes based on D-saccharic acid (H{sub 2}sac), [K(Hsac)]{sub n} (1) and [K{sub 2}(sac)]{sub n} (2) were obtained and characterized. Electrochemical studies indicate the potential use of 2 in Ni-MH battery. Display Omitted highlights: > Two novel chiral K(I) frameworks based on D-saccharic acid were obtained. > The structure of 1 includes K(I) polyhedral rods and typical helical chains. > 2 contains 2D polyhedral sheets and generates an unprecedented (7,11)-connected net. > Addition of 2 to electrolyte could improve the nickel hydroxide electrode's property.

  19. Characteristics of hydrolysis of the complex Na2SnF6 in hydrothermal solutions-An experimental study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Y.; I-Ming, C.

    1987-01-01

    Characteristics of hydrolysis of the complex Na2SnF6, which is used as the starting material, in hydrothermal solutions have been studied at 200-602??C and 1 kbar. Experimental results show that intense hydrolysis of Na2SnF6 occurs at high temperatures and that with the rise of temperature the hydrolysis will become more intense. Under the present experimental conditions the most possible existing form of Sn in the hydrothermal solutions is SnF3(OH) or Na2SnF3(OH). In addition, the hydrolysis constants for Na2SnF6 have also been calculated at 200-602??C, and the relationship between Na2SnF6 hydrolysis and temperature is discussed. ?? 1987 Science Press.

  20. Enhancement of palladium-porphyrin room temperature phosphorescence by alkaline earth metal in deoxycholate aggregates solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Te; Wang, Xiang-Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2011-01-01

    Room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) of three palladium (Pd)-phorphyrins in air-saturated solution of sodium deoxycholate (NaDC) aggregates was measured. RTP of Pd-meso-tetrakis (4-carboxyphenyl) porphyrin (Pd-TCPP) was obviously enhanced in NaDC-aggregates mediated by alkaline earth metal (AEM). Under the same experimental conditions, Ca(2+), Ba(2+) and Mg(2+) induced 200, 90 and 24 times greater enhancement in RTP of Pd-TCPP, respectively. It is ascribed to form the complex of NaDC-aggregate/AEM/Pd-TCPP in the system. The positively charged AEM has a strong capability of co-ordination with negatively charged carboxyl groups of NaDC and Pd-TCPP. The phosphor Pd-TCPP is confined in rigid NaDC-aggregates/AEM system by the coordination which decreases the probability of collision of phosphor with quenchers such as dissolved oxygen molecules and prolongs the lifetime of the phosphor on the triplet state. Long excited-state lifetimes resulted in great enhancement of Pd-TCPP phosphorescence. Observations by optical microscope showed that specific fan-like structures of NaDC were formed under the influence of AEM. Surface tension measurements supported a close interaction between Ca(2+) ions and anion aggregates of NaDC with 1:1 stoichiometric ratio. Due to its outstanding RTP behavior in NaDC-aggregates induced by Ca(2+), Pd-TCPP was used as a RTP probe to detect bovine serum albumin (BSA). A broad linear range from 1.0 × 10(-9) to 9.0 × 10(-7) g mL(-1) was obtained. Detection limit is 2.6 × 10(-11) g mL(-1), the relative standard deviation (n = 6) is 2.3% for 2.0 × 10(-9) g mL(-1) BSA. PMID:21438880

  1. CO adsorption and kinetics on well-characterized Pd films on Pt(111) in alkaline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Arenz, M.; Stamenkovic, V.; Wandelt, K.; Ross, P.N.; Markovic, N.M.

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemistry of CO on a bare Pt(111) electrode as well as a Pt(111) electrode modified with pseudomorphic thin palladium films has been studied in alkaline solution by means of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. First Pd films were prepared and well characterized in UHV and subsequently transferred into the electrochemical cell for the registration of the voltammetric profiles. The charge corresponding to the formation of underpotentially deposited hydrogen (H{sub upd}) on these Pt(111)-xPd surfaces was established in sulfuric acid solution as a function of x (0 {le} x {le} 1 Pd monolayer (ML)). All subsequent measurements were then performed on electrochemically deposited palladium films using the above H{sub upd}-charge vs. Pd coverage relationship to evaluate the amount of electrochemically deposited palladium. FTIR spectra for CO adsorbed on one monolayer and a submonolayer coverage are compared to those of the unmodified Pt(111) surface, all surfaces having identical 2D lattice structures. Infrared absorption bands of CO bound on either Pt(111) or Pt(111)-1ML Pd are clearly distinguished. Spectra of CO adsorbed on Pd submonolayers show characteristic features of both CO bound to Pt and to Pd, indicating that on Pt(111)-xPd surfaces there is no coupling between Pt-CO{sub ad} and Pd-CO{sub ad} molecules. The kinetics of CO oxidation on these surfaces is determined either by rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements or by FTIR spectroscopy, monitoring the CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} production. The oxidation of CO{sub ad} on Pt(111) and on Pd modified platinum surfaces starts at the same potential, ca. at 0.2 V. The oxidation rate is, however, considerably lower on the Pt(111)-xPd surfaces than on the Pt(111) surface. The kinetics of CO oxidation appears to be determined by the nature of adsorbed hydroxyl anions (OH{sub ad}), which are more strongly (less active) adsorbed on the highly oxophilic Pd atoms.

  2. Growth of tourmaline single crystals containing transition metal elements in hydrothermal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setkova, Tatiana; Shapovalov, Yury; Balitsky, Vladimir

    2011-03-01

    Interest in the growth of tourmaline single crystals is based on the promising piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties of this material compared to quartz crystals currently in use. Moreover, synthetic tourmaline can be used as a substitute for the natural stone in the jewelry industry similar to other synthetic analogues of gemstones. Single crystals of colored Co-, Ni-, Fe-, (Ni,Cr)-, (Ni,Fe)-, and (Co,Ni,Cr)-containing tourmalines with concentration of transition metal elements up to 16 wt% on a seed have been grown from complex boron-containing hydrothermal solutions at a range of temperatures 400-750 °C and pressures 100 MPa. Experiments were conducted under conditions of a thermal gradient in titanium and chromium-nickel autoclaves. Tourmaline growth on a seed crystal occurs only if separate tourmaline-forming components (monocrystalline corundum and quartz bars) are used as charge. All tourmalines specified above grow in analogous (+) direction of the optical axis with a speed of 0.05 mm/day by faces of the trigonal pyramid, except tourmalines containing chromium. They grow in analogous (+0001) direction with a speed 0.05 mm/day, and in antilogous (-0001) direction with a speed of 0.01 mm/day by faces of the trigonal pyramid and in prism direction with a speed of 0.001 mm/day. Along with the large single crystals, a great amount of finest (30-150 μm in size) tourmaline crystals was formed during the runs by spontaneous nucleation both on the surface of the seed crystals and in the charge.

  3. Early containment of high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream in clay-bearing blended cement

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, A.A.; Olson, R.A.; Tennis, P.D.

    1995-04-01

    Portland cement blended with fly ash and attapulgite clay was mixed with high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream at a one-to-one weight ratio. Mixtures were adiabatically and isothermally cured at various temperatures and analyzed for phase composition, total alkalinity, pore solution chemistry, and transport properties as measured by impedance spectroscopy. Total alkalinity is characterized by two main drops. The early one corresponds to a rapid removal of phosphorous, aluminum, sodium, and to a lesser extent potassium solution. The second drop from about 10 h to 3 days is mainly associated with the removal of aluminum, silicon, and sodium. Thereafter, the total alkalinity continues descending, but at a lower rate. All pastes display a rapid flow loss that is attributed to an early precipitation of hydrated products. Hemicarbonate appears as early as one hour after mixing and is probably followed by apatite precipitation. However, the former is unstable and decomposes at a rate that is inversely related to the curing temperature. At high temperatures, zeolite appears at about 10 h after mixing. At 30 days, the stabilized crystalline composition Includes zeolite, apatite and other minor amounts of CaCO{sub 3}, quartz, and monosulfate Impedance spectra conform with the chemical and mineralogical data. The normalized conductivity of the pastes shows an early drop, which is followed by a main decrease from about 12 h to three days. At three days, the permeability of the cement-based waste as calculated by Katz-Thompson equation is over three orders of magnitude lower than that of ordinary portland cement paste. However, a further decrease in the calculated permeability is questionable. Chemical stabilization is favorable through incorporation of waste species into apatite and zeolite.

  4. Chemically and compositionally modified solid solution disordered multiphase nickel hydroxide positive electrode for alkaline rechargeable electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Ovshinsky, Stanford R.; Corrigan, Dennis; Venkatesan, Srini; Young, Rosa; Fierro, Christian; Fetcenko, Michael A.

    1994-01-01

    A high capacity, long cycle life positive electrode for use in an alkaline rechargeable electrochemical cell comprising: a solid solution nickel hydroxide material having a multiphase structure that comprises at least one polycrystalline .gamma.-phase including a polycrystalline .gamma.-phase unit cell comprising spacedly disposed plates with at least one chemical modifier incorporated around the plates, the plates having a range of stable intersheet distances corresponding to a 2.sup.+ oxidation state and a 3.5.sup.+, or greater, oxidation state; and at least one compositional modifier incorporated into the solid solution nickel hydroxide material to promote the multiphase structure.

  5. Removal of dissolved actinides from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents

    DOEpatents

    Krot, Nikolai N.; Charushnikova, Iraida A.

    1997-01-01

    A method of reducing the concentration of neptunium and plutonium from alkaline radwastes containing plutonium and neptunium values along with other transuranic values produced during the course of plutonium production. The OH.sup.- concentration of the alkaline radwaste is adjusted to between about 0.1M and about 4M. [UO.sub.2 (O.sub.2).sub.3 ].sup.4- ion is added to the radwastes in the presence of catalytic amounts of Cu.sup.+2, Co.sup.+2 or Fe.sup.+2 with heating to a temperature in excess of about 60.degree. C. or 85.degree. C., depending on the catalyst, to coprecipitate plutonium and neptunium from the radwaste. Thereafter, the coprecipitate is separated from the alkaline radwaste.

  6. Hydrothermal diamond anvil cell for XAFS studies of first-row transition elements in aqueous solutions up to supercritical conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bassett, William A.; Anderson, Alan J.; Mayanovic, Robert A.; Chou, I.-Ming

    2000-01-01

    A hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) has been modified by drilling holes with a laser to within 150 ??m of the anvil face to minimize the loss of X-rays due to absorption and scatter by diamond. This modification enables acquisition of K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra from first-row transition metal ions in aqueous solutions at temperatures ranging from 25??C to 660??C and pressures up to 800 MPa. These pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions are more than sufficient for carrying out experimental measurements that can provide data valuable in the interpretation of fluid inclusions in minerals found in ore-forming hydrothermal systems as well as other important lithospheric processes involving water. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Investigation on the co-precipitation of transuranium elements from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Krot, N.; Shilov, V.; Bessonov, A.; Budantseva, N.; Charushnikova, I.; Perminov, V.; Astafurova, L.

    1996-06-06

    Highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions originating from production of plutonium for military purposes are stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The purification of alkaline solutions from neptunium and plutonium is important in the treatment and disposal of these wastes. This report describes scoping tests with sodium hydroxide solutions, where precipitation techniques were investigated to perform the separation. Hydroxides of iron (III), manganese (II), cobalt (II, III), and chromium (III); manganese (IV) oxide, and sodium uranate were investigated as carriers. The report describes the optimum conditions that were identified to precipitate these carriers homogeneously throughout the solution by reductive, hydrolytic, or catalytic decomposition of alkali-soluble precursor compounds by a technique called the Method of Appearing Reagents. The coprecipitation of pentavalent and hexavalent neptunium and plutonium was investigated for the candidate agents under optimum conditions and is described in this report along with the following results. Plutonium coprecipitated well with all tested materials except manganese (IV) oxide. Neptunium only coprecipitated well with uranate. The report presents a hypothesis to explain these behaviors. Further tests with more complex solution matrices must be performed.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTINIDES IN SIMULATED ALKALINE TANK WASTE SLUDGES AND LEACH SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The expectation that solubility of actinide ions will be low during alkaline sludge washing to remediate DOE's underground waste tanks is based on minimal experimental evidence, and the application of thermodynamic models of dubious validity to systems that may well be under kine...

  9. Effects of applied potential on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of 7003 aluminum alloy in acid and alkaline chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-yan; Song, Ren-guo; Sun, Bin; Lu, Hai; Wang, Chao

    2016-07-01

    Potentiodynamic polarization tests and slow strain rate test (SSRT) in combination with fracture morphology observations were conducted to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of 7003 aluminum alloy (AA7003) in acid and alkaline chloride solutions under various applied potentials ( E a). The results show that AA7003 is to a certain extent susceptible to SCC via anodic dissolution (AD) at open-circuit potential (OCP) and is highly susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement (HE) at high negative E a in the solutions with pH levels of 4 and 11. The susceptibility increases with negative shift in the potential when E a is less than -1000 mV vs. SCE. However, the susceptibility distinctly decreases because of the inhibition of AD when E a is equal to -1000 mV vs. SCE. In addition, the SCC susceptibility of AA7003 in the acid chloride solution is higher than that in the alkaline solution at each potential. Moreover, the effect of hydrogen on SCC increases with increasing hydrogen ion concentration.

  10. Reactivity of Tannic Acid with Common Corrosion Products and Its Influence on the Hydrolysis of Iron in Alkaline Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaén, J. A.; Araúz, E. Y.; Iglesias, J.; Delgado, Y.

    2003-06-01

    To ascertain the role of tannic acid in the anticorrosive protection of steels, the reaction between 5% tannic acid aqueous solutions with lepidocrocite, goethite, superparamagnetic goethite, akaganeite, poorly crystalline maghemite, magnetite and hematite was studied using color changes, infrared and Mössbauer spectroscopy. After three months of interaction with lepidocrocite, the formation of an iron tannate complex was detected by its dark blue color and confirmed by infrared and Mössbauer analysis. Evidence for the chemical transformation was obtained for goethite in nanoparticles and poorly crystalline maghemite after reaction for six months. The other iron compounds do not transform to another oxide or phase upon treatment with the tannic acid solution. These results showed that lepidocrocite is the most reactive phase and that the size and degree of crystallinity have strong influence on the formation of the tannate complexes. The precipitation of iron phases from alkaline solutions of iron (II) sulfate heptahydrate containing different amount of tannic acid and potassium nitrate as oxidative agent was also studied. Mössbauer and infrared results show that in the absence of tannic acid some common rust components are obtained (viz. goethite, superparamagnetic goethite, maghemite and non-stoichiometric magnetite). The presence of 0.1% tannic acid in a low alkalinity solution results in the precipitation of iron oxyhydroxides and some iron tannates. Concentrations of 1% tannic acid are required for the formation of the tannates complexes as main reaction product.

  11. Spatial and temporal geochemical trends in the hydrothermal system of Yellowstone National Park: Inferences from river solute fluxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurwitz, S.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Heasler, H.

    2007-01-01

    We present and analyze a chemical dataset that includes the concentrations and fluxes of HCO3-, SO42-, Cl-, and F- in the major rivers draining Yellowstone National Park (YNP) for the 2002-2004 water years (1 October 2001 - 30 September 2004). The total (molar) flux in all rivers decreases in the following order, HCO3- > Cl- > SO42- > F-, but each river is characterized by a distinct chemical composition, implying large-scale spatial heterogeneity in the inputs of the various solutes. The data also display non-uniform temporal trends; whereas solute concentrations and fluxes are nearly constant during base-flow conditions, concentrations decrease, solute fluxes increase, and HCO3-/Cl-, and SO42-/Cl- increase during the late-spring high-flow period. HCO3-/SO42- decreases with increasing discharge in the Madison and Falls Rivers, but increases with discharge in the Yellowstone and Snake Rivers. The non-linear relations between solute concentrations and river discharge and the change in anion ratios associated with spring runoff are explained by mixing between two components: (1) a component that is discharged during base-flow conditions and (2) a component associated with snow-melt runoff characterized by higher HCO3-/Cl- and SO42-/Cl-. The fraction of the second component is greater in the Yellowstone and Snake Rivers, which host lakes in their drainage basins and where a large fraction of the solute flux follows thaw of ice cover in the spring months. Although the total river HCO3- flux is larger than the flux of other solutes (HCO3-/Cl- ??? 3), the CO2 equivalent flux is only ??? 1% of the estimated emission of magmatic CO2 soil emissions from Yellowstone. No anomalous solute flux in response to perturbations in the hydrothermal system was observed, possibly because gage locations are too distant from areas of disturbance, or because of the relatively low sampling frequency. In order to detect changes in river hydrothermal solute fluxes, sampling at higher

  12. Fabrication of free-standing NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoarrays via a facile modified hydrothermal synthesis method and their applications for lithium ion batteries and high-rate alkaline batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Qingyun Zhang, Xiangyang; Shen, Youming

    2015-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Hydrothermal-synthesized NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays exhibit porous structure and high capacity as well as good cycling life for lithium ion batteries and alkaline batteries. - Highlights: • Self-supported NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays are prepared by a hydrothermal method. • NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays show high capacity and good cycling life. • Porous nanoflake arrays structure is favorable for fast ion/electron transfer. - Abstract: Self-supported NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays on nickel foam are prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. The obtained NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflakes with thicknesses of ∼25 nm grow vertically to the nickel foam substrate and form an interconnected porous network with pore diameters of 50–500 nm. As anode material of LIBs, the NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays show a high initial coulombic efficiency of 76%, as well as good cycling stability with a capacity of 880 mAh g{sup −1} at 0.5 A g{sup −1}, and 523 mAh g{sup −1} at 1.5 A g{sup −1} after 50 cycles. As the cathode of alkaline batteries, a high capacity of 95 mAh g{sup −1} is achieved at 2 A g{sup −1} and 94% retention is maintained after 10,000 cycles. The superior electrochemical performance is mainly due to the unique nanoflake arrays structure with large surface area and shorter diffusion length for mass and charge transport.

  13. Effects of Aging on PuO2∙xH2O Particle Size in Alkaline Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, Calvin H.

    2013-05-01

    Between 1944 and 1989, 54.5 metric tons of the United States’ weapons-grade plutonium and an additional 12.9 metric tons of fuel-grade plutonium were produced and separated from irradiated fuel at the Hanford Site. Acidic high-activity wastes containing around 600 kg of plutonium were made alkaline and discharged to underground storage tanks from separations, isolation, and recycle processes to yield average plutonium concentration of about 0.003 grams per liter (or ~0.0002 wt%) in the ~200 million liter tank waste volume. The plutonium is largely associated with low-solubility metal hydroxide/oxide sludges where its low concentration and intimate mixture with neutron-absorbing elements (e.g., iron) are credited in nuclear criticality safety. However, concerns have been expressed that plutonium, in the form of plutonium hydrous oxide, PuO2∙xH2O, could undergo sufficient crystal growth through dissolution and reprecipitation in the alkaline tank waste to potentially become separable from neutron absorbing constituents by settling or sedimentation. Thermodynamic considerations and laboratory studies of systems chemically analogous to tank waste show that the plutonium formed in the alkaline tank waste by precipitation through neutralization from acid solution probably entered as 2–4-nm PuO2∙xH2O crystallite particles that, because of their low solubility and opposition from radiolytic processes, grow from that point at exceedingly slow rates, thus posing no risk of physical segregation.

  14. Evidence for the Formation of Benzacridine Derivatives in Alkaline-Treated Sunflower Meal and Model Solutions.

    PubMed

    Bongartz, Verena; Brandt, Lisa; Gehrmann, Mai Linh; Zimmermann, Benno F; Schulze-Kaysers, Nadine; Schieber, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Sunflower extraction meal (SEM) is an economically interesting protein source. During alkaline extraction of proteins, the presence of chlorogenic acid (CQA) in the meal gives rise to the formation of o-quinones. Reactions with nucleophiles present in proteins can lead to green discoloration. Although such reactions have been known for a long time, there is a lack of information on the chemical nature of the reaction products. SEM and model systems consisting of amino acids and CQA were subjected to alkaline treatment and, for comparison, to oxidation of CQA by polyphenoloxidase (PPO). Several green trihydroxy benzacridine (TBA) derivatives were tentatively identified in all samples by UHPLC-DAD-MS/MS. Surprisingly, in alkaline-treated samples of particular amino acids as well as in SEM, the same six TBA isomers were detected. In contrast, the enzymatically oxidized samples resulted in only three TBA derivatives. Contrary to previous findings, neither peptide nor amino acid residues were attached to the resultant benzacridine core. The results indicate that the formation of TBA derivatives is caused by the reaction between CQA quinones and free NH2 groups. Further research is necessary to elucidate the structure of the addition products for a comprehensive evaluation of food and feed safety aspects. PMID:26784152

  15. Enhancement of the absorption of CO{sub 2} in alkaline buffer solutions: Joint action of two enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, G.; Chenlo, F.; Pereira, G.; Vazquez, P.

    1999-05-01

    The authors measured the absorption of CO{sub 2} in alkaline 0.5 M/0.5 M sodium carbonate/bicarbonate buffers containing either saccharose and sodium arsenite or saccharose and formaldehyde. Absorption enhancement increased upon increasing the concentration of either of the catalysts, but the joint action of the two was always less than the sum of their individual effects, the difference being a function of the acidities and concentrations of the catalysts and the pH of the carbonate/bicarbonate buffer solution

  16. A study on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in hot alkaline-sulfide solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasse, Kevin Robert

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) generally have superior strength and corrosion resistance as compared to most standard austenitic and ferritic stainless grades owing to a balanced microstructure of austenite and ferrite. As a result of having favorable properties, DSS have been selected for the construction of equipment in pulp and paper, chemical processing, nuclear, oil and gas as well as other industries. The use of DSS has been restricted in some cases because of stress corrosion cracking (SCC), which can initiate and grow in either the ferrite or austenite phase depending on the environment. Thorough understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in chloride- and hydrogen sulfide-containing solutions has been useful for material selection in many environments. However, understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in sulfide-containing caustic solutions is limited, which has restricted the capacity to optimize process and equipment design in pulp and paper environments. Process environments may contain different concentrations of hydroxide, sulfide, and chloride, altering corrosion and SCC susceptibility of each phase. Crack initiation and growth behavior will also change depending on the relative phase distribution and properties of austenite and ferrite. The role of microstructure and environment on the SCC of standard grade UNS S32205 and lean grade UNS S32101 in hot alkaline-sulfide solution were evaluated in this work using electrochemical, film characterization, mechanical testing, X-ray diffraction, and microscopy techniques. Microstructural aspects, which included residual stress state, phase distribution, phase ratio, and microhardness, were related to the propensity for SCC crack initiation in different simulated alkaline pulping liquors at 170 °C. Other grades of DSS and reference austenitic and superferritic grades of stainless steel were studied using exposure coupons for comparison to understand compositional effects and individual phase susceptibility

  17. Controlled synthesis of La{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} nanoparticles by hydrothermal method with nonionic surfactant and their ORR activity in alkaline medium

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Bo Hyun; Park, Shin-Ae; Park, Bong Kyu; Chun, Ho Hwan; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: We demonstrate that Sr-doped LaCrO{sub 3} nanoparticles were successfully prepared by the hydrothermal synthesis method using the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 and the applicability of La{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} to oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysis in an alkaline medium. Compared with the nanoparticles synthesized by the coprecipitation method, they showed enhanced ORR activity. - Highlights: • Sr-doped LaCrO{sub 3} nanoparticles were successfully prepared by the hydrothermal method using the nonionic surfactant. • Homogeneously shaped and sized Sr-doped LaCrO{sub 3} nanoparticles were readily obtained. • Compared with the nanoparticles synthesized by the coprecipitation method, they showed an enhanced ORR activity. • The main origin was revealed to be the decreased particle size due to the nonionic surfactant. - Abstract: Sr-doped LaCrO{sub 3} nanoparticles were prepared by the hydrothermal method with the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 followed by heat treatment at 1000 °C for 10 h. The obtained perovskite nanoparticles had smaller particle size (about 100 nm) and more uniform size distribution than those synthesized by the conventional coprecipitation method. On the other hand, it was identified with the material simulation that the electronic structure change by Sr doping was negligible, because the initially unfilled e{sub g}-band was not affected by the p-type doping. Finally, the perovskite nanoparticles synthesized by hydrothermal method showed much higher ORR activity by over 200% at 0.8 V vs. RHE than those by coprecipitation method.

  18. Prediction of the speciation of alkaline earths adsorbed on mineral surfaces in salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverjensky, Dimitri A.

    2006-05-01

    Despite the fact that the bulk compositions of most low temperature natural surface waters, groundwaters, and porewaters are heavily influenced by alkaline earths, an understanding of the development of proton surface charge in the presence of alkaline earth adsorption on the surfaces of minerals is lacking. In particular, models of speciation at the mineral-water interface in systems involving alkaline earths need to be established for a range of different minerals. In the present study, X-ray standing wave results for Sr 2+ adsorption on rutile as a tetranuclear complex [Fenter, P., Cheng, L., Rihs, S., Machesky, M., Bedyzk, M.D., Sturchio, N.C., 2000. Electrical double-layer structure at the rutile-water interface as observed in situ with small-period X-ray standing waves. J. Colloid Interface Sci.225, 154-165] are used as constraints for all the alkaline earths in surface complexation simulations of proton surface charge, metal adsorption, and electrokinetic experiments referring to wide ranges of pH, ionic strength, surface coverage, and type of oxide. The tetranuclear reaction 4>SOH+M+H2O=(>SOH)2(>SO-)2_M(OH)++3H+ predominates for the large cations Sr 2+ and Ba 2+ (and presumably Ra 2+), consistent with X-ray results. In contrast, the mononuclear reaction >SOH+M+H2O=>SO-_M(OH)++2H+ predominates for the much smaller Mg 2+ (and presumably Be 2+), with minor amounts of the tetranuclear reaction. Both reaction types appear to be important for the intermediate size Ca 2+. For all the alkaline earths on all oxides, the proportions of the different reaction types vary systematically as a function of pH, ionic strength, and surface coverage. The application of Born solvation and crystal-chemical theory enables estimation of the equilibrium constants of adsorption of all the alkaline earths on all oxides. On high dielectric constant solids (rutile, magnetite, manganese dioxide), where the solvation contribution is negligable, ion adsorption correlates with crystal

  19. Inorganic polymers from laterite using activation with phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution: Mechanical and microstructural properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lassinantti Gualtieri, Magdalena

    2015-01-15

    Geopolymers from laterite, an iron-rich soil available in developing countries, have great potential as building materials. In this work, laterite from Togo (Africa) was used to prepare geopolymers using both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution. Microstructural properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and mercury porosimetry, whereas thermal properties were evaluated by thermal analyses. The local environment of iron was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XANES region). The mechanical properties were determined. Modulus of Rupture and Young's modulus fell in the ranges 3.3–4.5 MPa and 12–33 GPa, respectively, rendering the materials good candidates for construction purposes. Heating above 900 °C results in weight-gain, presumably due to iron redox reactions. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy data evidence changes in the chemical and structural environments of iron following thermal treatment of geopolymers. These changes indicate interaction between the geopolymer structure and iron during heating, possibly leading to redox properties. -- Highlights: •Geopolymerization of laterite is promising for fabrication of building materials. •Both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution can be used for activation. •Thermally activated redox properties of the inorganic polymers were observed.

  20. Cysteine as a green corrosion inhibitor for Cu37Zn brass in neutral and weakly alkaline sulphate solutions.

    PubMed

    Radovanović, Milan B; Petrović, Marija B; Simonović, Ana T; Milić, Snežana M; Antonijević, Milan M

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate electrochemical properties of brass in neutral and weakly alkaline solutions in the presence of cysteine as a nontoxic and ecological corrosion inhibitor. Potentiodynamic measurements, open circuit potential measurements, as well as chronoamperometric measurements were the methods used during investigation of the inhibitory effect of cysteine on the corrosion behaviour of brass. Potentiodynamic measurements showed that cysteine behaves as a mixed-type inhibitor in the investigated media. Based on polarization curves for brass in a weakly alkaline solution of sodium sulphate at varying cysteine concentrations, an interaction occurs between Cu(+) ions and the inhibitor, resulting in the formation of a protective complex on the electrode surface. The results of chronoamperometric measurements confirm the results obtained by potentiodynamic measurements. Optical microphotography of the brass surface also confirms the formation of a protective film in the presence of a 1 × 10(-4) mol/dm(3) cysteine. Adsorption of cysteine on the brass surface proceeds according to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. PMID:22836675

  1. Influence of grain refinement on the electrochemical behavior of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel in an alkaline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah-alhosseini, A.; Vafaeian, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of grain refinement on the electrochemical behavior of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel in 0.1 M NaOH solution was investigated. Potentiodynamic polarization curves showed that fine-grained samples have less corrosion potential, higher corrosion current density, and less protective passive film in comparison to coarse-grained samples. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis revealed that implementing the thermomechanical operation led to lower polarization resistance. Also, Mott-Schottky analysis revealed that the passive films on both fine-grained and coarse-grained samples behave as n-type and p-type semiconductors and the semiconductor character of the passive films did not change by grain refinement. Moreover, it was found that the calculated donor and acceptor densities increased with grain refinement. Thus, the presented results indicated that grain refinement weakens the corrosion and passivation behavior of AISI 430 stainless steel in this alkaline solution.

  2. Effects of solvent structure on the distribution of silicate anions in mixed aqueous/organic solutions of alkaline tetramethylammonium silicate

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, W.M.; Bell, A.T.; Radke, C.J. )

    1991-11-14

    Interest in the physical-chemical processes occurring during zeolite synthesis has stimulated the study of dissolved silicate oligomers in aqueous alkaline solution and their possible link to zeolite nucleation and crystal growth. Effects of solvent structure on the equilibrium distribution of silicate oligomers in mixed organic/aqueous solutions of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH) have been investigated by using {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopy. The results indicate that the presence of organic molecules leads to condensation of the silicates, particularly to double-ring structures. Equilibrium calculations indicate that the observed extent of silicate condensation exceeds what would be expected from mass action. The variety of organic solvents used allowed elucidation of structure effects due to the following: carbon chain length, carbon chain morphology, functional group, and placement of the functional group. The structural effects of organic solvents can be attributed to the ordering of water around the solvent molecules.

  3. Crystal-chemical controls on the partitioning of Sr and Ba between plagioclase feldspar, silicate melts, and hydrothermal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundy, Jonathan D.; Wood, Bernard J.

    1991-01-01

    The isothermal (750°C) experiments of LAGACHE and DUJON (1987) reveal that the partitioning of Sr between plagioclase feldspar and hydrothermal solutions is a funtion of the anorthite (An) content of the plagioclase, indicating that crystal chemistry may exert a powerful influence on trace element partitioning. In order to compare these results with those on trace element partitioning between plagioclase and silicate melts we have compiled from the literature a large dataset of experimental and volcanic distribution coefficients ( D's) for Sr (and Ba). These data, which span a compositional range from lunar basalt to high silica rhyolite and a temperature range of over 650°C, show a relationship between DSr (and DBa) and mole fraction An ( XAn) which is similar to that exhibited by the hydrothermal results obtained at constant temperature. Plots of In DSr and In DBa versus XAn are linear with negative slope, indicating that both elements are more compatible in albite than anorthite. In terms of molar distribution coefficients ( D Sr∗) the hydrothermal and silicate melt data display an identical linear relationship between RT In D Sr∗ (where T is the absolute temperature in K and R is the gas constant, 8.314 JK -1 mol -1) and XAn. We conclude therefore that crystal chemistry provides the dominant control on partitioning of Sr and Ba into plagioclase and that the effects of temperature, pressure, and fluid composition are minor. Apparent relationships between DSr (and DBa) and the reciprocal temperature (1/ T) are artefacts of the linear relationships between XAn and 1/ T in the experimental studies. By defining a Henry's law standard state for the silicate melts and hydrothermal solutions, and considering plagioclases to be ternary regular solutions, we are able to relate the observed relationships between RT In D i∗ (where i is Ba or Sr) and XAn to the excess free energies of the trace element partitioning reactions between plagioclase and melt or

  4. Enhanced removal of trace Cr(VI) from neutral and alkaline aqueous solution by FeCo bimetallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Qin, Nannan; Zhang, Ya; Zhou, Hongjian; Geng, Zhigang; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Yunxia; Zhao, Huijun; Wang, Guozhong

    2016-06-15

    The reactivity of zero valent iron (Fe(0)) for removing Cr(VI) is self-inhibiting under neutral and alkaline conditions, due to the precipitation of ferrous hydroxide on the surface of Fe(0). To overcome this difficulty, we incorporated a second metal (Co) into Fe(0) to form FeCo bimetallic nanoparticles (FeCo BNPs), which can achieve higher activity and significant improvement in the reaction kinetics for the removal of Cr(VI) compared with Fe(0). The FeCo BNPs were synthesized by a hydrothermal reduction method without using any templates. The characterization analysis indicated that the products were highly uniform in large scale with 120-140 nm size in diameter. The obtained FeCo BNPs exhibited a remarkable removal ability for Cr(VI) in the pH range of 5.3-10.0. Especially, FeCo BNPs were able to reduce trace Cr(VI) (1.0 mg L(-1), pH=7.5) down to about 0.025 mg L(-1) within 1h. XPS analysis confirmed that Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) by FeCo BNPs, while Fe and Co was oxidized, implying a chemical reduction process. The enhanced removal of trace Cr(VI) could be originated from the introduction of Co, which not only served as a protecting agent against surface corrosion by galvanic cell effect, but also enhanced the efficient flow of electron transfer between iron and Cr(VI). All the results primarily imply that FeCo BNPs can be employed as high efficient material for wastewater treatment. PMID:26998785

  5. Equilibrium and Kinetic Studies of Phosphate Removal from Solution onto a Hydrothermally Modified Oyster Shell Material

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Cai, Yun; Clark, Malcolm; Yu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Phosphate removal to a hydrothermally modified fumed silica and pulverized oyster shell material for use in wastewater treatments were made. Sorption data modeling (pH’s 3–11, P concentrations of 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, & 25 mg/L, and at an ambient temperature of 23°C) indicate that an optimal removal of P occurs at pH 11. Three kinetic models were also applied (a pseudo-first-order Lagergren kinetic model, a pseudo-second-order (PSO) kinetic and Elovich) and indicate that a PSO model best describes P-removal. In addition, an application of the Weber and Morris intra-particle diffusion model indicates that external mass transfer and intra-particle diffusion were both involved in the rate-determining step. Langmuir, Freundlich modeling of the sorption data also indicate that the heterogeneous Freundlich sorption site model best describes the data although Langmuir data also fit with data tailing suggesting data are not linear. The data collected indicates that the hydrothermally modified fumed silica and pulverized oyster shell material is suitable for use in wastewater treatment, with P-removal to the solids being preferential and spontaneous. PMID:23565207

  6. The reaction of synthetic nuclear waste glass in steam and hydrothermal solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.

    1989-12-31

    Glass monoliths of the WVCM 44, WVCM 50, SRL 165, and SRL 202 compositions were reacted in steam and in hydrothermal liquid at 200{degree}C. The glass reaction resulted in the formation of leached surface layers in both environments. The reaction in steam proceeds at a very low rate until precipitates form, after which the glass reaction proceeds at a greater rate. Precipitates were formed on all glass types reacted in steam. The assemblage of phases formed was unique to each glass type, but several precipitates were common to all glasses, including analcime, gyrolite, and weeksite. Reaction in steam occurs in a thin layer of condensed water which becomes saturated with respect to the observed phases after only a few days of reaction. The reaction in steam is accelerated relative to reaction in hydrothermal liquid in the sense that secondary phases from after a shorter reaction time, that is, after less glass has reacted, because of the smaller effective leachant volume present in the steam environment. A knowledge of the secondary phases which form and their influence on the glass reaction rate is crucial to the modeling effort of the repository program. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Copper Catalyzed Sodium Tetraphenylborate, Triphenylborane, Diphenylborinic Acid and Phenylboronic Acid Decomposition Kinetic Studies in Aqueous Alkaline Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.

    1999-03-15

    This work studied the kinetics of copper-catalyzed decomposition of tetraphenylborate, triphenylborane, diphenylborinic acid and phenylboronic acid (NaTPB, 3PB, 2PB and 1PB, respectively) in aqueous alkaline solution over the temperature range of 25 to 70 degrees C. The statistically designed test matrices added copper sulfate to maximum concentrations of 10 mg/L. The relative rates of decomposition increase in the order of NaTPB < 1PB {tilde} 3PB < 2PB. Dependence of decomposition on the amount of added copper increases in the order of 3PB {tilde} 2PB < 1PB {tilde} NaTPB. Activation energies ranged from 82 to 143 kJ/mole over the temperature range studied. Final decomposition products predominately involved benzene and phenol. All 3PB, 2PB and 1PB intermediate phenylborate species proved relatively stable (< 8 percent decomposition over {tilde} 500 h) towards thermal hydrolysis in 1.5 M NaOH when contained in carbon-steel vessels sealed under air at ambient temperature (23 - 25 degrees C) with no added copper. Measurable (> 10-7 Mh-1) thermal hydrolysis of the phenylborate species occurs at 55 to 70 degrees C in alkaline (0.6-2.3 M OH-, 2-4.7 M Na+) solution with no added copper. The experiments suggest an important role for oxygen in copper-catalyzed phenylborate decomposition. NaTPB decomposes promptly under anoxic conditions while 3PB, 2PB and 1PB decompose faster in aerobic solutions. Benzene and phenol form as the predominant end-products from alkaline copper catalysis in static systems sealed under air. Both 2PB and 1PB decompose with near equal rates and quantitatively produce phenol under flowing air-purge conditions at 25 to 60 degrees C. Mechanisms for copper-catalyzed phenylborate decomposition likely involve a redox process giving loss of a phenyl group from the phenylborate with reduction of cupric ion, or dephenylation by reduced cuprous ion involving a phenylated copper intermediate.

  8. Process for recovering uranium using an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid and alkaline stripping solution

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington, R.E.; Magdics, A.

    1987-03-24

    A process is described for stripping uranium for a pregnant organic extractant comprising an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in a substantially water-immiscible organic diluent. The organic extractant contains tetravalent uranium and an alcohol or phenol modifier in a quantity sufficient to retain substantially all the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid in solution in the diluent during stripping. The process comprises adding an oxidizing agent to the organic extractant and thereby oxidizing the tetravalent uranium to the +6 state in the organic extractant, and contacting the organic extractant containing the uranium in the +6 state with a stripping solution comprising an aqueous solution of an alkali metal or ammonium carbonate or hydroxide thereby stripping uranium from the organic extractant into the stripping solution. The resulting barren organic extractant containing substantially all of the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in the diluent is separated from the stripping solution containing the stripped uranium, the barren extractant being suitable for recycle.

  9. Process for recovering uranium using an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid and alkaline stripping solution

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington, R.E.; Magdics, A.

    1987-03-24

    A process is described for stripping uranium from a pregnant organic extractant comprising an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in a substantially water-immiscible organic diluent. The organic extractant contains tetravalent uranium and an alcohol or phenol modifier in a quantity sufficient to retain substantially all the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid in solution in the diluent during stripping. The process comprises adding an oxidizing agent to the organic extractant to and thereby oxidizing the tetravalent uranium to the +6 state in the organic extractant, and contacting the organic extractant containing the uranium in the +6 state with a stripping solution comprising an aqueous solution of an alkali metal or ammonium carbonate, nonsaturated in uranium. The uranium is stripped from, the organic extractant into the stripping solution, and the resulting barren organic extractant containing substantially all of the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in the diluent is separated from the stripping solution containing the stripped uranium, the barren extractant being suitable for recycle.

  10. Reductive atmospheric acid leaching of spent alkaline batteries in H2SO4/Na2SO3 solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morcali, Mehmet Hakan

    2015-07-01

    This work studies the optimum reductive leaching process for manganese and zinc recovery from spent alkaline battery paste. The effects of reducing agents, acid concentration, pulp density, reaction temperature, and leaching time on the dissolution of manganese and zinc were investigated in detail. Manganese dissolution by reductive acidic media is an intermediate-controlled process with an activation energy of 12.28 kJ·mol-1. After being leached, manganese and zinc were selectively precipitated with sodium hydroxide. The zinc was entirely converted into zincate (Zn(OH){4/2-}) ions and thus did not co-precipitate with manganese hydroxide during this treatment (2.0 M NaOH, 90 min, 200 r/min, pH > 13). After the manganese was removed from the solution, the Zn(OH){4/2-} was precipitated as zinc sulfate in the presence of sulfuric acid. The results indicated that this process could be effective in recovering manganese and zinc from alkaline batteries.

  11. Sodium Sulfate Separation from Aqueous Alkaline Solutions via Crystalline Urea-Functionalized Capsules: Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Crystallization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Custelcean, Radu; Sloop, Frederick V.; Rajbanshi, Arbin; Wan, Shun; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2014-12-04

    We measured the thermodynamics and kinetics of crystallization of sodium sulfate with a tripodal tris-urea receptor (L1) from aqueous alkaline solutions in the 15 55 C temperature range, with the goal of identifying the optimal conditions for efficient and quick sulfate removal from nuclear wastes. The use of radiolabeled Na235SO4 provided a practical way to monitor the sulfate concentration in solution by liquid scintillation counting. Our results are consistent with a two-step crystallization mechanism, involving relatively quick dissolution of crystalline L1 followed by the rate-limiting crystallization of the Na2SO4(L1)2(H2O)4 capsules. We found that temperature exerted relatively little influence over themore » equilibrium sulfate concentration, which ranged between 0.004 and 0.011 M. Moreover, this corresponds to 77 91% removal of sulfate from a solution containing 0.0475 M initial sulfate concentration, as found in a typical Hanford waste tank. The apparent pseudo-first-order rate constant for sulfate removal increased 20-fold from 15 to 55 C, corresponding to an activation energy of 14.1 kcal/mol. At the highest measured temperature of 55 C, 63% and 75% of sulfate was removed from solution within 8 h and 24 h, respectively.« less

  12. Sodium Sulfate Separation from Aqueous Alkaline Solutions via Crystalline Urea-Functionalized Capsules: Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Custelcean, Radu; Sloop, Frederick V.; Rajbanshi, Arbin; Wan, Shun; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2014-12-04

    We measured the thermodynamics and kinetics of crystallization of sodium sulfate with a tripodal tris-urea receptor (L1) from aqueous alkaline solutions in the 15 55 C temperature range, with the goal of identifying the optimal conditions for efficient and quick sulfate removal from nuclear wastes. The use of radiolabeled Na235SO4 provided a practical way to monitor the sulfate concentration in solution by liquid scintillation counting. Our results are consistent with a two-step crystallization mechanism, involving relatively quick dissolution of crystalline L1 followed by the rate-limiting crystallization of the Na2SO4(L1)2(H2O)4 capsules. We found that temperature exerted relatively little influence over the equilibrium sulfate concentration, which ranged between 0.004 and 0.011 M. Moreover, this corresponds to 77 91% removal of sulfate from a solution containing 0.0475 M initial sulfate concentration, as found in a typical Hanford waste tank. The apparent pseudo-first-order rate constant for sulfate removal increased 20-fold from 15 to 55 C, corresponding to an activation energy of 14.1 kcal/mol. At the highest measured temperature of 55 C, 63% and 75% of sulfate was removed from solution within 8 h and 24 h, respectively.

  13. RECENT STUDIES OF URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM CHEMISTRY IN ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    King, W; Bill Wilmarth, B; David Hobbs, D; Tommy Edwards, T

    2006-06-13

    Solubility studies of uranium and plutonium in a caustic, radioactive Savannah River Site tank waste solution revealed the existence of uranium supersaturation in the as-received sample. Comparison of the results to predictions generated from previously published models for solubility in these waste types revealed that the U model poorly predicts solubility while Pu model predictions are quite consistent with experimental observations. Separate studies using simulated Savannah River Site evaporator feed solution revealed that the known formation of sodium aluminosilicate solids in waste evaporators can promote rapid precipitation of uranium from supersaturated solutions.

  14. Geochemistry and solute fluxes of volcano-hydrothermal systems of Shiashkotan, Kuril Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalacheva, Elena; Taran, Yuri; Kotenko, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    Shiashkotan Island belongs to the Northern Kuril island arc and consists of two joined volcanoes, Sinarka and Kuntomintar, with about 18 km of distance between the summits. Both volcanoes are active, with historic eruptions, and both emit fumarolic gases. Sinarka volcano is degassing through the extrusive dome with inaccessible strong and hot (> 400 °C) fumaroles. A large fumarolic field of the Kuntomintar volcano situated in a wide eroded caldera-like crater hosts many fumarolic vents with temperatures from boiling point to 480 °C. Both volcanoes are characterized by intense hydrothermal activity discharging acid SO4-Cl waters, which are drained to the Sea of Okhotsk by streams. At least 4 groups of near-neutral Na-Mg-Ca-Cl-SO4 springs with temperatures in the range of 50-80 °C are located at the sea level, within tide zones and discharge slightly altered diluted seawater. Volcanic gas of Kuntomintar as well as all types of hydrothermal manifestations of both volcanoes were collected and analyzed for major and trace elements and water isotopes. Volcanic gases are typical for arc volcanoes with 3He/4He corrected for air contamination up to 6.4 Ra (Ra = 1.4 × 10- 6, the air ratio) and δ13C (CO2) within - 10‰ to - 8 ‰ VPDB. Using a saturation indices approach it is shown that acid volcanic waters are formed at a shallow level, whereas waters of the coastal springs are partially equilibrated with rocks at ~ 180 °C. Trace element distribution and concentrations and the total REE depend on the water type, acidity and Al + Fe concentration. The REE pattern for acidic waters is unusual but similar to that found in some acidic crater lake waters. The total hydrothermal discharge of Cl and S from the island associated with volcanic activity is estimated at ca. 20 t/d and 40 t/d, respectively, based on the measurements of flow rates of the draining streams and their chemistry. The chemical erosion of the island by surface and thermal waters is estimated at 27 and

  15. In situ generated highly active copper oxide catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction at low overpotential in alkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Cui, Shengsheng; Qian, Manman; Sun, Zijun; Du, Pingwu

    2016-04-25

    Developing efficient water oxidation catalysts made up of earth-abundant elements has attracted much attention as a step toward for future clean energy production. Herein we report a simple one-step method to generate a low cost copper oxide catalyst film in situ from a copper(ii) ethylenediamine complex. The resulting catalyst has excellent activity toward the oxygen evolution reaction in alkaline solutions. A catalytic current density of 1.0 mA cm(-2) and 10 mA cm(-2) for the catalyst film requires the overpotentials of only ∼370 mV and ∼475 mV in 1.0 M KOH, respectively. This catalytic performance shows that the new catalyst is one of the best Cu-based heterogeneous OER catalysts to date. PMID:27020763

  16. Facile synthesis of PbTe nanoparticles and thin films in alkaline aqueous solution at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.Y.; Cai, K.F.; Yao, X.

    2009-12-15

    A novel, simple, and cost-effective route to PbTe nanoparticles and films is reported in this paper. The PbTe nanoparticles and films are fabricated by a chemical bath method, at room temperature and ambient pressure, using conventional chemicals as starting materials. The average grain size of the nanoparticles collected at the bottom of the bath is {approx}25 nm. The film deposited on glass substrate is dense, smooth, and uniform with silver gray metallic luster. The film exhibits p-type conduction and has a moderate Seebeck coefficient value ({approx}147 muV K{sup -1}) and low electrical conductivity ({approx}0.017 S cm{sup -1}). The formation mechanism of the PbTe nanoparticles and films is proposed. - PbTe nanoparticles and films were fabricated at room temperature and ambient pressure in an alkaline aqueous solution by a chemical bath method.

  17. Hydrothermolysis of biomass-ethanol fermentation of hydrothermal solutions with Saccharomyces carlsbergensis W 34

    SciTech Connect

    Bonn, G.; Bobleter, O.; Pfeifer, P.; Schwald, W.

    1983-12-01

    Research on alternative energy sources and raw materials is gaining in importance owing to the increasing shortage of energy carriers and petrochemicals. Hydrothermolysis of lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., wood, straw) degrades the high molecular substrate into low molecular compounds (sugars, furfurals, phenols etc.). In this process water dissolves hemicellulose at approximately 180/sup 0/ C, cellulose at approximately 270/sup 0/ C, and lignin at about 300/sup 0/ C, without the addition of any chemicals / 1-4/. Over 50% of the cellulose thus hydrolyzed can be fermented to ethanol by saccharomyces carlsbergensis W 34. To obtain these results it was necessary to carry out basic fermentation experiments on the inhibition of certain by-products such as lignin compounds, glyceraldehyde, methylglyoxal etc.. On the basis of these experiments, the optimum conditions for the fermentation to ethanol of hydrothermally treated pure cellulose (filter paper), cotton with and without impurities, waste cotton from textile manufacture, and straw, were examined.

  18. Aloe vera plant-extracted solution hydrothermal synthesis and magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phumying, Santi; Labuayai, Sarawuth; Thomas, Chunpen; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya; Swatsitang, Ekaphan; Maensiri, Santi

    2013-06-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by a novel hydrothermal method using ferric acetylacetonate (Fe(C5H8O2)3) and aloe vera plant-extracted solution. The influences of different reaction temperatures and times on the structure and magnetic properties of the synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles were investigated. The synthesized nanoparticles are crystalline and have particle sizes of ˜6-30 nm, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results of X-ray diffraction (XRD), High resolution TEM (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) indicate that the synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles have the inverse cubic spinel structure without the presence of any other phase impurities. The hysteresis loops of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles at room temperature show superparamagnetic behavior and the saturation magnetization of the Fe3O4 samples increases with increasing reaction temperature and time.

  19. Counter-ion specificity explored in abnormal expansion of supra-molecular aggregates in aqueous solution of alkaline metal salts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ningdong; Tao, Jiaojiao; Wei, Shenghui; Chen, Mingming; Wei, Chengsha; Li, Liangbin

    2015-09-21

    Ionic effects in aqueous solution of macro-ions showing specificity and unconventional characters, respectively, receive a lot of interests recently; however, the complexity of specific ion effects in unconventional phenomena remains ambiguous. In this study, the effects of univalent ions on aggregation of supra-molecular nano-fibrils with charged carboxylate groups on the surface as a prototype of macro-ions are investigated by Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) in aqueous solutions of alkaline metal chlorides. It is found that the columnar bundles of charged fibrils are expanded in certain salt concentration range contradicting the conventional screening effects of salts. The degree of expansion is dominated by cations as Na(+) induces drastic effects in comparison to rather gentle changes from K(+) and Cs(+). The specific cations effects observed by SAXS correlate with the pH behavior of the solutions, an indicator of surface charge, or number of carboxylate groups along the supra-molecular fibrils. It is postulated that while Na(+) with stronger affinity to carboxylates apparently reduces the surface charge, K(+) and Cs(+) only weakly interact with carboxylates and induce minor changes, accounting for the cation-sensitive aggregation behavior of fibrils observed by SAXS. By probing the bundling aggregation of charged supra-molecular nano-fibrils in salty water, we provide direct evidence of specific counter-ion effects in unusual expansion caused by univalent salts. PMID:26395732

  20. Speciation and Structural Properties of Hydrothermal Solutions of Sodium and Potassium Sulfate Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Joachim; Vogel, Frédéric; Steele-MacInnis, Matthew

    2016-05-18

    Aqueous solutions of salts at elevated pressures and temperatures play a key role in geochemical processes and in applications of supercritical water in waste and biomass treatment, for which salt management is crucial for performance. A major question in predicting salt behavior in such processes is how different salts affect the phase equilibria. Herein, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to investigate molecular-scale structures of solutions of sodium and/or potassium sulfate, which show contrasting macroscopic behavior. Solutions of Na-SO4 exhibit a tendency towards forming large ionic clusters with increasing temperature, whereas solutions of K-SO4 show significantly less clustering under equivalent conditions. In mixed systems (Nax K2-x SO4 ), cluster formation is dramatically reduced with decreasing Na/(K+Na) ratio; this indicates a structure-breaking role of K. MD results allow these phenomena to be related to the characteristics of electrostatic interactions between K(+) and SO4 (2-) , compared with the analogous Na(+) -SO4 (2-) interactions. The results suggest a mechanism underlying the experimentally observed increasing solubility in ternary mixtures of solutions of Na-K-SO4 . Specifically, the propensity of sodium to associate with sulfate, versus that of potassium to break up the sodium-sulfate clusters, may affect the contrasting behavior of these salts. Thus, mutual salting-in in ternary hydrothermal solutions of Na-K-SO4 reflects the opposing, but complementary, natures of Na-SO4 versus K-SO4 interactions. The results also provide clues towards the reported liquid immiscibility in this ternary system. PMID:26888426

  1. On the decay of the ozonide radical in aqueous alkaline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, P. K.; Saini, R. D.

    1982-11-01

    In flash photolysis of an oxygenated aqueous potassium persulphate solution at pH 12.5 the decay of the ozonide radical has been found to follow 3/2 order kinetics which has been explained by reactions O -3 + O - ⇌ 2 O -2 and O -3 + HO 2 → 2 O 2 + OH -

  2. Spray washing carcasses with alkaline solutions of lauric acid to reduce bacterial contamination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of lauric acid (LA)-potassium hydroxide (KOH) solutions to reduce carcass bacterial contamination was examined. Skin of carcasses was inoculated with a cecal paste containing antibiotic resistant strains of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimirum, and Campylobacter coli. In one trial, in...

  3. Association-dissociation and denaturation behaviour of an oligomeric seed protein alpha-globulin of Sesamum indicum L. in acid and alkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    Prakash, V; Nandi, P K

    1977-01-01

    The association-dissociation and denaturation behaviour of the major protein fraction, alpha-globulin of sesame seed (Sesamum indicum L.), in acid and alkaline solutions in the ranges of pH 4.2-1.5 and pH 7-12 have been studied. The results of gel filtration, fluorescence and viscosity measurements indicate dissociation and denaturation of the protein up to pH approximately 3. The difference spectrum in this region arises from a combination of dissociation, denaturation and charge effect on the chromophore. In still stronger acid solution, reassociation of the dissociated fraction takes place by hydrophobic interaction. In alkaline solution dissociation takes place around pH 8, and above pH 10 dissociation and denaturation proceed simultaneously as has been evidenced by sedimentation, fluorescence, spectral change, optical rotation and viscosity measurements. The phenolic group (pKInt=10.6) in the protein is abnormal and denaturation in alkaline solution is irreversible. Above pH 11.5 further dissociation of the protein takes place. Characteristic pH values of transition from 10.6-10.8 indicate that the transition of the protein involves a single step in alkaline solution. PMID:19367

  4. Rod-like CuMnOx transformed from mixed oxide particles by alkaline hydrothermal treatment as a novel catalyst for catalytic combustion of toluene.

    PubMed

    Li, W B; Liu, Z X; Liu, R F; Chen, J L; Xu, B Q

    2016-08-17

    Rod-like copper manganese mixed oxides (CuMnx-NR) have been synthesized from copper manganese mixed oxide particles by sodium hydroxide hydrothermal treatment, and a higher BET surface area of 221 m(2) g(-1) is obtained on the nanorod-like sample, which exhibits superior catalytic activity toward toluene combustion at 210 °C due to the increase in its oxygen mobility of the chemisorbed oxygen species as well as the increase in surface concentrations of higher valance cations, Cu(2+), Mn(3+) and Mn(4+), in the samples. PMID:27498822

  5. The Role of Oxygen in the Copper-Catalyzed Decomposition of Phenylborates in Aqueous Alkaline Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L.

    1997-03-17

    The effect of oxygen on the copper-catalyzed hydrolysis of phenyl borates containing from one to four phenyl groups was studied in 1 M aqueous sodium hydroxide solution at 59 degrees C. The results are tentatively explained if the effective catalyst for each of the reactions is either cupric or cuprous ion, with the latter being present in significant concentration only in the absence of air.

  6. Chemistry of hydrothermal solutions from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Von Damm, K.L.; Bischoff, J.L.

    1987-10-10

    Fluids from three vent fields on the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge were sampled in September 1984 using the DSRV Alvin. The fluids are uniquely high in both chloride, which ranges up to twice the seawater value, and in metal content. Simple vapor-liquid phase separation could not have produced both the high chlorinity and gas concentrations observed in these fluids. The cause of the elevated chlorinity can not be uniquely identified but may be the result of either or a combination of two processes: (1) subsurface formation of a degassed brine and subsequent mixing of a small amount of this brine with a hydrothermal seawater which has not undergone a phase separation and (2) dissolution of a chloride-rich phase combined with a possible small loss of gas during sampling procedures. Although measured temperatures were all less than 300 /sup 0/C, quartz geothermometry suggests that the fluids have equilibrated at greater than 340 /sup 0/C. Quartz geobarometry is also in agreement with geophysical estimates of depth to the local magma chamber. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  7. Thermodynamic Model for ThO2(am) Solubility in Alkaline Silica Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, D; Yui, Mikazu; Moore, Dean A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Xia, Yuanxian; Felmy, Andrew R.; Skomurski, Frances N.

    2008-10-11

    literature, agreed closely with the extensive experimental data and showed that under alkaline conditions aqueous Si makes very strong complexes with Th.

  8. Influence of monovalent ions on density fluctuations in hydrothermal aqueous solutions by small angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva-Cadoux, Cécile; Hazemann, Jean-Louis; Testemale, Denis; Proux, Olivier; Rochas, Cyrille

    2012-01-01

    Synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering measurements on water and alkaline bromine aqueous solutions (XBr, with X = Li, Rb, or Cs) were carried out from ambient to supercritical conditions. The temperature was increased from 300 to 750 K along several isobars between 24 and 35 MPa. The correlation length and the structure factor were extracted from the data following the Ornstein-Zernike formalism. We obtained experimental evidence of the shift of the critical point and isochore and their dependence on the ions concentration (0.33 mol/kg and 1.0 mol/kg). We also observed that the size of the density fluctuations and the structure factor increase with the presence of the ions and that this effect is positively correlated with the atomic number of the cation. These behaviors were compared with ZnBr2 and NaCl systems from the literature.

  9. Solid-phase electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide films in alkaline solution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) film was evaporated onto graphite and used as an electrode to produce electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) films by electrochemical reduction in 6 M KOH solution through voltammetric cycling. Fourier transformed infrared and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the presence of ERGO. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy characterization of ERGO and GO films in ferrocyanide/ferricyanide redox couple with 0.1 M KCl supporting electrolyte gave results that are in accordance with previous reports. Based on the EIS results, ERGO shows higher capacitance and lower charge transfer resistance compared to GO. PMID:24059434

  10. Observations on the crystallization of spodumene from aqueous solutions in a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Jianking; Chou, I-Ming; Yuan, Shunda; Burruss, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Crystallization experiments were conducted in a new type of hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC; type V) using LiAlSi2O6 (S) gel and H2O (W) as starting materials. A total of 21 experiments were performed at temperatures up to 950°C and pressures up to 788 MPa. In the samples with relatively low W/S ratios, many small crystals formed in the melt phase during cooling. In those with high W/S ratios, only a few crystals with smooth surfaces crystallized from the aqueous fluid in the presence of melt droplets, which were gradually consumed during crystal growth, indicating rapid transfer of material from the melt to the crystals through the aqueous fluid. The nucleation of crystals started at 710 (±70)°C and 520 (±80) MPa, and crystal growth ended at 570 (±40)°C and 320 (±90) MPa, with the cooling P-T path within the stability field of spodumene + quartz in the S-W system. The observed linear crystal growth rates in the aqueous phase, calculated by dividing the maximum length of a single crystal by the duration of the entire growth step, were 4.7 × 10−6 and 5.7 × 10−6 cm s−1 for the cooling rates of 0.5 and 1°C min−1, respectively. However, a rapid crystal growth rate of 3.6 × 10−5 cm s−1 in the aqueous fluid was observed when the components were supplied by nearby melt droplets. Our results show that when crystals nucleate in the aqueous fluid instead of the melt phase, there are fewer nuclei formed, and they grow much faster due to the low viscosity of the aqueous fluid, which accelerates diffusion of components for the growth of crystals. Therefore, the large crystals in granitic pegmatite can crystallize directly from aqueous fluids rather than hydrosilicate melt.

  11. Preparation, stability, and structural characterization of plutonium(VII) in alkaline aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Antonio, Mark R; Williams, C W; Sullivan, James A; Skanthakumar, S; Hu, Yung-Jin; Soderholm, L

    2012-05-01

    A freshly prepared solution of Pu(VI) in 2 M NaOH was oxidized to Pu(VII), via ozonolysis, while simultaneously collecting X-ray absorption spectra. Analyses of the XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) data, acquired throughout the in situ experiments, show a dioxo coordination environment for Pu(VI), PuO(2)(2+), typical for it and the hexavalent actinyl species of U and Np, and its evolution into a tetraoxo-coordination environment for Pu(VII), PuO(4)(-), like that known for Np(VII). The EXAFS data provide average Pu-O distances of 1.79(1) and 1.88(1) Å, respectively. The second coordination shells, also fit as O atoms, provide Pu-O distances of 2.29-2.32 Å that are independent of the Pu oxidation state. The coordination numbers for the distant O atoms in sums with those for the nearest O atoms are consistent with 6-O environments for both Pu(VI) and Pu(VII) ions in accordance with their previously proposed speciation as [Pu(VI)O(2)(OH)(4)](2-) and [Pu(VII)O(4)(OH)(2)](3-), respectively. This solution speciation accounts precisely for the Pu(VI) and Pu(VII) coordination environments reported in various solid state structures. The Pu(VII) tetraoxo-dihydroxo anion was found to have a half-life of 3.7 h. Its instability is attributed to spontaneous reduction to Pu(VI) and not to a measurable extent of disproportionation. We found no direct evidence for Pu(VIII) in the X-ray data and, furthermore, the stoichiometry of the oxidation of Cr(III) by Pu is consistent with that expected for a valence-pure Pu(VII) preparation by ozonation and, in turn, stoichiometrically equivalent to the established Np(VII)/Cr(III) redox reaction. PMID:22524489

  12. Interaction of lead(II) with beta-cyclodextrin in alkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    Norkus, Eugenijus; Grinciene, Giedre; Vaitkus, Rimantas

    2002-10-01

    Polarographic and UV-spectrophotometric investigations of Pb(II) complex formation with beta-cyclodextrin have showed that the complexation of Pb(II) ions begins at pH >10. The formation of lead(II) 1:1 complex with the beta-cyclodextrin anion was observed at pH 10-11.5. The logarithm of the stability constant of this complex compound is 15.9+/-0.3 (20 degrees C, ionic strength 1.0), and the molar extinction coefficient value is ca. 5500 (lambda(max)=260 nm). With further increase in solution pH the Pb-beta-cyclodextrin complex decomposes and converts to Pb(OH)(2) or Pb(OH)(3)(-) hydroxy-complexes. This process occurs with a decrease in Pb(II) complexation degree. The latter result could be explained by a decrease in the beta-cyclodextrin anion activity. Neither Pb(OH)(2) nor Pb(OH)(3)(-) encapsulation into beta-CD cavity was observed. PMID:12423967

  13. Clastic dikes of the Hatrurim basin (western flank of the Dead Sea) as natural analogues of alkaline concretes: Mineralogy, solution chemistry, and durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, E. V.; Gaskova, O. L.; Kozmenko, O. A.; Kokh, S. N.; Vapnik, E. A.; Novikova, S. A.; Nigmatulina, E. N.

    2014-11-01

    This study shows that the mineral assemblages from clastic dikes in areas adjacent to the Dead Sea graben may be considered as natural analogues of alkaline concretes. The main infilling material of the clastic dikes is composed of well-sorted and well-rounded quartz sand. The cement of these hard rocks contains hydroxylapophyllite, tacharanite, calcium silicate hydrates, opal, calcite, and zeolite-like phases, which is indicative of a similarity of the natural cementation processes and industrial alkaline concrete production from quartz sands and industrial alkaline cements. The quartz grains exhibit a variety of reaction textures reflecting the interaction with alkaline solutions (opal and calcium hydrosilicate overgrowths; full replacement with apophyllite or thomsonite + apophyllite). The physicochemical analysis and reconstruction of the chemical composition of peralkaline Ca, Na, and K solutions that formed these assemblages reveal that the solutions evolved toward a more stable composition of zeolite-like phases, which are more resistant to long-term chemical weathering and atmospheric corrosion. The 40Ar/39Ar age of 6.2 ± 0.7 Ma obtained for apophyllite provides conclusive evidence for the high corrosion resistance of the assemblages consisting of apophyllite and zeolite-like phases.

  14. Separating nano graphene oxide from the residual strong-acid filtrate of the modified Hummers method with alkaline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xuebing; Yu, Yun; Wang, Yongqing; Zhou, Jianer; Song, Lixin

    2015-02-01

    In the modified Hummers method for preparing graphene oxide, the yellow slurry can be obtained. After filtering through a quantitative filter paper, the strong-acid filtrate containing the unprecipitated nano graphene oxide was gained. The corresponding filtrate was added gradually with an alkaline (NaOH or KOH) solution at room temperature. The unprecipitated nano graphene oxide could undergo fast aggregation when the pH value of the filtrate was about 1.7 and formed the stable floccules. X-ray diffraction analysis shows the dominant peak of the floccules is about 11°, which accords to the peak of graphene oxide. Spectra of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirm the presence in the floccules of an abundance of oxygen functional groups and the purified graphene oxide floccules can be obtained. Atomic force microscopy measurement shows the graphene oxide floccules consists of sheet-like objects, mostly containing only a few layers (about 5 layers). Zeta potential analysis demonstrates the surface charge of the graphene oxide is pH-sensitive and its isoelectric point is ∼1.7. The flocculation mechanism of graphene oxide ascribes to the acid-base interaction with the surface functional groups of the carbon layers.

  15. Implications of alkaline solutions-induced etching on optical and minority carrier lifetime features of monocrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachtouli, N.; Aouida, S.; Laajimi, R. Hadj; Boujmil, M. F.; Bessais, B.

    2012-09-01

    In this work, we search to optimize the surface textures of monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) intended to be used in silicon solar cells. For this purpose, we studied the morphology of formed etch hillocks during anisotropic etching of silicon using alkaline solutions based on sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH) and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). Such treatments lead to the formation of various pyramids-like textures that can be well optimized to improve the photocurrent of c-Si-based solar cells. The produced textures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV-visible optical reflectivity and minority carrier lifetime measurements. These investigations allow evaluating the size and density of the formed pyramidal textures; the apex angles vary between 75° and 82°, while the heights and bases of the pyramids range from a few hundred nanometers to several micrometers. A minimum reflectivity value of about 6% was obtained at specific conditions using NaOH, whereas it was found that the apparent effective minority carrier lifetime (τeff) is sensitive to the injection level (Δn), which shows an apparent increase from 1.2 μs to 2.4 μs for a minority carrier density of about Δn = 21014 cm-3.

  16. Catalytic Activity-d-Band Center Correlation for the O2 Reduction on Platinum in Alkaline Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lima,F.; Zhang, J.; Shao, M.; Sasaki, K.; Vukmirovic, M.; Ticianelli, E.; Adzic, R.

    2007-01-01

    We determined, by the rotating disk electrode technique, the kinetics of the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) on the surfaces of single crystals of Au(111), Ag(111), Pd(111), Rh(111), Ir(111), and Ru(0001), on Pt monolayers deposited on their surfaces, and also on nanoparticles of these metals dispersed on high-surface-area carbon. Plotting the correlation between the experimentally determined activities of these three types of electrocatalysts with the calculated metal d-band center energies,{var_epsilon}{sub d}, revealed a volcano-type dependence. In all cases, the electronic properties of the metal electrocatalysts, represented by the {var_epsilon}{sub d} value, were used for elucidating the metal-dependent catalytic activities, and establishing their electronic properties-the ORR kinetics relationship. Pt(111), Pt/C, and Pt/Pd(111) were found to top their corresponding volcano plots. Pd in alkaline solutions showed particularly high activity, suggesting it may offer potential replacement for Pt in fuel cells.

  17. Kinetic study on the degradation of meclophenoxate hydrochloride in alkaline aqueous solutions by high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    El-Bardicy, Mohammad Galal; Lotfy, Hayam Mahmoud; El-Sayed, Mohammad Abdalla; El-Tarras, Mohammad Fayez

    2007-01-01

    A high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for determination of meclophenoxate hydrochloride (I) in the presence of its degradation product (p-chlorophenoxy acetic acid) (II). Separation of (I) from (II) was performed using a ZORBAX ODS column with a mobile phase consisting of 0.2% triethylamine in 0.01 M ammonium carbonate: acetonitrile (70:30 v/v). The method showed high sensitivity with good linearity over the concentration range of 50 to 400 mug/ml. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of a pharmaceutical formulation containing (I) with excellent recovery. A kinetics investigation of the alkaline hydrolysis of (I) was carried out in sodium hydroxide solutions of 1, 1.5 and 2 N by monitoring the parent compound itself. The reaction order of (I) followed pseudo-first order kinetics. The activation energy could be estimated from the Arrhenius plot and it was found to be 12.331 kcal/mole. PMID:17202800

  18. Graphene-based non-noble-metal Co/N/C catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Kexing; Yang, Baoping; Cui, Jinfeng; Jin, Jutao; Fu, Xiaogang; Zhao, Qiuping; Zhang, Junyan

    2013-12-01

    This study develops a promising catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) via a simple two-step heat treatment of a mixture of cobalt(II) nitrate hexahydrate (Co(NO3)2·6H2O), polyethyleneimine (PEI), and graphene oxide (GO), firstly in argon atmosphere and then in ammonia atmosphere. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) result reveals that the catalyst has pyridinic N-dominant (46% atomic concentration among all N components) on the surface. The kinetics measurement of the catalyst in 0.1 M KOH solution using a rotating disk electrode (RDE) reveals that the catalyst (Co/N/rGO(NH3)) has high activity. Furthermore, the number of electrons exchanged during the ORR with the catalyst is determined to be ˜3.9, suggesting that the ORR is dominated by a 4e- reduction of O2 to H2O. The catalyst has good stability, and its performance is superior to the commercial Pt/C(20%) catalyst in alkaline condition, making the material a promising substitute to noble metal ORR electrocatalyst on the cathode side of fuel cells.

  19. Products of pertechnetate radiolysis in highly alkaline solution: structure of TcO2 x xH2O.

    PubMed

    Lukens, Wayne W; Bucher, Jerome I; Edelstein, Norman M; Shuh, David K

    2002-03-01

    The chemistry of technetium in certain high-level nuclear waste (HLW) tanks at the Hanford Site complicates the treatment and vitrification of HLW. A major problem is the presence, in certain tanks, of unidentified, lower-valent technetium species, which are difficult to remove from the waste by current separation processes. Radiolytic reduction of TcO4- in alkaline solutions containing selected organic compounds, approximating the conditions in HLW, was investigated to determine the classes of compounds that can be formed under these conditions. Insoluble TcO2 x xH2O is the primary radiolysis product with the majority of organic compounds investigated, including citrate, dibutyl phosphate, and aminopolycarboxylates. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements show that TcO2 x xH2O has a one-dimensional chain structure consisting of edge-sharing TcO6 octahedra with bridging oxide and trans water ligands. When diols, such as ethylene glycol, are present, only soluble, Tc(IV) alkoxide compounds are produced. The XAFS and UV-visible spectra of these compounds provide evidence for a binuclear structure similar to (H2EDTA)2Tc2(mu-O)2. The properties of the Tc(IV) alkoxide complexes were determined and are consistent with those observed for the soluble, lower-valent technetium complexes that complicate the treatment of HLW at the Hanford site. PMID:11918000

  20. Kinetics of reduction of plutonium(VI) and neptunium(VI) by sulfide in neutral and alkaline solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nash, K.L.; Cleveland, J.M.; Sullivan, J.C.; Woods, M.

    1986-01-01

    The rate of reduction of plutonium(VI) and neptunium(VI) by bisulfide ion in neutral and mildly alkaline solutions has been investigated by the stopped-flow technique. The reduction of both of these ions to the pentavalent oxidation state appears to occur in an intramolecular reaction involving an unusual actinide(VI)-hydroxide-bisulfide complex. For plutonium the rate of reduction is 27.4 (??4.1) s-1 at 25??C with ??H* = +33.2 (??1.0) kJ/mol and ??S* = -106 (??4) J/(mol K). The apparent stability constant for the transient complex is 4.66 (??0.94) ?? 103 M-1 at 25??C with associated thermodynamic parameters of ??Hc = +27.7 (??0.4) kJ/mol and ??Sc = +163 (??2) J/(mol K). The corresponding rate and stability constants are determined for the neptunium system at 25??C (k3 = 139 (??30) s-1, Kc. = 1.31 (??0.32) ?? 103 M-1), but equivalent parameters cannot be determined at reduced temperatures. The reaction rate is decreased by bicarbonate ion. At pH > 10.5, a second reaction mechanism, also involving a sulfide complex, is indicated. ?? 1986 American Chemical Society.

  1. The relationship between coefficient of restitution and state of charge of zinc alkaline primary LR6 batteries [Bouncing alkaline batteries: A basic solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bhadra, S.; Hertzberg, B. J.; Croft, M.; Gallaway, J. W.; Van Tassell, B. J.; Chamoun, M.; Erdonmez, C.; Zhong, Z.; Steingart, D. A.

    2015-03-13

    The coefficient of restitution of alkaline batteries had been shown to increase as a function of depth of discharge. In this work, using non-destructive mechanical testing, the change in coefficient of restitution is compared to in situ energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction data to determine the cause of the macroscopic change in coefficient of restitution. The increase in coefficient of restitution correlates to the formation of a percolation pathway of ZnO within the anode of the cell, and that the coefficient of restitution saturates at a value of 0.63 ± .05 at 50% state if charge when the anode has densified into porous ZnO solid. Of note is the sensitivity of coefficient of restitution to the amount of ZnO formation that rivals the sensitivity on in situ energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction spectroscopy.

  2. The relationship between coefficient of restitution and state of charge of zinc alkaline primary LR6 batteries [Bouncing alkaline batteries: A basic solution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bhadra, S.; Hertzberg, B. J.; Croft, M.; Gallaway, J. W.; Van Tassell, B. J.; Chamoun, M.; Erdonmez, C.; Zhong, Z.; Steingart, D. A.

    2015-03-13

    The coefficient of restitution of alkaline batteries had been shown to increase as a function of depth of discharge. In this work, using non-destructive mechanical testing, the change in coefficient of restitution is compared to in situ energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction data to determine the cause of the macroscopic change in coefficient of restitution. The increase in coefficient of restitution correlates to the formation of a percolation pathway of ZnO within the anode of the cell, and that the coefficient of restitution saturates at a value of 0.63 ± .05 at 50% state if charge when the anode has densified intomore » porous ZnO solid. Of note is the sensitivity of coefficient of restitution to the amount of ZnO formation that rivals the sensitivity on in situ energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction spectroscopy.« less

  3. A fuel-cell reactor for the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide alkaline solutions from H(2) and O(2).

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Ichiro; Onisawa, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Toshikazu; Murayama, Toru

    2011-04-18

    The effects of the type of fuel-cell reactors (undivided or divided by cation- and anion-exchange membranes), alkaline electrolytes (LiOH, NaOH, KOH), vapor-grown carbon fiber (VGCF) cathode components (additives: none, activated carbon, Valcan XC72, Black Pearls 2000, Seast-6, and Ketjen Black), and the flow rates of anolyte (0, 1.5, 12 mL h(-1)) and catholyte (0, 12 mL h(-1)) on the formation of hydrogen peroxide were studied. A divided fuel-cell system, O(2) (g)|VGCF-XC72 cathode|2 M NaOH catholyte|cation-exchange membrane (Nafion-117)|Pt/XC72-VGCF anode|2 M NaOH anolyte at 12 mL h(-1) flow|H(2) (g), was effective for the selective formation of hydrogen peroxide, with 130 mA cm(-2) , a 2 M aqueous solution of H(2)O(2)/NaOH, and a current efficiency of 95 % at atmospheric pressure and 298 K. The current and formation rate gradually decreased over a long period of time. The cause of the slow decrease in electrocatalytic performance was revealed and the decrease was stopped by a flow of catholyte. Cyclic voltammetry studies at the VGCF-XC72 electrode indicated that fast diffusion of O(2) from the gas phase to the electrode, and quick desorption of hydrogen peroxide from the electrode to the electrolyte were essential for the efficient formation of solutions of H(2)O(2)/NaOH. PMID:21400665

  4. The effect of solution chemistry on the preparation of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} by hydrothermal-assisted sol-gel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Amini, M.M. . E-mail: m-pouramini@cc.sbu.ac.ir; Mirzaee, M.; Sepanj, N.

    2007-03-22

    Preparation of magnesium aluminate spinel powder by hydrothermal-assisted sol-gel processing from MgAl{sub 2}(OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OR){sub 8}, R=CH{sub 3} (1), CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OCH{sub 3} (2), MgAl{sub 2}[OCH(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 8} (3) and MgAl{sub 2}(O- {sup s}Bu){sub 8} (4) in toluene and parent alcohol has been investigated. Coordination status of aluminum atom in precursors was determined by {sup 27}Al NMR and correlation between coordination number of aluminum and development of spinel phase in hydrothermal-assisted sol-gel processing has been studied. The gels obtained from hydrothermal-assisted hydrolysis of magnesium-aluminum alkoxides that contain six-coordinated aluminum atoms in solution (1 and 2) after calcination at 700 deg. C resulted in the formation of pure spinel phase, whereas in similar hydrolysis and calcination processes of precursors that contain four-coordinated aluminum (3 and 4) spinel phase forms along with some Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgO. Selected powders obtained from hydrothermal-assisted sol-gel processing were characterized by thermal analysis (TGA/DSC), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results indicate that the coordination status of aluminum in the precursor is very crucial for the formation of pure phase spinel. The morphology of prepared spinels was studied by SEM and the results showed that the solvent in hydrothermal-assisted sol-gel processing has a marked effect on the morphology of the resulting MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. In hydrothermal-assisted sol-gel processing of aluminum-magnesium alkoxides in hydrophobic solvent, spherical particles are formed, while in the parent alcohol, non-spherical powders are formed.

  5. Synchrotron x-ray spectroscopy of EuHN O3 aqueous solutions at high temperatures and pressures and Nb-bearing silicate melt phases coexisting with hydrothermal fluids using a modified hydrothermal diamond anvil cell and rail assembly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mayanovic, Robert A.; Anderson, Alan J.; Bassett, William A.; Chou, I.-Ming

    2007-01-01

    A modified hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) rail assembly has been constructed for making synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, and x-ray mapping measurements on fluids or solid phases in contact with hydrothermal fluids up to ???900??C and 700 MPa. The diamond anvils of the HDAC are modified by laser milling grooves or holes, for the reduction of attenuation of incident and fluorescent x rays and sample cavities. The modified HDAC rail assembly has flexibility in design for measurement of light elements at low concentrations or heavy elements at trace levels in the sample and the capability to probe minute individual phases of a multiphase fluid-based system using focused x-ray microbeam. The supporting rail allows for uniform translation of the HDAC, rotation and tilt stages, and a focusing mirror, which is used to illuminate the sample for visual observation using a microscope, relative to the direction of the incident x-ray beam. A structure study of Eu(III) aqua ion behavior in high-temperature aqueous solutions and a study of Nb partitioning and coordination in a silicate melt in contact with a hydrothermal fluid are described as applications utilizing the modified HDAC rail assembly. ?? 2007 American Institute of Physics.

  6. Synchrotron x-ray spectroscopy of EuHNO3 aqueous solutions at high temperatures and pressures and Nb-bearing silicate melt phases coexisting with hydrothermal fluids using a modified hydrothermal diamond anvil cell and rail assembly.

    PubMed

    Mayanovic, Robert A; Anderson, Alan J; Bassett, William A; Chou, I-Ming

    2007-05-01

    A modified hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) rail assembly has been constructed for making synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, and x-ray mapping measurements on fluids or solid phases in contact with hydrothermal fluids up to approximately 900 degrees C and 700 MPa. The diamond anvils of the HDAC are modified by laser milling grooves or holes, for the reduction of attenuation of incident and fluorescent x rays and sample cavities. The modified HDAC rail assembly has flexibility in design for measurement of light elements at low concentrations or heavy elements at trace levels in the sample and the capability to probe minute individual phases of a multiphase fluid-based system using focused x-ray microbeam. The supporting rail allows for uniform translation of the HDAC, rotation and tilt stages, and a focusing mirror, which is used to illuminate the sample for visual observation using a microscope, relative to the direction of the incident x-ray beam. A structure study of Eu(III) aqua ion behavior in high-temperature aqueous solutions and a study of Nb partitioning and coordination in a silicate melt in contact with a hydrothermal fluid are described as applications utilizing the modified HDAC rail assembly. PMID:17552838

  7. Hydrothermal growth of vertically-aligned ordered mesoporous nickel oxide nanosheets on three-dimensional nickel framework for electrocatalytic oxidation of urea in alkaline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mao-Sung; Lin, Guan-Wei; Yang, Run-Song

    2014-12-01

    Vertically-aligned α-Ni(OH)2 nanosheets are homogeneously covered on three-dimensional (3D) macroporous Ni foam and stainless steel (SS) sheet by a simple hydrothermal synthesis. After annealing at 300 °C, most of the α-Ni(OH)2 is transformed to cubic NiO. The NiO nanosheets exhibit ordered mesoporous structure. Electrolysis of urea is analyzed by cyclic voltammetry and potential step chronoamperometry in 1 M KOH electrolyte with 0.33 M urea. The electrocatalytic performance of NiO electrodes depends strongly on their configuration and substrate. Vertically-aligned NiO nanosheets favor the electrolysis of urea because they can provide more catalytic sites than the NiO powder with aggregated nanosheets. In addition, the large open space between vertically-aligned NiO nanosheets expedites the transport of electrolyte, urea, and gases. 3D macroporous Ni foam substrate is very helpful to the electrolysis of urea which allows for fast electron conduction, leading to a decrease of overpotential and the increase of oxidation current density. Consequently, the Ni foam-supported mesoporous NiO nanosheets can offer a much better electrocatalytic performance than SS-supported mesoporous NiO nanosheets and powder during electrolysis of urea.

  8. An assessment of the long-term environmental impacts of reusing alkaline clay on coal refuse piles with a dynamic solute transport model at a watershed scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Liang, X.; Davis, T. W.; Patterson, J.; Jaw, F. K.; Koranchie-Boah, P.

    2011-12-01

    Coal refuse piles play a significant role in producing acid mining drainage (AMD) that deteriorates water quality at a watershed scale. The waste produced from coal refuse piles results in a decrease of the pH value in soil water and river flow. Metal compounds, such as ferric and ferrous solutions, are also continuously released from the coal pile due to the extensive and complicated chemical reactions in the acidic environment. Alkaline clay, a byproduct of alumina refining process, has a high residual pH in the material. If the alkaline clay is used innovatively with the coal mine refuse, the problems associated with each (e.g., high and low pH values) are likely to be effectively resolved. In addition, the solubility of the sulfur and iron will be reduced significantly. This will effectively eliminate the AMD problem at the coal refuse pile and improve the water quality at the watershed scale. This study investigates the long-term impacts of the combined mixture (i.e., alkaline clay + coal refuse) on the environment (e.g., in the soil column and in the river system) through systematic modeling simulations in a combination with field measurements. In particular, a dynamic solute transport model that accounts for processes of the pyrite oxidation, oxygen diffusion, absorption, desorption, and advection is developed and is coupled with the Distributed Hydrology Soil and Vegetation Model (DHSVM) to assess the environmental impacts at the watershed scale. The model-simulated sulfur and iron concentrations are compared with field observations and the long-term impacts of the combined mixture (i.e., alkaline clay + coal refuse) on the environment are investigated. This study paves the way for monitoring and assessing the impacts of the reuse of the alkaline clay and refuse mixture on the environment at a watershed scale.

  9. Spectrophotometric determination of copper in alkaline solutions and evaluation of some hydroxy-substituted 1,10-phenanthrolines as chromogenic reagents.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, W E; Schilt, A A

    1972-09-01

    Seven new hydroxy-substituted 1,10-phenanthroline derivatives have been evaluated as chromogenic reagents for the determination of copper in strongly alkaline solution. The most sensitive of these, 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-dihydroxy-1,10-phenanthroline, has proven to be highly effective in a simple, rapid procedure for determining trace amounts of copper in sodium hydroxide, potassium carbonate, sodium phosphate or ammonium hydroxide. PMID:18961151

  10. Enzymatically mediated bioprecipitation of heavy metals from industrial wastes and single ion solutions by mammalian alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Gouri; Shah, Gaurav A; Dey, Pritam; S, Ganesh; Venu-Babu, P; Thilagaraj, W Richard

    2013-01-01

    The study was aimed at investigating the potential use of calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase (CIAP) enzyme in the removal of heavy metals (Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+) and Cr(3+/6+)) from single ion solutions as well as tannery and electroplating effluents. CIAP mediated bioremediation (white biotechnology) is a novel technique that is eco-friendly and cost effective unlike the conventional chemical technologies. Typical reactions containing the enzyme (CIAP) and p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) as substrate in Tris-HCl buffer (pH 8 and 11) and either single ion metal solutions (250 ppm and 1000 ppm) or effluents from tannery or electroplating industry were incubated at 37°C for 30 min, 60 min and 120 min. The inorganic phosphate (P(i)) generated due to catalytic breakdown of pNPP complexes free metal ions as metal-phosphate and the amount of metal precipitated was derived by estimating the reduction in the free metal ion present in the supernatant of reactions employing atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). Better precipitation of metal was obtained at pH 11 than at pH 8 and between the two concentrations of different metals tested, an initial metal concentration of 250 ppm in the reaction gave more precipitation than with 1000 ppm. Experimental data showed that at pH 11, the percentage of removal of metal ions (for an initial concentration of 250 ppm) was in the following order: Cd(2+) (80.99%) > Ni(2+) (64.78%) > Cr(3+) > (46.15%) > Co(2+) (36.47%) > Cr(6+) (32.33%). The overall removal of Cr(3+) and Cr(6+) from tannery effluent was 32.77% and 37.39% respectively in 120 min at pH 11. Likewise, the overall removal of Cd(2+), Co(2+) and Ni(2+) from electroplating effluent was 50.42%, 13.93% and 38.64% respectively in 120 min at pH 11. The study demonstrates that bioprecipitation by CIAP may be a viable and environmental friendly method for clean-up of heavy metals from tannery and electroplating effluents. PMID:23030390

  11. Influence of acid and alkaline sources on optical, structural and photovoltaic properties of CdSe nanoparticles precipitated from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coria-Monroy, C. Selene; Sotelo-Lerma, Mérida; Hu, Hailin

    2016-06-01

    CdSe is a widely researched material for photovoltaic applications. One of the most important parameters of the synthesis is the pH value, since it determines the kinetics and the mechanism of the reaction and in consequence, the optical and morphological properties of the products. We present the synthesis of CdSe in solution with strict control of pH and the comparison of ammonia and KOH as alkaline sources and diluted HCl as acid medium. CdSe formation was monitored with photoluminescence emission spectra (main peak in 490 nm, bandgap of CdSe nanoparticles). XRD patterns indicated that CdSe nanoparticles are mainly of cubic structure for ammonia and HCl, but the hexagonal planes appear with KOH. Product yield decreases with pH and also decreases with KOH at constant pH value since ammonia has a double function, as complexing agent and alkaline source. Changes in morphology were observed in SEM images as well with the different alkaline source. The effect of alkaline sources on photovoltaic performance of hybrid organic solar cells with CdSe and poly(3-hexylthiophene) as active layers was clearly observed, indicating the importance of synthesis conditions on optoelectronic properties of promising semiconductor nanomaterials for solar cell applications.

  12. Development of an analytical technique for the detection of alteration minerals formed in bentonite by reaction with alkaline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, H.; Shibata, M.; Owada, H.; Kaneko, M.; Kuno, Y.; Asano, H.

    A multibarrier system consisting of cement-based backfill, structures and support materials, and a bentonite-based buffer material has been studied for the TRU waste disposal concept being developed in Japan, the aim being to restrict the migration of radionuclides. Concern regarding bentonite-based materials in this disposal environment relates to long-term alteration under hyper-alkaline conditions due to the presence of cementitious materials. In tests simulating the interaction between bentonite and cement, formation of secondary minerals due to alteration reactions under the conditions expected for geological disposal of TRU waste (equilibrated water with cement at low liquid/solid ratio) has not been observed, although alteration was observed under extremely hyper-alkaline conditions with high temperatures. This was considered to be due to the fact that analysis of C-S-H gel formed at the interface as a secondary mineral was difficult using XRD, because of its low crystallinity and low content. This paper describes an analytical technique for the characterization of C-S-H gel using a heavy liquid separation method which separates C-S-H gel from Kunigel V1 bentonite (bentonite produced in Japan) based on the difference in specific gravity between the crystalline minerals constituting Kunigel V1 and the secondary C-S-H gel. For development of C-S-H gel separation methods, simulated alteration samples were prepared by mixing 990 mg of unaltered Kunigel V1 and 10 mg of C-S-H gel synthesized using pure chemicals at a ratio of Ca/Si = 1.2. The simulated alteration samples were dispersed in bromoform-methanol mixtures with specific gravities ranging from 2.00 to 2.57 g/cm 3 and subjected to centrifuge separation to recover the light density fraction. Subsequent XRD analysis to identify the minerals was complemented by dissolution in 0.6 N hydrochloric acid to measure the Ca and Si contents. The primary peak (2 θ = 29.4°, Cu Kα) and secondary peaks (2 θ = 32.1

  13. Surface capping-assisted hydrothermal growth of gadolinium-doped CeO₂ nanocrystals dispersible in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuyoshi; Arai, Manami; Valmalette, Jean-Christophe; Abe, Hiroya

    2014-10-14

    Nanocrystals of 20 mol % Gd(3+)-doped CeO2 dispersible in basic aqueous solutions were grown via hydrothermal treatment of anionic Ce(IV) and Gd(III) carbonate complexes at 125-150 °C for 6-24 h with N(CH3)4(+) as a capping agent. The nanocrystals were characterized in detail using dynamic light scattering (DLS), ζ-potential measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), specific surface area measurements based on the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller theory (SSA(BET)), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. DLS analysis revealed that the highly transparent product solution consisted of nanocrystals approximately 10-20 nm of hydrodynamic diameter with a very narrow size distribution, while the ζ-potential analysis results strongly suggested that the N(CH3)4(+) capped negatively charged sites on the nanocrystals' surface and provided sufficient repulsive steric effect to prevent agglomeration. Moreover, the crystallite size (d(XRD)) estimated from the XRD patterns and the equivalent particle size (d(BET)) estimated from the SSA(BET) data were in the range between 5-6 and 4-4.5 nm, respectively, and nearly constant independent of reaction time, indicating suppressed Ostwald ripening due to capping. Good agreement between the values obtained from the d(XRD) and d(BET) analyses with the size of the primary nanocrystals observed in the TEM image also confirmed that the primary nanocrystals were single crystals and nearly free from aggregation. Furthermore, the gadolinium content in the as-prepared nanocrystals was determined to be very close to 20 mol % and remained unchanged after HCl treatment, indicating successful doping of stoichiometric amount of Gd(3+) into CeO2 lattices. Finally, the Raman analysis suggested that only a slightly Gd(3+)-rich phase was present in the nanocrystals grown for shorter reaction times. By increasing the reaction time, even at 125 °C, the Gd(3+) was homogeneously distributed into the CeO2

  14. Hydrothermal Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2011-03-11

    This chapter is a contribution to a book on Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass being edited by Prof. Robert Brown of Iowa State University. It describes both hydrothermal liquefaction and hydrothermal gasification of biomass to fuels.

  15. Fabrication of hydroxyapatite and TiO 2 nanorods on microarc-oxidized titanium surface using hydrothermal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ho-Jun; Kim, Ji-Woo; Kook, Min-Suk; Moon, Won-Jin; Park, Yeong-Joon

    2010-09-01

    AC-type microarc oxidation (MAO) and hydrothermal treatment techniques were used to enhance the bioactivity of commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti). The porous TiO 2 layer fabricated by the MAO treatment had a dominant anatase structure and contained Ca and P ions. The MAO-treated specimens were treated hydrothermally to form HAp crystallites on the titanium oxide layer in an alkaline aqueous solution (OH-solution) or phosphorous-containing alkaline solution (POH-solution). A small number of micro-sized hydroxyapatite (HAp) crystallites and a thin layer composed of nano-sized HAps were formed on the Ti-MAO-OH group treated hydrothermally in an OH-solution, whereas a large number of micro-sized HAp crystallites and dense anatase TiO 2 nanorods were formed on the Ti-MAO-POH group treated hydrothermally in a POH-solution. The layer of bone-like apatite that formed on the surface of the POH-treated sample after soaking in a modified simulated body fluid was thicker than that on the OH-treated samples.

  16. Structural studies of TiO2/wood coatings prepared by hydrothermal deposition of rutile particles from TiCl4 aqueous solutions on spruce (Picea Abies) wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pori, Pavel; Vilčnik, Aljaž; Petrič, Marko; Sever Škapin, Andrijana; Mihelčič, Mohor; Šurca Vuk, Angela; Novak, Urban; Orel, Boris

    2016-05-01

    A low temperature approach was developed for the deposition of rutile TiO2 particles on a wood surface by hydrolysis of TiCl4 in aqueous solutions acidified with HCl, and crystallization at 75 and 90 °C (1 h). Prior to hydrothermal treatment, Picea Abies wood was first soaked in a 0.5 mmol/l aqueous solution containing anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS, Sigma Aldrich) for 2 h at 80 °C. The crystal structure of the hydrothermally made rutile particles was determined with XRD, while the morphology of the deposited TiO2 particles and their distribution in the wood were examined with SEM and EDX measurements. The penetration and amount of deposited rutile particles could be modified by changing the deposition conditions. Thicker layers were obtained from more concentrated aqueous TiCl4 solutions with and without added HCl, and with longer deposition times and higher temperatures of the hydrothermal treatment. The interaction of TiO2 particles with hemicellulose and lignin in wood was established from infrared attenuated total reflection (FT-IR ATR) and Raman spectra measurements, from which the spectra of wood were subtracted. Analysis of the subtraction spectra showed the presence of titania particles on the wood surface, revealing also the establishment of TiO2-wood coordinative bonds of titanium ions with hemicellulose and lignin. The red frequency shift of the OH stretching modes suggested interaction of the TiO2 particles with water molecules of wood. TiO2 deposited on wood treated with SDS became hydrophobic (water contact angles (WCA) of 150°), contrasting the properties of untreated wood with a deposited TiO2 particle coating, which remained hydrophilic.

  17. Hydrothermal method of preparation of actinide(IV) phosphate hydrogenphosphate hydrates and study of their conversion into actinide(IV) phosphate diphosphate solid solutions.

    PubMed

    Dacheux, N; Grandjean, S; Rousselle, J; Clavier, N

    2007-11-26

    Several compositions of Th2-x/2AnIVx/2(PO4)2(HPO4).H2O (An=U, Np, Pu) were prepared through hydrothermal precipitation from a mixture of nitric solutions containing cations and concentrated phosphoric acid. All the samples were fully characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis, and infrared spectroscopies to check for the existence of thorium-actinide(IV) phosphate hydrogenphosphate hydrates solid solutions. Such compounds were obtained as single phases, up to x=4 for uranium, x=2 for neptunium, and x<4 for plutonium, the cations being fully maintained in the tetravalent oxidation state. In a second step, the samples obtained after heating crystallized precursors at high temperature (1100 degrees C) were characterized. Single-phase thorium-actinide(IV) phosphate-diphosphate solid solutions were obtained up to x=0.8 for Np(IV) and x=1.6 for Pu(IV). For higher substitution rates, polyphase systems composed by beta-TAnPD, An2O(PO4)2, and/or alpha-AnP2O7 were formed. Finally, this hydrothermal route of preparation was applied successfully to the synthesis of an original phosphate-based compound incorporating simultaneously tetravalent uranium, neptunium and plutonium. PMID:17973479

  18. Distributions of 14 elements on 60 selected absorbers from two simulant solutions (acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate) for Hanford HLW Tank 102-SY

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1993-10-01

    Sixty commercially available or experimental absorber materials were evaluated for partitioning high-level radioactive waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. The distributions of 14 elements onto each absorber were measured from simulated solutions that represent acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate solutions from Hanford high-level waste (HLW) Tank 102-SY. The selected elements, which represent fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y); actinides (U, Pu, and Am); and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Zr), were traced by radionuclides and assayed by gamma spectrometry. Distribution coefficients for each of the 1680 element/absorber/solution combinations were measured for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to provide sorption kinetics information for the specified elements from these complex media. More than 5000 measured distribution coefficients are tabulated.

  19. Kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in aqueous solution and highly contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Emmrich, M.

    1999-11-01

    During the two World Wars, large amounts of TNT were released into the environment. Until today, high concentrations of TNT can be found in the soil of former ammunition plants. To obtain basic data for a novel treatment process for highly contaminated soils, the homogeneous aqueous hydrolysis of TNT in the pH range from 10 to 12 and the alkaline treatment of two contaminated soils at pH 11 and pH 12 were investigated. The experimental data were described for their respective pH values using a pseudo-first-order model. In the homogeneous experiments, 95--97% of the TNT was hydrolyzed. During alkaline hydrolysis, up to two nitrogroups per TNT molecule were released, indicating the irreversible destruction of TNT. Except for the formation of small traces of amino dinitrotoluenes and trinitrobenzenes, no nitroaromatic benzenes or toluenes were detected during GC analysis. For the less contaminated soil, ELBP2, with an initial TNT concentration of 116 mg/kg, a destruction of 99% was achieved. The highly contaminated soil, HTNT2 (16.1 g of TNT/kg), showed a hydrolyzation level of 90-94%. The results show that the alkaline treatment of highly contaminated soils may prove to be effective as an alternative treatment technology.

  20. Decontamination of alkaline solution from technetium and other fission products and from some actinides by reductive coprecipitation and sorption on metals

    SciTech Connect

    Peretrukhin, V.F.; Silin, V.I.; Tananaev, I.G.; Kareta, A.V.; Trushina, V.E.

    1997-09-01

    Effective decontamination of alkaline solutions and Hanford Site tank waste simulants from technetium has been accomplished by reductive coprecipitation with iron(III) hydroxide. Addition of 1 M (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}Fe(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} to 0.5 to 4.0 M NaOH to a final concentration of 0.1 to 0.15 M coprecipitates more than 99% of the technetium. from 0.5 to 1.0 M NaOH and 98 to 96% from 2.0 to 4.0 M NaOH. Similar results were obtained by reduction of Tc(VII) with 0.1 to 0.15 M hydrazine and subsequent addition of FeCl{sub 3} to a final concentration of 0.15 M. Inclusion of four complex-forming agents [0.01 M phosphate, 0.1 M EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetate), 0.03 M citrate, and 0.1 M glycolate (HOCH{sub 2}CO{sub 2}{sup -})] to the alkaline solution decreases technetium coprecipitation with iron hydroxide to 85% under otherwise similar conditions. Inclusion of 0.04 M Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} drastically decreases reductive coprecipitation of Tc(VII) in 0.5 to 4.0 M NaOH. Iron(II) salt, added to a 0.07 M excess over that of chromate, completely reduces chromate and provides greater than 99% coprecipitation of technetium with product iron(III) and chromium(III) hydroxides. Technetium(VII) reduction by hydrazine is slow in the presence of chromate in alkaline solution, and technetium coprecipitation is incomplete in these conditions. Decontamination of an alkaline Hanford Site tank waste simulant, containing 0.04M chromate and eleven salts and complex-forming agents, by adding 1 M iron(II) salt solution was studied. Coprecipitation of 15 to 28% of the technetium and more than 99% of the plutonium occurred in the Fe/Cr(III) hydroxide precipitate produced by adding 0.05 to 0.10 M iron(II). Chromate reduction was incomplete. About 75% of the technetium was coprecipitated, and the chromate was completely reduced, after adding 0.2 M iron(II) salt.

  1. Immobilization of ultrafine bimetallic Ni-Pt nanoparticles inside the pores of metal-organic frameworks as efficient catalysts for dehydrogenation of alkaline solution of hydrazine.

    PubMed

    Cao, Nan; Yang, Lan; Dai, Hongmei; Liu, Teng; Su, Jun; Wu, Xiaojun; Luo, Wei; Cheng, Gongzhen

    2014-10-01

    We report a facile liquid impregnation approach for immobilization of ultrafine bimetallic Ni-Pt nanoparticles (NPs) inside the pores of MIL-101. The methods of powder X-ray diffraction, N2 physisorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy were employed to characterize the NiPt@MIL-101 catalysts and further indicated the as-synthesized Ni-Pt NPs were confined in the pores of MIL-101. These as-synthesized bimetallic NiPt@MIL-101 NPs exhibit exceedingly high catalytic activity, selectivity, and durability toward hydrogen generation from alkaline solution of hydrazine. PMID:25197778

  2. On the formation and structure of rare-earth element complexes in aqueous solutions under hydrothermal conditions with new data on gadolinium aqua and chloro complexes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mayanovic, Robert A.; Anderson, Alan J.; Bassett, William A.; Chou, I.-Ming

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray spectroscopy experiments were made on the Gd(III) aqua and chloro complexes in low pH aqueous solutions at temperatures ranging from 25 to 500????C and at pressures up to 480??MPa using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell. Analysis of fluorescence Gd L3-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra measured from a 0.006m Gd/0.16m HNO3 aqueous solution at temperatures up to 500????C and at pressures up to 260??MPa shows that the Gd-O distance of the Gd3+ aqua ion decreases steadily at a rate of ??? 0.007??A??/100????C whereas the number of coordinated H2O molecules decreases from 9.0 ?? 0.5 to 7.0 ?? 0.4. The loss of water molecules in the Gd3+ aqua ion inner hydration shell over this temperature range (a 22% reduction) is smaller than exhibited by the Yb3+ aqua ion (42% reduction) indicating that the former is significantly more stable than the later. We conjecture that the anomalous enrichment of Gd reported from measurement of REE concentrations in ocean waters may be attributed to the enhanced stability of the Gd3+ aqua ion relative to other REEs. Gd L3-edge XAFS measurements of 0.006m and 0.1m GdCl3 aqueous solutions at temperatures up to 500????C and pressures up to 480??MPa reveal that the onset of significant Gd3+-Cl- association occurs around 300????C. Partially-hydrated stepwise inner-sphere complexes most likely of the type Gd(H2O)??-nCln+3-n occur in the chloride solutions at higher temperatures, where ?? ??? 8 at 300????C decreasing slightly to an intermediate value between 7 and 8 upon approaching 500????C. This is the first direct evidence for the occurrence of partially-hydrated REE Gd (this study) and Yb [Mayanovic, R.A., Jayanetti, S., Anderson, A.J., Bassett, W.A., Chou, I-M., 2002a. The structure of Yb3+ aquo ion and chloro complexes in aqueous solutions at up to 500 ??C and 270 MPa. J. Phys. Chem. A 106, 6591-6599.] chloro complexes in hydrothermal solutions. The number of chlorides (n) of the partially-hydrated Gd

  3. High-pressure densified solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides (Ca/Sr, Ca/Ba, Sr/Ba) and their high-temperature thermoelectric properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gürsoy, M.; Takeda, M.; Albert, B.

    2015-01-15

    Solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides were synthesized and densified by spark plasma sintering at 100 MPa. The high-temperature thermoelectric properties (Seebeck coefficients, electrical and thermal diffusivities, heat capacities) were measured between room temperature and 1073 K. CaB{sub 6}, SrB{sub 6}, BaB{sub 6} and the ternary hexaborides Ca{sub x}Sr{sub 1−x}B{sub 6}, Ca{sub x}Ba{sub 1−x}B{sub 6}, Sr{sub x}Ba{sub 1−x}B{sub 6} (x = 0.25, 0.5, 0.75) are n-type conducting compounds over the whole compositional and thermal ranges. The values of the figure of merit ZT for CaB{sub 6} (ca. 0.3 at 1073 K) were found to be significantly increased compared to earlier investigations which is attributed to the densification process. - Highlights: • Solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides were synthesized. • High-temperature thermoelectric properties of mixed calcium borides are excellent. • Spark plasma source densification results in high ZT values. • Borides are rare-earth free and refractory materials.

  4. Purification of alkaline solutions and wastes from actinides and technetium by coprecipitation with some carriers using the method of appearing reagents: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Peretrukhin, V.F.; Silin, V.I.; Kareta, A.V.; Gelis, A.V.; Shilov, V.P.; German, K.E.; Firsova, E.V.; Maslennikov, A.G.; Trushina, V.E.

    1998-09-01

    The coprecipitation of transuranium elements (TRU) and technetium from alkaline solutions and from simulants of Hanford Site tank wastes has been studied in reducing and oxidizing conditions on uranium(IV,VI) hydroxocompounds, tetraalkylammonium perrhenate and perchlorate, and on hydroxides of Fe(III), Co(III), Mn(II), and Cr(III) using the method of appearing reagents (MAR). Coprecipitations in alkaline solution have been shown to give high decontamination factors (DF) at low content of carrier and in the presence of high salt concentrations. Uranium(IV) hydroxide in concentrations higher than 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} M coprecipitates Pu and Cm in any oxidation state from 0.2 to 4 M NaOH with DFs of 110 to 1000 and Np and Tc with DFs of 51 to 176. Technetium (VII) coprecipitates with (5 to 8) {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M tetrabutylammonium (TBA) perrhenate in 0.01 to 0.02 M TBA hydroxide from 0.5 to 1.5 M NaOH to give DFs of 150 to 200. Coprecipitations of Np and Pu with Co(OH){sub 3}, Fe(OH){sub 3}, Cr(OH){sub 3}, and Mn(OH){sub 2} obtained by the MAR from precursors in the range from pH 10.5 to 0.4 M NaOH give DFs from 80 to 400.

  5. Plants increase arsenic in solution but decrease the non-specifically bound fraction in the rhizosphere of an alkaline, naturally rich soil.

    PubMed

    Obeidy, Carole; Bravin, Matthieu N; Bouchardon, Jean-Luc; Conord, Cyrille; Moutte, Jacques; Guy, Bernard; Faure, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    We aimed at determining the major physical-chemical processes that drive arsenic (As) dynamic in the rhizosphere of four species (Holcus lanatus, Dittrichia viscosa, Lotus corniculatus, Plantago lanceolata) tested for phytostabilization. Experiments were performed with an alkaline soil naturally rich in As. Composition of the soil solution of planted and unplanted pots was monitored every 15 days for 90 days, with a focus on the evolution of As concentrations in solution and in the non-specifically bound (i.e. easily exchangeable) fraction. The four species similarly increased As concentration in solution, but decreased As concentration in the non-specifically bound fraction. The major part (60%) of As desorbed from the non-specifically bound fraction in planted pots was likely redistributed on the less available fractions of As on the solid phase. A second part (35%) of desorbed As was taken up by plants. The minor part (5%) of desorbed As supplied As increase in solution. To conclude, plants induced a substantial redistribution of As on the less available fractions in the rhizosphere, as expected in phytostabilization strategies. Plants however concomitantly increased As concentration in the rhizosphere solution which may contribute to As transfer through plant uptake and leaching. PMID:26707185

  6. Synthesis of size-selected Pt nanoparticles supported on sulfonated graphene with polyvinyl alcohol for methanol oxidation in alkaline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jen-Ming; Wang, Sheng-An; Sun, Chia-Liang; Ger, Ming-Der

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the size-selected platinum (Pt) nanoparticles are loaded on sulfonated graphene with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as the conductive polymer for fuel-cell applications. Methanol oxidation reactions and reliability of various catalysts based on carbon black, graphene, and sulfonated graphene catalyst supports are compared under alkaline conditions. When PVA is used as the conductive polymer in place of Nafion, both the electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) and the methanol oxidation property were superior, irrespective of the catalyst and support. On the other hand, the catalyst with Pt on sulfonated graphene (Pt/sG) outperforms those on other supports. For methanol oxidation, the catalyst decay occurs with a decay of only 9.06% for Pt/sG. It is suggested that the sulfonate functional group on graphene not only improves catalytic activity but can also enhance catalyst reliability.

  7. Visualization of the missing role of hydrothermal interactions in a Japanese megalopolis for a win-win solution.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, T

    2012-01-01

    The urban heat island effect has become a serious environmental problem with the expansion of cities and industrial areas. Prohibition of the use of groundwater has caused a further serious problem such as floating of subways, stations and buildings through an imbalance of the hydrologic cycle in a Japanese megalopolis. Most of the previous research has evaluated separately hydrologic and thermal cycles in atmospheric, land and water areas because of the complexity in this feedback mechanism. In this study, the author used the process-based National Integrated Catchment-based Eco-hydrology (NICE) model, which includes surface-unsaturated-saturated water processes coupled with the urban canopy and regional atmospheric models, to simulate the effect of urban geometry and anthropogenic exhaustion on the hydrothermal changes in the atmospheric/land areas of the Japanese megalopolis. The simulation was conducted with multi-scale in horizontal regional-urban-point levels and in vertical atmosphere-surface-unsaturated-saturated layers, and projected the effect of water resources use to ameliorate the heat island and its impact on the hydrologic change in the catchment. Finally, the author presented the procedure to visualize the missing role of hydrothermal interactions in atmospheric, land and water areas, which would be effective to recover a sound hydrologic cycle and to create thermally pleasing environments in an eco-conscious megalopolis. PMID:22699347

  8. Design, fabrication, and test of a hydrothermal reactor for origin-of-life experiments.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Randall E; Russell, Michael J; Wilson, Philip R; McGlynn, Shawn E; Coleman, Max; Kidd, Richard; Kanik, Isik

    2010-10-01

    We describe a continuous high-pressure flow reactor designed to simulate the unforced convective interaction of hydrothermal solutions and ocean waters with submarine crust on early Earth-conditions appropriate to those that may have led to the onset of life. The experimental operating conditions are appropriate for investigating kinetic hydrothermal processes in the early history of any sizable wet, rocky planet. Beyond the description of the fabrication, we report an initial experiment that tested the design and investigated the feasibility of sulfide and silica dissolution in alkaline solution from iron sulfide and basaltic rock, and their possible subsequent transport as HS(-) and H(2)SiO(2-)(4) in hot alkaline solutions. Delivery of hydrogen sulfide and dihydrogen silicate ions would have led to the precipitation of ferrous hydroxide, hydroxysilicates, and iron sulfides as integral mineral components of an off-ridge compartmentalized hydrothermal mound in the Hadean. Such a mound could, we contend, have acted as a natural chemical and electrochemical reactor and, ultimately, as the source of all biochemistry on our planet. In the event, we show that an average of ∼1 mM/kg of both sulfide and silica were released throughout, though over 10 mM/kg of HS(-) was recorded for ∼100 minutes in the early stages of the experiment. This alkaline effluent from the reactor was injected into a reservoir of a simulacrum of ferrous iron-bearing "Hadean Ocean" water in an experiment that demonstrated the capacity of such fluids to generate hydrothermal chimneys and a variety of contiguous inorganic microgeode precipitates bearing disseminations of discrete metal sulfides. Comparable natural composite structures may have acted as hatcheries for emergent life in the Hadean. PMID:21087160

  9. Aldehydes in hydrothermal solution - Standard partial molal thermodynamic properties and relative stabilities at high temperatures and pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, Mitchell D.; Shock, Everett L.

    1993-01-01

    Aldehydes are common in a variety of geologic environments and are derived from a number of sources, both natural and anthropogenic. Experimental data for aqueous aldehydes were taken from the literature and used, along with parameters for the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state, to estimate standard partial molal thermodynamic data for aqueous straight-chain alkyl aldehydes at high temperatures and pressures. Examples of calculations involving aldehydes in geological environments are given, and the stability of aldehydes relative to carboxylic acids is evaluated. These calculations indicate that aldehydes may be intermediates in the formation of carboxylic acids from hydrocarbons in sedimentary basin brines and hydrothermal systems like they are in the atmosphere. The data and parameters summarized here allow evaluation of the role of aldehydes in the formation of prebiotic precursors, such as amino acids and hydroxy acids on the early Earth and in carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies.

  10. Aldehydes in hydrothermal solution: Standard partial molal thermodynamic properties and relative stabilities at high temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, M.D.; Shock, E.L. )

    1993-08-01

    Aldehydes are common in a variety of geologic environments and are derived from a number of sources, both natural and anthropogenic. Experimental data for aqueous aldehydes were taken from the literature and used, along with parameters for the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state, to estimate standard partial molal thermodynamic data for aqueous straight-chain alkyl aldehydes at high temperatures and pressures. Examples of calculations involving aldehydes in geological environments are given, and the stability of aldehydes relative to carboxylic acids is evaluated. These calculations indicate that aldehydes may be intermediates in the formation of carboxylic acids from hydrocarbons in sedimentary basins brines and hydrothermal systems like they are in the atmosphere. The data and parameters summarized here allow evaluation of the role of aldehydes in the formation of prebiotic precursors, such as amino acids and hydroxy acids on the early Earth and in carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies. 97 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Fluorescence Characterization of Dissolved Organic Matter (DOC) from Marine and Terrestrial Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnett, H. E.; Coe, J. D.; Smith, Z. P.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrothermal ecosystems exhibit a wide range in temperature, pH, and solute concentrations, including dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Here we compare DOC concentrations among marine (Iheya North Field, East China Sea) and terrestrial (Yunnan Province, China and Yellowstone National Park, USA) hydrothermal systems. We further characterize DOC fluorescence in these three systems using 3D excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs) and PARAFAC modeling. DOC concentrations in pore waters from the Iheya North hydrothermal field are always extremely low (<1 mg/L) and EEMs analysis suggests the DOC is of microbial origin. DOC concentrations in terrestrial springs from both China and Yellowstone have somewhat consistent variations with pH; generally, there are lower DOC concentrations in alkaline springs and higher, but more variable, DOC concentrations in acidic springs. DOC concentrations in alkaline springs are generally <2 mg/L, but in acidic hot springs DOC can be >100 mg/L. Fluorescence analysis of DOC from terrestrial hot springs reveals that some, but by no means all, of the fluorophores exhibit relationships with pH similar to those of the bulk DOC. In contrast, other fluorophores vary independently of the bulk DOC concentration. The DOC in hot springs from both China and Yellowstone appears to be predominantly of microbial origin but there are as yet unidentified fluorophores in both regions that could be unique tracers for DOC in hydrothermal systems.

  12. Hydrothermal synthesis of anatase nanoleaves and size dependence of anatase-rutile transformation upon heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisnycha, T. V.; Kirillov, S. A.; Potapenko, A. V.; Terikovska, T. E.; Kosilov, V. V.; Vyshnevskiy, O. A.

    2016-01-01

    Amorphous TiO2 obtained by adding TiCl4 to an alkaline medium crystallizes slowly and upon 3 years ageing transforms to nanosized anatase containing an admixture of brookite. The hydrothermal treatment of this sample in solutions of lithium hydroxide leads to anatase nanoleaves, and the more concentrated LiOH solution, the greater the nanoleaves and the smaller their specific surface area. The thermal treatment of nanoleaves leads to the bulk rutile, and the greater the specific surface area of anatase nanoleaves, the lower the anatase-rutile transition temperature. This is in line with conclusions based on the thermodynamic stability of nanosized anatase over the bulk rutile.

  13. Study of the electrochemical oxidation and reduction of C.I. Reactive Orange 4 in sodium sulphate alkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    del Río, A I; Molina, J; Bonastre, J; Cases, F

    2009-12-15

    Synthetic solutions of hydrolysed C.I. Reactive Orange 4, a monoazo textile dye commercially named Procion Orange MX-2R (PMX2R) and colour index number C.I. 18260, was exposed to electrochemical treatment under galvanostatic conditions and Na2SO4 as electrolyte. The influence of the electrochemical process as well as the applied current density was evaluated. Ti/SnO2-Sb-Pt and stainless steel electrodes were used as anode and cathode, respectively, and the intermediates generated on the cathode during electrochemical reduction were investigated. Aliquots of the solutions treated were analysed by UV-visible and FTIR-ATR spectroscopy confirming the presence of aromatic structures in solution when an electro-reduction was carried out. Electro-oxidation degraded both the azo group and aromatic structures. HPLC measures revealed that all processes followed pseudo-first order kinetics and decolourisation rates showed a considerable dependency on the applied current density. CV experiments and XPS analyses were carried out to study the behaviour of both PMX2R and intermediates and to analyse the state of the cathode after the electrochemical reduction, respectively. It was observed the presence of a main intermediate in solution after an electrochemical reduction whose chemical structure is similar to 2-amino-1,5-naphthalenedisulphonic acid. Moreover, the analysis of the cathode surface after electrochemical reduction reveals the presence of a coating layer with organic nature. PMID:19647934

  14. Alkaline titrations of poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC): microemulsion versus solution behavior.

    PubMed

    Airoldi, Marta; Gennaro, Giuseppe; Giomini, Marcello; Giuliani, Anna Maria; Giustini, Mauro

    2007-06-01

    PolyGC was titrated with a strong base in the presence of increasing concentrations of NaCl (from 0.00 to 0.60M) either in water solution or with the polynucleotide solubilized in the aqueous core of reverse micelles, i.e., the cationic quaternary water-in-oil microemulsion CTAB/n-hexane/n-pentanol/water. The results for matched samples in the two media were compared. CD and UV spectroscopies and, for the solution experiments, pH measurements were used to follow the course of deprotonation. In both media the primary effect of the addition of base was denaturation of the polynucleotide, reversible by back-titration with a strong acid. In solution, the apparent pK(a) of the transition decreases with increasing the salt concentration and a roughly linear dependence of pK(a) on p[NaCl] has been found. A parallel monotonic decay with ionic strength has been found in solution for R(OH), defined as the number of hydroxyl ions required per monomeric unit of polyGC to reach half-transition. By contrast, in microemulsion, R(OH) has been found to be independent of the NaCl concentration (and 10 to 50 times lower than in solution). This result is proposed as an indirect evidence of the independence of pK(a) on the salt concentration in microemulsion, where the pH cannot be measured. A sort of buffering effect of the positive charges on the micellar wall and of their counter-ions on the ionic strength could well explain this discrepancy of behavior in the two media. PMID:17508778

  15. Synthesis of luminescent nanocrystals and solid solutions in the YNbO{sub 4}–EuNbO{sub 4} system via hydrothermal route

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Masanori Dozono, Hayato

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • Nanocrystals: YNbO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} were directly formed under hydrothermal conditions at 240 °C. • The nanocrystals (10–20 nm) were luminescent and had ellipsoidal morphology. • The complete solid solutions in the YNbO{sub 4}–EuNbO{sub 4} system were also directly formed. • The PL intensity and R/O intensity ratio changed depending on heating temperature. - Abstract: Luminescent nanocrystals having distinctive ellipsoidal morphology and the complete solid solution of monoclinic phase in the YNbO{sub 4}–EuNbO{sub 4} system were hydrothermally formed under weakly basic conditions at 180–240 °C for 5 h. The excitation spectra of the Y{sub 1−x}Eu{sub x}NbO{sub 4} nanocrystals, which consisted of the charge transfer (CT) band around 240–270 nm due to [NbO{sub 4}]{sup 3−}–Eu{sup 3+} interaction and several sharp bands corresponding to the f–f transitions of Eu{sup 3+}, e.g. the most intense absorption band at 395 nm ({sup 7}F{sub 0}→{sup 5}L{sub 6}), showed that the compounds could be excited by both ultraviolet and visible light. A dominant red emission at 610 nm and a weak orange emission at 590 nm assigned to {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub 2} and {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub 1} transitions of Eu{sup 3+}, respectively were observed in the as-prepared nanocrystals containing europium under excitation at 395 nm. The heat treatment at temperatures more than 1000 °C in air was effective for the improvement in the photoluminescence intensity of the as-prepared solid solutions. By the enhancement in the crystallinity and crystallite growth of the monoclinic phase through heat treatment at 1300 °C in air, the luminescence intensity of the as-prepared solid solution, Y{sub 0.75}Eu{sub 0.25}NbO{sub 4} (x = 0.25), which showed the most significant photoluminescence, became more than 5 times as strong as that before the heat treatment.

  16. Catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction of water hyacinth.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rawel; Balagurumurthy, Bhavya; Prakash, Aditya; Bhaskar, Thallada

    2015-02-01

    Thermal and catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction of water hyacinth was performed at temperatures from 250 to 300 °C under various water hyacinth:H2O ratio of 1:3, 1:6 and 1:12. Reactions were also carried out under various residence times (15-60 min) as well as catalytic conditions (KOH and K2CO3). The use of alkaline catalysts significantly increased the bio-oil yield. Maximum bio-oil yield (23 wt%) comprising of bio-oil1 and bio-oil2 as well as conversion (89%) were observed with 1N KOH solution. (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR data showed that both bio-oil1 and bio-oil2 have high aliphatic carbon content. FTIR of bio-residue indicated that the usage of alkaline catalyst resulted in bio-residue samples with lesser oxygen functionality indicating that catalyst has a marked effect on nature of the bio-residue and helps to decompose biomass to a greater extent compared to thermal case. PMID:25240515

  17. An ion-imprinted amino-functionalized silica gel sorbent prepared by hydrothermal assisted surface imprinting technique for selective removal of cadmium (II) from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hong-Tao; Li, Jing; Li, Zhan-Chao; Sun, Ting

    2012-02-01

    A new ion-imprinted amino-functionalized silica gel sorbent was synthesized by the hydrothermal-assisted surface imprinting technique using Cd2+ as the template, 3-[2-(2-aminoethylamino)ethylamino]propyl-trimethoxysilane (AAAPTS) as the functional monomer, and epichlorohydrin as the cross-linking agent (IIP-AAAPTS/SiO2) for the selective removal of Cd2+ from aqueous solution, and was characterized by FTIR, SEM, nitrogen adsorption and the static adsorption-desorption experiment method. The specific surface area of the IIP-AAAPTS/SiO2 sorbents was found to be 149 m2 g-1. The results showed that the maximum static adsorption capacities of IIP-AAAPTS/SiO2 sorbents by hydrothermal heating method and by the conventional heating method were 57.4 and 31.6 mg g-1, respectively. The IIP-AAAPTS/SiO2 sorbents offered a fast kinetics for the adsorption and desorption of Cd(II). The relative selectivity coefficients of IIP-AAAPTS/SiO2 sorbents for Cd2+/Co2+, Cd2+/Ni2+, Cd2+/Zn2+, Cd2+/Pb2+ and Cd2+/Cu2+ were 30.68, 14.02, 3.00, 3.12 and 6.17, respectively. IIP-AAAPTS/SiO2 sorbents had a substantial binding capacity in the range of pH 4-8 and could be used repeatedly. Equilibrium data fitted perfectly with Langmuir isotherm model compared to Freundlich isotherm model. Kinetic studies indicated that adsorption followed a pseudo-second-order model. Negative values of ΔG° indicated spontaneous adsorption and the degree of spontaneity of the reaction increased with increasing temperature. ΔH° of 26.13 kJ mol-1 due to the adsorption of Cd2+ on the IIP-AAAPTS/SiO2 sorbents indicated that the adsorption was endothermic in the experimental temperature range.

  18. 1-Dodecane-sulfonic-acid-sodium-salt(LAS) assisted hydrothermal synthesis of Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}S solid solution as efficient photocatalysts under visible light irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, B.; Guo, L. J.

    2010-03-01

    With anionic surfactant LAS assisted, series of zinc cadmium sulfide semiconductor photocatalysts were synthesized by hydrothermal method. These products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-Vis absorption spectra (UV-Vis) and scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The photocatalytic activities of as-prepared samples were evaluated by photocatalytic hydrogen production from water under visible-light irradiation. The best synthesis parameters are: Composition 0.9:0.1 (Cd:Zn molar ratio), Temperature 160 deg. C, Hydrothermal Time 48 Hour, LAS Concentration 1.7 mmol/L, the maximum visible-light-catalytic hydrogen production rate is 161.25 {mu}mol/h (lambda>430 nm) which is higher than those of by coprecipitation method. The experiment results indicate that surfactant assisted hydrothermal method is an effective way to get highly active CdZnS solid solution photocatalyst.

  19. Uranium mobility during interaction of rhyolitic obsidian, perlite and felsite with alkaline carbonate solution: T = 120° C, P = 210 kg/cm2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zielinski, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    Well-characterized samples of rhyolitic obsidian, perlite and felsite from a single lava flow are leached of U by alkaline oxidizing solutions under open-system conditions. Pressure, temperature, flow rate and solution composition are held constant in order to evaluate the relative importance of differences in surface area and crystallinity. Under the experimental conditions U removal from crushed glassy samples proceeds by a mechanism of glass dissolution in which U and silica are dissolved in approximately equal weight fractions. The rate of U removal from crushed glassy samples increases with decreasing average grain size (surface area). Initial rapid loss of a small component (≈ 2.5%) of the total U from crushed felsite. followed by much slower U loss, reflects variable rates of attack of numerous uranium sites. The fractions of U removed during the experiment ranged from 3.2% (felsite) to 27% (perlite). An empirical method for evaluating the relative rate of U loss from contemporaneous volcanic rocks is presented which incorporates leaching results and rock permeability data.

  20. Recycling of waste printed circuit boards with simultaneous enrichment of special metals by using alkaline melts: A green and strategically advantageous solution.

    PubMed

    Stuhlpfarrer, Philipp; Luidold, Stefan; Antrekowitsch, Helmut

    2016-04-15

    The increasing consumption of electric and electronic equipment has led to a rise in toxic waste. To recover the metal fraction, a separation of the organic components is necessary because harmful substances such as chlorine, fluorine and bromine cause ecological damage, for example in the form of dioxins and furans at temperature above 400°C. Hence, an alternative, environmentally friendly approach was investigated exploiting that a mixture of caustic soda and potassium hydroxide in eutectic composition melts below 200°C, enabling a fast cracking of the long hydrocarbon chains. The trials demonstrate the removal of organic compounds without a loss of copper and precious metals, as well as a suppressed formation of hazardous off-gases. In order to avoid an input of alkaline elements into the furnace and ensuing problems with refractory materials, a washing step generates a sodium and potassium hydroxide solution, in which special metals like indium, gallium and germanium are enriched. Their concentrations facilitate the recovery of these elements, because otherwise they become lost in the typical recycling processes. The aim of this work was to find an environmental solution for the separation of plastics and metals as well as a strategically important answer for the recycling of printed circuit boards and mobile phones. PMID:26775099

  1. Novel one-step synthesis of wool-ball-like Ni-carbon nanotubes composite cathodes with favorable electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhouhao; Ma, Zhipeng; Song, Jianjun; Wang, Lixin; Shao, Guangjie

    2016-08-01

    In this work, supergravity fields are performed to prepare Ni-CNTs composite cathodes with wool-ball-like morphology from the Watts bath containing well-distributed functionalized CNTs. The prepared Ni-CNTs composite cathodes are used as noble metal-free electrocatalyst with favorable electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline solutions. The crystal structure and morphology of the composite cathodes are characterized by XRD and SEM measurements. The electrochemical activities of the cathodes are characterized through Tafel polarization measurement, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetric study in 1.0 M NaOH solution. The results indicate that catalytic activities of the Ni-CNTs cathodes prepared under supergravity fields are enhanced significantly, and the sample prepared at rotating speed 3000 rpm from the bath containing 1 g dm-3 CNTs exhibits the highest HER activity with smallest Tafel slope and largest exchange current density of 823.9 μA cm-2. Furthermore, the effects of both the CNTs concentrations and the intensities of supergravity fields on the properties of the Ni-CNTs cathodes are investigated.

  2. Chemical Corrosion of Liquid-Phase Sintered SiC in Acidic/Alkaline Solutions Part 1. Corrosion in HNO3 Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ming; He, Xinnong; Tang, Wenming

    2016-03-01

    The corrosion behavior of the liquid-phase sintered SiC (LPS-SiC) was studied by dipping in 3.53 mol/L HNO3 aqueous solution at room temperature and 70 °C, respectively. The weight loss, strength reduction and morphology evolution of the SiC specimens during corroding were revealed and also the chemical corrosion process and mechanism of the SiC specimens in the acidic solution were clarified. The results show that the corrosion of the LPS-SiC specimens in the HNO3 solution is selective. The SiC particles are almost free from corrosion, but the secondary phases of BaAl2Si2O8 (BAS) and Y2Si2O7 are corroded via an acid-alkali neutralization reaction. BAS has a higher corrosion rate than Y2Si2O7, resulting in the formation of the bamboo-leaf-like corrosion pits. As the SiC specimens etched in the HNO3 solution at room temperature for 75 days, about 80 μm thickness corrosion layer forms. The weight loss and bending strength reduction of the etched SiC specimens are 2.6 mg/cm2 and 52%, respectively. The corrosion of the SiC specimens is accelerated in the 70 °C HNO3 solution with a rate about five times bigger than that in the same corrosion medium at room temperature.

  3. /sup 237/Np and /sup 239/Pu solution behavior during hydrothermal testing of simulated nuclear waste glass with basalt and steel

    SciTech Connect

    Schramke, J.A.; Simonson, S.A.; Coles, D.G.

    1984-09-01

    A series of hydrothermal experiments were carried out on /sup 237/Np- and /sup 239/Pu-doped PNL 76-68 glass, synthetic basalt groundwater, basalt, and cast steel. Experiments of duration were conducted in Dickson-type rocking autoclaves at 200/sup 0/C and 30 MPa, with an initial fluid to solid weight ratio of 10:1. The tests carried out were: glass and groundwater; glass, basalt, and groundwater; glass, steel, and groundwater; and glass, steel, basalt, and groundwater. Unfiltered, 4000 A filtered, and 18 A filtered solutions were analyzed to determine the concentrations of radionuclides in solution and those associated with colloids. In all four experiments, /sup 237/Np and /sup 239/Pu were present in solution in quantities at or below the analytical detection limits. The only detectable differences in radionuclide concentrations between the four experiments were brought about by changes in the amounts of colloidally associated radionuclides. Besalt added to the glass and groundwater system increased the quantities of the colloidally associated /sup 237/Np and /sup 239/Pu by an order of magnitude. The addition of steel to the glass and groundwater system reduced the colloidally associated radionuclides to levels below detection limits. The effects of both steel and basalt on the glass and groundwater system seemed to cancel out, and the colloidally associated radionuclide concentrations were similar to the observed levels in the glass plus groundwater system. These variations in the quantities of the colloidally associated radionuclides did not appear to be correlated with other changes in the quantities or composition of the colloidal material in solution. Other than /sup 237/Np and /sup 239/Pu, silica was the only constituent of the colloids in these experiments. The amounts of colloidal silica did not vary significantly between the four experiments. 7 references, 7 figures.

  4. Bottom-up synthesis of high-performance nitrogen-enriched transition metal/graphene oxygen reduction electrocatalysts both in alkaline and acidic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Qingxue; Gao, Qingwen; Su, Qi; Liang, Yanyu; Wang, Yuxi; Yang, Zhi

    2015-08-01

    Oxygen reduction electrocatalysts with low cost and excellent performance are urgently required for large-scale application in fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Though nitrogen-enriched transition metal/graphene hybrids (N-TM/G, TM = Fe, Co, and Ni and related compounds) have been developed as novel substitutes for precious metal catalysts (PMCs) towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), a significant challenge still remains for simple and efficient synthesis of N-TM/G catalysts with satisfactory electrocatalytic behavior. Herein, we demonstrate a universal bottom-up strategy for efficient fabrication of strongly-coupled N-TM/G catalysts. This strategy is implemented via direct polymerization of transition metal phthalocyanine (TMPc) in the two-dimensional confined space of in situ generated g-C3N4 and a subsequent pyrolysis. Such a space-confined bottom-up synthesis route successfully constructs a strongly-coupled triple junction of transition metal-graphitic carbon-nitrogen-doped graphene (TM-GC-NG) with extensive controllability over the specific surface area, nitrogen content/types as well as the states of metal. As a result, the optimized N-Fe/G materials have promising potential as high-performance NPMCs towards ORR both in alkaline and acidic solution.Oxygen reduction electrocatalysts with low cost and excellent performance are urgently required for large-scale application in fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Though nitrogen-enriched transition metal/graphene hybrids (N-TM/G, TM = Fe, Co, and Ni and related compounds) have been developed as novel substitutes for precious metal catalysts (PMCs) towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), a significant challenge still remains for simple and efficient synthesis of N-TM/G catalysts with satisfactory electrocatalytic behavior. Herein, we demonstrate a universal bottom-up strategy for efficient fabrication of strongly-coupled N-TM/G catalysts. This strategy is implemented via direct polymerization of transition

  5. Volcano-hydrothermal system of Ebeko volcano, Paramushir, Kuril Islands: Geochemistry and solute fluxes of magmatic chlorine and sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalacheva, Elena; Taran, Yuri; Kotenko, Tatiana; Hattori, Keiko; Kotenko, Leonid; Solis-Pichardo, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Ebeko volcano at the northern part of Paramushir Island in the Kuril island arc produces frequent phreatic eruptions and relatively strong fumarolic activity at the summit area ~ 1000 m above sea level (asl). The fumaroles are characterized by low-temperature, HCl- and S-rich gas and numerous hyper-acid pools (pH < 1) without drains. At ~ 550 m asl, in the Yurieva stream canyon, many hot (up to 87 °C) springs discharge ultra-acidic (pH 1-2) SO4-Cl water into the stream and finally into the Sea of Okhotsk. During quiescent stages of degassing, these fumaroles emit 1000-2000 t/d of water vapor, < 20 t/d of SO2 and < 5 t/d of HCl. The measurement of acidic hot Yurieva springs shows that the flux of Cl and S, 60-80 t/d each, is independent on the volcanic activity in the last two decades. Such high flux of Cl is among the highest ever measured in a volcano-hydrothermal system. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition of water and Cl concentration for Yurieva springs show an excellent positive correlation, indicating a mixing between meteoric water and magmatic vapor. In contrast, volcanic gas condensates of Ebeko fumaroles do not show a simple mixing trend but rather a complicated data suggesting evaporation of the acidic brine. Temperatures calculated from gas compositions and isotope data are similar, ranging from 150 to 250 °C, which is consistent with the presence of a liquid aquifer below the Ebeko fumarolic fields. Saturation indices of non-silicate minerals suggest temperatures ranging from 150 to 200 °C for Yurieva springs. Trace elements (including REE) and Sr isotope composition suggest congruent dissolution of the Ebeko volcanic rocks by acidic waters. Waters of Yurieva springs and waters of the summit thermal fields (including volcanic gas condensates) are different in Cl/SO4 ratios and isotopic compositions, suggesting complicated boiling-condensation-mixing processes.

  6. Application of nano-sized nanoporous zinc 2-methylimidazole metal-organic framework for electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol in alkaline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadi-Maybodi, Abdolraouf; Ghasemi, Shahram; Ghaffari-Rad, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a novel non-platinum group metals (non-PGM) catalyst based on modified zinc 2-methylimidazole metal-organic framework (ZIF-8) is proposed and used for electrooxidation of methanol. Nano-sized particles of nonporous ZIF-8 are synthesized at room temperature using a simple template-free method. The synthesized ZIF-8 nanoparticles are characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption techniques. In order to decrease the overvoltage of methanol oxidation on carbon paste electrode (CPE), nickel species doped ZIF-8 modified carbon paste electrode (Ni/ZIF-8CPE) is fabricated as a modified electrode. Electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry are used to investigate the electrocatalytic activity of Ni/ZIF-8CPE toward methanol oxidation in alkaline solution. Cyclic voltammetry results show that oxidation current is considerably increased using Ni/ZIF-8CPE in comparison with unmodified CPE. Catalytic rate constant of methanol oxidation on Ni/ZIF-8CPE is obtained using chronoamperometric studies. Besides the good catalytic activity of the modified electrode toward methanol oxidation, it has other advantages such as simple preparation, ease of operation, good stability and low cost, which can be promising in the field of preparation of non-PGM electrocatalysts for application in fuel cells.

  7. Bottom-up synthesis of high-performance nitrogen-enriched transition metal/graphene oxygen reduction electrocatalysts both in alkaline and acidic solution.

    PubMed

    Lai, Qingxue; Gao, Qingwen; Su, Qi; Liang, Yanyu; Wang, Yuxi; Yang, Zhi

    2015-09-21

    Oxygen reduction electrocatalysts with low cost and excellent performance are urgently required for large-scale application in fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Though nitrogen-enriched transition metal/graphene hybrids (N-TM/G, TM = Fe, Co, and Ni and related compounds) have been developed as novel substitutes for precious metal catalysts (PMCs) towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), a significant challenge still remains for simple and efficient synthesis of N-TM/G catalysts with satisfactory electrocatalytic behavior. Herein, we demonstrate a universal bottom-up strategy for efficient fabrication of strongly-coupled N-TM/G catalysts. This strategy is implemented via direct polymerization of transition metal phthalocyanine (TMPc) in the two-dimensional confined space of in situ generated g-C3N4 and a subsequent pyrolysis. Such a space-confined bottom-up synthesis route successfully constructs a strongly-coupled triple junction of transition metal-graphitic carbon-nitrogen-doped graphene (TM-GC-NG) with extensive controllability over the specific surface area, nitrogen content/types as well as the states of metal. As a result, the optimized N-Fe/G materials have promising potential as high-performance NPMCs towards ORR both in alkaline and acidic solution. PMID:26282404

  8. Chemical equilibrium model for interfacial activity of crude oil in aqueous alkaline solution: the effects of pH, alkali and salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.; Yen, T.F.

    1980-11-01

    A chemical equilibrium model for interfacial activity of crude in aqueous alkaline solution is proposed. The model predicts the observed effects of pH and concentrations of alkali and salt on the interfacial tension (IFT). The model proposed was shown to describe the observed effects of acid content, pH, and sodium ions on the interfacial activity of crude oil in water. Once the pH of the interface reaches the pKa of the acids, sometimes with the help of addition of some salt, the IFT experiences a sudden steep drop to the range of 10/sup -2/ dynes/cm. After that, further addition of sodium either in the form of NaOH or NaCl is going to increase the IFT due to a shift of equilibriumn to the formation of undissociated soap. This was confirmed by the difference in the observed effect of sodium on the IFT of the extracted soap molecules which are dissociated easily and those which are associated highly and precipitated easily. These soap molecules have dissociation constant values ranging from below 10/sup -2/ to above one. 13 references.

  9. Graphene oxide electrocatalyst on MnO2 air cathode as an efficient electron pump for enhanced oxygen reduction in alkaline solution

    PubMed Central

    Basirun, Wan Jeffrey; Sookhakian, Mehran; Baradaran, Saeid; Endut, Zulkarnain; Mahmoudian, Mohammad Reza; Ebadi, Mehdi; Yousefi, Ramin; Ghadimi, Hanieh; Ahmed, Sohail

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was deposited on the surface of a MnO2 air cathode by thermal evaporation at 50°C from a GO colloidal suspension. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy confirmed the presence of GO on the MnO2 air cathode (GO-MnO2). Voltammetry and chrono-amperometry showed increased currents for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 6 M KOH solution for GO-MnO2 compared to the MnO2 cathode. The GO-MnO2 was used as an air cathode in an alkaline tin-air cell and produced a maximum power density of 13 mW cm−2, in contrast to MnO2, which produced a maximum power density of 9.2 mW cm−2. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results suggest that the chemical step for the ORR is the rate determining step, as proposed earlier by different researchers. It is suggested that the presence of GO and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) on the MnO2 surface are responsible for the increased rate of this step, whereby GO and ERGO accelerate the process of electron donation to the MnO2 and to adsorbed oxygen atoms. PMID:25765731

  10. EXAFS analysis of cations distribution in structure of Co1-xNixFe2O4 nanoparticles obtained by hydrothermal method in aloe vera extract solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongpratat, Unchista; Maensiri, Santi; Swatsitang, Ekaphan

    2016-09-01

    Effect of cations distribution upon EXAFS analysis on magnetic properties of Co1-xNixFe2O4 (x = 0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.0) nanoparticles prepared by the hydrothermal method in aloe vera extract solution were studied. XRD analysis confirmed a pure phase of cubic spinel ferrite of all samples. Changes in lattice parameter and particle size depended on the Ni content with partial substitution and site distributions of Co2+, Ni2+ ions of different ionic radii at both tetrahedral and octahedral sites in the crystal structure. Particle sizes of samples estimated by TEM images were found to be in the range of 10.87-62.50 nm. The VSM results at room temperature indicated the ferrimagnetic behavior of all samples. Superparamagnetic behavior was observed in NiFe2O4 sample. The coercivity (Hc) and remanance (Mr) values were related to the particle sizes of samples. The saturation magnetization (Ms) was increased by a factor of 1.4 to a value of 57.57 emu/g, whereas the coercivity (Hc) was decreased by a factor of 20 to a value of 63.15 Oe for a sample with x = 0.75. In addition to the cations distribution, the increase of aspect ratio (surface to volume ratio) due to the decrease of particle size could significantly affect the magnetic properties of the materials.

  11. Preparation of Cr2O3 precursors by hydrothermal reduction in the abundant Na2CO3 and Na2CrO4 solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guang-ye; Qu, Jing-kui; Zheng, Yu-dong; Qi, Tao; Guo, Qiang

    2012-11-01

    Precursors of chromium oxide (p-Cr2O3) were prepared by reducing hexavalent chromium in the presence of sodium carbonate solution under hydrothermal conditions. Methanal was used as the reductant, and carbon dioxide was the acidulating agent. The influences of reaction temperature, initial pressure of carbon dioxide, isothermal time and methanal coefficient on Cr(VI) reduction were investigated. Experimental results showed that Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) with a yield of 99%. Chemical titration, thermogravimetry (TG), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the p-Cr2O3 and Cr2O3. The series of p-Cr2O3 were found to be multiphase even if they presented different colors, from gray green to lavender. After these p-Cr2O3 samples were calcined, the product of rhombohedral Cr2O3 with a purity of 99.5wt% was obtained.

  12. Investigation on the coprecipitation of transuranium elements from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents. Study of the effects of waste components on decontamination from Np(IV) and Pu(IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Bessonov, A.A.; Budantseva, N.A.; Gelis, A.V.; Nikonov, M.V.; Shilov, V.P.

    1997-09-01

    The third stage of the study on the homogeneous coprecipitation of neptunium and plutonium from alkaline high-level radioactive waste solutions by the Method of Appearing Reagents has been completed. Alkaline radioactive wastes exist at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The recent studies investigated the effects of neptunium chemical reductants, plutonium(IV) concentration, and the presence of bulk tank waste solution components on the decontamination from tetravalent neptunium and plutonium achieved by homogeneous coprecipitation. Data on neptunium reduction to its tetravalent state in alkaline solution of different NaOH concentrations are given. Eleven reductants were tested to find those most suited to remove neptunium, through chemical reduction, from alkaline solution by homogeneous coprecipitation. Hydrazine, VOSO{sub 4}, and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 4} were found to be the most effective reductants. The rates of reduction with these reductants were comparable with the kinetics of carrier formation. Solution decontamination factors of about 400 were attained for 10{sup -6}M neptunium. Coprecipitation of plutonium(IV) with carriers obtained as products of thermal hydrolysis, redox transformations, and catalytic decomposition of [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+}, [Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]{sup 2-}, Cr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, KMnO{sub 4}, and Li{sub 4}UO{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 3} was studied and results are described. Under optimum conditions, a 100-fold decrease of plutonium concentration was possible with each of these reagents.

  13. Conventional hydrothermal synthesis of Na-A zeolite from cupola slag and aluminum sludge.

    PubMed

    Anuwattana, Rewadee; Khummongkol, Pojanie

    2009-07-15

    Na-A type zeolites were prepared from two industrial wastes: the solid by-product of cupola slag and aluminum sludge from an aluminum plating plant. Two preparation methods using the same starting material compositions were carried out. In the first method, alkaline fusion was introduced, followed by the hydrothermal treatment to obtain sodium aluminosilicate which was then crystallized in NaOH solution under the condition of 90+/-3 degrees C for 1-9h with different H(2)O/SiO2 ratios. The result shows that higher H(2)O/SiO2 ratio increases the rate of crystallization. The largest amount of crystallinity for Na-A was found at 3h. In the second method, alkaline hydrothermal treatment without fusion was carried out in the same condition as the first method. No Na-A zeolite was obtained by this method. The changes of the dissolved amounts of Si(4+) and Al(3+) in 3M NaOH were investigated during the hydrothermal reaction. PMID:19111982

  14. Orientation- and concentration-dependent surfactant adsorption on silicon in aqueous alkaline solutions: explaining the changes in the etch rate, roughness and undercutting for MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosálvez, M. A.; Tang, B.; Pal, P.; Sato, K.; Kimura, Y.; Ishibashi, K.

    2009-12-01

    We combine spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (KMC) and convex corner undercutting analysis in order to characterize and explain the effect of the addition of small amounts of surfactant in alkaline aqueous solutions, such as Triton X-100 in tetra methyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH). We propose that the surfactant is adsorbed at the silicon-etchant interface as a thin layer, acting as a filter that moderates the surface reactivity by reducing the amount of reactant molecules that reach the surface. According to the SE and FT-IR measurements, the thickness of the adsorbed layer is an orientation- and concentration-dependent quantity, mostly due to the orientation dependence of the surface density of H-terminations and the concentration dependence of the relative rates of the underlying oxidation and etching reactions, which have a direct impact on the number of OH terminations. For partial OH coverage of the surface, the hydration of the OH group effectively acts as an anchoring location for the hydration shell of a surfactant molecule, thus enabling the formation of hydration bridges that amplify the adsorption density of the surfactant. At high concentration, the model explains the large reduction in the etch rate of the exact and vicinal Si{1 1 0} surfaces, and the small changes in the etch rates for the exact and vicinal Si{1 0 0} surfaces. At low concentration, it explains how the etch rate for both families is significantly reduced. The orientation and concentration dependence of the surfactant adsorption explains the dramatic differences in the micron-scale wet-etched patterns obtained using TMAH and TMAH+Triton for microelectromechanical systems applications.

  15. Rare earth element systematics in hydrothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Michard, A. )

    1989-03-01

    Rare earth element concentrations have been measured in hydrothermal solutions from geothermal fields in Italy, Dominica, Valles Caldera, Salton Sea and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The measured abundances show that hydrothermal activity is not expected to affect the REE balance of either continental or oceanic rocks. The REE enrichment of the solutions increases when the pH decreases. High-temperature solutions (> 230{degree}C) percolating through different rock types may show similar REE patterns.

  16. Hydrothermal Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; von Damm, K. L.

    2003-12-01

    What is Hydrothermal Circulation?Hydrothermal circulation occurs when seawater percolates downward through fractured ocean crust along the volcanic mid-ocean ridge (MOR) system. The seawater is first heated and then undergoes chemical modification through reaction with the host rock as it continues downward, reaching maximum temperatures that can exceed 400 °C. At these temperatures the fluids become extremely buoyant and rise rapidly back to the seafloor where they are expelled into the overlying water column. Seafloor hydrothermal circulation plays a significant role in the cycling of energy and mass between the solid earth and the oceans; the first identification of submarine hydrothermal venting and their accompanying chemosynthetically based communities in the late 1970s remains one of the most exciting discoveries in modern science. The existence of some form of hydrothermal circulation had been predicted almost as soon as the significance of ridges themselves was first recognized, with the emergence of plate tectonic theory. Magma wells up from the Earth's interior along "spreading centers" or "MORs" to produce fresh ocean crust at a rate of ˜20 km3 yr-1, forming new seafloor at a rate of ˜3.3 km2 yr-1 (Parsons, 1981; White et al., 1992). The young oceanic lithosphere formed in this way cools as it moves away from the ridge crest. Although much of this cooling occurs by upward conduction of heat through the lithosphere, early heat-flow studies quickly established that a significant proportion of the total heat flux must also occur via some additional convective process (Figure 1), i.e., through circulation of cold seawater within the upper ocean crust (Anderson and Silbeck, 1981). (2K)Figure 1. Oceanic heat flow versus age of ocean crust. Data from the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian oceans, averaged over 2 Ma intervals (circles) depart from the theoretical cooling curve (solid line) indicating convective cooling of young ocean crust by circulating seawater

  17. Ecology of mixed biofilms subjected daily to a chlorinated alkaline solution: spatial distribution of bacterial species suggests a protective effect of one species to another.

    PubMed

    Leriche, V; Briandet, R; Carpentier, B

    2003-01-01

    Three bacterial strains (Kocuria sp. C714.1, Brevibacterium linens B337.1 and Staphylococcus sciuri CCL101) were grown together on stainless steel and were subjected daily to a commercial alkaline chlorine solution (22 mg l-1 of free chlorine, pH 11) over a period of 4 weeks. After the daily chemical shock, culture madia [1:20 dilution of tryptic soy broth (TSB-YE/20) or diluted whey] was deposited on the biofilms. The chemical shocks led first to a drop in the culturable population, followed by an increase and finally stabilization at around 106-107 CFU cm-2 by day 11 of the experiment. These changes in the microbial population can be attributed to a decreasing susceptibility to the antimicrobial agent with biofilm age, and to the consumption of free chlorine by biofilm exoproteins. The microbial composition appeared to be linked to the free chlorine concentration that depended on exoprotein production. At the end of the experiment, exoprotein production was greater for biofilms grown in TSBYE/20 than in whey. As a consequence, biofilms grown in whey did not neutralize the chlorine and the dominant strain was the one having the highest resistance to chlorine: K. varians. When biofilm were grown in TSBYE/20, chlorine was neutralized and the dominant strain was the one having the highest growth rate: S. sciuri. The presence of chlorine may also explain the distribution of S. sciuri cells as a ring around Kocuria sp. microcolonies. When chlorine was totally consumed by the biofilm during the chemical shock, S. sciuri was no longer grouped around Kocuria sp. microcolonies but was evenly scattered over the substratum as single cells or in small clusters, as it was before any chemical treatment. These findings strongly suggest protection of S. sciuri by Kocuria sp. microcolonies against the chlorinated solution. This phenomenon, added to the low susceptibility phenotype of the biofilm cells, could at least partly explain the survival of microbial cells in an adverse

  18. In vitro biocompatibility of magnesium-incorporated submicro-porous titanium oxide surface produced by hydrothermal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Youn-Jeong; Jang, Je-Hee; An, Chang-Hyeon

    2010-11-01

    This study investigated the surface characteristics and in vitro biocompatibility of titanium (Ti) oxide surface incorporating magnesium ions (Mg), produced by hydrothermal treatment using an alkaline Mg-containing solution, for future biomedical applications. The surface characteristics were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, thin-film X-ray diffractometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and optical profilometry. Mouse calvaria-derived osteoblastic cell (MC3T3-E1) attachment, spreading, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and osteoblastic gene expression on Mg-containing surfaces were compared with untreated Ti surfaces. Hydrothermal treatment resulted in Mg-incorporated Ti oxide layer with submicro-porous surface structures approximately 2 μm in thickness. ICP-AES analysis revealed Mg ions release from treated surfaces into the solution. The Mg-incorporated surface displayed significantly increased cellular attachment and ALP activity compared with untreated surface ( p < 0.05), and supported better cell spreading. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed notably higher mRNA expression of the osteoblast transcription factor genes (Dlx5, Runx2) and the osteoblast phenotype genes (ALP, bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin) in cells grown on the Mg-incorporated surfaces than untreated surfaces. These results demonstrate that the Mg-incorporated submicro-porous Ti oxide surface produced by hydrothermal treatment may improve implant osseointegration by enhancing the attachment, spreading and differentiation of osteoblastic cells.

  19. Hydrothermal Growth of Polyscale Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrappa, Kullaiah

    In this chapter, the importance of the hydrothermal technique for growth of polyscale crystals is discussed with reference to its efficiency in synthesizing high-quality crystals of various sizes for modern technological applications. The historical development of the hydrothermal technique is briefly discussed, to show its evolution over time. Also some of the important types of apparatus used in routine hydrothermal research, including the continuous production of nanosize crystals, are discussed. The latest trends in the hydrothermal growth of crystals, such as thermodynamic modeling and understanding of the solution chemistry, are elucidated with appropriate examples. The growth of some selected bulk, fine, and nanosized crystals of current technological significance, such as quartz, aluminum and gallium berlinites, calcite, gemstones, rare-earth vanadates, electroceramic titanates, and carbon polymorphs, is discussed in detail. Future trends in the hydrothermal technique, required to meet the challenges of fast-growing demand for materials in various technological fields, are described. At the end of this chapter, an Appendix 18.A containing a more or less complete list of the characteristic families of crystals synthesized by the hydrothermal technique is given with the solvent and pressure-temperature (PT) conditions used in their synthesis.

  20. A method for making an alkaline battery electrode plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chida, K.; Ezaki, T.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for making an alkaline battery electrode plate where the desired active substances are filled into a nickel foam substrate. In this substrate an electrolytic oxidation reduction occurs in an alkaline solution containing lithium hydroxide.

  1. Efficient and durable oxygen reduction and evolution of a hydrothermally synthesized La(Co0.55Mn0.45)0.99O3-δ nanorod/graphene hybrid in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xiaoming; Goh, F. W. Thomas; Li, Bing; Hor, T. S. Andy; Zhang, Jie; Xiao, Peng; Wang, Xin; Zong, Yun; Liu, Zhaolin

    2015-05-01

    The increasing global energy demand and the depletion of fossil fuels have stimulated intense research on fuel cells and batteries. Oxygen electrocatalysis plays essential roles as the electrocatalytic reduction and evolution of di-oxygen are always the performance-limiting factors of these devices relying on oxygen electrochemistry. A novel perovskite with the formula La(Co0.55Mn0.45)0.99O3-δ (LCMO) is designed from molecular orbital principles. The hydrothermally synthesized LCMO nanorods have unique structural and chemical properties and possess high intrinsic activities for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The synergic covalent coupling between LCMO and NrGO enhances the bifunctional ORR and OER activities of the novel LCMO/NrGO hybrid catalyst. The ORR activity of LCMO/NrGO is comparable to the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst and its OER activity is competitive to the state-of-the-art Ir/C catalyst. LCMO/NrGO generally outperforms Pt/C and Ir/C with better bifunctional ORR and OER performance and operating durability. LCMO/NrGO represents a new class of low-cost, efficient and durable electrocatalysts for fuel cells, water electrolysers and batteries.The increasing global energy demand and the depletion of fossil fuels have stimulated intense research on fuel cells and batteries. Oxygen electrocatalysis plays essential roles as the electrocatalytic reduction and evolution of di-oxygen are always the performance-limiting factors of these devices relying on oxygen electrochemistry. A novel perovskite with the formula La(Co0.55Mn0.45)0.99O3-δ (LCMO) is designed from molecular orbital principles. The hydrothermally synthesized LCMO nanorods have unique structural and chemical properties and possess high intrinsic activities for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The synergic covalent coupling between LCMO and NrGO enhances the bifunctional ORR and OER activities of the novel LCMO/NrGO hybrid

  2. Efficient and durable oxygen reduction and evolution of a hydrothermally synthesized La(Co0.55Mn0.45)0.99O3-δ nanorod/graphene hybrid in alkaline media.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiaoming; Goh, F W Thomas; Li, Bing; Hor, T S Andy; Zhang, Jie; Xiao, Peng; Wang, Xin; Zong, Yun; Liu, Zhaolin

    2015-05-21

    The increasing global energy demand and the depletion of fossil fuels have stimulated intense research on fuel cells and batteries. Oxygen electrocatalysis plays essential roles as the electrocatalytic reduction and evolution of di-oxygen are always the performance-limiting factors of these devices relying on oxygen electrochemistry. A novel perovskite with the formula La(Co0.55Mn0.45)0.99O3-δ (LCMO) is designed from molecular orbital principles. The hydrothermally synthesized LCMO nanorods have unique structural and chemical properties and possess high intrinsic activities for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The synergic covalent coupling between LCMO and NrGO enhances the bifunctional ORR and OER activities of the novel LCMO/NrGO hybrid catalyst. The ORR activity of LCMO/NrGO is comparable to the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst and its OER activity is competitive to the state-of-the-art Ir/C catalyst. LCMO/NrGO generally outperforms Pt/C and Ir/C with better bifunctional ORR and OER performance and operating durability. LCMO/NrGO represents a new class of low-cost, efficient and durable electrocatalysts for fuel cells, water electrolysers and batteries. PMID:25921031

  3. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park: I. The origin of thiosulfate in hot spring waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, Y.; Schoonen, M.A.A.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Cunningham, K.M.; Ball, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Thiosulfate (S2O2-3), polythionate (SxO2-6), dissolved sulfide (H2S), and sulfate (SO2-4) concentrations in thirty-nine alkaline and acidic springs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) were determined. The analyses were conducted on site, using ion chromatography for thiosulfate, polythionate, and sulfate, and using colorimetry for dissolved sulfide. Thiosulfate was detected at concentrations typically less than 2 ??mol/L in neutral and alkaline chloride springs with low sulfate concentrations (C1-/SO2-4 > 25). The thiosulfate concentration levels are about one to two orders of magnitude lower than the concentration of dissolved sulfide in these springs. In most acid sulfate and acid sulfate-chloride springs (Cl-/SO2-4 < 10), thiosulfate concentrations were also typically lower than 2 ??mol/L. However, in some chloride springs enriched with sulfate (Cl-/SO2-4 between 10 to 25), thiosulfate was found at concentrations ranging from 9 to 95 ??mol/L, higher than the concentrations of dissolved sulfide in these waters. Polythionate was detected only in Cinder Pool, Norris Geyser basin, at concentrations up to 8 ??mol/L, with an average S-chain-length from 4.1 to 4.9 sulfur atoms. The results indicate that no thiosulfate occurs in the deeper parts of the hydrothermal system. Thiosulfate may form, however, from (1) hydrolysis of native sulfur by hydrothermal solutions in the shallower parts (<50 m) of the system, (2) oxidation of dissolved sulfide upon mixing of a deep hydrothermal water with aerated shallow groundwater, and (3) the oxidation of dissolved sulfide by dissolved oxygen upon discharge of the hot spring. Upon discharge of a sulfide-containing hydrothermal water, oxidation proceeds rapidly as atmospheric oxygen enters the water. The transfer of oxygen is particularly effective if the hydrothermal discharge is turbulent and has a large surface area.

  4. Hydrothermal treatment of electric arc furnace dust.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing-Sheng; Wang, Yuh-Ruey; Chang, Tien-Chin

    2011-06-15

    In this study, ZnO crystals were fabricated from electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) after alkaline leaching, purification and hydrothermal treatment. The effects of temperature, duration, pH, and solid/liquid ratio on ZnO crystal morphology and size were investigated. Results show a high reaction temperature capable of accelerating the dissolution of ZnO precursor, expediting the growth of 1D ZnO, and increasing the L/D ratio in the temperature range of 100-200°C. ZnO crystals with high purity can also be obtained, using the one-step hydrothermal treatment with a baffle that depends on the different solubility of zincite and franklinite in the hydrothermal conditions. PMID:21497436

  5. A Hydrothermal Origin for the Sulfate-rich Ocean of Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolotov, M. Yu.; Shock, E. L.

    2001-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations show that formation of a sulfate-rich ocean on Europa might require high-temperature alkaline hydrothermal processes in the oxidized silicate mantle. The ocean on Europa could be thought of as a cooled hydrothermal fluid. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. FINAL REPORT. ACTINIDE-ALUMINATE SPECIATION IN ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigation of behavior of actinides in alkaline media containing Al(III) showed that no aluminate complexes of actinides in oxidation states (III-VII) were formed in alkaline solutions. At alkaline precipitation (pH 10-14) of actinides in presence of Al(III) formation of alumi...

  7. Performed surfactant-optimized aqueous alkaline flood

    SciTech Connect

    Thigpen, D.R.; Lawson, J.B.; Nelson, R.C.

    1991-11-26

    This paper describes improvement in a process for recovering oil from an acidic oil reservoir by injecting an aqueous alkaline solution comprising water, sodium chloride, and alkaline material for reacting with the reservoir oil forming a petroleum acid soap to form an in-situ surfactant system. The improvement comprises: selecting a preformed cosurfactant which is soluble in both the aqueous solution and the reservoir oil and has a solubility ratio which is grater than the solubility ratio of the petroleum acid soap where the solubility ratio is the ratio of solubility in the aqueous alkaline solution to the solubility in the reservoir oil; combining with the alkaline solution an amount of the preformed cosurfactant which will result in the in-situ surfacant system having a salinity about equal to a salinity which results in minimal interfacial tension between the oil in the reservoir and the in-situ surfactant system at reservoir temperature, wherein the amount of the preformed cosurfactant is about 0.3 percent by weight in the aqueous alkaline solution; and injecting the cosurfactant-aqueous alkaline solution mixture into the reservoir to displace oil toward a fluid production location.

  8. Major- and minor-metal composition of three distinct solid material fractions associated with Juan de Fuca hydrothermal fluids (northeast Pacific), and calculation of dilution fluid samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkley, T.K.; Seeley, J.L.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1988-01-01

    Three distinct types of solid material are associated with each sample of the hydrothermal fluid that was collected from the vents of the Southern Juan de Fuca Ridge. The solid materials appear to be representative of deposits on ocean floors near mid-ocean ridges, and interpretation of the chemistry of the hydrothermal solutions requires understanding of them. Sr isotopic evidence indicates that at least two and probably all three of these solid materials were removed from the solution with which they are associated, by precipitation or adsorption. This occurred after the "pure" hydrothermal fluid was diluted and thoroughly mixed with ambient seawater. The three types of solid materials, are, respectively, a coarse Zn- and Fe-rich material with small amounts of Na and Ca; a finer material also rich in Zn and Fe, but with alkali and alkaline-earth metals; and a scum composed of Ba or Zn, with either considerable Fe or Si, and Sr. Mineral identification is uncertain because of uncertain anion composition. Only in the cases of Ba and Zn were metal masses greater in solid materials than in the associated fluids. For all other metals measured, masses in fluids dwarf those in solids. The fluids themselves contain greater concentrations of all metals measured, except Mg, than seawater. We discuss in detail the relative merits of two methods of determining the mixing proportions of "pure" hydrothermal solution and seawater in the fluids, one based on Sr isotopes, and another previously used method based on Mg concentrations. Comparison of solute concentrations in the several samples shows that degree of dilution of "pure" hydrothermal solutions by seawater, and amounts of original solutes that were removed from it as solid materials, are not related. There is no clear evidence that appreciable amounts of solid materials were not conserved (lost) either during or prior to sample collection. ?? 1988.

  9. ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as: ALK PHOS; Alkp Formal name: Alkaline Phosphatase Related tests: AST ; ALT ; GGT ; Bilirubin ; Liver Panel ; Bone Markers ; Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes; Bone Specific ALP All content on Lab ...

  10. Influencing Factor Investigation on Dynamic Hydrothermal Growth of Gapped Hollow BaTiO3 Nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jiabing; Shi, Haiyue; Yang, Jing; Li, Tao; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Deliang

    2015-08-01

    Gapped hollow BaTiO3 nanospheres with an apparent diameter of 93 ± 19 nm (shell thickness of 10-20 nm) were synthesized via a dynamic hydrothermal process using TiO2 sols and Ba2+ ions as the Ti and Ba sources in alkaline aqueous solutions. The phases and morphologies of the BaTiO3 samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM, TEM, and Raman spectra. The effects of the hydrothermal temperatures and durations, NaOH concentrations, and Ba/Ti ratios on the formation of gapped hollow BaTiO3 nanospheres were systematically investigated. The optimum conditions for forming gapped hollow BaTiO3 nanospheres are hydrothermal treatment at 180 °C for 10-20 h under a continuous magnetic stirring with NaOH concentrations of about 1 mol/L and molar Ba/Ti ratios of 1.2-1.5. The formation mechanism of the gapped hollow BaTiO3 nanospheres is understood as the combination of the orientated attachment and reversed crystal growth.

  11. Direct measurement of CO2 solubility and pH in NaCl hydrothermal solutions by combining in-situ potentiometry and Raman spectroscopy up to 280 °C and 150 bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truche, Laurent; Bazarkina, Elena F.; Berger, Gilles; Caumon, Marie-Camille; Bessaque, Gilles; Dubessy, Jean

    2016-03-01

    The in-situ monitoring of aqueous solution chemistry at elevated temperatures and pressures is a major challenge in geochemistry. Here, we combined for the first time in-situ Raman spectroscopy for concentration measurements and potentiometry for pH measurement in a single hydrothermal cell equipped with sampling systems and operating under controlled conditions of temperature and pressure. Dissolved CO2 concentration and pH were measured at temperatures up to 280 °C and pressures up to 150 bar in the H2O-CO2 and H2O-CO2-NaCl systems. A Pitzer specific-ion-interaction aqueous model was developed and confirmed the accuracy and consistency of the measurements, at least up to 250 °C. The revised Pitzer parameters for the H2O-CO2-NaCl system were formatted for the Phreeqc geochemical software. Significant changes with respect to the Pitzer.dat database currently associated with Phreeqc were observed. The new model parameters are now available for further applications. The Raman and pH probes tested here may also be applied to field monitoring of hydrothermal springs, geothermal wells, and oil and gas boreholes.

  12. Effects of NaOH Concentration on CO2 Reduction via Hydrothermal Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoki, Takamasa; Takahashi, Hiro; Kori, Toshinari; Yamasaki, Nakamichi; Hashida, Toshiyuki

    2006-05-01

    The reductions of CO2 under hydrothermal conditions were investigated by using the micro autoclave (45cm3) lined with Hastelloy-C alloy. Sodium hydrogen carbonate (NaHCO3) was used as a starting material. H2 gas was used as reducing agents. NaHCO3 powder, H2 gas and water put into the autoclave simultaneously. The autoclave was heated upto 300°C by induction heater. In this study, effects of pH value of the NaOH solution in the autoclave are investigated. Reaction products were analyzed with gas chromatographs (GC), liquid chromatographs (LC), X-ray diffractometor (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The following things were showed in this research: CO2 was reducted to HCOO- and CH4 at high conversion ratio under hydrothermal conditions. HCOO- was formed at high selectivity using Hastelloy-C reactor in the alkaline solution with Raney Ni catalyst. Raney Ni was exellent methanation catalyst, and CH4 formation progressed via HCO3-, not via CO. It is cleared that the NaOH solution in the autoclave should be kept pH value 11.0 for the highest conversion ratio from CO2 to useful carbonic compounds (CH4, HCOO-).

  13. Facile synthesis of alumina hollow microspheres via trisodium citrate-mediated hydrothermal process and their adsorption performances for p-nitrophenol from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiabin; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhong; Yu, Jiaguo

    2013-03-15

    Alumina hollow microspheres with high adsorption affinity toward p-nitrophenol in water were prepared by using urea and trisodium citrate as precipitating and mediating agents, respectively, via a simple one-pot hydrothermal synthesis followed by calcination. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms measurement. This study shows that the morphology, specific surface area, and the pore structure of the resulting materials can be controlled by varying the concentration of trisodium citrate. The result of adsorption of p-nitrophenol onto the as-prepared samples revealed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic equation can better describe the adsorption kinetics. Furthermore, adsorption isotherm studies indicated that the resulting alumina microspheres are powerful adsorbents for the removal of p-nitrophenol from water with maximum adsorption capacity of 217.4 mg/g. PMID:23276687

  14. Extraction of edingtonite from a natural zeolite under hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutti, F.; Kamyab, S. M.; Barghi, M. A.; Badiei, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, edingtonite has been extracted from natural zeolite clinoptilolite by simulating the natural hydrothermal conditions in the laboratory, under the influence of solutions with different concentrations of Ba+2 and Na+, varying from 0.5 to 2.8 mol/L, at 150 °C. In this work, the essential hydrothermal conditions have been provided by hydrothermal autoclaves. The natural and laboratory prepared samples were characterized by XRD, XRF and SEM methods.

  15. Hydrothermal Conditions and the Origin of Cellular Life.

    PubMed

    Deamer, David W; Georgiou, Christos D

    2015-12-01

    The conditions and properties of hydrothermal vents and hydrothermal fields are compared in terms of their ability to support processes related to the origin of life. The two sites can be considered as alternative hypotheses, and from this comparison we propose a series of experimental tests to distinguish between them, focusing on those that involve concentration of solutes, self-assembly of membranous compartments, and synthesis of polymers. Key Word: Hydrothermal systems. PMID:26684507

  16. Combined capillary electrophoresis and high performance liquid chromatography studies on the kinetics and mechanism of the hydrogen peroxide-thiocyanate reaction in a weakly alkaline solution.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Song, Yanan; Horváth, Attila K; Cui, Yin; Ji, Chen; Zhao, Yuemin; Gao, Qingyu

    2014-03-01

    The hydrogen peroxide-thiocyanate reaction has been reinvestigated by means of capillary electrophoresis and high performance liquid chromatography under weakly alkaline conditions at 25.0±0.1 °C. Concentration-time series of thiocyanate, sulfate and cyanate have been followed by capillary electrophoresis as well as that of thiocyanate and hydrogen peroxide by HPLC. It has been clearly demonstrated that OxSCN(-) (where x=1, 2 and 3) cannot be accumulated in detectable amount in contrast to the results of Christy and Egeberg, hence these species can only be regarded as short-lived intermediates. It has been shown that the overall rate law is first-order with respect to both reactants, but no pH-dependence was observed within the pH range of 8.86-10.08. A simple kinetic model has been proposed to fit all the concentration-time curves simultaneously at five different pHs demonstrating the powerful combination of the experimental techniques CE and HPLC with simultaneous evaluation of kinetic curves. It is also enlightened that the quality of the buffer strongly affects the rate of the overall reaction that increases in the order of application of ammonia, phosphate, carbonate and borate, respectively at a constant ionic strength and pH. PMID:24468335

  17. Structural stability of beta-globulin, the low molecular weight protein fraction from sesame seed (Sesamum indicum L.) in alkaline solution.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, S; Prakash, V

    1993-02-01

    Beta-globulin, a single polypeptide chain of molecular weight 15,000 +/- 1,000, undergoes denaturation in alkaline pH (7.0-13.0), thereby affecting the hydrodynamic properties of the protein, viz. a decrease in sedimentation coefficient from a value of 2.0s to 1.4s at pH 11.3, an increase in reduced viscosity from 0.042 dl/g to 0.158 dl/g at pH 12.6 and a decrease in partial specific volume resulting in a volume change of 6.3 +/- 1.0 ml/mole residue at pH 11.7. The perturbation of tryptophanyl residues and ionization of tyrosyl residues are preceded by alteration in conformational status of the protein. The fluorescence emission measurements indicate initial unfolding of the protein molecule which exposes the tryptophan and tyrosyl residues to the solvent. The tyrosyl phenolic group ionization is anomalous having a pKint value of 11.2. The reduced viscosity value reaches a plateau region at pH 12.5. PMID:8509122

  18. In situ observations of liquid-liquid phase separation in aqueous ZnSO4 solutions at temperatures up to 400 °C: Implications for Zn2+-SO42- association and evolution of submarine hydrothermal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Wan, Ye; Hu, Wenxuan; Chou, I.-Ming; Cao, Jian; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Meng; Li, Zhen

    2016-05-01

    Liquid-liquid immiscibility is gaining recognition as an important process in hydrothermal fluid activity. However, studies of this complex process are relatively limited. We examined liquid-liquid immiscibility in aqueous ZnSO4 solutions at temperatures above ∼266.5 °C and at vapor-saturation pressures. The homogeneous aqueous ZnSO4 solution separated into ZnSO4-rich (L1) and ZnSO4-poor (L2) liquid phases coexisting with the vapor phase. The L1-L2 phase separation temperature decreased with increasing ZnSO4 concentration up to 1.0 mol/kg, and then increased at greater ZnSO4 concentrations, showing a typical lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of ∼266.5 °C. Gunningite (ZnSO4·H2O) precipitated in 2.0 mol/kg ZnSO4 solution at 360 °C. The L1-L2 phase separation resulted mainly from the strong Zn2+-SO42- association at high temperatures. The major results of this study are: (1) the discovery of the LCST in these systems, a macroscale property associated with polymeric mixtures; (2) analyses of the peak area ratios of the v1(SO42-) and OH stretching bands, which suggest that the sulfate concentration increases with increasing temperature in L1, especially above 375 °C; (3) a new Raman v1(SO42-) mode at ∼1005 cm-1 observed only in the L1 phase, whose fraction increases with increasing temperature; and (4) the shape of the OH Raman stretching band, which indicates that water molecules and solute interact much more strongly in L1 than in the coexisting L2 phase, suggesting that water molecules fit into the framework formed by various Zn2+-SO42- pairs and chain structures in L1. These results have potential implications for understanding transport and reduction of seawater-derived sulfate in submarine hydrothermal systems. The formation of an immiscible sulfate-rich liquid phase can favor the circulation of sulfate within mid-ocean ridge basalt because the sulfate-rich liquid density is higher than that of the coexisting fluid. The reduction of sulfate

  19. Alkaline injection for enhanced oil recovery: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, E.H.; Berg, R.L.; Carmichael, J.D.; Weinbrandt, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    In the past several years, there has been renewed interest in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by alkaline injection. Alkaline solutions also are being used as preflushes in micellar/polymer projects. Several major field tests of alkaline flooding are planned, are in progress, or recently have been completed. Considerable basic research on alkaline injection has been published recently, and more is in progress. This paper summarizes known field tests and, where available, the amount of alkali injected and the performance results. Recent laboratory work, much sponsored by the U.S. DOE, and the findings are described. Alkaline flood field test plans for new projects are summarized.

  20. Mineralogy and geochemistry of a sediment-hosted hydrothermal sulfide deposit from the Southern Trough of Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koski, Randolph A.; Lonsdale, Peter F.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Berndt, Michael E.; Howe, Stephen S.

    1985-07-01

    Samples dredged from a 15-m-high hydrothermal mound atop the flat turbidite pond in the Southern Trough of Guaymas Basin consist of pyrrhotite-rich massive sulfide, barite, barite + calcite, talc, and opaline silica as well as substrate material composed of fossiliferous, clay-rich ooze. An 11-m-long sediment core taken near the dredge site shows increasing hydrothermal alteration with depth; anhydrite-filled fractures near the base of the core appear to be channels for hydrothermal discharge. Oxidation of the sulfide-rich samples to an assemblage of geothite, lepidocrocite, and amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide is ubiquitous. Compared to other massive sulfide deposits on sediment-starved oceanic ridges, the hydrothermal deposit dredged in Guaymas Basin has a high pyrrhotite/pyrite ratio, a low Zn sulfide and combined ore metal (Cu + Zn + Pb + Ag + Cd) content, and a greater abundance of sulfate, carbonate, and silicate phases. Venting hydrothermal solutions are alkaline with moderately high pH; high Ca, Ba, and SiO2 content; low ƒS2 and ƒo2; and very low transition metal content. Disequilibrium assemblages of pyrrhotite and sulfate minerals form during rapid mixing of this evolved vent fluid with ambient bottom waters at the discharge site. Talc is formed at a temperature near 270°C by mixing or entrainment of Mg-rich bottom water or pore fluid with upwelling hydrothermal fluid that is saturated with silica. Calcite may precipitate from the alkaline, Ca-rich fluid during degassing of CO2. The minimum temperature range for sulfide and nonsulfide deposition is approximately 190°-326°C. The composition of hydrothermal deposits, vent solutions, and altered sediment requires that circulating fluids evolve during deep penetration into the basaltic basement complex, further interaction with the organic-and carbonate-rich sediment pile, and near-surface mixing with ambient seawater. Although the stable assemblage albite-epidote-clinochlore present at depth in the sediment

  1. QM/MM analysis suggests that Alkaline Phosphatase (AP) and Nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase slightly tighten the transition state for phosphate diester hydrolysis relative to solution: implication for catalytic promiscuity in the AP superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Guanhua

    2011-01-01

    Several members of the Alkaline Phosphatase (AP) superfamily exhibit a high level of catalytic proficiency and promiscuity in structurally similar active sites. A thorough characterization of the nature of transition state for different substrates in these enzymes is crucial for understanding the molecular mechanisms that govern those remarkable catalytic properties. In this work, we study the hydrolysis of a phosphate diester, MpNPP−, in solution, two experimentally well-characterized variants of AP (R166S AP, R166S/E322Y AP) and wild type Nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (NPP) by QM/MM calculations in which the QM method is an approximate density functional theory previously parameterized for phosphate hydrolysis (SCC-DFTBPR). The general agreements found between these calculations and available experimental data for both solution and enzymes support the use of SCC-DFTBPR/MM for a semi-quantitative analysis of the catalytic mechanism and nature of transition state in AP and NPP. Although phosphate diesters are cognate substrates for NPP but promiscuous substrates for AP, the calculations suggest that their hydrolysis reactions catalyzed by AP and NPP feature similar synchronous transition states that are slightly tighter in nature compared to that in solution, due in part to the geometry of the bimetallic zinc motif. Therefore, this study provides the first direct computational support to the hypothesis that enzymes in the AP superfamily catalyze cognate and promiscuous substrates via similar transition states to those in solution. Our calculations do not support the finding of recent QM/MM studies by López-Canut and coworkers, who suggested that the same diester substrate goes through a much looser transition state in NPP/AP than in solution, a result likely biased by the large structural distortion of the bimetallic zinc site in their simulations. Finally, our calculations for different phosphate diester orientations and phosphorothioate diesters

  2. Alkaline "Permanent" Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Antony

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of paper manufacturing processes and their effects on library materials focuses on the promotion of alkaline "permanent" paper, with less acid, by Canadian library preservation specialists. Standards for paper acidity are explained; advantages of alkaline paper are described, including decreased manufacturing costs; and recyclability is…

  3. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  4. Alkaline detergent recycling via ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-06-01

    The metal finishing industry uses alkaline cleaners and detergents to remove oils and dirt from manufactured parts, often before they are painted or plated. The use of these cleaners has grown because environmental regulations are phasing out ozone depleting substances and placing restrictions on the use and disposal of many hazardous solvents. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is examining ultrafiltration as a cleaning approach that reclaims the cleaning solutions and minimizes wastes. The ultrafiltration membrane is made from sheets of polymerized organic film. The sheets are rolled onto a supporting frame and installed in a tube. Spent cleaning solution is pumped into a filter chamber and filtered through the membrane that captures oils and dirt and allows water and detergent to pass. The membrane is monitored and when pressure builds from oil and dirt, an automatic system cleans the surface to maintain solution flow and filtration quality. The results show that the ultrafiltration does not disturb the detergent concentration or alkalinity but removed almost all the oils and dirt leaving the solution in condition to be reused.

  5. Alkaline battery, separator therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An improved battery separator for alkaline battery cells has low resistance to electrolyte ion transfer and high resistance to electrode ion transfer. The separator is formed by applying an improved coating to an electrolyte absorber. The absorber, preferably, is a flexible, fibrous, and porous substrate that is resistant to strong alkali and oxidation. The coating composition includes an admixture of a polymeric binder, a hydrolyzable polymeric ester and inert fillers. The coating composition is substantially free of reactive fillers and plasticizers commonly employed as porosity promoting agents in separator coatings. When the separator is immersed in electrolyte, the polymeric ester of the film coating reacts with the electrolyte forming a salt and an alcohol. The alcohol goes into solution with the electrolyte while the salt imbibes electrolyte into the coating composition. When the salt is formed, it expands the polymeric chains of the binder to provide a film coating substantially permeable to electrolyte ion transfer but relatively impermeable to electrode ion transfer during use.

  6. Stability constants and thermodynamic data for complexes of 12-crown-4 with alkali metal and alkaline-earth cations in methanol solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Buschmann, H.

    1987-03-01

    The formation of 1:1- and 2:1-complexes of the crown ether 12C4 with mono- and bivalent cations was studied in methanol solutions by calorimetric, potentiometric and conductometric titrations. It is shown that not all donor atoms of the ligand 12C4 take part in complex formation. The accuracy of the three experimental methods are checked by comparing the results for the complexation of alkali ions with crown ether 18C6.

  7. Alkaline igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitton, J.G.; Upton, B.G.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this volume, an international team of scientists provides an up-to-date overview of the nature, origin, and evolution of alkaline magmas. Particular attention is paid to carbonatites, lamprophyres, and lamproites which are rock suites of current interest not recently reviewed elsewhere. Recent work on the classical alkaline provinces of East Africa, South Greenland, and the Kola Peninsula is included together with reviews of other areas of alkaline magmatism in North and South America, East Greenland, Europe, West Africa, and the ocean basins. Other papers discuss the impact of experimental isotopic and geochemical studies of the petrogenesis of alkaline rocks. This book will be of interest to petrologists and geochemists studying alkaline igneous rocks, and to other earth scientists as a reference on the rapidly expanding field of igneous petrology.

  8. The effects of acid and alkaline solutions on cut marks and on the structure of bone: An experimental study on porcine ribs.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Camici, Arianna; Sironi, Luca; Profumo, Antonella; Merli, Davide; Mazzarelli, Debora; Porta, Davide; Duday, Henri; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-11-01

    Among taphonomical modifications during decomposition processes, little is known about the action of high or low pH to human tissues and bones. Moreover, acid or basic solutions are seldom used to ease decomposition and wrecking of the body. In this study a total of 60 samples of porcine bones on which two cut marks were produced before the beginning of the experiment, were put in six different solutions with different pH (1, 3, 5, 9, 12, 14) and analyzed every five days over a period of 70 days. Surveys were carried out macroscopically, with stereomicroscopy and with light microscopy on thin sections. Only the specimens exposed to extremely acid (<1) or basic (>12) pH showed evident modifications of the bone's structure, as witnessed by the analyses with stereomicroscopy as well. Many samples showed a detachment of the periosteum; cut marks became soon unrecognizable with pH 14 but still detectable in all the other samples. The information gained from the present study can be of great help in detecting the exposure of human tissues to high or low environmental pH and in understanding the effects that these solutions can exert on human bones. PMID:26593998

  9. Investigation of the hydrothermal crystallisation of the perovskite solid solution NaCe{sub 1−x}La{sub x}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 6} and its defect chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Harunsani, Mohammad H.; Woodward, David I.; Peel, Martin D.; Ashbrook, Sharon E.; Walton, Richard I.

    2013-11-15

    Perovskites of nominal composition NaCe{sub 1−x}La{sub x}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 6} (0≤x≤1) crystallise directly under hydrothermal conditions at 240 °C. Raman spectroscopy shows distortion from the ideal cubic structure and Rietveld analysis of powder X-ray and neutron diffraction reveals that the materials represent a continuous series in rhombohedral space group R3-bar c. Ce L{sub III}-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy shows that while the majority of cerium is present as Ce{sup 3+} there is evidence for Ce{sup 4+}. The paramagnetic Ce{sup 3+} affects the chemical shift and line width of {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectra, which also show with no evidence for A-site ordering. {sup 2}H MAS NMR of samples prepared in D{sub 2}O shows the inclusion of deuterium, which IR spectroscopy shows is most likely to be as D{sub 2}O. The deuterium content is highest for the cerium-rich materials, consistent with oxidation of some cerium to Ce{sup 4+} to provide charge balance of A-site water. - Graphical abstract: A multi-element A-site perovskite crystallises directly from aqueous, basic solutions at 240 °C; while the paramagnetic effect of Ce{sup 3+} on the {sup 23}Na NMR shows a homogeneous solid-solution, the incorporation of A-site water is also found from {sup 2}H NMR and IR, with oxidation of some cerium to charge balance proved by XANES spectroscopy. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Direct hydrothermal synthesis allows crystallisation of a perovskite solid-solution. • XANES spectroscopy shows some oxidation of Ce{sup 3+} to Ce{sup 4+}. • The paramagnetism of Ce{sup 3+} shifts and broadens the {sup 23}Na solid-state NMR. • The perovskite materials incorporate water as an A-site defect.

  10. Evolution of the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in an alkaline NaCl solution with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate and lanthanum chloride inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Biner; Wang, Yishan; Zuo, Yu

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in 0.58 g L-1 NaCl solution (pH 10) with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) and lanthanum chloride inhibitors was studied with electrochemical and surface analysis methods. With the addition of the compounded LaCl3 and SDBS inhibitors, in the early stage the polarization behavior of AA 2024-T3 changed from active corrosion to passivation, and both the general corrosion and pitting corrosion were inhibited. However, with the immersion time extended, the passive behavior gradually disappeared and pitting happened at the Cu-rich phases. After 24 h immersion, the compounded inhibitors still showed good inhibition for general corrosion, but the polarization curve again presented the characteristic similar to active polarization. The compounded inhibitors also inhibited the pitting corrosion to some extent. The acting mechanism of the inhibitors SDBS and La3Cl on the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in the test solution was discussed.

  11. Controlled synthesis of BiVO{sub 4} with multiple morphologies via an ethylenediamine-assisted hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Xuemei; Zhu, Xinyuan; Wu, Jiang; Wu, Qiang; Li, Xian; Gu, Miaoli

    2014-11-15

    Graphical abstract: BiVO{sub 4} samples with various morphologies were synthesized via a simple ethylenediamine (EN) assisted hydrothermal route. One of the mixed crystal phase with spherical and porous morphology showed excellent photocatalytic activity and about 90% Rhodamine B was degraded after 140 min visible light irradiation. - Highlights: • BiVO{sub 4} samples with various morphologies were synthesized by hydrothermal method. • Ethylenediamine mainly acts as alkaline source to adjust pH values of precursor. • BiVO{sub 4} with spherical morphology has excellent photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: In this work, BiVO{sub 4} particles with different crystal structures and morphologies including hexahedral, spherical porous and hyperbranched ones were fabricated in the presence of ethylenediamine by hydrothermal process. The as-fabricated samples were well characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and ultraviolet–visible absorption spectroscopy. The results showed that the morphology and crystal structure of BiVO{sub 4} particles could be well controlled by only changing the ethylenediamine content in the deionized water solution. Photocatalytic activity of the samples was evaluated by the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible-light irradiation. It was shown that BiVO{sub 4} sample with spherical porous morphology and mixed crystal phase exhibited the best photocatalytic performance after optimizing the ethylenediamine content. The best degradation ratio of Rhodamine B could reach about 87% after 140 min visible-light irradiation.

  12. The structure and stability of aqueous rare-earth elements in hydrothermal fluids: New results on neodymium(III) aqua and chloroaqua complexes in aqueous solutions to 500 °C and 520 MPa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mayanovic, Robert A.; Anderson, Alan J.; Bassett, William A.; Chou, I.-Ming

    2009-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements were made at the Nd L3-edge on neodymium(III) aqua and chloroaqua complexes in low pH aqueous solutions from 25 to 500????C and up to 520??MPa. Analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure of the XAS spectra measured from a 0.07??m Nd/0.16??m HNO3 aqueous solution reveals a contraction of the Nd-O distance of the Nd3+ aqua ion at a uniform rate of ~ 0.013????/100????C and a uniform reduction of the number of coordinated H2O molecules from 10.0 ?? 0.9 to 7.4 ?? 0.9 over the range from 25 to 500????C and up to 370??MPa. The rate of reduction of the first-shell water molecules with temperature for Nd3+ (26%) is intermediate between the rate for the Gd3+ aqua ion (22% from 25 to 500????C) and the rates for the Eu3+ (29% from 25 to 400????C) and the Yb3+ aqua ions (42% from 25 to 500????C) indicating an intermediate stability of the Nd3+ aqua ion consistent with the tetrad effect. Nd L3-edge XAS measurements of 0.05??m NdCl3 aqueous solution at 25 to 500????C and up to 520??MPa show that stepwise inner-sphere complexes most likely of the type Nd(H2O)?? - nCln+3 - n occur in the solution at elevated temperatures, where ?? ??? 9 at 150????C decreasing to ~ 6 at 500????C and the number of chloride ions (n) of the chloroaqua complexes increases uniformly with temperature from 1.2 ?? 0.2 to 2.0 ?? 0.2 in the solution upon increase of temperature from 150 to 500????C. Conversely, the number of H2O ligands of Nd(H2O)?? - nCln+3 - n complexes is uniformly reduced with temperature from 7.5 ?? 0.8 to 3.7 ?? 0.3 in the aqueous solution, in the same temperature range. These data show greater stability of neodymium(III) than gadolinium(III) and ytterbium(III) chloride complexes in low pH aqueous solutions at elevated temperatures. Our data suggest a greater stability of aqueous light REE than that of heavy REE chloride complexes in low pH fluids at elevated temperatures consistent with REE analysis of fluids from deep

  13. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    DOEpatents

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  14. Nanocrystalline spinel ferrite (MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, M = Ni, Co, Mn, Mg, Zn) powders prepared by a simple aloe vera plant-extracted solution hydrothermal route

    SciTech Connect

    Phumying, Santi; Labuayai, Sarawuth; Swatsitang, Ekaphan; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya; Maensiri, Santi

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: This figure shows the specific magnetization curves of the as-prepared MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M = Ni, Co, Mn, Mg, Zn) powders obtained from room temperature VSM measurement. These curves are typical for a soft magnetic material and indicate hysteresis ferromagnetism in the field ranges of ±500 Oe, ±1000 Oe, and ±2000 Oe for the CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} respectively, whereas the samples of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} show a superparamagnetic behavior. Highlights: ► Nanocrystalline MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} powders were synthesized by a novel hydrothermal method. ► Metal acetylacetonates and aloe vera plant-extracted solution are used. ► This biosynthetic route is very simple and provides high-yield oxide nanomaterials. ► XRD and TEM results indicate that the prepared samples have only spinel structure. ► The maximum M{sub s} of 68.9 emu/g at 10 kOe were observed for the samples of MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. - Abstract: Nanocrystalline spinel ferrite MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M = Ni, Co, Mn, Mg, Zn) powders were synthesized by a novel hydrothermal method using Fe(acac){sub 3}, M(acac){sub 3} (M = Ni, Co, Mn, Mg, Zn) and aloe vera plant extracted solution. The X-ray diffraction and selected-area electron diffraction results indicate that the synthesized nanocrystalline have only spinel structure without the presence of other phase impurities. The crystal structure and morphology of the spinel ferrite powders, as revealed by TEM, show that the NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} samples contain nanoparticles, whereas the MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} samples consist of many nanoplatelets and nanoparticles. Interestingly, the ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} sample contains plate-like structure of networked nanocrystalline particles. Room temperature magnetization results show a ferromagnetic behavior of the CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} samples, whereas the

  15. Synthesis, crystal structure and investigation of mononuclear copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes of a new carboxylate rich tripodal ligand and their interaction with carbohydrates in alkaline aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Christopher D.; Pedraza, Mayra; Arman, Hadi; Fan, Hua-Jun; Schilling, Eduardo Luiz; Szpoganicz, Bruno; Musie, Ghezai T.

    2016-01-01

    A new carboxylate rich asymmetric tripodal ligand, N-[2-carboxybenzomethyl]-N-[carboxymethyl]-β-alanine (H3camb), and its di-copper(II), (NH4)2[1]2, and di-zinc(II), ((CH3)4 N)2[2]2, complexes have been synthesized as carbohydrate binding models in aqueous solutions. The ligand and complexes have been fully characterized using several techniques, including single crystal X-ray diffraction. The interactions of (NH4)2[1]2 and ((CH3)4 N)2[2]2 with D-glucose, D-mannose, D-xylose and xylitol in aqueous alkaline media were investigated using UV–Vis and 13C-NMR spectroscopic techniques, respectively. The molar conductance, NMR and ESI–MS studies indicate that the complexes dissociate in solution to produce the respective complex anions, 1− and 2−. Complexes 1− and 2− showed chelating ability towards the naturally abundant and biologically relevant sugars, D-glucose, D-mannose, D-xylose, and xylitol. The complex ions bind to one molar equivalent of the sugars, even in the presence of stoichiometric excess of the substrates, in solution. Experimentally obtained spectroscopic data and computational results suggest that the substrates bind to the metal center in a bidentate fashion. Apparent binding constant values, pKapp, between the complexes and the substrates were determined and a specific mode of substrate binding is proposed. The pKapp and relativistic density functional theory (DFT) calculated Gibbs free energy values indicate that D-mannose displayed the strongest interaction with the complexes. Syntheses, characterizations, detailed substrate binding studies using spectroscopic techniques, single crystal X-ray diffraction and geometry optimizations of the complex-substrates with DFT calculations are also reported. PMID:25969174

  16. Synthesis, crystal structure and investigation of mononuclear copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes of a new carboxylate rich tripodal ligand and their interaction with carbohydrates in alkaline aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Christopher D; Pedraza, Mayra; Arman, Hadi; Fan, Hua-Jun; Schilling, Eduardo Luiz; Szpoganicz, Bruno; Musie, Ghezai T

    2015-08-01

    A new carboxylate rich asymmetric tripodal ligand, N-[2-carboxybenzomethyl]-N-[carboxymethyl]-β-alanine (H3camb), and its di-copper(II), (NH4)2[1]2, and di-zinc(II), ((CH3)4N)2[2]2, complexes have been synthesized as carbohydrate binding models in aqueous solutions. The ligand and complexes have been fully characterized using several techniques, including single crystal X-ray diffraction. The interactions of (NH4)2[1]2 and ((CH3)4N)2[2]2 with D-glucose, D-mannose, D-xylose and xylitol in aqueous alkaline media were investigated using UV-Vis and (13)C-NMR spectroscopic techniques, respectively. The molar conductance, NMR and ESI-MS studies indicate that the complexes dissociate in solution to produce the respective complex anions, 1(-) and 2(-). Complexes 1(-) and 2(-) showed chelating ability towards the naturally abundant and biologically relevant sugars, D-glucose, D-mannose, D-xylose, and xylitol. The complex ions bind to one molar equivalent of the sugars, even in the presence of stoichiometric excess of the substrates, in solution. Experimentally obtained spectroscopic data and computational results suggest that the substrates bind to the metal center in a bidentate fashion. Apparent binding constant values, pK(app), between the complexes and the substrates were determined and a specific mode of substrate binding is proposed. The pK(app) and relativistic density functional theory (DFT) calculated Gibbs free energy values indicate that D-mannose displayed the strongest interaction with the complexes. Syntheses, characterizations, detailed substrate binding studies using spectroscopic techniques, single crystal X-ray diffraction and geometry optimizations of the complex-substrates with DFT calculations are also reported. PMID:25969174

  17. U and Th Concentration and Isotopic Composition of Hydrothermal Fluids at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, K. A.; Shen, C.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R.; Kelley, D. S.; Butterfield, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    Uranium and Th concentration and isotopic composition of hydrothermal fluids at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) were determined using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP- MS). The LCHF is an off-axis, serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal system located at 30°N near the Mid- Atlantic Ridge. Carbonate chimneys reaching 60 m in height vent alkaline (pH~10), calcium-rich fluids at 40- 91°C and the towers are home to dense microbial communities. Vent fluid and seawater U and Th concentration and isotopic composition data provide critical information for constraining U-Th chimney ages. The increased sensitivity (1-2%) of MC-ICP-MS combined with an Aridus nebulization system allows the precise measurement of small quantities of sample (~150 ml) with low concentrations (<<1ng/g) of U and Th. In this study, we have developed MC-ICP-MS techniques to measure the U and Th concentration and isotopic composition (234U, 238U, 230Th, and 232Th) of eight hydrothermal fluid samples. Endmember fluids with ~1mmol/kg Mg have ~0.02 ng/g U, confirming that end-member fluids contain near-zero values of both Mg and U. Thorium concentrations of fluids are close to deep seawater values. U and Th isotopic compositions are reported at the permil level. These data may provide new insights into the role of serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal systems in the budgets of U and Th in the ocean. Techniques presented in this study may be applied to other hydrothermal and seep environments.

  18. A study of X100 pipeline steel passivation in mildly alkaline bicarbonate solutions using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy under potentiodynamic conditions and Mott-Schottky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadala, Ibrahim M.; Alfantazi, Akram

    2015-12-01

    The key steps involved in X100 pipeline steel passivation in bicarbonate-based simulated soil solutions from the pre-passive to transpassive potential regions have been analyzed here using a step-wise anodizing-electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) routine. Pre-passive steps involve parallel dissolution-adsorption in early stages followed by clear diffusion-adsorption control shortly before iron hydroxide formation. Aggressive NS4 chlorides/sulfate promote steel dissolution whilst inhibiting diffusion in pre-passive steps. Diffusive and adsorptive effects remain during iron hydroxide formation, but withdraw shortly thereafter during its removal and the development of the stable iron carbonate passive layer. Passive layer protectiveness is evaluated using EIS fitting, current density analysis, and correlations with semiconductive parameters, consistently revealing improved robustness in colder, bicarbonate-rich, chloride/sulfate-free conditions. Ferrous oxide formation at higher potentials results in markedly lower impedances with disordered behavior, and the involvement of the iron(III) valence state is observed in Mott-Schottky tests exclusively for 75 °C conditions.

  19. A scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of the phases formed by the sulfur adsorption on Au(100) from an alkaline solution of 1,4-piperazine(bis)-dithiocarbamate of potassium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Javier A.; Valenzuela B., José; Cao Milán, R.; Herrera, José; Farías, Mario H.; Hernández, Mayra P.

    2014-11-01

    Piperazine-dithiocarbamate of potassium (K2DTC2pz) was used as a new precursor for the spontaneous deposition of sulfur on the Au(100) surface in alkaline solution. Two new sulfur phases were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). These phases were formed by six sulfur atoms (S6 phase, hexamer) and by four sulfur atoms (S4 phase, tetramer with (√{ 2} ×√{ 2}) structure), and they were observed in coexistence with the well-known quasi-square patterns formed by eight sulfur atoms (S8 phase, octomer). A model was proposed where sulfur multilayers were formed by a (√{ 2} ×√{ 2}) phase adsorbed directly on the gold surface while one of the other structures: hexamers or octomers were deposited on top. Sulfur layers were formed on gold terraces, vacancies and islands produced by lifting reconstructed surface. Sequential high-resolution STM images allowed the direct observation of the dynamic of the octomers, while the (√{ 2} ×√{ 2}) structure remained static. Images also showed the reversible association/dissociation of the octomer.

  20. Alkaline electrochemical cells and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    Equilibrated cellulose ether membranes of increased electrolytic conductivity for use as separators in concentrated alkaline electrochemical cells are investigated. The method of making such membranes by equilibration to the degree desired in an aqueous alkali solution mantained at a temperature below about 10 C is described.

  1. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park. 1: The origin of thiosulfate in hot spring waters

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Schoonen, M.A.A.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Cunningham, K.M.; Ball, J.W.

    1998-12-01

    Thiosulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), polythionate (S{sub x}O{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}), dissolved sulfide (H{sub 2}S), and sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) concentrations in thirty-nine alkaline and acidic springs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) were determined. The analyses were conducted on site, using ion chromatography for thiosulfate, polythionate, and sulfate, and using colorimetry for dissolved sulfide. Thiosulfate was detected at concentrations typically less than 2 {micro}mol/L in neutral and alkaline chloride springs with low sulfate concentrations (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} > 25). The thiosulfate concentration levels are about one to two orders of magnitude lower than the concentration of dissolved sulfide in these springs. In most acid sulfate and acid sulfate-chloride springs (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} < 10), thiosulfate concentrations were also typically lower than 2 {micro}mol/L. However, in some chloride springs enriched with sulfate (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} between 10 and 25), thiosulfate was found at concentrations ranging from 9 to 95 {micro}mol/L, higher than the concentrations of dissolved sulfide in these waters. Polythionate was detected only in Cinder Pool, Norris Geyser basin, at concentrations up to 8 {micro}mol/L, with an average S-chain-length from 4.1 to 4.9 sulfur atoms. The results indicate that no thiosulfate occurs in the deeper parts of the hydrothermal system. Thiosulfate may form, however, from (1) hydrolysis of native sulfur by hydrothermal solutions in the shallower parts (<50 m) of the system, (2) oxidation of dissolved sulfide upon mixing of a deep hydrothermal water with aerated shallow groundwater, and (3) the oxidation of dissolved sulfide by dissolved oxygen upon discharge of the hot spring. Upon discharge of a sulfide-containing hydrothermal water, oxidation proceeds rapidly as atmospheric oxygen enters the water. The transfer of oxygen is particularly effective if the

  2. Pyrophosphate synthesis in iron mineral films and membranes simulating prebiotic submarine hydrothermal precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barge, Laura M.; Doloboff, Ivria J.; Russell, Michael J.; VanderVelde, David; White, Lauren M.; Stucky, Galen D.; Baum, Marc M.; Zeytounian, John; Kidd, Richard; Kanik, Isik

    2014-03-01

    Cells use three main ways of generating energy currency to drive metabolism: (i) conversion of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by the proton motive force through the rotor-stator ATP synthase; (ii) the synthesis of inorganic phosphate˜phosphate bonds via proton (or sodium) pyrophosphate synthase; or (iii) substrate-level phosphorylation through the direct donation from an active phosphoryl donor. A mechanism to produce a pyrophosphate bond as “energy currency” in prebiotic systems is one of the most important considerations for origin of life research. Baltscheffsky (1996) suggests that inorganic pyrophosphate (PO74-; PPi) may have preceded ATP/ADP as an energy storage molecule in earliest life, produced by an H+ pyrophosphatase. Here we test the hypothesis that PPi could be synthesized in inorganic precipitates simulating hydrothermal chimney structures transected by thermal and/or ionic gradients. Appreciable yields of PPi were obtained via substrate phosphorylation by acetyl phosphate within the iron sulfide/silicate precipitates at temperatures expected for an alkaline hydrothermal system. The formation of PPi only occurred in the solid phase, i.e. when both Pi and the phosphoryl donor were precipitated with Fe-sulfides or Fe-silicates. The amount of Ac-Pi incorporated into the precipitate was a significant factor in the amount of PPi that could form, and phosphate species were more effectively incorporated into the precipitate at higher temperatures (⩾50 to >85 °C). Thus, we expect that the hydrothermal precipitate would be more enriched in phosphate (and especially, Ac-Pi) near the inner margins of a hydrothermal mound where PPi formation would be at a maximum. Iron sulfide and iron silicate precipitates effectively stabilized Ac-Pi and PPi against hydrolysis (relative to hydrolysis in aqueous solution). Thus it is plausible that PPi could accumulate as an energy currency up to useful concentrations for early life in a

  3. Alkaline Band Formation in Chara corallina

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, William J.

    1979-01-01

    The nature of the transport system responsible for the establishment of alkaline bands on cells of Chara corallina was investigated. The transport process was found to be insensitive to external pH, provided the value was above a certain threshold. At this threshold (pH 5.1 to 4.8) the transport process was inactivated. Transport function could be recovered by raising the pH value of the external solution. The fastest rate of recovery was always obtained in the presence of exogenous HCO3−. Experiments in which plasmalemma integrity was modified using 10 millimolar K+ treatment were also performed. Alkaline band transport was significantly reduced in the presence of 10 millimolar K+, but the system did not recover, following return to 0.2 millimolar K+ solutions, until the transport site was reexposed to exogenous HCO3−. The influence of presence and absence of various cations on both alkaline band transport and total H14CO3− assimilation was examined. No specific cation requirement (mono- or divalent) was found for either process, except the previously established role of Ca2+ at the HCO3− transport site. The alkaline band transport process exhibited a general requirement for cations. This transport system could be partially or completely stalled in low cation solutions, or glass-distilled water, respectively. The results indicate that no cationic flux occurs across the plasmalemma in direct association with either the alkaline band or HCO3− transport systems. It is felt that the present results offer support for the hypothesis that an OH− efflux transport system (rather than a H+ influx system) is responsible for alkaline band development in C. corallina. The results support the hypothesis that OH− efflux is an electrogenic process. This OH− transport system also appears to contain two allosteric effector sites, involving an acidic group and a HCO3− ion. PMID:16660706

  4. An experimental study of zinc chloride speciation from 300 to 600 °C and 0.5 to 2.0 kbar in buffered hydrothermal solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cygan, G.L.; Hemley, J.J.; d'Angelo, W. M.

    1994-01-01

    The solubility of sphalerite (ZnS) was measured in KCl-HCl-H2O solutions at 300-600??C and 0.5-2.0 kbar. The silicate assemblage K-feldspar-muscovite (or andalusite)-quartz was used to buffer the solution to acid conditions, resulting in the total solubility reaction 2K+ + KAl2AlSi3O10(OH)2 + 6SiO2 + ZnS + nCl- = ZnCln(2-n) + 3KAlSi3O8 + H2S. (muscovite) (quartz) (sphalerite) (K-feldspar) A computer retrieval technique was used to derive average chloride ligand numbers for chlorozinc species at 0.25-2.0 molal total chloride. This technique mathematically solves for the average ligand number using a series of pertinent chemical relations at P and T. Mono- and di-chlorozinc species were found to predominate throughout the pressure-temperature-composition range investigated. The logarithms of the first and second dissociation constants for ZnCl20 were evaluated over the P-T range; for example, at 1 kbar, the values -0.41 and -1.42 were computed for the logarithm of the first dissociation constant, while -7.62 and -10.57 were computed for the logarithm of the second dissociation constant, for 400 and 500??C, respectively. Results are compared to past studies conducted at subcritical conditions and differ in that we find no evidence for more highly coordinated chloro-zinc species except possibly for ZnCl3- at 600??C, 1 and 2 kbar. Our results are consistent with electrostatic theory, which favors lower charged to neutral molecules in low dielectric-constant media. ?? 1994.

  5. Interactions Between Serpentinization, Hydrothermal Activity and Microbial Community at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacour, A.; Frueh-Green, G. L.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Schaeffer, P.; Frank, M.; Gutjahr, M.; Kelley, D. S.

    2008-12-01

    Seafloor investigations of slow- and ultraslow-spreading ridges have reported many occurrences of exposed mantle peridotites and gabbroic rocks on the ocean floor. Along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, these uplifted portions of oceanic crust host high-temperature black smoker-type hydrothermal systems (e.g., Rainbow, Logatchev, Saldanha), and the more distinct low-temperature Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF). Built on a southern terrace of the Atlantis Massif, the LCHF is composed of carbonate-brucite chimneys that vent alkaline and low-temperature (40-90°C) hydrothermal fluids. These fluids are related to serpentinization of mantle peridotites, which together with minor gabbroic intrusions form the basement of the LCHF. Long-lived hydrothermal activity at Lost City led to extensive seawater-rock interaction in the basement rocks, as indicated by seawater-like Sr- and mantle to unradiogenic Nd-isotope compositions of the serpentinites. These high fluid fluxes in the southern part of the massif influenced the conditions of serpentinization and have obliterated the early chemical signatures in the serpentinites, especially those of carbon and sulfur. Compared to reducing conditions commonly formed during the first stages of serpentinization, serpentinization at Lost City is characterized by relatively oxidizing conditions resulting in a predominance of magnetite, the mobilization/dissolution and oxidation of igneous sulfides to secondary pyrite, and the incorporation of seawater sulfate, all leading to high bulk-rock S-isotope compositions. The Lost City hydrothermal fluids contain high concentrations in methane, hydrogen, and low-molecular weight hydrocarbons considered as being produced abiotically. In contrast, organic compounds in the serpentinites are dominated by the occurrences of isoprenoids (pristane, phytane, and squalane), polycyclic compounds (hopanes and steranes), and higher abundances of C16 to C20 n-alkanes indicative of a marine organic input. We

  6. Kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Christodoulatos, C; Su, T L; Koutsospyros, A

    2001-01-01

    Cellulose nitrate (nitrocellulose) is an explosive solid substance used in large quantities in various formulations of rocket and gun propellants. Safe destruction of nitrocellulose can be achieved by alkaline hydrolysis, which converts it to biodegradable products that can then be treated by conventional biological processes. The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of munitions-grade nitrocellulose in sodium hydroxide solutions were investigated in completely mixed batch reactors. Experiments were conducted using solutions of alkaline strength ranging from 0.1 to 15% by mass and temperatures in the range of 30 to 90 degrees C. Regression analysis of the kinetic data revealed that alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose is of the order 1.0 and 1.5 with respect to nitrocellulose and hydroxide concentration, respectively. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction was found to be 100.9 kJ/mol with a preexponential Arrhenius constant of 4.73 x 10(13). Nitrite and nitrate, in a 3:1 ratio, were the primary nitrogen species present in the posthydrolysis solution. The kinetic information is pertinent to the development and optimization of nitrocellulose chemical-biological treatment systems. PMID:11563378

  7. Geochemistry of hydrothermal plume in the Suiyo Seamount Caldera.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitashima, K.; Maeda, Y.

    2002-12-01

    samples were collected by taking the distance from the chimney gradually and pH change was monitored during the sampling and observing at the hydrothermal active areas. Alkalinity, pH, hydrogen sulfide, total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), chemical species of trace metals (particulate, dissolved and organic form) and nutrients in the hydrothermal plume samples were analyzed. Though DIC concentration in the hydrothermal plume sample gradually decreased with dilution and diffusion of the plume, DIC concentration in the caldera was higher than that in the seawater around the seamount. These results indicate that many chemical compounds discharged by hydrothermal activity have been remained in the caldera. According to the pH mapping of the hydrothermal area in the caldera, low pH areas in the patch state were located in each hydrothermal area. The low pH areas seem to have been formed by getting together with some hydrothermal plume. During long-term monitoring of pH at the hydrothermal active area in the caldera, the decreases of 0.3_`0.4pH in 24 hours periods correspond with the results of water current were detected.

  8. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2015-05-31

    The term “hydrothermal” used here refers to the processing of biomass in water slurries at elevated temperature and pressure to facilitate the chemical conversion of the organic structures in biomass into useful fuels. The process is meant to provide a means for treating wet biomass materials without drying and to access ionic reaction conditions by maintaining a liquid water processing medium. Typical hydrothermal processing conditions are 523-647K of temperature and operating pressures from 4-22 MPa of pressure. The temperature is sufficient to initiate pyrolytic mechanisms in the biopolymers while the pressure is sufficient to maintain a liquid water processing phase. Hydrothermal gasification is accomplished at the upper end of the process temperature range. It can be considered an extension of the hydrothermal liquefaction mechanisms that begin at the lowest hydrothermal conditions with subsequent decomposition of biopolymer fragments formed in liquefaction to smaller molecules and eventually to gas. Typically, hydrothermal gasification requires an active catalyst to accomplish reasonable rates of gas formation from biomass.

  9. The structure and stability of aqueous rare-earth elements in hydrothermal fluids: New results on neodymium(III) aqua and chloroaqua complexes in aqueous solutions to 500 °C and 520 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Mayanovic, R.A.; Anderson, A.J.; Bassett, W.A.; Chou, I.-M.

    2009-02-04

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements were made at the Nd L{sub 3}-edge on neodymium(III) aqua and chloroaqua complexes in low pH aqueous solutions from 25 to 500 C and up to 520 MPa. Analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure of the XAS spectra measured from a 0.07 m Nd/0.16 m HNO{sub 3} aqueous solution reveals a contraction of the Nd-O distance of the Nd{sup 3+} aqua ion at a uniform rate of {approx} 0.013 {angstrom}/100 C and a uniform reduction of the number of coordinated H{sub 2}O molecules from 10.0 {+-} 0.9 to 7.4 {+-} 0.9 over the range from 25 to 500 C and up to 370 MPa. The rate of reduction of the first-shell water molecules with temperature for Nd{sup 3+} (26%) is intermediate between the rate for the Gd{sup 3+} aqua ion (22% from 25 to 500 C) and the rates for the Eu{sup 3+} (29% from 25 to 400 C) and the Yb{sup 3+} aqua ions (42% from 25 to 500 C) indicating an intermediate stability of the Nd{sup 3+} aqua ion consistent with the tetrad effect. Nd L{sub 3}-edge XAS measurements of 0.05 m NdCl{sub 3} aqueous solution at 25 to 500 C and up to 520 MPa show that stepwise inner-sphere complexes most likely of the type Nd(H{sub 2}O){sub {delta}-n}Cl{sub n}{sup +3-n} occur in the solution at elevated temperatures, where {delta} {approx} 9 at 150 C decreasing to {approx} 6 at 500 C and the number of chloride ions (n) of the chloroaqua complexes increases uniformly with temperature from 1.2 {+-} 0.2 to 2.0 {+-} 0.2 in the solution upon increase of temperature from 150 to 500 C. Conversely, the number of H{sub 2}O ligands of Nd(H{sub 2}O){sub {delta}-n}Cl{sub n}{sup +3-n} complexes is uniformly reduced with temperature from 7.5 {+-} 0.8 to 3.7 {+-} 0.3 in the aqueous solution, in the same temperature range. These data show greater stability of neodymium(III) than gadolinium(III) and ytterbium(III) chloride complexes in low pH aqueous solutions at elevated temperatures. Our data suggest a greater stability of aqueous light REE than

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis and thermal properties of a novel cubic ZrW{sub 1.80}V{sub 0.20}O{sub 7.90} solid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xi; Deng, Xuebin; Ma, Hui; Tao, Juzhou; Zhao, Xinhua

    2011-05-15

    Tetragonal ZrW{sub 1.80}V{sub 0.20}O{sub 6.90}(OH){sub 2.00}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2.00} hydrate was prepared using an acidic steam hydrothermal (ASH) method. Thermal dehydration followed by phase transformation of this precursor leads to successful synthesis of a novel W-site low-valent substituted cubic ZrW{sub 1.80}V{sub 0.20}O{sub 7.90} solid solution, the mechanism of this process is studied in detail revealing the hydrate and a metastable orthorhombic phase of V'{sub W}substitution solid solution as important intermediate product. This material is found to possess thermal contraction and order-disorder phase transformation properties similar to that of the cubic ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8}. -- Graphical Abstract: A novel cubic ZrW{sub 1.80}V{sub 0.20}O{sub 7.90} solid solution (a) was synthesized through its metastable orthorhombic phase (b) as the dehydration product of hydrate precursor ZrW{sub 1.80}V{sub 0.20}O{sub 6.90}(OH){sub 2.00}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2.00} (c). Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} The details of ZrW{sub 1.80}V{sub 0.20}O{sub 6.90}(OH){sub 2.00}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2.00} dehydration process is revealed. {yields} V{sup 5+} remaining a substitution state is crucial to the formation of c-ZrW{sub 1.80}V{sub 0.20}O{sub 7.90}. {yields} Synthesis of a novel aliovalent W-site substituted cubic ZrW{sub 1.80}V{sub 0.20}O{sub 7.90} was achieved. {yields} Phase transition temperature and thermal contraction were determined for c-ZrW{sub 1.80}V{sub 0.20}O{sub 7.90}.

  11. Hydrothermal mineralization at seafloor spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.

    1984-01-01

    The recent recognition that metallic mineral deposits are concentrated by hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers constitutes a scientific breakthrough that opens active sites at seafloor spreading centers as natural laboratories to investigate ore-forming processes of such economically useful deposits as massive sulfides in volcanogenic rocks on land, and that enhances the metallic mineral potential of oceanic crust covering two-thirds of the Earth both beneath ocean basins and exposed on land in ophiolite belts. This paper reviews our knowledge of processes of hydrothermal mineralization and the occurrence and distribution of hydrothermal mineral deposits at the global oceanic ridge-rift system. Sub-seafloor hydrothermal convection involving circulation of seawater through fractured rocks of oceanic crust driven by heat supplied by generation of new lithosphere is nearly ubiquitous at seafloor spreading centers. However, ore-forming hydrothermal systems are extremely localized where conditions of anomalously high thermal gradients and permeability increase hydrothermal activity from the ubiquitous low-intensity background level (⩽ 200°C) to high-intensity characterized by high temperatures ( > 200-c.400°C), and a rate and volume of flow sufficient to sustain chemical reactions that produce acid, reducing, metal-rich primary hydrothermal solutions. A series of mineral phases with sulfides and oxides as high- and low-temperature end members, respectively, are precipitated along the upwelling limb and in the discharge zone of single-phase systems as a function of increasing admixture of normal seawater. The occurrence of hydrothermal mineral deposits is considered in terms of spatial and temporal frames of reference. Spatial frames of reference comprise structural features along-axis (linear sections that are the loci of seafloor spreading alternating with transform faults) and perpendicular to axis (axial zone of volcanic extrusion and marginal

  12. COMBUSTION OF HYDROTHERMALLY TREATED COALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of: (1) the relationship of the combustion characteristics of hydrothermally treated (HTT) coals to environmental emissions, boiler design, and interchangeability of solid fuels produced by the Hydrothermal Coal Process (HCP) with raw coa...

  13. Alkaline flooding injection strategy

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to improved alkali-surfactant flooding methods, and this includes determining the proper design of injection strategy. Several different injection strategies have been used or suggested for recovering heavy oils with surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding methods. Oil recovery was compared for four different injection strategies: (1) surfactant followed by polymer, (2) surfactant followed by alkaline polymer, (3) alkaline surfactant followed by polymer, and (4) alkali, surfactant, and polymer mixed in a single formulation. The effect of alkaline preflush was also studied under two different conditions. All of the oil recovery experiments were conducted under optimal conditions with a viscous, non-acidic oil from Hepler (KS) oil field. The coreflood experiments were conducted with Berea sandstone cores since field core was not available in sufficient quantity for coreflood tests. The Tucker sand of Hepler field is a Class I fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir, as classified by the Department of Energy, which has been selected as the site of a DOE-sponsored field pilot test.

  14. Pyrrhotite catalyzes the synthesis of uracil under hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Ibáñez de Aldecoa, A.; Menor-Salván, C.

    2013-09-01

    The hypothesis of a prebiotic origin for metabolic cycles in hydrothermal systems gained interest during last years. The experimental approach to support this hypothesis was oriented mainly to the formation of organic molecules in iron sulfide mineral surfaces from inorganic precursors. In this work, we explore the behavior of previously formed, prebiotically plausible organic molecules in iron sulfide rich, low temperature hydrothermal environments. Using urea as a starting point, we found that uracil and other nitrogen heterocycles could be synthesized using water-urea solution as precursor in a packed pyrrhotite bed reactor, simulating hydrothermal conditions.

  15. Hyperbaric Hydrothermal Atomic Force Microscope

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Boro, Carl O.; Higgins, Steven R.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2003-07-01

    A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

  16. Hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Boro, Carl O.; Higgins, Steven R.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2002-01-01

    A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

  17. Hydrothermal pretreatment of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, Bock; Ross, D.S.

    1990-08-14

    We are examining the effects on composition and behavior of Argonne-supplied Wyodak coal under both thermal (no added water/N{sub 2}) and hydrothermal (liquid water/N{sub 2}) conditions at 350{degree}C for periods of 30 min and 5 hr, with emphasis during this period on the longer treatment. Field ionization mass spectrometry (FIMS) of the untreated, thermally treated, and hydrothermally treated coals is conducted at conditions where the samples are heated from ambient to 500{degree}C at 2.5{degree}/min. In the 5 hr work the volatilities of the coals are 24%, 16%, and 25% respectively. Solvent swelling studies with the recovered coals do not demonstrate the expected lower degree of crosslinking in the hydrothermal case. Both the thermal and hydrothermal treatments yield products with a decreased swelling ratio, but the ratio for the product from the aqueous treatment is slightly lower than that from thermal treatment. At present we cannot reconcile this result with our other data. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Experimental constraints on hydrothermal activities in Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Y.; Shibuya, T.; Suzuki, K.; Kuwatani, T.

    2012-12-01

    One of the most remarkable findings by the Cassini-Huygens mission is perhaps water-rich plumes erupting from the south-pole region of Enceladus [1]. Given such geological activity and the detection of sodium salts in the plume, the interior of Enceladus is highly likely to contain an interior ocean interacting with the rock core [2]. A primary question regarding astrobiology and planetary science is whether Enceladus has (or had) hydrothermal activities in the interior ocean. Because N2 might be formed by thermal dissociation of primordial NH3 [3], the presence of N2 in the plume may be a possible indicator for the presence of hydrothermal activities in Enceladus. However, the Cassini UVIS revealed that the plumes do not contain large amounts of N2 [4]. Although these observations may not support the presence of hydrothermal activities, whether NH3 dissociation proceeds strongly depends on the kinetics of hydrothermal reactions and interactions with the rock components, which remain largely unknown. Furthermore, the Cassini CDA recently showed that small amounts of SiO2 might have been included in the plume dusts [5]. Formation of amorphous SiO2 usually occurs when high-temperature and/or high-pH solution with high concentrations of dissolved SiO2 cools and/or is neutralized. Thus, the presence of SiO2 in the plume dusts may suggest the presence of a temperature and/or pH gradient in the ocean. However, no laboratory experiments have investigated what processes control pH and SiO2 concentrations in hydrothermal fluids possibly existing in Enceladus. Here, we show the results of laboratory experiments simulating hydrothermal systems on Enceladus. As the initial conditions, we used both aqueous solution of high concentrations (0.01-2%) of NH3 and NaHCO3 and powdered olivine as an analog for the rock components. Our experimental results show that formation of N2 from NH3 is kinetically and thermodynamically inhibited even under high temperature conditions (< 400

  19. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy. PMID:26404834

  20. Surface roughened zirconia: towards hydrothermal stability.

    PubMed

    Camposilvan, Erik; Flamant, Quentin; Anglada, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Surface roughness is needed in several yttria-stabilized zirconia components used in restorative dentistry for osseointegration or adhesion purposes. This can be achieved by different treatments, which may also modify the microstructure of the surface. Among them, sandblasting and chemical etching are widely used, but their effect on hydrothermal aging of zirconia is not fully understood. In the present work, the zirconia long-term stability of rough surfaces prepared by these techniques is analyzed and a method is proposed for preventing hydrothermal aging while maintaining the original surface appearance and mechanical properties. The method involves pressure infiltration of a Cerium salt solution on the roughened surfaces followed by a thermal treatment. The solution, trapped by surface defects and small pores, is decomposed during thermal treatment into Cerium oxide, which is diffused at high temperature, obtaining Ce co-doping in the near-surface region. In addition, the microstructural changes induced in the near-surface by sandblasting or chemical etching are removed by the thermal treatment together with surface defects. No color modification was observed and the final roughness parameters were in the range of existing implants of proved good osseointegration. The aging resistance of Ce co-doped materials was strongly enhanced, showing the absence of aging after artificial degradation, increasing in this way the surface mechanical integrity. The proposed treatment is easily applicable to the current manufacturing procedures of zirconia dental posts, abutments, crowns and dentures, representing a solution to hydrothermal aging in these and other biomedical applications. PMID:25867636

  1. Peptide synthesis under Enceladus hydrothermal condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishima, Kosuke; Takano, Yoshinori; Takai, Ken; Takahagi, Wataru; Adachi, Keito; Shibuya, Takazo; Tomita, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Enceladus is one of the moons of Saturn, and it has been known to harbor interior ocean beneath the icy crust. The mass spectrometry data obtained by Cassini spacecraft indicates the presence of salty, and most likely alkaline ocean containing various organic compounds. While geochemical and other radiation related processes for in situ production of organics remain elusive, thermally unaltered carbonaceous chondrites, consisting the main body of Enceladus are known to be enriched with organic matters potentially including the building blocks of life (e.g., amino acids and amino acid precursors). Assuming that abiotic amino acids exist in the Enceladus alkaline seawater, we hypothesized that water-rock interaction may contribute to condensation of localized amino acids leading to peptide formation. In order to test this hypothesis, we have developed the Enceladus hydrothermal reactor based on the chemical constraints obtained through previous experimental and theoretical studies. We have added six different amino acids and introduced a thermal fluctuation system simulating the periodic tidal heating of the interior chondritic core. Total, eight sea water samples were obtained over the course of 147 days of experiment. While detection of peptide using Capillary Electrophoresis Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (CE-TOF/MS) is still at the preliminary stage, so far pH monitoring and H2 and CO2 Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) data clearly indicated the occurrence of serpentinization/carbonation reaction. Here, we discuss the interaction between aqueous alteration reactions and thermal cycling processes for the role of abiotic peptide formation under the Enceladus hydrothermal condition.

  2. Titanium corrosion in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Been, Jantje

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion of Grade 2 titanium in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments has been studied by weight loss corrosion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and potentiodynamic polarography. Calcium ions and wood pulp were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. In alkaline peroxide, the titanium corrosion rate increased with increasing pH, temperature, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The corrosion controlling mechanism is thought to be the reaction of the oxide with the perhydroxyl ion. No evidence of thermodynamically stable calcium titanate was found in the surface film of test coupons exposed to calcium-inhibited alkaline peroxide solutions. Calcium inhibition is probably the result of low local alkali and peroxide concentrations at the metal surface produced by reaction of adsorbed calcium with hydrogen peroxide. It has been shown that the inhibiting effect of calcium is temporary, possibly through an effect of calcium on the chemical and/or physical stability of the surface oxide. Pulp is an effective and stable corrosion inhibitor. Raising the pulp concentration decreased the corrosion rate. The inhibiting effect of pulp may be related to the adsorption and interaction of the pulp fibers with H 2O2, thereby decreasing the peroxide concentration and rendering the solution less corrosive. The presence of both pulp and calcium led to higher corrosion rates than obtained by either one inhibitor alone. Replacement of hydrofluoric acid with alkaline peroxide for pickling of titanium was investigated. Titanium corrosion rates in alkaline peroxide exceeded those obtained in the conventional hydrofluoric acid bath. General corrosion was observed with extensive roughening of the surface giving a dull gray appearance. Preferred dissolution of certain crystallographic planes was investigated through the corrosion of a titanium single crystal. Whereas the overall effect on the corrosion rate was small

  3. Hydrothermal reactions of fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.W.

    1995-12-31

    The emphasis of the work done has been to determine the reactivities of two ashes believed to be representative of those generated. A bituminous ash and a lignitic ash have been investigated. The reactions of these ashes undergo when subjected to mild hydrothermal conditions were explored. The nature of the reactions which the ashes undergo when alkaline activators, calcium hydroxide and calcium sulfate are present was also investigated. It was determined that calcium silicate hydrate, calcium aluminate hydrate, and the calcium sulfoaluminate hydrate ettringite form under these conditions. It appears 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}3CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}32H{sub 2}O (ettringite) formation needs to be considered in ashes which contain significant amounts of sulfate. Therefore the stability region for ettringite was established. It was also determined that calcium silicate hydrate, exhibiting a high internal surface area, will readily form with hydrothermal treatment between 50{degrees} and 100{degrees}C. This phase is likely to have a significant capacity to take up heavy metals and oxyanions and this ability is being explored.

  4. The partitioning of uranium and neptunium onto hydrothermally altered concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, P.; Allen, P.G.; Sylwester, E.R.; Viani, B.E.

    1999-10-14

    Cementitious materials that are used to construct the ground support for high-level repositories have a high probability of interacting with radionuclide-bearing fluids derived from failed waste packages. Cementitious materials provide a highly alkaline environment; pore fluids in concrete can have pH {gt} 10 for thousands to hundreds of thousands of years. Studies have shown that fresh concrete and cement phases strongly retard or immobilize certain actinides. Consequently, cementitious materials may serve as a barrier to the release of the radionuclides to the far field. However, the effect of thermal alteration of these materials, which may occur in high-level repositories, on their interaction with radionuclides has not been addressed. In contrast to retardation, colloidal silica-enriched particles that are abundant in the pore fluids of cementitious materials may facilitate radionuclide migration through the near-field into the adjacent geological environment. Due to the uncertainties of these two opposite effects, it is important to investigate the interaction of actinides with cementitious materials under varying conditions. It is expected that cementitious materials in high-level waste repositories will be subjected to and altered by hot dry and/or humid conditions forhundreds to thousands of years by the time they interact with radionuclide-bearing fluids. After alteration, the chemical and mineralogical properties of these materials will be significantly different from that of the as-placed or fresh concrete. To assess the effect that this alteration would have on radionuclide interactions, samples of hardened concrete (untreated concrete) were hydrothermally heated at 200 C for 8 months (treated concrete). The concrete used in the experiments consisted of portland cement with an aggregate of dolomitic limestone. X-ray diffraction analysis has shown that portlandite and amorphous calcium silicate hydrate gels were converted to the crystalline calcium

  5. Hydrothermal synthesis of lutetium disilicate nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Xiaoping; Gao Yanfeng; Chen Hongfei; Luo Hongjie

    2012-04-15

    A simple, low-cost hydrothermal method was developed to synthesize irregular-and rod-shaped lutetium disilicate (Lu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}) powders with sizes ranging from 71 to 340 nm. The synthesis temperature was 260 Degree-Sign C, which is nearly 1300 Degree-Sign C lower than that required for the solid-state reaction. The results indicated that both the hydrothermal temperature and pH values had great influences on the composition, crystalline phase and morphology of the powders. The formation mechanism, basic thermophysical properties, stability and anticorrosion properties of the Lu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} powders were also investigated. The obtained powders possessed low thermal conductivity, a suitable thermal expansion coefficient (3.92-5.17 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} K{sup -1}) with the silicon-based substrate and excellent thermal and structural stability. During hot corrosion testing, the surfaces of the samples appeared to react with the water and molten salt vapors, but no serious failure occurred. - Graphical abstract: An image for the as-prepared Lu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} powders (left) and XRD pattern (right) (inset shows the SEM graph of powders). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We synthesized Lu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} powders via a hydrothermal process at 260 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystalline phase and morphology of the powders changed with experimental parameter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hot corrosion was determined in an airflow environment containing alkaline vapor.

  6. Pyroxenes of the Khibiny alkaline pluton, Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovenchuk, V. N.; Ivanyuk, G. Yu.; Pakhomovsky, Ya. A.; Men'shikov, Yu. P.; Konopleva, N. G.; Korchak, Yu. A.

    2008-12-01

    Seven pyroxene varieties were identified in nepheline syenites and foidolites of the Khibiny pluton: enstatite, ferrosilite, diopside, hedenbergite, augite, aegirine-augite, and aegirine. Enstatite and augite are typical of alkaline and ultramafic rocks of dike series. Ferrosilite was found in country quartzitic hornfels. Diopside is a rock-forming mineral in alkaline and ultramafic rocks, alkali gabbroids, hornfels in xenoliths of volcanic and sedimentary rocks and foyaite, melteigite-urtite that assimilate them, and certain hydrothermal pegmatite veins. Hedenbergite was noted in hornfels from xenoliths of volcanic and sedimentary rocks and in a hydrothermal pegmatite vein at Mount Eveslogchorr. Aegirine-augite is the predominant pyroxene in all types of nepheline syenites, phonolites and tinguaites, foidolites, alkaline and ultramafic rocks of dike series, fenitized wall rocks surrounding the pluton, and xenoliths of Devonian volcanic and sedimentary rocks. Aegirine is an abundant primary or, more often, secondary mineral in nepheline syenites, foidolites, and hydrothermal pegmatite veins. It occurs as separate crystals, outer zones of diopside and aegirine-augite crystals, and homoaxial pseudomorphs after Na-Ca amphiboles. Microprobe analyses of 265 pyroxenes samples allowed us to distinguish ten principal trends of isomorphic replacement and corresponding typomorphic features of pyroxenes. Compositional variations in clinopyroxenes along the sampled 35-km profile from the margin of the Khibiny pluton to its center confirm the symmetric zoning of the foyaite pluton relative to semicircular faults of the Minor Arc and the Main (Central) Ring marked by Devonian volcanic and sedimentary rocks, foidolites, and related metasomatic rocks (rischorrite, albitite, and aegirinite). Changes in the composition of pyroxenes are explained mainly by the redistribution of elements between coexisting minerals of foyaites in the process of their intense differentiation under the

  7. The onset of life in a natural submarine hydrothermal fractionation reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, M. J.; Martin, W.

    There was a strong disequilibrium between the carbon dioxide in the early atmosphere and hydrothermal hydrogen. Such a disequilibrium tends to increase at lower temperatures but so do the kinetic barriers to reaction. Ignoring these kinetic barriers the strongest thermodynamic drive is to the production of methane as carbon dioxide reacts with hydrogen. But kinetic barriers prevent this reaction below 500C. In its stead Shock et al. (1998) demonstrate that metastable acetate is overwhelmingly the best represented carbon compound produced theoretically on the mixing of hydrothermal solution with seawater between 10 and 65C. The minor sticky by-product of this reaction, which involves other reactants, can be considered as evolving to protolife. Thus we argue that the organic building modules of life could be generated from the simplest entities within the hydrothermal mound. And the main waste products would be acetate and water: {407H2+10NH3+HS-hydroth'l +{210CO2+H2PO4- + [Fe,Ni,Co]2+ocean → gC70H129O65N10P(Fe,Ni,Co)Sprotolife+{70H3C.COOH+219H2Owaste We suggest that protolife emerged at ˜ 40C where chemical gradients were steep in a hydrothermal mound which developed where alkaline waters seeped into the Hadean ocean. The mound acted as a fractionation reactor. Reactions were catalysed by such sulfide clusters as would produce greigite (NiFe5S8) in membranes also composed of sulfides (Martin and Russell 2003). A greigite cluster was the precursor to the active sites of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (NiFe4S5) and acetyl coenzyme-A synthase ([Fe4S4]cysNicys2Ni) (Svetlitchnyi et al. 2004). Activation energy was supplied by reaction between photolytic ferric iron and H2 across the membranes comprising FeS compartments at the mound's surface. Small quantities of amino acids, metal-bearing clusters (Milner-White and Russell 2004), and eventually RNA precursors, self-organised to become involved in the more efficient generation of acetate waste, a thermodynamic

  8. Mechanical properties of anodic titanium films containing ions of Ca and P submitted to heat and hydrothermal treatment.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Gabriel G; de Souza, Gelson B; Lepienski, Carlos M; Kuromoto, Neide K

    2016-12-01

    Anodic oxidation is a technique widely used to improve the bioactivity of Ti surface. In this study, micro-arc oxidation (MAO) was used to obtain an anodic film incorporating Ca and P ions to evaluate the effect of heat and hydrothermal treatment on the mechanical and in vitro bioactivity properties of these new layers. The MAO process was carried out using (CH3COO)2Ca·H2O and NaH2PO4·2H2O electrolytes under galvanostatic mode (150mA/cm(2)). The thermal treatments were made at 400°C and 600°C in air atmosphere while hydrothermal treatment was made in an alkaline water solution at 130°C. These surfaces presented desired mechanical properties for biomedical applications owing to the rutile and anatase phases in the anodic film that are more crystalline after thermal treatments; which provided an increase in hardness values and lower elastic modulus. The dry sliding wear resistance increased by performing thermal treatments on the surfaces with one condition still maintaining the film after the test. Bioactivity was investigated by immersion in simulated body fluid during 21 days and hydroxyapatite was formed on all samples. Finally, lower values of contact angle were obtained for heat treated samples. PMID:27479891

  9. Energetics of amino acid synthesis in hydrothermal ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amend, J. P.; Shock, E. L.

    1998-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations showed that the autotrophic synthesis of all 20 protein-forming amino acids was energetically favored in hot (100 degrees C), moderately reduced, submarine hydrothermal solutions relative to the synthesis in cold (18 degrees C), oxidized, surface seawater. The net synthesis reactions of 11 amino acids were exergonic in the hydrothermal solution, but all were endergonic in surface seawater. The synthesis of the requisite amino acids of nine thermophilic and hyperthermophilic proteins in a 100 degreesC hydrothermal solution yielded between 600 and 8000 kilojoules per mole of protein, which is energy that is available to drive the intracellular synthesis of enzymes and other biopolymers in hyperthermophiles thriving in these ecosystems.

  10. Hydrothermal reactivity of saponite.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, G.

    1983-01-01

    The nature and extent of the reactions of synthetic Fe-free saponite have been investigated under experimental hydrothermal conditions as a first step towards understanding saponite reactivity under relatively simple conditions. Saponite crystallizes from amorphous gel of ideal saponite composition within 7 days at 300o-550oC under P = 1 kbar. Reactions subsequent to this initial crystallization depend on reaction T and interlayer cations. Saponite is found to react hydrothermally, over a period of 200 days, at T down to 400oC, at least 150oC lower than previously reported, but showed no signs of reaction below 400oC. At 450oC, a mixture of talc/saponite and saponite/phlogopite clays forms from K-saponite via intracrystalline layer transformations, while above 450oC the initial K-saponite dissolves, with talc and phlogopite forming as discrete phases. After 200 days reactions at 400-450oC were not complete, so that given sufficient time to reach equilibrium, a lower hydrothermal stability limit for saponite is possible. Further study of the Fe-bearing saponite system will be required before experimental results can be applied to natural systems.-D.F.B.

  11. Numerical simulation of magmatic hydrothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Geiger, S.; Hurwitz, S.; Driesner, T.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of magmatic hydrothermal systems entails coupled and nonlinear multiphase flow, heat and solute transport, and deformation in highly heterogeneous media. Thus, quantitative analysis of these systems depends mainly on numerical solution of coupled partial differential equations and complementary equations of state (EOS). The past 2 decades have seen steady growth of computational power and the development of numerical models that have eliminated or minimized the need for various simplifying assumptions. Considerable heuristic insight has been gained from process-oriented numerical modeling. Recent modeling efforts employing relatively complete EOS and accurate transport calculations have revealed dynamic behavior that was damped by linearized, less accurate models, including fluid property control of hydrothermal plume temperatures and three-dimensional geometries. Other recent modeling results have further elucidated the controlling role of permeability structure and revealed the potential for significant hydrothermally driven deformation. Key areas for future reSearch include incorporation of accurate EOS for the complete H2O-NaCl-CO2 system, more realistic treatment of material heterogeneity in space and time, realistic description of large-scale relative permeability behavior, and intercode benchmarking comparisons. Copyright 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Hydrothermal synthesis map of bismuth titanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardar, Kripasindhu; Walton, Richard I.

    2012-05-01

    The hydrothermal synthesis of four bismuth titanate materials from common bismuth and titanium precursors under hydrothermal conditions is described. Reaction of NaBiO3·2H2O and anatase TiO2 in concentrated NaOH solution at 240 °C is shown to produce perovskite and sillenite phases Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3 and Bi12TiO20, depending on the ratio of metal precursors used. When KOH solution is used and a 1:1 ratio of the same precursors, a pyrochlore Bi1.43Ti2O6(OH)0.29(H2O)0.66 is formed. The use of a mixture of HNO3 and NaOH is shown to facilitate the formation of the Aurivillius-type bismuth titanate Bi4Ti3O12. The phases have been isolated separately as phase-pure powders and profile refinement of powder X-ray diffraction data allows comparisons with comparable materials reported in the literature. Analysis of Bi LIII-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of the materials shows the oxidation state of bismuth is +3 in all of the hydrothermally derived products.

  13. Hydrothermal mixing: Fuel for life in the deep-sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentscher, M.; Bach, W.; Amend, J.; McCollom, T.

    2009-04-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems show a wide range of fluid compositions and temperatures. They reach from highly alkaline and reducing, like the Lost City hydrothermal field, to acidic and reducing conditions, (e. g., the Logatchev hydrothermal field) to acidic and oxidizing conditions (e. g., island arc hosted systems). These apparently hostile vent systems are generally accompanied by high microbial activity forming the base of a food-web that often includes higher organisms like mussels, snails, or shrimp. The primary production is boosted by mixing of chemically reduced hydrothermal vent fluids with ambient seawater, which generates redox disequilibria that serve as energy source for chemolithoautotrophic microbial life. We used geochemical reaction path models to compute the affinities of catabolic (energy-harvesting) and anabolic (biosynthesis) reactions along trajectories of batch mixing between vent fluids and 2 °C seawater. Geochemical data of endmember hydrothermal fluids from 12 different vent fields (Lost City, Rainbow, Logatchev, TAG, EPR 21 °N, Manus Basin, Mariana Arc, etc.) were included in this reconnaissance study of the variability in metabolic energetics in global submarine vent systems. The results show a distinction between ultramafic-hosted and basalt-hosted hydrothermal systems. The highest energy yield for chemolithotrophic catabolism in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems is reached at low temperature and under slightly aerobic to aerobic conditions. The dominant reactions, for example at Rainbow or Lost City, are the oxidation of H2, Fe2+ and methane. At temperatures >60 °C, anaerobic metabolic reactions, e. g., sulphate reduction and methanogenesis, become more profitable. In contrast, basalt-hosted systems, such as TAG and 21 °N EPR uniformly indicate H2S oxidation to be the catabolically dominant reaction over the entire microbial-relevant temperature range. Affinities were calculated for the formation of individual cellular

  14. Lead recovery from scrap cathode ray tube funnel glass by hydrothermal sulphidisation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wenyi; Meng, Wen; Li, Jinhui; Zhang, Chenglong; Song, Qingbin; Bai, Jianfeng; Wang, Jingwei; Li, Yingshun

    2015-10-01

    This research focused on the application of the hydrothermal sulphidisation method to separate lead from scrap cathode ray tube funnel glass. Prior to hydrothermal treatment, the cathode ray tube funnel glass was pretreated by mechanical activation. Under hydrothermal conditions, hydroxyl ions (OH(-)) were generated through an ion exchange reaction between metal ions in mechanically activated funnel glass and water, to accelerate sulphur disproportionation; no additional alkaline compound was needed. Lead contained in funnel glass was converted to lead sulphide with high efficiency. Temperature had a significant effect on the sulphidisation rate of lead in funnel glass, which increased from 25% to 90% as the temperature increased from 100 °C to 300 °C. A sulphidisation rate of 100% was achieved at a duration of 8 h at 300 °C. This process of mechanical activation and hydrothermal sulphidisation is efficient and promising for the treatment of leaded glass. PMID:26264931

  15. Hydrothermal phase transformation of hematite to magnetite

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Different phases of iron oxide were obtained by hydrothermal treatment of ferric solution at 200°C with the addition of either KOH, ethylenediamine (EDA), or KOH and EDA into the reaction system. As usually observed, the α-Fe2O3 hexagonal plates and hexagonal bipyramids were obtained for reaction with KOH and EDA, respectively. When both KOH and EDA were added into the reaction system, we observed an interesting phase transformation from α-Fe2O3 to Fe3O4 at low-temperature hydrothermal conditions. The phase transformation involves the formation of α-Fe2O3 hexagonal plates, the dissolution of the α-Fe2O3 hexagonal plates, the reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+, and the nucleation and growth of new Fe3O4 polyhedral particles. PMID:24940172

  16. Alkaline Phosphatase in Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Štefková, Kateřina; Procházková, Jiřina; Pacherník, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme commonly expressed in almost all living organisms. In humans and other mammals, determinations of the expression and activity of alkaline phosphatase have frequently been used for cell determination in developmental studies and/or within clinical trials. Alkaline phosphatase also seems to be one of the key markers in the identification of pluripotent embryonic stem as well as related cells. However, alkaline phosphatases exist in some isoenzymes and isoforms, which have tissue specific expressions and functions. Here, the role of alkaline phosphatase as a stem cell marker is discussed in detail. First, we briefly summarize contemporary knowledge of mammalian alkaline phosphatases in general. Second, we focus on the known facts of its role in and potential significance for the identification of stem cells. PMID:25767512

  17. Process of treating cellulosic membrane and alkaline with membrane separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    The improvement of water-soluble cellulose ether membranes for use as separators in concentrated alkaline battery cells is discussed. The process of contacting membranes with an aqueous alkali solution of concentration less than that of the alkali solution to be used in the battery but above that at which the membrane is soluble is described.

  18. Alkaline fuel cells applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, Karl; Hacker, Viktor; Gsellmann, Josef; Cifrain, Martin; Faleschini, Gottfried; Enzinger, Peter; Fankhauser, Robert; Ortner, Markus; Muhr, Michael; Aronson, Robert R.

    On the world-wide automobile market technical developments are increasingly determined by the dramatic restriction on emissions as well as the regimentation of fuel consumption by legislation. Therefore there is an increasing chance of a completely new technology breakthrough if it offers new opportunities, meeting the requirements of resource preservation and emission restrictions. Fuel cell technology offers the possibility to excel in today's motive power techniques in terms of environmental compatibility, consumer's profit, costs of maintenance and efficiency. The key question is economy. This will be decided by the costs of fuel cell systems if they are to be used as power generators for future electric vehicles. The alkaline hydrogen-air fuel cell system with circulating KOH electrolyte and low-cost catalysed carbon electrodes could be a promising alternative. Based on the experiences of Kordesch [K. Kordesch, Brennstoffbatterien, Springer, Wien, 1984, ISBN 3-387-81819-7; K. Kordesch, City car with H 2-air fuel cell and lead-battery, SAE Paper No. 719015, 6th IECEC, 1971], who operated a city car hybrid vehicle on public roads for 3 years in the early 1970s, improved air electrodes plus new variations of the bipolar stack assembly developed in Graz are investigated. Primary fuel choice will be a major issue until such time as cost-effective, on-board hydrogen storage is developed. Ammonia is an interesting option. The whole system, ammonia dissociator plus alkaline fuel cell (AFC), is characterised by a simple design and high efficiency.

  19. A ubiquitous thermoacidophilic archaeon from deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reysenbach, A.-L.; Liu, Yajing; Banta, A.B.; Beveridge, T.J.; Kirshtein, J.D.; Schouten, S.; Tivey, M.K.; Von Damm, K. L.; Voytek, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are important in global biogeochemical cycles, providing biological oases at the sea floor that are supported by the thermal and chemical flux from the Earth's interior. As hot, acidic and reduced hydrothermal fluids mix with cold, alkaline and oxygenated sea water, minerals precipitate to form porous sulphide-sulphate deposits. These structures provide microhabitats for a diversity of prokaryotes that exploit the geochemical and physical gradients in this dynamic ecosystem. It has been proposed that fluid pH in the actively venting sulphide structures is generally low (pH < 4.5), yet no extreme thermoacidophile has been isolated from vent deposits. Culture-independent surveys based on ribosomal RNA genes from deep-sea hydrothermal deposits have identified a widespread euryarchaeotal lineage, DHVE2 (deep-sea hydrothermal vent euryarchaeotic 2). Despite the ubiquity and apparent deep-sea endemism of DHVE2, cultivation of this group has been unsuccessful and thus its metabolism remains a mystery. Here we report the isolation and cultivation of a member of the DHVE2 group, which is an obligate thermoacidophilic sulphur- or iron-reducing heterotroph capable of growing from pH 3.3 to 5.8 and between 55 and 75??C. In addition, we demonstrate that this isolate constitutes up to 15% of the archaeal population, providing evidence that thermoacidophiles may be key players in the sulphur and iron cycling at deep-sea vents. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  20. A ubiquitous thermoacidophilic archaeon from deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Liu, Yitai; Banta, Amy B; Beveridge, Terry J; Kirshtein, Julie D; Schouten, Stefan; Tivey, Margaret K; Von Damm, Karen L; Voytek, Mary A

    2006-07-27

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are important in global biogeochemical cycles, providing biological oases at the sea floor that are supported by the thermal and chemical flux from the Earth's interior. As hot, acidic and reduced hydrothermal fluids mix with cold, alkaline and oxygenated sea water, minerals precipitate to form porous sulphide-sulphate deposits. These structures provide microhabitats for a diversity of prokaryotes that exploit the geochemical and physical gradients in this dynamic ecosystem. It has been proposed that fluid pH in the actively venting sulphide structures is generally low (pH < 4.5), yet no extreme thermoacidophile has been isolated from vent deposits. Culture-independent surveys based on ribosomal RNA genes from deep-sea hydrothermal deposits have identified a widespread euryarchaeotal lineage, DHVE2 (deep-sea hydrothermal vent euryarchaeotic 2). Despite the ubiquity and apparent deep-sea endemism of DHVE2, cultivation of this group has been unsuccessful and thus its metabolism remains a mystery. Here we report the isolation and cultivation of a member of the DHVE2 group, which is an obligate thermoacidophilic sulphur- or iron-reducing heterotroph capable of growing from pH 3.3 to 5.8 and between 55 and 75 degrees C. In addition, we demonstrate that this isolate constitutes up to 15% of the archaeal population, providing evidence that thermoacidophiles may be key players in the sulphur and iron cycling at deep-sea vents. PMID:16871216

  1. Composition of pore and spring waters from Baby Bare: global implications of geochemical fluxes from a ridge flank hydrothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheat, C. Geoffrey; Mottl, Michael J.

    2000-02-01

    Warm hydrothermal springs were discovered on Baby Bare, which is an isolated basement outcrop on 3.5 Ma-old crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We have sampled these spring waters from a manned submersible, along with associated sediment pore waters from 48 gravity and piston cores. Systematic variations in the chemical composition of these waters indicate that hydrothermal reactions in basement at moderate temperatures (63°C in uppermost basement at this site) remove Na, K, Li, Rb, Mg, TCO 2, alkalinity, and phosphate from the circulating seawater and leach Ca, Sr, Si, B, and Mn from the oceanic crust; and that reactions with the turbidite sediment surrounding Baby Bare remove Na, Li, Mg, Ca, Sr, and sulfate from the pore water while producing ammonium and Si and both producing and consuming phosphate, nitrate, alkalinity, Mn, and Fe. K, Rb, and B are relatively unreactive in the sediment column. These data confirm the earlier inference that sediment pore waters from areas of upwelling can be used to estimate the composition of altered seawater in the underlying basement, even for those elements that are reactive in the sediment column or are affected by sampling artifacts. The composition of altered seawater in basement at Baby Bare is similar to the inferred composition of 58°C formation water from crust nearly twice as old (5.9 Ma) on the southern flank of the Costa Rica Rift. The Baby Bare fluids also exhibit the same directions of net elemental transfer between basalt and seawater as solutions produced in laboratory experiments at a similar temperature, and complement compositional changes from seawater observed in seafloor basalts altered at cool to moderate temperatures. The common parameter among the two ridge flanks and experiments is temperature, suggesting that the residence time of seawater in basement at the two ridge-flank sites is sufficiently long for the solutions to equilibrate with altered basalt. This conclusion is supported

  2. Hydrothermal Occurrences in Gusev Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, S. W.; Farmer, J. D.; Milliken, R.; Mills, V. W.; Shock, E.

    2011-12-01

    -rich (~40 wt%) volcaniclastic rocks that show no other phases indicative of significant alteration, such as phyllosilicates. Even the presence of so much olivine in the outcrops attests to minimal alteration. This suggests that the carbonate was not derived from hydrothermal alteration of the local rock. Instead, carbonate-bearing solutions sourced from elsewhere in the region may have precipitated carbonate as cement within the olivine-rich host rock [4]. An alternative hypothesis by [5] suggests that Comanche carbonate resulted from direct precipitation of evaporating brine, perhaps related to the putative ancient lake in Gusev crater, which infiltrated the host rock. In either case, the presence of outcrops of abundant carbonate and opaline silica demonstrates a rich and varied aqueous history in Gusev crater. [1] Squyres, S. W., et al. (2008), Science, 320, 1063-1067. [2] Squyres, S. W., et al. (2007), Science, 316, 738-742. [3] Ruff, S. W., et al. (2011), J. Geophys. Res., 116, E00F23, 10.1029/2010JE003767. [4] Morris, R. V., et al. (2010), Science, 329, 5990, 421-424, 10.1126/science.1189667. [5] Ruff, S. W. (2011), Lunar Planet. Sci., XLII, abstract #2708.

  3. Refractory Organic Compounds in Enceladus' Ice Grains and Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postberg, F.; Khawaja, N.; Hsu, H. W.; Sekine, Y.; Shibuya, T.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini's Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) generates time-of-flight mass spectra of individual grains impinging on the instruments target-plate. Following the analysis of salt rich ice grains emitted by Enceladus that indicated a salt-water ocean in contact with the moon's rocky core [1,2] a recent CDA analysis of nano-phase silica particles pointed at hydrothermal activity at the moon's rock/water interface [3]. The results imply temperatures above 80 - 90°C and alkaline pH values around 10 reminiscent of alkaline hydrothermal vents on Earth like the Lost City Hydrothermal Field. In this context the compositional analysis of organic components in CDA mass spectra of the ejected ice grains is of particular relevance. A multitude of volatile organic species has already been identified in the gas component of the plume [4]. As expected, we find more complex organic molecules in ice grains than in the gas indicating aromatic species, amines, and carbonyl group species. The composition of organic-bearing ice grains displays a great diversity indicating a variety of different organic species in varying concentrations. Recent spatially resolved CDA in situ measurements inside Enceladus' plume indicate that these organic compounds are especially frequent in 'young' ice grains that have just been ejected by high velocity jets. We investigate the implications of our findings with respect to ice grain formation at the water surface and inside the icy vents. We constrain the generation of organic compounds at the rock/water interface in the light of hydrothermal activity and the potential for the formation of life precursor molecules in Enceladus' ocean. Ref:[1] Postberg et al., Nature 459, 1098-1101 (2009). [2] Postberg et al., Nature 474, 620-622 (2011). [3]. Hsu, Postberg, Sekine et al., Nature, 519, 207-210 (2015). [4] Waite et al., Nature 460, 487-490 (2009).

  4. Modelling magmatic gas scrubbing in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Napoli, Rossella; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Valenza, Mariano; Bergsson, Baldur; Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Pfeffer, Melissa Anne; Rakel Guðjónsdóttir, Sylvía

    2015-04-01

    In volcano-hosted hydrothermal systems, the chemistry of deeply rising magmatic gases is extensively modified by gas-water-rock interactions taking place within the hydrothermal reservoir, and/or at shallow groundwaters conditions. These reactions can scrub reactive, water-soluble species (S, halogens) from the magmatic gas phase, so that their quantitative assessment is central to understanding the chemistry of surface gas manifestations, and brings profound implications to the interpretation of volcanic-hydrothermal unrests. Here, we present the results of numerical simulations of magmatic gas scrubbing, in which the reaction path modelling approach (Helgeson, 1968) is used to reproduce hydrothermal gas-water-rock interactions at both shallow (temperature up to 109°C; low-T model runs) and deep reservoir (temperature range: 150-250 °C; high-T model runs) conditions. The model was built based upon the EQ3/6 software package (Wolery and Daveler, 1992), and consisted into a step by step addition of a high-temperature magmatic gas to an initial meteoric water, in the presence of a dissolving aquifer rock. The model outputted, at each step of gas addition, the chemical composition of a new aqueous solution formed after gas-water-rock interactions; which, upon reaching gas over-pressuring (PgasTOT > Psat(H2O) at run T), is degassed (by single-step degassing) to separate a scrubbed gas phase. As an application of the model results, the model compositions of the separated gases are finally compared with compositions of natural gas emissions from Hekla volcano (T< 100°C) and from Krisuvik geothermal system (T> 100°C), resulting into an excellent agreement. The compositions of the model solutions are also in fair agreement with compositions of natural thermal water samples. We conclude that our EQ3/6-based reaction path simulations offer a realistic representation of gas-water-rock interaction processes occurring underneath active magmatic-hydrothermal systems

  5. Abiotic Organic Chemistry in Hydrothermal Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoneit, B. R.; Rushdi, A. I.

    2004-12-01

    Abiotic organic chemistry in hydrothermal systems is of interest to biologists, geochemists and oceanographers. This chemistry consists of thermal alteration of organic matter and minor prebiotic synthesis of organic compounds. Thermal alteration has been extensively documented to yield petroleum and heavy bitumen products from contemporary organic detritus. Carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, ammonia and sulfur species have been used as precursors in prebiotic synthesis experiments to organic compounds. These inorganic species are common components of hot spring gases and marine hydrothermal systems. It is of interest to further test their reactivities in reductive aqueous thermolysis. We have synthesized organic compounds (lipids) in aqueous solutions of oxalic acid, and with carbon disulfide or ammonium bicarbonate at temperatures from 175-400° C. The synthetic lipids from oxalic acid solutions consisted of n-alkanols, n-alkanoic acids, n-alkyl formates, n-alkanones, n-alkenes and n-alkanes, typically to C30 with no carbon number preferences. The products from CS2 in acidic aqueous solutions yielded cyclic thioalkanes, alkyl polysulfides, and thioesters with other numerous minor compounds. The synthesis products from oxalic acid and ammonium bicarbonate solutions were homologous series of n-alkyl amides, n-alkyl amines, n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids, also to C30 with no carbon number predominance. Condensation (dehydration) reactions also occur under elevated temperatures in aqueous medium as tested by model reactions to form amide, ester and nitrile bonds. It is concluded that the abiotic formation of aliphatic lipids, condensation products (amides, esters, nitriles, and CS2 derivatives (alkyl polysulfides, cyclic polysulfides) is possible under hydrothermal conditions and warrants further studies.

  6. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2010-12-10

    Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international collaboration with

  7. Enceladus: Starting Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Johnson, T. V.; Lunine, J. I.; Davies, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a process for starting the hydrothermal activity in Enceladus' South Polar Region. The process takes advantage of fissures that reach the water table, about 1 kilometer below the surface. Filling these fissures with fresh ocean water initiates a flow of water up from an ocean that can be self-sustaining. In this hypothesis the heat to sustain the thermal anomalies and the plumes comes from a slightly warm ocean at depth. The heat is brought to the surface by water that circulates up, through the crust and then returns to the ocean.

  8. Cody hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, H.P.

    1982-01-01

    The hot springs of Colter's Hell are the surface manifestations of a much larger hydothermal system. That system has been studied to define its extent, maximum temperature, and mechanism of operation. The study area covers 2700 km/sup 2/ (1040 mi/sup 2/) in northwest Wyoming. Research and field work included locating and sampling the hot springs, geologic mapping, thermal logging of available wells, measuring thermal conductivities, analyzing over 200 oil and gas well bottom-hole temperatures, and compiling and analyzing hydrologic data. These data were used to generate a model for the hydrothermal system.

  9. Silica in alkaline brines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, B.F.; Rettig, S.L.; Eugster, H.P.

    1967-01-01

    Analysis of sodium carbonate-bicarbonate brines from closed basins in volcanic terranes of Oregon and Kenya reveals silica contents of up to 2700 parts per million at pH's higher than 10. These high concentrations of SiO 2 can be attributed to reaction of waters with silicates, and subsequent evaporative concentration accompanied by a rise in pH. Supersaturation with respect to amorphous silica may occur and persist for brines that are out of contact with silicate muds and undersaturated with respect to trona; correlation of SiO2 with concentration of Na and total CO2 support this interpretation. Addition of moredilute waters to alkaline brines may lower the pH and cause inorganic precipitation of substantial amounts of silica.

  10. Bifunctional alkaline oxygen electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.; Mccatty, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the identification and testing of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate-temperature, single-unit, rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. Recent work on Na(x)Pt3O4, a potential bifunctional catalyst, is described, as well as the application of novel approaches to the development of more efficient bifunctional electrode structures. The three dual-character electrodes considered here showed similar superior performance; the Pt/RhO2 and Rh/RhO2 electrodes showed slightly better performance than the Pt/IrO2 electrode. It is concluded that Na(x)Pt3O4 continues to be a promising bifunctional oxygen electrode catalyst but requires further investigation and development.

  11. Evidence for Hydrothermal Vents as "Biogeobatteries" (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, M. E.; Girguis, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrothermal vents are unique systems that play an important role in oceanic biogeochemical cycles. As chemically reduced hydrothermal fluid mixes with cold oxic seawater, minerals precipitate out of solution resulting in chimney structures composed largely of metal sulfides and anhydrite. Pyrite, which is a natural semi-conductor, is the primary sulfide mineral, but other minerals within chimneys are also conductive (e.g. chalcopyrite, wurtzite, and some iron oxides). Sulfide chimneys are also known to host an extensive endolithic microbial community. Accordingly, submarine hydrothermal systems appear to be examples of biogeobatteries, wherein conductive mineral assemblages span naturally occuring redox gradients and enable anaerobic microbes to access oxygen as an oxidant via extracellular electron transfer (or EET). To test this hypothesis, we ran a series of electrochemical laboratory experiments in which pyrite was used as an anode (in a vessel flushed with hydrothermal-like fluid). When placed in continuity with a carbon fiber cathode, pyrite was found to accept and conduct electrons from both abiotic and biological processes (microbial EET). Specifically, electrical current increased 4-fold (5 nA/m2 to 20 nA/m2) in response to inoculation with a slurry prepared from a hydrothermal vent sample. Inspection of the pyrite anode with SEM revealed ubiquitous coverage by microbes. DNA was extracted from the anodes and the inoculum, and was subjected to pyrosequencing to examine prokaryotic diversity. These data suggest that key microbial phylotypes were enriched upon the pyrite, implicating them in EET. In addition, we deployed an in situ experiment based on microbial fuel cell architecture with a graphite anode inserted into a vent wall coupled to a carbon fiber cathode outside the vent. We observed current production over the course of one year, implying microbial EET in situ. Via pyrosequencing, we observed that the microbial community on the anode was

  12. Cation exchange properties of zeolites in hyper alkaline aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Van Tendeloo, Leen; de Blochouse, Benny; Dom, Dirk; Vancluysen, Jacqueline; Snellings, Ruben; Martens, Johan A; Kirschhock, Christine E A; Maes, André; Breynaert, Eric

    2015-02-01

    Construction of multibarrier concrete based waste disposal sites and management of alkaline mine drainage water requires cation exchangers combining excellent sorption properties with a high stability and predictable performance in hyper alkaline media. Though highly selective organic cation exchange resins have been developed for most pollutants, they can serve as a growth medium for bacterial proliferation, impairing their long-term stability and introducing unpredictable parameters into the evolution of the system. Zeolites represent a family of inorganic cation exchangers, which naturally occur in hyper alkaline conditions and cannot serve as an electron donor or carbon source for microbial proliferation. Despite their successful application as industrial cation exchangers under near neutral conditions, their performance in hyper alkaline, saline water remains highly undocumented. Using Cs(+) as a benchmark element, this study aims to assess the long-term cation exchange performance of zeolites in concrete derived aqueous solutions. Comparison of their exchange properties in alkaline media with data obtained in near neutral solutions demonstrated that the cation exchange selectivity remains unaffected by the increased hydroxyl concentration; the cation exchange capacity did however show an unexpected increase in hyper alkaline media. PMID:25569300

  13. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qui; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling

    2004-05-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding in the swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to the naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of the injected solution bypasses the target pore space containing oil. The objective of this work is to investigate whether combining these two technologies could broaden the applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium--polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 9.2 to 12.9.

  14. Hydrothermal processes above the Yellowstone magma chamber: Large hydrothermal systems and large hydrothermal explosions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, L.A.; Shanks, W.C. Pat, III; Pierce, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrothermal explosions are violent and dramatic events resulting in the rapid ejection of boiling water, steam, mud, and rock fragments from source craters that range from a few meters up to more than 2 km in diameter; associated breccia can be emplaced as much as 3 to 4 km from the largest craters. Hydrothermal explosions occur where shallow interconnected reservoirs of steam- and liquid-saturated fluids with temperatures at or near the boiling curve underlie thermal fields. Sudden reduction in confi ning pressure causes fluids to fl ash to steam, resulting in signifi cant expansion, rock fragmentation, and debris ejection. In Yellowstone, hydrothermal explosions are a potentially signifi cant hazard for visitors and facilities and can damage or even destroy thermal features. The breccia deposits and associated craters formed from hydrothermal explosions are mapped as mostly Holocene (the Mary Bay deposit is older) units throughout Yellowstone National Park (YNP) and are spatially related to within the 0.64-Ma Yellowstone caldera and along the active Norris-Mammoth tectonic corridor. In Yellowstone, at least 20 large (>100 m in diameter) hydrothermal explosion craters have been identifi ed; the scale of the individual associated events dwarfs similar features in geothermal areas elsewhere in the world. Large hydrothermal explosions in Yellowstone have occurred over the past 16 ka averaging ??1 every 700 yr; similar events are likely in the future. Our studies of large hydrothermal explosion events indicate: (1) none are directly associated with eruptive volcanic or shallow intrusive events; (2) several historical explosions have been triggered by seismic events; (3) lithic clasts and comingled matrix material that form hydrothermal explosion deposits are extensively altered, indicating that explosions occur in areas subjected to intense hydrothermal processes; (4) many lithic clasts contained in explosion breccia deposits preserve evidence of repeated fracturing

  15. Modeling of the fault-controlled hydrothermal ore-forming systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pek, A.A.; Malkovsky, V.I.

    1993-07-01

    A necessary precondition for the formation of hydrothermal ore deposits is a strong focusing of hydrothermal flow as fluids move from the fluid source to the site of ore deposition. The spatial distribution of hydrothermal deposits favors the concept that such fluid flow focusing is controlled, for the most part, by regional faults which provide a low resistance path for hydrothermal solutions. Results of electric analog simulations, analytical solutions, and computer simulations of the fluid flow, in a fault-controlled single-pass advective system, confirm this concept. The influence of the fluid flow focusing on the heat and mass transfer in a single-pass advective system was investigated for a simplified version of the metamorphic model for the genesis of greenstone-hosted gold deposits. The spatial distribution of ore mineralization, predicted by computer simulation, is in reasonable agreement with geological observations. Computer simulations of the fault-controlled thermoconvective system revealed a complex pattern of mixing hydrothermal solutions in the model, which also simulates the development of the modern hydrothermal systems on the ocean floor. The specific feature of the model considered, is the development under certain conditions of an intra-fault convective cell that operates essentially independently of the large scale circulation. These and other results obtained during the study indicate that modeling of natural fault-controlled hydrothermal systems is instructive for the analysis of transport processes in man-made hydrothermal systems that could develop in geologic high-level nuclear waste repositories.

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis map of bismuth titanates

    SciTech Connect

    Sardar, Kripasindhu; Walton, Richard I.

    2012-05-15

    The hydrothermal synthesis of four bismuth titanate materials from common bismuth and titanium precursors under hydrothermal conditions is described. Reaction of NaBiO{sub 3}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O and anatase TiO{sub 2} in concentrated NaOH solution at 240 Degree-Sign C is shown to produce perovskite and sillenite phases Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3} and Bi{sub 12}TiO{sub 20}, depending on the ratio of metal precursors used. When KOH solution is used and a 1:1 ratio of the same precursors, a pyrochlore Bi{sub 1.43}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 6}(OH){sub 0.29}(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.66} is formed. The use of a mixture of HNO{sub 3} and NaOH is shown to facilitate the formation of the Aurivillius-type bismuth titanate Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12}. The phases have been isolated separately as phase-pure powders and profile refinement of powder X-ray diffraction data allows comparisons with comparable materials reported in the literature. Analysis of Bi L{sub III}-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of the materials shows the oxidation state of bismuth is +3 in all of the hydrothermally derived products. - Graphical abstract: Use of NaBiO{sub 3}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O and TiO{sub 2} as reagents under hydrothermal conditions allows the phase-pure preparation of four crystalline bismuth titanate materials. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NaBiO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} under hydrothermal conditions allow formation of bismuth titanates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of four distint phases has been mapped. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bi LIII-edge XANES shows Bi is reduced to oxidation state +3 in all materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new hydrated bismuth titanate pyrochlore has been isolated.

  17. Microbial community development in deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the Earth and the Enceladus (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, K.; Shibuya, T.; Sekine, Y.; Russell, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past 35 years, researchers have explored seafloor deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments around the globe and studied a number of microbial ecosystems. Bioinformatics and interdisciplinary geochemistry-microbiology approaches have provided new ideas on the diversity and community composition of microbial life living in deep-sea vents. In particular, recent investigations have revealed that the community structure and productivity of chemolithotrophic microbial communities in the deep-sea hydrothermal environments are controlled primarily by variations in the geochemical composition of hydrothermal fluids. This was originally predicted by a thermodynamic calculation of energy yield potential of various chemolithotrophic metabolisms in a simulated hydrothermal mixing zone. The prediction has been finally justified by the relatively quantitative geomicrobiological characterizations in various deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments all over the world. Thus, there should be a possible principle that the thermodynamic estimation of chemolithotrophic energy yield potentials could predict the realistic chemolithotrophic living community in any of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments in this planet. In 2005, a spacecraft Cassini discovered a water vapour jet plume from the sole pole area of the Saturnian moon Enceladus. The chemical composition analyses of Cassini's mass spectrometer strongly suggested that the Enceladus could host certain extent of extraterrestrial ocean beneath the surface ice sheet and possible ocean-rock hydrothermal systems. In addition, a recent research has suggests that there is silica nanoparticles in Saturn's E-ring derived from the Enceladus plume. An experimental study simulating the reaction between chondritic material and alkaline seawater reveals that the formation of silica nanoparticles requires hydrothermal reaction at high temperatures. Based on these findings, we attempt to built a model of possible hydrothermal fluid

  18. Modulators of intestinal alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, Ekaterina V; Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Sergienko, Eduard A

    2013-01-01

    Small molecule modulators of phosphatases can lead to clinically useful drugs and serve as invaluable tools to study functional roles of various phosphatases in vivo. Here, we describe lead discovery strategies for identification of inhibitors and activators of intestinal alkaline phosphatases. To identify isozyme-selective inhibitors and activators of the human and mouse intestinal alkaline phosphatases, ultrahigh throughput chemiluminescent assays, utilizing CDP-Star as a substrate, were developed for murine intestinal alkaline phosphatase (mIAP), human intestinal alkaline phosphatase (hIAP), human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), and human tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) isozymes. Using these 1,536-well assays, concurrent HTS screens of the MLSMR library of 323,000 compounds were conducted for human and mouse IAP isozymes monitoring both inhibition and activation. This parallel screening approach led to identification of a novel inhibitory scaffold selective for murine intestinal alkaline phosphatase. SAR efforts based on parallel testing of analogs against different AP isozymes generated a potent inhibitor of the murine IAP with IC50 of 540 nM, at least 65-fold selectivity against human TNAP, and >185 selectivity against human PLAP. PMID:23860652

  19. Hydrothermal Flux of Metamorphic Carbon Dioxide From the Central Nepal Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, M. J.; Derry, L. A.; France-Lanord, C.

    2005-12-01

    Hot springs are common along the Himalayan front at or near the Main Central Thrust. The combination of sharply incised south flowing rivers, rapid uplift, and steep relief bring meteoric waters and hot rocks together to form localized but numerous hydrothermal systems flanking the riverbeds. The hot springs have temperatures ranging from 20-70°C and high solute loads (up to 10 g/L). Germanium/silicon ratios in the hot springs are among the highest reported (50-800 μmol/mol), and are 10-200x those of the rivers. Ge/Si mass balance calculations show that hydrothermal waters account for 0.1 to 4% of total discharge for individual tributaries in central Nepal, and ca. 0.5% of the total discharge for the Narayani. The hot springs derive up to 100% of their total alkalinity from silicate mineral alteration, and have been shown to provide up to 25% of the silicate alkalinity in the Narayani River. Many of the springs along the Himalayan front are actively degassing carbon dioxide and dissolved CO2 concentrations are high. Bicarbonate is the dominant anion in the hot spring waters with concentrations up to 55000 μmol/kg. Carbon isotope values for dissolved inorganic CO2 (DIC) in the springs average -0.5‰ but range from -13‰ to as high as +13‰ with springs in the Marsyandi, Seti, Trisuli, and Modi systems showing positive values. These enriched δ13C values are rare and suggest a complex history. We propose a three-step process, involving the release of CO2 from underlying lesser Himalayan sediments during metamorphism, mixing of these metamorphic fluids with meteoric waters, and subsequent degassing of this mixture in the near-surface as a means to produce heavy DIC. Simple modeling suggests that nearly all (99%) of the DIC must be degassed from the fluid at the near-surface in order for such significant δ13C enrichment to occur. The significant degassing required to produce enriched DIC combined with the high [HCO3-] indicate a large CO2 flux from the central

  20. Hydrothermally prepared inorganic siliceous wastes: Hydrothermal reaction of calcareous and steatite ceramic tile wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Maenami, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Takeyuki; Ishida, Hideki

    1996-12-31

    Possibility of solidification of various ceramic wastes by hydrothermal processing was investigated. The starting materials were feldspathic porcelain tile waste, steatite ceramic tile waste, and calcareous ceramic tile waste. These were mixed with CaO so as to obtain a Ca/Si molar ratio of 0.5. After forming, they were cured for 2 to 20 h under the saturated steam pressure at 200{degrees}C. Although the SiO{sub 2} content of these ceramic wastes was about 70 mass% and they contain various alkaline ions and alkaline earth ions, solidified specimens with flexural strength up to 35MPa were obtained. This is within the range of strengths when quartz or fused silica is used as pure SiO{sub 2} sources. Formation of tobermorite, which was detected in all systems after 2 h of curing, was considered to affect the increase of the strength. It was found that there is a possibility of aluminum and alkali ions being included in the structure of the formed tobermorite. In the case of using steatite ceramic tile waste containing Mg, magnesium silicate hydrates were also formed. The modal pore diameter shifted to 0.01 {mu} m with the formation of these hydrates and there was correlation between the flexural strength and the pore size distribution.

  1. Evaluation of Alkaline Cleaner Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partz, Earl

    1998-01-01

    Alkaline cleaners used to process aluminum substrates have contained chromium as the corrosion inhibitor. Chromium is a hazardous substance whose use and control are described by environmental laws. Replacement materials that have the characteristics of chromated alkaline cleaners need to be found that address both the cleaning requirements and environmental impacts. This report will review environmentally friendly candidates evaluated as non-chromium alkaline cleaner replacements and methods used to compare those candidates one versus another. The report will also list characteristics used to select candidates based on their declared contents. It will also describe and evaluate methods used to discriminate among the large number of prospective candidates.

  2. Net alkalinity and net acidity 2: Practical considerations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, C.S.; Cravotta, C.A., III

    2005-01-01

    The pH, alkalinity, and acidity of mine drainage and associated waters can be misinterpreted because of the chemical instability of samples and possible misunderstandings of standard analytical method results. Synthetic and field samples of mine drainage having various initial pH values and concentrations of dissolved metals and alkalinity were titrated by several methods, and the results were compared to alkalinity and acidity calculated based on dissolved solutes. The pH, alkalinity, and acidity were compared between fresh, unoxidized and aged, oxidized samples. Data for Pennsylvania coal mine drainage indicates that the pH of fresh samples was predominantly acidic (pH 2.5-4) or near neutral (pH 6-7); ??? 25% of the samples had pH values between 5 and 6. Following oxidation, no samples had pH values between 5 and 6. The Standard Method Alkalinity titration is constrained to yield values >0. Most calculated and measured alkalinities for samples with positive alkalinities were in close agreement. However, for low-pH samples, the calculated alkalinity can be negative due to negative contributions by dissolved metals that may oxidize and hydrolyze. The Standard Method hot peroxide treatment titration for acidity determination (Hot Acidity) accurately indicates the potential for pH to decrease to acidic values after complete degassing of CO2 and oxidation of Fe and Mn, and it indicates either the excess alkalinity or that required for neutralization of the sample. The Hot Acidity directly measures net acidity (= -net alkalinity). Samples that had near-neutral pH after oxidation had negative Hot Acidity; samples that had pH < 6.3 after oxidation had positive Hot Acidity. Samples with similar pH values before oxidation had dissimilar Hot Acidities due to variations in their alkalinities and dissolved Fe, Mn, and Al concentrations. Hot Acidity was approximately equal to net acidity calculated based on initial pH and dissolved concentrations of Fe, Mn, and Al minus the

  3. Hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers,

    SciTech Connect

    Sleep, N.H.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter discusses the initial entry of hydrothermal seawater into deep levels of the oceanic crust, the effectiveness of hydrothermal circulation in cooling the crust, the geometry of hydrothermal circulation, the relationship between the hydrothermal circulation and the magma chamber, the reaction of the oceanic crust with the seawater, and the identification of the hydrothermal fluid which alters a rock sample. Topics considered include the crack front, observation relevant to the crack front, the limitations of the crack front hypothesis, the observed pattern of hydrothermal alteration, the nature of the hydrothermal fluid, the physics of large scale convection, and convection through crack zones. Knowledge of hydrothermal circulation at the ridge axis is based on sampling of the hydrothermal fluid, indirect geophysical measurements of the oceanic crust, and studies of rocks which are believed to have undergone hydrothermal alteration at the ridge axis. Includes 2 drawings.

  4. Hydrothermally growth of novel hierarchical structures titanium dioxide for high efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Pengfei; Liu, Yang; Sun, Peng; Du, Sisi; Cai, Yaxin; Liu, Fengmin; Zheng, Jie; Lu, Geyu

    2014-12-01

    We report an innovative development of novel double layered photoanodes made of hierarchical TiO2 micro-corollas as the overlayer and TiO2 nanoforest as the underlayer (HTCF), for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). They are obtained by a facile hydrothermal reaction of TiO2 nanorods array with top microspheres (MS)/FTO (Fluorine-doped tin oxide) glass substrate in an alkaline solution. In this process, the microspheres and nanorods are transformed into micro-corollas and nanotrees, respectively. The photoanodes with HTCF structure can greatly improve the light scattering ability due to their novel structures. Moreover, the enhanced surface area of HTCF can lead to larger dye loading, which achieves the higher light harvesting capacity. Base on the fast electron transport of the interior nanorods, higher light scattering and harvesting capacities, this novel HTCF photoanode realizes tri-functions. The overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the HTCF DSSCs are 51% increase in the conversion efficiency compare with those of constructed by bare TiO2 nanorod arrays. In our work, tri-functions of photoanodes are obtained by improving the 1D TiO2 nanostructures (nanorod, nanowire, nanotube et al.). To the best of our knowledge, it is a significant fabrication technology breakthrough for the photoanode of dye-sensitized solar cells.

  5. Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, David T.

    1992-01-01

    A method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction.

  6. Implementation of model predictive control on a hydrothermal oxidation reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Muske, K.R.; Dell`Orco, P.C.; Le, L.A.; Flesner, R.L.

    1998-12-31

    This paper describes the model-based control algorithm developed for a hydrothermal oxidation reactor at the Pantex Department of Energy facility in Amarillo, Texas. The combination of base hydrolysis and hydrothermal oxidation is used for the disposal of PBX 9404 high explosive at Pantex. The reactor oxidizes the organic compounds in the hydrolysate solutions obtained from the base hydrolysis process. The objective of the model predictive controller is to minimize the total aqueous nitrogen compounds in the effluent of the reactor. The controller also maintains a desired excess oxygen concentration in the reactor effluent to ensure the complete destruction of the organic carbon compounds in the hydrolysate.

  7. Alkaline galvanic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, M.

    1993-06-01

    A battery is described having an anode, a cathode and an electrolyte with the anode having zinc or a zinc alloy as an active anodic material, the cathode having a metal oxide or hydroxide as an active cathodic material, and the electrolyte comprising a solution of a first salt formed by the reaction of one or more acids selected from the group consisting of boric acid, phosphoric acid and arsenic acid with an alkali or earth alkali hydroxide present in an amount to produce a stoichiometric, excess of said hydroxide to said acid in the range of 2.5 to 11.0 equivalents per liter, and a solution of a second salt which is a soluble alkali or earth alkali fluoride in an amount corresponding to a concentration range of 0.01 to 1.0 equivalents per liter of total solution.

  8. Hydrothermal Chemotrophic Biosignatures on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westall, F.; Campbell, K. A.; Gautret, P.; Bréhéret, J.; Foucher, F.; Vago, J.; Kminek, G.; Hubert, A.; Hickman-Lewis, K.; Cockell, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrothermal chemotrophic biosignatures (morphological and geo-organochemical) were common in shallow water on the anaerobic early Earth, preserved by silicification. They are representative also of shallow crustal biosignatures.

  9. Lipid Biomarker Preservation in Silica-Depositing Hydrothermal Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Parenteau, M. N.; Farmer, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    The discovery of extensive silica-rich deposits at Home Plate in the Columbia Hills indicates that hydrothermal conditions once existed on Mars (Squyres et al. 2008). Two types of environments could have been responsible for forming these materials: fumaroles or hydrothermal springs. Examples of both types of these thermal features are found throughout Yellowstone National Park (YNP). The discovery of bona fide microfossils in ancient cherts indicates that silica deposition was an excellent mechanism for organic preservation on the early Earth. Given the importance that organic biomarkers have played in identifying some of the earliest microbial life on Earth and the potential for a similar habitable period on Mars, examination of the preservation of organic biomarkers within various hydrothermal, silica-rich modern analogs is essential for future interpretation of Martian organics. Cyanobacterial mats and biofilms are common inhabitants of hydrothermal spring systems worldwide, at temperatures below 73°C and over a broad range of pH, from acidic to alkaline. Bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs) are the biological precursors for the abundant fossil hopanes recovered from sedimentary rock (Brocks et al. 1999; Summons et al. 1999). The 2-methyl homologs are generally considered a biomarker for cyanobacterial-dominated paleoecosystems. Some evidence exists that the complex molecular structure of BHP is retained upon entombment in hydrothermal silica and that rapid incorporation into the silica matrix may enhance preservation (Gibson et al. 2008). Here we report on the preservation of microbial lipids in several alkaline and acidic, silica-depositing hotsprings in YNP with particular emphasis on the potential for BHP preservation. Brocks JJ et al (1999) Archaean molecular fossils and the early rise of the eukaryotes. Science 185: 1033-1036 Gibson RA et al (2008) Bacteriohopanepolyol signatures of cyanobacterial and methanotrophic bacterial populations recorded in a geothermal

  10. Hydrothermal electrocatalytic oxidation for the treatment of herbicides wastewater.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hanshuang; Lv, Baoying; Gao, Junxia; Zhao, Guohua

    2016-05-01

    A hydrothermal electrocatalytic oxidation (HTECO) method is adopted to treat the biorefractory and toxic 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) herbicides wastewater on nano-Pt/Ti electrode in the existence of H2O2. Comparisons for the removal of 2,4-D and total organic carbon (TOC) have been carried out between HTECO with individual electrochemical oxidation (EO) and hydrothermal catalytic oxidation (HTCO), showing that high mineralization efficiency was obtained in HTECO process. The possible factors resulting in the high removal efficiency in HTECO process have been studied by investigating the properties of the electrode and solution in hydrothermal condition, the amount of active radicals, the decay kinetic, and evolution of main intermediates of 2,4-D. Thus, an enhanced mechanism for HTECO method for the treatment of herbicides wastewater has been obtained. PMID:26865489

  11. Versatile hydrothermal synthesis of one-dimensional composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yonglan

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we report on a versatile hydrothermal approach developed to fabricate one-dimensional (1D) composite structures. Sulfur and selenium formed liquid and adsorbed onto microrods as droplets and subsequently reacted with metallic ion in solution to produce nanoparticles-decorated composite microrods. 1D composites including ZnO/CdS, ZnO/MnS, ZnO/CuS, ZnO/CdSe, and FeOOH/CdS were successfully made using this hydrothermal strategy and the growth mechanism was also discussed. This hydrothermal strategy is simple and green, and can be extended to the synthesis of various 1D composite structures. Moreover, the interaction between the shell nanoparticles and the one-dimensional nanomaterials were confirmed by photoluminescence investigation of ZnO/CdS.

  12. TiO2 Nanotubes of Enhanced Nanocrystallinity and Well-Preserved Nanostructure by Pre-Annealing and Post-Hydrothermal Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuwono, Akhmad Herman; Ferdiansyah, Alfian; Sofyan, Nofrijon; Kartini, Indriana; Pujianto, Tego Hadi

    2011-12-01

    In the current investigation, a modified process combining pre-annealing and post-hydrothermal treatments has been applied on the as-dried TiO2 nanotubes derived from alkaline route of TiO2 P25 nanoparticles in 10 M NaOH solution. The combined treatment is purposely aimed at enhancing the nanocrystallinity of anatase TiO2, while at the same time maintaining the integrity of the nanotube hollow structures. The detail of the structure, morphology and crystallinity of the resulting nanotubes were examined by XRD, SEM and TEM, while the optical properties of nanotubes were investigated by UV-visible spectroscopy. For the nanotube samples which have been previously annealed at 300 °C, the crystallite size of anatase TiO2 in nanotubes increased from 17.20 to 18.30 nm after being subjected to post-hydrothermal treatment at 100 to 150 °C. The band gap energy (Eg) of the resulting nanotubes is inversely proportional to the crystallite size of anatase phase where the lowest value of 3.21 eV was obtained from the TiO2 nanotube sample with the biggest crystallite size of 18.30 nm.

  13. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson

    2004-10-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Neither aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide nor silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems produced significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested

  14. Hydrothermal acid treatment for sugar extraction from Golenkinia sp.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun-A; Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Jin-Suk; Kim, Seung Wook; Lee, Gye-An; Yun, Jihyun; Park, Ji-Yeon

    2015-08-01

    In this study, hydrothermal acid treatment for efficient recovery of sugar from Golenkinia sp. was investigated. The initial glucose and XMG (xylose, mannose, and galactose) contents of a prepared Golenkinia sp. solution (40g/L) were 15.05 and 5.24g/L, respectively. The microalgal cell walls were hydrolyzed, for sugar recovery, by enzymatic saccharification and/or hydrothermal acid treatment. Among the various hydrothermal acid treatment conditions, the most optimal were the 2.0% H2SO4 concentration at 150°C for 15min, under which the glucose- and XMG-extraction yields were 71.7% and 64.9%, respectively. By pH 4.8, 50°C enzymatic hydrolysis after optimal hydrothermal acid treatment, the glucose- and XMG-extraction yields were additionally increased by 8.3% and 0.8%, respectively. After hydrothermal acid treatment, the combination with the enzymatic hydrolysis process improved the total sugar yield of Golenkinia sp. to 75.4%. PMID:25976916

  15. Impact-generated Hydrothermal Activity at the Chicxulub Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kring, D. A.; Zurcher, L.; Abramov, O.

    2007-05-01

    Borehole samples recovered from PEMEX exploration boreholes and an ICDP scientific borehole indicate the Chicxulub impact event generated hydrothermal alteration throughout a large volume of the Maya Block beneath the crater floor and extending across the bulk of the ~180 km diameter crater. The first indications of hydrothermal alteration were observed in the crater discovery samples from the Yucatan-6 borehole and manifest itself in the form of anhydrite and quartz veins. Continuous core from the Yaxcopoil-1 borehole reveal a more complex and temporally extensive alteration sequence: following a brief period at high temperatures, impact- melt-bearing polymict breccias and a thin, underlying unit of impact melt were subjected to metasomatism, producing alkali feldspar, sphene, apatite, and magnetite. As the system continued to cool, smectite-series phyllosilicates appeared. A saline solution was involved. Stable isotopes suggest the fluid was dominated by a basinal brine created mostly from existing groundwater of the Yucatan Peninsula, although contributions from down-welling water also occurred in some parts of the system. Numerical modeling of the hydrothermal system suggests circulation occurred for 1.5 to 2.3 Myr, depending on the permeability of the system. Our understanding of the hydrothermal system, however, is still crude. Additional core recovery projects, particularly into the central melt sheet, are needed to better evaluate the extent and duration of hydrothermal alteration.

  16. Baseline Hydrothermal Monitoring Data from Cascade Range Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crankshaw, I. M.; Ingebritsen, S.; Randolph-Flagg, N. G.; Newman, A. C.; Evans, W.; Spicer, K. R.; Ledingham, G.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2009 the U.S. Geological Survey has systematically monitored hydrothermal behavior at selected Cascade Range volcanoes in order to define baseline hydrothermal and geochemical conditions. Gas and water data have been collected at 25 monitoring sites on 10 of the highest-risk volcanoes in the Cascade Range. These sites include summit-fumarole groups and springs/streams that show clear evidence of magmatic influence in the form of high 3He/4He ratios and (or) large fluxes of magmatic CO2 or heat. The monitoring data are intended to (1) be suitable for comparison with other continuous geophysical monitoring data and (2) provide baseline data that will be useful during future episodes of volcanic unrest. Site records consist mainly of hourly temperature and (or) hydrothermal solute flux data spanning multiple years. Many of the hydrothermal time series data show considerable variability during quiescent periods, including diurnal, seasonal, and inter-annual variability. Having established baseline conditions, we are reducing our monitoring frequency, and data are being archived and analyzed with a view to providing useful and succinct summaries of baseline behavior during quiescent periods. The hydrothermal response to recent (November 2014 to present) unrest at Lassen Volcanic Center demonstrates the utility of long-term background data, which has made it straightforward to isolate symptoms of unrest.

  17. Reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride using buffered alkaline ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ya-Ting; Liang, Chenju

    2015-10-01

    Alkaline ascorbic acid (AA) was recently discovered as a novel in-situ chemical reduction (ISCR) reagent for remediating chlorinated solvents in the subsurface. For this ISCR process, the maintenance of an alkaline pH is essential. This study investigated the possibility of the reduction of carbon tetrachloride (CT) using alkaline AA solution buffered by phosphate and by NaOH. The results indicated that CT was reduced by AA, and chloroform (CF) was a major byproduct at a phosphate buffered pH of 12. However, CT was completely reduced by AA in 2M NaOH without CF formation. In the presence of iron/soil minerals, iron could be reduced by AA and Fe(2+) tends to precipitate on the mineral surface to accelerate CT degradation. A simultaneous transfer of hydrogenolysis and dichloroelimination would occur under phosphate buffered pH 12. This implies that a high alkaline environment is a crucial factor for maintaining the dominant pathway of two electron transfer from dianionic AA to dehydroascorbic acid, and to undergo dichloroelimination of CT. Moreover, threonic acid and oxalic acid were identified to be the major AA decomposition products in alkaline solutions. PMID:25912910

  18. Alkaline extraction of phenolic compounds from intact sorghum kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An aqueous sodium hydroxide solution was employed to extract phenolic compounds from whole grain sorghum without decortication or grinding as determined by Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC). The alkaline extract ORAC values were more stable over 32 days compared to neutralized and freeze dri...

  19. Thermochemical alkaline degradation of polysaccharide materials: Product characterization and identification

    SciTech Connect

    Krochta, J.M.; Hudson, J.S.; Tillin, S.J.; Spala, K.

    1985-01-01

    Degradation of cellulosics or starch in alkaline solution produces mostly organic acids which are monocarboxylic in nature. Seven of the organic acids have been identified as formic, acetic, glycolic, lactic, 2-hydroxybutyric, 2-hydroxyisobutyric and 2-hydroxyvaleric acids. In total, their yields amount to 41-46% of starting material weight.

  20. The alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite magmatism from Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberti, E.; Gomes, C. D. B.; Comin-Chiaramonti, P.

    2015-12-01

    Early to Late Cretaceous lasting to Paleocene alkaline magmatism from southern Brazil is found associated with major extensional structural features in and around the Paraná Basin and grouped into various provinces on the basis of several data. Magmatism is variable in size, mode of occurrence and composition. The alkaline rocks are dominantly potassic, a few occurrences showing sodic affinity. The more abundant silicate rocks are evolved undersaturated to saturated in silica syenites, displaying large variation in igneous forms. Less evolved types are restricted to subvolcanic environments and outcrops of effusive suites occur rarely. Cumulatic mafic and ultramafic rock types are very common, particularly in the alkali-carbonatitic complexes. Carbonatite bodies are represented by Ca-carbonatites and Mg-carbonatites and more scarcely by Fe-carbonatites. Available radiometric ages for the alkaline rocks fit on three main chronological groups: around 130 Ma, subcoveal with the Early Cretaceous flood tholeiites of the Paraná Basin, 100-110 Ma and 80-90 Ma (Late Cretaceous). The alkaline magmatism also extends into Paleocene times, as indicated by ages from some volcanic lavas. Geochemically, alkaline potassic and sodic rock types are distinguished by their negative and positive Nb-Ta anomalies, respectively. Negative spikes in Nb-Ta are also a feature common to the associated tholeiitic rocks. Sr-Nd-Pb systematics confirm the contribution of both HIMU and EMI mantle components in the formation of the alkaline rocks. Notably, Early and Late Cretaceous carbonatites have the same isotopic Sr-Nd initial ratios of the associated alkaline rocks. C-O isotopic Sr-Nd isotopic ratios indicate typical mantle signature for some carbonatites and the influence of post-magmatic processes in others. Immiscibility of liquids of phonolitic composition, derived from mafic alkaline parental magmas, has been responsible for the origin of the carbonatites. Close association of alkaline

  1. Net alkalinity and net acidity 1: Theoretical considerations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, C.S.; Cravotta, C.A., III

    2005-01-01

    Net acidity and net alkalinity are widely used, poorly defined, and commonly misunderstood parameters for the characterization of mine drainage. The authors explain theoretical expressions of 3 types of alkalinity (caustic, phenolphthalein, and total) and acidity (mineral, CO2, and total). Except for rarely-invoked negative alkalinity, theoretically defined total alkalinity is closely analogous to measured alkalinity and presents few practical interpretation problems. Theoretically defined "CO 2-acidity" is closely related to most standard titration methods with an endpoint pH of 8.3 used for determining acidity in mine drainage, but it is unfortunately named because CO2 is intentionally driven off during titration of mine-drainage samples. Using the proton condition/mass- action approach and employing graphs to illustrate speciation with changes in pH, the authors explore the concept of principal components and how to assign acidity contributions to aqueous species commonly present in mine drainage. Acidity is defined in mine drainage based on aqueous speciation at the sample pH and on the capacity of these species to undergo hydrolysis to pH 8.3. Application of this definition shows that the computed acidity in mg L -1 as CaCO3 (based on pH and analytical concentrations of dissolved FeII, FeIII, Mn, and Al in mg L -1):aciditycalculated=50{1000(10-pH)+[2(FeII)+3(FeIII)]/56+2(Mn)/ 55+3(Al)/27}underestimates contributions from HSO4- and H+, but overestimates the acidity due to Fe3+ and Al3+. However, these errors tend to approximately cancel each other. It is demonstrated that "net alkalinity" is a valid mathematical construction based on theoretical definitions of alkalinity and acidity. Further, it is shown that, for most mine-drainage solutions, a useful net alkalinity value can be derived from: (1) alkalinity and acidity values based on aqueous speciation, (2) measured alkalinity minus calculated acidity, or (3) taking the negative of the value obtained in a

  2. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-04-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent

  3. Dolomite Dissolution in Alkaline Cementious Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittermayr, Florian; Klammer, Dietmar; Köhler, Stephan; Dietzel, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Chemical alteration of concrete has gained much attention over the past years as many cases of deterioration due to sulphate attack, thaumasite formation (TSA) or alkali silica reactions (ASR) have been reported in various constructions (Schmidt et al, 2009). Much less is known about the so called alkali carbonate reaction (ACR). It is believed that dolomite aggregates can react with the alkalis from the cement, dissolve and form calcite and brucite (Katayama, 2004). Due to very low solubility of dolomite in alkaline solutions this reaction seems doubtful. In this study we are trying to gain new insides about the conditions that can lead to the dissolution of dolomite in concrete. Therefore we investigated concrete samples from Austrian tunnels that show partially dissolved dolomite aggregates. Petrological analysis such as microprobe, SEM and Raman spectroscopy as well as a hydrochemical analysis of interstitial solutions and ground water and modelling with PhreeqC (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999) are carried out. In addition a series of batch experiments is set up. Modelling approaches by PhreeqC show a thermodynamically possibility in the alkaline range when additional Ca2+ in solution causes dolomite to become more and more undersaturated as calcite gets supersaturated. Interacting ground water is enriched in Ca2+and saturated with respect to gypsum as marine evaporites are found in situ rocks. Furthermore it is more likely that Portlandite (Ca(OH)2) plays a more important role than Na and K in the cement. Portlandite acts as an additional Ca2+ source and is much more abundant than the alkalies. Some interstitial solutions are dominated mainly by Na+ and SO42- and reach concentrations up to 30 g/l TDS. It is believed that solutions can even reach thenardite saturation as efflorescences are found on the tunnel walls. In consequence dolomite solubility increases with increasing ionic strength. pH > 11 further accelerate the process of dedolomitization by the removal

  4. Marine diagenesis of hydrothermal sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Moammar, M.O.

    1985-01-01

    An attempt is made to discuss the artificial and natural oxidation and hydrolysis of hydrothermal sulfide upon interaction with normal seawater. Synthetic and natural ferrosphalerite particles used in kinetic oxidation and hydrolysis studies in seawater develop dense, crystalline coatings consisting of ordered and ferrimagnetic delta-(Fe, Zn)OOH. Due to the formation of this reactive diffusion barrier, the release of Zn into solution decreases rapidly, and sulfide oxidation is reduced to a low rate determined by the diffusion of oxygen through the oxyhydroxide film. This also acts as an efficient solvent for ions such as Zn/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, and possibly Cd/sup 2 +/, which contribute to the stabilization of the delta-FeOOH structure. The oxidation of sulfide occurs in many seafloor spreading areas, such as 21/sup 0/N on the East Pacific Ridge. In these areas the old surface of the sulfide chimneys are found to be covered by an orange stain, and sediment near the base of nonactive vents is also found to consist of what has been referred to as amorphous iron oxide and hydroxide. This thesis also discusses the exceedingly low solubility of zinc in seawater, from delta-(Fe, Zn)OOH and the analogous phase (zinc-ferrihydroxide) and the zinc exchange minerals, 10-A manganate and montmorillonite. The concentrations of all four are of the same magnitude (16, 36.4, and 12 nM, respectively) as the zinc concentration in deep ocean water (approx. 10 nM), which suggests that manganates and montmorillonite with iron oxyhydroxides control zinc concentration in the deep ocean.

  5. Alkaline oxide conversion coatings for aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.

    1996-02-01

    Three related conversion coating methods are described that are based on film formation which occurs when aluminum alloys are exposed to alkaline Li salt solutions. Representative examples of the processing methods, resulting coating structure, composition and morphology are presented. The corrosion resistance of these coatings to aerated 0.5 M NaCl solution has been evaluated as a function of total processing time using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). This evaluation shows that excellent corrosion resistance can be uniformly achieved using no more than 20 minutes of process time for 6061-T6. Using current methods a minimum of 80 minutes of process time is required to get marginally acceptable corrosion resistance for 2024-T3. Longer processing times are required to achieve uniformly good corrosion resistance.

  6. Probing Hydrothermal Organic Reaction Mechanisms with Hydrothermal Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Gould, I.; Shock, E.

    2013-12-01

    In most hydrothermal organic experiments the emphasis is on reaction product distributions and kinetic measurements, with mechanistic information or the direct evidence of proposed reaction intermediates rare or lacking. We believe that greater mechanistic insight will yield greater predictive power. Previously, we studied the reactions of a model ketone, dibenzylketone (DBK) in aqueous media at 300°C and 700 bars for durations up to several days [1], and found that many of the reaction products arise from coupling of benzyl and related radicals generated through homolytic bond cleavage of DBK. In the present work, we find that in situ photochemical generation of the radicals can provide independent evidence for radical intermediates in the hydrothermal reaction of DBK, yielding valuable insights into the thermal reactions. Hydrothermal photochemical experiments of DBK were conducted in water in sealed fused silica glass tubes at 300°C and 86 bars under UV irradiation for minutes. The short timescale of the experiments allows the primary radical coupling products of DBK to be generated and identified, and their follow-up reactions to be monitored directly. The primary hydrothermal photolysis products include toluene, bibenzyl, a three-benzene-ring product (with isomers), and two four-benzene-ring products (with isomers), which represent a much simpler version of the products obtained through thermal reactions under similar conversions. Most of the observed photolysis products were identical to the ones in the thermal reactions, and those not observed in thermal reactions were found to be the short-lived precursors of the thermal products. As an example, the transformation of one four-ring product to the other was attained and monitored by experiments in which hydrothermal photolysis of DBK was followed by thermolysis at 300°C for a further few hours. The transformation steps included dehydration and isomerization, which were known to be thermodynamically

  7. Metal ion effects on the kinetics of abiotic formation of glycylglycine and diketopiperazine under the simulated conditions of the Lost City hydrothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, K.; Yabuta, H.

    2010-12-01

    Introduction: The Lost City hydrothermal field has been recently discovered in 2000 and known for its characteristic conditions that differs from the typical hydrothermal vents, such as alkaline pH, low temperature (> ~90°C), metal ion compositions [1, 2]. The hydrothermal system is suggested as a plausible environment for the origin and evolution of life in the early Earth [3]. In our previous study, it was revealed that the dimerization of glycine (Gly) in aqueous solution reached the maximum rate in alkaline solution at pH 9.8 [4], supporting the above hypothesis from the perspective of abiotic chemistry. In this study, the heating experiments of Gly were conducted under the conditions simulating the metal ion composition of the Lost City, in order to evaluate the effects of metal ions on the kinetics of the formation of glycylglycine (GlyGly) and diketopiperazine (DKP). Experimental: Eight milliliter of 100 mM aqueous solutions of Gly at pH 9.3 with MgCl2 : MgSO4 : CaCl2 : NaCl : NaOH concentration ratio (mM) of 9.4 : 4.6 : 23 : 35 : 470 (solution A) were put into Teflon bottles and heated at 120, 140, 160 and 180°C for 1 to 5 days. For comparison, 100 mM aqueous solutions of Gly at pH 9.3 with 32 mM NaOH (solution B) and at pH 6.0 without NaOH (solution C) were heated at 140°C for 14 days. After heating, each sample was diluted and analyzed by HPLC. In this experiment, the four reaction pathways were considered: 2 Gly → GlyGly (the second order), GlyGly → DKP (the first order), DKP → GlyGly (the first order), GlyGly → 2 Gly (the first order). The rate constants were determined by fitting the changes of the concentrations of Gly, GlyGly, and DKP with increasing heating time. Results and discussion: The concentration of GlyGly in solution A at equilibrium was 25 % lower than that in solution B, although the formation rates of GlyGly were similar values for solutions A and B, 1.25 ×10-9 and 0.93 ×10-9 l mol-1 s-1, respectively. This observation is

  8. Cymrite as an indicator of high barium activity in the formation of hydrothermal rocks related to carbonatites of the Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokhtina, N. V.; Chukanov, N. V.; Voloshin, A. V.; Pakhomovsky, Ya. A.; Bogdanova, A. N.; Moiseev, M. M.

    2008-12-01

    Cymrite, BaAl2Si2O8 · nH2O, is a rare mineral formed during low-grade dynamothermal metamorphism ( T = 250-300°C, P = 1-3 kbar). Cymrite has been described from many metasedimentary ores and hydrothermal rocks. In carbonatites, it has been found for the first time. Cymrite has been identified in the Kovdor and Seblyavr massifs, Kola Peninsula. In Kovdor, this mineral has been described from one of the hydrothermal veins cutting the pyroxenite-melilitite-ijolite complex at the Phlogopite deposit; cymrite is associated with thomsonite, calcite, and stivensite. In the Seblyavr pluton, cymrite occurs in thin veins of calcite carbonatite that cut pyroxenite contacting with ijolite. Cymrite from the Seblyavr pluton is associated with calcite, natrolite, pyrite, and chalcopyrite. The mineral is optically negative and uniaxial, with extinction parallel to elongation; ω ˜ 1.607(1). According to X-ray diffraction data, cymrite from Seblyavr is monoclinic, space group P1 m1; unit-cell dimensions are: a = 5.33, b = 36.96, c = 7.66 Å, β = 90°, V = 1510.55 Å3. According to the results of IR spectroscopy, in the series of samples from different massifs (in the running order Kovdor-Voishor-Seblyavr), the double-layer deformation is enhanced and accompanied by a decrease in the Si-O-Si angle and weakening of hydrogen bonds of interlayer water. The empirical formulas of cymrite calculated from electron microprobe analyses are Ba0.93-0.95Ca0.01-0.02K0.00-0.05Na0.02-0.04Al1.97-2.01Si1.99-2.03O8(H2O) and Ba1.00-1.02Ca0.00-0.01Sr0.00-0.01Fe0.00-0.01Al1.94-2.00Si1.98-2.03O8(H2O) at Seblyavr and Kovdor, respectively. Cymrite from the carbonatite massifs of the Kola Peninsula was formed under hydrothermal conditions at low temperature (200-300°C), high activity of Ba and Si, and high water pressure. At Kovdor, the mineral crystallized directly from the residual solution enriched in Ba. The sequence of mineral deposition is as follows: thomsonite-cymrite-calcite-stevensite. Cymrite

  9. Composition of pore and spring waters from Baby Bare: Global implications of geochemical fluxes from a ridge flank hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, C.G.; Mottl, M.J.

    2000-02-01

    Warm hydrothermal springs were discovered on Baby Bare, which is an isolated basement outcrop on 3.5 Ma-old crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The authors have sampled these spring waters from a manned submersible, along with associated sediment pore waters from 48 gravity and piston cores. Systematic variations in the chemical composition of these waters indicate that hydrothermal reactions in basement at moderate temperatures remove Na, K, Li, Rb, Mg, TCO{sub 2}, alkalinity, and phosphate from the circulating seawater and leach Ca, Sr, Si, B, and Mn from the oceanic crust; and that reactions with the turbidite sediment surrounding Baby Bare remove Na, Li, Mg, Ca, Sr, and sulfate from the pore water while producing ammonium and Si and both producing and consuming phosphate, nitrate, alkalinity, Mn, and Fe. K, Rb, and B are relatively unreactive in the sediment column. The composition of altered seawater in basement at Baby Bare is similar to the inferred composition of 58 C formation water from crust nearly twice as old (5.9 Ma) on the southern flank of the Costa Rica Rift. The Baby Bare fluids also exhibit the same directions of net elemental transfer between basalt and seawater as solutions produced in laboratory experiments at a similar temperature, and complement compositional changes form seawater observed in seafloor basalts altered at cool to moderate temperatures. The common parameter among the two ridge flanks and experiments is temperature, suggesting that the residence time of seawater in the two ridge-flank sites is sufficiently long for the solutions to equilibrate with altered basalt. The authors use the Baby Bare spring water to estimate upper limits on the global fluxes of 14 elements at warm ridge-flank sites such as Baby Bare. Maximum calculated fluxes of Mg, Ca, sulfate, B, and K may equal or exceed 25% of the riverine flux, and such sites may represent the missing, high K/Rb sink required for the K budget.

  10. One-pot synthesis of nitrogen and sulfur co-doped onion-like mesoporous carbon vesicle as an efficient metal-free catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ce; Bo, Xiangjie; Zhang, Yufan; Li, Mian; Guo, Liping

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen and sulfur co-doped onion-like mesoporous carbon vesicle (NS-MCV) with multilayer lamellar structure is synthesized as a metal-free catalyst through a convenient and economical procedure. The synthesized materials are systematically characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectra, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The characterization results demonstrate that N and S atoms can be successfully doped into the framework of MCV with little impact on the morphology and structure. The NS-MCV manifests a remarkably high electrocatalytic activity as a metal-free electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with mainly a four-electron transfer pathway. Moreover, in contrast to the commercially available Pt/C catalyst, the NS-MCV shows much better long-term stability and tolerance toward methanol crossover in an alkaline medium. Such excellent performances can be mainly attributed to the synergistic effect arising from the addition of N and S heteroatom, optimized S content and high surface area. The NS-MCV with a simple synthesis method may further exploited as potentially efficient and inexpensive metal-free ORR catalyst materials.

  11. Porosity evolution in Icelandic hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thien, B.; Kosakowski, G.; Kulik, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Mineralogical alteration of reservoir rocks, driven by fluid circulation in natural or enhanced hydrothermal systems, is likely to influence the long-term performance of geothermal power generation. A key factor is the change of porosity due to dissolution of primary minerals and precipitation of secondary phases. Porosity changes will affect fluid circulation and solute transport, which, in turn, influence mineralogical alteration. This study is part of the Sinergia COTHERM project (COmbined hydrological, geochemical and geophysical modeling of geotTHERMal systems, grant number CRSII2_141843/1) that is an integrative research project aimed at improving our understanding of the sub-surface processes in magmatically-driven natural geothermal systems. These are typically high enthalphy systems where a magmatic pluton is located at a few kilometers depth. These shallow plutons increase the geothermal gradient and trigger the circulation of hydrothermal waters with a steam cap forming at shallow depth. Field observations suggest that active and fossil Icelandic hydrothermal systems are built from a superposition of completely altered and completely unaltered layers. With help of 1D and 2D reactive transport models (OpenGeoSys-GEM code), we investigate the reasons for this finding, by studying the mineralogical evolution of protoliths with different initial porosities at different temperatures and pressures, different leaching water composition and gas content, and different porosity geometries (i.e. porous medium versus fractured medium). From this study, we believe that the initial porosity of protoliths and volume changes due to their transformation into secondary minerals are key factors to explain the different alteration extents observed in field studies. We also discuss how precipitation and dissolution kinetics can influence the alteration time scales.

  12. Actinide-Aluminate Speciation in Alkaline Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. David L. Clark; Dr. Alexander M. Fedosseev

    2001-12-21

    Investigation of behavior of actinides in alkaline media containing AL(III) showed that no aluminate complexes of actinides in oxidation states (IIII-VIII) were formed in alkaline solutions. At alkaline precipitation IPH (10-14) of actinides in presence of AL(III) formation of aluminate compounds is not observed. However, in precipitates contained actinides (IIV)<(VI), and to a lesser degree actinides (III), some interference of components takes place that is reflected in change of solid phase properties in comparison with pure components or their mechanical mixture. The interference decreases with rise of precipitation PH and at PH 14 is exhibited very feebly. In the case of NP(VII) the individual compound with AL(III) is obtained, however it is not aluminate of neptunium(VII), but neptunate of aluminium(III) similar to neptunates of other metals obtained earlier.

  13. Hydrothermal synthesis of ammonium illite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sucha, V.; Elsass, F.; Eberl, D.D.; Kuchta, L'.; Madejova, J.; Gates, W.P.; Komadel, P.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic gel and glass of illitic composition, natural kaolinite, and mixed-layer illite-smectite were used as starting materials for hydrothermal synthesis of ammonium illite. Ammonium illite was prepared from synthetic gel by hydrothermal treatment at 300??C. The onset of crystallization began within 3 h, and well-crystallized ammonium illite appeared at 24 h. Increasing reaction time (up to four weeks) led to many illite layers per crystal. In the presence of equivalent proportions of potassium and ammonium, the gel was transformed to illite with equimolar contents of K and NH4. In contrast, synthesis using glass under the same conditions resulted in a mixture of mixed-layer ammonium illite-smectite with large expandability and discrete illite. Hydrothermal treatments of the fine fractions of natural kaolinite and illite-smectite produced ammonium illite from kaolinite but the illite-smectite remained unchanged.

  14. Introduction to Atlantic Hydrothermal Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.; Thompson, Geoffrey

    1993-06-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal research has advanced rapidly from local to global scope through a sequence of discoveries. Hydrothermal research at seafloor spreading centers began in the mid-1960s with the discovery of hot metalliferous brines and sediments ponded in deeps along the slow spreading (half rate 1 cm yr-1) axis of the Red Sea [Chamock, 1964; Miller, 1964; Swallow and Crease, 1965; Miller et al., 1966; Hunt et al., 1967; Bischoff, 1969]. At the same time a hydrothermal metalliferous component was identified in sediments of the East Pacific Rise [Skomyakova, 1965; Arrhenins and Bonatti, 1965; Boström and Peterson, 1966]. Geophysicists recognized that heat flow measurements at spreading centers could only be explained by convective cooling of the crust with circulating seawater [Elder, 1967; Lister, 1972].

  15. Hydrothermal Activity in the Northern Guaymas Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, C.; Hensen, C.; Mortera-Gutierrez, C. A.; Sarkar, S.; Geilert, S.; Schmidt, M.; Liebetrau, V.; Kipfer, R.; Scholz, F.; Doll, M.; Muff, S.; Karstens, J.; Böttner, C.; Chi, W. C.; Moser, M.; Behrendt, R.; Fiskal, A.; Evans, T.; Planke, S.; Lizarralde, D.; Lever, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Rift-related magmatism in the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California induces hydrothermal activity within the basin sediments. Mobilized fluids migrate to the seafloor where they are emitted into the water column changing ocean chemistry and fuelling chemosynthetic ecosystems. New seismic and geochemical data from the northern rift arm of the Guaymas Basin document the variety of fluid expulsion phenomena from large-scale subsurface sediment mobilization related to contact metamorphosis to focused small-scale structures. The geochemical composition of emitted fluids depends largely on the age of the fluid escape structures with respect to the underlying intrusions. Whereas, old structures are dominated by methane emission, young vent sites are characterized by hot fluids that carry a wide range of minerals in solution. The overall high geothermal gradient within the basin (mainly between 160 and 260 °C/km) leads to a thin gas hydrate stability zone. Thus, deep hydrothermal fluid advection affects the gas hydrate system and makes it more dynamic than in colder sedimentary basins.

  16. Hydrothermal vents in Lake Tanganyika, East African, Rift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiercelin, Jean-Jacques; Pflumio, Catherine; Castrec, Maryse; Boulégue, Jacques; Gente, Pascal; Rolet, Joël; Coussement, Christophe; Stetter, Karl O.; Huber, Robert; Buku, Sony; Mifundu, Wafula

    1993-06-01

    Sublacustrine hydrothermal vents with associated massive sulfides were discovered during April 1987 at Pemba and Cape Banza on the Zaire side of the northern basin of Lake Tanganyika, East African Rift system. New investigations by a team of ten scuba divers during the multinational (France, Zaire, Germany, and Burundi) TANGANYDRO expedition (August-October 1991) found hydrothermal vents down to a depth of 46 m along north-trending active faults bounding the Tanganyika rift on the western side. Temperatures from 53 to 103 °C were measured in hydrothermal fluids and sediments. Veins of massive sulfides 1-10 cm thick (pyrite and marcasite banding) were found associated with vents at the Pemba site. At Cape Banza,active vents are characterized by 1-70-cm-high aragonite chimneys, and there are microcrystalline pyrite coatings on the walls of hydrothermal pipes. Hydrothermal fluid end members show distinctive compositions at the two sites. The Pemba end member is a NaHCO3-enriched fluid similar to the NaHCO3 thermal fluids from lakes Magadi and Bogoria in the eastern branch off the rift. The Cape Banza end member is a solution enriched in NaCl. Such brines may have a deep-seated basement origin, as do the Uvinza NaCl brines on the eastern flank of the Tanganyika basin. Geothermometric calculations have yielded temperatures of fluid-rock interaction off 219 and 179 °C in the Pemba and Cape Banza systems, respectively. Abundant white or reddish-brown microbial colonies resembling Beggiatoa mats were found surrounding the active vents. Thermal fluid circulation is permitted by opening of cracks related to 130 °N normal-dextral faults that intersect the north- south major rift trend. The source of heat for such hydrothermal systems may relate to the existence of magmatic bodies under the rift, which is suggested by the isotopic composition of carbon dioxide released at Pemba and Cape Banza.

  17. The rare-metal ore potential of the Proterozoic alkaline ultramafic massifs from eastern part of the Baltic Shield in the Kola alkaline province.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokhtina, Natalia; Kogarko, Lia

    2014-05-01

    The Kola Alkaline Province consists of intrusions of two main stages of the intraplate alkaline magmatism. The early stage of igneous activity occurred in Proterozoic 1.9 billion years ago, the next in Paleozoic at 380 million years. The Proterozoic alkaline magmatism produced Gremyakha-Vyrmes and Elet'ozero large alkaline-ultrabasic massifs, Tiksheozero carbonatite massif and numerous small syenite complexes. Paleozoic magmatism on Baltic Shield exhibited more widely, than Proterozoic. The world largest Khibiny and Lovozero alkaline intrusions, numerous alkaline-ultrabasic massifs with carbonanites, alkaline dike swarms and diatremes were formed. It is well known that carbonatites of Paleozoic alkaline-ultrabasic massifs contain large-scale deposits of rare-metal ores (Afanasiev et al., 1998). The metasomatic rocks on foidolites and carbonatites of Gremyakha-Vyrmes are final products of differentiation of Proterozoic alkaline-ultrabasic magma enriched in incompatible elements, including Nb and Zr similar to Paleozoic carbonatites. The massif Gremyakha-Vyrmes is one of the largest titanomagnetite-ilmenite deposits in Russia associated with ultrabasites. Our investigation showed that albite-microcline and aegirine-albite metasomatites formed rich rare-metal ores consisting of 3.2 wt. % Nb2O5 and 0.7 ZrO2. Zircon and pyrochlore-group minerals represent the main minerals of rare-metal ores. The following evolutionary sequences of pyrochlore group minerals has been observed: betafite or U pyrochlore - Na-Ca pyrochlore - Ba-Sr pyrochlore - "silicified" pyrochlore - Fe-Nb, Al-Nb silicates. Such evolution from primary Nb oxides to secondary silicates under low temperature hydrothermal conditions is similar to the evolution of rare metal phases in Paleozoic alkaline massifs analogous to Lovozero syenites and in carbonatites. The rare metal minerals of Gremyakha-Vyrmes crystallized in high alkaline hydrothermal environment at increased activity of Nb, Ta, Zr, U, Th and at

  18. Field measurement of alkalinity and pH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Ivan

    1964-01-01

    The behavior of electrometric pH equipment under field conditions departs from the behavior predicted from Nernst's law. The response is a linear function of pH, and hence measured pH values may be corrected to true pH if the instrument is calibrated with two reference solutions for each measurement. Alkalinity titrations may also be made in terms of true pH. Standard methods, such as colorimetric titrations, were rejected as unreliable or too cumbersome for rapid field use. The true pH of the end point of the alkalinity titration as a function of temperature, ionic strength, and total alkalinity has been calculated. Total alkalinity in potable waters is the most important factor influencing the end point pH, which varies from 5.38 (0 ? C, 5 ppm (parts per million) HC0a-) to 4.32 (300 ppm HC0a-,35 ? C), for the ranges of variables considered. With proper precautions, the pH may be determined to =i:0.02 pH and the alkalinity to =i:0.6 ppm HCO3- for many naturally occurring bodies of fresh water.

  19. Comparative assessment of five potential sites for hydrothermal magma systems: geochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.F.

    1980-08-01

    A brief discussion is given of the geochemical objectives and questions that must be addressed in such an evaluation. A summary of the currently published literature that is pertinent in answering these questions is presented for each of the five areas: The Geysers-Clear Lake region, Long Valley, Rio Grand Rift, Roosevelt Hot Springs, and the Salton Trough. The major geochemical processes associated with proposed hydrothermal sites are categorized into three groups for presentation: geochemistry of magma and associated volcanic rocks, geochemistry of hydrothermal solutions, and geochemistry of hydrothermal alteration. (MHR)

  20. Hydrothermal phonolite alteration in the Kaiserstuhl Volcanic Complex, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenberger, T. B.; Spürgin, S.

    2013-12-01

    The subvolcanic Fohberg and Endhale phonolitic intrusions in the Kaiserstuhl volcanic complex in SW Germany are economic zeolite deposits, formed by hydrothermal alteration of primary magmatic minerals. Due to the high (>40 wt%) zeolite content, which accounts for the remarkable zeolitic physicochemical properties of the ground rock, the zeolitized phonolites are in economic interest. New mineralogical and geochemical studies are carried out a) to evaluate the manifestation of hydrothermal alteration of the Fohberg and Endhale phonolitic intrusions, and b) to constrain the physical and chemical properties of the fluids, which promoted hydrothermal replacement of primary igneous minerals. The alkaline intrusive bodies are characterized by the primary mineralogy: feldspathoid mineral, K-feldspar, aegirine-augite, wollastonite, and andradite. The REE-phase götzenite is formed during late stage magmatic crystallization. Fluid-induced re-equilibration of feldspathoid minerals and wollastonite caused breakdown to a set of secondary phases. Feldspathoid minerals are totally replaced by secondary phases including various zeolite species, calcite, and barite. Wollastonite breakdown results in the formation of various zeolites, calcite, pectolite, sepiolite, and quartz. The large variability of secondary minerals indicates a heterogenic fluid composition throughout the phonolitic intrusions and through time. Zeolites formed during sub-solidus hydrothermal alteration under alkaline conditions and completely replacefeldspathoid minerals in the matrix of the rock. A sequence of Ca-Na dominated zeolite species (gonnardite, thomsonite, mesolite) is followed by pure sodium endmember species. The sequence reflects an increase in log[aNa+)/(aH+)] of the precipitating fluid. Low radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr values of secondary calcite indicate a local origin of Ca and elements necessary for secondary mineral formation most probably derived from primary igneous phases. The Fohberg phonolite

  1. Autonomous in situ measurements of seawater alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Reggie S; DeGrandpre, Michael D; Beck, James C; Hart, Robert D; Peterson, Brittany; De Carlo, Eric H; Drupp, Patrick S; Hammar, Terry R

    2014-08-19

    Total alkalinity (AT) is an important parameter for describing the marine inorganic carbon system and understanding the effects of atmospheric CO2 on the oceans. Measurements of AT are limited, however, because of the laborious process of collecting and analyzing samples. In this work we evaluate the performance of an autonomous instrument for high temporal resolution measurements of seawater AT. The Submersible Autonomous Moored Instrument for alkalinity (SAMI-alk) uses a novel tracer monitored titration method where a colorimetric pH indicator quantifies both pH and relative volumes of sample and titrant, circumventing the need for gravimetric or volumetric measurements. The SAMI-alk performance was validated in the laboratory and in situ during two field studies. Overall in situ accuracy was -2.2 ± 13.1 μmol kg(-1) (n = 86), on the basis of comparison to discrete samples. Precision on duplicate analyses of a carbonate standard was ±4.7 μmol kg(-1) (n = 22). This prototype instrument can measure in situ AT hourly for one month, limited by consumption of reagent and standard solutions. PMID:25051401

  2. RECLAMATION OF ALKALINE ASH PILES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the study was to develop methods for reclaiming ash disposal piles for the ultimate use as agricultural or forest lands. The ashes studied were strongly alkaline and contained considerable amounts of salts and toxic boron. The ashes were produced from burning bit...

  3. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  4. Structure elucidation of alkaline earth impregnated MCM-41 type mesoporous materials obtained by direct synthesis: An experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz, Gizeuda L.; Silva, Francisco das Chagas M.; Araújo, Maciel M.; Lima, Francisco das Chagas A.; Luz, Geraldo E.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, MCM-41 were synthesized hydrothermally and functionalized with calcium and strontium salts by direct method, using the Si/M = 50 molar ratio, in order to elucidate the way as the alkaline earth is incorporated on MCM-41 molecular sieve. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption and theoretical calculations by DFT method. Experimental results and computer simulations showed that the alkaline earths were incorporated on MCM-41 through a complex structure, which negatively influences on basic sites formation.

  5. Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride Nanoparticles And Hydrothermal Method For Forming Nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, John L.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2003-12-23

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  6. Rare earth oxide fluoride nanoparticles and hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, John L [Richland, WA; Hoffmann, Markus M [Richland, WA

    2001-11-13

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  7. Priming effect of abscisic acid on alkaline stress tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Wei, Li-Xing; Lv, Bing-Sheng; Wang, Ming-Ming; Ma, Hong-Yuan; Yang, Hao-Yu; Liu, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Liang, Zheng-Wei

    2015-05-01

    Saline-alkaline stress is characterized by high salinity and high alkalinity (high pH); alkaline stress has been shown to be the primary factor inhibiting rice seedling growth. In this study, we investigated the potential priming effect of abscisic acid (ABA) on tolerance of rice seedlings to alkaline stress simulated by Na2CO3. Seedlings were pretreated with ABA at concentrations of 0 (control), 10, and 50 μM by root-drench for 24 h and then transferred to a Na2CO3 solution that did not contain ABA. Compared to control treatment, pretreatment with ABA substantially improved the survival rate of rice seedlings and increased biomass accumulation after 7 days under the alkaline condition. ABA application at 10 μM also alleviated the inhibitory effects of alkaline stress on the total root length and root surface area. Physiologically, ABA increased relative water content (RWC) and decreased cell membrane injury degree (MI) and Na(+)/K(+) ratios. In contrast, fluridone (an ABA biosynthesis inhibitor) decreased the RWC and increased MI in shoots under the alkaline conditions. These data suggest that ABA has a potent priming effect on the adaptive response to alkaline stress in rice and may be useful for improving rice growth in saline-alkaline paddy fields. PMID:25780993

  8. Isolation of alkaline mutagens from complex mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.H.; Guerin, M.R.; Clark, B.R.; Rao, T.K.; Epler, J.L.

    1981-05-01

    A method for the preparative-scale enrichment of alkaline mutagens from complex natural and anthropogenic mixtures is described. Mutagenic alkaline fractions were isolated from cigarette smoke, crude petroleum, and petroleum substitutes derived from coal and shale.

  9. Remediation of Former Manufactured Gas Plant Tars Using Alkaline Flushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauswirth, S.; Rylander, S.; Birak, P. S.; Miller, C. T.

    2010-12-01

    The remediation of former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) tars in the subsurface is particularly difficult due to the wetting behavior and high viscosities of these dense non-aqueous liquids (DNAPLs). Alkaline flooding is a technique which has proven effective in improving the recovery of crude oils, which share some characteristics with FMGP tars. For this study, we measured the effect of NaOH solutions on interfacial tension and conducted column experiments to investigate the feasibility of applying this technique to FMGP tars. The pendant drop technique was used to measure interfacial tensions for solutions ranging from 0-1% NaOH. Column experiments were conducted by contaminating sands with tars recovered from a FMGP then flushing the columns with NaOH solutions. A final, 70% v/v ethanol cosolvent flush was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of a two-stage remediation approach. The mass removal of tar, as well as 26 individual PAHs, was measured, along with the aqueous phase mass flux of PAHs after each flushing stage. The interfacial tension was reduced from about 20 mN/m with pure water to a minimum of 0.05 mN/m at a concentration of 0.1% NaOH. In the column experiments, alkaline flushing resulted in a 50% reduction of the residual saturation. Aqueous phase PAH concentrations, however, were similar before and after the alkaline flushing stage. The combination of alkaline and cosolvent flushing resulted in an overall reduction of 95% of the total mass of the 16 EPA PAHs. Final aqueous phase concentrations were reduced significantly for lower molecular weight PAHs, but increased slightly for the higher molecular weight compounds, likely due to their increased mole fraction within the remaining tar. Additional work is being conducted to improve the effectiveness of the alkaline flushing through the use of surfactants and polymers.

  10. REE/Fe variations in hydrothermal sediments: Implications for the REE content of seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Olivarez, A.M.; Owen, R.M. )

    1989-03-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal vent solutions exhibit rare earth element (REE) enrichments ranging between one to three orders of magnitude greater than average seawater. To assess the impact of these hydrothermal inputs on ocean chemistry, the authors have examined he behavior of REEs for hydrothermal sediments collected adjacent to two Pacific spreading ridge sites: the East Pacific Rise at 19{degree}S, and the Southern Juan de Fuca Ridge at 45{degree}N. In general, the REE/Fe ratios for both proximal and distal hydrothermal sediments are greater than vent solutions by a factor of 2 to 500, and these ratios increase with increasing distance away from the ridge axis. An evaluation of these results in the context of previous models of REE behavior indicates that, in fact, seawater experiences a net depletion in REEs as a result of hydrothermal activity. This is due primarily to the large scavenging capacity of iron oxyhydroxides which precipitate from these solutions. Such an interpretation explains why the REE content of seawater collected in the vicinity of hydrothermal vents is anomalously lower than normal seawater sampled from a comparable depth.

  11. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  12. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  13. Evaluating experimental artifacts in hydrothermal prebiotic synthesis experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smirnov, Alexander; Schoonen, Martin A A.

    2003-01-01

    Control experiments with ultra pure deionized water were conducted to evaluate the organic contamination in hydrothermal prebiotic experiments. Different combinations of reaction vessel material, sampling tubing and stirring were tested and the amounts of organic contaminants determined. All tested types of polymer tubing were proven to introduce organic contaminants (formate, acetate and propionate ions) into the reacting solution. Stainless steel has a catalytic effect on the decomposition of formate, consistent with earlier work at high temperatures and pressures.

  14. Evaluating Experimental Artifacts in Hydrothermal Prebiotic Synthesis Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Alexander; Schoonen, Martin A. A.

    2003-04-01

    Control experiments with ultra pure deionized water were conducted to evaluate the organic contamination in hydrothermal prebiotic experiments. Different combinations of reaction vessel material, sampling tubing and stirring were tested and the amounts of organic contaminants determined. All tested types of polymer tubing were proven to introduce organic contaminants (formate, acetate and propionate ions) into the reacting solution. Stainless steel has a catalytic effect on the decomposition of formate, consistent with earlier work at high temperatures and pressures.

  15. The Nickel(111)/Alkaline Electrolyte Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Kuilong; Chottiner, G. S.; Scherson, D. A.; Reid, Margaret A.

    1991-01-01

    The electrochemical properties of Ni (111) prepared and characterized in ultra high vacuum, UHV, by surface analytical techniques have been examined in alkaline media by cyclic voltammetry using an UHV-electrochemical cell transfer system designed and built in this laboratory. Prior to the transfer, the Ni(111) surfaces were exposed to saturation coverages of CO in UHV in an attempt to protect the surface from possible contamination with other gases during the transfer. Temperature Programmed Desorption, TPD, of CO-dosed Ni (111) surfaces displaying sharp c(4x2), LEED patterns, subsequently exposed to water-saturated Ar at atmospheric pressure in an auxiliary UHV compatible chamber and finally transferred back to the main UHV chamber, yielded CO2 and water as the only detectable products. This indicates that the CO-dosed surfaces react with water and/or bicarbonate and hydroxide as the most likely products. Based on the integration of the TPD peaks, the combined amounts of H2O and CO2 were found to be on the order of a single monolayer. The reacted c(4x2)CO/Ni(111) layer seems to protect the surface from undergoing spontaneous oxidation in strongly alkaline solutions. This was evidenced by the fact that the open circuit potential observed immediately after contact with deaerated 0.1 M KOH was about 0.38 V vs. DHE, drifting slightly towards more negative values prior to initiating the voltametric scans. The average ratio of the integrated charge obtained in the first positive linear scan in the range of 0.35 to 1.5 V vs. DHE (initiated at the open circuit potential) and the first (and subsequent) linear negative scans in the same solution yielded for various independent runs a value of 3.5 +/- 0.3. Coulometric analysis of the cyclic voltammetry curves indicate that the electrochemically formed oxyhydroxide layer involves a charge equivalent to 3.2 +/- 0.4 layers of Ni metal.

  16. Hydrothermal processes at seafloor spreading centers,

    SciTech Connect

    Rona, P.A.; Bostrom, K.; Laubier, L.; Smith, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    This book examines research on the description and interpretation of hydrothermal and associated phenomena at seafloor spreading centers. An interdisciplinary overview of the subject is presented, including geological, geophysical, geochemical, and biological discoveries. The implications of the discoveries for understanding the earth's heat transfer, geochemical mass balances and cycles, mineralization, and biological adaptation are discussed. Topics considered include geologic setting (e.g., the four dimensions of the spreading axis, geological processes of the mid-ocean ridge), hydrothermal convection (e.g., oxygen and hydrogen isotope studies, the basic physics of water penetration into hot rock), Iceland and oceanic ridges (e.g., chemical evidence from Icelandic geothermal systems, the physical environment of hydrothermal systems), mass balances and cycles (e.g., reduced gases and bacteria in hydrothermal fluids, the effects of hydrothermal activity on sedimentary organic matter), ferromanganese deposits, hydrothermal mineralization, and the biology of hydrothermal vents.

  17. Determination of As, Cd, Pb and Se in DORM-1 dogfish muscle reference material using alkaline solubilization and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with Ir+Rh as permanent modifiers or Pd+Mg in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, Maria Bertília Oss; Lima, Maria Carminati; Stupp, Volnei; de Carvalho Júnior, Rui Miguel; Borba da Silva, José Bento; Barrera, Pilar Bermejo

    2002-12-01

    In this work, tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) was used to solubilize the DORM-1 dogfish muscle certified reference material as a model substance for the determination of As, Cd, Pb and Se by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS). The sample was mixed with a small amount of TMAH and heated to 60 °C for 10 min in a water bath. After dissolution, As and Se were determined using palladium and magnesium nitrates as a chemical modifier added in solution. For Cd and Pb, best results were obtained with a mixture of 250 μg of each of iridium and rhodium as permanent modifiers. In both cases, the calibration was performed with aqueous solutions in 0.2% v/v HNO 3. The temperature program for each analyte was optimized using pyrolysis and atomization curves established with the fish reference material. The detection limits in dry samples and the characteristic mass values were: Cd 0.005 μg g -1 and 0.9 pg; Pb 0.04 μg g -1 and 7.6 pg; As 0.4 μg g -1 and 13 pg and Se 0.6 μg g -1 and 20 pg, respectively. Results from the determination of these elements in the DORM-1 certified fish reference material were within the 95% confidence interval of the certified values.

  18. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassov's research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herring's group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  19. Alkalinity production in intertidal sands intensified by lugworm bioirrigation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Alexandra M.F.; Malkin, Sairah Y.; Montserrat, Francesc; Meysman, Filip J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Porewater profiles and sediment-water fluxes of oxygen, nutrients, pH, calcium, alkalinity, and sulfide were measured in intertidal sandflat sediments from the Oosterschelde mesotidal lagoon (The Netherlands). The influence of bioturbation and bioirrigation by the deep-burrowing polychaete Arenicola marina on the rates and sources of benthic alkalinity generation was examined by comparing measurements in intact and defaunated sediment cores before and after the addition of A. marina in summer and fall 2011. Higher organic matter remineralization rates, shallower O2 penetration, and greater sediment-water solute fluxes were observed in summer, consistent with higher sediment community metabolic rates at a higher temperature. Lugworm activity stimulated porewater exchange (5.1 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), organic matter remineralization (6.2 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), aerobic respiration (2.4 × in summer, 2.1 × in fall), alkalinity release (4.7 × in summer, 4.0 × in fall), nutrient regeneration, and iron cycling. The effects of lugworm activity on net sediment-water fluxes were similar but more pronounced in summer than in fall. Alkalinity release in fall was entirely driven by metabolic carbonate dissolution, while this process explained between 22 and 69% of total alkalinity production in summer, indicating the importance of other processes in this season. By enhancing organic matter remineralization and the reoxidation of reduced metabolites by the sediment microbial community, lugworm activity stimulated the production of dissolved inorganic carbon and metabolic acidity, which in turn enhanced metabolic CaCO3 dissolution efficiency. In summer, evidence of microbial long distance electron transport (LDET) was observed in defaunated sediment. Thus, alkalinity production by net carbonate dissolution was likely supplemented by anaerobic respiration and LDET in summer. PMID:25431515

  20. Alkalinity production in intertidal sands intensified by lugworm bioirrigation.

    PubMed

    Rao, Alexandra M F; Malkin, Sairah Y; Montserrat, Francesc; Meysman, Filip J R

    2014-07-01

    Porewater profiles and sediment-water fluxes of oxygen, nutrients, pH, calcium, alkalinity, and sulfide were measured in intertidal sandflat sediments from the Oosterschelde mesotidal lagoon (The Netherlands). The influence of bioturbation and bioirrigation by the deep-burrowing polychaete Arenicola marina on the rates and sources of benthic alkalinity generation was examined by comparing measurements in intact and defaunated sediment cores before and after the addition of A. marina in summer and fall 2011. Higher organic matter remineralization rates, shallower O2 penetration, and greater sediment-water solute fluxes were observed in summer, consistent with higher sediment community metabolic rates at a higher temperature. Lugworm activity stimulated porewater exchange (5.1 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), organic matter remineralization (6.2 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), aerobic respiration (2.4 × in summer, 2.1 × in fall), alkalinity release (4.7 × in summer, 4.0 × in fall), nutrient regeneration, and iron cycling. The effects of lugworm activity on net sediment-water fluxes were similar but more pronounced in summer than in fall. Alkalinity release in fall was entirely driven by metabolic carbonate dissolution, while this process explained between 22 and 69% of total alkalinity production in summer, indicating the importance of other processes in this season. By enhancing organic matter remineralization and the reoxidation of reduced metabolites by the sediment microbial community, lugworm activity stimulated the production of dissolved inorganic carbon and metabolic acidity, which in turn enhanced metabolic CaCO3 dissolution efficiency. In summer, evidence of microbial long distance electron transport (LDET) was observed in defaunated sediment. Thus, alkalinity production by net carbonate dissolution was likely supplemented by anaerobic respiration and LDET in summer. PMID:25431515

  1. Alkalinity production in intertidal sands intensified by lugworm bioirrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Alexandra M. F.; Malkin, Sairah Y.; Montserrat, Francesc; Meysman, Filip J. R.

    2014-07-01

    Porewater profiles and sediment-water fluxes of oxygen, nutrients, pH, calcium, alkalinity, and sulfide were measured in intertidal sandflat sediments from the Oosterschelde mesotidal lagoon (The Netherlands). The influence of bioturbation and bioirrigation by the deep-burrowing polychaete Arenicola marina on the rates and sources of benthic alkalinity generation was examined by comparing measurements in intact and defaunated sediment cores before and after the addition of A. marina in summer and fall 2011. Higher organic matter remineralization rates, shallower O2 penetration, and greater sediment-water solute fluxes were observed in summer, consistent with higher sediment community metabolic rates at a higher temperature. Lugworm activity stimulated porewater exchange (5.1 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), organic matter remineralization (6.2 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), aerobic respiration (2.4 × in summer, 2.1 × in fall), alkalinity release (4.7 × in summer, 4.0 × in fall), nutrient regeneration, and iron cycling. The effects of lugworm activity on net sediment-water fluxes were similar but more pronounced in summer than in fall. Alkalinity release in fall was entirely driven by metabolic carbonate dissolution, while this process explained between 22 and 69% of total alkalinity production in summer, indicating the importance of other processes in this season. By enhancing organic matter remineralization and the reoxidation of reduced metabolites by the sediment microbial community, lugworm activity stimulated the production of dissolved inorganic carbon and metabolic acidity, which in turn enhanced metabolic CaCO3 dissolution efficiency. In summer, evidence of microbial long distance electron transport (LDET) was observed in defaunated sediment. Thus, alkalinity production by net carbonate dissolution was likely supplemented by anaerobic respiration and LDET in summer.

  2. Surface Characterization and Osteoconductivity Evaluation of Micro/Nano Surface Formed on Titanium Using Anodic Oxidation Combined with H2O2 Etching and Hydrothermal Treatment.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jin; Song, Yo-Han; Hwang, Moon-Jin; Song, Ho-Jun; Park, Yeong-Joon

    2015-08-01

    In this study, surface characteristics and osteoconductivity were investigated for the micro/nanostructured oxide layers fabricated on titanium using anodic oxidation (ANO), chemical etching (Et), and hydrothermal treatment (HT). Commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) disks were anodic-oxidized using DC-type power supply in 1 M phosphoric acid electrolyte (P-ANO group). These specimens were further chemically etched using 30% H2O2 solution at 60 °C for 10 min (P-ANO-Et group). The P-ANO-Et-HT group was fabricated by hydrothermally treating the P-ANO-Et specimens in phosphorus-containing alkaline solution at 190 °C for 8 hrs. The P-ANO group showed a porous surface that was evenly covered with micro- and sub-micro pores. The size of these pores was decreased in the P-ANO-Et group. The P-ANO-Et-HT group showed a porous surface that was covered with nano-sized crystallites. Anatase TiO2 structure was observed in P-ANO-Et-HT group. The results of XPS demonstrated that the P-ANO-Et-HT group had a well-crystallized TiC2 structure, while the P-ANO and P-ANO-Et groups had an amorphous and phosphate-containing structure. Hydrophilicity of the P-ANO-Et-HT group was the highest. After MG63 osteoblast-like cells were cultured on the specimens for 3 hrs, SEM images of the cells cultured on P-ANO-Et-HT group specimens showed low initial adhesion. However, the osteoconductivity of these specimens increased more rapidly compared to that of the micro-structured surfaces. These results could be applied to fabricate titanium implants with an optimum micro/nano-surface for enhancing their osteoconductivity. PMID:26369213

  3. Synergy among transition element, nitrogen, and carbon for oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhou Peng; Liu, Zi Xuan; Zhu, Kun Ning; Li, Zhuo; Liu, Bin Hong

    2012-12-01

    A series of M-doped polypyrrole (PPy)-modified BP2000 catalysts (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) are synthesized using the hydrothermal method. The synergy among a transition element, nitrogen, and carbon for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline medium is discussed based on the physical characterization and electrochemical analyses of the Co-doped PPy-modified BP2000. PPy is found to adhere carbon black particles together to form a porous 3D network during the PPy modification on BP2000. PPy reconfiguration occurs during the hydrothermal treatment process. The individual interactions between BP and PPy, BP and Co, and Co and PPy exhibit insignificant effects on the enhancement of ORR. The cooperative interaction among Co, N, and C plays a very important role in the enhancement of ORR. The doping effect of transition-metal salt on ORR enhancement depends on the nature of the transition element and the corresponding anion.

  4. Use of natural mordenite to remove chromium (III) and to neutralize pH of alkaline waste waters.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Rodríguez, Valduvina; Rodríguez-Iznaga, Inocente; Acosta-Chávez, Raquel María; Chávez-Rivas, Fernando; Petranovskii, Vitalii; Pestryakov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The natural mordenite from Palmarito de Cauto deposit (PZ), Cuba, was studied in this work as an ion exchanger to remove Cr(3+) cations from alkaline aqueous solutions at different pH and chromium concentrations. The mordenite stability under cyclic treatment processes with alkaline solutions and its capacity to decrease the pH of the solutions was also analyzed. It was shown that PZ removes Cr(3+) ions from alkaline solutions, and it happens independently of the starting chromium concentration and the pH of the exchange solution used. This material has an important neutralizing effect on alkaline solutions, expressed in a significant pH decrease from the early stages of the treatments. For solutions with initial pH equal to 11, it decreases to a value of around seven. The stability of this material is not affected significantly after continuous cyclic treatment with NaOH solution, which shows that mordenite, in particular from Palmarito de Cauto deposit, has high stability in alkaline solutions. The results are important as they suggest that natural zeolites may be of interest in treatments of alkaline industrial waste effluents. PMID:26818904

  5. Feedbacks of Rock Hydration on Hydrothermal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, K.; Ruepke, L.

    2009-04-01

    Hydration of the oceanic lithosphere is an important process which alters both the chemical and physical properties of the affected lithologies. Although hydrothermal convection has been extensively researched, little work has been done on the effects of hydration reactions occurring during convection. One of the most important reactions occurring in the oceanic lithosphere is serpentinization of ultramafic rocks. We present a numerical solution for hydrothermal circulation which explores the feedbacks generated during serpentinization of mantle rocks. The model is two dimensional and uses the FEM approach. Three coupled, time-dependent equations are solved: the first equation is mass conserving and is based on Darcy flow. The second equation describes heat transport and accounts for advective and diffusive heat transfer as well as latent heat effects. The final equation describes the serpentinization rate of olivine in ultramafic rocks (Emmanuel and Berkowitz, 2006) and is derived from experimental results (Martin and Fyfe, 1970). Serpentinization is a fluid-consuming process and manifests itself as a sink term in the Darcy flow equation. The exothermic heat of reaction is added as a source term in the heat transport equation. Moreover, serpentinization is associated with a large positive volume change. This large volume change may decrease the porosity of the rock but can also increase permeability by deformation. The rate of serpentinization used in the model is, therefore, also coupled to the porosity and permeability. We investigate the role of hydration in a box model using thermodynamically constrained fluid properties where the lower part is composed of reactive mantle rocks. The effects of serpentinization on the temperatures of the venting fluids and variations in flow pathways are explored. Furthermore, the model is also used in a mid-ocean ridge setting and the amount and depth of serpentinization, in addition to the above mentioned effects, is also

  6. Entropy Production in Convective Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersing, Nele; Wellmann, Florian; Niederau, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Exploring hydrothermal reservoirs requires reliable estimates of subsurface temperatures to delineate favorable locations of boreholes. It is therefore of fundamental and practical importance to understand the thermodynamic behavior of the system in order to predict its performance with numerical studies. To this end, the thermodynamic measure of entropy production is considered as a useful abstraction tool to characterize the convective state of a system since it accounts for dissipative heat processes and gives insight into the system's average behavior in a statistical sense. Solving the underlying conservation principles of a convective hydrothermal system is sensitive to initial conditions and boundary conditions which in turn are prone to uncertain knowledge in subsurface parameters. There exist multiple numerical solutions to the mathematical description of a convective system and the prediction becomes even more challenging as the vigor of convection increases. Thus, the variety of possible modes contained in such highly non-linear problems needs to be quantified. A synthetic study is carried out to simulate fluid flow and heat transfer in a finite porous layer heated from below. Various two-dimensional models are created such that their corresponding Rayleigh numbers lie in a range from the sub-critical linear to the supercritical non-linear regime, that is purely conductive to convection-dominated systems. Entropy production is found to describe the transient evolution of convective processes fairly well and can be used to identify thermodynamic equilibrium. Additionally, varying the aspect ratio for each Rayleigh number shows that the variety of realized convection modes increases with both larger aspect ratio and higher Rayleigh number. This phenomenon is also reflected by an enlarged spread of entropy production for the realized modes. Consequently, the Rayleigh number can be correlated to the magnitude of entropy production. In cases of moderate

  7. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  8. Development of Alkaline Oxidative Dissolution Methods for Chromium (III) Compounds Present in Hanford Site Tank Sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Krot, N N.; Shilov, V P.; Fedoseev, A M.; Budantseva, N A.; Nikonov, M V.; Yusov, A B.; Garnov, A Y.; Charushnikova, I A.; Perminov, V P.; Astafurova, L N.; Lapitskaya, T S.; Makarenkov, V I.

    1999-07-02

    The high-level radioactive waste sludge in the underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site contains various chromium solid phases. Dissolution and removal of chromium from tank waste sludges is desirable prior to high-level waste vitrification because increased volume is required to incorporate the residual chromium. Unfortunately, dissolution of chromium from the sludge to form Cr(OH){sub 4}{sup -} through treatment with heated NaOH solution (also used to dissolve aluminum phases and metathesize phosphates to sodium salts) generally has been unsuccessful in tests with both simulated and genuine Hanford waste sludges. Oxidative dissolution of the Cr(III) compounds to form soluble chromate has been proposed as an alternative chromium solid phase dissolution method and results of limited prior testing have been reported. The present systematic tests investigated oxygen gas, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium persulfate oxidants to dissolve Cr(III) under alkaline conditions to form soluble chromate. Permanganate and ozone also were considered for testing but were thought to be of secondary interest because of the insoluble residue (MnO{sub 2} from permanganate) and complex equipment (necessary to generate ozone) implicit with use of these reagents. The oxygen and hydrogen peroxide reagents leave no condensable residue and sodium persulfate only leaves soluble sodium sulfate. Crystalline Cr(OH){sub 3}, various hydrothermally aged amorphous Cr(III) oxide hydrates, mixed Fe(III)/Cr(III) oxide hydrates, and nickel and iron Cr(III) spinels, all of which have been identified or are likely constituents in Hanford tank wastes, were prepared and characterized for the dissolution tests. The effects of reagent and hydroxide concentrations, reaction temperature, and transition metal catalysts on reaction progress were investigated for each reagent as functions of reaction time. Reaction progress was measured by monitoring chromate concentration. Oxidation of chromium compounds by

  9. An experimental study of magnesite precipitation rates at neutral to alkaline conditions and 100-200 °C as a function of pH, aqueous solution composition and chemical affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldi, Giuseppe D.; Schott, Jacques; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Gautier, Quentin; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2012-04-01

    Magnesite precipitation rates were measured at temperatures from 100 to 200 °C as a function of saturation state and reactive fluid composition in mixed flow reactors. Measured rates were found to increase systematically with increasing saturation state but to decrease with increasing reactive fluid aqueous CO32- activity and pH. Measured rates are interpreted through a combination of surface complexation models and transition state theory. In accord with this formalism, constant saturation state BET surface area normalized magnesite precipitation rates (rMg) are a function of the concentration of protonated Mg sites at the surface (>MgOH2+) and can be described using: rMg=kMg-Kn 1-ΩMgn where kMg- represents a rate constant, KOH and KCO3 stand for equilibrium constants, ai designates the activity of the subscripted aqueous species, n refers to a reaction order equal to 2, and ΩMg denotes the saturation state of the reactive solution with respect to magnesite. Retrieved values of n are consistent with magnesite precipitation control by a spiral growth mechanism. The temperature variation of the rate constant can be described using kMg-=Aaexp(-Ea/RT), where Aa represents a pre-exponential factor equal to 5.9 × 10-5 mol/cm2/s, Ea designates an activation energy equal to 80.2 kJ/mol, R denotes the gas constant, and T corresponds to the absolute temperature. Comparison of measured magnesite precipitation rates with corresponding forsterite dissolution rates suggest that the relatively slow rates of magnesite precipitation may be the rate limiting step in mineral carbonation efforts in ultramafic rocks.

  10. Accumulation of formamide in hydrothermal pores to form prebiotic nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Niether, Doreen; Afanasenkau, Dzmitry; Dhont, Jan K G; Wiegand, Simone

    2016-04-19

    Formamide is one of the important compounds from which prebiotic molecules can be synthesized, provided that its concentration is sufficiently high. For nucleotides and short DNA strands, it has been shown that a high degree of accumulation in hydrothermal pores occurs, so that temperature gradients might play a role in the origin of life [Baaske P, et al. (2007)Proc Natl Acad Sci USA104(22):9346-9351]. We show that the same combination of thermophoresis and convection in hydrothermal pores leads to accumulation of formamide up to concentrations where nucleobases are formed. The thermophoretic properties of aqueous formamide solutions are studied by means of Infrared Thermal Diffusion Forced Rayleigh Scattering. These data are used in numerical finite element calculations in hydrothermal pores for various initial concentrations, ambient temperatures, and pore sizes. The high degree of formamide accumulation is due to an unusual temperature and concentration dependence of the thermophoretic behavior of formamide. The accumulation fold in part of the pores increases strongly with increasing aspect ratio of the pores, and saturates to highly concentrated aqueous formamide solutions of ∼85 wt% at large aspect ratios. Time-dependent studies show that these high concentrations are reached after 45-90 d, starting with an initial formamide weight fraction of[Formula: see text]wt % that is typical for concentrations in shallow lakes on early Earth. PMID:27044100

  11. Hydrothermal Fluxes in Europan Ocean: The Effect of Seawater and Oceanic Crust Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foustoukos, D.; Seyfried, W.

    2005-12-01

    The recent discovery of electrolyte-enriched liquid water layer in Jupiter icy satellite, Europa, has triggered numerous investigations to assess the chemical composition and physicochemical processes occurring within Europan ocean. Europa appears to be strongly differentiated composed by a metallic core and a hydrated silicate mantle. Thus, heat fluxes could be generated in the planetary core through radioactive decay stimulating volcanic events and serving as the driving force for subseafloor hydrothermal activity. Beyond doubt, the chemical composition of the seawater and the oceanic substrate on Europa plays a key role in regulating pH and redox reactions during presumed hydrothermal alteration processes. Hydrothermal alteration of basalt and peridotite, for example, will likely yield different pH conditions, with the ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal system resulting in higher pH, significantly affecting the ratio of reduced/oxidized sulfur and the metal fluxes. Incipient alteration of basalt and peridotite will also generate reducing conditions, although the H2/H2S ratio of the coexisting fluid will be higher in the ultramafic systems. An important chemical control on Europan ocean evolution is the redox state of the sulfur originated from the oceanic crust and the SO4-enriched neutral-alkaline seawater. In general, relatively alkaline and oxidizing conditions favor the formation of SO4, while more acidic and reducing conditions yield H2S(aq) stable. Thus, hydrothermal alteration of basalt and peridotite facilitates sulfate reduction, while constraints imposed by a more oxidizing mineral assemblage (e.g. hematite-magnetite-pyrite) would render low H2(aq) conditions inhibiting formation of reduced sulfate species. Extensive hydrothermal alteration of fresh basalt, however, forming epidote and anhydrite, would preclude phase equilibria involving hematite. Consequently, initial neutral pH would be shifted towards more acidic conditions, limiting by this way any

  12. Basin-scale transport of hydrothermal dissolved metals across the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Resing, Joseph A; Sedwick, Peter N; German, Christopher R; Jenkins, William J; Moffett, James W; Sohst, Bettina M; Tagliabue, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    Hydrothermal venting along mid-ocean ridges exerts an important control on the chemical composition of sea water by serving as a major source or sink for a number of trace elements in the ocean. Of these, iron has received considerable attention because of its role as an essential and often limiting nutrient for primary production in regions of the ocean that are of critical importance for the global carbon cycle. It has been thought that most of the dissolved iron discharged by hydrothermal vents is lost from solution close to ridge-axis sources and is thus of limited importance for ocean biogeochemistry. This long-standing view is challenged by recent studies which suggest that stabilization of hydrothermal dissolved iron may facilitate its long-range oceanic transport. Such transport has been subsequently inferred from spatially limited oceanographic observations. Here we report data from the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect (EPZT) that demonstrate lateral transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron, manganese, and aluminium from the southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR) several thousand kilometres westward across the South Pacific Ocean. Dissolved iron exhibits nearly conservative (that is, no loss from solution during transport and mixing) behaviour in this hydrothermal plume, implying a greater longevity in the deep ocean than previously assumed. Based on our observations, we estimate a global hydrothermal dissolved iron input of three to four gigamoles per year to the ocean interior, which is more than fourfold higher than previous estimates. Complementary simulations with a global-scale ocean biogeochemical model suggest that the observed transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron requires some means of physicochemical stabilization and indicate that hydrothermally derived iron sustains a large fraction of Southern Ocean export production. PMID:26156374

  13. Basin-scale transport of hydrothermal dissolved metals across the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resing, Joseph A.; Sedwick, Peter N.; German, Christopher R.; Jenkins, William J.; Moffett, James W.; Sohst, Bettina M.; Tagliabue, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    Hydrothermal venting along mid-ocean ridges exerts an important control on the chemical composition of sea water by serving as a major source or sink for a number of trace elements in the ocean. Of these, iron has received considerable attention because of its role as an essential and often limiting nutrient for primary production in regions of the ocean that are of critical importance for the global carbon cycle. It has been thought that most of the dissolved iron discharged by hydrothermal vents is lost from solution close to ridge-axis sources and is thus of limited importance for ocean biogeochemistry. This long-standing view is challenged by recent studies which suggest that stabilization of hydrothermal dissolved iron may facilitate its long-range oceanic transport. Such transport has been subsequently inferred from spatially limited oceanographic observations. Here we report data from the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect (EPZT) that demonstrate lateral transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron, manganese, and aluminium from the southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR) several thousand kilometres westward across the South Pacific Ocean. Dissolved iron exhibits nearly conservative (that is, no loss from solution during transport and mixing) behaviour in this hydrothermal plume, implying a greater longevity in the deep ocean than previously assumed. Based on our observations, we estimate a global hydrothermal dissolved iron input of three to four gigamoles per year to the ocean interior, which is more than fourfold higher than previous estimates. Complementary simulations with a global-scale ocean biogeochemical model suggest that the observed transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron requires some means of physicochemical stabilization and indicate that hydrothermally derived iron sustains a large fraction of Southern Ocean export production.

  14. A facile vapor-phase hydrothermal method for direct growth of titanate nanotubes on a titanium substrate via a distinctive nanosheet roll-up mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Porun; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Hongwei; Wang, Yun; Yao, Xiangdong; Zhu, Guangshan; Zhang, Shanqing; Zhao, Huijun

    2011-11-30

    We present a facile vapor-phase hydrothermal approach for direct growth of vertically aligned titanate nanotubes on a titanium foil substrate. The resultant nanotubes display external diameters of 50-80 nm and walls with an average thickness of 10 nm that consist of more than 10 titanate layers. This is in strong contrast to the titanate nanotubes obtained from alkaline liquid-phase hydrothermal methods, which are generally smaller than 12 nm in external diameter and have walls consisting of less than five titanate layers. Importantly, the investigation confirmed that under vapor-phase hydrothermal conditions, the nanotubes were formed via a distinctive nanosheet roll-up mechanism that differs remarkably from those of conventional liquid-phase hydrothermal processes. For the first time, a coaxial circular cylinder crystal structure of the resultant nanotubes was confirmed. PMID:22035232

  15. Artificial Bee Colony Optimization for Short-Term Hydrothermal Scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, M.

    2014-12-01

    Artificial bee colony optimization is applied to determine the optimal hourly schedule of power generation in a hydrothermal system. Artificial bee colony optimization is a swarm-based algorithm inspired by the food foraging behavior of honey bees. The algorithm is tested on a multi-reservoir cascaded hydroelectric system having prohibited operating zones and thermal units with valve point loading. The ramp-rate limits of thermal generators are taken into consideration. The transmission losses are also accounted for through the use of loss coefficients. The algorithm is tested on two hydrothermal multi-reservoir cascaded hydroelectric test systems. The results of the proposed approach are compared with those of differential evolution, evolutionary programming and particle swarm optimization. From numerical results, it is found that the proposed artificial bee colony optimization based approach is able to provide better solution.

  16. Sustainability and dynamics of outcrop-to-outcrop hydrothermal circulation

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Dustin M.; Fisher, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Most seafloor hydrothermal circulation occurs far from the magmatic influence of mid-ocean ridges, driving large flows of water, heat and solutes through volcanic rock outcrops on ridge flanks. Here we create three-dimensional simulations of ridge–flank hydrothermal circulation, flowing between and through seamounts, to determine what controls hydrogeological sustainability, flow rate and preferred flow direction in these systems. We find that sustaining flow between outcrops that penetrate less-permeable sediment depends on a contrast in transmittance (the product of outcrop permeability and the area of outcrop exposure) between recharging and discharging sites, with discharge favoured through less-transmissive outcrops. Many simulations include local discharge through outcrops at the recharge end of an outcrop-to-outcrop system. Both of these characteristics are observed in the field. In addition, smaller discharging outcrops sustain higher flow rates than larger outcrops, which may help to explain how so much lithospheric heat is extracted globally by this process. PMID:26113260

  17. Sustainability and dynamics of outcrop-to-outcrop hydrothermal circulation.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Dustin M; Fisher, Andrew T

    2015-01-01

    Most seafloor hydrothermal circulation occurs far from the magmatic influence of mid-ocean ridges, driving large flows of water, heat and solutes through volcanic rock outcrops on ridge flanks. Here we create three-dimensional simulations of ridge-flank hydrothermal circulation, flowing between and through seamounts, to determine what controls hydrogeological sustainability, flow rate and preferred flow direction in these systems. We find that sustaining flow between outcrops that penetrate less-permeable sediment depends on a contrast in transmittance (the product of outcrop permeability and the area of outcrop exposure) between recharging and discharging sites, with discharge favoured through less-transmissive outcrops. Many simulations include local discharge through outcrops at the recharge end of an outcrop-to-outcrop system. Both of these characteristics are observed in the field. In addition, smaller discharging outcrops sustain higher flow rates than larger outcrops, which may help to explain how so much lithospheric heat is extracted globally by this process. PMID:26113260

  18. Sustainability and dynamics of outcrop-to-outcrop hydrothermal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, Dustin M.; Fisher, Andrew T.

    2015-06-01

    Most seafloor hydrothermal circulation occurs far from the magmatic influence of mid-ocean ridges, driving large flows of water, heat and solutes through volcanic rock outcrops on ridge flanks. Here we create three-dimensional simulations of ridge-flank hydrothermal circulation, flowing between and through seamounts, to determine what controls hydrogeological sustainability, flow rate and preferred flow direction in these systems. We find that sustaining flow between outcrops that penetrate less-permeable sediment depends on a contrast in transmittance (the product of outcrop permeability and the area of outcrop exposure) between recharging and discharging sites, with discharge favoured through less-transmissive outcrops. Many simulations include local discharge through outcrops at the recharge end of an outcrop-to-outcrop system. Both of these characteristics are observed in the field. In addition, smaller discharging outcrops sustain higher flow rates than larger outcrops, which may help to explain how so much lithospheric heat is extracted globally by this process.

  19. Anode conductor for alkaline cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schrenk, D.J.; Murphy, P.E.

    1988-12-13

    This patent describes an electrochemical cell comprised of an anode comprised of zinc; a cathode; and alkaline electrolyte; and a current collector comprised of a silicon bronze alloy that is comprised of 85-98% by weight copper and 1-5% by weight silicon with the remainder being comprised of at least one of manganese, iron, zinc, aluminum, tin, lead, or mixtures thereof; and a strip of metal tab stock welded to the current collector, the tab stock being a metal other than silicon bronze alloy.

  20. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more than two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  1. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more that two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  2. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-10-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent

  3. Hydrothermal organic synthesis experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    The serious scientific debate about spontaneous generation which raged for centuries reached a climax in the nineteenth century with the work of Spallanzani, Schwann, Tyndall, and Pasteur. These investigators demonstrated that spontaneous generation from dead organic matter does not occur. Although no aspects of these experiments addressed the issue of whether organic compounds could be synthesized abiotically, the impact of the experiments was great enough to cause many investigators to assume that life and its organic compounds were somehow fundamentally different than inorganic compounds. Meanwhile, other nineteenth-century investigators were showing that organic compounds could indeed be synthesized from inorganic compounds. In 1828 Friedrich Wohler synthesized urea in an attempt to form ammonium cyanate by heating a solution containing ammonia and cyanic acid. This experiment is generally recognized to be the first to bridge the artificial gap between organic and inorganic chemistry, but it also showed the usefulness of heat in organic synthesis. Not only does an increase in temperature enhance the rate of urea synthesis, but Walker and Hambly showed that equilibrium between urea and ammonium cyanate was attainable and reversible at 100 C. Wohler's synthesis of urea, and subsequent syntheses of organic compounds from inorganic compounds over the next several decades dealt serious blows to the 'vital force' concept which held that: (1) organic compounds owe their formation to the action of a special force in living organisms; and (2) forces which determine the behavior of inorganic compounds play no part in living systems. Nevertheless, such progress was overshadowed by Pasteur's refutation of spontaneous generation which nearly extinguished experimental investigations into the origins of life for several decades. Vitalism was dealt a deadly blow in the 1950's with Miller's famous spark-discharge experiments which were undertaken in the framework of the Oparin

  4. Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1992-10-06

    A method is described for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction. 2 figs.

  5. Vapor-rich Hydrothermal Fluid Migration Within Pumiceous Sediment in the Iheya North Knoll, Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, J.; Suzuki, R.; Hamasaki, H.; Yamanaka, T.; Chiba, H.; Tsunogai, U.; Ijiri, A.; Nakagawa, S.; Nunoura, T.; Takai, K.; Kinoshita, M.; Ashi, J.

    2007-12-01

    The newly developed ROV NSS (Navigable Sampling System) enabled pin-point piston core sampling from the active hydrothermal field. In the Iheya North hydrothermal field in the mid-Okinawa Trough (27°47.5'N, 126°53.8'E, depth = 1000m), animal colonies are observed not only around the central mound structure (named as NBC) which discharges vigrously high temperature (T=311°C) clear fluid, but also as Calyptogena colony at 200m east from the NBC mound and as tube-worm colony at 250m southeast from the NBC mound. During Leg 3 of KY05-14 cruise (R/V Kaiyo of JAMSTEC) in Jan. 2005, fourn piston cores were successfully recovered with length from 65cm to 250cm. Surface sediments from the Calyptogena colony and the tube-worm colony were revealed as mainly composed of pumiceous sediment. Pore fluids from the Calyptogena Field showed unusual chemistry characterized as very low salinity (Cl=420mM), low Mg concentration, significantly lower Na/Cl ratio than seawater and high methane concentration, which suggests contribution of a vapor-rich hydrothermal component migrating within the pumice layer from the activity center. Moreover, decrease of SO4 accompanied by increase of alkalinity is notable even less than one meter depth below the seafloor. In situ sulfate reduction in the surface sediment caused by entrainment of the hydrothermal component would be a source of hydrogen sulfide that supports Calyptogena colony.

  6. Structural evolution in a hydrothermal reaction between Nb2O5 and NaOH solution: from Nb2O5 grains to microporous Na2Nb2O6.2/3H2O fibers and NaNbO3 cubes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huaiyong; Zheng, Zhanfeng; Gao, Xueping; Huang, Yining; Yan, Zhimin; Zou, Jin; Yin, Hongming; Zou, Qingdi; Kable, Scott H; Zhao, Jincai; Xi, Yunfei; Martens, Wayde N; Frost, Ray L

    2006-02-22

    Niobium pentoxide reacts actively with concentrate NaOH solution under hydrothermal conditions at as low as 120 degrees C. The reaction ruptures the corner-sharing of NbO(7) decahedra and NbO(6) octahedra in the reactant Nb(2)O(5), yielding various niobates, and the structure and composition of the niobates depend on the reaction temperature and time. The morphological evolution of the solid products in the reaction at 180 degrees C is monitored via SEM: the fine Nb(2)O(5) powder aggregates first to irregular bars, and then niobate fibers with an aspect ratio of hundreds form. The fibers are microporous molecular sieve with a monoclinic lattice, Na(2)Nb(2)O(6).(2)/(3)H(2)O. The fibers are a metastable intermediate of this reaction, and they completely convert to the final product NaNbO(3) cubes in the prolonged reaction of 1 h. This study demonstrates that by carefully optimizing the reaction condition, we can selectively fabricate niobate structures of high purity, including the delicate microporous fibers, through a direct reaction between concentrated NaOH solution and Nb(2)O(5). This synthesis route is simple and suitable for the large-scale production of the fibers. The reaction first yields poorly crystallized niobates consisting of edge-sharing NbO(6) octahedra, and then the microporous fibers crystallize and grow by assembling NbO(6) octahedra or clusters of NbO(6) octahedra and NaO(6) units. Thus, the selection of the fibril or cubic product is achieved by control of reaction kinetics. Finally, niobates with different structures exhibit remarkable differences in light absorption and photoluminescence properties. Therefore, this study is of importance for developing new functional materials by the wet-chemistry process. PMID:16478193

  7. Chemical and biochemical transformations in hydrothermal plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilley, Marvin D.; Feely, Richard A.; Trefry, John H.

    Hydrothermal plumes integrate the heat and mass flux originating at seafloor hydrothermal vents thereby providing both a means of detecting hydrothermal activity and estimating hydrothermal fluxes. Many chemical species are introduced into the deep sea via hydrothermal plumes (Figure 1) in concentrations many orders of magnitude higher than that existing in background seawater (e.g. H2, CH4 3He, Mn, Fe) while others are scavenged from seawater by hydrothermal particles (e.g. PO4-3, V, As, rare earth elements, Th). Dilution by entrainment of background seawater in the buoyant portion of the plume is very rapid (see chapters by Lupton and McDuff, this volume) such that the hydrothermal component in the near-field portion of the neutrally buoyant plume represents only about 0.01% of the mixture. Nevertheless, chemical tracers such as 3He, CH4, and Mn are widely utilized in addition to temperature, salinity, and light transmission anomalies to detect hydrothermal venting and to draw inferences about the nature of the underlying geochemistry of the hydrothermal system. Many other chemical tracers can be utilized during plume studies to provide additional information about the nature of the venting. These include particles, H2, Al, and radioisotopes, among others.

  8. Efficient methods for optimal scheduling of fixed head hydrothermal power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zaghlool, M.F.; Trutt, F.C.

    1988-02-01

    This paper highlights a simple, very reliable and effective approach, employing matrix factorization, to the solution of hydrothermal dispatch problems. The salient feature of the solution method is calculating the LU factors corresponding to a permutation of the rows of the Jacobian matrix (Lagrange matrix) at each iteration. The economic operation of hydrothermal systems is further reformulated as a linearly constrained least-squares problem leading to another iterative technique which needs much less computer storage for cases when the hydro plant performance curve is modelled by a linear function. Results for sample systems are worked out in order to demonstrate the superiority of the proposed techniques.

  9. Tested Demonstrations. The Stepwise Reduction of Permanganate in Alkaline Conditions: A Lecture Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruoff, Peter; Riley, Megan

    1987-01-01

    Describes a chemistry experiment where an alkaline ice-cold permanganate solution is reduced by adding dropwise a cold diluted hydrogen peroxide solution. Outlines the course of the reduction through the various oxidation states of manganese with their characteristic colors. (TW)

  10. Grace DAKASEP alkaline battery separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovannoni, R. T.; Lundquist, J. T.; Choi, W. M.

    1987-01-01

    The Grace DAKASEP separator was originally developed as a wicking layer for nickel-zinc alkaline batteries. The DAKASEP is a filled non-woven separator which is flexible and heat sealable. Through modification of formulation and processing variables, products with a variety of properties can be produced. Variations of DAKASEP were tested in Ni-H2, Ni-Zn, Ni-Cd, and primary alkaline batteries with good results. The properties of DAKASEP which are optimized for Hg-Zn primary batteries are shown in tabular form. This separator has high tensile strength, 12 micron average pore size, relatively low porosity at 46-48 percent, and consequently moderately high resistivity. Versions were produced with greater than 70 percent porosity and resistivities in 33 wt percent KOH as low as 3 ohm cm. Performance data for Hg-Zn E-1 size cells containing DAKASEP with the properties shown in tabular form, are more reproducible than data obtained with a competitive polypropylene non-woven separator. In addition, utilization of active material is in general considerably improved.

  11. Solubility Behavior and Phase Stability of Transition Metal Oxides in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Ziemniak

    2000-05-18

    The solubility behavior of transition metal oxides in high temperature water is interpreted by recognizing three types of chemical reaction equilibria: metal oxide hydration/dehydration, metal oxide dissolution and metal ion hydroxocomplex formation. The equilibria are quantified using thermodynamic concepts and the thermochemical properties of the metal oxides/ions representative of the most common constituents of construction metal alloys, i.e., element shaving atomic numbers between Z = 22 (Ti) and Z = 30 (Zn), are summarized on the basis of metal oxide solubility studies conducted in the laboratory. Particular attention is devoted to the uncharged metal ion hydrocomplex, M{sup Z}(OH){sub Z}(aq), since its thermochemical properties define minimum solubilities of the metal oxide at a given temperature. Experimentally-extracted values of standard partial molal entropy (S{sup 0}) for the transition metal ion neutral hydroxocomplex are shown to be influenced by ligand field stabilization energies and complex symmetry.

  12. Hydrothermal alteration and zeolitization of the Fohberg phonolite, Kaiserstuhl Volcanic Complex, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenberger, Tobias Björn; Spürgin, Simon; Lahaye, Yann

    2014-11-01

    The subvolcanic Fohberg phonolite (Kaiserstuhl Volcanic Complex, Germany) is an economic zeolite deposit, formed by hydrothermal alteration of primary magmatic minerals. It is mined due to the high (>40 wt%) zeolite content, which accounts for the remarkable zeolitic physicochemical properties of the ground rock. New mineralogical and geochemical studies are carried out (a) to evaluate the manifestation of hydrothermal alteration, and (b) to constrain the physical and chemical properties of the fluids, which promoted hydrothermal replacement. The alkaline intrusion is characterized by the primary mineralogy: feldspathoid minerals, K-feldspar, aegirine-augite, wollastonite, and andradite. The rare-earth elements-phase götzenite is formed during the late-stage magmatic crystallization. Fluid-induced re-equilibration of feldspathoid minerals and wollastonite caused breakdown to a set of secondary phases. Feldspathoid minerals are totally replaced by various zeolite species, calcite, and barite. Wollastonite breakdown results in the formation of various zeolites, calcite, pectolite, sepiolite, and quartz. Zeolites are formed during subsolidus hydrothermal alteration (<150 °C) under alkaline conditions. A sequence of Ca-Na-dominated zeolite species (gonnardite, thomsonite, mesolite) is followed by natrolite. The sequence reflects an increase in and decrease in of the precipitating fluid. Low radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr values indicate a local origin of the elements necessary for secondary mineral formation from primary igneous phases. In addition, fractures cut the intrusive body, which contain zeolites, followed by calcite and a variety of other silicates, carbonates, and sulfates as younger generations. Stable isotope analysis of late-fracture calcite indicates very late circulation of meteoric fluids and mobilization of organic matter from surrounding sedimentary units.

  13. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  14. The Potential of Soft Soil Improvement Through a Coupled Technique Between Electro Kinetic and Alkaline Activation of Soft Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, G. E.; Ismail, H. B.; Huat, B. K.; Afshin, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.

    2016-07-01

    Soil stabilization techniques have been in development for decades with different rates of success. Alkaline activation of soft soil is one of those techniques that has proved to deliver some of the best shear strength values with minor drawbacks in comparison with conventional soil stabilization methods. However, environmental considerations have not been taken into account, as major mineral glassy phase activators are poisoning alkaline solutions, such as sodium-, potassium-hydroxide, and sodium-, potassium-silicate, which poses serious hazards to man and environment. This paper addresses the ways of discarding the involvement of the aforementioned alkaline solutions in soft soil stabilization by investigating the potential of a coupled electro kinetic alkaline activation technique for soft soil strengthening, through which the provision of alkaline pH is governed by electro kinetic potential. Uncertainties in regard to the dissolution of aluminosilicate as well as the dominance of acidic front are challenges that need to be overcome.

  15. The Effect of Alkaline Earth Metal on the Cesium Loading of Ionsiv(R) IE-910 and IE-911

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F.F.

    2001-01-16

    This study investigated the effect of variances in alkaline earth metal concentrations on cesium loading of IONSIV(R) IE-911. The study focused on Savannah River Site (SRS) ''average'' solution with varying amounts of calcium, barium and magnesium.

  16. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Biocompatibility Study of Highly Crystalline Carbonated Hydroxyapatite Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Caibao; Chen, Yingzhi; Huang, Yongzhuo; Zhu, Peizhi

    2015-08-01

    Highly crystalline carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) nanorods with different carbonate contents were synthesized by a novel hydrothermal method. The crystallinity and chemical structure of synthesized nanorods were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photo-electronic spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The biocompatibility of synthesized CHA nanorods was evaluated by cell viability and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of MG-63 cell line. The biocompatibility evaluation results show that these CHA nanorods are biologically active apatites and potentially promising bone-substitute biomaterials for orthopedic application.

  17. Experimental investigation of the hydrothermal geochemistry of platinum and palladium: I. Solubility of platinum and palladium sulfide minerals in NaCl/H 2SO 4 solutions at 300°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammons, C. H.; Bloom, M. S.; Yu, Y.

    1992-11-01

    Approximately 150 silica tube experiments were used to determine the solubility of Pt and Pd sulfides in NaCl/H 2SO 4 solutions at 300°C. Oxidation state was controlled by equilibrium between aqueous sulfate and coexisting solids. Buffering assemblages included Pd + Pd4S, Pd4S + Pd16S7, Pd16S7 + PdS, Pt + PtS, and PtS + PtS2. Solution pH was controlled by the dissociation of H 2SO 4 (0.1 or 1.0 m), adjusted for ion pairing. Salinities ranged from 0.01 to 3.0 m NaCl. Under these conditions, measured Pt and Pd solubilities varied over a wide range (<0.1 ppb to >1000 ppm), indicating dissolution as chloride complexes of high ligand number. Detailed interpretation of the results gives equilibrium constants for the following reactions: Pd(s) + 2H + + 4Cl - + 1/2O2(g) = PdCl 42- + H 2O (a1) Pt(s) + 2H + + 3Cl - + 1/2O2(g) = PtCl 3- + H 2O , (a2) logK(300° C, Psat) = +12.65 ± 0.5 (reaction al) and +14.84 ± 0.3 (reaction a2). Our experimentally derived constants are in fair (Pt) to excellent (Pd) agreement with previously published estimates based on extrapolation of low-temperature data. The temperature dependence of reaction (a1) is described by the following polynomial (valid between 25 and 300°C): logKal = 22.53 - 7.398 e - 02 T + 1.433 e-04 T2 - 1.034 e - 08 T3 ( T = ° C). Our study indicates that chloride complexes may contribute significant solubilities (> 1 ppb) of Pt and Pd at low to moderate temperature, but only under conditions which are highly oxidized (hematite stable), highly saline (>3 m NaCl eq), and/or unusually acidic ( pH < 4). In the presence of aqueous sulfide, Pt-group element (PGE) solubilities as chloride complexes are extremely low (<1 ppt) and are probably less than the total contribution from other aqueous species (e.g., bisulfide, hydroxy, or ammonia complexes). However, the very strong temperature dependence of reaction (a1) suggests that much higher PGE mobility may be expected at supercritical temperatures. PGEs dissolved as chloride

  18. Metal complexation and ion hydration in low density hydrothermal fluids: Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of Cu(I) and Au(I) in chloride solutions (25-1000 °C, 1-5000 bar)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Yuan; Liu, Weihua; Sherman, David M.; Brugger, Joël

    2014-04-01

    Low-density supercritical fluids are suspected of being able to transport metals, but it is unclear what the speciation/complexation would be in such conditions. In this work, we used ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the complexation, ion association and hydration of Cu+ and Au+ in NaCl brines as a function of solution density, from ambient to supercritical conditions (to 1000 °C, 5000 bar). Cu(I) and Au(I) form distorted linear complexes with two chloride ligands (i.e., CuCl2- and AuCl2-) in subcritical chloride brines. We have discovered that these charged complexes remain in high density supercritical fluids even at high temperature; however, with decreasing density, these complexes become progressively neutralized by ion association with Na+ to form low-charge (NanCuCl2)n-1 and (NanAuCl2)n-1 complexes. In these species, the Na+ ion is very weakly bonded in the outer coordination sphere, resulting in highly disordered structures and fast (few picoseconds) exchange among coordinated and solvent Na+ ions. Thermodynamic models to predict the solubility of metals in low-density magmatic or metamorphic fluids must account for these species. In addition, we found that the number of water molecules (i.e., the hydration number) surrounding the Cu+, Au+, Na+ and Cl- ions decreases linearly when fluid density decreases; this supports empirical thermodynamic models that correlate the stability constants of complexation reactions with solvent density. The traditional Born-model description explains the ion association as resulting from the decreased dielectric constant of the solvent. However at a molecular level, the increased ion association results from the increase in translational entropy associated with ion dehydration.

  19. Preparation and mechanism of nano mullite powders from kaolin via open hydrothermal process.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhong; Tong, Lingxin; Wang, Xiang

    2014-05-01

    Nano mullite powders have been synthesized from calcined kaolin via open hydrothermal process. The powder product was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with selected area electron diffraction (SAED) analysis. The results indicated that single phase puncheon-shaped nano mullite with about 140-360 nm in length and 50-80 nm in diameter is produced when synthesized in 4 mol/L NaOH solution at 100 degrees C for 4 h. The grain size of mullite decrease slightly with increasing reaction time from 0 h to 4 h. In addition, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis confirms presence of Al3+ during the whole reaction process, which indicates that there is an absence of growth units of mullite in the open hydrothermal system and the mullite precursor mainly underwent a solution process during open hydrothermal treatment. PMID:24734655

  20. Hydrothermal vents is Lake Tanganyika, East African Rift system

    SciTech Connect

    Tiercelin, J.J.; Pflumio, C.; Castrec, M.

    1993-06-01

    Sublacustrine hydrothermal vents with associated massive sulfides were discovered during April 1987 at Pemba and Cape Banza on the Zaire side of the northern basin of Lake Tanganyika, East African Rift system. New investigations by a team of ten scuba divers during the multinational (France, Zaire, Germany, and Burundi) TANGANYDRO expedition (August-October 1991) found hydrothermal vents down to a depth of 46 m along north-trending active faults bounding the Tanganyika rift on the western side. Temperatures from 53 to 103 {degrees}C were measured in hydrothermal fluids and sediments. Veins of massive sulfides 1-10 cm thick (pyrite and marcasite banding) were found associated with vents at the Pemba site. At Cape Banza, active vents are characterized by 1-70-cm-high aragonite chimneys, and there are microcrystalline pyrite coatings on the walls of hydrothermal pipes. Hydrothermal fluid end members show distinctive compositions at the two sites. The Pemba end member is a NaHCO{sub 3}-enriched fluid similar to the NaHCO{sub 3} thermal fluids form lakes Magadi and Bogoria in the eastern branch of the rift. The Cape Banza end member is a solution enriched in NaCl. Such brines may have a deep-seated basement origin, as do the Uvinza NaCl brines on the eastern flank of the Tanganyika basin. Geothermometric calculations have yielded temperatures of fluid-rock interaction of 219 and 179 {degrees}C in the Pemba and Cape Banza systems, respectively. Abundant white or reddish-brown microbial colonies resembling Beggiatoa mats were found surrounding the active vents. Thermal fluid circulation is permitted by opening of cracks related to 130{degrees}N normal-dextral faults that intersect the north-south major rift trend. The sources of heat for such hydrothermal systems may relate to the existence of magmatic bodies under the rift, which is suggested by the isotopic composition of carbon dioxide released at Pemba and Cape Banza. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Experimental investigation of single carbon compounds under hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Zolotov, Mikhail Yu.; McCollom, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The speciation of carbon in subseafloor hydrothermal systems has direct implications for the maintenance of life in present-day vent ecosystems and possibly the origin of life on early Earth. Carbon monoxide is of particular interest because it represents a key reactant during the abiotic synthesis of reduced carbon compounds via Fischer-Tropsch-type processes. Laboratory experiments were conducted to constrain reactions that regulate the speciation of aqueous single carbon species under hydrothermal conditions and determine kinetic parameters for the oxidation of CO according to the water water-gas shift reaction (CO 2 + H 2 = CO + H 2O). Aqueous fluids containing added CO 2, CO, HCOOH, NaHCO 3, NaHCOO, and H 2 were heated at 150, 200, and 300 °C and 350 bar in flexible-cell hydrothermal apparatus, and the abundances of carbon compounds was monitored as a function of time. Variations in fluid chemistry suggest that the reduction of CO 2 to CH 3OH under aqueous conditions occurs via a stepwise process that involves the formation of HCOOH, CO, and possibly CH 2O, as reaction intermediaries. Kinetic barriers that inhibit the reduction of CH 3OH to CH 4 allow the accumulation of reaction intermediaries in solution at high concentrations regulated by metastable thermodynamic equilibrium. Reaction of CO 2 to CO involves a two-step process in which CO 2 initially undergoes a reduction step to HCOOH which subsequently dehydrates to form CO. Both reactions proceed readily in either direction. A preexponential factor of 1.35 × 10 6 s -1 and an activation energy of 102 kJ/mol were retrieved from the experimental results for the oxidation of CO to CO 2. Reaction rates amongst single carbon compounds during the experiments suggest that ΣCO 2 (CO 2 + HCO 3- + CO 32-), CO, ΣHCOOH (HCOOH + HCOO -), and CH 3OH may reach states of redox-dependent metastable thermodynamic equilibrium in subseafloor and other hydrothermal systems. The abundance of CO under equilibrium conditions

  2. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Biddy, M.; Davis, R.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  3. Silica nanoparticles as indicator of hydrothermal activities at Enceladus ocean floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postberg, F.; Hsu, S.; Sekine, Y.; Kempf, S.; Juhasz, A.; Horanyi, M.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Srama, R.

    2013-12-01

    hydrothermal liquid, probably as it travels upwards towards the surface (e.g., Matson et al., 2012). The temperatures of the near surface waters which fuel the plume are close to 0°C (Schmidt et al. 2008). Formation and stablility of a nano-colloidal silica phase requires alkaline pH (8 - 10) and only tolerates a mild salinity, not higher than a few percent, which agrees with previous compositional measurements of ice grains in Enceladus plume (Postberg et al. 2009, 2011).

  4. Gold solubility and speciation in hydrothermal solutions: experimental study of the stability of hydrosulphide complex of gold (AuHS°) at 350 to 450°C and 500 bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, F.; Pascal, M.-L.; Pichavant, M.

    1998-09-01

    The solubility of gold was measured in aqueous KCl (0.5 m) solutions under oxygen, sulfur, and slightly acidic pH buffered conditions between 350 and 450°C at a constant pressure of 500 bars. Two buffer assemblages were used to constrain fO 2, fS 2, and consequently fH 2 and aH 2S: respectively, pyrite-pyrrhotite-magnetite (Py-Po-Mt) and pyrite-magnetite-hematite (Py-Mt-Hm). The measured solubility of gold at equilibrium with Py-Po-Mt and Qtz-KF-Mus is 52 ± 8 ppb at 350°C, 134 ± 17 ppb at 400°C and 496 ± 37 ppb at 450°C. With Py-Mt-Hm and Qtz-KF-Mus the solubility of gold is increased to 198 ± 9 ppb at 400°C and 692 ± 10 ppb at 450°C. These results are consistent with the aqueous complex AuHS° being the dominant gold-bearing species. The equilibrium constants (log K R10) for the reaction: Au (s)+H 2S (aq)=AuHS 0+ 1/2H 2(g) R10 have been determined at 350, 400, and 450°C and are, respectively, -5.20 ± 0.25, -5.30 ± 0.15, and -5.40 ± 0.15. These values are similar to those suggested by Zotov (written pers. commun.) and those obtained by recalculating the experimental data of Hayashi and Ohmoto (1991). They are significantly higher than those derived by Benning and Seward (1996) and the possible causes of the discrepancies are discussed. The equilibrium constant for AuHS° shows that this species plays an important role in the deposition of gold in natural environments. Cooling, H 2S loss, pH change, and oxidation seem to be effective mechanisms for gold precipitation, depending on the local ore forming conditions.

  5. Hydrothermal processing of Hanford tank wastes: Process modeling and control

    SciTech Connect

    Currier, R.P.

    1994-10-01

    In the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) hydrothermal process, waste streams are first pressurized and heated as they pass through a continuous flow tubular reactor vessel. The waste is maintained at reaction temperature of 300--550 C where organic destruction and sludge reformation occur. This report documents LANL activities in process modeling and control undertaken in FY94 to support hydrothermal process development. Key issues discussed include non-ideal flow patterns (e.g. axial dispersion) and their effect on reactor performance, the use and interpretation of inert tracer experiments, and the use of computational fluid mechanics to evaluate novel hydrothermal reactor designs. In addition, the effects of axial dispersion (and simplifications to rate expressions) on the estimated kinetic parameters are explored by non-linear regression to experimental data. Safety-related calculations are reported which estimate the explosion limits of effluent gases and the fate of hydrogen as it passes through the reactor. Development and numerical solution of a generalized one-dimensional mathematical model is also summarized. The difficulties encountered in using commercially available software to correlate the behavior of high temperature, high pressure aqueous electrolyte mixtures are summarized. Finally, details of the control system and experiments conducted to empirically determine the system response are reported.

  6. Hydrothermal epitaxy of perovskite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Allen T.

    1998-12-01

    This work details the discovery and study of a new process for the growth of epitaxial single crystal thin films which we call hydrothermal epitaxy. Hydrothermal epitaxy is a low temperature solution route for producing heteroepitaxial thin films through the use of solution chemistry and structurally similar substrates. The application of this synthesis route has led to the growth of a variety of epitaxial perovskite (BaTiOsb3, SrTiOsb3, and Pb(Zr,Ti)Osb3 (PZT)) thin films which provides a simple processing pathway for the formation of other materials of technological interest. BaTiOsb3 and PZT heteroepitaxial thin films and powders were produced by the hydrothermal method at 90-200sp°C using various alkali bases. XRD and TEM analysis shows that, in each case, the films and powders form epitaxially with a composition nearly identical to that of the starting precursors. Sequential growth experiments show that film formation initiates by the nucleation of submicron faceted islands at the step edges of the SrTiOsb3 substrates followed by coalescence after longer growth periods. A Ba-rich interfacial layer between the BaTiOsb3 islands and the SrTiOsb3 surface is seen by cross-section TEM during early growth periods. Electrophoretic and Basp{2+} adsorption data provide a chemical basis for the existence of the interfacial layer. Homoepitaxial growth of SrTiOsb3 on SrTiOsb3 also occurs by island growth, suggesting that the growth mode may be a consequence of the aqueous surface chemistry inherent in the process. Film formation is shown to be affected by any number of factors including type of base, pH, temperature, and substrate pretreatments. Different cation bases (Na-, K-, Rb-, Cs-, TMA-OH) demonstrated pronounced changes in powder and film morphology. For example, smaller cation bases (e.g., NaOH, KOH and RbOH) resulted the formation of 1.5 mum \\{100\\} faceted perovskite PbTiOsb3 blocks while larger cation bases (e.g., CsOH and TMA-OH) produced 500 nm sized

  7. Ongoing hydrothermal activities within Enceladus.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiang-Wen; Postberg, Frank; Sekine, Yasuhito; Shibuya, Takazo; Kempf, Sascha; Horányi, Mihály; Juhász, Antal; Altobelli, Nicolas; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Masaki, Yuka; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Tachibana, Shogo; Sirono, Sin-iti; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Srama, Ralf

    2015-03-12

    Detection of sodium-salt-rich ice grains emitted from the plume of the Saturnian moon Enceladus suggests that the grains formed as frozen droplets from a liquid water reservoir that is, or has been, in contact with rock. Gravitational field measurements suggest a regional south polar subsurface ocean of about 10 kilometres thickness located beneath an ice crust 30 to 40 kilometres thick. These findings imply rock-water interactions in regions surrounding the core of Enceladus. The resulting chemical 'footprints' are expected to be preserved in the liquid and subsequently transported upwards to the near-surface plume sources, where they eventually would be ejected and could be measured by a spacecraft. Here we report an analysis of silicon-rich, nanometre-sized dust particles (so-called stream particles) that stand out from the water-ice-dominated objects characteristic of Saturn. We interpret these grains as nanometre-sized SiO2 (silica) particles, initially embedded in icy grains emitted from Enceladus' subsurface waters and released by sputter erosion in Saturn's E ring. The composition and the limited size range (2 to 8 nanometres in radius) of stream particles indicate ongoing high-temperature (>90 °C) hydrothermal reactions associated with global-scale geothermal activity that quickly transports hydrothermal products from the ocean floor at a depth of at least 40 kilometres up to the plume of Enceladus. PMID:25762281

  8. Primary radical yields in pulse irradiated alkaline aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielden, E. M.; Hart, E. J.

    1969-01-01

    Primary radical yields of hydrated electrons, H atoms, and OH radicals are determined by measuring hydrated electron formation following a 4 microsecond pulse of X rays. The pH dependence of free radical yields beyond pH 12 is determined by observation of the hydrated electrons.

  9. Simplified seawater alkalinity analysis: Use of linear array spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wensheng; Byrne, Robert H.

    1998-08-01

    Modified spectrophotometric procedures are presented for the determination of seawater total alkalinity using rapid scan linear array spectrometers. Continuous monitoring of solution pH allows titrations to be terminated at relatively high pH, whereby excess acid terms are very small. Excess acid concentrations are quantified using the sulfonephthalein indicators, bromocresol green and bromocresol purple. The outlined spectrophotometric procedures require no thermal equilibration of samples. Using bromocresol green, solution pH T ([H +] T in moles per kg of solution) is given as: pHT=4.2699+0.002578(35- S)+ log((R(25)-0.00131)/(2.3148-0.1299 R(25))) - log(1-0.001005S) and R(25)= R( t){1+0.00909(25- t)}, where 29⩽S⩽37, 13° C⩽t⩽32° C, and R( t) is the absorbance ratio ( A616/ A444) at temperature t and salinity S. Using bromocresol purple, the solution pH T is given as pH T=5.8182+0.00129(35- S)+log(( R(25)-0.00381)/(2.8729-0.05104 R(25))) and R(25)= R( t){1+0.01869(25- t)}, where 29⩽S⩽37, 13° C⩽t⩽32° C, and R( t)= A589/ A432. Alkalinity measurements using bromocresol purple had a precision on the order of 0.3 μmol kg -1 and were within 0.3-0.9 μmol kg -1 of the alkalinities of certified seawater reference materials.

  10. Spinel-group minerals in rocks of the Khibiny alkaline pluton, Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyuk, G. Yu.; Pakhomovsky, Ya. A.; Konopleva, N. G.; Yakovenchuk, V. N.; Men'shikov, Yu. P.; Mikhailova, Yu. A.

    2007-12-01

    Seven spinel-group minerals in various geological settings have been revealed in the rocks of the Khibiny pluton. Hercynite, gahnite, and vuorelainenite occur only in xenoliths of hornfels after volcanic and sedimentary rocks, whereas spinel and magnesiochromite occur in alkaline ultramafic rocks of dike series. Franklinite has been discovered in a low-temperature hydrothermal vein. Ubiquitous magnetite is abundant in foyaite, foidolites, alkaline ultrabasic rocks, and pegmatite and hydrothermal veins and may even be the main mineral in some foidolite varieties. The spinel-group minerals are characterized by various chemical compositions due to the fractionation of nepheline syenites resulting in formation of the Main ring of foidolites and apatite-nepheline ore. Like most other minerals found throughout the pluton, magnetite is characterized by variation in the chemical composition along the radial line from the contact with country Proterozoic volcanic rocks to the geometric center of the pluton. Toward the center, the total Ti and Mn contents in magnetite increase from 5 15 up to 40 at %.

  11. Prebiotic organic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    Organic compounds which are obviously synthesized from inorganic precursors (e.g., CO) by hydrothermal activity are currently a research topic in prebiotic chemistry leading to the origin of life. However, such de novo products would be overwhelmed in present Earth environments, by an excess of thermal alteration (pyrolysis) products formed from contemporary life (e.g., hydrocarbons, alkanoic acids, etc.). Thus, organic syntheses must be demonstrated and distinguished from organic matter alteration initially in the laboratory and then in the field. Organic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions is theoretically possible and various established industrial processes are used to synthesize organic compounds from inorganic substrates with the aid of catalysts. A set of Strecker-type synthesis experiments has been carried out under hydrothermal conditions (150 °C), producing various amino acids. The formation of lipid compounds during an aqueous organic synthesis (Fischer-Tropsch-type) reaction was reported, using solutions of oxalic acid (also formic acid) as the carbon and hydrogen sources, and heating at discrete temperatures (50° intervals) from 100 to 400 °C. The maximum lipid yield, especially for oxygenated compounds was in the window of 150-250 °C. The compounds range from C6 to >C33, including n-alkanols, n-alkanoic acids, n-alkyl formates, n-alkanones, and n-alkanes, all with no carbon number preferences. These lipid compounds, especially the acids, can form lipid bilayers or micelles, potential precursors for membranes. Reductive condensation (i.e., dehydration) reactions also occur under simulated hydrothermal conditions and form amide, nitrile and ester bonds. The chemistry and kinetics of the condensation reactions are under further study and have the potential for oligomerization of acid-amides in aqueous medium. Abiotic organic compounds are not biomarkers per se because they do not originate from biosynthesis. Thus, they should be regarded as a

  12. Alkaline-resistance model of subtilisin ALP I, a novel alkaline subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Maeda, H; Mizutani, O; Yamagata, Y; Ichishima, E; Nakajima, T

    2001-05-01

    The alkaline-resistance mechanism of the alkaline-stable enzymes is not yet known. To clarify the mechanism of alkaline-resistance of alkaline subtilisin, structural changes of two typical subtilisins, subtilisin ALP I (ALP I) and subtilisin Sendai (Sendai), were studied by means of physicochemical methods. Subtilisin NAT (NAT), which exhibits no alkaline resistance, was examined as a control. ALP I gradually lost its activity, accompanied by protein degradation, but, on the contrary, Sendai was stable under alkaline conditions. CD spectral measurements at neutral and alkaline pH indicated no apparent differences between ALP I and Sendai. A significant difference was observed on measurement of fluorescence emission spectra of the tryptophan residues of ALP I that were exposed on the enzyme surface. The fluorescence intensity of ALP I was greatly reduced under alkaline conditions; moreover, the reduction was reversed when alkaline-treated ALP I was neutralized. The fluorescence spectrum of Sendai remained unchanged. The enzymatic and optical activities of NAT were lost at high pH, indicating a lack of functional and structural stability in an alkaline environment. Judging from these results, the alkaline resistance is closely related to the surface structure of the enzyme molecule. PMID:11328588

  13. Microemulsion-mediated hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of nanosize rutile and anatase particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.; Long, J.; Huang, A.; Luo, Y.; Feng, S.; Xu, R.

    1999-12-21

    Uniform nanoparticles of rutile and anatase were prepared, respectively, by a new approach, a microemulsion-mediated method, in which the microemulsion medium was further treated by hydrothermal reaction. Herein, the combined procedure of microemulsion and hydrothermal synthesis to prepare nanoparticles is referred to as a microemulsion-mediated hydrothermal (MMH) method. This MMH method could lead to the formation of crystalline titania powders under much milder reaction conditions than the normally reported microemulsion-mediated methods, in which posttreatment of calcination was necessary. In this work, a kind of solution was formed by dissolving tetrabutyl titanate into hydrochloric acid or nitric acid, and the solution was dispersed in an organic phase for the preparation of the microemulsion medium. The aqueous cores of water/Triton X-100/hexanol/cyclohexane microemulsions were used as constrained microreactors for a controlled growth of titania particles under hydrothermal conditions. The product of hydrothermal synthesis was separated and dried for characterization. The phase components and the morphologies and grain sizes of products were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effects of changing the variables of the reaction conditions, such as the use of acid, the concentrations of acid, the reaction temperatures, and/or the reaction times on the phases and morphologies of the titania product are described.

  14. NMR Studies of Cu/zeolite SCR Catalysts Hydrothermally Aged with Urea

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yisun; Hoard, John; Lambert, Christine; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF

    2008-06-26

    The effects of hydrothermal aging of Cu/zeolite urea-SCR catalysts on their reactivity and material properties was assessed by performance tests and multiple characterization techniques that included 27Al NMR and XRD. Three aging protocols were used that consisted of varying temperature during hydrothermal aging with or without exposure to aqueous urea solution. Differences in behavior were even found for samples hydrothermally aged immediately following exposure to the urea solution or if the sample was dried overnight before hydrothermal aging. The combination of urea and high temperature exposure increased the deactivation of Cu/zeolite SCR catalysts beyond that observed by hydrothermal aging alone, with an immediate high temperature exposure following wetting of the catalyst core with aqueous urea causing the most significant deterioration in performance. The impact of urea on SCR catalyst durability was also found to increase with the aging temperature. NMR analysis suggested that aging with urea resulted in relatively more dealumination of the zeolite for the SCR catalysts in this study.

  15. Zinc oxide hollow microstructures and nanostructures formed under hydrothermal conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dem'yanets, L. N. Artemov, V. V.; Li, L. E.; Mininzon, Yu. M.; Uvarova, T. G.

    2008-09-15

    Zinc oxide low-dimensional hollow structures in the form of hexagonal plates with holes at the center of the {l_brace}0001{r_brace} facets are synthesized in the course of the low-temperature interaction of ZnO precursors with aqueous solutions of potassium fluoride under hydrothermal conditions. Crystals have the shape of single-walled or multiwalled 'nuts.' The high optical quality of the structures is confirmed by cathodoluminescence data at room temperature. The mechanism of the formation of ZnO 'nanonuts' and products of the interaction of the ZnO precursors with KF is proposed.

  16. In situ total X-ray scattering study of WO₃ nanoparticle formation under hydrothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Saha, Dipankar; Jensen, Kirsten M Ø; Tyrsted, Christoffer; Bøjesen, Espen D; Mamakhel, Aref Hasen; Dippel, Ann-Christin; Christensen, Mogens; Iversen, Bo B

    2014-04-01

    Pair distribution function analysis of in situ total scattering data recorded during formation of WO3 nanocrystals under hydrothermal conditions reveal that a complex precursor structure exists in solution. The WO6 polyhedra of the precursor cluster undergo reorientation before forming the nanocrystal. This reorientation is the critical element in the formation of different hexagonal polymporphs of WO3. PMID:24574244

  17. Dynamics of the Yellowstone hydrothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, Shaul; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2014-09-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field is characterized by extensive seismicity, episodes of uplift and subsidence, and a hydrothermal system that comprises more than 10,000 thermal features, including geysers, fumaroles, mud pots, thermal springs, and hydrothermal explosion craters. The diverse chemical and isotopic compositions of waters and gases derive from mantle, crustal, and meteoric sources and extensive water-gas-rock interaction at variable pressures and temperatures. The thermal features are host to all domains of life that utilize diverse inorganic sources of energy for metabolism. The unique and exceptional features of the hydrothermal system have attracted numerous researchers to Yellowstone beginning with the Washburn and Hayden expeditions in the 1870s. Since a seminal review published a quarter of a century ago, research in many fields has greatly advanced our understanding of the many coupled processes operating in and on the hydrothermal system. Specific advances include more refined geophysical images of the magmatic system, better constraints on the time scale of magmatic processes, characterization of fluid sources and water-rock interactions, quantitative estimates of heat and magmatic volatile fluxes, discovering and quantifying the role of thermophile microorganisms in the geochemical cycle, defining the chronology of hydrothermal explosions and their relation to glacial cycles, defining possible links between hydrothermal activity, deformation, and seismicity; quantifying geyser dynamics; and the discovery of extensive hydrothermal activity in Yellowstone Lake. Discussion of these many advances forms the basis of this review.

  18. Dynamics of the Yellowstone hydrothermal system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurwitz, Shaul; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2014-01-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field is characterized by extensive seismicity, episodes of uplift and subsidence, and a hydrothermal system that comprises more than 10,000 thermal features, including geysers, fumaroles, mud pots, thermal springs, and hydrothermal explosion craters. The diverse chemical and isotopic compositions of waters and gases derive from mantle, crustal, and meteoric sources and extensive water-gas-rock interaction at variable pressures and temperatures. The thermal features are host to all domains of life that utilize diverse inorganic sources of energy for metabolism. The unique and exceptional features of the hydrothermal system have attracted numerous researchers to Yellowstone beginning with the Washburn and Hayden expeditions in the 1870s. Since a seminal review published a quarter of a century ago, research in many fields has greatly advanced our understanding of the many coupled processes operating in and on the hydrothermal system. Specific advances include more refined geophysical images of the magmatic system, better constraints on the time scale of magmatic processes, characterization of fluid sources and water-rock interactions, quantitative estimates of heat and magmatic volatile fluxes, discovering and quantifying the role of thermophile microorganisms in the geochemical cycle, defining the chronology of hydrothermal explosions and their relation to glacial cycles, defining possible links between hydrothermal activity, deformation, and seismicity; quantifying geyser dynamics; and the discovery of extensive hydrothermal activity in Yellowstone Lake. Discussion of these many advances forms the basis of this review.

  19. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2008-05-06

    A recent development in biomass gasification is the use of a pressurized water processing environment in order that drying of the biomass can be avoided. This paper reviews the research undertaken developing this new option for biomass gasification. This review does not cover wet oxidation or near-atmospheric-pressure steam-gasification of biomass. Laboratory research on hydrothermal gasification of biomass focusing on the use of catalysts is reviewed here, and a companion review focuses on non-catalytic processing. Research includes liquid-phase, sub-critical processing as well as super-critical water processing. The use of heterogeneous catalysts in such a system allows effective operation at lower temperatures, and the issues around the use of catalysts are presented. This review attempts to show the potential of this new processing concept by comparing the various options under development and the results of the research.

  20. Seawater bicarbonate removal during hydrothermal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proskurowski, G. K.; Seewald, J.; Sylva, S. P.; Reeves, E.; Lilley, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    High temperature fluids sampled at hydrothermal vents represent a complex alteration product of water-rock reactions on a multi-component mixture of source fluids. Sources to high-temperature hydrothermal samples include the 'original' seawater present in the recharge limb of circulation, magmatically influenced fluids added at depth as well as any seawater entrained during sampling. High-temperature hydrothermal fluids are typically enriched in magmatic volatiles, with CO2 the dominant species, characterized by concentrations of 10's-100's of mmol/kg (1, 2). Typically, the high concentration of CO2 relative to background seawater bicarbonate concentrations (~2.3 mmol/kg) obscures a full analysis of the fate of seawater bicarbonate during high-temperature hydrothermal circulation. Here we present data from a suite of samples collected over the past 15 years from high-temperature hydrothermal vents at 9N, Endeavour, Lau Basin, and the MAR that have endmember CO2 concentrations less than 10 mmol/kg. Using stable and radiocarbon isotope measurements these samples provide a unique opportunity to examine the balance between 'original' seawater bicarbonate and CO2 added from magmatic sources. Multiple lines of evidence from multiple hydrothermal settings consistently points to the removal of ~80% of the 'original' 2.3 mmol/kg seawater bicarbonate. Assuming that this removal occurs in the low-temperature, 'recharge' limb of hydrothermal circulation, this removal process is widely occurring and has important contributions to the global carbon cycle over geologic time. 1. Lilley MD, Butterfield DA, Lupton JE, & Olson EJ (2003) Magmatic events can produce rapid changes in hydrothermal vent chemistry. Nature 422(6934):878-881. 2. Seewald J, Cruse A, & Saccocia P (2003) Aqueous volatiles in hydrothermal fluids from the Main Endeavour Field, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge: temporal variability following earthquake activity. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 216(4):575-590.

  1. Gas phase salt clusters from electrosprayed alkaline earth colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, R. Marshall; Shen, Nanzhu; Nicoll, Jeremy; Tarnawiecki, Boris; Dejsupa, Chadin; Dearden, David V.

    1997-03-01

    Several distributions of small polynuclear ions of general form [nM + mA + pS]q+ (where M represents an alkaline earth cation (Mg, Ca, Sr or Ba), n = 2-10, A represents a halide, acetate or nitrate counterion originating in the divalent salt, and S represents an acetic acid or methanol adduct) are detected by FTICR when water/methanol solutions of alkaline earth salts are electrosprayed. For example, the largest cluster ion derived from 6.3 mM solutions of calcium acetate acidified with 2%x acetic acid have n= 10, m = 18, p = 5 and q = 2. Characteristics of these solutions suggest the presence of colloidal dispersions. These characteristics include stability upon aging, light scattering response and the requisite pre-etching of the glass containers. Aqueous mixtures of two group II salts produce mixed-salt cluster ions. For instance, from a mixture of calcium and magnesium acetate we trap mixed-cation clusters characterized by a complete set of binary partitions of n, for n = 2-6. Specifically, the manifold of clusters with four cations contains 4:0, 3:1, 2:2, 1:3 and 0:4 ratios of magnesium to calcium. Isolated alkaline earth clusters react with a low-pressure background of 18-crown-6 (C6) by salt abstraction exclusively. In general, the more facile abstraction from a mixed cluster produces a pair of products in which the neutral conforms to the hard-soft acid-base principle. The reactions of C6 with [MgSr(OAc)3]+ provide evidence for the existence of isomeric clusters at m/z 289. This is supported by bimodal kinetics and preliminary results of ab initio calculations.

  2. What Defines a Separate Hydrothermal System

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless, J.V.; Bogie, I.; Bignall, G.

    1995-01-01

    Separate hydrothermal systems can be defined in a variety of ways. Criteria which have been applied include separation of heat source, upflow, economic resource and geophysical anomaly. Alternatively, connections have been defined by the effects of withdrawal of economically useful fluid and subsidence, effects of reinjection, changes in thermal features, or by a hydrological connection of groundwaters. It is proposed here that: ''A separate hydrothermal system is one that is fed by a separate convective upflow of fluid, at a depth above the brittle-ductile transition for the host rocks, while acknowledging that separate hydrothermal systems can be hydrologically interconnected at shallower levels''.

  3. Cripple Creek and other alkaline-related gold deposits in the Southern Rocky Mountains, USA: Influence of regional tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, K.D.; Ludington, S.

    2002-01-01

    Alkaline-related epithermal vein, breccia, disseminated, skarn, and porphyry gold deposits form a belt in the southern Rocky Mountains along the eastern edge of the North American Cordillera. Alkaline igneous rocks and associated hydrothermal deposits formed at two times. The first was during the Laramide orogeny (about 70-40 Ma), with deposits restricted spatially to the Colorado mineral belt (CMB). Other alkaline igneous rocks and associated gold deposits formed later, during the transition from a compressional to an extensional regime (about 35-27 Ma). These younger rocks and associated deposits are more widespread, following the Rocky Mountain front southward, from Cripple Creek in Colorado through New Mexico. All of these deposits are on the eastern margin of the Cordillera, with voluminous calc-alkaline rocks to the west. The largest deposits in the belt include Cripple Creek and those in the CMB. The most important factor in the formation of all of the gold deposits was the near-surface emplacement of relatively oxidized volatile-rich alkaline magmas. Strontium and lead isotope compositions suggest that the source of the magmas was subduction-modified subcontinental lithosphere. However, Cripple Creek alkaline rocks and older Laramide alkaline rocks in the CMB that were emplaced through hydrously altered LREE-enriched rocks of the Colorado (Yavapai) province have 208Pb/204Pb ratios that suggest these magmas assimilated and mixed with significant amounts of lower crust. The anomalously hot, thick, and light crust beneath Colorado may have been a catalyst for large-scale transfer of volatiles and crustal melting. Increased dissolved H2O (and CO2, F, Cl) of these magmas may have resulted in more productive gold deposits due to more efficient magmatic-hydrothermal systems. High volatile contents may also have promoted Te and V enrichment, explaining the presence of fluorite, roscoelite (vanadium-rich mica) and tellurides in the CMB deposits and Cripple Creek as

  4. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  5. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  6. Inorganic-organic separators for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible separator is reported for use between the electrodes of Ni-Cd and Ni-Zn batteries using alkaline electrolytes. The separator was made by coating a porous substrate with a battery separator composition. The coating material included a rubber-based resin copolymer, a plasticizer and inorganic and organic fillers which comprised 55% by volume or less of the coating as finally dried. One or more of the filler materials, whether organic or inorganic, is preferably active with the alkaline electrolyte to produce pores in the separator coating. The plasticizer was an organic material which is hydrolyzed by the alkaline electrolyte to improve conductivity of the separator coating.

  7. Effect of pH on the Preparation of {alpha}-Calcium Sulfate Hemihydrate from FGD Gypsum with the Hydrothermal Method

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, B.H.; Shen, Z.X.; Wu, Z.B.; Yang, L.C.; Ma, X.F.

    2008-12-15

    pH is one of the most important parameters that determine the crystallization process, but it is always neglected in the preparation of {alpha}-calcium sulfate hemihydrate ({alpha}-HH) from calcium sulfate dihydrate (DH) with the hydrothermal method. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum, which is mainly composed of DH, was used as raw material to obtain {alpha}-HH through dehydration in a Ca-Mg-K-Cl-solution medium at 95{sup o}C under atmospheric pressure. The initial pH values of the suspensions were adjusted from 1.2 to 8.0 to explore the influence of pH on the dehydration process and the product characteristics. The results showed that {alpha}-HH crystal was the only dehydration product with the pH ranging from 1.2 to 8.0. With the increase of initial pH, the dehydration rate decreased and the formed {alpha}-HH crystal had a larger particle size. The length/width ratio decreased markedly from 4.8 to 2.9 as the initial pH increased from 1.2 to 7.3. pH had a profound influence on the dehydration of DH and the morphology of alpha-HH via its effect on the supersaturation and perhaps also the precipitation of Ca(OH){sub 2} in an alkaline environment.

  8. Methanethiol abundance in high-temperature hydrothermal fluids from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, E.; Seewald, J. S.; Saccocia, P.; van der Meer, M.

    2008-12-01

    metabolism in highly-reducing alkaline hydrothermal environments invoke CH3SH as a key reactant leading to Acetyl CoA-based (Wood-Ljungdahl) carbon fixation pathways. Results of this study challenge the notion that high-pH, reducing fluids emanating from serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal systems like Lost City were favorable for the production of CH3SH, the establishment of a primitive metabolic cycle and the emergence of microbial life on Earth.

  9. Accumulation of formamide in hydrothermal pores to form prebiotic nucleobases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niether, Doreen; Afanasenkau, Dzmitry; Dhont, Jan K. G.

    2016-04-01

    Formamide is one of the important compounds from which prebiotic molecules can be synthesized, provided that its concentration is sufficiently high. For nucleotides and short DNA strands, it has been shown that a high degree of accumulation in hydrothermal pores occurs, so that temperature gradients might play a role in the origin of life [Baaske P, et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104(22):9346-9351]. We show that the same combination of thermophoresis and convection in hydrothermal pores leads to accumulation of formamide up to concentrations where nucleobases are formed. The thermophoretic properties of aqueous formamide solutions are studied by means of Infrared Thermal Diffusion Forced Rayleigh Scattering. These data are used in numerical finite element calculations in hydrothermal pores for various initial concentrations, ambient temperatures, and pore sizes. The high degree of formamide accumulation is due to an unusual temperature and concentration dependence of the thermophoretic behavior of formamide. The accumulation fold in part of the pores increases strongly with increasing aspect ratio of the pores, and saturates to highly concentrated aqueous formamide solutions of ˜85 wt% at large aspect ratios. Time-dependent studies show that these high concentrations are reached after 45-90 d, starting with an initial formamide weight fraction of 10-310-3 wt % that is typical for concentrations in shallow lakes on early Earth.

  10. Silica Transport and Distribution in Saline, Immiscible Fluids: Application to Subseafloor Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele-Macinnis, M.; Bodnar, R. J.; Lowell, R.; Rimstidt, J. D.

    2009-05-01

    Quartz is a nearly ubiquitous gangue mineral in hydrothermal mineral deposits, most often constituting the bulk of hydrothermal mineralization. The dissolution, transport and precipitation of quartz is controlled by the solubility of silica; in particular, in hot hydrothermal fluids in contact with quartz, silica saturation can generally be assumed, as rates of dissolution and precipitation are generally much faster than fluid flow rates. The solubility of silica in aqueous fluids can be used to understand the evolution of hydrothermal systems by tracing the silica distribution in these systems through time. The solubility of quartz in an aqueous fluid is dependent upon the pressure, temperature and composition (PTX) of the fluid. Silica solubility in pure water as a function of pressure and temperature is well understood. However, natural fluids contain variable amounts of dissolved ionic species, thus it is necessary to include the effects of salinity on silica solubility to accurately predict quartz distribution in hydrothermal systems. In particular, addition of NaCl results in enhanced quartz solubility over a wide range of PT conditions. Furthermore, if phase separation occurs in saline fluids, silica is preferentially partitioned into the higher salinity brine phase; if vapor is removed from the system, the bulk salinity in the system evolves towards the brine end member, and overall silica solubility is enhanced. There is abundant evidence from natural fluid inclusions for fluid immiscibility in hydrothermal ore deposits. Additionally, recent hydrothermal models that include fluid phase equilibria effects predict that phase separation may be an important control on the distribution of dissolved components in seafloor hydrothermal systems. An empirical equation describing the solubility of silica in salt-bearing hydrothermal solutions over a wide range of PTX conditions has been incorporated into a multiphase fluid flow model for seafloor hydrothermal

  11. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Luminescent Properties of Eu3+ Doped Sr3Al2O6 Phosphor for White LED.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Pan, Heng; Tang, Aiwei; Zhang, Jinping; Guan, Li; Su, Hongxin; Dong, Guoyi; Yang, Zhiping; Wang, Huike; Teng, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Eu3+ ions doped Sr3Al2O6 phosphors were successfully synthesized via a hydrothermal method. The precursor was prepared by low temperature hydrothermal method using ammonia as both alkaline source and precipitator. Then the final product was obtained by high temperature sintering. In addition, the structures, morphologies, and luminescent properties of as-prepared products were thoroughly characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fluorescence spectroscopy (PL). XRD shown a single phase Sr3Al2O6 prepared by a facile hydrothermal method at 250 °C for 10 h. In the PL spectra of as-prepared samples, the optimal value of Eu3+ concentration is 2 mol%. From the fluorescent spectra, the emission peaks of Sr3Al2O6: Eul+ phosphors are centered at around 591 nm, and the excitation peaks are centered at around 233 nm, 323 nm, 394 nm, and 468 nm, respectively, which were assigned to the characteristic transition of Eu3+ ions. The influence of ammonia, and the synthesis temperature on the luminescent properties of Sr3Al206: Eu3+ phosphors were studied in detail. The alkaline earth aluminates luminescent materials activated by rare earth ions have good prospects in the field of new-generation light sources. PMID:27451652

  12. Volcano-Hydrothermal Systems of the Central and Northern Kuril Island Arc - a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalacheva, E.; Taran, Y.; Voloshina, E.; Ptashinsky, L.

    2015-12-01

    More than 20 active volcanoes with historical eruptions are known on 17 islands composing the Central and Northern part of the Kurilian Arc. Six islands - Paramushir, Shiashkotan, Rasshua, Ushishir, Ketoy and Simushir - are characterized by hydrothermal activity, complementary to the fumarolic activity in their craters. There are several types of volcano-hydrothermal systems on the islands. At Paramushir, Shiashkotan and Ketoy the thermal manifestations are acidic to ultra-acidic water discharges associated with hydrothermal aquifers inside volcano edifices and formed as the result of the absorption of magmatic gases by ground waters. A closest known analogue of such activity is Satsuma-Iwojima volcano-island at the Ryukyu Arc. Another type of hydrothermal activity are wide spread coastal hot springs (Shiashkotan, Rasshua), situated as a rule within tide zones and formed by mixing of the heated seawater with cold groundwater or, in opposite, by mixing of the steam- or conductively heated groundwater with seawater. This type of thermal manifestation is similar to that reported for other volcanic islands of the world (Satsuma Iwojima, Monserrat, Ischia, Socorro). Ushishir volcano-hydrothermal system is formed by the absorption of magmatic gases by seawater. Only Ketoy Island hosts a permanent acidic crater lake. At Ebeko volcano (Paramushir) rapidly disappearing small acidic lakes (formed after phreatic eruptions) have been reported. The main hydrothermal manifestation of Simushir is the Zavaritsky caldera lake with numerous coastal thermal springs and weak steam vents. The last time measured temperatures of fumaroles at the islands are: >500ºC at Pallas Peak (Ketoy), 480ºC at Kuntamintar volcano (Shiashkotan), variable and fast changing temperatures from 120º C to 500ºC at Ebeko volcano (Paramushir), 150ºC in the Rasshua crater, and > 300ºC in the Chirpoy crater (Black Brothers islands). The magmatic and rock-forming solute output by the Kurilian volcano-hydrothermal

  13. Hydrous pyrolysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and implications for the origin of PAH in hydrothermal petroleum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCollom, T. M.; Simoneit, B. R.; Shock, E. L.

    1999-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are found at high concentrations in thermally altered organic matter and hydrothermally generated petroleum from sediment-covered seafloor hydro-thermal systems. To better understand the factors controlling the occurrence of PAH in thermally altered environments, the reactivities of two PAH, phenanthrene and anthracene, were investigated in hydrothermal experiments. The compounds were heated with water at 330 degrees C in sealed reaction vessels for durations ranging from 1 to 17 days. Iron oxide and sulfide minerals, formic acid, or sodium for-mate were included in some experiments to vary conditions within the reaction vessel. Phenanthrene was unreactive both in water alone and in the presence of minerals for up to 17 days, while anthracene was partially hydrogenated (5-10%) to di- and tetrahydroanthracene. In the presence of 6-21 vol % formic acid, both phenanthrene and anthracene reacted extensively to form hydrogenated and minor methylated derivatives, with the degree of hydrogenation and methylation increasing with the amount of formic acid. Phenanthrene was slightly hydrogenated in sodium formate solutions. The hydrogenation reactions could be readily reversed; heating a mixture of polysaturated phenanthrenes resulted in extensive dehydrogenation (aromatization) after 3 days at 330 degrees C. While the experiments demonstrate that reaction pathways for the hydrogenation of PAH under hydrothermal conditions exist, the reactions apparently require higher concentrations of H2 than are typical of geologic settings. The experiments provide additional evidence that PAH may be generated in hydrothermal systems from progressive aromatization and dealkylation of biologically derived polycyclic precursors such as steroids and terpenoids. Furthermore, the results indicate that PAH initially present in sediments or formed within hydrothermal systems are resistant to further thermal degradation during hydrothermal alteration.

  14. Hydrothermal monitoring in a quiescent volcanic arc: Cascade Range, northwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Randolph-Flagg, N. G.; Gelwick, K.D.; Lundstrom, E.A.; Crankshaw, I.M.; Murveit, A.M.; Schmidt, M.E.; Bergfeld, D.; Spicer, K.R.; Tucker, D.S.; Mariner, R.H.; Evans, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing (1996–present) volcanic unrest near South Sister, Oregon, is accompanied by a striking set of hydrothermal anomalies, including elevated temperatures, elevated major ion concentrations, and 3He/4He ratios as large as 8.6 RA in slightly thermal springs. These observations prompted the US Geological Survey to begin a systematic hydrothermal-monitoring effort encompassing 25 sites and 10 of the highest-risk volcanoes in the Cascade volcanic arc, from Mount Baker near the Canadian border to Lassen Peak in northern California. A concerted effort was made to develop hourly, multiyear records of temperature and/or hydrothermal solute flux, suitable for retrospective comparison with other continuous geophysical monitoring data. Targets included summit fumarole groups and springs/streams that show clear evidence of magmatic influence in the form of high 3He/4He ratios and/or anomalous fluxes of magmatic CO2 or heat. As of 2009–2012, summit fumarole temperatures in the Cascade Range were generally near or below the local pure water boiling point; the maximum observed superheat was 3 during periods of hourly record. Hydrothermal responses to these small seismic stimuli were generally undetectable or ambiguous. Evaluation of multiyear to multidecadal trends indicates that whereas the hydrothermal system at Mount St. Helens is still fast-evolving in response to the 1980–present eruptive cycle, there is no clear evidence of ongoing long-term trends in hydrothermal activity at other Cascade Range volcanoes that have been active or restless during the past century (Baker, South Sister, and Lassen). Experience gained during the Cascade Range hydrothermal-monitoring experiment informs ongoing efforts to capture entire unrest cycles at more active but generally less accessible volcanoes such as those in the Aleutian arc.

  15. Composite seal reduces alkaline battery leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clatterbuck, C. H.; Plitt, K. F.

    1965-01-01

    Composite seal consisting of rubber or plastic washers and a metal washer reduces alkaline battery leakage. Adhesive is applied to each washer interface, and the washers are held together mechanically.

  16. Heavy metals stabilization in medical waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline assisted supercritical water technology.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jian; Li, Xiaodong; Chi, Yong; Yan, Jianhua

    2010-12-01

    This study investigated the process of aluminosilicate formation in medical waste incinerator fly ash containing large amounts of heavy metals and treated with alkaline compounds at 375 degrees C and examined how this process affected the mobility and availability of the metals. As a consequence of the treatments, the amount of dissolved heavy metals, and thus their mobility, was greatly reduced, and the metal leaching concentration was below the legislative regulations for metal leachability. Moreover, this process did not produce a high concentration of heavy metals in the effluent. The addition of alkaline compounds such as sodium hydroxide and sodium carbonate can prevent certain heavy metal ions dissolving in water. In comparison with the alkaline-free condition, the extracted concentrations of As, Mn, Pb, Sr and Zn were decreased by about 51.08, 97.22, 58.33, 96.77 and 86.89% by the addition of sodium hydroxide and 66.18, 86.11, 58.33, 83.87 and 81.91% by the addition of sodium carbonate. A mechanism for how the formation of aluminosilicate occurred in supercritical water and affected the mobility and availability of the heavy metals is discussed. The reported results could be useful as basic knowledge for planning new technologies for the hydrothermal stabilization of heavy metals in fly ash. PMID:20430801

  17. Organic compounds in hydrothermal systems on the Russian Far East: relevance to the origin of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompanichenko, Vladimir

    In 70th of the last century L. Mukhin with co-authors (1) explored amino acids in the hot springs and water-steam mixture from the boreholes in Kamchatka peninsula of eastern Rus-sia. According to their results, 12 amino acids of biological origination were detected in hot springs inhabited by thermophiles and hyperthermophiles. Only a single amino acid -glycine -was found in the lifeless condensate of water-steam mixture. These authors proposed its abiotic genesis. Our research is devoted to exploration of moderately volatile organic com-pounds in the hot springs and water-steam mixture in Kamchatka peninsula, Kuriles and intracontinental part of eastern Russia. Samples were taken from hot springs far from poten-tial sources of contamination by human populations, and from boreholes 60 to 1200 meters in depth. The temperature ranged from 175C (sterile water-steam mixture) to 55C (hot water with thermophile populations). The samples were analyzed by the gas chromatomass-spectrometer Shimatsu (GCMS-QP20105). Lifeless condensate of water-steam mixture (t = 108-175C) con-tains aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene, 1,2-methylnaphtaline biphenyl, phenathrene, fluo-rene,squalene, 1,3-diethylbenzene, and trichlorobenzene)., n-alkanes (decane, dodecane, tride-cane, tetradecane, pentadecane, hexadecane, and geptadecane), aldehyde (oktadekanal), ketone (2-geptadekanon), and alcohol (2-undetsenol-1). 10 homologous series have been found in hot solutions (t = 55-99C) inhabited by thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms hav-ing low concentrations: aromatic hydrocarbons, n-alkanes, alkenes, aldehydes, dietoxyalkanes, naphthenes, fatty acids, methyl ethers of fatty acids, monoglycerides, and steroids. Especially diverse organic substance is detected in alkaline lower-temperature solutions (pH 9-9.5, t up to 72C). The source of these compounds is not yet established. They may represent pre-existing organic material that has been chemically degraded by pyrolysis. For

  18. Organic compounds in hydrothermal systems on the Russian Far East: relevance to the origin of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompanichenko, Vladimir

    In 70th of the last century L. Mukhin with co-authors (1) explored amino acids in the hot springs and water-steam mixture from the boreholes in Kamchatka peninsula of eastern Rus-sia. According to their results, 12 amino acids of biological origination were detected in hot springs inhabited by thermophiles and hyperthermophiles. Only a single amino acid -glycine -was found in the lifeless condensate of water-steam mixture. These authors proposed its abiotic genesis. Our research is devoted to exploration of moderately volatile organic com-pounds in the hot springs and water-steam mixture in Kamchatka peninsula, Kuriles and intracontinental part of eastern Russia. Samples were taken from hot springs far from poten-tial sources of contamination by human populations, and from boreholes 60 to 1200 meters in depth. The temperature ranged from 175C (sterile water-steam mixture) to 55C (hot water with thermophile populations). The samples were analyzed by the gas chromatomass-spectrometer Shimatsu (GCMS-QP20105). Lifeless condensate of water-steam mixture (t = 108-175C) con-tains aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene, 1,2-methylnaphtaline biphenyl, phenathrene, fluo-rene,squalene, 1,3-diethylbenzene, and trichlorobenzene)., n-alkanes (decane, dodecane, tride-cane, tetradecane, pentadecane, hexadecane, and geptadecane), aldehyde (oktadekanal), ketone (2-geptadekanon), and alcohol (2-undetsenol-1). 10 homologous series have been found in hot solutions (t = 55-99C) inhabited by thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms hav-ing low concentrations: aromatic hydrocarbons, n-alkanes, alkenes, aldehydes, dietoxyalkanes, naphthenes, fatty acids, methyl ethers of fatty acids, monoglycerides, and steroids. Especially diverse organic substance is detected in alkaline lower-temperature solutions (pH 9-9.5, t up to 72C). The source of these compounds is not yet established. They may represent pre-existing organic material that has been chemically degraded by pyrolysis. For

  19. Chemical environments of submarine hydrothermal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    Perhaps because black-smoker chimneys make tremendous subjects for magazine covers, the proposal that submarine hydrothermal systems were involved in the origin of life has caused many investigators to focus on the eye-catching hydrothermal vents. In much the same way that tourists rush to watch the spectacular eruptions of Old Faithful geyser with little regard for the hydrology of the Yellowstone basin, attention is focused on the spectacular, high-temperature hydrothermal vents to the near exclusion of the enormous underlying hydrothermal systems. Nevertheless, the magnitude and complexity of geologic structures, heat flow, and hydrologic parameters which characterize the geyser basins at Yellowstone also characterize submarine hydrothermal systems. However, in the submarine systems the scale can be considerably more vast. Like Old Faithful, submarine hydrothermal vents have a spectacular quality, but they are only one fascinating aspect of enormous geologic systems operating at seafloor spreading centers throughout all of the ocean basins. A critical study of the possible role of hydrothermal processes in the origin of life should include the full spectrum of probable environments. The goals of this chapter are to synthesize diverse information about the inorganic geochemistry of submarine hydrothermal systems, assemble a description of the fundamental physical and chemical attributes of these systems, and consider the implications of high-temperature, fluid-driven processes for organic synthesis. Information about submarine hydrothermal systems comes from many directions. Measurements made directly on venting fluids provide useful, but remarkably limited, clues about processes operating at depth. The oceanic crust has been drilled to approximately 2.0 km depth providing many other pieces of information, but drilling technology has not allowed the bore holes and core samples to reach the maximum depths to which aqueous fluids circulate in oceanic crust. Such

  20. Hydrothermal Manganese Mineralization Near the Samoan Hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, J. R.; Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A.; Hart, S. R.; Dunham, R.

    2006-12-01

    The thickest beds of hydrothermal manganese oxides recovered to date from the global ocean were collected from a volcanic cone in the south Pacific. In April 2005, samples were dredged aboard the R.V. Kilo Moana from a volcanic cone on the lower flank of Tulaga seamount (about 2,700 m water depth; 14° 39.222' S; 170° 1.730' W), located 115 km SW of Vailulu'u, the volcanically and hydrothermally active center of the Samoan hotspot. Additional hydrothermal manganese samples were collected off Ofu Island (dredge Alia 107), 72 km to the WSW of Vailulu'u. Manganese-oxide beds up to 9 cm thick are composed of birnessite and 10 Å manganates. Some layers consist of Mn-oxide columnar structures 4 cm long and 1 cm wide, which have not been described previously. The mean Mn and Fe contents of 18 samples are 51 weight percent and 0.76 weight percent, respectively. Elevated concentrations of Li (mean 0.11 wt. percent) are indicators of a hydrothermal origin, and distinguishes these samples, along with the high Mn and low Fe contents, from hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts. Other enriched elements include Ba (mean 0.14 percent), Cu (249 ppm), Mo (451 ppm), Ni (400 ppm), Zn (394 ppm), V (214 ppm), and W (132 ppm). Chondrite-normalized REE patterns show large negative Ce anomalies and LREE enrichments, both characteristic of hydrothermal Mn deposits. Small negative Eu anomalies are not typical of hydrothermal deposits and can be explained either by the absence of leaching of plagioclase by the hydrothermal fluids or by the precipitation of Eu-rich minerals, such as barite and anhydrite, at depth. The high base-metal contents indicate that sulfides are not forming deeper in the hydrothermal system or that such deposits are being leached by the ascending fluids. Textures of the thickest Mn deposits indicate that the Mn oxides formed below the seabed from ascending fluids during multiple phases of waxing and waning hydrothermal pulses. The deposits were later exposed at the seafloor by

  1. Hazards From Hydrothermally Sealed Volcanic Conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, Bruce W.; Werner, Cynthia A.; Reyes, Agnes G.; Sherburn, Steve; Scott, Bradley J.; Miller, Craig; Rosenburg, Michael J.; Hurst, Anthony W.; Britten, Karen A.

    2007-01-01

    The 17 March 2006 eruption from Raoul Island (Kermadec arc, north of New Zealand) is interpreted as a magmatic-hydrothermal event triggered by shaking associated with a swarm of local earthquakes. The eruption, which tragically claimed the life of New Zealand Department of Conservation Ranger Mark Kearney, occurred without significant volcanic seismicity or any of the precursory responses the volcanic hydrothermal system exhibited prior to a similarly sized eruption in 1964.

  2. Hydrothermal industrialization: direct heat development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    A description of hydrothermal resources suitable for direct applications, their associated temperatures, geographic distribution and developable capacity are given. An overview of the hydrothermal direct-heat development infrastructure is presented. Development activity is highlighted by examining known and planned geothermal direct-use applications. Underlying assumptions and results for three studies conducted to determine direct-use market penetration of geothermal energy are discussed.

  3. Optimum reaction conditions for lead zirconate titanate thick film deposition by ultrasound-assisted hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saigusa, Katsuhiro; Morita, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    A hydrothermal method can be used to deposit lead zirconate titanate (PZT) films and has several advantages, such as a relatively low reaction temperature and high crystal quality. We developed an ultrasound-assisted hydrothermal method to promote the hydrothermal reactions, which is effective for thick-PZT-film deposition. The first ultrasound-assisted hydrothermal method we developed can synthesize a 7.5 µm PZT film on a titanium substrate. However, for a much thicker film, repeated depositions were required, and the optimum precursor solution for the first deposition was not suitable for repeated depositions. In this study, we attempted to find the optimum precursor solution for depositing a film of sufficient thickness by repeated depositions. As a result, we were able to synthesize a 23.6 µm PZT film on second deposition by changing the ratio of zirconium to titanium ions in the precursor solutions. In addition, a transverse effect transducer was fabricated under optimum conditions and its vibration properties were evaluated.

  4. Dissolved gases in hydrothermal (phreatic) and geyser eruptions at Yellowstone National Park, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurwitz, Shaul; Clor, Laura; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D Kirk; Hunt, Andrew G.; Evans, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Multiphase and multicomponent fluid flow in the shallow continental crust plays a significant role in a variety of processes over a broad range of temperatures and pressures. The presence of dissolved gases in aqueous fluids reduces the liquid stability field toward lower temperatures and enhances the explosivity potential with respect to pure water. Therefore, in areas where magma is actively degassing into a hydrothermal system, gas-rich aqueous fluids can exert a major control on geothermal energy production, can be propellants in hazardous hydrothermal (phreatic) eruptions, and can modulate the dynamics of geyser eruptions. We collected pressurized samples of thermal water that preserved dissolved gases in conjunction with precise temperature measurements with depth in research well Y-7 (maximum depth of 70.1 m; casing to 31 m) and five thermal pools (maximum depth of 11.3 m) in the Upper Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park, USA. Based on the dissolved gas concentrations, we demonstrate that CO2 mainly derived from magma and N2 from air-saturated meteoric water reduce the near-surface saturation temperature, consistent with some previous observations in geyser conduits. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the dissolved CO2 and N2 modulate the dynamics of geyser eruptions and are likely triggers of hydrothermal eruptions when recharged into shallow reservoirs at high concentrations. Therefore, monitoring changes in gas emission rate and composition in areas with neutral and alkaline chlorine thermal features could provide important information on the natural resources (geysers) and hazards (eruptions) in these areas.

  5. Alkaline tolerant dextranase from streptomyces anulatus

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Stephen R.; Adney, William S.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    A process for production of an alkaline tolerant dextranase enzyme comprises culturing a dextran-producing microorganism Streptomyces anulatus having accession no. ATCC PTA-3866 to produce an alkaline tolerant dextranase, Dex 1 wherein the protein in said enzyme is characterized by a MW of 63.3 kDa and Dex 2 wherein its protein is characterized by a MW of 81.8 kDa.

  6. Evaluation of the alkaline electrolysis of zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Meisenhelder, J.H.; Brown, A.P.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1981-05-01

    The alkaline leach and electrolysis process for zinc production is compared to the conventional acid-sulfate process in terms of both energy saving and technical merit. In addition, the potential for industrial application of the alkaline process is discussed on the basis of present market conditions, possible future zinc market scenarios, and the probability of increased secondary zinc recovery. In primary zinc production, the energy-saving potential for the alkaline process was estimated to be greater than 10%, even when significantly larger electrolysis current densities than those required for the sulfate process are used. The principal technical advantages of the alkaline process are that it can handle low-grade, high-iron-content or oxidized ores (like most of those found in the US) in a more cost- and energy-efficient manner than can the sulfate process. Additionally, in the electrowinning operation, the alkaline process should be technically superior because a dendritic or sponge deposit is formed that is amenable to automated collection without interruption of the electrolysis. Also, use of the higher current densities would result in significant capital cost reductions. Alkaline-based electrolytic recovery processes were considered for the recycling of zinc from smelter baghouse dusts and from the potential source of nickel/zinc electric-vehicle batteries. In all comparisons, an alkaline process was shown to be technically superior and, particularly for the baghouse dusts, energetically and economically superior to alternatively proposed recovery methods based on sulfate electrolysis. It is concluded that the alkaline zinc method is an important alternative technology to the conventional acid zinc process. (WHK)

  7. Hydrothermal crystal growth of the potassium niobate and potassium tantalate family of crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Matthew; Jackson, Summer; Kolis, Joseph

    2010-11-15

    Single crystals of KNbO{sub 3} (KN), KTaO{sub 3} (KT), and KTa{sub 1-x}Nb{sub x}O{sub 3} (x=0.44, KTN) have been prepared by hydrothermal synthesis in highly concentrated KOH mineralizer solutions. The traditional problems of inhomogeneity, non-stoichiometry, crystal striations and crystal cracking resulting from phase transitions associated with this family compounds are minimized by the hydrothermal crystal growth technique. Crystals of good optical quality with only minor amounts of metal ion reduction can be grown this way. Reactions were also designed to provide homogeneous distribution of tantalum and niobium metal centers throughout the KTN crystal lattice to maximize its electro-optic properties. Synthesis was performed at relatively low (500-660 {sup o}C) temperatures in comparison to the flux and Czochralski techniques. This work represents the largest crystals of this family of compounds grown by hydrothermal methods to date. -- Graphical Abstract:

  8. Hydrothermal macroscopic Fe-sepiolite from Oujda Mounts (Middle Atlas, Eastern Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arranz, Enrique; Lago, Marceliano; Bastida, Joaquín; Galé, Carlos; Soriano, Jesús; Ubide, Teresa

    2008-10-01

    The Triassic-Jurassic series in the Oujda Mounts (Middle Atlas, NE Morocco) includes two basaltic units. The whole sequence is crosscut by veins filled with Fe-sepiolite + chalcedony + calcite + smectite and mixed layer talc-saponite. Fe-sepiolite occurs as macroscopic fibres and is one of the latest mineral phases in the filling sequence of the veins. The compositional relationships and crystallographic parameters obtained on carefully selected samples of sepiolite are compared with previous data, and support the actual development of Mg-Fe substitution in this clay mineral, given the adequate hydrothermal conditions. Genesis of this uncommon variety of sepiolite in veins is interpreted as the result of regional low temperature hydrothermalism that affected the Middle Atlas during the Jurassic. The Mg-rich hydrothermal solutions interacted with the basaltic sequences, previously affected by alteration processes, producing the mobilization of Fe and allowing for the precipitation of Fe-sepiolite as a late mineral in the veins.

  9. Geochemistry of precambrian carbonates. I. Archean hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Veizer, J. ); Hoefs, J. ); Ridler, R.H. ); Jensen, L.S. ); Lowe, D.R. )

    1989-04-01

    Carbonate rocks from the Superior and Slave Provinces of Canada, Kaapvaal Craton of South Africa and the Pilbara Block of Australia, considered of hydrothermal origin from field criteria, have been characterized mineralogically, isotopically and chemically. In agreement with previous studies, the bulk chemical composition suggests that the carbonate rocks originated by massive carbonatization, silicification and K ({plus minus}Na) metasomatism of intermediate to ultramafic silicate precursors. The carbonate component itself defines two partially overlapping populations. The ferroan dolomite + breunnerite assemblage is confined mostly to shear zones, conduits and stockworks, while the calcite + ferroan dolomite (ankerite) {plus minus} siderite mineral assemblage represents a wider regional halo. Trace element chemistry of carbonates is consistent with their precipitation from relatively low salinity solutions and with derivation of solutes from the contemporaneous volcanosedimentary piles. The hydrothermal waters were derived either from metamorphic dewatering at the base of the piles, or from a magmatic source with {delta}{sup 18}O of about +6 {plus minus} 7{per thousand} SMOW. In contrast, carbon dioxide in the regional and the conduit assemblages had dissimilar principal sources. In the former it was derived from exogenic sources while in the latter the CO{sub 2} was of mantle origin.

  10. Alkaline Water and Longevity: A Murine Study

    PubMed Central

    Magro, Massimiliano; Corain, Livio; Ferro, Silvia; Baratella, Davide; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Terzo, Milo; Corraducci, Vittorino; Salmaso, Luigi; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The biological effect of alkaline water consumption is object of controversy. The present paper presents a 3-year survival study on a population of 150 mice, and the data were analyzed with accelerated failure time (AFT) model. Starting from the second year of life, nonparametric survival plots suggest that mice watered with alkaline water showed a better survival than control mice. Interestingly, statistical analysis revealed that alkaline water provides higher longevity in terms of “deceleration aging factor” as it increases the survival functions when compared with control group; namely, animals belonging to the population treated with alkaline water resulted in a longer lifespan. Histological examination of mice kidneys, intestine, heart, liver, and brain revealed that no significant differences emerged among the three groups indicating that no specific pathology resulted correlated with the consumption of alkaline water. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survival data as a function of watering with alkaline water of long-lived mouse models. PMID:27340414

  11. Hydrothermal Synthesis of BiFeO3 Nanoparticles for Visible Light Photocatalytic Applications.

    PubMed

    Niu, Feng; Gao, Tong; Zhang, Ning; Chen, Zhi; Huang, Qiaoli; Qin, Laishun; Sun, Xingguo; Huang, Yuexiang

    2015-12-01

    Bismuth ferrite is a promising material for visible light response photocatalytic applications due to its narrow band gap. In this work, single crystalline BiFeO3 nanoparticles were prepared by a modified hydrothermal process. The effects of hydrothermal temperature, reaction time and precursor xerogel amoumt on the as-prepared BiFeO3 particle size and morphology were investigated by XRD, TEM and HRTEM. The XRD analysis reveals that single crystalline BiFeO3 particles can be obtained when the hydrothermal temperature is kept below 220 degrees C. TEM observation showed that the as-formed BFO particles are in a square or rectangle-like shape and that the particle size is increased with increasing hydrothermal temperature. The hydrothermal reaction time and the amount of xerogel could also influence the as-formed BFO particle morphology and size. The band gap of the as-prepared BFO nanoparticles was identified by UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrum. The measurement of photodegradation of methyl orange dye in an aqueous solution revealed that the as-prepared BFO nanoparticles exhibit photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation. PMID:26682398

  12. Efficient removal of recalcitrant deep-ocean dissolved organic matter during hydrothermal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, Jeffrey A.; Rossel, Pamela E.; Stubbins, Aron; Butterfield, David; Connelly, Douglas P.; Achterberg, Eric P.; Koschinsky, Andrea; Chavagnac, Valérie; Hansen, Christian T.; Bach, Wolfgang; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    Oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important carbon pool, similar in magnitude to atmospheric CO2, but the fate of its oldest forms is not well understood. Hot hydrothermal circulation may facilitate the degradation of otherwise un-reactive dissolved organic matter, playing an important role in the long-term global carbon cycle. The oldest, most recalcitrant forms of DOC, which make up most of oceanic DOC, can be recovered by solid-phase extraction. Here we present measurements of solid-phase extractable DOC from samples collected between 2009 and 2013 at seven vent sites in the Atlantic, Pacific and Southern oceans, along with magnesium concentrations, a conservative tracer of water circulation through hydrothermal systems. We find that magnesium and solid-phase extractable DOC concentrations are correlated, suggesting that solid-phase extractable DOC is almost entirely lost from solution through mineralization or deposition during circulation through hydrothermal vents with fluid temperatures of 212-401 °C. In laboratory experiments, where we heated samples to 380 °C for four days, we found a similar removal efficiency. We conclude that thermal degradation alone can account for the loss of solid-phase extractable DOC in natural hydrothermal systems, and that its maximum lifetime is constrained by the timescale of hydrothermal cycling, at about 40 million years.

  13. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Electrochemical Properties of Spherical α-MnO2 for Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya; Qin, Wenqing; Fan, Ruijuan; Wang, Jiawei; Chen, Baizhen

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, spherical α-MnO2 with a high specific capacitance was synthesized by a two-step hydrothermal route. MnCO3 precursors were first prepared by a common hydrothermal method, and then converted to α-MnO2 via a hydrothermal reaction between the precursors and KMnO4 solutions. The effects of hydrothermal temperature on the morphology, crystal structure and specific area of the MnO2 were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and BET measurements. The electrochemical capacitive properties of the manganese dioxides with different morphologies and structures were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and galvonostatic charge-discharge tests. The results showed that the temperature in the second hydrothermal step had prominent impact on the capacitive properties of a-MnO2. The MnO2 synthesized at 150 *C exhibited a highest specific capacitance of 328.4 Fx g(-1) at a charge-discharge current density of 100 mA x g(-1). PMID:26682409

  14. Basalt as a solid source of calcium and alkalinity for the sequestration of carbon dioxide in building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, N. C.; Westfield, I.; Lu, P.; Bourcier, W. L.; Kendall, T.; Constantz, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    Motivated by the idea of converting waste carbon dioxide into usable building products, Calera Corporation has developed a multi-step process that sequesters CO2 as carbonate minerals in cementitious materials. Process inputs include dissolved divalent cations and alkalinity, both of which can be extracted from basalt. In one mode of the Calera process, the electrochemical production of alkalinity generates large volumes of hydrochloric acid as a by-product, which has been shown to effectively leach divalent cations from basalt while being neutralized by the basalt dissolution reaction. Using a 10:1 1M HCl solution to rock ratio, 3500 ppm Ca was extracted while the initial solution was neutralized to a pH of 2.60 in two weeks at a temperature of 80oC in an anoxic batch reactor. In this scenario, mineral carbonation occurs via three steps: electrochemical production of alkalinity, CO2 absorption by the alkaline stream, then precipitation by mixing the basalt-derived divalent cation stream and the CO2-containing alkaline stream. In a second scenario, alkalinity is extracted from basalt using an alkalinity capacitor, a weak acid. This solution may contain a proton source, such as ammonium chloride, or a hydroxyl acceptor, such as boric acid, but the main design constraint is that the pKa of the capacitor be high enough to deprontonate carbonic acid. The weak acid solution is mixed with basalt in an anoxic batch reactor and the dissolving rock consumes protons from the weak acid, generating the conjugate base. The solution rich in conjugate base then absorbs CO2 and the carbonate-rich solution is mixed with a calcium-rich stream to precipitate carbonate minerals. We have extracted up to 1100 mmol alkalinity per kg rock using an alkalinity capacitor, versus no more than 50 mmol alkalinity per kg rock using DI water as a solvent. Again, carbon sequestration occurs via three steps: alkalinity extraction from basalt, CO2 absorption, and finally carbonate precipitation

  15. 21 CFR 864.7660 - Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test. 864.7660... Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test is a device used to identify the enzyme leukocyte alkaline phosphatase in neutrophilic granulocytes...

  16. 21 CFR 864.7660 - Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test. 864.7660... Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test is a device used to identify the enzyme leukocyte alkaline phosphatase in neutrophilic granulocytes...

  17. ALKALINE SCRUBBING OF IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT OFFGAS AT GEOKINETICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the use of EPA's mobile wet scrubber on a 200-acfm slipstream of Geokinetics' retort offgas to investigate the H2S removal efficiency and selectivity (percent H2S removal/percent CO2 removal) as a function of liquid/gas contact time, alkaline solution OH(minus...

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis of pyrochlores and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redkin, Alexander F.; Ionov, Andrey M.; Kotova, Nataliya P.

    2013-10-01

    Pyrochlores, microlites, and U-betafites of pyrochlore group minerals were obtained from mixing experiments of the corresponding oxides and fluorides by hydrothermal synthesis at T = 800 °C and P = 200 MPa in the solution of 1.0 M NaF. The presence of U4+ in pyrochlore does not affect the cell parameter, which for the phases of pyrochlore-microlite series is 10.42 ± 0.01 Å. In a system with an excess of UO2, pyrochlores and microlites, containing uranium up to 0.2-0.3 atoms per formula unit (apfu), are formed. In the uranium-free system of betafites composition, perovskites and Ti-bearing pyrochlores are formed. U-pyrochlores of betafite series, containing 2Ti = Nb + Ta in moles, have cubic cell parameters of 10.26 ± 0.02 Å and U4+ isomorphic capacity of 0.4-0.5 apfu. In the pyrochlore structure, U4+ may substitute for Ca2+ and Na+ cations in the eightfold site. In pyrochlores of pyrochlore-microlite series, Ca2+ is replaced by U4+, while in pyrochlores of betafite series, U4+ replaces Na+. Phases with pyrochlore structure, containing U5+ and U6+ in the sixfold site, usually occupied by Nb5+, Ta5+, and Ti4+, are formed under oxidizing conditions (Cu-Cu2O buffer). They are characterized by low content of Nb5+, Ta5+ (<0.1 apfu), and anomalous behavior of the crystal lattice (compression, instead of expansion). Under natural conditions, the formation of pyrochlores containing a significant amount of U5+ and U6+ is unlikely.

  19. Crystallization process of zircon and fergusonite during hydrothermal alteration in Nechalacho REE deposit, Thor Lake, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Murakami, H.; Kon, Y.; Tsunematsu, M.

    2012-04-01

    The core samples of two drill holes, which penetrate sub-horizontal mineralized horizons at Nechalacho REE deposit in the Proterozoic Thor Lake syenite, Canada, were studied in order to clarify magmatic and hydrothermal processes that enriched HFSE (e.g. Zr, Nb, Y and REE). Zircon is the most common REE minerals in Nechalacho REE deposit. The zircon is divided into five types as follows: Type-1 zircon occurs as single grain in phlogopite and the chondrite-normalized REE pattern is characterized by a steeply-rising slope from the LREE to the HREE with a positive Ce-anomaly and negative Eu-anomaly. This chemical characteristic is similar to that of igneous zircon. Type-2 zircon consists of HREE-rich magmatic porous core and LREE-Nb-F-rich hydrothermal rim. This type zircon is mostly included in phlogopite and fluorite, and occasionally in microcline. Type-3 zircon is characterized by euhedral to anhedral crystal, occurring in a complex intergrowth with REE fluorocarbonates. Type-3 zircons have high contents of REE, Nb and fluorine. Type-4 zircon consists of porous-core and -rim zones, but their chemical compositions are similar to each other. This type zircon is a subhedral crystal rimmed by fergusonite. Type-5 zircon is characterized by smaller, porous and subhedral to anhedral crystals. The interstices between small zircons are filled by fergusonite. Type-4 and -5 zircons show low REE and Nb contents. Occurrences of these five types of zircon are different according to the depth and degree of the alteration by hydrothermal solutions rich in F- and CO3 of the two drill holes, which permit a model for evolution of the zircon crystallization in Nechalacho REE deposit as follows: (1) type-1 (single magmatic zircon) is formed in miaskitic syenite. (2) LREE-Nb-F-rich hydrothermal zircon formed around HREE-rich magmatic zircon (type-2 zircon); (3) type-3 zircon crystallized thorough F and CO3-rich hydrothermal alteration of type-2 zircon which formed the complex

  20. Interfacial activity in alkaline flooding enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization of long-chained organic acids in the crude oil to form soaps was shown to be primarily responsible for the lowering of oil-water interfacial tension at alkaline pH. These active acids can be concentrated by silica gel chromatography into a minor polar fraction. An equilibrium chemical model was proposed based on 2 competing reactions: the ionization of acids to form active anions, and the formation of undissociated soap between acid anions and sodium ions. It correlates the interfacial activity with the interfacial concentration of active acid anions which is expressed in terms of the concentrations of the chemical species in the system. The model successfully predicts the observed oil-alkaline solution interfacial phenomenon, including its dependence on pH, alkali and salt concentrations, type of acid present and type of soap formed. Flooding at different alkali concentrations to activate different acid species present in the crude was shown to give better recovery than flooding at a single high alkali concentration. Treating the crude oil with a dilute solution of mineral acids liberates additional free active acids and yields better interfacial activity during subsequent alkali contact.